Science.gov

Sample records for accessible frequency range

  1. An Ultrasonic Multiple-Access Ranging Core Based on Frequency Shift Keying Towards Indoor Localization.

    PubMed

    Segers, Laurent; Van Bavegem, David; De Winne, Sam; Braeken, An; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2015-07-30

    This paper describes a new approach and implementation methodology for indoor ranging based on the time difference of arrival using code division multiple access with ultrasound signals. A novel implementation based on a field programmable gate array using finite impulse response filters and an optimized correlation demodulator implementation for ultrasound orthogonal signals is developed. Orthogonal codes are modulated onto ultrasound signals using frequency shift keying with carrier frequencies of 24.5 kHz and 26 kHz. This implementation enhances the possibilities for real-time, embedded and low-power tracking of several simultaneous transmitters. Due to the high degree of parallelism offered by field programmable gate arrays, up to four transmitters can be tracked simultaneously. The implementation requires at most 30% of the available logic gates of a Spartan-6 XC6SLX45 device and is evaluated on accuracy and precision through several ranging topologies. In the first topology, the distance between one transmitter and one receiver is evaluated. Afterwards, ranging analyses are applied between two simultaneous transmitters and one receiver. Ultimately, the position of the receiver against four transmitters using trilateration is also demonstrated. Results show enhanced distance measurements with distances ranging from a few centimeters up to 17 m, while keeping a centimeter-level accuracy.

  2. An Ultrasonic Multiple-Access Ranging Core Based on Frequency Shift Keying Towards Indoor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Segers, Laurent; Van Bavegem, David; De Winne, Sam; Braeken, An; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach and implementation methodology for indoor ranging based on the time difference of arrival using code division multiple access with ultrasound signals. A novel implementation based on a field programmable gate array using finite impulse response filters and an optimized correlation demodulator implementation for ultrasound orthogonal signals is developed. Orthogonal codes are modulated onto ultrasound signals using frequency shift keying with carrier frequencies of 24.5 kHz and 26 kHz. This implementation enhances the possibilities for real-time, embedded and low-power tracking of several simultaneous transmitters. Due to the high degree of parallelism offered by field programmable gate arrays, up to four transmitters can be tracked simultaneously. The implementation requires at most 30% of the available logic gates of a Spartan-6 XC6SLX45 device and is evaluated on accuracy and precision through several ranging topologies. In the first topology, the distance between one transmitter and one receiver is evaluated. Afterwards, ranging analyses are applied between two simultaneous transmitters and one receiver. Ultimately, the position of the receiver against four transmitters using trilateration is also demonstrated. Results show enhanced distance measurements with distances ranging from a few centimeters up to 17 m, while keeping a centimeter-level accuracy. PMID:26263986

  3. Range aliasing in frequency coherent geoacoustic inversion.

    PubMed

    Yardim, Caglar; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S

    2011-10-01

    This paper discusses the effects of frequency selection on source localization and geoacoustic inversion methods that use frequency coherent objective functions. Matched-field processors based on frequency-coherent objective functions often have rapidly fluctuating range ambiguity surfaces. Insufficient sampling in frequency domain results in range aliasing terms that affect geoacoustic inversion. Range aliasing and its effects on source localization and environmental parameter inversion are demonstrated on data collected during the MAPEX2000 experiment. Guidance for frequency selection to avoid range aliasing is provided.

  4. Transponder System for High-Frequency Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, C. L.; Shores, P. W.; Kobayashi, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    Transponder system uses phase difference between transmitted and reflected high-frequency radio waves to measure distance to target. To suppress spurious measurements of reflections from objects near target at transmitted frequency and its harmonics, transponder at target generates return signal at half transmitted frequency. System useful in such applications as surveying, docking of ships, and short-range navigation.

  5. 33 CFR 86.01 - Frequencies and range of audibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Frequencies and range of audibility. The fundamental frequency of the signal shall lie within the range 70-525..., which may include the fundamental and/or one or more higher frequencies, which lie within the...

  6. 47 CFR 18.309 - Frequency range of measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency range of measurements. 18.309 Section... MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Technical Standards § 18.309 Frequency range of measurements. (a) For field strength measurements: Frequency band in which device operates (MHz) Range of frequency measurements Lowest...

  7. 47 CFR 18.309 - Frequency range of measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency range of measurements. 18.309 Section... MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Technical Standards § 18.309 Frequency range of measurements. (a) For field strength measurements: Frequency band in which device operates (MHz) Range of frequency measurements Lowest...

  8. Characteristics of different frequency ranges in scanning electron microscope images

    SciTech Connect

    Sim, K. S. Nia, M. E.; Tan, T. L.; Tso, C. P.; Ee, C. S.

    2015-07-22

    We demonstrate a new approach to characterize the frequency range in general scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. First, pure frequency images are generated from low frequency to high frequency, and then, the magnification of each type of frequency image is implemented. By comparing the edge percentage of the SEM image to the self-generated frequency images, we can define the frequency ranges of the SEM images. Characterization of frequency ranges of SEM images benefits further processing and analysis of those SEM images, such as in noise filtering and contrast enhancement.

  9. 47 CFR 15.202 - Certified operating frequency range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Certified operating frequency range. 15.202 Section 15.202 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.202 Certified operating frequency range. Client devices that operate in a...

  10. 47 CFR 15.202 - Certified operating frequency range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Certified operating frequency range. 15.202 Section 15.202 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.202 Certified operating frequency range. Client devices that operate in a...

  11. 47 CFR 15.202 - Certified operating frequency range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Certified operating frequency range. 15.202 Section 15.202 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.202 Certified operating frequency range. Client devices that operate in a...

  12. 47 CFR 15.202 - Certified operating frequency range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Certified operating frequency range. 15.202 Section 15.202 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators § 15.202 Certified operating frequency range. Client devices that operate in a...

  13. 47 CFR 15.33 - Frequency range of radiated measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... level of radiated emissions within the frequency range 9 kHz to 30 MHz, such as a CB receiver or a device designed to conduct its radio frequency emissions via connecting wires or cables, e.g., a carrier... used in the device, without going below 9 kHz (25 MHz for CB receivers), up to the frequency shown...

  14. 47 CFR 15.33 - Frequency range of radiated measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... level of radiated emissions within the frequency range 9 kHz to 30 MHz, such as a CB receiver or a device designed to conduct its radio frequency emissions via connecting wires or cables, e.g., a carrier... used in the device, without going below 9 kHz (25 MHz for CB receivers), up to the frequency shown...

  15. 47 CFR 15.33 - Frequency range of radiated measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... level of radiated emissions within the frequency range 9 kHz to 30 MHz, such as a CB receiver or a device designed to conduct its radio frequency emissions via connecting wires or cables, e.g., a carrier... used in the device, without going below 9 kHz (25 MHz for CB receivers), up to the frequency shown...

  16. 47 CFR 15.33 - Frequency range of radiated measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... level of radiated emissions within the frequency range 9 kHz to 30 MHz, such as a CB receiver or a device designed to conduct its radio frequency emissions via connecting wires or cables, e.g., a carrier... used in the device, without going below 9 kHz (25 MHz for CB receivers), up to the frequency shown...

  17. 47 CFR 18.309 - Frequency range of measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency range of measurements. 18.309 Section 18.309 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Technical Standards § 18.309 Frequency range of measurements. (a) For field...

  18. 47 CFR 18.309 - Frequency range of measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency range of measurements. 18.309 Section 18.309 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Technical Standards § 18.309 Frequency range of measurements. (a) For field...

  19. 47 CFR 18.309 - Frequency range of measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency range of measurements. 18.309 Section 18.309 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Technical Standards § 18.309 Frequency range of measurements. (a) For field...

  20. Predicting Achievable Fundamental Frequency Ranges in Vocalization Across Species.

    PubMed

    Titze, Ingo; Riede, Tobias; Mau, Ted

    2016-06-01

    Vocal folds are used as sound sources in various species, but it is unknown how vocal fold morphologies are optimized for different acoustic objectives. Here we identify two main variables affecting range of vocal fold vibration frequency, namely vocal fold elongation and tissue fiber stress. A simple vibrating string model is used to predict fundamental frequency ranges across species of different vocal fold sizes. While average fundamental frequency is predominantly determined by vocal fold length (larynx size), range of fundamental frequency is facilitated by (1) laryngeal muscles that control elongation and by (2) nonlinearity in tissue fiber tension. One adaptation that would increase fundamental frequency range is greater freedom in joint rotation or gliding of two cartilages (thyroid and cricoid), so that vocal fold length change is maximized. Alternatively, tissue layers can develop to bear a disproportionate fiber tension (i.e., a ligament with high density collagen fibers), increasing the fundamental frequency range and thereby vocal versatility. The range of fundamental frequency across species is thus not simply one-dimensional, but can be conceptualized as the dependent variable in a multi-dimensional morphospace. In humans, this could allow for variations that could be clinically important for voice therapy and vocal fold repair. Alternative solutions could also have importance in vocal training for singing and other highly-skilled vocalizations. PMID:27309543

  1. Predicting Achievable Fundamental Frequency Ranges in Vocalization Across Species

    PubMed Central

    Titze, Ingo; Riede, Tobias; Mau, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Vocal folds are used as sound sources in various species, but it is unknown how vocal fold morphologies are optimized for different acoustic objectives. Here we identify two main variables affecting range of vocal fold vibration frequency, namely vocal fold elongation and tissue fiber stress. A simple vibrating string model is used to predict fundamental frequency ranges across species of different vocal fold sizes. While average fundamental frequency is predominantly determined by vocal fold length (larynx size), range of fundamental frequency is facilitated by (1) laryngeal muscles that control elongation and by (2) nonlinearity in tissue fiber tension. One adaptation that would increase fundamental frequency range is greater freedom in joint rotation or gliding of two cartilages (thyroid and cricoid), so that vocal fold length change is maximized. Alternatively, tissue layers can develop to bear a disproportionate fiber tension (i.e., a ligament with high density collagen fibers), increasing the fundamental frequency range and thereby vocal versatility. The range of fundamental frequency across species is thus not simply one-dimensional, but can be conceptualized as the dependent variable in a multi-dimensional morphospace. In humans, this could allow for variations that could be clinically important for voice therapy and vocal fold repair. Alternative solutions could also have importance in vocal training for singing and other highly-skilled vocalizations. PMID:27309543

  2. Numerical simulation of carpet cloaking device in terahertz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, V. V.; Vozianova, A. V.; Khodzitsky, M. K.

    2015-11-01

    This work is devoted to the numerical calculation of the effective constitutive parameters of the carpet cloaking device and to the numerical simulation of this cloak using finite element method (FEM) for the terahertz frequency range.

  3. Coupled whispering gallery mode resonators in the Terahertz frequency range.

    PubMed

    Preu, S; Schwefel, H G L; Malzer, S; Döhler, G H; Wang, L J; Hanson, M; Zimmerman, J D; Gossard, A C

    2008-05-12

    We report on coupling of two whispering gallery mode resonators in the Terahertz frequency range. Due to the long wavelength in the millimeter to submillimeter range, the resonators can be macroscopic allowing for accurate size and shape control. This is necessary to couple specific modes of two or more resonators. Sets of polyethylene (PE) and quartz disk resonators are demonstrated, with medium (loaded) quality (Q)-factors of 40-800. Both exhibit coinciding resonance frequency spectra over more than ten times the free spectral range. Loading effects of single resonators are investigated which provide strong Q-factor degradation and red-shifts of the resonances in the 0.2% range. By coupling two resonators of the same size, we observe mode splitting, in very good agreement with our numerical calculations.

  4. Investigation of a slot nanoantenna in optical frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinesh kumar, V.; Asakawa, Kiyoshi

    2009-11-01

    Following the analogy of radio frequency slot antenna and its complementary dipole, we propose the implementation of a slot nanoantenna (SNA) in the optical frequency range. Using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we investigate the electromagnetic (EM) properties of a SNA formed in a thin gold film and compare the results with the properties of a gold dipole nanoantenna (DNA) of the same dimension as the slot. It is found that the response of the SNA is very similar to the DNA, like their counterparts in the radio frequency (RF) range. The SNA can enhance the near field intensity of incident field which strongly depends on its feedgap dimension. The resonance of the SNA is influenced by its slot length; for the increasing slot length, resonant frequency decreases whereas the sharpness of resonance increases. Besides, the resonance of the SNA is found sensitive to the thickness of metal film, when the latter is smaller than the skin depth. The effect of polarization of incident field on the EM response of the SNA was examined; the field enhancement is optimum when polarization is parallel to the feedgap. Finally, we calculate the radiation patterns of the DNA and SNA and compare them with those of the RF dipole antenna. The radiation pattern of the SNA is found to be independent of its slot length when excited at resonant frequency. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study on a slot antenna in the optical frequency.

  5. Experimental Limits on Gravitational Waves in the MHz frequency Range

    SciTech Connect

    Lanza, Robert Jr.

    2015-03-01

    This thesis presents the results of a search for gravitational waves in the 1-11MHz frequency range using dual power-recycled Michelson laser interferometers at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. An unprecedented level of sensitivity to gravitational waves in this frequency range has been achieved by cross-correlating the output fluctuations of two identical and colocated 40m long interferometers. This technique produces sensitivities better than two orders of magnitude below the quantum shot-noise limit, within integration times of less than 1 hour. 95% confidence level upper limits are placed on the strain amplitude of MHz frequency gravitational waves at the 10-21 Hz-1/2 level, constituting the best direct limits to date at these frequencies. For gravitational wave power distributed over this frequency range, a broadband upper limit of 2.4 x 10-21Hz-1/2 at 95% confidence level is also obtained. This thesis covers the detector technology, the commissioning and calibration of the instrument, the statistical data analysis, and the gravitational wave limit results. Particular attention is paid to the end-to-end calibration of the instrument’s sensitivity to differential arm length motion, and so to gravitational wave strain. A detailed statistical analysis of the data is presented as well.

  6. Frequency stability requirements for two way range rate tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, V.

    1975-01-01

    Accuracy limitations to two way range rate Doppler tracking due to master (reference) oscillator frequency instabilities are discussed. Theory is developed to treat both the effects of random and nonrandom oscillator instabilities. The nonrandom instabilities treated are drift, environmental effects, and coherent phase modulation. The effects of random instabilities on range rate accuracy are shown to be describable in terms of sigma y (2, T, tau). For the typical noise processes encountered in precision oscillators, range rate error is related to the more familiar sigma y (tau) and script L (f). Three examples are discussed to show how to determine range rate error from given sigma y (tau) or script L (f) curves, and approximations are developed to simplify the treatment of complex systems. An error analysis of range determined from rate data is also given.

  7. Modeling of long range frequency sweeping for energetic particle modes

    SciTech Connect

    Nyqvist, R. M.; Breizman, B. N.

    2013-04-15

    Long range frequency sweeping events are simulated numerically within a one-dimensional, electrostatic bump-on-tail model with fast particle sources and collisions. The numerical solution accounts for fast particle trapping and detrapping in an evolving wave field with a fixed wavelength, and it includes three distinct collisions operators: Drag (dynamical friction on the background electrons), Krook-type collisions, and velocity space diffusion. The effects of particle trapping and diffusion on the evolution of holes and clumps are investigated, and the occurrence of non-monotonic (hooked) frequency sweeping and asymptotically steady holes is discussed. The presented solution constitutes a step towards predictive modeling of frequency sweeping events in more realistic geometries.

  8. A broadband multifocal metalens in the terahertz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Mahdieh; Moazami, Amin; Naserpour, Mahin; Zapata-Rodríguez, Carlos J.

    2016-07-01

    Metasurfaces, the 2D form of metamaterials with their ability in phase, amplitude and polarization manipulation are widely used in designing optical devices. Efforts to find proper photonic components in the terahertz (THz) range of frequency lead us to adopt metasurfaces as their constituent elements. Here, we conceived a broadband THz lens with an adjustable number and arrangement of focal points. To have a full control over the lens functionality, we used a metasurface with the capability of simultaneously modulating the amplitude and phase of the incident wave. C-shaped ring resonators (CSRRs) with different geometry and orientation capable of simultaneously manipulating phase and amplitude of the scattered fields, are proper choice to design the lens. We show that the introduced lens in a one-dimensional layout has a wide range of working frequencies within the THz spectrum, which can be used in a plethora of applications.

  9. Atmospheric range correction for two-frequency SLR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijaya, Dudy D.; Brunner, Fritz K.

    2011-09-01

    It has been widely known that the use of two-frequency Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) system is limited by stringent precision requirements of the range measurements and the proper atmospheric model. Owing to the stringent requirements, this SLR system is impractical for the current requirement of SLR measurements within the framework of global geodetic observing system (GGOS). If in the future this stringent requirement could be met, this SLR system would be an attractive tool to reduce atmospheric propagation effects of SLR and would be of great benefit for the next generation of GGOS design. To anticipate possible future developments of the two-frequency SLR systems, we have developed a new atmospheric correction formula for the two-frequency SLR measurements. The new formula eliminates the total atmospheric density effect including its gradient and provides two terms to calculate the curvature effect and the water vapor distribution effect. While the curvature effect can be calculated by an accurate model, the required information about the water vapor distribution along the propagation path can be calculated using previous developments of optical delay modeling or alternatively using results from microwave measurements. Theoretical simulations using the two-frequency systems of the Graz and TIGO-Concepción stations shows that the new formula completely reduces all propagation effects at any elevation angle above 3° with an accuracy better than 1 mm. However, the required precision for the difference of the two-frequency SLR measurements, i.e. better than 45 μm for a single epoch, exceeds the capability of the current state of the art SLR systems.

  10. Ultrasonic Multiple-Access Ranging System Using Spread Spectrum and MEMS Technology for Indoor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Segers, Laurent; Tiete, Jelmer; Braeken, An; Touhafi, Abdellah

    2014-01-01

    Indoor localization of persons and objects poses a great engineering challenge. Previously developed localization systems demonstrate the use of wideband techniques in ultrasound ranging systems. Direct sequence and frequency hopping spread spectrum ultrasound signals have been proven to achieve a high level of accuracy. A novel ranging method using the frequency hopping spread spectrum with finite impulse response filtering will be investigated and compared against the direct sequence spread spectrum. In the first setup, distances are estimated in a single-access environment, while in the second setup, two senders and one receiver are used. During the experiments, the micro-electromechanical systems are used as ultrasonic sensors, while the senders were implemented using field programmable gate arrays. Results show that in a single-access environment, the direct sequence spread spectrum method offers slightly better accuracy and precision performance compared to the frequency hopping spread spectrum. When two senders are used, measurements point out that the frequency hopping spread spectrum is more robust to near-far effects than the direct sequence spread spectrum. PMID:24553084

  11. Frequency Drives Lexical Access in Reading but Not in Speaking: The Frequency-Lag Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gollan, Tamar H.; Slattery, Timothy J.; Goldenberg, Diane; Van Assche, Eva; Duyck, Wouter; Rayner, Keith

    2011-01-01

    To contrast mechanisms of lexical access in production versus comprehension we compared the effects of word frequency (high, low), context (none, low constraint, high constraint), and level of English proficiency (monolingual, Spanish-English bilingual, Dutch-English bilingual) on picture naming, lexical decision, and eye fixation times. Semantic…

  12. Ionospheric Coherence Bandwidth Measurements in the Lower VHF Frequency Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suszcynsky, D. M.; Light, M. E.; Pigue, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Radio Frequency Propagation (RFProp) experiment consists of a satellite-based radio receiver suite to study various aspects of trans-ionospheric signal propagation and detection in four frequency bands, 2 - 55 MHz, 125 - 175 MHz, 365 - 415 MHz and 820 - 1100 MHz. In this paper, we present simultaneous ionospheric coherence bandwidth and S4 scintillation index measurements in the 32 - 44 MHz frequency range collected during the ESCINT equatorial scintillation experiment. 40-MHz continuous wave (CW) and 32 - 44 MHz swept frequency signals were transmitted simultaneously to the RFProp receiver suite from the Reagan Test Site at Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands (8.7° N, 167.7° E) in three separate campaigns during the 2014 and 2015 equinoxes. Results show coherence bandwidths as small as ~ 1 kHz for strong scintillation (S4 > 0.7) and indicate a high degree of ionospheric variability and irregularity on 10-m spatial scales. Spread-Doppler clutter effects arising from preferential ray paths to the satellite due to refraction off of isolated density irregularities are also observed and are dominant at low elevation angles. The results are compared to previous measurements and available scaling laws.

  13. Heating by waves in the ion cyclotron frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, R.

    1996-03-01

    The main aspects of heating with the fast wave in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are reviewed. First, the ion cyclotron resonance mechanism, fundamental and harmonics, is examined. Then the properties of fast wave dispersion are reviewed, and the principles of minority and higher cylcotron harmonic heating are discussed. An elementary coupling model is worked out in order to outline the computation of the electrical properties of ICRF antennas. Using the simple model, the antenna radiation pattern inside the plasma is computed and the effect of phasing on the k spectrum and on the antenna radiation properties is illustrated. The quasi linear-Fokker-Planck computation of the deformation of distribution functions due to Radio-Frequency (RF) and tail formation are briefly discussed. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  14. A wide range sigma—delta fractional-N frequency synthesizer with adaptive frequency calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianjun, Wei; Hanjun, Jiang; Lingwei, Zhang; Jingjing, Dong; Fule, Li; Zhihua, Wang; Chun, Zhang

    2013-06-01

    A wide range fractional-N frequency synthesizer in 0.18 μm RF CMOS technology is implemented. A switched-capacitors bank LC-tank VCO and an adaptive frequency calibration technique are used to expand the frequency range. A 16-bit third-order sigma—delta modulator with dither is used to randomize the fractional spur. The active area is 0.6 mm2. The experimental results show the proposed frequency synthesizer consumes 4.3 mA from a single 1.8 V supply voltage except for buffers. The frequency range is 1.44-2.11 GHz and the frequency resolution is less than 0.4 kHz. The phase noise is -94 dBc/Hz @ 100 kHz and -121 dBc/Hz @ 1 MHz at the output of the prescaler with a loop bandwidth of approximately 120 kHz. The performance meets the requirements for the multi-band and multi-mode transceiver applications.

  15. Wide tracking range, auto ranging, low jitter phase lock loop for swept and fixed frequency systems

    DOEpatents

    Kerner, Thomas M.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a wide tracking range phase locked loop (PLL) circuit that achieves minimal jitter in a recovered clock signal, regardless of the source of the jitter (i.e. whether it is in the source or the transmission media). The present invention PLL has automatic harmonic lockout detection circuitry via a novel lock and seek control logic in electrical communication with a programmable frequency discriminator and a code balance detector. (The frequency discriminator enables preset of a frequency window of upper and lower frequency limits to derive a programmable range within which signal acquisition is effected. The discriminator works in combination with the code balance detector circuit to minimize the sensitivity of the PLL circuit to random data in the data stream). In addition, the combination of a differential loop integrator with the lock and seek control logic obviates a code preamble and guarantees signal acquisition without harmonic lockup. An adaptive cable equalizer is desirably used in combination with the present invention PLL to recover encoded transmissions containing a clock and/or data. The equalizer automatically adapts to equalize short haul cable lengths of coaxial and twisted pair cables or wires and provides superior jitter performance itself. The combination of the equalizer with the present invention PLL is desirable in that such combination permits the use of short haul wires without significant jitter.

  16. Frequency Drives Lexical Access in Reading but not in Speaking: The Frequency-Lag Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Gollan, Tamar H.; Slattery, Timothy J.; Goldenberg, Diane; van Assche, Eva; Duyck, Wouter; Rayner, Keith

    2010-01-01

    To contrast mechanisms of lexical access in production versus comprehension we compared the effects of word-frequency (high, low), context (none, low-constraining, high-constraining), and level of English proficiency (monolinguals, Spanish-English bilinguals, Dutch-English bilinguals), on picture naming, lexical decision, and eye fixation times. Semantic constraint effects were larger in production than in reading. Frequency effects were larger in production than in reading without constraining context, but larger in reading than in production with constraining context. Bilingual disadvantages were modulated by frequency in production but not in eye fixation times, were not smaller in low-constraining context, and were reduced by high-constraining context only in production and only at the lowest level of English proficiency. These results challenge existing accounts of bilingual disadvantages, and reveal fundamentally different processes during lexical access across modalities, entailing a primarily semantically driven search in production, but a frequency driven search in comprehension. The apparently more interactive process in production than comprehension could simply reflect a greater number of frequency-sensitive processing stages in production. PMID:21219080

  17. High precision spectroscopy and imaging in THz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaks, Vladimir L.

    2014-03-01

    Application of microwave methods for development of the THz frequency range has resulted in elaboration of high precision THz spectrometers based on nonstationary effects. The spectrometers characteristics (spectral resolution and sensitivity) meet the requirements for high precision analysis. The gas analyzers, based on the high precision spectrometers, have been successfully applied for analytical investigations of gas impurities in high pure substances. These investigations can be carried out both in absorption cell and in reactor. The devices can be used for ecological monitoring, detecting the components of chemical weapons and explosive in the atmosphere. The great field of THz investigations is the medicine application. Using the THz spectrometers developed one can detect markers for some diseases in exhaled air.

  18. Optical conductivity of warm dense matter within a wide frequency range using quantum statistical and kinetic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veysman, M.; Röpke, G.; Winkel, M.; Reinholz, H.

    2016-07-01

    Fundamental properties of warm dense matter are described by the dielectric function, which gives access to the frequency-dependent electrical conductivity; absorption, emission, and scattering of radiation; charged particles stopping; and further macroscopic properties. Different approaches to the dielectric function and the related dynamical collision frequency are compared in a wide frequency range. The high-frequency limit describing inverse bremsstrahlung and the low-frequency limit of the dc conductivity are considered. Sum rules and Kramers-Kronig relation are checked for the generalized linear response theory and the standard approach following kinetic theory. The results are discussed in application to aluminum, xenon, and argon plasmas.

  19. Optical conductivity of warm dense matter within a wide frequency range using quantum statistical and kinetic approaches.

    PubMed

    Veysman, M; Röpke, G; Winkel, M; Reinholz, H

    2016-07-01

    Fundamental properties of warm dense matter are described by the dielectric function, which gives access to the frequency-dependent electrical conductivity; absorption, emission, and scattering of radiation; charged particles stopping; and further macroscopic properties. Different approaches to the dielectric function and the related dynamical collision frequency are compared in a wide frequency range. The high-frequency limit describing inverse bremsstrahlung and the low-frequency limit of the dc conductivity are considered. Sum rules and Kramers-Kronig relation are checked for the generalized linear response theory and the standard approach following kinetic theory. The results are discussed in application to aluminum, xenon, and argon plasmas. PMID:27575226

  20. Range and Frequency of Africanized Honey Bees in California (USA)

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Yoshiaki; Kohn, Joshua R.

    2015-01-01

    Africanized honey bees entered California in 1994 but few accounts of their northward expansion or their frequency relative to European honey bees have been published. We used mitochondrial markers and morphometric analyses to determine the prevalence of Africanized honeybees in San Diego County and their current northward progress in California west of the Sierra Nevada crest. The northernmost African mitotypes detected were approximately 40 km south of Sacramento in California’s central valley. In San Diego County, 65% of foraging honey bee workers carry African mitochondria and the estimated percentage of Africanized workers using morphological measurements is similar (61%). There was no correlation between mitotype and morphology in San Diego County suggesting Africanized bees result from bidirectional hybridization. Seventy percent of feral hives, but only 13% of managed hives, sampled in San Diego County carried the African mitotype indicating that a large fraction of foraging workers in both urban and rural San Diego County are feral. We also found a single nucleotide polymorphism at the DNA barcode locus COI that distinguishes European and African mitotypes. The utility of this marker was confirmed using 401 georeferenced honey bee sequences from the worldwide Barcode of Life Database. Future censuses can determine whether the current range of the Africanized form is stable, patterns of introgression at nuclear loci, and the environmental factors that may limit the northern range of the Africanized honey bee. PMID:26361047

  1. Range and Frequency of Africanized Honey Bees in California (USA).

    PubMed

    Kono, Yoshiaki; Kohn, Joshua R

    2015-01-01

    Africanized honey bees entered California in 1994 but few accounts of their northward expansion or their frequency relative to European honey bees have been published. We used mitochondrial markers and morphometric analyses to determine the prevalence of Africanized honeybees in San Diego County and their current northward progress in California west of the Sierra Nevada crest. The northernmost African mitotypes detected were approximately 40 km south of Sacramento in California's central valley. In San Diego County, 65% of foraging honey bee workers carry African mitochondria and the estimated percentage of Africanized workers using morphological measurements is similar (61%). There was no correlation between mitotype and morphology in San Diego County suggesting Africanized bees result from bidirectional hybridization. Seventy percent of feral hives, but only 13% of managed hives, sampled in San Diego County carried the African mitotype indicating that a large fraction of foraging workers in both urban and rural San Diego County are feral. We also found a single nucleotide polymorphism at the DNA barcode locus COI that distinguishes European and African mitotypes. The utility of this marker was confirmed using 401 georeferenced honey bee sequences from the worldwide Barcode of Life Database. Future censuses can determine whether the current range of the Africanized form is stable, patterns of introgression at nuclear loci, and the environmental factors that may limit the northern range of the Africanized honey bee.

  2. Range and Frequency of Africanized Honey Bees in California (USA).

    PubMed

    Kono, Yoshiaki; Kohn, Joshua R

    2015-01-01

    Africanized honey bees entered California in 1994 but few accounts of their northward expansion or their frequency relative to European honey bees have been published. We used mitochondrial markers and morphometric analyses to determine the prevalence of Africanized honeybees in San Diego County and their current northward progress in California west of the Sierra Nevada crest. The northernmost African mitotypes detected were approximately 40 km south of Sacramento in California's central valley. In San Diego County, 65% of foraging honey bee workers carry African mitochondria and the estimated percentage of Africanized workers using morphological measurements is similar (61%). There was no correlation between mitotype and morphology in San Diego County suggesting Africanized bees result from bidirectional hybridization. Seventy percent of feral hives, but only 13% of managed hives, sampled in San Diego County carried the African mitotype indicating that a large fraction of foraging workers in both urban and rural San Diego County are feral. We also found a single nucleotide polymorphism at the DNA barcode locus COI that distinguishes European and African mitotypes. The utility of this marker was confirmed using 401 georeferenced honey bee sequences from the worldwide Barcode of Life Database. Future censuses can determine whether the current range of the Africanized form is stable, patterns of introgression at nuclear loci, and the environmental factors that may limit the northern range of the Africanized honey bee. PMID:26361047

  3. 47 CFR 15.33 - Frequency range of radiated measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 5000. Above 1000 5th harmonic of the highest frequency or 40 GHz, whichever is lower. (2) A... below 10 GHz: to the tenth harmonic of the highest fundamental frequency or to 40 GHz, whichever is... harmonic of the highest fundamental frequency or to 100 GHz, whichever is lower. (3) If the...

  4. A wide-frequency-range air-jet shaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herr, Robert W

    1957-01-01

    This paper presents a description of a simple air-jet shaker. Its force can be calibrated statically and appears to be constant with frequency. It is relatively easy to use, and it has essentially massless characteristics. This shaker is applied to define the unstable branch of a frequency-response curve obtained for a nonlinear spring with a single degree of freedom.

  5. Enhanced compressive wideband frequency spectrum sensing for dynamic spectrum access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yipeng; Wan, Qun

    2012-12-01

    Wideband spectrum sensing detects the unused spectrum holes for dynamic spectrum access (DSA). Too high sampling rate is the main challenge. Compressive sensing (CS) can reconstruct sparse signal with much fewer randomized samples than Nyquist sampling with high probability. Since survey shows that the monitored signal is sparse in frequency domain, CS can deal with the sampling burden. Random samples can be obtained by the analog-to-information converter. Signal recovery can be formulated as the combination of an L0 norm minimization and a linear measurement fitting constraint. In DSA, the static spectrum allocation of primary radios means the bounds between different types of primary radios are known in advance. To incorporate this a priori information, we divide the whole spectrum into sections according to the spectrum allocation policy. In the new optimization model, the minimization of the L2 norm of each section is used to encourage the cluster distribution locally, while the L0 norm of the L2 norms is minimized to give sparse distribution globally. Because the L2/L0 optimization is not convex, an iteratively re-weighted L2/L1 optimization is proposed to approximate it. Simulations demonstrate the proposed method outperforms others in accuracy, denoising ability, etc.

  6. 47 CFR 15.202 - Certified operating frequency range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 15.202 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES... is defined as a device operating in a mode in which it has the capability to transmit without receiving an enabling signal. In this mode it is able to select a channel and initiate a network by...

  7. Airborne Gravity Gradiometry Resolves a Full Range of Gravity Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mataragio, J.; Brewster, J.; Mims, J.

    2007-12-01

    Airborne Full Tensor Gradiometry (Air\\-FTGR) was flown at high altitude coincident with Airborne Gravity (AG) flown in 2003 in West Arnhem Land, Australia. A preliminary analysis of two data sets indicates that the Air\\-FTGR system has the capability of resolving intermediate to long wavelengths features that may be associated with relatively deeper geological structures. A comparison of frequency filtered slices and power spectral density (PSD) for both data sets using the short (> 5 km), intermediate (10 km) and long (20 km) wavelengths reveals that high altitude Air\\-FTGR data show greater response in high frequency anomalies than a conventional Airborne Gravity and matches well with the AG even at the longest wavelengths anomalies. The effect of line spacing and target resolution was examined between the two data sets. Reprocessed gradient and AG data at 2, 4 and 6 km line spacing suggest that Air\\-FTGR could be effectively flown at a comparatively wider line spacing to resolve similar targets the AG would resolve with tighter line spacing. Introduction Airborne Full Tensor Gradiometry (Air\\-FTGR) data have been available to the mining industry since 2002 and their use for geologic applications is well established. However, Air\\-FTGR data has been mostly considered and used in mapping and delineation of near surface geological targets. This is due to the fact that gravity gradiometer measurements are well suited to capture the high frequency signal associated with near\\-surface targets ( Li, 2001). This is possible because the gradiometer signal strength falls off with the cube of the distance to the target. Nonetheless, in recent years there has been an increasing demand from the mining, oil, and gas industry in utilizing Full Tensor Gravity Gradiometer as a mapping tool for both regional and prospect level surveys. Air\\-FTGR as a Regional Mapping Tool Several, relatively low altitude surveys have been successfully flown in Brazil, Canada and Australia

  8. Satellite range delay simulator for a matrix-switched time division multiple-access network simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Lawrence A.

    1989-01-01

    The Systems Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility at NASA Lewis Research Center is presently configured as a satellite-switched time division multiple access (SS-TDMA) network simulator. The purpose of SITE is to demonstrate and evaluate advanced communication satellite technologies, presently embodied by POC components developed under NASA contracts in addition to other hardware, such as ground terminals, designed and built in-house at NASA Lewis. Each ground terminal in a satellite communications system will experience a different aspect of the satellite's motion due mainly to daily tidal effects and station keeping, hence a different duration and rate of variation in the range delay. As a result of this and other effects such as local oscillator instability, each ground terminal must constantly adjust its transmit burst timing so that data bursts from separate ground terminals arrive at the satellite in their assigned time slots, preventing overlap and keeping the system in synchronism. On the receiving end, ground terminals must synchronize their local clocks using reference transmissions received through the satellite link. A feature of the SITE facility is its capability to simulate the varying propagation delays and associated Doppler frequency shifts that the ground terminals in the network have to cope with. Delay is achieved by means of two NASA Lewis designed and built range delay simulator (RDS) systems, each independently controlled locally with front panel switches or remotely by an experiment control and monitor (EC/M) computer.

  9. Fiber-based multiple-access frequency synchronization via 1f-2f dissemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xi; Wang, Bo; Gao, Chao; Wang, Li-Jun

    2016-09-01

    Considering the reference frequency dissemination requirements of the Square Kilometre Array telescope (SKA) project, on the basis of the 1f-2f precision frequency synchronization scheme, we propose and demonstrate a fiber-based multiple-access frequency synchronization scheme. The dissemination reference frequency can be recovered at arbitrary nodes along the entire fiber link. It can be applied to antennas close proximity to the SKA central station, and will lead to a better SKA frequency synchronization network. As a performance test, we recover the disseminated 100-MHz reference frequency at an arbitrary node chosen as being 5 km away from the transmitting site. Relative frequency stabilities of 2.0×10-14/s and 1.6×10-16/104s are obtained. We also experimentally verify the feasibility of a frequency dissemination link with three access points. Project supported by the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project of China (Grant No. 2013YQ09094303).

  10. An optical beam frequency reference with 10{sup -14} range frequency instability

    SciTech Connect

    McFerran, J. J.; Hartnett, J. G.; Luiten, A. N.

    2009-07-20

    The authors report on a thermal beam optical frequency reference with a fractional frequency instability of 9.2x10{sup -14} at 1 s reducing to 2.0x10{sup -14} at 64 s before slowly rising. The {sup 1}S{sub 0}{r_reversible}{sup 3}P{sub 1} intercombination line in neutral {sup 40}Ca is used as a frequency discriminator. A diode laser at 423 nm probes the ground state population after a Ramsey-Borde sequence of 657 nm light-field interactions on the atoms. The measured fractional frequency instability is an order of magnitude improvement on previously reported thermal beam optical clocks. The photon shot-noise of the read-out produces a limiting square root {lambda}-variance of 7x10{sup -14}/{radical}({tau})

  11. Frequency-dependent conductivity contrast for tissue characterization using a dual-frequency range conductivity mapping magnetic resonance method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Chauhan, Munish; Kim, Min-Oh; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kim, Hyung Joong; Sersa, Igor; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2015-02-01

    Electrical conductivities of biological tissues show frequency-dependent behaviors, and these values at different frequencies may provide clinically useful diagnostic information. MR-based tissue property mapping techniques such as magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) and magnetic resonance electrical property tomography (MREPT) are widely used and provide unique conductivity contrast information over different frequency ranges. Recently, a new method for data acquisition and reconstruction for low- and high-frequency conductivity images from a single MR scan was proposed. In this study, we applied this simultaneous dual-frequency range conductivity mapping MR method to evaluate its utility in a designed phantom and two in vivo animal disease models. Magnetic flux density and B(1)(+) phase map for dual-frequency conductivity images were acquired using a modified spin-echo pulse sequence. Low-frequency conductivity was reconstructed from MREIT data by the projected current density method, while high-frequency conductivity was reconstructed from MREPT data by B(1)(+) mapping. Two different conductivity phantoms comprising varying ion concentrations separated by insulating films with or without holes were used to study the contrast mechanism of the frequency-dependent conductivities related to ion concentration and mobility. Canine brain abscess and ischemia were used as in vivo models to evaluate the capability of the proposed method to identify new electrical properties-based contrast at two different frequencies. The simultaneous dual-frequency range conductivity mapping MR method provides unique contrast information related to the concentration and mobility of ions inside tissues. This method has potential to monitor dynamic changes of the state of disease.

  12. Alleviating a form of electric vehicle range anxiety through on-demand vehicle access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Christopher; Griggs, Wynita; Wirth, Fabian; Quinn, Karl; Shorten, Robert

    2015-04-01

    On-demand vehicle access is a method that can be used to reduce types of range anxiety problems related to planned travel for electric vehicle owners. Using ideas from elementary queueing theory, basic quality of service (QoS) metrics are defined to dimension a shared fleet to ensure high levels of vehicle access. Using mobility data from Ireland, it is argued that the potential cost of such a system is very low.

  13. Wave Heating in Ion Cyclotron Ranges of Frequencies in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Mushiake, T.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2015-11-01

    The magnetosphere plasma device RT-1 has been developed for the studies on magnetosphere and advanced fusion plasmas. A levitated superconducting coil produces magnetic dipole fields that realize a high confinement state. The electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) with 8.2 GHz and 50 kW produces the plasmas with hot electrons in a few ten keV range. We reported that the local electron beta exceeded 1 in RT-1 plasmas. In such situation, the ions still remain cold at a few ten eV. Heating ions is expected to access high ion beta state and to improve the plasma confinement theoretically. Therefore the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating with 2-4 MHz and 10 kW is being prepared in RT-1. Based on the results of the TASK-WF2 code, the ∩ shape loop antenna was designed for a slow wave excitation, and was implemented in the RT-1. In the ICRF heating experiments, a base plasma was sustained by ECRH. We observed the clear increase in diamagnetic signals and impurity ion temperature (CIII) in helium plasmas at the neutral gas pressure of 3 mPa, if the ICRF power of 10 kW is comparable to the ECRH one. This result is the first time in a magnetosphere plasma device. The results related to the ICRF heating will be presented in detail. JSPS KAKENHI Grant Nos 23224014 and 24360384.

  14. Experimental access to HSQC spectra decoupled in all frequency dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhaii, Peyman; Haase, Burkhard; Bermel, Wolfgang

    2009-08-01

    A new operator called RESET "Reducing nuclEar Spin multiplicitiEs to singuleTs" is presented to acquire broadband proton decoupled proton spectra in one and two dimensions. Basically, the homonuclear decoupling is achieved through the application of bilinear rotation pulses and delays. A [BIRD] r,x pulse building block is used to selectively invert all proton magnetization remotely attached to 13C isotopes, which is equivalent to a scalar J decoupling of the protons directly attached to 13C from all other protons in the spin system. In conjunction with an appropriate data processing technique pure shift proton spectra are obtained. For this purpose, the concept of constant time acquisition in the observe dimension is exploited. Both ideas were merged together producing superior HSQC based pseudo 3D pulse sequences. The resulting HSQC spectra show cross peaks with collapsed multiplet structures and singlet responses for the proton chemical shift frequencies. An unambiguous assignment of signals from overcrowded spectra becomes much easier. Finally, the recently introduced SHARC technique is exploited to enhance the capability of the scalar J decoupling method. A significant reduction of the total measurement time is achieved. The time is saved by reducing the number of 13C chemical shift evolution increments and working with superimposed narrow spectral bandwidths in the 13C indirect domain.

  15. Improvement spatial resolution of frequency modulated continuous wave laser ranging system by splicing equal optical frequency interval sampled signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guang; Zhang, Fumin; Qu, Xinghua

    2015-02-01

    A dual interferometry FMCW laser ranging system is presented. The auxiliary interferometer for generating the clock pulses at equally spaced optical frequencies is incorporated into the main interferometer to simplify the system configuration and to compensate the tuning linearity of the laser source. The need of widely tunable laser limits the practical application of the FMCW laser ranging for precision industrial measurement. Splicing sampled signal method is proposed to break though the tuning range of the laser source limitation against the special resolution. In the experiments, 50 μm range resolution at 8.7 m is demonstrated, and this resolution is maintained over the entire measuring range. The measuring range depending on the power and coherence length of the source can reach more than 20 m. The system structure is simple, and the requirement on the tuning range of laser source is reduced in this system.

  16. Buried Object Detection Method Using Optimum Frequency Range in Extremely Shallow Underground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Tsuneyoshi; Abe, Touma

    2011-07-01

    We propose a new detection method for buried objects using the optimum frequency response range of the corresponding vibration velocity. Flat speakers and a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) are used for noncontact acoustic imaging in the extremely shallow underground. The exploration depth depends on the sound pressure, but it is usually less than 10 cm. Styrofoam, wood (silver fir), and acrylic boards of the same size, different size styrofoam boards, a hollow toy duck, a hollow plastic container, a plastic container filled with sand, a hollow steel can and an unglazed pot are used as buried objects which are buried in sand to about 2 cm depth. The imaging procedure of buried objects using the optimum frequency range is given below. First, the standardized difference from the average vibration velocity is calculated for all scan points. Next, using this result, underground images are made using a constant frequency width to search for the frequency response range of the buried object. After choosing an approximate frequency response range, the difference between the average vibration velocity for all points and that for several points that showed a clear response is calculated for the final confirmation of the optimum frequency range. Using this optimum frequency range, we can obtain the clearest image of the buried object. From the experimental results, we confirmed the effectiveness of our proposed method. In particular, a clear image of the buried object was obtained when the SLDV image was unclear.

  17. Excitation, detection, and electrostatic manipulation of terahertz-frequency range plasmons in a two-dimensional electron system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jingbo; Mayorov, Alexander S.; Wood, Christopher D.; Mistry, Divyang; Li, Lianhe; Muchenje, Wilson; Rosamond, Mark C.; Chen, Li; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Cunningham, John E.

    2015-10-01

    Terahertz frequency time-domain spectroscopy employing free-space radiation has frequently been used to probe the elementary excitations of low-dimensional systems. The diffraction limit, however, prevents its use for the in-plane study of individual laterally-defined nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate a planar terahertz frequency plasmonic circuit in which photoconductive material is monolithically integrated with a two-dimensional electron system. Plasmons with a broad spectral range (up to ~ 400 GHz) are excited by injecting picosecond-duration pulses, generated and detected by a photoconductive semiconductor, into a high mobility two-dimensional electron system. Using voltage modulation of a Schottky gate overlying the two-dimensional electron system, we form a tuneable plasmonic cavity, and observe electrostatic manipulation of the plasmon resonances. Our technique offers a direct route to access the picosecond dynamics of confined electron transport in a broad range of lateral nanostructures.

  18. Excitation, detection, and electrostatic manipulation of terahertz-frequency range plasmons in a two-dimensional electron system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingbo; Mayorov, Alexander S; Wood, Christopher D; Mistry, Divyang; Li, Lianhe; Muchenje, Wilson; Rosamond, Mark C; Chen, Li; Linfield, Edmund H; Davies, A Giles; Cunningham, John E

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz frequency time-domain spectroscopy employing free-space radiation has frequently been used to probe the elementary excitations of low-dimensional systems. The diffraction limit, however, prevents its use for the in-plane study of individual laterally-defined nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate a planar terahertz frequency plasmonic circuit in which photoconductive material is monolithically integrated with a two-dimensional electron system. Plasmons with a broad spectral range (up to ~ 400 GHz) are excited by injecting picosecond-duration pulses, generated and detected by a photoconductive semiconductor, into a high mobility two-dimensional electron system. Using voltage modulation of a Schottky gate overlying the two-dimensional electron system, we form a tuneable plasmonic cavity, and observe electrostatic manipulation of the plasmon resonances. Our technique offers a direct route to access the picosecond dynamics of confined electron transport in a broad range of lateral nanostructures. PMID:26487263

  19. Excitation, detection, and electrostatic manipulation of terahertz-frequency range plasmons in a two-dimensional electron system

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingbo; Mayorov, Alexander S.; Wood, Christopher D.; Mistry, Divyang; Li, Lianhe; Muchenje, Wilson; Rosamond, Mark C.; Chen, Li; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Cunningham, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz frequency time-domain spectroscopy employing free-space radiation has frequently been used to probe the elementary excitations of low-dimensional systems. The diffraction limit, however, prevents its use for the in-plane study of individual laterally-defined nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate a planar terahertz frequency plasmonic circuit in which photoconductive material is monolithically integrated with a two-dimensional electron system. Plasmons with a broad spectral range (up to ~ 400 GHz) are excited by injecting picosecond-duration pulses, generated and detected by a photoconductive semiconductor, into a high mobility two-dimensional electron system. Using voltage modulation of a Schottky gate overlying the two-dimensional electron system, we form a tuneable plasmonic cavity, and observe electrostatic manipulation of the plasmon resonances. Our technique offers a direct route to access the picosecond dynamics of confined electron transport in a broad range of lateral nanostructures. PMID:26487263

  20. Optimal frequency range for medical radar measurements of human heartbeats using body-contact radar.

    PubMed

    Brovoll, Sverre; Aardal, Øyvind; Paichard, Yoann; Berger, Tor; Lande, Tor Sverre; Hamran, Svein-Erik

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the optimal frequency range for heartbeat measurements using body-contact radar is experimentally evaluated. A Body-contact radar senses electromagnetic waves that have penetrated the human body, but the range of frequencies that can be used are limited by the electric properties of the human tissue. The optimal frequency range is an important property needed for the design of body-contact radar systems for heartbeat measurements. In this study heartbeats are measured using three different antennas at discrete frequencies from 0.1 - 10 GHz, and the strength of the received heartbeat signal is calculated. To characterize the antennas, when in contact with the body, two port S-parameters(†) are measured for the antennas using a pork rib as a phantom for the human body. The results shows that frequencies up to 2.5 GHz can be used for heartbeat measurements with body-contact radar.

  1. Simulation of polarizer based on chiral medium for terahertz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolenko, S. Yu; Grebenchukov, A. N.; Masyukov, M. S.; Vozianova, A. V.; Khodzitsky, M. K.

    2016-08-01

    The work is devoted to development of the polarizer for terahertz frequency range. Chiral medium was simulated using the software package CST Microwave Studio by the method of Finite-Differences in Frequency Domain. The influence of geometry of chiral unit cell on the polarization of incident plane wave was investigated.

  2. Wide frequency range capacitive detection of loss in a metallic cantilever using resonance and relaxation modes.

    PubMed

    Richert, Ranko

    2007-05-01

    The impedance of a capacitor which embraces a charged cantilever is used to measure the mechanical properties of the cantilever material. The technique has been tested with an amorphous metallic specimen, but is applicable for many other solids. The material damping can be measured at the resonance frequency of the cantilever via the width of the resonance curve or by recording the ring-down behavior. Additionally, several decades in frequency are accessible below the resonance frequency, where values as low as nu=0.03 Hz are achieved easily. The data are analyzed with a single equation that captures the damping at all frequencies in terms of the material specific Young's modulus E and its loss angle tan delta=E"/E'.

  3. High-resolution frequency-modulated continuous-wave laser ranging for precision distance metrology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guang; Zhang, Fumin; Qu, Xinghua; Meng, Xiangsong

    2014-12-01

    Frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW) laser ranging is one of the most interesting techniques for precision distance metrology. In order to ensure the theoretical measurement range and precision, a narrow linewidth external cavity tunable laser with large tuning range is chosen. In practical situations, the tuning nonlinearity of the laser reduces the measurement precision, hence an auxiliary interferometer is used to measure the laser tuning rate and linearize the frequency ramp. Then, fast Fourier transform algorithm is applied to the resampled signal of the main interferometer, and the full-width at half maximum of the frequency spectrum is narrowed. In the end, the experiments are carried out using the FMCW laser ranging system and demonstrate 50-μm range resolution at 8.7 m.

  4. Full-range imaging of eye accommodation by high-speed long-depth range optical frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Hiro-Oka, Hideaki; Satoh, Nobuyuki; Yoshimura, Reiko; Choi, Donghak; Nakanishi, Motoi; Igarashi, Akihito; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Ohbayashi, Kohji; Shimizu, Kimiya

    2010-01-01

    We describe a high-speed long-depth range optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) system employing a long-coherence length tunable source and demonstrate dynamic full-range imaging of the anterior segment of the eye including from the cornea surface to the posterior capsule of the crystalline lens with a depth range of 12 mm without removing complex conjugate image ambiguity. The tunable source spanned from 1260 to 1360 nm with an average output power of 15.8 mW. The fast A-scan rate of 20,000 per second provided dynamic OFDI and dependence of the whole anterior segment change on time following abrupt relaxation from the accommodated to the relaxed status, which was measured for a healthy eye and that with an intraocular lens. PMID:21258564

  5. Widely tunable laser frequency offset lock with 30 GHz range and 5 THz offset.

    PubMed

    Biesheuvel, J; Noom, D W E; Salumbides, E J; Sheridan, K T; Ubachs, W; Koelemeij, J C J

    2013-06-17

    We demonstrate a simple and versatile method to greatly extend the tuning range of optical frequency shifting devices, such as acousto-optic modulators (AOMs). We use this method to stabilize the frequency of a tunable narrow-band continuous-wave (CW) laser to a transmission maximum of an external Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) with a tunable frequency offset. This is achieved through a servo loop which contains an in-loop AOM for simple radiofrequency (RF) tuning of the optical frequency over the full 30 GHz mode-hop-free tuning range of the CW laser. By stabilizing the length of the FPI to a stabilized helium-neon (HeNe) laser (at 5 THz offset from the tunable laser) we simultaneously transfer the ~ 1 MHz absolute frequency stability of the HeNe laser to the entire 30 GHz range of the tunable laser. Thus, our method allows simple, wide-range, fast and reproducible optical frequency tuning and absolute optical frequency measurements through RF electronics, which is here demonstrated by repeatedly recording a 27-GHz-wide molecular iodine spectrum at scan rates up to 500 MHz/s. General technical aspects that determine the performance of the method are discussed in detail.

  6. Dielectric response of transformer oil based ferrofluid in low frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajnak, M.; Kurimsky, J.; Dolnik, B.; Marton, K.; Tomco, L.; Taculescu, A.; Vekas, L.; Kovac, J.; Vavra, I.; Tothova, J.; Kopcansky, P.; Timko, M.

    2013-07-01

    In this article, our experimental study of the dynamic dielectric behaviour of transformer oil-based ferrofluid with magnetite nanoparticles is presented. Frequency-dependent dielectric permittivity and dissipation factor were measured within the frequency range from 20 Hz to 2 MHz by a capacitance method. The ferrofluid samples were placed in a liquid crystal cell, and experiments were carried out in an electromagnetically anechoic chamber. Two polarization processes and corresponding relaxations were revealed within the applied frequency range. Schwarz theory of electric double layer polarization is used to explain the low frequency relaxation maximum. Moreover, the shift of the maximum position towards higher frequencies is observed as the magnetic volume fraction in the ferrofluid increases. The related decrease in relaxation time due to higher counterion mobility is analysed. Reduced electric field intensity due to depolarization field, which is dependent on the particle concentration, is proposed as the reason for the maxima shift. This assumption is wholly supported by a complementary experiment.

  7. Development of Acceleration Sensor and Acceleration Evaluation System for Super-Low-Range Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Shogo; Matsumoto, Hideki

    2001-05-01

    This paper describes the development process for acceleration sensors used on automobiles and an acceleration evaluation system designed specifically for acceleration at super-low-range frequencies. The features of the newly developed sensor are as follows. 1) Original piezo-bimorph design based on a disc-center-fixed structure achieves pyroeffect cancelling and stabilization of sensor characteristics and enables the detection of the acceleration of 0.0009 G at the super-low-range-frequency of 0.03 Hz. 2) The addition of a self-diagnostic function utilizing the characteristics of piezoceramics enables constant monitoring of sensor failure. The frequency range of acceleration for accurate vehicle motion control is considered to be from DC to about 50 Hz. However, the measurement of acceleration in the super-low-range frequency near DC has been difficult because of mechanical and electrical noise interruption. This has delayed the development of the acceleration sensor for automotive use. We have succeeded in the development of an acceleration evaluation system for super-low-range frequencies from 0.015 Hz to 2 Hz with detection of the acceleration range from 0.0002 G (0.2 gal) to 1 G, as well as the development of a piezoelectric-type acceleration sensor for automotive use.

  8. Numerical analysis of radio-frequency sheath-plasma interactions in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, H.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2012-01-15

    A new finite element numerical scheme for analyzing self-consistent radio-frequency (RF) sheath-plasma interaction problems in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies is applied to various problems represented by simplified models for the tokamak scrape-off layer. The present code incorporates a modified boundary condition, which is called a sheath boundary condition, that couples the radio-frequency waves and sheaths at the material boundaries by treating the sheath as a thin vacuum layer. A series of numerical analyses in one- and two-dimensional domains show several important physical properties, such as the existence of multiple roots, hysteresis effects, presence and characteristics of the sheath-plasma waves, and the phase shift of a reflected slow wave, some of which are newly identified by introducing a spatially varying plasma density and background magnetic field.

  9. Acoustic Treatment Design Scaling Methods. Volume 2; Advanced Treatment Impedance Models for High Frequency Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.; Yu, J.; Kwan, H. W.

    1999-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to develop improved models for the acoustic impedance of treatment panels at high frequencies, for application to subscale treatment designs. Effects that cause significant deviation of the impedance from simple geometric scaling are examined in detail, an improved high-frequency impedance model is developed, and the improved model is correlated with high-frequency impedance measurements. Only single-degree-of-freedom honeycomb sandwich resonator panels with either perforated sheet or "linear" wiremesh faceplates are considered. The objective is to understand those effects that cause the simple single-degree-of- freedom resonator panels to deviate at the higher-scaled frequency from the impedance that would be obtained at the corresponding full-scale frequency. This will allow the subscale panel to be designed to achieve a specified impedance spectrum over at least a limited range of frequencies. An advanced impedance prediction model has been developed that accounts for some of the known effects at high frequency that have previously been ignored as a small source of error for full-scale frequency ranges.

  10. Range compensation for backscattering measurements in the difference-frequency nearfield of a parametric sonar.

    PubMed

    Foote, Kenneth G

    2012-05-01

    Measurement of acoustic backscattering properties of targets requires removal of the range dependence of echoes. This process is called range compensation. For conventional sonars making measurements in the transducer farfield, the compensation removes effects of geometrical spreading and absorption. For parametric sonars consisting of a parametric acoustic transmitter and a conventional-sonar receiver, two additional range dependences require compensation when making measurements in the nonlinearly generated difference-frequency nearfield: an apparently increasing source level and a changing beamwidth. General expressions are derived for range compensation functions in the difference-frequency nearfield of parametric sonars. These are evaluated numerically for a parametric sonar whose difference-frequency band, effectively 1-6 kHz, is being used to observe Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in situ. Range compensation functions for this sonar are compared with corresponding functions for conventional sonars for the cases of single and multiple scatterers. Dependences of these range compensation functions on the parametric sonar transducer shape, size, acoustic power density, and hydrography are investigated. Parametric range compensation functions, when applied with calibration data, will enable difference-frequency echoes to be expressed in physical units of volume backscattering, and backscattering spectra, including fish-swimbladder-resonances, to be analyzed.

  11. Ultrawideband temperature-dependent dielectric properties of animal liver tissue in the microwave frequency range.

    PubMed

    Lazebnik, Mariya; Converse, Mark C; Booske, John H; Hagness, Susan C

    2006-04-01

    The development of ultrawideband (UWB) microwave diagnostic and therapeutic technologies, such as UWB microwave breast cancer detection and hyperthermia treatment, is facilitated by accurate knowledge of the temperature- and frequency-dependent dielectric properties of biological tissues. To this end, we characterize the temperature-dependent dielectric properties of a representative tissue type-animal liver-from 0.5 to 20 GHz. Since discrete-frequency linear temperature coefficients are impractical and inappropriate for applications spanning wide frequency and temperature ranges, we propose a novel and compact data representation technique. A single-pole Cole-Cole model is used to fit the dielectric properties data as a function of frequency, and a second-order polynomial is used to fit the Cole-Cole parameters as a function of temperature. This approach permits rapid estimation of tissue dielectric properties at any temperature and frequency.

  12. Leg stiffness of older and younger individuals over a range of hopping frequencies.

    PubMed

    Hobara, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Eiichi; Mochimaru, Masaaki

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare spring-mass behavior between older and younger individuals at a range of hopping frequencies. A total of 14 elderly and 14 young subjects performed in-place hopping in time with a metronome at frequencies of 2.2, 2.6, and 3.0 Hz. Using a spring-mass model, leg stiffness was calculated as the ratio of maximum ground reaction force to maximum center of mass displacement at the middle of the stance phase during ground contact. The lower extremities of both groups behaved like a simple spring-mass system at all three hopping frequencies. Further, statistical analysis revealed the existence of a significant interaction between hopping frequency and age group on leg stiffness. These results suggest that the sensitivity of leg stiffness to accommodate for variations in hopping frequency is likely to differ between elderly and young individuals. PMID:25716326

  13. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, S. E-mail: pradhans75@gmail.com; Poornima,; Dasgupta, K.; Mishra, S.; Behera, R.

    2015-06-15

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz{sup 1/2} @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity.

  14. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S; Mishra, S; Behera, R; Poornima; Dasgupta, K

    2015-06-01

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz(1/2) @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity. PMID:26133825

  15. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S; Mishra, S; Behera, R; Poornima; Dasgupta, K

    2015-06-01

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz(1/2) @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity.

  16. UTag: Long-range Ultra-wideband Passive Radio Frequency Tags

    SciTech Connect

    Dowla, F

    2007-03-14

    Long-range, ultra-wideband (UWB), passive radio frequency (RF) tags are key components in Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) system that will revolutionize inventory control and tracking applications. Unlike conventional, battery-operated (active) RFID tags, LLNL's small UWB tags, called 'UTag', operate at long range (up to 20 meters) in harsh, cluttered environments. Because they are battery-less (that is, passive), they have practically infinite lifetimes without human intervention, and they are lower in cost to manufacture and maintain than active RFID tags. These robust, energy-efficient passive tags are remotely powered by UWB radio signals, which are much more difficult to detect, intercept, and jam than conventional narrowband frequencies. The features of long range, battery-less, and low cost give UTag significant advantage over other existing RFID tags.

