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Sample records for accessible pore volume

  1. Estimation and modeling of coal pore accessibility using small angle neutron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Rui; Liu, Shimin; Bahadur, Jitendra; ...

    2015-09-04

    Gas diffusion in coal is controlled by nano-structure of the pores. The interconnectivity of pores not only determines the dynamics of gas transport in the coal matrix but also influences the mechanical strength. In this study, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was employed to quantify pore accessibility for two coal samples, one of sub-bituminous rank and the other of anthracite rank. Moreover, a theoretical pore accessibility model was proposed based on scattering intensities under both vacuum and zero average contrast (ZAC) conditions. Our results show that scattering intensity decreases with increasing gas pressure using deuterated methane (CD4) at low Qmore » values for both coals. Pores smaller than 40 nm in radius are less accessible for anthracite than sub-bituminous coal. On the contrary, when the pore radius is larger than 40 nm, the pore accessibility of anthracite becomes larger than that of sub-bituminous coal. Only 20% of pores are accessible to CD4 for anthracite and 37% for sub-bituminous coal, where the pore radius is 16 nm. For these two coals, pore accessibility and pore radius follows a power-law relationship.« less

  2. Estimation and modeling of coal pore accessibility using small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rui; Liu, Shimin; Bahadur, Jitendra; Elsworth, Derek; Melnichenko, Yuri; He, Lilin; Wang, Yi

    2015-09-04

    Gas diffusion in coal is controlled by nano-structure of the pores. The interconnectivity of pores not only determines the dynamics of gas transport in the coal matrix but also influences the mechanical strength. In this study, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was employed to quantify pore accessibility for two coal samples, one of sub-bituminous rank and the other of anthracite rank. Moreover, a theoretical pore accessibility model was proposed based on scattering intensities under both vacuum and zero average contrast (ZAC) conditions. Our results show that scattering intensity decreases with increasing gas pressure using deuterated methane (CD4) at low Q values for both coals. Pores smaller than 40 nm in radius are less accessible for anthracite than sub-bituminous coal. On the contrary, when the pore radius is larger than 40 nm, the pore accessibility of anthracite becomes larger than that of sub-bituminous coal. Only 20% of pores are accessible to CD4 for anthracite and 37% for sub-bituminous coal, where the pore radius is 16 nm. For these two coals, pore accessibility and pore radius follows a power-law relationship.

  3. Derivation of Archie's' law based on a fractal pore volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongtao; Liu, Tangyan

    2017-03-01

    The geometrical mechanism behind Archie's law has been extensively investigated for many years, but is as yet inadequately understood. In this research, we present a straight-forward theoretical derivation revealing that the geometrical mechanism behind Archie's law is well represented in terms of a fractal pore volume. This representation is verified by the results of numerical simulations of the electrical conductivity obtained from deterministic fractal models. The derivation naturally suggests some new physical interpretations for Archie's parameters. It is revealed that the fractal building process determines the values of the cementation exponent and the prefactor. In addition, the prefactor is also determined by the initial states of the porosity and formation factor, which together define the initial state of the fractal building process.

  4. NASA thesaurus. Volume 2: Access vocabulary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The access vocabulary, which is essentially a permuted index, provides access to any word or number in authorized postable and nonpostable terms. Additional entries include postable and nonpostable terms, other word entries and pseudo-multiword terms that are permutations of words that contain words within words. The access vocabulary contains almost 42,000 entries that give increased access to the hierarchies in Volume 1 - Hierarchical Listing.

  5. NASA Thesaurus. Volume 2: Access vocabulary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Access Vocabulary, which is essentially a permuted index, provides access to any word or number in authorized postable and nonpostable terms. Additional entries include postable and nonpostable terms, other word entries, and pseudo-multiword terms that are permutations of words that contain words within words. The Access Vocabulary contains, 40,661 entries that give increased access to he hierarchies in Volume 1 - Hierarchical Listing.

  6. NASA thesaurus. Volume 2: Access vocabulary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Access Vocabulary, which is essentially a permuted index, provides access to any word or number in authorized postable and nonpostable terms. Additional entries include postable and nonpostable terms, other word entries, and pseudo-multiword terms that are permutations of words that contain words within words. The Access Vocabulary contains 40,738 entries that give increased access to the hierarchies in Volume 1 - Hierarchical Listing.

  7. Idealized Shale Sorption Isotherm Measurements to Determine Pore Volume, Pore Size Distribution, and Surface Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, R.; Wang, B.; Aljama, H.; Rupp, E.; Wilcox, J.

    2014-12-01

    One method for mitigating the impacts of anthropogenic CO2-related climate change is the sequestration of CO2 in depleted gas and oil reservoirs, including shale. The accurate characterization of the heterogeneous material properties of shale, including pore volume, surface area, pore size distributions (PSDs) and composition is needed to understand the interaction of CO2 with shale. Idealized powdered shale sorption isotherms were created by varying incremental amounts of four essential components by weight. The first two components, organic carbon and clay, have been shown to be the most important components for CO2 uptake in shales. Organic carbon was represented by kerogen isolated from a Silurian shale, and clay groups were represented by illite from the Green River shale formation. The rest of the idealized shale was composed of equal parts by weight of SiO2 to represent quartz and CaCO3 to represent carbonate components. Baltic, Eagle Ford, and Barnett shale sorption measurements were used to validate the idealized samples. The idealized and validation shale sorption isotherms were measured volumetrically using low pressure N2 (77K) and CO2 (273K) adsorbates on a Quantachrome Autosorb IQ2. Gravimetric isotherms were also produced for a subset of these samples using CO2 and CH4adsorbates under subsurface temperature and pressure conditions using a Rubotherm magnetic suspension balance. Preliminary analyses were inconclusive in validating the idealized samples. This could be a result of conflicting reports of total organic carbon (TOC) content in each sample, a problem stemming from the heterogeneity of the samples and different techniques used for measuring TOC content. The TOC content of the validation samples (Eagle Ford and Barnett) was measured by Rock-Eval pyrolysis at Weatherford Laboratories, while the TOC content in the Baltic validation samples was determined by LECO TOC. Development of a uniform process for measuring TOC in the validation samples is

  8. NASA Thesaurus. Volume 2: Access vocabulary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The NASA Thesaurus -- Volume 2, Access Vocabulary -- contains an alphabetical listing of all Thesaurus terms (postable and nonpostable) and permutations of all multiword and pseudo-multiword terms. Also included are Other Words (non-Thesaurus terms) consisting of abbreviations, chemical symbols, etc. The permutations and Other Words provide 'access' to the appropriate postable entries in the Thesaurus.

  9. Unified method for the total pore volume and pore size distribution of hierarchical zeolites from argon adsorption and mercury intrusion.

    PubMed

    Kenvin, Jeffrey; Jagiello, Jacek; Mitchell, Sharon; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-02-03

    A generalized approach to determine the complete distribution of macropores, mesopores, and micropores from argon adsorption and mercury porosimetry is developed and validated for advanced zeolite catalysts with hierarchically structured pore systems in powder and shaped forms. Rather than using a fragmented approach of simple overlays from individual techniques, a unified approach that utilizes a kernel constructed from model isotherms and model intrusion curves is used to calculate the complete pore size distribution and the total pore volume of the material. An added benefit of a single full-range pore size distribution is that the cumulative pore area and the area distribution are also obtained without the need for additional modeling. The resulting complete pore size distribution and the kernel accurately model both the adsorption isotherm and the mercury porosimetry. By bridging the data analysis of two primary characterization tools, this methodology fills an existing gap in the library of familiar methods for porosity assessment in the design of materials with multilevel porosity for novel technological applications.

  10. State-dependent access of anions to the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Mohammad; Linsdell, Paul

    2008-03-07

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is gated by intracellular factors; however, conformational changes in the channel pore associated with channel activation have not been identified. We have used patch clamp recording to investigate the state-dependent accessibility of substituted cysteine residues in the CFTR channel pore to a range of cysteine-reactive reagents applied to the extracellular side of the membrane. Using functional modification of the channel current-voltage relationship as a marker of modification, we find that several positively charged reagents are able to penetrate deeply into the pore from the outside irrespective of whether or not the channels have been activated. In contrast, access of three anionic cysteine-reactive reagents, the methanesulfonate sodium (2-sulfonatoethyl)methanesulfonate, the organic mercurial p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid, and the permeant anion Au(CN)(2)(-), to several different sites in the pore is strictly limited prior to channel activation. This suggests that in nonactivated channels some ion selectivity mechanism exists to exclude anions yet permit cations into the channel pore from the extracellular solution. We suggest that activation of CFTR channels involves a conformational change in the pore that removes a strong selectivity against anion entry from the extracellular solution. We propose further that this conformational change occurs in advance of channel opening, suggesting that multiple distinct closed pore conformations exist.

  11. Key role of the pore volume of zeolite for selective production of propylene from olefins.

    PubMed

    Koyama, To-ru; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Horie, Hironori; Kawauchi, Susumu; Matsumoto, Akihiko; Iwase, Yasuyoshi; Sakamoto, Yasuharu; Miyaji, Akimitsu; Motokura, Ken; Baba, Toshihide

    2010-03-20

    A plausible reaction mechanism for propylene (C(3)H(6)) production from ethylene (C(2)H(4)) was investigated, based on the amounts of effluent hydrocarbons and hydrocarbons produced in the pores of SAPO-34. Propylene was produced via an oligomerization-cracking mechanism. On the basis of this mechanism, the conversions of C(2)H(4), pentenes, and hexenes were examined. The catalytic performance was compared, in order to investigate the role of the pore volume of zeolites with 8-, 10-, and 12-membered rings in the selective production of C(3)H(6). The selectivity for C(3)H(6) was crucially dependent upon the pore volume of the zeolite. Highly selective production of C(3)H(6) from olefins (C(2)H(4), pentenes, and hexenes) can be accomplished by employing a new concept: adjusting the pore volume of a zeolite to accommodate the volume of an olefin and/or its carbenium cations, as opposed to a conventional molecular sieve approach. For example, an unimolecular cracking of pentenes into C(3)H(6) and C(2)H(4) involving primary cations can be controlled by the pore volume of a zeolite.

  12. State-independent intracellular access of quaternary ammonium blockers to the pore of TREK-1.

    PubMed

    Rapedius, Markus; Schmidt, Matthias R; Sharma, Chetan; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Sansom, Mark S P; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Tucker, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that TREK-1 gating by internal pH and pressure occurs close to or within the selectivity filter. These conclusions were based upon kinetic measurements of high-affinity block by quaternary ammonium (QA) ions that appeared to exhibit state-independent accessibility to their binding site within the pore. Intriguingly, recent crystal structures of two related K2P potassium channels were also both found to be open at the helix bundle crossing. However, this did not exclude the possibility of gating at the bundle crossing and it was suggested that side-fenestrations within these structures might allow state-independent access of QA ions to their binding site. In this addendum to our original study we demonstrate that even hydrophobic QA ions do not access the TREK-1 pore via these fenestrations. Furthermore, by using a chemically reactive QA ion immobilized within the pore via covalent cysteine modification we provide additional evidence that the QA binding site remains accessible to the cytoplasm in the closed state. These results support models of K2P channel gating which occur close to or within the selectivity filter and do not involve closure at the helix bundle crossing.

  13. Fungal colonization in soils with different management histories: modeling growth in three-dimensional pore volumes.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, Alexandra; Falconer, Ruth E; Grinev, Dmitri; Otten, Wilfred

    2011-06-01

    Despite the importance of fungi in soil functioning they have received comparatively little attention, and our understanding of fungal interactions and communities is lacking. This study aims to combine a physiologically based model of fungal growth with digitized images of internal pore volume of samples of undisturbed soil from contrasting management practices to determine the effect of physical structure on fungal growth dynamics. We quantified pore geometries of the undisturbed-soil samples from two contrasting agricultural practices, conventionally plowed (chisel plow) (CT) and no till (NT), and from native-species vegetation land use on land that was taken out of production in 1989 (NS). Then we modeled invasion of a fungal species within the soil samples and evaluated the role of soil structure on the progress of fungal colonization of the soil pore space. The size of the studied pores was > or =110 microm. The dynamics of fungal invasion was quantified through parameters of a mathematical model fitted to the fungal invasion curves. Results indicated that NT had substantially lower porosity and connectivity than CT and NS soils. For example, the largest connected pore volume occupied 79% and 88% of pore space in CT and NS treatments, respectively, while it only occupied 45% in NT. Likewise, the proportion of pore space available to fungal colonization was much greater in NS and CT than in NT treatment, and the dynamics of the fungal invasion differed among the treatments. The relative rate of fungal invasion at the onset of simulation was higher in NT samples, while the invasion followed a more sigmoidal pattern with relatively slow invasion rates at the initial time steps in NS and CT samples. Simulations allowed us to elucidate the contribution of physical structure to the rates and magnitudes of fungal invasion processes. It appeared that fragmented pore space disadvantaged fungal invasion in soils under long-term no-till, while large connected pores in

  14. A USANS/SANS study of the accessibility of pores in the Barnett Shale to methane and water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Sakurovs, Richard; Blach, Tomasz P.; He, Lilin; Melnichenko, Yuri B.; Mildner, David F.; Alcantar-Lopez, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Shale is an increasingly important source of natural gas in the United States. The gas is held in fine pores that need to be accessed by horizontal drilling and hydrofracturing techniques. Understanding the nature of the pores may provide clues to making gas extraction more efficient. We have investigated two Mississippian Barnett Shale samples, combining small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS) to determine the pore size distribution of the shale over the size range 10 nm to 10 μm. By adding deuterated methane (CD4) and, separately, deuterated water (D2O) to the shale, we have identified the fraction of pores that are accessible to these compounds over this size range. The total pore size distribution is essentially identical for the two samples. At pore sizes >250 nm, >85% of the pores in both samples are accessible to both CD4 and D2O. However, differences in accessibility to CD4 are observed in the smaller pore sizes (~25 nm). In one sample, CD4 penetrated the smallest pores as effectively as it did the larger ones. In the other sample, less than 70% of the smallest pores (4, but they were still largely penetrable by water, suggesting that small-scale heterogeneities in methane accessibility occur in the shale samples even though the total porosity does not differ. An additional study investigating the dependence of scattered intensity with pressure of CD4 allows for an accurate estimation of the pressure at which the scattered intensity is at a minimum. This study provides information about the composition of the material immediately surrounding the pores. Most of the accessible (open) pores in the 25 nm size range can be associated with either mineral matter or high reflectance organic material. However, a complementary scanning electron microscopy investigation shows that most of the pores in these shale samples are contained in the organic components. The neutron scattering results indicate that the pores are

  15. Surface area and volume fraction of random open-pore systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, H.; Elsner, A.; Stoyan, D.

    2013-12-01

    For the first time, explicit approximate formulas are presented for the volume fraction and specific surface area of random open-pore systems with poly-disperse pore size distributions. It is shown that the formulas are valid for broad classes of models for porous media characterized by tunable pore size distributions and a variable degree of inter-penetrability of pores. The formulas for the poly-disperse case are based on expressions derived previously for mono-disperse penetrable-sphere models. The results are obtained by analysis of a series of open-pore models, which are prepared by computer simulation of systems of randomly packed partially penetrable spheres with various poly-disperse size distributions such as gamma, lognormal, and Gaussian. The formulas are applied in a study of atomic layer deposition processes on open-pore systems, and the effective Young's modulus and the effective thermal conductivity of Al2O3 coated porous polypropylene electrodes for lithium ion batteries are predicted.

  16. Ion access pathway to the transmembrane pore in P2X receptor channels

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Janice L.; Li, Mufeng; Silberberg, Shai D.

    2011-01-01

    P2X receptors are trimeric cation channels that open in response to the binding of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to a large extracellular domain. The x-ray structure of the P2X4 receptor from zebrafish (zfP2X4) receptor reveals that the extracellular vestibule above the gate opens to the outside through lateral fenestrations, providing a potential pathway for ions to enter and exit the pore. The extracellular region also contains a void at the central axis, providing a second potential pathway. To investigate the energetics of each potential ion permeation pathway, we calculated the electrostatic free energy by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation along each of these pathways in the zfP2X4 crystal structure and a homology model of rat P2X2 (rP2X2). We found that the lateral fenestrations are energetically favorable for monovalent cations even in the closed-state structure, whereas the central pathway presents strong electrostatic barriers that would require structural rearrangements to allow for ion accessibility. To probe ion accessibility along these pathways in the rP2X2 receptor, we investigated the modification of introduced Cys residues by methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents and constrained structural changes by introducing disulfide bridges. Our results show that MTS reagents can permeate the lateral fenestrations, and that these become larger after ATP binding. Although relatively small MTS reagents can access residues in one of the vestibules within the central pathway, no reactive positions were identified in the upper region of this pathway, and disulfide bridges that constrain movements in that region do not prevent ion conduction. Collectively, these results suggest that ions access the pore using the lateral fenestrations, and that these breathe as the channel opens. The accessibility of ions to one of the chambers in the central pathway likely serves a regulatory function. PMID:21624948

  17. NASA Thesaurus. Volume 1: Hierarchical listing. Volume 2: Access vocabulary. Volume 3: Definitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    There are over 17,500 postable terms and some 4,000 nonpostable terms approved for use in the NASA Scientific and Technical Information Database in the Hierarchical Listing of the NASA Thesaurus. The generic structure is presented for many terms. The broader term and narrower term relationships are shown in an indented fashion that illustrates the generic structure better than the more widely used BT and NT listings. Related terms are generously applied, thus enhancing the usefulness of the Hierarchical Listing. Greater access to the Hierarchical Listing may be achieved with the collateral use of Volume 2 - Access Vocabulary and Volume 3 - Definitions.

  18. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 9.

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    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  19. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 4.

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    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  20. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 21 .

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    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  1. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  2. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 9.

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    "Access" is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

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    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

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    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

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    "Access" is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

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    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

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  1. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 5.

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    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  3. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 7.

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  4. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 17.

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    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  5. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 19.

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    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  6. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 1.

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    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  7. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 4.

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    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  8. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 3.

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    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  9. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 2.

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    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  10. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service covering published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  11. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  12. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  13. Prediction of Shrinkage Pore Volume Fraction Using a Dimensionless Niyama Criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Kent D.; Beckermann, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented to use a dimensionless form of the well-known Niyama criterion to directly predict the amount of shrinkage porosity that forms during solidification of metal alloy castings. The main advancement offered by this method is that it avoids the need to know the threshold Niyama value below which shrinkage porosity forms; such threshold values are generally unknown and alloy dependent. The dimensionless criterion accounts for both the local thermal conditions (as in the original Niyama criterion) and the properties and solidification characteristics of the alloy. Once a dimensionless Niyama criterion value is obtained from casting simulation results, the corresponding shrinkage pore volume fraction can be determined knowing only the solid fraction-temperature curve and the total solidification shrinkage of the alloy. Curves providing the shrinkage pore volume percentage as a function of the dimensionless Niyama criterion are given for WCB steel, aluminum alloy A356, and magnesium alloy AZ91D. The present method is used in a general-purpose casting simulation software package to predict shrinkage porosity in three-dimensional (3-D) castings. Comparisons between simulated and experimental shrinkage porosity results for a WCB steel plate casting demonstrate that this method can reasonably predict shrinkage. Additional simulations for magnesium alloy AZ91D illustrate that this method is applicable to a wide variety of alloys and casting conditions.

  14. RACBVHs: random-accessible compressed bounding volume hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Joon; Moon, Bochang; Kim, Duksu; Yoon, Sung-Eui

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel compressed bounding volume hierarchy (BVH) representation, random-accessible compressed bounding volume hierarchies (RACBVHs), for various applications requiring random access on BVHs of massive models. Our RACBVH representation is compact and transparently supports random access on the compressed BVHs without decompressing the whole BVH. To support random access on our compressed BVHs, we decompose a BVH into a set of clusters. Each cluster contains consecutive bounding volume (BV) nodes in the original layout of the BVH. Also, each cluster is compressed separately from other clusters and serves as an access point to the RACBVH representation. We provide the general BVH access API to transparently access our RACBVH representation. At runtime, our decompression framework is guaranteed to provide correct BV nodes without decompressing the whole BVH. Also, our method is extended to support parallel random access that can utilize the multicore CPU architecture. Our method can achieve up to a 12:1 compression ratio, and more importantly, can decompress 4.2 M BV nodes ({=}135 {\\rm MB}) per second by using a single CPU-core. To highlight the benefits of our approach, we apply our method to two different applications: ray tracing and collision detection. We can improve the runtime performance by more than a factor of 4 as compared to using the uncompressed original data. This improvement is a result of the fast decompression performance and reduced data access time by selectively fetching and decompressing small regions of the compressed BVHs requested by applications.

  15. Relevance of Pore Structure and Diffusion-Accessible Porosity for Calcium-Bromide Diffusion in Na-Montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnacher, R. M.; Davis, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Bentonite is an important hydraulic barrier material in many geotechnical applications, such as geosynthetic clay liners at solid waste landfills, or as proposed backfill material in engineered barrier systems at nuclear waste repositories. The limited permeability of bentonite is at least partially the result of its low porosity and the swelling of Na-montmorillonite, its major mineralogical component, in water. Due to these characteristics, the transport of contaminants through bentonite layers is expected to be limited and dominated by diffusion processes. In bentonite, the majority of the connected porosity is associated with montmorillonite particles, which consist of stacks of negatively-charged smectite layers. As a result, compacted smectite has two types of porosities: (1) large pores between clay particles, where diffusion is less affected by electric-double-layer forces, and (2) very thin interlayer spaces within individual clay particles, where diffusion is strongly impacted by surface charge and ionic strength. As diffusion is expected to take place differently in these two volumes, this essentially creates two 'small-scale diffusion pathways', where each may become dominant under different system conditions. Furthermore, for surface-reactive solutes, these two porous regimes differ with regards to surface complexation reactions. Electrostatic and hydration forces only are thought to govern interlayer binding, whereas chemical bonding with surface ligands is dominant for reactions at edge sites of layered clay particles and for iron oxide nanoparticles on outer basal planes. In this presentation, we will demonstrate the relevance of clay pore structure and diffusion-accessible porosity for solute diffusion rates, and hence, contaminant mobility in bentonites. First, we will discuss the effects of chemical solution conditions on montmorillonite properties, such as clay surface charge, diffusion-accessible porosity, clay tortuosity and constrictivity

  16. Role of tentacles and protein loading on pore accessibility and mass transfer in cation exchange materials for proteins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Helen; Coquebert de Neuville, Bertrand; Storti, Giuseppe; Morbidelli, Massimo; Joehnck, Matthias; Schulte, Michael

    2013-04-12

    In protein chromatography, the size of the protein determines which fraction of pores it can access within a resin and at which rate of diffusion. Moreover, in the presence of grafted polymers like in advanced materials, adsorbed proteins and electrolytes complicate the interaction pore-protein. In this study, we evaluated in a comparative way the behavior of Fractogel EMD SO3 (M) and (S), "tentacle"-type, strong cation exchangers, as well as a reference material without tentacles, all of which are commonly used for protein purification. ISEC experiments were carried out with a set of Dextran tracers of largely different molecular size covering the typical range of protein sizes. Experimental values of porosity (internal and external to the particles) as well as of pore diffusion coefficients have been measured at different NaCl concentrations and under protein loading. These results provide useful insights into the complex interplay among mentioned factors: first, the presence of tentacles induces size exclusion selectivity in the materials; second, the salt induces conformational changes of the tentacles, leading to porosities larger than expected in tentacle materials; third, protein adsorption mainly leads to a reduction of porosity due to pore space occupied by the protein and to a decrease of pore diffusion coefficient.

  17. Characterization of the intragranular water regime within subsurface sediments: pore volume, surface area, and mass transfer limitations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hay, Michael B.; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Davis, James A.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Although "intragranular" pore space within grain aggregates, grain fractures, and mineral surface coatings may contain a relatively small fraction of the total porosity within a porous medium, it often contains a significant fraction of the reactive surface area, and can thus strongly affect the transport of sorbing solutes. In this work, we demonstrate a batch experiment procedure using tritiated water as a high-resolution diffusive tracer to characterize the intragranular pore space. The method was tested using uranium-contaminated sediments from the vadose and capillary fringe zones beneath the former 300A process ponds at the Hanford site (Washington). Sediments were contacted with tracers in artificial groundwater, followed by a replacement of bulk solution with tracer-free groundwater and the monitoring of tracer release. From these data, intragranular pore volumes were calculated and mass transfer rates were quantified using a multirate first-order mass transfer model. Tritium-hydrogen exchange on surface hydroxyls was accounted for by conducting additional tracer experiments on sediment that was vacuum dried after reaction. The complementary ("wet" and "dry") techniques allowed for the simultaneous determination of intragranular porosity and surface area using tritium. The Hanford 300A samples exhibited intragranular pore volumes of ~1% of the solid volume and intragranular surface areas of ~20%–35% of the total surface area. Analogous experiments using bromide ion as a tracer yielded very different results, suggesting very little penetration of bromide into the intragranular porosity.

  18. Characterization of the intragranular water regime within subsurface sediments: Pore volume, surface area, and mass transfer limitations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hay, M.B.; Stoliker, D.L.; Davis, J.A.; Zachara, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Although "intragranular" pore space within grain aggregates, grain fractures, and mineral surface coatings may contain a relatively small fraction of the total porosity within a porous medium, it often contains a significant fraction of the reactive surface area, and can thus strongly affect the transport of sorbing solutes. In this work, we demonstrate a batch experiment procedure using tritiated water as a high-resolution diffusive tracer to characterize the intragranular pore space. The method was tested using uranium-contaminated sediments from the vadose and capillary fringe zones beneath the former 300A process ponds at the Hanford site (Washington). Sediments were contacted with tracers in artificial groundwater, followed by a replacement of bulk solution with tracer-free groundwater and the monitoring of tracer release. From these data, intragranular pore volumes were calculated and mass transfer rates were quantified using a multirate first-order mass transfer model. Tritium-hydrogen exchange on surface hydroxyls was accounted for by conducting additional tracer experiments on sediment that was vacuum dried after reaction. The complementary ("wet" and "dry") techniques allowed for the simultaneous determination of intragranular porosity and surface area using tritium. The Hanford 300A samples exhibited intragranular pore volumes of ???1% of the solid volume and intragranular surface areas of ???20%-35% of the total surface area. Analogous experiments using bromide ion as a tracer yielded very different results, suggesting very little penetration of bromide into the intragranular porosity. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Pore-scale simulations of drainage in granular materials: Finite size effects and the representative elementary volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chao; Chareyre, Bruno; Darve, Félix

    2016-09-01

    A pore-scale model is introduced for two-phase flow in dense packings of polydisperse spheres. The model is developed as a component of a more general hydromechanical coupling framework based on the discrete element method, which will be elaborated in future papers and will apply to various processes of interest in soil science, in geomechanics and in oil and gas production. Here the emphasis is on the generation of a network of pores mapping the void space between spherical grains, and the definition of local criteria governing the primary drainage process. The pore space is decomposed by Regular Triangulation, from which a set of pores connected by throats are identified. A local entry capillary pressure is evaluated for each throat, based on the balance of capillary pressure and surface tension at equilibrium. The model reflects the possible entrapment of disconnected patches of the receding wetting phase. It is validated by a comparison with drainage experiments. In the last part of the paper, a series of simulations are reported to illustrate size and boundary effects, key questions when studying small samples made of spherical particles be it in simulations or experiments. Repeated tests on samples of different sizes give evolution of water content which are not only scattered but also strongly biased for small sample sizes. More than 20,000 spheres are needed to reduce the bias on saturation below 0.02. Additional statistics are generated by subsampling a large sample of 64,000 spheres. They suggest that the minimal sampling volume for evaluating saturation is one hundred times greater that the sampling volume needed for measuring porosity with the same accuracy. This requirement in terms of sample size induces a need for efficient computer codes. The method described herein has a low algorithmic complexity in order to satisfy this requirement. It will be well suited to further developments toward coupled flow-deformation problems in which evolution of the

  20. Dynamics of benzene vapor adsorption on carbon adsorbents having different volumes of transporting pores

    SciTech Connect

    Ivakhnyuk, G.K.; Fedorov, N.F.; Babkin, O.E.; Smetanin, G.N.; Belotserkovskii, G.M.

    1986-08-20

    To ascertain the effect of the porosity peculiarities on the benzene vapor adsorption process under dynamic conditions, a series of adsorbents was synthesized in this work from zirconium carbide. Their porous structure was studied by a traditional set of methods, viz., pycnometric, porometric, and sorption. Carbon adsorbents derived from zirconium carbide have an open-pore system of adsorbing pores which communicate directly with the outer surface. Transporting porosity of carbon adsorbents derived from zirconium carbide does not affect the mass transport processes during adsorption of benzene vapors on them under the conditions of a dynamic experiment.

  1. Final report of CCQM-K136 measurement of porosity properties (specific adsorption, BET specific surface area, specific pore volume and pore diameter) of nanoporous Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobina, E.; Zimathis, A.; Prinz, C.; Emmerling, F.; Unger, W.; de Santis Neves, R.; Galhardo, C. E.; De Robertis, E.; Wang, H.; Mizuno, K.; Kurokawa, A.

    2016-01-01

    CCQM key comparison K-136 Measurement of porosity properties (specific adsorption, BET specific surface area, specific pore volume and pore diameter) of nanoporous Al2O3 has been performed by the Surface Analysis Working Group (SAWG) of the Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance (CCQM). The objective of this key comparison is to compare the equivalency of the National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) and Designated Institutes (DIs) for the measurement of specific adsorption, BET specific surface area, specific pore volume and pore diameter) of nanoporous substances (sorbents, catalytic agents, cross-linkers, zeolites, etc) used in advanced technology. In this key comparison, a commercial sorbent (aluminum oxide) was supplied as a sample. Five NMIs participated in this key comparison. All participants used a gas adsorption method, here nitrogen adsorption at 77.3 K, for analysis according to the international standards ISO 15901-2 and 9277. In this key comparison, the degrees of equivalence uncertainties for specific adsorption, BET specific surface area, specific pore volume and pore diameter was established. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  2. Tunable Rare Earth fcu-MOF Platform: Access to Adsorption Kinetics Driven Gas/Vapor Separations via Pore Size Contraction.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dong-Xu; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Shekhah, Osama; Jiang, Hao; Adil, Karim; Cairns, Amy J; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2015-04-22

    Reticular chemistry approach was successfully employed to deliberately construct new rare-earth (RE, i.e., Eu(3+), Tb(3+), and Y(3+)) fcu metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with restricted window apertures. Controlled and selective access to the resultant contracted fcu-MOF pores permits the achievement of the requisite sorbate cutoff, ideal for selective adsorption kinetics based separation and/or molecular sieving of gases and vapors. Predetermined reaction conditions that permitted the formation in situ of the 12-connected RE hexanuclear molecular building block (MBB) and the establishment of the first RE-fcu-MOF platform, especially in the presence of 2-fluorobenzoic acid (2-FBA) as a modulator and a structure directing agent, were used to synthesize isostructural RE-1,4-NDC-fcu-MOFs based on a relatively bulkier 2-connected bridging ligand, namely 1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylate (1,4-NDC). The subsequent RE-1,4-NDC-fcu-MOF structural features, contracted windows/pores and high concentration of open metal sites combined with exceptional hydrothermal and chemical stabilities, yielded notable gas/solvent separation properties, driven mostly by adsorption kinetics as exemplified in this work for n-butane/methane, butanol/methanol, and butanol/water pair systems.

  3. Mesoporous calcium–silicon xerogels with mesopore size and pore volume influence hMSC behaviors by load and sustained release of rhBMP-2

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenhua; Li, Xiangde; Qian, Jun; Lv, Guoyu; Yan, Yonggang; Su, Jiacan; Wei, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Mesoporous calcium–silicon xerogels with a pore size of 15 nm (MCS-15) and pore volume of 1.43 cm3/g were synthesized by using 1,3,5-mesitylene (TMB) as the pore-expanding agent. The MCS-15 exhibited good degradability with the weight loss of 50 wt% after soaking in Tris-HCl solution for 56 days, which was higher than the 30 wt% loss shown by mesoporous calcium–silicon xerogels with a pore size of 4 nm (MCS-4). The pore size and pore volume of MCS-15 had significant influences on load and release of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). The MCS-15 had a higher capacity to encapsulate a large amount of rhBMP-2; it could adsorb 45 mg/g of rhBMP-2 in phosphate-buffered saline after 24 hours, which was more than twice that with MCS-4 (20 mg/g). Moreover, the MCS-15 system exhibited sustained release of rhBMP-2 as compared with MCS-4 system (showing a burst release). The MCS-15/rhBMP-2 system could promote the proliferation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells, showing good cytocompatibility and bioactivity. The results indicated that MCS-15, with larger mesopore size and higher pore volume, might be a promising carrier for loading and sustained release of rhBMP-2, which could be used as bone repair material with built-in osteoinduction function in bone reconstruction. PMID:25784801

  4. Molecular mobility with respect to accessible volume in Monte Carlo lattice model for polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diani, J.; Gilormini, P.

    2017-02-01

    A three-dimensional cubic Monte Carlo lattice model is considered to test the impact of volume on the molecular mobility of amorphous polymers. Assuming classic polymer chain dynamics, the concept of locked volume limiting the accessible volume around the polymer chains is introduced. The polymer mobility is assessed by its ability to explore the entire lattice thanks to reptation motions. When recording the polymer mobility with respect to the lattice accessible volume, a sharp mobility transition is observed as witnessed during glass transition. The model ability to reproduce known actual trends in terms of glass transition with respect to material parameters, is also tested.

  5. A two-phase debris-flow model that includes coupled evolution of volume fractions, granular dilatancy, and pore-fluid pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, David L.; Iverson, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Pore-fluid pressure plays a crucial role in debris flows because it counteracts normal stresses at grain contacts and thereby reduces intergranular friction. Pore-pressure feedback accompanying debris deformation is particularly important during the onset of debrisflow motion, when it can dramatically influence the balance of forces governing downslope acceleration. We consider further effects of this feedback by formulating a new, depth-averaged mathematical model that simulates coupled evolution of granular dilatancy, solid and fluid volume fractions, pore-fluid pressure, and flow depth and velocity during all stages of debris-flow motion. To illustrate implications of the model, we use a finite-volume method to compute one-dimensional motion of a debris flow descending a rigid, uniformly inclined slope, and we compare model predictions with data obtained in large-scale experiments at the USGS debris-flow flume. Predictions for the first 1 s of motion show that increasing pore pressures (due to debris contraction) cause liquefaction that enhances flow acceleration. As acceleration continues, however, debris dilation causes dissipation of pore pressures, and this dissipation helps stabilize debris-flow motion. Our numerical predictions of this process match experimental data reasonably well, but predictions might be improved by accounting for the effects of grain-size segregation.

  6. Sulphonic acid derivatives as probes of pore properties of volume-regulated anion channels in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Droogmans, G; Maertens, C; Prenen, J; Nilius, B

    1999-09-01

    1. We have used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to study the effects of 4-sulphonic-calixarenes and some other poly-sulphonic acid agents, such as suramin and basilen blue, on volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) currents in cultured endothelial cells (CPAE cells). 2. The 4-sulphonic-calixarenes induced a fast inhibition at positive potentials but were ineffective at negative potentials. At small positive potentials, 4-sulphonic-calix[4]arene was a more effective inhibitor than 4-sulphonic-calix[6]arene and -calix[8]arene, which became more effective at more positive potentials. 3. Also suramin and basilen blue induced a voltage dependent current inhibition, reaching a maximum around +40 mV and declining at more positive potentials. 4. The voltage dependence of inhibition was modelled by assuming that these negatively charged molecules bind to a site inside VRAC that senses a fraction delta of the applied electrical field, ranging beween 0.16 to 0.32. 4-Sulphonic-calix[4]arene, suramin and basilen blue bind and occlude VRAC at moderate potentials, but permeate the channel at more positive potentials. 4-Sulphonic-calix[6]arene and -calix[8]arene however do not permeate the channel. From the structural information of the calixarenes, we estimate a lower and upper limit of 11*12 and 17*12 A2 respectively for the cross-sectional area of the pore.

  7. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Numbers 15 and 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    "Access" is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  8. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Numbers 11 and 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  9. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Numbers 13 and 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  10. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Numbers 13 and 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  11. Accession Bulletin, Volume 1 Number 1, January 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Solid Waste Management Office.

    The purpose of this Bulletin is to list both what is being published in the world literature pertaining to solid waste management and being abstracted for input into the Solid Waste Information Retrieval System (SWIRS). SWIRS accessions cannot be all-inclusive; the holdings represent only that portion of the massive literature rapidly being…

  12. Scientific Journal Publishing: Yearly Volume and Open Access Availability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjork, Bo-Christer; Roos, Annikki; Lauri, Mari

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: We estimate the total yearly volume of peer-reviewed scientific journal articles published world-wide as well as the share of these articles available openly on the Web either directly or as copies in e-print repositories. Method: We rely on data from two commercial databases (ISI and Ulrich's Periodicals Directory) supplemented by…

  13. Preferential use of unobstructed lateral portals as the access route to the pore of human ATP-gated ion channels (P2X receptors).

    PubMed

    Samways, Damien S K; Khakh, Baljit S; Dutertre, Sébastien; Egan, Terrance M

    2011-08-16

    P2X receptors are trimeric cation channels with widespread roles in health and disease. The recent crystal structure of a P2X4 receptor provides a 3D view of their topology and architecture. A key unresolved issue is how ions gain access to the pore, because the structure reveals two different pathways within the extracellular domain. One of these is the central pathway spanning the entire length of the extracellular domain and covering a distance of ≈70 Å. The second consists of three lateral portals, adjacent to the membrane and connected to the transmembrane pore by short tunnels. Here, we demonstrate the preferential use of the lateral portals. Owing to their favorable diameters and equivalent spacing, the lateral portals split the task of ion supply threefold and minimize an ion's diffusive path before it succumbs to transmembrane electrochemical gradients.

  14. Water-soluble gases as partitioning tracers to investigate the pore volume?transmissivity correlation in a fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunati, Ivan; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2004-11-01

    Hydraulically equivalent fractures may show striking differences when a gas-migration experiment is performed because of the different correlations between transmissivity, pore volume and entry pressure. We numerically simulate gas migration between injection and extraction boreholes in a parallel plate fracture with a heterogeneous fault gouge, in a rough-walled fracture filled with homogeneous material, and in a rough-walled empty fracture. The parallel plate model and the empty model clearly show the existence of preferential paths; for high variance of the transmissivity field, gas flow takes place only in few discrete channels separated by water-saturated regions. In contrast, in the fracture filled with homogeneous fault gouge, the gas saturation is continuous and more uniformly distributed. It appears a fundamental issue to be able to discriminate in situ among conceptual models that can yield such a different gas-saturation distribution. As in practice, the saturation distribution cannot be directly observed, tracer experiments are performed to characterize a fracture. For these reasons, we simulate the transport of tracers, which are added to the gas phase as soon as quasi-steady saturation distribution and extraction rate are achieved, and we compare the breakthrough curves obtained assuming different models. Our numerical simulations suggest that discrimination among the models on the basis of single-tracer tests is unlikely. A better tool to investigate fracture properties is provided by a gas-tracer test, in which a cocktail of gases with different water solubility is employed. These gases behave as partitioning tracers and allow us to estimate the gas saturation in the fracture. Indeed, by comparison of the residence-time distributions of different gases, we are able to compute a streamline effective saturation, which is an excellent estimate of fracture saturation. In addition, the streamline effective saturation curve contains information that is

  15. An Ultrahigh Pore Volume Drives Up the Amine Stability and Cyclic CO2 Capacity of a Solid-Amine@Carbon Sorbent.

    PubMed

    Gadipelli, Srinivas; Patel, Hasmukh A; Guo, Zhengxiao

    2015-09-02

    Carbon monoliths of ultrahigh pore volume (5.35 cm(3) g(-1) ) and high surface area (2700 m(2) g(-1) ) accommodate a record high level of amine(tetraethylenepentamine), up to 5 g g(-1) within its hierarchically networked micro-/mesopores over a wide range. Thus, this solid-amine@carbon shows exceptional CO2 sorption and stable cyclic capacities at simulated flue-gas conditions.

  16. Micro-CT scan reveals an unexpected high-volume and interconnected pore network in a Cretaceous Sanagasta dinosaur eggshell.

    PubMed

    Hechenleitner, E Martín; Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Foley, Matthew; Fiorelli, Lucas E; Thompson, Michael B

    2016-03-01

    The Cretaceous Sanagasta neosauropod nesting site (La Rioja, Argentina) was the first confirmed instance of extinct dinosaurs using geothermal-generated heat to incubate their eggs. The nesting strategy and hydrothermal activities at this site led to the conclusion that the surprisingly 7 mm thick-shelled eggs were adapted to harsh hydrothermal microenvironments. We used micro-CT scans in this study to obtain the first three-dimensional microcharacterization of these eggshells. Micro-CT-based analyses provide a robust assessment of gas conductance in fossil dinosaur eggshells with complex pore canal systems, allowing calculation, for the first time, of the shell conductance through its thickness. This novel approach suggests that the shell conductance could have risen during incubation to seven times more than previously estimated as the eggshell erodes. In addition, micro-CT observations reveal that the constant widening and branching of pore canals form a complex funnel-like pore canal system. Furthermore, the high density of pore canals and the presence of a lateral canal network in the shell reduce the risks of pore obstruction during the extended incubation of these eggs in a relatively highly humid and muddy nesting environment.

  17. Micro-CT scan reveals an unexpected high-volume and interconnected pore network in a Cretaceous Sanagasta dinosaur eggshell

    PubMed Central

    Grellet-Tinner, Gerald; Foley, Matthew; Thompson, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    The Cretaceous Sanagasta neosauropod nesting site (La Rioja, Argentina) was the first confirmed instance of extinct dinosaurs using geothermal-generated heat to incubate their eggs. The nesting strategy and hydrothermal activities at this site led to the conclusion that the surprisingly 7 mm thick-shelled eggs were adapted to harsh hydrothermal microenvironments. We used micro-CT scans in this study to obtain the first three-dimensional microcharacterization of these eggshells. Micro-CT-based analyses provide a robust assessment of gas conductance in fossil dinosaur eggshells with complex pore canal systems, allowing calculation, for the first time, of the shell conductance through its thickness. This novel approach suggests that the shell conductance could have risen during incubation to seven times more than previously estimated as the eggshell erodes. In addition, micro-CT observations reveal that the constant widening and branching of pore canals form a complex funnel-like pore canal system. Furthermore, the high density of pore canals and the presence of a lateral canal network in the shell reduce the risks of pore obstruction during the extended incubation of these eggs in a relatively highly humid and muddy nesting environment. PMID:27009182

  18. The ATS Web Page Provides "Tool Boxes" for: Access Opportunities, Performance, Interfaces, Volume, Environments, "Wish List" Entry and Educational Outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Access to Space website, including information on the 'tool boxes' available on the website for access opportunities, performance, interfaces, volume, environments, 'wish list' entry, and educational outreach.

  19. Large pore volume mesoporous copper particles and scaffold microporous carbon material obtained from an inorganic-organic nanohybrid material, copper-succinate-layered hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Ghotbi, Mohammad Yeganeh; Bagheri, Narjes; Sadrnezhaad, S K

    2011-10-01

    Copper-succinate-layered hydroxide (CSLH), a new nanohybrid material, was synthesized as an inorganic-organic nanohybrid, in which organic moiety was intercalated between the layers of a single cation layered material, copper hydroxide nitrate. Microporous scaffold carbon material was obtained by thermal decomposition of the nanohybrid at 500 °C under argon atmosphere followed by acid washing process. Furthermore, the heat-treated product of the nanohybrid at 600 °C was ultrafine mesoporous metallic copper particles. The results of this study confirmed the great potential of CSLH to produce the carbon material with large surface area (580 m(2)/g) and high pore volume copper powder (2.04 cm(3)/g).

  20. The effects of bone and pore volume fraction on the mechanical properties of PMMA/bone biopsies extracted from augmented vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Kinzl, M; Boger, A; Zysset, P K; Pahr, D H

    2011-10-13

    Vertebroplasty forms a porous PMMA/bone composite which was shown to be weaker and less stiff than pure PMMA. It is not known what determines the mechanical properties of such composites in detail. This study investigated the effects of bone volume fraction (BV/TV), cement porosity (PV/(TV-BV), PV…pore volume) and cement stiffness. Nine human vertebral bodies were augmented with either standard or low-modulus PMMA cement and scanned with a HR-pQCT system before and after augmentation. Fourteen cylindrical PMMA/bone biopsies were extracted from the augmented region, scanned with a micro-CT system and tested in compression until failure. Micro-finite element (FE) models of the complete biopsies, of the trabecular bone alone as well as of the porous cement alone were generated from CT images to gain more insight into the role of bone and pores. PV/(TV-BV) and experimental moduli of standard/low-modulus cement (R(2)=0.91/0.98) as well as PV/(TV-BV) and yield stresses (R(2)=0.92/0.83) were highly correlated. No correlation between BV/TV (ranging from 0.057 to 0.138) and elastic moduli was observed (R(2)< 0.05). Interestingly, the micro-FE models of the porous cement alone reproduced the experimental elastic moduli of the standard/low-modulus cement biopsies (R(2)=0.75/0.76) more accurately than the models with bone (R(2)=0.58/0.31). In conclusion, the mechanical properties of the biopsies were mainly determined by the cement porosity and the cement material properties. The study showed that bone tissue inside the biopsies was mechanically "switched off" such that load was carried essentially by the porous PMMA.

  1. Structural Determinants of the Closed KCa3.1 Channel Pore in Relation to Channel Gating: Results from a Substituted Cysteine Accessibility Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Hélène; Garneau, Line; Banderali, Umberto; Simoes, Manuel; Parent, Lucie; Sauvé, Rémy

    2007-01-01

    In this work we address the question of the KCa3.1 channel pore structure in the closed configuration in relation to the contribution of the C-terminal end of the S6 segments to the Ca2+-dependent gating process. Our results based on SCAM (substituted cysteine accessibility method) experiments first demonstrate that the S6 transmembrane segment of the open KCa3.1 channel contains two distinct functional domains delimited by V282 with MTSEA and MTSET binding leading to a total channel inhibition at positions V275, T278, and V282 and to a steep channel activation at positions A283 and A286. The rates of modification by MTSEA (diameter 4.6 Å) of the 275C (central cavity) and 286C residues (S6 C-terminal end) for the closed channel configuration were found to differ by less than sevenfold, whereas experiments performed with the larger MTSET reagent (diameter 5.8 Å) resulted in modification rates 103–104 faster for cysteines at 286 compared with 275. Consistent with these results, the modification rates of the cavity lining 275C residue by MTSEA, Et-Hg+, and Ag+ appeared poorly state dependent, whereas modification rates by MTSET were 103 faster for the open than the closed configuration. A SCAM analysis of the channel inner vestibule in the closed state revealed in addition that cysteine residues at 286 were accessible to MTS reagents as large as MTS-PtrEA, a result supported by the observation that binding of MTSET to cysteines at positions 283 or 286 could neither sterically nor electrostatically block the access of MTSEA to the closed channel cavity (275C). It follows that the closed KCa3.1 structure can hardly be accountable by an inverted teepee-like structure as described for KcsA, but is better represented by a narrow passage centered at V282 (equivalent to V474 in Shaker) connecting the channel central cavity to the cytosolic medium. This passage would not be however restrictive to the diffusion of small reagents such as MTSEA, Et-Hg+, and Ag+, arguing

  2. Effect of pore size distribution on the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Grethlein, H.E.

    1985-02-01

    Hard and softwoods were pretreated by mild acid hydrolysis and their pore size distribution determined. Regardless of the substrate, the initial rate of hydrolysis using cellulase from Trichoderma reesei is linearly correlated with the pore volume of the substrate accessible to a nominal diameter of 51 Angstroms representative of the size of the cellulase. In contrast, crystallinity index has no relationship to the rate of hydrolysis. 21 references.

  3. Control over fuel cell performance through modulation of pore accessibility: investigation and modeling of carbon nanotubes effects on oxygen reduction at N-graphene-based nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazzazie, Dureid; Halhouli, Mohammad; Yurchenko, Olena; Urban, Gerald

    2016-11-01

    The lack of performance of graphene-based electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction (ORR) is a major concern for fuel cells which can be mastered using nanocomposites. This work is highlighted by the optimization of nitrogen(N)-doped graphene/carbon nanotubes (CNTs) nanocomposite’s ORR performance examined by galvanostatic measurements in realistically approached glucose half-cells. Obtained results mark an essential step for the development of nanocarbon-based cathodes, as we specifically evaluate the electrode performance under real fuel cell conditions. The 2D simulations exclusively represent an important approach for understanding the catalytic efficiency of the nanocomposite with unique structure. The kinetics features extracted from simulations are consistent with the experimentally determined kinetics. The morphology analysis reveals a 3D porous structure. The results demonstrate that the incorporation of CNTs implements mesoscale channels for improved mass transport and leads to efficient 4-electron transfer and enhanced overall catalytic activity in pH-neutral media. The nanocomposite shows increased specific surface area of 142 m2 g-1, positively shifted ORR onset potential of 67 mV and higher open circuit potential of 268 mV versus Ag/AgCl compared to N-graphene (11 m2 g-1, -17, 220 mV). The findings are supported by 2D simulations giving qualitative evidence to the significant role of CNTs for achieving better accessibility of pores, i.e. enabling improved transfer of oxygen and OH-, and providing more reaction sites in the nanocomposite. The nanocomposite demonstrates better ORR performance than constituent components regarding potential application in miniaturized single-compartment glucose-based fuel cells.

  4. MODIS Technical Report Series. Volume 4: MODIS data access user's guide: Scan cube format

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalb, Virginia L.; Goff, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    The software described in this document provides I/O functions to be used with Moderate Resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) level 1 and 2 data, and could be easily extended to other data sources. This data is in a scan cube data format: a 3-dimensional ragged array containing multiple bands which have resolutions ranging from 250 to 1000 meters. The complexity of the data structure is handled internally by the library. The I/O calls allow the user to access any pixel in any band through 'C' structure syntax. The high MODIS data volume (approaching half a terabyte per day) has been a driving factor in the library design. To avoid recopying data for user access, all I/O is performed through dynamic 'C' pointer manipulation. This manual contains background material on MODIS, several coding examples of library usage, in-depth discussions of each function, reference 'man' type pages, and several appendices with details of the included files used to customize a user's data product for use with the library.

  5. Accessibility

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Federal laws, including Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, mandate that people with disabilities have access to the same information that someone without a disability would have. 508 standards cover electronic and information technology (EIT) products.

  6. Synthetic chars for studies of char combustion mechanisms: Quarterly technical progress report, December 1, 1986-February 28, 1987. [The role of density, porosity, and pore volume on combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Synthetic char particles of uniform size and a variety of porous microstructures wre geerated by atomization of solutions or suspensions of a polymer of furfuryl alcohol in acetone with added pore formers. Several types of particle swere generated and characterized. BET surface areas of the various chars are also reported. Surace areas are seen to vary by more than two orders of magnitude, with the carbon black containing material being by far the highest. Chars were burned in a drop tube furnace to examine the role of the porous microstructure on the oxidation kinetics. Material with carbon black was most reactive, attributed to enhanced oxygen diffusion due to the transitional pore network.

  7. The 1983 ARI Survey of Army Recruits: Tabular Description of 1983 (Active) Army Accessions. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    and graduate markets. Volume 2 reports breakdowns of each question by age at .L. contracting, geographic region, rural/urban background, term of...gender, education, ethnic group, AFQT, and high school graduate and senior markets. Volume 2 reports breakdowns of each question by age at contracting...Fund, Cash Bonus, Both, Neither). Two volumes with identical breakdowns for the 1982 DA Survey are also available (Elig, Johnson, Gade, I Hertzbach

  8. ATLAS, an integrated structural analysis and design system. Volume 4: Random access file catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, F. P., Jr. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    A complete catalog is presented for the random access files used by the ATLAS integrated structural analysis and design system. ATLAS consists of several technical computation modules which output data matrices to corresponding random access file. A description of the matrices written on these files is contained herein.

  9. Carbon turnover in pore spaces - CIPS model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuka, Katrin

    2010-05-01

    The CIPS (Carbon turnover In Pore Spaces) model has been developed to overcome the constraints of conceptual pools and to get a better insight into the nature of carbon stabilization in soil (KUKA, 2007). This pure carbon turnover model was implemented in CANDY (CArbon and Nitrogen Dynamics) model system (Franko, 1995). The CIPS model did overcome the empirical pools taking into account soil structure effects. It is based on quality driven primary stabilisation mechanism (recalcitrance of SOM) and process driven secondary stabilisation mechanism (place of turnover) of SOM in soil. In addition to the division of SOM in the qualitative pools on the basis of chemical measurability, a dependence of the turnover conditions from the location of SOM in pore space is implemented taking into account different turnover conditions in the particular pore space and the accessibility for microbial biomass. The main assumption of the CIPS model is that the biological activity is not evenly distributed through the whole pore space. The pore space classes - micro, meso and macro pores - used in the model are marked by wilting point, field capacity and pore volume as a first approach. Because of the poor aeration in the micro pores they show very low biological activity leading to a strong protection of the carbon localized in this pore space. The biological active time (BAT) concept of the CANDY model was adapted to the CIPS model in order to calculate the distribution of biological activity for each pore space class. The reduction functions of the turnover active time concept of CANDY model, related to soil temperature, soil moisture, soil texture, relative air volume and distance to the soil surface are multiplied by the step width of calendar time producing the transformed time step as total BAT (BATtot). The calculated BATtot corresponds to the time that would be required under optimal conditions in the laboratory to perform the same turnover result as under the given

  10. Comparison of bone volume and strength as measures of skeletal integrity in caged laying hens with access to perches.

    PubMed

    Hughes, B O; Wilson, S; Appleby, M C; Smith, S F

    1993-03-01

    Fractures in spent laying hens are now recognised as a major welfare problem; the objective of this work was to determine whether provision of perches for caged layers would increase bone strength, bone volume or both. Sixteen ISA Brown hens were housed from 18 to 72 weeks old in cages with perches and 16 in similar cages without perches. At the end of lay the birds' tibiotarsi were examined for strength by a three-point loading test and their tarsometatarsi for bone volume by histomorphometry. There was no significant effect of perches on tibiotarsal breaking strength. Hens from both groups showed evidence of osteoporosis, but it was more severe in the birds from conventional cages: tarsometatarsal trabecular bone volume was greater in the hens which had access to perches. A positive correlation was found between trabecular bone volume and the degree of day-time perch usage by individual hens. Provision of perches can have a slight but significant beneficial effect, at least for the leg bones, in increasing the bone volume of caged laying hens.

  11. Electrical Evaluation of RCA MWS5501D Random Access Memory, Volume 2, Appendix a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klute, A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical characterization and qualification test results are presented for the RCA MWS5001D random access memory. The tests included functional tests, AC and DC parametric tests, AC parametric worst-case pattern selection test, determination of worst-case transition for setup and hold times, and a series of schmoo plots. The address access time, address readout time, the data hold time, and the data setup time are some of the results surveyed.

  12. Volume server: A scalable high speed and high capacity magnetic tape archive architecture with concurrent multi-host access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybczynski, Fred

    1993-01-01

    A major challenge facing data processing centers today is data management. This includes the storage of large volumes of data and access to it. Current media storage for large data volumes is typically off line and frequently off site in warehouses. Access to data archived in this fashion can be subject to long delays, errors in media selection and retrieval, and even loss of data through misplacement or damage to the media. Similarly, designers responsible for architecting systems capable of continuous high-speed recording of large volumes of digital data are faced with the challenge of identifying technologies and configurations that meet their requirements. Past approaches have tended to evaluate the combination of the fastest tape recorders with the highest capacity tape media and then to compromise technology selection as a consequence of cost. This paper discusses an architecture that addresses both of these challenges and proposes a cost effective solution based on robots, high speed helical scan tape drives, and large-capacity media.

  13. Successful treatment of a LifeSite Hemodialysis Access System pocket infection with large-volume kanamycin solution irrigation.

    PubMed

    Ross, John R

    2003-07-01

    Bridge devices-dialysis catheters and subcutaneous access devices-play a critical role in increasing the placement of arteriovenous (AV) fistulas by providing hemodialysis vascular access while AV fistulas mature. The LifeSite Hemodialysis Access System (Vasca Inc, Tewskburg, MA), a fully implantable, subcutaneous dual valve access system, has been shown to have lower complication rates, higher blood flow rates, and better long-term device survival than conventional tunneled hemodialysis catheters, indicating it may better meet the requirements for optimally bridging to a fistula. This case study of a 48-year-old black man undergoing chronic hemodialysis for renal failure because of insulin-dependent diabetes describes a simple approach for resolving localized pocket infections associated with the LifeSite System by drip irrigation of the valves and tissue pockets with an antibiotic solution. Eight weeks after implantation of the LifeSite System, the patient exhibited symptoms of infection of the lateral LifeSite valve tissue pocket, which on culture was shown to be caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Flushing the LifeSite valve and tissue pocket with a large volume of kanamycin solution, in conjunction with intravenous vancomycin and routine irrigation of the valve with isopropyl alcohol, resolved the infection after 1 treatment. The LifeSite System successfully bridged the patient to a transposed basilic vein fistula created through a 2-stage surgical procedure. The LifeSite System provided uninterrupted access for hemodialysis over a period of 6 months while the fistula matured. The LifeSite System should allow surgeons to attempt fistula construction in more patients, including diabetics, access-challenged patients, and patients with small vessels, who may benefit from a nontraditional surgical approach toward fistula creation.