  17. Leg stiffness adjustment for a range of hopping frequencies in humans.

    PubMed

    Hobara, Hiroaki; Inoue, Koh; Muraoka, Tetsuro; Omuro, Kohei; Sakamoto, Masanori; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2010-02-10

    The purpose of the present study was to determine how humans adjust leg stiffness over a range of hopping frequencies. Ten male subjects performed in place hopping on two legs, at three frequencies (1.5, 2.2, and 3.0Hz). Leg stiffness, joint stiffness and touchdown joint angles were calculated from kinetic and/or kinematics data. Electromyographic activity (EMG) was recorded from six leg muscles. Leg stiffness increased with an increase in hopping frequency. Hip and knee stiffnesses were significantly greater at 3.0Hz than at 1.5Hz. There was no significant difference in ankle stiffness among the three hopping frequencies. Although there were significant differences in EMG activity among the three hopping frequencies, the largest was the 1.5Hz, followed by the 2.2Hz and then 3.0Hz. The subjects landed with a straighter leg (both hip and knee were extended more) with increased hopping frequency. These results suggest that over the range of hopping frequencies we evaluated, humans adjust leg stiffness by altering hip and knee stiffness. This is accomplished by extending the touchdown joint angles rather than by altering neural activity.

  18. Absolute frequency measurement for the emission transitions of molecular iodine in the 982 - 985 nm range

    SciTech Connect

    Matyugin, Yu A; Ignatovich, S M; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Nesterenko, M I; Okhapkin, M V; Pivtsov, V S; Skvortsov, Mikhail N; Bagaev, Sergei N

    2012-03-31

    We report high-precision frequency measurements of the separate hyperfine structure (HFS) components of the emission B - X system transitions of {sup 127}I{sub 2} molecules in the 982 - 985 nm range. To resolve the HFS of the emission lines, advantage was taken of the method of three-level laser spectroscopy. The function of exciting radiation was fulfilled by the second harmonic of a cw Nd : YAG laser, and the probe radiation in the 968 - 998 nm range was generated by an external-cavity diode laser. The output Nd : YAG laser frequency was locked to an HFS component of the absorption transition and the probing laser radiation to the emission transition component. When both frequencies were locked to HFS components with a common upper level, the output diode laser frequency was precisely equal to the emission transition frequency. The output frequency of the thus stabilised diode laser was measured with the help of a femtosecond optical frequency synthesiser based on a Ti : sapphire laser. We present the results of the absolute frequency measurements of 20 HFS components belonging to six vibrational - rotational transitions of the B - X system of iodine [R56(32 - 48)a1, P58(32 - 48)a1, P85(33 - 48)a1, R87(33 - 48a1, R88(33 - 48)a10] and all 15 components of the R86(33 - 48) line. The relative measurement uncertainty is equal to 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} and is determined by the frequency instability of the diode laser radiation.

  19. On radio frequency current drive in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in DEMO and large ignited plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, Marco; Bilato, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    To explore the possibility of efficient fast wave current drive in an ignited plasma in the ion cyclotron (IC) range of frequency in spite of competition from absorption by ions, we have added to the full-wave toroidal code TORIC a set of subroutines which evaluate absorption by these particles at IC harmonic resonances, using a realistic ‘slowing-down’ distribution function, and taking into account that their Larmor radius is comparable or even larger than the fast wave wavelength. The thermalized population of α-particles is not a serious competitor for power absorption as long as their number density is compatible with maintenance of ignition. By contrast, the energetic slowing down fraction, in spite of its even greater dilution, can absorb from the waves a substantial amount of power at the cyclotron resonance and its harmonics. An extensive exploration both in frequency and in toroidal wavenumbers using the parameters of one of the European versions of DEMO shows that three frequency windows exist in which damping is nevertheless predominantly on the electrons. Designing an antenna capable of shaping the launched spectrum to optimize current drive, however, will not be straightforward. Only in a narrow range when the first IC harmonic of tritium is deep inside the plasma on the high-field side of the magnetic axis, and that of deuterium and helium is still outside on the low-field side, it appears possible to achieve a satisfactory current drive efficiency with a conventional multi-strap antenna, preferentially located in the upper part of the vessel. Exploiting the other two windows at quite low and quite high frequencies is either impossible on first principles, or will demand novel ideas in antenna design.

  20. A wide-range programmable frequency synthesizer based on a finite state machine filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alser, Mohammed H.; Assaad, Maher M.; Hussin, Fawnizu A.

    2013-11-01

    In this article, an FPGA-based design and implementation of a fully digital wide-range programmable frequency synthesizer based on a finite state machine filter is presented. The advantages of the proposed architecture are that, it simultaneously generates a high frequency signal from a low frequency reference signal (i.e. synthesising), and synchronising the two signals (signals have the same phase, or a constant difference) without jitter accumulation issue. The architecture is portable and can be easily implemented for various platforms, such as FPGAs and integrated circuits. The frequency synthesizer circuit can be used as a part of SERDES devices in intra/inter chip communication in system-on-chip (SoC). The proposed circuit is designed using Verilog language and synthesized for the Altera DE2-70 development board, with the Cyclone II (EP2C35F672C6) device on board. Simulation and experimental results are included; they prove the synthesizing and tracking features of the proposed architecture. The generated clock signal frequency of a range from 19.8 MHz to 440 MHz is synchronized to the input reference clock with a frequency step of 0.12 MHz.

  1. Rolling estimations of long range dependence volatility for high frequency S&P500 index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Chin Wen; Pei, Tan Pei

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluates the time-varying long range dependence behaviors of the S&P500 volatility index using the modified rescaled adjusted range (R/S) statistic. For better computational result, a high frequency rolling bipower variation realized volatility estimates are used to avoid possible abrupt jump. The empirical analysis findings allow us to understand better the informationally market efficiency before and after the subprime mortgage crisis.

  2. Long-range vibration sensor based on correlation analysis of optical frequency-domain reflectometry signals.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhenyang; Yao, X Steve; Liu, Tiegen; Du, Yang; Liu, Kun; Han, Qun; Meng, Zhuo; Chen, Hongxin

    2012-12-17

    We present a novel method to achieve a space-resolved long- range vibration detection system based on the correlation analysis of the optical frequency-domain reflectometry (OFDR) signals. By performing two separate measurements of the vibrated and non-vibrated states on a test fiber, the vibration frequency and position of a vibration event can be obtained by analyzing the cross-correlation between beat signals of the vibrated and non-vibrated states in a spatial domain, where the beat signals are generated from interferences between local Rayleigh backscattering signals of the test fiber and local light oscillator. Using the proposed technique, we constructed a standard single-mode fiber based vibration sensor that can have a dynamic range of 12 km and a measurable vibration frequency up to 2 kHz with a spatial resolution of 5 m. Moreover, preliminarily investigation results of two vibration events located at different positions along the test fiber are also reported.

  3. Computerized J-H loop tracer for soft magnetic thick films in the audio frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loizos, G.; Niarchos, D.

    2014-07-01

    A computerized J-H loop tracer for soft magnetic thick films in the audio frequency range is described. It is a system built on a PXI platform combining PXI modules for control signal generation and data acquisition. The physiscal signals are digitized and the respective data strems are processed, presented and recorded in LabVIEW 7.0.

  4. Obtaining eigensolutions for multiple frequency ranges in a single NASTRAN execution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamidi, P. R.; Brown, W. K.

    1990-01-01

    A novel and general procedure for obtaining eigenvalues and eigenvectors for multiple frequency ranges in a single NASTRAN execution is presented. The scheme is applicable to normal modes analyzes employing the FEER and Inverse Power methods of eigenvalue extraction. The procedure is illustrated by examples.

  5. Semiannual Status Report. [excitation of electromagnetic waves in the whistler frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    During the last six months, we have continued our study of the excitation of electromagnetic waves in the whistler frequency range and the role that these waves will play in the acceleration of electrons and ions in the auroral region. A paper entitled 'Electron Beam Excitation of Upstream Waves in the Whistler Mode Frequency Range' was listed in the Journal of Geophysical Research. In this paper, we have shown that an anisotropic electron beam (or gyrating electron beam) is capable of generating both left-hand and right-hand polarized electromagnetic waves in the whistler frequency range. Since right-hand polarized electromagnetic waves can interact with background electrons and left-hand polarized waves can interact with background ions through cyclotron resonance, it is possible that these beam generated left-hand and right-hand polarized electromagnetic waves can accelerate either ions or electrons (or both), depending on the physical parameters under consideration. We are currently carrying out a comprehensive study of the electromagnetic whistler and lower hybrid like waves observed in the auroral zone using both wave and particle data. Our first task is to identify these wave modes and compare it with particle observations. Using both the DE-1 particle and wave measurements, we can positively identify those electromagnetics lower hybrid like waves as fast magnetosonic waves and the upper cutoff of these waves is the local lower hybrid frequency. From the upper cutoff of the frequency spectrum, one can infer the particle density and the result is in very good agreement with the particle data. Since these electromagnetic lower hybrid like waves can have frequencies extended down to the local ion cyclotron frequency, it practically confirms that they are not whistler waves.

  6. Sub-THz photonic frequency conversion using optoelectronic transistors for future fully coherent access network systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuji, Taiichi; Sugawara, Kenta; Tamamushi, Gen; Dobroiu, Adrian; Suemitsu, Tetsuya; Ryzhii, Victor; Iwatsuki, Katsumi; Kuwano, Shigeru; Kani, Jun-ichi; Terada, Jun

    2016-02-01

    This paper reviews advances in sub-THz photonic frequency conversion using optoelectronic transistors for future fully coherent access network systems. Graphene-channel field effect transistors (G-FETs) and InP-based high electron mobility transistors (inP-HEMT) are experimentally examined as photonic frequency converters. Optoelectronic properties and three-terminal functionalities of the G-FETs and InP-HEMTs are exploited to perform single-chip photonic double-mixing operation over the 120 GHz wireless communication band. A single transistor can photomix the optical subcarriers to generate LO and mix down the RF data on the sub-THz carrier to the IF band.

  7. AC electric field induced dielectrophoretic assembly behavior of gold nanoparticles in a wide frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weiyu; Wang, Chunhui; Ding, Haitao; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we focus on frequency-dependence of pearl chain formations (PCF) of gold nanoparticles driven by AC dielectrophoresis (DEP), especially in a low field-frequency range, where induced double-layer charging effect at ideally polarizable surfaces on particle DEP behavior and surrounding liquid motion need not be negligible. As field frequency varies, grown features of DEP assembly structures ranging from low-frequency non-bridged gap to high-frequency single gold nanoparticle-made nanowires bridging the electrodes are demonstrated experimentally. Specifically, at 10 kHz, a kind of novel channel-like structure with parallel opposing banks is formed at the center of interelectrode gap. In stark contrast, at 1 MHz, thin PCF with diameter of 100 nm is created along the shortest distance of the isolation spacing. Moreover, a particular conductive path of nanoparticle chains is produced at 1 MHz in a DEP device embedded with multiple floating electrodes. A theoretical framework taking into account field-induced double-layer polarization at both the particle/electrolyte and electrode/electrolyte interface is developed to correlate these experimental observations with induced-charge electrokinetic (ICEK) phenomenon. And a RC circuit model is helpful in accounting for the formation of this particular non-bridged channel-like structure induced by a low-frequency AC voltage. As compared to thin PCF formed at high field frequency that effectively short circuits the electrode pair, though it is difficult for complete PCF bridging to occur at low frequency, the non-bridged conducting microstructure has potential to further miniaturize the size of electrode gap fabricated by standard micromachining process and may find useful application in biochemical sensing.

  8. The influence of flight speed on the ranging performance of bats using frequency modulated echolocation pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonman, Arjan M.; Parsons, Stuart; Jones, Gareth

    2003-01-01

    Many species of bat use ultrasonic frequency modulated (FM) pulses to measure the distance to objects by timing the emission and reception of each pulse. Echolocation is mainly used in flight. Since the flight speed of bats often exceeds 1% of the speed of sound, Doppler effects will lead to compression of the time between emission and reception as well as an elevation of the echo frequencies, resulting in a distortion of the perceived range. This paper describes the consequences of these Doppler effects on the ranging performance of bats using different pulse designs. The consequences of Doppler effects on ranging performance described in this paper assume bats to have a very accurate ranging resolution, which is feasible with a filterbank receiver. By modeling two receiver types, it was first established that the effects of Doppler compression are virtually independent of the receiver type. Then, used a cross-correlation model was used to investigate the effect of flight speed on Doppler tolerance and range-Doppler coupling separately. This paper further shows how pulse duration, bandwidth, function type, and harmonics influence Doppler tolerance and range-Doppler coupling. The influence of each signal parameter is illustrated using calls of several bat species. It is argued that range-Doppler coupling is a significant source of error in bat echolocation, and various strategies bats could employ to deal with this problem, including the use of range rate information are discussed.

  9. Natural variation in the temperature range permissive for vernalization in accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg, Amanda C; Amasino, Richard M

    2012-12-01

    Vernalization is an acceleration of flowering in response to chilling, and is normally studied in the laboratory at near-freezing (2-4 °C) temperatures. Many vernalization-requiring species, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, are found in a range of habitats with varying winter temperatures. Natural variation in the temperature range that elicits a vernalization response in Arabidopsis has not been fully explored. We characterized the effect of intermediate temperatures (7-19 °C) on 15 accessions and the well-studied reference line Col-FRI. Although progressively warmer temperatures are gradually less effective at activating expression of the vernalization-specific gene VERNALIZATION-INSENSITIVE 3 (VIN3) and in accelerating flowering, there is substantial natural variation in the upper threshold (T(max) ) of the flowering-time response. VIN3 is required for the T(max) (13 °C) response of Col-FRI. Surprisingly, even 16 °C treatment caused induction of VIN3 in six tested lines, despite the ineffectiveness of this temperature in accelerating flowering for two of them. Finally, we present evidence that mild acceleration of flowering by 19 °C exposure may counterbalance the flowering time delay caused by non-inductive photoperiods in at least one accession, creating an appearance of photoperiod insensitivity.

  10. UWB micro-doppler radar for human gait analysis using joint range-time-frequency representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yazhou; Fathy, Aly E.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel, standalone ultra wideband (UWB) micro-Doppler radar sensor that goes beyond simple range or micro-Doppler detection to combined range-time-Doppler frequency analysis. Moreover, it can monitor more than one human object in both line-of-sight (LOS) and through wall scenarios, thus have full human objects tracking capabilities. The unique radar design is based on narrow pulse transceiver, high speed data acquisition module, and wideband antenna array. For advanced radar post-data processing, joint range-time-frequency representation has been performed. Characteristics of human walking activity have been analyzed using the radar sensor by precisely tracking the radar object and acquiring range-time-Doppler information simultaneously. The UWB micro-Doppler radar prototype is capable of detecting Doppler frequency range from -180 Hz to +180 Hz, which allows a maximum target velocity of 9 m/s. The developed radar sensor can also be extended for many other applications, such as respiration and heartbeat detection of trapped survivors under building debris.

  11. [Study of the dielectric permeability in the superhigh frequency range of a degraded polyoxybutyrate biopolymer].

    PubMed

    Beliaev, G A; Volova, T G; Drokin, N A; Shepov, V N

    2000-01-01

    The dielectric permeability of the degradable biopolymer polyhydroxybutyrate synthesized by hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria Alcaligenes eutrophus was investigated by the resonance method using original highly sensitive microstrip sensors. For the first time, a linear growth of dielectric permeability (delta epsilon/delta T = 7 x 10(-4) degree-1) due to the flexibility of the polymer chain in the temperature range from 10 to 70 degrees C was revealed. The energy of a bend of the nearest fragments was evaluated (E = 392 K), and its correspondence to the energies of bends of the alcyl groups of low-molecular substances like liquid crystals was established. It was shown that at low values of dielectric permeability in the high-frequency range (epsilon' = 2.25 +/- 0.02), which are stable, in a wide range of frequencies of the electromagnetic field (1 MHz - 1 Hz), polyoxybutyrate can be used in the microwave equipment.

  12. Development of gyrotrons for fusion with power exceeding 1 MW over a wide frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariya, T.; Imai, T.; Minami, R.; Numakura, T.; Eguchi, T.; Kato, T.; Endo, Y.; Ichimura, M.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Takahashi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Mutoh, T.; Sakamoto, K.; Idei, H.; Zushi, H.; Nagasaki, K.; Sano, F.; Ono, M.; Mitsunaka, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Megawatt-class gyrotrons covering a wide frequency range (14 GHz-300 GHz) are in increasing demand for nuclear fusion. Recent electron cyclotron heating and electron cyclotron current drive experiments highlight a requirement of megawatt-scale gyrotrons at a relatively lower frequency (14-35 GHz) range of some plasma devices, like GAMMA 10/PDX of the University of Tsukuba, QUEST of Kyushu University, NSTX-U of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and Heliotron J of Kyoto University. Collaborative studies for designing a new 28 GHz/35 GHz dual-frequency gyrotron and a 14 GHz gyrotron have commenced. Operation above 1 MW of 28 GHz/35 GHz dual oscillation was demonstrated experimentally. Further in the design of dual-frequency gyrotron, operations with 2 MW 3 s and 0.4 MW CW (continuous wave) at 28 GHz, and power exceeding 1 MW for 3 s at 34.8 GHz have been shown to be feasible. The 14 GHz gyrotron is expected to operate above 1 MW. We are also developing higher frequency gyrotrons (77-300 GHz). The joint program of National Institute for Fusion Science and the University of Tsukuba developed two new 154 GHz gyrotrons for the large helical device after the demonstration of three 77 GHz gyrotrons. The 154 GHz gyrotrons achieved a maximum output power of 1.25 MW and quasi-CW operation of 0.35 MW for 30 min.

  13. Observation of harmonically related solar radio zebra patterns in the 1-4 GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, H. S.; Karlický, M.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Cecatto, J. R.

    2002-12-01

    A unique case of two zebra patterns related harmonically with ratio of ~ 1:2 was observed by distant radio telescopes at São José dos Campos and Ondřejov Observatories. Accompanied zebras show that the ratio of frequencies of the neighboring zebra lines is in the range of 1.009-1.037. There is a tendency of a decrease of this ratio with decreasing frequency within the specific zebra pattern. Both facts speak in favour of plasma emission models for the zebra pattern fine structure in radio burst continua.

  14. Excitation of azimuthal surface modes by relativistic flows of electrons in the high-frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Girka, V. O.; Girka, I. O.; Pavlenko, I. V.

    2011-05-15

    Excitation of extraordinarily polarized azimuthal surface eigenwaves is shown to be possible in the frequency range above the upper hybrid resonance in waveguides with metal walls which are partially filled by cold magnetoactive plasma. Interaction of these waves with flows of electrons which rotate around the plasma column in the narrow gap separating the plasma from the wall of the waveguide is studied. Conditions of resonant interaction of the beam with the mentioned high-frequency azimuthal surface waves are shown by numerical methods to be reachable ones in the case of enough strong external magnetic fields without passing to the field of ultra-relativistic velocities of the beam.

  15. Theoretical analysis of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna with variational theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia-Hui; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Zhao, Yan-Ping; Qin, Cheng-Ming; Chen, Zhao; Yang, Lei; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-08-01

    A variational principle code which can calculate self-consistently currents on the conductors is used to assess the coupling characteristic of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna. Taking into account two layers of antenna conductors without lateral frame but with slab geometry, the antenna impedances as a function of frequency and the structure of RF field excited inside the plasma in various phasing cases are discussed in this paper. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program, China (Grant No. 2015GB101001) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375236 and 11375235).

  16. Theoretical analysis of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna with variational theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia-Hui; Zhang, Xin-Jun; Zhao, Yan-Ping; Qin, Cheng-Ming; Chen, Zhao; Yang, Lei; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-08-01

    A variational principle code which can calculate self-consistently currents on the conductors is used to assess the coupling characteristic of the EAST 4-strap ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna. Taking into account two layers of antenna conductors without lateral frame but with slab geometry, the antenna impedances as a function of frequency and the structure of RF field excited inside the plasma in various phasing cases are discussed in this paper. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program, China (Grant No. 2015GB101001) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375236 and 11375235).

  17. Evaluation of frequency dependent non-linear optical property using long-range correction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Yukina; Ishimaru, Hiroki; Kamiya, Muneaki; Sekino, Hideo

    2015-02-01

    We for the first time performed a systematic evaluation of dynamic second hyperpolarizabilities corresponding to all the third-order Nonlinear Optical (NLO) processes using Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) with exchange functional corrected for long-range interaction. We develop a program system which quantitatively evaluate the frequency dependent non-linear optical property of molecules, and apply to the polyene molecules of different lengths. The dispersion curves obtained for each NLO processes have divergence at the frequency corresponding to the one predicted by Sum Over State (SOS) interpretation of the property.

  18. Fundamental Frequency Range in Japanese and English: The Case of Simultaneous Bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Graham, Calbert

    2014-01-01

    This article reports an experiment to test whether Japanese and English speakers vary their fundamental frequency (f0) range as a function of the language spoken. Speech samples of Japanese-(American) English simultaneous bilinguals (5 males, 5 females; all undergraduates at UC Berkeley) performing comparable reading tasks in their two native languages were analysed. The study builds on a relatively new approach to measuring f0 range that computes its high and low points from tonal targets in the intonational phonology. Unlike in most previous studies where f0 range is traditionally treated as a one-dimensional measure, f0 range in this study is measured along two quasi-independent dimensions: level and span. Findings revealed statistically significant crosslanguage differences between Japanese and English in both dimensions. This provides new insights into the relation between prosodic structure and f0 range in these two typologically different prosodic systems. PMID:25997935

  19. Fundamental Frequency Range in Japanese and English: The Case of Simultaneous Bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Graham, Calbert

    2014-01-01

    This article reports an experiment to test whether Japanese and English speakers vary their fundamental frequency (f0) range as a function of the language spoken. Speech samples of Japanese-(American) English simultaneous bilinguals (5 males, 5 females; all undergraduates at UC Berkeley) performing comparable reading tasks in their two native languages were analysed. The study builds on a relatively new approach to measuring f0 range that computes its high and low points from tonal targets in the intonational phonology. Unlike in most previous studies where f0 range is traditionally treated as a one-dimensional measure, f0 range in this study is measured along two quasi-independent dimensions: level and span. Findings revealed statistically significant crosslanguage differences between Japanese and English in both dimensions. This provides new insights into the relation between prosodic structure and f0 range in these two typologically different prosodic systems.

  20. Clock signal requirement for high-frequency, high dynamic range acquisition systems

    SciTech Connect

    Viscor, Ivo; Halamek, Josef; Villa, Marco

    2005-11-15

    Analog-to-digital converters (ADC's) are increasingly replacing mixers in frequency conversion schemes. To achieve superior performances, in terms of bandwidth and dynamic range, a nearly ideal ADC clock is needed, with a spectral purity higher than the reference signal of the classical mixing scheme. These requirements of spectral purity for the ADC clock are discussed by analyzing in detail the nonuniform sampling process and by characterizing an actual acquisition system. The effect of clock phase imperfections on the output is proportional to the input frequency over sampling frequency ratio. Moreover, at the output we may have a multiple folding of the phase jitter spectrum. These effects are illustrated by three sets of measurements performed using our system: transfer of spurious clock components, aliasing of these components, and transfer of clock phase noise.

  1. Propagation in a shearing plasma. II - Turbulence and the frequency range of pulsar microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.; Tademaru, E.

    1980-01-01

    Numerical calculations are presented which explore the propagation of radio waves and pulses through a turbulent shearing plasma. A stochastic model is used to describe the turbulent velocity field, in which random fluctuations are superposed on a mean profile. Both Gaussian wave packets and shot-noise pulses polarized in the plane of shearing acquire quasi-periodic intensity modulations above the rest-frame plasma frequency. The frequency range over which these modulations appear is shown to depend on the spatial correlation length of the turbulent fluctuations and on their standard deviation from the mean velocity. The period of the modulations is variable from one realization of the random process to the next, and the average period is frequency dependent. The results of these calculations lend further support to a model for pulsar microstructure in which periodic micropulses are pure temporal modulations of the emitted radiation due to propagation effects in magnetospheric shearing regions. It is shown that turbulence on a scale of approximately 10 cm can produce these quasi-periodic modulations over a frequency range comparable to that of observed microstructure.

  2. Design and optimization of an ultra-wide frequency range CMOS divide-by-two circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Lu; Niansong, Mei; Hu, Chen; Zhiliang, Hong

    2010-11-01

    A novel toggled flip-flop (TFF) divide-by-two circuit (DTC) and its optimization method based on a large-signal analysis approach are proposed. By reducing the output RC constant in tracking mode and making it large in latching mode, compressing the internal signal swing as well as compensating the current leaked in the latching mode, the operating frequency range is greatly expanded. Implemented in a SMIC 0.13 μm RF CMOS process with a 1.2 V power supply, it can work under an ultra-wide frequency band ranging from 320 MHz to 29.6 GHz. Experimental results show that two phase-locked loops (PLLs) with the proposed DTC can achieve in-band phase noise of -94 dBc/Hz @ 10 kHz under 4224 MHz operating frequency and -84 dBc/Hz @ 10 kHz under 10 GHz operating frequency, respectively. The power consumption of the proposed DTC is reduced by almost 50% compared with the conventional counterparts.

  3. Double Brillouin frequency spaced multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser with 50 nm tuning range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. F.; Liao, T. Q.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, R. X.; Miao, C. Y.; Tong, Z. R.

    2012-09-01

    A 50 nm tuning range multiwavelength Brillouin-erbium fiber laser (MWBEFL) with double Brillouin frequency spacing is presented. Two separated gain blocks with symmetrical architecture, consisted by erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) and Brillouin gain media, are used to generate double Brillouin frequency spacing. The wider tuning range is realized by eliminating the self-lasing cavity modes existing in conventional MWBEFLs because of the absence of the physical mirrors at the ends of the linear cavity. The Brillouin pump (BP) is preamplified by the EDFA before entering the single-mode fiber (SMF), which leads to the reduction of threshold power and the generation enhancement of Brillouin Stokes (BS) signals. Four channels with 0.176 nm spacing are achieved at 2 mW BP power and 280 mW 980 nm pump power which can be tuned from 1525 to 1575 nm.

  4. A reduced order model for dielectric elastomer actuators over a range of frequencies and prestrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, Jillian; Manning, Michael; Adler, David; Breuer, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    The actuation strain of an equibiaxially prestrained dielectric elastomer membrane is studied as a function of driving frequency and prestrain. Experimental data are gathered on the membrane's creep and recovery following DC actuation, as well as the steady state amplitude and phase for AC driving voltages ranging from 2 to 40 Hz. The effect of prestretch on steady state actuation was also investigated, using membranes of both 250% and 300% prestretch. A three-element generalized Kelvin-Voigt model is developed to capture the transient and steady-state actuation responses as a function of frequency and prestrain. We show that, despite its relative simplicity, this model captures the relevant timescales for the membrane behavior with good fidelity and can be used to accurately predict the actuation magnitude and phase as a function of time over a range of actuation configurations and driving conditions.

  5. [Immunotropic effects of electromagnetic fields in the range of radio- and microwave frequencies].

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, M P; Stankiewicz, W; Sobiczewska, E; Szmigielski, S

    2001-11-01

    On the grounds of reviewed literature and the results of own experiments, the authors present current views on the possible immunotropic influence of low energy electromagnetic fields, in the range of radio- and microwave frequencies. They conclude, that a more systematic and multidisciplinary investigations should be undertaken, comprising the wide spectrum of immune homeostatic tasks, including defensive, immunoregulatory and pro-regenerative capabilities of immune system exposed to rapid environmental spread of different electromagnetic emitters.

  6. Moment method analysis of microstrip antennas over a wide frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwan, B. W.; Newman, E. H.

    1985-01-01

    Expressions for the self and mutual impedance between microstrip antenna modes on a grounded dielectric slab are presented. The mutual impedance between the microstrip modes and a vertical current filament in the dielectric is also presented. These are the quantities required in a method of moments analysis of the microstrip antenna. Entire domain expansion modes, suitable for representing the microstrip current over a broad frequency range, are used. Efficient methods for the evaluation of the mutual impedance elements are described.

  7. High-Resolution Group Quantization Phase Processing Method in Radio Frequency Measurement Range.

    PubMed

    Du, Baoqing; Feng, Dazheng; Tang, Yaohua; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Duo; Cai, Chaofeng; Wan, Maoquan; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at the more complex frequency translation, the longer response time and the limited measurement precision in the traditional phase processing, a high-resolution phase processing method by group quantization higher than 100 fs level is proposed in radio frequency measurement range. First, the phase quantization is used as a step value to quantize every phase difference in a group by using the fixed phase relationships between different frequencies signals. The group quantization is formed by the results of the quantized phase difference. In the light of frequency drift mainly caused by phase noise of measurement device, a regular phase shift of the group quantization is produced, which results in the phase coincidence of two comparing signals which obtain high-resolution measurement. Second, in order to achieve the best coincidences pulse, a subtle delay is initiatively used to reduce the width of the coincidences fuzzy area according to the transmission characteristics of the coincidences in the specific medium. Third, a series of feature coincidences pulses of fuzzy area can be captured by logic gate to achieve the best phase coincidences information for the improvement of the measurement precision. The method provides a novel way to precise time and frequency measurement. PMID:27388587

  8. High-Resolution Group Quantization Phase Processing Method in Radio Frequency Measurement Range

    PubMed Central

    Du, Baoqing; Feng, Dazheng; Tang, Yaohua; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Duo; Cai, Chaofeng; Wan, Maoquan; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at the more complex frequency translation, the longer response time and the limited measurement precision in the traditional phase processing, a high-resolution phase processing method by group quantization higher than 100 fs level is proposed in radio frequency measurement range. First, the phase quantization is used as a step value to quantize every phase difference in a group by using the fixed phase relationships between different frequencies signals. The group quantization is formed by the results of the quantized phase difference. In the light of frequency drift mainly caused by phase noise of measurement device, a regular phase shift of the group quantization is produced, which results in the phase coincidence of two comparing signals which obtain high-resolution measurement. Second, in order to achieve the best coincidences pulse, a subtle delay is initiatively used to reduce the width of the coincidences fuzzy area according to the transmission characteristics of the coincidences in the specific medium. Third, a series of feature coincidences pulses of fuzzy area can be captured by logic gate to achieve the best phase coincidences information for the improvement of the measurement precision. The method provides a novel way to precise time and frequency measurement. PMID:27388587

  9. High-Resolution Group Quantization Phase Processing Method in Radio Frequency Measurement Range.

    PubMed

    Du, Baoqing; Feng, Dazheng; Tang, Yaohua; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Duo; Cai, Chaofeng; Wan, Maoquan; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-07-08

    Aiming at the more complex frequency translation, the longer response time and the limited measurement precision in the traditional phase processing, a high-resolution phase processing method by group quantization higher than 100 fs level is proposed in radio frequency measurement range. First, the phase quantization is used as a step value to quantize every phase difference in a group by using the fixed phase relationships between different frequencies signals. The group quantization is formed by the results of the quantized phase difference. In the light of frequency drift mainly caused by phase noise of measurement device, a regular phase shift of the group quantization is produced, which results in the phase coincidence of two comparing signals which obtain high-resolution measurement. Second, in order to achieve the best coincidences pulse, a subtle delay is initiatively used to reduce the width of the coincidences fuzzy area according to the transmission characteristics of the coincidences in the specific medium. Third, a series of feature coincidences pulses of fuzzy area can be captured by logic gate to achieve the best phase coincidences information for the improvement of the measurement precision. The method provides a novel way to precise time and frequency measurement.

  10. High-Resolution Group Quantization Phase Processing Method in Radio Frequency Measurement Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Baoqing; Feng, Dazheng; Tang, Yaohua; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Duo; Cai, Chaofeng; Wan, Maoquan; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-07-01

    Aiming at the more complex frequency translation, the longer response time and the limited measurement precision in the traditional phase processing, a high-resolution phase processing method by group quantization higher than 100 fs level is proposed in radio frequency measurement range. First, the phase quantization is used as a step value to quantize every phase difference in a group by using the fixed phase relationships between different frequencies signals. The group quantization is formed by the results of the quantized phase difference. In the light of frequency drift mainly caused by phase noise of measurement device, a regular phase shift of the group quantization is produced, which results in the phase coincidence of two comparing signals which obtain high-resolution measurement. Second, in order to achieve the best coincidences pulse, a subtle delay is initiatively used to reduce the width of the coincidences fuzzy area according to the transmission characteristics of the coincidences in the specific medium. Third, a series of feature coincidences pulses of fuzzy area can be captured by logic gate to achieve the best phase coincidences information for the improvement of the measurement precision. The method provides a novel way to precise time and frequency measurement.

  11. Serially homologous ears perform frequency range fractionation in the praying mantis, Creobroter (Mantodea, Hymenopodidae).

    PubMed

    Yager, D D

    1996-04-01

    Unlike most praying mantises that have a single region of auditory sensitivity, species in the genus Creobroter have equally sensitive hearing at 2-4 and at 25-50 kHz and and are relatively insensitivity at 10-15 kHz- they have a W-shaped audiogram. Ultrasonic sensitivity originates from an auditory organ in the ventral midline of the metathorax that closely resembles the ear of other mantises. Ablation experiments demonstrate that low frequency sensitivity derives from a serially homologous mesothoracic auditory organ. Extracellular recordings suggest that these two ears operate largely, if not entirely, independently of one another in the thorax. The low frequency response has a longer latency, more action potentials per stimulus, and different patterns of change with increasing SPL than the high frequency response. Separate interneurons mediate responses in the two frequency ranges, but our evidence suggests that they are two serially homologous sets of cells. Neither auditory organ shows any physiological evidence of directional sensitivity. Ultrasound triggers a set of behaviors in flying hymenopodid mantises much like those in other mantises, but the behavioral significance of low frequency hearing in these animals is still unknown. PMID:8847662

  12. Compensation of laser frequency tuning nonlinearity of a long range OFDR using deskew filter.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhenyang; Yao, X Steve; Liu, Tiegen; Du, Yang; Liu, Kun; Jiang, Junfeng; Meng, Zhuo; Chen, Hongxin

    2013-02-11

    We present a simple and effective method to compensate the optical frequency tuning nonlinearity of a tunable laser source (TLS) in a long range optical frequency-domain reflectometry (OFDR) by using the deskew filter, where a frequency tuning nonlinear phase obtained from an auxiliary interferometer is used to compensate the nonlinearity effect on the beating signals generated from a main OFDR interferometer. The method can be applied to the entire spatial domain of the OFDR signals at once with a high computational efficiency. With our proposed method we experimentally demonstrated a factor of 93 times improvement in spatial resolution by comparing the results of an OFDR system with and without nonlinearity compensation. In particular we achieved a measurement range of 80 km and a spatial resolution of 20 cm and 1.6 m at distances of 10 km and 80 km, respectively with a short signal processing time of less than 1 s for 5 × 10(6) data points. The improved performance of the OFDR with a high spatial resolution, a long measurement range and a short process time will lead to practical applications in the real-time monitoring, test and measurement of fiber optical communication networks and sensing systems.

  13. Low-power wide-locking-range injection-locked frequency divider for OFDM UWB systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiangwei, Yin; Ning, Li; Renliang, Zheng; Wei, Li; Junyan, Ren

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes a divide-by-two injection-locked frequency divider (ILFD) for frequency synthesizers as used in multiband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) ultra-wideband (UWB) systems. By means of dual-injection technique and other conventional tuning techniques, such as DCCA and varactor tuning, the divider demonstrates a wide locking range while consuming much less power. The chip was fabricated in the Jazz 0.18 μm RF CMOS process. The measurement results show that the divider achieves a locking range of 4.85 GHz (6.23 to 11.08 GHz) at an input power of 8 dBm. The core circuit without the test buffer consumes only 3.7 mA from a 1.8 V power supply and has a die area of 0.38 × 0.28 mm2. The wide locking range combined with low power consumption makes the ILFD suitable for its application in UWB systems.

  14. Satellite range delay simulator for a matrix-switched time division multiple-access network simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Lawrence A.

    1990-01-01

    The Systems Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility at NASA Lewis Research Center is presently configured as a satellite-switched time division multiple access (SS-TDMA) network simulator. The purpose of SITE is to demonstrate and evaluate advanced communication satellite technologies, presently embodied by POC components developed under NASA contracts in addition to other hardware, such as ground terminals, designed and built in-house at NASA Lewis. Each ground terminal in a satellite communications system will experience a different aspect of the satellite's motion due mainly to daily tidal effects and station keeping, hence a different duration and rate of variation in the range delay. As a result of this and other effects such as local oscillator instability, each ground terminal must constantly adjust its transmit burst timing so that data bursts from separate ground terminals arrive at the satellite in their assigned time slots, preventing overlap and keeping the system in synchronism. On the receiving end, ground terminals must synchronize their local clocks using reference transmissions received through the satellite link. A feature of the SITE facility is its capability to simulate the varying propagation delays and associated Doppler frequency shifts that the ground terminals in the network have to cope with. Delay is ahcieved by means of two NASA Lewis designed and built range delay simulator (RDS) systems, each independently controlled locally with front panel switches or remotely by an experiment control and monitor (EC/M) computer.

  15. Equitable access to spectrum in further development of the Geneva 2006 frequency plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, J.

    2011-12-01

    Since the frequency plan of the Regional Radiocommunication Conference Geneva 2006 has come into force, many attempts have been made towards its enhancement. The preliminary results, however, seem not to be compliant with elementary principles of distribution justice. Therefore, the planning principles which lead to the observed imbalance will be scrutinized. Furthermore it will be shown that the utilization of spectrum can be advanced in a balanced way when the same (necessary) condition for "equitable access", which has been used by a group of middle European countries for the construction of the original frequency plan, is applied to plan refinements as well. The necessary condition mentioned consists simply in the parity of the number of coverages (constituted of disjoint allotments) configured in the plan for each country. In order to be able to plan enhancements, the concept of coverage number has to be generalized to the case of incomplete coverages of potentially overlapping allotments. The computation of coverage numbers is straightforward and renders the concept of coverage number parity a useful tool to be applied as a necessary condition in testing a frequency plan variant for equitable access.

  16. Frequency-Modulated, Continuous-Wave Laser Ranging Using Photon-Counting Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Barber, Zeb W.; Dahl, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Optical ranging is a problem of estimating the round-trip flight time of a phase- or amplitude-modulated optical beam that reflects off of a target. Frequency- modulated, continuous-wave (FMCW) ranging systems obtain this estimate by performing an interferometric measurement between a local frequency- modulated laser beam and a delayed copy returning from the target. The range estimate is formed by mixing the target-return field with the local reference field on a beamsplitter and detecting the resultant beat modulation. In conventional FMCW ranging, the source modulation is linear in instantaneous frequency, the reference-arm field has many more photons than the target-return field, and the time-of-flight estimate is generated by balanced difference- detection of the beamsplitter output, followed by a frequency-domain peak search. This work focused on determining the maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation algorithm when continuous-time photoncounting detectors are used. It is founded on a rigorous statistical characterization of the (random) photoelectron emission times as a function of the incident optical field, including the deleterious effects caused by dark current and dead time. These statistics enable derivation of the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRB) on the accuracy of FMCW ranging, and derivation of the ML estimator, whose performance approaches this bound at high photon flux. The estimation algorithm was developed, and its optimality properties were shown in simulation. Experimental data show that it performs better than the conventional estimation algorithms used. The demonstrated improvement is a factor of 1.414 over frequency-domainbased estimation. If the target interrogating photons and the local reference field photons are costed equally, the optimal allocation of photons between these two arms is to have them equally distributed. This is different than the state of the art, in which the local field is stronger than the target return. The optimal

  17. In vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access: towards image guided radio-frequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Kang, Wei; Carrigan, Thomas; Bishop, Austin; Rosenthal, Noah; Arruda, Mauricio; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Complete catheter-tissue contact and permanent tissue destruction are essential for efficient radio-frequency ablation (RFA) during cardiac arrhythmia treatment. Current methods of monitoring lesion formation are indirect and unreliable. We aim to develop optical coherence tomography (OCT) as an imaging guidance for RFA. OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using OCT catheter to image endocardia wall in active beating hearts through percutaneous access. This is a critical step toward image guided RFA in a clinic setting. METHODS A cone-scanning forward-viewing OCT catheter was advanced into active beating hearts through percutaneous access in four swine. The OCT catheter was steered by an introducer to touch the endocardia wall. The images were then acquired at 10 frames per second at an axial resolution and lateral resolution of 15 μm. RESULTS We report the first in vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access with a thin and flexible OCT catheter. We are able to acquire high quality OCT images in active beating hearts, observe the polarization-related artifacts induced by the birefringence of myocardium and readily evaluate catheter-tissue contact. CONCLUSIONS It is feasible to acquire OCT images in beating hearts through percutaneous access. The observations indicate that OCT could be a promising technique for in vivo guidance of RFA.

  18. Fundamental problems in modern astrophysics requiring access to the ultraviolet range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez de Castro, Ana I.; Lecavelier des Étangs, Alain; Reimers, Dieter

    2006-06-01

    Progress of modern astrophysics requires the access to the electromagnetic spectrum in the broadest energy range. The ultraviolet is a fundamental energy domain; warm plasmas at temperatures of 3,000-300,000 K radiate in this range, also the electronic transitions of the most abundant molecules in the Universe are in the UV. Moreover, the UV radiation field is a powerful astrochemical and photoionizing agent. Some of the most relevant problems in modern astrophysical research are related with the properties and abundance of this warm plasma in the Universe, e.g. the chemical enrichment of the Universe, the formation of the galaxies or the contribution of the InterGalactic Medium (IGM) to the total mass of the Universe. Also, this plasma is the primary tracer of some very important processes for the generation of life in our planet like the onset and stabilization of the Solar dynamo or the acceleration of organic chemistry processes in young planetary disks. This contribution represents a brief accounting of the BIG science to be carried out if new UV instrumentation becomes, eventually, available.

  19. Mechanical properties of bulk polydimethylsiloxane for microfluidics over a large range of frequencies and aging times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placet, V.; Delobelle, P.

    2015-03-01

    The dynamic mechanical characterization of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) over a large range of frequencies (10-2 < f < 105 Hz) and long aging times at room temperature (4 h < tv < ~60 000 h) has been presented. Three samples with different curing conditions have been studied and three different techniques, dynamic mechanical analysis at different temperatures, nano-indentation and scanning micro-deformation microscopy, have been used. Although the three techniques work at different scales and at different frequencies all the results match the same master curve. As expected, the storage and the loss moduli greatly increase with the frequency. Moreover, these moduli moderately increase with the aging time tv depending on the curing temperature. A simple model which takes the frequency and the aging time into account, and which is based on the Havriliak-Negami model, has been presented and identified. Hence, values of the relaxed and instantaneous moduli at tv = 0 and tv = ∞ are proposed. Only the relaxed moduli depend on the curing conditions and moreover it has been shown that the tangent of the phase lag is independent of the aging time and thus of the curing process.

  20. Boosting brain excitability by transcranial high frequency stimulation in the ripple range

    PubMed Central

    Moliadze, Vera; Antal, Andrea; Paulus, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Alleviating the symptoms of neurological diseases by increasing cortical excitability through transcranial stimulation is an ongoing scientific challenge. Here, we tackle this issue by interfering with high frequency oscillations (80–250 Hz) via external application of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) over the human motor cortex (M1). Twenty-one subjects participated in three different experimental studies and they received on separate days tACS at three frequencies (80 Hz, 140 Hz and 250 Hz) and sham stimulation in a randomized order. tACS with 140 Hz frequency increased M1 excitability as measured by transcranial magnetic stimulation-generated motor evoked potentials (MEPs) during and for up to 1 h after stimulation. Control experiments with sham and 80 Hz stimulation were without any effect, and 250 Hz stimulation was less efficient with a delayed excitability induction and reduced duration. After-effects elicited by 140 Hz stimulation were robust against inversion of test MEP amplitudes seen normally under activation. Stimulation at 140 Hz reduced short interval intracortical inhibition, but left intracortical facilitation, long interval cortical inhibition and cortical silent period unchanged. Implicit motor learning was not facilitated by 140 Hz stimulation. High frequency stimulation in the ripple range is a new promising non-invasive brain stimulation protocol to increase human cortical excitability during and after the end of stimulation. PMID:20962008

  1. Dielectric dispersion of water in the frequency range from 10 mHz to 30 MHz.

    PubMed

    Batalioto, F; Duarte, A R; Barbero, G; Neto, A M F

    2010-03-18

    We investigate the dielectric dispersion of water, specially in the low-frequency range, by using the impedance spectroscopy technique. The frequency dependencies of the real R and imaginary chi parts of the impedance could not be explained by means of the usual description of the dielectric properties of the water as an insulating liquid containing ions. This is due to the incomplete knowledge of the parameters entering in the fundamental equations describing the evolution of the system, and on the mechanisms regulating the exchange of charge of the cell with the external circuit. We propose a simple description of our experimental data based on the model of Debye, by invoking a dc conductivity of the cell, related to the nonblocking character of the electrodes. A discussion on the electric circuits able to simulate the cell under investigation, based on bulk and surface elements, is also reported. We find that the simple circuit formed by a series of two parallels of resistance and capacitance is able to reproduce the experimental data concerning the real and imaginary part of the electrical impedance of the cell for frequency larger than 1 Hz. According to this description, one of the parallels takes into account the electrical properties of interface between the electrode and water, and the other of the bulk. For frequency lower than 1 Hz, a good agreement with the experimental data is obtained by simulating the electrical properties of the interface by means of the constant phase element.

  2. Boosting brain excitability by transcranial high frequency stimulation in the ripple range.

    PubMed

    Moliadze, Vera; Antal, Andrea; Paulus, Walter

    2010-12-15

    Alleviating the symptoms of neurological diseases by increasing cortical excitability through transcranial stimulation is an ongoing scientific challenge. Here, we tackle this issue by interfering with high frequency oscillations (80–250 Hz) via external application of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) over the human motor cortex (M1). Twenty-one subjects participated in three different experimental studies and they received on separate days tACS at three frequencies (80 Hz, 140 Hz and 250 Hz) and sham stimulation in a randomized order. tACS with 140 Hz frequency increased M1 excitability as measured by transcranial magnetic stimulation-generated motor evoked potentials (MEPs) during and for up to 1 h after stimulation. Control experiments with sham and 80 Hz stimulation were without any effect, and 250 Hz stimulation was less efficient with a delayed excitability induction and reduced duration. After-effects elicited by 140 Hz stimulation were robust against inversion of test MEP amplitudes seen normally under activation. Stimulation at 140 Hz reduced short interval intracortical inhibition, but left intracortical facilitation, long interval cortical inhibition and cortical silent period unchanged. Implicit motor learning was not facilitated by 140 Hz stimulation. High frequency stimulation in the ripple range is a new promising non-invasive brain stimulation protocol to increase human cortical excitability during and after the end of stimulation.

  3. Dielectric dispersion of water in the frequency range from 10 mHz to 30 MHz.

    PubMed

    Batalioto, F; Duarte, A R; Barbero, G; Neto, A M F

    2010-03-18

    We investigate the dielectric dispersion of water, specially in the low-frequency range, by using the impedance spectroscopy technique. The frequency dependencies of the real R and imaginary chi parts of the impedance could not be explained by means of the usual description of the dielectric properties of the water as an insulating liquid containing ions. This is due to the incomplete knowledge of the parameters entering in the fundamental equations describing the evolution of the system, and on the mechanisms regulating the exchange of charge of the cell with the external circuit. We propose a simple description of our experimental data based on the model of Debye, by invoking a dc conductivity of the cell, related to the nonblocking character of the electrodes. A discussion on the electric circuits able to simulate the cell under investigation, based on bulk and surface elements, is also reported. We find that the simple circuit formed by a series of two parallels of resistance and capacitance is able to reproduce the experimental data concerning the real and imaginary part of the electrical impedance of the cell for frequency larger than 1 Hz. According to this description, one of the parallels takes into account the electrical properties of interface between the electrode and water, and the other of the bulk. For frequency lower than 1 Hz, a good agreement with the experimental data is obtained by simulating the electrical properties of the interface by means of the constant phase element. PMID:20178324

  4. High-resolution frequency measurement method with a wide-frequency range based on a quantized phase step law.

    PubMed

    Du, Baoqiang; Dong, Shaofeng; Wang, Yanfeng; Guo, Shuting; Cao, Lingzhi; Zhou, Wei; Zuo, Yandi; Liu, Dan

    2013-11-01

    A wide-frequency and high-resolution frequency measurement method based on the quantized phase step law is presented in this paper. Utilizing a variation law of the phase differences, the direct different frequency phase processing, and the phase group synchronization phenomenon, combining an A/D converter and the adaptive phase shifting principle, a counter gate is established in the phase coincidences at one-group intervals, which eliminates the ±1 counter error in the traditional frequency measurement method. More importantly, the direct phase comparison, the measurement, and the control between any periodic signals have been realized without frequency normalization in this method. Experimental results show that sub-picosecond resolution can be easily obtained in the frequency measurement, the frequency standard comparison, and the phase-locked control based on the phase quantization processing technique. The method may be widely used in navigation positioning, space techniques, communication, radar, astronomy, atomic frequency standards, and other high-tech fields.

  5. Three-dimensional ray tracing of the Jovian magnetosphere in the low-frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Green, J. L.; Gulkis, S.; Six, F.

    1984-01-01

    Three-dimensional ray tracing of the Jovian DAM emission has been performed utilizing the O-4 magnetic field model (Acuna and Ness, 1979) and a realistic plasma model. Minimal assumptions about the emission mechanism have been made that include radiation in the right-hand extraordinary mode, propagating nearly perpendicular to the field line at source points located just above the RX cutoff frequency along Io flux tubes. Ray tracing has been performed in the frequency range from 2-35 MHz from successive Io flux tubes separated by ten degrees of central meridian longitude for a full circumference of northern hemisphere sources. The results show unusual complexity in model arc spectra that is displayed in a constant Io phase format with many similarities to the Voyager PRA data. The results suggest much of the variation in observed DAM spectral features is a result of propagation effects rather than emission process differences.

  6. Parallel PWMs Based Fully Digital Transmitter with Wide Carrier Frequency Range

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bo; Zhang, Kun; Zhou, Wenbiao; Zhang, Yanjun; Liu, Dake

    2013-01-01

    The carrier-frequency (CF) and intermediate-frequency (IF) pulse-width modulators (PWMs) based on delay lines are proposed, where baseband signals are conveyed by both positions and pulse widths or densities of the carrier clock. By combining IF-PWM and precorrected CF-PWM, a fully digital transmitter with unit-delay autocalibration is implemented in 180 nm CMOS for high reconfiguration. The proposed architecture achieves wide CF range of 2 M–1 GHz, high power efficiency of 70%, and low error vector magnitude (EVM) of 3%, with spectrum purity of 20 dB optimized in comparison to the existing designs. PMID:24223503

  7. Morfology of SEE spectral features in a wide pump wave frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, E. N.; Frolov, V. L.; Grach, S. M.; Kotov, P. V.

    Systematic study of stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) stationary spectrum dependence on the pump wave (PW) frequency f_0 was continued. Investigations were performed at the SURA facility for the PW frequency range 4.3≤ f_0 ≤ 9.5 MHz with stepping of ≈ 5-50 kHz including the vicinities of the electron gyroharmonics nfce from n=4 to n=7 for most prominent SEE features like downshifted maximum (DM) and its satellites, narrow and broad continua (NC and BC), upshifted maximum (UM), broad upshifted maximum (BUM), and broad upshifted structure (BUS) (for references see, e.g., Leyser et al., J. Geophys. Res., 1993, v. 98, p. 17597, 1994, Frolov et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 2001, v. 28, p. 3103). Main attention was paid to maximal and integral intensities of the SEE features and their frequency shifts Δ f from f_0. The results can be summarized as follows. (i) While the SEE qualitative behaviour periodically repeats between successive gyroharmonics, maximal intensity for all of the SEE features is observed for 4fce5fce (except of narrow range below 6 and 7fce) the BC is replaced by a set of DM satellites in the SEE spectrum. (iii) DM intensity decreases with f_0 and DM peak frequency shift increases with f_0 as Δ fDM ˜ 2 f_0\\cdot10-3 across the whole f_0 frequency range, except of narrow ranges near f_0 ≃ nfce, where the DM intensity falls up to the noise level, and Δ fDM decreases up to ≈ 9 kHz. (iv) The UM behaviour is similar for the DM one, but for f_0≃ nfce the maximal UM and minimal DM intensities occur for the same f_0, while the minimal UM is observed for f_0 less by 10-20 kHz in comparison with f_0 for the minimal DM. (v) Maximal BUM intensity is observed for f_0 just above nfce where the frequency shift of BUM peak Δ fBUM ≃ 20 kHz; for f_0 ≳ nfce+30 kHz Δ f

  8. Spectral investigation of nematic liquid crystals with high optical anisotropy at THz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chodorow, U.; Parka, J.; Garbat, K.; Pałka, N.; Czupryński, K.

    2012-04-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) with high optical anisotropy are very desirable for different applications in devices, such as filters, phase shifters, or phase gratings [T. Göbel, P. Meissner, A. Gaebler, M. Koeberle, S. Mueller, and R. Jakoby, Dual-Frequency Switching Liquid Crystal Based Tunable THz Filter, CLEO, Baltimore, MD, 2009; C.-Y. Chen, T.-R. Tsai, C.-L. Pan, and R.-P. Pan, Room temperature terahertz phase shifter based on magnetically controlled birefringence in liquid crystals, Appl. Phys. Lett. 83 (2003), pp. 4497-4499; and C.-J. Lin, C.-H. Lin, Y.-T. Li, R.-P. Pan, and C.-L. Pan, Electrically controlled liquid crystal phase grating for terahertz waves, IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 21 (2009), pp. 730-732]. We present spectral studies of LCs with large optical anisotropy in the range from 0.3 to 3 THz. Nematic LC mixtures which have Δn > 0.30 for visible frequency range, i.e., 1825 (Δn = 0.42 at 633 nm) were measured. Properties of LC materials like birefringence, absorption coefficients, and refractive indices for ordinary and extraordinary polarization in THz range were obtained. Orientation of LC was done by a high electric field. Measurements were performed using a TDS spectra 3000 spectrometer.

  9. Optimization of the signal processing in frequency modulated continuous wave laser ranging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangsong; Zhang, Fumin; Qu, Xinghua

    2015-02-01

    Based on a dual interferometry frequency modulated wave laser (FMCW) laser ranging system, three steps to optimize the signal processing is proposed in this paper. The first step is signal re-sampling, by which the sampling signal is turned to be equal optical frequency intervals. The second step is splicing the re-sampled signal, by which can break though the tuning range of the laser source limitation. The last step is the all-phase pretreatment of the signal, its means that the all-phase Fast Fourier Transformation (apFFT) is used to handle the re-sampled signal, which could reduce the phase error of the signal. The experiments shows that the noise effect due to the tuning nonlinearity of laser can be reduced by re-sampling the signal, 50μm range resolution can be easily obtained by this method, the apFFT is more reliable and effective than FFT in the processing to reduce the phase error and improve the speed of operation.

  10. Nanostructured composite layers for electromagnetic shielding in the GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchea, M.; Tudose, I. V.; Tzagkarakis, G.; Kenanakis, G.; Katharakis, M.; Drakakis, E.; Koudoumas, E.

    2015-10-01

    We report on preliminary results regarding the applicability of nanostructured composite layers for electromagnetic shielding in the frequency range of 4-20 GHz. Various combinations of materials were employed including poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), polyaniline, graphene nanoplatelets, carbon nanotubes, Cu nanoparticles and Poly(vinyl alcohol). As shown, paint-like nanocomposite layers consisting of graphene nanoplatelets, polyaniline PEDOT:PSS and Poly(vinyl alcohol) can offer quite effective electromagnetic shielding, similar or even better than that of commercial products, the response strongly depending on their thickness and resistivity.

  11. Comments on finite Larmor radius models for ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Hosea, J.C.; Majeski, R.; Smithe, D.N.

    1994-06-01

    The accuracy of standard finite Larmor radius (FLR) models for wave propagation in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is compared against full hot plasma models. For multiple ion species plasmas, the FLR model is shown to predict the presence of a spurious second harmonic ion-ion type resonance between the second harmonic cyclotron layers of two ion species. It is shown explicitly here that the spurious resonance is an artifact of the FLR models and that no absorption occurs in the plasma as a result of this ``resonance.``

  12. Mid-frequency sound propagation through internal waves at short range with synoptic oceanographic observations.

    PubMed

    Rouseff, Daniel; Tang, Dajun; Williams, Kevin L; Wang, Zhongkang; Moum, James N

    2008-09-01

    Preliminary results are presented from an analysis of mid-frequency acoustic transmission data collected at range 550 m during the Shallow Water 2006 Experiment. The acoustic data were collected on a vertical array immediately before, during, and after the passage of a nonlinear internal wave on 18 August, 2006. Using oceanographic data collected at a nearby location, a plane-wave model for the nonlinear internal wave's position as a function of time is developed. Experimental results show a new acoustic path is generated as the internal wave passes above the acoustic source.

  13. Range-resolved frequency-agile CO2 lidar measurements of smokestack vapor effluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Francis M.; Vanderbeek, Richard G.; Warren, Russell E.

    1999-11-01

    Range-resolved lidar measurements of chemical vapor output from a smokestack were conducted using a moderate-power (100 millijoules per pulse) frequency-agile CO2 differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system. A 70-foot non-industrial smokestack, erected for the purpose of studying effluent emissions, was used in the experiment. These measurements were conducted for the purpose of obtaining real data to support development of advanced chemical and biological (CB) range- resolved vapor detection algorithms. Plume transmission measurements were made using natural atmospheric backscatter from points at the mouth of the stack and several positions downwind. Controlled releases of triethyl-phosphate (TEP), dimethyl-methylphosphonate (DMMP), and sulfur-hexaflouride (SF6) were performed. Test methodology and experimental results are presented. Effective application of ground-based lidar to the monitoring of smokestack effluents, without the use of fixed targets, is discussed.

  14. Optical-fiber frequency domain interferometer with nanometer resolution and centimeter measuring range.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jidong; Tao, Tianjiong; Liu, Shenggang; Ma, Heli; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Hua

    2013-11-01

    A new optical-fiber frequency domain interferometer (OFDI) device for accurate measurement of the absolute distance between two stationary objects, with centimeter measuring range and nanometer resolution, has been developed. Its working principle and on-line data processing method were elaborated. The new OFDI instrument was constructed all with currently available commercial communication products. It adopted the wide-spectrum amplified spontaneous emission light as the light source and optical-fiber tip as the test probe. Since this device consists of only fibers or fiber coupled components, it is very compact, convenient to operate, and easy to carry. By measuring the single-step length of a translation stage and the thickness of standard gauge blocks, its ability in implementing nanometer resolution and centimeter measuring range on-line measurements was validated.

  15. Nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with frequency-modulated light in the geophysical field range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, V.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Rochester, S. M.; Budker, D.; Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Hovde, D. C.; Gawlik, W.; Pustelny, S.; Zachorowski, J.; Yashchuk, V. V.

    2006-05-01

    Recent work investigating resonant nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) related to long-lived (τrel˜1s) ground-state atomic coherences has demonstrated potential magnetometric sensitivities exceeding 10-11G/Hz for small (≲1μG ) magnetic fields. In the present work, NMOR using frequency-modulated light (FM NMOR) is studied in the regime where the longitudinal magnetic field is in the geophysical range (˜500mG) , of particular interest for many applications. In this regime a splitting of the FM NMOR resonance due to the nonlinear Zeeman effect is observed. At sufficiently high light intensities, there is also a splitting of the FM NMOR resonances due to ac Stark shifts induced by the optical field, as well as evidence of alignment-to-orientation conversion type processes. The consequences of these effects for FM-NMOR-based atomic magnetometry in the geophysical field range are considered.

  16. LTP in Hippocampal Area CA1 Is Induced by Burst Stimulation over a Broad Frequency Range Centered around Delta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Lawrence M.; Kim, Eunyoung; Cooke, Jennifer D.; Holmes, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is typically studied using either continuous high-frequency stimulation or theta burst stimulation. Previous studies emphasized the physiological relevance of theta frequency; however, synchronized hippocampal activity occurs over a broader frequency range. We therefore tested burst stimulation at intervals from 100…

  17. Frequency-selective design of wireless power transfer systems for controlled access applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maschino, Tyler Stephen

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) has become a common way to charge or power many types of devices, ranging from cell phones to electric toothbrushes. WPT became popular through the introduction of a transmission mode known as strongly coupled magnetic resonance (SCMR). This means of transmission is non-radiative and enables mid-range WPT. Shortly after the development of WPT via SCMR, a group of researchers introduced the concept of resonant repeaters, which allows power to hop from the source to the device. These repeaters are in resonance with the WPT system, which enables them to propagate the power wirelessly with minimal losses to the environment. Resonant repeaters have rekindled the dream of ubiquitous wireless power. Inherent risks come with the realization of such a dream. One of the most prominent risks, which we set out in this thesis to address, is that of accessibility to the WPT system. We propose the incorporation of a controlled access schema within a WPT system to prevent unwarranted use of wireless power. Our thesis discusses the history of electromagnetism, examines the inception of WPT via SCMR, evaluates recent developments in WPT, and further elaborates on the controlled access schema we wish to contribute to the field.

  18. Frequency-Range Distribution of Boulders Around Cone Crater: Relevance to Landing Site Hazard Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clegg-Watkins, R. N.; Jolliff, B. L.; Lawrence, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Boulders represent a landing hazard that must be addressed in the planning of future landings on the Moon. A boulder under a landing leg can contribute to deck tilt and boulders can damage spacecraft during landing. Using orbital data to characterize boulder populations at locations where landers have safely touched down (Apollo, Luna, Surveyor, and Chang'e-3 sites) is important for determining landing hazard criteria for future missions. Additionally, assessing the distribution of boulders can address broader science issues, e.g., how far craters distribute boulders and how this distribution varies as a function of crater size and age. The availability of new Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) images [1] enables the use of boulder size- and range frequency distributions for a variety of purposes [2-6]. Boulders degrade over time and primarily occur around young or fresh craters that are large enough to excavate bedrock. Here we use NAC images to analyze boulder distributions around Cone crater (340 m diameter) at the Apollo 14 site. Cone crater (CC) was selected because it is the largest crater where astronaut surface photography is available for a radial traverse to the rim. Cone crater is young (approximately 29 Ma [7]) relative to the time required to break down boulders [3,8], giving us a data point for boulder range-frequency distributions (BRFDs) as a function of crater age.

  19. Characterization of a Prototype Radio Frequency Space Environment Path Emulator for Evaluating Spacecraft Ranging Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Jason W.; Baldwin, Philip J.; Kurichh, Rishi; Naasz, Bo J.; Luquette, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    The Formation Flying Testbed (FFTB) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) provides a hardware-in-the-loop test environment for formation navigation and control. The facility is evolving as a modular, hybrid, dynamic simulation facility for end-to-end guidance, navigation and control (GN&C) design and analysis of formation flying spacecraft. The core capabilities of the FFTB, as a platform for testing critical hardware and software algorithms in-the-loop, have expanded to include S-band Radio Frequency (RF) modems for interspacecraft communication and ranging. To enable realistic simulations that require RF ranging sensors for relative navigation, a mechanism is needed to buffer the RF signals exchanged between spacecraft that accurately emulates the dynamic environment through which the RF signals travel, including the effects of the medium, moving platforms, and radiated power. The Path Emulator for Radio Frequency Signals (PERFS), currently under development at NASA GSFC, provides this capability. The function and performance of a prototype device are presented.

  20. Signature of forty years of artificial selection in U.S. Holstein cattle identified by long-range frequency analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three groups of U.S. Holstein cattle were analyzed for selection signature of artificial selection since 1964 using long-range frequency measures. The three groups included Holsteins unselected since 1964, contemporary Holsteins, and an elite line of contemporary Holsteins. Long-range frequencies in...

  1. Radio frequency interference survey over the 1.0-10.4 GHz frequency range at the Goldstone-Venus Development Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, S.; Olsen, E. T.; Klein, M. J.; Jackson, E. B.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a low sensitivity Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) survey carried out at the Venus Station of the Goldstone Communications Complex are reported. The data cover the spectral range from 1 GHz to 10.4 GHz with a 10-kHz instantaneous bandwidth. Frequency and power levels were observed using a sweep-frequency spectrum analyzer connected to a 1-m diameter antenna pointed at zenith. The survey was conducted from February 16, 1987 through February 24, 1987.

  2. Orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing access (OFDMA) based wireless visible light communication (VLC) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Jiun-Yu; Yeh, Chien-Hung; Chow, Chi-Wai; Lin, Wan-Feng; Liu, Yang

    2015-11-01

    An orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing access (OFDMA) based visible light communication (VLC) system is proposed in this paper. The architecture of the proposed system is divided into several VLC cells, which is defined in this paper. The deployment and upgrade of the system involve only simple combination of the VLC cells. Hence it is economically advantageous. To guarantee smooth communication, nearly equal data rate is provided at every location within the system with no concern on the system scale. The user location monitor strategy is also discussed to solve the region division issues. The characteristics of the proposed system are analyzed in detail in this paper. A one-dimensional experiment was demonstrated with 13.6 Mb/s data rate.

  3. Magnetic relaxation for Mn-based compounds exhibiting the Larmor precession at THz wave range frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukami, S.; Iihama, S.; Sasaki, Y.; Sugihara, A.; Ranjbar, R.; Suzuki, K. Z.

    2016-10-01

    Mn-based hard magnets are potentially suitable for advanced ultra-high frequency spintronics applications because they exhibit the Larmor precession of magnetization at THz wave-range frequencies with low magnetic relaxation. However, the low magnetic relaxation properties are not well understood; thus, a more detailed study is necessary. In this study, magnetization precessions in L10 Mn1.54Ga, D022 Mn2.12Ga, and C38 MnAlGe epitaxial films grown on MgO substrates were investigated using an all-optical pump-probe method under a magnetic field of ˜20 kOe. The coherent magnetization precessions at frequencies of more than 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 THz for the C38 MnAlGe, L10 Mn1.54Ga, and D022 Mn2.12Ga films, respectively, were clearly measured. The effective damping constant for the C38 MnAlGe film was smaller than the previously reported value measured at 10 kOe by a factor of 2, whereas those showed a large angular dependence. The effective damping constants for the L10 Mn1.54Ga and D022 Mn2.12Ga films were independent of the field angle and approximately identical to the values measured at 10 kOe. Thus, it was concluded that the values for the Gilbert damping constant, α, were 0.008 and 0.012 for the L10 Mn1.54Ga and D022 Mn2.12Ga films, respectively. The possible origin of the discrepancy between the experimental and theoretical α values for these films is discussed.

  4. Performance of a Frequency-Hopped Real-Time Remote Control System in a Multiple Access Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes, Frank

    A recent trend is observed in the context of the radio-controlled aircrafts and automobiles within the hobby grade category and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) applications moving to the well-known Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) band. Based on this technological fact, the present thesis evaluates an individual user performance by featuring a multiple-user scenario where several point-to-point co-located real-time Remote Control (RC) applications operate using Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS) as a medium access technique in order to handle interference efficiently. Commercial-off-the-shelf wireless transceivers ready to operate in the ISM band are considered as the operational platform supporting the above-mentioned applications. The impact of channel impairments and of different critical system engineering issues, such as working with real clock oscillators and variable packet duty cycle, are considered. Based on the previous, simulation results allowed us to evaluate the range of variation for those parameters for an acceptable system performance under Multiple Access (MA) environments.

  5. Paternal kin recognition in the high frequency / ultrasonic range in a solitary foraging mammal

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Kin selection is a driving force in the evolution of mammalian social complexity. Recognition of paternal kin using vocalizations occurs in taxa with cohesive, complex social groups. This is the first investigation of paternal kin recognition via vocalizations in a small-brained, solitary foraging mammal, the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus), a frequent model for ancestral primates. We analyzed the high frequency/ultrasonic male advertisement (courtship) call and alarm call. Results Multi-parametric analyses of the calls’ acoustic parameters and discriminant function analyses showed that advertisement calls, but not alarm calls, contain patrilineal signatures. Playback experiments controlling for familiarity showed that females paid more attention to advertisement calls from unrelated males than from their fathers. Reactions to alarm calls from unrelated males and fathers did not differ. Conclusions 1) Findings provide the first evidence of paternal kin recognition via vocalizations in a small-brained, solitarily foraging mammal. 2) High predation, small body size, and dispersed social systems may select for acoustic paternal kin recognition in the high frequency/ultrasonic ranges, thus limiting risks of inbreeding and eavesdropping by predators or conspecific competitors. 3) Paternal kin recognition via vocalizations in mammals is not dependent upon a large brain and high social complexity, but may already have been an integral part of the dispersed social networks from which more complex, kin-based sociality emerged. PMID:23198727

  6. Frequency-division multiplexing in the terahertz range using a leaky-wave antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, Nicholas J.; McKinney, Robert W.; Monnai, Yasuaki; Mendis, Rajind; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2015-11-01

    The idea of using radiation in the 0.1-1.0 THz range as carrier waves for free-space wireless communications has attracted growing interest in recent years, due to the promise of the large available bandwidth. Recent research has focused on system demonstrations, as well as the exploration of new components for modulation, beam steering and polarization control. However, the multiplexing and demultiplexing of terahertz signals remains an unaddressed challenge, despite the importance of such capabilities for broadband networks. Using a leaky-wave antenna based on a metal parallel-plate waveguide, we demonstrate frequency-division multiplexing and demultiplexing over more than one octave of bandwidth. We show that this device architecture offers a unique method for controlling the spectrum allocation, by variation of the waveguide plate separation. This strategy, which is distinct from those previously employed in either the microwave or optical regimes, enables independent control of both the centre frequency and bandwidth of multiplexed terahertz channels.

  7. Long range dependence in the high frequency USD/INR exchange rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dilip

    2014-02-01

    Using high frequency data, this paper examines the long memory property in the unconditional and conditional volatility of the USD/INR exchange rate at different time scales using the Local Whittle (LW), the Exact Local Whittle (ELW) and the FIAPARCH models. Results indicate that the long memory property remains quite stable across different time scales for both unconditional and conditional volatility measures. Results from the non-overlapping moving window approach indicate that the extreme events (such as the subprime crisis and the European debt crisis) resulted in highly persistent behavior of the USD/INR exchange rate and thus lead to market inefficiency. This paper also examines the long memory property in the realized volatility based on different time scale data. Results indicate that the realized volatility measures based on different scales of the high frequency data exhibit a consistent and stable long memory property. However, the realized volatility measures based on daily data exhibit lower degree of long-range dependence. This study has implications for traders and investors (with different trading horizons) and can be helpful in predicting expected future volatility and in designing and implementing trading strategies at different time scales.

  8. Global Low Frequency Protein Motions in Long-Range Allosteric Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeish, Tom; Rogers, Thomas; Townsend, Philip; Burnell, David; Pohl, Ehmke; Wilson, Mark; Cann, Martin; Richards, Shane; Jones, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    We present a foundational theory for how allostery can occur as a function of low frequency dynamics without a change in protein structure. Elastic inhomogeneities allow entropic ``signalling at a distance.'' Remarkably, many globular proteins display just this class of elastic structure, in particular those that support allosteric binding of substrates (long-range co-operative effects between the binding sites of small molecules). Through multi-scale modelling of global normal modes we demonstrate negative co-operativity between the two cAMP ligands without change to the mean structure. Crucially, the value of the co-operativity is itself controlled by the interactions around a set of third allosteric ``control sites.'' The theory makes key experimental predictions, validated by analysis of variant proteins by a combination of structural biology and isothermal calorimetry. A quantitative description of allostery as a free energy landscape revealed a protein ``design space'' that identified the key inter- and intramolecular regulatory parameters that frame CRP/FNR family allostery. Furthermore, by analyzing naturally occurring CAP variants from diverse species, we demonstrate an evolutionary selection pressure to conserve residues crucial for allosteric control. The methodology establishes the means to engineer allosteric mechanisms that are driven by low frequency dynamics.

  9. Absolute distance measurement with extension of nonambiguity range using the frequency comb of a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Yoon-Soo; Lee, Keunwoo; Han, Seongheum; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2014-12-01

    We revisit the method of synthetic wavelength interferometry (SWI) for absolute measurement of long distances using the radio-frequency harmonics of the pulse repetition rate of a mode-locked femtosecond laser. Our intention here is to extend the nonambiguity range (NAR) of the SWI method using a coarse virtual wavelength synthesized by shifting the pulse repetition rate. The proposed concept of NAR extension is experimentally verified by measuring a ˜13-m distance with repeatability of 9.5 μm (root-mean-square). The measurement precision is estimated to be 31.2 μm in comparison with an incremental He-Ne laser interferometer. This extended SWI method is found to be well suited for long-distance measurements demanded in the fields of large-scale precision engineering, geodetic survey, and future space missions.

  10. Fiber optic probe of free electron evanescent fields in the optical frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    So, Jin-Kyu MacDonald, Kevin F.; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2014-05-19

    We introduce an optical fiber platform which can be used to interrogate proximity interactions between free-electron evanescent fields and photonic nanostructures at optical frequencies in a manner similar to that in which optical evanescent fields are sampled using nanoscale aperture probes in scanning near-field microscopy. Conically profiled optical fiber tips functionalized with nano-gratings are employed to couple electron evanescent fields to light via the Smith-Purcell effect. We demonstrate the interrogation of medium energy (30–50 keV) electron fields with a lateral resolution of a few micrometers via the generation and detection of visible/UV radiation in the 700–300 nm (free-space) wavelength range.

  11. Filamentation instability of nonextensive current-driven plasma in the ion acoustic frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M. Rastbood, E.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-12-15

    The filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities of nonextensive current-driven plasma in the ion acoustic frequency range have been studied using the Lorentz transformation formulas. Based on the kinetic theory, the possibility of filamentation instability and its growth rate as well as the ion acoustic instability have been investigated. The results of the research show that the possibility and growth rate of these instabilities are significantly dependent on the electron nonextensive parameter and drift velocity. Besides, the increase of electrons nonextensive parameter and drift velocity lead to the increase of the growth rates of both instabilities. In addition, the wavelength region in which the filamentation instability occurs is more stretched in the presence of higher values of drift velocity and nonextensive parameter. Finally, the results of filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities have been compared and the conditions for filamentation instability to be dominant mode of instability have been presented.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of biotissue-mimicking phantoms in the THz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liakhov, E.; Smolyanskaya, O.; Popov, A.; Odlyanitskiy, E.; Balbekin, N.; Khodzitsky, M.

    2016-08-01

    The study revealed the most promising candidates for phantoms mimicking different biological tissues in the terahertz frequency range. Closest to biological tissues in terms of the refractive index appeared to be gelatin-based gels; in terms of the absorption coefficient they were agar-based gels. Gelatin is more stable in time, but requires special storage conditions to limit water evaporation. The dense structure of the agar-based phantom allows its use without mold and risk of damage. However, agar is a nutrient medium for bacteria and its parameters degrade even when the phantom form and water content are retained. Use of liquid suspensions of lecithin and milk powder are found to be extremely limited.

  13. Opto-electronic device for frequency standard generation and terahertz-range optical demodulation based on quantum interference

    DOEpatents

    Georgiades, N.P.; Polzik, E.S.; Kimble, H.J.

    1999-02-02

    An opto-electronic system and technique for comparing laser frequencies with large frequency separations, establishing new frequency standards, and achieving phase-sensitive detection at ultra high frequencies are disclosed. Light responsive materials with multiple energy levels suitable for multi-photon excitation are preferably used for nonlinear mixing via quantum interference of different excitation paths affecting a common energy level. Demodulation of a carrier with a demodulation frequency up to 100`s THZ can be achieved for frequency comparison and phase-sensitive detection. A large number of materials can be used to cover a wide spectral range including the ultra violet, visible and near infrared regions. In particular, absolute frequency measurement in a spectrum from 1.25 {micro}m to 1.66 {micro}m for fiber optics can be accomplished with a nearly continuous frequency coverage. 7 figs.

  14. Opto-electronic device for frequency standard generation and terahertz-range optical demodulation based on quantum interference

    DOEpatents

    Georgiades, Nikos P.; Polzik, Eugene S.; Kimble, H. Jeff

    1999-02-02

    An opto-electronic system and technique for comparing laser frequencies with large frequency separations, establishing new frequency standards, and achieving phase-sensitive detection at ultra high frequencies. Light responsive materials with multiple energy levels suitable for multi-photon excitation are preferably used for nonlinear mixing via quantum interference of different excitation paths affecting a common energy level. Demodulation of a carrier with a demodulation frequency up to 100's THZ can be achieved for frequency comparison and phase-sensitive detection. A large number of materials can be used to cover a wide spectral range including the ultra violet, visible and near infrared regions. In particular, absolute frequency measurement in a spectrum from 1.25 .mu.m to 1.66 .mu.m for fiber optics can be accomplished with a nearly continuous frequency coverage.

  15. Expanding Hardware-in-the-Loop Formation Navigation and Control with Radio Frequency Crosslink Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Jason W.; Barbee, Brent W.; Baldwin, Philip J.; Luquette, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    The Formation Flying Testbed (FFTB) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) provides a hardware-in-the-loop test environment for formation navigation and control. The facility continues to evolve as a modular, hybrid, dynamic simulation facility for end-to-end guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) design and analysis of formation flying spacecraft. The core capabilities of the FFTB, as a platform for testing critical hardware and software algorithms in-the-loop, are reviewed with a focus on recent improvements. With the most recent improvement, in support of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6 testing of the Inter-spacecraft Ranging and Alarm System (IRAS) for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, the FFTB has significantly expanded its ability to perform realistic simulations that require Radio Frequency (RF) ranging sensors for relative navigation with the Path Emulator for RF Signals (PERFS). The PERFS, currently under development at NASA GSFC, modulates RF signals exchanged between spacecraft. The RF signals are modified to accurately reflect the dynamic environment through which they travel, including the effects of medium, moving platforms, and radiated power.

  16. Development of a Radio Frequency Space Environment Path Emulator for Evaluating Spacecraft Ranging Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Jason W.; Baldwin, Philip J.; Kurichh, Rishi; Naasz, Bo J.; Luquette, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    The Formation Flying Testbed (FFTB) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) provides a hardware-in-the-loop test environment for formation navigation and control. The facility is evolving as a modular, hybrid, dynamic simulation facility for end-to-end guidance, navigation and. control (GN&C) design and analysis of formation flying spacecraft. The core capabilities of the FFTB, as a platform for testing critical hardware and software algorithms in-the-loop, have expanded to include S-band Radio Frequency (RF) modems for inter-spacecraft communication and ranging. To enable realistic simulations that require RF ranging sensors for relative navigation, a mechanism is needed to buffer the RF signals exchanged between spacecraft that accurately emulates the dynamic environment through which the RF signals travel, including the effects of medium, moving platforms, and radiated power. The Path Emulator for RF Signals (PERFS), currently under development at NASA GSFC, provides this capability. The function and performance of a prototype device are presented.

  17. Time-frequency analysis of acoustic signals in the audio-frequency range generated during Hadfield's steel friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynin, S. A.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Smolin, A. Yu.; Dmitriev, A. I.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2010-07-01

    Time-frequency analysis of sound waves detected by a microphone during the friction of Hadfield’s steel has been performed using wavelet transform and window Fourier transform methods. This approach reveals a relationship between the appearance of quasi-periodic intensity outbursts in the acoustic response signals and the processes responsible for the formation of wear products. It is shown that the time-frequency analysis of acoustic emission in a tribosystem can be applied, along with traditional approaches, to studying features in the wear and friction process.

  18. The possible meaning of the upper and lower alpha frequency ranges for cognitive and creative tasks.

    PubMed

    Petsche, H; Kaplan, S; von Stein, A; Filz, O

    1997-06-01

    This study is aimed at verifying the functional independence of two frequency bands within the alpha range. It is based on experiments that examined the role of these two hands with regard to the amount of local electrogenesis (amplitude) and the cooperation of brain areas (coherence) in mental tasks concerning: (1) visual perception and imagery; (2) listening to and composing music; (3) verbal and visual creativity; and (4) aspects of mood. In all experiments EEG were recorded for at least 1 min during each task, separated one from another by at rest periods of at least equal lengths. EEG electrodes were pasted according to the 10/20 system (averaged ear lobes as reference). After FFT power was calculated for all 19 electrodes, coherence was estimated for all possible electrode pairs (i.e. 171). This was done for six frequency ranges between 1.5 and 31.5 Hz, the alpha range having been divided into two (7.5-9 Hz and 9.5-12.5 Hz). The spectral parameters obtained during each task were compared with those of the merged EEG at rest, significant changes (P < or = 0.01-P < or = 0.05) were entered into schematic maps of the brain. Generally, fewer differences were found for amplitude than for coherence. In all four tasks concerning visual perception the clearest differences were found in single person studies. But also in group studies more or less distinct differences were found between alpha 1 and 2. Also in the series with music the two alpha bands did not behave uniformly, nor were uniform features found in the two series of musically trained and untrained subjects. Distinct discrepancies were also found in a verbal and visual imagery task. With respect to mood, only elevated mood was correlated with a decrease of coherence in alpha 2 and an increase of amplitude in alpha 1. This study though hinting at a different functional significance of these two alpha bands, however, does not allow to draw any conclusions as to their distinct functional meanings. Generally

  19. Plasma Current Start-up Experiment using Waves in the Lower Hybrid Frequency Range in TST-2

    SciTech Connect

    Takase, Y.; Wakatsuki, T.; Ejiri, A.; Kakuda, H.; Ambo, T.; Hanashima, K.; Hiratsuka, J.; Nagashima, Y.; Sakamoto, T.; Shino, R.; Sonehara, M.; Watanabe, O.; Yamaguchi, T.; Moeller, C. P.; Kasahara, H.; Kumazawa, R.; Saito, K.; Seki, T.; Shimpo, F.

    2011-12-23

    Noninductive plasma current (I{sub p}) start-up experiments using RF power in the lower hybrid frequency range are being conducted on the TST-2 spherical tokamak. The lower hybrid wave (LHW) has demonstrated efficient current drive in conventional tokamaks. However, in spherical tokamak (ST) plasmas with very high dielectric constants (;{epsilon}{approx}{omega}{sub pe}{sup 2}/{Omega}{sub e}{sup 2}>>1), accessibility of the LHW to the plasma core is severely limited. Our approach is to keep the plasma density low (such that {epsilon}{approx}1) during I{sub p} ramp-up. Once I{sub p} reaches a level sufficiently high for neutral beam current drive, plasma can be densified and transformed into an advanced tokamak plasma dominated by the self-driven bootstrap current. Initial plasma start-up experiments were performed on TST-2 using a combline antenna which excites a traveling fast wave. After formation of toroidal flux surfaces, RF power and vertical field were ramped up to increase I{sub p}. Up to 12 kA of Ip has been obtained by this method. Soft X-ray measurements indicate that the electron temperature increases as I{sub p} increases, and hard X-ray spectroscopy indicates that energetic electrons build up as I{sub p} is ramped up.

  20. Frequency-range discriminations: special and general abilities in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) and humans (Homo sapiens).

    PubMed

    Weisman, R; Njegovan, M; Sturdy, C; Phillmore, L; Coyle, J; Mewhort, D

    1998-09-01

    The acoustic frequency ranges in birdsongs and human speech can provide important pitch cues for recognition. Zebra finches and humans were trained to sort contiguous frequencies into 3 or 8 ranges, based on associations between the ranges and reward. The 3-range task was conducted separately in 3 spectral regions. Zebra finches discriminated 3 ranges in the medium and high spectral regions faster than in the low region and discriminated 8 ranges with precision. Humans discriminated 3 ranges in all 3 spectral regions to the same modest standard and acquired only a crude discrimination of the lowest and highest of 8 ranges. The results indicate that songbirds have a special sensitivity to the pitches in conspecific songs and, relative to humans, have a remarkable general ability to sort pitches into ranges.

  1. Frequency-range discriminations: special and general abilities in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) and humans (Homo sapiens).

    PubMed

    Weisman, R; Njegovan, M; Sturdy, C; Phillmore, L; Coyle, J; Mewhort, D

    1998-09-01

    The acoustic frequency ranges in birdsongs and human speech can provide important pitch cues for recognition. Zebra finches and humans were trained to sort contiguous frequencies into 3 or 8 ranges, based on associations between the ranges and reward. The 3-range task was conducted separately in 3 spectral regions. Zebra finches discriminated 3 ranges in the medium and high spectral regions faster than in the low region and discriminated 8 ranges with precision. Humans discriminated 3 ranges in all 3 spectral regions to the same modest standard and acquired only a crude discrimination of the lowest and highest of 8 ranges. The results indicate that songbirds have a special sensitivity to the pitches in conspecific songs and, relative to humans, have a remarkable general ability to sort pitches into ranges. PMID:9770314

  2. Experimental Study of High-Range-Resolution Medical Acoustic Imaging for Multiple Target Detection by Frequency Domain Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Tomoki; Taki, Hirofumi; Sakamoto, Takuya; Sato, Toru

    2009-07-01

    We employed frequency domain interferometry (FDI) for use as a medical acoustic imager to detect multiple targets with high range resolution. The phase of each frequency component of an echo varies with the frequency, and target intervals can be estimated from the phase variance. This processing technique is generally used in radar imaging. When the interference within a range gate is coherent, the cross correlation between the desired signal and the coherent interference signal is nonzero. The Capon method works under the guiding principle that output power minimization cancels the desired signal with a coherent interference signal. Therefore, we utilize frequency averaging to suppress the correlation of the coherent interference. The results of computational simulations using a pseudoecho signal show that the Capon method with adaptive frequency averaging (AFA) provides a higher range resolution than a conventional method. These techniques were experimentally investigated and we confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed method of processing by FDI.

  3. Multicolor photoacoustic imaging by a single transducer with piezoelectric copolymer film in a wide frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Tsutomu; Ishihara, Miya; Tsujita, Kazuhiro; Bansaku, Isao; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    We built a photoacoustic tomographic (PAT) imaging system by scanning a single detector (φ 3.5 mm) made of piezoelectric copolymer poly(vinylidene difluoride-trifluoroethylene), P(VDF-TrFE), which had been fabricated for diagnostic photoacoustic measurement of cartilage tissues in our group. The PAT images of a phantom were obtained at two excitation wavelength of 687.5 nm and 795 nm. The phantom was made of agar including a black hair and agarose gels dissolving indocyanine green (ICG) and methylene blue (MB). Laser pulses (685-900 nm) were generated from a Ti:Sappire tunable laser to excite ICG and MB molecules. The PAT image at 687.5 nm shows signals due to all absorption sources. This is good agreement with dimension of the phantom. The PAT image at 795 nm shows a strong signal due to the ICG-dyed gel and almost no signal due to the MB-dyed gel. This result indicated that absorption sources were extracted by excitation wavelength according to their absorption spectra. The signal/noise ratio of the PAT images were compared between the P(VDF-TrFE) transducer in our group and a PZT transducer (Parametrics V309, 5 MHz, φ 12.7 mm) which is commercially available. The P(VDF-TrFE) transducer was more sensitive by 9 times (120 times per area) than the PZT transducer. By using this imaging system with a P(VDF-TrFE) transducer which is highly sensitive in a wide frequency range, we will achieve frequency analysis of the PAT images to associate photoacoustic waveforms with physical properties of sample tissues.

  4. Effective conductivity and permittivity of unsaturated porous materials in the frequency range 1 mHz-1GHz.

    PubMed

    Revil, A

    2013-01-01

    A model combining low-frequency complex conductivity and high-frequency permittivity is developed in the frequency range from 1 mHz to 1 GHz. The low-frequency conductivity depends on pore water and surface conductivities. Surface conductivity is controlled by the electrical diffuse layer, the outer component of the electrical double layer coating the surface of the minerals. The frequency dependence of the effective quadrature conductivity shows three domains. Below a critical frequency fp , which depends on the dynamic pore throat size Λ, the quadrature conductivity is frequency dependent. Between fp and a second critical frequency fd , the quadrature conductivity is generally well described by a plateau when clay minerals are present in the material. Clay-free porous materials with a narrow grain size distribution are described by a Cole-Cole model. The characteristic frequency fd controls the transition between double layer polarization and the effect of the high-frequency permittivity of the material. The Maxwell-Wagner polarization is found to be relatively negligible. For a broad range of frequencies below 1 MHz, the effective permittivity exhibits a strong dependence with the cation exchange capacity and the specific surface area. At high frequency, above the critical frequency fd , the effective permittivity reaches a high-frequency asymptotic limit that is controlled by the two Archie's exponents m and n like the low-frequency electrical conductivity. The unified model is compared with various data sets from the literature and is able to explain fairly well a broad number of observations with a very small number of textural and electrochemical parameters. It could be therefore used to interpret induced polarization, induction-based electromagnetic methods, and ground penetrating radar data to characterize the vadose zone.

  5. Effective conductivity and permittivity of unsaturated porous materials in the frequency range 1 mHz–1GHz

    PubMed Central

    Revil, A

    2013-01-01

    A model combining low-frequency complex conductivity and high-frequency permittivity is developed in the frequency range from 1 mHz to 1 GHz. The low-frequency conductivity depends on pore water and surface conductivities. Surface conductivity is controlled by the electrical diffuse layer, the outer component of the electrical double layer coating the surface of the minerals. The frequency dependence of the effective quadrature conductivity shows three domains. Below a critical frequency fp, which depends on the dynamic pore throat size Λ, the quadrature conductivity is frequency dependent. Between fp and a second critical frequency fd, the quadrature conductivity is generally well described by a plateau when clay minerals are present in the material. Clay-free porous materials with a narrow grain size distribution are described by a Cole-Cole model. The characteristic frequency fd controls the transition between double layer polarization and the effect of the high-frequency permittivity of the material. The Maxwell-Wagner polarization is found to be relatively negligible. For a broad range of frequencies below 1 MHz, the effective permittivity exhibits a strong dependence with the cation exchange capacity and the specific surface area. At high frequency, above the critical frequency fd, the effective permittivity reaches a high-frequency asymptotic limit that is controlled by the two Archie's exponents m and n like the low-frequency electrical conductivity. The unified model is compared with various data sets from the literature and is able to explain fairly well a broad number of observations with a very small number of textural and electrochemical parameters. It could be therefore used to interpret induced polarization, induction-based electromagnetic methods, and ground penetrating radar data to characterize the vadose zone. PMID:23576823

  6. Blood optical properties at various glucose level values in THz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, S. I.; Borovkova, M. A.; Strepitov, M. A.; Khodzitsky, M. K.

    2015-07-01

    the patients. Most biomolecules have characteristic signature frequencies in the terahertz (THz) range, which can reveal their presence and determine the concentration. Therefore, this paper is intended to study the blood optical properties in the THz frequency range in order to determine THz radiation effect on blood. The main aim of this investigation is to determine the effect of blood glucose concentration on the blood optical properties. In the case if blood optical properties vary at different glucose concentrations having a proportional relationship between them, these results will confirm the possibility of development of non-invasive procedures for blood glucose level diagnostics.

  7. Preferred Frequency Range, Technical Characteristics, and Interference Assessment for a Microwave Observatory of Subsurface and Subcanopy (MOSS) for 1 MHZ Bandwidth in the Frequency Range of 100-150 MHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honeycutt, Bryan L.

    2005-01-01

    This document presents rationale for the frequency band selection, technical and operational characteristics of active spaceborne sensors in the Earth Exploration-Satellite Service (active), and interference assessment for a 1 MHz bandwidth sensor in the 100-150 MHz frequency range. The active spaceborne sensors expected to be operating in the frequency range of 100-150 MHz is the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) such as the MOSS. The technical characteristics, mission objectives, orbital parameters, design parameters, antenna characteristics, and preliminary interference assessment are given for MOSS. The purpose of the document is to provide rationale for the frequency band selection, technical characteristics of the active spaceborne sensor Microwave Observatory of Subsurface and Subcanopy (MOSS) that can be used to analyze the compatibility of active spaceborne sensors and other systems of 1 MHz bandwidth in the 100-150 MHz frequency band.

  8. An Obliquely Propagating Electromagnetic Drift Instability in the Lower Hybrid Frequency Range

    SciTech Connect

    Hantao Ji; Russell Kulsrud; William Fox; Masaaki Yamada

    2005-06-10

    By employing a local two-fluid theory, we investigate an obliquely propagating electromagnetic instability in the lower hybrid frequency range driven by cross-field current or relative drifts between electrons and ions. The theory self-consistently takes into account local cross-field current and accompanying pressure gradients. It is found that the instability is caused by reactive coupling between the backward propagating whistler (fast) waves in the moving electron frame, and the forward propagating sound (slow) waves in the ion frame when the relative drifts are large. The unstable waves we consider propagate obliquely to the unperturbed magnetic field and have mixed polarization with significant electromagnetic components. A physical picture of the instability emerges in the limit of large wave number characteristic of the local approximation. The primary positive feedback mechanism is based on reinforcement of initial electron density perturbations by compression of electron fluid via induced Lorentz force. The resultant waves are qualitatively consistent with the measured electromagnetic fluctuations in reconnecting current sheet in a laboratory plasma.

  9. Three dimensional ray tracing Jovian magnetosphere in the low frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Ray tracing of the Jovian magnetosphere in the low frequency range (1+40 MHz) has resulted in a new understanding of the source mechanism for Io dependent decametric radiation (DAM). Our three dimensional ray tracing computer code has provided model DAM arcs at 10 deg. intervals of Io longitude source positions for the full 360 deg of Jovian system III longitude. In addition, particularly interesting arcs were singled out for detailed study and modelling. Dependent decametric radiation arcs are categorized according to curvature--the higher curvature arcs are apparently due to wave stimulation at a nonconstant wave normal angle, psi. The psi(f) relationship has a signature that is common to most of the higher curvature arcs. The low curvature arcs, on the other hand, are adequately modelled with a constant wave normal angle of close to 90 deg. These results imply that for higher curvature arcs observed for from Jupiter (to diminish spacecraft motion effects) the electrons providing the gyroemission are relativistically beamed.

  10. An obliquely propagating electromagnetic drift instability in the lower hybrid frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hantao; Kulsrud, Russell; Fox, William; Yamada, Masaaki

    2005-08-01

    By employing a local two-fluid theory, we investigate an obliquely propagating electromagnetic instability in the lower hybrid frequency range driven by cross-field current or relative drifts between electrons and ions. The theory self-consistently takes into account local cross-field current and accompanying pressure gradients. It is found that the instability is caused by reactive coupling between the backward propagating whistler (fast) wave in the electron frame and the forward propagating sound (slow) wave in the ion frame when the relative drifts are large. The unstable waves we consider propagate obliquely to the unperturbed magnetic field and have mixed polarization with significant electromagnetic components. A physical picture of the instability emerges in the limit of a large wave number characteristic of the local approximation. The primary positive feedback mechanism is based on reinforcement of initial electron density perturbations by compression of electron fluid via induced Lorentz force. The resultant waves are qualitatively consistent with the measured electromagnetic fluctuations in reconnecting current sheet in a laboratory plasma.

  11. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating of plasma with small impurity production

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1987-01-01

    Plasma including plasma ions is magnetically confined by a magnetic field. The plasma has a defined outer surface and is intersected by resonance surfaces of respective common ion cyclotron frequency of a predetermined species of plasma ions moving in the magnetic field. A radio frequency source provides radio frequency power at a radio frequency corresponding to the ion cyclotron frequency of the predetermined species of plasma ions moving in the field at a respective said resonance surface. RF launchers coupled to the radio frequency source radiate radio frequency energy at the resonance frequency onto the respective resonance surface within the plasma from a plurality of locations located outside the plasma at such respective distances from the intersections of the respective resonance surface and the defined outer surface and at such relative phases that the resulting interference pattern provides substantially null net radio frequency energy over regions near and including substantial portions of the intersections relative to the radio frequency energy provided thereby at other portions of the respective resonance surface within the plasma.

  12. Linearization of the frequency sweep of a frequency-modulated continuous-wave semiconductor laser radar and the resulting ranging performance.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, C J; Olsson, F A

    1999-05-20

    The performance of a frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) semiconductor laser radar has been examined. Frequency modulation (linear chirp) has been studied experimentally in detail. To create a linear frequency sweep, we modified the modulating function according to the measured frequency response of the laser, using an arbitrary function generator. The measurements indicate the possibility of achieving a spectral width of the signal peak that is transform limited rather than limited by the frequency modulation response of the laser, which permits the use of a narrow detection bandwidth. The narrow width results in a relatively high signal-to-noise ratio for low output power and thus also in relatively long-range and high-range accuracy. We have performed measurements of a diffuse target to determine the performance of a test laser radar system. The maximum range, range accuracy, and speed accuracy for a semiconductor laser with an output power of 10 mW and a linewidth of 400 kHz are presented. The influence of the laser's output power and coherence length on the performance of a semiconductor-laser-based FMCW laser radar is discussed. PMID:18319935

  13. An acoustical assessment of pitch-matching accuracy in relation to speech frequency, speech frequency range, age and gender in preschool children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trollinger, Valerie L.

    This study investigated the relationship between acoustical measurement of singing accuracy in relationship to speech fundamental frequency, speech fundamental frequency range, age and gender in preschool-aged children. Seventy subjects from Southeastern Pennsylvania; the San Francisco Bay Area, California; and Terre Haute, Indiana, participated in the study. Speech frequency was measured by having the subjects participate in spontaneous and guided speech activities with the researcher, with 18 diverse samples extracted from each subject's recording for acoustical analysis for fundamental frequency in Hz with the CSpeech computer program. The fundamental frequencies were averaged together to derive a mean speech frequency score for each subject. Speech range was calculated by subtracting the lowest fundamental frequency produced from the highest fundamental frequency produced, resulting in a speech range measured in increments of Hz. Singing accuracy was measured by having the subjects each echo-sing six randomized patterns using the pitches Middle C, D, E, F♯, G and A (440), using the solfege syllables of Do and Re, which were recorded by a 5-year-old female model. For each subject, 18 samples of singing were recorded. All samples were analyzed by the CSpeech for fundamental frequency. For each subject, deviation scores in Hz were derived by calculating the difference between what the model sang in Hz and what the subject sang in response in Hz. Individual scores for each child consisted of an overall mean total deviation frequency, mean frequency deviations for each pattern, and mean frequency deviation for each pitch. Pearson correlations, MANOVA and ANOVA analyses, Multiple Regressions and Discriminant Analysis revealed the following findings: (1) moderate but significant (p < .001) relationships emerged between mean speech frequency and the ability to sing the pitches E, F♯, G and A in the study; (2) mean speech frequency also emerged as the strongest

  14. Accurate displacement-measuring interferometer with wide range using an I2 frequency-stabilized laser diode based on sinusoidal frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Thanh-Tung; Higuchi, Masato; Aketagawa, Masato

    2016-10-01

    We propose the use of the sinusoidal frequency modulation technique to improve both the frequency stability of an external cavity laser diode (ECLD) and the measurement accuracy and range of a displacement-measuring interferometer. The frequency of the ECLD was modulated at 300 kHz by modulating the injection current, and it was locked to the b21 hyperfine component of the transition 6-3, P(33), 127I2 (633 nm) by the null method. A relative frequency stability of 6.5  ×  10-11 was achieved at 100 s sampling time. The stabilized ECLD was then utilized as a light source for an unbalanced Michelson interferometer. In the interferometer, the displacement and direction of the target mirror can be determined using a Lissajous diagram based on two consecutive and quadrant-phase harmonics of the interference signal. Generally, the measurement range of the interferometer by the proposed method is limited by the modulation index and the signal-to-noise ratio of the harmonics. To overcome this drawback, suitable consecutive harmonic pairs were selected for the specific measurement ranges to measure the displacement. The displacements determined in the specific ranges by the proposed method were compared with those observed by a commercial capacitive sensor. From the comparison, the proposed method has high precision to determine the displacement. The measurement range was also extended up to 10 m by selecting a suitable modulation index and suitable consecutive pairs of harmonics.

  15. The Influence of Fundamental Frequency and Sound Pressure Level Range on Breathing Patterns in Female Classical Singing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collyer, Sally; Thorpe, C. William; Callaghan, Jean; Davis, Pamela J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the influence of fundamental frequency (F0) and sound pressure level (SPL) range on respiratory behavior in classical singing. Method: Five trained female singers performed an 8-s messa di voce (a crescendo and decrescendo on one F0) across their musical F0 range. Lung volume (LV) change was estimated, and…

  16. On the minimum electron transport coefficients in tokamaks in the range of low collision frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Merezhkin, V. G.

    2009-06-15

    There are two close empirical scalings, namely, the T-11 and neo-Alcator ones, that provide correct estimates for the energy confinement time in tokamaks in ohmic heating regimes in the linear part of the dependence {tau}{sub E}(n-bar{sub e}) in the range of low values of n-bar{sub e} and <{nu}{sub e}{sup *}> {<=} 1. The similar character of electron energy confinement in this range, which expands with increasing magnetic field B{sub 0}, has stimulated the search for dimensionless parameters and simple physical models that would explain the experimentally observed dependences {chi}{sub e} {approx} 1/n{sub e} and {tau}{sub Ee} {approx} n-bar{sub e}. In 1987, T. Okhawa showed that the experimental data were satisfactorily described by the formula {chi}{sub eperpendicular} = (c{sup 2}/{omega}{sub pe}{sup 2}){nu}{sub e}/qR, in deriving of which the random spatial leap along the radius r on the electron trajectory was assumed to be the same as that in the coefficient of the poloidal field diffusion, while the repetition rate of these leaps was assumed to be {nu}{sub e}/qR. In 2004, J. Callen took into account the decrease in the fraction of transient electrons with increasing toroidal ratio {epsilon} = r/R and corrected the coefficient c{sup 2}/{omega}{sub pe}{sup 2} in Okhawa equation by the factor {sigma}{sub ||} {sup Sp}/{sigma}{sub ||}{sup neo}. If one takes into account this correction and assumes that the frequency of the stochastic process is equal to the reciprocal of the half-period of rotation of a trapped electron along its banana trajectory, then the resulting expression for {chi}{sub eperpendicular} will coincide with the T-11 scaling: {chi}{sub e}{sup an} {infinity} {epsilon}{sup 1.75}(T{sub e}/A{sub i}){sup 0.5}/(n{sub e}qR) at Ai = 1. If the same stochastic process also involves ions, it may result in the opening of the orbit of a trapped ion at the distance {approx}(c/{omega}{sub pe})(m{sub i}/m{sub e}){sup 1/4}. In this case, the calculated coefficient

  17. Masking of low frequency information in short-range apparent motion.

    PubMed

    Cleary, R; Braddick, O J

    1990-01-01

    When an array of random dots is displaced, the ability to report the direction of apparent motion is subject to an upper spatial limit (dmax). Using spatially low-pass filtered random dot kinematograms we show that dmax is dependent on the upper cut-off frequency of the stimulus (Fh). The extent of this dependence is critically dependent on the size of the stimulus. Our results suggest a process whereby low spatial frequency motion information is masked by the presence of high spatial frequencies in the same region of the field, analogous to phenomena occurring in the perception of static form (e.g. the Abraham Lincoln effect). The effects of stimulus size on dmax, found for broad-band stimuli by ourselves and others, result from a loss of high frequency sensitivity at increased retinal eccentricities; this loss reduces the masking effect of high frequencies, as stimulus size increases.

  18. Frequency dependence of Q sub Lg and its relation to crustal anelasticity in the Basin and Range province

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, B.J. )

    1991-04-01

    The high observed frequency dependence of Q for 1-hz Lg waves (f{sup 0.4 - 0.6}) in the Basin and Range province can be explained by a frequency-independent layered model of intrinsic Q for shear waves (Q{sub mu}) which has very low values in the upper crust and rapidly increasing values at greater depths. By contrast, earlier work in the eastern United States indicated Q{sub mu} values in the upper crust which are high and which vary with frequency. The Q{mu} model which best explains reported values of Q{sub Lg} and its frequency dependence in the Basin-and-Range consists of an 8-km thick low-Q layer (60 or less) overlying Q values as high as 1,000 or more at mid-crustal depths. This Q{sub mu} distribution is best explained by an upper crust which contains fluids in interconnected cracks overlying a lower crust where higher lithostatic pressure has closed those cracks. These results indicate that whereas the frequency dependence of Q{mu} is an intrinsic property of crustal material, the frequency dependence of Q{sub Lg} arises from both the intrinsic frequency dependence of crustal material and its layered structure. A notation is suggested which distinguishes between the frequency dependence of Q{sub Lg} and Q{sub mu}.

  19. Impact of contact and access resistances in graphene field-effect transistors on quartz substrates for radio frequency applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ramón, Michael E. E-mail: hemacp@utexas.edu; Movva, Hema C. P. E-mail: hemacp@utexas.edu; Fahad Chowdhury, Sk.; Parrish, Kristen N.; Rai, Amritesh; Akinwande, Deji; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Magnuson, Carl W.; Ruoff, Rodney S.

    2014-02-17

    High-frequency performance of graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) has been limited largely by parasitic resistances, including contact resistance (R{sub C}) and access resistance (R{sub A}). Measurement of short-channel (500 nm) GFETs with short (200 nm) spin-on-doped source/drain access regions reveals negligible change in transit frequency (f{sub T}) after doping, as compared to ∼23% f{sub T} improvement for similarly sized undoped GFETs measured at low temperature, underscoring the impact of R{sub C} on high-frequency performance. DC measurements of undoped/doped short and long-channel GFETs highlight the increasing impact of R{sub A} for larger GFETs. Additionally, parasitic capacitances were minimized by device fabrication using graphene transferred onto low-capacitance quartz substrates.

  20. Multi-service small-cell cloud wired/wireless access network based on tunable optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Yu; Zhou, Kun; Yang, Liu; Pan, Lei; Liao, Zhen-wan; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a novel multi-service wired/wireless integrated access architecture of cloud radio access network (C-RAN) based on radio-over-fiber passive optical network (RoF-PON) system, which utilizes scalable multiple- frequency millimeter-wave (MF-MMW) generation based on tunable optical frequency comb (TOFC). In the baseband unit (BBU) pool, the generated optical comb lines are modulated into wired, RoF and WiFi/WiMAX signals, respectively. The multi-frequency RoF signals are generated by beating the optical comb line pairs in the small cell. The WiFi/WiMAX signals are demodulated after passing through the band pass filter (BPF) and band stop filter (BSF), respectively, whereas the wired signal can be received directly. The feasibility and scalability of the proposed multi-service wired/wireless integrated C-RAN are confirmed by the simulations.

  1. Spatial Release From Masking in Simulated Cochlear Implant Users With and Without Access to Low-Frequency Acoustic Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Mathias; Hohmann, Volker; Jürgens, Tim

    2015-01-01

    For normal-hearing listeners, speech intelligibility improves if speech and noise are spatially separated. While this spatial release from masking has already been quantified in normal-hearing listeners in many studies, it is less clear how spatial release from masking changes in cochlear implant listeners with and without access to low-frequency acoustic hearing. Spatial release from masking depends on differences in access to speech cues due to hearing status and hearing device. To investigate the influence of these factors on speech intelligibility, the present study measured speech reception thresholds in spatially separated speech and noise for 10 different listener types. A vocoder was used to simulate cochlear implant processing and low-frequency filtering was used to simulate residual low-frequency hearing. These forms of processing were combined to simulate cochlear implant listening, listening based on low-frequency residual hearing, and combinations thereof. Simulated cochlear implant users with additional low-frequency acoustic hearing showed better speech intelligibility in noise than simulated cochlear implant users without acoustic hearing and had access to more spatial speech cues (e.g., higher binaural squelch). Cochlear implant listener types showed higher spatial release from masking with bilateral access to low-frequency acoustic hearing than without. A binaural speech intelligibility model with normal binaural processing showed overall good agreement with measured speech reception thresholds, spatial release from masking, and spatial speech cues. This indicates that differences in speech cues available to listener types are sufficient to explain the changes of spatial release from masking across these simulated listener types. PMID:26721918

  2. Effects of the gaseous and liquid water content of the atmosphere on range delay and Doppler frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flock, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    When high precision is required for range measurement on Earth space paths, it is necessary to correct as accurately as possible for excess range delays due to the dry air, water vapor, and liquid water content of the atmosphere. Calculations based on representative values of atmospheric parameters are useful for illustrating the order of magnitude of the expected delays. Range delay, time delay, and phase delay are simply and directly related. Doppler frequency variations or noise are proportional to the time rate of change of excess range delay. Tropospheric effects were examined as part of an overall consideration of the capability of precision two way ranging and Doppler systems.

  3. The influence of interlayer exchange coupling in giant-magnetoresistive devices on spin diode effect in wide frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Ziętek, Sławomir Skowroński, Witold; Wiśniowski, Piotr; Czapkiewicz, Maciej; Stobiecki, Tomasz; Ogrodnik, Piotr; Barnaś, Józef

    2015-09-21

    Spin diode effect in a giant magnetoresistive strip is measured in a broad frequency range, including resonance and off-resonance frequencies. The off-resonance dc signal is relatively strong and also significantly dependent on the exchange coupling between magnetic films through the spacer layer. The measured dc signal is described theoretically by taking into account magnetic dynamics induced by Oersted field created by an ac current flowing through the system.

  4. Photonic chirped radio-frequency generator with ultra-fast sweeping rate and ultra-wide sweeping range.

    PubMed

    Wun, Jhih-Min; Wei, Chia-Chien; Chen, Jyehong; Goh, Chee Seong; Set, S Y; Shi, Jin-Wei

    2013-05-01

    A high-performance photonic sweeping-frequency (chirped) radio-frequency (RF) generator has been demonstrated. By use of a novel wavelength sweeping distributed-feedback (DFB) laser, which is operated based on the linewidth enhancement effect, a fixed wavelength narrow-linewidth DFB laser, and a wideband (dc to 50 GHz) photodiode module for the hetero-dyne beating RF signal generation, a very clear chirped RF waveform can be captured by a fast real-time scope. A very-high frequency sweeping rate (10.3 GHz/μs) with an ultra-wide RF frequency sweeping range (~40 GHz) have been demonstrated. The high-repeatability (~97%) in sweeping frequency has been verified by analyzing tens of repetitive chirped waveforms.

  5. Oscillating two stream instability of electromagnetic pump in the ion cyclotron range of frequency in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Nafis; Tripathi, V. K.; Rafat, M.; Husain, Mudassir M.

    2009-06-15

    An analytical formalism of oscillating two stream instability of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave in the ion cyclotron range of frequency in a plasma is developed. The instability produces electrostatic ion cyclotron sidebands and a driven low frequency mode. The nonlinear coupling arises primarily due to the motion of ions and is strong when the pump frequency is close to ion cyclotron frequency and the oscillatory ion velocity is a significant fraction of acoustic speed. For propagation perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, the X-mode pump wave produces flute type perturbation with maximum growth rate at some specific wavelengths, which are three to four times larger than the ion Larmor radius. For propagation at oblique angles to ambient magnetic field, the ion cyclotron O-mode, the growth rate increases with the wave number of the low frequency mode.

  6. Wide-frequency range, dynamic matching network and power system for the “Shoelace” radio frequency antenna on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Golfinopoulos, Theodore LaBombard, Brian; Burke, William; Parker, Ronald R.; Parkin, William; Woskov, Paul

    2014-04-15

    A wide-frequency range (50–300 kHz) power system has been implemented for use with a new RF antenna – the “Shoelace” antenna – built to drive coherent plasma fluctuations in the edge of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. A custom, dynamically tunable matching network allows two commercial 1 kW, 50-Ω RF amplifiers to drive the low-impedance, inductive load presented by the antenna. This is accomplished by a discretely variable L-match network, with 81 independently selected steps available for each of the series and parallel legs of the matching configuration. A compact programmable logic device provides a control system that measures the frequency with better than 1 kHz accuracy and transitions to the correct tuning state in less than 1 ms. At least 85% of source power is dissipated in the antenna across the operational frequency range, with a minimum frequency slew rate of 1 MHz/s; the best performance is achieved in the narrower band from 80 to 150 kHz which is of interest in typical experiments. The RF frequency can be run with open-loop control, following a pre-programmed analog waveform, or phase-locked to track a plasma fluctuation diagnostic signal in real time with programmable phase delay; the amplitude control is always open-loop. The control waveforms and phase delay are programmed remotely. These tools have enabled first-of-a-kind measurements of the tokamak edge plasma system response in the frequency range and at the wave number at which coherent fluctuations regulate heat and particle transport through the plasma boundary.

  7. Wide-frequency range, dynamic matching network and power system for the "Shoelace" radio frequency antenna on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak.

    PubMed

    Golfinopoulos, Theodore; LaBombard, Brian; Burke, William; Parker, Ronald R; Parkin, William; Woskov, Paul

    2014-04-01

    A wide-frequency range (50-300 kHz) power system has been implemented for use with a new RF antenna - the "Shoelace" antenna - built to drive coherent plasma fluctuations in the edge of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. A custom, dynamically tunable matching network allows two commercial 1 kW, 50-Ω RF amplifiers to drive the low-impedance, inductive load presented by the antenna. This is accomplished by a discretely variable L-match network, with 81 independently selected steps available for each of the series and parallel legs of the matching configuration. A compact programmable logic device provides a control system that measures the frequency with better than 1 kHz accuracy and transitions to the correct tuning state in less than 1 ms. At least 85% of source power is dissipated in the antenna across the operational frequency range, with a minimum frequency slew rate of 1 MHz/s; the best performance is achieved in the narrower band from 80 to 150 kHz which is of interest in typical experiments. The RF frequency can be run with open-loop control, following a pre-programmed analog waveform, or phase-locked to track a plasma fluctuation diagnostic signal in real time with programmable phase delay; the amplitude control is always open-loop. The control waveforms and phase delay are programmed remotely. These tools have enabled first-of-a-kind measurements of the tokamak edge plasma system response in the frequency range and at the wave number at which coherent fluctuations regulate heat and particle transport through the plasma boundary.

  8. Wide-frequency range, dynamic matching network and power system for the "Shoelace" radio frequency antenna on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golfinopoulos, Theodore; LaBombard, Brian; Burke, William; Parker, Ronald R.; Parkin, William; Woskov, Paul

    2014-04-01

    A wide-frequency range (50-300 kHz) power system has been implemented for use with a new RF antenna - the "Shoelace" antenna - built to drive coherent plasma fluctuations in the edge of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. A custom, dynamically tunable matching network allows two commercial 1 kW, 50-Ω RF amplifiers to drive the low-impedance, inductive load presented by the antenna. This is accomplished by a discretely variable L-match network, with 81 independently selected steps available for each of the series and parallel legs of the matching configuration. A compact programmable logic device provides a control system that measures the frequency with better than 1 kHz accuracy and transitions to the correct tuning state in less than 1 ms. At least 85% of source power is dissipated in the antenna across the operational frequency range, with a minimum frequency slew rate of 1 MHz/s; the best performance is achieved in the narrower band from 80 to 150 kHz which is of interest in typical experiments. The RF frequency can be run with open-loop control, following a pre-programmed analog waveform, or phase-locked to track a plasma fluctuation diagnostic signal in real time with programmable phase delay; the amplitude control is always open-loop. The control waveforms and phase delay are programmed remotely. These tools have enabled first-of-a-kind measurements of the tokamak edge plasma system response in the frequency range and at the wave number at which coherent fluctuations regulate heat and particle transport through the plasma boundary.

  9. Dielectric properties of skeletal muscle during ischemia in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 200 MHz.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, M; Kirlum, H J; Schlegel, C; Gebhard, M M

    1999-04-20

    The complex dielectric properties of canine skeletal muscles were measured at 25 degrees C during ischemia in the frequency range from 50 Hz to 200 MHz. The dielectric spectrum of skeletal muscle shows an alpha-dispersion below 1 kHz and a beta-dispersion with a relaxation frequency of about 100 kHz. The alpha-dispersion disappears between 450 and 500 min of ischemia time, the same time during which mechanical contraction was observed, and was restored later. During ischemia, the beta-dispersion is shifted continuously to higher frequencies; and at frequencies above 50 MHz, a decrease of the real part of the dielectric permittivity was measured. The dielectric loss factor decreases during ischemia at frequencies below 500 kHz, only interrupted by a short increase, coinciding with the disappearance of the alpha-dispersion. The principal processes that happen during ischemia inside the skeletal muscle tissues were studied with the help of a model especially designed to simulate membrane effects on the dielectric spectrum. The disappearance of the alpha-dispersion is explained by an increase of conductivity in the membrane of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Shifting beta-dispersion to higher frequencies is a result of metabolically produced ions and therefore increasing conductivity of the intracellular medium. Decreasing dielectric permittivity at frequencies above 50 MHz and decreasing dielectric loss factor at low frequencies are caused by the cell edema.

  10. Measurements of ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) loading with a ridged waveguide coupler on PLT

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.J.; Wilson, J.R.; Colestock, P.L.; Fortgang, C.M.; Hosea, J.C.; Hwang, D.Q.; Nagy, A.

    1987-11-01

    An ICRF ridged waveguide coupler has been installed on PLT for measurements of plasma loading. The coupler was partially filled with TiO/sub 2/ dielectric in order to sufficiently lower the cutoff frequency and utilized a tapered ridge for improved matching. Vacuum field measurements indicated a single propagating mode in the coupler and emphasized the importance of considering the fringing fields at the mouth of the waveguide. Low power experiments were carried out at 72.6 and 95.0 MHz without any external impedance matching network. Plasma loading increased rapidly as the face of the coupler approached the plasma, and, at fixed position, increased with line-averaged plasma density. At the lower frequency, the reflection coefficient exhibited a minimum (<8%) at a particular coupler position. At both frequencies, measurements indicated efficient power coupling to the plasma. Magnetic probe signals showed evidence of dense eigenmodes suggesting excitation of the fast wave. 24 refs., 13 figs.

  11. A comparison of Frequency Domain Multiple Access (FDMA) and Time Domain Multiple Access (TDMA) approaches to satellite service for low data rate Earth stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, G.

    1983-01-01

    A technological and economic assessment is made of providing low data rate service to small earth stations by satellite at Ka-band. Various Frequency Domain Multiple Access (FDMA) and Time Domain Multiple Access (TDMA) scenarios are examined and compared on the basis of cost to the end user. Very small stations (1 to 2 meters in diameter) are found not to be viable alternatives to available terrestrial services. However, medium size (3 to 5 meters) earth stations appear to be very competitive if a minimum throughput of about 1.5 Mbs is maintained. This constrains the use of such terminals to large users and shared use by smaller users. No advantage was found to the use of FDMA. TDMA had a slight advantage from a total system viewpoint and a very significant advantage in the space segment (about 1/3 the required payload weight for an equivalent capacity).

  12. Efficient treatment of stacked metasurfaces for optimizing and enhancing the range of accessible optical functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, C.; Sperrhake, J.; Pertsch, T.

    2016-06-01

    We present, discuss, and validate an adapted S -matrix formalism for an efficient, simplified treatment of stacked homogeneous periodically structured metasurfaces operated under normally incident plane wave excitation. The proposed formalism can be applied to any material system, arbitrarily shaped metaatoms, at any frequency, and with arbitrary subwavelength periods. Circumventing the introduction of any kind of effective parameters we directly use the S parameters of the individual metasurfaces to calculate the response of an arbitrary stack. In fact, the S parameters are the complex parameters of choice fully characterizing the homogeneous metasurfaces, in particular with respect to its polarization manipulating properties. Just as effective material parameters like the permittivity and the permeability or wave parameters like the propagation constant and the impedance, the stacking based upon S matrices can be applied as long as the individual layers are decoupled with respect to their near fields. This requirement eventually sets the limits for using the optical properties of the individual layers to calculate the response of the stacked system—this being the conceptual aim for any homogeneous metasurface or metamaterial layer and therefore the essence of what is eventually possible with homogeneous metasurfaces. As simple and appealing as this approach is, it is as powerful as well: Combining structured metasurfaces with each other as well as with isotropic, anisotropic, or chiral homogeneous layers is possible by simple semianalytical S -matrix multiplication. Hence, complex stacks and resonators can be set up, accurately treated and optimized with respect to their dispersive polarization sensitive optical functionality without the need for further rigorous full-wave simulations.

  13. THz-range generation frequency growth in semiconductor superlattice coupled to external high-quality resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Vladimir V.; Maksimenko, Vladimir A.; Khramova, Marina V.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate effects of a linear resonator on spatial electron dynamics in semiconductor superlattice. We have shown that coupling the external resonant system to superlattice leads to occurrence of the additional area of negative differential conductance on the current-voltage characteristic, which does not occur in autonomous system. Furthermore, this region shows great increase of generation frequency, that contains practical interest.

  14. Three dimensional ray tracing of the Jovian magnetosphere in the low frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Ray tracing studies of Jovian low frequency emissions were studied. A comprehensive three-dimensional ray tracing computer code for examination of model Jovian decametric (DAM) emission was developed. The improvements to the computer code are outlined and described. The results of the ray tracings of Jovian emissions will be presented in summary form.

  15. New space research frequency band proposals in the 20- to 40.5-GHz range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, D. F.

    1991-01-01

    Future space research communications systems may require spectra above 20 GHz. Frequency bands above 20 GHz are identified that are suitable for space research. The selection of the proper bands depends on consideration of interference with other radio services, adequate bandwidths, link performance, and technical requirements for practical implementation.

  16. In vitro Neurons in Mammalian Cortical Layer 4 Exhibit Intrinsic Oscillatory Activity in the 10- to 50-Hz Frequency Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinas, Rodolfo R.; Grace, Anthony A.; Yarom, Yosef

    1991-02-01

    We report here the presence of fast subthreshold oscillatory potentials recorded in vitro from neurons within layer 4 of the guinea pig frontal cortex. Two types of oscillatory neurons were recorded: (i) One type exhibited subthreshold oscillations whose frequency increased with membrane depolarization and encompassed a range of 10-45 Hz. Action potentials in this type of neuron demonstrated clear after-hyperpolarizations. (ii) The second type of neuron was characterized by narrow-frequency oscillations near 35-50 Hz. These oscillations often outlasted the initiating depolarizing stimulus. No calcium component could be identified in their action potential. In both types of cell the subthreshold oscillations were tetrodotoxin-sensitive, indicating that the depolarizing phase of the oscillation was generated by a voltage-dependent sodium conductance. The initial depolarizing phase was followed by a potassium conductance responsible for the falling phase of the oscillatory wave. In both types of cell, the subthreshold oscillation could trigger spikes at the oscillatory frequency, if the membrane was sufficiently depolarized. Combining intracellular recordings with Lucifer yellow staining showed that the narrow-frequency oscillatory activity was produced by a sparsely spinous interneuron located in layer 4 of the cortex. This neuron has extensive local axonal collaterals that ramify in layers 3 and 4 such that they may contribute to the columnar synchronization of activity in the 40- to 50-Hz range. Cortical activity in this frequency range has been proposed as the basis for the "conjunctive properties" of central nervous system networks.