  14. Three dimensional analysis of the pore space in fine-grained Boom Clay, using BIB-SEM (broad-ion beam scanning electron microscopy), combined with FIB (focused ion-beam) serial cross-sectioning, pore network modeling and Wood's metal injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemes, Susanne; Klaver, Jop; Desbois, Guillaume; Urai, Janos

    2014-05-01

    The Boom Clay is, besides the Ypresian clays, one of the potential host rock materials for radioactive waste disposal in Belgium (Gens et al., 2003; Van Marcke & Laenen, 2005; Verhoef et al., 2011). To access parameters, which are relevant for the diffusion controlled transport of radionuclides in the material, such as porosity, pore connectivity and permeability, it is crucial to characterize the pore space at high resolution (nm-scale) and in 3D. Focused-ion-beam (FIB) serial cross-sectioning in combination with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM), pore network modeling, Wood's metal injection and broad-ion-beam (BIB) milling, constitute a superior set of methods to characterize the 3D pore space in fine-grained, clayey materials, down to the nm-scale resolution. In the present study, we identified characteristic 3D pore space morphologies, determined the 3D volume porosity of the material and applied pore network extraction modeling (Dong and Blunt, 2009), to access the connectivity of the pore space and to discriminate between pore bodies and pore throats. Moreover, we used Wood's metal injection (WMI) in combination with BIB-SEM imaging to assess the pore connectivity at a larger scale and even higher resolution. The FIB-SEM results show a highly (~ 90 %) interconnected pore space in Boom Clay, down to the resolution of ~ 3E+03 nm³ (voxel-size), with a total volume porosity of ~ 20 %. Pore morphologies of large (> 5E+08 nm³), highly interconnected pores are complex, with high surface area to volume ratios (shape factors G ~ 0.01), whereas small (< 1E+06 nm³), often isolated pores are much more compact and show higher shape factors (G) up to 0.03. WMI in combination with BIB-SEM, down to a resolution of ~ 50 nm² pixel-size, indicates an interconnected porosity fraction of ~ 80 %, of a total measured 2D porosity of ~ 20 %. Determining and distinguishing between pore bodies and pore throats enables us to compare 3D FIB-SEM pore

  15. Restricted access magnetic core-mesoporous shell microspheres with C8-modified interior pore-walls for the determination of diazepam in rat plasma by LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodan; Yu, Yingjia; Li, Yan; Ning, Suli; Liu, Tingting; Li, Fajie; Duan, Gengli

    2013-03-15

    In this study, a novel enrichment technique based on magnetic core-mesoporous shell microspheres with C8-modified interior pore-walls (C8-Fe₃O₄@mSiO₂) was successfully developed for the determination of diazepam in rat plasma by LC-MS. Due to the unique properties of the synthesized C8-Fe₃O₄@mSiO₂ microspheres (C8-modified magnetic mesoporous microsphere), small drug molecules like diazepam can enter the mesopore channels and be efficiently absorbed through hydrophobic interaction by interior C8-groups (Octyl functional groups). Large molecules like proteins are excluded from the mesopore channels as a result of size exclusion effect, leading to direct extraction of drug molecules from protein-rich biosmaples such as plasma without any other pretreatment procedure. Moreover, diazepam adsorbed C8-Fe₃O₄@mSiO₂ microspheres could be simply and rapidly isolated through placing a magnet on the bottom of container, and then diazepam could be easily eluted from C8-Fe₃O₄@mSiO₂ microspheres for further LC-MS analysis. Extraction conditions such as amounts of C8-Fe₃O₄@mSiO₂ microspheres added, adsorption time, elution solvent and elution time were investigated. Method validations including linear range, the limit of detection, precision, and recovery were also studied. The results indicated that the proposed method based on C8-Fe₃O₄@mSiO₂ microspheres was simple and accurate for the analysis of diazepam in the rat plasma. And it will provide new ideas for analyzing plasma concentration and pharmacokinetics of similar drugs.

  16. Policies to Spur Energy Access. Executive Summary; Volume 1, Engaging the Private Sector in Expanding Access to Electricity; Volume 2, Case Studies to Public-Private Models to Finance Decentralized Electricity Access

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Terri; Rai, Neha; Esterly, Sean; Cox, Sadie; Reber, Tim; Muzammil, Maliha; Mahmood, Tasfiq; Kaur, Nanki; Tesfaye, Lidya; Mamuye, Simret; Knuckles, James; Morris, Ellen; de Been, Merijn; Steinbach, Dave; Acharya, Sunil; Chhetri, Raju Pandit; Bhushal, Ramesh

    2015-09-01

    Government policy is one of the most important factors in engaging the private sector in providing universal access to electricity. In particular, the private sector is well positioned to provide decentralized electricity products and services. While policy uncertainty and regulatory barriers can keep enterprises and investors from engaging in the market, targeted policies can create opportunities to leverage private investment and skills to expand electricity access. However, creating a sustainable market requires policies beyond traditional electricity regulation. The report reviews the range of policy issues that impact the development and expansion of a market for decentralized electricity services from establishing an enabling policy environment to catalyzing finance, building human capacity, and integrating energy access with development programs. The case studies in this report show that robust policy frameworks--addressing a wide range of market issues--can lead to rapid transformation in energy access. The report highlights examples of these policies in action Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Mali, Mexico, and Nepal.

  17. Trade and Technical Volumes I: Access Skills. Vocational Readiness Skills. Missouri LINC. Assessing Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Dept. of Practical Arts and Vocational-Technical Education.

    This document contains trade and industrial occupations-related materials to help teachers and parents teach access skills to Missouri junior high and high school special needs students who want to pursue a vocational program in carpentry; commercial art; drafting; electronics; heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration; or offset lithography…

  18. Catalytic reforming catalyst with modified pore size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Unmuth, E.E.; Fleming, B.A.

    1987-10-27

    In a naphtha reforming catalyst having at least one catalytic metal deposited on a porous solid catalyst support, an improvement is described which comprises the catalyst having the following in combination: (A) a surface area above about 250M/sup 2//gram of catalyst; (B) A pore volume above about 0.4 cc/gram of catalyst in pores having diameters of from about 30 angstroms to about 38,000 angstroms; and (C) A pore volume distribution wherein about 70 percent or less of the pore volume is in pores having diameters of from about 30 angstroms to about 400 angstroms, and 30 percent or more of the pore volume is in pores having diameters of from about 400 angstroms to about 38,000 angstroms.

  19. Solvent accessibility, residue charge and residue volume, the three ingredients of a robust amino acid substitution matrix.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, Hani; Katanforoush, Ali; Torabi, Noorossadat; Najafabadi, Hamed Shateri

    2007-04-21

    Cost measure matrices or different amino acid indices have been widely used for studies in many fields of biology. One major criticism of these studies might be based on the unavailability of an unbiased and yet effective amino acid substitution matrix. Throughout this study we have devised a cost measure matrix based on the solvent accessibility, residue charge, and residue volume indices. Performed analyses on this novel substitution matrix (i.e. solvent accessibility charge volume (SCV) matrix) support the uncontaminated nature of this matrix regarding the genetic code. Although highly similar to a number of previously available cost measure matrices, the SCV matrix results in a more significant optimality in the error-buffering capacity of the genetic code when compared to many other amino acid substitution matrices. Besides, a method to compare an SCV-based scoring matrix with a number of widely used matrices has been devised, the results of which highlights the robustness of this matrix in protein family discrimination.

  20. Electrical Evaluation of RCA MWS5001D Random Access Memory, Volume 4, Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klute, A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical characterization and qualification test results are presented for the RCA MWS5001D random access memory. The tests included functional tests, AC and DC parametric tests, AC parametric worst-case pattern selection test, determination of worst-case transition for setup and hold times, and a series of schmoo plots. Statistical analysis data is supplied along with write pulse width, read cycle time, write cycle time, and chip enable time data.

  1. The 1984 ARI Survey of Army Recruits: Tabular Description of NPS (active) Army Accessions. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    people who played various important roles in database construction, the data entry, and documentation of the 1984 Winter Survey of Active...produce comparable crosstabula- tions. The specific crossing variables used in the Summer tabula - tion volumes varies according to component...15.300 12 0.2254 s" %’ v « rasa T230 BY RURAL/URBAN N = LG CITY 302 MED CITY 307 SUBURB 345 TOWN 462 RURAL 443 TOTAL 1859 1 2 3 4

  2. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  3. Preparation of magnetic graphene/mesoporous silica composites with phenyl-functionalized pore-walls as the restricted access matrix solid phase extraction adsorbent for the rapid extraction of parabens from water-based skin toners.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianan; He, Xinying; Liu, Xiaodan; Sun, Xueni; Li, Yan

    2016-09-23

    In this work, phenyl-functionalized magnetic graphene/mesoporous silica composites (MG-mSiO2-Ph) were prepared and applied as restricted access matrix solid phase extraction (RAM-SPE) adsorbents to determine the parabens in commercially available retail cosmetics. MG-mSiO2-Ph composites were synthesized by a surfactant-mediated co-condensation reaction in which mesoporous silica with phenyl-functionalized pore-walls was coated on a magnetic graphene sheet. The obtained nano-composites were proven to be of sufficient quality for an ideal RAM-SPE adsorbent with a large specific surface area of 369m(2)g(-1), uniform mesopores of 2.8nm, and special phenyl-functionalized pore-walls. Parabens, such as methyl paraben, ethyl paraben and propyl paraben, were extracted from water-based skin toners using one step of the RAM-SPE and were then analysed by a HPLC-DAD system. The SPE conditions were optimized by studying the parameters, such as the adsorbent amount, elution solvent type, adsorption time and desorption time, that influence the extraction efficiency. For each analyte, there were good linearities of approximately 0.10-120μgmL(-1) with determination coefficients (R(2))>0.995. The sensitivity was as low as 0.01-0.025μgmL(-1) for the LOD, and the percent recoveries were 98.37-105.84%. The intra-day and inter-day RSDs were 1.44-6.11% (n=6) and 3.12-11.70% (n=6), respectively. The results indicated that this method with novel RAM-SPE adsorbents is sensitive and convenient. The results also offered an attractive alternative for the extraction and determination of paraben preservatives in a complex matrix, such as cosmetics.

  4. Electrical Characterization of the RCA CDP1822SD Random Access Memory, Volume 1, Appendix a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klute, A.

    1979-01-01

    Electrical characteristization tests were performed on 35 RCA CDP1822SD, 256-by-4-bit, CMOS, random access memories. The tests included three functional tests, AC and DC parametric tests, a series of schmoo plots, rise/fall time screening, and a data retention test. All tests were performed on an automated IC test system with temperatures controlled by a thermal airstream unit. All the functional tests, the data retention test, and the AC and DC parametric tests were performed at ambient temperatures of 25 C, -20 C, -55 C, 85 C, and 125 C. The schmoo plots were performed at ambient temperatures of 25 C, -55 C, and 125 C. The data retention test was performed at 25 C. Five devices failed one or more functional tests and four of these devices failed to meet the expected limits of a number of AC parametric tests. Some of the schmoo plots indicated a small degree of interaction between parameters.

  5. Physical Pore Properties and Grain Interactions of SAX04 Sands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    serve as flow junctions and ac- count for void volume in these models, while pore throats serve as conduits between the pore bodies and provide...properties can be addressed and quantified using a network, similar to an electrical circuit, of interconnected pore bodies ( junctions ) and pore...Berger, M. J. Buckingham, N. P. Chotiros, P. H. Dahl, N. T. Dewitt, P. Fleischer, R. Flood, C. F. Greenlaw. D. V. Holliday , M. H. Hulbert. M. P. Hutnak

  6. An Increase in Mean Platelet Volume/Platelet Count Ratio Is Associated with Vascular Access Failure in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong Ho; Rhee, So Yon; Jeon, Hee Jung; Park, Ji-Young; Kang, Shin-Wook; Oh, Jieun

    2017-01-01

    After stenosis of arteriovenous vascular access in hemodialysis patients, platelets play a crucial role in subsequent thrombus formation, leading to access failure. In a previous study, the mean platelet volume (MPV)/platelet count ratio, but not MPV alone, was shown to be an independent predictor of 4-year mortality after myocardial infarction. However, little is known about the potential influence of MPV/platelet count ratio on vascular access patency in hemodialysis patients. A total of 143 patients undergoing routine hemodialysis were recruited between January 2013 and February 2016. Vascular access failure (VAF) was defined as thrombosis or a decrease of greater than 50% of normal vessel diameter, requiring either surgical revision or percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Cox proportional hazards model analysis ascertained that the change of MPV/platelet count ratio between baseline and 3 months [Δ(MPV/platelet count ratio)3mo-baseline] had prognostic value for VAF. Additionally, the changes of MPV/platelet count ratio over time were compared in patients with and without VAF by using linear mixed model analysis. Of the 143 patients, 38 (26.6%) were diagnosed with VAF. During a median follow-up of 26.9 months (interquartile range 13.0–36.0 months), Δ(MPV/platelet count ratio)3mo-baseline significantly increased in patients with VAF compared to that in patients without VAF [11.6 (6.3–19.0) vs. 0.8 (-1.8–4.0), P< 0.001]. In multivariate analysis, Δ(MPV/platelet ratio count)3mo-baseline was an independent predictor of VAF, after adjusting for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, vascular access type, the presence of previous VAF, and antiplatelet drug use (hazard ratio, 1.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.10–1.21; P< 0.001). Moreover, a liner mixed model revealed that there was a significant increase of MPV/platelet count ratio over time in patients with VAF compared to those without VAF (P< 0.001). An

  7. Exploring the Unknown: Selected Documents in the History of the U.S. Civil Space Program. Volume 4; Accessing Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logsdon, John M. (Editor); Williamson, Ray A. (Editor); Launius, Roger D. (Editor); Acker, Russell J. (Editor); Garber, Stephen J. (Editor); Friedman, Jonathan L. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The documents selected for inclusion in this volume are presented in four major chapters, each covering a particular aspect of access to space and the manner in which it has developed over time. These chapters focus on the evolution toward the giant Saturn V rocket, the development of the Space Shuttle, space transportation commercialization, and future space transportation possibilities. Each chapter in this volume is introduced by an overview essay, prepared by individuals who are particularly well qualified to write on the topic. In the main, these essays are intended to introduce and complement the documents in the chapter and to place them, for the most part, in a chronological and substantive context. Each essay contains references to the documents in the chapter it introduces, and many also contain references to documents in other chapters of the collection. These introductory essays are the responsibility of their individual authors, and the views and conclusions contained therein do not necessarily represent the opinions of either George Washington University or NASA.

  8. Effect of pore size on the performance of immobilised enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bayne, Lauren; Ulijn, Rein V; Halling, Peter J

    2013-12-07

    Porous materials are widely employed as supports in the immobilisation of enzymes. Traditionally macroporous materials with pore diameters >50 nm were believed to be the most suitable support material, ensuring no spatial restrictions upon enzyme molecules entering such large pores. In recent years however, there has been growing emphasis in the use of mesoporous supports with pore diameters ranging between 2 and 50 nm. It is thought this smaller pore range may offer enhanced conformational stability to immobilised enzymes while not being so small as to restrict enzyme access. Despite their increasing popularity, many argue that mesoporous materials have not yet proven superior to traditional macroporous supports for enzyme immobilisation. Through the design and application of a unique confidence rating system we were able to accurately compare data and establish trends between pore characteristics and protein loading. By analysing published data (182 experiments in total) and extracting pore characteristics and protein loading values, we have described three categories of pore diameters in which correlations between pore characteristics and protein loading are noted. With pore diameters less than 10 nm we see a general decrease in protein loading as the enzymes find physical restrictions in accessing the high surface offered in this pore diameter range. At pore sizes greater than 100 nm, protein loading generally decreases due to a concomitant reduction in available surface area. In the pore range of 10-100 nm there it is expected to see a decrease in protein loading level with increasing pore diameter. In fact protein loading in this range remains largely constant, suggesting some degree of protein-protein interaction blocking pores and restricting access to the increasing surface area available at decreasing pore diameters. No trends were established between pore characteristics and retention of activity.

  9. Probing Aircraft Flight Test Hazard Mitigation for the Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) Research Team . Volume 2; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The Alternative Fuel Effects on Contrails and Cruise Emissions (ACCESS) Project Integration Manager requested in July 2012 that the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) form a team to independently assess aircraft structural failure hazards associated with the ACCESS experiment and to identify potential flight test hazard mitigations to ensure flight safety. The ACCESS Project Integration Manager subsequently requested that the assessment scope be focused predominantly on structural failure risks to the aircraft empennage (horizontal and vertical tail). This report contains the Appendices to Volume I.

  10. Providing an Analysis Environment with Access to High-Volume Simulation and Observational Data for Climate Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, V. L.; Juckes, M. N.; Kershaw, P. J.; Lawrence, B.; Stephens, A.; Pritchard, M.; Pepler, S.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental science requires the fusion of ever growing volumes of data from multiple simulation and observation platforms. In the UK, the Centre for Environmental Analysis (CEDA) provides infrastructure to support the analysis of such data. CEDA delivers both a curated archive, and an environment to exploit that data alongside other datasets. Over 3 petabytes (PB) of data are now available in the archive and this will rise considerably in the next 12 months as key datasets are acquired and made available via the JASMIN super data cluster. JASMIN incorporates over 17 PB of disk, co-located with tape and computing facilities for data analysis via batch, hosted and cloud computing The first of the European Sentinel series of satellites, Sentinel-1A was launched in April 2014, followed by Sentinel-2A in July 2015. Synthetic Aperture Radar data from Sentinel-1A data is already flowing, with around one terabyte per day being archived at CEDA. Recent data are stored on-line for direct access to users; older data will be moved to near-line tape, reinstating for users on demand. It is expected that most UK science users will access, process and analyse the data in the JASMIN-CEMS hosted environment avoiding the need to download and store data on their local machines. Sentinel 2 and Sentinel 3 data will follow soon, with landcover mapping expected to be an important application for Sentinel 2 data. The same approach will be adopted for CMIP6 data, where we expect to both host the largest possible CMIP cache and provide a specific resource for one of the constituent MIPS: HIRESMIP. We expect to provide the UK climate community (and related European collaborators, such as the PRIMAVERA consortium) a 2 PB disk cache alongside a complete copy of HIRESMIP (10-50 PB) on tape. This paper describes these challenging use cases and presents recent infrastructure developments, including how the facility for Climate and Environmental Monitoring from Space, CEMS, exploits JASMIN.

  11. Resolving pore-space characteristics by rate-controlled porosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, H.H.; Swanson, B.F.

    1989-03-01

    By monitoring the mercury capillary pressure in rate-controlled porosimetry (intrusion) experiments, new information regarding the pore space of a rock sample has been obtained. With this technique, called an apparatus for pore examination (APEX), it is now possible to resolve the pore space of a rock sample into two interconnected parts. One part identifies the individual pore systems (pore bodies), which are low-energy sumps or regions of low capillarity. The other part corresponds to the pore throats that interconnect with pore systems. New capillary-pressure curves have been obtained by partitioning the total capillary-pressure curve (normal capillary-pressure curve) into two subcurves: the subison capillary-pressure curve, which details the distribution of pore bodies, and the rison capillary-pressure curve, which details the distribution of pore throats. The authors present APEX data on Berea sandstone and San Andres dolomite that show the volume distribution of low-capillarity regions within the pore space of these rocks. These regions of low capillarity are the principal pore-space regions that trap the residual nonwetting phase upon imbibition of a strongly wetting fluid, as measured by toluene/air systems. The residual nonwetting-phase saturations as determined by the APEX method and by the toluene/air method are in excellent agreement. Thus, the detailed volume distribution of pore systems responsible for trapped nonwetting-phase saturation is determined from APEX measurements, which can have important implications for EOR.

  12. Using spatial accessibility to identify polyclinic service gaps and volume of under-served population in Singapore using Geographic Information System.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lai Yin; Heng, Bee Hoon; Cheah, Jason Tiang Seng; Tan, Chee Beng

    2012-01-01

    Primary care services in Singapore are provided by 18 Government-funded polyclinics and about 1200 private General Practitioners (GPs). This study aims to examine the spatial accessibility to polyclinics and identify service gaps, and suggest optimal sites using Geographic Information System (GIS) to aid in future planning. A national database containing 3.6 million polyclinic visits in 2006 were geo-analysed using ArcView GIS. Patients' travel impedance to the nearest polyclinic was computed using DriveTime to identify areas with the lowest spatial accessibility and highest volume of under-served population. Jurong West and Sembawang were ranked as top areas with poor spatial accessibility to polyclinic services. ArcGIS was used to identify optimal sites with the minimum accumulated distance impedance to this under-served population. If new facilities were set up at these identified sites, volume of visits by Jurong West and Sembawang patients who could access the nearest polyclinics within 4 km Euclidean distance from their residence would total at 123 000 and 93 000, respectively. Future efforts in polyclinic planning should take this into consideration to maximize patients' benefits and minimize patients' travelling costs in order to achieve social equity on healthcare access.

  13. Highly ordered, accessible and nanocrystalline mesoporous TiO₂ thin films on transparent conductive substrates.

    PubMed

    Violi, Ianina L; Perez, M Dolores; Fuertes, M Cecilia; Soler-Illia, Galo J A A

    2012-08-01

    Highly porous (V(mesopore) = 25-50%) and ordered mesoporous titania thin films (MTTF) were prepared on ITO (indium tin oxide)-covered glass by a fast two-step method. The effects of substrate surface modification and thermal treatment on pore order, accessibility and crystallinity of the MTTF were systematically studied for MTTF deposited onto bare and titania-modified ITO. MTTF exposed briefly to 550 °C resulted in highly ordered films with grid-like structures, enlarged pore size, and increased accessible pore volume when prepared onto the modified ITO substrate. Mesostructure collapse and no significant change in pore volume were observed for MTTF deposited on bare ITO substrates. Highly crystalline anatase was obtained for MTTF prepared on the modified-ITO treated at high temperatures, establishing the relationship between grid-like structures and titania crystallization. Photocatalytic activity was maximized for samples with increased crystallization and high accessible pore volume. In this manner, a simple way of designing materials with optimized characteristics for optoelectronic applications was achieved through the modification of the ITO surface and a controlled thermal treatment.

  14. Characterization of Connectivity between Fractures and Nano-pores in Shale Using Gas Adsorption Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, H.; Daigle, H.; Hayman, N. W.

    2015-12-01

    Most pores hosting hydrocarbon in mudrocks are at the nanometer to tens of nanometer scale. However, observational evidence shows that natural and induced fractures which govern the permeability of mudrocks appear to be spaced at centimeter scale or greater. The mismatch in scales raises the question of how the hydrocarbons in the nanopores can gain access to the induced hydraulic fracture systems. To answer the question, we experimentally induced fractures on core-scale samples, and characterized microstructure around the stimulated fracture networks and in the surrounding, unfractured rock matrix. Confined compressive strength tests were performed on preserved core plugs from the Eagle Ford shale and a siliceous, oil-bearing mudrock from the northern Rocky Mountains. Dried, ground specimens were collected from before-test (intact) and after-test (failed) samples. Their pore structure was analyzed by N2/CO2 gas adsorption, which together can measure pore diameters between 0.35 and 300 nm. Adsorption data shows a Type IV N2 isotherm and a Type I CO2 isotherm. The hysteresis loop in the N2 adsorption curve indicates the presence of slit-shaped pores. Failed siliceous samples exhibit higher overall N2 and CO2 adsorbed gas amount compared with the intact samples, indicating a wide range increase of nanoporosity. Eagle Ford samples, however, show no significant change in adsorbed gas amount. We determined pore size distributions (PSDs) using density functional theory (DFT). The N2 PSDs of the siliceous samples appear to be bimodal, with a peak around 1 nm pore size, while the N2 PSDs of the Eagle Ford samples is unimodal. Comparison of intact and failed samples reveals no significant change in pore volume for Eagle Ford samples. The siliceous samples, in contrast, increase their nanopore volume (1-100 nm pore diameter) after fracturing. The increased nanoporosity may result from microcracks that develop in the matrix surrounding the main fractures that connect nano

  15. Quantification of Organic Porosity and Water Accessibility in Marcellus Shale Using Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Xin; Mildner, David F. R.; Cole, David R.; Rother, Gernot; Slingerland, Rudy; Brantley, Susan L.

    2016-04-28

    Pores within organic matter (OM) are a significant contributor to the total pore system in gas shales. These pores contribute most of the storage capacity in gas shales. Here we present a novel approach to characterize the OM pore structure (including the porosity, specific surface area, pore size distribution, and water accessibility) in Marcellus shale. By using ultrasmall and small-angle neutron scattering, and by exploiting the contrast matching of the shale matrix with suitable mixtures of deuterated and protonated water, both total and water-accessible porosity were measured on centimeter-sized samples from two boreholes from the nanometer to micrometer scale with good statistical coverage. Samples were also measured after combustion at 450 °C. Analysis of scattering data from these procedures allowed quantification of OM porosity and water accessibility. OM hosts 24–47% of the total porosity for both organic-rich and -poor samples. This porosity occupies as much as 29% of the OM volume. In contrast to the current paradigm in the literature that OM porosity is organophilic and therefore not likely to contain water, our results demonstrate that OM pores with widths >20 nm exhibit the characteristics of water accessibility. In conclusion, our approach reveals the complex structure and wetting behavior of the OM porosity at scales that are hard to interrogate using other techniques.

  16. Quantification of Organic Porosity and Water Accessibility in Marcellus Shale Using Neutron Scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Gu, Xin; Mildner, David F. R.; Cole, David R.; ...

    2016-04-28

    Pores within organic matter (OM) are a significant contributor to the total pore system in gas shales. These pores contribute most of the storage capacity in gas shales. Here we present a novel approach to characterize the OM pore structure (including the porosity, specific surface area, pore size distribution, and water accessibility) in Marcellus shale. By using ultrasmall and small-angle neutron scattering, and by exploiting the contrast matching of the shale matrix with suitable mixtures of deuterated and protonated water, both total and water-accessible porosity were measured on centimeter-sized samples from two boreholes from the nanometer to micrometer scale withmore » good statistical coverage. Samples were also measured after combustion at 450 °C. Analysis of scattering data from these procedures allowed quantification of OM porosity and water accessibility. OM hosts 24–47% of the total porosity for both organic-rich and -poor samples. This porosity occupies as much as 29% of the OM volume. In contrast to the current paradigm in the literature that OM porosity is organophilic and therefore not likely to contain water, our results demonstrate that OM pores with widths >20 nm exhibit the characteristics of water accessibility. In conclusion, our approach reveals the complex structure and wetting behavior of the OM porosity at scales that are hard to interrogate using other techniques.« less

  17. Velocities in Solar Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Keil, S. L.; Smaldone, L. A.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the three dimensional structure of solar pores and their surroundings using high spatial and spectral resolution data. We present evidence that surface velocities decrease around pores with a corresponding increase in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities. LOS velocities in pores increase with the strength of the magnetic field. Surface velocities show convergence toward a weak downflow which appear to trace boundaries resembling meso-granular and super granular flows. The observed magnetic fields in the pores appear near these boundaries. We analyze the vertical velocity structure in pores and show that they generally have downflows decreasing exponentially with height, with a scale height of about 90 km. Evidence is also presented for the expanding nature of flux tubes. Finally we describe a phenomenological model for pores. This work was supported by AFOSR Task 2311G3. LAS was partially supported by the Progetto Nazionale Astrofisica e Fisica Cosmica of MURST and Scambi Internazionali of the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Frederico II. National Solar Observatory, NOAO, is operated for the National Science Foundation by AURA, Inc.

  18. An undulation theory for condensation in open end slit pores: critical hysteresis temperature & critical hysteresis pore size.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chunyan; Zeng, Yonghong; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2014-06-28

    A new theory of condensation in an open end slit pore, based on the concept of temperature dependent undulation, at the interface separating the adsorbed phase and the gas-like region, is presented. The theory, describes, for the first time, the microscopic origin of the critical hysteresis temperature and the critical hysteresis pore size, properties which are not accessible to any classical theories.

  19. Access to the UW System for Wisconsin High School Graduates. Occasional Research Brief, Volume 00, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ. System, Madison.

    This paper examines trends in access rates to the University of Wisconsin (UW) system from the mid 1970s to the late 1990s with particular emphasis on how enrollment management planning for the mid to late 1990s affected the overall UW system access rate for resident undergraduates and how the application and admission patterns of these high…

  20. Biological Chitin-MOF Composites with Hierarchical Pore Systems for Air-Filtration Applications.

    PubMed

    Wisser, Dorothea; Wisser, Florian M; Raschke, Silvia; Klein, Nicole; Leistner, Matthias; Grothe, Julia; Brunner, Eike; Kaskel, Stefan

    2015-10-19

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are promising materials for gas-separation and air-filtration applications. However, for these applications, MOF crystallites need to be incorporated in robust and manageable support materials. We used chitin-based networks from a marine sponge as a non-toxic, biodegradable, and low-weight support material for MOF deposition. The structural properties of the material favor predominant nucleation of the MOF crystallites at the inside of the hollow fibers. This composite has a hierarchical pore system with surface areas up to 800 m(2)  g(-1) and pore volumes of 3.6 cm(3)  g(-1) , allowing good transport kinetics and a very high loading of the active material. Ammonia break-through experiments highlight the accessibility of the MOF crystallites and the adsorption potential of the composite indicating their high potential for filtration applications for toxic industrial gases.

  1. Dendritic silica nanomaterials (KCC-1) with fibrous pore structure possess high DNA adsorption capacity and effectively deliver genes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoxi; Tao, Zhimin; Praskavich, John C; Goswami, Anandarup; Al-Sharab, Jafar F; Minko, Tamara; Polshettiwar, Vivek; Asefa, Tewodros

    2014-09-16

    The pore size and pore structure of nanoporous materials can affect the materials' physical properties, as well as potential applications in different areas, including catalysis, drug delivery, and biomolecular therapeutics. KCC-1, one of the newest members of silica nanomaterials, possesses fibrous, large pore, dendritic pore networks with wide pore entrances, large pore size distribution, spacious pore volume and large surface area--structural features that are conducive for adsorption and release of large guest molecules and biomacromolecules (e.g., proteins and DNAs). Here, we report the results of our comparative studies of adsorption of salmon DNA in a series of KCC-1-based nanomaterials that are functionalized with different organoamine groups on different parts of their surfaces (channel walls, external surfaces or both). For comparison the results of our studies of adsorption of salmon DNA in similarly functionalized, MCM-41 mesoporous silica nanomaterials with cylindrical pores, some of the most studied silica nanomaterials for drug/gene delivery, are also included. Our results indicate that, despite their relatively lower specific surface area, the KCC-1-based nanomaterials show high adsorption capacity for DNA than the corresponding MCM-41-based nanomaterials, most likely because of KCC-1's large pores, wide pore mouths, fibrous pore network, and thereby more accessible and amenable structure for DNA molecules to diffuse through. Conversely, the MCM-41-based nanomaterials adsorb much less DNA, presumably because their outer surfaces/cylindrical channel pore entrances can get blocked by the DNA molecules, making the inner parts of the materials inaccessible. Moreover, experiments involving fluorescent dye-tagged DNAs suggest that the amine-grafted KCC-1 materials are better suited for delivering the DNAs adsorbed on their surfaces into cellular environments than their MCM-41 counterparts. Finally, cellular toxicity tests show that the KCC-1-based

  2. Pore scale dynamics underlying the motion of drainage fronts in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, Franziska; Or, Dani

    2014-11-01

    Fluid displacement fronts in porous media exhibit a peculiar duality; the seemingly regular macroscopic motion of the front is propelled by numerous and irregular pore scale interfacial jumps. These pore scale events shape emergent front morphology, affect phase entrapment behind a front, and are likely important for colloidal mobilization and solute dispersion at the front. We present an experimental study focusing on drainage fluid front invasion dynamics through sintered glass beads using a high-speed camera and rapid capillary pressure measurements to resolve pore scale invasion events over a wide range of boundary conditions (flow rates and gravitational influences). We distinguished three types of "pores": geometrical pores deduced from image analyses; individual pore invasion volumes imaged during displacement; and pore volumes deduced from capillary pressure fluctuations during constant withdrawal rates. The resulting pore volume distributions were remarkably similar for slow drainage rates. Invaded pore volumes were not affected by gravitational forces, however with increased viscous forces (higher displacement rates) the fraction of small invaded volumes increased. Capillary pressure fluctuations were exponentially distributed in agreement with findings from previous studies. The distribution of pressure fluctuations exhibited a distinct cutoff concurrent with the onset of simultaneous invasion events. The study highlights the different manifestation of "pores" and their sensitivity to external (macroscopic) boundary conditions. The remarkable similarity of geometrical and pressure-deduced pore spaces offers opportunities for deducing pore size distribution dynamically.

  3. Catalytic reforming catalyst with modified pore size distribution and a process using the same

    SciTech Connect

    Unmuth, E.E.; Fleming, B.A.

    1987-05-12

    This patent describes a catalytic reforming process for conversion of a naptha hydrocarbon at reforming conditions using a catalyst comprising at least one catalytic metal and alumina. The improvement comprises using a catalyst having the following properties in combination: a surface area above about 250 M/sup 2//gram of catalyst; a pore volume above about 0.44 cc/gram of catalyst in pores having diameters of from about 30 angstroms to about 38,000 angstroms; and a pore volume distribution wherein about 70 percent or less of the pore volume is in pores having diameters of from about 30 angstroms to about 400 angstroms. About 30 percent or more pore volume is in pores having diameters of from about 400 angstroms to about 38,000 angstroms.

  4. Pore architecture of nanoporous gold and titania by hydrogen thermoporometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, L. T.; Biener, M. M.; Ye, J. C.; Baumann, T. F.; Kucheyev, S. O.

    2015-07-01

    Nanoporous gold (NPG) and materials derived from it by templating have complex pore architecture that determines their technologically relevant physical properties. Here, we apply high-resolution hydrogen thermoporometry to study the pore structure of NPG and NPG-derived titania nanofoam (TNF). Results reveal complex multimodal pore size distributions for NPG and TNF. The freezing-melting hysteresis is pronounced, with freezing and melting scans having entirely different shapes. Experiments involving partial freeze-melt cycles reveal the lack of direct correlation between individual freezing and melting peaks, pointing to phenomena that are beyond the Gibbs-Thomson formalism. The depression of the average freezing temperature scales linearly with the ratio of the internal surface area (measured by gas sorption) and the total pore volume derived from the density of monoliths. Thermoporometry yields total pore volumes in good agreement with those derived from monolith densities for both NPG and TNF.

  5. Pore size engineering applied to starved electrochemical cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbey, K. M.; Thaller, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    To maximize performance in starved, multiplate cells, the cell design should rely on techniques which widen the volume tolerance characteristics. These involve engineering capillary pressure differences between the components of an electrochemical cell and using these forces to promote redistribution of electrolyte to the desired optimum values. This can be implemented in practice by prescribing pore size distributions for porous back-up plates, reservoirs, and electrodes. In addition, electrolyte volume management can be controlled by incorporating different pore size distributions into the separator. In a nickel/hydrogen cell, the separator must contain pores similar in size to the small pores of both the nickel and hydrogen electrodes in order to maintain an optimum conductive path for the electrolyte. The pore size distributions of all components should overlap in such a way as to prevent drying of the separator and/or flooding of the hydrogen electrode.

  6. Low pore connectivity in natural rock.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15

    As repositories for CO(2) and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air-water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  7. Low Pore Connectivity in Natural Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15

    As repositories for CO₂ and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air–water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  8. Magnetospheric access of solar particles and the configuration of the distant geomagnetic field, volume 1. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, L. C.

    1972-01-01

    The access of 1.2 to 40 MeV protons and 0.4 to 1.0 MeV electrons from interplanetary space to the polar cap regions was investigated with an experiment on board a low altitude, polar-orbiting satellite (0G0 4). A total of 333 quiet time observations of the electron polar cap boundary give a mapping of the boundary between open and closed geomagnetic field lines. Observations of events associated with co-rotating regions of enhanced proton flux in interplanetary space were used to establish the characteristics of the 1.2 to 40 MeV proton access windows. The results were compared to particle access predictions of the distant geomagnetic tail configurations. The role played by interplanetary anisotropies in the observation of persistent polar cap features is discussed. Special emphasis is given to the problem of nonadiabatic particle entry through regions where the magnetic field is changing direction.

  9. Prediction of Hydraulic Conductivity as Related to Pore Size Distribution in Unsaturated Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil pore volume as well as pore size, shape, type (i.e. biopore versus crack), continuity, and distribution in soil affect soil water and gas exchange. Vertical and lateral drainage of water by gravitational forces occurs through large, non-capillary soil pores, but redistribution and upward moveme...

  10. The pore space scramble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormally, Alexandra; Bentham, Michelle; Vermeylen, Saskia; Markusson, Nils

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and energy security continue to be the context of the transition to a secure, affordable and low carbon energy future, both in the UK and beyond. This is reflected in for example, binding climate policy targets at the EU level, the introduction of renewable energy targets, and has also led to an increasing interest in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology with its potential to help mitigate against the effects of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning. The UK has proposed a three phase strategy to integrate CCS into its energy system in the long term focussing on off-shore subsurface storage (DECC, 2014). The potential of CCS therefore, raises a number of challenging questions and issues surrounding the long-term storage of CO2 captured and injected into underground spaces and, alongside other novel uses of the subsurface, contributes to opening a new field for discussion on the governance of the subsurface. Such 'novel' uses of the subsurface have lead to it becoming an increasingly contested space in terms of its governance, with issues emerging around the role of ownership, liability and property rights of subsurface pore space. For instance, questions over the legal ownership of pore space have arisen with ambiguity over the legal standpoint of the surface owner and those wanting to utilise the pore space for gas storage, and suggestions of whether there are depths at which legal 'ownership' becomes obsolete (Barton, 2014). Here we propose to discuss this 'pore space scramble' and provide examples of the competing trajectories of different stakeholders, particularly in the off-shore context given its priority in the UK. We also propose to highlight the current ambiguity around property law of pore space in the UK with reference to approaches currently taken in different national contexts. Ultimately we delineate contrasting models of governance to illustrate the choices we face and consider the ethics of these models for the common good

  11. Magnetic-resonance pore imaging of nonsymmetric microscopic pore shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, Stefan Andreas; Wang, Xindi; Hosking, Peter; Simpson, M. Cather; Hunter, Mark; Galvosas, Petrik

    2015-07-01

    Imaging of the microstructure of porous media such as biological tissue or porous solids is of high interest in health science and technology, engineering and material science. Magnetic resonance pore imaging (MRPI) is a recent technique based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which allows us to acquire images of the average pore shape in a given sample. Here we provide details on the experimental design, challenges, and requirements of MRPI, including its calibration procedures. Utilizing a laser-machined phantom sample, we present images of microscopic pores with a hemiequilateral triangular shape even in the presence of NMR relaxation effects at the pore walls. We therefore show that MRPI is applicable to porous samples without a priori knowledge about their pore shape and symmetry. Furthermore, we introduce "MRPI mapping," which combines MRPI with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This enables one to resolve microscopic pore sizes and shapes spatially, thus expanding the application of MRPI to samples with heterogeneous distributions of pores.

  12. Volume and accessibility of entrained (solution) methane in deep geopressured reservoirs - tertiary formations of the Texas Gulf Coast. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, A.R.; Dodge, M.M.; Posey, J.S.; Morton, R.A.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this project was to appraise the total volume of in-place methane dissolved in formation waters of deep sandstone reservoirs of the onshore Texas Gulf Coast within the stratigraphic section extending from the base of significant hydrocarbon production (8000 ft)* to the deepest significant sandstone occurrence. The area of investigation is about 50,000 mi/sup 2/. Factors that determine the total methane resource are reservoir bulk volume, porosity, and methane solubility; the latter is controlled by the temperature, pressure, and salinity of formation waters. Regional assessment of the volume and the distribution of potential sandstone reservoirs was made from a data base of 880 electrical well logs, from which a grid of 24 dip cross sections and 4 strike cross sections was constructed. Solution methane content in each of nine formations or divisions of formations was determined for each subdivision. The distribution of solution methane in the Gulf Coast was described on the basis of five reservoir models. Each model was characterized by depositional environment, reservoir continuity, porosity, permeability, and methane solubility.

  13. Nanometer-Scale Pore Characteristics of Lacustrine Shale, Songliao Basin, NE China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Yang, Jinxiu; Wang, Zhiwei; Lu, Shuangfang

    2015-01-01

    In shale, liquid hydrocarbons are accumulated mainly in nanometer-scale pores or fractures, so the pore types and PSDs (pore size distributions) play a major role in the shale oil occurrence (free or absorbed state), amount of oil, and flow features. The pore types and PSDs of marine shale have been well studied; however, research on lacustrine shale is rare, especially for shale in the oil generation window, although lacustrine shale is deposited widely around the world. To investigate the relationship between nanometer-scale pores and oil occurrence in the lacustrine shale, 10 lacustrine shale core samples from Songliao Basin, NE China were analyzed. Analyses of these samples included geochemical measurements, SEM (scanning electron microscope) observations, low pressure CO2 and N2 adsorption, and high-pressure mercury injection experiments. Analysis results indicate that: (1) Pore types in the lacustrine shale include inter-matrix pores, intergranular pores, organic matter pores, and dissolution pores, and these pores are dominated by mesopores and micropores; (2) There is no apparent correlation between pore volumes and clay content, however, a weak negative correlation is present between total pore volume and carbonate content; (3) Pores in lacustrine shale are well developed when the organic matter maturity (Ro) is >1.0% and the pore volume is positively correlated with the TOC (total organic carbon) content. The statistical results suggest that oil in lacustrine shale mainly occurs in pores with diameters larger than 40 nm. However, more research is needed to determine whether this minimum pore diameter for oil occurrence in lacustrine shale is widely applicable. PMID:26285123

  14. Nanometer-Scale Pore Characteristics of Lacustrine Shale, Songliao Basin, NE China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Yang, Jinxiu; Wang, Zhiwei; Lu, Shuangfang

    2015-01-01

    In shale, liquid hydrocarbons are accumulated mainly in nanometer-scale pores or fractures, so the pore types and PSDs (pore size distributions) play a major role in the shale oil occurrence (free or absorbed state), amount of oil, and flow features. The pore types and PSDs of marine shale have been well studied; however, research on lacustrine shale is rare, especially for shale in the oil generation window, although lacustrine shale is deposited widely around the world. To investigate the relationship between nanometer-scale pores and oil occurrence in the lacustrine shale, 10 lacustrine shale core samples from Songliao Basin, NE China were analyzed. Analyses of these samples included geochemical measurements, SEM (scanning electron microscope) observations, low pressure CO2 and N2 adsorption, and high-pressure mercury injection experiments. Analysis results indicate that: (1) Pore types in the lacustrine shale include inter-matrix pores, intergranular pores, organic matter pores, and dissolution pores, and these pores are dominated by mesopores and micropores; (2) There is no apparent correlation between pore volumes and clay content, however, a weak negative correlation is present between total pore volume and carbonate content; (3) Pores in lacustrine shale are well developed when the organic matter maturity (Ro) is >1.0% and the pore volume is positively correlated with the TOC (total organic carbon) content. The statistical results suggest that oil in lacustrine shale mainly occurs in pores with diameters larger than 40 nm. However, more research is needed to determine whether this minimum pore diameter for oil occurrence in lacustrine shale is widely applicable.

  15. Model Pores of Molecular Dimension

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, J. A.; Anderson, J. L.; Ho, W. S.; Petzny, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Extremely uniform pores of near molecular dimension can be formed by the irradiation-etching technique first demonstrated by Price and Walker. The technique has now been developed to the stage where it can be used to fabricate model membranes for examining the various steric, hydrodynamic, and electrodynamic phenomena encountered in transport through molecular-size pores. Methods for preparing and characterizing membranes with pores as small as 25 A (radius) are described in this paper. Results on pore size determination via Knudsen gas flow and electrolyte conduction are compared. Pore wall modification by monolayer deposition is also discussed. PMID:4339801

  16. Federal Logistics Information System (FLIS) Procedures Manual. Volume 16, Logistics On-Line Access (LOLA) End-User Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-10-01

    C’) LU 00C E 0)0 Figure 4.1-06 Inquiry Processing Steps 16.4-8 DoD 4100.39-M Volume 16 CJ) w al W D W Iz zi 0 rWL 0 -C)Lzz(1 C) LUz *L 0 -J U LUC) I...BULLETIN TIME: 13:05 TO: SANDI FROM: ANGELA DATE: 03-MAR-93 MESSAGE NO: 46 SUBJ: . <MSG 2013> ENTER TEXT OR PRESS <PF5> TO CANCEL FI=HELP F2= F3=PREV MENU

  17. Maglev Launch: Ultra-low Cost, Ultra-high Volume Access to Space for Cargo and Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, James; Maise, George; Rather, John

    2010-01-01

    Despite decades of efforts to reduce rocket launch costs, improvements are marginal. Launch cost to LEO for cargo is ~$10,000 per kg of payload, and to higher orbit and beyond much greater. Human access to the ISS costs $20 million for a single passenger. Unless launch costs are greatly reduced, large scale commercial use and human exploration of the solar system will not occur. A new approach for ultra low cost access to space-Maglev Launch-magnetically accelerates levitated spacecraft to orbital speeds, 8 km/sec or more, in evacuated tunnels on the surface, using Maglev technology like that operating in Japan for high speed passenger transport. The cost of electric energy to reach orbital speed is less than $1 per kilogram of payload. Two Maglev launch systems are described, the Gen-1System for unmanned cargo craft to orbit and Gen-2, for large-scale access of human to space. Magnetically levitated and propelled Gen-1 cargo craft accelerate in a 100 kilometer long evacuated tunnel, entering the atmosphere at the tunnel exit, which is located in high altitude terrain (~5000 meters) through an electrically powered ``MHD Window'' that prevents outside air from flowing into the tunnel. The Gen-1 cargo craft then coasts upwards to space where a small rocket burn, ~0.5 km/sec establishes, the final orbit. The Gen-1 reference design launches a 40 ton, 2 meter diameter spacecraft with 35 tons of payload. At 12 launches per day, a single Gen-1 facility could launch 150,000 tons annually. Using present costs for tunneling, superconductors, cryogenic equipment, materials, etc., the projected construction cost for the Gen-1 facility is 20 billion dollars. Amortization cost, plus Spacecraft and O&M costs, total $43 per kg of payload. For polar orbit launches, sites exist in Alaska, Russia, and China. For equatorial orbit launches, sites exist in the Andes and Africa. With funding, the Gen-1 system could operate by 2020 AD. The Gen-2 system requires more advanced technology

  18. Pore dynamics in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozen, I.; Dommersnes, P.

    2014-09-01

    Transient circular pores can open in plasma membrane of cells due to mechanical stress, and failure to repair such pores lead to cell death. Similar pores in the form of defects also exist among smectic membranes, such as in myelin sheaths or mitochondrial membranes. The formation and growth of membrane defects are associated with diseases, for example multiple sclerosis. A deeper understanding of membrane pore dynamics can provide a more refined picture of membrane integrity-related disease development, and possibly also treatment options and strategies. Pore dynamics is also of great importance regarding healthcare applications such as drug delivery, gene or as recently been implied, cancer therapy. The dynamics of pores significantly differ in stacks which are confined in 2D compared to those in cells or vesicles. In this short review, we will summarize the dynamics of different types of pores that can be observed in biological membranes, which include circular transient, fusion and hemi-fusion pores. We will dedicate a section to floral and fractal pores which were discovered a few years ago and have highly peculiar characteristics. Finally, we will discuss the repair mechanisms of large area pores in conjunction with the current cell membrane repair hypotheses.

  19. Biotemplating pores with size and shape diversity for Li-oxygen Battery Cathodes

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dahyun; Ozgit-Akgun, Çagla; Akca, Esin; Thompson, Leslie E.; Tadesse, Loza F.; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Demirci, Gökhan; Miller, Robert D.; Maune, Hareem

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic porogens provide an easy way to create porous structures, but their usage is limited due to synthetic difficulties, process complexities and prohibitive costs. Here we investigate the use of bacteria, sustainable and naturally abundant materials, as a pore template. The bacteria require no chemical synthesis, come in variable sizes and shapes, degrade easier and are approximately a million times cheaper than conventional porogens. We fabricate free standing porous multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films using cultured, harmless bacteria as porogens, and demonstrate substantial Li-oxygen battery performance improvement by porosity control. Pore volume as well as shape in the cathodes were easily tuned to improve oxygen evolution efficiency by 30% and double the full discharge capacity in repeated cycles compared to the compact MWCNT electrode films. The interconnected pores produced by the templates greatly improve the accessibility of reactants allowing the achievement of 4,942 W/kg (8,649 Wh/kg) at 2 A/ge (1.7 mA/cm2). PMID:28374862

  20. Effects of supersaturation on pore shape in solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, P. S.; Hsiao, S. Y.

    2017-02-01

    The shape of a pore resulting from a bubble entrapped by a solidification front with different supersaturation ratios is predicted in this work. Supersaturation ratio, representing the ratio between solute concentration and saturation solute concentration, determines nucleation of a bubble and development of the pore shape in the early stage. Pore formation and its shape in solid influence contemporary issues of biology, engineering, foods, geophysics and climate change, etc. This work extends and combines previous models accounting for realistic mass and momentum transport, and physico-chemical equilibrium of solute gas across the bubble cap to self-consistently determine shape of the bubble cap beyond the solidification front and the pore shape in solid. The study also deal with that pore formation can be resulted from three different mechanisms, depending on the directions and magnitude of solute gas transport across the bubble cap. Case 1 is subject to solute transport from the pore across the cap into the surrounding liquid in the early stage. Cases 2a and 2b indicate opposite direction of solute transport. In contrast to Case 2b, the effect of solute transport on solute gas pressure in the pore in Case 2a is stronger than that of pore volume expansionin the last stage. The results find that an increase in supersaturation ratio decreases pore radius and time for bubble entrapment in Case 1. The bubble cannot be entrapped in Case 2. The predicted pore shape in solid agrees with experimental data. Understanding, prediction and control of the growth of the pore shape have therefore been obtained.

  1. Determination of pore size distributions in capillary-channeled polymer fiber stationary phases by inverse size-exclusion chromatography and implications for fast protein separations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengxin; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2014-07-18

    Capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) fibers have been utilized as liquid chromatography stationary phases, primarily for biomacromolecule separations on the analytical and preparative scales. The collinear packing of the eight-channeled C-CP fibers provides for very efficient flow, allowing operation at high linear velocity (u>100mm s(-1)) and low backpressure (<2000psi) in analytical-scale separations. To take advantage of these fluid transport properties, there must not be mass transfer limitations as would be imposed by having an appreciably porous phase, wherein solute diffusion limits the overall mass transport rates. To better understand the physical nano-/micro- structure of C-CP fibers, inverse size exclusion chromatography (iSEC) has been employed to determine the pore size distribution (PSD) within C-CP fibers. A diversity of test species (from metal ions to large proteins) was used as probes under non-retaining conditions to obtain a response curve reflecting the apparent partition coefficient (Kd) versus hydrodynamic radii (rm). A mean pore radius (rp) of 4.2nm with standard deviation (sp) of ±1.1nm was calculated by fitting the Kd versus rm data to model equations with a Gaussian pore size distribution, and a pore radius of 4.0±0.1nm was calculated based on a log-normal distribution. The derived mean pore radius is much smaller than traditional support materials, with the standard deviation showing a relatively uniform pore distribution. van Deemter plots were analyzed to provide practical confirmation of the structural implications. Large molecules (e.g., proteins) that are fully excluded from pores have no significant C-terms in the van Deemter plots whereas small molecules that can access the pore volumes display appreciable C-terms, as expected. Fitting of retention data to the Knox equation suggests that the columns operate with a characteristic particle diameter (dp) of ∼53μm.

  2. Using X-Ray Computed Tomography in Pore Structure Characterization for a Berea Sandstone: Resolution Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Sheng; Hu, Qinhong; Dultz, Stefan; Zhang, Ming

    2012-11-23

    X-raycomputedtomography (XCT) is a powerful tool for detecting the micro-scale porestructure and has been applied to many natural and synthetic porous media. However, due to the resolution limitations, either non-representative view of the sample or inaccurate results can be produced from the XCT image processing. In this paper, two XCT (micro-CT and CT with synchrotron radiation) with different resolutions of 12.7 μm and 0.35 μm, as well as mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) with a minimum detection limit of 3 nm, were used for Berea sandstone to investigate the effect of detecting resolution on the porestructure. Several key porestructure parameters, including porosity, pore size distribution, pore connectivity, surface area, hydraulic radius, and aspect ratio were analyzed in a manner of quantitative comparison between different resolutions of XCT and MIP. The low resolution XCT can capture the large-pore porosity, while overestimates the pore size and pore connectivity. The high resolution XCT is more accurate in describing the pore shape, porosity, pore size; however, it is not representative since narrower detecting pore size range and small volume represented. A representative element volume related to large-pore porosity and probably large-pore connectivity with diameter and height of 2.8 mm is obtained through scale effect analysis. Therefore, selecting an appropriate resolution should be a compromise between the pore size and the representative element volume for the specific property or process of interest.

  3. ARVO: A Fortran package for computing the solvent accessible surface area and the excluded volume of overlapping spheres via analytic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buša, Ján; Džurina, Jozef; Hayryan, Edik; Hayryan, Shura; Hu, Chin-Kun; Plavka, Ján; Pokorný, Imrich; Skřivánek, Jaroslav; Wu, Ming-Chya

    2005-01-01

    In calculating the solvation energy of proteins, the hydration effects, drug binding, molecular docking, etc., it is important to have an efficient and exact algorithms for computing the solvent accessible surface area and the excluded volume of macromolecules. Here we present a Fortran package based on the new exact analytical methods for computing volume and surface area of overlapping spheres. In the considered procedure the surface area and volume are expressed as surface integrals of the second kind over the closed region. Using the stereographic projection the surface integrals are transformed to a sum of double integrals which are reduced to the curve integrals. MPI Fortran version is described as well. The package is also useful for computing the percolation probability of continuum percolation models. Program summaryTitle of program: ARVO Catalogue identifier: ADUL Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUL Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Operating system under which the program has been tested: LINUX system and Windows system Programming language used: FORTRAN Computer: PC Pentium; SPP'2000; Number of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 322 633 Number of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5051 Distribution format: tar.gz Card punching code: ASCII Nature of physical problem: Molecular mechanics computations, continuum percolations. Method of solution: Numerical algorithm based on the analytical formulas, after using the stereographic transformation. Restriction on the complexity of the problem: The program does not account explicitly for cavities inside the molecule. Typical running time: Depends on the size of the molecule under consideration. Unusual features of the program: No

  4. Effect of foam stability on pore coherence and mechanical properties of rubber latex based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsarevskii, V. B.; Irgen, L. A.

    1996-11-01

    The effect of a foaming agent, gelling agent, porous and nonporous fillers (silica gel and chalk) on the ability of latex foam to resist rupture of pore walls, the coherence of the pore volume, and the mechanical properties of foam rubber are investigated. It is demonstrated that the average size of the pores and the through junctions between pores can be increased by up to 1.5 times, their ratio by up to 1.5 times, and pore coherence by up to two times by varying compositional factors.

  5. X-ray CT analysis of pore structure in sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukunoki, Toshifumi; Miyata, Yoshihisa; Mikami, Kazuaki; Shiota, Erika

    2016-06-01

    The development of microfocused X-ray computed tomography (CT) devices enables digital imaging analysis at the pore scale. The applications of these devices are diverse in soil mechanics, geotechnical and geoenvironmental engineering, petroleum engineering, and agricultural engineering. In particular, the imaging of the pore space in porous media has contributed to numerical simulations for single-phase and multiphase flows or contaminant transport through the pore structure as three-dimensional image data. These obtained results are affected by the pore diameter; therefore, it is necessary to verify the image preprocessing for the image analysis and to validate the pore diameters obtained from the CT image data. Moreover, it is meaningful to produce the physical parameters in a representative element volume (REV) and significant to define the dimension of the REV. This paper describes the underlying method of image processing and analysis and discusses the physical properties of Toyoura sand for the verification of the image analysis based on the definition of the REV. On the basis of the obtained verification results, a pore-diameter analysis can be conducted and validated by a comparison with the experimental work and image analysis. The pore diameter is deduced from Young-Laplace's law and a water retention test for the drainage process. The results from previous study and perforated-pore diameter originally proposed in this study, called the voxel-percolation method (VPM), are compared in this paper. In addition, the limitations of the REV, the definition of the pore diameter, and the effectiveness of the VPM for an assessment of the pore diameter are discussed.

  6. A pore network model for adsorption in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Satik, Cengiz; Yortsos, Yanis C.

    1995-01-26

    Using a pore network model to represent porous media we investigate adsorption-desorption processes over the entire range of the relative pressure, highlighting in particular capillary condensation. The model incorporates recent advances from density functional theory for adsorption-desorption in narrow pores (of order as low as 1 nm), which improve upon the traditional multi-layer adsorption and Kelvin's equation for phase change and provide for the dependence of the critical pore size on temperature. The limited accessibility of the pore network gives rise to hysteresis in the adsorption-desorption cycle. This is due to the blocking of larger pores, where adsorbed liquid is allowed to but cannot desorb, by smaller pores containing liquid that may not desorb. By allowing for the existence of supercritical liquid in pores in the nm range, it is found that the hysteresis area increases with an increase in temperature, in agreement with experiments of water adsorption-desorption in rock samples from The Geysers. It is also found that the hysteresis increases if the porous medium is represented as a fractured (dual porosity) system. The paper finds applications to general adsorption-desorption problems but it is illustrated here for geothermal applications in The Geysers.