  17. Wide-range frequency selectivity in an acoustic sensor fabricated using a microbeam array with non-uniform thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintaku, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Takayuki; Zusho, Kazuki; Kotera, Hidetoshi; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we have demonstrated the fabrication of a microbeam array (MBA) with various thicknesses and investigated the suitability it for an acoustic sensor with wide-range frequency selectivity. For this, an MBA composed of 64 beams, with thicknesses varying from 2.99-142 µm, was fabricated by using single gray-scale lithography and a thick negative photoresist. The vibration of the beams in air was measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer; the resonant frequencies of the beams were measured to be from 11.5 to 290 kHz. Lastly, the frequency range of the MBA with non-uniform thickness was 10.9 times that of the MBA with uniform thickness.

  18. Cryocooled terahertz photoconductive detector system with background-limited performance in 1.5–4 THz frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Makoto; Hiromoto, Norihisa

    2015-10-15

    We describe a 4-K-cryocooled dual-band terahertz (THz) photoconductive detector system with background-limited performance. The detector system comprises two THz photoconductive detectors covering a response in a wide frequency range from 1.5 to 4 THz, low noise amplifiers, optical low-pass filters to eliminate input radiation of higher frequencies, and a mechanical 4 K Gifford-McMahon refrigerator that provides practical and convenient operation without a liquid He container. The electrical and optical performances of the THz detector system were evaluated at a detector temperature of 4 K under 300 K background radiation. We proved that the detector system can achieve background-limited noise-equivalent-power on the order of 10{sup −14} W/Hz{sup 1/2} in the frequency range from 1.5 to 4 THz even if the vibration noise of the mechanical refrigerator is present.

  19. Cryocooled terahertz photoconductive detector system with background-limited performance in 1.5-4 THz frequency range.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Makoto; Hiromoto, Norihisa

    2015-10-01

    We describe a 4-K-cryocooled dual-band terahertz (THz) photoconductive detector system with background-limited performance. The detector system comprises two THz photoconductive detectors covering a response in a wide frequency range from 1.5 to 4 THz, low noise amplifiers, optical low-pass filters to eliminate input radiation of higher frequencies, and a mechanical 4 K Gifford-McMahon refrigerator that provides practical and convenient operation without a liquid He container. The electrical and optical performances of the THz detector system were evaluated at a detector temperature of 4 K under 300 K background radiation. We proved that the detector system can achieve background-limited noise-equivalent-power on the order of 10(-14) W/Hz(1/2) in the frequency range from 1.5 to 4 THz even if the vibration noise of the mechanical refrigerator is present.

  20. Effects of body size and home range on access to mates and paternity in male bridled nailtail wallabies.

    PubMed

    Fisher; Lara

    1999-07-01

    The bridled nailtail wallaby, Onychogalea fraenata, is a relatively small, solitary and sexually size dimorphic macropod. We studied the mating system of free-ranging wallabies over 3 years, using microsatellite analysis of paternity, radiotelemetry and behavioural observations. Both sexes were promiscuous, and general reproductive behaviour was similar to that of larger, better-known macropods. Home range size influenced the number of associations with oestrous females, and was a significant component of male reproductive success. Female population density varied within the site, but males with home ranges that overlapped more females did not sire more offspring. Aggression between males occurred only around oestrous females and males did not establish a predetermined dominance hierarchy. Male body weight strongly influenced priority of access to oestrous females, and was related to age. The number of times that males were seen closest to an oestrous female when other males were present (priority of access) was the most important predictor of variation in the number of offspring sired. Females mated with several males within and between oestrous cycles, and may have influenced male-male competition by prolonging advertisement of approaching oestrus, expanding their home ranges at oestrus and engaging in mate chases that attracted groups of up to six males. Despite overall similarities in the mating system of this species and that of other macropods, male mating success may be less skewed in bridled nailtail wallabies than in other species, although paternity analysis of free-ranging populations of other species is required to confirm this conclusion. Copyright 1999 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. PMID:10413548

  1. Comment on "Mode Conversion of Waves In The Ion-Cyclotron Frequency Range in Magnetospheric Plasmas"

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun; Johnson, J. R.

    2014-02-01

    Recently, Kazakov and Fulop [1] studied mode conversion (MC) at the ion-ion hybrid (IIH) resonance in planetary magnetospheric plasmas by simplifying the dispersion relation of the fast wave (FW) modes to describe a cutoff-resonance (CR) pair near the IIH resonance, which can be reduced to a Budden problem. They suggested that when the IIH resonance frequency (ωS) approaches the crossover frequency (ωcr), and the parallel wavenumber (k∥) is close to the critical wavenumber k* ∥(ωS = ωcr), MC can be efficient for arbitrary heavy ion density ratios. In this Comment, we argue that (a) the FW dispersion relation cannot be simplified to the CR pair especially near ωcr because in many parameter regimes there is a cutoff-resonance-cutoff (CRC) triplet that completely changes the wave absorption; and (b) the maximum MC efficiency does not always occur near k∥ ≈ k*∥∥.

  2. Measurement of ion motional heating rates over a range of trap frequencies and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzewicz, C. D.; Sage, J. M.; Chiaverini, J.

    2015-04-01

    We present measurements of the motional heating rate of a trapped ion at different trap frequencies and temperatures between ˜0.6 and 1.5 MHz and ˜4 and 295 K. Additionally, we examine the possible effect of adsorbed surface contaminants with boiling points below ˜105 ∘C by measuring the ion heating rate before and after locally baking our ion trap chip under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. We compare the heating rates presented here to those calculated from available electric-field noise models. We can tightly constrain a subset of these models based on their expected frequency and temperature scaling interdependence. Discrepancies between the measured results and predicted values point to the need for refinement of theoretical noise models in order to more fully understand the mechanisms behind motional trapped-ion heating.

  3. Ion heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in the Wisconsin Tokapole II

    SciTech Connect

    Biddle, A. P.

    1980-06-01

    Ion temperatures of 75 eV, a doubling of the ohmic heating temperature in a normal discharge, have been achieved using the fast magnetosonic wave heating at the second, third, and fourth harmonics of the cyclotron frequency in a single component hydrogen plasma. The wave launching structure is a single turn, shielded, insulated loop which constitutes the inductor of the rf source tank circuit. Power levels of 800 kW have been applied to the plasma for periods of up to 1.1 milliseconds. Good agreement has been found between theory and experiment for loading and wave propagation in the plasma for m = 0 and m = +1 modes. Eigenmodes have been observed by peaking of both the rf wave amplitude and the loading of the oscillator, as well as by oscillator frequency shifts imposed by their passage.

  4. Mechanical behavior of the fingertip in the range of frequencies and displacements relevant to touch.

    PubMed

    Wiertlewski, Michael; Hayward, Vincent

    2012-07-26

    It was previously suggested that the mechanical properties of the fingertip could be characterized by elasticity from dc to about 100Hz and by viscosity above this frequency. Using a specifically designed high mobility probe, we accurately measured the impedance of the fingertips of seven participants under a variety of conditions relevant to purposeful touch. Direct measurements vindicated previous indirect observations. We also characterized the dependency of the fingertip impedance upon normal load, orientation, and time.

  5. [The biological activity of a decameter-range electromagnetic field with a frequency of 24 MHz].

    PubMed

    Bezdol'naia, I S; Dumanskiĭ, Iu D; Smolia, A L

    1991-03-01

    A study of behavioural reactions indicates that the effect of 24 MHz frequencies of the electromagnetic field results in changes of the ratio of excitatory and inhibitory processes in the nervous system of white rats with prevalence of inhibitory processes. By the 90-th day of effect of the above factor all changes returned to the initial level. This indicates stability of the adaptative reactions of the integrative level of the nervous system to the acting factor. PMID:2042349

  6. [The mosaic structure of the high-frequency range of neocortical electrical activity in dogs].

    PubMed

    Dumenko, V N; Kozlov, M K

    2000-01-01

    The study was aimed to reveal the subbands of correlated changes in power spectral density of brain electrical activity (EA), including the low-voltage (up to 10 microV) high-frequency (HF) components (40-200 Hz) in dogs during instrumental conditioning by means of factor analysis. The values of the EA spectral density in interstimulus intervals calculated with a resolution of 1 Hz were used for subsequent factor analysis (the standard principle component technique with varimax rotation). Twenty factors could explain about 80% of total variance. The groups of frequencies which were presented by comparatively narrow peaks (2-3 points) of high loads (more than 0.6) of single factors ("stable" factors) were taken into consideration. In the process of conditioning the factor organization of the EA became substantially complicated, the number of the "stable" factors increased. It was originally shown that the high loads of these factors divided the HF band in comparatively narrow frequency subbands, which appear to reflect the functional mosaics in the neocortex.

  7. Multi-pulse frequency shifted (MPFS) multiple access modulation for ultra wideband

    DOEpatents

    Nekoogar, Faranak; Dowla, Farid U.

    2012-01-24

    The multi-pulse frequency shifted technique uses mutually orthogonal short duration pulses o transmit and receive information in a UWB multiuser communication system. The multiuser system uses the same pulse shape with different frequencies for the reference and data for each user. Different users have a different pulse shape (mutually orthogonal to each other) and different transmit and reference frequencies. At the receiver, the reference pulse is frequency shifted to match the data pulse and a correlation scheme followed by a hard decision block detects the data.

  8. Distribution of interaural time difference in the barn owl's inferior colliculus in the low- and high-frequency ranges.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Hermann; Asadollahi, Ali; Bremen, Peter; Endler, Frank; Vonderschen, Katrin; von Campenhausen, Mark

    2007-04-11

    Interaural time differences are an important cue for azimuthal sound localization. It is still unclear whether the same neuronal mechanisms underlie the representation in the brain of interaural time difference in different vertebrates and whether these mechanisms are driven by common constraints, such as optimal coding. Current sound localization models may be discriminated by studying the spectral distribution of response peaks in tuning curves that measure the sensitivity to interaural time difference. The sound localization system of the barn owl has been studied intensively, but data that would allow discrimination between currently discussed models are missing from this animal. We have therefore obtained extracellular recordings from the time-sensitive subnuclei of the barn owl's inferior colliculus. Response peaks were broadly scattered over the physiological range of interaural time differences. A change in the representation of the interaural phase differences with frequency was not observed. In some neurons, response peaks fell outside the physiological range of interaural time differences. For a considerable number of neurons, the peak closest to zero interaural time difference was not the behaviorally relevant peak. The data are in best accordance with models suggesting that a place code underlies the representation of interaural time difference. The data from the high-frequency range, but not from the low-frequency range, are consistent with predictions of optimal coding. We speculate that the deviation of the representation of interaural time difference from optimal-coding models in the low-frequency range is attributable to the diminished importance of low frequencies for catching prey in this species. PMID:17428997

  9. An objective approach to determining the weight ranges of prey preferred by and accessible to the five large African carnivores.

    PubMed

    Clements, Hayley S; Tambling, Craig J; Hayward, Matt W; Kerley, Graham I H

    2014-01-01

    Broad-scale models describing predator prey preferences serve as useful departure points for understanding predator-prey interactions at finer scales. Previous analyses used a subjective approach to identify prey weight preferences of the five large African carnivores, hence their accuracy is questionable. This study uses a segmented model of prey weight versus prey preference to objectively quantify the prey weight preferences of the five large African carnivores. Based on simulations of known predator prey preference, for prey species sample sizes above 32 the segmented model approach detects up to four known changes in prey weight preference (represented by model break-points) with high rates of detection (75% to 100% of simulations, depending on number of break-points) and accuracy (within 1.3±4.0 to 2.7±4.4 of known break-point). When applied to the five large African carnivores, using carnivore diet information from across Africa, the model detected weight ranges of prey that are preferred, killed relative to their abundance, and avoided by each carnivore. Prey in the weight ranges preferred and killed relative to their abundance are together termed "accessible prey". Accessible prey weight ranges were found to be 14-135 kg for cheetah Acinonyx jubatus, 1-45 kg for leopard Panthera pardus, 32-632 kg for lion Panthera leo, 15-1600 kg for spotted hyaena Crocuta crocuta and 10-289 kg for wild dog Lycaon pictus. An assessment of carnivore diets throughout Africa found these accessible prey weight ranges include 88±2% (cheetah), 82±3% (leopard), 81±2% (lion), 97±2% (spotted hyaena) and 96±2% (wild dog) of kills. These descriptions of prey weight preferences therefore contribute to our understanding of the diet spectrum of the five large African carnivores. Where datasets meet the minimum sample size requirements, the segmented model approach provides a means of determining, and comparing, the prey weight range preferences of any carnivore species. PMID

  10. An Objective Approach to Determining the Weight Ranges of Prey Preferred by and Accessible to the Five Large African Carnivores

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Hayley S.; Tambling, Craig J.; Hayward, Matt W.; Kerley, Graham I. H.

    2014-01-01

    Broad-scale models describing predator prey preferences serve as useful departure points for understanding predator-prey interactions at finer scales. Previous analyses used a subjective approach to identify prey weight preferences of the five large African carnivores, hence their accuracy is questionable. This study uses a segmented model of prey weight versus prey preference to objectively quantify the prey weight preferences of the five large African carnivores. Based on simulations of known predator prey preference, for prey species sample sizes above 32 the segmented model approach detects up to four known changes in prey weight preference (represented by model break-points) with high rates of detection (75% to 100% of simulations, depending on number of break-points) and accuracy (within 1.3±4.0 to 2.7±4.4 of known break-point). When applied to the five large African carnivores, using carnivore diet information from across Africa, the model detected weight ranges of prey that are preferred, killed relative to their abundance, and avoided by each carnivore. Prey in the weight ranges preferred and killed relative to their abundance are together termed “accessible prey”. Accessible prey weight ranges were found to be 14–135 kg for cheetah Acinonyx jubatus, 1–45 kg for leopard Panthera pardus, 32–632 kg for lion Panthera leo, 15–1600 kg for spotted hyaena Crocuta crocuta and 10–289 kg for wild dog Lycaon pictus. An assessment of carnivore diets throughout Africa found these accessible prey weight ranges include 88±2% (cheetah), 82±3% (leopard), 81±2% (lion), 97±2% (spotted hyaena) and 96±2% (wild dog) of kills. These descriptions of prey weight preferences therefore contribute to our understanding of the diet spectrum of the five large African carnivores. Where datasets meet the minimum sample size requirements, the segmented model approach provides a means of determining, and comparing, the prey weight range preferences of any carnivore

  11. An objective approach to determining the weight ranges of prey preferred by and accessible to the five large African carnivores.

    PubMed

    Clements, Hayley S; Tambling, Craig J; Hayward, Matt W; Kerley, Graham I H

    2014-01-01

    Broad-scale models describing predator prey preferences serve as useful departure points for understanding predator-prey interactions at finer scales. Previous analyses used a subjective approach to identify prey weight preferences of the five large African carnivores, hence their accuracy is questionable. This study uses a segmented model of prey weight versus prey preference to objectively quantify the prey weight preferences of the five large African carnivores. Based on simulations of known predator prey preference, for prey species sample sizes above 32 the segmented model approach detects up to four known changes in prey weight preference (represented by model break-points) with high rates of detection (75% to 100% of simulations, depending on number of break-points) and accuracy (within 1.3±4.0 to 2.7±4.4 of known break-point). When applied to the five large African carnivores, using carnivore diet information from across Africa, the model detected weight ranges of prey that are preferred, killed relative to their abundance, and avoided by each carnivore. Prey in the weight ranges preferred and killed relative to their abundance are together termed "accessible prey". Accessible prey weight ranges were found to be 14-135 kg for cheetah Acinonyx jubatus, 1-45 kg for leopard Panthera pardus, 32-632 kg for lion Panthera leo, 15-1600 kg for spotted hyaena Crocuta crocuta and 10-289 kg for wild dog Lycaon pictus. An assessment of carnivore diets throughout Africa found these accessible prey weight ranges include 88±2% (cheetah), 82±3% (leopard), 81±2% (lion), 97±2% (spotted hyaena) and 96±2% (wild dog) of kills. These descriptions of prey weight preferences therefore contribute to our understanding of the diet spectrum of the five large African carnivores. Where datasets meet the minimum sample size requirements, the segmented model approach provides a means of determining, and comparing, the prey weight range preferences of any carnivore species.

  12. Electron beam excitation of upstream waves in the whistler mode frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Hung K.; Smith, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    We examine whistler mode instabilities arising from electron beams in interplanetary space at 1 AU. Both parallel and obliquely propagating solutions are considered. We demonstrate that the generation of two simultaneous whistler mode waves is possible, and even reasonably likely, for beam parameters frequently encountered upstream of the Earth's bow shock and at interplanetary shocks. We also explore the generation of left-hand polarized waves at whistler mode frequencies under these same conditions. We offer both parametric variations derived from numerical solutions of the various instabilities as well as an analytical treatment of the problem which succeeds in unifying the various numerical results.

  13. High resolution kilometric range optical telemetry in air by radio frequency phase measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillory, Joffray; Šmíd, Radek; García-Márquez, Jorge; Truong, Daniel; Alexandre, Christophe; Wallerand, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an optical Absolute Distance Meter (ADM) based on the measurement of the phase accumulated by a Radio Frequency wave during its propagation in the air by a laser beam. In this article, the ADM principle will be described and the main results will be presented. In particular, we will emphasize how the choice of an appropriate photodetector can significantly improve the telemeter performances by minimizing the amplitude to phase conversion. Our prototype, tested in the field, has proven its efficiency with a resolution better than 15 μm for a measurement time of 10 ms and distances up to 1.2 km.

  14. Improving Processes of Mechanized Pulsed Arc Welding of Low-Frequency Range Variation of Mode Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraev, Yu N.; Solodskiy, S. A.; Ulyanova, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    A new technology of low-frequency modulation of the arc current in MAG and MIG welding is presented. The technology provides control of thermal and crystallization processes, stabilizes the time of formation and crystallization of the weld pool. Conducting theoretical studies allowed formulating the basic criteria for obtaining strong permanent joints for high-duty structures, providing conditions for more equilibrium structure of the deposited metal and the smaller width of the HAZ. The stabilization of time of the formation and crystallization of the weld pool improves the formation of the weld and increases productivity in welding thin sheet metal.

  15. High resolution kilometric range optical telemetry in air by radio frequency phase measurement.

    PubMed

    Guillory, Joffray; Šmíd, Radek; García-Márquez, Jorge; Truong, Daniel; Alexandre, Christophe; Wallerand, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an optical Absolute Distance Meter (ADM) based on the measurement of the phase accumulated by a Radio Frequency wave during its propagation in the air by a laser beam. In this article, the ADM principle will be described and the main results will be presented. In particular, we will emphasize how the choice of an appropriate photodetector can significantly improve the telemeter performances by minimizing the amplitude to phase conversion. Our prototype, tested in the field, has proven its efficiency with a resolution better than 15 μm for a measurement time of 10 ms and distances up to 1.2 km.

  16. Motion artifacts in optical coherence tomography with frequency-domain ranging

    PubMed Central

    Yun, S. H.; Tearney, G. J.; de Boer, J. F.; Bouma, B. E.

    2009-01-01

    We describe results of theoretical and experimental investigations of artifacts that can arise in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) as a result of sample or probe beam motion. While SD-OCT and OFDI are based on similar spectral interferometric principles, the specifics of motion effects are quite different because of distinct signal acquisition methods. These results provide an understanding of motion artifacts such as signal fading, spatial distortion and blurring, and emphasize the need for fast image acquisition in biomedical applications. PMID:19483816

  17. High resolution kilometric range optical telemetry in air by radio frequency phase measurement.

    PubMed

    Guillory, Joffray; Šmíd, Radek; García-Márquez, Jorge; Truong, Daniel; Alexandre, Christophe; Wallerand, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an optical Absolute Distance Meter (ADM) based on the measurement of the phase accumulated by a Radio Frequency wave during its propagation in the air by a laser beam. In this article, the ADM principle will be described and the main results will be presented. In particular, we will emphasize how the choice of an appropriate photodetector can significantly improve the telemeter performances by minimizing the amplitude to phase conversion. Our prototype, tested in the field, has proven its efficiency with a resolution better than 15 μm for a measurement time of 10 ms and distances up to 1.2 km. PMID:27475593

  18. Study of transmission line attenuation in broad band millimeter wave frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Hitesh Kumar B.; Austin, M. E.; Ellis, R. F.

    2013-10-15

    Broad band millimeter wave transmission lines are used in fusion plasma diagnostics such as electron cyclotron emission (ECE), electron cyclotron absorption, reflectometry and interferometry systems. In particular, the ECE diagnostic for ITER will require efficient transmission over an ultra wide band, 100 to 1000 GHz. A circular corrugated waveguide transmission line is a prospective candidate to transmit such wide band with low attenuation. To evaluate this system, experiments of transmission line attenuation were performed and compared with theoretical loss calculations. A millimeter wave Michelson interferometer and a liquid nitrogen black body source are used to perform all the experiments. Atmospheric water vapor lines and continuum absorption within this band are reported. Ohmic attenuation in corrugated waveguide is very low; however, there is Bragg scattering and higher order mode conversion that can cause significant attenuation in this transmission line. The attenuation due to miter bends, gaps, joints, and curvature are estimated. The measured attenuation of 15 m length with seven miter bends and eighteen joints is 1 dB at low frequency (300 GHz) and 10 dB at high frequency (900 GHz), respectively.

  19. Plasma channel produced by femtosecond laser pulses as a medium for amplifying electromagnetic radiation of the subterahertz frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Bogatskaya, A V; Volkova, E A; Popov, A M

    2013-12-31

    The electron energy distribution function in the plasma channel produced by a femtosecond laser pulse with a wavelength of 248 nm in atmospheric-pressure gases was considered. Conditions were determined whereby this channel may be employed for amplifying electromagnetic waves up to the terahertz frequency range over the energy spectrum relaxation time ∼10{sup -7} s. Gains were calculated as functions of time and radiation frequency. The effect of electron – electron collisions on the rate of relaxation processes in the plasma and on its ability to amplify the electromagnetic radiation was investigated. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  20. A new ionosphere-free ambiguity resolution method for long-range baseline with GNSS triple-frequency signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ying; Ji, Shengyue; Chen, Wu; Weng, Duojie

    2015-10-01

    New GNSS systems (i.e. GPS modernization, BeiDou, and Galileo) will provide multiple navigation signals for reliable navigation services. The triple or even multiple frequency signals are expected to bring great benefits to the ambiguity resolution (AR) over long-range baselines, which is always regarded as a huge challenge. Another issue in the long baseline AR is the unmodeled ionospheric delay, which is one of the major errors in ranging signals. A new triple-frequency, ionosphere-free technique for ambiguity resolution of long-range baseline is developed in this study. In this technique, the optimal observation combinations are chosen considering the effect of ionospheric delay. At the same time, using this technique, the double difference (DD) ionospheric delay is nullified in the ambiguity search process. The performance of the new technique is examined using the simulated GPS triple frequency data as well as the real BDS observation. Results show that the ambiguity can be fixed within 10 min for GPS and BDS long-range baselines with this new technique.

  1. Frontside-micromachined planar piezoresistive vibration sensor: Evaluating performance in the low frequency test range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lan; Lu, Jian; Takagi, Hideki; Maeda, Ryutaro

    2014-01-01

    Using a surface piezoresistor diffusion method and front-side only micromachining process, a planar piezoresistive vibration sensor was successfully developed with a simple structure, lower processing cost and fewer packaging difficulties. The vibration sensor had a large sector proof mass attached to a narrow flexure. Optimization of the boron diffusion piezoresistor placed on the edge of the narrow flexure greatly improved the sensitivity. Planar vibration sensors were fabricated and measured in order to analyze the effects of the sensor dimensions on performance, including the values of flexure width and the included angle of the sector. Sensitivities of fabricated planar sensors of 0.09-0.46 mV/V/g were measured up to a test frequency of 60 Hz. The sensor functioned at low voltages (<3 V) and currents (<1 mA) with a high sensitivity and low drift. At low background noise levels, the sensor had performance comparable to a commercial device.

  2. Frontside-micromachined planar piezoresistive vibration sensor: Evaluating performance in the low frequency test range

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lan; Lu, Jian Takagi, Hideki; Maeda, Ryutaro

    2014-01-15

    Using a surface piezoresistor diffusion method and front-side only micromachining process, a planar piezoresistive vibration sensor was successfully developed with a simple structure, lower processing cost and fewer packaging difficulties. The vibration sensor had a large sector proof mass attached to a narrow flexure. Optimization of the boron diffusion piezoresistor placed on the edge of the narrow flexure greatly improved the sensitivity. Planar vibration sensors were fabricated and measured in order to analyze the effects of the sensor dimensions on performance, including the values of flexure width and the included angle of the sector. Sensitivities of fabricated planar sensors of 0.09–0.46 mV/V/g were measured up to a test frequency of 60 Hz. The sensor functioned at low voltages (<3 V) and currents (<1 mA) with a high sensitivity and low drift. At low background noise levels, the sensor had performance comparable to a commercial device.

  3. Observation of ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) wave-packet propagation in a tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.J.; Gould, R.W.

    1987-11-01

    Experimental observation of ICRF wave-packet propagation in a tokamak plasma is reported. Studies were carried out in the Caltech Research Tokamak in a pure hydrogen plasma and in a regime where fast-wave damping was sufficiently small to permit multiple toroidal transits of the wave-packet. Waves were launched by exciting a small loop antenna with a short burst of rf current and were detected with shielded magnetic probes. Probe scans revealed a large increase in wave-packet amplitude at smaller minor radii, and the packet velocity was found to be independent of radial position. Measurement of the packet transit time yielded direct information about the wave group velocity. Packet velocity was investigated as a function of the fundamental excitation frequency, plasma density, and toroidal magnetic field. Results are compared with the predictions of a cold plasma model which includes a vacuum layer at the edge. 24 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Characterization of CVD graphene permittivity and conductivity in micro-/millimeter wave frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yunqiu; Wu, Yun; Kang, Kai; Chen, Yuanfu; Li, Yanrong; Chen, Tangsheng; Xu, Yuehang

    2016-09-01

    The permittivity and conductivity of chemical vapor deposited monolayer graphene are investigated up to 40 GHz. The characterization method is based on a coplanar waveguide transmission line structure that is fabricated on a multilayer substrate of Si/SiO2/graphene/Al2O3 from the bottom up. The effective relative permittivity of the coplanar waveguide transmission line is extracted using Thru-Reflect-Line calibration and scattering parameter measurements, and then the relative permittivity and corresponding conductivity of graphene are characterized using partial capacitance techniques. The results demonstrate that the conductivity and sheet resistance are remarkably frequency-dependent and that the complex relative permittivity is consistent with the Drude model.

  5. Range-resolved interferometric signal processing using sinusoidal optical frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Kissinger, Thomas; Charrett, Thomas O H; Tatam, Ralph P

    2015-04-01

    A novel signal processing technique using sinusoidal optical frequency modulation of an inexpensive continuous-wave laser diode source is proposed that allows highly linear interferometric phase measurements in a simple, self-referencing setup. Here, the use of a smooth window function is key to suppress unwanted signal components in the demodulation process. Signals from several interferometers with unequal optical path differences can be multiplexed, and, in contrast to prior work, the optical path differences are continuously variable, greatly increasing the practicality of the scheme. In this paper, the theory of the technique is presented, an experimental implementation using three multiplexed interferometers is demonstrated, and detailed investigations quantifying issues such as linearity and robustness against instrument drift are performed.

  6. Beta and gamma frequency-range abnormalities in parkinsonian patients under cognitive sensorimotor task.

    PubMed

    Dushanova, Juliana; Philipova, Dolja; Nikolova, Gloria

    2010-06-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a disruption of dopaminergic neurotransmission in the basal ganglia. Some of PD clinical symptoms are suggested to stem directly from the excessive synchrony between the basal ganglia and cortical circuits. Our present investigation explores the functional relationships between event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) of beta and gamma band activity for idiopathic non-demented Parkinson's patients (PP) and control subjects (CS) during auditory discrimination tasks between two tone types (LT: 800 Hz, HT: 1000 Hz) within two post-stimulus intervals of 0-250 and 250-600 ms. Beta1 (13-20 Hz) ERD was found for both groups within both intervals more expressed in CS except for frontal beta1 synchronization in CS during the second interval. Beta2 (20-32 Hz) ERD was revealed in CS after both tones during both post-stimulus intervals. Beta2 ERS was only observed in PP. The most prominent beta2 ERS followed HT during the second interval. Gamma frequency (32-50 Hz) ERD was found in both groups except for fronto-parietal ERS for PP during the first interval after LT. During the second interval, either tone, we found prominent ERS for PP and ERD for CS everywhere except for a frontal ERS after HT. Deviations of the beta and gamma ERD/ERS for the PP compared with CS during the sensorimotor and cognitive processing are a clear evidence for disturbances in the temporal and regional integration of these frequency components and the relationships between cortical and the basal ganglia circuits in parkinsonism. PMID:20392453

  7. Active diagnostic of the eigenmode formation in the ion-cyclotron frequency range in the GAMMA10 central cell

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Ichimura, M.; Higaki, H.; Kakimoto, S.; Nakagome, K.; Nemoto, K.; Katano, M.; Nakajima, H.; Fukuyama, A.; Cho, T.

    2006-10-15

    A wide-band radio-frequency (rf) probe system was constructed for the active diagnostic of the eigenmode formations in the ion-cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) in GAMMA10. An antenna was installed in the peripheral region in the central cell. The low power rf pulse with the frequency sweep is applied to the antenna. The waves excited in the plasma are detected with a magnetic probe. The excitation of eigenmodes is described by using the antenna-plasma-probe transfer function. The transfer function can be obtained from the antenna current signal and the magnetic probe signal. When the real and imaginary parts of the transfer function are plotted on the complex plane, the resultant curves are approximately circular, indicating an eigenmode formation. The results of the measurement show that several eigenmodes can be excited in the present experimental condition.

  8. Low-frequency source for very long-range underwater communication.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Frédéric; Matte, Guillaume; Shimura, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    Very long-range underwater acoustic communication (UAC) is crucial for long cruising (>1000 km) autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). Very long-range UAC source for AUV must exhibit high electro-acoustic efficiency (>60%) and compactness. This paper describes the Janus-Hammer Bell (JHB) transducer that has been designed for this purpose and meets those requirements. The transducer works on the 450-550 Hz bandwidth and reaches source level above 200 dB (ref. 1 μPa at 1 m) with 1 kW excitation and full immersion capability. JHB source has been used for communication experiments by the Japanese institute for marine technology (Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology) achieving a baud rate of 100 bits/s at 1000 km. PMID:23298019

  9. Low-frequency source for very long-range underwater communication.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Frédéric; Matte, Guillaume; Shimura, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    Very long-range underwater acoustic communication (UAC) is crucial for long cruising (>1000 km) autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). Very long-range UAC source for AUV must exhibit high electro-acoustic efficiency (>60%) and compactness. This paper describes the Janus-Hammer Bell (JHB) transducer that has been designed for this purpose and meets those requirements. The transducer works on the 450-550 Hz bandwidth and reaches source level above 200 dB (ref. 1 μPa at 1 m) with 1 kW excitation and full immersion capability. JHB source has been used for communication experiments by the Japanese institute for marine technology (Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology) achieving a baud rate of 100 bits/s at 1000 km.

  10. Seasonality in Frequency of Marine Access to an Intermittently Open Estuary: Implications for Recruitment Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, K. N. I.; Cowley, P. D.; Whitfield, A. K.

    2001-03-01

    Timing of life-history stages and environmental conditions is key to recruitment success. We examine the seasonal pattern in access between the surf zone and an estuary, and the implications for recruitment success and process in fish that spawn at sea but spend their juvenile phase in estuaries. About 70% of South African estuaries are closed by barrier sand bars that open intermittently; an alternative but brief access opportunity is marine overwash (overtopping), when the surf zone extends over the bar to contact estuarine waters. Larval fish have limited ability to wait for an access opportunity (overtopping or opening event), so timing of settlement is important with respect to the seasonal distribution of waiting times for access opportunities. Periodic regression on daily observations (1993-1999) at the East Kleinemonde Estuary profiled the seasonal variation in expected waiting time. The data set is dominated by overwash events. Waiting time (for all events) is significantly related to both the first and second harmonics of season, and tends to be longest in December-January, and shortest in April-May. If the analysis is restricted to openings alone waiting times are shortest near November, and longest from February to September. The seasonal variation shown has implications for recruitment processes, population sizes, and productivity in estuaries.

  11. Transitions between various diffuse discharge modes in atmospheric-pressure helium in the medium-frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, J.-S.; Margot, J.; Massines, F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate DBDs in the medium frequency range (MF, 0.3-3 MHz). More precisely, for a 2 inter-dielectric gap in helium at atmospheric pressure, the frequency is varied from 1.0 to 2.7 MHz. The generated discharge shows similarities with both the low-frequency atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) and the atmospheric pressure capacitively coupled radio-frequency (CCRF) discharge. In the frequency range under investigation, two diffuse discharge modes can be observed depending on the voltage applied between the electrodes. At low applied voltage, the discharge emissions are barely visible and are concentrated in the center of the gas gap similarly to CCRF discharges in the Ω mode where the electron density is concentrated in the bulk. Ohmic heating is the main power transfer mechanism. At higher applied voltage, the discharge emissions are 10 times more intense and are closer to the dielectric surfaces similarly to the more common radio-frequency α mode. These two discharge modes can be observed in the same experimental conditions with the amplitude of the applied voltage as sole control parameter. The gas temperature obtained from N2 impurities rotational spectrum increases from room temperature to about 500 K while the power density rises from 10-1 to 101 W cm-3 when the applied voltage is increased. In addition, when the discharge transits back and forth from the Ω to the α mode, a hysteresis is observed. The transition from the Ω to the α mode occurs abruptly with a large RMS current increase while the transition from the α to the Ω mode is rather smooth with no significant discontinuity in the RMS current.

  12. Transitions between various diffuse discharge modes in atmospheric-pressure helium in the medium-frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, J.-S.; Margot, J.; Massines, F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate DBDs in the medium frequency range (MF, 0.3–3 MHz). More precisely, for a 2 inter-dielectric gap in helium at atmospheric pressure, the frequency is varied from 1.0 to 2.7 MHz. The generated discharge shows similarities with both the low-frequency atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) and the atmospheric pressure capacitively coupled radio-frequency (CCRF) discharge. In the frequency range under investigation, two diffuse discharge modes can be observed depending on the voltage applied between the electrodes. At low applied voltage, the discharge emissions are barely visible and are concentrated in the center of the gas gap similarly to CCRF discharges in the Ω mode where the electron density is concentrated in the bulk. Ohmic heating is the main power transfer mechanism. At higher applied voltage, the discharge emissions are 10 times more intense and are closer to the dielectric surfaces similarly to the more common radio-frequency α mode. These two discharge modes can be observed in the same experimental conditions with the amplitude of the applied voltage as sole control parameter. The gas temperature obtained from N2 impurities rotational spectrum increases from room temperature to about 500 K while the power density rises from 10‑1 to 101 W cm‑3 when the applied voltage is increased. In addition, when the discharge transits back and forth from the Ω to the α mode, a hysteresis is observed. The transition from the Ω to the α mode occurs abruptly with a large RMS current increase while the transition from the α to the Ω mode is rather smooth with no significant discontinuity in the RMS current.

  13. Stroke frequency, but not swimming speed, is related to body size in free-ranging seabirds, pinnipeds and cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Katsufumi; Watanuki, Yutaka; Takahashi, Akinori; Miller, Patrick J.O; Tanaka, Hideji; Kawabe, Ryo; Ponganis, Paul J; Handrich, Yves; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Watanabe, Yuuki; Mitani, Yoko; Costa, Daniel P; Bost, Charles-André; Aoki, Kagari; Amano, Masao; Trathan, Phil; Shapiro, Ari; Naito, Yasuhiko

    2006-01-01

    It is obvious, at least qualitatively, that small animals move their locomotory apparatus faster than large animals: small insects move their wings invisibly fast, while large birds flap their wings slowly. However, quantitative observations have been difficult to obtain from free-ranging swimming animals. We surveyed the swimming behaviour of animals ranging from 0.5 kg seabirds to 30 000 kg sperm whales using animal-borne accelerometers. Dominant stroke cycle frequencies of swimming specialist seabirds and marine mammals were proportional to mass−0.29 (R2=0.99, n=17 groups), while propulsive swimming speeds of 1–2 m s−1 were independent of body size. This scaling relationship, obtained from breath-hold divers expected to swim optimally to conserve oxygen, does not agree with recent theoretical predictions for optimal swimming. Seabirds that use their wings for both swimming and flying stroked at a lower frequency than other swimming specialists of the same size, suggesting a morphological trade-off with wing size and stroke frequency representing a compromise. In contrast, foot-propelled diving birds such as shags had similar stroke frequencies as other swimming specialists. These results suggest that muscle characteristics may constrain swimming during cruising travel, with convergence among diving specialists in the proportions and contraction rates of propulsive muscles. PMID:17476766

  14. A MEMS Interface IC With Low-Power and Wide-Range Frequency-to-Voltage Converter for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Arefin, Md Shamsul; Redouté, Jean-Michel; Yuce, Mehmet Rasit

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an interface circuit for capacitive and inductive MEMS biosensors using an oscillator and a charge pump based frequency-to-voltage converter. Frequency modulation using a differential crossed coupled oscillator is adopted to sense capacitive and inductive changes. The frequency-to-voltage converter is designed with a negative feedback system and external controlling parameters to adjust the sensitivity, dynamic range, and nominal point for the measurement. The sensitivity of the frequency-to-voltage converter is from 13.28 to 35.96 mV/MHz depending on external voltage and charging current. The sensitivity ranges of the capacitive and inductive interface circuit are 17.08 to 54.4 mV/pF and 32.11 to 82.88 mV/mH, respectively. A capacitive MEMS based pH sensor is also connected with the interface circuit to measure the high acidic gastric acid throughout the digestive tract. The sensitivity for pH from 1 to 3 is 191.4 mV/pH with 550 μV(pp) noise. The readout circuit is designed and fabricated using the UMC 0.18 μm CMOS technology. It occupies an area of 0.18 mm (2) and consumes 11.8 mW.

  15. Study and development of a six port network analyzer in the 1-18 GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeault, Eric

    A theoretical and experimental study for the realization of a six port analyzer to calibrate the components of the verification kit, used to evaluate the measurement accuracy of automated network analyzers, is presented. The detection is performed at the frequency of use, and the scattering parameters are determined in magnitude and phase by means of power measurements. The six port accuracy, realized in the 1 to 18 GHz frequency range, is limited by uncertainties in the power measurements. The detection law of the Schottky diodes used as power detectors, that relates the incident power level and the diode output voltage, is performed in situ. The characterization requires only two reference unknown test loads without any power measurement. The procedure is shown to be rather stable with frequency, so that a midband characterization is generally sufficient to provide enough accuracy in the whole frequency range. The measurement uncertainties due to the variation of the detector reflection coefficients with power, are estimated by determining the variations of the six port parameters. The principle of the six port compared to that of the heteordyne network analyzers is simpler, and it makes modeling and correcting systematic errors easier. Good agreement is found between the measurement results obtained with the dual six port and the other operating systems. Generally, the amplitude measurements are within a few thousands, while the phase measurement errors are below or around one degree for the parameters being measured.

  16. Dynamic Confinement of ITER Plasma by O-Mode Driver at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2009-05-01

    A low B-field side launched electron cyclotron O-Mode driver leads to the dynamic rf confinement, in addition to rf turbulent heating, of ITER plasma. The scaling law for the local energy confinement time τE is evaluated (τE ˜ 3neTe/2Q, where (3/2) neTe is the local plasma thermal energy density and Q is the local rf turbulent heating rate). The dynamics of unstable dissipative trapped particle modes (DTPM) strongly coupled to Trivelpiece-Gould (T-G) modes is studied for gyrotron frequency 170GHz; power˜24 MW CW; and on-axis B-field ˜ 10T. In the case of dynamic stabilization of DTPM turbulence and for the heavily damped T-G modes, the energy confinement time scales as τE˜(I0)-2, whereby I0(W/m^2) is the O-Mode driver irradiance. R. Prater et. al., Nucl. Fusion 48, No 3 (March 2008). E. P. Velikhov, History of the Russian Tokamak and the Tokamak Thermonuclear Fusion Research Worldwide That Led to ITER (Documentary movie; Stefan Studios Int'l, La Jolla, CA, 2008; E. P. Velikhov, V. Stefan.) M N Rosenbluth, Phys. Scr. T2A 104-109 1982 B. B. Kadomtsev and O. P. Pogutse, Nucl. Fusion 11, 67 (1971).

  17. Electromagnetic bias in sea surface range measurements at frequencies of the TOPEX/POSEIDON satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hevizi, Laszlo G.; Walsh, E. J.; Mcintosh, Robert E.; Vandemark, Douglas; Hines, Donald E.; Swift, Robert N.; Scott, John F.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of EM bias at the 13.6 GHz and 5.3 GHz operating frequencies of the NASA altimeter on the TOPEX/POSEIDON satellite in a series of 11 aircraft flights from January 17, 1991 through March 4, 1991, during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment, are reported. The data are consistent with an earlier set of airborne measurements and indicate that EM bias is slightly higher at 5.3 GHz than at 13.6 GHz, and that the magnitudes of both biases increase with increasing wind speed, as does their difference. With some exceptions, EM bias shows little variation over a mesoscale region on a given day or within 1 or 2 h, but it can change significantly over a 6-h period. Recent tower, airborne, and satellite measurements exhibit a consistency in the characteristics of the wind speed dependence but suggest that there may be a height dependence in the determinations, with the bias decreasing with increasing altitude.

  18. An experimental investigation of thermoacoustic lasers operating in audible frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolhe, Sanket Anil

    Thermoacoustic lasers convert heat from a high-temperature heat source into acoustic power while rejecting waste heat to a low temperature sink. The working fluids involved can be air or noble gases which are nontoxic and environmentally benign. Simple in construction due to absence of moving parts, thermoacoustic lasers can be employed to achieve generation of electricity at individual homes, water-heating for domestic purposes, and to facilitate space heating and cooling. The possibility of utilizing waste heat or solar energy to run thermoacoustic devices makes them technically promising and economically viable to generate large quantities of acoustic energy. The research presented in this thesis deals with the effects of geometric parameters (stack position, stack length, tube length) associated with a thermoacoustic laser on the output sound wave. The effects of varying input power on acoustic output were also studied. Based on the experiments, optimum operating conditions were identified and qualitative and/or quantitative explanations were provided to justify our observations. It was observed that the maximum sound pressure level was generated for the laser with the stack positioned at a distance of quarter lengths of a resonator from the closed end. Higher sound pressure levels were recorded for the laser with longer stack lengths and longer resonator lengths. Efforts were also made to develop high-frequency thermoacoustic lasers.

  19. The mechanism of modulation of geoacoustic emission intensity by weak electromagnetic fields in the audio-frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a physical mechanism explaining the mechanism of modulation of the geoacoustic emission intensity by an external electromagnetic field in the audio-frequency range, which was previously revealed as a result of borehole measurements at the Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskii geodynamic testing area. It was established that electric double layers (EDL) at the interface between solid and liquid phases in a fluidsaturated geological medium play a key role in the mechanism proposed.

  20. An analysis of dielectric properties of synthetic ballast water at frequencies ranging from 300 to 3000 MHz.

    PubMed

    Boldor, Dorin; Ortego, Jeffrey; Rusch, Kelly A

    2008-01-01

    Ballast water presents an important vector for introduction of aquatic invasive species in the coastal waters around the world. Currently there are no established technologies proven to completely eliminate this problem due to the particularities of the ballasting and de-ballasting operations (extremely large volumes of water, efficiency at destroying macro and micro organisms, environmental issues associated with chemical treatments). Continuous microwave heating presents a potential solution to this problem, but the design of suitable applicators depends on the dielectric properties of the ballast water to be processed. The study presented in this paper is focused on the dielectric properties (dielectric constant--epsilon'; dielectric loss--epsilon") of synthetic ballast water inoculated with four organisms at seven different temperatures in the frequency range of 300 to 3000 MHz. The dielectric properties of the mixtures were determined using a network analyzer and a dielectric probe kit using the open-ended coaxial probe method. Numerical analysis was performed on data collected across all frequencies involved with an emphasis placed on F.C.C. allotted frequencies of 433, 915 and 2450 MHz. The dielectric constant was relatively independent of frequency and the organism used, but it showed a remarkable decrease with temperature. The dielectric loss showed an extreme decrease with increasing frequency, marked differences between the different organisms and between different growth stages of the same organism, and a large relatively linear increase with increasing temperature.

  1. An analysis of dielectric properties of synthetic ballast water at frequencies ranging from 300 to 3000 MHz.

    PubMed

    Boldor, Dorin; Ortego, Jeffrey; Rusch, Kelly A

    2008-01-01

    Ballast water presents an important vector for introduction of aquatic invasive species in the coastal waters around the world. Currently there are no established technologies proven to completely eliminate this problem due to the particularities of the ballasting and de-ballasting operations (extremely large volumes of water, efficiency at destroying macro and micro organisms, environmental issues associated with chemical treatments). Continuous microwave heating presents a potential solution to this problem, but the design of suitable applicators depends on the dielectric properties of the ballast water to be processed. The study presented in this paper is focused on the dielectric properties (dielectric constant--epsilon'; dielectric loss--epsilon") of synthetic ballast water inoculated with four organisms at seven different temperatures in the frequency range of 300 to 3000 MHz. The dielectric properties of the mixtures were determined using a network analyzer and a dielectric probe kit using the open-ended coaxial probe method. Numerical analysis was performed on data collected across all frequencies involved with an emphasis placed on F.C.C. allotted frequencies of 433, 915 and 2450 MHz. The dielectric constant was relatively independent of frequency and the organism used, but it showed a remarkable decrease with temperature. The dielectric loss showed an extreme decrease with increasing frequency, marked differences between the different organisms and between different growth stages of the same organism, and a large relatively linear increase with increasing temperature. PMID:19227068

  2. Wide range tuning of resonant frequency for a vortex core in a regular triangle magnet

    PubMed Central

    Yakata, Satoshi; Tanaka, Terumitsu; Kiseki, Kohei; Matsuyama, Kimihide; Kimura, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    A magnetic vortex structure stabilized in a micron or nano-sized ferromagnetic disk has a strong potential as a unit cell for spin-based nano-electronic devices because of negligible magnetostatic interaction and superior thermal stability. Moreover, various intriguing fundamental physics such as bloch point reversal and symmetry breaking can be induced in the dynamical behaviors in the magnetic vortex. The static and dynamic properties of the magnetic vortex can be tuned by the disk dimension and/or the separation distance between the disks. However, to realize these modifications, the preparations of other devices with different sample geometries are required. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that, in a regular-triangle Permalloy dot, the dynamic properties of a magnetic vortex are greatly modified by the application of the in-plane magnetic field. The obtained wide range tunability based on the asymmetric position dependence of the core potential provides attractive performances in the microwave spintronic devices. PMID:24356511

  3. A Constant Energy-Per-Cycle Ring Oscillator Over a Wide Frequency Range for Wireless Sensor Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Inhee; Sylvester, Dennis; Blaauw, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an energy-efficient oscillator for wireless sensor nodes (WSNs). It avoids short-circuit current by minimizing the time spent in the input voltage range from Vthn to [Vdd − |Vthp|]. A current-feeding scheme with gate voltage control enables the oscillator to operate over a wide frequency range. A test chip is fabricated in a 0.18 μm CMOS process. The measurements show that the proposed oscillator achieves a constant energy-per-cycle (EpC) of 0.8 pJ/cycle over the 21–60 MHz frequency range and is more efficient than a conventional current-starved ring oscillator (CSRO) below 300 kHz at 1.8 V supply voltage. As an application example, the proposed oscillator is implemented in a switched-capacitor DC–DC converter. The converter is 11%–56% more efficient for load power values ranging from 583 pW to 2.9 nW than a converter using a conventional CSRO. PMID:27546899

  4. Frequency distribution and assessment of genetic diversity of novel endophyte Alternaria alternata accessions isolated from Pongamia pinnata L.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Kartikeya

    2013-10-01

    Thepresent study discusses the frequency distribution and genetic diversity of novel fungal endopyte Alternaria alternata within the Pongammia pinnata plant samples. A total of ten plant samples of Pongammia pinnata, Pierre. (Karanja) were collected from specific locations of Sanganer region of Rajasthan for the isolation of fungal endophytes. Of these, maximum frequency of Alternaria alternata (22.29%) were recorded which are morphologically similar but ecologically variant. Efficacy of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), were assessed in seventeen individuals of the primers was GCC 180 where as 10 bands were generated by GCC 181. The similarity coefficient matrix generated for the primers was subjected to algorithm UPGMA (Unweighted Pair Group Method Analysis) and clusters were generated using NTSYS 2.02 pc program. To stabilize the level of relatedness among the seventeen ecologically variant Alternaria alternata accessions, the dendrogram was constructed, which showed that all the isolates were diversified endophytically with in the plant Pongamia pinnata. PMID:24502162

  5. Optimal detection and concentration estimation of vapor materials using range-resolved lidar with frequency-agile lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Russell E.; Vanderbeek, Richard G.; D'Amico, Francis M.

    1999-10-01

    In previous work, we presented a methodology for optimally processing data from lidar with frequency-agile wavelength capability using techniques of multivariate statistics. Among the applications considered was the case of range- resolved lidar with short (delta function) transmitter pulses. This paper extends that analysis by deriving a method for estimating range-dependent vapor concentration for arbitrary pulse shapes. A Bayesian statistical approach leads to a MAP (maximum a posteriori) estimator for C(z), the concentration at range z. The estimates are computed iteratively for a given set of multiwavelength lidar return data using an approximation to the Gauss-Newton method. The concentration estimates are then used as the basis for a detection algorithm for the leading edge of the vapor plume based on the CUSUM approach. The detection and estimation approaches are illustrated on a combination of synthetic and field test data collected by SBCCOM at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory test site.

  6. Sequential detection and concentration estimation of chemical vapors using range-resolved lidar with frequency-agile lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Russell E.; Vanderbeek, Richard G.; D'Amico, Francis M.

    2000-07-01

    This paper extends our earlier work in developing statistically optimal algorithms for estimating the range- dependent concentration of multiple vapor materials using multiwavelength frequency-agile lidar with a fixed set of wavelength bursts to the case of a time series processor that recursively updates the estimates as new data become available. The concentration estimates are used to detect the presence of one or more vapor materials by a sequential approach that accumulates likelihood in time for each range cell. A Bayesian methodology is used to construct the concentration estimates with a prior concentration smoothness constraint chosen to produce numerically stable results at longer ranges having weak signal return. The approach is illustrated on synthetic and actual field test data collected by SBCCOM.

  7. Excitation of the surface flute waves in electron cyclotron frequency range by internal rotating electron beam in a coaxial waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blednov, O.; Girka, I.; Girka, V.; Pavlenko, I.; Sydora, R.

    2014-12-01

    The initial stage of interaction between a gyrating beam of electrons, which move along Larmor orbits in a narrow gap between a cylindrical plasma layer and an internal screen of a metal coaxial waveguide and electromagnetic eigen waves, is studied theoretically. These waves are extraordinary polarized ones; they propagate along the azimuthal angle across an axial external steady magnetic field in the electron cyclotron frequency range. The numerical analysis shows that the excitation process is stable enough in respect to changing plasma waveguide parameters. The wider the plasma layer, the broader the range of plasma waveguide parameters within which effective wave excitation takes place. The main influence on the excitation of these modes is performed by the applied axial magnetic field, namely: its increase leads to an increase of growth rate and a broadening of the range of the waveguide parameters within which wave excitation is effective.

  8. Absolute backscatter coefficient estimates of tissue-mimicking phantoms in the 5–50 MHz frequency range

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Matthew M.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Deaner, Meagan E.; Varghese, Tomy

    2011-01-01

    Absolute backscatter coefficients in tissue-mimicking phantoms were experimentally determined in the 5–50 MHz frequency range using a broadband technique. A focused broadband transducer from a commercial research system, the VisualSonics Vevo 770, was used with two tissue-mimicking phantoms. The phantoms differed regarding the thin layers covering their surfaces to prevent desiccation and regarding glass bead concentrations and diameter distributions. Ultrasound scanning of these phantoms was performed through the thin layer. To avoid signal saturation, the power spectra obtained from the backscattered radio frequency signals were calibrated by using the signal from a liquid planar reflector, a water-brominated hydrocarbon interface with acoustic impedance close to that of water. Experimental values of absolute backscatter coefficients were compared with those predicted by the Faran scattering model over the frequency range 5–50 MHz. The mean percent difference and standard deviation was 54% ± 45% for the phantom with a mean glass bead diameter of 5.40 μm and was 47% ± 28% for the phantom with 5.16 μm mean diameter beads. PMID:21877789

  9. Spectral features of stimulated electromagnetic emission, measured in the 4.3-9.5 MHz pump wave frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. L.; Sergeev, E. N.; Ermakova, E. N.; Komrakov, G. P.; Stubbe, P.

    Steady state spectral features of stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEEs) for their major emission components (DM, NC, BC, BUM, and BUS) are studied in a wide pump wave frequency range, from 4.3 to 9.5 MHz, i.e., from slightly above the 3rd to slightly above the 7th gyroharmonic frequency. Based on these systematic experimental data, new peculiarities in the behaviour of the SEE intensity and of the spectral properties, in relation to the gyroharmonic mode number, have been found. The experimental results, discussed in the paper, were collected during the years 1996-2000 at the Sura heating facility in Russia by modification of the ionospheric F region, using ordinary mode HF pump waves.

  10. Empirical dependence of acoustic transmission scintillation statistics on bandwidth, frequency, and range in New Jersey continental shelf.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Mark; Chen, Tianrun; Ratilal, Purnima

    2009-01-01

    The scintillation statistics of broadband acoustic transmissions are determined as a function of signal bandwidth B, center frequency f(c), and range with experimental data in the New Jersey continental shelf. The received signal intensity is shown to follow the Gamma distribution implying that the central limit theorem has led to a fully saturated field from independent multimodal propagation contributions. The Gamma distribution depends on the mean intensity and the number of independent statistical fluctuations or coherent cells micro of the received signal. The latter is calculated for the matched filter, the Parseval sum, and the bandpassed center frequency, all of which are standard ocean acoustic receivers. The number of fluctuations mu of the received signal is found to be an order of magnitude smaller than the time-bandwidth product TB of the transmitted signal, and to increase monotonically with relative bandwidth Bfc. A computationally efficient numerical approach is developed to predict the mean intensity and the corresponding broadband transmission loss of a fluctuating, range-dependent ocean waveguide by range and depth averaging the output of a time-harmonic stochastic propagation model. This model enables efficient and accurate estimation of transmission loss over wide areas, which has become essential in wide-area sonar imaging applications.

  11. Vibroacoustics of the piano soundboard: (Non)linearity and modal properties in the low- and mid-frequency ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ege, Kerem; Boutillon, Xavier; Rébillat, Marc

    2013-03-01

    The piano soundboard transforms the string vibration into sound and therefore, its vibrations are of primary importance for the sound characteristics of the instrument. An original vibro-acoustical method is presented to isolate the soundboard nonlinearity from that of the exciting device (here: a loudspeaker) and to measure it. The nonlinear part of the soundboard response to an external excitation is quantitatively estimated for the first time, at ≈-40 dB below the linear part at the ff nuance. Given this essentially linear response, a modal identification is performed up to 3 kHz by means of a novel high resolution modal analysis technique [K. Ege, X. Boutillon, B. David, High-resolution modal analysis, Journal of Sound and Vibration 325 (4-5) (2009) 852-869]. Modal dampings (which, so far, were unknown for the piano in this frequency range) are determined in the mid-frequency domain where FFT-based methods fail to evaluate them with an acceptable precision. They turn out to be close to those imposed by wood. A finite-element modelling of the soundboard is also presented. The low-order modal shapes and the comparison between the corresponding experimental and numerical modal frequencies suggest that the boundary conditions can be considered as blocked, except at very low frequencies. The frequency-dependency of the estimated modal densities and the observation of modal shapes reveal two well-separated regimes. Below ≈1 kHz, the soundboard vibrates more or less like a homogeneous plate. Above that limit, the structural waves are confined by ribs, as already noticed by several authors, and localised in restricted areas (one or a few inter-rib spaces), presumably due to a slightly irregular spacing of the ribs across the soundboard.

  12. In vivo intracardiac optical coherence tomography imaging through percutaneous access: toward image-guided radio-frequency ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Kang, Wei; Carrigan, Thomas; Bishop, Austin; Rosenthal, Noah; Arruda, Mauricio; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2011-11-01

    Complete catheter-tissue contact and permanent tissue destruction are essential for efficient radio-frequency ablation (RFA) during cardiac arrhythmia treatment. Current methods of monitoring lesion formation are indirect and unreliable. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) catheter to image endocardial wall in actively beating hearts through percutaneous access. We reported the first in vivo intracardiac OCT imaging through percutaneous access with a thin and flexible OCT catheter. This is a critical step toward image-guided RFA in a clinical setting. A cone-scanning forward-viewing OCT catheter was advanced into beating hearts through percutaneous access in four swine. The OCT catheter was steered by an introducer to touch the endocardial wall. We are able to acquire high quality OCT images in beating hearts, observe the polarization-related artifacts induced by the birefringence of myocardium, and readily evaluate catheter-tissue contact. The observations indicate that OCT could be a promising technique for in vivo guidance of RFA.

  13. Experience using radio frequency laptops to access the electronic medical record in exam rooms.

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, L. A.; Krall, M.; Chin, H.; Robertson, N.; Harris, J.; Hughes, J.

    1999-01-01

    Kaiser Permanente, Northwest, evaluated the use of laptop computers to access our existing comprehensive Electronic Medical Record in exam rooms via a wireless radiofrequency (RF) network. Eleven of 22 clinicians who were offered the laptops successfully adopted their use in the exam room. These clinicians were able to increase their exam room time with the patient by almost 4 minutes (25%), apparently without lengthening their overall work day. Patient response to exam room computing was overwhelmingly positive. The RF network response time was similar to the hardwired network. Problems cited by some laptop users and many of the eleven non-adopters included battery issues, different equipment layout and function, and inadequate training. IT support needs for the RF laptops were two to four times greater than for hardwired desktops. Addressing the reliability and training issues should increase clinician acceptance, making a successful general roll-out for exam room computing more likely. PMID:10566458

  14. Frequency and Correlates of Service Access among Youth with Autism Transitioning to Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Julie Lounds; Henninger, Natalie A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined service receipt and unmet service needs among youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in their last year of high school, as well as the youth (intellectual disability, race/ethnicity, autism severity, comorbid psychiatric diagnoses, behavior problems, adaptive behavior) and family (income, parental health, parental depressive symptoms, parental anxiety) correlates of service access. Thirty-nine families of youth with ASD participated. Data were collected via parental interview/questionnaire and youth psychological evaluation. Results suggested that this sample was underserved relative to a nationally-representative cohort. Those with a comorbid psychiatric diagnosis and lower levels of adaptive behavior received more services. Greater unmet needs were reported for youth who were racial/ethnic minorities, who had more behavior problems, and whose parents had greater anxiety. PMID:25081594

  15. Prediction of rain effects on earth-space communication links operating in the 10 to 35 GHz frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, Warren L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the effects of precipitation on earth-space communication links operating the 10 to 35 GHz frequency range. Emphasis is on the quantitative prediction of rain attenuation and depolarization. Discussions center on the models developed at Virginia Tech. Comments on other models are included as well as literature references to key works. Also included is the system level modeling for dual polarized communication systems with techniques for calculating antenna and propagation medium effects. Simple models for the calculation of average annual attenuation and cross-polarization discrimination (XPD) are presented. Calculation of worst month statistics are also presented.

  16. Negative permittivity and permeability spectra of Cu/yttrium iron garnet hybrid granular composite materials in the microwave frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutaoka, Takanori Fukuyama, Koki; Kinoshita, Hideaki; Kasagi, Teruhiro; Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Hatakeyama, Kenichi

    2013-12-23

    The relative complex permittivity and permeability spectra of the coagulated copper and yttrium iron garnet (Cu/YIG) hybrid granular composite materials have been studied in the microwave range. The insulator to metal transition was observed at the percolation threshold of Cu particle content (φ{sub Cu} = 16.0 vol. %) in the electrical conductivity. In the percolation threshold, the low frequency plasmonic state caused by the metallic Cu particle networks was observed. The percolated Cu/YIG granular composites show simultaneous negative permittivity and permeability spectra under external magnetic fields.

  17. Numerical study on an equivalent source model for inhomogeneous magnetic field dosimetry in the low-frequency range.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Shinichiro; Ruoss, Hans-Oliver; Landstorfer, Friedrich M; Hashimoto, Osamu

    2004-04-01

    A new equivalent numerical source model is proposed for efficient dosimetric investigations in the low-frequency range. This approach allows the reproduction of complicated inhomogeneous magnetic field distributions around electronic appliances with full generality (i.e., supports three-dimensional vector fields). This paper investigates the accuracy of the equivalent source model using the geometry-based numerical reference model of a current loop to simulate the magnetic field distribution of a real electronic appliance. Good agreement between the equivalent source model and the reference is obtained with regard to the magnetic field distribution and the induced electric current density in a homogeneous human body model, respectively.

  18. Ultrastable optical frequency dissemination on a multi-access fibre network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercy, Anthony; Lopez, Olivier; Pottie, Paul-Eric; Amy-Klein, Anne

    2016-07-01

    We report a laboratory demonstration of the dissemination of an ultrastable optical frequency signal to two distant users simultaneously using a branching network. The ultrastable signal is extracted along a main fibre link; it is optically tracked by a narrow linewidth laser diode, which light is injected in a secondary link. The propagation noise of both links is actively compensated. We implement this scheme with two links of 50-km fibre spools, the extraction being set up at the mid-point of the main link. We show that the extracted signal at the end of the secondary link exhibits a fractional frequency instability of 1.4 × 10-15 at 1-s measurement time, almost equal to the 1.3 × 10-15 instability of the main link output end. The long-term instabilities are also very similar, at a level of 3-5 × 10-20 at 3 × 104-s integration time. We also show that the setting up of this extraction device, or of a simpler one, at the main link input, can test the proper functioning of the noise rejection on this main link. This work is a significant step towards a robust and flexible ultrastable network for multi-users dissemination.

  19. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5-10 GHz frequency range.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; Spoddig, Detlef; Ollefs, Katharina; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ∼6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ∼0.1° amplitude at ∼9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip. PMID:26429444

  20. Microwave absorption studies of Cr-doped Co-U type hexaferrites over 2-18 GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Meena, Ram Swaroop; Chatterjee, Ratnamala

    2016-11-01

    The effect of Cr3+ ions doping on the electromagnetic (EM) properties of polycrystalline U-type hexaferrite samples: Ba4Co2-3xCr2xFe36O60 (0.0≤x≤0.60, in steps of 0.15) have been studied. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies confirmed the formation of single U-type hexaferrite phase in all the prepared samples. Le Bail refinement of XRD patterns was used to calculate the lattice parameters 'a' and 'c'. The room temperature M-H studies indicate that the saturation magnetization (Ms) decreases and coercivity (Hc) increases with increasing Cr3+ ions concentration. The complex permittivity (ε* = ε ‧ - i ε ″) and permeability (μ* = μ ‧ - i μ ″) measurement were carried out using vector network analyser (VNA) over 2-18 GHz frequency range. The complex permeability (μ* = μ ‧ - μ ″) spectra clearly observed the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) phenomenon in all the prepared samples. The maximum microwave absorption (MWA) of 99.97% (or minimum reflection loss RLmin=-34.90 dB) was observed for Ba4Co1.1Cr0.6Fe36O60 sample at 8.2 GHz frequency with 1.7 mm absorber thickness. The RLmin peak was found to shift towards higher microwave (MW) frequency with increase in Cr3+ ions concentration.

  1. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5–10 GHz frequency range

    DOE PAGES

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; Spoddig, Detlef; Ollefs, Katharina; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; et al

    2015-09-10

    In this study, we present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme in order to study high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes of the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combination of the developed excitation mechanism with a single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. The required mechanical stability is achieved by a compact design of the microscope. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range,more » with 35 nm resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a –6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ~0.1° amplitude at –9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.« less

  2. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5-10 GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; Spoddig, Detlef; Ollefs, Katharina; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A.; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ˜6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ˜0.1° amplitude at ˜9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  3. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5–10 GHz frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Bonetti, Stefano; Kukreja, Roopali; Chen, Zhao; Spoddig, Detlef; Ollefs, Katharina; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A.; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-10

    In this study, we present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme in order to study high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes of the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combination of the developed excitation mechanism with a single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. The required mechanical stability is achieved by a compact design of the microscope. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with 35 nm resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a –6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ~0.1° amplitude at –9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  4. Frequency-based nanoparticle sensing over large field ranges using the ferromagnetic resonances of a magnetic nanodisc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Maximilian; Beg, Marijan; Chernyshenko, Dmitri; Bisotti, Marc-Antonio; Carey, Rebecca L.; Fangohr, Hans; Metaxas, Peter J.

    2016-11-01

    Using finite element micromagnetic simulations, we study how resonant magnetisation dynamics in thin magnetic discs with perpendicular anisotropy are influenced by magnetostatic coupling to a magnetic nanoparticle. We identify resonant modes within the disc using direct magnetic eigenmode calculations and study how their frequencies and spatial profiles are changed by the nanoparticle’s stray magnetic field. We demonstrate that particles can generate shifts in the resonant frequency of the disc’s fundamental mode which exceed resonance linewidths in recently studied spin torque oscillator devices. Importantly, it is shown that the simulated shifts can be maintained over large field ranges (here up to 1 T). This is because the resonant dynamics (the basis of nanoparticle detection here) respond directly to the nanoparticle stray field, i.e. detection does not rely on nanoparticle-induced changes to the magnetic ground state of the disc. A consequence of this is that in the case of small disc-particle separations, sensitivities to the particle are highly mode- and particle-position-dependent, with frequency shifts being maximised when the intense stray field localised directly beneath the particle can act on a large proportion of the disc’s spins that are undergoing high amplitude precession.

  5. Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5–10 GHz frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Bonetti, Stefano Chen, Zhao; Kukreja, Roopali; Spoddig, Detlef; Schöppner, Christian; Meckenstock, Ralf; Ollefs, Katharina; Ney, Andreas; Pinto, Jude; Houanche, Richard; Frisch, Josef; Stöhr, Joachim; Dürr, Hermann A.; Ohldag, Hendrik

    2015-09-15

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ∼6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ∼0.1° amplitude at ∼9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  6. The Digital Simulation of Synchronous Motors Fed by Voltage-Source Inverters Over Wide Speed and Frequency Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowihal, Said Soliman

    Both voltage-source and current-source inverters are widely used for supplying three-phase power to induction motor drives, each having their advantages and disadvantages. For high power drives and applications requiring accurate speed and tracking coordination, the synchronous motors are the optimum choice. For constant speed applications of synchronous motor drives, current-source inverters tend to be favored as the motor can usually be operated in the overexcited leading power factor region, thus providing the inverter with sufficient electro-motive force to allow natural commutation. Generally speaking low speed operation of synchronous motors is not satisfactory from naturally commutated current-source inverters. To provide a dynamic range of speed and frequency would require expensive control circuitry and complicates the performance of the drive. The advantage of the voltage-source inverter for the wide range of speed and frequency control herein envisaged is that forced commutation is employed throughout the range and the commutating circuits have been well developed and established. On balance, voltage-source inverters represent a viable compromise for variable-speed three -phase synchronous motor drives including start-up. To investigate the transient response of the voltage -source fed-synchronous motor drives, a digital computer program is developed. The program is based on two models --machine model and inverter model. The machine is represented by a detailed two-axis model which includes the effects due to saliency, damper windings, and machine resistances. The inverter model represents a forced-commutated voltage-source inverter assuming ideal switching devices (thyristors and diodes). To cope with the wide variations of power factor during start-up, a thyristor with a reverse connected parallel diode are integrated as a bidirectional switch. The digital program provides the machine variables of interest (phase currents, field current, damper winding

  7. Study of the heating characteristics and mechanisms of magnetic nanoparticles over a wide range of frequencies and amplitudes of an alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, A.; Kita, E.; Isaka, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Suzuki, K. Z.; Horiuchi, A.; Kishimoto, M.; Yanagihara, H.; Oda, T.; Ohkohchi, N.; Ikehata, H.; Nagano, I.

    2014-06-01

    An effective approach to gaining an understanding of the mechanism of heat generation for magnetic hyperthermia from nanomagnet suspensions is to perform heating tests over a wide frequency range. We constructed a heating test apparatus by using ferrite field cores with air gaps for low frequencies and solenoids for high frequencies. Magnetic field amplitudes up to 600 Oe (400 Oe) can be generated for frequencies lower than 500 kHz (800 kHz). Heat generation tests were performed for ferromagnetic nano-platelets and Co-doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles over a wide range of frequencies.

  8. Steady-state visual evoked potentials in the low frequency range in migraine: a study of habituation and variability phenomena.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Schoffelen, Jan Mathijs; Guido, Marco; Libro, Giuseppe; Losito, Luciana; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Sardaro, Michele; Pellicoro, Mario; Puca, Franco Michele

    2003-08-01

    Previous studies have revealed that migraine patients display an increased photic driving to flash stimuli in the medium frequency range. The aim of this study was to perform a topographic analysis of steady-state visual evoked potentials (SVEPs) in the low frequency range (3-9 Hz), evaluating the temporal behaviour of the F1 amplitude by investigating habituation and variability phenomena. The main component of SVEPs, the F1, demonstrated an increased amplitude in several channels at 3 Hz. Behaviour of F1 amplitude was rather variable over time, and the wavelet-transform standard deviation was increased in migraine patients at a low stimulus rate. The discriminative value of the F1 mean amplitude and variability index, tested by both an artificial neural network classifier and a support vector machine, were high according to both methods. The increased photic driving in migraine should be subtended by a more generic abnormality of visual reactivity instead of a selective impairment of a visual subsystem. Temporal behaviour of SVEPs is not influenced by a clear tendency to habituation, but the F1 amplitude seemed to change in a complex way, which is better described by variability phenomena. An increased variability in response to flicker stimuli in migraine patients could be interpreted as an overactive regulation mechanism, prone to instability and consequently to headache attacks, whether spontaneous or triggered. PMID:12919718

  9. Steady-state visual evoked potentials in the low frequency range in migraine: a study of habituation and variability phenomena.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Stramaglia, Sebastiano; Schoffelen, Jan Mathijs; Guido, Marco; Libro, Giuseppe; Losito, Luciana; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Sardaro, Michele; Pellicoro, Mario; Puca, Franco Michele

    2003-08-01

    Previous studies have revealed that migraine patients display an increased photic driving to flash stimuli in the medium frequency range. The aim of this study was to perform a topographic analysis of steady-state visual evoked potentials (SVEPs) in the low frequency range (3-9 Hz), evaluating the temporal behaviour of the F1 amplitude by investigating habituation and variability phenomena. The main component of SVEPs, the F1, demonstrated an increased amplitude in several channels at 3 Hz. Behaviour of F1 amplitude was rather variable over time, and the wavelet-transform standard deviation was increased in migraine patients at a low stimulus rate. The discriminative value of the F1 mean amplitude and variability index, tested by both an artificial neural network classifier and a support vector machine, were high according to both methods. The increased photic driving in migraine should be subtended by a more generic abnormality of visual reactivity instead of a selective impairment of a visual subsystem. Temporal behaviour of SVEPs is not influenced by a clear tendency to habituation, but the F1 amplitude seemed to change in a complex way, which is better described by variability phenomena. An increased variability in response to flicker stimuli in migraine patients could be interpreted as an overactive regulation mechanism, prone to instability and consequently to headache attacks, whether spontaneous or triggered.

  10. Viscoelastic behavior over a wide range of time and frequency in tin alloys: SnCd and SnSb

    SciTech Connect

    Quackenbush, J.; Brodt, M.; Lakes, R.S.

    1996-08-01

    All materials exhibit some viscoelastic response, which can manifest itself as creep, relaxation, or, if the load is sinusoidal in time, a phase angle {delta} between stress and strain. Recently, a study of pure elements with low melting points, Cd, In, Pb, and Sn disclosed that cadmium exhibited a substantial loss tangent of 0.03 to 0.04 over much of the audio range of frequencies, combined with a moderate stiffness G = 20.7 GPa. Lead, by contrast, exhibited tan {delta} of 0.005 to 0.016 in the audio range. Indium exhibited a high loss tangent exceeding 0.1 at very low frequency. A eutectic alloy of indium and tin was found to exhibit substantial damping exceeding 0.1 below 0.1 Hz, and this alloy was used to make a composite exhibiting high stiffness and high damping. It is the purpose of this communication to present viscoelastic properties of two additional low melting point alloys, SnCd and SnSb. Both InSn and SnSb are used as solders. Although the melting point of Sb is 630.74 C, T{sub H} > 0.55 at ambient temperature for the alloy of SnSb (95 wt% Sn/5 wt% Sb) which melts near 240 C. Eutectic SnCd melts at 177 C so T{sub H} {approx} 0.65 at room temperature.

  11. The effects of sampling frequency on the climate statistics of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T.J.; Gates, W.L. ); Arpe, K. )

    1992-12-20

    The effects of sampling frequency on the first- and second-moment statistics of selected European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model variables are investigated in a simulation of perpetual July' with a diurnal cycle included and with surface and atmospheric fields saved at hourly intervals. The shortest characteristic time scales are those of ground heat fluxes and temperatures, precipitation and runoff, convective processes, cloud properties, and atmospheric vertical motion, while the longest time scales are exhibited by soil temperature and moisture, surface pressure, and atmospheric specific humidity, temperature, and wind. The time scales of surface heat and momentum fluxes and of convective processes are substantially shorter over land than over oceans. An appropriate sampling frequency for each model variable is obtained by comparing the estimates of first- and second-moment statistics determined at intervals ranging from 2 to 24 hours with the best' estimates obtained from hourly sampling. Relatively accurate estimation of first- and second-moment climate statistics can be achieved by sampling a model variable at intervals that usually are longer than the bandwidth of its time series but that often are shorter than its characteristic time scale. The superior estimates of first-moment statistics are accompanied by inferior estimates of the variance of the daily means due to the presence of systematic biases, but these probably can be avoided by defining a different measure of low-frequency variability. Estimates of the intradiurnal variance of accumulated precipitation and surface runoff also are strongly impacted by the length of the storage interval. In light of these results, several alternative strategies for storage of the EMWF model variables are recommended. 20 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The effects of sampling frequency on the climate statistics of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Thomas J.; Gates, W. Lawrence; Arpe, Klaus

    1992-12-01

    The effects of sampling frequency on the first- and second-moment statistics of selected European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model variables are investigated in a simulation of "perpetual July" with a diurnal cycle included and with surface and atmospheric fields saved at hourly intervals. The shortest characteristic time scales (as determined by the e-folding time of lagged autocorrelation functions) are those of ground heat fluxes and temperatures, precipitation and runoff, convective processes, cloud properties, and atmospheric vertical motion, while the longest time scales are exhibited by soil temperature and moisture, surface pressure, and atmospheric specific humidity, temperature, and wind. The time scales of surface heat and momentum fluxes and of convective processes are substantially shorter over land than over oceans. An appropriate sampling frequency for each model variable is obtained by comparing the estimates of first- and second-moment statistics determined at intervals ranging from 2 to 24 hours with the "best" estimates obtained from hourly sampling. Relatively accurate estimation of first- and second-moment climate statistics (10% errors in means, 20% errors in variances) can be achieved by sampling a model variable at intervals that usually are longer than the bandwidth of its time series but that often are shorter than its characteristic time scale. For the surface variables, sampling at intervals that are nonintegral divisors of a 24-hour day yields relatively more accurate time-mean statistics because of a reduction in errors associated with aliasing of the diurnal cycle and higher-frequency harmonics. The superior estimates of first-moment statistics are accompanied by inferior estimates of the variance of the daily means due to the presence of systematic biases, but these probably can be avoided by defining a different measure of low-frequency variability. Estimates of the intradiurnal variance of accumulated

  13. Design, performance, and grounding aspects of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Durodié, F. Dumortier, P.; Vrancken, M.; Messiaen, A.; Huygen, S.; Louche, F.; Van Schoor, M.; Vervier, M.; Winkler, K.

    2014-06-15

    ITER's Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) system [Lamalle et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 88, 517–520 (2013)] comprises two antenna launchers designed by CYCLE (a consortium of European associations listed in the author affiliations above) on behalf of ITER Organisation (IO), each inserted as a Port Plug (PP) into one of ITER's Vacuum Vessel (VV) ports. Each launcher is an array of 4 toroidal by 6 poloidal RF current straps specified to couple up to 20 MW in total to the plasma in the frequency range of 40 to 55 MHz but limited to a maximum system voltage of 45 kV and limits on RF electric fields depending on their location and direction with respect to, respectively, the torus vacuum and the toroidal magnetic field. A crucial aspect of coupling ICRF power to plasmas is the knowledge of the plasma density profiles in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) and the location of the RF current straps with respect to the SOL. The launcher layout and details were optimized and its performance estimated for a worst case SOL provided by the IO. The paper summarizes the estimated performance obtained within the operational parameter space specified by IO. Aspects of the RF grounding of the whole antenna PP to the VV port and the effect of the voids between the PP and the Blanket Shielding Modules (BSM) surrounding the antenna front are discussed. These blanket modules, whose dimensions are of the order of the ICRF wavelengths, together with the clearance gaps between them will constitute a corrugated structure which will interact with the electromagnetic waves launched by ICRF antennas. The conditions in which the grooves constituted by the clearance gaps between the blanket modules can become resonant are studied. Simple analytical models and numerical simulations show that mushroom type structures (with larger gaps at the back than at the front) can bring down the resonance frequencies, which could lead to large voltages in the gaps between the blanket modules and perturb the

  14. Design, performance, and grounding aspects of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durodié, F.; Dumortier, P.; Vrancken, M.; Messiaen, A.; Bamber, R.; Hancock, D.; Huygen, S.; Lockley, D.; Louche, F.; Maggiora, R.; Milanesio, D.; Nightingale, M. P. S.; Shannon, M.; Tigwell, P.; Van Schoor, M.; Vervier, M.; Wilson, D.; Winkler, K.

    2014-06-01

    ITER's Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) system [Lamalle et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 88, 517-520 (2013)] comprises two antenna launchers designed by CYCLE (a consortium of European associations listed in the author affiliations above) on behalf of ITER Organisation (IO), each inserted as a Port Plug (PP) into one of ITER's Vacuum Vessel (VV) ports. Each launcher is an array of 4 toroidal by 6 poloidal RF current straps specified to couple up to 20 MW in total to the plasma in the frequency range of 40 to 55 MHz but limited to a maximum system voltage of 45 kV and limits on RF electric fields depending on their location and direction with respect to, respectively, the torus vacuum and the toroidal magnetic field. A crucial aspect of coupling ICRF power to plasmas is the knowledge of the plasma density profiles in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) and the location of the RF current straps with respect to the SOL. The launcher layout and details were optimized and its performance estimated for a worst case SOL provided by the IO. The paper summarizes the estimated performance obtained within the operational parameter space specified by IO. Aspects of the RF grounding of the whole antenna PP to the VV port and the effect of the voids between the PP and the Blanket Shielding Modules (BSM) surrounding the antenna front are discussed. These blanket modules, whose dimensions are of the order of the ICRF wavelengths, together with the clearance gaps between them will constitute a corrugated structure which will interact with the electromagnetic waves launched by ICRF antennas. The conditions in which the grooves constituted by the clearance gaps between the blanket modules can become resonant are studied. Simple analytical models and numerical simulations show that mushroom type structures (with larger gaps at the back than at the front) can bring down the resonance frequencies, which could lead to large voltages in the gaps between the blanket modules and perturb the RF

  15. A wide range ultra-low power Phase-Locked Loop with automatic frequency setting in 130 nm CMOS technology for data serialisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Moroń, J.; Świentek, K.

    2015-12-01

    The design and measurements results of a wide frequency range ultra-low power Phase-Locked Loop (PLL) for applications in readout systems of particle physics detectors are presented. The PLL was fabricated in a 130 nm CMOS technology. To allow the implementation of different data serialisation schemes multiple division factors (6, 8, 10, 16) were implemented in the PLL feedback loop. The main PLL block—VCO works in 16 frequency ranges/modes, switched either manually or automatically. A dedicated automatic frequency mode switching circuit was developed to allow simple frequency tuning. Although the PLL was designed and simulated for a frequency range of 30 MHz-3 GHz, due to the SLVS interface limits, the measurements were done only up to 1.3 GHz. The full PLL functionality was experimentally verified, confirming a very low and frequency scalable power consumption (0.7 mW at 1 GHz).

  16. A detailed comparison of antenna impedance measurements on ASDEX Upgrade with the ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna code TOPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, I.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Bobkov, V.; Faugel, H.; Coster, D.; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.; Siegl, G.; Bilato, R.; Brambilla, M.; Verdoolaege, G.; Braun, F.; Fünfgelder, H.; D'Inca, R.; Suttrop, W.; Kallenbach, A.; Schweinzer, J.; Wolfrum, E.; Fischer, R.; Mlynek, A.; Nikolaeva, V.; Guimarais, L.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-09-01

    New antenna diagnostics on the ASDEX Upgrade, in the form of voltage and current probe pairs on the feeding lines of each ion cyclotron range of frequencies antenna, close to the input ports, have made it possible to study in detail the behavior of the ASDEX Upgrade two-strap antenna under changing loading conditions, and compare these measurements with the results of simulations using the TOPICA code. The present work extends previous studies by using the input impedance (more precisely, the complex voltage reflection coefficient Γ ) on each antenna port for comparison, instead of the more commonly used loading resistance or coupled power. The electron density profiles used for the simulation were reconstructed from the deuterium-carbon-nitrogen interferometer and lithium beam emission spectroscopy measurements, edge-localized mode-synchronized and averaged over time intervals from 10 to 200 ms depending on the case; 112 cases were compared from seven ASDEX Upgrade discharges with widely different plasma parameters and two operating frequencies (30 and 36.5 MHz). Very good agreement in \\vert Γ\\vert was found with the measurements on antenna 3 (<3% averaged over a shot), and good agreement was found with antennas 1 and 2 (<10%) the code reproduced the correct trend in loading resistance {{R}\\text{L}} in a significant majority of cases, although the discrepancies in the absolute values were rather high (up to  ˜50%) due to high reflection. Sources of discrepancy are discussed.

  17. Development and Applications of High—Frequency Gyrotrons in FIR FU Covering the sub-THz to THz Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idehara, Toshitaka; Sabchevski, Svilen Petrov

    2012-07-01

    Powerful sources of coherent radiation in the sub-terahertz and in the terahertz frequency range of the electromagnetic spectrum are necessary for a great and continuously expanding number of applications in the physical research and in various advanced technological processes as well as in radars, communication systems, for remote sensing and inspection etc.. In recent years, a spectacular progress in the development of various gyro-devices and in particular of the powerful high frequency (sub-terahertz and terahertz) gyrotron oscillators has demonstrated a remarkable potential for bridging the so-called terahertz power gap and stimulated many novel and prospective applications. In this review paper we outline two series of such devices, namely the Gyrotron FU Series which includes pulsed gyrotrons and Gyrotron FU CW Series which consist of tubes operated in a CW (continuous wave) or long pulse mode, both developed at the FIR FU Center. We present the most remarkable achievements of these devices and illustrate their applications by some characteristic examples. An outlook for the further extension of the Gyrotron FU CW Series is also provided.

  18. Low-frequency sound speed and attenuation in sandy seabottom from long-range broadband acoustic measurements.

    PubMed

    Wan, Lin; Zhou, Ji-Xun; Rogers, Peter H

    2010-08-01

    A joint China-U.S. underwater acoustics experiment was conducted in the Yellow Sea with a very flat bottom and a strong and sharp thermocline. Broadband explosive sources were deployed both above and below the thermocline along two radial lines up to 57.2 km and a quarter circle with a radius of 34 km. Two inversion schemes are used to obtain the seabottom sound speed. One is based on extracting normal mode depth functions from the cross-spectral density matrix. The other is based on the best match between the calculated and measured modal arrival times for different frequencies. The inverted seabottom sound speed is used as a constraint condition to extract the seabottom sound attenuation by three methods. The first method involves measuring the attenuation coefficients of normal modes. In the second method, the seabottom sound attenuation is estimated by minimizing the difference between the theoretical and measured modal amplitude ratios. The third method is based on finding the best match between the measured and modeled transmission losses (TLs). The resultant seabottom attenuation, averaged over three independent methods, can be expressed as alpha=(0.33+/-0.02)f(1.86+/-0.04)(dB/m kHz) over a frequency range of 80-1000 Hz.

  19. An algorithm for the calculation of 3-D ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) fields in tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smithe, D.N.; Colestock, P.L.; Kashuba, R.J.; Kammash, T.

    1987-04-01

    A computational scheme is developed which permits tractable calculation of three-dimensional full-wave solutions to the Maxwell-Vlasov equations under typical Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) experimental conditions. The method is unique in that power deposition to the plasma is determined via the anti-Hermitian part of a truncated warm-plasma dielectric operator, rather than as the result of an assumed phenomenological collision frequency. The resulting computer code allows arbitrary variation of density, temperature, magnetic field, and minority concentration in the poloidal plane by performing a convolution of poloidal modes to produce a coupled system of differential equations in the radial variable. By assuming no inhomogeneity along the toroidal axis, an inverse transform over k/sub parallel/ is performed to yield the full three-dimensional field solutions. The application of the code to TFTR-like plasmas shows a mild resonance structure in antenna loading related to the changing number of wavelengths between antenna and the resonance layer. 48 figs.

  20. Adaptive three-dimensional range-crossrange-frequency filter processing string for sea mine classification in side scan sonar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aridgides, Tom; Fernandez, Manuel F.; Dobeck, Gerald J.

    1997-07-01

    An automatic, robust, adaptive clutter suppression, predetection level fusion, sea mine detection and classification processing string has been developed and applied to shallow water side-scan sonar imagery data. The overall processing string includes pre-processing string includes pre-processing, adaptive clutter filtering (ACF), 2D normalization, detection, feature extraction and classification processing blocks. The pre-processing block contains automatic gain control, data decimation and data alignment processing. The ACF is a multi-dimensional adaptive linear FIR filter, optimal in the least squares sense, for simultaneous background clutter suppression and preservation of an average peak target signature. After data alignment, using a 3D ACF enables simultaneous multiple frequency data fusion and clutter suppression in the composite frequency-range-crossrange domain. Following 2D normalization, the detection consists of thresholding, clustering of exceedances and limiting their number. Finally, features are extracted and a orthogonalization transformation is applied to the data, enabling an efficient application of the optimal log-likelihood-ratio-test (LLRT) classification rule. The utility of the overall processing string was demonstrated with two side-scan sonar data sets. The ACF, feature orthogonalization, LLRT-based classification processing string provided average probability of correct mine classification and false alarm rate performance exceeding the one obtained when utilizing an expert sonar operator. The overall processing string can be easily implemented in real-time using COTS technology.

  1. Optimization of electrode size for aluminum-nitride matrix ultrasonic transducers in the frequency range above 200 MHz.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yangjie; Herzog, Thomas; Heuer, Henning

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes an optimization method of the top electrode size for a thin film matrix ultrasonic transducer (M-UT) in the frequency range above 200 MHz. The goal of this work is to design an optimal top electrode size for an M-UT providing the maximal output peak-peak voltage (V(PP)) and the maximal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) without additional electrical impedance matching. In order to reduce the complexity of the M-UT with more than 1000 elements, an intrinsic matching by electrode size variation is necessary. However, the size of a single element top electrode for an M-UT is related to the number of elements within a targeted sensor area, V(PP) and SNR of the transducer. In this paper, varying the active area of the top electrode from 0.09 to 25 mm(2) shows that for an Al-AlN-Al on silicon wafer configuration connected with a JSR Ultrasonics pulser/receiver (50 ohms), the optimal electrode size is 1 mm(2). With the optimal size electrode, the maximum output V(PP) of 0.08 V and the SNR of 42.93 dB are achieved at the resonance frequency of 225 MHz, and the bandwidth is 16.21 MHz.

  2. Photonic crystal fiber with a dual-frequency addressable liquid crystal: behavior in the visible wavelength range.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, A; Kitzerow, H-S; Schwuchow, A; Kobelke, J; Bartelt, H

    2008-11-10

    Wave-guiding in the visible spectral range is investigated for a micro-structured crystal fiber filled with a dual-frequency addressable nematic liquid crystal mixture. The fiber exhibits a solid core surrounded by just 4 rings of cylindrical holes. Control of the liquid crystal alignment by anchoring agents permits relatively low attenuation. Samples with different anchoring conditions at the interface of the silica glass and the liquid crystal show different transmission properties and switching behavior. Polarization dependent and independent fiber optic switching is observed. Due to a dualfrequency addressing scheme, active switching to both states with enhanced and reduced transmission becomes possible for planar anchoring. Even a non-perfect fiber shows reasonable transmission and a variety of interesting effects.

  3. A solar plasma stream measured by DRVID and dual-frequency range and Doppler radio metric data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, F. B.; Wu, S. C.; Komarek, T. A.; Lam, V. W.; Royden, H. N.; Yip, K. B. W.

    1977-01-01

    S- and X-band DRVID, S- and X-band dual-frequency range (SX(p)), and Doppler (SX(p)) measured a 15-fold increase in the line-of-sight electron content of the solar plasma above the normal plasma background. A general increase in the plasma electron content continued for nearly 50 hours: it started about 12:00 (GMT) on 12 March 1976 and continued to grow until 17:00 (GMT) on 14 March. For the next 55 hours, between 17:00 (GMT) on 14 March to 00:54 (GMT) on 17 March, the plasma level diminished as the background level was approached. Not only were the temporal changes and absolute level of the plasma content measured but the measurements were also used to ascertain the mean-plasma-concentration location: it was estimated to be 4.1 light minutes from earth.

  4. 750 nm 1.5 W frequency-doubled semiconductor disk laser with a 44 nm tuning range.

    PubMed

    Saarinen, Esa J; Lyytikäinen, Jari; Ranta, Sanna; Rantamäki, Antti; Sirbu, Alexei; Iakovlev, Vladimir; Kapon, Eli; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate 1.5 W of output power at the wavelength of 750 nm by intracavity frequency doubling a wafer-fused semiconductor disk laser diode-pumped at 980 nm. An optical-to-optical efficiency of 8.3% was achieved using a bismuth borate crystal. The wavelength of the doubled emission could be tuned from 720 to 764 nm with an intracavity birefringent plate. The beam quality parameter M2 of the laser output was measured to be below 1.5 at all pump powers. The laser is a promising tool for biomedical applications that can take advantage of the large penetration depth of light in tissue in the 700-800 nm spectral range.

  5. Photonic crystal fiber with a dual-frequency addressable liquid crystal: behavior in the visible wavelength range.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, A; Kitzerow, H-S; Schwuchow, A; Kobelke, J; Bartelt, H

    2008-11-10

    Wave-guiding in the visible spectral range is investigated for a micro-structured crystal fiber filled with a dual-frequency addressable nematic liquid crystal mixture. The fiber exhibits a solid core surrounded by just 4 rings of cylindrical holes. Control of the liquid crystal alignment by anchoring agents permits relatively low attenuation. Samples with different anchoring conditions at the interface of the silica glass and the liquid crystal show different transmission properties and switching behavior. Polarization dependent and independent fiber optic switching is observed. Due to a dualfrequency addressing scheme, active switching to both states with enhanced and reduced transmission becomes possible for planar anchoring. Even a non-perfect fiber shows reasonable transmission and a variety of interesting effects. PMID:19582031

  6. Microwave Absorption Properties of Ni-Foped SiC Powders in the 2-18 GHz Frequency Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hai-Bo; Li, Dan; Cao, Mao-Sheng; Dou, Yan-Kun; Chen, Tao; Wen, Bo; Simeon, Agathopoulos

    2011-03-01

    Ni-doped SiC powder with improved dielectric and microwave absorption properties was prepared by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS). The XRD analysis of the as-synthesized powders suggests that Ni is accommodated in the sites of Si in the lattice of SiC, which shrinks in the presence of Ni. The experimental results show an improvement in the dielectric properties of the Ni-doped SiC powder in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz. The bandwidth of the reflection loss below -10 dB is broadened from 3.04 (for pure SiC) to 4.56 GHz (for Ni-doped SiC), as well as the maximum reflection loss of produced powders from 13.34 to 22.57 dB, indicating that Ni-doped SiC could be used as an effective microwave absorption material.

  7. 750 nm 1.5 W frequency-doubled semiconductor disk laser with a 44 nm tuning range.

    PubMed

    Saarinen, Esa J; Lyytikäinen, Jari; Ranta, Sanna; Rantamäki, Antti; Sirbu, Alexei; Iakovlev, Vladimir; Kapon, Eli; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate 1.5 W of output power at the wavelength of 750 nm by intracavity frequency doubling a wafer-fused semiconductor disk laser diode-pumped at 980 nm. An optical-to-optical efficiency of 8.3% was achieved using a bismuth borate crystal. The wavelength of the doubled emission could be tuned from 720 to 764 nm with an intracavity birefringent plate. The beam quality parameter M2 of the laser output was measured to be below 1.5 at all pump powers. The laser is a promising tool for biomedical applications that can take advantage of the large penetration depth of light in tissue in the 700-800 nm spectral range. PMID:26421536

  8. Investigation of electrostatic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in L-4 and ACT-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Masayuki.

    1993-05-01

    Electrostatic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) were studied in the Princeton L-4 and ACT-1 devices for approximately ten years, from 1975 to 1985. The investigation began in the L-4 linear device, looking for the parametric excitation of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi-ion-species plasmas. In addition, this investigation verified multi-ion-species effects on the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave dispersion religion including the ion-ion hybrid resonance. Finite-Larmor-radius modification of the wave dispersion relation was also observed, even for ion temperatures of T[sub i] [approx] 1/40 eV. Taking advantage of the relatively high field and long device length of L-4, the existence of the cold electrostatic ion cyclotron wave (CES ICW) was verified. With the arrival of the ACT-1 toroidal device, finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) waves were studied in a relatively collisionless warm-ion hydrogen plasma. Detailed investigations of ion Bernstein waves (IBW) included the verification of mode-transformation in their launching, their wave propagation characteristics, their absorption, and the resulting ion heating. This basic physics activity played a crucial role in developing a new reactor heating concept termed ion Bernstein wave heating. Experimental research in the lower hybrid frequency range confirmed the existence of FLR effects near the lower hybrid resonance, predicted by Stix in 1965. In a neon plasma with a carefully placed phased wave exciter, the neutralized ion Bernstein wave was observed for the first time. Using a fastwave ICRF antenna, two parasitic excitation processes for IBW -- parametric instability and density-gradient-driven excitation -- were also discovered. In the concluding section of this paper, a possible application of externally launched electrostatic waves is suggested for helium ash removal from fusion reactor plasmas.

  9. Investigation of electrostatic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies in L-4 and ACT-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Masayuki

    1993-05-01

    Electrostatic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) were studied in the Princeton L-4 and ACT-1 devices for approximately ten years, from 1975 to 1985. The investigation began in the L-4 linear device, looking for the parametric excitation of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi-ion-species plasmas. In addition, this investigation verified multi-ion-species effects on the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave dispersion religion including the ion-ion hybrid resonance. Finite-Larmor-radius modification of the wave dispersion relation was also observed, even for ion temperatures of T{sub i} {approx} 1/40 eV. Taking advantage of the relatively high field and long device length of L-4, the existence of the cold electrostatic ion cyclotron wave (CES ICW) was verified. With the arrival of the ACT-1 toroidal device, finite-Larmor-radius (FLR) waves were studied in a relatively collisionless warm-ion hydrogen plasma. Detailed investigations of ion Bernstein waves (IBW) included the verification of mode-transformation in their launching, their wave propagation characteristics, their absorption, and the resulting ion heating. This basic physics activity played a crucial role in developing a new reactor heating concept termed ion Bernstein wave heating. Experimental research in the lower hybrid frequency range confirmed the existence of FLR effects near the lower hybrid resonance, predicted by Stix in 1965. In a neon plasma with a carefully placed phased wave exciter, the neutralized ion Bernstein wave was observed for the first time. Using a fastwave ICRF antenna, two parasitic excitation processes for IBW -- parametric instability and density-gradient-driven excitation -- were also discovered. In the concluding section of this paper, a possible application of externally launched electrostatic waves is suggested for helium ash removal from fusion reactor plasmas.

  10. The Contribution of Microbunching Instability to Solar Flare Emission in the GHz to THz Range of Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopf, J. Michael; Kaufmann, Pierre; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Szpigel, Sérgio

    2014-08-01

    Recent solar flare observations in the sub-terahertz range have provided evidence of a new spectral component with fluxes increasing for larger frequencies, separated from the well-known microwave emission that maximizes in the gigahertz range. Suggested interpretations explain the terahertz spectral component but do not account for the simultaneous microwave component. We present a mechanism for producing the observed "double spectra." Based on coherent enhancement of synchrotron emission at long wavelengths in laboratory accelerators, we consider how similar processes may occur within a solar flare. The instability known as microbunching arises from perturbations that produce electron beam density modulations, giving rise to broadband coherent synchrotron emission at wavelengths comparable to the characteristic size of the microbunch structure. The spectral intensity of this coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) can far exceed that of the incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), which peaks at a higher frequency, thus producing a double-peaked spectrum. Successful CSR simulations are shown to fit actual burst spectral observations, using typical flaring physical parameters and power-law energy distributions for the accelerated electrons. The simulations consider an energy threshold below which microbunching is not possible because of Coulomb repulsion. Only a small fraction of the radiating charges accelerated to energies above the threshold is required to produce the microwave component observed for several events. The ISR/CSR mechanism can occur together with other emission processes producing the microwave component. It may bring an important contribution to microwaves, at least for certain events where physical conditions for the occurrence of the ISR/CSR microbunching mechanism are possible.

  11. The contribution of microbunching instability to solar flare emission in the GHz to THz range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Klopf, J. Michael; Kaufmann, Pierre; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Szpigel, Sergio

    2014-07-01

    Recent solar flare observations in the sub-terahertz range have provided evidence of a new spectral component with fluxes increasing for larger frequencies, separated from the well-known microwave emission that maximizes in the gigahertz range. Suggested interpretations explain the terahertz spectral component but do not account for the simultaneous microwave component. We present a mechanism for producing the observed "double spectra." Based on coherent enhancement of synchrotron emission at long wavelengths in laboratory accelerators, we consider how similar processes may occur within a solar flare. The instability known as microbunching arises from perturbations that produce electron beam density modulations, giving rise to broadband coherent synchrotron emission at wavelengths comparable to the characteristic size of the microbunch structure. The spectral intensity of this coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) can far exceed that of the incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), which peaks at a higher frequency, thus producing a double-peaked spectrum. Successful CSR simulations are shown to fit actual burst spectral observations, using typical flaring physical parameters and power-law energy distributions for the accelerated electrons. The simulations consider an energy threshold below which microbunching is not possible because of Coulomb repulsion. Only a small fraction of the radiating charges accelerated to energies above the threshold is required to produce the microwave component observed for several events. The ISR/CSR mechanism can occur together with other emission processes producing the microwave component. It may bring an important contribution to microwaves, at least for certain events where physical conditions for the occurrence of the ISR/CSR microbunching mechanism are possible.

  12. Lattice dynamics and dielectric response of Mg-doped SrTiO3 ceramics in a wide frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkach, A.; Vilarinho, P. M.; Kholkin, A. L.; Pashkin, A.; Samoukhina, P.; Pokorny, J.; Veljko, S.; Petzelt, J.

    2005-02-01

    Atomic substitutions in the SrTiO3 (ST) perovskite lattice are foreseen to modify the lattice vibration modes, which are apparently sensitive to the site at which the substitution occurs. In order to understand the effect of Mg substitution in the ST lattice, the dielectric properties of Sr1-xMgxTiO3 and SrTi1-yMgyO3-δ ceramics were investigated in radio frequency (rf), microwave, terahertz (THz), and infrared (IR) ranges. Micro-Raman spectroscopy and rf tunability measurements were also conducted on these samples. The micro-Raman spectra and the high-frequency dielectric properties of Sr1-xMgxTiO3, including rf tunability, do not differ considerably from the properties of undoped SrTiO3, confirming only slight (if any) incorporation of Mg into the Sr site of ST perovskite lattice. At the same time, Ti-site Mg doping results in significant stiffening of the soft lattice mode observed in IR reflectivity spectra. Dielectric permittivity and dielectric losses decrease in both rf and THz ranges accompanied by the decrease of the tunability, in accordance with the stiffened ferroelectric soft mode. The appearance in the Raman spectra of the forbidden polar modes TO4 at 545cm-1 and TO2 at 174cm-1 at room temperature and their strengthening on cooling, demonstrate the local loss of the inversion center and the breaking of the cubic symmetry by the substitution of Ti4+ by Mg2+ ions. These results confirm more favorable occupation of Mg at the Ti site of the ST lattice and show the possibility of using Ti-site Mg-doped ST as an active material for low-loss microwave waveguides and resonators.

  13. The contribution of microbunching instability to solar flare emission in the GHz to THz range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Klopf, J.; Kaufmann, Pierre; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Szpigel, Sérgio

    2014-08-10

    Recent solar flare observations in the sub-terahertz range have provided evidence of a new spectral component with fluxes increasing for larger frequencies, separated from the well-known microwave emission that maximizes in the gigahertz range. Suggested interpretations explain the terahertz spectral component but do not account for the simultaneous microwave component. We present a mechanism for producing the observed 'double spectra'. Based on coherent enhancement of synchrotron emission at long wavelengths in laboratory accelerators, we consider how similar processes may occur within a solar flare. The instability known as microbunching arises from perturbations that produce electron beam density modulations, giving rise to broadband coherent synchrotron emission at wavelengths comparable to the characteristic size of the microbunch structure. The spectral intensity of this coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) can far exceed that of the incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), which peaks at a higher frequency, thus producing a double-peaked spectrum. Successful CSR simulations are shown to fit actual burst spectral observations, using typical flaring physical parameters and power-law energy distributions for the accelerated electrons. The simulations consider an energy threshold below which microbunching is not possible because of Coulomb repulsion. Only a small fraction of the radiating charges accelerated to energies above the threshold is required to produce the microwave component observed for several events. The ISR/CSR mechanism can occur together with other emission processes producing the microwave component. It may bring an important contribution to microwaves, at least for certain events where physical conditions for the occurrence of the ISR/CSR microbunching mechanism are possible.

  14. Novel Reactor Relevant RF Actuator Schemes for the Lower Hybrid and the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonoli, Paul

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a fresh physics perspective on the onerous problem of coupling and successfully utilizing ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and lower hybrid range of frequencies (LHRF) actuators in the harsh environment of a nuclear fusion reactor. The ICRF and LH launchers are essentially first wall components in a fusion reactor and as such will be subjected to high heat fluxes. The high field side (HFS) of the plasma offers a region of reduced heat flux together with a quiescent scrape off layer (SOL). Placement of the ICRF and LHRF launchers on the tokamak HFS also offers distinct physics advantages: The higher toroidal magnetic field makes it possible to couple faster phase velocity LH waves that can penetrate farther into the plasma core and be absorbed by higher energy electrons, thereby increasing the current drive efficiency. In addition, re-location of the LH launcher off the mid-plane (i.e., poloidal ``steering'') allows further control of the deposition location. Also ICRF waves coupled from the HFS couple strongly to mode converted ion Bernstein waves and ion cyclotron waves waves as the minority density is increased, thus opening the possibility of using this scheme for flow drive and pressure control. Finally the quiescent nature of the HFS scrape off layer should minimize the effects of RF wave scattering from density fluctuations. Ray tracing / Fokker Planck simulations will be presented for LHRF applications in devices such as the proposed Advanced Divertor Experiment (ADX) and extending to ITER and beyond. Full-wave simulations will also be presented which demonstrate the possible combinations of electron and ion heating via ICRF mode conversion. Work supported by the US DoE under Contract Numbers DE-FC02-01ER54648 and DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  15. Effects of sample size and sampling frequency on studies of brown bear home ranges and habitat use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, Steve M.; Schwartz, Charles C.

    1999-01-01

    We equipped 9 brown bears (Ursus arctos) on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, with collars containing both conventional very-high-frequency (VHF) transmitters and global positioning system (GPS) receivers programmed to determine an animal's position at 5.75-hr intervals. We calculated minimum convex polygon (MCP) and fixed and adaptive kernel home ranges for randomly-selected subsets of the GPS data to examine the effects of sample size on accuracy and precision of home range estimates. We also compared results obtained by weekly aerial radiotracking versus more frequent GPS locations to test for biases in conventional radiotracking data. Home ranges based on the MCP were 20-606 km2 (x = 201) for aerial radiotracking data (n = 12-16 locations/bear) and 116-1,505 km2 (x = 522) for the complete GPS data sets (n = 245-466 locations/bear). Fixed kernel home ranges were 34-955 km2 (x = 224) for radiotracking data and 16-130 km2 (x = 60) for the GPS data. Differences between means for radiotracking and GPS data were due primarily to the larger samples provided by the GPS data. Means did not differ between radiotracking data and equivalent-sized subsets of GPS data (P > 0.10). For the MCP, home range area increased and variability decreased asymptotically with number of locations. For the kernel models, both area and variability decreased with increasing sample size. Simulations suggested that the MCP and kernel models required >60 and >80 locations, respectively, for estimates to be both accurate (change in area <1%/additional location) and precise (CV < 50%). Although the radiotracking data appeared unbiased, except for the relationship between area and sample size, these data failed to indicate some areas that likely were important to bears. Our results suggest that the usefulness of conventional radiotracking data may be limited by potential biases and variability due to small samples. Investigators that use home range estimates in statistical tests should consider the

  16. Frequency conversion of molecular gas lasers in PbIn6Te10 crystal within mid-IR range.

    PubMed

    Ionin, A A; Kinyaevskiy, I O; Klimachev, Y M; Kotkov, A A; Badikov, V V; Mitin, K V

    2016-05-15

    PbIn6Te10 is a new mid-infrared (IR) nonlinear crystal with a very wide transparency range from 1.7 up to 31 μm. Calculated phase-matching angles show possibility of frequency conversion throughout the transparency range. Sum frequency generation of multiline carbon monoxide (CO) laser and difference frequency generation when mixing CO and carbon dioxide laser radiation were experimentally studied. Laser-induced damage threshold and frequency conversion efficiency under multiline CO laser pumping were measured.

  17. Frequency-range discriminations and absolute pitch in black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus), mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli), and zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata).

    PubMed

    Lee, Tiffany T Y; Charrier, Isabelle; Bloomfield, Laurie L; Weisman, Ronald G; Sturdy, Christopher B

    2006-08-01

    The acoustic frequency ranges in birdsongs provide important absolute pitch cues for the recognition of conspecifics. Black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus), mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli), and zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) were trained to sort tones contiguous in frequency into 8 ranges on the basis of associations between response to the tones in each range and reward. All 3 species acquired accurate frequency-range discriminations, but zebra finches acquired the discrimination in fewer trials and to a higher standard than black-capped or mountain chickadees, which did not differ appreciably in the discrimination. Chickadees' relatively poorer accuracy was traced to poorer discrimination of tones in the higher frequency ranges. During transfer tests, the discrimination generalized to novel tones when the training tones were included, but not when they were omitted.

  18. Frequency-range discriminations and absolute pitch in black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus), mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli), and zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata).

    PubMed

    Lee, Tiffany T Y; Charrier, Isabelle; Bloomfield, Laurie L; Weisman, Ronald G; Sturdy, Christopher B

    2006-08-01

    The acoustic frequency ranges in birdsongs provide important absolute pitch cues for the recognition of conspecifics. Black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus), mountain chickadees (Poecile gambeli), and zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) were trained to sort tones contiguous in frequency into 8 ranges on the basis of associations between response to the tones in each range and reward. All 3 species acquired accurate frequency-range discriminations, but zebra finches acquired the discrimination in fewer trials and to a higher standard than black-capped or mountain chickadees, which did not differ appreciably in the discrimination. Chickadees' relatively poorer accuracy was traced to poorer discrimination of tones in the higher frequency ranges. During transfer tests, the discrimination generalized to novel tones when the training tones were included, but not when they were omitted. PMID:16893259

  19. Medium-Range Predictability of Contrail-Cirrus Demonstrated during Experiments Ml-Cirrus and Access-Ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, U.

    2015-12-01

    The Contrail Cirrus Prediction model CoCiP (doi:10.5194/gmd-5-543-2012) has been applied quasi operationally to predict contrails for flight planning of ML-CIRRUS (C. Voigt, DLR, et al.) in Europe and for ACCESS II in California (B. Anderson, NASA, et al.) in March-May 2014. The model uses NWP data from ECMWF and past airtraffic data (actual traffic data are used for analysis). The forecasts provided a sequence of hourly forecast maps of contrail cirrus optical depth for 3.5 days, every 12 h. CoCiP has been compared to observations before, e.g. within a global climate-aerosol-contrail model (Schumann, Penner et al., ACPD, 2015, doi:10.5194/acpd-15-19553-2015). Good predictions would allow for climate optimal routing (see, e.g., US patent by Mannstein and Schumann, US 2012/0173147 A1). The predictions are tested by: 1) Local eyewitness reports and photos, 2) satellite observed cloudiness, 3) autocorrelation analysis of predictions for various forecast periods, 4) comparisons of computed with observed optical depth from COCS (doi:10.5194/amt-7-3233-2014, 2014) by IR METEOSAT-SEVIRI observations over Europe. The results demonstrate medium-range predictability of contrail cirrus to a useful degree for given traffic, soot emissions, and high-quality NWP data. A growing set of satellite, Lidar, and in-situ data from ML-CIRRUS and ACCENT are becoming available and will be used to further test the forecast quality. The autocorrelation of optical depth predictions is near 70% for 3-d forecasts for Europe (outside times with high Sahara dust loads), and only slightly smaller for continental USA. Contrail cirrus is abundant over Europe and USA. More than 1/3 of all cirrus measured with the research aircraft HALO during ML-CIRRUS was impacted by contrails. The radiative forcing (RF) is strongly daytime and ambience dependent. The net annual mean RF, based on our global studies, may reach up to 0.08 W/m2 globally, and may well exceed 1 W/m2 regionally, with maximum over Europe

  20. A preliminary study on the prediction of damaged areas on ordinary concrete and lightweight concrete using electromechanical impedance technique with different frequency ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, K. J.; Na, S.; Jang, J. G.; Lee, H. K.

    2014-03-01

    The electromechanical impedance (EMI) method for NDE uses a single piezoelectric material to act as an actuator and a sensor simultaneously, and the EMI method is suitable for structures with complex surfaces. However, this technique still has wide range of problems which needs to be investigated. For one, locating damaged areas on a host structure precisely is known to be extremely difficult as this non-model based technique heavily relies on the variations in the impedance signatures. In this study, an attempt to locate the damaged areas on an ordinary concrete panel and a lightweight concrete panel using bottom ash is carried out by using different frequency ranges. Since the sensing range decreases as the excitation frequency of piezoelectric material increases, one can possibly predict the damaged areas by analyzing the impedance signatures from different frequency ranges. Statistical analysis method such as root mean square deviation (RMSD) is applied to determine the changes of the experimental structures, and the RMSD values of low frequency range and high frequency range are compared to verify the relationship between the frequency range and sensing range. Furthermore, the applicability of this method to locating the damaged areas is investigated on various materials including the lightweight concrete.

  1. Microstrip Antennas with Polarization Diversity across a Wide Frequency Range and Phased Array Antennas for Radar and Satellite Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kevin Ming-Jiang

    The thesis comprises of 3 projects; an L-band microstrip antenna with frequency agility and polarization diversity, X-band phased array antennas incorporating commercially packaged RFIC phased array chips, and studies for Ku/Ka-band shared aperture antenna array. The first project features the use of commercially packaged RF-MEMS SPDT switches, that boasts of high reliability, high linearity, low losses, hermetically packaged and fully compatible for SMTA processes for mass-assembly and production. Using the switches in a novel manner for the feed network, microstrip antennas with polarization diversity are presented. Frequency agility is achieved with the use of tuning diodes to provide capacitive loading to the antenna element. Additional inductance effects from surface-mounted capacitors, and its impact, is introduced. Theoretical cross-polarization of probe-fed antenna elements is presented for both linear and circular polarized microstrip antennas. Designs and measurements are presented, for microstrip antennas with polarization diversity, wide frequency tuning range, and both features. Replacement of the tuning diodes with commercially-packaged high Q RF MEMS tunable capacitors will allow for significant improvements to the radiation efficiency. In another project, multi-channel CMOS RFIC phased-array receiver chips are assembled in QFN packages and directly integrated on the same multi-layered PCB stack-up with the antenna arrays. Problems of isolation from the PCB-QFN interface, and potential performance degradation on antenna array from the use of commercial-grade laminates for assembly requirements, namely potential scan blindness and radiation efficiency, are presented. Causes for apparent drift of dielectric constant for microstrip circuits, and high conductor losses observed in measurements, are introduced. Finally, studies are performed for the design of a Ku/Ka-Band shared aperture array. Different approaches for developing dual-band shared apertures

  2. Frequency range selection method of trans-impedance amplifier for high sensitivity lock-in amplifier used in the optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang-In; Jeon, Su-Jin; Hong, Nam-Pyo; Choi, Young-Wan

    2016-03-01

    Lock-in amplifier (LIA) has been proposed as a detection technique for optical sensors because it can measure low signal in high noise level. LIA uses synchronous method, so the input signal frequency is locked to a reference frequency that is used to carry out the measurements. Generally, input signal frequency of LIA used in optical sensors is determined by modulation frequency of optical signal. It is important to understand the noise characteristics of the trans-impedance amplifier (TIA) to determine the modulation frequency. The TIA has a frequency range in which noise is minimized by the capacitance of photo diode (PD) and the passive component of TIA feedback network. When the modulation frequency is determined in this range, it is possible to design a robust system to noise. In this paper, we propose a method for the determination of optical signal modulation frequency selection by using the noise characteristics of TIA. Frequency response of noise in TIA is measured by spectrum analyzer and minimum noise region is confirmed. The LIA and TIA circuit have been designed as a hybrid circuit. The optical sensor is modeled by the laser diode (LD) and photo diode (PD) and the modulation frequency was used as the input to the signal generator. The experiments were performed to compare the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the minimum noise region and the others. The results clearly show that the SNR is enhanced in the minimum noise region of TIA.

  3. Free-Ranging Male Koalas Use Size-Related Variation in Formant Frequencies to Assess Rival Males

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, Benjamin D.; Whisson, Desley A.; Reby, David

    2013-01-01

    Although the use of formant frequencies in nonhuman animal vocal communication systems has received considerable recent interest, only a few studies have examined the importance of these acoustic cues to body size during intra-sexual competition between males. Here we used playback experiments to present free-ranging male koalas with re-synthesised bellow vocalisations in which the formants were shifted to simulate either a large or a small adult male. We found that male looking responses did not differ according to the size variant condition played back. In contrast, male koalas produced longer bellows and spent more time bellowing when they were presented with playbacks simulating larger rivals. In addition, males were significantly slower to respond to this class of playback stimuli than they were to bellows simulating small males. Our results indicate that male koalas invest more effort into their vocal responses when they are presented with bellows that have lower formants indicative of larger rivals, but also show that males are slower to engage in vocal exchanges with larger males that represent more dangerous rivals. By demonstrating that male koalas use formants to assess rivals during the breeding season we have provided evidence that male-male competition constitutes an important selection pressure for broadcasting and attending to size-related formant information in this species. Further empirical studies should investigate the extent to which the use of formants during intra-sexual competition is widespread throughout mammals. PMID:23922967

  4. Review of recent experimental and modeling progress in the lower hybrid range of frequencies at ITER relevant parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bonoli, Paul T.

    2014-02-12

    Progress in experiment and simulation capability in the lower hybrid range of frequencies (LHRF) at ITER relevant parameters is reviewed. Use of LH power in reactor devices is motivated in terms of its potential for efficient off-axis current profile control. Recent improvements in simulation capability including the development of full-wave field solvers, inclusion of the scrape off layer (SOL) in wave propagation codes, the use of coupled ray tracing / full-wave / 3D (r v{sub ⊥}, v{sub ∥}) Fokker Planck models, and the inclusion of nonlinear broadening effects in ray tracing / Fokker Planck codes are discussed. Experimental and modeling results are reviewed which are aimed at understanding the spectral gap problem in LH current drive (LHCD) and the density limit that has been observed in LHCD experiments. Physics mechanisms that could be operative in these experiments are discussed, including toroidally induced variations in the parallel wavenumber, nonlinear broadening of the pump wave, scattering of LH waves from density fluctuations in the SOL, and spectral broadening at the plasma edge via full-wave effects.

  5. Study of toroidal flow generation by ion cyclotron range of frequency minority heating in the Alcator C-Mod plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, S.; Itoh, K.; Zheng, L. J.; Van Dam, J. W.; Bonoli, P.; Rice, J. E.; Fiore, C. L.; Gao, C.; Fukuyama, A.

    2016-01-01

    The averaged toroidal flow of energetic minority ions during ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) heating is investigated in the Alcator C-Mod plasma by applying the GNET code, which can solve the drift kinetic equation with complicated orbits of accelerated energetic particles. It is found that a co-directional toroidal flow of the minority ions is generated in the region outside of the resonance location, and that the toroidal velocity reaches more than 40% of the central ion thermal velocity (Vtor ˜ 300 km/s with PICRF ˜ 2 MW). When we shift the resonance location to the outside of |r /a |˜0.5 , the toroidal flow immediately inside of the resonance location is reduced to 0 or changes to the opposite direction, and the toroidal velocity shear is enhanced at r/a ˜ 0.5. A radial diffusion equation for toroidal flow is solved by assuming a torque profile for the minority ion mean flow, and good agreements with experimental radial toroidal flow profiles are obtained. This suggests that the ICRF driven minority ion flow is related to the experimentally observed toroidal rotation during ICRF heating in the Alcator C-Mod plasma.

  6. Review of recent experimental and modeling progress in the lower hybrid range of frequencies at ITER relevant parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bonoli, Paul T.

    2014-06-15

    Progress in experiment and simulation capability in the lower hybrid range of frequencies at ITER relevant parameters is reviewed. Use of LH power in reactor devices is motivated in terms of its potential for efficient off-axis current profile control. Recent improvements in simulation capability including the development of full-wave field solvers, inclusion of the scrape off layer (SOL) in wave propagation codes, the use of coupled ray tracing/full-wave/3D (r v{sub ⊥}, v{sub //}) Fokker Planck models, and the inclusion of wave scattering as well as nonlinear broadening effects in ray tracing / Fokker Planck codes are discussed. Experimental and modeling results are reviewed which are aimed at understanding the spectral gap problem in LH current drive (LHCD) and the density limit that has been observed and mitigated in LHCD experiments. Physics mechanisms that could be operative in these experiments are discussed, including toroidally induced variations in the parallel wavenumber, nonlinear broadening of the pump wave, scattering of LH waves from density fluctuations in the SOL, and spectral broadening at the plasma edge via full-wave effects.

  7. Assessing a dual-frequency identification sonars' fish-counting accuracy, precision, and turbid river range capability.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Suzanne L; Gove, Nancy E

    2007-12-01

    Accurately assessing migrating salmon populations in turbid rivers with hydroacoustics is challenging. Using single, dual, or split-beam sonars, difficulties occur fitting acoustic beams between the river's narrow boundaries, distinguishing fish from nonfish echoes, and resolving individual fish at high densities. To address these issues, the fish-counting capability of a dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON), which produces high resolution, video-like images, was assessed. In a clear river, fish counts generated from a DIDSON, an echo counter, split-beam sonar, and video were compared to visual counts from a tower, a method frequently used to ground-truth sonars. The DIDSON and tower counts were very similar and showed the strongest agreement and least variability compared to the other methods. In a highly turbid river, the DIDSON's maximum detection range for a 10.16 cm spherical target was 17 m, less than absorption and wave spreading losses predict, and 26 m in clear water. Unlike tower and video methods, the DIDSON was not limited by surface disturbances or turbidity. DIDSON advantages over other sonars include: better target resolution; wider viewing angle; better coverage of the water column; accurate direction of travel; and simpler to aim and operate.

  8. Assessment of genetic diversity of accessions in Brassicaceae genetic resources by frequency distribution analysis of S haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Takuno, S; Oikawa, E; Kitashiba, H; Nishio, T

    2010-04-01

    Plant genetic resources are important sources of genetic variation for improving crop varieties as breeding materials. Conservation of such resources of allogamous species requires maintenance of the genetic diversity within each accession to avoid inbreeding depression and loss of rare alleles. For assessment of genetic diversity in the self-incompatibility locus (S locus), which is critically involved in the chance of mating, we developed a dot-blot genotyping method for self-incompatibility (S) haplotypes and applied it to indigenous, miscellaneous landraces of Brassica rapa, provided by the IPK Gene Bank (Gatersleben, Germany) and the Tohoku University Brassica Seed Bank (Sendai, Japan), in which landraces are maintained using different population sizes. This method effectively determined S genotypes of more than 500 individuals from the focal landraces. Although our results suggest that these landraces might possess sufficient numbers of S haplotypes, the strong reduction of frequencies of recessive S haplotypes occurred, probably owing to genetic drift. Based on these results, we herein discuss an appropriate way to conserve genetic diversity of allogamous plant resources in a gene bank.

  9. Frequency Allocations for Unmanned Aircraft Systems in the National Airspace. Access 5 White Paper to the WRC Advisory Committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    A critical aspect of the Access 5 program is identifying appropriate spectrum for civil and commercial purposes. However, currently, there is no spectrum allocated for the command/control link between the aircraft control station and the unmanned aircraft. Until such frequency spectrum is allocated and approved, it will be difficult for the UAS community to obtain civil airworthiness certification and operate in the NAS on a routine basis. This document provides a perspective from the UAS community on Agenda Items being considered for the upcoming World Radiocommunication Conference 2007 (WRC 07). Primarily, it supports the proposal to add Aeronautical Mobile (Route) Services (AM(R)S) to existing bands that could be used for UAS Line-of-Sight operations. It also recommends the need to identify spectrum that could be used for an Aeronautical Mobile Satellite (Route) Service (AMS(R)S) that would allow UAS to operate Beyond Line-of-Sight. If spectrum is made available to provide these services, it will then be incumbent upon the UAS community to justify their use of this spectrum as well as the assurance that they will not interfere with other users of this newly allocated spectrum.