  7. Hydrate formation and growth in pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jong-Won; Santamarina, J. Carlos

    2012-04-01

    Gas hydrates consist of guest gas molecules encaged in water cages. Methane hydrate forms in marine and permafrost sediments. In this study, we use optical, mechanical and electrical measurements to monitor hydrate formation and growth in small pores to better understand the hydrate pore habit in hydrate-bearing sediments. Hydrate formation in capillary tubes exposes the complex and dynamic interactions between nucleation, gas diffusion and gas solubility. The observation of hydrate growth in a droplet between transparent plates shows that the hydrate shell does not grow homogeneously but advances in the form of lobes that invade the water phase; in fact, the hydrate shell must be discontinuous and possibly cracked to justify the relatively fast growth rates observed in these experiments. Volume expansion during hydrate formation causes water to flow out of menisci; expelled water either spreads on the surface of water-wet substrates and forms a thin hydrate sheet, or remains next to menisci when substrates are oil-wet. Hydrate formation is accompanied by ion exclusion, yet, there is an overall increase in electrical resistance during hydrate formation. Hydrate growth may become salt-limited in trapped water conditions; in this case, aqueous brine and gas CH4 may be separated by hydrate and the three-phase system remains stable within the pore space of sediments.

  8. Pore-scale supercritical CO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun; Zhou, Quanlin; Oostrom, Mart; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Mehta, Hardeep

    2017-02-01

    Recently, both core- and pore-scale imbibition experiments have shown non-equilibrium dissolution of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and a prolonged depletion of residual scCO2. In this study, pore-scale scCO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions were investigated using a two-dimensional heterogeneous micromodel and a novel fluorescent water dye with a sensitive pH range between 3.7 and 6.5. Drainage experiments were conducted at 9 MPa and 40 °C by injecting scCO2 into the sandstone-analogue pore network initially saturated by water without dissolved CO2 (dsCO2). During the experiments, time-lapse images of dye intensity, reflecting water pH, were obtained. These images show non-uniform pH in individual pores and pore clusters, with average pH levels gradually decreasing with time. Further analysis on selected pores and pore clusters shows that (1) rate-limited mass transfer prevails with slowly decreasing pH over time when the scCO2-water interface area is low with respect to the volume of water-filled pores and pore clusters, (2) fast scCO2 dissolution and phase equilibrium occurs when scCO2 bubbles invade into water-filled pores, significantly enhancing the area-to-volume ratio, and (3) a transition from rate-limited to diffusion-limited mass transfer occurs in a single pore when a medium area-to-volume ratio is prevalent. The analysis also shows that two fundamental processes - scCO2 dissolution at phase interfaces and diffusion of dsCO2 at the pore scale (10-100 μm) observed after scCO2 bubble invasion into water-filled pores without pore throat constraints - are relatively fast. The overall slow dissolution of scCO2 in the millimeter-scale micromodel can be attributed to the small area-to-volume ratios that represent pore-throat configurations and characteristics of phase interfaces. This finding is applicable for the behavior of dissolution at pore, core, and field scales when water-filled pores and pore clusters of varying size are surrounded

  9. Slow Desorption of Phenanthrene from Silica Particles: Influence of Pore Size, Pore Water, and Aging Time

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Fortman, Timothy J.; Riley, Robert G.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Wang, Zheming; Truex, Michael J.; Peyton, Brent M.

    2006-01-16

    When micro-porous and meso-porous silica particles were exposed to aqueous phenanthrene solutions for various durations it was observed that sorbed-phase phenanthrene concentrations increased with aging time only for meso-porous but not micro-porous silicas. Desorption equilibrium was reached almost instantaneously for the micro-porous particles while both the rate and extent of desorption decreased with increasing aging time for the meso-porous silicas. These findings indicate that phenanthrene can be sequestered within the internal pore-space of meso-porous silicas while the internal surfaces of micro-porous silicas are not accessible to phenanthrene sorption, possibly due to the presence of physi- or chemi-sorbed water that may sterically hinder the diffusion of phenanthrene inside water-filled micro-pores. By contrast, the internal surfaces of these micro-porous silicas are accessible to phenanthrene when aging methods are employed which assure that pores are devoid of physi-sorbed water. Consequently, when phenanthrene was incorporated into these particles using either supercritical CO2 or via solvent soaking, the aqueous desorption kinetics were extremely slow indicating effective sequestration of phenanthrene inside micro-porous particles. Finally, a two-compartment conceptual model is used to interpret the experimental findings.

  10. Pore size distribution in an uncompacted equilibrated ordinary chondrite

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, J.M.; Macke, R.J.; Wignarajah, D.P.; Rivers, M.L.; Britt, D.T.; Ebel, D.S.

    2008-05-30

    The extraordinarily uncompacted nature of the ordinary L chondrite fall Baszkowka gives a unique opportunity to investigate the potentially pre-compaction pore size distribution in an equilibrated ordinary chondrite. Using X-ray microtomography and helium pycnometry on two samples of Baszkowka, we have found that on average, two-thirds of the 19.0% porosity resides in inter- and intra-granular voids with volumes between {approx}3 x10{sup 05} and 3 mm{sup 3}. We show the cumulative number density of pore volumes observable by X-ray microtomography obeys a power law distribution function in this equilibrated ordinary chondrite. We foresee these data adding to our understanding of the impact processing of chondrites and their parent asteroids, where porosity and pore size play significant roles in the parameterization of impact events.

  11. Evolution of Micro-Pores in a Single-Crystal Nickel-Based Superalloy During Solution Heat Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangwei; Wang, Li; Dong, Jiasheng; Lou, Langhong; Zhang, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Evolution of micro-pores in a third-generation single-crystal nickel-based superalloy during solution heat treatment at 1603 K (1330 °C) was investigated by X-ray computed tomography. 3D information including morphology, size, number, and volume fraction of micro-pores formed during solidification (S-pores) and solution (H-pores) was analyzed. The growth behaviors of both S-pores and H-pores can be related to the vacancy formation and diffusion during heat treatment.

  12. Pore network and pore scale modeling of reactive transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Vu, T. M.; Varloteaux, C.; Bekri, S.

    2012-12-01

    dominant diffusion to the one of perfect mixing (with a constant concentration). Then, the three macroscopic parameters governing the solute displacement are successfully compared as well as the reaction regimes. Note that the resolution of one reactive transport problem requires 48 hours and 3 gigabytes of random access memory for PSM and only a few seconds and 100 megabytes for PNM. The second pore-network is mostly used to bring a new reaction regime into light. According to the classical classification of Daccord et al (1993), three main regimes occur during a surface reaction depending on the Péclet and Péclet Dahmkohler numbers Pe and PeDa, namely a uniform reaction for low PeDa, a flow path reaction for high PeDa and high Pe (with wormholing) and a compact reaction for high PeDa and low Pe (with formation of a vuggy porosity). A new reaction regime can occur which depends on the localization and on the diameter of the greatest elements of the porous medium compared to the main flow path. This new reaction regime can have major consequences on the macroscopic behavior of the solute in reservoir simulators. Finally, application of PNM is made on a large irregular network reconstructed from micro-tomography images.

  13. Restricted access: on the nature of adsorption/desorption hysteresis in amorphous, microporous polymeric materials.

    PubMed

    Jeromenok, Jekaterina; Weber, Jens

    2013-10-22

    The phenomenon of low-pressure adsorption/desorption hysteresis, which is commonly observed in microporous polymers, is investigated by detailed gas adsorption studies. Diffusional limitations by pore blocking effects, which arise as a consequence of the micropore morphology and connectivity, are discussed as the origin of the hysteresis rather than swelling effects, which have been suggested previously. Micropores with narrow openings, which cannot be filled easily, are expected to be present next to open pores. Those pores are termed restricted-access pores and are only filled in the course of the adsorption process as a consequence of the increasing solvation pressure exhibited from already filled micropores. As a consequence of the results presented here, it is suggested to use the desorption branch in addition to the adsorption branch for the extraction of the porosity characteristics, such as specific surface area, pore volume, and pore size distribution. The magnitude of the low-pressure hysteresis might hence give an idea of the micropore connectivity, which is important information for potential applications.

  14. Triggered pore-forming agents

    DOEpatents

    Bayley, Hagan; Walker, Barbara J.; Chang, Chung-yu; Niblack, Brett; Panchal, Rekha

    1998-01-01

    An inactive pore-forming agent which is activated to lytic function by a condition such as pH, light, heat, reducing potential, or metal ion concentration, or substance such as a protease, at the surface of a cell.

  15. Distributed pore model for bio-molecule chromatography.

    PubMed

    Coquebert de Neuville, Bertrand; Tarafder, Abhijit; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2013-07-12

    One of the main peculiarities in protein chromatography is that the adsorbing proteins and the adsorbent pores have comparable sizes. This has the consequence that the pore accessibility depends not only on the solute size but also on the loading conditions of the adsorbent because protein adsorption significantly reduces the size of the pores. A model that accounts for the pore size distribution of the stationary phase and for the pore shrinkage due to protein adsorption has been developed to describe mass transport and adsorption in the porous particles. This model has been shown to be equivalent to the general rate model (GRM) in the case of processes under highly diluted conditions with little adsorption. This implies that the model parameters determination follows the same procedure as for the classical GRM. The new pore model has been applied and compared to the GRM for the simulation of lysozyme breakthrough experiments and for the prediction of 5% dynamic binding capacity values solely based on static capacity measurements.

  16. Precipitation in pores: A geochemical frontier

    DOE PAGES

    Stack, Andrew G.

    2015-07-29

    This article's purpose is to review some of the recent research in which geochemists have examined precipitation of solid phases in porous media, particularly in pores a few nanometers in diameter (nanopores). While this is a “review,” it is actually more forward-looking in that the list of things about this phenomenon that we do not know or cannot control at this time is likely longer than what we do know and can control. For example, there are three directly contradictory theories on how to predict how precipitation proceeds in a medium of varying pore size, as will be discussed below.more » The confusion on this subject likely stems from the complexity of the phenomenon itself: One can easily clog a porous medium by inducing a rapid, homogeneous precipitation directly from solution, or have limited precipitation occur that does not affect permeability or even porosity substantially. It is more difficult to engineer mineral precipitation in order to obtain a specific outcome, such as filling all available pore space over a targeted area for the purposes of contaminant sequestration. However, breakthrough discoveries could occur in the next five to ten years that enhance our ability to predict robustly and finely control precipitation in porous media by understanding how porosity and permeability evolve in response to system perturbations. These discoveries will likely stem (at least in part) from advances in our ability to 1) perform and interpret X-ray/neutron scattering experiments that reveal the extent of precipitation and its locales within porous media (Anovitz and Cole 2015, this volume), and 2) utilize increasingly powerful simulations to test concepts and models about the evolution of porosity and permeability as precipitation occurs (Steefel et al. 2015, this volume). A further important technique to isolate specific phenomena and understand reactivity is also microfluidics cell experiments that allow specific control of flow paths and fluid

  17. Precipitation in pores: A geochemical frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Stack, Andrew G.

    2015-07-29

    This article's purpose is to review some of the recent research in which geochemists have examined precipitation of solid phases in porous media, particularly in pores a few nanometers in diameter (nanopores). While this is a “review,” it is actually more forward-looking in that the list of things about this phenomenon that we do not know or cannot control at this time is likely longer than what we do know and can control. For example, there are three directly contradictory theories on how to predict how precipitation proceeds in a medium of varying pore size, as will be discussed below. The confusion on this subject likely stems from the complexity of the phenomenon itself: One can easily clog a porous medium by inducing a rapid, homogeneous precipitation directly from solution, or have limited precipitation occur that does not affect permeability or even porosity substantially. It is more difficult to engineer mineral precipitation in order to obtain a specific outcome, such as filling all available pore space over a targeted area for the purposes of contaminant sequestration. However, breakthrough discoveries could occur in the next five to ten years that enhance our ability to predict robustly and finely control precipitation in porous media by understanding how porosity and permeability evolve in response to system perturbations. These discoveries will likely stem (at least in part) from advances in our ability to 1) perform and interpret X-ray/neutron scattering experiments that reveal the extent of precipitation and its locales within porous media (Anovitz and Cole 2015, this volume), and 2) utilize increasingly powerful simulations to test concepts and models about the evolution of porosity and permeability as precipitation occurs (Steefel et al. 2015, this volume). A further important technique to isolate specific phenomena and understand reactivity is also microfluidics cell experiments that allow specific control of flow paths and fluid velocities

  18. Tailoring the pore size of hypercrosslinked polymer foams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W.P. Jr.; Mitchell, M.A.; Apen, P.G.

    1996-12-31

    Organic analogues to inorganic zeolites would be a significant step forward in engineered porous materials and would provide advantages in range, selectivity, tailorability and processing. Rigid molecular foams or organic zeolites would not be crystalline materials and could be tailored over a broader range of pore sizes and volumes. A novel process for preparing hypercrosslinked polymeric foams has been developed via a Friedel-Crafts polycondensation reaction. A series of rigid hypercrosslinked foams have been prepared using simple rigid polyaromatic hydrocarbons including benzene, biphenyl, m-terphenyl, diphenylmethane, and polystyrene, with p-dichloroxylene (DCX) or divinylbenzene (DVB) as the crosslinking agent. Transparent gels are formed suggesting a very small pore size. After drying the foams are robust and rigid. Densities of the resulting foams can range from 0.15 g/cc to 0.75 g/cc. Nitrogen adsorption studies have shown that by judiciously selecting monomers and crosslinking agent along with the level of crosslinking and the cure time of the resulting gel, the pore size, pore size distribution, and the total surface area of the foam can be tailored. Surface areas range from 160 to 1,200 m{sup 2}/g with pore sizes ranging from 6{angstrom} to 2,000{angstrom}. Further evidence of the uniformity of the foams and their pore sizes has been confirmed by high resolution TEM.

  19. Pore Scale Analysis of Oil Shale/Sands Pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chen-Luh; Miller, Jan

    2011-03-01

    There are important questions concerning the quality and volume of pore space that is created when oil shale is pyrolyzed for the purpose of producing shale oil. In this report, 1.9 cm diameter cores of Mahogany oil shale were pyrolyzed at different temperatures and heating rates. Detailed 3D imaging of core samples was done using multiscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) before and after pyrolysis to establish the pore structure. The pore structure of the unreacted material was not clear. Selected images of a core pyrolyzed at 400oC were obtained at voxel resolutions from 39 microns (Οm) to 60 nanometers (nm). Some of the pore space created during pyrolysis was clearly visible at these resolutions and it was possible to distinguish between the reaction products and the host shale rock. The pore structure deduced from the images was used in Lattice Boltzmann simulations to calculate the permeability in the pore space. The permeabilities of the pyrolyzed samples of the silicate-rich zone were on the order of millidarcies, while the permeabilities of the kerogen-rich zone after pyrolysis were very anisotropic and about four orders of magnitude higher.

  20. Mangrove pore water exchange across a latitudinal gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Douglas R.; Maher, Damien T.; Macklin, Paul A.; Santos, Isaac R.

    2016-04-01

    We combined observations of the natural tracer radon (222Rn) with hydrodynamic models across a broad latitudinal gradient covering several climate zones to estimate pore water exchange rates in mangroves. Pore water exchange ranged from 2.1 to 35.5 cm d-1 from temperate to tropical regions and averaged 16.3 ± 5.1 cm d-1. If upscaled to the global weighted mangrove area, pore water exchange in mangroves would recirculate the entire volume of water overlying the continental shelf in less than 153 years. Although pore water exchange (recirculated seawater) and river discharge represent different pathways for water entering the coastal ocean, the estimated global mangrove pore water exchange would be equal to approximately one third of annual global river discharge to the ocean (3.84 × 1013 m3 yr-1). Because biogeochemical processes in mangroves are largely dependent on pore water exchange, these large exchange rates have major implications for coastal nutrient, carbon, and greenhouse gas cycling in tropical marine systems.

  1. Predicting the Influence of Pore Characteristics on Ductility of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die Casting Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Li, Dongsheng

    2013-06-10

    In this paper, a two-dimensional microstructure-based finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die casting Mg materials on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM50 and AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope to obtain the overall information on the pore characteristics. The experimentally quantified pore characteristics are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructures with different pore sizes, pore volume fractions and pore size distributions. Pores are explicitly represented in the synthetic microstructures and meshed out for the subsequent finite element analysis. In the finite element analysis, an intrinsic critical strain value is used for the Mg matrix material, beyond which work-hardening is no longer permissible. With no artificial failure criterion prescribed, ductility levels are predicted for the various microstructures in the form of strain localization. Mesh size effect study is also conducted, from which a mesh size dependent critical strain curve is determined. A concept of scalability of pore size effects is then presented and examined with the use of the mesh size dependent critical strain curve. The results in this study show that, for the regions with lower pore size and lower volume fraction, the ductility generally decreases as the pore size and pore volume fraction increase whereas, for the regions with larger pore size and larger pore volume fraction, other factors such as the mean distance between the pores begin to have some substantial influence on the ductility. The results also indicate that the pore size effects may be scalable for the models with good-representative pore shape and distribution with the use of the mesh size dependent critical strain curve.

  2. Comparative study of pore structure evolution during solvent and thermal debinding of powder injection molded parts

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K.S.; Hsieh, Y.M.

    1996-02-01

    The solvent debinding process has been widely accepted in the powder injection molding (PIM) industry due to its short debinding cycle. In the current study, specimens were immersed in a heptane bath for different lengths of time, and the pore structure evolvement in the compact was analyzed. Mercury porosimetry analyses and scanning electron micrographs showed that the binder extraction started from the surface and progressed toward the center of the compacts. As the debinding continued, the pores grew and were widely distributed in size. This pore structure evolvement was different from that of straight thermal debinding in which the pore size distribution was quite narrow and the mean pore diameter shifted toward smaller sizes as debinding time increased. After the soluble binders were extracted, parts were subjected to a subsequent thermal debinding during which these pores served as conduits for decomposed gas to escape. Concurrently, the remaining binder became fluidlike and was redistributed within the compact due to capillarity. This pore structure, as observed from the mercury intrusion curves, showed a sharp increase in the pore volume at the 0.8-{micro}m size, followed by a series of fine pores, which is different from the pore structure of straight thermal debinding. The difference in the pore structure evolvement between solvent and thermal debinding and its effect on the debinding rate are discussed.

  3. Gas Hydrate and Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinivella, Umberta; Giustiniani, Michela

    2014-05-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to quantify excess pore pressures related to gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments below the BSR using several approaches. Dissociation of gas hydrates in proximity of the BSR, in response to a change in the physical environment (i.e., temperature and/or pressure regime), can liberate excess gas incrising the local pore fluid pressure in the sediment, so decreasing the effective normal stress. So, gas hydrate dissociation may lead to excess pore pressure resulting in sediment deformation or failure, such as submarine landslides, sediment slumping, pockmarks and mud volcanoes, soft-sediment deformation and giant hummocks. Moreover, excess pore pressure may be the result of gas hydrate dissociation due to continuous sedimentation, tectonic uplift, sea level fall, heating or inhibitor injection. In order to detect the presence of the overpressure below the BSR, we propose two approachs. The fist approach models the BSR depth versus pore pressure; in fact, if the free gas below the BSR is in overpressure condition, the base of the gas hydrate stability is deeper with respect to the hydrostatic case. This effect causes a discrepancy between seismic and theoretical BSR depths. The second approach models the velocities versus gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and pore pressure, considering the approximation of the Biot theory in case of low frequency, i.e. seismic frequency. Knowing the P and S seismic velocity from seismic data analysis, it is possibile to jointly estimate the gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and the pore pressure regime. Alternatively, if the S-wave velocity is not availbale (due to lack of OBS/OBC data), an AVO analysis can be performed in order to extract information about Poisson ratio. Our modeling suggests that the areas characterized by shallow waters (i.e., areas in which human infrastructures, such as pipelines, are present) are significantly affected by the presence of overpressure condition

  4. Geostatistical Modeling of Pore Velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Devary, J.L.; Doctor, P.G.

    1981-06-01

    A significant part of evaluating a geologic formation as a nuclear waste repository involves the modeling of contaminant transport in the surrounding media in the event the repository is breached. The commonly used contaminant transport models are deterministic. However, the spatial variability of hydrologic field parameters introduces uncertainties into contaminant transport predictions. This paper discusses the application of geostatistical techniques to the modeling of spatially varying hydrologic field parameters required as input to contaminant transport analyses. Kriging estimation techniques were applied to Hanford Reservation field data to calculate hydraulic conductivity and the ground-water potential gradients. These quantities were statistically combined to estimate the groundwater pore velocity and to characterize the pore velocity estimation error. Combining geostatistical modeling techniques with product error propagation techniques results in an effective stochastic characterization of groundwater pore velocity, a hydrologic parameter required for contaminant transport analyses.

  5. Restricted Transport in Small Pores

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John L.; Quinn, John A.

    1974-01-01

    The basic hydrodynamic equations governing transport in submicron pores are reexamined. Conditions necessary for a simplified, one-dimensional treatment of the diffusion/convection process are established. Steric restrictions and Brownian motion are incorporated directly into the resulting model. Currently available fluid mechanical results are used to evaluate an upper limit on hindered diffusion; this limit is valid for small particle-to-pore ratios. Extensions of the analysis are shown to depend on numerical solutions of the related hydrodynamic problem, that of asymmetrical particle motion in a bounded fluid. PMID:4813157

  6. Reactive transport in porous media for CO2 sequestration: Pore scale modeling using the lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinfang; Xing, Huilin; Tian, Zhiwei; Pearce, Julie K.; Sedek, Mohamed; Golding, Suzanne D.; Rudolph, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Injection of CO2 subsurface may lead to chemical reactivity of rock where CO2 is dissolved in groundwater. This process can modify pore networks to increase or decrease porosity through mineral dissolution and precipitation. A lattice Boltzmann (LB) based computational model study on the pore scale reactive transport in three dimensional heterogeneous porous media (sandstone consisting of both reactive and non-reactive minerals) is described. This study examines how fluid transport in porous materials subject to reactive conditions is affected by unsteady state local reactions and unstable dissolution fronts. The reaction of a calcite cemented core sub-plug from the Hutton Sandstone of the Surat Basin, Australia, is used as a study case. In particular, the work studies the interaction of acidic fluid (an aqueous solution with an elevated concentration of carbonic acid) with reactive (e.g. calcite) and assumed non-reactive (e.g. quartz) mineral surfaces, mineral dissolution and mass transfer, and resultant porosity change. The proposed model is implemented in our custom LBM code and suitable for studies of multiple mineral reactions with disparate reaction rates. A model for carbonic acid reaction with calcite cemented sandstone in the CO2-water-rock system is verified through laboratory experimental data including micro-CT characterization before and after core reaction at reservoir conditions. The experimentally validated model shows: (1) the dissolution of calcite cement forms conductive channels at the pore scale, and enables the generation of pore throats and connectivity; (2) the model is able to simulate the reaction process until the reaction equilibrium status is achieved (around 1440 days); (3) calcite constituting a volume of around 9.6% of the whole core volume is dissolved and porosity is consequently increased from 1.1% to 10.7% on reaching equilibrium; (4) more than a third of the calcite (constituting 7.4% of the total core volume) is unaffected

  7. Effects of Pore Distributions on Ductility of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die-Cast Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Li, Mei; Allison, John

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a microstructure-based three-dimensional (3D) finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die-cast (HPDC) Magnesium alloys on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope and X-ray tomography to obtain the general information on the pore distribution features. The experimentally observed pore distribution features are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element models with different pore volume fractions and pore distribution features. Shear and ductile damage models are adopted in the finite element analyses to induce the fracture by element removal, leading to the prediction of ductility. The results in this study show that the ductility monotonically decreases as the pore volume fraction increases and that the effect of ‘skin region’ on the ductility is noticeable under the condition of same local pore volume fraction in the center region of the sample and its existence can be beneficial for the improvement of ductility. The further synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element analyses are planned to investigate the effects of pore size and pore size distribution.

  8. Activated carbon from char obtained from vacuum pyrolysis of teak sawdust: pore structure development and characterization.

    PubMed

    Ismadji, S; Sudaryanto, Y; Hartono, S B; Setiawan, L E K; Ayucitra, A

    2005-08-01

    The preparation of activated carbon from vacuum pyrolysis char of teak sawdust was studied and the results are presented in this paper. The effects of process variables such as temperature and activation time on the pore structure of activated carbons were studied. The activated carbon prepared from char obtained by vacuum pyrolysis has higher surface area and pore volume than that from atmospheric pyrolysis char. The BET surface area and pore volume of activated carbon prepared from vacuum pyrolysis char were 1150 m2/g and 0.43 cm3/g, respectively.

  9. Pore morphologies of root induced biopores from single pore to network scale investigated by XRCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peth, Stephan; Wittig, Marlen C.; Uteau Puschmann, Daniel; Pagenkemper, Sebastian; Haas, Christoph; Holthusen, Dörthe; Horn, Rainer

    2015-04-01

    Biopores are assumed to be an important factor for nutrient acquisition by providing biologically highly active soil-root interfaces to re-colonizing roots and controlling oxygen and water flows at the pedon scale and within the rhizosphere through the formation of branching channel networks which potentially enhance microbial turnover processes. Characteristic differences in pore morphologies are to be expected depending on the genesis of biopores which, for example, can be earthworm-induced or root-induced or subsequently modified by one of the two. Our understanding of biophysical interactions between plants and soil can be significantly improved by quantifying 3D biopore architectures across scales ranging from single biopores to pedon scale pore networks and linking pore morphologies to microscale measurements of transport processes (e.g. oxygen diffusion). While a few studies in the past have investigated biopore networks on a larger scale yet little is known on the micro-morphology of root-induces biopores and their associated rhizosphere. Also little data is available on lateral transport of oxygen through the rhizosphere which will strongly influence microbial turnover processes and consequently control the release and uptake of nutrients. This paper highlights results gathered within a research unit on nutrient acquisition from the subsoil. Here we focus on X-ray microtomography (XRCT) studies ranging from large soil columns (70 cm length and 20 cm diameter) to individual biopores and its surrounding rhizosphere. Samples were collected from sites with different preceding crops (fescue, chicory, alfalfa) and various cropping durations (1-3 years). We will present an approach for quantitative image analysis combined with micro-sensor measurements of oxygen diffusion and spatial gradients of O2 partial pressures to relate pore structure with transport functions. Implications of various biopore architectures for the accessibility of nutrient resources in

  10. Pore Water Transport of Enterococci out of Beach Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Matthew C.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Reniers, Adrianus J. H. M.; Wang, John D.; Kiger, Russell T.; Abdel-Mottaleb, Noha

    2011-01-01

    Enterococci are used to evaluate the safety of beach waters and studies have identified beach sands as a source of these bacteria. In order to study and quantify the release of microbes from beach sediments, flow column systems were built to evaluate flow of pore water out of beach sediments. Results show a peak in enterococci (average of 10% of the total microbes in core) released from the sand core within one pore water volume followed by a marked decline to below detection. These results indicate that few enterococci are easily removed and that factors other than simple pore water flow control the release of the majority of enterococci within beach sediments. A significantly larger quantity and release of enterococci were observed in cores collected after a significant rain event suggesting the influx of fresh water can alter the release pattern as compared to cores with no antecedent rainfall. PMID:21945015

  11. GATED PORES IN THE FERRITIN PROTEIN NANOCAGE

    PubMed Central

    Theil, Elizabeth C.; Liu, Xiaofeng S.; Tosha, Takehiko

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis and pictogram: Gated pores in the ferritin family of protein nanocages, illustrated in the pictogram, control transfer of ferrous iron into and out of the cages by regulating contact between hydrated ferric oxide mineral inside the protein cage, and reductants such as FMNH2 on the outside. The structural and functional homology between the gated ion channel proteins in inaccessible membranes and gated ferritin pores in the stable, water soluble nanoprotein, make studies of ferritin pores models for gated pores in many ion channel proteins. Properties of ferritin gated pores, which control rates of FMNH2 reduction of ferric iron in hydrated oxide minerals inside the protein nanocage, are discussed in terms of the conserved pore gate residues (arginine 72-apspartate 122 and leucine 110-leucine 134), of pore sensitivity to heat at temperatures 30 °C below that of the nanocage itself, and of pore sensitivity to physiological changes in urea (1–10 mM). Conditions which alter ferritin pore structure/function in solution, coupled with the high evolutionary conservation of the pore gates, suggest the presence of molecular regulators in vivo that recognize the pore gates and hold them either closed or open, depending on biological iron need. The apparent homology between ferrous ion transport through gated pores in the ferritin nanocage and ion transport through gated pores in ion channel proteins embedded in cell membranes, make studies of water soluble ferritin and the pore gating folding/unfolding a useful model for other gated pores. PMID:19262678

  12. Smectic pores and defect cores

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Elisabetta A.; Kamien, Randall D.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2012-01-01

    Riemann's minimal surfaces, a one-parameter family of minimal surfaces, describe a bicontinuous lamellar system with pores connecting alternating layers. We demonstrate explicitly that Riemann's minimal surfaces are composed of a nonlinear sum of two oppositely handed helicoids. PMID:24098846

  13. Membrane pores induced by magainin

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtke, S.J.; He, Ke; Heller, W.T.

    1996-10-29

    Magainin, found in the skin of Xenopus laevis, belongs to a broad class of antimicrobial peptides which kill bacteria by permeabilizing the cytoplasmic membrane but do not lyse eukaryotic cells. The 23-residue peptide has been shown to form an amphiphilic helix when associated with membranes. However, its molecular mechanism of action has been controversial. Oriented circular dichroism has detected helical magainin oriented perpendicular to the plane of the membrane at high peptide concentrations, but Raman, fluorescence, differential scanning calorimetry, and NMR all indicate that the peptide is associated with the head groups of the lipid bilayer. Here we show that neutron in-plane scattering detects pores formed by magainin 2 in membranes only when a substantial fraction of the peptide is oriented perpendicular to the membrane. The pores are almost twice as large as the alamethicin pores. On the basis of the in-plane scattering data, we propose a toroidal (or wormhole) model, which differs from the barrel-stave model of alamethicin in that the lipid bends back on itself like the inside of a torus. The bending requires a lateral expansion in the head group region of the bilayer. Magainin monomers play the role of fillers in the expansion region thereby stabilizing the pore. This molecular configuration is consistent with all published magainin data. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Triggered pore-forming agents

    DOEpatents

    Bayley, H.; Walker, B.J.; Chang, C.Y.; Niblack, B.; Panchal, R.

    1998-07-07

    An inactive pore-forming agent is revealed which is activated to lytic function by a condition such as pH, light, heat, reducing potential, or metal ion concentration, or substance such as a protease, at the surface of a cell. 30 figs.

  15. Extending electromagnetic methods to map coastal pore water salinities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenwood, Wm. J.; Kruse, S.; Swarzenski, P.

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of mapping pore water salinity based on surface electromagnetic (EM) methods over land and shallow marine water is examined in a coastal wetland on Tampa Bay, Florida. Forward models predict that useful information on seabed conductivity can be obtained through <1.5 m of saline water, using floating EM-31 and EM-34 instruments from Geonics Ltd. The EM-31 functioned as predicted when compared against resistivity soundings and pore water samples and proved valuable for profiling in otherwise inaccessible terrain due to its relatively small size. Experiments with the EM-34 in marine water, however, did not reproduce the theoretical instrument response. The most effective technique for predicting pore water conductivities based on EM data entailed (1) computing formation factors from resistivity surveys and pore water samples at representative sites and (2) combining these formation factors with onshore and offshore EM-31 readings for broader spatial coverage. This method proved successful for imaging zones of elevated pore water conductivities/ salinities associated with mangrove forests, presumably caused by salt water exclusion by mangrove roots. These zones extend 5 to 10 m seaward from mangrove trunks fringing Tampa Bay. Modeling indicates that EM-31 measurements lack the resolution necessary to image the subtle pore water conductivity variations expected in association with diffuse submarine ground water discharge of fresher water in the marine water of Tampa Bay. The technique has potential for locating high-contrast zones and other pore water salinity anomalies in areas not accessible to conventional marine- or land-based resistivity arrays and hence may be useful for studies of coastal-wetland ecosystems. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  16. The effect of electrical conductivity on pore resistance and electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianbo; Lin, Hao

    2008-11-01

    Electroporation is an elegant means to gain access to the cytoplasm, and to deliver molecules into the cell while simultaneously maintaining viability and functionality. In this technique, an applied electric pulse transiently permeabilizes the cell membrane, through which biologically active agents such as DNA, RNA, and amino acids can enter the cell, and perform tasks such as gene and cancer therapy. Despite wide applications, current electroporation technologies fall short of desired efficiency and reliability, in part due to the lack of fundamental understanding and quantitative modeling tools. This work focuses on the modeling of cell membrane conductance due to the formation of aqueous conducting pores. An analytical expression is developed to determine effective pore resistance as a function of the membrane thickness, pore size, and intracellular and extracellular conductivities. The availability of this expression avoids empirical or ad hoc specification of the conductivity of the pore-filling solution which was adopted in previous works. Such pore resistance model is then incorporated into a whole-cell electroporation simulation to investigate the effect of conductivity ratio on membrane permeabilization. The results reveal that the degree of permeabilization strongly depends on the specific values of the extracellular and intracellular conductivities.

  17. The role of pore geometry in single nanoparticle detection

    DOE PAGES

    Davenport, Matthew; Healy, Ken; Pevarnik, Matthew; ...

    2012-08-22

    In this study, we observe single nanoparticle translocation events via resistive pulse sensing using silicon nitride pores described by a range of lengths and diameters. Pores are prepared by focused ion beam milling in 50 nm-, 100 nm-, and 500 nm-thick silicon nitride membranes with diameters fabricated to accommodate spherical silica nanoparticles with sizes chosen to mimic that of virus particles. In this manner, we are able to characterize the role of pore geometry in three key components of the detection scheme, namely, event magnitude, event duration, and event frequency. We find that the electric field created by the appliedmore » voltage and the pore’s geometry is a critical factor. We develop approximations to describe this field, which are verified with computer simulations, and interactions between particles and this field. In so doing, we formulate what we believe to be the first approximation for the magnitude of ionic current blockage that explicitly addresses the invariance of access resistance of solid-state pores during particle translocation. These approximations also provide a suitable foundation for estimating the zeta potential of the particles and/or pore surface when studied in conjunction with event durations. We also verify that translocation achieved by electro-osmostic transport is an effective means of slowing translocation velocities of highly charged particles without compromising particle capture rate as compared to more traditional approaches based on electrophoretic transport.« less

  18. The role of pore geometry in single nanoparticle detection

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, Matthew; Healy, Ken; Pevarnik, Matthew; Teslich, Nick; Cabrini, Stefano; Morrison, Alan P.; Siwy, Zuzanna S.; Letant, Sonia E.

    2012-08-22

    In this study, we observe single nanoparticle translocation events via resistive pulse sensing using silicon nitride pores described by a range of lengths and diameters. Pores are prepared by focused ion beam milling in 50 nm-, 100 nm-, and 500 nm-thick silicon nitride membranes with diameters fabricated to accommodate spherical silica nanoparticles with sizes chosen to mimic that of virus particles. In this manner, we are able to characterize the role of pore geometry in three key components of the detection scheme, namely, event magnitude, event duration, and event frequency. We find that the electric field created by the applied voltage and the pore’s geometry is a critical factor. We develop approximations to describe this field, which are verified with computer simulations, and interactions between particles and this field. In so doing, we formulate what we believe to be the first approximation for the magnitude of ionic current blockage that explicitly addresses the invariance of access resistance of solid-state pores during particle translocation. These approximations also provide a suitable foundation for estimating the zeta potential of the particles and/or pore surface when studied in conjunction with event durations. We also verify that translocation achieved by electro-osmostic transport is an effective means of slowing translocation velocities of highly charged particles without compromising particle capture rate as compared to more traditional approaches based on electrophoretic transport.

  19. Novel method for stratum corneum pore size determination using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Yoshiaki; Shimazu, Akira; Sadzuka, Yasuyuki; Sonobe, Takashi; Itai, Shigeru

    2008-06-24

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is a powerful tool for the investigation of microstructure. Three main classes of materials, metals, semiconductors and polymers, have been studied by using this technique. But, relatively few investigations have been performed in the biological sciences. PALS provides important information on pore properties and free volume at the molecular level. Our PALS study showed that Yucatan miniature pig stratum corneum separated with heat and trypsin digestion had a longer positron annihilation lifetime than cyclodextrins. This indicates that the stratum corneum has larger pores and/or free volume than cyclodextrins, whose pores have a diameter of 0.5-0.8 nm and a torus height of 0.79 nm. Positron annihilation spectroscopy may be developed as a new technique for the detection of nano-pore properties and free volume in the biological sciences.

  20. National Crime Information Center Mandatory Minimum Standards Curriculum for Full Access Terminal Operators. Volume One--Administrative Issues, Policy and the Interstate Identification Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Bureau of Investigation, Washington, DC. National Crime Information Center.

    This document is the first volume of a two-volume set of lesson plans which together make up a complete training package for full-service terminal operators. The lesson plans are designed to ensure that a state's National Crime Information Center (NCIC) training program meets Advisory Policy Board standards. (NCIC is a nationwide computerized…

  1. Biogenesis of the pore architecture of a voltage-gated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Christine; Dagcan, Alper; Roux, Benoit; Deutsch, Carol

    2011-02-22

    The pore domain of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels consists of transmembrane helices S5 and S6, the turret, the pore helix, the selectivity filter, and the loop preceding S6, with a tertiary reentrant structure between S5 and S6. Using biogenic intermediates, mass tagging (pegylation), and a molecular tape measure, we explored the possibility that the first stages of pore formation occur prior to oligomerization of the transmembrane core. Pegylation of introduced cysteines shows that the pore helix, but not the turret, forms a compact secondary structure in the terminal 20 Å of the ribosomal tunnel. We assessed the tertiary fold of the pore loop in monomeric constructs by determining the relative accessibilities of select cysteines using the kinetics of pegylation. Turret residues are accessible at the extracellular surface. In contrast, pore helix residues are less accessible. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of a single Kv monomer in a solvated lipid membrane indicate that secondary and tertiary folds are stable over 650 ns. These results are consistent with acquisition of a tertiary reentrant pore architecture at the monomer stage of Kv biogenesis and begin to define a plausible sequence of folding events in the formation of Kv channels.

  2. A large-cavity zeolite with wide pore windows and potential as an oil refining catalyst.

    PubMed

    Corma, Avelino; Díaz-Cabañas, María J; Martínez-Triguero, Joaquín; Rey, Fernando; Rius, Jordi

    2002-08-01

    Crude oil is an important feedstock for the petrochemical industry and the dominant energy source driving the world economy, but known oil reserves will cover demand for no more than 50 years at the current rate of consumption. This situation calls for more efficient strategies for converting crude oil into fuel and petrochemical products. At present, more than 40% of oil conversion is achieved using catalysts based on faujasite; this zeolite requires extensive post-synthesis treatment to produce an ultrastable form, and has a large cavity accessible through four 0.74-nm-wide windows and thus limits the access of oil molecules to the catalytically active sites. The use of zeolites with better accessibility to their active sites should result in improved catalyst efficiency. To date, two zeolites with effective pore diameters exceeding that of faujasite have been reported, but their one-dimensional pore topology excludes use in oil refining. Similarly, zeolites with large pores and a three-dimensional pore topology have been reported, but in all these materials the pore openings are smaller than in faujasite. Here we report the synthesis of ITQ-21, a zeolite with a three-dimensional pore network containing 1.18-nm-wide cavities, each of which is accessible through six circular and 0.74-nm-wide windows. As expected for a zeolite with this structure, ITQ-21 exhibits high catalytic activity and selectivity for valuable products in preliminary oil refining tests.

  3. Pore-size distribution in loamy soils: A comparison between microtomographic and capillarimetric determination methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shein, E. V.; Skvortsova, E. B.; Dembovetskii, A. V.; Abrosimov, K. N.; Il'in, L. I.; Shnyrev, N. A.

    2016-03-01

    Pore-size distribution in a soddy-podzolic silt loamy soil developing from mantle loesslike loam (Eutric Albic Retisol (Loamic, Cutanic)) was calculated from the water retention curve according to Jurin's equation and directly determined in microtomographic experiments. Rounded macropores with the diameter of their sections from 75 to 1000 μm predominate in horizontal sections if the studied soil samples. A larger part of the soil pores (>30-35%) belongs to micro- and nanopores, and they cannot be quantitatively determined by the tomographic method, because their sizes are smaller than the detection limit of the applied X-ray microtomography (8.75 μm per pixel). This leads to a significantly larger pore volume determined from the water retention curve in comparison with the "tomographic" pore volume. A comparative analysis of pore-size distribution curves obtained by these methods shows that the major regularities of the pore-size distribution in the range from 30 to 5000 μm are similar in both cases. Fine macropores and, partly, mesopores predominate. Common characteristics of the pore-size distribution curves obtained by these methods, including the coincidence of the peaks, attest to the validity of classical approaches, according to which the hydrology of soil pore space can be perceived as a physical model of cylindrical capillaries of different sizes with capillary-sorbed water.

  4. Protein crystal nucleation in pores

    PubMed Central

    Nanev, Christo N.; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2017-01-01

    The most powerful method for protein structure determination is X-ray crystallography which relies on the availability of high quality crystals. Obtaining protein crystals is a major bottleneck, and inducing their nucleation is of crucial importance in this field. An effective method to form crystals is to introduce nucleation-inducing heterologous materials into the crystallization solution. Porous materials are exceptionally effective at inducing nucleation. It is shown here that a combined diffusion-adsorption effect can increase protein concentration inside pores, which enables crystal nucleation even under conditions where heterogeneous nucleation on flat surfaces is absent. Provided the pore is sufficiently narrow, protein molecules approach its walls and adsorb more frequently than they can escape. The decrease in the nucleation energy barrier is calculated, exhibiting its quantitative dependence on the confinement space and the energy of interaction with the pore walls. These results provide a detailed explanation of the effectiveness of porous materials for nucleation of protein crystals, and will be useful for optimal design of such materials. PMID:28091515

  5. Synchrotron microtomographic quantification of geometrical soil pore characteristics affected by compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udawatta, Ranjith P.; Gantzer, Clark J.; Anderson, Stephen H.; Assouline, Shmuel

    2016-05-01

    Soil compaction degrades soil structure and affects water, heat, and gas exchange as well as root penetration and crop production. The objective of this study was to use X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) techniques to compare differences in geometrical soil pore parameters as influenced by compaction of two different aggregate size classes. Sieved (diameter < 2 mm and < 0.5 mm) and repacked (1.51 and 1.72 Mg m-3) Hamra soil cores of 5 by 5 mm (average porosities were 0.44 and 0.35) were imaged at 9.6 μm resolution at the Argonne Advanced Photon Source (synchrotron facility) using X-ray CMT. Images of 58.9 mm3 volume were analyzed using 3-Dimensional Medial Axis (3-DMA) software. Geometrical characteristics of the spatial distributions of pore structures (pore radii, volume, connectivity, path length, and tortuosity) were numerically investigated. Results show that the coordination number (CN) distribution and path length (PL) measured from the medial axis were reasonably fit by exponential relationships P(CN) = 10-CN/Co and P(PL) = 10-PL/PLo, respectively, where Co and PLo are the corresponding characteristic constants. Compaction reduced porosity, average pore size, number of pores, and characteristic constants. The average pore radii (63.7 and 61 µm; p < 0.04), largest pore volume (1.58 and 0.58 mm3; p = 0.06), number of pores (55 and 50; p = 0.09), and characteristic coordination number (3.74 and 3.94; p = 0.02) were significantly different between the low-density than the high-density treatment. Aggregate size also influenced measured geometrical pore parameters. This analytical technique provides a tool for assessing changes in soil pores that affect hydraulic properties and thereby provides information to assist in assessment of soil management systems.

  6. DESIGN INFORMATION ON FINE PORE AERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies were conducted over several years at municipal wastewater treatment plants employing line pore diffused aeration systems. These studies were designed to produce reliable information on the performance and operational requirements of fine pore devices under process ...

  7. Atomistic Insight on the Charging Energetics in Sub-nanometer Pore Supercacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Rui; Huang, Jingsong; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Feng, Guang

    2010-01-01

    Electrodes featuring sub-nanometer pores can significantly enhance the capacitance and energy density of supercapacitors. However, ions must pay an energy penalty to enter sub-nanometer pores as they have to shed part of their solvation shell. The magnitude of such energy penalty plays a key role in determining the accessibility and charging/discharging of these sub-nanometer pores. Here we report on the atomistic simulation of Na+ and Cl ions entering a polarizable slit pore with a width of 0.82 nm. We show that the free energy penalty for these ions to enter the pore is less than 14 kJ/mol for both Na+ and Cl ions. The surprisingly small energy penalty is caused by the van der Waals attractions between ion and pore walls, the image charge effects, the moderate (19-26%) de-hydration of the ions inside the pore, and the strengthened interactions between ions and their hydration water molecules in the sub-nanometer pore. The results provide strong impetus for further developing nanoporous electrodes featuring sub- nanometer pores.

  8. Explaining glomerular pores with fiber matrices. A visualization study based on computer modeling.

    PubMed Central

    Booth, J W; Lumsden, C J

    1993-01-01

    The extracellular space of the glomerular capillary wall is occupied by a complex meshwork of fibrous molecules. Little is understood about how the size, shape, and charge recognition properties of glomerular ultrafiltration arise from this space-filling fiber matrix. We studied the problem of size recognition by visualizing the void volume accessible to hard spheres in computer-generated three-dimensional homogeneous random fiber matrices. The spatial organization of the void volume followed a complex "blob-and-throat" pattern in which circumscribed cavities of free space within the matrix ("blobs") were joined to adjacent cavities by narrower throats of void space. For sufficiently small solutes, chains of blobs and throats traversed the matrix, providing pathways for trans-matrix permeation. The matrices showed threshold or gating properties with respect to permeation: solutes whose radius exceeded a critical value, at which a throat on the last connected trans-matrix pathway pinched off, could not cross, whereas smaller solutes had nonzero permeability. The thresholds may give the glomerular fiber matrix porelike response properties and explain why pore models have been such a useful means of treating permselectivity. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:8369404

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance diffusion pore imaging: Experimental phase detection by double diffusion encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demberg, Kerstin; Laun, Frederik Bernd; Windschuh, Johannes; Umathum, Reiner; Bachert, Peter; Kuder, Tristan Anselm

    2017-02-01

    Diffusion pore imaging is an extension of diffusion-weighted nuclear magnetic resonance imaging enabling the direct measurement of the shape of arbitrarily formed, closed pores by probing diffusion restrictions using the motion of spin-bearing particles. Examples of such pores comprise cells in biological tissue or oil containing cavities in porous rocks. All pores contained in the measurement volume contribute to one reconstructed image, which reduces the problem of vanishing signal at increasing resolution present in conventional magnetic resonance imaging. It has been previously experimentally demonstrated that pore imaging using a combination of a long and a narrow magnetic field gradient pulse is feasible. In this work, an experimental verification is presented showing that pores can be imaged using short gradient pulses only. Experiments were carried out using hyperpolarized xenon gas in well-defined pores. The phase required for pore image reconstruction was retrieved from double diffusion encoded (DDE) measurements, while the magnitude could either be obtained from DDE signals or classical diffusion measurements with single encoding. The occurring image artifacts caused by restrictions of the gradient system, insufficient diffusion time, and by the phase reconstruction approach were investigated. Employing short gradient pulses only is advantageous compared to the initial long-narrow approach due to a more flexible sequence design when omitting the long gradient and due to faster convergence to the diffusion long-time limit, which may enable application to larger pores.

  10. A Stereolithography Pore-Throat Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, D.; Ahmadi, G.; Ferer, M.; Smith, D. H.

    2007-12-01

    A new experimental, heterogeneous pore-throat model has been designed and fabricated using stereolithography (SL). In SL production, a laser cures a thin layer of photo-sensitive resin on the surface of a vat of liquid resin; a moveable platform then submerges the cured layer and a new layer is cured on top of the previous one, creating a physical model from a computer generated model. This layered fabrication of a computer generated model has enabled the production of an experimental porous medium with improved fluid resistance properties, as compared to previously studied, constant-height etched cells. A uniform distribution of throat widths was randomly placed throughout the pore-throat matrix and the throat height of each throat was assigned to increase the range of viscous and capillary resistances within the physical model. This variation in both throat height and width generated a porous medium with fairly low porosity (43%), permeability (~400 D), and wide range of geometric resistance properties. Experimental, two-phase immiscible drainage studies in the porous flowcell were performed. Analysis of the captured images was performed with open-source image processing software. These analysis techniques utilized the capability of both ImageJ and the Gnu Image Manipulation Program to be customized with ancillary codes. This enabled batch procedures to be created that converted the original grey-scale bitmaps to binary data sets, which were then analyzed with in-house codes. The fractal dimension, Df, (measured with box-counting) and percent saturation of these experiments were calculated and shown to compare favorably to fractal predictions and previous flowcell studies. Additionally, using the computer generated pore-throat geometry, a computational fluid dynamics model of two- phase flow through the porous medium was created. This model was created using FLUENT code and the Volume of Fluid method. The percent saturation of the less-viscous invading fluid

  11. Pore formation by Cry toxins.

    PubMed

    Soberón, Mario; Pardo, Liliana; Muñóz-Garay, Carlos; Sánchez, Jorge; Gómez, Isabel; Porta, Helena; Bravo, Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) bacteria produce insecticidal Cry and Cyt proteins used in the biological control of different insect pests. In this review, we will focus on the 3d-Cry toxins that represent the biggest group of Cry proteins and also on Cyt toxins. The 3d-Cry toxins are pore-forming toxins that induce cell death by forming ionic pores into the membrane of the midgut epithelial cells in their target insect. The initial steps in the mode of action include ingestion of the protoxin, activation by midgut proteases to produce the toxin fragment and the interaction with the primary cadherin receptor. The interaction of the monomeric CrylA toxin with the cadherin receptor promotes an extra proteolytic cleavage, where helix alpha-1 of domain I is eliminated and the toxin oligomerization is induced, forming a structure of 250 kDa. The oligomeric structure binds to a secondary receptor, aminopeptidase N or alkaline phosphatase. The secondary receptor drives the toxin into detergent resistant membrane microdomains formingpores that cause osmotic shock, burst of the midgut cells and insect death. Regarding to Cyt toxins, these proteins have a synergistic effect on the toxicity of some Cry toxins. Cyt proteins are also proteolytic activated in the midgut lumen of their target, they bind to some phospholipids present in the mosquito midgut cells. The proposed mechanism of synergism between Cry and Cyt toxins is that Cyt1Aa function as a receptor for Cry toxins. The Cyt1A inserts into midgut epithelium membrane and exposes protein regions that are recognized by Cry11Aa. It was demonstrated that this interaction facilitates the oligomerization of Cry11Aa and also its pore formation activity.

  12. Capillary Properties of Model Pores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Tim J.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Liquid menisci in small pores exhibit a curved surface across which there is a significant pressure difference. In the past it has been difficult to calculate the curvatures, of this class of menisci. Some recent studies have shown that a relatively straightforward, but hitherto neglected, method originated by Mayer & Stowe (1965) and Princen (1969a) can be applied to analyse wedging menisci. However, the method has lacked a comprehensive experimental verification. This investigation follows on from the previously limited studies. A standardised method for the application of the analysis is described, the results from which are compared to observations made using modified experimental procedures. The behaviour of the capillary surfaces formed in several model pores are analysed with the method. The model systems studied are rectangular ducts, the pores formed by a rod in an angled corner, by two contacting rods and a plate and the space between a rod and a plate. For the latter two shapes the analysis is extended to include systems of mixed wettability which have a particular bearing on enhanced oil recovery operations. Experiments in which curvatures are inferred from observations of capillary rise, are performed using two comparative techniques. An involved procedure confirms predictions of meniscus curvature to within 0.3%. Use of a more straightforward, through less accurate, technique enables variations of curvature with tube shape or contact angle(s) to be conveniently studied. Results obtained are excellent and confirm the theory within the determined experimental errors. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  13. Storage of hydrogen at 303 K in graphite slitlike pores from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Tanaka, Hideki; Hołyst, Robert; Kaneko, Katsumi; Ohmori, Takumi; Miyamoto, Junichi

    2005-09-15

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were used for the modeling of the hydrogen adsorption in idealized graphite slitlike pores. In all simulations, quantum effects were included through the Feynman and Hibbs second-order effective potential. The simulated surface excess isotherms of hydrogen were used for the determination of the total hydrogen storage, density of hydrogen in graphite slitlike pores, distribution of pore sizes and volumes, enthalpy of adsorption per mole, total surface area, total pore volume, and average pore size of pitch-based activated carbon fibers. Combining experimental results with simulations reveals that the density of hydrogen in graphite slitlike pores at 303 K does not exceed 0.014 g/cm(3), that is, 21% of the liquid-hydrogen density at the triple point. The optimal pore size for the storage of hydrogen at 303 K in the considered pore geometry depends on the pressure of storage. For lower storage pressures, p < 30MPa, the optimal pore width is equal to a 2.2 collision diameter of hydrogen (i.e., 0.65 nm), whereas, for p congruent with 50MPa, the pore width is equal to an approximately 7.2 collision diameter of hydrogen (i.e., 2.13 nm). For the wider pores, that is, the pore width exceeds a 7.2 collision diameter of hydrogen, the surface excess of hydrogen adsorption is constant. The importance of quantum effects is recognized in narrow graphite slitlike pores in the whole range of the hydrogen pressure as well as in wider ones at high pressures of bulk hydrogen. The enthalpies of adsorption per mole for the considered carbonaceous materials are practically constant with hydrogen loading and vary within the narrow range q(st) congruent with 7.28-7.85 kJ/mol. Our systematic study of hydrogen adsorption at 303 K in graphite slitlike pores gives deep insight into the timely problem of hydrogen storage as the most promising source of clean energy. The calculated maximum storage of hydrogen is equal to approximately 1.4 wt

  14. Correlation of permeability and solute uptake in membranes of arbitrary pore morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, V.G.J.; Oppenheim, S.F.; Datta, R.

    1995-07-01

    Membrane fouling is a phenomenon that plagues practically all ultrafiltration processes, and involves a buildup of solute molecules or particles on the external and internal pore surface of the asymmetric membrane. As a result, the effective pore size and porosity of the membrane decrease, with a concomitant decline in the solvent flux and an alteration of the sieving coefficient. There have been a number of attempts, generally based on the assumption of straight cylindrical pores, to qualitatively correlate the solute uptake with the decline in permeability. It is useful to develop a physically more appealing model that provides a quantitative correlation between adsorbed solute surface coverage and hydraulic permeability. This work develops such a model without recourse to a specific pore geometry, but rather in terms of independently measurable quantities: pore surface area and volume. Theoretical results are compared with previously published experimental results for protein uptake and hydraulic permeabilities (Robertson and Zydney, 1990) in ultrafiltration membranes.

  15. Structure of the sodium channel pore revealed by serial cysteine mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-García, M T; Chiamvimonvat, N; Marban, E; Tomaselli, G F

    1996-01-01

    The pores of voltage-gated cation channels are formed by four intramembrane segments that impart selectivity and conductance. Remarkably little is known about the higher order structure of these critical pore-lining or P segments. Serial cysteine mutagenesis reveals a pattern of side-chain accessibility that contradicts currently favored structural models based on alpha-helices or beta-strands. Like the active sites of many enzymes of known structure, the sodium channel pore consists of irregular loop regions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8552626

  16. The Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program: Learning To Succeed. Volume I: Reducing Barriers for Homeless Children and Youth for Access and Achievement. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Clarenda M.; Wodatch, Jessica K.; Kelliher, Catherine T.

    A 1984 amendment to the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act instructs states to ensure that homeless students have equal access to the same free and appropriate public education as nonhomeless students. It provides local educational authorities increased flexibility to use funds, specify the rights of homeless preschoolers, give parents of…

  17. Libraries for Lifelong Literacy: Unrestricted Access to Information as a Basis for Lifelong Learning and Empowerment. IFLA/FAIFE Theme Report. World Report Series Volume IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidelin, Susanne, Ed.; Hamilton, Stuart, Ed.; Sturges, Paul, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The IFLA/FAIFE (International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions/Committee on Free Access to Information and Freedom of Expression) Theme Report 2004 presents visions of how libraries can promote literacy and lifelong learning. The literacy process has to be recognised as inclusive of all ranges of communication, and it occurs at…

  18. An Analysis of Supported Projects to Test Methods for Increasing the Access of Ethnic Minority Students to Careers in Science and Technology. Volume II, Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Joel B.

    In the first section of Volume II of this report, complete details are given concerning the background, goals, methodology, conclusions, and recommendations of a study evaluating eleven projects dealing with science education for minority students. Section 2 provides full descriptions for each of the eleven projects. Section 3 includes details of…

  19. Pore and grain boundary migration under a temperature gradient: A phase-field model study

    DOE PAGES

    Biner, S. B.

    2016-03-16

    In this study, the collective migration behavior of pores and grain boundaries under a temperature gradient is studied for simple single crystal, bi-crystal and polycrystal configurations with a phase-field model formulism. For simulation of the microstructure of solids, composed of pores and grain boundaries, the results indicate that not only the volume fraction of pores, but also its spatial partitioning between the grain boundary junctions and the grain boundary segments appears to be important. In addition to various physical properties, the evolution kinetics, under given temperature gradients, will be strongly influenced with the initial morphology of a poly-crystalline microstructure.

  20. Investigation of pore initiation in metal foams by synchrotron-radiation tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfen, L.; Baumbach, T.; Pernot, P.; Cloetens, P.; Stanzick, H.; Schladitz, K.; Banhart, J.