  10. Different Mode of Afferents Determines the Frequency Range of High Frequency Activities in the Human Brain: Direct Electrocorticographic Comparison between Peripheral Nerve and Direct Cortical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Riki; Matsuhashi, Masao; Usami, Kiyohide; Shimotake, Akihiro; Kunieda, Takeharu; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Physiological high frequency activities (HFA) are related to various brain functions. Factors, however, regulating its frequency have not been well elucidated in humans. To validate the hypothesis that different propagation modes (thalamo-cortical vs. cortico-coritcal projections), or different terminal layers (layer IV vs. layer II/III) affect its frequency, we, in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), compared HFAs induced by median nerve stimulation with those induced by electrical stimulation of the cortex connecting to SI. We employed 6 patients who underwent chronic subdural electrode implantation for presurgical evaluation. We evaluated the HFA power values in reference to the baseline overriding N20 (earliest cortical response) and N80 (late response) of somatosensory evoked potentials (HFA(SEP(N20)) and HFA(SEP(N80))) and compared those overriding N1 and N2 (first and second responses) of cortico-cortical evoked potentials (HFA(CCEP(N1)) and HFA(CCEP(N2))). HFA(SEP(N20)) showed the power peak in the frequency above 200 Hz, while HFA(CCEP(N1)) had its power peak in the frequency below 200 Hz. Different propagation modes and/or different terminal layers seemed to determine HFA frequency. Since HFA(CCEP(N1)) and HFA induced during various brain functions share a similar broadband profile of the power spectrum, cortico-coritcal horizontal propagation seems to represent common mode of neural transmission for processing these functions. PMID:26087042

  11. Wide frequencies range of spin excitations in a rare-earth Bi-doped iron garnet with a giant Faraday rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parchenko, Sergii; Stupakiewicz, Andrzej; Yoshimine, Isao; Satoh, Takuya; Maziewski, Andrzej

    2013-10-01

    Ultrafast magnetization dynamics of a rare-earth Bi-doped garnet were studied using an optical pump-probe technique via the inverse Faraday effect. We observed a wide range of frequency modes of the magnetization precession, covering two orders of magnitude. The excitation efficiency of low-frequency precessions in the GHz range, together with a significant beating effect, strongly depended on the amplitude of the external magnetic field. On the contrary, high-frequency precession was independent of the external magnetic field. The obtained results may be exploited in the development of wide class of microwave and magneto-optical devices.

  12. Photonic approach for microwave frequency measurement with adjustable measurement range and resolution using birefringence effect in highly non-linear fiber.

    PubMed

    Feng, Danqi; Xie, Heng; Qian, Lifen; Bai, Qinhong; Sun, Junqiang

    2015-06-29

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel approach for microwave frequency measurement utilizing birefringence effect in the highly non-linear fiber (HNLF). A detailed theoretical analysis is presented to implement the adjustable measurement range and resolution. By stimulating a complementary polarization-domain interferometer pair in the HNLF, a mathematical expression that relates the microwave frequency and amplitude comparison function is developed. We carry out a proof-to-concept experiment. A frequency measurement range of 2.5-30 GHz with a measurement error within 0.5 GHz is achieved except 16-17.5 GHz. This method is all-optical and requires no high-speed electronic components. PMID:26191769

  13. Modification of S. cerevisiae Growth Dynamics Using Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields in the 1-2 kHz Range

    PubMed Central

    Barabáš, Ján; Radil, Roman; Malíková, Ivona

    2015-01-01

    This paper details our further experiments pertaining to the influence of low frequency electromagnetic fields (LF EMF) on the growth dynamics of two wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strands. We opted to explore frequencies beyond the usual 50–60 Hz range, motivated by the ion parametric resonance theory and several studies which discovered and recorded endogenous biosignals in various Saccharomyces cerevisiae strands in the 0.4–2.0 kHz frequency range, most probably stemming from microtubules. Both yeast strands used in our experiments have been subjected to continuous 66-hour session of LF EMF exposure (frequencies 1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8, and 2.0 kHz; average magnetic flux density 2.43 mT) under identical ambient conditions. Experiment results indicate a frequency-dependent proliferative response of both yeast strands. PMID:26290871

  14. Tracking the time course of lexical access in orthographic production: An event-related potential study of word frequency effects in written picture naming.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qingqing; Zhang, Qingfang; Damian, Markus F

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies of spoken picture naming using event-related potentials (ERPs) have shown that speakers initiate lexical access within 200ms after stimulus onset. In the present study, we investigated the time course of lexical access in written, rather than spoken, word production. Chinese participants wrote target object names which varied in word frequency, and written naming times and ERPs were measured. Writing latencies exhibited a classical frequency effect (faster responses for high- than for low-frequency names). More importantly, ERP results revealed that electrophysiological activity elicited by high- and low frequency target names started to diverge as early as 168ms post picture onset. We conclude that lexical access during written word production is initiated within 200ms after picture onset. This estimate is compatible with previous studies on spoken production which likewise showed a rapid onset of lexical access (i.e., within 200ms after stimuli onset). We suggest that written and spoken word production share the lexicalization stage. PMID:27393929

  15. Modelling the spectral induced polarization response of water-saturated sands in the intermediate frequency range (102-105 Hz) using mechanistic and empirical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Thomas; Schmutz, Myriam; Leroy, Philippe; Agrinier, Pierre; Maineult, Alexis

    2016-11-01

    The intermediate frequency range 102-105 Hz forms the transition range between the spectral induced polarization frequency domain and the dielectric spectroscopy frequency domain. Available experimental data showed that the spectral induced polarization response of sands fully saturated with water was particularly sensitive to variations of the saturating water electrical conductivity value in the intermediate frequency range. An empirical and a mechanistic model have been developed and confronted to this experimental data. This confrontation showed that the Maxwell Wagner polarization alone is not sufficient to explain the observed signal in the intermediate frequency range. The SIP response of the media was modelled by assigning relatively high dielectric permittivity values to the sand particle or high effective permittivity values to the media. Such high values are commonly observed in the dielectric spectroscopy literature when entering the intermediate frequency range. The physical origin of these high dielectric permittivity values is discussed (grain shape, electromagnetic coupling), and a preliminary study is presented which suggests that the high impedance values of the non-polarizable electrodes might play a significant role in the observed behaviour.

  16. Novel wavelength division multiplex-radio over fiber-passive optical network architecture for multiple access points based on multitone generation and triple sextupling frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guangming; Guo, Banghong; Liu, Songhao; Huang, Xuguang

    2014-01-01

    An innovative wavelength division multiplex-radio over fiber-passive optical network architecture for multiple access points (AP) based on multitone generation and triple sextupling frequency is proposed and demonstrated. A dual-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator (DD-MZM) is utilized to realize the multitone generation. Even sidebands are suppressed to make the adjacent frequency separation twice the frequency of the local oscillator by adjusting the modulation voltage of the DD-MZM. Due to adopting three fiber Bragg gratings to reflect the unmodulated sidebands for uplink communications source free at optical network unit (ONU), is achieved. The system can support at least three APs at one ONU simultaneously with a 30 km single-mode fiber (SMF) transmission and 5 Gb/s data rate both for uplink and downlink communications. The theoretical analysis and simulation results show the architecture has an excellent performance and will be a promising candidate in future hybrid access networks.

  17. Face Recognition Is Affected by Similarity in Spatial Frequency Range to a Greater Degree Than Within-Category Object Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collin, Charles A.; Liu, Chang Hong; Troje, Nikolaus F.; McMullen, Patricia A.; Chaudhuri, Avi

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that face identification is more sensitive to variations in spatial frequency content than object recognition, but none have compared how sensitive the 2 processes are to variations in spatial frequency overlap (SFO). The authors tested face and object matching accuracy under varying SFO conditions. Their results…

  18. Characterization and performance of a field aligned ion cyclotron range of frequency antenna in Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wukitch, S. J.; Garrett, M. L.; Ochoukov, R.; Terry, J. L.; Hubbard, A.; Labombard, B.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Miller, D.; Reinke, M. L.; Whyte, D.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-05-01

    Ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is expected to provide auxiliary heating for ITER and future fusion reactors where high Z metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) are being considered. Impurity contamination linked to ICRF antenna operation remains a major challenge particularly for devices with high Z metallic PFCs. Here, we report on an experimental investigation to test whether a field aligned (FA) antenna can reduce impurity contamination and impurity sources. We compare the modification of the scrape of layer (SOL) plasma potential of the FA antenna to a conventional, toroidally aligned (TA) antenna, in order to explore the underlying physics governing impurity contamination linked to ICRF heating. The FA antenna is a 4-strap ICRF antenna where the current straps and antenna enclosure sides are perpendicular to the total magnetic field while the Faraday screen rods are parallel to the total magnetic field. In principle, alignment with respect to the total magnetic field minimizes integrated E|| (electric field along a magnetic field line) via symmetry. A finite element method RF antenna model coupled to a cold plasma model verifies that the integrated E|| should be reduced for all antenna phases. Monopole phasing in particular is expected to have the lowest integrated E||. Consistent with expectations, we observed that the impurity contamination and impurity source at the FA antenna are reduced compared to the TA antenna. In both L and H-mode discharges, the radiated power is 20%-30% lower for a FA-antenna heated discharge than a discharge heated with the TA-antennas. However, inconsistent with expectations, we observe RF induced plasma potentials (via gas-puff imaging and emissive probes to be nearly identical for FA and TA antennas when operated in dipole phasing). Moreover, the highest levels of RF-induced plasma potentials are observed using monopole phasing with the FA antenna. Thus, while impurity contamination and sources are indeed

  19. Impedance of Aqueous Solutions of KCl at the Ultra-low Frequency Range: Use of Cole-Cole Impedance Element to Account for the Frequency Dispersion Peak at 20 mHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacometti, José A.; Alves, Neri; Teruya, Márcia Y.

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports on the analysis of dispersion in the imaginary part of impedance often observed at low frequencies in a variety of systems. The experimental data were obtained with an electrolytic cell containing KCl aqueous solution in the frequency range from 0.1 mHz to 10 MHz, where the use of ultra-low frequencies helps clarify the analysis of the imaginary impedance dispersion. It is shown that the low frequency dispersion described in the literature is the tail of a relaxation peak located at f ≅ 20 mHz. This ultra-low frequency dispersion peak is analyzed with a Cole-Cole impedance element, being associated with the electric double layer at the metal-electrolyte interface. Quantitative information can be extracted for the double layer, including its thickness (˜1 nm) and electrical resistivity (˜50 GΩm).

  20. Large allele frequency differences between human continental groups are more likely to have occurred by drift during range expansions than by selection.

    PubMed

    Hofer, T; Ray, N; Wegmann, D; Excoffier, L

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have found strikingly different allele frequencies between continents. This has been mainly interpreted as being due to local adaptation. However, demographic factors can generate similar patterns. Namely, allelic surfing during a population range expansion may increase the frequency of alleles in newly colonised areas. In this study, we examined 772 STRs, 210 diallelic indels, and 2834 SNPs typed in 53 human populations worldwide under the HGDP-CEPH Diversity Panel to determine to which extent allele frequency differs among four regions (Africa, Eurasia, East Asia, and America). We find that large allele frequency differences between continents are surprisingly common, and that Africa and America show the largest number of loci with extreme frequency differences. Moreover, more STR alleles have increased rather than decreased in frequency outside Africa, as expected under allelic surfing. Finally, there is no relationship between the extent of allele frequency differences and proximity to genes, as would be expected under selection. We therefore conclude that most of the observed large allele frequency differences between continents result from demography rather than from positive selection.

  1. Interaction of electromagnetic radiation in the 20-200 GHz frequency range with arrays of carbon nanotubes with ferromagnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Atdayev, Agylych; Danilyuk, Alexander L; Prischepa, Serghej L

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of electromagnetic radiation with a magnetic nanocomposite based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) is considered within the model of distributed random nanoparticles with a core-shell morphology. The approach is based on a system composed of a CNT conducting resistive matrix, ferromagnetic inductive nanoparticles and the capacitive interface between the CNT matrix and the nanoparticles, which form resonance resistive-inductive-capacitive circuits. It is shown that the influence of the resonant circuits leads to the emergence of specific resonances, namely peaks and valleys in the frequency dependence of the permeability of the nanocomposite, and in the frequency dependence of the reflection and transmission of electromagnetic radiation.

  2. A FDR Sensor for Measuring Complex Soil Dielectric Permittivity in the 10–500 MHz Frequency Range

    PubMed Central

    Skierucha, Wojciech; Wilczek, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical details as well as electrical models of FDR (frequency domain reflectometry) sensors for the measurement of the complex dielectric permittivity of porous materials are presented. The sensors are formed from two stainless steel parallel waveguides of various lengths. Using the data from VNA (vector network analyzer) with the connected FDR sensor and selected models of the applied sensor it was possible obtain the frequency spectrum of dielectric permittivity from 10 to 500 MHz of reference liquids and soil samples of various moisture and salinity. The performance of the analyzed sensors were compared with TDR (time domain reflectometry) ones of similar mechanical construction. PMID:22319300

  3. Particle simulations of mode conversion between slow mode and fast mode in lower hybrid range of frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guozhang; Xiang, Nong; Wang, Xueyi; Huang, Yueheng; Lin, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The propagation and mode conversion of lower hybrid waves in an inhomogeneous plasma are investigated by using the nonlinear δf algorithm in a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation code based on the gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion (GeFi) scheme [Lin et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 47, 657 (2005)]. The characteristics of the simulated waves, such as wavelength, frequency, phase, and group velocities, agree well with the linear theoretical analysis. It is shown that a significant reflection component emerges in the conversion process between the slow mode and the fast mode when the scale length of the density variation is comparable to the local wavelength. The dependences of the reflection coefficient on the scale length of the density variation are compared with the results based on the linear full wave model for cold plasmas. It is indicated that the mode conversion for the waves with a frequency of 2.45 GHz (ω ˜ 3ωLH, where ωLH represents the lower hybrid resonance) and within Tokamak relevant amplitudes can be well described in the linear scheme. As the frequency decreases, the modification due to the nonlinear term becomes important. For the low-frequency waves (ω ˜ 1.3ωLH), the generations of the high harmonic modes and sidebands through nonlinear mode-mode coupling provide new power channels and thus could reduce the reflection significantly.

  4. Divinyl-end-functionalized polyethylenes: ready access to a range of telechelic polyethylenes through thiol-ene reactions.

    PubMed

    Norsic, Sebastien; Thomas, Coralie; D'Agosto, Franck; Boisson, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Telechelic α,ω-iodo-vinyl-polyethylenes (Vin-PE-I) were obtained by catalytic ethylene polymerization in the presence of [(C5 Me5 )2 NdCl2 Li(OEt2 )2 ] in combination with a functionalized chain-transfer agent, namely, di(10-undecenyl)magnesium, followed by treatment of the resulting di(vinylpolyethylenyl)magnesium compounds ((vinyl-PE)2 Mg) with I2 . The iodo-functionalized vinylpolyethylenes (Vin-PE-I) were transformed into unique divinyl-functionalized polyethylenes (Vin-PE-Vin) by simple treatment with tBuOK in toluene at 95 °C. Thiol-ene reactions were then successfully performed on Vin-PE-Vin with functionalized thiols in the presence of AIBN. A range of homobifunctional telechelic polyethylenes were obtained on which a hydroxy, diol, carboxylic acid, amine, ammonium chloride, trimethoxysilyl, chloro, or fluoroalkyl group was installed quantitatively at each chain end. PMID:25688747

  5. Studies of selective attention in dogs using the coherence-phase characteristics of cortical potentials over a wide range of frequencies, 1-220 Hz.

    PubMed

    Dumenko, V N; Kozlov, M K

    2003-07-01

    The state of selective attention formed during operant food-related behavior was studied using the coherence-phase characteristics between potentials in several areas of the neocortex at frequencies of 1-220 Hz. Functional groups were identified among the areas compared, which appear to have priority for this state. The temporal relationships between potentials in these groups were established from values for coherence functions at a particular optimum level (0.7) mainly in the band 1-15 Hz and the high-frequency range 40-200 Hz. The phenomenon of synchronicity appeared at phase shifts close to zero, while at significant phase shifts the phenomenon of non-synchronous time relationships with defined spatial directions was seen in the high-frequency range.

  6. Nonlinear frequency up-conversion of femtosecond pulses from an erbium fibre laser to the range of 0.8 - 1 {mu}m in silica fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Anashkina, E A; Andrianov, A V; Kim, A V

    2013-03-31

    We consider different mechanisms of nonlinear frequency up-conversion of femtosecond pulses emitted by an erbium fibre system ({lambda} = 1.5 {mu}m) to the range of 0.8 - 1.2 {mu}m in nonlinear silica fibres. The generation efficiency and the centre frequencies of dispersive waves are found as functions of the parameters of the fibre and the input pulse. Simple analytical estimates are obtained for the spectral distribution of the intensity and the frequency shift of a wave packet in the region of normal dispersion during the emission of a high-order soliton under phase matching conditions. In the geometrical optics approximation the frequency shifts are estimated in the interaction of dispersive waves with solitons in various regimes. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  7. Effect of continuous irradiation with terahertz electromagnetic waves of the NO frequency range on behavioral reactions of male albino rats under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Kirichuk, V F; Antipova, O N; Krylova, Ya A

    2014-06-01

    We studied the effect of terahertz waves (NO frequency range, 150.176-150.664 GHz) on stress-induced variations in behavioral reactions of male albino rats during hypokinetic stress. THz irradiation was followed by partial or complete normalization of behavioral reactions of male albino rats after hypokinetic stress. The most significant effect was observed after continuous irradiation for 30 min.

  8. Influence of temporal noise on the skin blood flow measurements performed by cooled thermal imaging camera: limit possibilities within each physiological frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagaidachnyi, A. A.; Volkov, I. U.; Fomin, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes limit possibilities of modern cooled thermal imaging cameras as a tool for estimation of blood flow oscillations at the surface of living body. Skin temperature oscillations, as we assumed, are a consequence of the blood flow oscillations. We considered the temperature sensitivity 0.01-0.02 °C as a typical for the most of modern cooled long wave thermal imaging cameras. Fourier filter used to investigate the temperature signal separately within endothelial, neurogenic, myogenic, respiratory and cardiac frequency ranges. The level of temporal noise has been estimated during measurements of no living body with stabilized temperature ~ 24°C. The level of temperature oscillations has been calculated for the group of healthy subjects within each frequency range. Thus, we were able to determine signal-to-noise ratio within frequency band [0.001, 1] Hz. As a result, we determine that skin temperature oscillations measured by thermal imaging camera with sensitivity 0.02°C have the upper frequency limit ~ 0.2 Hz. In other words, within the respiratory and cardiac frequency ranges of blood flow oscillations the noise level exceeds signal one, and temperature measurements at the skin surface are practically useless. The endothelial, neurogenic and myogenic components of the temperature oscillations contain ~98% of the total spectral power of the signal. We have plot the empirical extrapolated curve of sensitivity of thermal imaging camera vs. frequency of the temperature oscillations. The data analysis shows that measurements of skin temperature oscillations within respiratory and cardiac ranges require the temperature sensitivity at least ~ 0.01°C and 0.001°C, respectively.

  9. Slowing down terahertz waves with tunable group velocities in a broad frequency range by surface magneto plasmons.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Wang, Qi Jie; Zhang, Ying

    2012-04-23

    This paper proposes one broadly tunable terahertz (THz) slow-light system in a semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor structure. Subject to an external magnetic field, the structure supports in total two surface magneto plasmons (SMPs) bands above and below the surface plasma frequency, respectively. Both the SMPs bands can be tuned by the external magnetic field. Numerical studies show that leveraging on the two tunable bands, the frequency and the group velocity of the slowed-down THz wave can be widely tuned from 0.3 THz to 10 THz and from 1 c to 10(-6) c, respectively, when the external magnetic field increases up to 6 Tesla. The proposed method based on the two SMPs bands can be widely used for many other plasmonic devices.

  10. Excitation of electrostatic waves in the electron cyclotron frequency range during magnetic reconnection in laboratory overdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahata, A.; Igami, H.; Kawamori, E.; Kogi, Y.; Inomoto, M.; Ono, Y.

    2014-10-15

    We report the observation of electromagnetic radiation at high harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency that was considered to be converted from electrostatic waves called electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) during magnetic reconnection in laboratory overdense plasmas. The excitation of EBWs was attributed to the thermalization of electrons accelerated by the reconnection electric field around the X-point. The radiative process discussed here is an acceptable explanation for observed radio waves pulsation associated with major flares.

  11. A Tale of Two Frequencies: Determining the Speed of Lexical Access for Mandarin Chinese and English Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Niels; Bi, Yanchao; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    Two picture naming experiments show that compound word production in Mandarin Chinese and in English is determined by the compound's whole-word frequency, and not by its constituent morpheme frequency. Four control experiments rule out that these results are caused by recognition or articulatory processes. These results are consistent with models…

  12. Long-range measurement of Rayleigh scatter signature beyond laser coherence length based on coherent optical frequency domain reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Shingo; Iida, Daisuke; Toge, Kunihiro; Manabe, Tetsuya

    2016-08-22

    Long-range C-OFDR measurement of fiber Rayleigh scatter signature is described. The Rayleigh scatter signature, which is an interference pattern of backscatters from the random refractive indices in fibers, is known to be applicable to fiber identification and temperature or strain sensing by measuring its repeatability and its spectral shift. However, these applications have not been realized at ranges beyond the laser coherence length since laser phase noise degrades its repeatability. This paper proposes and demonstrates a method for analyzing the optical power spectrum of local Rayleigh backscatter to overcome the limitation imposed by laser phase noise. The measurable range and spatial performance are also investigated experimentally with respect to the remaining phase noise and noise reduction by signal averaging with the proposed method. The feasibility of Rayleigh scatter signature measurement for long-range applications is confirmed. PMID:27557243

  13. Full-range imaging of the whole anterior segment of eye by high-speed optical frequency domain imaging using a reflective Fabry-Perot tunable laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Hiro-Oka, Hideaki; Yoshimura, Reiko; Choi, Dong-Hak; Nakanishi, Motoi; Igarashi, Akihito; Ohbayashi, Kohji; Shimizu, Kimiya

    2011-03-01

    We describe a high-speed long-depth range optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) system employing a long-coherence length tunable source and demonstrate dynamic full-range imaging of the anterior segment of the eye including from the cornea surface to the posterior capsule of the crystalline lens with a depth range of 12 mm without removing complex conjugate image ambiguity. The dependence of the whole anterior segment change on time following abrupt relaxation from the accommodated to the relaxed status was measured for a healthy eye and that with an intraocular lens.

  14. Spatial-phase-modulation-based study of polyvinyl-alcohol/acrylamide photopolymers in the low spatial frequency range.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Sergi; Márquez, André; Méndez, David; Marini, Stephan; Beléndez, Augusto; Pascual, Inmaculada

    2009-08-01

    Photopolymers are appealing materials for the fabrication of diffractive optical elements (DOEs). We evaluate the possibilities of polyvinyl-alcohol/acrylamide-based photopolymers to store diffractive elements with low spatial frequencies. We record gratings with different spatial frequencies in the material and analyze the material behavior measuring the transmitted and the reflected orders as a function of exposition. We study two different compositions for the photopolymer, with and without a cross-linker. The values of diffraction efficiency achieved for both compositions make the material suitable to record DOEs with long spatial periods. Assuming a Fermi-Dirac-function-based profile, we fitted the diffracted intensities (up to the eighth order) to obtain the phase profile of the recorded gratings. This analysis shows that it is possible to achieve a phase shift larger than 2pi rad with steep edges in the periodic phase profile. In the case of the measurements in reflection, we have obtained information dealing with the surface profile, which show that it has a smooth shape with an extremely large phase-modulation depth.

  15. Studies of selective attention in dogs using the energy characteristics of neocortical potentials in the frequency range 1-220 Hz.

    PubMed

    Dumenko, V N; Kozlov, M L; Kulikov, M A

    2002-01-01

    Experiments were performed in dogs to study the state of selective attention formed during operant food-related training and apparent during interstimulus intervals as a state of tense expectation of the conditioned signal. Electrical activity in various parts of the neocortex, in both hemispheres, was analyzed in the frequency range 1-220 Hz (epidural electrodes) using Fourier transforms. The electrical activity of the motor area of the right hemisphere showed a predominance of high-frequency (40-200 Hz) components, as did the visual and parietal areas of the left hemisphere. The state of selective attention was associated with a different functional mosaic in the organization of neocortical electrical activity.

  16. Multiple Access Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motamedi, Masoud

    1990-01-01

    The Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) strawman design uses a hybrid Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA)/Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA) implementation. TDMA is used for the forward direction (from Suppliers to Users), and FDMA for the return direction (from Users to Suppliers). An alternative architecture is proposed that will require minimal real time coordination and yet provide a fast access method by using random access Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA). The CDMA system issues are addressed such as connecting suppliers and users, both of whom may be located anywhere in the CONUS, when the user terminals are constrained in size and weight; and providing efficient traffic routing under highly variable traffic requirements. It is assumed that bandwidth efficiency is not of paramount importance. CDMA or Spread Spectrum Multiple Access (SSMA) communication is a method in which a group of carriers operate at the same nominal center frequency but are separable from each other by the low cross correlation of the spreading codes used. Interference and multipath rejection capability, ease of selective addressing and message screening, low density power spectra for signal hiding and security, and high resolution ranging are among the benefits of spread spectrum communications.

  17. Characterization of timing jitter spectra in free-running mode-locked lasers with 340  dB dynamic range over 10 decades of Fourier frequency.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate a method that enables accurate timing jitter spectral-density characterization of free-running mode-locked laser oscillators over more than 10 decades of Fourier frequency from mHz to tens of MHz range. The method is based on analyzing both the input voltage noise to the slave laser and the output voltage noise from the balanced optical cross-correlator (BOC), when two mode-locked lasers are synchronized in repetition rate by the BOC. As a demonstration experiment, timing jitter spectrum of a free-running mode-locked Er-fiber laser with a dynamic range of >340  dB is measured over Fourier frequency ranging from 1 mHz to 38.5 MHz (Nyquist frequency). The demonstrated method can resolve different noise mechanisms that cause specific jitter characteristics in free-running mode-locked laser oscillators for a vast range of time scales from <100  ns to >1000  s.

  18. Efficient frequency downconversion at the single photon level from the red spectral range to the telecommunications C-band.

    PubMed

    Zaske, Sebastian; Lenhard, Andreas; Becher, Christoph

    2011-06-20

    We report on single photon frequency downconversion from the red part of the spectrum (738 nm) to the telecommunications C-band. By mixing attenuated laser pulses with an average photon number per pulse < 1 with a strong continuous light field at 1403 nm in a periodically poled Zn:LiNbO3 ridge waveguide an internal conversion efficiency of ∼ 73% is achieved. We further investigate the noise properties of the process by measuring the output spectrum. Our results indicate that by narrow spectral filtering a quantum interface should be feasible which bridges the wavelength gap between quantum emitters like color centers in diamond emitting in the red part of the spectrum and low-loss fiber-optic telecommunications wavelengths.

  19. Dielectric properties measurement method in the microwave frequencies range for non-polar/polar liquid mixtures characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surducan, E.; Neamtu, C.; Ienciu, M.; Surducan, V.; Limare, A.; Fourel, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present a method based on dielectric properties measurements over a large spectrum of frequencies, in the microwave (MW) domain, in order to characterize a liquid mixture. The liquid mixtures consist of non-polar fluids (silicone oil, diesel fuel) and polar additives, in order to increase the specific MW absorption of the mixture for further MW power processing. We have measured the MW specific absorptions for mixtures of silicone oil with 20% and 30% (w/w) isopropanol. In both cases, the mixtures are sufficiently stable over time to allow further studies of thermal convection dynamics initiated by MW heating. For a mixture of diesel fuel with 10% (w/w) alkyl polyglycoside, the main observation was that its MW specific absorption varies over time after the mechanical mixing process.

  20. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Picosecond laser with discrete frequency tuning in the visible range utilizing stimulated Raman scattering with nonlinear mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel'skiĭ, A. M.; Gulis, I. M.; Mikhaĭlov, V. P.; Saechnikov, K. A.; Tsvirko, V. A.

    1992-08-01

    A YAG:Nd3+ laser emitting radiation at eight frequencies in the visible range has been developed. This continuously pumped passively mode-locked laser contained an intracavity LiIO3 crystal which served both as a Raman-active medium and as an element for nonlinear frequency mixing. Processes of stimulated Raman scattering with nonlinear mixing in an LiIO crystal were analyzed. It was established that the phonon mode having the E2 symmetry (ν = 824 cm-1) and the tilted polariton vibration having the A + E1 symmetry (ν ~ 650 cm-1) are actively involved in the emission process. Continuous frequency tuning could be achieved because of the angular dispersion of the tilted polaritons.

  1. An inexpensive and versatile technique for wide frequency range surface pressure measurements: an application for the study of turbulent buffeting of a square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbajo Fuertes, Fernando; Cecchi, Enrico; van Beeck, Jeroen; Schram, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the development of an inexpensive measurement technique based on miniature microphones for the measurement of pressure fluctuations in a wide frequency range, starting from infrasound up to several kilohertz. Special emphasis has been put on achieving accurate calibration of the system at very low frequencies and good agreement with reference measurements have been achieved at frequencies as low as 1 Hz, therefore opening new low-budget research possibilities in many fields of fluid mechanics. The measurement technique proposed is specially indicated when the number of simultaneous pressure measurements is high since the sensors used are inexpensive, contrarily to common research equipment. One particular area in which this technique results useful is bluff-body aerodynamics. As an example of the potential of the technique, the structural response of a finite-square cylinder immersed in a turbulent flow is studied.

  2. Performance Study of Hybrid DS/FFH Spread-Spectrum Systems in the Presence of Frequency-Selective Fading and Multiple-Access Interference

    SciTech Connect

    Olama, Mohammed M; Smith, Stephen Fulton; Kuruganti, Phani Teja; Ma, Xiao

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid spread-spectrum (HSS) systems have recently received considerable interest in commercial, Smart Grid, and military communication systems because they accommodate high data rates with high link integrity, even in the presence of significant multipath effects and interfering signals. A highly useful form of this modulation scheme is the specific code-related combination of standard direct-sequence spread spectrum (DSSS) with fast frequency-hopping (FFH) spread spectrum, denoted hybrid DS/FFH, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time. In this paper we perform a simulation-based study of the DS/FFH performance as compared to the existing standard DSSS and FHSS wireless networks. The performance metrics are bit-error probability and multiple-access capability. The parameter space of DS/FFH, including the DS spreading rate, frequency hopping rate, carrier frequencies, and numbers of users, is explored to show its performance under frequency-selective Rayleigh fading environments and multiuser interference. Direct digital synthesizers to achieve fast hopping speeds are also considered in our study.

  3. Effects of time varying currents and magnetic fields in the frequency range of 1 kHz to 1 MHz to the human body - a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Bohnert, Julia; Dössel, Olaf

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to time-varying magnetic fields evokes two effects in biological tissue: Firstly, an electric field is induced that generates eddy currents in conductive tissues, and, secondly, power deposit might increase local temperatures. Field effects of frequencies up to 1 kHz and above 1 MHz are well known. The intermediate frequency range lacks intensive research. Only little attention has been paid so far. Yet due to recent innovations in medical diagnostics and therapies like Magnetic Particle Imaging or RF-Hyperthermia, the need arises to investigate the frequency range from 1kHz to 1 MHz. This work presents results of numerical field calculations of a human body model placed within simple coil configurations. Induced current densities, generated by alternating coil currents, are simulated. The effect of current densities are demonstrated and evaluated on schematic cell models of excitable tissue. In order to generate an action potential at the cell membrane, a difference in electric potential from intra- to extracellular space must be present. It can be shown that in case of sufficient field strength, stimulation of nerves and muscles is possible up to a frequency of 100 kHz. The aim of this paper is to transfer simulation results from the macroscopic model to the microscopic model in order to estimate field effects of big field generating coils.

  4. Linear-array-based photoacoustic imaging of human microcirculation with a range of high frequency transducer probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Haroon; Breathnach, Aedán; Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Leahy, Martin J.

    2015-05-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) with a linear-array-based probe can provide a convenient means of imaging the human microcirculation within its native structural context and adds functional information. PAI using a multielement linear transducer array combined with multichannel collecting system was used for in vivo volumetric imaging of the blood microcirculation, the total concentration of hemoglobin (HbT), and the hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) within human tissue. Three-dimensional (3-D) PA and ultrasound (US) volumetric scans were acquired from the forearm skin by linearly translating the transducer with a stepper motor over a region of interest, while capturing two-dimensional images using 15, 21, and 40 MHz frequency transducer probes. For the microvasculature imaging, PA images were acquired at 800- and 1064-nm wavelengths. For the HbT and sO2 estimates, PA images were collected at 750- and 850-nm wavelengths. 3-D microcirculation, HbT, and sO2 maps of the forearm skin were obtained from normal subjects. The linear-array-based PAI has been found promising in terms of resolution, imaging depth, and imaging speed for in vivo microcirculation imaging within human skin. We believe that a reflection type probe, similar to existing clinical US probes, is most likely to succeed in real clinical applications. Its advantages include ease of use, speed, and familiarity for radiographers and clinicians.

  5. Age group estimation in free-ranging African elephants based on acoustic cues of low-frequency rumbles

    PubMed Central

    Stoeger, Angela S.; Zeppelzauer, Matthias; Baotic, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Animal vocal signals are increasingly used to monitor wildlife populations and to obtain estimates of species occurrence and abundance. In the future, acoustic monitoring should function not only to detect animals, but also to extract detailed information about populations by discriminating sexes, age groups, social or kin groups, and potentially individuals. Here we show that it is possible to estimate age groups of African elephants (Loxodonta africana) based on acoustic parameters extracted from rumbles recorded under field conditions in a National Park in South Africa. Statistical models reached up to 70 % correct classification to four age groups (infants, calves, juveniles, adults) and 95 % correct classification when categorising into two groups (infants/calves lumped into one group versus adults). The models revealed that parameters representing absolute frequency values have the most discriminative power. Comparable classification results were obtained by fully automated classification of rumbles by high-dimensional features that represent the entire spectral envelope, such as MFCC (75 % correct classification) and GFCC (74 % correct classification). The reported results and methods provide the scientific foundation for a future system that could potentially automatically estimate the demography of an acoustically monitored elephant group or population. PMID:25821348

  6. Theoretical and practical aspects of application of a low-energy electromagnetic radiation of the extremely high-frequency range in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyapina, Elena P.; Chesnokov, Igor A.; Bushuev, Nikolay A.; Kuzyutkina, Svetlana E.; Shuldjakov, Andrey A.

    2006-02-01

    The questions concerning the mechanism of action of a low-energy electromagnetic radiation of the extremely high frequency range (EMR EHF) are considered. Also the features of biological effects are considered in their application as therapeutic actions. As an example the advantages of EHF treatment of patients with chronic brucellosis are shown, the algorithm of a choice of the scheme of treatment using EMR EHF is offered.

  7. Acute effects on metabolism and appetite profile of one meal difference in the lower range of meal frequency.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Astrid J; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2008-06-01

    A gorging pattern of food intake has been shown to enhance lipogenesis and increase body weight, which may be due to large fluctuations in storage and mobilisation of nutrients. In a state of energy balance, increasing meal frequency, and thereby decreasing inter-meal interval, may prevent large metabolic fluctuations. Our aim was to study the effect of the inter-meal interval by dividing energy intake over two or three meals on energy expenditure, substrate oxidation and 24 h satiety, in healthy, normal-weight women in a state of energy balance. The study was a randomised crossover design with two experimental conditions. During the two experimental conditions subjects (fourteen normal-weight women, aged 24.4 (SD 7.1) years, underwent 36 h sessions in energy balance in a respiration chamber for measurements of energy expenditure and substrate oxidation. The subjects were given two (breakfast, dinner) or three (breakfast, lunch, dinner) meals per d. We chose to omit lunch in the two meals condition, because this resulted in a marked difference in inter-meal-interval after breakfast (8.5 h v. 4 h). Eating three meals compared with two meals had no effects on 24 h energy expenditure, diet-induced thermogenesis, activity-induced energy expenditure and sleeping metabolic rate. Eating three meals compared with two meals increased 24 h fat oxidation, but decreased the amount of fat oxidised from the breakfast. The same amount of energy divided over three meals compared with over two meals increased satiety feelings over 24 h. In healthy, normal-weight women, decreasing the inter-meal interval sustains satiety, particularly during the day, and sustains fat oxidation, particularly during the night.

  8. HCN channels enhance spike phase coherence and regulate the phase of spikes and LFPs in the theta-frequency range.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Manisha; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2015-04-28

    What are the implications for the existence of subthreshold ion channels, their localization profiles, and plasticity on local field potentials (LFPs)? Here, we assessed the role of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in altering hippocampal theta-frequency LFPs and the associated spike phase. We presented spatiotemporally randomized, balanced theta-modulated excitatory and inhibitory inputs to somatically aligned, morphologically realistic pyramidal neuron models spread across a cylindrical neuropil. We computed LFPs from seven electrode sites and found that the insertion of an experimentally constrained HCN-conductance gradient into these neurons introduced a location-dependent lead in the LFP phase without significantly altering its amplitude. Further, neurons fired action potentials at a specific theta phase of the LFP, and the insertion of HCN channels introduced large lags in this spike phase and a striking enhancement in neuronal spike-phase coherence. Importantly, graded changes in either HCN conductance or its half-maximal activation voltage resulted in graded changes in LFP and spike phases. Our conclusions on the impact of HCN channels on LFPs and spike phase were invariant to changes in neuropil size, to morphological heterogeneity, to excitatory or inhibitory synaptic scaling, and to shifts in the onset phase of inhibitory inputs. Finally, we selectively abolished the inductive lead in the impedance phase introduced by HCN channels without altering neuronal excitability and found that this inductive phase lead contributed significantly to changes in LFP and spike phase. Our results uncover specific roles for HCN channels and their plasticity in phase-coding schemas and in the formation and dynamic reconfiguration of neuronal cell assemblies. PMID:25870302

  9. The effect of hair bundle shape on hair bundle hydrodynamics of non-mammalian inner ear hair cells for the full frequency range.

    PubMed

    Shatz, Lisa F

    2004-09-01

    The effect of the size and the shape of the hair bundle of a hair cell in the inner ear of non-mammals on its motion for the full range of frequencies is determined thereby extending the results of a previous analysis of hair bundle motion for high and low frequencies [Hear Res. 141 (2000) 39-50]. A hemispheroid is used to represent the hair bundle because it can represent a full range of shapes, from thin, pencil-like shapes to wide, flat, disk-like shapes. Boundary element methods are used to approximate the solution for the hydrodynamics. For physiologically relevant parameters, an excellent match is obtained between the model's predictions and measurements of hair bundle motion in the free-standing region of the basilar papilla of the alligator lizard [Aranyosi, Measuring sound-induced motions of the alligator lizard cochlea. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, PhD Thesis, 2002]. Neither in the model's predictions nor in experimental measurements is sharp tuning observed. The model predicted the low frequency region of neural tuning curves for the alligator lizard and bobtail lizard, but could not predict the sharp tuning or the high frequency region. An element that represents an active mechanism is added to the hair bundle model to predict neural tuning curves, which are sharply tuned, and an excellent match is obtained for all the characteristics of neural tuning curves for the alligator lizard, and for the low and high frequency regions for the bobtail lizard. The model does not predict well the sharp tuning of the shorter hair bundles of the bobtail lizard, possibly because it does not represent tectorial sallets.

  10. Aerial perches and free-range laying hens: the effect of access to aerial perches and of individual bird parameters on keel bone injuries in commercial free-range laying hens.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, C J; Ball, M E E; O'Connell, N E

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this trial was to determine the effect of aerial perches on keel bone injuries and tibia bone characteristics in free-range laying hens. The relationship between keel bone injuries and individual bird parameters, such as weight, girth, wing:girth ratio, feather coverage, and tibia bone characteristics, was also assessed. Five commercial free-range houses, each containing between 7,000 and 8,000 birds, were used. The houses and range areas were divided in half; in half of the house, birds had access to aerial perches (P) and in the other half, they did not (NP). On 13 occasions between 17 and 70 wk of age, 20 birds per treatment were randomly selected from the slatted area and palpated for keel bone injury. At 72 wk of age, 30 birds per treatment in each of 4 houses were selected at random, weighed, and then euthanized. Girth and wing area and feather coverage were measured. The keel and left tibia bones were removed and keel bones were scored for injury. Tibia bones were weighed and diameter, length, breaking strength, and ash content recorded. Results indicated that access to aerial perches did not affect tibia bone measures (P > 0.05). Average palpated keel bone score increased with age of the hens (P < 0.001) but was not significantly affected by perch treatment (P > 0.05). There was a significant interaction between treatment and farm on keel bone injuries measured at dissection (P < 0.05), with the probability of birds having high keel-damage scores increasing in the perched treatment in some farms but not others. In general, as the keel bone injury score measured at dissection increased, the breaking strength (P < 0.001) and ash content (P < 0.05) of the tibia bone decreased. It is suggested that individual variation in bone strength contributes to differences in susceptibility to keel injury. No relationship existed between keel-injury score measured at dissection and individual parameters, such as weight, girth, or wing:girth ratio (P > 0

  11. Functional organization of mustached bat inferior colliculus: I. Representation of FM frequency bands important for target ranging revealed by 14C-2-deoxyglucose autoradiography and single unit mapping.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, W E; Frisina, R D; Gooler, D M

    1989-06-01

    The representation in the inferior colliculus of the frequency modulated (FM) components of the first (25-30 kHz) and second (50-60 kHz) harmonic of the sonar signal of the mustached bat, which may be important for target range processing, was investigated by using the 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) technique and single-unit mapping. In the 2-DG experiments, bats presented with second harmonic FM stimuli alone showed uptake of label in specific regions of the central nucleus and dorsal cortex of the inferior colliculus, and the nucleus of the brachium. In the central nucleus, a dorsoventrally and mediolaterally elongated slab at the caudal border of the anterolateral division was observed. Labeling in the dorsal cortex was contiguous with this band. Bats stimulated with pairs of first and second harmonic FM stimuli separated by short time delays showed similar patterns of labeling, with the addition of another dorsoventrally elongated region of uptake in the more rostral part of the anterolateral division, associated with label in the dorsal cortex. By comparison to control cases exposed to delayed pairs of first and third harmonic signals, or to a second harmonic constant-frequency tone burst at the bat's reference frequency (ca. 60 kHz), we deduced that this additional region of uptake was attributable to the first harmonic FM component. To elucidate further the details of the tonotopic organization and to correlate the frequency representation with anatomical features of the IC, fine-grained maps of single-unit best frequencies were obtained in the central nucleus. Isofrequency contours were reconstructed by computer from five bats after focal, iontophoretic injection of horseradish peroxidase to locate the penetrations and trace connections of the FM2 area. We found that the tissue volume representing FM2 frequencies (50-60 kHz) showed approximately a sixfold overrepresentation for this frequency band. This region occupied most of the caudal portion of the anterolateral

  12. Calibration of miniature medical ultrasonic hydrophones for frequencies in the range 100 to 500 kHz using an ultrasonically absorbing waveguide.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Srinath; Zeqiri, Bajram; Gélat, Pierre N

    2014-05-01

    Enhancements to the existing primary standard optical interferometer and narrowband tone-burst comparison calibration methods for miniature medical ultrasonic hydrophones of the membrane type over the frequency range 100 to 500 kHz are described. Improvements were realized through application of an ultrasonically absorbing waveguide made of a low-frequency-absorbing tile used in sonar applications which narrows the spatial extent of the broad acoustic field. The waveguide was employed in conjunction with a sonar multilayered polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) hydrophone used as a transmitting transducer covering a frequency range of 100 kHz to 1 MHz. The acoustic field emanating from the ultrasonically absorbing waveguide reduced the significance of diffracted acoustic waves from the membrane hydrophone ring and the consequent interference of this wave with the direct acoustic wave received by the active element of the hydrophone during calibration. Four membrane hydrophone make/ models with ring sizes (defined as the inner diameter of the annular mounting ring of the hydrophone) in the range 50 to 100 mm were employed along with a needle hydrophone. A reference membrane hydrophone, calibrated using the NPL primary standard optical interferometer in combination with the ultrasonically absorbing waveguide, was subsequently used to calibrate the other four hydrophones by comparison, again using the ultrasonically absorbing waveguide. In comparison to existing methods, the use of the ultrasonically absorbing waveguide enabled the low-frequency calibration limit of a membrane hydrophone with a ring diameter of 50 mm to be reduced from 400 kHz to 200 kHz.

  13. Investigation of Multiple Frequency Ranges Using Discrete Wavelet Decomposition of Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haoxing; Roys, Steven; Zhuo, Jiachen; Varshney, Amitabh; Gullapalli, Rao P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate if discrete wavelet decomposition provides additional insight into resting-state processes through the analysis of functional connectivity within specific frequency ranges within the default mode network (DMN) that may be affected by mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Participants included 32 mTBI patients (15 with postconcussive syndrome [PCS+] and 17 without [PCS−]). mTBI patients received resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) at acute (within 10 days of injury) and chronic (6 months postinjury) time points and were compared with 31 controls (healthy control [HC]). The wavelet decomposition divides the time series into multiple frequency ranges based on four scaling factors (SF1: 0.125–0.250 Hz, SF2: 0.060–0.125 Hz, SF3: 0.030–0.060 Hz, SF4: 0.015–0.030 Hz). Within each SF, wavelet connectivity matrices for nodes of the DMN were created for each group (HC, PCS+, PCS−), and bivariate measures of strength and diversity were calculated. The results demonstrate reduced strength of connectivity in PCS+ patients compared with PCS− patients within SF1 during both the acute and chronic stages of injury, as well as recovery of connectivity within SF1 across the two time points. Furthermore, the PCS− group demonstrated greater network strength compared with controls at both time points, suggesting a potential compensatory or protective mechanism in these patients. These findings stress the importance of investigating resting-state connectivity within multiple frequency ranges; however, many of our findings are within SF1, which may overlap with frequencies associated with cardiac and respiratory activities. PMID:25808612

  14. Power and efficiency scaling of diode pumped Cr:LiSAF lasers: 770-1110 nm tuning range and frequency doubling to 387-463 nm.

    PubMed

    Demirbas, Umit; Baali, Ilyes

    2015-10-15

    We report significant average power and efficiency scaling of diode-pumped Cr:LiSAF lasers in continuous-wave (cw), cw frequency-doubled, and mode-locked regimes. Four single-emitter broad-area laser diodes around 660 nm were used as the pump source, which provided a total pump power of 7.2 W. To minimize thermal effects, a 20 mm long Cr:LiSAF sample with a relatively low Cr-concentration (0.8%) was used as the gain medium. In cw laser experiments, 2.4 W of output power, a slope efficiency of 50%, and a tuning range covering the 770-1110 nm region were achieved. Intracavity frequency doubling with beta-barium borate (BBO) crystals generated up to 1160 mW of blue power and a record tuning range in the 387-463 nm region. When mode locked with a saturable absorber mirror, the laser produced 195 fs pulses with 580 mW of average power around 820 nm at a 100.3 MHz repetition rate. The optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of the system was 33% in cw, 16% in cw frequency-doubled, and 8% in cw mode-locked regimes.

  15. Study of the dielectric properties of weathered granite, basalt and quartzite by means of broadband dielectric spectroscopy over a wide range of frequency and temperature.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, Steven; Delbreilh, Laurent; Antoine, Raphael; Dargent, Eric; Fauchard, Cyrille

    2016-04-01

    Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy (BDS) allows the measurement of the complex impedance of various materials over a wide range of frequency (0.1 Hz to 2 MHz) and temperature (-150 to 400°C). Other properties can be assessed from this measurement such as permittivity and conductivity. In this study, the BDS is presented to figure out the complex behaviour of several rock parameters as a function of the temperature and frequency. Indeed, multiple processes might occur such as interfacial polarization, AC and DC conductivity. The measurements of a weathered granite, basalt and quartzite were performed. The activation energy associated to each process involved during the measurement can be calculated by following the relaxation time as a function of the temperature, taking into account the Havriliak-Négami model. The principle of the technique and the whole study is presented here and several hypothesis are advanced to explain the dielectric behaviour of rocks. Finally, as the range of frequency and temperature of the BDS method is common to several electromagnetic and electrical techniques applied in subsurface geophysics, some perspectives are proposed to better understand geophysical measurements in hydrothermal systems.

  16. Frequency and Risk of Marijuana Use among Substance-Using Health Care Patients in Colorado with and without Access to State Legalized Medical Marijuana.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Melissa K; Pampel, Fred C; Rivera, Laura S; Broderick, Kerryann B; Reimann, Brie; Fischer, Leigh

    2015-01-01

    With increasing use of state legalized medical marijuana across the country, health care providers need accurate information on patterns of marijuana and other substance use for patients with access to medical marijuana. This study compared frequency and severity of marijuana use, and use of other substances, for patients with and without state legal access to medical marijuana. Data were collected from 2,030 patients who screened positive for marijuana use when seeking health care services in a large, urban safety-net medical center. Patients were screened as part of a federally funded screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) initiative. Patients were asked at screening whether they had a state-issued medical marijuana card and about risky use of tobacco, alcohol, and other illicit substances. A total of 17.4% of marijuana users had a medical marijuana card. Patients with cards had higher frequency of marijuana use and were more likely to screen at moderate than low or high risk from marijuana use. Patients with cards also had lower use of other substances than patients without cards. Findings can inform health care providers of both the specific risks of frequent, long-term use and the more limited risks of other substance use faced by legal medical marijuana users. PMID:25715066

  17. The effect of a Lean quality improvement implementation program on surgical pathology specimen accessioning and gross preparation error frequency.

    PubMed

    Smith, Maxwell L; Wilkerson, Trent; Grzybicki, Dana M; Raab, Stephen S

    2012-09-01

    Few reports have documented the effectiveness of Lean quality improvement in changing anatomic pathology patient safety. We used Lean methods of education; hoshin kanri goal setting and culture change; kaizen events; observation of work activities, hand-offs, and pathways; A3-problem solving, metric development, and measurement; and frontline work redesign in the accessioning and gross examination areas of an anatomic pathology laboratory. We compared the pre- and post-Lean implementation proportion of near-miss events and changes made in specific work processes. In the implementation phase, we documented 29 individual A3-root cause analyses. The pre- and postimplementation proportions of process- and operator-dependent near-miss events were 5.5 and 1.8 (P < .002) and 0.6 and 0.6, respectively. We conclude that through culture change and implementation of specific work process changes, Lean implementation may improve pathology patient safety.

  18. Measurements of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode converted wave intensity with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod and comparison with full-wave simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-08-01

    Radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat tokamak plasmas. In ICRF heating schemes involving multiple ion species, the launched fast waves convert to ion cyclotron waves or ion Bernstein waves at the two-ion hybrid resonances. Mode converted waves are of interest as actuators to optimise plasma performance through current drive and flow drive. In order to describe these processes accurately in a realistic tokamak geometry, numerical simulations are essential, and it is important that these codes be validated against experiment. In this study, the mode converted waves were measured using a phase contrast imaging technique in D-H and D-3He plasmas. The measured mode converted wave intensity in the D-3He mode conversion regime was found to be a factor of ˜50 weaker than the full-wave predictions. The discrepancy was reduced in the hydrogen minority heating regime, where mode conversion is weaker.

  19. Source model for strong ground motion generation in the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz during the 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Kimiyuki; Iwata, Tomotaka

    2012-12-01

    The source model of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, which is composed of four strong motion generation areas (SMGAs), is estimated based on the broadband strong ground motion simulations in the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz using the empirical Green's function method. Two strong motion generation areas are identified in the Miyagi-oki region west of the hypocenter. Another two strong motion generation areas are located in the Fukushima-oki region southwest of the hypocenter. The strong ground motions in the frequency range 0.1-10 Hz along the Pacific coast are mainly controlled by these SMGAs. All the strong motion generation areas exist in the deeper portion of the source fault plane. The stress drops of the four SMGAs range from 6.6 to 27.8 MPa, which are similar to estimations for past M 7-class events occurring in this region. Compared with the slip models and aftershock distributions of past interplate earthquakes in the Miyagi-oki and Fukushima-oki regions since the 1930s, the SMGAs of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake spatially correspond to the asperities of M 7-class events in 1930s. In terms of broadband strong ground motions, the 2011 Tohoku earthquake is not only a tsunamigenic event with a huge coseismic slip near the trench but is also a complex event simultaneously rupturing pre-existing asperities.

  20. Brazing of ceramic and graphite to metal in the fabrication of ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) antenna and feedthrough components

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, D.E.; Sluss, F.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Fabrication of some of the more critical components of ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) antenna and feedthrough assemblies has involved the brazing of alumina ceramic and graphite to various metals. Copper end pieces have been successfully brazed to alumina cylinders for use in feedthroughs for TEXTOR and in feedthroughs and capacitors for a Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) antenna. Copper-plated Inconel rods and tubes have been armored with graphite for construction of Faraday shields on antennas for Doublet III-D and TFTR. Details of brazing procedures and test results, including rf performance, mechanical strength, and thermal capabilities, are presented. 14 figs.

  1. The acoustic power of a vibrating clamped circular plate revisited in the wide low frequency range using expansion into the radial polynomials.

    PubMed

    Rdzanek, Wojciech P

    2016-06-01

    This study deals with the classical problem of sound radiation of an excited clamped circular plate embedded into a flat rigid baffle. The system of the two coupled differential equations is solved, one for the excited and damped vibrations of the plate and the other one-the Helmholtz equation. An approach using the expansion into radial polynomials leads to results for the modal impedance coefficients useful for a comprehensive numerical analysis of sound radiation. The results obtained are accurate and efficient in a wide low frequency range and can easily be adopted for a simply supported circular plate. The fluid loading is included providing accurate results in resonance. PMID:27369144

  2. Relationship between peak spatial-averaged specific absorption rate and peak temperature elevation in human head in frequency range of 1-30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Ryota; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the peak temperature elevation and the peak specific absorption rate (SAR) averaged over 10 g of tissue in human head models in the frequency range of 1-30 GHz. As a wave source, a half-wave dipole antenna resonant at the respective frequencies is located in the proximity of the pinna. The bioheat equation is used to evaluate the temperature elevation by employing the SAR, which is computed by electromagnetic analysis, as a heat source. The computed SAR is post-processed by calculating the peak spatial-averaged SAR with six averaging algorithms that consider different descriptions provided in international guidelines and standards, e.g. the number of tissues allowed in the averaging volume, different averaging shapes, and the consideration of the pinna. The computational results show that the SAR averaging algorithms excluding the pinna are essential when correlating the peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna. In the averaging scheme considering an arbitrary shape, for better correlation, multiple tissues should be included in the averaging volume rather than a single tissue. For frequencies higher than 3-4 GHz, the correlation for peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna is modest for the different algorithms. The 95th percentile value of the heating factor as well as the mean and median values derived here would be helpful for estimating the possible temperature elevation in the head.

  3. Relationship between peak spatial-averaged specific absorption rate and peak temperature elevation in human head in frequency range of 1–30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Ryota; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the peak temperature elevation and the peak specific absorption rate (SAR) averaged over 10 g of tissue in human head models in the frequency range of 1–30 GHz. As a wave source, a half-wave dipole antenna resonant at the respective frequencies is located in the proximity of the pinna. The bioheat equation is used to evaluate the temperature elevation by employing the SAR, which is computed by electromagnetic analysis, as a heat source. The computed SAR is post-processed by calculating the peak spatial-averaged SAR with six averaging algorithms that consider different descriptions provided in international guidelines and standards, e.g. the number of tissues allowed in the averaging volume, different averaging shapes, and the consideration of the pinna. The computational results show that the SAR averaging algorithms excluding the pinna are essential when correlating the peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna. In the averaging scheme considering an arbitrary shape, for better correlation, multiple tissues should be included in the averaging volume rather than a single tissue. For frequencies higher than 3–4 GHz, the correlation for peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna is modest for the different algorithms. The 95th percentile value of the heating factor as well as the mean and median values derived here would be helpful for estimating the possible temperature elevation in the head.

  4. 1.55-μm mode-locked quantum-dot lasers with 300 MHz frequency tuning range

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeev, T. Arsenijević, D.; Bimberg, D.; Franke, D.; Kreissl, J.; Künzel, H.

    2015-01-19

    Passive mode-locking of two-section quantum-dot mode-locked lasers grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on InP is reported. 1250-μm long lasers exhibit a wide tuning range of 300 MHz around the fundamental mode-locking frequency of 33.48 GHz. The frequency tuning is achieved by varying the reverse bias of the saturable absorber from 0 to −2.2 V and the gain section current from 90 to 280 mA. 3 dB optical spectra width of 6–7 nm leads to ex-facet optical pulses with full-width half-maximum down to 3.7 ps. Single-section quantum-dot mode-locked lasers show 0.8 ps broad optical pulses after external fiber-based compression. Injection current tuning from 70 to 300 mA leads to 30 MHz frequency tuning.

  5. Tandem mirror ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequency) and SRX (Second Region Experiment) physics analyses: Progress report for period August 15, 1986-April 14, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The ICRF electromagnetic fields are solved for an axisymmetric mirror plasma. For these calculations a numerical code that solves for global wave solutions of the cold plasma wave equation is used. The resulting radial ponderomotive force is evaluated and its possible impact on MHD stability is discussed. The slow wave is always found to be present and dominates the electric field structure when ..omega.. < ..cap omega../sub ci min/. The radial ponderomotive force is stabilizing when ..omega.. > ..cap omega../sub ci min/ but becomes destabilizing at higher densities and driving frequencies. So called low n 'infernal' modes which reflect a breakdown in standard ballooning theory at low shear in presence of significant pressure gradients have been codiscovered. Intermediate n infernal behavior is found to set the most stringent requirement for second region access and operation. Access to the high ..beta.., second region of MHD stability has been studied for large aspect ratio (A > 6) near circular cross section tokamak geometry. Evolving high epsilon..beta..phi equilibria generated by a 1-1/2D Transport code have been analyzed for both high and low n, internal and external mode stability. Neutral beam induced current programming is shown to modify the shear profile and to drive q on axis significantly above unity. This reduces the radial extent of the unstable zone which develops and the time required to cross it, thus reducing the demands on alternate stabilization mechanisms. These calculations show transition to the second region when epsilon..beta..phi greater than or equal to 1. An enhanced transport model, triggered locally by n = infinity unstable flux surfaces, suggests that controlled transition to the second region is possible solely with current profile programming that raises q/sub 0/ greater than or equal to 1.5 at plausible auxiliary heating power levels (approx.3.5 MW) for SRX parameters. 25 refs., 30 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating experiments in H-mode plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N.; Zhao, Y. P.; Ding, B. J.; Xu, G. S.; Gong, X. Z.; Li, J. G.; Lin, Y.; Taylor, G.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Braun, F.; Wukitch, S.; Magne, R.; Litaudon, X.; Kumazawa, R.; Kasahara, H.

    2014-06-01

    An ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) system with power up to 6.0 MW and a lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system up to 4 MW have been applied for heating and current drive experiments in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak (EAST). Significant progress has been made with ICRF heating and LHCD for realizing the H-mode plasma operation in EAST. During 2010 and 2012 experimental campaigns, ICRF heating experiments were carried out at the fixed frequency of 27MHz, achieving effective ions and electrons heating with the H minority heating (H-MH) mode. The H-MH mode produced good plasma performance, and realized H-mode using ICRF power alone in 2012. In 2010, H-modes were generated and sustained by LHCD alone, where lithium coating and gas puffing near the mouth of the LH launcher were applied to improve the LHCD power coupling and penetration into the core plasmas of H-modes. In 2012, the combination of LHCD and ICRH power extended the H-mode duration up to over 30 s. H-modes with various types of edge localized modes (ELMs) have been achieved with HIPB98(y, 2) ranging from 0.7 to over unity. A brief overview of LHCD and ICRF Heating experiment and their application in achieving H-mode operation during these two campaigns will be presented.

  7. Lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating experiments in H-mode plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N. Zhao, Y. P.; Ding, B. J.; Xu, G. S.; Gong, X. Z.; Li, J. G.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S.; Taylor, G.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Braun, F.; Magne, R.; Litaudon, X.; Kumazawa, R.; Kasahara, H.

    2014-06-15

    An ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) system with power up to 6.0 MW and a lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system up to 4 MW have been applied for heating and current drive experiments in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak (EAST). Significant progress has been made with ICRF heating and LHCD for realizing the H-mode plasma operation in EAST. During 2010 and 2012 experimental campaigns, ICRF heating experiments were carried out at the fixed frequency of 27MHz, achieving effective ions and electrons heating with the H minority heating (H-MH) mode. The H-MH mode produced good plasma performance, and realized H-mode using ICRF power alone in 2012. In 2010, H-modes were generated and sustained by LHCD alone, where lithium coating and gas puffing near the mouth of the LH launcher were applied to improve the LHCD power coupling and penetration into the core plasmas of H-modes. In 2012, the combination of LHCD and ICRH power extended the H-mode duration up to over 30 s. H-modes with various types of edge localized modes (ELMs) have been achieved with H{sub IPB98}(y, 2) ranging from 0.7 to over unity. A brief overview of LHCD and ICRF Heating experiment and their application in achieving H-mode operation during these two campaigns will be presented.

  8. Electrodeposited thin FeCo films with highly thermal stable properties in high frequency range obtained by annealing in a strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, B. Y.; Phuoc, N. N.; Wu, Y. P.; Ho, P.; Yang, Y.; Li, Z. W.

    2016-08-01

    The preparation of thin ferromagnetic films with thermally stable properties in the high frequency gigahertz range is crucial for applications in different advanced devices. However, it is a challenge to attain such films as the mechanism and correlation between the crystallographic structure and dynamic magnetic properties remain unclear. Herein, through an appropriate annealing process involving a temperature of 510-580 K and an applied strong magnetic field of 10 kOe along the easy-axis of electrodeposited FeCo films, magnetic properties of the films (300-450 nm) in the gigahertz range are significantly improved. Typically, the magnetic soft nanofilms display highly stable dynamic microwave properties from room temperature to 420 K, even in the presence of a high frequency of ˜1.5 GHz and a large magnetic permeability of ˜460 (the maximum value in real part). The origin of the high thermal stability is attributed to the recrystallized uniformity in crystalline orientations and larger particle sizes after the annealing, which leads to slightly increased anisotropy, stress, Curie temperature, and difference in the magnetic coercivity between the easy and hard axes for the crystalline films, thus giving rise to the steady static magnetic properties (e.g., magnetic moment of 2.02-2.05 T) against environmental temperature fluctuation. This is in contrast to conventional as-prepared thin films without annealing or annealed in a transverse applied field. This method can be applied to other ferromagnetic films to improve their thermal stability for the utilization in various high frequency devices.

  9. Free range rearing of pigs with access to pasture grazing - effect on fatty acid composition and lipid oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Nilzén, V; Babol, J; Dutta, P C; Lundeheim, N; Enfält, A C; Lundström, K

    2001-07-01

    The influence of free-range rearing, RN genotype and sex on different pig meat quality traits, including intramuscular fatty acid composition and levels of lipid oxidation products, were studied. A total of 60 Hampshire crossbred pigs were reared outdoors for two months with access to green feed, while 60 others were kept indoors, in a 120-m(2)-large pen, throughout the rearing period. From these 120 animals a subsample of 44 animals was chosen for meat quality analysis. Of the three factors studied, the RN genotype had the largest influence on basic technological meat quality traits, whereas the rearing conditions and sex had limited effects. However, outdoor rearing resulted in higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the intramuscular fat (P=0.026) and in an increased level of vitamin E (P=0.030) compared with the pigs that had been reared indoors. The sex and RN genotype of the animals also had an effect on the fatty acid profile: females had higher levels of unsaturated fatty acids (P=0.003) as well as lower levels of saturated fatty acids (P=0.011) than castrated males. Carriers of the RN(-) allele expressed a higher sum of omega-3 fatty acids (P=0.047) and C22:5 (P=0.012) than did the non-carriers. In a storage study where meat from free-range and indoor reared pigs was stored for 3 months at-20°C, it was shown that the lipid oxidation product malondialdehyde was formed at increased levels in animals that had a higher lean meat percentage than others, i.e. females that were carriers of the RN(-) gene and that were reared outdoors. PMID:22062255

  10. Suppression of optical beat interference-noise in orthogonal frequency division multiple access-passive optical network link using self-homodyne balanced detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Yong-Yuk; Jung, Sang-Min; Han, Sang-Kook

    2014-08-01

    A new technique, which reduces optical beat interference (OBI) noise in orthogonal frequency division multiple access-passive optical network (OFDMA-PON) links, is proposed. A self-homodyne balanced detection, which uses a single laser for the optical line terminal (OLT) as well as for the optical network unit (ONU), reduces OBI noise and also improves the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the discrete multi-tone (DMT) signal. The proposed scheme is verified by transmitting quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK)-modulated DMT signal over a 20-km single mode fiber. The optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR), that is required for BER of 10-5, is reduced by 2 dB in the balanced detection compared with a single channel due to the cancellation of OBI noise in conjunction with the local laser.

  11. Physical-layer energy-efficient receiving method based on selective sampling in orthogonal frequency division multiplexing access passive optical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; He, Hao; Bi, Meihua; Hu, Weisheng

    2014-05-01

    We propose a physical-layer energy-efficient receiving method based on selective sampling in an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing access passive optical network (OFDMA-PON). By using the special designed frame head, the receiver within an optical network unit (ONU) can identify the destination of the incoming frame. The receiver only samples at the time when the destination is in agreement with the ONU, while it stays in standby during the rest of the time. We clarify its feasibility through an experiment and analyze the downstream traffic delay by simulation. The results indicate that under limited delay conditions, ˜60% energy can be saved compared with the traditional receiving method in the OFDMA-PON system with 512 ONUs.

  12. 1 Gbps full-duplex links for ultra-dense-WDM 6.25 GHz frequency slots in optical metro-access networks.

    PubMed

    Altabas, Jose A; Izquierdo, David; Lazaro, Jose A; Lerin, Adolfo; Sotelo, Felix; Garces, Ignacio

    2016-01-11

    1 Gbps full-duplex optical links for 6.25 GHz ultra dense WDM frequency slots are demonstrated and optimized for cost-effective metro-access networks. The OLT-ONU downlinks are based on 1 Gbps Nyquist-DPSK using MZM and single-detector heterodyne reception obtaining a sensitivity of -52 dBm. The ONU-OLT uplinks are based on 1 Gbps NRZ-DPSK by directly phase modulated DFB and also single-detector heterodyne reception obtaining same sensitivity of -52 dBm. The power budget of full-duplex link is 43 dB. These proposed links can provide service to 16 (32) users at each 100 (200) GHz WDM channel.

  13. Dynamics of Flare Processes and Variety of the Fine Structure of Solar Radio Emission over a Wide Frequency Range of 30 - 7000 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, Gennady; Fomichev, Valery; Tan, Baolin; Yan, Yihua; Tan, Chengming; Fu, Qijun

    2015-01-01

    Radiobursts exhibiting fine structure observed over two years during the rising phase of Cycle 24 by the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS/Huairou) in the range 1 - 7.6 GHz and the spectrograph IZMIRAN in the meter range (25 - 270 MHz) are analyzed. In five events the zebra structure, various fiber bursts, and fast pulsations were observed. These observations have great importance for testing different theoretical models of fine structure formation, as, for example, only for explaining the zebra structure more than ten mechanisms have been proposed. The events on 15 and 24 February 2011 are of the greatest interest. In the course of the flare on 15 February (which occurred close to the center of disk) the zebra structure was observed during three sequential flare brightenings. The polarization changed sign in the third. This behavior of polarization combined with images of the corresponding flare brightenings, obtained in extreme ultraviolet radiation by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/AIA, 171 Å), provides important clues. The polarization of radio emission in all three cases is related to the ordinary wave mode of radio emission. The zebra structure was present at frequencies 190 - 220 MHz in the Culgoora spectrum. The event on 24 February 2011 is remarkable, as the zebra structure at frequencies of 2.6 - 3.8 GHz was not polarized and it appeared during the magnetic reconnection observed by SDO/AIA 171 Å in this limb flare. In the event on 9 August 2011, for the first time, a superfine millisecond structure was registered simultaneously in the fast pulsations and the stripes of the zebra structure. In the event on 1 August 2010 after the zebra structure two families of fibers bursts with opposite frequency drifts were observed. On 19 April 2012 the fibers against the background of type III bursts were observed by IZMIRAN and Nançay spectrographs. In the band of 42 - 52 MHz a group of nine slowly drifting narrow-band (

  14. Report on BIPM/CIPM key comparison CCAUV.U-K4: absolute calibration of medical hydrophones in the frequency range 0.5 MHz to 20 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopal, S.; Fury, C. R.; Zeqiri, B.; Brandt, M.; Wilkens, V.; Koch, C.; Matsuda, Y.; Yoshioka, M.; Ping, Y.; Yan, Z.; Wenping, B.; Costa-Felix, R. P. B.; Oliveira, E. G.

    2016-01-01

    The key compariosn CCAUV.U-K4 involved measurement of end-of-cable loaded sensitivity in units of volts/pascal of two travelling standards, 1 mm element diamater medical hydrophones at medical ultrasound frequencies. This is a repetition of key comparison CCAUV.U-K2 but the scope has been extended upwards to 20 MHz and downwards to 0.5 MHz. The reduction in the lower frequency provided an overlap with the underwater acoustics key comparison CCAUV.W-K1 which covers the range 1 kHz to 0.5 MHz. The results are analysed and presented in terms of degrees of equivalence, suitable for entry in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  15. Measurements of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode converted wave intensity with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod and comparison with full-wave simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-08-15

    Radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat tokamak plasmas. In ICRF heating schemes involving multiple ion species, the launched fast waves convert to ion cyclotron waves or ion Bernstein waves at the two-ion hybrid resonances. Mode converted waves are of interest as actuators to optimise plasma performance through current drive and flow drive. In order to describe these processes accurately in a realistic tokamak geometry, numerical simulations are essential, and it is important that these codes be validated against experiment. In this study, the mode converted waves were measured using a phase contrast imaging technique in D-H and D-{sup 3}He plasmas. The measured mode converted wave intensity in the D-{sup 3}He mode conversion regime was found to be a factor of {approx}50 weaker than the full-wave predictions. The discrepancy was reduced in the hydrogen minority heating regime, where mode conversion is weaker.

  16. Investigation of dielectric behavior of water and thermally aged of XLPE/BaTiO3 composites in the low-frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, Lakhdar; Belkhiat, Saad; Berrag, Amine; Nemdili, Saad

    2015-10-01

    Cross-Linked Polyethylene (XLPE) is widely used as insulation in electrical engineering, especially as cable insulation sheaths. In order to improve the dielectric properties susceptible to be modified under the effects of thermal aging and water in an absorption environment, polymers are mixed with ceramics. In this paper, the influence of barium titanate (BaTiO3), on the dielectric properties of XLPE has been studied. Dielectric parameters have been measured using an impedance analyzer RLC (WAYNE KERR 6420 type). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used as characterization techniques. The study has been carried out on two samples of XLPE. A pure sample of each were studied as a unloaded samples to be compared with samples of 5%wt, 10%wt, 15%wt and 20%wt. BaTiO3 loaded XLPE. Afterwards, the composites were subject to humidity and to thermal aging. The incorporation of BaTiO3 1∘C does not modify the crystallinity and morphology of the XLPE and 2∘C reduces the space charges therefore the dielectric losses. tgδ, ɛr and loss index are measured. Frequency response analysis has been followed in the frequency range (20-300 Hz). Experimental results show well that BaTiO3 as nano-filler improves the dielectric properties of XLPE but in excessive content can drive to the cracking and therefore to absorption of water.

  17. Validation of full-wave simulations for mode conversion of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Edlund, E. M.; Ennever, P. C.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2015-08-15

    Mode conversion of fast waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is known to result in current drive and flow drive under optimised conditions, which may be utilized to control plasma profiles and improve fusion plasma performance. To describe these processes accurately in a realistic toroidal geometry, numerical simulations are essential. Quantitative comparison of these simulations and the actual experimental measurements is important to validate their predictions and to evaluate their limitations. The phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic has been used to directly detect the ICRF waves in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The measurements have been compared with full-wave simulations through a synthetic diagnostic technique. Recently, the frequency response of the PCI detector array on Alcator C-Mod was recalibrated, which greatly improved the comparison between the measurements and the simulations. In this study, mode converted waves for D-{sup 3}He and D-H plasmas with various ion species compositions were re-analyzed with the new calibration. For the minority heating cases, self-consistent electric fields and a minority ion distribution function were simulated by iterating a full-wave code and a Fokker-Planck code. The simulated mode converted wave intensity was in quite reasonable agreement with the measurements close to the antenna, but discrepancies remain for comparison at larger distances.

  18. Dielectric behavior of wild-type yeast and vacuole-deficient mutant over a frequency range of 10 kHz to 10 GHz.

    PubMed Central

    Asami, K; Yonezawa, T

    1996-01-01

    Dielectric behavior of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and vacuole-deficient mutant cells has been studied over a frequency range of 10 kHz to 10 GHz. Both types of cells harvested at the early stationary growth phase showed dielectric dispersion that was phenomenologically formulated by a sum of three separate dispersion terms: beta 1-dispersion (main dispersion) and beta 2-dispersion (additional dispersion) and gamma-dispersion due to orientation of water molecules. The beta 1-dispersion centered at a few MHz, which has been extensively studied so far, is due to interfacial polarization (or the Maxwell-Wagner effect) related to the plasma membrane. The beta 2-dispersion for the vacuole-deficient mutant centered at approximately 50 MHz was explained by taking the cell wall into account, whereas, for the wild-type cells, the beta 2-dispersion around a few tens MHz involved the contributions from the vacuole and cell wall. PMID:8889195

  19. Annual variations of the amplitude characteristic of the noise magnetic field in the ELF frequency range based on the results of high-latitude observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pchelkin, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    The annual variation of a number of amplitude characteristics of the noise electromagnetic field in the frequency range near the first Schumann resonance (and in particular the mean values of the modulus of horizontal magnetic components and parameters of the distribution function of noise pulses over amplitudes) was obtained and analyzed based on the results of three-year measurements performed at the high-latitude magnetic observatory Lovozero. The summer increase in mean and median values of the magnetic component of noises associated with electrical storms and the lack of annual variations of the exponent that empirically describes the distribution of amplitudes of noise signals were found. The relationship between the seasonal (winter/summer in the northern hemisphere) increase in the mean value of the modulus of the horizontal magnetic field component and seasonal increase in the global number of lightning discharges is shown by the correlation of the results of satellite observations and measurements of the magnetic component.

  20. An algorithm for the analysis of inductive antennas of arbitrary cross-section for heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Lehrman, I.S.; Colestock, P.L.

    1986-10-01

    The application of Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating to near ignited plasmas will require launching structures that will be capable of withstanding the harsh plasma environment. The recessed antenna configuration is expected to provide sufficient protection for the structure, but to date no analysis has been done to determine if adequate coupling can be achieved in such a configuration. In this work we present a method for determining the current distribution for the antenna in the direction transverse to current flow and predict antenna loading in the presence of plasma. Antennas of arbitrary cross section are analyzed above ground planes of arbitrary shape. Results from ANDES, the ANtenna DESign code, are presented and compared to experimental results.

  1. Frequency-resolved optical gating system with a tellurium crystal for characterizing free-electron lasers in the wavelength range of 10-30 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Iijima, Hokuto; Nagai, Ryoji; Nishimori, Nobuyuki; Hajima, Ryoichi; Minehara, Eisuke J.

    2009-12-15

    A second-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating (SHG-FROG) system has been developed for the complete characterization of laser pulses in the wavelength range of 10-30 {mu}m. A tellurium crystal is used so that spectrally resolved autocorrelation signals with a good signal-to-noise ratio are obtained. Pulses (wavelength {approx}22 {mu}m) generated from a free-electron laser are measured by the SHG-FROG system. The SHG intensity profile and the spectrum obtained by FROG measurements are well consistent with those of independent measurements of the pulse length and spectrum. The pulse duration and spectral width determined from the FROG trace are 0.6 ps and 5.2 THz at full width half maximum, respectively.

  2. Application of the methane saturated dispersion resonance near 2.36 μm over the temperature range of 77-300 K for optical frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarabrin, Mikhail K.; Lazarev, Vladimir A.; Karasik, Valeriy E.; Kireev, Alexey N.; Korostelin, Yuri V.; Shelkovnikov, Alexander S.; Tuyrikov, Dmitry A.; Kozlovsky, Vladimir I.; Podmar'kov, Yuri P.; Frolov, Mikhail P.; Gubin, Mikhail A.

    2016-07-01

    New spectroscopic knowledge of the ν1 +ν4 R(2) E line of methane over the temperature range 77-300 K is reported. Theoretical calculations of the absorption coefficient and the amplitudes of saturated dispersion resonances at 4234 cm-1 were derived. The theoretical dependence on the temperature of the amplitudes of the saturated dispersion resonances was obtained. A novel setup based on a Cr2+ : ZnSe laser was used for Doppler-free spectroscopy of methane. The amplitudes of the saturated dispersion resonances of the ν1 +ν4 R(2) E line of methane were measured experimentally at different temperatures. A comparison with theoretical dependence supports the reliability of the experiment. The obtained results are of immediate interest in applications demanding laser frequency stabilization.

  3. Big Data, Small Data: Accessing and Manipulating Geoscience Data Ranging From Repositories to Student-Collected Data Sets Using GeoMapApp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    We often demand information and data to be accessible over the web at no cost, and no longer do we expect to spend time labouriously compiling data from myriad sources with frustratingly-different formats. Instead, we increasingly expect convenience and consolidation. Recent advances in web-enabled technologies and cyberinfrastructure are answering those calls by providing data tools and resources that can transform undergraduate education. By freeing up valuable classroom time, students can focus upon gaining deeper insights and understanding from real-world data. GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org) is a map-based data discovery and visualisation tool developed at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. GeoMapApp promotes U-Learning by working across all major computer platforms and functioning anywhere with internet connectivity, by lowering socio-economic barriers (it is free), by seamlessly integrating thousands of built-in research-grade data sets under intuitive menus, and by being adaptable to a range of learning environments - from lab sessions, group projects, and homework assignments to in-class pop-ups. GeoMapApp caters to casual and specialist users alike. Contours, artificial illumination, 3-D displays, data point manipulations, cross-sectional profiles, and other display techniques help students better grasp the content and geospatial context of data. Layering capabilities allow easy data set comparisons. The core functionality also applies to imported data sets: Student-collected data can thus be imported and analysed using the same techniques. A new Save Session function allows educators to preserve a pre-loaded state of GeoMapApp. When shared with a class, the saved file allows every student to open GeoMapApp at exactly the same starting point from which to begin their data explorations. Examples of built-in data sets include seafloor crustal age, earthquake locations and focal mechanisms, analytical geochemistry, ocean water physical properties, US and

  4. Vibrotactile Presentation of Musical Notes to the Glabrous Skin for Adults with Normal Hearing or a Hearing Impairment: Thresholds, Dynamic Range and High-Frequency Perception.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Carl; Maté-Cid, Saúl; Fulford, Robert; Seiffert, Gary; Ginsborg, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Presentation of music as vibration to the skin has the potential to facilitate interaction between musicians with hearing impairments and other musicians during group performance. Vibrotactile thresholds have been determined to assess the potential for vibrotactile presentation of music to the glabrous skin of the fingertip, forefoot and heel. No significant differences were found between the thresholds for sinusoids representing notes between C1 and C6 when presented to the fingertip of participants with normal hearing and with a severe or profound hearing loss. For participants with normal hearing, thresholds for notes between C1 and C6 showed the characteristic U-shape curve for the fingertip, but not for the forefoot and heel. Compared to the fingertip, the forefoot had lower thresholds between C1 and C3, and the heel had lower thresholds between C1 and G2; this is attributed to spatial summation from the Pacinian receptors over the larger contactor area used for the forefoot and heel. Participants with normal hearing assessed the perception of high-frequency vibration using 1s sinusoids presented to the fingertip and were found to be more aware of transient vibration at the beginning and/or end of notes between G4 and C6 when stimuli were presented 10dB above threshold, rather than at threshold. An average of 94% of these participants reported feeling continuous vibration between G4 and G5 with stimuli presented 10dB above threshold. Based on the experimental findings and consideration of health effects relating to vibration exposure, a suitable range of notes for vibrotactile presentation of music is identified as being from C1 to G5. This is more limited than for human hearing but the fundamental frequencies of the human voice, and the notes played by many instruments, lie within it. However, the dynamic range might require compression to avoid the negative effects of amplitude on pitch perception. PMID:27191400

  5. Developing A Low-frequency Interferometer For Detecting The Epoch Of Reionization: Correlation, Calibration, And High Dynamic-range Imaging With Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Aaron; PAPER Team

    2009-01-01

    The Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) is a low-frequency interferometer being developed to detect cosmic reionization via fluctuations in the brightness temperature of the 21cm hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen in the early intergalactic medium. Interfering with the direct detection of a global reionization signature are a myriad of astrophysical foregrounds, including polarized galactic synchrotron emission, continuum point-sources, and galactic/extra-galactic free-free emission. Suppression of these foregrounds will require extraordinary calibration and high dynamic-range imaging, as well as large numbers of antennas to achieve the necessary sensitivity in the region of the power spectrum where the reionization signal peaks relative to them. Addressing the challenge of correlating large numbers of antennas, we have developed a flexible correlator architecture that scales to hundreds of antennas. This correlator is based on Field-Programmable Gate Array processors connected by a 10 Gb Ethernet switch, and programmed using a parameterized signal processing library. We demonstrate how this work has dramatically decreased correlator development time, and has enabled PAPER to grow as a series of deployments of increasing size. Calibration and high dynamic-range imaging with low-frequency interferometers are exacerbated by wide bandwidths and large fields-of-view (FoV). To simplify the calibration process when an interferometer consistently has many strong sources simultaneously in its FoV, we present a fringe-rate/delay filtering technique to isolating source fluxes. This is implemented as part of Astronomical Interferometry in PYthon (AIPY), a new open-source software toolkit that facilitates exploration and algorithm development by modularizing data processing and visibility simulation. We present the application of this toolkit to various aspects of PAPER calibration. Finally, we present the first all-sky map and point source

  6. Vibrotactile Presentation of Musical Notes to the Glabrous Skin for Adults with Normal Hearing or a Hearing Impairment: Thresholds, Dynamic Range and High-Frequency Perception

    PubMed Central

    Maté-Cid, Saúl; Fulford, Robert; Seiffert, Gary; Ginsborg, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Presentation of music as vibration to the skin has the potential to facilitate interaction between musicians with hearing impairments and other musicians during group performance. Vibrotactile thresholds have been determined to assess the potential for vibrotactile presentation of music to the glabrous skin of the fingertip, forefoot and heel. No significant differences were found between the thresholds for sinusoids representing notes between C1 and C6 when presented to the fingertip of participants with normal hearing and with a severe or profound hearing loss. For participants with normal hearing, thresholds for notes between C1 and C6 showed the characteristic U-shape curve for the fingertip, but not for the forefoot and heel. Compared to the fingertip, the forefoot had lower thresholds between C1 and C3, and the heel had lower thresholds between C1 and G2; this is attributed to spatial summation from the Pacinian receptors over the larger contactor area used for the forefoot and heel. Participants with normal hearing assessed the perception of high-frequency vibration using 1s sinusoids presented to the fingertip and were found to be more aware of transient vibration at the beginning and/or end of notes between G4 and C6 when stimuli were presented 10dB above threshold, rather than at threshold. An average of 94% of these participants reported feeling continuous vibration between G4 and G5 with stimuli presented 10dB above threshold. Based on the experimental findings and consideration of health effects relating to vibration exposure, a suitable range of notes for vibrotactile presentation of music is identified as being from C1 to G5. This is more limited than for human hearing but the fundamental frequencies of the human voice, and the notes played by many instruments, lie within it. However, the dynamic range might require compression to avoid the negative effects of amplitude on pitch perception. PMID:27191400

  7. Millimeter wave transmission studies of YBa2Cu3O7-delta thin films in the 26.5 to 40.0 GHz frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, F. A.; Gordon, W. L.; Bhasin, K. B.; Heinen, V. O.; Warner, J. D.; Valco, G. J.

    1989-01-01

    Millimeter wave transmission measurements through YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) thin films on MgO, ZrO2 and LaAlO3 substrates, are reported. The films (approx. 1 micron) were deposited by sequential evaporation and laser ablation techniques. Transition temperatures T sub c, ranging from 89.7 K for the Laser Ablated film on LaAlO3 to approximately 72 K for the sequentially evaporated film on MgO, were obtained. The values of the real and imaginary parts of the complex conductivity, sigma 1 and sigma 2, are obtained from the transmission data, assuming a two fluid model. The BCS approach is used to calculate values for an effective energy gap from the obtained values of sigma sub 1. A range of gap values from 2 DELTA o/K sub B T sub c = 4.19 to 4.35 was obtained. The magnetic penetration depth is evaluated from the deduced values of sigma 2. These results are discussed together with the frequency dependence of the normalized transmission amplitude, P/P sub c, below and above T sub c.

  8. A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic for amplitude, polarization, and wavenumber measurements of ion cyclotron range-of frequency fields on ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Ochoukov, R; Bobkov, V; Faugel, H; Fünfgelder, H; Noterdaeme, J-M

    2015-11-01

    A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic has been installed on an ASDEX Upgrade tokamak to characterize ion cyclotron range-of frequency (ICRF) wave generation and interaction with magnetized plasma. The diagnostic consists of a field-aligned array of B-dot probes, oriented to measure fast and slow ICRF wave fields and their field-aligned wavenumber (k(//)) spectrum on the low field side of ASDEX Upgrade. A thorough description of the diagnostic and the supporting electronics is provided. In order to compare the measured dominant wavenumber of the local ICRF fields with the expected spectrum of the launched ICRF waves, in-air near-field measurements were performed on the newly installed 3-strap ICRF antenna to reconstruct the dominant launched toroidal wavenumbers (k(tor)). Measurements during a strap current phasing scan in tokamak discharges reveal an upshift in k(//) as strap phasing is moved away from the dipole configuration. This result is the opposite of the k(tor) trend expected from in-air near-field measurements; however, the near-field based reconstruction routine does not account for the effect of induced radiofrequency (RF) currents in the passive antenna structures. The measured exponential increase in the local ICRF wave field amplitude is in agreement with the upshifted k(//), as strap phasing moves away from the dipole configuration. An examination of discharges heated with two ICRF antennas simultaneously reveals the existence of beat waves at 1 kHz, as expected from the difference of the two antennas' operating frequencies. Beats are observed on both the fast and the slow wave probes suggesting that the two waves are coupled outside the active antennas. Although the new diagnostic shows consistent trends between the amplitude and the phase measurements in response to changes applied by the ICRF antennas, the disagreement with the in-air near-field measurements remains. An electromagnetic model is currently under development to address this issue.

  9. A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic for amplitude, polarization, and wavenumber measurements of ion cyclotron range-of frequency fields on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoukov, R.; Bobkov, V.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-11-01

    A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic has been installed on an ASDEX Upgrade tokamak to characterize ion cyclotron range-of frequency (ICRF) wave generation and interaction with magnetized plasma. The diagnostic consists of a field-aligned array of B-dot probes, oriented to measure fast and slow ICRF wave fields and their field-aligned wavenumber (k//) spectrum on the low field side of ASDEX Upgrade. A thorough description of the diagnostic and the supporting electronics is provided. In order to compare the measured dominant wavenumber of the local ICRF fields with the expected spectrum of the launched ICRF waves, in-air near-field measurements were performed on the newly installed 3-strap ICRF antenna to reconstruct the dominant launched toroidal wavenumbers (ktor). Measurements during a strap current phasing scan in tokamak discharges reveal an upshift in k// as strap phasing is moved away from the dipole configuration. This result is the opposite of the ktor trend expected from in-air near-field measurements; however, the near-field based reconstruction routine does not account for the effect of induced radiofrequency (RF) currents in the passive antenna structures. The measured exponential increase in the local ICRF wave field amplitude is in agreement with the upshifted k//, as strap phasing moves away from the dipole configuration. An examination of discharges heated with two ICRF antennas simultaneously reveals the existence of beat waves at 1 kHz, as expected from the difference of the two antennas' operating frequencies. Beats are observed on both the fast and the slow wave probes suggesting that the two waves are coupled outside the active antennas. Although the new diagnostic shows consistent trends between the amplitude and the phase measurements in response to changes applied by the ICRF antennas, the disagreement with the in-air near-field measurements remains. An electromagnetic model is currently under development to address this issue.

  10. Low frequency of PrP genotype 225SF among free-ranging mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) with chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Jean E; Conner, Mary M; Wolfe, Lisa L; Miller, Michael W; Williams, Elizabeth S

    2005-08-01

    The prion protein (PrP) gene was characterized in 1482 free-ranging mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) from Wyoming and Colorado. Using DNA sequences from 363 deer, dimorphisms at codons 20 (aspartate/glycine) and 225 [serine (S)/phenylalanine (F)] were found; silent changes occurred at codons 131 (tyrosine) and 247 (isoleucine). The remaining samples were surveyed for codon 225 genotype and all were characterized for chronic wasting disease (CWD) infection status. A total of 112 deer with the genotype 225SF or FF were found, of which one was CWD-positive; 1370 were 225SS, with 289 positive for CWD. Among CWD-negative deer, the frequency of 225SF/FF genotypes was 9.3 % but among CWD-positive deer it was only 0.3 %. For all samples combined, CWD status was not independent of codon 225 genotype (P<0.0001). The odds that a deer of the 225SS genotype was CWD-infected were 30 times greater (95 % confidence intervals=4-213) than for a 225SF deer. The proportion of 225SF animals in sampled subpopulations varied from 0 to 18 %; the CWD prevalence varied from 0 to 25 %. However, no relationship was observed between genotype frequency and CWD prevalence in different areas. The PrP sequences of experimentally infected mule deer were analysed from pre-existing projects and 10 animals were found with 225SF genotypes, all of which were positive for CWD. Data available from some of these animals suggest that the 225SF genotype could be associated with longer incubation periods in CWD infection compared with the 225SS genotype.

  11. An initial measurement of a fast neutral spectrum for ion cyclotron range of frequency heated plasma using two-channel compact neutral particle analyzers in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Wang, S. J.; Park, M.; Kim, S. K.

    2013-11-01

    The accurate measurement of fast neutral particles from high energy ion tails is very important since it is a measure of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) or neutral beam (NB) ion heating. In KSTAR, fast neutral measurements have been carried out using a compact neutral particle analyzer based on the silicon photo diode since 2010. As a result, the fast neutral spectrum was observed consistent with the ion temperature, diamagnetic energy, and neutron flux in 2011. However, there was fast neutral count beyond the injected neutral beam energy in NB-only heating. Since it is difficult to expect the count unless the temperature is high enough to diffuse the fast ions beyond the beam energy it was required to identify what it is. During the 2012 campaign, the two-channel diode detectors with and without a particle stopper were used to distinguish fast neutral counts and other counts by a hard X-ray or neutrons. As a result, it was confirmed that the high energy component beyond the beam energy originated from a hard X-ray or neutrons. Finally, it was observed that faster neutrals are generated by ICRF heating and enhanced by electron cyclotron heating compared to NB-only heating.

  12. An initial measurement of a fast neutral spectrum for ion cyclotron range of frequency heated plasma using two-channel compact neutral particle analyzers in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. H.; Park, M.; Kim, S. K.; Wang, S. J.

    2013-11-15

    The accurate measurement of fast neutral particles from high energy ion tails is very important since it is a measure of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) or neutral beam (NB) ion heating. In KSTAR, fast neutral measurements have been carried out using a compact neutral particle analyzer based on the silicon photo diode since 2010. As a result, the fast neutral spectrum was observed consistent with the ion temperature, diamagnetic energy, and neutron flux in 2011. However, there was fast neutral count beyond the injected neutral beam energy in NB-only heating. Since it is difficult to expect the count unless the temperature is high enough to diffuse the fast ions beyond the beam energy it was required to identify what it is. During the 2012 campaign, the two-channel diode detectors with and without a particle stopper were used to distinguish fast neutral counts and other counts by a hard X-ray or neutrons. As a result, it was confirmed that the high energy component beyond the beam energy originated from a hard X-ray or neutrons. Finally, it was observed that faster neutrals are generated by ICRF heating and enhanced by electron cyclotron heating compared to NB-only heating.

  13. Paired Associative Stimulation with High-Frequency Peripheral Component Leads to Enhancement of Corticospinal Transmission at Wide Range of Interstimulus Intervals

    PubMed Central

    Shulga, Anastasia; Zubareva, Aleksandra; Lioumis, Pantelis; Mäkelä, Jyrki P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In spinal paired associative stimulation (PAS), orthodromic and antidromic volleys elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) coincide at corticomotoneuronal synapses at the spinal cord. The interstimulus interval (ISI) between TMS and PNS determines whether PAS leads to motor-evoked potential (MEP) potentiation or depression. PAS applied as a long-term treatment for neurological patients might alter conduction of neural fibers over time. Moreover, measurements of motoneuron conductance for determination of ISIs may be challenging in these patients. Results: We sought to design a PAS protocol to induce MEP potentiation at wide range of ISIs. We tested PAS consisting of high-intensity (100% stimulator output, SO) TMS and high-frequency (50 Hz) PNS in five subjects at five different ISIs. Our protocol induced potentiation of MEP amplitudes in all subjects at all tested intervals. TMS and PNS alone did not result in MEP potentiation. The variant of PAS protocol described here does not require exact adjustment of ISIs in order to achieve effective potentiation of MEPs. Conclusions: This variant of PAS might be feasible as a long-term treatment in rehabilitation of neurological patients. PMID:27721747

  14. Report on key comparison COOMET.AUV.A-K5: pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range 2 Hz to 10 kHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowolska, D.; Kosterov, A.

    2016-01-01

    This is the final report for regional key comparison COOMET.AUV.A-K5 on the pressure calibration of laboratory standard microphones in the frequency range from 2 Hz to 10 kHz. Two laboratories—Central Office of Measures (GUM)—the national metrology institute for Poland and the State Enterprise Scientific-Research Institute for Metrology of Measurement and Control Systems (DP NDI Systema)— the designated institute for acoustics in Ukraine took part in this comparison with the GUM as a pilot. One travelling type LS1P microphone was circulated to the participants and results in the form of regular calibration certificates were collected. The results of the DP NDI Systema obtained in this comparison were linked to the CCAUV.A-K5 key comparison through the joint participation of the GUM. The degrees of equivalence were computed for DP NDI Systema with respect to the CCAUV.A-K5 key comparison reference value. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  15. A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic for amplitude, polarization, and wavenumber measurements of ion cyclotron range-of frequency fields on ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoukov, R.; Bobkov, V.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-11-15

    A new B-dot probe-based diagnostic has been installed on an ASDEX Upgrade tokamak to characterize ion cyclotron range-of frequency (ICRF) wave generation and interaction with magnetized plasma. The diagnostic consists of a field-aligned array of B-dot probes, oriented to measure fast and slow ICRF wave fields and their field-aligned wavenumber (k{sub //}) spectrum on the low field side of ASDEX Upgrade. A thorough description of the diagnostic and the supporting electronics is provided. In order to compare the measured dominant wavenumber of the local ICRF fields with the expected spectrum of the launched ICRF waves, in-air near-field measurements were performed on the newly installed 3-strap ICRF antenna to reconstruct the dominant launched toroidal wavenumbers (k{sub tor}). Measurements during a strap current phasing scan in tokamak discharges reveal an upshift in k{sub //} as strap phasing is moved away from the dipole configuration. This result is the opposite of the k{sub tor} trend expected from in-air near-field measurements; however, the near-field based reconstruction routine does not account for the effect of induced radiofrequency (RF) currents in the passive antenna structures. The measured exponential increase in the local ICRF wave field amplitude is in agreement with the upshifted k{sub //}, as strap phasing moves away from the dipole configuration. An examination of discharges heated with two ICRF antennas simultaneously reveals the existence of beat waves at 1 kHz, as expected from the difference of the two antennas’ operating frequencies. Beats are observed on both the fast and the slow wave probes suggesting that the two waves are coupled outside the active antennas. Although the new diagnostic shows consistent trends between the amplitude and the phase measurements in response to changes applied by the ICRF antennas, the disagreement with the in-air near-field measurements remains. An electromagnetic model is currently under development to

  16. Effects of Electromagnetic Field Over a Human Body, Sar Simulation with and Without Nanotextile in the Frequency Range 0.9-1.8GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomovski, Boyan; Gräbner, Frank; Hungsberg, Axel; Kallmeyer, Christian; Linsel, Mario

    2011-11-01

    Within only the last decade, usage of mobile phones and many other electronic devices with high speed wireless RF connection is rapidly increasing. Modern life requires reliable, quick and high-quality information connections, which explains the widely spreading craze for electronic mobile devices of various types. The vast technological advances we are witnessing in electronics, electro-optics, and computer science have profoundly affected our everyday lives. Meanwhile, safety concerns regarding the biological effects of electromagnetic (EM) radiation have been raised, in particular at a low level of exposure which we everyday experience. A variety of waves and signals have to be considered such as different sine waves, digital signals used in radio, television, mobile phone systems and other information transfer systems. The field around us has become rather complicated and the "air space is getting more and more dense with RF. The establishing of safety recommendations, law norms and rules augmented by adequate measurements is very important and requires quite an expertise. But as many scientific researches suggest, what we are currently witnessing is very likely to generate a great public danger and a bad influence over the human body. There are many health organisations warning the public for possible development of cancer, mental and physical disorders etc [7, 8]. These suggestions are quite serious and should not be neglected by the official bodies and the test laboratories. In the following work, the effects of electromagnetic field over a virtual model of a human head have been simulated in the frequency range from 900 MHz to 1800 MHz (commonly created in the real life by mobile GSM system) with the help of the program MEFiSTo 2D Classic [1]. The created virtual models using the 2D simulation & computation software proved that the use of new high tech nanotextile materials for shielding layers around the human body can reduce the effects of EM fields

  17. Application of AWE Along with a Combined FEM/MoM Technique to Compute RCS of a Cavity-Backed Aperture in an Infinite Ground Plane Over a Frequency Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C.J.; Deshpande, M.D.

    1997-01-01

    A hybrid Finite Element Method (FEM)/Method of Moments (MoM) technique in conjunction with the Asymptotic Waveform Evaluation (AWE) technique is applied to obtain radar cross section (RCS) of a cavity-backed aperture in an infinite ground plane over a frequency range. The hybrid FEM/MoM technique when applied to the cavity-backed aperture results in an integro-differential equation with electric field as the unknown variable, the electric field obtained from the solution of the integro-differential equation is expanded in Taylor series. The coefficients of the Taylor series are obtained using the frequency derivatives of the integro-differential equation formed by the hybrid FEM/MoM technique. The series is then matched via the Pade approximation to a rational polynomial, which can be used to extrapolate the electric field over a frequency range. The RCS of the cavity-backed aperture is calculated using the electric field at different frequencies. Numerical results for a rectangular cavity, a circular cavity, and a material filled cavity are presented over a frequency range. Good agreement between AWE and the exact solution over the frequency range is obtained.

  18. Semantic Priming from Letter-Searched Primes Occurs for Low- but Not High-Frequency Targets: Automatic Semantic Access May Not Be a Myth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tse, Chi-Shing; Neely, James H.

    2007-01-01

    Letter-search (LS) within a prime often eliminates semantic priming. In 2 lexical decision experiments, the authors found that priming from LS primes occurred for low-frequency (LF) but not high-frequency (HF) targets whether the target's word frequency was manipulated between or within participants and whether the prime-target pairs were…

  19. Identification of low and high frequency ranges for heart rate variability and blood pressure variability analyses using pharmacological autonomic blockade with atropine and propranolol in swine.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding autonomic nervous system functioning, which mediates behavioral and physiological responses to stress, offers great potential for evaluation of farm animal stress and welfare. Evaluation of heart rate variability (HRV) and blood pressure variability (BPV), using time and frequency doma...

  20. Stability of long term facilitation and expression of zif268 and Arc in the spinal cord dorsal horn is modulated by conditioning stimulation within the physiological frequency range of primary afferent fibers.

    PubMed

    Haugan, F; Wibrand, K; Fiskå, A; Bramham, C R; Tjølsen, A

    2008-07-17

    Long term facilitation (LTF) of C-fiber-evoked firing of wide dynamic range neurons in the spinal dorsal horn in response to conditioning stimulation (CS) of afferent fibers is a widely studied cellular model of spinal nociceptive sensitization. Although 100 Hz CS of primary afferent fibers is commonly used to induce spinal cord LTF, this frequency exceeds the physiological firing range. Here, we examined the effects of electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve within the physiological frequency range on the magnitude and stability of the C-fiber-evoked responses of wide dynamic range neurons and the expression of immediate early genes (c-fos, zif268, and Arc) in anesthetized rats. Stimulation frequencies of 3, 30 and 100 Hz all induced facilitation of similar magnitude as recorded at 1 h post-CS. Strikingly, however, 3 Hz-induced potentiation of the C-fiber responses was decremental, whereas both 30 and 100 Hz stimulation resulted in stable, non-decremental facilitation over 3 h of recording. The number of dorsal horn neurons expressing c-fos, but not zif268 or Arc, was significantly elevated after 3 Hz CS and increased proportionally with stimulation rate. In contrast, a stable LTF of C-fiber responses was obtained at 30 and 100 Hz CS, and at these frequencies there was a sharp increase in zif268 expression and appearance of Arc-positive neurons. The results show that response facilitation can be induced by stimulation frequencies in the physiological range (3 and 30 Hz). Three hertz stimulation induced the early phase of LTF, but the responses were decremental. Arc and zif268, two genes previously coupled to LTP of synaptic transmission in the adult brain, are upregulated at the same frequencies that give stable LTF (30 and 100 Hz). This frequency-dependence is important for understanding how the afferent firing pattern affects neuronal plasticity and nociception in the spinal dorsal horn.

  1. The changes of the frequency specific impedance of the human body due to the resonance in the kHz range in cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalak, K. P.; Nawrocka-Bogusz, H.

    2011-12-01

    The frequency-specific absorption of kHz signals has been postulated for different tissues, trace elements, vitamins, toxins, pathogens, allergens etc. for low-power (μV) signals. An increase in the impedance of the human body is observed only up to the given power of the applied signal. The highest amplification of the given signal being damped by the body makes it possible to determine the intensity of the given process in the body (e.g. amount of the toxin, trace element, intensity of the allergy) being connected with a given frequency spectrum of the signal. The mechanism of frequency-specific absorption can be explained by means of the Quantum Field Theory being applied to the structure of the water. Substantially high coincidence between the frequencies of the rotation of free quasi-excited electrons in coherent domains of water and the frequencies being used in the MORA diagnostics (Med-Tronic GmbH, EN ISO 13485, EN ISO 9001) can be observed. These frequencies are located in the proximity of f = 7kHz · i (i = 1,3,5,7,...). This fact suggests that the coherent domains with the admixtures of the given substances create structure-specific coherent domains that possess frequency-specific absorption spectra. The diagnostic tool called "MORA System diagnosis" was used to investigate 102 patients with different types and stages of cancer. Many signals were observed to be absorbed by many cancer patients, e.g.: 'Cellular defense system', 'Degeneration tendencies', Manganese, Magnesium, Zinc, Selenium, Vitamin E, Glutamine, Glutathione, Cysteine, Candida albicans, Mycosis. The results confirm the role of oxidative stress, immunological system deficiency and mitochondria malfunction in the development of cancer.

  2. Self-oscillations in the laboratory periodic flow and the linear law for the dissipation rate in the single-frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchaev, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a Reynolds number increase transition from self-oscillations close to single-frequency ones to the temporally chaotic regime in the flow in a cylindrical channel driven by a spatially periodic force with four half-periods is experimentally investigated. The parameter ɛ proportional to the mean rate of the kinetic energy dissipation in unit mass per unit time associated with perturbations in the fluid is used as a basic characteristic of self-oscillations. The Reynolds number dependence ɛ(Re) for single frequency self-oscillations is considered theoretically.

  3. Polarized and depolarized Raman spectra of liquid carbon disulfide in the pressure range 0-10 kbar. I. Vibration frequencies, C-S bond length, and Fermi resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikawa, S.; Whalley, Edward

    1986-09-01

    The effect of pressure on the polarized and depolarized Raman spectra of liquid carbon disulphide, i.e., the peak frequencies, bandwidths, and relative intensities of both the allowed ν1 and 2ν2 bands and the interaction-induced ν2 and ν3 bands, have been measured at 22 °C up to 10 kbar. This paper discusses the effect of pressure on the frequencies and on the relative isotropic intensity of the ν1 and 2ν2 bands. The frequency of the ν1 band increases linearly with pressure, within the experimental uncertainty, at the rate 0.16±0.01 cm-1 kbar-1, and the frequencies of the ν2, ν3, and 2ν2 bands decrease nonlinearly. The frequency shifts are described by second-order perturbation theory with the molecular anharmonicity and the intermolecular interaction as perturbations. The leading terms of the shifts consist of the same derivative of the interaction potential, multiplied by different anharmonicity constants, and the shifts of the ν1 and 2ν2 bands suggests that the C-S bond length decreases at the rate 2×10-4 Å kbar-1. The relative isotropic intensity of the 2ν2 and ν1 bands increases with pressure at the rate 0.050 kbar-1, whereas the anisotropic 2ν2 intensity relative to the isotropic ν1 intensity is independent of pressure to the experimental precision of ˜0.005. The effect of pressure on the second derivative of the isotropic and anisotropic parts of the polarizability with respect to the bend coordinate was estimated as 1.1×10-43 C m2 V-1 kbar-1 and ˜0, respectively, from these values.

  4. The effects of water content and water resistivity on the dispersion of resistivity and dielectric constant in quartz sand in the frequency range 10^2 to 10^8 Hz

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberle, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    Using modifications of previously developed methods, measurements were made of the resistivity and the dielectric constant of two similar quartz sands of different porosity over the frequency range 102-108 Hertz for various water contents and water resistivities. Dispersion is pronounced in all the resistivity data above 106 Hz. As water content decreases, resistivity dispersion becomes noticeable at lower frequencies. The resistivity data at all frequencies, however, fit an empirical prediction formula relating observed resistivity to water saturation and resistivity of the saturated sample. The data suggest that the dispersion of resistivity of some earth materials with frequency may be predicted on the basis of curve matching of the data obtained in this investigation with the resistivity of the material at a frequency of 100 Hz or lower. The dispersion of dielectric constant with frequency is pronounced at all frequencies, being more pronounced with increasing water content. The shape of the dispersion curve is dependent on the resistivity of the water in the sample.

  5. Human exposure standards in the frequency range 1 Hz To 100 kHz: the case for adoption of the IEEE standard.

    PubMed

    Patrick Reilly, J

    2014-10-01

    Differences between IEEE C95 Standards (C95.6-2002 and C95.1-2005) in the low-frequency (1 Hz-100 kHz) and the ICNIRP-2010 guidelines appear across the frequency spectrum. Factors accounting for lack of convergence include: differences between the IEEE standards and the ICNIRP guidelines with respect to biological induction models, stated objectives, data trail from experimentally derived thresholds through physical and biological principles, selection and justification of safety/reduction factors, use of probability models, compliance standards for the limbs as distinct from the whole body, defined population categories, strategies for central nervous system protection below 20 Hz, and correspondence of environmental electric field limits with contact currents. This paper discusses these factors and makes the case for adoption of the limits in the IEEE standards.

  6. Electric field of the power terrestrial sources observed by microsatellite Chibis-M in the Earth's ionosphere in frequency range 1-60 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkin, Fedir; Korepanov, Valery; Dudkin, Denis; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Pronenko, Vira; Klimov, Stanislav

    2015-07-01

    The power line emission (PLE) 50/60 Hz and the Schumann resonance (SR) harmonics were detected by the use of a compact electrical field sensor of length 0.42 m during microsatellite Chibis-M mission in years 2012-2014. The initial orbit of Chibis-M has altitude 500 km and inclination 52°. We present the space distribution of PLE and its connections with the possible overhead power lines. PLE has been recorded both in the shade and sunlit parts of the orbits as opposed to SR which have been recorded only in the nightside of the Earth. The cases of an extra long distance of PLE propagation in the Earth's ionosphere and increased value of SR Q factor have been also observed. These results should stimulate the ionosphere model refinement for ultralow frequency and extremely low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation as well as a study on new possibility of the ionosphere diagnostics.

  7. The effect of a diet containing grasshoppers and access to free-range on carcase and meat physicochemical and sensory characteristics in broilers.

    PubMed

    Sun, T; Long, R J; Liu, Z Y

    2013-01-01

    1. Research was conducted to evaluate the impact of a diet containing grasshoppers on the carcase, physicochemical and sensory characteristics in a free-range, grassland-based broiler production system. 2. A total of 80, 28-d-old male broilers were reared on grassland containing a large population of grasshoppers (treatment PB). Control birds were reared intensively on a maize-soybean diet (treatment CB). At 91 d of age, 24 birds from each treatment were slaughtered to evaluate carcase, meat and sensory characteristics. 3. Treatment PB produced birds with significantly lower live weights, breast, wing, thigh and drum weights, and higher dressing percentage and breast percentage of carcase, compared with CB. Treatment PB produced breast meat with significantly higher redness values, shear force and protein content, and lower pH values, cooking loss, moisture and fat content compared with CB. Sensory panel results for breast and thigh meats showed no treatment effect on colour and juiciness, but significantly higher scores for chewiness, flavour, aroma and overall appreciation, and lower scores for tenderness from treatment PB compared with CB. 4. Rearing chickens on rangeland may provide an alternative way to produce poultry meat which is considered superior by modern consumers.

  8. Investigation of broadening and shift of vapour absorption lines of H{sub 2}{sup 16}O in the frequency range 7184 – 7186 cm{sup -1}

    SciTech Connect

    Nadezhdinskii, A I; Pereslavtseva, A A; Ponurovskii, Ya Ya

    2014-10-31

    We present the results of investigation of water vapour absorption spectra in the 7184 – 7186 cm{sup -1} range that is of particular interest from the viewpoint of possible application of the data obtained for monitoring water vapour in the Earth's stratosphere. The doublet of H{sub 2}{sup 16}O near ν = 7185.596 cm{sup -1} is analysed. The coefficients of broadening and shift of water vapour lines are found in the selected range in mixtures with buffer gases and compared to those obtained by other authors. (laser spectroscopy)

  9. Intrinsic vs. spurious long-range memory in high-frequency records of environmental radioactivity - Critical re-assessment and application to indoor 222Rn concentrations from Coimbra, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Reik V.; Potirakis, Stelios M.; Barbosa, Susana M.; Matos, Jose A. O.

    2015-04-01

    The presence or absence of long-range correlations in environmental radioactivity fluctuations has recently attracted considerable interest. Among a multiplicity of practically relevant applications, identifying and disentangling the environmental factors controlling the variable concentrations of the radioactive noble gas Radon is important for estimating its effect on human health and the efficiency of possible measures for reducing the corresponding exposition. In this work, we present a critical re-assessment of a multiplicity of complementary methods that have been previously applied for evaluating the presence of long-range correlations and fractal scaling in environmental Radon variations with a particular focus on the specific properties of the underlying time series. As an illustrative case study, we subsequently re-analyze two high-frequency records of indoor Radon concentrations from Coimbra, Portugal, each of which spans several months of continuous measurements at a high temporal resolution of five minutes. Our results reveal that at the study site, Radon concentrations exhibit complex multi-scale dynamics with qualitatively different properties at different time-scales: (i) essentially white noise in the high-frequency part (up to time-scales of about one hour), (ii) spurious indications of a non-stationary, apparently long-range correlated process (at time scales between hours and one day) arising from marked periodic components probably related to tidal frequencies, and (iii) low-frequency variability indicating a true long-range dependent process, which might be dominated by a response to meteorological drivers. In the presence of such multi-scale variability, common estimators of long-range memory in time series are necessarily prone to fail if applied to the raw data without previous separation of time-scales with qualitatively different dynamics. We emphasize that similar properties can be found in other types of geophysical time series (for

  10. A new ion cyclotron range of frequency scenario for bulk ion heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas: How to utilize intrinsic impurities in our favour

    SciTech Connect

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Ongena, J.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A.; Dumont, R.; Mantsinen, M.

    2015-08-15

    A fusion reactor requires plasma pre-heating before the rate of deuterium-tritium fusion reactions becomes significant. In ITER, radio frequency (RF) heating of {sup 3}He ions, additionally puffed into the plasma, is one of the main options considered for increasing bulk ion temperature during the ramp-up phase of the pulse. In this paper, we propose an alternative scenario for bulk ion heating with RF waves, which requires no extra {sup 3}He puff and profits from the presence of intrinsic Beryllium impurities in the plasma. The discussed method to heat Be impurities in D-T plasmas is shown to provide an even larger fraction of fuel ion heating.

  11. Accuracy analysis on C/A code and P(Y) code pseudo-range of GPS dual frequency receiver and application in point positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xiuying; Fan, Shijie; Guo, Jiming

    2008-10-01

    When the Anti-Spoofing (A-S) is active, the civilian users have some difficulties in using the P(Y) code for precise navigation and positioning. Z-tracking technique is one of the effective methods to acquire the P(Y) code. In this paper, the accuracy of pseudoranges from C/A code and P(Y) code for dual frequency GPS receiver is discussed. The principle of measuring the encrypted P(Y) code is described firstly, then a large data set from IGS tracking stations is utilized for analysis and verification with the help of a precise point positioning software developed by authors. Especially, P(Y) code pseudoranges of civilian GPS receivers allow eliminating/reducing the effect of ionospheric delay and improve the precision of positioning. The point positioning experiments for this are made in the end.

  12. Decametric survey of discrete sources in the northern sky. 11: The results of the UTR-2 very low-frequency sky survey in the declination range 41 deg to 52 deg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braude, S. Ya; Sokolov, K. P.; Zakharenko, S. M.

    1994-03-01

    The results of the very-low frequency sky survey of discrete sources made with the UTR-2 radio telescope within the declination zone 41 deg to 52 deg are presented. The UTR-2 radio source catalogue contains the estimates of the coordinates and flux densities of 432 sources measured at a number of the lowest frequencies used in contemporary radio astronomy within the range from 10 at 25 MHz. The questions of establishing the UTR-2 sky survey sensitivity, completeness and reliability of the resulting catalogue are considered. The coordinates of the sources measured at very low frequencies have been compared with respective data obtained in the 4C survey at 178 MHz.

  13. The efficacy of cerebellar vermal deep high frequency (theta range) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in schizophrenia: A randomized rater blind-sham controlled study.

    PubMed

    Garg, Shobit; Sinha, Vinod Kumar; Tikka, Sai Krishna; Mishra, Preeti; Goyal, Nishant

    2016-09-30

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a promising therapeutic for schizophrenia. Treatment effects of rTMS have been variable across different symptom clusters, with negative symptoms showing better response, followed by auditory hallucinations. Cerebellum, especially vermis and its abnormalities (both structural and functional) have been implicated in cognitive, affective and positive symptoms of schizophrenia. rTMS to this alternate site has been suggested as a novel target for treating patients with this disorder. Hypothesizing cerebellar vermal magnetic stimulation as an adjunct to treat schizophrenia psychopathology, we conducted a double blind randomized sham controlled rTMS study. In this study, forty patients were randomly allocated (using block randomization method) to active high frequency (theta patterned) rTMS (n=20) and sham (n=20) groups. They received 10 sessions over 2 weeks. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS) scores were assessed at baseline, after last session and at 4 weeks (2 weeks post-rTMS). We found a significantly greater improvement in the group receiving active rTMS sessions, compared to the sham group on negative symptoms, and depressive symptoms. We conclude that cerebellar stimulation can be used as an effective adjunct to treat negative and affective symptoms. PMID:27450744

  14. Quantum teleportation in space and frequency using entangled pairs of photons from a frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hongbin; Yonezawa, Hidehiro; Kuntz, Katanya B.; Heurs, Michele; Huntington, Elanor H.

    2014-10-01

    Using entangled pairs of photons from a frequency comb and wide-band frequency-resolved homodyne detection, we propose a sequential quantum teleportation protocol for continuous variables that teleports an unknown state in space and frequency. A subthreshold optical parametric oscillator (OPO) produces a comb of entangled pairs of photons separated by the free spectral range of the OPO cavity. Wide-band frequency-resolved homodyne detection enables direct access to the sum and difference of quadratures between different teeth in the comb. Such measurements are Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen nullifiers, and can be used as the basis for teleportation protocols. Our protocol for space-and-frequency teleportation effectively links arbitrary frequency channels for frequency-division multiplexing, which has applications in universal quantum computation and large-capacity quantum communication.

  15. Synchronization of human heart-rate indicators and geomagnetic field variations in the frequency range of 0.5-3.0 mHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenchenko, T. A.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Khorseva, N. I.; Breus, T. K.

    2014-12-01

    Fifty-seven experiments have been conducted to monitor the minute indicators of heart rate at rest in 38 practically healthy individuals (9 men and 29 women) from 18 to 58 years old. The duration of each observation period is 60 to 200 min. We have measured the heart rate and the minute-averaged cardiac section durations reflecting the passage of electrical excitation over different parts of myocardium. A comparison of the dynamics of minute values of these physiological parameters with variations of the X and Z components of the geomagnetic field has shown that two-thirds of experiments revealed the synchronization of oscillations in the heart rate and variations in the components of the geomagnetic field. We have revealed both the matching of the observed periods of oscillations ranging between 4 and 30 min and an approximate synchronicity in the times of their appearance and disappearance.

  16. Development and numerical characterization of a new standing wave ultrasonic motor operating in the 30-40kHz frequency range.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaoyan; Lee, Heow Pueh; Ong, Chong Jin; Lim, Siak Piang

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to present a new design of standing-wave ultrasonic motor. This motor uses three piezoelectric actuating blocks which deform appropriately when powered up. The deformations of the blocks in ultrasonic range are internally amplified via the design of the motor by about 80 times and collectively yield an elliptical trajectory for the driving head of the motor. Finite Element Analysis using ANSYS was performed for both dynamic analysis and optimization of a prototype motor. The numerical results verified that at steady state, the motor can achieve vibrations in micro-meter level and the velocity can reach decimeter scale, satisfying the fast speed requirement as a positioning actuator.

  17. Intrinsic vs. spurious long-range memory in high-frequency records of environmental radioactivity. Critical re-assessment and application to indoor 222Rn concentrations from Coimbra, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, R. V.; Potirakis, S. M.; Barbosa, S. M.; Matos, J. A. O.; Pereira, A. J. S. C.; Neves, L. J. P. F.

    2015-05-01

    The presence or absence of long-range correlations in the environmental radioactivity fluctuations has recently attracted considerable interest. Among a multiplicity of practically relevant applications, identifying and disentangling the environmental factors controlling the variable concentrations of the radioactive noble gas radon is important for estimating its effect on human health and the efficiency of possible measures for reducing the corresponding exposition. In this work, we present a critical re-assessment of a multiplicity of complementary methods that have been previously applied for evaluating the presence of long-range correlations and fractal scaling in environmental radon variations with a particular focus on the specific properties of the underlying time series. As an illustrative case study, we subsequently re-analyze two high-frequency records of indoor radon concentrations from Coimbra, Portugal, each of which spans several weeks of continuous measurements at a high temporal resolution of five minutes.Our results reveal that at the study site, radon concentrations exhibit complex multi-scale dynamics with qualitatively different properties at different time-scales: (i) essentially white noise in the high-frequency part (up to time-scales of about one hour), (ii) spurious indications of a non-stationary, apparently long-range correlated process (at time scales between some hours and one day) arising from marked periodic components, and (iii) low-frequency variability indicating a true long-range dependent process. In the presence of such multi-scale variability, common estimators of long-range memory in time series are prone to fail if applied to the raw data without previous separation of time-scales with qualitatively different dynamics.

  18. Delivering Microwave Spectroscopy to the Masses: a Design of a Low-Cost Microwave Spectrometer Operating in the 18-26 GHZ Frequency Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steber, Amanda; Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    Advances in chip-level microwave technology in the communications field have led to the possibilities of low cost alternatives for current Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectrometers. Many of the large, expensive microwave components in a traditional design can now be replaced by robust, mass market monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs). "Spectrometer on a board" designs are now feasible that offer dramatic cost reduction for microwave spectroscopy. These chip-level components can be paired with miniature computers to produce compact instruments that are operable through USB. A FTMW spectrometer design using the key MMIC components that drive cost reduction will be presented. Two dual channel synthesizers (Valon Technology Model 5008), a digital pattern generator (Byte Paradigm Wav Gen Xpress), and a high-speed digitizer/arbitrary waveform generator combination unit (Tie Pie HS-5 530 XM) form the key components of the spectrometer for operation in the 18-26.5 GHz range. The design performance is illustrated using a spectrometer that is being incorporated into a museum display for astrochemistry. For this instrument a user interface, developed in Python, has been developed and will be shown.

  19. A full-duplex multiband access radio-over-fiber link with frequency multiplying millimeter-wave generation and wavelength reuse for upstream signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianxin; Li, Yanjie

    2015-01-01

    A full-duplex radio-over-fiber (RoF) link providing multiband wireless accesses including 20 GHz, 40 GHz and 60 GHz millimeter (mm)-wave signal using a 10 GHz RF signal source is proposed. According to our theoretical analysis and simulation of the transmission performance of the signal along the single mode fiber, the code form distortion caused by the sideband walk-off effect due to the fiber chromatic dispersion can be eliminated, and the degradation caused by the fading effect on the down-stream signal is removed by adjusting the relative phase shift between the two sidebands. The upstream signal carried by the optical carrier abstracted from the downlink signal is also immune to the code outline distortion. The numerical simulation results show that the 20 km full-duplex RoF link with our generated optical mm-wave signal maintains good performance.