    2005-06-01

    Synchrotron-radiation tomography was used to investigate early foaming stages of aluminium alloys. Monochromatic radiation, high spatial resolution down to the micrometer scale, partial beam coherence, and holographic reconstruction techniques permit the distinction between different foam constituents which are not visible by other volume imaging techniques. In combination with three-dimensional image analysis, the differences in the pore initiation processes in two different aluminium alloys are shown. We find that, in powder compacts made from prealloyed AA6061 alloy powder, pores appear predominantly around the blowing agent particles whereas, in compacts made from a powder blend of Al and Si, pores tend to initiate around Si particles.

  1. Postseismic Rebound in Fault Step-Overs Caused by Pore Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peltzer, Gilles; Rosen, Paul; Rogez, Francois; Hudnut, Ken

    1996-01-01

    Near-field strain induced by large crustal earthquakes results in changes in pore fluid pressure that dissipate with time and produce surface deformation. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) interferometry revealed several centimeters of postseismic uplift in pull-apart structures and subsidence in a compressive jog along the Landers, California, 1992 earthquake surface rupture, with a relaxation time of 270 +/- 45 days. Such a postseismic rebound may be explained by the transition of the Poisson's ratio of the deformed volumes of rock from undrained to drained conditions as pore fluid flow allows pore pressure to return to hydrostatic equilibrium.

  2. Postseismic rebound in fault step-overs caused by pore fluid flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peltzer, G.; Rosen, P.; Rogez, F.; Hudnut, K.

    1996-01-01

    Near-field strain induced by large crustal earthquakes results in changes in pore fluid pressure that dissipate with time and produce surface deformation. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry revealed several centimeters of postseismic uplift in pull-apart structures and subsidence in a compressive jog along the Landers, California, 1992 earthquake surface rupture, with a relaxation time of 270 ?? 45 days. Such a postseismic rebound may be explained by the transition of the Poisson's ratio of the deformed volumes of rock from undrained to drained conditions as pore fluid flow allows pore pressure to return to hydrostatic equilibrium.

  3. Pore distributions in nanocrystalline metals from small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, P.G.; Weertman, J.R.; Eastman, J.A.

    1998-07-24

    Recent upgrades in inert-gas condensation processing equipment have produced nanocrystalline metal samples with high densities and low-impurity levels. Typical Cu and Pd samples have densities {ge}98% of theoretical and oxygen and hydrogen impurity concentrations {le}0.5 at. %. Lower porosity and impurity levels may make it difficult to produce and maintain samples with the smallest nanocrystalline grain sizes. These improved samples were studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to determine the volume fraction and size distribution of pores. Excellent correlation was obtained between the total volume fraction of pores and the Archimedes density for Pd, signifying that most of the pores were relatively small and in the detectability range of SANS ({approx}1--100 nm). Nanocrystalline Cu is shown to exhibit a wider pore size distribution. For Pd, the average pore sizes were slightly smaller than the average grain size, while for Cu the pore size and grain size were about the same. Both materials exhibited a trend of increasing pore size with increasing grain size. In terms of processing prerequisites, the principal condition for the production of high-density nanocrystalline Cu is an exceptionally clean synthesis environment, while nanocrystalline Pd requires compaction at elevated temperatures. These differences are the result of Cu having both a lower melting point and a greater susceptibility to contamination by gaseous impurities such as oxygen.

  4. A thermodynamic approach to Alamethicin pore formation

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Asif; Lazaridis, Themis

    2013-01-01

    The structure and energetics of alamethicin Rf30 monomer to nonamer in cylindrical pores of 5 to 11 Å radius are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations in an implicit membrane model that includes the free energy cost of acyl chain hydrophobic area exposure. Stable, low energy pores are obtained for certain combinations of radius and oligomeric number. The trimer and the tetramer formed 6 Å pores that appear closed while the larger oligomers formed open pores at their optimal radius. The hexamer in an 8 Å pore and the octamer in an 11 Å pore give the lowest effective energy per monomer. However, all oligomers beyond the pentamer have comparable energies, consistent with the observation of multiple conductance levels. The results are consistent with the widely accepted “barrel-stave” model. The N terminal portion of the molecule exhibits smaller tilt with respect to the membrane normal than the C terminal portion, resulting in a pore shape that is a hybrid between a funnel and an hourglass. Transmembrane voltage has little effect on the structure of the oligomers but enhances or decreases their stability depending on its orientation. Antiparallel bundles are lower in energy than the commonly accepted parallel ones and could be present under certain experimental conditions. Dry aggregates (without an aqueous pore) have lower average effective energy than the corresponding aggregates in a pore, suggesting that alamethicin pores may be excited states that are stabilized in part by voltage and in part by the ion flow itself. PMID:24071593

  5. A thermodynamic approach to alamethicin pore formation.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Asif; Lazaridis, Themis

    2014-01-01

    The structure and energetics of alamethicin Rf30 monomer to nonamer in cylindrical pores of 5 to 11Å radius are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations in an implicit membrane model that includes the free energy cost of acyl chain hydrophobic area exposure. Stable, low energy pores are obtained for certain combinations of radius and oligomeric number. The trimer and the tetramer formed 6Å pores that appear closed while the larger oligomers formed open pores at their optimal radius. The hexamer in an 8Å pore and the octamer in an 11Å pore give the lowest effective energy per monomer. However, all oligomers beyond the pentamer have comparable energies, consistent with the observation of multiple conductance levels. The results are consistent with the widely accepted "barrel-stave" model. The N terminal portion of the molecule exhibits smaller tilt with respect to the membrane normal than the C terminal portion, resulting in a pore shape that is a hybrid between a funnel and an hourglass. Transmembrane voltage has little effect on the structure of the oligomers but enhances or decreases their stability depending on its orientation. Antiparallel bundles are lower in energy than the commonly accepted parallel ones and could be present under certain experimental conditions. Dry aggregates (without an aqueous pore) have lower average effective energy than the corresponding aggregates in a pore, suggesting that alamethicin pores may be excited states that are stabilized in part by voltage and in part by the ion flow itself.

  6. A thermodynamic approach to alamethicin pore formation.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Asif; Lazaridis, Themis

    2014-05-01

    The structure and energetics of alamethicin Rf30 monomer to nonamer in cylindrical pores of 5 to 11Å radius are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations in an implicit membrane model that includes the free energy cost of acyl chain hydrophobic area exposure. Stable, low energy pores are obtained for certain combinations of radius and oligomeric number. The trimer and the tetramer formed 6Å pores that appear closed while the larger oligomers formed open pores at their optimal radius. The hexamer in an 8Å pore and the octamer in an 11Å pore give the lowest effective energy per monomer. However, all oligomers beyond the pentamer have comparable energies, consistent with the observation of multiple conductance levels. The results are consistent with the widely accepted "barrel-stave" model. The N terminal portion of the molecule exhibits smaller tilt with respect to the membrane normal than the C terminal portion, resulting in a pore shape that is a hybrid between a funnel and an hourglass. Transmembrane voltage has little effect on the structure of the oligomers but enhances or decreases their stability depending on its orientation. Antiparallel bundles are lower in energy than the commonly accepted parallel ones and could be present under certain experimental conditions. Dry aggregates (without an aqueous pore) have lower average effective energy than the corresponding aggregates in a pore, suggesting that alamethicin pores may be excited states that are stabilized in part by voltage and in part by the ion flow itself.

  7. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schonherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li -Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2015-09-28

    In this study, multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include (1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and (2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support

  8. Saturation-dependent solute dispersivity in porous media: Pore-scale processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoof, A.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    2013-04-01

    It is known that in variably saturated porous media, dispersion coefficient depends on Darcy velocity and water saturation. In one-dimensional flow, it is commonly assumed that the dispersion coefficient is a linear function of velocity. The coefficient of proportionality, called the dispersivity, is considered to depend on saturation. However, there is not much known about its dependence on saturation. In this study, we investigate, using a pore network model, how the longitudinal dispersivity varies nonlinearly with saturation. We schematize the porous medium as a network of pore bodies and pore throats with finite volumes. The pore space is modeled using the multidirectional pore-network concept, which allows for a distribution of pore coordination numbers. This topological property together with the distribution of pore sizes are used to mimic the microstructure of real porous media. The dispersivity is calculated by solving the mass balance equations for solute concentration in all network elements and averaging the concentrations over a large number of pores. We have introduced a new formulation of solute transport within pore space, where we account for different compartments of residual water within drained pores. This formulation makes it possible to capture the effect of limited mixing due to partial filling of the pores under variably saturated conditions. We found that dispersivity increases with the decrease in saturation, it reaches a maximum value, and then decreases with further decrease in saturation. To show the capability of our formulation to properly capture the effect of saturation on solute dispersion, we applied it to model the results of a reported experimental study.

  9. Benchmark Study of 3D Pore-scale Flow and Solute Transport Simulation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe, T. D.; Yang, X.; Mehmani, Y.; Perkins, W. A.; Pasquali, A.; Schoenherr, M.; Kim, K.; Perego, M.; Parks, M. L.; Trask, N.; Balhoff, M.; Richmond, M. C.; Geier, M.; Krafczyk, M.; Luo, L. S.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that benchmark study to include additional models of the first type based on the immersed-boundary method (IMB), lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all five approaches (FVM-based CFD, IMB, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The benchmark study was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence in a variety of pore-scale modeling methods, and motivates further development and application of pore-scale simulation methods.

  10. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schönherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li-Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence

  11. Variational-based segmentation of bio-pores in tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Benjamin; Cai, Xiaohao; Peth, Stephan; Schladitz, Katja; Steidl, Gabriele

    2017-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) combined with a quantitative analysis of the resulting volume images is a fruitful technique in soil science. However, the variations in X-ray attenuation due to different soil components keep the segmentation of single components within these highly heterogeneous samples a challenging problem. Particularly demanding are bio-pores due to their elongated shape and the low gray value difference to the surrounding soil structure. Recently, variational models in connection with algorithms from convex optimization were successfully applied for image segmentation. In this paper we apply these methods for the first time for the segmentation of bio-pores in CT images of soil samples. We introduce a novel convex model which enforces smooth boundaries of bio-pores and takes the varying attenuation values in the depth into account. Segmentation results are reported for different real-world 3D data sets as well as for simulated data. These results are compared with two gray value thresholding methods, namely indicator kriging and a global thresholding procedure, and with a morphological approach. Pros and cons of the methods are assessed by considering geometric features of the segmented bio-pore systems. The variational approach features well-connected smooth pores while not detecting smaller or shallower pores. This is an advantage in cases where the main bio-pores network is of interest and where infillings, e.g., excrements of earthworms, would result in losing pore connections as observed for the other thresholding methods.

  12. Evidence for a pore-filling mechanism in the adsorption of aromatic hydrocarbons to a natural wood char.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh H; Cho, Hyun-Hee; Poster, Dianne L; Ball, William P

    2007-02-15

    Sorption isotherms for five aromatic hydrocarbons were obtained with a natural wood char (NC1) and its residue after solvent extraction (ENC1). Substantial isotherm nonlinearity was observed in all cases. ENC1 showed higher BET surface area, higher nitrogen-accessible micropore volume, and lower mass of extractable organic chemicals, including quantifiable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs),while the two chars showed identical surface oxygen/ carbon (O/C) ratio. For two chlorinated benzenes that normally condense as liquids at the temperatures used, sorption isotherms with NC1 and ENC1 were found to be statistically identical. For the solid-phase compounds (1,4-dichlorobenzene (1,4-DCB) and two PAHs), sorption was statistically higher with ENC1, thus demonstrating sorption effects due to both (1) authigenic organic content in the sorbentand (2)the sorbate's condensed state. Polanyi-based isotherm modeling, pore size measurements, and comparisons with activated carbon showthe relative importance of adsorptive pore filling and help explain results. With both chars, maximum sorption increased in the order of decreasing molecular diameter: phenanthrene < naphthalene < 1,2-dichlorobenzene/1,2,4-trichlorobenzene < 1,4-DCB. Comparison of 1,4- and 1,2-DCB shows that the critical molecular diameter was apparently more important than the condensed state, suggesting that 1,4-DCB sorbed in the liquid state for ENC1.

  13. Multi-scale characterization of pore evolution in a combustion metamorphic complex, Hatrurim basin, Israel: Combining (ultra) small-angle neutron scattering and image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Burg, Avihu; Cole, David; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Jackson, Andrew J; Stack, Andrew G; Rother, Gernot; Ciarlette, Diane D

    2013-01-01

    Backscattered scanning electron micrograph and ultra small- and small-angle neutron scattering data have been combined to provide statistically meaningful data on the pore/grain structure and pore evolution of combustion metamorphic complexes from the Hatrurim basin, Israel. Three processes, anti-sintering roughening, alteration of protolith (dehydration, decarbonation, and oxidation) and crystallization of high-temperature minerals, occurred simultaneously, leading to significant changes in observed pore/grain structures. Pore structures in the protoliths, and in lowand high-grade metamorphic rocks show surface (Ds) and mass (Dm) pore fractal geometries with gradual increases in both Ds and Dm values as a function of metamorphic grade. This suggests that increases in pore volume and formation of less branching pore networks are accompanied by a roughening of pore/grain interfaces. Additionally, pore evolution during combustion metamorphism is also characterized by reduced contributions from small-scale pores to the cumulative porosity in the high-grade rocks. At high temperatures, small-scale pores may be preferentially closed by the formation of high-temperature minerals, producing a rougher morphology with increasing temperature. Alternatively, large-scale pores may develop at the expense of small-scale pores. These observations (pore fractal geometry and cumulative porosity) indicate that the evolution of pore/grain structures is correlated with the growth of high-temperature phases and is a consequence of the energy balance between pore/grain surface energy and energy arising from heterogeneous phase contacts. The apparent pore volume density further suggests that the localized time/temperature development of the high-grade Hatrurim rocks is not simply an extension of that of the low-grade rocks. The former likely represents the "hot spots (burning foci)" in the overall metamorphic terrain while the latter may represent contact aureoles.

  14. Integrated Information Support System (IISS). Volume 5. Common Data Model Subsystem. Part 16. NDML Precompiler Select Internal Schema Access Path Product Specification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    XAD -A182 WS NMTEGRATED IN A IMOIS N SUP) USOLUME 5 1/1 7/ KNLSIID HMS IT ALUR NOV YSS-629L41 qi F/G 12/3 ML. I H ’I, 4i -- - - = AD-A182 005 UTZ0 LL...CQPY A1VAL-TIR-86-4006 Volume V Part 16 INTEGRATED INFORMATION SUPPORT SySTEN (1188) Volume V - Common Data Model Subsystem Part 16 - MDIIL...AFVAL-TR-8-4005 Vol V.* Part 16 G& 6,601 Of P94900001% ORGANIATI~ON a 0WUSC5 ITS~OL. I& "A"NS0 0W mO10aIAabS OAIIAwMt. ceseral xlectric CeONW7APAyX

  15. Fine structures at pore boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, L.; Quintero Noda, C.; Joshi, C.; Rakesh, S.; Pandya, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present high resolution observations of fine structures at pore boundaries. The inner part of granules towards umbra show dark striations which evolve into a filamentary structure with dark core and `Y' shape at the head of the filaments. These filaments migrate into the umbra similar to penumbral filaments. These filaments show higher temperature, lower magnetic field strength and more inclined field compared to the background umbra. The optical depth stratification of physical quantities suggests their similarity with penumbral filaments. However, line-of-sight velocity pattern is different from penumbral filaments where they show downflows in the deeper layers of the atmosphere while the higher layers show upflows. These observations show filamentation in a simple magnetic configuration.

  16. Open-pore polyurethane product

    DOEpatents

    Jefferson, R.T.; Salyer, I.O.

    1974-02-17

    The method is described of producing an open-pore polyurethane foam having a porosity of at least 50% and a density of 0.1 to 0.5 g per cu cm, and which consists of coherent spherical particles of less than 10 mu diam separated by interconnected interstices. It is useful as a filter and oil absorbent. The product is admirably adapted to scavenging of crude oil from the surface of seawater by preferential wicking. The oil-soaked product may then be compressed to recover the oil or burned for disposal. The crosslinked polyurethane structures are remarkably solvent and heat-resistance as compared with known thermoplastic structures. Because of their relative inertness, they are useful filters for gasoline and other hydrocarbon compounds. (7 claims)

  17. Nuclear Pore Proteins and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Songli; Powers, Maureen A.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of macromolecules, a highly specific and tightly regulated process, occurs exclusively through the Nuclear Pore Complex. This immense structure is assembled from approximately 30 proteins, termed nucleoporins. Here we discuss the four nucleoporins that have been linked to cancers, either through elevated expression in tumors (Nup88) or through involvement in chromosomal translocations that encode chimeric fusion proteins (Tpr, Nup98, Nup214). In each case we consider the normal function of the nucleoporin and its translocation partners, as well as what is known about their mechanistic contributions to carcinogenesis, particularly in leukemias. Studies of nucleoporin-linked cancers have revealed novel mechanisms of oncogenesis and. in the future, should continue to expand our understanding of cancer biology. PMID:19577736

  18. Sulphonic acid strong cation-exchange restricted access columns in sample cleanup for profiling of endogenous peptides in multidimensional liquid chromatography. Structure and function of strong cation-exchange restricted access materials.

    PubMed

    Machtejevas, E; Denoyel, R; Meneses, J M; Kudirkaite, V; Grimes, B A; Lubda, D; Unger, K K

    2006-08-04

    In this work, the pore structural parameters and size exclusion properties of LiChrospher strong cation-exchange and reverse phase restricted access materials (RAM) are analysed. The molecular weight size exclusion limit for polystyrenes was found to be about 17.7 kDa, while for standard proteins, the molecular weight size exclusion limit was higher, at approximately 25 kDa. The average pore diameter on a volume basis calculated from the pore network model changes from 8.5 nm (native LiChrospher) to 8.6 nm (diol derivative) to 8.2 nm (sulphonic acid derivative) to 6.9 nm (n-octadecyl derivative). Additional characterisations were performed on restricted access materials with nitrogen sorption at 77 K, water adsorption at 25 degrees C, intrusion-extrusion of water (in order to evaluate the hydrophobic properties of the pores of the hydrophobic RAM), and zeta potential measurements by microelectrophoresis. For peptide analysis out of the biofluids, the strong cation-exchange functionality seems to be particularly suitable mainly because of the high loadability of the strong cation-exchange restricted access material (SCX-RAM) and the fact that one can work under non-denaturing conditions to perform effective chromatographic separations. For bacitracin, the dynamic capacity of the SCX-RAM columns does not reach its maximum value in the analysed range. For lysozyme, the dynamic capacity reaches a value of 0.08 mg/ml of column volume before column is overloaded. Additionally, the proper column operating conditions that lead to the total effective working time of the RAM column to be equal to approximately 500 injections (depending on the type of sample), is comprehensively described. The SCX-RAM column was used in the same system analysing urine samples for the period of 1 month (approximately 150 injections) with run-to-run reproducibility below 5% RSD and below 10% RSD for the relative fractions.

  19. How Lipid Membranes Affect Pore Forming Toxin Activity.

    PubMed

    Rojko, Nejc; Anderluh, Gregor

    2015-12-15

    Pore forming toxins (PFTs) evolved to permeate the plasma membrane of target cells. This is achieved in a multistep mechanism that usually involves binding of soluble protein monomer to the lipid membrane, oligomerization at the plane of the membrane, and insertion of part of the polypeptide chain across the lipid membrane to form a conductive channel. Introduced pores allow uncontrolled transport of solutes across the membrane, inflicting damage to the target cell. PFTs are usually studied from the perspective of structure-function relationships, often neglecting the important role of the bulk membrane properties on the PFT mechanism of action. In this Account, we discuss how membrane lateral heterogeneity, thickness, and fluidity influence the pore forming process of PFTs. In general, lipid molecules are more accessible for binding in fluid membranes due to steric reasons. When PFT specifically binds ordered domains, it usually recognizes a specific lipid distribution pattern, like sphingomyelin (SM) clusters or SM/cholesterol complexes, and not individual lipid species. Lipid domains were also suggested to act as an additional concentration platform facilitating PFT oligomerization, but this is yet to be shown. The last stage in PFT action is the insertion of the transmembrane segment across the membranes to build the transmembrane pore walls. Conformational changes are a spontaneous process, and sufficient free energy has to be available for efficient membrane penetration. Therefore, fluid bilayers are permeabilized more readily in comparison to highly ordered and thicker liquid ordered lipid phase (Lo). Energetically more costly insertion into the Lo phase can be driven by the hydrophobic mismatch between the thinner liquid disordered phase (Ld) and large protein complexes, which are unable to tilt like single transmembrane segments. In the case of proteolipid pores, membrane properties can directly modulate pore size, stability, and even selectivity. Finally

  20. Reversible control of pore size and surface chemistry of mesoporous silica through dynamic covalent chemistry: philicity mediated catalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dheeraj Kumar; Pavan Kumar, B V V S; Eswaramoorthy, M

    2015-08-28

    Here, we report the synthesis of adaptive hybrid mesoporous silica having the ability to reconfigure its pore properties such as pore size and philicity in response to the external environment. Decyl chains were reversibly appended to the pore walls of silica through imine motifs as dynamic covalent modules to switch the pore size and philicity in response to pH. This switching of pore properties was used to gate the access of reactants to the gold nanoparticles immobilized inside the nanopores, thus enabling us to turn-on/turn-off the catalytic reaction. The use of such dynamic covalent modules to govern pore properties would enable the realization of intelligent hybrids capable of controlling many such chemical processes in response to stimuli.

  1. Modeling the interaction of ultrasound with pores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yichi; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Parthasarathi, Sanjai

    1991-01-01

    Factors that affect ultrasonic velocity sensing of density during consolidation of metal powders are examined. A comparison is made between experimental results obtained during the final stage of densification and the predictions of models that assume either a spherical or a spheroidal pore shape. It is found that for measurements made at low frequencies during the final stage of densification, relative density (pore fraction) and pore shape are the two most important factors determining the ultrasonic velocity, the effect of pore size is negligible.

  2. Nanoscale pore formation dynamics during aluminum anodization.

    PubMed

    Thamida, Sunil Kumar; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2002-03-01

    A theoretical analysis of nanoscale pore formation during anodization reveals its fundamental instability mechanism to be a field focusing phenomenon when perturbations on the minima of the two oxide interfaces are in phase. Lateral leakage of the layer potential at high wave number introduces a layer tension effect that balances the previous destabilizing effect to produce a long-wave instability and a selected pore separation that scales linearly with respect to voltage. At pH higher than 1.77, pores do not form due to a very thick barrier layer. A weakly nonlinear theory based on long-wave expansion of double free surface problem yields two coupled interface evolution equations that can be reduced to one without altering the dispersion relationship by assuming an equal and in-phase amplitude for the two interfaces. This interface evolution equation faithfully reproduces the initial pore ordering and their dynamics. A hodograph transformation technique is then used to determine the interior dimension of the well-developed pores in two dimensions. The ratio of pore diameter to pore separation is found to be a factor independent of voltage but varies with the pH of the electrolyte. Both the predicted pH range where pores are formed and the predicted pore dimensions are favorably compared to experimental data. (c) 2002 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Reversible control of pore size and surface chemistry of mesoporous silica through dynamic covalent chemistry: philicity mediated catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Dheeraj Kumar; Pavan Kumar, B. V. V. S.; Eswaramoorthy, M.

    2015-08-01

    Here, we report the synthesis of adaptive hybrid mesoporous silica having the ability to reconfigure its pore properties such as pore size and philicity in response to the external environment. Decyl chains were reversibly appended to the pore walls of silica through imine motifs as dynamic covalent modules to switch the pore size and philicity in response to pH. This switching of pore properties was used to gate the access of reactants to the gold nanoparticles immobilized inside the nanopores, thus enabling us to turn-on/turn-off the catalytic reaction. The use of such dynamic covalent modules to govern pore properties would enable the realization of intelligent hybrids capable of controlling many such chemical processes in response to stimuli.Here, we report the synthesis of adaptive hybrid mesoporous silica having the ability to reconfigure its pore properties such as pore size and philicity in response to the external environment. Decyl chains were reversibly appended to the pore walls of silica through imine motifs as dynamic covalent modules to switch the pore size and philicity in response to pH. This switching of pore properties was used to gate the access of reactants to the gold nanoparticles immobilized inside the nanopores, thus enabling us to turn-on/turn-off the catalytic reaction. The use of such dynamic covalent modules to govern pore properties would enable the realization of intelligent hybrids capable of controlling many such chemical processes in response to stimuli. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02959g

  4. The Pivotal Role of Alumina Pore Structure in HF Capture and Fluoride Return in Aluminum Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Grant J.; Agbenyegah, Gordon E. K.; Hyland, Margaret M.; Metson, James B.

    2016-09-01

    Fluoride emissions during primary aluminum production are mitigated by dry scrubbing on alumina which, as the metal feedstock, also returns fluoride to the pots. This ensures stable pot operation and maintains process efficiency but requires careful optimization of alumina for both fluoride capture and solubility. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of 70-80 m2 g-1 is currently accepted. However, this does not account for pore accessibility. We demonstrate using industry-sourced data that pores <3.5 nm are not correlated with fluoride return. Reconstructing alumina pore size distributions (PSDs) following hydrogen fluoride (HF) adsorption shows surface area is not lost by pore diameter shrinkage, but by blocking the internal porosity. However, this alone cannot explain this 3.5 nm threshold. We show this is a consequence of surface diffusion-based inhibition with surface chemistry probably playing an integral role. We advocate new surface area estimates for alumina which account for pore accessibility by explicitly ignoring <3.5 nm pores.

  5. Importance of Interlayer Equivalent Pores for Anion Diffusion in Clay-Rich Sedimentary Rocks.

    PubMed

    Wigger, Cornelia; Van Loon, Luc R

    2017-02-21

    The anion exclusion behavior in two different clay stones, Opalinus Clay (OPA) and Helvetic Marl (HM), was studied using a well-established experimental through-diffusion technique. The ionic strength of the pore water was varied between 0.01 and 5 M to evaluate its effect on the diffusion of HTO and (36)Cl(-). The total porosity determined by HTO-diffusion was independent of the ionic strength, while the anion accessible porosity varies with the ionic strength of the pore water. In the case of Opalinus Clay, the anion accessible porosity increases from 3% at low ionic strength (0.01 M) up to 8.4% at high ionic strength (5 M), whereas the anion accessible porosity of Helvetic Marl increases from 0.6% up to only 1.1%. The anion exclusion effect in HM is thus more pronounced than that in OPA, even at high ionic strength. This observation can be correlated to differences in mineralogy and to the fact that HM has a larger fraction of interlayer equivalent pores. Interlayer equivalent pores are small pores in compressed clay stones that are small enough to have, because of overlapping electric double layers, properties similar to those of interlayers and are therefore rather inaccessible for anions.

  6. Arteriovenous Access

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, Jennifer M.; Dipchand, Christine; Oliver, Matthew; Moist, Louise; Yilmaz, Serdar; Lok, Charmaine; Leung, Kelvin; Clark, Edward; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Luscombe, Rick; Miller, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Complications of vascular access lead to morbidity and may reduce quality of life. In this module, we review both infectious and noninfectious arteriovenous access complications including neuropathy, aneurysm, and high-output access. For the challenging patients who have developed many complications and are now nearing their last vascular access, we highlight some potentially novel approaches. PMID:28270919

  7. A New Path through the Nuclear Pore.

    PubMed

    Gozalo, Alejandro; Capelson, Maya

    2016-11-17

    Knowing the configuration of the nuclear pore is essential for appreciating the underlying mechanisms of nucleo-cytoplasmic communication. Now, Fernandez-Martinez et al. present a high-resolution structure of the cytoplasmic nuclear pore-mRNA export holo-complex, challenging our textbook depiction of this massive membrane-embedded complex.

  8. Cavitation and pore blocking in nanoporous glasses.

    PubMed

    Reichenbach, C; Kalies, G; Enke, D; Klank, D

    2011-09-06

    In gas adsorption studies, porous glasses are frequently referred to as model materials for highly disordered mesopore systems. Numerous works suggest that an accurate interpretation of physisorption isotherms requires a complete understanding of network effects upon adsorption and desorption, respectively. The present article deals with nitrogen and argon adsorption at different temperatures (77 and 87 K) performed on a series of novel nanoporous glasses (NPG) with different mean pore widths. NPG samples contain smaller mesopores and significantly higher microporosity than porous Vycor glass or controlled pore glass. Since the mean pore width of NPG can be tuned sensitively, the evolution of adsorption characteristics with respect to a broadening pore network can be investigated starting from the narrowest nanopore width. With an increasing mean pore width, a H2-type hysteresis develops gradually which finally transforms into a H1-type. In this connection, a transition from a cavitation-induced desorption toward desorption controlled by pore blocking can be observed. Furthermore, we find concrete hints for a pore size dependence of the relative pressure of cavitation in highly disordered pore systems. By comparing nitrogen and argon adsorption, a comprehensive insight into adsorption mechanisms in novel disordered materials is provided.

  9. Fluctuation of surface charge in membrane pores.

    PubMed Central

    Bashford, C Lindsay; Alder, Glenn M; Pasternak, Charles A

    2002-01-01

    Surface charge in track-etched polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membranes with narrow pores has been probed with a fluorescent cationic dye (3,3'-diethyloxacarbocyanine iodide (diO-C2-(3))) using confocal microscopy. Staining of negatively charged PET membranes with diO-C2-(3) is a useful measure of surface charge for the following reasons: 1) the dye inhibits K(+) currents through the pores and reduces their selectivity for cations; 2) it inhibits [3H]-choline+ transport and promotes 36Cl- transport across the membrane in a pH- and ionic-strength-dependent fashion; and 3) staining of pores by diO-C2-(3) is reduced by low pH and by the presence of divalent cations such as Ca2+ and Zn2+. Measurement of the time dependence of cyanine staining of pores shows fluctuations of fluorescence intensity that occur on the same time scale as do fluctuations of ionic current in such pores. These data support our earlier proposal that fluctuations in ionic current across pores in synthetic and biological membranes reflect fluctuations in the surface charge of the pore walls in addition to molecular changes in pore proteins. PMID:11916860

  10. A user-friendly modified pore-solid fractal model

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dian-yuan; Zhao, Ying; Feng, Hao; Si, Bing-cheng; Hill, Robert Lee

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate a range of calculation points on water retention curves (WRC) instead of the singularity point at air-entry suction in the pore-solid fractal (PSF) model, which additionally considered the hysteresis effect based on the PSF theory. The modified pore-solid fractal (M-PSF) model was tested using 26 soil samples from Yangling on the Loess Plateau in China and 54 soil samples from the Unsaturated Soil Hydraulic Database. The derivation results showed that the M-PSF model is user-friendly and flexible for a wide range of calculation point options. This model theoretically describes the primary differences between the soil moisture desorption and the adsorption processes by the fractal dimensions. The M-PSF model demonstrated good performance particularly at the calculation points corresponding to the suctions from 100 cm to 1000 cm. Furthermore, the M-PSF model, used the fractal dimension of the particle size distribution, exhibited an accepted performance of WRC predictions for different textured soils when the suction values were ≥100 cm. To fully understand the function of hysteresis in the PSF theory, the role of allowable and accessible pores must be examined. PMID:27996013

  11. A user-friendly modified pore-solid fractal model.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dian-Yuan; Zhao, Ying; Feng, Hao; Si, Bing-Cheng; Hill, Robert Lee

    2016-12-20

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate a range of calculation points on water retention curves (WRC) instead of the singularity point at air-entry suction in the pore-solid fractal (PSF) model, which additionally considered the hysteresis effect based on the PSF theory. The modified pore-solid fractal (M-PSF) model was tested using 26 soil samples from Yangling on the Loess Plateau in China and 54 soil samples from the Unsaturated Soil Hydraulic Database. The derivation results showed that the M-PSF model is user-friendly and flexible for a wide range of calculation point options. This model theoretically describes the primary differences between the soil moisture desorption and the adsorption processes by the fractal dimensions. The M-PSF model demonstrated good performance particularly at the calculation points corresponding to the suctions from 100 cm to 1000 cm. Furthermore, the M-PSF model, used the fractal dimension of the particle size distribution, exhibited an accepted performance of WRC predictions for different textured soils when the suction values were ≥100 cm. To fully understand the function of hysteresis in the PSF theory, the role of allowable and accessible pores must be examined.

  12. A user-friendly modified pore-solid fractal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Dian-Yuan; Zhao, Ying; Feng, Hao; Si, Bing-Cheng; Hill, Robert Lee

    2016-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate a range of calculation points on water retention curves (WRC) instead of the singularity point at air-entry suction in the pore-solid fractal (PSF) model, which additionally considered the hysteresis effect based on the PSF theory. The modified pore-solid fractal (M-PSF) model was tested using 26 soil samples from Yangling on the Loess Plateau in China and 54 soil samples from the Unsaturated Soil Hydraulic Database. The derivation results showed that the M-PSF model is user-friendly and flexible for a wide range of calculation point options. This model theoretically describes the primary differences between the soil moisture desorption and the adsorption processes by the fractal dimensions. The M-PSF model demonstrated good performance particularly at the calculation points corresponding to the suctions from 100 cm to 1000 cm. Furthermore, the M-PSF model, used the fractal dimension of the particle size distribution, exhibited an accepted performance of WRC predictions for different textured soils when the suction values were ≥100 cm. To fully understand the function of hysteresis in the PSF theory, the role of allowable and accessible pores must be examined.

  13. Simulation of porosity decrease with protein adsorption using the distributed pore model.

    PubMed

    Coquebert de Neuville, Bertrand; Thomas, Helen; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2013-11-01

    Chromatographic stationary phases such as Fractogel EMD SO3 (M) have a pore size distribution that is close to the size of proteins. The accessible porosity and the mass transfer inside the particles are therefore strongly affected by the pore to solute size ratio. This effect was simulated using the distributed pore model for three media: Base Fractogel SO3, Fractogel EMD SO3 (M) and (S). This model was extended so as to be able to account for the effect of pore shrinkage due to protein loading on the chromatographic behavior of other proteins. Pulse chromatographic experiments using dextrans of various sizes on column pre-loaded with antibodies have been conducted to test the model reliability.

  14. Probing the SecYEG translocation pore size with preproteins conjugated with sizable rigid spherical molecules.

    PubMed

    Bonardi, Francesco; Halza, Erik; Walko, Martin; Du Plessis, François; Nouwen, Nico; Feringa, Ben L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2011-05-10

    Protein translocation in Escherichia coli is mediated by the translocase that in its minimal form consists of the protein-conducting channel SecYEG, and the motor protein, SecA. SecYEG forms a narrow pore in the membrane that allows passage of unfolded proteins only. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the maximal width of the central pore of SecYEG is limited to . To access the functional size of the SecYEG pore, the precursor of outer membrane protein A was modified with rigid spherical tetraarylmethane derivatives of different diameters at a unique cysteine residue. SecYEG allowed the unrestricted passage of the precursor of outer membrane protein A conjugates carrying tetraarylmethanes with diameters up to , whereas a sized molecule blocked the translocation pore. Translocation of the protein-organic molecule hybrids was strictly proton motive force-dependent and occurred at a single pore. With an average diameter of an unfolded polypeptide chain of , the pore accommodates structures of at least , which is vastly larger than the predicted maximal width of a single pore by molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Deposition nucleation viewed as homogeneous or immersion freezing in pores and cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolli, C.

    2013-06-01

    filled with water. Water in pores can freeze in immersion mode at T > 235 K if the pore walls contain an active site. Pore analysis of clay minerals shows that kaolinites exhibit pore structures with pore diameters of 20-50 nm. The mesoporosity of illites and montmorillonites is characterized by pores with T = 2-5 nm. The number and size of pores is distinctly increased in acid treated montmorillonites like K10. Many clay minerals and mineral dusts show a strong increase in ice nucleation efficiency when temperature is decreased below 235 K. Such an increase is difficult to explain when ice nucleation is supposed to occur by a deposition mechanism, but evident when assuming freezing in pores, because for homogeneous ice nucleation only small pore volumes are needed, while heterogeneous ice nucleation requires larger pore structures to contain at least one active site for immersion nucleation. Together, these pieces of evidence strongly suggest that ice nucleation within pores should be the prevailing freezing mechanism of clay minerals for RHw below water saturation. Extending the analysis to other types of ice nuclei shows that freezing in pores and cracks is probably the prevailing ice nucleation mechanism for glassy and volcanic ash aerosols at RHw below water saturation. Freezing of water in carbon nanotubes might be of significance for ice nucleation by soot aerosols. No case could be identified that gives clear evidence of ice nucleation by water vapor deposition on a solid surface. Inspection of ice nuclei with a close lattice match to ice, such as silver iodide or SnomaxTM, show that for high ice nucleation efficiency below water saturation the presence of impurities or cracks on the surface may be essential. Soluble impurities promote the formation of a liquid phase below water saturation in patches on the surface or as a complete surface layer that offers an environment for immersion freezing. If porous aerosol particles come in contact with semivolatile vapors

  16. High-pressure alchemy on a small-pore zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.

    2011-12-01

    While an ever-expanding variety of zeolites with a wide range of framework topology is available, it is desirable to have a way to tailor the chemistry of the zeolitic nanopores for a given framework topology via controlling both the coordination-inclusion chemistry and framework distortion/relaxation. This is, however, subjected to the ability of a zeolitic nanopore to allow the redistribution of cations-water assembly and/or insertion of foreign molecules into the pores and channels. Small-pore zeolites such as natrolite (Na16Al16Si24O80x16H2O), however, have been known to show very limited capacity for any changes in the confinement chemistry. We have recently shown that various cation-exchanged natrolites can be prepared under modest conditions from natural sodium natrolite and exhibit cation-dependent volume expansions by up to 18.5% via converting the elliptical channels into progressively circular ones. Here, we show that pressure can be used as a unique and clean tool to further manipulate the chemistry of the natrolite nanopores. Our recent crystallographic and spectroscopic studies of pressure-insertion of foreign molecules, trivalent-cation exchange under pressure, and pressure-induced inversion of cation-water coordination and pore geometry in various cation-exchanged natrolites will be presented.

  17. The influence of extraction procedure on ion concentrations in sediment pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.; Jackson, B.P.

    1998-01-01

    Sediment pore water has the potential to yield important information on sediment quality, but the influence of isolation procedures on the chemistry and toxicity are not completely known and consensus on methods used for the isolation from sediment has not been reached. To provide additional insight into the influence of collection procedures on pore water chemistry, anion (filtered only) and cation concentrations were measured in filtered and unfiltered pore water isolated from four sediments using three different procedures: dialysis, centrifugation and vacuum. Peepers were constructed using 24-cell culture plates and cellulose membranes, and vacuum extractors consisted of fused-glass air stones attached with airline tubing to 60cc syringes. Centrifugation was accomplished at two speeds (2,500 and 10,000 x g) for 30 min in a refrigerated centrifuge maintained at 4?C. Only minor differences in chemical characteristics and cation and anion concentrations were found among the different collecting methods with differences being sediment specific. Filtering of the pore water did not appreciably reduce major cation concentrations, but trace metals (Cu and Pb) were markedly reduced. Although the extraction methods evaluated produced pore waters of similar chemistries, the vacuum extractor provided the following advantages over the other methods: (1) ease of extraction, (2) volumes of pore water isolated, (3) minimal preparation time and (4) least time required for extraction of pore water from multiple samples at one time.

  18. Quantitative characterization of pore structure of several biochars with 3D imaging.

    PubMed

    Hyväluoma, Jari; Kulju, Sampo; Hannula, Markus; Wikberg, Hanne; Källi, Anssi; Rasa, Kimmo

    2017-03-24

    Pore space characteristics of biochars may vary depending on the used raw material and processing technology. Pore structure has significant effects on the water retention properties of biochar amended soils. In this work, several biochars were characterized with three-dimensional imaging and image analysis. X-ray computed microtomography was used to image biochars at resolution of 1.14 μm and the obtained images were analysed for porosity, pore size distribution, specific surface area and structural anisotropy. In addition, random walk simulations were used to relate structural anisotropy to diffusive transport. Image analysis showed that considerable part of the biochar volume consist of pores in size range relevant to hydrological processes and storage of plant available water. Porosity and pore size distribution were found to depend on the biochar type and the structural anisotopy analysis showed that used raw material considerably affects the pore characteristics at micrometre scale. Therefore, attention should be paid to raw material selection and quality in applications requiring optimized pore structure.

  19. Pore structure of hydrating cement paste by magnetic resonance relaxation analysis and freezing.

    PubMed

    Jehng, J Y; Sprague, D T; Halperin, W P

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analysis has been applied to interpret the evolution of microstructure in a cement paste during hydration. A basic understanding of the wet-dry and freeze-thaw processes of cement pastes has been developed. The pore structure evolution has been studied by the suppression of the freezing temperature of water and compared with spin-spin relaxation analysis performed at room temperature. Both methods consistently show that hydrating cement pastes have two principal components in their size distribution. The NMR relaxation times provide a measure of the characteristic pore sizes. Their interpretation is made in the context of a fast exchange model. Supercooling and thawing point depression of confined water has been studied systematically. The depression of the freezing point of liquid water confined within a pore was found to be dependent on the pore size, with capillary pore water freezing at 240 K and the remaining gel pore water freezing over a temperature range extending to as low as 160 K.A modified Gibbs-Thompson analysis was used to determine pore volume distributions from the distribution of thawing temperatures.

  20. Experimental and Numerical Study of Pore-Scale Multi-Phase Flow Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, A. M.; Ling, B.; Oostrom, M.; Bao, J.; Kim, K.; Trask, N.; Battiato, I.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding multiphase fluid flow is critical for many applications, including CO2 sequestration, bioremediation, and oil recovery. Micro-fluidic experiments and pore-scale simulations become important tools in studying multiphase flow in porous media. At the same time, many pore-scale numerical models lack rigorous validation and verification, and micro-fluidic experiments are hard to reproduce due to physical instabilities and challenges in precisely controlling the experiments. We performed a set of microcell experiments and determined conditions necessary to obtain reproducible pore-scale evolution of the fluid-fluid interfaces during both infiltration and drainage phases. Next, we modeled the experiments using Finite Volume and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics codes. The point-by-point comparison of the experimental results and numerical simulations revealed advantages and disadvantages of these two methods in capturing the overall behavior and pore-scale phenomena, including residual saturations, formation of thin films, fluid bridges and various fluid trapping mechanisms.

  1. Numerical Investigation of the Formation and Detachment of Droplets from Pores in a Shear Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigl, Kathleen; Tanner, Franz X.; Windhab, Erich J.

    2010-09-01

    The formation and detachment behavior of droplets from a pore opening into a simple shear field within a channel gap is investigated using numerical simulations. The mathematical model consists of the governing equations for an incompressible two-phase flow problem with a moving contact line. These equations are numerically solved using the volume-of-fluid method implemented in the open source software OpenFOAM. A parameter study was performed to determine the effect of relevant dimensionless parameters on the formation and detachment behavior of the droplets. These dimensionless parameters involve the pore size, pore flow rate, gap shear rate, interfacial tension, and the viscosity and density of the two fluid phases. For the parameter range considered in this study, different degrees of jetting behavior were observed. Also, the sizes of the detached droplets were seen to decrease as the gap shear rate increased, and increase with the pore flow rate, with the gap shear rate having a larger effect.

  2. Curvature-dependent metastability of the solid phase and the freezing-melting hysteresis in pores.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Oleg; Furó, István

    2006-01-01

    We recapitulate and generalize the concept of the freezing-melting hysteresis that attributes this phenomenon to a free-energy barrier between metastable and stable states of pore-filling material. In a phenomenological description, we show that under commonly encountered conditions, this renders the freezing-point depression DeltaTf defined by the surface-to-volume ratio S/V, whereas the melting-point depression DeltaTm, by the mean curvature kappa of the pore surface, with DeltaTm/DeltaTf =2kappa(V/S). Employing 1H NMR cryoporometry, we experimentally demonstrate the linear correlation between DeltaTm and DeltaTf for several liquids with different DeltaTf,m imbibed in controlled pore glasses. The results compare favorably to the morphological properties of the glasses determined by other techniques. Our findings suggest a simple method for analyzing the pore morphology from the observed phase transition temperatures.

  3. Pore connectivity effects on solute transport in rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.

    2001-11-30

    how low connectivity alters the accessible porosity in the vicinity of the inlet face. The study supports pore connectivity as a coherent explanation for the observed anomalies and demonstrates the utility of pore-scale modeling in elucidating mechanisms critical to radionuclide retardation in geological repositories.

  4. Pore Connectivity Effects on Solute Transport in Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Oinhong Hu

    2001-12-05

    how low connectivity alters the accessible porosity in the vicinity of the inlet face. The study supports pore connectivity as a coherent explanation for the observed anomalies and demonstrates the utility of pore-scale modeling in elucidating mechanisms critical to radionuclide retardation in geological repositories.

  5. Broad pore channels as molecular highways in nanoporous catalysts: Multiscale modeling, optimization and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang

    the total volume of the catalyst) and keeping broad pore channel walls (consisting of the same mesoporous catalytic material) 33mum thick. For autothermal reforming of methane, the gain in overall catalytic activity could be improved by a factor of 1.5-1.8, by the introduction of broad pore channels with a size of 1 mum, and occupying an optimized fraction of space. The H 2/CO ratio could be tuned as well: a large channel volume fraction generally favors a high H2/CO ratio.

  6. Comparison of caprock pore networks which potentially will be impacted by carbon sequestration projects.

    SciTech Connect

    McCray, John; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis; Mouzakis, Katherine; Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rother, Gernot

    2010-12-01

    Injection of CO2 into underground rock formations can reduce atmospheric CO2 emissions. Caprocks present above potential storage formations are the main structural trap inhibiting CO2 from leaking into overlying aquifers or back to the Earth's surface. Dissolution and precipitation of caprock minerals resulting from reaction with CO2 may alter the pore network where many pores are of the micrometer to nanometer scale, thus altering the structural trapping potential of the caprock. However, the distribution, geometry and volume of pores at these scales are poorly characterized. In order to evaluate the overall risk of leakage of CO2 from storage formations, a first critical step is understanding the distribution and shape of pores in a variety of different caprocks. As the caprock is often comprised of mudstones, we analyzed samples from several mudstone formations with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging to compare the pore networks. Mudstones were chosen from current or potential sites for carbon sequestration projects including the Marine Tuscaloosa Group, the Lower Tuscaloosa Group, the upper and lower shale members of the Kirtland Formation, and the Pennsylvanian Gothic shale. Expandable clay contents ranged from 10% to approximately 40% in the Gothic shale and Kirtland Formation, respectively. During SANS, neutrons effectively scatter from interfaces between materials with differing scattering length density (i.e., minerals and pores). The intensity of scattered neutrons, I(Q), where Q is the scattering vector, gives information about the volume and arrangement of pores in the sample. The slope of the scattering data when plotted as log I(Q) vs. log Q provides information about the fractality or geometry of the pore network. On such plots slopes from -2 to -3 represent mass fractals while slopes from -3 to -4 represent surface fractals. Scattering data showed surface fractal dimensions for

  7. Comparison of caprock pore networks which potentially will be impacted by carbon sequestration projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzakis, K. M.; Sitchler, A.; McCray, J. E.; Rother, G.; Dewers, T.; Heath, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    Injection of CO2 into underground rock formations can reduce atmospheric CO2 emissions. Caprocks present above potential storage formations are the main structural trap inhibiting CO2 from leaking into overlying aquifers or back to the Earth’s surface. Dissolution and precipitation of caprock minerals resulting from reaction with CO2 may alter the pore network where many pores are of the micrometer to nanometer scale, thus altering the structural trapping potential of the caprock. However, the distribution, geometry and volume of pores at these scales are poorly characterized. In order to evaluate the overall risk of leakage of CO2 from storage formations, a first critical step is understanding the distribution and shape of pores in a variety of different caprocks. As the caprock is often comprised of mudstones, we analyzed samples from several mudstone formations with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging to compare the pore networks. Mudstones were chosen from current or potential sites for carbon sequestration projects including the Marine Tuscaloosa Group, the Lower Tuscaloosa Group, the upper and lower shale members of the Kirtland Formation, and the Pennsylvanian Gothic shale. Expandable clay contents ranged from 10% to approximately 40% in the Gothic shale and Kirtland Formation, respectively. During SANS, neutrons effectively scatter from interfaces between materials with differing scattering length density (i.e., minerals and pores). The intensity of scattered neutrons, I(Q), where Q is the scattering vector, gives information about the volume and arrangement of pores in the sample. The slope of the scattering data when plotted as log I(Q) vs. log Q provides information about the fractality or geometry of the pore network. On such plots slopes from -2 to -3 represent mass fractals while slopes from -3 to -4 represent surface fractals. Scattering data showed surface fractal dimensions for

  8. Using Advanced Tensiometers to Monitor Temporal Variations in Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, R. L.; Young, M. H.; Dixon, K. L.; Rossabi, J.; Hyde, W. K.; Holmes-Burns, H.

    2002-12-01

    The Savannah River Site has installed a comprehensive vadose zone monitoring system (VZMS) at it's low level radioactive waste disposal facility to collect the necessary information to calculate contaminant flux. The VZMS includes water content reflectometers, suction lysimeters, advanced tensiometers (ATs), water flux meters, access ports for neutron probes, and a tipping bucket rain gauge. Forty one ATs were installed from 1999 to 2001 at depths ranging from 2 to 60 feet and have been operated continuously. The installation depths were based on a hydrostatigraphic model developed from core logs, cone penetrometer logs, moisture content profiles, water retention curves model that were obtained during the phased installation of the VZMS. An AT consists of a porous cup installed at a prescribed depth with casing back to the surface and a pressure transducer that is lowered into the casing and connects with the porous cup. The pressure transducer transmits it's signal to a datalogger where the data is stored for future retrieval using a cellular phone communications package. Results from the 2 year operating period show that the AT calibrations are stable and t ATs are capable of extended monitoring of pore pressures in the 0 to 300 cm H2 O range. The ATs had sufficient resolution to detect the naturally occurring fluctuations in pore pressure (1 to 100 cm H2 O over 1 to 72 hours) that resulted from infiltration events at the site. The stable performance of the ATs combined with their ability to detect naturally occurring fluctuations in pore pressure make the ATs a useful tool in measuring temporal pore pressure variations for use in calibrating numerical models of fluid flow in variably saturated porous media.

  9. Unlocking the Physiochemical Controls on Organic Carbon Dynamics from the Soil Pore- to Core-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. P.; Tfaily, M. M.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Todd-Brown, K. E.; Bailey, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    The physical organization of soil includes pore networks of varying size and connectivity. These networks control microbial access to soil organic carbon (C) by spatially separating microorganisms and C by both distance and size exclusion. The extent to which this spatially isolated C is vulnerable to microbial transformation under hydrologically dynamic conditions is unknown, and limits our ability to predict the source and sink capacity of soils. We investigated the effects of shifting hydrologic connectivity and soil structure on greenhouse gas C emissions from surface soils collected from the Disney Wilderness Preserve (Florida, USA). We subjected intact soil cores and re-packed homogenized soil cores to simulated groundwater rise or precipitation, monitoring their CO2 and CH4 emissions over 24 hours. Soil pore water was then extracted from each core using different suctions to sample water retained by pore throats of different sizes and then characterized by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. Greater respiration rates were observed from homogenized cores compared to intact cores, and from soils wet from below, in which the wetting front is driven by capillary forces, filling fine pores first. This suggests that C located in fine pores may turn over via diffusion processes that lead to the colocation of this C with other resources and microorganisms. Both the complexity and concentration of soluble-C increased with decreasing pore size domains. Pore water extracted from homogenized cores had greater C concentrations than from intact cores, with the greatest concentrations in pore waters sampled from very fine pores, highlighting the importance of soil structure in physically protecting C. These results suggest that the spatial separation of decomposers from C is a key mechanism stabilizing C in these soils. Further research is ongoing to accurately represent this protection mechanism, and the conditions under which it breaks

  10. Petrophysical and magnetic pore network anisotropy of some cretaceous sandstone from Tushka Basin, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabawy, Bassem S.; Rochette, Pierre; Géraud, Yves

    2009-04-01

    Pore magnetic fabric is a well-established technique for the determination of pore elongation and preferred directions for migration of the interstitial fluids. This study further exemplify this technique on a set of the Nubia sandstones through a comparison with the pore anisotropy obtained from measuring permeability in three orthogonal directions in a gaz permeameter. The Nubia sandstones are represented in Tushka area (South Egypt) by quartz arenite of large porosity (29-40 per cent) which was measured on thin sections parallel and perpendicular to the bedding plane and petrophysically by helium pycnometry and ferrofluid injection at 1 bar pressure. Petrographically, there is a detectable difference between the porosity values in the bedding plane and in the perpendicular direction indicating inhomogeneity in the pore space network distribution. The petrophysical studies indicate large porosity and permeability values with some differences between the helium and ferrofluid porosity due to presence of micro pore spaces not accessible for the ferrofluid molecules having relatively high diameters and injected at low pressure. An overall agreement is observed between the permeability anisotropy and the magnetic grain and pore fabrics (magnetic anisotropy measured before and after ferrofluid injection). The three fabrics are mainly dominated by a bedding parallel foliation. In a few cases maximum permeability appears to be perpendicular to bedding. Within the bedding plane, maximum pore elongation direction from ferrofluid injection is NNW for Adindan and Kesieba formations and NW for Abu Simbil Formation. The maximum pore elongation direction for Abu Ballas samples showed a direction fluctuating around the E-W direction, the main fault trends in Tushka area. The pore fabric of Abu Ballas formation seems therefore to be structurally controlled, while it would be originated from palaeocurrent directions in the other formations.

  11. Classification and quantification of pore shapes in sandstone reservoir rocks with 3-D X-ray micro-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Mayka; Halisch, Matthias; Müller, Cornelia; Peres Fernandes, Celso

    2016-02-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in the characterization of the pore morphologies of reservoir rocks and how the spatial organization of pore traits affects the macro behavior of rock-fluid systems. With the availability of 3-D high-resolution imaging, such as x-ray micro-computed tomography (µ-CT), the detailed quantification of particle shapes has been facilitated by progress in computer science. Here, we show how the shapes of irregular rock particles (pores) can be classified and quantified based on binary 3-D images. The methodology requires the measurement of basic 3-D particle descriptors (length, width, and thickness) and a shape classification that involves the similarity of artificial objects, which is based on main pore network detachments and 3-D sample sizes. Two main pore components were identified from the analyzed volumes: pore networks and residual pore ganglia. A watershed algorithm was applied to preserve the pore morphology after separating the main pore networks, which is essential for the pore shape characterization. The results were validated for three sandstones (S1, S2, and S3) from distinct reservoirs, and most of the pore shapes were found to be plate- and cube-like, ranging from 39.49 to 50.94 % and from 58.80 to 45.18 % when the Feret caliper descriptor was investigated in a 10003 voxel volume. Furthermore, this study generalizes a practical way to correlate specific particle shapes, such as rods, blades, cuboids, plates, and cubes to characterize asymmetric particles of any material type with 3-D image analysis.

  12. Analytical applications for pore-forming proteins.

    PubMed

    Kasianowicz, John J; Balijepalli, Arvind K; Ettedgui, Jessica; Forstater, Jacob H; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Huisheng; Robertson, Joseph W F

    2016-03-01

    Proteinaceous nanometer-scale pores are ubiquitous in biology. The canonical ionic channels (e.g., those that transport Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Cl(-) across cell membranes) play key roles in many cellular processes, including nerve and muscle activity. Another class of channels includes bacterial pore-forming toxins, which disrupt cell function, and can lead to cell death. We describe here the recent development of these toxins for a wide range of biological sensing applications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pore-Forming Toxins edited by Mauro Dalla Serra and Franco Gambale.

  13. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow; Lee, Elizabeth; Kallam, Alekhya; Majumdar, Partha; Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J.; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Bahr, James; Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  14. High temperature ion channels and pores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Xiaofeng (Inventor); Gu, Li Qun (Inventor); Cheley, Stephen (Inventor); Bayley, Hagan (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention includes an apparatus, system and method for stochastic sensing of an analyte to a protein pore. The protein pore may be an engineer protein pore, such as an ion channel at temperatures above 55.degree. C. and even as high as near 100.degree. C. The analyte may be any reactive analyte, including chemical weapons, environmental toxins and pharmaceuticals. The analyte covalently bonds to the sensor element to produce a detectable electrical current signal. Possible signals include change in electrical current. Detection of the signal allows identification of the analyte and determination of its concentration in a sample solution. Multiple analytes present in the same solution may also be detected.

  15. From concave to convex: capillary bridges in slit pore geometry.

    PubMed

    Broesch, David J; Frechette, Joelle

    2012-11-06

    We investigate the morphological evolution of nonaxisymmetric capillary bridges in slit-pore geometry as the height of the pore and aspect ratio of the bridge are varied. The liquid bridges are formed between two hydrophobic surfaces patterned with hydrophilic strips. The aspect ratio of the capillary bridges (length/width) is varied from 2.5 to 120 by changing the separation between the surfaces, the width of the strips, or the fluid volume. As the bridge height is increased, the aspect ratio decreases and we observe a large increase in the mean curvature of the bridge. More specifically, the following counterintuitive result is observed: the mean curvature of the bridges changes sign and goes from negative (concave bridge) to positive (convex bridge) when the height is increased at constant volume. These experimental observations are in quantitative agreement with Surface Evolver simulations. Scaling shows a collapse of the data indicating that this transition in the sign of the Laplace pressure is universal for capillary bridges with high aspect ratios. Finally, we show that the morphology diagrams obtained from our 3D analysis are considerably different from those expected from a 2D analysis.

  16. Pore structure characterization of Chang-7 tight sandstone using MICP combined with N2GA techniques and its geological control factors

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhe; Liu, Guangdi; Zhan, Hongbin; Li, Chaozheng; You, Yuan; Yang, Chengyu; Jiang, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the pore networks of unconventional tight reservoirs such as tight sandstones and shales is crucial for extracting oil/gas from such reservoirs. Mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) and N2 gas adsorption (N2GA) are performed to evaluate pore structure of Chang-7 tight sandstone. Thin section observation, scanning electron microscope, grain size analysis, mineral composition analysis, and porosity measurement are applied to investigate geological control factors of pore structure. Grain size is positively correlated with detrital mineral content and grain size standard deviation while negatively related to clay content. Detrital mineral content and grain size are positively correlated with porosity, pore throat radius and withdrawal efficiency and negatively related to capillary pressure and pore-to-throat size ratio; while interstitial material is negatively correlated with above mentioned factors. Well sorted sediments with high debris usually possess strong compaction resistance to preserve original pores. Although many inter-crystalline pores are produced in clay minerals, this type of pores is not the most important contributor to porosity. Besides this, pore shape determined by N2GA hysteresis loop is consistent with SEM observation on clay inter-crystalline pores while BJH pore volume is positively related with clay content, suggesting N2GA is suitable for describing clay inter-crystalline pores in tight sandstones. PMID:27830731

  17. Pore structure characterization of Chang-7 tight sandstone using MICP combined with N2GA techniques and its geological control factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhe; Liu, Guangdi; Zhan, Hongbin; Li, Chaozheng; You, Yuan; Yang, Chengyu; Jiang, Hang

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the pore networks of unconventional tight reservoirs such as tight sandstones and shales is crucial for extracting oil/gas from such reservoirs. Mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) and N2 gas adsorption (N2GA) are performed to evaluate pore structure of Chang-7 tight sandstone. Thin section observation, scanning electron microscope, grain size analysis, mineral composition analysis, and porosity measurement are applied to investigate geological control factors of pore structure. Grain size is positively correlated with detrital mineral content and grain size standard deviation while negatively related to clay content. Detrital mineral content and grain size are positively correlated with porosity, pore throat radius and withdrawal efficiency and negatively related to capillary pressure and pore-to-throat size ratio; while interstitial material is negatively correlated with above mentioned factors. Well sorted sediments with high debris usually possess strong compaction resistance to preserve original pores. Although many inter-crystalline pores are produced in clay minerals, this type of pores is not the most important contributor to porosity. Besides this, pore shape determined by N2GA hysteresis loop is consistent with SEM observation on clay inter-crystalline pores while BJH pore volume is positively related with clay content, suggesting N2GA is suitable for describing clay inter-crystalline pores in tight sandstones.

  18. Pore structure characterization of Chang-7 tight sandstone using MICP combined with N2GA techniques and its geological control factors.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhe; Liu, Guangdi; Zhan, Hongbin; Li, Chaozheng; You, Yuan; Yang, Chengyu; Jiang, Hang

    2016-11-10

    Understanding the pore networks of unconventional tight reservoirs such as tight sandstones and shales is crucial for extracting oil/gas from such reservoirs. Mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) and N2 gas adsorption (N2GA) are performed to evaluate pore structure of Chang-7 tight sandstone. Thin section observation, scanning electron microscope, grain size analysis, mineral composition analysis, and porosity measurement are applied to investigate geological control factors of pore structure. Grain size is positively correlated with detrital mineral content and grain size standard deviation while negatively related to clay content. Detrital mineral content and grain size are positively correlated with porosity, pore throat radius and withdrawal efficiency and negatively related to capillary pressure and pore-to-throat size ratio; while interstitial material is negatively correlated with above mentioned factors. Well sorted sediments with high debris usually possess strong compaction resistance to preserve original pores. Although many inter-crystalline pores are produced in clay minerals, this type of pores is not the most important contributor to porosity. Besides this, pore shape determined by N2GA hysteresis loop is consistent with SEM observation on clay inter-crystalline pores while BJH pore volume is positively related with clay content, suggesting N2GA is suitable for describing clay inter-crystalline pores in tight sandstones.

  19. Using synchrotron X-ray microtomography to characterize the pore network of reservoir rocks: A case study on carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, F.; Cilona, A.; Mancini, L.; Tondi, E.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we propose a new methodology to calculate pore connectivity in granular rocks. This method is useful to characterize the pore networks of natural and laboratory compaction bands (CBs), and compare them with the host rock pore network. Data were collected using the synchrotron X-ray microtomography technique and quantitative analyses were carried out using the Pore3D software library. The porosity was calculated from segmented tridimensional images of deformed and pristine rocks. A process of skeletonization of the pore space was used to obtain the number of connected pores within the rock volume. By analyzing the skeletons the differences between natural and laboratory CBs were highlighted. The natural CB has a lower porosity than to the laboratory one. In natural CBs, the grain contacts appear welded, whereas laboratory CBs show irregular pore shape. Moreover, we assessed for the first time how pore connectivity evolves as a function of deformation, documenting the mechanism responsible for pore connectivity drop within the CBs.

  20. From the Nano- to the Formation Scale: Accessible Reactive Surface Area in a CO2 Saline Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, A.; Cole, D. R.; Sheets, J. M.; Anovitz, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Among the outstanding subsurface science challenges today is the translation of our improved understanding of pore-scale reactive transport and bench-scale geochemical rates of reaction to the prediction of long-term formation response to the sequestration of carbon dioxide. The emergent complexity of CO2-brine-rock interactions, on a large scale, over long periods of time (up to 1000 years) arises from a number of imperfectly understood factors. Of these, the accessibility of reactive surfaces distinguishes natural materials from powders commonly used in reaction rate studies, and geologic heterogeneity requires a workflow that connects samples, not to depths, but to material types that, combined, constitute a subsurface formation. To this end, core samples targeting every lithology type (quartz arenite, quartz-feldspar arenite, hematitic matrix-rich sandstone, clay-silt lens) observed in two bore holes through the Mt. Simon Sandstone of Ohio have been interrogated. Small- and ultra small-angle neutron scattering (SANS, USANS) and mercury and gas porosimetry (MICP, BET) have been used to quantify pore and pore throat distributions, and therefore pore volume accessibility at any given intrusion pressure. Mineral surface area is calculated using high-resolution SEM-BSE imagery combined with energy dispersive X-ray mineral mapping, and then extended beyond the limit of image-based techniques by using BET estimates for specific minerals. Combined, these datasets enable the quantification of mineral-specific, connected surface area as a function of pore/fracture scale. This is a defining feature of a pore-mineral assemblage, the microanalysis analogue of a macroscale lithology. The whole formation is then reconstructed by connecting pore-mineral assemblages to lithologies, defined by permeability/porosity and by mineralogy, and these in turn to the whole vertical extent of the formation using coarser-scale images of whole core. This effort therefore contributes both to

  1. Block copolymer structures in nano-pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, Marco; Guo, Xiaohu; Zvelindovsky, Andrei

    2010-03-01

    We present results of coarse-grained computer modelling of block copolymer systems in cylindrical and spherical nanopores on Cell Dynamics Simulation. We study both cylindrical and spherical pores and systematically investigate structures formed by lamellar, cylinders and spherical block copolymer systems for various pore radii and affinity of block copolymer blocks to the pore walls. The obtained structures include: standing lamellae and cylinders, ``onions,'' cylinder ``knitting balls,'' ``golf-ball,'' layered spherical, ``virus''-like and mixed morphologies with T-junctions and U-type defects [1]. Kinetics of the structure formation and the differences with planar films are discussed. Our simulations suggest that novel porous nano-containers can be formed by confining block copolymers in pores of different geometries [1,2]. [4pt] [1] M. Pinna, X. Guo, A.V. Zvelindovsky, Polymer 49, 2797 (2008).[0pt] [2] M. Pinna, X. Guo, A.V. Zvelindovsky, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 214902 (2009).

  2. OBSERVATIONS OF SAUSAGE MODES IN MAGNETIC PORES

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R. J.; Erdelyi, R.; Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M. E-mail: Robertus@sheffield.ac.uk

    2011-03-10

    We present here evidence for the observation of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) sausage modes in magnetic pores in the solar photosphere. Further evidence for the omnipresent nature of acoustic global modes is also found. The empirical decomposition method of wave analysis is used to identify the oscillations detected through a 4170 A 'blue continuum' filter observed with the Rapid Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere (ROSA) instrument. Out of phase, periodic behavior in pore size and intensity is used as an indicator of the presence of magnetoacoustic sausage oscillations. Multiple signatures of the magnetoacoustic sausage mode are found in a number of pores. The periods range from as short as 30 s up to 450 s. A number of the magnetoacoustic sausage mode oscillations found have periods of 3 and 5 minutes, similar to the acoustic global modes of the solar interior. It is proposed that these global oscillations could be the driver of the sausage-type magnetoacoustic MHD wave modes in pores.

  3. Pore Space Partition in Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Quan-Guo; Bu, Xianhui; Zhao, Xiang; Li, Dong-Sheng; Feng, Pingyun

    2017-02-21

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) materials have emerged as one of the favorite crystalline porous materials (CPM) because of their compositional and geometric tunability and many possible applications. In efforts to develop better MOFs for gas storage and separation, a number of strategies including creation of open metal sites and implantation of Lewis base sites have been used to tune host-guest interactions. In addition to these chemical factors, the geometric features such as pore size and shape, surface area, and pore volume also play important roles in sorption energetics and uptake capacity. For efficient capture of small gas molecules such as carbon dioxide under ambient conditions, large surface area or high pore volume are often not needed. Instead, maximizing host-guest interactions or the density of binding sites by encaging gas molecules in snug pockets of pore space can be a fruitful approach. To put this concept into practice, the pore space partition (PSP) concept has been proposed and has achieved a great experimental success. In this account, we will highlight many efforts to implement PSP in MOFs and impact of PSP on gas uptake performance. In the synthetic design of PSP, it is helpful to distinguish between factors that contribute to the framework formation and factors that serve the purpose of PSP. Because of the need for complementary structural roles, the synthesis of MOFs with PSP often involves multicomponent systems including mixed ligands, mixed inorganic nodes, or both. It is possible to accomplish both framework formation and PSP with a single type of polyfunctional ligands that use some functional groups (called framework-forming group) for framework formation and the remaining functional groups (called pore-partition group) for PSP. Alternatively, framework formation and PSP can be shouldered by different chemical species. For example, in a mixed-ligand system, one ligand (called framework-forming agent) can play the role of the

  4. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2015-04-01

    In extremely dynamic microhabitats as bio-pores made by earthworm, the in situ enzyme activities are assumed as a footprint of complex biotic interactions. Our study focused on the effect of earthworm on the enzyme activities inside bio-pores and visualizing the differences between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil by zymography technique (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2013). For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in bio-pores. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworms, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine-aminopeptidase, and phosphatase. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. However, the differences in activity of cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase between bio-pore and bulk soil were less pronounced. This demonstrated an applicability of zymography approach to monitor and to distinguish the in situ activity of hydrolytic enzymes in soil biopores.

  5. Probing Pore Constriction in a Ligand-gated Ion Channel by Trapping a Metal Ion in the Pore upon Agonist Dissociation*

    PubMed Central

    Pittel, Ilya; Witt-Kehati, Dvora; Degani-Katzav, Nurit; Paas, Yoav

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are receptors activated by neurotransmitters to rapidly transport ions across cell membranes, down their electrochemical gradients. Recent crystal structures of two prokaryotic pLGICs were interpreted to imply that the extracellular side of the transmembrane pore constricts to close the channel (Hilf, R. J., and Dutzler, R. (2009) Nature 457, 115–118; Bocquet, N., Nury, H., Baaden, M., Le Poupon, C., Changeux, J. P., Delarue, M., and Corringer, P. J. (2009) Nature 457, 111–114). Here, we utilized a eukaryotic acetylcholine (ACh)-serotonin chimeric pLGIC that was engineered with histidines to coordinate a metal ion within the channel pore, at its cytoplasmic side. In a previous study, the access of Zn2+ ions to the engineered histidines had been explored when the channel was either at rest (closed) or active (open) (Paas, Y., Gibor, G., Grailhe, R., Savatier-Duclert, N., Dufresne, V., Sunesen, M., de Carvalho, L. P., Changeux, J. P., and Attali, B. (2005) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 102, 15877–15882). In this study, the interactions of Zn2+ with the pore were probed upon agonist (ACh) dissociation that triggers the transition of the receptor from the active conformation to the resting conformation (i.e. during deactivation). Application of Zn2+ onto ACh-bound open receptors obstructed their pore and prevented ionic flow. Removing ACh from its extracellular binding sites to trigger deactivation while Zn2+ is still bound led to tight trapping of Zn2+ within the pore. Together with single-channel recordings, made to explore single pore-blocking events, we show that dissociation of ACh causes the gate to shut on a Zn2+ ion that effectively acts as a “foot in the door.” We infer that, upon deactivation, the cytoplasmic side of the pore of the ACh-serotonin receptor chimera constricts to close the channel. PMID:20466725

  6. More Than a Pore: The Interplay of Pore-Forming Proteins and Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ros, Uris; García-Sáez, Ana J

    2015-06-01

    Pore-forming proteins (PFPs) punch holes in their target cell membrane to alter their permeability. Permeabilization of lipid membranes by PFPs has received special attention to study the basic molecular mechanisms of protein insertion into membranes and the development of biotechnological tools. PFPs act through a general multi-step mechanism that involves (i) membrane partitioning, (ii) insertion into the hydrophobic core of the bilayer, (iii) oligomerization, and (iv) pore formation. Interestingly, PFPs and membranes show a dynamic interplay. As PFPs are usually produced as soluble proteins, they require a large conformational change for membrane insertion. Moreover, membrane structure is modified upon PFPs insertion. In this context, the toroidal pore model has been proposed to describe a pore architecture in which not only protein molecules but also lipids are directly involved in the structure. Here, we discuss how PFPs and lipids cooperate and remodel each other to achieve pore formation, and explore new evidences of protein-lipid pore structures.

  7. Opening protein pores with chaotropes enhances Fe reduction and chelation of Fe from the ferritin biomineral.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Jin, Weili; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2003-04-01

    Iron is concentrated in ferritin, a spherical protein with a capacious cavity for ferric nanominerals of <4,500 Fe atoms. Global ferritin structure is very stable, resisting 6 M urea and heat (85 degrees C) at neutral pH. Eight pores, each formed by six helices from 3 of the 24 polypeptide subunits, restrict mineral access to reductant, protons, or chelators. Protein-directed transport of Fe and aqueous Fe(3+) chemistry (solubility approximately 10(-18) M) drive mineralization. Ferritin pores are "gated" based on protein crystals and Fe chelation rates of wild-type (WT) and engineered proteins. Pore structure and gate residues, which are highly conserved, thus should be sensitive to environmental changes such as low concentrations of chaotropes. We now demonstrate that urea or guanidine (1-10 mM), far below concentrations for global unfolding, induced multiphasic rate increases in Fe(2+)-bipyridyl formation similar to conservative substitutions of pore residues. Urea (1 M) or the nonconservative LeuPro substitution that fully unfolded pores without urea both induced monophasic rate increases in Fe(2+) chelation rates, indicating unrestricted access between mineral and reductantchelator. The observation of low-melting ferritin subdomains by CD spectroscopy (melting midpoint 53 degrees C), accounting for 10% of ferritin alpha-helices, is unprecedented. The low-melting ferritin subdomains are pores, based on percentage helix and destabilization by either very dilute urea solutions (1 mM) or LeuPro substitution, which both increased Fe(2+) chelation. Biological molecules may have evolved to control gating of ferritin pores in response to cell iron need and, if mimicked by designer drugs, could impact chelation therapies in iron-overload diseases.

  8. Screening of pi-basic naphthalene and anthracene amplifiers for pi-acidic synthetic pore sensors.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Shinya; Gremaud, Ludovic; Bollot, Guillaume; Mareda, Jiri; Matile, Stefan

    2008-04-02

    Synthetic ion channels and pores attract current attention as multicomponent sensors in complex matrixes. This application requires the availability of reactive signal amplifiers that covalently capture analytes and drag them into the pore. pi-Basic 1,5-dialkoxynaphthalenes (1,5-DAN) are attractive amplifiers because aromatic electron donor-acceptor (AEDA) interactions account for their recognition within pi-acidic naphthalenediimide (NDI) rich synthetic pores. Focusing on amplifier design, we report here the synthesis of a complete collection of DAN and dialkoxyanthracene amplifiers, determine their oxidation potentials by cyclic voltammetry, and calculate their quadrupole moments. Blockage experiments reveal that subtle structural changes in regioisomeric DAN amplifiers can be registered within NDI pores. Frontier orbital overlap in AEDA complexes, oxidation potentials, and, to a lesser extent, quadrupole moments are shown to contribute to isomer recognition by synthetic pores. Particularly important with regard to practical applications of synthetic pores as multianalyte sensors, we further demonstrate that application of the lessons learned with DAN regioisomers to the expansion to dialkoxyanthracenes provides access to privileged amplifiers with submicromolar activity.

  9. Elastic response of mesoporous silicon to capillary pressures in the pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gor, Gennady Y.; Bertinetti, Luca; Bernstein, Noam; Hofmann, Tommy; Fratzl, Peter; Huber, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    We study water adsorption-induced deformation of a monolithic, mesoporous silicon membrane traversed by independent channels of ˜8 nm diameter. We focus on the elastic constant associated with the Laplace pressure-induced deformation of the membrane upon capillary condensation, i.e., the pore-load modulus. We perform finite-element method (FEM) simulations of the adsorption-induced deformation of hexagonal and square lattices of cylindrical pores representing the membrane. We find that the pore-load modulus weakly depends on the geometrical arrangement of pores, and can be expressed as a function of porosity. We propose an analytical model which relates the pore-load modulus to the porosity and to the elastic properties of bulk silicon (Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio), and provides an excellent agreement with FEM results. We find good agreement between our experimental data and the predictions of the analytical model, with the Young's modulus of the pore walls slightly lower than the bulk value. This model is applicable to a large class of materials with morphologies similar to mesoporous silicon. Moreover, our findings suggest that liquid condensation experiments allow one to elegantly access the elastic constants of a mesoporous medium.

  10. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  11. Superficially porous particles with 1000Å pores for large biomolecule high performance liquid chromatography and polymer size exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Brian M; Schuster, Stephanie A; Boyes, Barry E; Shields, Taylor J; Miles, William L; Haynes, Mark J; Moran, Robert E; Kirkland, Joseph J; Schure, Mark R

    2017-03-17

    To facilitate mass transport and column efficiency, solutes must have free access to particle pores to facilitate interactions with the stationary phase. To ensure this feature, particles should be used for HPLC separations which have pores sufficiently large to accommodate the solute without restricted diffusion. This paper describes the design and properties of superficially porous (also called Fused-Core(®), core shell or porous shell) particles with very large (1000Å) pores specifically developed for separating very large biomolecules and polymers. Separations of DNA fragments, monoclonal antibodies, large proteins and large polystyrene standards are used to illustrate the utility of these particles for efficient, high-resolution applications.

  12. Pore pressure embrittlement in a volcanic edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Jamie; Heap, Michael J.; Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry; Varley, Nick R.

    2016-01-01

    The failure mode of porous rock in compression—dilatant or compactant—is largely governed by the overlying lithostatic pressure and the pressure of pore fluids within the rock (Wong, Solid Earth 102:3009-3025, 1997), both of which are subject to change in space and time within a volcanic edifice. While lithostatic pressure will tend to increase monotonously with depth due to the progressive accumulation of erupted products, pore pressures are prone to fluctuations (during periods of volcanic unrest, for example). An increase in pore fluid pressure can result in rock fracture, even at depths where the lithostatic pressure would otherwise preclude such dilatant behaviour—a process termed pore fluid-induced embrittlement. We explore this phenomenon through a series of targeted triaxial experiments on typical edifice-forming andesites (from Volcán de Colima, Mexico). We first show that increasing pore pressure over a range of timescales (on the order of 1 min to 1 day) can culminate in brittle failure of otherwise intact rock. Irrespective of the pore pressure increase rate, we record comparable accelerations in acoustic emission and strain prior to macroscopic failure. We further show that oscillating pore fluid pressures can cause iterative and cumulative damage, ultimately resulting in brittle failure under relatively low effective mean stress conditions. We find that macroscopic failure occurs once a critical threshold of damage is surpassed, suggesting that only small increases in pore pressure may be necessary to trigger failure in previously damaged rocks. Finally, we observe that inelastic compaction of volcanic rock (as we may expect in much of the deep edifice) can be overprinted by shear fractures due to this mechanism of embrittlement. Pore fluid-induced embrittlement of edifice rock during volcanic unrest is anticipated to be highest closer to the conduit and, as a result, may assist in the development of a fractured halo zone surrounding the

  13. Isolated pores dissected from human two-pore channel 2 are functional

    PubMed Central

    Penny, Christopher J.; Rahman, Taufiq; Sula, Altin; Miles, Andrew J.; Wallace, B. A.; Patel, Sandip

    2016-01-01

    Multi-domain voltage-gated ion channels appear to have evolved through sequential rounds of intragenic duplication from a primordial one-domain precursor. Whereas modularity within one-domain symmetrical channels is established, little is known about the roles of individual regions within more complex asymmetrical channels where the domains have undergone substantial divergence. Here we isolated and characterised both of the divergent pore regions from human TPC2, a two-domain channel that holds a key intermediate position in the evolution of voltage-gated ion channels. In HeLa cells, each pore localised to the ER and caused Ca2+ depletion, whereas an ER-targeted pore mutated at a residue that inactivates full-length TPC2 did not. Additionally, one of the pores expressed at high levels in E. coli. When purified, it formed a stable, folded tetramer. Liposomes reconstituted with the pore supported Ca2+ and Na+ uptake that was inhibited by known blockers of full-length channels. Computational modelling of the pore corroborated cationic permeability and drug interaction. Therefore, despite divergence, both pores are constitutively active in the absence of their partners and retain several properties of the wild-type pore. Such symmetrical ‘pore-only’ proteins derived from divergent channel domains may therefore provide tractable tools for probing the functional architecture of complex ion channels. PMID:27941820

  14. Temperature-mediated phase transformation, pore geometry and pore hysteresis transformation of borohydride derived in-born porous zirconium hydroxide nanopowders

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Nadiya B.; Nayak, Bibhuti B.

    2016-01-01

    Development of in-born porous nature of zirconium hydroxide nanopowders through a facile hydrogen (H2) gas-bubbles assisted borohydride synthesis route using sodium borohydride (NaBH4) and novel information on the temperature-mediated phase transformation, pore geometry as well as pore hysteresis transformation of in-born porous zirconium hydroxide nanopowders with the help of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) isotherm and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images are the main theme of this research work. Without any surfactants or pore forming agents, the borohydride derived amorphous nature of porous powders was stable up to 500 °C and then the seed crystals start to develop within the loose amorphous matrix and trapping the inter-particulate voids, which led to develop the porous nature of tetragonal zirconium oxide at 600 °C and further sustain this porous nature as well as tetragonal phase of zirconium oxide up to 800 °C. The novel hydrogen (H2) gas-bubbles assisted borohydride synthesis route led to develop thermally stable porous zirconium hydroxide/oxide nanopowders with an adequate pore size, pore volume, and surface area and thus these porous materials are further suggested for promising use in different areas of applications. PMID:27198738

  15. Extreme value statistics analysis of fracture strengths of a sintered silicon nitride failing from pores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Luen-Yuan; Shetty, Dinesh K.

    1992-01-01

    Statistical analysis and correlation between pore-size distribution and fracture strength distribution using the theory of extreme-value statistics is presented for a sintered silicon nitride. The pore-size distribution on a polished surface of this material was characterized, using an automatic optical image analyzer. The distribution measured on the two-dimensional plane surface was transformed to a population (volume) distribution, using the Schwartz-Saltykov diameter method. The population pore-size distribution and the distribution of the pore size at the fracture origin were correllated by extreme-value statistics. Fracture strength distribution was then predicted from the extreme-value pore-size distribution, usin a linear elastic fracture mechanics model of annular crack around pore and the fracture toughness of the ceramic. The predicted strength distribution was in good agreement with strength measurements in bending. In particular, the extreme-value statistics analysis explained the nonlinear trend in the linearized Weibull plot of measured strengths without postulating a lower-bound strength.

  16. A thermal porosimetry method to estimate pore size distribution in highly porous insulating materials

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, V.; Jannot, Y.; Degiovanni, A.

    2012-05-15

    Standard pore size determination methods such as mercury porosimetry, nitrogen sorption, microscopy, or x-ray tomography are not always applicable to highly porous, low density, and thus very fragile materials. For this kind of materials, a method based on thermal characterization is proposed. Indeed, the thermal conductivity of a highly porous and insulating medium is significantly dependent on the thermal conductivity of the interstitial gas that depends on both gas pressure and size of the considered pore (Knudsen effect). It is also possible to link the pore size with the thermal conductivity of the medium. Thermal conductivity measurements are realized on specimens placed in an enclosure where the air pressure is successively set to different values varying from 10{sup -1} to 10{sup 5} Pa. Knowing the global porosity ratio, an effective thermal conductivity model for a two-phase air-solid material based on a combined serial-parallel model is established. Pore size distribution can be identified by minimizing the sum of the quadratic differences between measured values and modeled ones. The results of the estimation process are the volume fractions of the chosen ranges of pore size. In order to validate the method, measurements done on insulating materials are presented. The results are discussed and show that pore size distribution estimated by the proposed method is coherent.

  17. A vacuum-operated pore-water extractor for estuarine and freshwater sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, Parley V.; Lasier, Peter J.

    1991-01-01

    A vacuum-operated pore-water extractor for estuarine and freshwater sediments was developed and constructed from a fused-glass air stone attached with aquarium airline tubing to a 30 or 60 cc polypropylene syringe. Pore water is extracted by inserting the air stone into the sediment and creating a vacuum by retracting and bracing the syringe plunger. A hand-operated vacuum pump attached to a filtration flask was also evaluated as an alternative vacuum source. The volume and time to extract pore water varies with the number of devices and the sediment particle size. Extraction time is longer for fine sediments than for sandy sediments. Four liters of sediment generally yield between 500 and 1,500 mL of pore water. The sediment that surrounds and accumulates on the air stone acts as a filter, and, except for the first few milliliters, the collected pore water is clear. Because there is no exposure to air or avenue for escape, volatile compounds andin situ characteristics are retained in the extracted pore water.

  18. Pore- and micro-structural characterization of a novel structural binder based on iron carbonation

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sumanta; Stone, David; Convey, Diana; Neithalath, Narayanan

    2014-12-15

    The pore- and micro-structural features of a novel binding material based on the carbonation of waste metallic iron powder are reported in this paper. The binder contains metallic iron powder as the major ingredient, followed by additives containing silica and alumina to facilitate favorable reaction product formation. Compressive strengths sufficient for a majority of concrete applications are attained. The material pore structure is investigated primarily through mercury intrusion porosimetry whereas electron microscopy is used for microstructural characterization. Reduction in the overall porosity and the average pore size with an increase in carbonation duration from 1 day to 4 days is noticed. The pore structure features are used in predictive models for gas and moisture transport (water vapor diffusivity and moisture permeability) through the porous medium which dictates its long-term durability when used in structural applications. Comparisons of the pore structure with those of a Portland cement paste are also provided. The morphology of the reaction products in the iron-based binder, and the distribution of constituent elements in the microstructure are also reported. - Highlights: • Carbonation of iron produces a dense microstructure. • Pore volume in iron carbonate lower, critical size higher than those in OPC pastes • Reaction product contains iron, carbon, silicon, aluminum and calcium. • Power-law for porosity-moisture permeability relationship was established.

  19. Pore-Scale and Multiscale Numerical Simulation of Flow and Transport in a Laboratory-Scale Column

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; McKinley, Matthey I.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Serkowski, John A.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-02-01

    Pore-scale models are useful for studying relationships between fundamental processes and phenomena at larger (i.e., Darcy) scales. However, the size of domains that can be simulated with explicit pore-scale resolution is limited by computational and observational constraints. Direct numerical simulation of pore-scale flow and transport is typically performed on millimeter-scale volumes at which X-ray computed tomography (XCT), often used to characterize pore geometry, can achieve micrometer resolution. In contrast, the scale at which a continuum approximation of a porous medium is valid is usually larger, on the order of centimeters to decimeters. Furthermore, laboratory experiments that measure continuum properties are typically performed on decimeter-scale columns. At this scale, XCT resolution is coarse (tens to hundreds of micrometers) and prohibits characterization of small pores and grains. We performed simulations of pore-scale processes over a decimeter-scale volume of natural porous media with a wide range of grain sizes, and compared to results of column experiments using the same sample. Simulations were conducted using high-performance codes executed on a supercomputer. Two approaches to XCT image segmentation were evaluated, a binary (pores and solids) segmentation and a ternary segmentation that resolved a third category (porous solids with pores smaller than the imaged resolution). We used a mixed Stokes-Darcy simulation method to simulate the combination of Stokes flow in large open pores and Darcy-like flow in porous solid regions. Simulations based on the ternary segmentation provided results that were consistent with experimental observations, demonstrating our ability to successfully model pore-scale flow over a column-scale domain.

  20. Final Report for Subcontract B541028, Pore-Scale Modeling to Support "Pore Connectivity" Research Work

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R P

    2009-02-25

    This report covers modeling aspects of a combined experimental and modeling task in support of the DOE Science and Technology Program (formerly OSTI) within the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). Research Objectives The research for this project dealt with diffusive retardation: solute moving through a fracture diffuses into and out of the rock matrix. This diffusive exchange retards overall solute movement, and retardation both dilutes waste being released, and allows additional decay. Diffusive retardation involves not only fracture conductivity and matrix diffusion, but also other issues and processes: contaminants may sorb to the rock matrix, fracture flow may be episodic, a given fracture may or may not flow depending on the volume of flow and the fracture's connection to the overall fracture network, the matrix imbibes water during flow episodes and dries between episodes, and so on. The objective of the project was to improve understanding of diffusive retardation of radionuclides due to fracture / matrix interactions. Results from combined experimental/modeling work were to (1) determine whether the current understanding and model representation of matrix diffusion is valid, (2) provide insights into the upscaling of laboratory-scale diffusion experiments, and (3) help in evaluating the impact on diffusive retardation of episodic fracture flow and pore connectivity in Yucca Mountain tuffs. Questions explored included the following: (1) What is the relationship between the diffusion coefficient measured at one scale, to that measured or observed at a different scale? In classical materials this relationship is trivial; in low-connectivity materials it is not. (2) Is the measured diffusivity insensitive to the shape of the sample? Again, in classical materials there should be no sample shape effect. (3) Does sorption affect diffusive exchange in low-connectivity media differently than in classical media? (4) What is the effect of matrix

  1. Three-dimensional pore space quantification of apple tissue using X-ray computed microtomography.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Fernando; Verboven, Pieter; Mebatsion, Hibru K; Kerckhofs, Greet; Wevers, Martine; Nicolaï, Bart

    2007-08-01

    The microstructure and the connectivity of the pore space are important variables for better understanding of the complex gas transport phenomena that occur in plant tissues. In this study, we present an experimental procedure for image acquisition and image processing to quantitatively characterize in 3D the pore space of apple tissues (Malus domestica Borkh.) for two cultivars (Jonagold and Braeburn) taken from the fleshy part of the cortex using X-ray computer microtomography. Preliminary sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the effect of the resolution and the volume size (REV, representative elementary volume analysis) on the computed porosity of apple samples. For comparison among cultivars, geometrical properties such as porosity, specific surface area, number of disconnected pore volumes and their distribution parameters were extracted and analyzed in triplicate based on the 3D skeletonization of the pore space (medial axis analysis). The results showed that microtomography provides a resolution at the micrometer level to quantitatively analyze and characterize the 3D topology of the pore space in apple tissue. The computed porosity was confirmed to be highly dependent of the resolution used, and the minimum REV of the cortical flesh of apple fruit was estimated to be 1.3 mm(3). Comparisons among the two cultivars using a resolution of 8.5 mum with a minimum REV cube showed that in spite of the complexity and variability of the pore space network observed in Jonagold and Braeburn apples, the extracted parameters from the medial axis were significantly different (P-value < 0.05). Medial axis parameters showed potential to differentiate the microstructure between the two evaluated apple cultivars.

  2. Laser scanning confocal microscopy characterization of water repellent distribution in a sandstone pore network.

    PubMed

    Zoghlami, Karima; Gómez-Gras, David; Corbella, Mercè; Darragi, Fadila

    2008-11-01

    In the present work, we propose the use of the Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) to determine the effect of water repellents on rock's pore-network configuration and interconnection. The rocks studied are sandstones of Miocene age, a building material that is commonly found in the architectural heritage of Tunisia. The porosity quantitative data of treated and untreated samples, obtained by mercury porosimetry tests, were compared. The results show a slight decrease in total porosity with the water repellent treatment, which reduced both microporosity and macroporosity. This reduction produced a modification in pore size distribution and a shift of the pore access size mode interval toward smaller pore diameters (from the 30-40 microm to the 20-30 microm intervals). The water repellent was observed in SEM images as a continuous film coating grain surfaces; moreover, it was easily visualized in LSCM, by staining the water repellent with Epodye fluorochrome, and the coating thickness was straightforwardly measured (1.5-2 microm). In fact, the combination of mercury intrusion porosimetry data and LSCM observations suggests that the porosity reduction and the shift of the pore diameter mode were mainly due to the general reduction of pore diameters, but also to the plugging of the smallest pores (less than 3-4 microm in diameter) by the water repellent film. Finally, the LSCM technique enabled the reconstruction of 3D views of the water repellent coating film in the pore network, indicating that its distribution was uniform and continuous over the 100 microm thick sample. The LSCM imaging facilitates the integration and interpretation of mercury porosimetry and SEM data.

  3. Recoverable gas from hydrate-bearing sediments: Pore network model simulation and macroscale analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jaewon; Santamarina, J. Carlos

    2011-08-01

    The volume of hydrate expands into a significantly larger volume of water and gas upon dissociation. Gas recovery and capillary-trapped residual gas saturation are investigated by simulating hydrate dissociation within pore networks. A fluid pressure-controlled boundary condition is used to determine the amount of recovered gas as a function of volume expansion; in this form, results are applicable to gas production by either thermal stimulation or depressurization when production rates prevent secondary hydrate or ice formation. Simulation results show that gas recovery is proportional to gas expansion, initial hydrate saturation, and the sediment pore size distribution (i.e., capillary pressure). Gas recovery is not affected by pore size in coarse-grained sediments with pores larger than 1 μm. Hydrate-bearing sediments with low hydrate saturation yield low gas recovery. Macroscale close form solutions, validated using the numerical results, provide estimates for recoverable gas as a function of the initial hydrate saturation and the fluid expansion factor.

  4. Pore Distribution and Water Uptake in a Cenosphere-Cement Paste Composite Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronins, J.; Setina, J.; Sahmenko, G.; Lagzdina, S.; Shishkin, A.

    2015-11-01

    Alumina silicate cenospheres (CS) is a significant waste material from power plants that use a coal. Use CS as Portland cement replacement material gives opportunity to control physical and mechanical properties and makes a product lighter and more cost-effective. In the frame of this study, Portland cement paste samples were produced by adding CS in the concentration range from 0 to 40 volume %. Water uptake of hardened samples was checked and pore size distribution by using the mercury porosimetry was determined. In a cold climate where the temperature often falls below 0 °C, it is important to avoid the amount of micrometer sized pores in the final structure and to decrease water absorption capacity of material. In winter conditions, water fills such pores and causes additional stresses to their walls by expansion while freezing. It was found that generally water uptake capacity for cement paste samples decreased up to 20% by increasing the concentration of CS up to 40 volume %, at the same time, the volume of micrometer sized opened pores increases.

  5. A kinetic study of the spontaneous penetration of a water drop into a hydrophobic pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyunho; Ma, Lian; Liang, Hong

    2017-03-01

    The spontaneous penetration of a water drop into hydrophobic single-pored samples of varying inside and outside diameters was studied. During penetration, the radius of the water drop, its contact angle, the contact radius, and the penetration length inside the pore were measured against time. Experimental results showed that a water drop on the sample with the smaller pore had a longer penetration time than a water drop on the sample with the bigger pore. A pored sample with a small outside radius (thin tube) leads to a fast penetration rate presenting a parabolic trend in penetration versus time. The maximum penetration rate was observed when the contact angle was 90°. This is mainly due to the minimum radius of the drop at this angle as the drop radius directly relates to the Laplace pressure, which is the driving force in penetration. Two factors were identified as affecting penetration. The first is the receding contact angle leading to the stick-slip-like motion of a water drop. The second is the outside radius of a pored sample, which affects the penetration rate and trend. These factors were also correlated to the penetration process through theoretical analysis considering the geometry of the capillary system, volume conservation and momentum conservation. The initial contact angle and radius of a drop were determined by the outside radius of a pored sample, which changed Laplace pressure with time, thus influencing the penetration trend and rate. This indicates that a thin tube promotes fast penetration, and the point of maximum penetration rate was shown to be later during the penetration. Understanding the effects of outside radius and receding contact angle in the kinetic aspect of drop penetration into a hydrophobic pore is fundamentally important. This research is beneficial to the design of porous materials and in controlling the wetting and penetration process.

  6. Pore distribution effect of activated carbon in adsorbing organic micropollutants from natural water.

    PubMed

    Ebie, K; Li, F; Azuma, Y; Yuasa, A; Hagishita, T

    2001-01-01

    Adsorption isotherms of organic micropollutants in coexistence with natural organic matter (NOM) were analyzed to evaluate the impacts of pore size distribution of activated carbon (AC) on the competition effects of the NOM. Single solute adsorption experiments and simultaneous adsorption experiments with NOM contained in a coagulation-pretreated surface water were performed for four agricultural chemicals and three coal-based activated carbons (ACs) having different pore distributions. The results showed that, for all the carbons used, the adsorption capacity of the chemicals was reduced distinctly in the presence of NOM. Such a reduction was more apparent for AC with a larger portion of small pores suitable for the adsorption of small organic molecules and for the agricultural chemicals with a more hydrophilic nature. Ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) incorporated with the Freundlich isotherm expression (IAST-Freundlich model) could not interpret the impact of NOM on the adsorption capacity of the chemicals unless a pore blockage effect caused by the adsorption of NOM was also considered. By taking into account this effect, the adsorption isotherm of the chemicals in the presence of NOM was well described, and the capacity reduction caused by the NOM was quantitatively assessed from the viewpoints of the site competition and the pore blockage. Analytical results clearly indicated that pore blockage was an important competition mechanism that contributed to 10-99% of the total capacity reductions of the chemicals, the level depended greatly on the ACs, the chemicals and the equilibrium concentrations, and could possibly be alleviated by broadening the pore size distributions of the ACs to provide a large volume percentage for pores with sizes above 30 A.

  7. Influence of pores created by laser superfinishing on osseointegration of titanium alloy implants.

    PubMed

    Stangl, R; Pries, A; Loos, B; Müller, M; Erben, R G

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the osseointegration of copper vapor laser-superfinished titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) implants with pore sizes of 25, 50, and 200 microm in a rabbit intramedullary model. Control implants were prepared by corundum blasting. Each animal received all four different implants in both femora and humeri. Using static and dynamic histomorphometry, the bone-implant interface and the peri-implant bone tissue were examined 3, 6, and 12 weeks postimplantation. Among the laser-superfinished implants, total bone-implant contact was smallest for the 25-microm pores, and was similar for 50- and 200-microm pore sizes at all time points. However, all laser-superfinished surfaces were inferior to corundum-blasted (CB) control implants in terms of bone-implant contact. Within the 12-week study period, remodeling of woven bone initially formed within pores occurred only in the implants with 200-microm pores. Implants with 25-microm pores showed the highest amount of peri-implant bone volume at all time points, indicating that the amount of peri-implant bone was not correlated with the quality of the bone-implant interface. At 3 and 6 weeks postsurgery, we did not find any differences in mineral apposition rates or bone formation rates between the various implant surfaces. However, the peri-implant bone formation rate at the end of the trial was 70 and 62% higher in implants with 50- and 200-microm pores compared with CB implants, respectively. We conclude that, although laser-superfinished implants were not superior to CB control implants in terms of osseointegration, our study has provided further insights into the mechanisms of bone remodeling within pores of various sizes, and may form a basis for future experiments to design optimal implant surfaces with the help of modern laser technology.

  8. Pitch-based activated carbon fibers: The effect of precursor composition on pore structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekinalp, Halil Levent

    Although researchers have previously investigated the effect of precursor differences on the final properties of activated carbon fibers (ACFs), those precursors were not well-characterized. In particular, detailed information about their molecular composition and anisotropy was not available. In this study, seven oligomeric fractions, each of well-defined composition and molecular weight (mol wt) distribution, were isolated from a commercially produced isotropic petroleum pitch (i.e., Marathon M-50) and used for the production of ACFs. Four of these precursors of varying oligomeric composition were fully isotropic and three contained different levels of mesophase, so that the effects of molecular composition and molecular order were successfully isolated from each other. After the precursors were melt-spun into fibers and stabilized, they were processed by so-called "direct activation", whereby carbonization and activation occurred simultaneously. Separate carbonization tests were also carried out in order to separate out the effects of carbonization vs. activation. Carbonization weight loss was found to be higher for fibers prepared from lower average mol wt (480--550 Da) precursors. The presence of mesophase per se did not affect weight loss during carbonization. On the other hand, activation weight loss (˜28 percent) was found to be essentially independent of precursor mol wt for all isotropic fibers. (Activation weight loss for mesophase-containing fibers was much lower.) The micropore volume of the ACFs was found to increase with decreasing precursor mol wt. However, the ratio of pores smaller than 7 A (i.e., the desired pore size for hydrogen storage) to the total pore volume (3.9--30 A) was found to be essentially constant for all isotropic precursors, suggesting that a similar activation mechanism occurred for all of these materials, with both new pore formation and pore widening proceeding at similar rates. For mesophase-containing precursors, on the

  9. Dynamics of water in the amphiphilic pore of amyloid β fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GhattyVenkataKrishna, Pavan K.; Mostofian, Barmak

    2013-09-01

    Alzheimers disease related amyloid peptide, Aβ, forms a fibrillar structure through aggregation. The aggregate is stabilized by a salt bridge that is responsible for the formation of an amphiphilic pore that can accommodate water molecules. None of the reported structures of Aβ, however, contain water. We present results from molecular dynamics simulations on dimeric Aβ fibrils solvated in water. Water penetrates and fills the amphiphilic pore increasing its volume. We observe a thick wire of water that is translationally and rotationally stiff in comparison to bulk water and may be essential for the stabilization of the amyloid Aβ protein.

  10. Hydrochromic Approaches to Mapping Human Sweat Pores.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Hoon; Park, Bum Jun; Kim, Jong-Man

    2016-06-21

    Hydrochromic materials, which undergo changes in their light absorption and/or emission properties in response to water, have been extensively investigated as humidity sensors. Recent advances in the design of these materials have led to novel applications, including monitoring the water content of organic solvents, water-jet-based rewritable printing on paper, and hydrochromic mapping of human sweat pores. Our interest in this area has focused on the design of hydrochromic materials for human sweat pore mapping. We recognized that materials appropriate for this purpose must have balanced sensitivities to water. Specifically, while they should not undergo light absorption and/or emission transitions under ambient moisture conditions, the materials must have sufficiently high hydrochromic sensitivities that they display responses to water secreted from human sweat pores. In this Account, we describe investigations that we have carried out to develop hydrochromic substances that are suitable for human sweat pore mapping. Polydiacetylenes (PDAs) have been extensively investigated as sensor matrices because of their stimulus-responsive color change property. We found that incorporation of headgroups composed of hygroscopic ions such as cesium or rubidium and carboxylate counterions enables PDAs to undergo a blue-to-red colorimetric transition as well as a fluorescence turn-on response to water. Very intriguingly, the small quantities of water secreted from human sweat pores were found to be sufficient to trigger fluorescence turn-on responses of the hydrochromic PDAs, allowing precise mapping of human sweat pores. Since the hygroscopic ion-containing PDAs developed in the initial stage display a colorimetric transition under ambient conditions that exist during humid summer periods, a new system was designed. A PDA containing an imidazolium ion was found to be stable under all ambient conditions and showed temperature-dependent hydrochromism corresponding to a

  11. Undrained heating and anomalous pore-fluid pressurization of a hardened cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabezloo, S.; Sulem, J.; Saint-Marc, J.

    2009-04-01

    Temperature increase in a fluid-saturated porous material in undrained condition leads to volume change and pore pressure increase due to the discrepancy between the thermal expansion coefficients of the pore fluid and of the pore volume. This increase of the pore fluid pressure induces a reduction of the effective mean stress, and can lead to shear failure or hydraulic fracturing. This phenomenon is important is important in environmental engineering for radioactive (exothermal) waste disposal in deep clay geological formations as well as in geophysics in the studies of rapid fault slip events when shear heating tends to increase the pore pressure and to decrease the effective compressive stress and the shearing resistance of the fault material (Sulem et al. 2007). This is also important in petroleum engineering where the reservoir rock and the well cement lining undergo sudden temperature changes for example when extracting heavy oils by steam injection methods. This rapid increase of temperature could damage cement sheath integrity of wells and lead to loss of zonal isolation. The values of the thermal pressurization coefficient, defined as the pore pressure increase due to a unit temperature increase in undrained condition, is largely dependent upon the nature of the material, the state of stress, the range of temperature change, the induced damage. The large variability of the thermal pressurization coefficient reported in the literature for different porous materials with values from 0.01MPa/°C to 1.5MPa/°C highlights the necessity of laboratory studies. This phenomenon of thermal pressurization is studied experimentally for a fluid-saturated hardened cement paste in an undrained heating test. Careful analysis of the effect of the dead volume of the drainage system of the triaxial cell has been performed based on a simple correction method proposed by Ghabezloo and Sulem (2008, 2009). The drained and undrained thermal expansion coefficients of the hardened

  12. Analysis of a spatially deconvolved solar pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero Noda, C.; Shimizu, T.; Ruiz Cobo, B.; Suematsu, Y.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ichimoto, K.

    2016-08-01

    Solar pores are active regions with large magnetic field strengths and apparent simple magnetic configurations. Their properties resemble the ones found for the sunspot umbra although pores do not show penumbra. Therefore, solar pores present themselves as an intriguing phenomenon that is not completely understood. We examine in this work a solar pore observed with Hinode/SP using two state of the art techniques. The first one is the spatial deconvolution of the spectropolarimetric data that allows removing the stray light contamination induced by the spatial point spread function of the telescope. The second one is the inversion of the Stokes profiles assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium that let us to infer the atmospheric physical parameters. After applying these techniques, we found that the spatial deconvolution method does not introduce artefacts, even at the edges of the magnetic structure, where large horizontal gradients are detected on the atmospheric parameters. Moreover, we also describe the physical properties of the magnetic structure at different heights finding that, in the inner part of the solar pore, the temperature is lower than outside, the magnetic field strength is larger than 2 kG and unipolar, and the line-of-sight velocity is almost null. At neighbouring pixels, we found low magnetic field strengths of same polarity and strong downward motions that only occur at the low photosphere, below the continuum optical depth log τ = -1. Finally, we studied the spatial relation between different atmospheric parameters at different heights corroborating the physical properties described before.

  13. Modeling tissue growth within nonwoven scaffolds pores.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Sharon L; Church, Jeffrey S; Alexander, David L J; Russell, Stephen J; Ingham, Eileen; Ramshaw, John A M; Werkmeister, Jerome A

    2011-02-01

    In this study we present a novel approach for predicting tissue growth within the pores of fibrous tissue engineering scaffolds. Thin nonwoven polyethylene terephthalate scaffolds were prepared to characterize tissue growth within scaffold pores, by mouse NR6 fibroblast cells. On the basis of measurements of tissue lengths at fiber crossovers and along fiber segments, mathematical models were determined during the proliferative phase of cell growth. Tissue growth at fiber crossovers decreased with increasing interfiber angle, with exponential relationships determined on day 6 and 10 of culture. Analysis of tissue growth along fiber segments determined two growth profiles, one with enhanced growth as a result of increased tissue lengths near the fiber crossover, achieved in the latter stage of culture. Derived mathematical models were used in the development of a software program to visualize predicted tissue growth within a pore. This study identifies key pore parameters that contribute toward tissue growth, and suggests models for predicting this growth, based on fibroblast cells. Such models may be used in aiding scaffold design, for optimum pore infiltration during the tissue engineering process.

  14. Modeling branching pore structures in membrane filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanaei, Pejman; Cummings, Linda J.

    2016-11-01

    Membrane filters are in widespread industrial use, and mathematical models to predict their efficacy are potentially very useful, as such models can suggest design modifications to improve filter performance and lifetime. Many models have been proposed to describe particle capture by membrane filters and the associated fluid dynamics, but most such models are based on a very simple structure in which the pores of the membrane are assumed to be simple circularly-cylindrical tubes spanning the depth of the membrane. Real membranes used in applications usually have much more complex geometry, with interconnected pores which may branch and bifurcate. Pores are also typically larger on the upstream side of the membrane than on the downstream side. We present an idealized mathematical model, in which a membrane consists of a series of bifurcating pores, which decrease in size as the membrane is traversed. Feed solution is forced through the membrane by applied pressure, and particles are removed from the feed either by sieving, or by particle adsorption within pores (which shrinks them). Thus the membrane's permeability decreases as the filtration progresses, ultimately falling to zero. We discuss how filtration efficiency depends on the characteristics of the branching structure. Partial support from NSF DMS 1261596 is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Performance of Small Pore Microchannel Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Gummin, M. A.; Ravinett, T.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Edgar, M.

    1995-01-01

    Small pore size microchannel plates (MCP's) are needed to satisfy the requirements for future high resolution small and large format detectors for astronomy. MCP's with pore sizes in the range 5 micron to 8 micron are now being manufactured, but they are of limited availability and are of small size. We have obtained sets of Galileo 8 micron and 6.5 micron MCP's, and Philips 6 micron and 7 micron pore MCP's, and compared them to our larger pore MCP Z stacks. We have tested back to back MCP stacks of four of these MCP's and achieved gains greater than 2 x 1O(exp 7) with pulse height distributions of less than 40% FWHM, and background rates of less than 0.3 events sec(exp -1) cm(exp -2). Local counting rates up to approx. 100 events/pore/sec have been attained with little drop of the MCP gain. The bare MCP quantum efficiencies are somewhat lower than those expected, however. Flat field images are characterized by an absence of MCP fixed pattern noise.

  16. Real Time Pore Structure Evolution during Olivine Mineral Carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Fusseis, F.; Lisabeth, H. P.; Xiao, X.

    2014-12-01

    Aqueous carbonation of ultramafic rocks has been proposed as a promising method for long-term, secure sequestration of carbon dioxide. While chemical kinetics data indicate that carbonation reaction in olivine is one of the fastest among the mg-bearing minerals, in practice, the factors that limit the extent and rate of carbonation in ultramafic rocks are fluid supply and flux. On the one hand, reaction products could produce passivating layer that prohibits further reactions. On the other hand, the increases in solid volume during carbonation could lead to cracking and create new fluid paths. Whether carbonation in ultramafic rocks is self-limiting or self-sustaining has been hotly debated. Experimental evidence of precipitation of reaction products during olivine carbonation was reported. To date, reaction-driven cracking has not been observed. In this paper, we present the first real-time pore structure evolution data using the x-ray synchrotron microtomography. Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solution was injected into porous olivine aggregates and in-situ pore structure change during olivine carbonation at a constant confining pressure (12 MPa) and a temperature of 200oC was captured at 30 min. interval for ~160 hours. Shortly after the experiment started, filling-in of the existing pores by precipitation of reaction products was visible. The size of the in-fills kept increasing as reactions continued. After ~48 hours, cracking around the in-fill materials became visible. After ~60 hours, these cracks started to show a clear polygonal pattern, similar to the crack patterns usually seen on the surface of drying mud. After ~72 hours, some of the cracks coalesced into large fractures that cut-through the olivine aggregates. New fractures continued to develop and at the end of the experiment, the sample was completely disintegrated by these fractures. We also conducted nanotomography experiments on a sub-volume of the reacted olivine aggregate. Orthogonal sets of

  17. Modeling of N2 adsorption in MCM-41 materials: hexagonal pores versus cylindrical pores.

    PubMed

    Ustinov, Eugene A

    2009-07-07

    Low-temperature nitrogen adsorption in hexagonal pores and equivalent cylindrical pores is analyzed using nonlocal density functional theory extended to amorphous solids (NLDFT-AS). It is found that, despite significant difference of the density distribution over the cross-section of the pore, the capillary condensation/evaporation pressure is not considerably affected by the pore shape being slightly lower in the case of hexagonal geometry. However, the condensation/evaporation step in the hexagonal pore is slightly larger than that in the equivalent cylindrical pore because in the latter case the pore wall surface area and, hence, the amount adsorbed at pressures below the evaporation pressure are underestimated by 5%. We show that a dimensionless parameter defined as the ratio of the condensation/evaporation step and the upper value of the amount adsorbed at the condensation/evaporation pressure can be used as an additional criterion of the correct choice of the gas-solid molecular parameters along with the dependence of condensation/evaporation pressure on the pore diameter. Application of the criteria to experimental data on nitrogen adsorption on a series of MCM-41 silica at 77 K corroborates some evidence that the capillary condensation occurs at equilibrium conditions.

  18. Chromatographic performance of large-pore versus small-pore columns in micellar liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Timothy J; Foley, Joe P; Lloyd, David K

    2003-02-25

    Micellar liquid chromatography (MLC) is useful in bioanalysis because proteinaceous biofluids can be directly injected onto the column. The technique has been limited in part because of the apparently weak eluting power of micellar mobile phases. It has recently been shown [Anal. Chem. 72 (2000) 294] that this may be overcome by the use of large pore size stationary phases. In this work, large-pore (1000 A) C(18) stationary phases were evaluated relative to conventional small-pore (100 A) C(18) stationary phases for the direct sample injection of drugs in plasma. Furthermore, the difference between the large and small pore phases in gradient elution separations of mixtures of widely varying hydrophobicities was investigated. Large-pore stationary phases were found to be very effective for eluting moderately to highly hydrophobic compounds such as ibuprofen, crotamiton, propranolol, and dodecanophenone, which were highly retained on the small-pore stationary phases typically used in MLC. The advantages of direct introduction of biological samples (drugs in plasma) and rapid column re-equilibration after gradient elution in MLC were maintained with large-pore phases. Finally, recoveries, precision, linearity, and detection limits for the determination of quinidine and DPC 961 in spiked bovine plasma were somewhat better using MLC with wide pore phases.

  19. Study on lotus-type porous copper electroplated with a Ni coating on inner surface of pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Hao; Song, Guihong; Nakajima, Hideo; Zhao, Yanhui; Xiao, Jinquan; Xiong, Tianying

    2013-01-01

    Deposition of Ni coating on inner surface of pores was attempted by electroplating for lotus-type porous copper with pore size of 0.6 mm and pore length of 6 mm. The surface morphology, thickness, thickness distribution along the pore length, and phase composition of the coating were characterized. It is proven that the Ni coating with a polycrystalline structure can be deposited on the inner surface of the pores with length/diameter of 10 for lotus-type porous copper by agitating the electroplating solution properly during the process. It is indicated that the coating thickness distributes uniformly along the pore depth and is about 4-5 μm. Furthermore, the mechanical properties including vicker hardness, compressive yield strength and absorbed energy ability of the electroplated porous copper were evaluated. It is found that the mechanical properties are improved significantly after depositing the nickel coating inside pores of the lotus-type porous copper. Among them, 0.2% yield stress increases from 22.96 to 30.15 MPa, while absorbed energy per volume from 60.83 to 96.01 MJ/m3 when compressed to strain of 80%, which is attributed mainly to the Ni coating as an obstacle to dislocation slip during deformation and its strengthening effect for the higher strength, and the good adhesion to the pore wall of the porous copper.

  20. Scaffold pore space modulation through intelligent design of dissolvable microparticles.

    PubMed

    Liebschner, Michael A K; Wettergreen, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this area of research is to manipulate the pore space of scaffolds through the application of an intelligent design concept on dissolvable microparticles. To accomplish this goal, we developed an efficient and repeatable process for fabrication of microparticles from multiple materials using a combination of rapid prototyping (RP) and soft lithography. Phase changed 3D printing was used to create masters for PDMS molds. A photocrosslinkable polymer was then delivered into these molds to make geometrically complex 3D microparticles. This repeatable process has demonstrated to generate the objects with greater than 95% repeatability with complete pattern transfer. This process was illustrated for three different shapes of various complexities. The shapes were based on the extrusion of 2D shapes. This may allow simplification of the fabrication process in the future combined with a direct transfer of the findings. Altering the shapes of particles used for porous scaffold fabrication will allow for tailoring of the pore shapes, and therefore their biological function within a porous tissue engineering scaffold. Through permeation experiments, we have shown that the pore geometry may alter the permeability coefficient of scaffolds while influencing mechanical properties to a lesser extent. By selecting different porogen shapes, the nutrition transport and scaffold degradation can be significantly influenced with minimal effect on the mechanical integrity of the construct. In addition, the different shapes may allow a control of drug release by modifying their surface-to-volume ratio, which could modulate drug delivery over time. While soft lithography is currently used with photolithography, its high precision is offset by high cost of production. The employment of RP to a specific resolution offers a much less expensive alternative with increased throughput due to the speed of current RP systems.