  20. Federally Qualified Health Centers Minimize the Impact of Loss of Frequency and Independence of Movement in Older Adult Patients through Access to Transportation Services

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Krystal Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Loss of mobility in older adults (65 and older) is associated with falling, loss of independence, and mortality. This paper, which to the author's knowledge is the first of its kind, summarizes findings of Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) case reports and how FQHCs minimize the impacts of mobility loss in older adult patients (who would not receive primary services without these transportation programs) by providing access to primary care services through transportation programs. This paper features the transportation programs of four FQHCs located in both urban and rural United States areas: LifeLong Medical Care (Oakland, CA); Hudson Headwaters Health Network (Queensbury, NY); North End Community Health Center (Boston, MA); Aaron E. Henry Community Health Services Center, Inc. (Clarksdale, MS). This paper is beneficial to primary care providers and public health officials in outlining how transportation may be used to minimize the effects of mobility loss in older adult patients. PMID:21748013

  1. RF-Medisys: a radio frequency identification-based electronic medical record system for improving medical information accessibility and services at point of care.

    PubMed

    Ting, Jacky S L; Tsang, Albert H C; Ip, Andrew W H; Ho, George T S

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative electronic medical records (EMR) system, RF-MediSys, which can perform medical information sharing and retrieval effectively and which is accessible via a 'smart' medical card. With such a system, medical diagnoses and treatment decisions can be significantly improved when compared with the conventional practice of using paper medical records systems. Furthermore, the entire healthcare delivery process, from registration to the dispensing or administration of medicines, can be visualised holistically to facilitate performance review. To examine the feasibility of implementing RF-MediSys and to determine its usefulness to users of the system, a survey was conducted within a multi-disciplinary medical service organisation that operates a network of medical clinics and paramedical service centres throughout Hong Kong Island, the Kowloon Peninsula and the New Territories. Questionnaires were distributed to 300 system users, including nurses, physicians and patients, to collect feedback on the operation and performance of RF-MediSys in comparison with conventional paper-based medical record systems. The response rate to the survey was 67%. Results showed a medium to high level of user satisfaction with the radiofrequency identification (RFID)-based EMR system. In particular, respondents provided high ratings on both 'user-friendliness' and 'system performance'. Findings of the survey highlight the potential of RF-MediSys as a tool to enhance quality of medical services and patient safety. PMID:21430306

  2. Dielectric properties of SiC fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composites in the temperature range from 25 to 700 °C at frequencies between 8.2 and 18 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haitao; Tian, Hao; Cheng, Haifeng

    2013-01-01

    The complex permittivity of a SiC fiber-reinforced SiC matrix (SiCf/SiC) composite was measured in a temperature range of 25-700 °C at frequencies from 8.2 to 18 GHz. The SiCf/SiC composite exhibited a positive temperature coefficient, that is, its complex permittivity increased with temperature. The observed positive temperature coefficient can be interpreted by Debye theory, by which the theoretical predictions were in well agreement with the experimental results.

  3. Accessibility Videos.

    PubMed

    Kurppa, Ari; Nordlund, Marika

    2016-01-01

    It can be difficult to understand accessibility, if you do not have the personal experience. The Accessibility Centre ESKE produced short videos which demonstrate the meaning of accessibility in different situations. Videos will raise accessibility awareness of architects, other planners and professionals in the construction field and maintenance. PMID:27534282

  4. Safety considerations for magnetic fields of 10 mT to 100 mT amplitude in the frequency range of 10 kHz to 100 kHz for magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Dössel, Olaf; Bohnert, Julia

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new imaging modality using oscillating magnetic fields in the frequency range of 10 kHz to 100 kHz. The duration of data acquisition becomes smaller, and signal-to-noise ratio improves if the amplitude of these fields is increased - technically amplitudes of up to 100 mT might be feasible for human-sized systems. On the other hand, with increasing field strength, adverse health effects must be expected: oscillating magnetic fields can stimulate nerves and muscle and heat up tissue. Thresholds for stimulation with magnetic fields in this frequency range are not precisely known, neither is the local temperature rise following exposure. The ICNIRP guidelines define reference levels for magnetic field exposure for the general public that contain large safety factors - for medical diagnostics, they might be exceeded for a short time. In this article, research and guidelines in this field are briefly reviewed, and new results are presented in order to contribute to a future definition of safety limits for oscillating magnetic fields in MPI. PMID:24176960

  5. Safety considerations for magnetic fields of 10 mT to 100 mT amplitude in the frequency range of 10 kHz to 100 kHz for magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Dössel, Olaf; Bohnert, Julia

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new imaging modality using oscillating magnetic fields in the frequency range of 10 kHz to 100 kHz. The duration of data acquisition becomes smaller, and signal-to-noise ratio improves if the amplitude of these fields is increased - technically amplitudes of up to 100 mT might be feasible for human-sized systems. On the other hand, with increasing field strength, adverse health effects must be expected: oscillating magnetic fields can stimulate nerves and muscle and heat up tissue. Thresholds for stimulation with magnetic fields in this frequency range are not precisely known, neither is the local temperature rise following exposure. The ICNIRP guidelines define reference levels for magnetic field exposure for the general public that contain large safety factors - for medical diagnostics, they might be exceeded for a short time. In this article, research and guidelines in this field are briefly reviewed, and new results are presented in order to contribute to a future definition of safety limits for oscillating magnetic fields in MPI.

  6. The impact of frequency of patient self-testing of prothrombin time on time in target range within VA Cooperative Study #481: The Home INR Study (THINRS), a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Matchar, David B; Love, Sean R; Jacobson, Alan K; Edson, Robert; Uyeda, Lauren; Phibbs, Ciaran S; Dolor, Rowena J

    2015-07-01

    Anticoagulation (AC) is effective in reducing thromboembolic events for individuals with atrial fibrillation (AF) or mechanical heart valve (MHV), but maintaining patients in target range for international normalized ratio (INR) can be difficult. Evidence suggests increasing INR testing frequency can improve time in target range (TTR), but this can be impractical with in-clinic testing. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that more frequent patient-self testing (PST) via home monitoring increases TTR. This planned substudy was conducted as part of The Home INR Study, a randomized controlled trial of in-clinic INR testing every 4 weeks versus PST at three different intervals. The setting for this study was 6 VA centers across the United States. 1,029 candidates with AF or MHV were trained and tested for competency using ProTime INR meters; 787 patients were deemed competent and, after second consent, randomized across four arms: high quality AC management (HQACM) in a dedicated clinic, with venous INR testing once every 4 weeks; and telephone monitored PST once every 4 weeks; weekly; and twice weekly. The primary endpoint was TTR at 1-year follow-up. The secondary endpoints were: major bleed, stroke and death, and quality of life. Results showed that TTR increased as testing frequency increased (59.9 ± 16.7 %, 63.3 ± 14.3 %, and 66.8 ± 13.2 % [mean ± SD] for the groups that underwent PST every 4 weeks, weekly and twice weekly, respectively). The proportion of poorly managed patients (i.e., TTR <50 %) was significantly lower for groups that underwent PST versus HQACM, and the proportion decreased as testing frequency increased. Patients and their care providers were unblinded given the nature of PST and HQACM. In conclusion, more frequent PST improved TTR and reduced the proportion of poorly managed patients.

  7. Access to modern contraception.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Michael J; Stanback, John; Shelton, James

    2006-06-01

    Access to modern contraception has become a recognized human right, improving the health and well-being of women, families and societies worldwide. However, contraceptive access remains uneven. Irregular contraceptive supply, limited numbers of service delivery points and specific geographic, economic, informational, psychosocial and administrative barriers (including medical barriers) undermine access in many settings. Widening the range of providers enabled to offer contraception can improve contraceptive access, particularly where resources are most scarce. International efforts to remove medical barriers include the World Health Organization's Medical Eligibility Criteria. Based on the best available evidence, these criteria provide guidance for weighing the risks and benefits of contraceptive choice among women with specific clinical conditions. Clinical job aids can also improve access. More research is needed to further elucidate the pathways for expanding contraceptive access. Further progress in removing medical barriers will depend on systems for improving provider education and promoting evidence-based contraceptive service delivery. PMID:16443395

  8. Absorption coefficients and frequency shifts measurement in the spectral range of 1071.88-1084.62 cm-1 vs. pressure for chlorodifluoromethane (CHClF2) using tunable CW CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hawat, Sharif

    2013-02-01

    Infrared (IR) absorption in the spectral range of (1071.88-1084.62 cm-1) vs. pressure in chlorodifluoromethane (CFC-22, F-22, and CHClF2) was studied using a tunable continuous wave (CW) CO2 laser radiation on 9R branch lines with a maximum output power of about 2.12 W, provided with an absorber cell located outside the laser cavity. The absorption coefficients were determined vs. the gas pressure between 0.2 mbar and 170 mbar at lines from 9R branch for CFC-22. The frequency shifts of the absorption lines of CFC-22 in relative to the central frequencies of laser lines were calculated vs. the pressure on the basis of these absorption coefficients. The chosen lines were selected according to IR spectrum of the studied gas given by HITRAN cross section database. So the absorption was achieved for CFC-22 at the spectral lines of 9R branch situated from 9R (10) to 9R (30) emitted by a tunable CW CO2 laser. The absorption cross sections of CFC-22 determined in this work were compared with the relevant data given by HITRAN cross section database and a reasonable agreement was observed.

  9. Wrist range of motion and motion frequency during toy and game play with a joint-specific controller specially designed to provide neuromuscular therapy: A proof of concept study in typically developing children.

    PubMed

    Crisco, Joseph J; Schwartz, Joel B; Wilcox, Bethany; Brideau, Holly; Basseches, Benjamin; Kerman, Karen

    2015-08-20

    Upper extremities affected by hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) and other neuromuscular disorders have been demonstrated to benefit from therapy, and the greater the duration of the therapy, the greater the benefit. A great motivator for participating in and extending the duration of therapy with children is play. Our focus is on active motion therapy of the wrist and forearm. In this study we examine the wrist motions associated with playing with two toys and three computer games controlled by a specially-designed play controller. Twenty children (ages 5-11) with no diagnosis of a muscular disorder were recruited. The play controller was fitted to the wrist and forearm of each child and used to measure and log wrist flexion and extension. Play activity and enjoyment were quantified by average wrist range of motion (ROM), motion frequency measures, and a discrete visual scale. We found significant differences in the average wrist ROM and motion frequency among the toys and games, yet there were no differences in the level of enjoyment across all toys and games, which was high. These findings indicate which toys and games may elicit the greater number of goal-directed movements, and lay the foundation for our long-term goal to develop and evaluate innovative motion-specific play controllers that are engaging rehabilitative devices for enhancing therapy and promoting neural plasticity and functional recovery in children with CP.

  10. Wrist range of motion and motion frequency during toy and game play with a joint-specific controller specially designed to provide neuromuscular therapy: A proof of concept study in typically developing children.

    PubMed

    Crisco, Joseph J; Schwartz, Joel B; Wilcox, Bethany; Brideau, Holly; Basseches, Benjamin; Kerman, Karen

    2015-08-20

    Upper extremities affected by hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP) and other neuromuscular disorders have been demonstrated to benefit from therapy, and the greater the duration of the therapy, the greater the benefit. A great motivator for participating in and extending the duration of therapy with children is play. Our focus is on active motion therapy of the wrist and forearm. In this study we examine the wrist motions associated with playing with two toys and three computer games controlled by a specially-designed play controller. Twenty children (ages 5-11) with no diagnosis of a muscular disorder were recruited. The play controller was fitted to the wrist and forearm of each child and used to measure and log wrist flexion and extension. Play activity and enjoyment were quantified by average wrist range of motion (ROM), motion frequency measures, and a discrete visual scale. We found significant differences in the average wrist ROM and motion frequency among the toys and games, yet there were no differences in the level of enjoyment across all toys and games, which was high. These findings indicate which toys and games may elicit the greater number of goal-directed movements, and lay the foundation for our long-term goal to develop and evaluate innovative motion-specific play controllers that are engaging rehabilitative devices for enhancing therapy and promoting neural plasticity and functional recovery in children with CP. PMID:25935686

  11. Final report of supplementary comparison AFRIMETS.AUV.A-S1: primary pressure calibration of LS2aP microphones according to IEC 61094-2, over the frequency range 1 Hz to 31.5 kHz.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nel, R.; Barrera-Figueroa, S.; Dobrowolska, D.; Defilippo Soares, Z. M.; Maina, A. K.; Hof, C.

    2016-01-01

    This is the final report of the AFRIMETS.AUV-S1 comparison of the pressure sensitivity, modulus and phase, of LS2aP microphones in the frequency range 1 Hz to 31.5 kHz in accordance with IEC 61094-2. Six national metrology institutes from three different regional metrology organisations participated in the comparison for which two LS2aP microphones were circulated simultaneously to all the participants in a hybrid-star configuration. The comparison reference values were calculated as the weighted mean for modulus and phase for each individual microphone. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  12. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  13. Isozyme variation in germplasm accessions of the wild oat Avena sterilis L.

    PubMed

    Phillips, T D; Murphy, J P; Goodman, M M

    1993-03-01

    Optimal exploitation of crop genetic resources requires a knowledge of the range and structure of the variation present in the gene pool of interest. Avena sterilis L., the cultivated oat progenitor, contains a store of genetic diversity that is readily accessible to the oat breeder. The objectives of the present paper were: (1) to evaluate isozyme polymorphisms in a sample of A. sterilis accessions from the U.S. National Small Grains Collection, (2) to analyze the distribution of isozyme diversity across the geographic range of the accessions, (3) to classify the accessions into groups based on isozyme variation, and (4) to suggest strategies for efficient sampling of this germplasm collection. One thousand and five accessions from 23 countries and 679 collection sites were screened for variation using 23 enzyme systems. Due to limited information about the genetic relationship among individual members of families of isozymes in hexaploid oat species, data were recorded solely for band presence. The frequencies of bands in accessions from the various countries were used to calculate the probability of genotypic identity (Ix.y), the probability of a unique genotype (Ux.y), and an adjusted polymorphic index (Hx). Accessions from Turkey and Lebanon had the largest polymorphic index values, Turkish and Moroccan accessions displayed the greatest numbers of bands. Accessions from Iran, Turkey, Iraq, and Lebanon had the largest mean probabilities of containing unique genotypes. Based on isozyme data, Turkey appeared to represent the center of diversity in this germplasm collection. Band frequencies calculated among countries were used in a principal component analysis. Accessions from Israel and Morocco clustered together; accessions from Iran, Iraq, Turkey, and Ethiopia formed another group; and Algerian accessions formed an outlying group. Several isozyme bands had a regional distribution. These results suggested that choosing accessions from countries based on their

  14. 47 CFR 15.609 - Marketing of Access BPL equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 15.609 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Access Broadband Over Power Line (Access BPL) § 15.609 Marketing of Access BPL equipment. The marketing of Access... consist of AC power line public utilities, Access BPL service providers and associates of Access...

  15. 47 CFR 15.609 - Marketing of Access BPL equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Section 15.609 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Access Broadband Over Power Line (Access BPL) § 15.609 Marketing of Access BPL equipment. The marketing of Access... consist of AC power line public utilities, Access BPL service providers and associates of Access...

  16. Telemetry Ranging: Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamkins, J.; Kinman, P.; Xie, H.; Vilnrotter, V.; Dolinar, S.

    2015-11-01

    Telemetry ranging is a proposed alternative to conventional two-way ranging for determining the two-way time delay between a Deep Space Station (DSS) and a spacecraft. The advantage of telemetry ranging is that the ranging signal on the uplink is not echoed to the downlink, so that telemetry alone modulates the downlink carrier. The timing information needed on the downlink, in order to determine the two-way time delay, is obtained from telemetry frames. This article describes the phase and timing estimates required for telemetry ranging, and how two-way range is calculated from these estimates. It explains why the telemetry ranging architecture does not require the spacecraft transponder to have a high-frequency or high-quality oscillator, and it describes how a telemetry ranging system can be infused in the Deep Space Network.

  17. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building access control (BAC)--a catchall phrase to describe the systems that control access to facilities across campus--has traditionally been handled with remarkably low-tech solutions: (1) manual locks; (2) electronic locks; and (3) ID cards with magnetic strips. Recent improvements have included smart cards and keyless solutions that make use…

  18. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  19. Frequency Extension to the THz Range in the High Pressure ESR System and Its Application to the Shastry-Sutherland Model Compound SrCu2(BO3)2.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hitoshi; Sakurai, Takahiro; Matsui, Ryosuke; Kawasaki, Kohei; Hirao, Yuki; Okubo, Susumu; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Kudo, Kazutaka; Koike, Yoji

    2015-10-29

    We have made a survey of ceramics for the inner parts of the transmission-type pressure cell to achieve the high pressure and the high transmission in the THz range. By using the optimal combination of ZrO2-based ceramic and Al2O3 ceramic, we have succeeded in obtaining a pressure up to 1.5 GPa and a frequency region up to 700 GHz simultaneously. We show the high-pressure ESR results of the Shastry-Sutherland compound SrCu2(BO3)2 as an application. We observed the direct ESR transition modes between the singlet ground state and the triplet excited states up to a pressure of 1.51 GPa successfully, and obtained the precise pressure dependence of the gap energy. The gap energy is directly proved to be suppressed by the pressure. Moreover, we found that the system approaches the quantum critical point with pressure by comparing the obtained data with the theory. This result also shows the usefulness of high-pressure ESR measurement in the THz region to study quantum spin systems.

  20. Multiple Access Schemes for Lunar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, Leslie; Hamkins, Jon; Stocklin, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    Two years ago, the NASA Coding, Modulation, and Link Protocol (CMLP) study was completed. The study, led by the authors of this paper, recommended codes, modulation schemes, and desired attributes of link protocols for all space communication links in NASA's future space architecture. Portions of the NASA CMLP team were reassembled to resolve one open issue: the use of multiple access (MA) communication from the lunar surface. The CMLP-MA team analyzed and simulated two candidate multiple access schemes that were identified in the original CMLP study: Code Division MA (CDMA) and Frequency Division MA (FDMA) based on a bandwidth-efficient Continuous Phase Modulation (CPM) with a superimposed Pseudo-Noise (PN) ranging signal (CPM/PN). This paper summarizes the results of the analysis and simulation of the CMLP-MA study and describes the final recommendations.

  1. Gaining Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Discusses issues schools and universities have encountered in complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and making their facilities more accessible to the disabled. The ADA's vagueness and the architect's need for understanding the regulations is highlighted. (GR)

  2. Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Patta, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Stephen McCarthy, co-partner and president of Equal Access ADA Consulting Architects of San Diego, California, about designing schools to naturally integrate compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (EV)

  3. Capital access.

    PubMed

    Towne, Jennifer

    2004-06-01

    To maintain their viability, hospitals are being compelled to invest in big capital projects such as information technology and renovation and construction. This gatefold examines the trends in credit and capital, and how they affect hospitals' access to money.

  4. Validation of soy protein estimates from a food-frequency questionnaire with repeated 24-h recalls and isoflavonoid excretion in overnight urine in a Western population with a wide range of soy intakes2

    PubMed Central

    Jaceldo-Siegl, Karen; Fraser, Gary E; Chan, Jacqueline; Franke, Adrian; Sabaté, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence of the benefits of soy on cancer risk in Western populations is inconsistent, in part because of the low intake of soy in these groups. Objective We assessed the validity of soy protein estimates from food-frequency questionnaires (FFQs) in a sample of Adventist Health Study-2 participants with a wide range of soy intakes. Design We obtained dietary intake data from 100 men and women (43 blacks and 57 nonblacks). Soy protein estimates from FFQs were compared against repeated 24-h recalls and urinary excretion of daidzein, genistein, total isoflavonoids (TIFLs), and equol (measured by HPLC/photodiode array/mass spectrometry) as reference criteria. We calculated Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients (with 95% CIs) for FFQ–24-h recall, 24 h-recall–urinary excretion, and FFQ–urinary excretion pairs. Results Among soy users, mean (± SD) soy protein values were 12.12 ± 10.80 g/d from 24-h recalls and 9.43 ± 7.83 g/d from FFQs. The unattenuated correlation (95% CI) between soy protein estimates from 24-h recalls and FFQs was 0.57 (0.32, 0.75). Correlation coefficients between soy protein intake from 24-h recalls and urinary isoflavonoids were 0.72 (0.43, 0.96) for daidzein, 0.67 (0.43, 0.91) for genistein, and 0.72 (0.47, 0.98) for TIFLs. Between FFQs and urinary excretion, these were 0.50 (0.32, 0.65), 0.48 (0.29, 0.61), and 0.50 (0.32, 0.64) for daidzein, genistein, and TIFLs, respectively. Conclusions Soy protein estimates from questionnaire were significantly correlated with soy protein from 24-h recalls and urinary excretion of daidzein, genistein, and TIFLs. The Adventist Health Study-2 FFQ is a valid instrument for assessing soy protein in a population with a wide range of soy intakes. PMID:18469267

  5. Accessibility and assistive products

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Porrero, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Accessibility and assistive products and technologies are needed to ensure the rights of persons with disabilities and older persons. Many developments have been implemented in laws, standards, markets and from the consumers perspective, at international, European and national levels. The real issue is that not all the potential users benefit from the use of assistive products or accessible measures. Discussion Innovative methods are needed to allow all potential users to have real advantage of assistive technologies and accessible and design for all facilities. Best practices will be presented and existing gaps and recommendations will be discussed. Cost-benefits aspects will also be presented. Conclusion In order to get advantages from opportunities of globalization, hard work and responsibilities of all stakeholders are needed, so that assistive products and accessibility reach a whole range of situations and environments and contribute to ensure quality of life in a society for all.

  6. Extra- and intrathoracic access.

    PubMed

    Lazarides, Miltos K; Georgakarakos, Efstratios I; Schoretsanitis, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    The most complex patients requiring vascular access are those with bilateral central vein occlusions. Endovascular repair of the central lesions when feasible allow upper extremity use for access. When endovascular repair is not feasible, femoral vein transposition should be the next choice. When lower limb access sites have been exhausted or are contraindicated as in obese patients and in patients with peripheral arterial obstructive disease, a range of extrathoracic "exotic" extra-anatomic access procedures as the necklace cross-chest arteriovenous (AV) grafts, the ipsilateral axillo-axillary loops, the brachial-jugular AV grafts, the axillo-femoral AV grafts or even intra-thoracic ones as the right atrial AV bypasses represent the vascular surgeon's last resort. The selection among those extra-anatomical chest-wall procedures should be based upon each patient's anatomy or patient-specific factors. PMID:24817469

  7. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - hemodialysis access; dialysis - hemodialysis access

  8. Frequency comb swept lasers.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Han; Zhou, Chao; Adler, Desmond C; Fujimoto, James G

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrate a frequency comb (FC) swept laser and a frequency comb Fourier domain mode locked (FC-FDML) laser for applications in optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-based FC swept lasers operate at a sweep rate of 1kHz and 120kHz, respectively over a 135nm tuning range centered at 1310nm with average output powers of 50mW. A 25GHz free spectral range frequency comb filter in the swept lasers causes the lasers to generate a series of well defined frequency steps. The narrow bandwidth (0.015nm) of the frequency comb filter enables a approximately -1.2dB sensitivity roll off over approximately 3mm range, compared to conventional swept source and FDML lasers which have -10dB and -5dB roll offs, respectively. Measurements at very long ranges are possible with minimal sensitivity loss, however reflections from outside the principal measurement range of 0-3mm appear aliased back into the principal range. In addition, the frequency comb output from the lasers are equally spaced in frequency (linear in k-space). The filtered laser output can be used to self-clock the OCT interference signal sampling, enabling direct fast Fourier transformation of the fringe signals, without the need for fringe recalibration procedures. The design and operation principles of FC swept lasers are discussed and designs for short cavity lasers for OCT and interferometric measurement applications are proposed.

  9. Easy Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    School and university restrooms, locker and shower rooms have specific ADA accessibility requirements that serve the needs of staff, students and campus visitors who are disabled as a result of injury, illness or age. Taking good care of them is good for the reputation of a sensitive community institution, and fosters positive public relations.…

  10. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    As faculty members add online and multimedia elements to their courses, colleges and universities across the country are realizing that there is a lot of work to be done to ensure that disabled students (and employees) have equal access to course material and university websites. Unfortunately, far too few schools consider the task a top priority.…

  11. Expanding Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    There is no question that the United States lags behind most industrialized nations in consumer access to broadband Internet service. For many policy makers and activists, this shortfall marks the latest phase in the struggle to overcome the digital divide. To remedy this lack of broadband affordability and availability, one start-up firm--with…

  12. Scaling of Yb-Fiber Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruehl, Axel; Marcinkevicius, Andrius; Fermann, Martin E.; Hartl, Ingmar

    2010-06-01

    Immediately after their introduction in 1999, femtosecond laser frequency combs revolutionized the field of precision optical frequency metrology and are key elements in many experiments. Frequency combs based on femtosecond Er-fiber lasers based were demonstrated in 2005, allowing additionally rugged, compact set-ups and reliable unattended long-term operation. The introduction of Yb-fiber technology led to an dramatic improvement in fiber-comb performance in various aspects. Low-noise Yb-fiber femtosecond oscillators enabled a reduction of relative comb tooth linewidth to the sub-Hz level as well as scaling of the fundamental comb spacings up to 1 GHz. This is beneficial for any frequency-domain comb application due to the higher power per comb-mode. Many spectroscopic applications require, however, frequency combs way beyond the wavelength range accessible with broad band laser materials, so nonlinear conversion and hence higher peak intensity is required. We demonstrated power scaling of Yb-fiber frequency combs up to 80 W average power in a strictly linear chirped-pulse amplification schemes compatible with low-noise phase control. These high-power Yb-fiber-frequency combs facilitated not only the extension to the mid-IR spectral region. When coupled to a passive enhancement cavity, the average power can be further scaled to the kW-level opening new capabilities for XUV frequency combs via high-harmonic generation. All these advances of fiber-based frequency combs will trigger many novel applications both in fundamental and applied sciences. Schibli et al., Nature Photonics 2 355 (2008). Hartl et al., MF9 in Advanced Solid-State Photonics. 2009, Optical Society of America. Ruehl et al., AWC7 in Advanced Solid-State Photonics. 2010, Optical Society of America. Adler et al., Optics Letters 34 1330 (2009). Yost et al., Nature Physics 5 815 (2009).

  13. Accessibility in E-Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Simon

    2009-01-01

    E-assessment offers many opportunities to broaden the range of tools at the assessor's disposal and thereby improve the overall accessibility of the assessment experience. In 2006, TechDis commissioned a report, produced by Edexcel, on the state of guidance on accessibility at the various stages of the assessment process--question design,…

  14. Broadband frequency demodulator for detecting small frequency shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyand, K.; Simon, E.

    1980-03-01

    A technique is presented that enables the indication of the smallest frequency-modulation shifts over a wide carrier-frequency range. Through coil-less modulation following conversion of the carrier-frequency, and subsequent phase-sensitive rectification of the low-frequency signal, it is possible to achieve high linearity and resolution over a frequency range of 20 kHz through 4 MHz. It is noted that the smallest frequency shift that can still be detected is 10 to the -4th Hz.

  15. Hemodialysis access procedures

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-dialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-dialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency-dialysis access; Chronic kidney failure-dialysis access; Chronic renal failure-dialysis access

  16. Simple sweep frequency generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegorov, I.

    1985-01-01

    A sweep frequency generator is described whose center frequency can be varied from 10 kHz to 50 MHz, with seven 1 to 3 and 3 to 10 scales covering the 10 kHz to 30 MHz range and one 3 to 5 scale for the 30 to 50 MHz range. It consists of a tunable pulse generator with output voltage attenuator, a diode mixer for calibration, and a sawtooth voltage generator as a source of frequency deviation. The pulse generator is a multivibrator with two emitter coupled transistors and two diodes in the collector circuit of one. The first diode extends the tuning range and increases the frequency deviation, the second diode provides the necessary base bias to the other transistor. The pulse repetition rate is modulated either directly by the sweep voltage of the calibrating oscilloscope, this voltage being applied to the base of the transistor with the two diodes in its collector circuit through an additional attenuator or a special emitter follower, or by the separate sawtooth voltage generator. The latter is a conventional two transistor multivibrator and produces signals at any constant frequency within the 40 to 60 Hz range. The mixer receives unmodulated signals from a reference frequency source and produces different frequency signals which are sent through an RCR-filter to a calibrating oscilloscope.

  17. Widening Access to Higher Education: An Evaluative Case Study of a Foundation Year Alternative to Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Peter A.; Moores, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    Universities are encouraged to widen access to a broad range of applicants, including mature students taking Access qualifications. Admissions tutors can find it difficult to compare and choose between Access and A-level applications, and Access applicants for popular courses may be disadvantaged relative to students with good A-levels. In this…

  18. High-power frequency comb in the range of 2-2.15  μm based on a holmium fiber amplifier seeded by wavelength-shifted Raman solitons from an erbium-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Coluccelli, Nicola; Cassinerio, Marco; Gambetta, Alessio; Laporta, Paolo; Galzerano, Gianluca

    2014-03-15

    We demonstrate a room-temperature high-power frequency comb source covering the spectral region from 2 to 2.15 μm. The source is based on a femtosecond erbium-fiber laser operating at 1.55 μm with a repetition rate of 250 MHz, wavelength-shifted up to 2.06 μm by the solitonic Raman effect, seeding a large-mode-area holmium (Ho) fiber amplifier pumped by a thulium (Tm) fiber laser emitting at 1.94 μm. The frequency comb has an integrated power of 2 W, with overall power fluctuations as low as 0.3%. The beatnote between the comb and a high-spectral-purity, single-frequency Tm-Ho laser has a linewidth of 32 kHz over 1 ms observation time, with a signal-to-noise ratio in excess of 30 dB.

  19. PN ranging/telemetry transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deerkoski, L. F.

    1977-01-01

    System can transmit range-indicating pseudonoise (PN) codes and simultaneously transmit auxiliary information as binary data at a rate at least on order of pseudonoise chipping rate. PN code is modulated by data stream with relatively low bit rate. Data stream with high bit rate can be transmitted in same frequency band as PN ranging code.

  20. Quantum theory of IR spectroscopy of dipole-forbidden vibrational modes of adsorbed molecules on the surface of a metal in the frequency range of the anomalous skin effect

    SciTech Connect

    Volokitin, A.I.; Persson, B.N.J.

    1995-09-01

    A completely quantum-mechanical calculation of the IR spectrum for the dipole-forbidden vibrational modes of adsorbed molecules on a metal surface is performed. IT is shown for broad-band metals with a simple band structure that the asymmetry of the line shape is determined by nonlocal effects, while the nonadiabaticity makes a small contribution. In the region of the limiting anomalous skin effect ({omega}/{omega}{sub 1}{much_lt} 1, where {omega} is the frequency of the IR radiation, {omega}{sub 1}={upsilon}{sub F}/{delta}, {upsilon}{sub F} is the Fermi velocity, {delta}=c/{omega}{sub p} is the depth of the skin layer, and {omega}{sub p} is the plasma frequency) the broad-band absorption spectrum caused by the adsorbed molecules has an asymptotic limit {omega}{sup O}. The theory is compared with new absolute measurements of the IR spectrum of the CO/Cu(100) system. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Generation of high-power femtosecond supercontinua in the near-IR spectral range using broadband parametric frequency conversion in LBO and DCDA crystals pumped at λ = 620 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Podshivalov, A A; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A; Potemkin, F V

    2014-09-30

    The pump wavelength of parametric amplifiers based on CLBO, DCDA and LBO crystals and pumped by the second harmonic of a femtosecond Cr : forsterite laser (620 nm) is close to optimal for broadband amplification because of the proximity of group velocities of interacting pulses. Injection of a broadband continuum into the range of the signal-wave gain in LBO and DCDA parametric amplifiers, pumped at λ = 620 nm, leads to generation of broadband femtosecond pulses with a spectrum ranging from 1050 to 1600 nm and peak powers up to 20 MW. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  2. Nonlinear Frequency Compression

    PubMed Central

    Scollie, Susan; Glista, Danielle; Seelisch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Frequency lowering technologies offer an alternative amplification solution for severe to profound high frequency hearing losses. While frequency lowering technologies may improve audibility of high frequency sounds, the very nature of this processing can affect the perceived sound quality. This article reports the results from two studies that investigated the impact of a nonlinear frequency compression (NFC) algorithm on perceived sound quality. In the first study, the cutoff frequency and compression ratio parameters of the NFC algorithm were varied, and their effect on the speech quality was measured subjectively with 12 normal hearing adults, 12 normal hearing children, 13 hearing impaired adults, and 9 hearing impaired children. In the second study, 12 normal hearing and 8 hearing impaired adult listeners rated the quality of speech in quiet, speech in noise, and music after processing with a different set of NFC parameters. Results showed that the cutoff frequency parameter had more impact on sound quality ratings than the compression ratio, and that the hearing impaired adults were more tolerant to increased frequency compression than normal hearing adults. No statistically significant differences were found in the sound quality ratings of speech-in-noise and music stimuli processed through various NFC settings by hearing impaired listeners. These findings suggest that there may be an acceptable range of NFC settings for hearing impaired individuals where sound quality is not adversely affected. These results may assist an Audiologist in clinical NFC hearing aid fittings for achieving a balance between high frequency audibility and sound quality. PMID:23539261

  3. Acoustic emission frequency discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugg, Frank E. (Inventor); Graham, Lloyd J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    In acoustic emission nondestructive testing, broadband frequency noise is distinguished from narrow banded acoustic emission signals, since the latter are valid events indicative of structural flaws in the material being examined. This is accomplished by separating out those signals which contain frequency components both within and beyond (either above or below) the range of valid acoustic emission events. Application to acoustic emission monitoring during nondestructive bond verification and proof loading of undensified tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter is considered.

  4. Laser Frequency Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donelan, Darsa; Mueller, Guido; Thorpe, James; Livas, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Laser ranging and interferometry are essential technologies allowing for many astounding new spacebased missions such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) to measure gravitational radiation emitted from distant super massive black hole mergers or distributed aperture telescopes with unprecedented angular resolution in the NIR or visible regime. The requirements on laser frequency noise depend on the residual motion and the distances between the spacecraft forming the interferometer. The intrinsic frequency stability of commercial lasers is several orders of magnitude above these requirements. Therefore, it is necessary for lasers to be stabilized to an ultrastable frequency reference so that they can be used to sense and control distances between spacecraft. Various optical frequency references and frequency stabilization schemes are considered and investigated for the applicability and usefulness for space-based interferometry missions.

  5. Measured Response of Local, Mid-range and Far-range Discontinuities of Large Metal Groundplanes using Time Domain Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Battermann, S.; Garbe, H.

    2005-05-01

    This work describes a method to detect and to quantify any local or mid-range discontinuity on extended flat metal planes. Often these planes are used for antenna calibration (open area test site - OATS) or the plane could be the ground of a semi-anechoic chamber used in Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) testing. The measurement uncertainty of antenna calibration or EMC testing depends on the groundplane's quality, which can be accessed using this method. A vector network analyzer with time-domain option is used to determine the complex-valued input scattering parameter S11,F of an aperture antenna in a monostatic setup. S;11,F contains the information desired about the discontinuities and is measured in the frequency domain with high dynamic range. But only after a linear filtering utilizing the Chirp-Z-Transform the obtained time-domain signal S11,T evidence of local and mid-range discontinuities.

  6. High-speed random access laser tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.C.; Busch, G.E.; Hewitt, C.J.; Remelius, D.K.; Shimada, T.; Strauss, C.E.; Wilson, C.W.; Zaugg, T.J.

    1999-04-01

    We have developed a technique for laser tuning at rates of 100 kHz or more using a pair of acousto-optic modulators. In addition to all-electronic wavelength control, the same modulators also can provide electronically variable {ital Q}-switching, cavity length and power stabilization, chirp and linewidth control, and variable output coupling, all at rates far beyond what is possible with conventional mechanically tuned components. Tuning rates of 70 kHz have been demonstrated on a radio-frequency-pumped CO{sub 2} laser, with random access to over 50 laser lines spanning a 17{percent} range in wavelength and with wavelength discrimination better than 1 part in 1000. A compact tuner and {ital Q}-switch has been deployed in a 5{endash}10-kHz pulsed lidar system. The modulators each operate at a fixed Bragg angle, with the acoustic frequency determining the selected wavelength. This arrangement doubles the wavelength resolution without introducing an undesirable frequency shift. {copyright} 1999 Optical Society of America

  7. High Precision Laser Range Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge (Inventor); Lay, Oliver P. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is an improved distance measuring interferometer that includes high speed phase modulators and additional phase meters to generate and analyze multiple heterodyne signal pairs with distinct frequencies. Modulation sidebands with large frequency separation are generated by the high speed electro-optic phase modulators, requiring only a single frequency stable laser source and eliminating the need for a fist laser to be tuned or stabilized relative to a second laser. The combination of signals produced by the modulated sidebands is separated and processed to give the target distance. The resulting metrology apparatus enables a sensor with submicron accuracy or better over a multi- kilometer ambiguity range.

  8. Determining the frequency, depth and velocity of preferential flow by high frequency soil moisture monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hardie, Marcus; Lisson, Shaun; Doyle, Richard; Cotching, William

    2013-01-01

    Preferential flow in agricultural soils has been demonstrated to result in agrochemical mobilisation to shallow ground water. Land managers and environmental regulators need simple cost effective techniques for identifying soil - land use combinations in which preferential flow occurs. Existing techniques for identifying preferential flow have a range of limitations including; often being destructive, non in situ, small sampling volumes, or are subject to artificial boundary conditions. This study demonstrated that high frequency soil moisture monitoring using a multi-sensory capacitance probe mounted within a vertically rammed access tube, was able to determine the occurrence, depth, and wetting front velocity of preferential flow events following rainfall. Occurrence of preferential flow was not related to either rainfall intensity or rainfall amount, rather preferential flow occurred when antecedent soil moisture content was below 226 mm soil moisture storage (0-70 cm). Results indicate that high temporal frequency soil moisture monitoring may be used to identify soil type - land use combinations in which the presence of preferential flow increases the risk of shallow groundwater contamination by rapid transport of agrochemicals through the soil profile. However use of high frequency based soil moisture monitoring to determine agrochemical mobilisation risk may be limited by, inability to determine the volume of preferential flow, difficulty observing macropore flow at high antecedent soil moisture content, and creation of artificial voids during installation of access tubes in stony soils. PMID:23159761

  9. Determining the frequency, depth and velocity of preferential flow by high frequency soil moisture monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hardie, Marcus; Lisson, Shaun; Doyle, Richard; Cotching, William

    2013-01-01

    Preferential flow in agricultural soils has been demonstrated to result in agrochemical mobilisation to shallow ground water. Land managers and environmental regulators need simple cost effective techniques for identifying soil - land use combinations in which preferential flow occurs. Existing techniques for identifying preferential flow have a range of limitations including; often being destructive, non in situ, small sampling volumes, or are subject to artificial boundary conditions. This study demonstrated that high frequency soil moisture monitoring using a multi-sensory capacitance probe mounted within a vertically rammed access tube, was able to determine the occurrence, depth, and wetting front velocity of preferential flow events following rainfall. Occurrence of preferential flow was not related to either rainfall intensity or rainfall amount, rather preferential flow occurred when antecedent soil moisture content was below 226 mm soil moisture storage (0-70 cm). Results indicate that high temporal frequency soil moisture monitoring may be used to identify soil type - land use combinations in which the presence of preferential flow increases the risk of shallow groundwater contamination by rapid transport of agrochemicals through the soil profile. However use of high frequency based soil moisture monitoring to determine agrochemical mobilisation risk may be limited by, inability to determine the volume of preferential flow, difficulty observing macropore flow at high antecedent soil moisture content, and creation of artificial voids during installation of access tubes in stony soils.

  10. Decrease in Self-Reported Tanning Frequency among Utah Teens following the Passage of Utah Senate Bill 41: An Analysis of the Effects of Youth-Access Restriction Laws on Tanning Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Rebecca G; Smith, Kristi; Balough, Meghan; Friedrichs, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Adolescent use of indoor tanning facilities is associated with an increased risk in later development of melanoma skin cancers. States that have imposed age restrictions on access to indoor tanning generally show lower self-reported rates of indoor tanning than states with no restrictions, but currently no studies have assessed indoor tanning use before and after such restrictions. Methods. In 2013, we compared self-reported indoor tanning data collected in the Prevention Needs Assessment (PNA) survey in 2011 to PNA 2013 data. We also assessed predictors of continued tanning after passage of the bill. Results. Prior to the passage of Senate Bill 41, 12% of students reported at least one incident of indoor tanning in the past 12 months. After passage, only 7% of students reported indoor tanning in the past 12 months (P < 0.0001). Students who continued indoor tanning were more likely to be older and female and to engage in other risk behaviors, including smoking and alcohol use. Lower parental education levels were also associated with continued tanning. Conclusion. Indoor tanning restrictions showed beneficial impact on tanning rates in adolescents in Utah. Stricter restrictions may show even greater impact than restrictions that allow for parental waivers. Stronger enforcement of bans is needed to further reduce youth access.

  11. Effects of Spatial Frequencies on Word Identification by Fast and Slow Readers: Evidence from Eye Movements

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Timothy R.; Dixon, Jasmine; McGowan, Victoria A.; Kurtev, Stoyan; Paterson, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has shown that differences in the effectiveness of spatial frequencies for fast and slow skilled adult readers may be an important component of differences in reading ability in the skilled adult reading population (Jordan et al., 2016a). But the precise nature of this influence on lexical processing during reading remains to be fully determined. Accordingly, to gain more insight into the use of spatial frequencies by skilled adult readers with fast and slow reading abilities, the present study looked at effects of spatial frequencies on the processing of specific target words in sentences. These target words were of either high or low lexical frequency and each sentence was displayed as normal or filtered to contain only very low, low, medium, high, or very high spatial frequencies. Eye movement behavior for target words was closest to normal for each reading ability when text was shown in medium or higher spatial frequency displays, although reading occurred for all spatial frequencies. Moreover, typical word frequency effects (the processing advantage for words with higher lexical frequencies) were observed for each reading ability across a broad range of spatial frequencies, indicating that many different spatial frequencies provide access to lexical representations during textual reading for both fast and slow skilled adult readers. Crucially, however, target word fixations were fewer and shorter for fast readers than for slow readers for all display types, and this advantage for fast readers appeared to be similar for normal, medium, high, and very high spatial frequencies but larger for low and very low spatial frequencies. Therefore, although fast and slow skilled adult readers can both use a broad range of spatial frequencies when reading, fast readers make more effective use of these spatial frequencies, and especially those that are lower, when processing the identities of words. PMID:27733837

  12. Frequency spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottino-Löffler, Bertrand; Strogatz, Steven H.

    2016-09-01

    We study the dynamics of coupled phase oscillators on a two-dimensional Kuramoto lattice with periodic boundary conditions. For coupling strengths just below the transition to global phase-locking, we find localized spatiotemporal patterns that we call "frequency spirals." These patterns cannot be seen under time averaging; they become visible only when we examine the spatial variation of the oscillators' instantaneous frequencies, where they manifest themselves as two-armed rotating spirals. In the more familiar phase representation, they appear as wobbly periodic patterns surrounding a phase vortex. Unlike the stationary phase vortices seen in magnetic spin systems, or the rotating spiral waves seen in reaction-diffusion systems, frequency spirals librate: the phases of the oscillators surrounding the central vortex move forward and then backward, executing a periodic motion with zero winding number. We construct the simplest frequency spiral and characterize its properties using analytical and numerical methods. Simulations show that frequency spirals in large lattices behave much like this simple prototype.

  13. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion develops due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the structural integrity. The nondestructive detection and monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted and the wall thickness reduced by consecutive milling of the steel structure. Further measurements were conducted using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath and the damage severity monitored. From the measured signal change due to the wave mode interference the wall thickness reduction was monitored. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  14. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, P.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion can develop due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the reduction of the strength and thus degradation of the structural integrity. The monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic wedge transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were selectively generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted for wall thickness reduction due to milling of the steel structure. From the measured signal changes due to the wave mode interference the reduced wall thickness was monitored. Good agreement with theoretical predictions was achieved. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  15. United States Access Board

    MedlinePlus

    ... Communications & IT Access to information and communication technology (ICT) is addressed by Board standards and guidelines issued ... Engineer (November 3) Access Board Approves Rules on ICT Refresh and Medical Diagnostic Equipment (September 14) Access ...

  16. Spectral Properties of THz Quantum-Cascade Lasers: Frequency Noise, Phase-Locking and Absolute Frequency Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravaro, Marco; Jagtap, Vishal; Manquest, Christophe; Gellie, Pierre; Santarelli, Giorgio; Sirtori, Carlo; Khanna, Suraj P.; Linfield, Edmund H.; Barbieri, Stefano

    2013-06-01

    Quantum cascade lasers combine desirable features, namely high optical power and compactness, as no other coherent source in the field of THz generation. While their maximum operating temperature is progressively increasing, getting close to the range accessible by Peltier cooling, their range of application is expanding into new fields, such us molecular spectroscopy and their use as local oscillators. These applications would benefit from the investigation and improvement of the laser coherence properties. In this contribution we report the exploitation of electro-optic coherent detection based on a near-IR frequency comb to measure the frequency noise of a free running 2.5 THz quantum cascade laser. An intrinsic linewidth quantum limit of ~230 Hz has been measured, in good agreement with the Schawlow-Townes theoretical prediction. The same detection scheme is then exploited to phase-lock the quantum cascade laser line to a multiple of the comb tooth spacing, while a second comb allows to precisely measure the THz frequency. Such a dual frequency comb experimental setup thus yields a narrow line THz emission traceable to a microwave frequency standard.

  17. Variable frequency iteration MPPT for resonant power converters

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Qian; Bataresh, Issa; Chen, Lin

    2015-06-30

    A method of maximum power point tracking (MPPT) uses an MPPT algorithm to determine a switching frequency for a resonant power converter, including initializing by setting an initial boundary frequency range that is divided into initial frequency sub-ranges bounded by initial frequencies including an initial center frequency and first and second initial bounding frequencies. A first iteration includes measuring initial powers at the initial frequencies to determine a maximum power initial frequency that is used to set a first reduced frequency search range centered or bounded by the maximum power initial frequency including at least a first additional bounding frequency. A second iteration includes calculating first and second center frequencies by averaging adjacent frequent values in the first reduced frequency search range and measuring second power values at the first and second center frequencies. The switching frequency is determined from measured power values including the second power values.

  18. Specifics of processing SRS lidar signals in GHz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishkanich, A. S.; Elizarov, V. V.; Kascheev, S. V.; Zhevlakov, A. P.; Sidorov, I. S.

    2015-12-01

    One of the highly effective methods of operative remote environmental monitoring on land and water surfaces is laser sensing. It knew that the Raman scattering cross section is very small (10-25-10-27), so in some cases radiation back into captivity to the target could be a few tens of photons. For high-speed sensing, speed of processing and ease of use lidar units required for the use of appropriate hardware and software systems used for the decision of tasks of collecting, processing, storing, organizing large amounts of data.

  19. High force vibration testing with wide frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, Edward F.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Gregory, Danny Lynn

    2013-04-02

    A shaker assembly for vibration testing includes first and second shakers, where the first shaker includes a piezo-electric material for generating vibration. A support structure permits a test object to be supported for vibration of the test object by both shakers. An input permits an external vibration controller to control vibration of the shakers.

  20. A Theory of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribot, Jesse C.; Peluso, Nancy Lee

    2003-01-01

    The term "access" is frequently used by property and natural resource analysts without adequate definition. In this paper we develop a concept of access and examine a broad set of factors that differentiate access from property. We define access as "the "ability" to derive benefits from things," broadening from property's classical definition as…

  1. Small Satellite Access of the Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horan, Stephen; Minnix, Timothy O.; Vigil, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    Small satellites have been perceived as having limited access to NASA's Space Network (SN). The potential for satellite access of the space network when the design utilizes a fixed antenna configuration and low-power, coded transmission is analyzed. From the analysis, satellites using this configuration in high-inclination orbits are shown to have a daily data throughput in the 100 to 1000 Mbit range using the multiple access communications service.

  2. Frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Laser diode pumped mid-IR wavelength sources include at least one high power, near-IR wavelength, injection and/or sources wherein one or both of such sources may be tunable providing a pump wave output beam to a quasi-phase matched (QPM) nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) device. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Wavelength tuning of at least one of the sources advantageously provides the ability for optimizing pump or injection wavelengths to match the QPM properties of the NFM device enabling a broad range of mid-IR wavelength selectivity. Also, pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  3. Radio frequency distribution assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culley, K. M.

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Radio Frequency Distribution Assembly (RFDA) is an interface between the Sperry four-channel, fast-switching synthesizer and the EF-111 jamming system antenna ports. The RFDS is a sophisticated, high-speed RF interface designed to convert the banded outputs of the four-channel synthesizer (16 ports) to 36 ports which represent six ordinal directions of arrival (DOA) for the EF-111 jamming system. The RFDS will distribute the RF signals while providing controlled RF amplitudes to simulate the antenna patterns of the EF-111 Electronic Warfare (EW) system. The simulation of the arrival angles which appear between the ordinal directions is performed by controlling the amplitude of the RF signal from the DOA channels. The RFDA is capable of operating over the frequency range of 500MHz to 18GHz, and can rapidly switch between varying frequencies and attenuation levels.

  4. Mid-infrared laser phase-locking to a remote near-infrared frequency reference for high-precision molecular spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanteau, B.; Lopez, O.; Zhang, W.; Nicolodi, D.; Argence, B.; Auguste, F.; Abgrall, M.; Chardonnet, C.; Santarelli, G.; Darquié, B.; Le Coq, Y.; Amy-Klein, A.

    2013-07-01

    We present a method for accurate mid-infrared frequency measurements and stabilization to a near-infrared ultra-stable frequency reference, transmitted with a long-distance fibre link and continuously monitored against state-of-the-art atomic fountain clocks. As a first application, we measure the frequency of an OsO4 rovibrational molecular line around 10 μm with an uncertainty of 8 × 10-13. We also demonstrate the frequency stabilization of a mid-infrared laser with fractional stability better than 4 × 10-14 at 1 s averaging time and a linewidth below 17 Hz. This new stabilization scheme gives us the ability to transfer frequency stability in the range of 10-15 or even better, currently accessible in the near infrared or in the visible, to mid-infrared lasers in a wide frequency range.

  5. Engineering Graphene Conductivity for Flexible and High-Frequency Applications.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Alexander J; Carey, J David

    2015-10-14

    Advances in lightweight, flexible, and conformal electronic devices depend on materials that exhibit high electrical conductivity coupled with high mechanical strength. Defect-free graphene is one such material that satisfies both these requirements and which offers a range of attractive and tunable electrical, optoelectronic, and plasmonic characteristics for devices that operate at microwave, terahertz, infrared, or optical frequencies. Essential to the future success of such devices is therefore the ability to control the frequency-dependent conductivity of graphene. Looking to accelerate the development of high-frequency applications of graphene, here we demonstrate how readily accessible and processable organic and organometallic molecules can efficiently dope graphene to carrier densities in excess of 10(13) cm(-2) with conductivities at gigahertz frequencies in excess of 60 mS. In using the molecule 3,6-difluoro-2,5,7,7,8,8-hexacyanoquinodimethane (F2-HCNQ), a high charge transfer (CT) of 0.5 electrons per adsorbed molecule is calculated, resulting in p-type doping of graphene. n-Type doping is achieved using cobaltocene and the sulfur-containing molecule tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) with a CT of 0.41 and 0.24 electrons donated per adsorbed molecule, respectively. Efficient CT is associated with the interaction between the π electrons present in the molecule and in graphene. Calculation of the high-frequency conductivity shows dispersion-less behavior of the real component of the conductivity over a wide range of gigahertz frequencies. Potential high-frequency applications in graphene antennas and communications that can exploit these properties and the broader impacts of using molecular doping to modify functional materials that possess a low-energy Dirac cone are also discussed.

  6. Engineering Graphene Conductivity for Flexible and High-Frequency Applications.

    PubMed

    Samuels, Alexander J; Carey, J David

    2015-10-14

    Advances in lightweight, flexible, and conformal electronic devices depend on materials that exhibit high electrical conductivity coupled with high mechanical strength. Defect-free graphene is one such material that satisfies both these requirements and which offers a range of attractive and tunable electrical, optoelectronic, and plasmonic characteristics for devices that operate at microwave, terahertz, infrared, or optical frequencies. Essential to the future success of such devices is therefore the ability to control the frequency-dependent conductivity of graphene. Looking to accelerate the development of high-frequency applications of graphene, here we demonstrate how readily accessible and processable organic and organometallic molecules can efficiently dope graphene to carrier densities in excess of 10(13) cm(-2) with conductivities at gigahertz frequencies in excess of 60 mS. In using the molecule 3,6-difluoro-2,5,7,7,8,8-hexacyanoquinodimethane (F2-HCNQ), a high charge transfer (CT) of 0.5 electrons per adsorbed molecule is calculated, resulting in p-type doping of graphene. n-Type doping is achieved using cobaltocene and the sulfur-containing molecule tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) with a CT of 0.41 and 0.24 electrons donated per adsorbed molecule, respectively. Efficient CT is associated with the interaction between the π electrons present in the molecule and in graphene. Calculation of the high-frequency conductivity shows dispersion-less behavior of the real component of the conductivity over a wide range of gigahertz frequencies. Potential high-frequency applications in graphene antennas and communications that can exploit these properties and the broader impacts of using molecular doping to modify functional materials that possess a low-energy Dirac cone are also discussed. PMID:26387636

  7. World Wide Access: Accessible Web Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper considers the application of "universal design" principles to Web page design in order to increase accessibility for people with disabilities. Suggestions are based on the World Wide Web Consortium's accessibility initiative, which has proposed guidelines for all Web authors and federal government standards. Seven guidelines for…

  8. Synthetic range profiling in ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarek, Pawel; Lapiński, Marian; Silko, Dariusz

    2009-06-01

    The paper describes stepped frequency continuous wave (SFCW) ground penetrating radar (GPR), where signal's frequency is discretely increased in N linear steps, each separated by a fixed ▵f increment from the previous one. SFCW radar determines distance from phase shift in a reflected signal, by constructing synthetic range profile in spatial time domain using the IFFT. Each quadrature sample is termed a range bin, as it represents the signal from a range window of length cτ/2, where τ is duration of single frequency segment. IFFT of those data samples resolves the range bin in into fine range bins of c/2N▵f width, thus creating the synthetic range profile in a GPR - a time domain approximation of the frequency response of a combination of the medium through which electromagnetic waves propagates (soil) and any targets or dielectric interfaces (water, air, other types of soil) present in the beam width of the radar. In the paper, certain practical measurements done by a monostatic SFCW GPR were presented. Due to complex nature of signal source, E5062A VNA made by Agilent was used as a signal generator, allowing number of frequency steps N to go as high as 1601, with generated frequency ranging from 300kHz to 3 GHz.

  9. Frequency Standards and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, Lute

    2009-04-01

    Preface / Lute Maleki -- Symposium history / Jacques Vanier -- Symposium photos -- pt. I. Fundamental physics. Variation of fundamental constants from the big bang to atomic clocks: theory and observations (Invited) / V. V. Flambaum and J. C. Berengut. Alpha-dot or not: comparison of two single atom optical clocks (Invited) / T. Rosenband ... [et al.]. Variation of the fine-structure constant and laser cooling of atomic dysprosium (Invited) / N. A. Leefer ... [et al.]. Measurement of short range forces using cold atoms (Invited) / F. Pereira Dos Santos ... [et al.]. Atom interferometry experiments in fundamental physics (Invited) / S. W. Chiow ... [et al.]. Space science applications of frequency standards and metrology (Invited) / M. Tinto -- pt. II. Frequency & metrology. Quantum metrology with lattice-confined ultracold Sr atoms (Invited) / A. D. Ludlow ... [et al.]. LNE-SYRTE clock ensemble: new [symbol]Rb hyperfine frequency measurement - spectroscopy of [symbol]Hg optical clock transition (Invited) / M. Petersen ... [et al.]. Precise measurements of S-wave scattering phase shifts with a juggling atomic clock (Invited) / S. Gensemer ... [et al.]. Absolute frequency measurement of the [symbol] clock transition (Invited) / M. Chwalla ... [et al.]. The semiclassical stochastic-field/atom interaction problem (Invited) / J. Camparo. Phase and frequency noise metrology (Invited) / E. Rubiola ... [et al.]. Optical spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen for an improved determination of the Rydberg constant / J. L. Flowers ... [et al.] -- pt. III. Clock applications in space. Recent progress on the ACES mission (Invited) / L. Cacciapuoti and C. Salomon. The SAGAS mission (Invited) / P. Wolf. Small mercury microwave ion clock for navigation and radioScience (Invited) / J. D. Prestage ... [et al.]. Astro-comb: revolutionizing precision spectroscopy in astrophysics (Invited) / C. E. Kramer ... [et al.]. High frequency very long baseline interferometry: frequency standards and

  10. Range indices of geomagnetic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, W.F.; Green, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    The simplest index of geomagnetic activity is the range in nT from maximum to minimum value of the field in a given time interval. The hourly range R was recommended by IAGA for use at observatories at latitudes greater than 65??, but was superceded by AE. The most used geomagnetic index K is based on the range of activity in a 3 h interval corrected for the regular daily variation. In order to take advantage of real time data processing, now available at many observatories, it is proposed to introduce a 1 h range index and also a 3 h range index. Both will be computed hourly, i.e. each will have a series of 24 per day, the 3 h values overlapping. The new data will be available as the range (R) of activity in nT and also as a logarithmic index (I) of the range. The exponent relating index to range in nT is based closely on the scale used for computing K values. The new ranges and range indices are available, from June 1987, to users in real time and can be accessed by telephone connection or computer network. Their first year of production is regarded as a trial period during which their value to the scientific and commercial communities will be assessed, together with their potential as indicators of regional and global disturbances' and in which trials will be conducted into ways of eliminating excessive bias at quiet times due to the rate of change of the daily variation field. ?? 1988.

  11. Open Access Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Open access publishing is a hot topic today. But open access publishing can have many different definitions, and pros and cons vary with the definitions. Open access publishing is especially attractive to companies and small colleges or universities that are likely to have many more readers than authors. A downside is that a membership fee sounds…

  12. [Accessible Rural Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Nick, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This issue of the quarterly newsletter "Rural Exchange" provides information and resources on accessible rural housing for the disabled. "Accessible Manufactured Housing Could Increase Rural Home Supply" (Nick Baker) suggests that incorporation of access features such as lever door handles and no-step entries into manufactured housing could help…

  13. Demystifying Remote Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Grant

    2009-01-01

    With money tight, more and more districts are considering remote access as a way to reduce expenses and budget information technology costs more effectively. Remote access allows staff members to work with a hosted software application from any school campus without being tied to a specific physical location. Each school can access critical…

  14. Open Access and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Shawn; Schmidt, Christian; Das, Chhaya; Tucker, Philip W

    2006-01-01

    Uncensored exchange of scientific results hastens progress. Open Access does not stop at the removal of price and permission barriers; still, censorship and reading disabilities, to name a few, hamper access to information. Here, we invite the scientific community and the public to discuss new methods to distribute, store and manage literature in order to achieve unfettered access to literature. PMID:16956402

  15. Reflective Database Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lars E.

    2009-01-01

    "Reflective Database Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a database privilege is expressed as a database query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of database access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…

  16. 75 FR 81284 - Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology... of High Frequency (HF) and Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Sound Navigation and Ranging (SONAR) Technology... in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Background and Purpose...

  17. Frequency metrology using highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.

    2016-06-01

    Due to the scaling laws of relativistic fine structure splitting, many forbidden optical transitions appear within the ground state configurations of highly charged ions (HCI). In some hydrogen-like ions, even the hyperfine splitting of the 1s ground state gives rise to optical transitions. Given the very low polarizability of HCI, such laser-accessible transitions are extremely impervious to external perturbations and systematics that limit optical clock performance and arise from AC and DC Stark effects, such as black-body radiation and light shifts. Moreover, AC and DC Zeeman splitting are symmetric due to the much larger relativistic spin-orbit coupling and corresponding fine-structure splitting. Appropriate choice of states or magnetic sub-states with suitable total angular momentum and magnetic quantum numbers can lead to a cancellation of residual quadrupolar shifts. All these properties are very advantageous for the proposed use of HCI forbidden lines as optical frequency standards. Extremely magnified relativistic, quantum electrodynamic, and nuclear size contributions to the binding energies of the optically active electrons make HCI ideal tools for fundamental research, as in proposed studies of a possible time variation of the fine structure constant. Beyond this, HCI that cannot be photoionized by vacuum-ultraviolet photons could also provide frequency standards for future lasers operating in that range.

  18. 47 CFR 15.607 - Equipment authorization of Access BPL equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Equipment authorization of Access BPL equipment. 15.607 Section 15.607 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Access Broadband Over Power Line (Access BPL) § 15.607 Equipment authorization of Access...

  19. 47 CFR 15.607 - Equipment authorization of Access BPL equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment authorization of Access BPL equipment. 15.607 Section 15.607 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Access Broadband Over Power Line (Access BPL) § 15.607 Equipment authorization of Access...

  20. Online Access to Mental Health Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Barbara A.

    1982-01-01

    Presents overview of commercially available databases useful to field of mental health. The availability, costs, coverage, currency, update frequency, and access points are compared for four major files--PsychINFO, National Clearinghouse for Mental Health Information, Social SciSearch, and MEDLINE. Forty-nine references are provided. (EJS)