  1. Foam invasion through a single pore.

    PubMed

    Delbos, Aline; Pitois, Olivier

    2011-07-01

    We investigate experimentally the behavior of liquid foams pumped at a given flow rate through a single pore, in the situation where the pore diameter is smaller than the bubble diameter. Results reveal that foam invasion can be observed only within a restricted range of values for the dimensionless flow rate and the foam liquid fraction. Within this foam invasion regime, the liquid content of invading foams is measured to be three times higher than the initial liquid content. Outside this regime, both gas alone and liquid alone invasion regimes can be observed. The gas invasion regime results from the rupture of foam films during local T1, during bubble rearrangements events induced by foam flow, whereas the liquid invasion regime is allowed by the formation of a stable cluster of jammed bubbles at the pore's opening.

  2. Moving Magnetic Features around a Pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaithakkal, A. J.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Solanki, S. K.; Lagg, A.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Hirzberger, J.; vanNoort, M.; Blanco Rodríguez, J.; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Schmidt, W.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Knölker, M.

    2017-03-01

    Spectropolarimetric observations from Sunrise/IMaX, obtained in 2013 June, are used for a statistical analysis to determine the physical properties of moving magnetic features (MMFs) observed near a pore. MMFs of the same and opposite polarity, with respect to the pore, are found to stream from its border at an average speed of 1.3 km s‑1 and 1.2 km s‑1, respectively, with mainly same-polarity MMFs found further away from the pore. MMFs of both polarities are found to harbor rather weak, inclined magnetic fields. Opposite-polarity MMFs are blueshifted, whereas same-polarity MMFs do not show any preference for up- or downflows. Most of the MMFs are found to be of sub-arcsecond size and carry a mean flux of ∼1.2 × 1017 Mx.

  3. Unplugging the callose plug from sieve pores.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bo; Hong, Zonglie

    2011-04-01

    The presence of callose in sieve plates has been known for a long time, but how this polysaccharide plug is synthesized has remained unsolved. Two independent laboratories have recently reported the identification of callose synthase 7 (CalS7), also known as glucan synthase-like 7 (GSL7), as the enzyme responsible for callose deposition in sieve plates. Mutant plants defective in this enzyme failed to synthesize callose in developing sieve plates during phloem formation and were unable to accumulate callose in sieve pores in response to stress treatments. The mutant plants developed less open pores per sieve plate and the pores were smaller in diameter. As a result, phloem conductivity was reduced significantly and the mutant plants were shorter and set fewer seeds.

  4. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building access control (BAC)--a catchall phrase to describe the systems that control access to facilities across campus--has traditionally been handled with remarkably low-tech solutions: (1) manual locks; (2) electronic locks; and (3) ID cards with magnetic strips. Recent improvements have included smart cards and keyless solutions that make use…

  5. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  6. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; ...

    2015-09-28

    In this study, multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include (1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and (2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the firstmore » type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides

  7. Assessing Coating Reliability Through Pore Architecture Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.

    2010-06-01

    Plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) exhibit many interlamellar pores, voids, and microcracks. These microstructural features are primarily responsible for the low global stiffness and the low thermal conductivity commonly exhibited by such coatings. The pore architecture thus has an important influence on such thermophysical properties. In the present work, the effect of heat treatment (at temperatures up to 1400 °C, for times of up to 20 h) on the pore architecture of detached YSZ top coats with different impurity levels have been characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry and gas-sorption techniques. Stiffness and thermal conductivity were also monitored to assess the effect of change in pore architecture on properties. While the overall porosity level remained relatively unaffected (at around 10-12%) after the heat treatments concerned, there were substantial changes in the pore size distribution and the (surface-connected) specific surface area. Fine pores (<~50 nm) rapidly disappeared, while the specific surface area dropped dramatically, particularly at high-treatment temperatures (~1400 °C). These changes are thought to be associated with intrasplat microcrack healing, improved intersplat bonding and increased contact area, leading to disappearance of much of the fine porosity. These microstructural changes are reflected in sharply increased stiffness and thermal conductivity. Increase in thermal conductivity and stiffness were found to be more pronounced for coatings with higher impurity content (particularly alumina and silica). Reliability issues surrounding such increase in thermal conductivity and stiffness are discussed along with a brief note on the effect of impurities on TBC life.

  8. Macroscopic ordering of helical pores for arraying guest molecules noncentrosymmetrically

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunji; Cho, Joonil; Yamada, Kuniyo; Hashizume, Daisuke; Araoka, Fumito; Takezoe, Hideo; Aida, Takuzo; Ishida, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Helical nanostructures have attracted continuous attention, not only as media for chiral recognition and synthesis, but also as motifs for studying intriguing physical phenomena that never occur in centrosymmetric systems. To improve the quality of signals from these phenomena, which is a key issue for their further exploration, the most straightforward is the macroscopic orientation of helices. Here as a versatile scaffold to rationally construct this hardly accessible structure, we report a polymer framework with helical pores that unidirectionally orient over a large area (∼10 cm2). The framework, prepared by crosslinking a supramolecular liquid crystal preorganized in a magnetic field, is chemically robust, functionalized with carboxyl groups and capable of incorporating various basic or cationic guest molecules. When a nonlinear optical chromophore is incorporated in the framework, the resultant complex displays a markedly efficient nonlinear optical output, owing to the coherence of signals ensured by the macroscopically oriented helical structure. PMID:26416086

  9. Active Polymer Translocation through Flickering Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Jack A.; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Golestanian, Ramin

    2011-12-01

    Single file translocation of a homopolymer through an active channel under the presence of a driving force is studied using Langevin dynamics simulation. It is shown that a channel with sticky walls and oscillating width could lead to significantly more efficient translocation as compared to a static channel that has a width equal to the mean width of the oscillating pore. The gain in translocation exhibits a strong dependence on the stickiness of the pore, which could allow the polymer translocation process to be highly selective.

  10. Characterization of Tight Gas Reservoir Pore Structure Using USANS/SANS and Gas Adsorption Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, Christopher R; He, Lilin; Agamalian, Michael; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Mastalerz, Maria; Bustin, Mark; Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell; Blach, Tomasz P

    2012-01-01

    Small-angle and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS) measurements were performed on samples from the Triassic Montney tight gas reservoir in Western Canada in order to determine the applicability of these techniques for characterizing the full pore size spectrum and to gain insight into the nature of the pore structure and its control on permeability. The subject tight gas reservoir consists of a finely laminated siltstone sequence; extensive cementation and moderate clay content are the primary causes of low permeability. SANS/USANS experiments run at ambient pressure and temperature conditions on lithologically-diverse sub-samples of three core plugs demonstrated that a broad pore size distribution could be interpreted from the data. Two interpretation methods were used to evaluate total porosity, pore size distribution and surface area and the results were compared to independent estimates derived from helium porosimetry (connected porosity) and low-pressure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption (accessible surface area and pore size distribution). The pore structure of the three samples as interpreted from SANS/USANS is fairly uniform, with small differences in the small-pore range (< 2000 {angstrom}), possibly related to differences in degree of cementation, and mineralogy, in particular clay content. Total porosity interpreted from USANS/SANS is similar to (but systematically higher than) helium porosities measured on the whole core plug. Both methods were used to estimate the percentage of open porosity expressed here as a ratio of connected porosity, as established from helium adsorption, to the total porosity, as estimated from SANS/USANS techniques. Open porosity appears to control permeability (determined using pressure and pulse-decay techniques), with the highest permeability sample also having the highest percentage of open porosity. Surface area, as calculated from low-pressure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption, is significantly less

  11. Differences in soluble organic carbon chemistry in pore waters sampled from different pore size domains

    DOE PAGES

    Bailey, Vanessa L.; Smith, A. P.; Tfaily, Malak; ...

    2017-01-11

    Spatial isolation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in different sized pores may be a mechanism by which otherwise labile carbon (C) could be protected in soils. When soil water content increases, the hydrologic connectivity of soil pores also increases, allowing greater transport of SOC and other resources from protected locations, to microbially colonized locations more favorable to decomposition. The heterogeneous distribution of specialized decomposers, C, and other resources throughout the soil indicates that the metabolism or persistence of soil C compounds is highly dependent on short-distance transport processes. The objective of this research was to characterize the complexity of Cmore » in pore waters held at weak and strong water tensions (effectively soil solution held behind coarse- and fine-pore throats, respectively) and evaluate the microbial decomposability of these pore waters. We saturated intact soil cores and extracted pore waters with increasing suction pressures to sequentially sample pore waters from increasingly fine pore domains. Ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry of the SOC was used to profile the major biochemical classes (i.e., lipids, proteins, lignin, carbohydrates, and condensed aromatics) of compounds present in the pore waters; some of these samples were then used as substrates for growth of Cellvibrio japonicus (DSMZ 16018), Streptomyces cellulosae (ATCC® 25439™), and Trichoderma reseei (QM6a) in 7 day incubations. The soluble C in finer pores was more complex than the soluble C in coarser pores, and the incubations revealed that the more complex C in these fine pores is not recalcitrant. The decomposition of this complex C led to greater losses of C through respiration than the simpler C from coarser pore waters. Our research suggests that soils that experience repeated cycles of drying and wetting may be accompanied by repeated cycles of increased CO2 fluxes that are driven by i) the transport of C from protected pools into

  12. Pore-Scale Modeling of Pore Structure Effects on P-Wave Scattering Attenuation in Dry Rocks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks. PMID:25961729

  13. Pore-scale modeling of pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zizhen; Wang, Ruihe; Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks.

  14. Pores in Marcellus Shale: A Neutron Scattering and FIB-SEM Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Xin; Cole, David R.; Rother, Gernot; Mildner, David F. R.; Brantley, Susan L.

    2015-01-26

    The production of natural gas has become more and more important in the United States because of the development of hydraulic fracturing techniques, which significantly increase the permeability and fracture network of black shales. The pore structure of shale is a controlling factor for hydrocarbon storage and gas migration. In this work, we investigated the porosity of the Union Springs (Shamokin) Member of the Marcellus Formation from a core drilled in Centre County, PA, USA, using ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), and nitrogen gas adsorption. The scattering of neutrons by Marcellus shale depends on the sample orientation: for thin sections cut in the plane of bedding, the scattering pattern is isotropic, while for thin sections cut perpendicular to the bedding, the scattering pattern is anisotropic. The FIB-SEM observations allow attribution of the anisotropic scattering patterns to elongated pores predominantly associated with clay. The apparent porosities calculated from scattering data from the bedding plane sections are lower than those calculated from sections cut perpendicular to the bedding. A preliminary method for estimating the total porosity from the measurements made on the two orientations is presented. This method is in good agreement with nitrogen adsorption for both porosity and specific surface area measurements. Neutron scattering combined with FIB-SEM reveals that the dominant nanosized pores in organic-poor, clay-rich shale samples are water-accessible sheetlike pores within clay aggregates. In contrast, bubble-like organophilic pores in kerogen dominate organic-rich samples. Lastly, developing a better understanding of the distribution of the water-accessible pores will promote more accurate models of water–mineral interactions during hydrofracturing.

  15. Pores in Marcellus Shale: A Neutron Scattering and FIB-SEM Study

    DOE PAGES

    Gu, Xin; Cole, David R.; Rother, Gernot; ...

    2015-01-26

    The production of natural gas has become more and more important in the United States because of the development of hydraulic fracturing techniques, which significantly increase the permeability and fracture network of black shales. The pore structure of shale is a controlling factor for hydrocarbon storage and gas migration. In this work, we investigated the porosity of the Union Springs (Shamokin) Member of the Marcellus Formation from a core drilled in Centre County, PA, USA, using ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS), small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), and nitrogen gas adsorption. The scattering of neutrons bymore » Marcellus shale depends on the sample orientation: for thin sections cut in the plane of bedding, the scattering pattern is isotropic, while for thin sections cut perpendicular to the bedding, the scattering pattern is anisotropic. The FIB-SEM observations allow attribution of the anisotropic scattering patterns to elongated pores predominantly associated with clay. The apparent porosities calculated from scattering data from the bedding plane sections are lower than those calculated from sections cut perpendicular to the bedding. A preliminary method for estimating the total porosity from the measurements made on the two orientations is presented. This method is in good agreement with nitrogen adsorption for both porosity and specific surface area measurements. Neutron scattering combined with FIB-SEM reveals that the dominant nanosized pores in organic-poor, clay-rich shale samples are water-accessible sheetlike pores within clay aggregates. In contrast, bubble-like organophilic pores in kerogen dominate organic-rich samples. Lastly, developing a better understanding of the distribution of the water-accessible pores will promote more accurate models of water–mineral interactions during hydrofracturing.« less

  16. Accurate and efficient maximal ball algorithm for pore network extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arand, Frederick; Hesser, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    The maximal ball (MB) algorithm is a well established method for the morphological analysis of porous media. It extracts a network of pores and throats from volumetric data. This paper describes structural modifications to the algorithm, while the basic concepts are preserved. Substantial improvements to accuracy and efficiency are achieved as follows: First, all calculations are performed on a subvoxel accurate distance field, and no approximations to discretize balls are made. Second, data structures are simplified to keep memory usage low and improve algorithmic speed. Third, small and reasonable adjustments increase speed significantly. In volumes with high porosity, memory usage is improved compared to classic MB algorithms. Furthermore, processing is accelerated more than three times. Finally, the modified MB algorithm is verified by extracting several network properties from reference as well as real data sets. Runtimes are measured and compared to literature.

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance pore size determination for unconsolidated sediments with strong internal gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duschl, M.; Pohlmeier, A. J.; Galvosas, P.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    Water distribution and flow within porous media are mainly controlled by the pore space structure. Well established methods for the determination of pore sizes like multistep outflow and gas adsorption isotherms (BET) are often time consuming, expensive, or produce toxic waste. As an alternative fast and non-destructive technique, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used because it probes hydrogen and therefore the dynamics and interactions of water. Pore space is most easily characterized by NMR relaxometry where the total relaxation rate is controlled by the surface relaxivity ρ of the porous medium in combination with the surface-to-volume ratio (S/V) [1]. Furthermore, there are contributions of molecular diffusion through local magnetic field gradients which are created by susceptibility differences between solid and liquid phases [2] as well as by paramagnetic impurities [3]. Hence, surface to volume ratios and surface relaxivities of porous media cannot be measured individually with NMR relaxometry. Therefore, NMR diffusion measurements are applied to probe the S/V of pores without other contributions. In this study, we demonstrate that NMR diffusion measurements are feasible to determine the S/V ratio of the pore space of quartz sand coated with goethite (α-FeOOH) as paramagnetic impurity. Our findings were compared to BET measurements and we found no dependence of the S/V on the coating density with NMR diffusion and a clear dependence between coating density and S/V with krypton BET measurements. Possible explanations are the different characteristic length scales on which the pore space is probed, and the intrinsic fractal nature of porous media [4] together with the roughness of the pore surface on a nm-scale due to the coating process. After isolating the additional contribution of the paramagnetic impurities to the NMR relaxation and the calibration of the NMR relaxation signal for each coating density it was possible to use fast relaxometry

  18. Effect of pore structure on gas trapping in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadian, Sadjad; Geistlinger, Helmut; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Capillary trapping of nonwetting phase in porous media plays an important role in many geological processes. For example, large portions of hydrocarbons cannot be extracted from reservoirs due to capillary forces, while in carbon sequestration processes; capillary trapping might improve the storage efficiency. An important case is when the wetting phase (mostly water) displaces a low-viscosity low-density fluid. In such cases, like water encroachment into gas reservoirs or rising of water table in soils, competition of gravity, viscous, and capillary forces determines the final configuration of the fluids in invaded zone. The trapped nonwetting phase and its distribution within the porous media will affect many other processes such as flow of the other fluids and mass transfer phenomena. Thus, investigating the parameters affecting phase trapping and distribution, especially their relation to pore structure, which controls the capillary action, is required. The aim is to predict gas trapping from structural properties of the material. We conducted a series of column experiments, in which water displaces air at a range of flow rates in different glass-bead packs. The final 3D configuration and morphology of fluids was observed using X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT). We extracted 3D structure of porous media as well as of the trapped gas phase, and quantified them in terms of volume ratios, interfacial area, and morphology. Then we investigated the relations of the trapped phase to capillary forces (pore structure) and viscous forces (front velocity). The results give us new insights to explore the flow and dissolution processes: We found no systematic dependency of the front velocity of the invading water phase in the velocity range from 0.1 to 0.6 cm/min what corresponds to capillary numbers from 2 to 12 ×10^-6. Our experimental results indicate that the capillary trapping mechanism is controlled by the local pore structure and local connectivity and not by

  19. FIB-SEM Tomography Probes the Mesoscale Pore Space of an Individual Catalytic Cracking Particle

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The overall performance of a catalyst particle strongly depends on the ability of mass transport through its pore space. Characterizing the three-dimensional structure of the macro- and mesopore space of a catalyst particle and establishing a correlation with transport efficiency is an essential step toward designing highly effective catalyst particles. In this work, a generally applicable workflow is presented to characterize the transport efficiency of individual catalyst particles. The developed workflow involves a multiscale characterization approach making use of a focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM). SEM imaging is performed on cross sections of 10.000 μm2, visualizing a set of catalyst particles, while FIB-SEM tomography visualized the pore space of a large number of 8 μm3 cubes (subvolumes) of individual catalyst particles. Geometrical parameters (porosity, pore connectivity, and heterogeneity) of the material were used to generate large numbers of virtual 3D volumes resembling the sample’s pore space characteristics, while being suitable for computationally demanding transport simulations. The transport ability, defined as the ratio of unhindered flow over hindered flow, is then determined via transport simulations through the virtual volumes. The simulation results are used as input for an upscaling routine based on an analogy with electrical networks, taking into account the spatial heterogeneity of the pore space over greater length scales. This novel approach is demonstrated for two distinct types of industrially manufactured fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles with zeolite Y as the active cracking component. Differences in physicochemical and catalytic properties were found to relate to differences in heterogeneities in the spatial porosity distribution. In addition to the characterization of existing FCC particles, our method of correlating pore space with transport efficiency does also allow for an up-front evaluation of

  20. Molecular Sensing with an Artificial Pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Omar A.

    2002-03-01

    While microfluidic systems are routinely integrated with optical schemes to measure biological macromolecules, there are relatively few examples of experiments in which electronic techniques are used. There are, however, good reasons to perform electronic measurements- macromolecules do not need to be fluorescently tagged, and different parameters of the analyte can be investigated. To begin to take advantage of these differences, we have developed a chip-based device that uses resistive sensing of a micro-fabricated pore to characterize solutions of particles. The device can perform size-based differentiation of polydisperse solutions of colloids with a precision of 10 nm in diameter^*. This level of precision could be utilized to perform simple binding or immuno-assays whereby the attachment of the appropriate ligand to a receptor immobilized on the colloid surface causes a detectable increase in the colloid’s diameter. Furthermore, the relatively simple design can easily be scaled up to create arrays of pores on a single chip, thus adding the capability to perform multiple assays in parallel. Finally, reductions in pore size have allowed us to detect successfully single molecules of lambda-phage DNA passing through the pore. This particular achievement represents a first step towards a host of bio-molecular sensing applications. ^*O. A. Saleh and L. L. Sohn, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 4449 (2001)

  1. Drainage Studies Using Pore-Scale Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, E. B.; Reed, A. H.; Hilpert, M.

    2007-12-01

    The process of drainage has wide spread applications in soil hydrology, irrigation, and the remediation of contaminants in the subsurface. In this paper, we present the comparison of experimental and pore-scale modeling results for drainage. Using a HD-500 microCT system, X-ray tomographic images (21 micron voxels) of saturation during a drainage experiment were obtained in a porous medium consisting of 20/30 mesh (590- 840 microns) Accusand. Utilizing the segmented microtomographic images of the pore space, we modeled drainage using two pore-scale approaches: (1) the pore-morphology-based simulator (PMBS) developed by Hilpert and Miller (2001), and (2) a Lattice Boltzmann (LB) model. Invasion pathways and pressure-saturation relations obtained from both the PMBS and the LB model were compared with those obtained from experiments. The results of PMBS modeling displayed good agreement with experimental observations, except at high suction and low water saturation values, where both CT resolution and model assumptions become an issue. The LB model is currently being refined, and the results of these simulations will also be presented.

  2. Channel gating pore: a new therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Kornilov, Polina; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard

    2013-09-01

    Each subunit of voltage-gated cation channels comprises a voltage-sensing domain and a pore region. In a paper recently published in Cell Research, Li et al. showed that the gating charge pathway of the voltage sensor of the KCNQ2 K+ channel can accommodate small opener molecules and offer a new target to treat hyperexcitability disorders.

  3. Pore-Forming Toxins Trigger the Purge.

    PubMed

    Bonfini, Alessandro; Buchon, Nicolas

    2016-12-14

    The intestinal epithelium responds to pathogens by coordinating microbial elimination with tissue repair, both required to survive an infection. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Lee et al. (2016) discover a rapid and evolutionarily conserved response to pore-forming toxins in the gut, involving cytoplasm ejection and enterocyte regrowth.

  4. In Situ Solid-State (13)C NMR Observation of Pore Mouth Catalysis in Etherification of β-Citronellene with Ethanol on Zeolite Beta.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Sambhu; Goossens, Pieter-Jan; Magusin, Pieter C M M; Sree, Sreeprasanth Pulinthanathu; Detavernier, Christophe; Breynaert, Eric; Martineau, Charlotte; Taulelle, Francis; Martens, Johan A

    2016-03-02

    The reaction mechanism of etherification of β-citronellene with ethanol in liquid phase over acid zeolite beta is revealed by in situ solid-state (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Comparison of (13)C Hahn-echo and (1)H-(13)C cross-polarization NMR characteristics is used to discriminate between molecules freely moving in liquid phase outside the zeolite and molecules adsorbed inside zeolite pores and in pore mouths. In the absence of ethanol, β-citronellene molecules enter zeolite pores and react to isomers. In the presence of ethanol, the concentration of β-citronellene inside zeolite pores is very low because of preferential adsorption of ethanol. The etherification reaction proceeds by adsorption of β-citronellene molecule from the external liquid phase in a pore opening where it reacts with ethanol from inside the pore. By competitive adsorption, ethanol prevents the undesired side reaction of β-citronellene isomerization inside zeolite pores. β-citronellene etherification on zeolite beta is suppressed by bulky base molecules (2,4,6-collidine and 2,6-ditertiarybutylpyridine) that do not enter the zeolite pores confirming the involvement of easily accessible acid sites in pore openings. The use of in situ solid-state NMR to probe the transition from intracrystalline catalysis to pore mouth catalysis depending on reaction conditions is demonstrated for the first time. The study further highlights the potential of this NMR approach for investigations of adsorption of multicomponent mixtures in general.

  5. Dendrimer-like hybrid particles with tunable hierarchical pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xin; Li, Xiaoyu; Huang, Hongwei; He, Junhui; Zhang, Xueji

    2015-03-01

    Dendrimer-like silica particles with a center-radial dendritic framework and a synergistic hierarchical porosity have attracted much attention due to their unique open three-dimensional superstructures with high accessibility to the internal surface areas; however, the delicate regulation of the hierarchical porosity has been difficult to achieve up to now. Herein, a series of dendrimer-like amino-functionalized silica particles with tunable hierarchical pores (HPSNs-NH2) were successfully fabricated by carefully regulating and optimizing the various experimental parameters in the ethyl ether emulsion systems via a one-pot sol-gel reaction. Interestingly, the simple adjustment of the stirring rate or reaction temperature was found to be an easy and effective route to achieve the controllable regulation towards center-radial large pore sizes from ca. 37-267 (148 +/- 45) nm to ca. 8-119 (36 +/- 21) nm for HPSNs-NH2 with particle sizes of 300-700 nm and from ca. 9-157 (52 +/- 28) nm to ca. 8-105 (30 +/- 16) nm for HPSNs-NH2 with particle sizes of 100-320 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful regulation towards center-radial large pore sizes in such large ranges. The formation of HPSNs-NH2 may be attributed to the complex cross-coupling of two processes: the dynamic diffusion of ethyl ether molecules and the self-assembly of partially hydrolyzed TEOS species and CTAB molecules at the dynamic ethyl ether-water interface of uniform small quasi-emulsion droplets. Thus, these results regarding the elaborate regulation of center-radial large pores and particle sizes not only help us better understand the complicated self-assembly at the dynamic oil-water interface, but also provide a unique and ideal platform as carriers or supports for adsorption, separation, catalysis, biomedicine, and sensor.Dendrimer-like silica particles with a center-radial dendritic framework and a synergistic hierarchical porosity have attracted much attention due to their

  6. Topographic labelling of pore-forming proteins from the outer membrane of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Page, M G; Rosenbusch, J P

    1986-01-01

    The topography of three pore-forming proteins from the outer membrane of Escherichia coli has been explored by using two labelling techniques. Firstly, the distribution of nucleophilic residues has been investigated by selective chemical modification using arylglyoxals (for arginine residues), isothiocyanates (for lysine residues), carbodi-imides (for carboxy residues) and diazonium salts. Secondly, the membrane-embedded domains have been investigated by labelling with photoactivatable phospholipid analogues and a reagent that partitions into the membrane. Few nucleophilic groups are found to be freely accessible to pore-impermeant probes reacting in the aqueous medium. More groups are accessible to small, pore-permeant probes, suggesting that several groups of each sort are contained within the pore. In addition, there appear to be a number of arginine, lysine, carboxyl and many tyrosine residues that are rather inaccessible and that react only with small, hydrophobic probes, if at all. Amongst these more deeply buried residues there are four arginine residues and an as-yet-undetermined number of carboxy residues that appear to be essential to the structural integrity of the oligomeric molecule. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2428354

  7. Novel residues lining the CFTR chloride channel pore identified by functional modification of introduced cysteines.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Mohammad; Linsdell, Paul

    2009-04-01

    Substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis (SCAM) has been used widely to identify pore-lining amino acid side chains in ion channel proteins. However, functional effects on permeation and gating can be difficult to separate, leading to uncertainty concerning the location of reactive cysteine side chains. We have combined SCAM with investigation of the charge-dependent effects of methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents on the functional permeation properties of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels. We find that cysteines substituted for seven out of 21 continuous amino acids in the eleventh and twelfth transmembrane (TM) regions can be modified by external application of positively charged [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] MTS bromide (MTSET) and negatively charged sodium [2-sulfonatoethyl] MTS (MTSES). Modification of these cysteines leads to changes in the open channel current-voltage relationship at both the macroscopic and single-channel current levels that reflect specific, charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl(-) permeation through the channel from the external solution. This approach therefore identifies amino acid side chains that lie within the permeation pathway. Cysteine mutagenesis of pore-lining residues also affects intrapore anion binding and anion selectivity, giving more information regarding the roles of these residues. Our results demonstrate a straightforward method of screening for pore-lining amino acids in ion channels. We suggest that TM11 contributes to the CFTR pore and that the extracellular loop between TMs 11 and 12 lies close to the outer mouth of the pore.

  8. Comparison on pore development of activated carbon produced from palm shell and coconut shell.

    PubMed

    Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri Wan; Ali, Wan Shabuddin Wan

    2004-05-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to compare the pore development in palm-shell and coconut-shell-based activated carbons produced under identical experimental conditions. Carbonization and activation processes were carried out at 850 degrees C using a fluidized bed reactor. Within the range of burn-off studied, at any burn-off, the micropore and mesopore volumes created in palm-shell-based activated carbon were always higher than those of coconut-shell-based activated carbon. On macropore volume, for palm-shell-based activated carbon, the volume increased with increase in burn-off up to 30% and then decreased. However, for coconut-shell-based activated carbon, the change in macropore volume with burn-off was almost negligible but the absolute macropore volume decreased with burn-off.

  9. Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Patta, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Stephen McCarthy, co-partner and president of Equal Access ADA Consulting Architects of San Diego, California, about designing schools to naturally integrate compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (EV)

  10. Characterization of PSD of activated carbons by using slit and triangular pore geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, D. C. S.; Rios, R. B.; López, R. H.; Torres, A. E. B.; Cavalcante, C. L.; Toso, J. P.; Zgrablich, G.

    2010-06-01

    A mixed geometry model for activated carbons, representing the porous space as a collection of an undetermined proportion of slit and triangular pores, is developed, evaluated theoretically and applied to the characterization of a controlled series of samples of activated carbon obtained from the same precursor material. A method is proposed for the determination of the Pore Size Distribution (PSD) for such a mixed geometry model, leading to the unique determination of the proportion of pores of the two geometries fitting adsorption data. By using the Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulation method in the continuum space, families of N2 adsorption isotherms are generated both for slit and triangular geometry corresponding to different pore sizes. The problem of the uniqueness in the determination of the PSD by fitting an adsorption isotherm using the mixed geometry model is then discussed and the effects of the addition of triangular pores on the PSD are analyzed by performing a test where the adsorption isotherm corresponding to the known PSD is generated and used as the "experimental" isotherm. It is found that a pure slit geometry model would widen the PSD and shift it to smaller sizes, whereas a pure triangular geometry model would produce the opposite effect. The slit and triangular geometry families of isotherms are finally used to the fit experimental N 2 adsorption data corresponding to a family of activated carbons obtained from coconut shells through a one-step chemical activation process with phosphoric acid in air, allowing for the determination of the micropore volume, the proportion of slit and triangular pores and the PSD corresponding to the mixed geometry. The same experimental data were fit using both the conventional slit pore model and the mixed geometry model. From the analysis of the effect of different preparation procedures on the resulting PSDs, it is concluded that the proposed mixed geometry model may probably better capture the

  11. Impact of NAPL architecture on interphase mass transfer: A pore network study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaoglu, Berken; Scheytt, Traugott; Copty, Nadim K.

    2016-09-01

    Interphase mass transfer in porous media is commonly modeled using Sherwood number expressions that are developed in terms of fluid and porous medium properties averaged over some representative elementary volume (REV). In this work the influence of sub-grid scale properties on interphase mass transfer was investigated using a two-dimensional pore network model. The focus was on assessing the impact of (i) NAPL saturation, (ii) interfacial area (iii) NAPL spatial distribution at the pore scale, (iv) grain size heterogeneity, (v) REV or domain size and (vi) pore scale heterogeneity of the porous media on interphase mass transfer. Variability of both the mass transfer coefficient that explicitly accounts for the interfacial area and the mass transfer coefficient that lumps the interfacial area was examined. It was shown that pore scale NAPL distribution and its orientation relative to the flow direction have significant impact on flow bypassing and the interphase mass transfer coefficient. This results in a complex non-linear relationship between interfacial area and the REV-based interphase mass transfer rate. Hence, explicitly accounting for the interfacial area does not eliminate the uncertainty of the mass transfer coefficient. It was also shown that, even for explicitly defined flow patterns, changing the domain size over which the mass transfer process is defined influences the extent of NAPL bypassing and dilution and, consequently, the interphase mass transfer. It was also demonstrated that the spatial variability of pore scale parameters such as pore throat diameters may result in different rates of interphase mass transfer even for the same pore size distribution index.

  12. Changes in pore geometry and relative permeability caused by carbonate precipitation in porous media.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fei; Tsuji, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    The CO_{2} behavior within the reservoirs of carbon capture and storage projects is usually predicted from large-scale simulations of the reservoir. A key parameter in reservoir simulation is relative permeability. However, mineral precipitation alters the pore structure over time, and leads correspondingly to permeability changing with time. In this study, we numerically investigate the influence of carbonate precipitation on relative permeability during CO_{2} storage. The pore spaces in rock samples were extracted by high-resolution microcomputed tomography (CT) scanned images. The fluid velocity field within the three-dimensional pore spaces was calculated by the lattice Boltzmann method, while reactive transport with calcite deposition was modeled by an advection-reaction formulation solved by the finite volume method. To increase the computational efficiency and reduce the processing time, we adopted a graphics processing unit parallel computing technique. The relative permeability of the sample rock was then calculated by a highly optimized two-phase lattice Boltzmann model. We also proposed two pore clogging models. In the first model, the clogging processes are modeled by transforming fluid nodes to solid nodes based on their precipitated mass level. In the second model, the porosity is artificially reduced by adjusting the gray scale threshold of the CT images. The developed method accurately simulates the mineralization process observed in laboratory experiment. Precipitation-induced evolution of pore structure significantly influenced the absolute permeability. The relative permeability, however, was much more influenced by pore reduction in the nonwetting phase than in the wetting phase. The output of the structural changes in pore geometry by this model could be input to CO_{2} reservoir simulators to investigate the outcome of sequestered CO_{2}.

  13. Quantitative analysis of nano-pore geomaterials and representative sampling for digital rock physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    Geomaterials containing nano-pores (e.g., shales and carbonate rocks) have become increasingly important for emerging problems such as unconventional gas and oil resources, enhanced oil recovery, and geologic storage of CO2. Accurate prediction of coupled geophysical and chemical processes at the pore scale requires realistic representation of pore structure and topology. This is especially true for chalk materials, where pore networks are small and complex, and require characterization at sub-micron scale. In this work, we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy to characterize pore structures and microlithofacies at micron- and greater scales and dual focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) for 3D imaging of nanometer-to-micron scale microcracks and pore distributions. With imaging techniques advanced for nano-pore characterization, a problem of scale with FIB-SEM images is how to take nanometer scale information and apply it to the thin-section or larger scale. In this work, several texture characterization techniques including graph-based spectral segmentation, support vector machine, and principal component analysis are applied for segmentation clusters represented by 1-2 FIB-SEM samples per each cluster. Geometric and topological properties are analyzed and lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to obtain permeability at several different scales. Upscaling of permeability to the Darcy scale (e.g., the thin-section scale) with image dataset will be discussed with emphasis on understanding microfracture-matrix interaction, representative volume for FIB-SEM sampling, and multiphase flow and reactive transport. Funding from the DOE Basic Energy Sciences Geosciences Program is gratefully acknowledged. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under

  14. Three-dimensional soil organic matter distribution, accessibility and microbial respiration in macroaggregates using osmium staining and synchrotron X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlins, Barry G.; Wragg, Joanna; Reinhard, Christina; Atwood, Robert C.; Houston, Alasdair; Lark, R. Murray; Rudolph, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    The spatial distribution and accessibility of organic matter (OM) to soil microbes in aggregates - determined by the fine-scale, 3-D distribution of OM, pores and mineral phases - may be an important control on the magnitude of soil heterotrophic respiration (SHR). Attempts to model SHR on fine scales requires data on the transition probabilities between adjacent pore space and soil OM, a measure of microbial accessibility to the latter. We used a combination of osmium staining and synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (CT) to determine the 3-D (voxel) distribution of these three phases (scale 6.6 µm) throughout nine aggregates taken from a single soil core (range of organic carbon (OC) concentrations: 4.2-7.7 %). Prior to the synchrotron analyses we had measured the magnitude of SHR for each aggregate over 24 h under controlled conditions (moisture content and temperature). We test the hypothesis that larger magnitudes of SHR will be observed in aggregates with (i) shorter length scales of OM variation (more aerobic microsites) and (ii) larger transition probabilities between OM and pore voxels. After scaling to their OC concentrations, there was a 6-fold variation in the magnitude of SHR for the nine aggregates. The distribution of pore diameters and tortuosity index values for pore branches was similar for each of the nine aggregates. The Pearson correlation between aggregate surface area (normalized by aggregate volume) and normalized headspace C gas concentration was both positive and reasonably large (r = 0.44), suggesting that the former may be a factor that influences SHR. The overall transition probabilities between OM and pore voxels were between 0.07 and 0.17, smaller than those used in previous simulation studies. We computed the length scales over which OM, pore and mineral phases vary within each aggregate using 3-D indicator variograms. The median range of models fitted to variograms of OM varied between 38 and 175 µm and was generally larger than

  15. Large-volume leukapheresis using femoral venous access for harvesting peripheral blood stem cells with the Fenwal CS 3000 Plus from normal healthy donors: predictors of CD34+ cell yield and collection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sang Kyun; Kim, Jong Gwang; Chae, Yeo Soo; Kim, Dong Hwan; Lee, Nan Young; Suh, Jang Soo; Lee, Kyu Bo

    2003-01-01

    The current paper reports on the predicting factors associated with satisfactory peripheral blood stem cell collection and the efficacy of large-volume leukapheresis (LVL) using femoral vein catheterization to harvest PBSCs with Fenwal CS 3000 Plus from normal healthy donors for allogeneic transplantation. A total of 113 apheresis procedures in 57 patients were performed. The median number of MNCs, CD3+ cells, and CD34+ cells harvested per apheresis was 5.3 x 10(8)/kg (range, 0.3-11.0 x 10(8)/kg), 3.0 x 10(8)/kg (range, 0.2-6.6 x 10(8)/kg), and 7.9 x 10(6)/kg (range, 0.1-188.9 x 10(6)/kg), respectively. The median collection efficiency of MNCs and CD34+ cells was 49.8% and 49.7%, respectively. A highly significant correlation was found between the collected CD34+ cell counts and the pre-apheresis WBC counts in the donors (P = 0.013), and between the collected CD34+ cell counts and the pre-apheresis peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cell counts (P<0.001). Harvesting at least >4 x 10(6)/kg CD34+ cells from the 1st LVL was achieved in 44 (77.2%) out of 57 donors and in 19 (90.5%) out of 21 donors with a PB-CD34+ cell count of >40/microl. There was no significant difference in the harvested MNC and CD34+ cell counts between the 1st and 2nd apheresis. The catheter-related complications included catheter obstruction (n = 2) and hematoma at the insertion site (n = 3). Accordingly, LVL using femoral venous access for allogeneic PBSC collection from normal healthy donors would appear to be safe and effective.

  16. A Pore-Centric Model for Combined Shrinkage and Gas Porosity in Alloy Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalajzadeh, Vahid; Carlson, Kent D.; Backman, Daniel G.; Beckermann, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    A unified model has been developed for combined gas- and shrinkage-induced pore formation during solidification of metal alloys. The model is based on a pore-centric approach, in which the temporal evolution of the pore radius is calculated as a function of cooling rate, thermal gradient, gas diffusion, and shrinkage. It accounts for the effect of porosity formation on the liquid velocity within the mushy zone. Simulations for an aluminum alloy show that the porosity transitions smoothly from shrinkage-induced to gas-induced as the Niyama value is increased. A Blake (cavitation) instability is observed to occur when the porosity is both gas- and shrinkage-driven. A revised dimensionless Niyama curve for pure shrinkage is presented. The experimentally observed gas porosity trend that the pore volume decreases with increasing cooling rate is well predicted. The pore-centric formulation allows the present model to be solved locally, at any point in a casting, during a regular casting simulation.

  17. Development of a pore network simulation model to study nonaqueous phase liquid dissolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillard, Leslie A.; Blunt, Martin J.

    2000-01-01

    A pore network simulation model was developed to investigate the fundamental physics of nonequilibrium nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) dissolution. The network model is a lattice of cubic chambers and rectangular tubes that represent pore bodies and pore throats, respectively. Experimental data obtained by Powers [1992] were used to develop and validate the model. To ensure the network model was representative of a real porous medium, the pore size distribution of the network was calibrated by matching simulated and experimental drainage and imbibition capillary pressure-saturation curves. The predicted network residual styrene blob-size distribution was nearly identical to the observed distribution. The network model reproduced the observed hydraulic conductivity and produced relative permeability curves that were representative of a poorly consolidated sand. Aqueous-phase transport was represented by applying the equation for solute flux to the network tubes and solving for solute concentrations in the network chambers. Complete mixing was found to be an appropriate approximation for calculation of chamber concentrations. Mass transfer from NAPL blobs was represented using a corner diffusion model. Predicted results of solute concentration versus Peclet number and of modified Sherwood number versus Peclet number for the network model compare favorably with experimental data for the case in which NAPL blob dissolution was negligible. Predicted results of normalized effluent concentration versus pore volume for the network were similar to the experimental data for the case in which NAPL blob dissolution occurred with time.

  18. A Pore-Centric Model for Combined Shrinkage and Gas Porosity in Alloy Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalajzadeh, Vahid; Carlson, Kent D.; Backman, Daniel G.; Beckermann, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    A unified model has been developed for combined gas- and shrinkage-induced pore formation during solidification of metal alloys. The model is based on a pore-centric approach, in which the temporal evolution of the pore radius is calculated as a function of cooling rate, thermal gradient, gas diffusion, and shrinkage. It accounts for the effect of porosity formation on the liquid velocity within the mushy zone. Simulations for an aluminum alloy show that the porosity transitions smoothly from shrinkage-induced to gas-induced as the Niyama value is increased. A Blake (cavitation) instability is observed to occur when the porosity is both gas- and shrinkage-driven. A revised dimensionless Niyama curve for pure shrinkage is presented. The experimentally observed gas porosity trend that the pore volume decreases with increasing cooling rate is well predicted. The pore-centric formulation allows the present model to be solved locally, at any point in a casting, during a regular casting simulation.

  19. Biofilm formation on a TiO2 nanotube with controlled pore diameter and surface wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitha, V. C.; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Jintae; Narayan Banerjee, Arghya; Joo, Sang Woo; Min, Bong Ki

    2015-02-01

    Titania (TiO2) nanotube arrays (TNAs) with different pore diameters (140 - 20 nm) are fabricated via anodization using hydrofluoric acid (HF) containing ethylene glycol (EG) by changing the HF-to-EG volume ratio and the anodization voltage. To evaluate the effects of different pore diameters of TiO2 nanotubes on bacterial biofilm formation, Shewanella oneidensis (S. oneidensis) MR-1 cells and a crystal-violet biofilm assay are used. The surface roughness and wettability of the TNA surfaces as a function of pore diameter, measured via the contact angle and AFM techniques, are correlated with the controlled biofilm formation. Biofilm formation increases with the decreasing nanotube pore diameter, and a 20 nm TiO2 nanotube shows the maximum biofilm formation. The measurements revealed that 20 nm surfaces have the least hydrophilicity with the highest surface roughness of ˜17 nm and that they show almost a 90% increase in the effective surface area relative to the 140 nm TNAs, which stimulate the cells more effectively to produce the pili to attach to the surface for more biofilm formation. The results demonstrate that bacterial cell adhesion (and hence, biofilm formation) can effectively be controlled by tuning the roughness and wettability of TNAs via controlling the pore diameters of TNA surfaces. This biofilm formation as a function of the surface properties of TNAs can be a potential candidate for both medical applications and as electrodes in microbial fuel cells.

  20. Investigation of grain-boundary geometry and pores morphology in dense and porous cubic zirconia polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrowski, Piotr; Faryna, Marek; Pędzich, Zbigniew

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Cubic zirconia sinters were investigated in three dimensions using dual-beam FEGSEM. • The 3D-EBSD technique was successfully applied to non-conductive ceramics. • New sample preparation approach to automated 3D-EBSD was proposed. • Grain boundary microstructures were reconstructed from inverse pole figure maps. • Pore microstructures were reconstructed from image quality maps. - Abstract: Three-dimensional electron backscatter diffraction technique was used for the visualization of grain boundary geometry and pore morphology in cubic zirconia. A set of four samples sintered under different conditions was investigated. Specimens which were characterized by energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were entirely composed of cubic phase. Investigations of boundaries and pore structures were carried out in a dual-beam scanning electron microscope. For each sample, a volume of 1000 μm{sup 3} was investigated. The analysis of grain boundary networks reconstructed from inverse pole figure maps revealed a strong dependence between grain boundary density and sample preparation parameters. Sintering also affects the size and distribution of pores. The total number of grains analyzed varied from 17 to 357 and the calculated volume of cavities from 0.01% to 21%. This paper shows the application of three-dimensional crystallographic orientation analysis to characterize the microstructure of yttria stabilized zirconia ceramics.

  1. Large pore diameter MCM-41 and its application for lead removal from aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Idris, Salah A; Davidson, Christine M; McManamon, Colm; Morris, Michael A; Anderson, Peter; Gibson, Lorraine T

    2011-01-30

    A room temperature method to create large pore size and pore volume ordered mesoporous silica (MCM-41) is demonstrated. Template removal was achieved with a microwave digestion procedure using a solution of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The silica product exhibited an ordered hexagonal mesostructure, large pore volume (up to 0.99 cm(3)/g), and large pore size (up to 6.74 nm) indicating its potential as a high capacity adsorbent. Surface modification, to enhance the ability of the material to extract potentially toxic metals (PTMs) from water was performed using different amino- and mercapto-functional groups. This paper reports on the extraction of lead ions from aqueous solution to demonstrate the material's significant improvement in adsorption capacity (up to 1000 μmol g(-1) for lead). Moreover, methods have been developed to regenerate the sorbent allowing 100% recovery of Pb and reuse of the sorbent material in subsequent extractions. The performance of the material was also demonstrated for environmental samples containing relatively high concentrations (ppmv) of mixed metal ions reducing them to lower values (<100 ppbv) indicating that the sorbent may have applicability for environmental remediation of polluted water.

  2. Adaptive Multi-Scale Pore Network Method for Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. W.; Khayrat, K.; Jenny, P.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic pore network simulators are important tools in studying macroscopic quantities in two-phase flow through porous media. However, these simulators have a time complexity of order N2 for N pore bodies, which limits their usage to small domains. Quasi-static pore network simulators, which assume capillary dominated flow, are more efficient with a time complexity of order N log(N), but are unable to capture phenomena caused by viscous effects such as viscous fingering and stable displacement. It has been experimentally observed that, in several flow scenarios, capillary forces are dominant at the pore scale and viscous forces at larger scales. In order to take advantage of this behaviour and to reduce the time complexity of existing dynamic pore network simulators, we propose a multi-scale pore-network method for two phase flow. In our solution algorithm, the pore network is first divided into smaller subnetworks. The algorithm to advance the fluid interfaces within each subnetwork consists of three steps: 1) The saturation rate of each subnetwork is obtained by solving a two-phase meso-scale mass balance equation over the domain of subnetworks. Here, a multi-point flux scheme is used. 2) Depending on the local capillary number computed in the subnetwork, either an invasion percolation algorithm or a dynamic network algorithm is used to locally advance the fluid-fluid interfaces within each subnetwork until a new saturation value is matched. 3) The transmissibilities for the meso-scale equation are updated based on the updated fluid configurations in each subnetwork. For this purpose the methodoloy of the existing multi-scale finite volume (MSFV) method is employed. An important feature of the multi-scale pore-network method is that it maintains consistency of both fluid occupancy and fluxes at subnetwork interfaces. Viscous effects such as viscous fingering (see figure) can be captured at a decreased computational cost compared to dynamic pore network

  3. Effects of catalyst pore structure and acid properties on the dehydration of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngbo; Park, Hongseok; Yun, Yang Sik; Yi, Jongheop

    2015-03-01

    Hierarchical porous catalysts have recently attracted increasing interest because of the enhanced accessibility to active sites on such materials. In this context, previously reported hierarchically mesoporous ASN and ASPN materials are evaluated by applying them to the dehydration of glycerol, and demonstrate excellent catalytic performance. In addition, a comprehensive understanding of the effects of pore structures and the acid properties on the reaction through comparative studies with microporous HZSM-5 and mesoporous AlMCM-41 is provided.

  4. Pore size engineering applied to the design of separators for nickel-hydrogen cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbey, K. M.; Britton, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Pore size engineering in starved alkaline multiplate cells involves adopting techniques to widen the volume tolerance of individual cells. Separators with appropriate pore size distributions and wettability characteristics (capillary pressure considerations) to have wider volume tolerances and an ability to resist dimensional changes in the electrodes were designed. The separators studied for potential use in nickel-hydrogen cells consist of polymeric membranes as well as inorganic microporous mats. In addition to standard measurements, the resistance and distribution of electrolyte as a function of total cell electrolyte content were determined. New composite separators consisting of fibers, particles and/or binders deposited on Zircar cloth were developed in order to engineer the proper capillary pressure characteristics in the separator. These asymmetric separators were prepared from a variety of fibers, particles and binders.

  5. "Opening" the ferritin pore for iron release by mutation of conserved amino acids at interhelix and loop sites.

    PubMed

    Jin, W; Takagi, H; Pancorbo, B; Theil, E C

    2001-06-26

    Ferritin concentrates, stores, and detoxifies iron in most organisms. The iron is a solid, ferric oxide mineral (< or =4500 Fe) inside the protein shell. Eight pores are formed by subunit trimers of the 24 subunit protein. A role for the protein in controlling reduction and dissolution of the iron mineral was suggested in preliminary experiments [Takagi et al. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 18685-18688] with a proline/leucine substitution near the pore. Localized pore disorder in frog L134P crystals coincided with enhanced iron exit, triggered by reduction. In this report, nine additional substitutions of conserved amino acids near L134 were studied for effects on iron release. Alterations of a conserved hydrophobic pair, a conserved ion pair, and a loop at the ferritin pores all increased iron exit (3-30-fold). Protein assembly was unchanged, except for a slight decrease in volume (measured by gel filtration); ferroxidase activity was still in the millisecond range, but a small decrease indicates slight alteration of the channel from the pore to the oxidation site. The sensitivity of reductive iron exit rates to changes in conserved residues near the ferritin pores, associated with localized unfolding, suggests that the structure around the ferritin pores is a target for regulated protein unfolding and iron release.

  6. Rural Libraries, Volume XIV, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Mary Lou, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    The 2 issues in this volume contain 10 articles on rural libraries and information access in rural America. Topics include telecommunications and distance education in Nebraska, the future of small rural public libraries, federal programs to improve rural access to information, outreach issues for public libraries, and the role of information in…

  7. Pressure- and heat-induced insertion of CO2 into an auxetic small-pore zeolite.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yongjae; Liu, Dan; Seoung, Donghoon; Liu, Zhenxian; Kao, Chi-Chang; Vogt, Thomas

    2011-02-16

    When the small-pore zeolite natrolite is compressed at ca. 1.5 GPa and heated to ca. 110 °C in the presence of CO(2), the unit cell volume of natrolite expands by 6.8% and ca. 12 wt % of CO(2) is contained in the expanded elliptical channels. This CO(2) insertion into natrolite is found to be reversible upon pressure release.

  8. Mechanics of membrane fusion/pore formation.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmans, Marc; Marelli, Giovanni; Smirnova, Yuliya G; Müller, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Lipid bilayers play a fundamental role in many biological processes, and a considerable effort has been invested in understanding their behavior and the mechanism of topological changes like fusion and pore formation. Due to the time- and length-scale on which these processes occur, computational methods have proven to be an especially useful tool in their study. With their help, a number of interesting findings about the shape of fusion intermediates could be obtained, and novel hypotheses about the mechanism of topological changes and the involvement of peptides therein were suggested. In this work, we try to present a summary of these developments together with some hitherto unpublished results, featuring, among others, the shape of stalks and fusion pores, possible modes of action of the influenza HA fusion peptide and the SNARE protein complex, the mechanism of supported lipid bilayer formation by vesicle spreading, and the free energy and transition pathway of the fusion process.

  9. Mineral dissolution kinetics at the pore scale

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.

    2007-05-24

    Mineral dissolution rates in the field have been reported to be orders of magnitude slower than those measured in the laboratory, an unresolved discrepancy that severely limits our ability to develop scientifically defensible predictive or even interpretive models for many geochemical processes in the earth and environmental sciences. One suggestion links this discrepancy to the role of physical and chemical heterogeneities typically found in subsurface soils and aquifers in producing scale-dependent rates where concentration gradients develop. In this paper, we examine the possibility that scale-dependent mineral dissolution rates can develop even at the single pore and fracture scale, the smallest and most fundamental building block of porous media. To do so, we develop two models to analyze mineral dissolution kinetics at the single pore scale: (1) a Poiseuille Flow model that applies laboratory-measured dissolution kinetics at the pore or fracture wall and couples this to a rigorous treatment of both advective and diffusive transport, and (2) a Well-Mixed Reactor model that assumes complete mixing within the pore, while maintaining the same reactive surface area, average flow rate, and geometry as the Poiseuille Flow model. For a fracture, a 1D Plug Flow Reactor model is considered in addition to quantify the effects of longitudinal versus transverse mixing. The comparison of averaged dissolution rates under various conditions of flow, pore size, and fracture length from the three models is used as a means to quantify the extent to which concentration gradients at the single pore and fracture scale can develop and render rates scale-dependent. Three important minerals that dissolve at widely different rates, calcite, plagioclase, and iron hydroxide, are considered. The modeling indicates that rate discrepancies arise primarily where concentration gradients develop due to comparable rates of reaction and advective transport, and incomplete mixing via molecular

  10. Pore scale heterogeneity in the mineral distribution and reactive surface area of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, P. E.; Krevor, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    There are long-standing challenges in characterizing reactive transport in porous media at scales larger than individual pores. This hampers the prediction of the field-scale impact of geochemical processes on fluid flow [1]. This is a source of uncertainty for CO2 injection, which results in a reactive fluid-rock system, particularly in carbonate rock reservoirs. A potential cause is the inability of the continuum approach to incorporate the impact of heterogeneity in pore-scale reaction rates. This results in part from pore-scale heterogeneities in surface area of reactive minerals [2,3]. In this study we have created μm resolution 3D images of 3 sandstone and 4 carbonate rocks using x-ray microtomography. Using in-house image processing techniques and auxiliary characterisation with thin section, electron microscope and spectroscopic techniques we quantified the surface area of each mineral phase in the x-ray CT images. This quantification was validated against N2 BET surface area and He porosity measurements of the imaged samples. Distributions in reactive surface area for each mineral phase were constructed by calculating surface areas in thousands of randomly selected subvolume images of the total sample, each normalized to the pore volume in that image. In all samples, there is little correlation between the reactive surface area fraction and the volumetric fraction of a mineral in a bulk rock. Berea sandstone was far less heterogeneous and has a characteristic pore size at which a surface area distribution may be used to quantify heterogeneity. In carbonates, heterogeneity is more complex and surface area must be characterized at multiple length scales for an accurate description of reactive transport. [1] Maher, Steefel, Depaolo and Vianni (2006) Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 70, 337-363 [2] Landrot, Ajo-Franklin, Yang, Cabrini and Steefel (2012) Chemical Geology 318-319, 113-125 [3] Li, Peters and Celia (2007) American Journal of Science 307, 1146

  11. Effect of Pore Structure of Macroporous Poly(Lactide-co-Glycolide) Scaffolds on the in Vivo Enrichment of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo enrichment of dendritic cells (DCs) in implanted macroporous scaffolds is an emerging strategy to modulate the adaptive immune system. The pore architecture is potentially one of the key factors in controlling enrichment of DCs. However, there have been few studies examining the effects of scaffold pore structure on in vivo DC enrichment. Here we present the effects of surface porosity, pore size, and pore volume of macroporous poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) scaffolds encapsulating granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), an inflammatory chemoattractant, on the in vivo enrichment of DCs. Although in vitro cell seeding studies using PLG scaffolds without GM-CSF showed higher cell infiltration in scaffolds with higher surface porosity, in vivo results revealed higher DC enrichment in GM-CSF loaded PLG scaffolds with lower surface porosity despite a similar level of GM-CSF released. The diminished compressive modulus of high surface porosity scaffolds compared to low surface porosity scaffolds lead to the significant shrinkage of these scaffolds in vivo, suggesting that the mechanical strength of scaffolds was critical to maintain a porous structure in vivo for accumulating DCs. The pore volume was also found to be important in total number of recruited cells and DCs in vivo. Varying the pore size significantly impacted the total number of cells, but similar numbers of DCs were found as long as the pore size was above 10–32 μm. Collectively, these results suggested that one can modulate in vivo enrichment of DCs by altering the pore architecture and mechanical properties of PLG scaffolds. PMID:24844318

  12. Probing pores using elementary quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Ryu, S

    2001-01-01

    The relaxation of polarized spins in a porous medium has been utilized as a probe of its structure. We note that the governing diffusion problem has a close parallel to that of a particle in a box, an elementary Quantum mechanics toy model. Following the spirits of "free electron" model, we use generic properties of the eigen spectrum to understand features common to a wide variety of pore geometry, consistent with large scale numerical simulations and experimental data.

  13. Further characterization of Closed Pore Insulation (CPI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russak, M.; Feldman, C.

    1973-01-01

    The thermophysical and mechanical properties of closed pore insulation (CPI) were measured after exposure to 25 simulated reentry thermal cycles. In addition, mechanical properties were obtained at elevated temperatures before and after cycling. The properties of CPI were not compromised by the cycling. High temperature creep studies were done on three CPI compositions (4, 8, and 12 Wt% CoO additive). CPI-4 had the best creep resistance at temperatures up to 1363 K.

  14. What is the mitochondrial permeability transition pore?

    PubMed

    Halestrap, Andrew P

    2009-06-01

    Under conditions of mitochondrial calcium overload, especially when accompanied by oxidative stress, elevated phosphate concentrations and adenine nucleotide depletion, a non-specific pore, the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), opens in the inner mitochondrial membrane. MPTP opening enables free passage into the mitochondria of molecules of <1.5 kDa including protons. The resulting uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation leads to ATP depletion and necrotic cell death and it is now widely recognised that MPTP opening is a major cause of reperfusion injury and an effective target for cardioprotection. The properties of the MPTP are well defined, but despite extensive research in many laboratories, its exact molecular identity remains uncertain. Knockout studies have confirmed a role for cyclophilin-D (CyP-D), probably mediated by its peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity facilitating a conformational change of an inner membrane protein. However, the identity of the membrane component(s) remains controversial. Knockout studies have eliminated an essential role for either the voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC) or the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), although a regulatory role for the ANT was confirmed. Our own studies implicate the mitochondrial phosphate carrier (PiC) in MPTP formation and are consistent with a calcium-triggered conformational change of the PiC, facilitated by CyP-D, inducing pore opening. We propose that this is enhanced by an association of the PiC with the "c" conformation of the ANT. Agents that modulate pore opening may act on either or both the PiC and the ANT. However, knockdown and reconstitution studies are awaited to confirm or refute this model.

  15. Coupling root architecture and pore network modeling - an attempt towards better understanding root-soil interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Daniel; Bodner, Gernot; Raoof, Amir

    2013-04-01

    Understanding root-soil interactions is of high importance for environmental and agricultural management. Root uptake is an essential component in water and solute transport modeling. The amount of groundwater recharge and solute leaching significantly depends on the demand based plant extraction via its root system. Plant uptake however not only responds to the potential demand, but in most situations is limited by supply form the soil. The ability of the plant to access water and solutes in the soil is governed mainly by root distribution. Particularly under conditions of heterogeneous distribution of water and solutes in the soil, it is essential to capture the interaction between soil and roots. Root architecture models allow studying plant uptake from soil by describing growth and branching of root axes in the soil. Currently root architecture models are able to respond dynamically to water and nutrient distribution in the soil by directed growth (tropism), modified branching and enhanced exudation. The porous soil medium as rooting environment in these models is generally described by classical macroscopic water retention and sorption models, average over the pore scale. In our opinion this simplified description of the root growth medium implies several shortcomings for better understanding root-soil interactions: (i) It is well known that roots grow preferentially in preexisting pores, particularly in more rigid/dry soil. Thus the pore network contributes to the architectural form of the root system; (ii) roots themselves can influence the pore network by creating preferential flow paths (biopores) which are an essential element of structural porosity with strong impact on transport processes; (iii) plant uptake depend on both the spatial location of water/solutes in the pore network as well as the spatial distribution of roots. We therefore consider that for advancing our understanding in root-soil interactions, we need not only to extend our root models

  16. Nuclear pore complex ion channels (review).

    PubMed

    Bustamante, J O; Liepins, A; Hanover, J A

    1994-01-01

    It is currently thought that nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) primarily govern nucleocytoplasmic interactions via selective recognition and active transport of macromolecules. However, in various nuclear preparations, patch-clamp and fluorescence, luminiscence and ion microscopy support classical microelectrode measurements indicating that monoatomic ion flow across the nuclear envelope (NE) is strictly regulated. Gating of large conductance nuclear envelope ion channels (NICs) somewhat resembles that of gap junctional channels. In other respects, NICs are distinct in that they require cytosolic factors, are blocked by wheat germ agglutinin and are blocked and/or modified by antibodies to epitopes of NPC glycoproteins. Therefore, NIC activity, recorded as electrical current/conductance is likely to be intrinsic to NPCs. This observation suggests a potential use for the patch-clamp technique in establishing the mechanisms underlying nuclear pore gating in response to cytosolic and nucleosolic factors such as transcription and growth factors, oncogene and proto-oncogene products and receptors for retinoids, steroids and thyroid hormone. NIC activity may also be useful in evaluating the mechanisms of nuclear import of foreign nucleic acid material such as that contained in virons and viroids. Finally, in consideration to the electrophysiological data accumulated so far, the study of nuclear pore ion channel activity may help our understanding of other important issues such as cell suicide, programmed cell death or apoptosis.

  17. INVESTIGATIONS INTO BIOFOULING PHENOMENA IN FINE PORE AERATION DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbiologically-based procedures were used to describe biofouling phenomena on fine pore aeration devices and to determine whether biofilm characteristics could be related to diffuser process performance parameters. Fine pore diffusers were obtained from five municipal wastewa...

  18. Hyperbolic regions in flows through three-dimensional pore structures.

    PubMed

    Hyman, Jeffrey D; Winter, C Larrabee

    2013-12-01

    Finite time Lyapunov exponents are used to determine expanding, contracting, and hyperbolic regions in computational simulations of laminar steady-state fluid flows within realistic three dimensional pore structures embedded within an impermeable matrix. These regions correspond approximately to pores where flow converges (contraction) or diverges (expansion), and to throats between pores where the flow mixes (hyperbolic). The regions are sparse and disjoint from one another, occupying only a small percentage of the pore space. Nonetheless, nearly every percolating fluid particle trajectory passes through several hyperbolic regions indicating that the effects of in-pore mixing are distributed throughout an entire pore structure. Furthermore, the observed range of fluid dynamics evidences two scales of heterogeneity within each of these flow fields. There is a larger scale that affects dispersion of fluid particle trajectories across the connected network of pores and a relatively small scale of nonuniform distributions of velocities within an individual pore.

  19. Dilation of fusion pores by crowding of SNARE proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenyong; Bello, Oscar D; Thiyagarajan, Sathish; Auclair, Sarah Marie; Vennekate, Wensi; Krishnakumar, Shyam S; O'Shaughnessy, Ben; Karatekin, Erdem

    2017-03-27

    Hormones and neurotransmitters are released through fluctuating exocytotic fusion pores that can flicker open and shut multiple times. Cargo release and vesicle recycling depend on the fate of the pore, which may reseal or dilate irreversibly. Pore nucleation requires zippering between vesicle-associated v- and target membrane t-SNAREs, but the mechanisms governing the subsequent pore dilation are not understood. Here, we probed dilation of single fusion pores using v-SNARE-reconstituted ~23 nm diameter discoidal nanolipoprotein particles (vNLPs) as fusion partners with cells ectopically expressing cognate, 'flipped' t-SNAREs. Pore nucleation required a minimum of 2, and reached a maximum above ~4 copies per face, but the probability of pore dilation was far from saturating at 15 copies, the NLP capacity. Our experimental and computational results suggest SNARE availability may be pivotal in determining whether neurotransmitters or hormones are released through a transient (kiss & run) or an irreversibly dilating pore (full fusion).

  20. Evaluation of bound and pore water in cortical bone using ultrashort-TE MRI.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Grogan, Shawn P; Shao, Hongda; D'Lima, Darryl; Bydder, Graeme M; Wu, Zhihong; Du, Jiang

    2015-12-01

    Bone water exists in different states with the majority bound to the organic matrix and to mineral, and a smaller fraction in 'free' form in the pores of cortical bone. In this study, we aimed to develop and evaluate ultrashort-TE (UTE) MRI techniques for the assessment of T2*, T1 and concentration of collagen-bound and pore water in cortical bone using a 3-T clinical whole-body scanner. UTE MRI, together with an isotope study using tritiated and distilled water (THO-H2O) exchange, as well as gravimetric analysis, were performed on ten sectioned bovine bone samples. In addition, 32 human cortical bone samples were prepared for comparison between the pore water concentration measured with UTE MRI and the cortical porosity derived from micro-computed tomography (μCT). A short T2* of 0.27 ± 0.03 ms and T1 of 116 ± 6 ms were observed for collagen-bound water in bovine bone. A longer T2* of 1.84 ± 0.52 ms and T1 of 527 ± 28 ms were observed for pore water in bovine bone. UTE MRI measurements showed a pore water concentration of 4.7-5.3% by volume and collagen-bound water concentration of 15.7-17.9% in bovine bone. THO-H2O exchange studies showed a pore water concentration of 5.9 ± 0.6% and collagen-bound water concentration of 18.1 ± 2.1% in bovine bone. Gravimetric analysis showed a pore water concentration of 6.3 ± 0.8% and collagen-bound water concentration of 19.2 ± 3.6% in bovine bone. A mineral water concentration of 9.5 ± 0.6% was derived in bovine bone with the THO-H2O exchange study. UTE-measured pore water concentration is highly correlated (R(2) = 0.72, p < 0.0001) with μCT porosity in the human cortical bone study. Both bovine and human bone studies suggest that UTE sequences could reliably measure collagen-bound and pore water concentration in cortical bone using a clinical scanner.

  1. Micro-computed tomography pore-scale study of flow in porous media: Effect of voxel resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, S. M.; Gray, F.; Crawshaw, J. P.; Boek, E. S.

    2016-09-01

    avoids the problem of partial volume effects and reduces the scaling effect by preserving the pore-space properties influencing the transport properties. This is evidently compared in this study by predicting several pore network properties such as number of pores and throats, average pore and throat radius and coordination number for both scan based analysis and numerical coarsened data.

  2. Expanding Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    There is no question that the United States lags behind most industrialized nations in consumer access to broadband Internet service. For many policy makers and activists, this shortfall marks the latest phase in the struggle to overcome the digital divide. To remedy this lack of broadband affordability and availability, one start-up firm--with…

  3. Easy Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    School and university restrooms, locker and shower rooms have specific ADA accessibility requirements that serve the needs of staff, students and campus visitors who are disabled as a result of injury, illness or age. Taking good care of them is good for the reputation of a sensitive community institution, and fosters positive public relations.…

  4. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    As faculty members add online and multimedia elements to their courses, colleges and universities across the country are realizing that there is a lot of work to be done to ensure that disabled students (and employees) have equal access to course material and university websites. Unfortunately, far too few schools consider the task a top priority.…

  5. Use of Computed Microtomography to Visualize and Quantify Pore-Scale Transport Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, S. J.; Rivers, M.; Peplinski, W. J.; Lucero, D. A.

    2001-05-01

    Pore-scale transport processes are critical to the understanding of oil and gas reservoirs, groundwater transport and toxic and radioactive waste migration. For example, at certain sites where deep geological repositories are being studied for nuclear waste storage, diffusion in fractured crystalline rocks is thought to be an important factor in retarding radionuclide transport. Presently, there is little direct observation of heterogeneous diffusion processes in crystalline rocks as it is mostly studied by field tracer tests or bulk laboratory measurements. Computed microtomography (CMT) is being applied at GSECARS (GeoSoilEnviro Consortium for Advanced Radiation Sources) at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source to better understand pore-space transport processes. The technique is being applied to 1-cm diameter, crystalline rock cores from underground experimental rock laboratories in Sweden, Switzerland and Japan. Approximately 20 micron resolution in three-dimensions is achieved on these cores. The CMT images of the natural samples show pore space, but the contrast in some samples is relatively poor because the required X-ray energy was high in order to penetrate the samples. The pore space is enhanced by digital subtraction tomography. In this method, the rock is saturated with high atomic number fluid (CsCl or KI solution) and images are taken with the X-ray energy below and above the cesium or iodine K absorption edge. The difference image shows only the solution, which is present in the accessible pore space and thus reveals potential fluid transport pathways. In addition to imaging the pore space, this method can detect minerals to which the cesium sorbs and differentiate between felsic and mafic minerals in the samples. New work will concentrate on real time experiments to measure transport properties. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy

  6. Influence of the pore size in multi-walled carbon nanotubes on the hydrogen storage behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seul-Yi; Park, Soo-Jin

    2012-10-15

    Activated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (A-MWCNTs) were prepared using a chemical activation method to obtain well-developed pore structures for use as hydrogen storage materials. The microstructure and crystallinity of the A-MWCNTs were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy. The textural properties of the A-MWCNTs were investigated by nitrogen gas sorption analysis at 77 K. The hydrogen storage capacity of the A-MWCNTs was evaluated at 77 K and 1 bar. The results showed that the specific surface area of the MWCNTs increased from 327 to 495 m{sup 2}/g as the activation temperature was increased. The highest hydrogen storage capacity was observed in the A-MWCNTs sample activated at 900 Degree-Sign C (0.54 wt%). This was attributed to it having the narrowest microporosity, which is a factor closely related to the hydrogen storage capacity. This shows that the hydrogen storage behaviors depend on the pore volume. Although a high pore volume is desirable for hydrogen storage, it is also severely affected if the pore size in the A-MWCNTs for the hydrogen molecules is suitable for creating the activation process. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AT-800 and AT-900 samples were prepared by a chemical activation method at activation temperature of 800 and 900 Degree-Sign C, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AT-900 sample has the narrowest peak in comparison with the AT-800 sample, resulting from the overlap of the two peaks (Peak I and Peak II). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This overlapping effect is due to the newly created micropores or shrinkages of pores in Peak II. So, these determining characteristics are essential for designing materials that are suitable for molecular hydrogen storage.

  7. Glutathione release through connexin hemichannels: Implications for chemical modification of pores permeable to large molecules

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xuhui; Lopez, William; Ramachandran, Jayalakshmi; Ayad, Wafaa A.; Liu, Yu; Lopez-Rodriguez, Angelica; Harris, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine-scanning mutagenesis combined with thiol reagent modification is a powerful method with which to define the pore-lining elements of channels and the changes in structure that accompany channel gating. Using the Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system and two-electrode voltage clamp, we performed cysteine-scanning mutagenesis of several pore-lining residues of connexin 26 (Cx26) hemichannels, followed by chemical modification using a methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagent, to help identify the position of the gate. Unexpectedly, we observed that the effect of MTS modification on the currents was reversed within minutes of washout. Such a reversal should not occur unless reducing agents, which can break the disulfide thiol–MTS linkage, have access to the site of modification. Given the permeability to large metabolites of connexin channels, we tested whether cytosolic glutathione (GSH), the primary cell reducing agent, was reaching the modified sites through the connexin pore. Inhibition of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase by buthionine sulfoximine decreased the cytosolic GSH concentration in Xenopus oocytes and reduced reversibility of MTS modification, as did acute treatment with tert-butyl hydroperoxide, which oxidizes GSH. Cysteine modification based on thioether linkages (e.g., maleimides) cannot be reversed by reducing agents and did not reverse with washout. Using reconstituted hemichannels in a liposome-based transport-specific fractionation assay, we confirmed that homomeric Cx26 and Cx32 and heteromeric Cx26/Cx32 are permeable to GSH and other endogenous reductants. These results show that, for wide pores, accessibility of cytosolic reductants can lead to reversal of MTS-based thiol modifications. This potential for reversibility of thiol modification applies to on-cell accessibility studies of connexin channels and other channels that are permeable to large molecules, such as pannexin, CALHM, and VRAC. PMID:26324677

  8. Salt Templating with Pore Padding: Hierarchical Pore Tailoring towards Functionalised Porous Carbons.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Vasanth; Gadipelli, Srinivas; Preuss, Kathrin; Porwal, Harshit; Zhao, Tingting; Guo, Zheng Xiao; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena

    2017-01-10

    We propose a new synthetic route towards nanoporous functional carbon materials based on salt templating with pore-padding approach (STPP). STPP relies on the use of a pore-padding agent that undergoes an initial polymerisation/ condensation process prior to the formation of a solid carbon framework. The pore-padding agent allows tailoring hierarchically the pore-size distribution and controlling the amount of heteroatom (nitrogen in this case) functionalities as well as the type of nitrogen (graphitic, pyridinic, oxides of nitrogen) incorporated within the carbon framework in a single-step-process. Our newly developed STPP method offers a unique pathway and new design principle to create simultaneously high surface area, microporosity, functionality and pore hierarchy. The functional carbon materials produced by STPP showed a remarkable CO2 /N2 selectivity. At 273 K, a carbon with only micropores offered an exceptionally high CO2 adsorption capacity whereas a carbon with only mesopores showed promising CO2 -philicity with high CO2 /N2 selectivity in the range of 46-60 %, making them excellent candidates for CO2 capture from flue gas or for CO2 storage.

  9. Variations in pore characteristics in high volatile bituminous coals: Implications for coal bed gas content

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastalerz, Maria; Drobniak, A.; Strapoc, D.; Solano-Acosta, W.; Rupp, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Seelyville Coal Member of the Linton Formation (Pennsylvanian) in Indiana was studied to: 1) understand variations in pore characteristics within a coal seam at a single location and compare these variations with changes occurring between the same coal at different locations, 2) elaborate on the influence of mineral-matter and maceral composition on mesopore and micropore characteristics, and 3) discuss implications of these variations for coal bed gas content. The coal is high volatile bituminous rank with R0 ranging from 0.57% to 0.60%. BET specific surface areas (determined by nitrogen adsorption) of the coals samples studied range from 1.8 to 22.9??m2/g, BJH adsorption mesopore volumes from 0.0041 to 0.0339??cm3/g, and micropore volumes (determined by carbon dioxide adsorption) from 0.0315 to 0.0540??cm3/g. The coals that had the largest specific surface areas and largest mesopore volumes occur at the shallowest depths, whereas the smallest values for these two parameters occur in the deepest coals. Micropore volumes, in contrast, are not depth-dependent. In the coal samples examined for this study, mineral-matter content influenced both specific surface area as well as mesopore and micropore volumes. It is especially clear in the case of micropores, where an increase in mineral-matter content parallels the decrease of micropore volume of the coal. No obvious relationships were observed between the total vitrinite content and pore characteristics but, after splitting vitrinite into individual macerals, we see that collotelinite influences both meso- and micropore volume positively, whereas collodetrinite contributes to the reduction of mesopore and micropore volumes. There are large variations in gas content within a single coal at a single location. Because of this variability, the entire thickness of the coal must be desorbed in order to determine gas content reliably and to accurately calculate the level of gas saturation. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All

  10. Energy conversion device with support member having pore channels

    DOEpatents

    Routkevitch, Dmitri [Longmont, CO; Wind, Rikard A [Johnstown, CO

    2014-01-07

    Energy devices such as energy conversion devices and energy storage devices and methods for the manufacture of such devices. The devices include a support member having an array of pore channels having a small average pore channel diameter and having a pore channel length. Material layers that may include energy conversion materials and conductive materials are coaxially disposed within the pore channels to form material rods having a relatively small cross-section and a relatively long length. By varying the structure of the materials in the pore channels, various energy devices can be fabricated, such as photovoltaic (PV) devices, radiation detectors, capacitors, batteries and the like.

  11. Displacement of soil pore water by trichloroethylene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Aiken, G.R.; Imbrigiotta, T.E.; Goldberg, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLS) are important pollutants because of their widespread use as chemical and industrial solvents. An example of the pollution caused by the discharge of DNAPLs is found at the Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, where trichloroethylene (TCE) has been discharged directly into the unsaturated zone. This discharge has resulted in the formation of a plume of TCE-contaminated water in the aquifer downgradient of the discharge. A zone of dark-colored groundwater containing a high dissolved organic C content has been found near the point of discharge of the TCE. The colored-water plume extends from the point of discharge at least 30 m (100 feet) downgradient. Fulvic acids isolated from the colored-waters plume, from water from a background well that has not been affected by the discharge of chlorinated solvents, and from soil pore water collected in a lysimeter installed at an uncontaminated site upgradient of the study area have been compared. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the fulvic acids from the colored waters and from the lysimeter are very similar, but are markedly different from the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the fulvic acid from the background well. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectrum and the DOC fractionation profile of the colored groundwater and the soil pore water are very similar to each other, but quite different from those of the background water. It is proposed from these observations that this colored water is soil pore water that has been displaced by a separate DNAPL liquid phase downward to the saturated zone.

  12. Displacement of soil pore water by trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Wershaw, R.L.; Aiken, G.R.; Imbrigiotta, T.E.

    1994-07-01

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLS) are important pollutants because of their widespread use as chemical and industrial solvents. An example of the pollution caused by the discharge of DNAPLs is found at the Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, where trichloroethylene (TCE) has been discharged directly into the unsaturated zone. This discharge has resulted in the formation of a plume of TCE-contaminated water in the aquifer downgradient of the discharge. A zone of dark-colored groundwater containing a high dissolved organic C content has been found near the point of discharge of the TCE. The colored-water plume extends from the point of discharge at least 30 m (100 feet) downgradient. Fulvic acids isolated from the colored-waters plume, from water from a background well that has not been affected by the discharge of chlorinated solvents, and from soil pore water collected in a lysimeter installed at an uncontaminated site upgradient of the study area have been compared. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the fulvic acids from the colored waters and from the lysimeter am very similar, but are markedly different from the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the fulvic acid from the background well. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectrum and the DOC fractionation profile of the colored groundwater and the soil pore water are very similar to each other, but quite different from those of the background water. It is proposed from these observations that this colored water is soil pore water that has been displaced by a separate DNAPL liquid phase downward to the saturated zone. 15 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. The pore structure and gating mechanism of K2P channels

    PubMed Central

    Piechotta, Paula L; Rapedius, Markus; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Bollepalli, Murali K; Erhlich, Gunter; Andres-Enguix, Isabelle; Fritzenschaft, Hariolf; Decher, Niels; Sansom, Mark S P; Tucker, Stephen J; Baukrowitz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Two-pore domain (K2P) potassium channels are important regulators of cellular electrical excitability. However, the structure of these channels and their gating mechanism, in particular the role of the bundle-crossing gate, are not well understood. Here, we report that quaternary ammonium (QA) ions bind with high-affinity deep within the pore of TREK-1 and have free access to their binding site before channel activation by intracellular pH or pressure. This demonstrates that, unlike most other K+ channels, the bundle-crossing gate in this K2P channel is constitutively open. Furthermore, we used QA ions to probe the pore structure of TREK-1 by systematic scanning mutagenesis and comparison of these results with different possible structural models. This revealed that the TREK-1 pore most closely resembles the open-state structure of KvAP. We also found that mutations close to the selectivity filter and the nature of the permeant ion profoundly influence TREK-1 channel gating. These results demonstrate that the primary activation mechanisms in TREK-1 reside close to, or within the selectivity filter and do not involve gating at the cytoplasmic bundle crossing. PMID:21822218

  14. Interaction of the noncovalent molecular adapter, beta-cyclodextrin, with the staphylococcal alpha-hemolysin pore.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, L Q; Bayley, H

    2000-01-01

    Cyclodextrins act as noncovalent molecular adapters when lodged in the lumen of the alpha-hemolysin (alphaHL) pore. The adapters act as binding sites for channel blockers, thereby offering a basis for the detection of a variety of organic molecules with alphaHL as a biosensor element. To further such studies, it is important to find conditions under which the dwell time of cyclodextrins in the lumen of the pore is extended. Here, we use single-channel recording to explore the pH- and voltage-dependence of the interaction of beta-cyclodextrin (betaCD) with alphaHL. betaCD can access its binding site only from the trans entrance of pores inserted from the cis side of a bilayer. Analysis of the binding kinetics shows that there is a single binding site for betaCD, with an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant that varies by >100-fold under the conditions explored. The dissociation rate constant for the neutral betaCD molecule varies with pH and voltage, a result that is incompatible with two states of the alphaHL pore, one of high and the other of low affinity. Rather, the data suggest that the actual equilibrium dissociation constant for the alphaHL. betaCD complex varies continuously with the transmembrane potential. PMID:11023901

  15. High-resolution face verification using pore-scale facial features.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Zhou, Huiling; Lam, Kin-Man

    2015-08-01

    Face recognition methods, which usually represent face images using holistic or local facial features, rely heavily on alignment. Their performances also suffer a severe degradation under variations in expressions or poses, especially when there is one gallery per subject only. With the easy access to high-resolution (HR) face images nowadays, some HR face databases have recently been developed. However, few studies have tackled the use of HR information for face recognition or verification. In this paper, we propose a pose-invariant face-verification method, which is robust to alignment errors, using the HR information based on pore-scale facial features. A new keypoint descriptor, namely, pore-Principal Component Analysis (PCA)-Scale Invariant Feature Transform (PPCASIFT)-adapted from PCA-SIFT-is devised for the extraction of a compact set of distinctive pore-scale facial features. Having matched the pore-scale features of two-face regions, an effective robust-fitting scheme is proposed for the face-verification task. Experiments show that, with one frontal-view gallery only per subject, our proposed method outperforms a number of standard verification methods, and can achieve excellent accuracy even the faces are under large variations in expression and pose.

  16. Extreme accumulation of nucleotides in simulated hydrothermal pore systems

    PubMed Central

    Baaske, Philipp; Weinert, Franz M.; Duhr, Stefan; Lemke, Kono H.; Russell, Michael J.; Braun, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    We simulate molecular transport in elongated hydrothermal pore systems influenced by a thermal gradient. We find extreme accumulation of molecules in a wide variety of plugged pores. The mechanism is able to provide highly concentrated single nucleotides, suitable for operations of an RNA world at the origin of life. It is driven solely by the thermal gradient across a pore. On the one hand, the fluid is shuttled by thermal convection along the pore, whereas on the other hand, the molecules drift across the pore, driven by thermodiffusion. As a result, millimeter-sized pores accumulate even single nucleotides more than 108-fold into micrometer-sized regions. The enhanced concentration of molecules is found in the bulk water near the closed bottom end of the pore. Because the accumulation depends exponentially on the pore length and temperature difference, it is considerably robust with respect to changes in the cleft geometry and the molecular dimensions. Whereas thin pores can concentrate only long polynucleotides, thicker pores accumulate short and long polynucleotides equally well and allow various molecular compositions. This setting also provides a temperature oscillation, shown previously to exponentially replicate DNA in the protein-assisted PCR. Our results indicate that, for life to evolve, complicated active membrane transport is not required for the initial steps. We find that interlinked mineral pores in a thermal gradient provide a compelling high-concentration starting point for the molecular evolution of life. PMID:17494767

  17. Flux theory for Poisson distributed pores with Gaussian permeability.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Dino G

    2016-01-01

    The mean of the solute flux through membrane pores depends on the random distribution and permeability of the pores. Mathematical models including such randomness factors make it possible to obtain statistical parameters for pore characterization. Here, assuming that pores follow a Poisson distribution in the lipid phase and that their permeabilities follow a Gaussian distribution, a mathematical model for solute dynamics is obtained by applying a general result from a previous work regarding any number of different kinds of randomly distributed pores. The new proposed theory is studied using experimental parameters obtained elsewhere, and a method for finding the mean single pore flux rate from liposome flux assays is suggested. This method is useful for pores without requiring studies by patch-clamp in single cells or single-channel recordings. However, it does not apply in the case of ion-selective channels, in which a more complex flux law combining the concentration and electrical gradient is required.

  18. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - hemodialysis access; dialysis - hemodialysis ...

  19. A geometric pore adsorption model for predicting the drug loading capacity of insoluble drugs in mesoporous carbon.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yikun; Zhu, Wenquan; Liu, Jia; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2015-05-15

    In this work, a simple and accurate geometric pore-adsorption model was established and experimentally validated for predicting the drug loading capacity in mesoporous carbon. The model was designed according to the shape of pore channels of mesoporous carbon and the arrangement of drug molecules loaded in the pores. Three different small molecule drugs (celecoxib, fenofibrate and carvedilol) were respectively loaded in mesoporous carbon with different pore sizes. In order to test the accuracy of the established model, nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis was employed to confirm the pore structure of mesoporous carbon and to calculate the occupation volume of the adsorbed drugs. The adsorption isotherms of celecoxib were systematically investigated to describe the adsorption process. It was found that the experimental results of adsorption capacity were all in the range of the predicted values for all the tested drugs and mesoporous carbon. The occupation volumes calculated from the model also agreed well with the experimental data. These results demonstrated that the established model could accurately provide the range of drug loading capacity, which may provide a useful option for the prediction of the drug loading capacity of small molecule drugs in mesoporous materials.

  20. Pore network connectivity anisotropy in Jurassic argillite specimens from eastern Paris Basin (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, Lionel; Géraud, Yves; Bouchez, Jean Luc

    In order to test the feasibility of nuclear waste storage, Andra, the French radioactive waste management agency, gave us the opportunity to study preserved specimens of Jurassic clay-rich rocks from eastern Paris Basin. These rocks, deposited during the Callovian and beginning of the Oxfordian, are dark- to light-grey marls that consist mainly in a mixture of clay, calcite and silt. Magnetic susceptibility and remanence vary according to the clay/calcite/silt ratios and the mineral preferred orientations are characterized by the anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility. A few test specimens, sampled from borehole-core #HTM 102, and coming from the base and top levels of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite formation, were subjected to connected porosity measurements using the mercury injection technique. By imposing mercury to flow parallel to a given direction, we were able to determine the anisotropy of connectivity along the three principal magnetic susceptibility axes. We find that the clay-richest specimens have a large and sub-isotropic connected porosity which is mostly accessible through the smallest pore threshold diameters (<0.02 μm). By contrast, carbonate-enriched specimens have anisotropic and smaller connected porosities accessible through larger pore thresholds (˜0.08 μm). Except in a carbonate-enriched specimen where the largest connectivity axis is vertical, attributed to tension cracks normal to bedding, the pore connectivity anisotropy positively correlates with the magnetic anisotropy, hence with the mineral arrangement.

  1. Hydrophobic polymers modification of mesoporous silica with large pore size for drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Di; Yang, Na

    2009-04-01

    Mesostructure cellular foam (MCF) materials were modified with hydrophobic polyisoprene (PI) through free radical polymerization in the pores network, and the resulting materials (MCF-PI) were investigated as matrices for drug storage. The successful synthesis of PI inside MCF was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements. It was interesting to find the resultant system held a relatively large pore size (19.5 nm) and pore volume (1.02 cm3 g-1), which would benefit for drug storage. Ibuprofen (IBU) and vancomycin were selected as model drugs and loaded onto unmodified MCF and modified MCF (MCF-PI). The adsorption capacities of these model drugs on MCF-PI were observed increase as compared to that of on pure MCF, due to the trap effects induced by polyisoprene chains inside the pores. The delivery system of MCF-PI was found to be more favorable for the adsorption of IBU (31 wt%, IBU/silica), possibly attributing to the hydrophobic interaction between IBU and PI formed on the internal surface of MCF matrix. The release of drug through the porous network was investigated by measuring uptake and release of IBU.

  2. Monodispersed mesoporous silica nanoparticles with very large pores for enhanced adsorption and release of DNA.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Botella, Pablo; Corma, Avelino; Blesa, Jose; Dong, Lin

    2009-02-12

    Silica nanoparticles with controlled diameter (approximately 70-300 nm) and with uniform pores of 20 nm are prepared by a low temperature (10 degrees C) synthetic method in the presence of a dual surfactant system. While a triblock copolymer (Pluronic F127) acts as supramolecular template and coassembles with hydrolyzed silica species to develop a partially ordered mesophase with face-centered cubic symmetry, a fluorocarbon surfactant with high surface activity (FC-4) surrounds the silica particles through S+X-I+ interactions, thereby limiting their growth. The final textural properties of this material are achieved by means of a subsequent hydrothermal treatment to yield high pore volume mesoporous silica nanoparticles with the largest pore entrance size (17 nm) and cavity diameter (20 nm) reported up to now. After surface modification with aminopropyl groups, the nanoparticles are able to encapsulate inside the pores molecules of the firefly luciferase plasmid DNA (pGL3-Control, 5256 pb), leading to stable conjugates with up to 0.07 microg DNA m(-2), which is the highest content achieved with silica-based materials. Furthermore, plasmid DNA becomes protected from enzymatic degradation when conjugated with the mesostructured nanoparticles.

  3. Mechanical properties and in vitro cell compatibility of hydroxyapatite ceramics with graded pore structure.

    PubMed

    Werner, Jan; Linner-Krcmar, Britta; Friess, Wolfgang; Greil, Peter

    2002-11-01

    In order to improve the mechanical strength of hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics used as osteoimplants and to enhance cellular penetration functionally graded ceramics with a transition in porosity from the surface towards the centre were designed. The multilayer structures were prepared by multiple tape casting based on an aqueous HA slurry containing polybutylmethacrylate (PBMA) spheres with diameters ranging from 100 to 300 microns. After burning out the PBMA, pores of 70-200 microns were generated. The pore-graded laminates were sintered at temperatures between 1250 degrees C and 1450 degrees C. Bending strength of the pore-graded ceramics was approximately 50% higher as compared to HA of the same pore volume fraction but without gradient structure. The materials were tested in vitro for attachment and activity of osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells over a period of 3 weeks. Cells formed confluent layers on the ceramic surface, penetrated into the graded porosity ranging from 100-150 microns to 250-300 microns in size and showed increasing alkaline phosphatase activity over 3 weeks. The results demonstrated initial in vitro cell compatibility of the functionally graded HA materials and their potential as osteoimplants.

  4. Pore-level mechanics of foam generation and coalescence in the presence of oil.

    PubMed

    Almajid, Muhammad M; Kovscek, Anthony R

    2016-07-01

    The stability of foam in porous media is extremely important for realizing the advantages of foamed gas on gas mobility reduction. Foam texture (i.e., bubbles per volume of gas) achieved is dictated by foam generation and coalescence processes occurring at the pore-level. For foam injection to be widely applied during gas injection projects, we need to understand these pore-scale events that lead to foam stability/instability so that they are modeled accurately. Foam flow has been studied for decades, but most efforts focused on studying foam generation and coalescence in the absence of oil. Here, the extensive existing literature is reviewed and analyzed to identify open questions. Then, we use etched-silicon micromodels to observe foam generation and coalescence processes at the pore-level. Special emphasis is placed on foam coalescence in the presence of oil. For the first time, lamella pinch-off as described by Myers and Radke [40] is observed in porous media and documented. Additionally, a new mechanism coined "hindered generation" is found. Hindered generation refers to the role oil plays in preventing the successful formation of a lamella following snap-off near a pore throat.

  5. Simulations of beta-hairpin folding confined to spherical pores using distributed computing.

    PubMed

    Klimov, D K; Newfield, D; Thirumalai, D

    2002-06-11

    We report the thermodynamics and kinetics of an off-lattice Go model beta-hairpin from Ig-binding protein confined to an inert spherical pore. Confinement enhances the stability of the hairpin due to the decrease in the entropy of the unfolded state. Compared with their values in the bulk, the rates of hairpin formation increase in the spherical pore. Surprisingly, the dependence of the rates on the pore radius, R(s), is nonmonotonic. The rates reach a maximum at R(s)/R(g,N)(b) approximately equal to 1.5, where R(g,N)(b) is the radius of gyration of the folded beta-hairpin in the bulk. The denatured state ensemble of the encapsulated beta-hairpin is highly structured even at substantially elevated temperatures. Remarkably, a profound effect of confinement is evident even when the beta-hairpin occupies less than a 10th of the sphere volume. Our calculations show that the emergence of substantial structure in the denatured state of proteins in inert pores is a consequence of confinement. In contrast, the structure of the bulk denatured state ensemble depends dramatically on the extent of denaturation.

  6. Dynamic three-dimensional pore-scale imaging of reaction in a carbonate at reservoir conditions.

    PubMed

    Menke, Hannah P; Bijeljic, Branko; Andrew, Matthew G; Blunt, Martin J

    2015-04-07

    Quantifying CO2 transport and average effective reaction rates in the subsurface is essential to assess the risks associated with underground carbon capture and storage. We use X-ray microtomography to investigate dynamic pore structure evolution in situ at temperatures and pressures representative of underground reservoirs and aquifers. A 4 mm diameter Ketton carbonate core is injected with CO2-saturated brine at 50 °C and 10 MPa while tomographic images are taken at 15 min intervals with a 3.8 μm spatial resolution over a period of 2(1/2) h. An approximate doubling of porosity with only a 3.6% increase in surface area to volume ratio is measured from the images. Pore-scale direct simulation and network modeling on the images quantify an order of magnitude increase in permeability and an appreciable alteration of the velocity field. We study the uniform reaction regime, with dissolution throughout the core. However, at the pore scale, we see variations in the degree of dissolution with an overall reaction rate which is approximately 14 times lower than estimated from batch measurements. This work implies that in heterogeneous rocks, pore-scale transport of reactants limits dissolution and can reduce the average effective reaction rate by an order of magnitude.

  7. Preparation of Granular Red Mud Adsorbent using Different Binders by Microwave Pore - Making and Activation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Thiquynhxuan; Wang, Hanrui; Ju, Shaohua; Peng, Jinhui; Zhou, Liexing; Wang, Shixing; Yin, Shaohua; Liu, Chao

    2016-04-01

    In this work, microwave energy is used for preparing a granular red mud (GRM) adsorbent made of red mud with different binders, such as starch, sodium silicate and cement. The effects of the preparation parameters, such as binder type, binder addition ratio, microwave heating temperature, microwave power and holding time, on the absorption property of GRM are investigated. The BET surface area, strength, pore structure, XRD and SEM of the GRM absorbent are analyzed. The results show that the microwave roasting has a good effect on pore-making of GRM, especially when using organic binder. Both the BET surface area and the strength of GRM obtained by microwave heating are significantly higher than that by conventional heating. The optimum conditions are obtained as follows: 6:100 (w/w) of starch to red mud ratio, microwave roasting with a power of 2.6 kW at 500℃ for holding time of 30 min. The BET surface area, pore volume and average pore diameter of GRM prepared at the optimum conditions are 15.58 m2/g, 0.0337 cm3/g and 3.1693 A0, respectively.

  8. Impact of Wettability on Pore-Scale Characteristics of Residual Nonaqueous Phase Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Raoush, Riyadh I.

    2009-07-31

    The objective of this paper was to investigate the impact of wettability of porous media on pore-scale characteristics of residual nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Synchrotron X-ray microtomography was used to obtain high-resolution three-dimensional images of fractionally wet sand systems with mean grain size of 250 {micro}m. Pore-scale characteristics of NAPL blobs such as volume, lengths, interfacial areas, and sphericity index were computed using three-dimensional image processing algorithms. Four systems comprised of 100, 50, 25, and 0% NAPL-wet mass fractions containing the residual NAPL were imaged and analyzed. Findings indicate that spatial variation in wettability of porous media surfaces has a significant impact on pore-scale characteristics of residual NAPL blobs in saturated porous media systems. As the porous media comprises more water-wet surfaces, residual NAPL blobs increase in size and length due to the entrapment at large pore bodies. NAPL-water interfacial areas tend to increase as the NAPL-wet surface fractions increase in the systems. Overall residual NAPL saturations are less in fractionally wet systems and increase as the systems become more NAPL-wet or water-wet.

  9. Pore diameter effects on phase behavior of a gas condensate in graphitic one-and two-dimensional nanopores.

    PubMed

    Welch, William R W; Piri, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed on a hydrocarbon mixture representing a typical gas condensate composed mostly of methane and other small molecules with small fractions of heavier hydrocarbons, representative of mixtures found in tight shale reservoirs. The fluid was examined both in bulk and confined to graphitic nano-scale slits and pores. Numerous widths and diameters of slits and pores respectively were examined under variable pressures at 300 K in order to find conditions in which the fluid at the center of the apertures would not be affected by capillary condensation due to the oil-wet walls. For the bulk fluid, retrograde phase behavior was verified by liquid volumes obtained from Voronoi tessellations. In cases of both one and two-dimensional confinement, for the smallest apertures, heavy molecules aggregated inside the pore space and compression of the gas outside the solid structure lead to decreases in density of the confined fluid. Normal density/pressure relationships were observed for slits having gaps of above 3 nm and pores having diameters above 6 nm. At 70 bar, the minimum gap width at which the fluid could pass through the center of slits without condensation effects was predicted to be 6 nm and the corresponding diameter in pores was predicted to be 8 nm. The models suggest that in nanoscale networks involving pores smaller than these limiting dimensions, capillary condensation should significantly impede transmission of natural gases with similar composition.

  10. Characterization of Pore Defects and Fatigue Cracks in Die Cast AM60 Using 3D X-ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhuofei; Kang, Jidong; Wilkinson, David S.

    2015-08-01

    AM60 high pressure die castings have been used in automobile applications to reduce the weight of vehicles. However, the pore defects that are inherent in die casting may negatively affect mechanical properties, especially the fatigue properties. Here we have studied damage ( e.g., pore defects, fatigue cracks) during strained-controlled fatigue using 3-dimensional X-ray computed tomography (XCT). The fatigue test was interrupted every 2000 cycles and the specimen was removed to be scanned using a desktop micro-CT system. XCT reveals pore defects, cracks, and fracture surfaces. The results show that pores can be accurately measured and modeled in 3D. Defect bands are found to be made of pores under 50 µm (based on volume-equivalent sphere diameter). Larger pores are randomly distributed in the region between the defect bands. Observation of fatigue cracks by XCT is performed in three ways such that the 3D model gives the best illustration of crack-porosity interaction while the other two methods, with the cracks being viewed on transverse or longitudinal cross sections, have better detectability on crack initiation and crack tip observation. XCT is also of value in failure analysis on fracture surfaces. By assessing XCT data during fatigue testing and observing fracture surfaces on a 3D model, a better understanding on the crack initiation, crack-porosity interaction, and the morphology of fracture surface is achieved.

  11. The pore structure and fractal characteristics of shales with low thermal maturity from the Yuqia Coalfield, northern Qaidam Basin, northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Haihai; Shao, Longyi; Li, Yonghong; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Wenlong; Wen, Huaijun

    2016-12-01

    The continental shales from the Middle Jurassic Shimengou Formation of the northern Qaidam Basin, northwestern China, have been investigated in recent years because of their shale gas potential. In this study, a total of twenty-two shale samples were collected from the YQ-1 borehole in the Yuqia Coalfield, northern Qaidam Basin. The total organic carbon (TOC) contents, pore structure parameters, and fractal characteristics of the samples were investigated using TOC analysis, low-temperature nitrogen adsorption experiments, and fractal analysis. The results show that the average pore size of the Shimengou shales varied from 8.149 nm to 20.635 nm with a mean value of 10.74 nm, which is considered mesopore-sized. The pores of the shales are mainly inkbottle- and slit-shaped. The sedimentary environment plays an essential role in controlling the TOC contents of the low maturity shales, with the TOC values of shales from deep to semi-deep lake facies (mean: 5.23%) being notably higher than those of the shore-shallow lake facies (mean: 0.65%). The fractal dimensions range from 2.4639 to 2.6857 with a mean of 2.6122, higher than those of marine shales, which indicates that the pore surface was rougher and the pore structure more complex in these continental shales. The fractal dimensions increase with increasing total pore volume and total specific surface area, and with decreasing average pore size. With increasing TOC contents in shales, the fractal dimensions increase first and then decrease, with the highest value occurring at 2% of TOC content, which is in accordance with the trends between the TOC and both total specific surface area and total pore volume. The pore structure complexity and pore surface roughness of these low-maturity shales would be controlled by the combined effects of both sedimentary environments and the TOC contents.

  12. A pore-hindered diffusion and reaction model can help explain the importance of pore size distribution in enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass.

    PubMed

    Luterbacher, Jeremy S; Parlange, Jean-Yves; Walker, Larry P

    2013-01-01

    Until now, most efforts to improve monosaccharide production from biomass through pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis have used empirical optimization rather than employing a rational design process guided by a theory-based modeling framework. For such an approach to be successful a modeling framework that captures the key mechanisms governing the relationship between pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis must be developed. In this study, we propose a pore-hindered diffusion and kinetic model for enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass. When compared to data available in the literature, this model accurately predicts the well-known dependence of initial cellulose hydrolysis rates on surface area available to a cellulase-size molecule. Modeling results suggest that, for particles smaller than 5 × 10(-3) cm, a key rate-limiting step is the exposure of previously unexposed cellulose occurring after cellulose on the surface has hydrolyzed, rather than binding or diffusion. However, for larger particles, according to the model, diffusion plays a more significant role. Therefore, the proposed model can be used to design experiments that produce results that are either affected or unaffected by diffusion. Finally, by using pore size distribution data to predict the biomass fraction that is accessible to degradation, this model can be used to predict cellulose hydrolysis with time using only pore size distribution and initial composition data.

  13. Developments in glass micro pore optics for x-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Kotska; Collon, Maximilien; Bavdaz, Marcos; Fairbend, Ray; Séguy, Julien; Krumrey, Michael

    2006-06-01

    ESA is developing technologies for x-ray imaging to reduce the mass and volume of future missions. Applications of x-ray optics are foreseen in future planetary x-ray imagers, x-ray timing observatories and in observatories for high-energy astrophysics. With reference to planetary x-ray imagers the use of glass micro-pore material is being investigated. This technology allows the formation of a monolithic, glass structure that can be used to focus x-rays by glancing reflections off the pore walls. A technique to form x-ray focusing plates that contain thousands of square micro-pores has been developed with Photonis. The square pores are formed in a process that fuses blocks of extruded square fibres, which can then be sliced, etched and slumped to form the segment of an optic with a specific radius. A proposed imager would be created from 2 optics, slumped with different radii, and mounted to form an approximation of a Wolter I optic configuration. Reflection can be improved by coating the channel surfaces with a heavy element, such as nickel. Continuing developments have been made to enhance the manufacturing processes and improve the characteristics of the manufactured x-ray focusing plates, such as improved surface roughness and squareness of pore walls, improved pore alignment from fibre stacking through to optic segment slumping and development of pore wall coatings. In order to measure improvements x-ray measurements are performed by ESA and cosine Research BV, using the BESSY-II synchrotron facility four-crystal monochromator beamline of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, on multifibres, sectors and slumped sectors. A probing beam is used to investigate a number of pores to determine x-ray transmission, focussing characteristics as they relate to the overall transmission, x-ray reflectivity of channel walls, radial alignment of fibres, slumping radius and fibre position in a fused block. SEM measurements and microscope inspection have also been used

  14. Size of diffusion pore of Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, J; Nakae, T

    1988-01-01

    The diffusion pore of the outer membrane of Alcaligenes faecalis was shown to be substantially smaller than the Escherichia coli porin pore. In experiments with intact cells, pentoses and hexoses penetrated into the NaCl-expanded periplasm, whereas saccharides of Mr greater than 342 did not. Cells treated with 0.5 M saccharides of Mr greater than 342 weighed 33 to 38% less than cells treated with isotonic solution, suggesting that these saccharides do not permeate through the outer membrane. The diffusion rates of various solutes through the liposome membranes reconstituted from the Mr-43,000 outer membrane protein showed the following characteristics. (i) The relative diffusion rates of pentoses, hexoses, and methylhexoses appeared to be about 1.0, 0.6, and negligibly small, respectively. (ii) The diffusion rate of glucose appeared to be about 1/10th that with the E. coli B porin. (iii) The diffusion rate of gluconic acid was five to seven times higher than that of glucose. (iv) The diffusion rates of beta-lactam antibiotics appeared to be 40 to less than 10% of those with the E. coli B porin. Images PMID:2835003

  15. Designing biomimetic pores based on carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    García-Fandiño, Rebeca; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2012-01-01

    Biomimetic nanopores based on membrane-spanning single-walled carbon nanotubes have been designed to include selectivity filters based on combinations of anionic and cationic groups mimicking those present in bacterial porins and in voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels. The ion permeation and selectivity properties of these nanopores when embedded in a phospholipid bilayer have been explored by molecular dynamics simulations and free energy profile calculations. The interactions of the nanopores with sodium, potassium, calcium, and chloride ions have been explored as a function of the number of anionic and cationic groups within the selectivity filter. Unbiased molecular dynamics simulations show that the overall selectivity is largely determined by the net charge of the filter. Analysis of distribution functions reveals considerable structuring of the distribution of ions and water within the nanopores. The distributions of ions along the pore axis reveal local selectivity for cations around filter, even in those nanopores (C0) where the net filter charge is zero. Single ion free energy profiles also reveal clear evidence for cation selectivity, even in the C0 nanopores. Detailed analysis of the interactions of the C0 nanopore with Ca2+ ions reveals that local interactions with the anionic (carboxylate) groups of the selectivity filter lead to (partial) replacement of solvating water as the ion passes through the pore. These studies suggest that a computational biomimetic approach can be used to evaluate our understanding of the design principles of nanopores and channels. PMID:22509000

  16. Computational modeling of electrokinetic transport in random networks of micro-pores and nano-pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Shima; Mani, Ali

    2014-11-01

    A reduced order model has been developed to study the nonlinear electrokinetic behaviors emerging in the transport of ionic species through micro-scale and nano-scale porous media. In this approach a porous structure is modeled as a network of long and thin pores. By assuming transport equilibrium in the thin dimensions for each pore, a 1D transport equation is developed in the longitudinal direction covering a wide range of conditions including extreme limits of thick and thin electric double layers. This 1D model includes transport via diffusion, electromigration and wide range of advection mechanisms including pressure driven flow, electroosmosis, and diffusion osmosis. The area-averaged equations governing the axial transport from different pores are coupled at the pore intersections using the proper conservation laws. Moreover, an asymptotic treatment has been included in order to remove singularities in the limit of small concentration. The proposed method provides an efficient framework for insightful simulations of porous electrokinetic systems with applications in water desalination and energy storage. PhD student in Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University. She received her Master's degree in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford at 2013. Her research interests include CFD, high performance computing, and optimization.

  17. Nanoscale Pore Imaging and Pore Scale Fluid Flow Modeling in Chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Tomutsa, Liviu; Silin, Dmitriy

    2004-08-19

    For many rocks of high economic interest such as chalk, diatomite, tight gas sands or coal, nanometer scale resolution is needed to resolve the 3D-pore structure, which controls the flow and trapping of fluids in the rocks. Such resolutions cannot be achieved with existing tomographic technologies. A new 3D imaging method, based on serial sectioning and using the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) technology has been developed. FIB allows for the milling of layers as thin as 10 nanometers by using accelerated Ga+ ions to sputter atoms from the sample surface. After each milling step, as a new surface is exposed, a 2D image of this surface is generated. Next, the 2D images are stacked to reconstruct the 3D pore or grain structure. Resolutions as high as 10 nm are achievable using such a technique. A new robust method of pore-scale fluid flow modeling has been developed and applied to sandstone and chalk samples. The method uses direct morphological analysis of the pore space to characterize the petrophysical properties of diverse formations. Not only petrophysical properties (porosity, permeability, relative permeability and capillary pressures) can be computed but also flow processes, such as those encountered in various IOR approaches, can be simulated. Petrophysical properties computed with the new method using the new FIB data will be presented. Present study is a part of the development of an Electronic Core Laboratory at LBNL/UCB.

  18. Dendritic silica particles with center-radial pore channels: promising platforms for catalysis and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Du, Xin; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2015-01-27

    Dendritic silica micro-/nanoparticles with center-radial pore structures, a kind of newly created porous material, have attracted considerable attention owing to their unique open three-dimensional dendritic superstructures with large pore channels and highly accessible internal surface areas compared with conventional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). They are very promising platforms for a variety of applications in catalysis and nanomedicine. In this review, their unique structural characteristics and properties are first analyzed, then novel and interesting synthesis methods associated with the possible formation mechanisms are summarized to provide material scientists some inspiration for the preparation of this kind of dendritic particles. Subsequently, a few examples of interesting applications are presented, mainly in catalysis, biomedicine, and other important fields such as for sacrificial templates and functional coatings. The review is concluded with an outlook on the prospects and challenges in terms of their controlled synthesis and potential applications.

  19. The nuclear pore complex--structure and function at a glance.

    PubMed

    Kabachinski, Greg; Schwartz, Thomas U

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are indispensable for cell function and are at the center of several human diseases. NPCs provide access to the nucleus and regulate the transport of proteins and RNA across the nuclear envelope. They are aqueous channels generated from a complex network of evolutionarily conserved proteins known as nucleporins. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we discuss how transport between the nucleoplasm and the cytoplasm is regulated, what we currently know about the structure of individual nucleoporins and the assembled NPC, and how the cell regulates assembly and disassembly of such a massive structure. Our aim is to provide a general overview on what we currently know about the nuclear pore and point out directions of research this area is heading to.

  20. Evolution of the pore structure during the early stages of the alkali-activation reaction: An in situ small-angle neutron scattering investigation

    DOE PAGES

    White, Claire E.; Olds, Daniel P.; Hartl, Monika; ...

    2017-02-01

    The long-term durability of cement-based materials is influenced by the pore structure and associated permeability at the sub-micrometre length scale. With the emergence of new types of sustainable cements in recent decades, there is a pressing need to be able to predict the durability of these new materials, and therefore nondestructive experimental techniques capable of characterizing the evolution of the pore structure are increasingly crucial for investigating cement durability. Here, small-angle neutron scattering is used to analyze the evolution of the pore structure in alkali-activated materials over the initial 24 h of reaction in order to assess the characteristic poremore » sizes that emerge during these short time scales. By using a unified fitting approach for data modeling, information on the pore size and surface roughness is obtained for a variety of precursor chemistries and morphologies (metakaolin- and slag-based pastes). Furthermore, the impact of activator chemistry is elucidatedviathe analysis of pastes synthesized using hydroxide- and silicate-based activators. It is found that the main aspect influencing the size of pores that are accessible using small-angle neutron scattering analysis (approximately 10–500 Å in diameter) is the availability of free silica in the activating solution, which leads to a more refined pore structure with smaller average pore size. Furthermore, as the reaction progresses the gel pores visible using this scattering technique are seen to increase in size.« less

  1. High Transmembrane Voltage Raised by Close Contact Initiates Fusion Pore.

    PubMed

    Bu, Bing; Tian, Zhiqi; Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    Membrane fusion lies at the heart of neuronal communication but the detailed mechanism of a critical step, fusion pore initiation, remains poorly understood. Here, through atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, a transient pore formation induced by a close contact of two apposed bilayers is firstly reported. Such a close contact gives rise to a high local transmembrane voltage that induces the transient pore formation. Through simulations on two apposed bilayers fixed at a series of given distances, the process in which two bilayers approaching to each other under the pulling force from fusion proteins for membrane fusion was mimicked. Of note, this close contact induced fusion pore formation is contrasted with previous reported electroporation under ad hoc applied external electric field or ionic charge in-balance. We show that the transmembrane voltage increases with the decrease of the distance between the bilayers. Below a critical distance, depending on the lipid composition, the local transmembrane voltage can be sufficiently high to induce the transient pores. The size of these pores is approximately 1~2 nm in diameter, which is large enough to allow passing of neurotransmitters. A resealing of the membrane pores resulting from the neutralization of the transmembrane voltage by ions through the pores was then observed. We also found that the membrane tension can either prolong the lifetime of transient pores or cause them to dilate for full collapse. This result provides a possible mechanism for fusion pore formation and regulation of pathway of fusion process.

  2. High Transmembrane Voltage Raised by Close Contact Initiates Fusion Pore

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Bing; Tian, Zhiqi; Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    Membrane fusion lies at the heart of neuronal communication but the detailed mechanism of a critical step, fusion pore initiation, remains poorly understood. Here, through atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, a transient pore formation induced by a close contact of two apposed bilayers is firstly reported. Such a close contact gives rise to a high local transmembrane voltage that induces the transient pore formation. Through simulations on two apposed bilayers fixed at a series of given distances, the process in which two bilayers approaching to each other under the pulling force from fusion proteins for membrane fusion was mimicked. Of note, this close contact induced fusion pore formation is contrasted with previous reported electroporation under ad hoc applied external electric field or ionic charge in-balance. We show that the transmembrane voltage increases with the decrease of the distance between the bilayers. Below a critical distance, depending on the lipid composition, the local transmembrane voltage can be sufficiently high to induce the transient pores. The size of these pores is approximately 1~2 nm in diameter, which is large enough to allow passing of neurotransmitters. A resealing of the membrane pores resulting from the neutralization of the transmembrane voltage by ions through the pores was then observed. We also found that the membrane tension can either prolong the lifetime of transient pores or cause them to dilate for full collapse. This result provides a possible mechanism for fusion pore formation and regulation of pathway of fusion process. PMID:28018169

  3. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; London, Erwin

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakage assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.

  4. Decreasing transmembrane segment length greatly decreases perfringolysin O pore size

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Qingqing; Li, Huilin; Wang, Tong; ...

    2015-04-08

    Perfringolysin O (PFO) is a transmembrane (TM) β-barrel protein that inserts into mammalian cell membranes. Once inserted into membranes, PFO assembles into pore-forming oligomers containing 30–50 PFO monomers. These form a pore of up to 300 Å, far exceeding the size of most other proteinaceous pores. In this study, we found that altering PFO TM segment length can alter the size of PFO pores. A PFO mutant with lengthened TM segments oligomerized to a similar extent as wild-type PFO, and exhibited pore-forming activity and a pore size very similar to wild-type PFO as measured by electron microscopy and a leakagemore » assay. In contrast, PFO with shortened TM segments exhibited a large reduction in pore-forming activity and pore size. This suggests that the interaction between TM segments can greatly affect the size of pores formed by TM β-barrel proteins. PFO may be a promising candidate for engineering pore size for various applications.« less

  5. Simple rules for passive diffusion through the nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Mironska, Roxana; Kim, Seung Joong

    2016-01-01

    Passive macromolecular diffusion through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) is thought to decrease dramatically beyond a 30–60-kD size threshold. Using thousands of independent time-resolved fluorescence microscopy measurements in vivo, we show that the NPC lacks such a firm size threshold; instead, it forms a soft barrier to passive diffusion that intensifies gradually with increasing molecular mass in both the wild-type and mutant strains with various subsets of phenylalanine-glycine (FG) domains and different levels of baseline passive permeability. Brownian dynamics simulations replicate these findings and indicate that the soft barrier results from the highly dynamic FG repeat domains and the diffusing macromolecules mutually constraining and competing for available volume in the interior of the NPC, setting up entropic repulsion forces. We found that FG domains with exceptionally high net charge and low hydropathy near the cytoplasmic end of the central channel contribute more strongly to obstruction of passive diffusion than to facilitated transport, revealing a compartmentalized functional arrangement within the NPC. PMID:27697925

  6. Visualizing and Quantifying Bioaccessible Pores in Field-Aged Petroleum Hydrocarbon-Contaminated Clay Soils Using Synchrotron-based X-ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W.; Kim, J.; Zhu, N.; McBeth, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial hydrocarbon degradation is environmentally significant and applicable to contaminated site remediation practices only when hydrocarbons (substrates) are physically bioaccessible to bacteria in soil matrices. Powerful X-rays are produced by synchrotron radiation, allowing for bioaccessible pores in soil (larger than 4 microns), where bacteria can be accommodated, colonize and remain active, can be visualized at a much higher resolution. This study visualized and quantified such bioaccessible pores in intact field-aged, oil-contaminated unsaturated soil fractions, and examined the relationship between the abundance of bioaccessible pores and hydrocarbon biodegradation. Using synchrotron-based X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) at the Canadian Light Source, a large dataset of soil particle characteristics, such as pore volumes, surface areas, number of pores and pore size distribution, was generated. Duplicate samples of five different soil fractions with different soil aggregate sizes and water contents (13, 18 and 25%) were examined. The method for calculating the number and distribution of bioaccessible pores using CT images was validated using the known porosity of Ottawa sand. This study indicated that the distribution of bioaccessible pore sizes in soil fractions are very closely related to microbial enhancement. A follow-up aerobic biodegradation experiment for the soils at 17 °C (average site temperature) over 90 days confirmed that a notable decrease in hydrocarbon concentrations occurred in soils fractions with abundant bioaccessible pores and with a larger number of pores between 10 and 100 μm. The hydrocarbon degradation in bioactive soil fractions was extended to relatively high-molecular-weight hydrocarbons (C16-C34). This study provides quantitative information about how internal soil pore characteristics can influence bioremediation performance.

  7. From the pore scale to the core scale: How to model the spatial interactions in soils?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Patricia; Pot, Valerie; Monga, Oivier; Chenu, Claire; Vieuble-Gonod, Laurent; Vogel, Laure; Nunan, Naoise; Otten, Wilfried; Baveye, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Recently, innovative modeling tools have been developed to describe the physico-chemical processes occurring in soil pores at scales directly relevant to microorganisms. Modelling efforts have attempted to understand how microbial processes such as decomposition or competition among species are affected by diffusion in 2-D or 3-D environments. Most of these models use a virtual representative pore network that can have the same features as soil pores with regular lattice grid. The most recent and innovative of these models use real images of soil structure from binarized 3D images. These models are able to simulate microbial degradation although microorganisms and organic matter are placed at different locations in the pore space. Then, the encounter of nutrients and microorganisms is achieved through the implementation of the diffusion process of the soluble substrates in the connected water-filled space. The high computational demand of this type of approach restricts its applicability to small-scale systems, typically in the order of micrometers or millimeters. The numerical techniques used to solve the equations include the lattice Boltzmann method, algorithmic methods and finite element methods. Most of these models have not yet been tested with experimental data because of the difficulties of investigating such small scales. On the other hand, many experimental results developed at the core scale have showed the importance of soil microbial habitat and especially how physical characteristics (pore sizes, connectivity) control the decomposition of organic substrates via their accessibility by microorganisms. The general question we have now to answer is whether information on the spatial heterogeneity of soils at the microscale can be used to predict the processes observed at the macroscale in soils

  8. Mechanism of Kir6.2 channel inhibition by sulfhydryl modification: pore block or allosteric gating?

    PubMed

    Cui, Yijun; Fan, Zheng

    2002-05-01

    Chemical modification can inhibit ion channels either by reacting with pore-lining residues and directly occluding the channel or by closing the channel allosterically. A general method to distinguish between these two mechanisms does not exist. Previously, sulfhydryl (SH) modification has been shown to inhibit ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channels. The crucial modification has been localized to C42 near the N-terminus of Kir6.2, a pore-forming subunit of K(ATP) channels, but little is known about how SH modification of C42 causes channel inhibition. To investigate this mechanism, we used the membrane-impermeable methanethiosulfonates, MTSET and MTS-TEAH, to modify Kir6.2 channels. While intracellular application of MTSET irreversibly inhibited channels, MTS-TEAH failed to do so. Instead, MTS-TEAH treatment prolonged channel openings and prevented the effect of subsequent MTSET treatment. Similar observations were made in mutants in which cysteines other than C42 had been mutated. Neither MTSET nor MTS-TEAH, however, affected mutant channels in which valines were substituted for C42 residues in all subunits. The reagents were effective when two of four C42 residues in the tetramer were replaced by valines. These results can be interpreted as indicating that both reagents modify C42. We then employed spermine, a known inner pore blocker, as a probe to examine whether MTS-TEAH modification alters pore accessibility. We found that spermine block was not changed by MTS-TEAH modification. Based on these data, we postulate that C42 faces either the cytoplasm or a vestibule section wide enough to allow spermine to pass freely after modification by MTS-TEAH. Our study suggests that channel inhibition caused by SH modification of Kir6.2 is an allosteric effect, and is not caused by direct pore blockage.

  9. A general approach to crystalline and monomodal pore size mesoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Poyraz, Altug S; Kuo, Chung-Hao; Biswas, Sourav; King'ondu, Cecil K; Suib, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    Mesoporous oxides attract a great deal of interest in many fields, including energy, catalysis and separation, because of their tunable structural properties such as surface area, pore volume and size, and nanocrystalline walls. Here we report thermally stable, crystalline, thermally controlled monomodal pore size mesoporous materials. Generation of such materials involves the use of inverse micelles, elimination of solvent effects, minimizing the effect of water content and controlling the condensation of inorganic frameworks by NO(x) decomposition. Nanosize particles are formed in inverse micelles and are randomly packed to a mesoporous structure. The mesopores are created by interconnected intraparticle voids and can be tuned from 1.2 to 25 nm by controlling the nanoparticle size. Such phenomena allow the preparation of multiple phases of the same metal oxide and syntheses of materials having compositions throughout much of the periodic table, with different structures and thermal stabilities as high as 800 °C.

  10. Single hepatitis-B virus core capsid binding to individual nuclear pore complexes in Hela cells.

    PubMed

    Lill, Yoriko; Lill, Markus A; Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Schwarz-Herion, Kyrill; Paulillo, Sara; Aebi, Ueli; Hecht, Bert

    2006-10-15

    We investigate the interaction of hepatitis B virus capsids lacking a nuclear localization signal with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) in permeabilized HeLa cells. Confocal and wide-field optical images of the nuclear envelope show well-spaced individual NPCs. Specific interactions of capsids with single NPCs are characterized by extended residence times of capsids in the focal volume which are characterized by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. In addition, single-capsid-tracking experiments using fast wide-field fluorescence microscopy at 50 frames/s allow us to directly observe specific binding via a dual-color colocalization of capsids and NPCs. We find that binding occurs with high probability on the nuclear-pore ring moiety, at 44 +/- 9 nm radial distance from the central axis.

  11. Osmotic Effects Induced by Pore-Forming Agent Nystatin: From Lipid Vesicles to the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Zemljič Jokhadar, Špela; Božič, Bojan; Kristanc, Luka; Gomišček, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    The responses of Chinese hamster ovary epithelial cells, caused by the pore-forming agent nystatin, were investigated using brightfield and fluorescence microscopy. Different phenomena, i.e., the detachment of cells, the formation of blebs, the occurrence of “cell-vesicles” and cell ruptures, were observed. These phenomena were compared to those discovered in giant lipid vesicles. A theoretical model, based on the osmotic effects that occur due to the size-discriminating nystatin transmembrane pores in lipid vesicles, was extended with a term that considers the conservation of the electric charge density in order to describe the cell’s behavior. The increase of the cellular volume was predicted and correlated with the observed phenomena. PMID:27788169

  12. Fabrication of hydroxyapatite ceramics with controlled pore characteristics by slip casting.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiumin; Tan, Shouhong; Jiang, Dongliang

    2005-02-01

    Porous hydroxyapatite (HAp) ceramics with controlled pore characteristics were fabricated using slip casting method by mixing PMMA with HAp powder. The optimum conditions of HAp slip for slip casting was achieved by employing various experimental techniques, zeta potential and sedimentation, as a function of pH of the slips in the pH range of 4-12. HAp suspensions displayed an absolute maximum in zeta potential values and a minimum in sedimentation height at pH 11.5. The optimal amount of dispersant for the HAp suspensions was found at 1.0 wt% according to the viscosity of 25 vol% HAp slurry. The rheological behaviour of HAp slurry displays a shear-thinning behavior without thixotropy, which is needed in slip casting processing. The pore characteristics of sintered porous hydroxyapatite bioceramics can be controlled by added PMMA particle size and volume. The obtained ceramics exhibit higher strength than those obtained by dry pressing.

  13. Porous Copolymer Resins: Tuning Pore Structure and Surface Area with Non Reactive Porogens

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Mohamed H.; Wilson, Lee D.

    2012-01-01

    In this review, the preparation of porous copolymer resin (PCR) materials via suspension polymerization with variable properties are described by tuning the polymerization reaction, using solvents which act as porogens, to yield microporous, mesoporous, and macroporous materials. The porogenic properties of solvents are related to traditional solubility parameters which yield significant changes in the surface area, porosity, pore volume, and morphology of the polymeric materials. The mutual solubility characteristics of the solvents, monomer units, and the polymeric resins contribute to the formation of porous materials with tunable pore structures and surface areas. The importance of the initiator solubility, surface effects, the temporal variation of solvent composition during polymerization, and temperature effects contribute to the variable physicochemical properties of the PCR materials. An improved understanding of the factors governing the mechanism of formation for PCR materials will contribute to the development and design of versatile materials with tunable properties for a wide range of technical applications. PMID:28348302

  14. Silicon pore optics development for ATHENA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collon, Maximilien J.; Vacanti, Giuseppe; Günther, Ramses; Yanson, Alex; Barrière, Nicolas; Landgraf, Boris; Vervest, Mark; Chatbi, Abdelhakim; Beijersbergen, Marco W.; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric; Haneveld, Jeroen; Koelewijn, Arenda; Leenstra, Anne; Wijnperle, Maurice; van Baren, Coen; Müller, Peter; Krumrey, Michael; Burwitz, Vadim; Pareschi, Giovanni; Conconi, Paolo; Christensen, Finn E.

    2015-09-01

    The ATHENA mission, a European large (L) class X-ray observatory to be launched in 2028, will essentially consist of an X-ray lens and two focal plane instruments. The lens, based on a Wolter-I type double reflection grazing incidence angle design, will be very large (~ 3 m in diameter) to meet the science requirements of large effective area (1-2 m2 at a few keV) at a focal length of 12 m. To meet the high angular resolution (5 arc seconds) requirement the X-ray lens will also need to be very accurate. Silicon Pore Optics (SPO) technology has been invented to enable building such a lens and thus enabling the ATHENA mission. We will report in this paper on the latest status of the development, including details of X-ray test campaigns.

  15. Development of a closed pore insulation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, A.; Feldman, C.; Russak, M.; Reichman, J.

    1973-01-01

    A closed pore ceramic foam insulation material (CPI) has been developed that offers possibilities for use as a reusable external heat shield for the NASA manned space shuttle. The outstanding characteristics of CPI are: (1) negligible water absorption due to a noninterconnecting network of cells; (2) high emittance at room and elevated temperature; (3) ability to survive at least 10 simulated reentry cycles to 1500 K using radiant heat lamps to simulate the reentry heat fluxes; (4) ability to survive, with no change in properties or appearance, at least 10 simulated plasma arc jet cycles to 1500 K (with the exception of some stress cracks induced either by the unduly severe nature of the initial arc splash heating pulse or by improper mechanical holding of the specimen in the test fixture); (5) strength (flexure); and (6) a low thermal conductivity throughout the temperature range of interest for the space shuttle.

  16. Pore size matters for potassium channel conductance.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, David; Moldenhauer, Hans; Pincuntureo, Matías; Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio

    2016-10-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins that mediate efficient ion transport across the hydrophobic core of cell membranes, an unlikely process in their absence. K(+) channels discriminate K(+) over cations with similar radii with extraordinary selectivity and display a wide diversity of ion transport rates, covering differences of two orders of magnitude in unitary conductance. The pore domains of large- and small-conductance K(+) channels share a general architectural design comprising a conserved narrow selectivity filter, which forms intimate interactions with permeant ions, flanked by two wider vestibules toward the internal and external openings. In large-conductance K(+) channels, the inner vestibule is wide, whereas in small-conductance channels it is narrow. Here we raise the idea that the physical dimensions of the hydrophobic internal vestibule limit ion transport in K(+) channels, accounting for their diversity in unitary conductance.

  17. Distributed Pore Chemistry in Porous Organic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A method for making a biocompatible polymer article using a uniform atomic oxygen treatment is disclosed. The sub-strate may be subsequently optionally grated with a compatibilizing compound. Compatibilizing compounds may include proteins, phosphorylcholine groups, platelet adhesion preventing polymers, albumin adhesion promoters, and the like. The compatibilized substrate may also have a living cell layer adhered thereto. The atomic oxygen is preferably produced by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge, wherein the substrate resides in a sidearm out of the plasma. Also, methods for culturing cells for various purposes using the various membranes are disclosed as well. Also disclosed are porous organic polymers having a distributed pore chemistry (DPC) comprising hydrophilic and hydrophobic region, and a method for making the DPC by exposing the polymer to atomic oxygen wherein the rate of hydrophilization is greater than the rate of mass loss.

  18. Distributed Pore Chemistry in Porous Organic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method for making a biocompatible polymer article using a uniform atomic oxygen treatment is disclosed. The substrate may be subsequently optionally grated with a compatibilizing compound. Compatibilizing compounds may include proteins, phosphorylcholine groups, platelet adhesion preventing polymers, albumin adhesion promoters, and the like. The compatibilized substrate may also have a living cell layer adhered thereto. The atomic oxygen is preferably produced by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge. wherein the substrate resides in a sidearm out of the plasma. Also, methods for culturing cells for various purposes using the various membranes are disclosed as well. Also disclosed are porous organic polymers having a distributed pore chemistry (DPC) comprising hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. and a method for making the DPC by exposing the polymer to atomic oxygen wherein the rate of hydrophilization is greater than the rate of mass loss.

  19. Silicon pore optics for the ATHENA telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collon, Maximilien J.; Vacanti, Giuseppe; Günther, Ramses; Yanson, Alex; Barriere, Nicolas; Landgraf, Boris; Vervest, Mark; Chatbi, Abdelhakim; van der Hoeven, Roy; Beijersbergen, Marco W.; Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric; Shortt, Brian; Haneveld, Jeroen; Koelewijn, Arenda; van Baren, Coen; Eigenraam, Alexander; Müller, Peter; Krumrey, Michael; Burwitz, Vadim; Pareschi, Giovanni; Conconi, Paolo; Massahi, Sonny; Christensen, Finn E.; Valsecchi, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Silicon Pore Optics is a high-energy optics technology, invented to enable the next generation of high-resolution, large area X-ray telescopes such as the ATHENA observatory, a European large (L) class mission with a launch date of 2028. The technology development is carried out by a consortium of industrial and academic partners and focuses on building an optics with a focal length of 12 m that shall achieve an angular resolution better than 5". So far we have built optics with a focal length of 50 m and 20 m. This paper presents details of the work carried out to build silicon stacks for a 12 m optics and to integrate them into mirror modules. It will also present results of x-ray tests taking place at PTB's XPBF with synchrotron radiation and the PANTER test facility.

  20. Sumoylation and transcription regulation at nuclear pores.

    PubMed

    Texari, Lorane; Stutz, Françoise

    2015-03-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that besides promoters, enhancers, and epigenetic modifications, nuclear organization is another parameter contributing to optimal control of gene expression. Although differences between species exist, the influence of gene positioning on expression seems to be a conserved feature from yeast to Drosophila and mammals. The nuclear periphery is one of the nuclear compartments implicated in gene regulation. It consists of the nuclear envelope (NE) and the nuclear pore complexes (NPC), which have distinct roles in the control of gene expression. The NPC has recently been shown to tether proteins involved in the sumoylation pathway. Here, we will focus on the importance of gene positioning and NPC-linked sumoylation/desumoylation in transcription regulation. We will mainly discuss observations made in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model system and highlight potential parallels in metazoan species.

  1. Mitochondrial permeability transition pore and calcium handling.

    PubMed

    Wong, Renee; Steenbergen, Charles; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Opening of a large conductance channel in the inner mitochondrial membrane, known as the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore, has been shown to be a primary mediator of cell death in the heart subjected to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Inhibitors of the MPT have been shown to reduce cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury. Furthermore, most cardioprotective strategies appear to reduce ischemic cell death either by reducing the triggers for the opening of the MPT, such as reducing calcium overload or reactive oxygen species, or by more direct inhibition of the MPT. This chapter focuses on key issues in the study of the MPT and provides some methods for measuring MPT opening in isolated mitochondria.

  2. Pore size matters for potassium channel conductance

    PubMed Central

    Moldenhauer, Hans; Pincuntureo, Matías

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins that mediate efficient ion transport across the hydrophobic core of cell membranes, an unlikely process in their absence. K+ channels discriminate K+ over cations with similar radii with extraordinary selectivity and display a wide diversity of ion transport rates, covering differences of two orders of magnitude in unitary conductance. The pore domains of large- and small-conductance K+ channels share a general architectural design comprising a conserved narrow selectivity filter, which forms intimate interactions with permeant ions, flanked by two wider vestibules toward the internal and external openings. In large-conductance K+ channels, the inner vestibule is wide, whereas in small-conductance channels it is narrow. Here we raise the idea that the physical dimensions of the hydrophobic internal vestibule limit ion transport in K+ channels, accounting for their diversity in unitary conductance. PMID:27619418

  3. Subsecond pore-scale displacement processes and relaxation dynamics in multiphase flow

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Ryan T; Ott, Holger; Georgiadis, Apostolos; Rücker, Maja; Schwing, Alex; Berg, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    With recent advances at X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT) synchrotron beam lines, it is now possible to study pore-scale flow in porous rock under dynamic flow conditions. The collection of four-dimensional data allows for the direct 3-D visualization of fluid-fluid displacement in porous rock as a function of time. However, even state-of-the-art fast-μCT scans require between one and a few seconds to complete and the much faster fluid movement occurring during that time interval is manifested as imaging artifacts in the reconstructed 3-D volume. We present an approach to analyze the 2-D radiograph data collected during fast-μCT to study the pore-scale displacement dynamics on the time scale of 40 ms which is near the intrinsic time scale of individual Haines jumps. We present a methodology to identify the time intervals at which pore-scale displacement events in the observed field of view occur and hence, how reconstruction intervals can be chosen to avoid fluid-movement-induced reconstruction artifacts. We further quantify the size, order, frequency, and location of fluid-fluid displacement at the millisecond time scale. We observe that after a displacement event, the pore-scale fluid distribution relaxes to (quasi-) equilibrium in cascades of pore-scale fluid rearrangements with an average relaxation time for the whole cascade between 0.5 and 2.0 s. These findings help to identify the flow regimes and intrinsic time and length scales relevant to fractional flow. While the focus of the work is in the context of multiphase flow, the approach could be applied to many different μCT applications where morphological changes occur at a time scale less than that required for collecting a μCT scan. PMID:25745271

  4. Collaborative Research: Evolution of Pore Structure and Permeability of Rocks Under Hydrothermal Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wenlu; Evans, J. Brian

    2007-04-15

    The physical and transport properties of porous rocks can be altered by a variety of diagenetic, metamorphic, and tectonic processes, and the changes that result are of critical importance to such industrial applications as resource recovery, carbon dioxide sequestration, and waste isolation in geologic formations. These inter-relationships between rocks, pore fluids, and deformation are also the key to understanding many natural processes, including: dynamic metamorphism, fault mechanics, fault stability, and pressure solution deformation. Here, we propose work to investigate the changes of permeability and pore geometry owing to inelastic deformation by solution-transfer, brittle fracturing, and dislocation creep. The work would study the relationship of deformation and permeability reduction in fluid-filled quartz and calcite rocks and investigate the effects of loading configuration on the evolution of porosity and permeability under hydrothermal conditions. We would use a combination of techniques, including laboratory experiments, numerical calculations, and observations of rock microstructure. The laboratory experiments provide mechanical and transport data under conditions that isolate each particular mechanism. Our apparatus are designed to provide simultaneous measurements of pore volume, permeability, axial and volumetric strain rates while being loaded under isostatic or conventional triaxial loading. Temperatures up to 1400 K may be obtained, while confining pressures and pore pressures are maintained independently up to 500 MPa. Observations of the structure will be made with standard optical, scanning electron, and laser confocal scanning optical microscopes. The data obtained will be used to quantify changes in surface roughness, porosity, pore dimensions, and their spatial fluctuations. The results of the experiments and the image data are then used in network, finite-difference and other numerical models to verify the validity of experimentally

  5. Synthesis and characterization of thermally stable large-pore mesoporous nanocrystallineanatase

    SciTech Connect

    Ermokhina, Natalia I.; Nevinskiy, Vitaly A.; Manorik, Piotr A.; Ilyin, Vladimir G.; Novichenko, Viktor N.; Shcherbatiuk, Mykola M.; Klymchuk, Dmitro O.; Tsyba, Mykola M.; Puziy, Alexander M.

    2013-04-15

    Thermally stable mesoporous nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} with a pure anatase structure was obtained by sol–gel synthesis (in combination with hydrothermal treatment) using titanium tetrabutoxide and dibenzo-18-crown-6 as a structure-directing agent in presence of surfactant and/or La{sup 3+} ions additives. Nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} demonstrates various textures with a well-defined spherical morphology (micro- and nanospheres), a crystallite size of no greater than 10 nm (XRD), and a narrow pore size distribution. Spherical particles of micrometer scale in the presence of La{sup 3+} ions do not form. TiO{sub 2} calcined (at 500 °C) after hydrothermal treatment (at 175 °C) has a significantly more developed porous structure as compared with TiO{sub 2} which was not treated hydrothermally. For example, specific surface area amounts 137 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and 69 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}, pore volume 0.98 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1} and 0.21 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}, pore diameter 17.5 nm and 12.5 nm respectively for samples hydrothermally treated and not treated. - Graphical abstract: Large-pore mesoporous nanocristalline anatase. Highlights: ► Large-pore mesoporous nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} was obtained by sol–gel synthesis. ► Crown ether was used as template in presence of surfactant and/or La{sup 3+} ions. ► Anatase (crystalline size<11 nm) is the only crystalline phase present in TiO{sub 2}. ► TiO{sub 2} shows well-defined homogeneous spherical morphology (micro- and nano-spheres)

  6. Isoreticular Expansion of Metal-Organic Frameworks with Multiple Functionalities and Controlled Pore Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hexiang

    : (a) long organic links usually exhibit low solubility, making them inaccessible for MOF synthesis; (b) the formation of interpenetrated structures will block the pores; and (c) frameworks with large pores usually collapse upon guest removal. In this study, strategies were designed for the first time to overcome all three limitations and thus allow us to expand the pores of MOFs into a new size regime (> 50 A). In particular, organic links containing one to eleven phenylene groups were used to produce a series of isoreticular MOFs (IRMOF-74) with progressively increased pore aperture up to nearly 100 A. It is remarkable that all nine members of this series have non-interpenetrating structures, high thermal stability, and permanent porosity. Seven of them break pore aperture record, a key parameter in porosity because it controls the size of molecules that might be captured into the pore. Furthermore, several macromolecules, including natural proteins such as myoglobin and green fluorescent protein, were chosen to demonstrate the accessibility of large pores in some of these MOFs.

  7. Application of real rock pore-threat statistics to a regular pore network model

    SciTech Connect

    Rakibul, M.; Sarker, H.; McIntyre, D.; Ferer, M.; Siddiqui, S.; Bromhal. G.

    2011-01-01

    This work reports the application of real rock statistical data to a previously developed regular pore network model in an attempt to produce an accurate simulation tool with low computational overhead. A core plug from the St. Peter Sandstone formation in Indiana was scanned with a high resolution micro CT scanner. The pore-throat statistics of the three-dimensional reconstructed rock were extracted and the distribution of the pore-throat sizes was applied to the regular pore network model. In order to keep the equivalent model regular, only the throat area or the throat radius was varied. Ten realizations of randomly distributed throat sizes were generated to simulate the drainage process and relative permeability was calculated and compared with the experimentally determined values of the original rock sample. The numerical and experimental procedures are explained in detail and the performance of the model in relation to the experimental data is discussed and analyzed. Petrophysical properties such as relative permeability are important in many applied fields such as production of petroleum fluids, enhanced oil recovery, carbon dioxide sequestration, ground water flow, etc. Relative permeability data are used for a wide range of conventional reservoir engineering calculations and in numerical reservoir simulation. Two-phase oil water relative permeability data are generated on the same core plug from both pore network model and experimental procedure. The shape and size of the relative permeability curves were compared and analyzed and good match has been observed for wetting phase relative permeability but for non-wetting phase, simulation results were found to be deviated from the experimental ones. Efforts to determine petrophysical properties of rocks using numerical techniques are to eliminate the necessity of regular core analysis, which can be time consuming and expensive. So a numerical technique is expected to be fast and to produce reliable results

  8. Application of real rock pore-throat statistics to a regular pore network model

    SciTech Connect

    Sarker, M.R.; McIntyre, D.; Ferer, M.; Siddigui, S.; Bromhal. G.

    2011-01-01

    This work reports the application of real rock statistical data to a previously developed regular pore network model in an attempt to produce an accurate simulation tool with low computational overhead. A core plug from the St. Peter Sandstone formation in Indiana was scanned with a high resolution micro CT scanner. The pore-throat statistics of the three-dimensional reconstructed rock were extracted and the distribution of the pore-throat sizes was applied to the regular pore network model. In order to keep the equivalent model regular, only the throat area or the throat radius was varied. Ten realizations of randomly distributed throat sizes were generated to simulate the drainage process and relative permeability was calculated and compared with the experimentally determined values of the original rock sample. The numerical and experimental procedures are explained in detail and the performance of the model in relation to the experimental data is discussed and analyzed. Petrophysical properties such as relative permeability are important in many applied fields such as production of petroleum fluids, enhanced oil recovery, carbon dioxide sequestration, ground water flow, etc. Relative permeability data are used for a wide range of conventional reservoir engineering calculations and in numerical reservoir simulation. Two-phase oil water relative permeability data are generated on the same core plug from both pore network model and experimental procedure. The shape and size of the relative permeability curves were compared and analyzed and good match has been observed for wetting phase relative permeability but for non-wetting phase, simulation results were found to be deviated from the experimental ones. Efforts to determine petrophysical properties of rocks using numerical techniques are to eliminate the necessity of regular core analysis, which can be time consuming and expensive. So a numerical technique is expected to be fast and to produce reliable results

  9. Movement of ions through fixed pores in the neural membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Wooldridge, D E

    1984-01-01

    A simple configuration is first proposed for the pores used by sodium and potassium ions in moving through the neural membrane. The voltage dependence of the ion current through a system of such pores is then derived from diffusion theory and shown not to agree well with experimental observation. Good agreement is obtained, however, when the end segments of the pores are modified to include constrictions and ion-specific trapping centers. PMID:6089215

  10. Tension-induced pore formation and leakage in adhering vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, P.; Johnson, J. M.; Chan, Y.-H. M.; Boxer, S. G.

    2006-08-01

    The influence of inclusion-induced tension on pore formation is studied theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that fluorescently labeled lipids can enhance pore formation and induce leakage of adhering vesicles. These effects are more pronounced for smaller vesicles. The theoretical predictions are confirmed by experimental two-color fluorescent data. Finally, the influence of the pore formation dynamics on rupture processes of vesicles is analyzed yielding a new picture of the transition to bilayer disks.

  11. Preparation of mesoporous cadmium sulfide nanoparticles with moderate pore size

    SciTech Connect

    Han Zhaohui Zhu, Huaiyong; Shi, Jeffrey; Parkinson, Gordon; Lu, G.Q.

    2007-03-15

    The preparation of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles that have a moderate pore size is reported. This preparation method involves a hydrothermal process that produces a precursor mixture and a following acid treatment of the precursor to get the porous material. The majority of the particles have a pore size close to 20nm, which complements and fills in the gap between the existing cadmium sulfide materials, which usually have a pore size either less than 10nm or are well above 100nm.

  12. Ultrafast laser fabrication of submicrometer pores in borosilicate glass.

    PubMed

    An, Ran; Uram, Jeffrey D; Yusko, Erik C; Ke, Kevin; Mayer, Michael; Hunt, Alan J

    2008-05-15

    We demonstrate rapid fabrication of submicrometer-diameter pores in borosilicate glass using femtosecond laser machining and subsequent wet-etch techniques. This approach allows direct and repeatable fabrication of high-quality pores with diameters of 400-800 nm. Such small pores coupled with the desirable electrical and chemical properties of glass enable sensitive resistive-pulse analysis to determine the size and concentration of macromolecules and nanoparticles. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition allows further reduction of pore diameters to below 300 nm.

  13. Extraction of pores from microtomographic reconstructions of intact soil aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Albee, P. B.; Stockman, G. C.; Smucker, A. J. M.

    2000-02-29

    Segmentation of features is often a necessary step in the analysis of volumetric data. The authors have developed a simple technique for extracting voids from irregular volumetric data sets. In this work they look at extracting pores from soil aggregates. First, they identify a threshold that gives good separability of the object from the background. They then segment the object, and perform connected components analysis on the pores within the object. Using their technique pores that break the surface can be segmented along with pores completely contained in the initially segmented object.

  14. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga`s mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  15. Pore-size-distribution of cationic polyacrylamide hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, M.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1992-06-01

    The pore size distribution of a AAm/MAPTAC (acrylamide copolymerized with (3-methacrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride) hydrogel was investigated using Kuga's mixed-solute-exclusion method, taking into account the wall effect. A Brownian-motion model is also used. Results show the feasibility of determining pore-size distribution of porous materials using the mixed-solute-exclusion method in conjunction with solution of the Fredholm equation; good agreement was obtained with experiment, even for bimodal pore structures. However, different pore size distributions were calculated for the two different probe-solutes (Dextran and poly(ethylene glycol/oxide)). Future work is outlined. 32 figs, 25 refs.

  16. Extending membrane pore lifetime with AC fields: A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, Allen L.; Bogdan Neculaes, V.

    2012-07-01

    AC (sinusoidal) fields with frequencies from kilohertz to gigahertz have been used for gene delivery. To understand the impact of AC fields on electroporation dynamics, we couple a nondimensionalized Smoluchowski equation to an exact representation of the cell membrane voltage obtained solving the Laplace equation. The slope of the pore energy function, dφ/dr, with respect to pore radius is critical in predicting pore dynamics in AC fields because it can vary from positive, inducing pore shrinkage, to negative, driving pore growth. Specifically, the net sign of the integral of dφ/dr over time determines whether the average pore size grows (negative), shrinks (positive), or oscillates (zero) indefinitely about a steady-state radius, rss. A simple analytic relationship predicting the amplitude of the membrane voltage necessary for this behavior agrees well with simulation for frequencies from 500 kHz to 5 MHz for rss < 10 nm. For larger pore size (rss > 10 nm), dφ/dr oscillates about a negative value, suggesting that a net creation of pores may be necessary to maintain a constant pore size. In both scenarios, the magnitude of rss depends only upon the amplitude of the membrane voltage and not directly upon the applied field frequency other than the relationship between the amplitudes of the applied field and membrane voltage.

  17. X-ray microtomography application in pore space reservoir rock.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M F S; Lima, I; Borghi, L; Lopes, R T

    2012-07-01

    Characterization of porosity in carbonate rocks is important in the oil and gas industry since a major hydrocarbons field is formed by this lithology and they have a complex media porous. In this context, this research presents a study of the pore space in limestones rocks by x-ray microtomography. Total porosity, type of porosity and pore size distribution were evaluated from 3D high resolution images. Results show that carbonate rocks has a complex pore space system with different pores types at the same facies.

  18. Single-Pore Membranes Gated by Microelectromagnetic Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Basore, Joseph; Baker, Lane; Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2010-01-01

    Gating of a single pore with a microelectromagnetic trap consisting of a single-turn gold wire microfabricated on a silicon membrane is described. A single micrometer-sized pore in the center of the microcoil conducts ionic current under the application of an applied transmembrane potential. When energized, the microelectromagnetic trap attracts a droplet of magnetic fluid, bringing the fluid to rest in the center of the trap, blocking the transport of ions through the pore, turning it 'off'. Reversal of the current flow through the trap moves the droplet to the periphery of the trap, turning the pore 'on'.

  19. Reading the primary structure of a protein with 0.07 nm3 resolution using a subnanometre-diameter pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Eamonn; Dong, Zhuxin; Tennant, Clare; Timp, Gregory

    2016-11-01

    The primary structure of a protein consists of a sequence of amino acids and is a key factor in determining how a protein folds and functions. However, conventional methods for sequencing proteins, such as mass spectrometry and Edman degradation, suffer from short reads and lack sensitivity, so alternative approaches are sought. Here, we show that a subnanometre-diameter pore, sputtered through a thin silicon nitride membrane, can be used to detect the primary structure of a denatured protein molecule. When a denatured protein immersed in electrolyte is driven through the pore by an electric field, measurements of a blockade in the current reveal nearly regular fluctuations, the number of which coincides with the number of residues in the protein. Furthermore, the amplitudes of the fluctuations are highly correlated with the volumes that are occluded by quadromers (four residues) in the primary structure. Each fluctuation, therefore, represents a read of a quadromer. Scrutiny of the fluctuations reveals that the subnanometre pore is sensitive enough to read the occluded volume that is related to post-translational modifications of a single residue, measuring volume differences of ∼0.07 nm3, but it is not sensitive enough to discriminate between the volumes of all twenty amino acids.

  20. Transpiring purging access probe for particulate laden or hazardous environments

    DOEpatents

    VanOsdol, John G

    2013-12-03

    An access probe for remote-sensing access through a viewing port, viewing volume, and access port into a vessel. The physical boundary around the viewing volume is partially formed by a porous sleeve lying between the viewing volume and a fluid conduit. In a first mode of operation, a fluid supplied to the fluid conduit encounters the porous sleeve and flows through the porous material to maintain the viewing volume free of ash or other matter. When additional fluid force is needed to clear the viewing volume, the pressure of the fluid flow is increased sufficiently to slidably translate the porous sleeve, greatly increasing the flow into the viewing volume. The porous sleeve is returned to position by an actuating spring. The access probe thereby provides for alternate modes of operation based on the pressure of an actuating fluid.

  1. Chemomechanical evolution of pore space in carbonate microstructures upon dissolution: Linking pore geometry to bulk elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arson, C.; Vanorio, T.

    2015-10-01

    One of the challenges faced today in a variety of geophysical applications is the need to understand the changes of elastic properties due to time-variant chemomechanical processes. The objective of this work is to model carbonate rock elastic properties as functions of pore geometry changes that occur when the solid matrix is dissolved by carbon dioxide. We compared two carbonate microstructures: porous micrite ("mudstone") and grain-supported carbonate ("packstone"). We formulated a mathematical model that distinguishes the effects of microporosity and macroporosity on stiffness changes. We used measures of mechanical and chemical porosity changes recorded during injection tests to compute elastic moduli and compare them to moduli obtained from wave velocity measurements. In mudstones, both experimental and numerical results indicate that bulk moduli change by less than 5%. The evolution of elastic moduli is controlled by macropore enlargement. In packstones, model predictions underestimate changes of elastic moduli with total porosity by 10% to 80%. The total porosity variation is 60% to 75% smaller than the chemical porosity variation, which indicates that pore expansion due to dissolution is counterbalanced by pore shrinkage due to compaction. Packstone elastic properties are controlled by grain sliding. The methodology presented in this paper can be generalized to other chemomechanical processes studied in rocks, such as dislocations, glide, diffusive mass transfer, recrystallization, and precipitation.

  2. Digital Dilemma: Issues of Access, Cost, and Quality in Media-Enhanced and Distance Education. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report, Volume 27, Number 5. Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dusen, Gerald C.

    This book examines the promise and some of the perils of the new digital age in higher education. It addresses how cost and affordability impact on universal access, noting that current virtual and distance education options will result in a digital divide. The book advocates removing barriers to higher education in order to make digitized…

  3. Mineral Dissolution Rates at the Pore Scale: Scaling Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Steefel, C. I.; Yang, L.

    2006-12-01

    Mineral dissolution reactions play an important role in various physical, chemical and biological processes in nature. Although rates of these reactions have been extensively studied in laboratories, they have been found to be orders of magnitude faster than those measured in the natural systems. This work examines some of the mechanisms that can produce such a discrepancy at the pore scale, while quantifying the conditions under which the discrepancy becomes significant. This work used the reactive transport model CrunchFlow to examine the dissolution rates of three minerals, calcite, labradorite, and iron hydroxide, in a single pore. Pores were assumed to be cylindrical, with axisymmetric flow given by the analytical solution for Poiseuille flow in a cylinder. Mineral dissolution occurs only at the pore wall, with the reactive surface area of the dissolving phase specified geometrically. The average dissolution rates in the pore (R_D) for various flow velocities is determined by the flux-weighted change in concentration over the length of the pore and is compared to the rates that assume complete mixing (R_M). The differences in rates between the two models, quantified by the ratio of R_D over R_M, provide a measure of the scaling effect. The modeling results were validated by a microfluidic reactive flow experiment using a cylindrical pore in calcite. Modeling results show that the scaling effect arises due to the development of large concentration gradients caused by incomplete mixing within a pore when transport and reaction rates are comparable. The magnitude of the scaling effect depends on the reaction kinetics, flow velocity, and pore size. For labradorite and iron hydroxide, the scaling effect is negligible under all conditions due to their slow dissolution rates, thus limiting the development of any intra-pore concentration gradients. For calcite dissolution at low (smaller than 0.1 cm/s) and high (larger than 1000 cm/s) flow velocities the scaling

  4. In silico modeling of the pore region of a KCNQ4 missense mutant from a patient with hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mutation of the voltage-gated potassium channel KCNQ4 causes DFNA2-type nonsyndromic autosomal dominant sensorineural hearing loss. KCNQ4 is expressed predominantly in the auditory sensory outer hair cells, which are critical for sound amplification. Results We sequenced KCNQ4 from Japanese patients with sensorineural hearing loss, and identified a novel missense mutation encoding a Tyr270His located at the N-terminus of the highly conserved pore helix sequence. As this patient was not accessible to us and information about them was limited, we used molecular modeling to investigate whether this novel mutation is hypothetically pathogenic. A careful examination of an in silico structural model of the KCNQ4 pore region revealed that the Tyr270His mutation caused an alteration in the electrostatic surface potential of the pore helix. Conclusion We propose two possible means by which the Tyr270His mutation causes hearing loss: a positively charged His270 side chain might enhance the helix dipole moment of the pore helix, thereby destabilizing the helix and/or the pore region, or it might disturb transport of K+ through the channel by electrostatic repulsion. PMID:22420747

  5. A highly stable zeotype mesoporous zirconium metal-organic framework with ultralarge pores.

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Dawei; Wang, Kecheng; Su, Jie; Liu, Tian-Fu; Park, Jihye; Wei, Zhangwen; Bosch, Mathieu; Yakovenko, Andrey; Zou, Xiaodong; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2015-01-02

    Through topological rationalization, a zeotype mesoporous Zr-containing metal-organic framework (MOF), namely PCN-777, has been designed and synthesized. PCN-777 exhibits the largest cage size of 3.8nm and the highest pore volume of 2.8cm(3)g(-1) among reported Zr-MOFs. Moreover, PCN-777 shows excellent stability in aqueous environments, which makes it an ideal candidate as a support to incorporate different functional moieties. Through facile internal surface modification, the interaction between PCN-777 and different guests can be varied to realize efficient immobilization

  6. Application of SAXS and SANS in evaluation of porosity, pore size distribution and surface area of coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radlinski, A.P.; Mastalerz, Maria; Hinde, A.L.; Hainbuchner, M.; Rauch, H.; Baron, M.; Lin, J.S.; Fan, L.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the applicability of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques for determining the porosity, pore size distribution and internal specific surface area in coals. The method is noninvasive, fast, inexpensive and does not require complex sample preparation. It uses coal grains of about 0.8 mm size mounted in standard pellets as used for petrographic studies. Assuming spherical pore geometry, the scattering data are converted into the pore size distribution in the size range 1 nm (10 A??) to 20 ??m (200,000 A??) in diameter, accounting for both open and closed pores. FTIR as well as SAXS and SANS data for seven samples of oriented whole coals and corresponding pellets with vitrinite reflectance (Ro) values in the range 0.55% to 5.15% are presented and analyzed. Our results demonstrate that pellets adequately represent the average microstructure of coal samples. The scattering data have been used to calculate the maximum surface area available for methane adsorption. Total porosity as percentage of sample volume is calculated and compared with worldwide trends. By demonstrating the applicability of SAXS and SANS techniques to determine the porosity, pore size distribution and surface area in coals, we provide a new and efficient tool, which can be used for any type of coal sample, from a thin slice to a representative sample of a thick seam. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Vertical structure of pore pressure under surface gravity waves on a steep, megatidal, mixed sand-gravel-cobble beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, Tristan B.; Hay, Alex E.

    2017-01-01

    The vertical structure of surface gravity wave-induced pore pressure is investigated within the intertidal zone of a natural, steeply sloping, megatidal, mixed sand-gravel-cobble beach. Results from a coherent vertical array of buried pore pressure sensors are presented in terms of signal phase lag and attenuation as functions of oscillatory forcing frequency and burial depth. Comparison of the observations with the predictions of a theoretical poro-elastic bed response model indicates that the large observed phase lags and attenuation are attributable to interstitial trapped air. In addition to the dependence on entrapped air volume, the pore pressure phase and attenuation are shown to be sensitive to the hydraulic conductivity of the sediment, to the changing mean water depth during the tidal cycle, and to the redistribution/rearrangement of beach face material by energetic wave action during storm events. The latter result indicates that the effects on pore pressure of sediment column disturbance during instrument burial can persist for days to weeks, depending upon wave forcing conditions. Taken together, these results raise serious questions as to the practicality of using pore pressure measurements to estimate the kinematic properties of surface gravity waves on steep, mixed sand-gravel beaches.

  8. Optimization of pore structure and particle morphology of mesoporous silica for antibody adsorption for use in affinity chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikosaka, Ryouichi; Nagata, Fukue; Tomita, Masahiro; Kato, Katsuya

    2016-10-01

    Antibodies have received significant attention for use as antibody drugs, because they bind the objective protein (antigen) via antigen-antibody reactions. Recently, many reports have appeared on various monoclonal antibodies that recognize a single antigen. In this study, monoclonal antibodies are used as adsorbates on mesoporous silica (MPS) for affinity chromatography. MPS has high surface area and large pore volume; moreover, pore diameter, pore structure, and particle morphology are relatively easy to tune by adjusting the conditions of synthesis. The pore structure (two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal and three-dimensional cubic) and particle morphology (spherical and polyhedral) of MPS are optimized for use in a monoclonal antibody/MPS composite. When anti-IgG (one of the monoclonal antibodies) adsorbs on the MPS material and IgG (antigen) binds to anti-IgG/MPS composites, MCM-41p with a 2D-hexagonal pore structure and polyhedral particle morphology has the highest IgG binding efficiency. In addition, the antibody/MPS composites remain stable in chaotropic and low-pH solutions and can be cycled at least five times without decreasing IgG elution. In purification and removal tests, the use of the antibody/MPS composites allows only the objective protein from protein mixtures to be bound and eluted.

  9. Freezing of charged colloids in slit pores.

    PubMed

    Grandner, Stefan; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2008-12-28

    Using Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical and isobaric ensembles we investigate freezing phenomena in a charged colloidal suspension confined to narrow slit pores. Our model involves only the macroions which interact via a Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) potential supplemented by a soft-sphere potential. We focus on DLVO parameters typical for moderately charged silica particles (with charges Z approximately 35) in solvents of low ionic strengths. The corresponding DLVO interactions are too weak to drive a (bulk) freezing transition. Nevertheless, for sufficiently small surface separations L(z) the confined systems display not only layering but also significant in-plane crystalline order at chemical potentials where the bulk system is a globally stable fluid (capillary freezing). At confinement conditions related to two-layer systems the observed in-plane structures are consistent with those detected in ground state calculations for perfect Yukawa bilayers [R. Messina and H. Lowen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 146101 (2003)]. Here we additionally observe (at fixed L(z)) a compression-induced first-order phase transition from a two-layer to a three-layer system with different in-plane structure, in agreement with previous findings for pure hard spheres.

  10. Gating of two pore domain potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Mathie, Alistair; Al-Moubarak, Ehab; Veale, Emma L

    2010-09-01

    Two-pore-domain potassium (K2P) channels are responsible for background leak currents which regulate the membrane potential and excitability of many cell types. Their activity is modulated by a variety of chemical and physical stimuli which act to increase or decrease the open probability of individual K2P channels. Crystallographic data and homology modelling suggest that all K(+) channels possess a highly conserved structure for ion selectivity and gating mechanisms. Like other K(+) channels, K2P channels are thought to have two primary conserved gating mechanisms: an inactivation (or C-type) gate at the selectivity filter close to the extracellular side of the channel and an activation gate at the intracellular entrance to the channel involving key, identified, hinge glycine residues. Zinc and hydrogen ions regulate Drosophila KCNK0 and mammalian TASK channels, respectively, by interacting with the inactivation gate of these channels. In contrast, the voltage dependence of TASK3 channels is mediated through its activation gate. For KCNK0 it has been shown that the gates display positive cooperativity. It is of much interest to determine whether other K2P regulatory compounds interact with either the activation gate or the inactivation gate to alter channel activity or, indeed, whether additional regulatory gating pathways exist.

  11. Gating of two pore domain potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Mathie, Alistair; Al-Moubarak, Ehab; Veale, Emma L

    2010-01-01

    Two-pore-domain potassium (K2P) channels are responsible for background leak currents which regulate the membrane potential and excitability of many cell types. Their activity is modulated by a variety of chemical and physical stimuli which act to increase or decrease the open probability of individual K2P channels. Crystallographic data and homology modelling suggest that all K+ channels possess a highly conserved structure for ion selectivity and gating mechanisms. Like other K+ channels, K2P channels are thought to have two primary conserved gating mechanisms: an inactivation (or C-type) gate at the selectivity filter close to the extracellular side of the channel and an activation gate at the intracellular entrance to the channel involving key, identified, hinge glycine residues. Zinc and hydrogen ions regulate Drosophila KCNK0 and mammalian TASK channels, respectively, by interacting with the inactivation gate of these channels. In contrast, the voltage dependence of TASK3 channels is mediated through its activation gate. For KCNK0 it has been shown that the gates display positive cooperativity. It is of much interest to determine whether other K2P regulatory compounds interact with either the activation gate or the inactivation gate to alter channel activity or, indeed, whether additional regulatory gating pathways exist. PMID:20566661

  12. Porous Boron Nitride with Tunable Pore Size.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jun; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jinlong; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2014-01-16

    On the basis of a global structural search and first-principles calculations, we predict two types of porous boron-nitride (BN) networks that can be built up with zigzag BN nanoribbons (BNNRs). The BNNRs are either directly connected with puckered B (N) atoms at the edge (type I) or connected with sp(3)-bonded BN chains (type II). Besides mechanical stability, these materials are predicted to be thermally stable at 1000 K. The porous BN materials entail large surface areas, ranging from 2800 to 4800 m(2)/g. In particular, type-II BN material with relatively large pores is highly favorable for hydrogen storage because the computed hydrogen adsorption energy (-0.18 eV) is very close to the optimal adsorption energy (-0.15 eV) suggested for reversible hydrogen storage at room temperature. Moreover, the type-II materials are semiconductors with width-dependent direct bandgaps, rendering the type-II BN materials promising not only for hydrogen storage but also for optoelectronic and photonic applications.

  13. Pore formation in lipid membranes by alamethicin.

    PubMed Central

    Fringeli, U P; Fringeli, M

    1979-01-01

    The conformation of the linear peptide antibiotic alamethicin in dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine multilayers was investigated in the absence of an electric field by means of infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy. Alamethicin was found to be incorporated into the lipid membrane not only in the dry state but also in an aqueous environment. Its molecular conformation, however, changed from a helix when dry to an extended chain when aqueous. The extended chain aggregated to di- and multimers spanning the lipid bilayer. The equilibrium concentration of alamethicin in the surrounding water was 90 nM, which is in the range of concentrations used in black film experiments. The corresponding molar ratio of lipid to peptide was 80:1. Concerning the molecular mechanism of electric field-induced pore formation, one has to conclude that the dipole model proposed by several authors is very unlikely because it is based on the assumption that the major part of alamethicin is adsorbed on the membrane surface, from which small amounts flip into the membrane under the influence of an electric field. An alternative mechanism is proposed, based on a field-induced conformational change of the peptide from the extended state to a helix. This transition is favored by the resulting dipole moment of the alamethicin helix. PMID:291045

  14. Evaluating transport in irregular pore networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, Dimitri A.; Hooman, Kamel; Klimenko, Alexander Y.

    2012-07-01

    A general approach for investigating transport phenomena in porous media is presented. This approach has the capacity to represent various kinds of irregularity in porous media without the need for excessive detail or computational effort. The overall method combines a generalized effective medium approximation (EMA) with a macroscopic continuum model in order to derive a transport equation with explicit analytical expressions for the transport coefficients. The proposed form of the EMA is an anisotropic and heterogeneous extension of Kirkpatrick's EMA [Rev. Mod. Phys.RMPHAT0034-686110.1103/RevModPhys.45.574 45, 574 (1973)] which allows the overall model to account for microscopic alterations in connectivity (with the locations of the pores and the orientation and length of the throat) as well as macroscopic variations in transport properties. A comparison to numerical results for randomly generated networks with different properties is given, indicating the potential for this methodology to handle cases that would pose significant difficulties to many other analytical models.

  15. Mutant Huntingtin Disrupts the Nuclear Pore Complex.

    PubMed

    Grima, Jonathan C; Daigle, J Gavin; Arbez, Nicolas; Cunningham, Kathleen C; Zhang, Ke; Ochaba, Joseph; Geater, Charlene; Morozko, Eva; Stocksdale, Jennifer; Glatzer, Jenna C; Pham, Jacqueline T; Ahmed, Ishrat; Peng, Qi; Wadhwa, Harsh; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C; Duan, Wenzhen; Snyder, Solomon H; Ranum, Laura P W; Thompson, Leslie M; Lloyd, Thomas E; Ross, Christopher A; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2017-04-05

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. The mechanism(s) by which mutant HTT (mHTT) causes disease is unclear. Nucleocytoplasmic transport, the trafficking of macromolecules between the nucleus and cytoplasm, is tightly regulated by nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) made up of nucleoporins (NUPs). Previous studies offered clues that mHTT may disrupt nucleocytoplasmic transport and a mutation of an NUP can cause HD-like pathology. Therefore, we evaluated the NPC and nucleocytoplasmic transport in multiple models of HD, including mouse and fly models, neurons transfected with mHTT, HD iPSC-derived neurons, and human HD brain regions. These studies revealed severe mislocalization and aggregation of NUPs and defective nucleocytoplasmic transport. HD repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation proteins also disrupted nucleocytoplasmic transport. Additionally, overexpression of NUPs and treatment with drugs that prevent aberrant NUP biology also mitigated this transport defect and neurotoxicity, providing future novel therapy targets.

  16. Pore characteristics and their emergent effect on water adsorption and transport in clays using small-angle neutron scattering with contrast variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Hartl, M.; Wang, Y.; Hjelm, R.

    2013-12-01

    In nuclear waste management, clays are canonical materials in the construction of engineered barriers. They are also naturally occurring reactive minerals which play an important role in retention and colloidal facilitated reactive transport in subsurface systems. Knowledge of total and accessible porosity in clays is crucial in determining fluids transport behavior in clays. It will provide fundamental insight on the performance efficiency of specific clays as a barrier material and their role in regulating radionuclide transport in subsurface environments. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the change in pore characteristics of clays as function of moisture content, and to determine their pore character in relation to their water retention capacity. Recent developments in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques allow quantitative measurement of pore morphology and size distribution of various materials in their pristine state under various sample environments (exposure to solution, high temperature, and so on). Furthermore, due to dramatic different neutron scattering properties of hydrogen and deuterium, one can readily use contrast variation, which is the isotopic labeling with various ratios of H and D (e.g. mixture of H2O/D2O) to highlight or suppress features of the sample. This is particularly useful in the study of complex pore system such as clays. In this study, we have characterized the pore structures for a number of clays including clay minerals and field samples which are relevant to high-level waste systems under various sample environments (e.g., humidity, temperature and pressure) using SANS. Our results suggest that different clays show unique pore features under various sample environments. To distinguish between accessible/non-accessible pores and the nature of pore filling (e.g. the quantity of H2O adsorbed by clays, and the distribution of H2O in relation to pore character) to water, clays were exposed for

  17. FINE PORE DIFFUSER FOULING: THE LOS ANGELES STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes five fine pore diffuser evaluations conducted at three different wastewater treatment plants located in the greater Los Angeles area. The overall goal of the study was to evaluate the performance of fine pore diffusers using selected cleaning methods for ex...

  18. Reforming naphtha with boron-containing large-pore zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Zones, S.I.; Holtermann, D.L.; Rainis, A.

    1992-05-19

    This patent describes a catalytic reforming process. It comprises contacting a hydrocarbonaceous feedstream under catalytic reforming conditions with a composition comprising larger-pore borosilicate zeolites having a pore size greater than 6 and less than 8 angstroms containing less that 1000 parts per million aluminum.

  19. MEASUREMENT AND CONTROL OF FOULING IN FINE PORE DIFFUSER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the study was two-fold: First, to define the efficiency of various methods of cleaning fine pore diffusers and, second, to develop a methodology that could be used to evaluate the efficiency of the cleaning techniques. Dirty fine pore domes from the North Texas Mu...

  20. Reversible Self-Actuated Thermo-Responsive Pore Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Park, Younggeun; Gutierrez, Maria Paz; Lee, Luke P.

    2016-01-01

    Smart membranes, which can selectively control the transfer of light, air, humidity and temperature, are important to achieve indoor climate regulation. Even though reversible self-actuation of smart membranes is desirable in large-scale, reversible self-regulation remains challenging. Specifically, reversible 100% opening/closing of pore actuation showing accurate responsiveness, reproducibility and structural flexibility, including uniform structure assembly, is currently very difficult. Here, we report a reversible, thermo-responsive self-activated pore membrane that achieves opening and closing of pores. The reversible, self-actuated thermo-responsive pore membrane was fabricated with hybrid materials of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), (PNIPAM) within polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to form a multi-dimensional pore array. Using Multiphysics simulation of heat transfer and structural mechanics based on finite element analysis, we demonstrated that pore opening and closing dynamics can be self-activated at environmentally relevant temperatures. Temperature cycle characterizations of the pore structure revealed 100% opening ratio at T = 40 °C and 0% opening ratio at T = 20 °C. The flexibility of the membrane showed an accurate temperature-responsive function at a maximum bending angle of 45°. Addressing the importance of self-regulation, this reversible self-actuated thermo-responsive pore membrane will advance the development of future large-scale smart membranes needed for sustainable indoor climate control. PMID:27991563

  1. Reversible Self-Actuated Thermo-Responsive Pore Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Younggeun; Gutierrez, Maria Paz; Lee, Luke P.

    2016-12-01

    Smart membranes, which can selectively control the transfer of light, air, humidity and temperature, are important to achieve indoor climate regulation. Even though reversible self-actuation of smart membranes is desirable in large-scale, reversible self-regulation remains challenging. Specifically, reversible 100% opening/closing of pore actuation showing accurate responsiveness, reproducibility and structural flexibility, including uniform structure assembly, is currently very difficult. Here, we report a reversible, thermo-responsive self-activated pore membrane that achieves opening and closing of pores. The reversible, self-actuated thermo-responsive pore membrane was fabricated with hybrid materials of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), (PNIPAM) within polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to form a multi-dimensional pore array. Using Multiphysics simulation of heat transfer and structural mechanics based on finite element analysis, we demonstrated that pore opening and closing dynamics can be self-activated at environmentally relevant temperatures. Temperature cycle characterizations of the pore structure revealed 100% opening ratio at T = 40 °C and 0% opening ratio at T = 20 °C. The flexibility of the membrane showed an accurate temperature-responsive function at a maximum bending angle of 45°. Addressing the importance of self-regulation, this reversible self-actuated thermo-responsive pore membrane will advance the development of future large-scale smart membranes needed for sustainable indoor climate control.

  2. Fractal geometry impact on nuclear relaxation in irregular pores.

    PubMed

    Sapoval, B; Russ, S; Petit, D; Korb, J P

    1996-01-01

    We apply a fractal description of pore surface irregularity to study the nuclear relaxation of a confined liquid. From the introduction of a length characteristic of diffusive and surface relaxing properties we describe three different relaxation regimes. These regimes show that the nuclear relaxation can be drastically modified by pore surface irregularity.

  3. DNA translocation through protein and synthetic nano pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Aniket

    2007-03-01

    DNA translocation through narrow protein channels is recognized as an important process in biology. Recently it has attracted lot of attention in the biophysical community following several experiments on DNA translocation through protein nano-pores, and more recently, through synthetic silicon nano-pores. A fundamental understanding is needed for various biological processes, e.g., entry and exit of a DNA in and out of a cell, efficient separation methods for macromolecules, and, possibly fast DNA sequencing. In this talk I will be presenting results for the DNA translocation using a coarse-grained model for an idealized DNA as well as the pore. I will consider several scenarios for the DNA translocation. First, I will show scaling of translocation time of a homopolymer as it escapes from the trans side to the cis side of an idealized thin membrane. Then I will consider DNA dynamics subject to a driving force inside the pore. Next, I will consider heteropolymer threading through a nano-pore. Specifically we will consider both highly ordered and completely random sequences of the chain and relate specific sequences to the distribution of the translocation time and the residence time inside the pore. These studies also will include effects due to different environment on either side of the pore, specific DNA-pore interactions located at selective sites, etc.. I will discuss relevance of these simulation results to recent experiments and theoretical models. A. Milchev, K. Binder, and Aniket Bhattacharya, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 6042 (2004).

  4. Reversible Self-Actuated Thermo-Responsive Pore Membrane.

    PubMed

    Park, Younggeun; Gutierrez, Maria Paz; Lee, Luke P

    2016-12-19

    Smart membranes, which can selectively control the transfer of light, air, humidity and temperature, are important to achieve indoor climate regulation. Even though reversible self-actuation of smart membranes is desirable in large-scale, reversible self-regulation remains challenging. Specifically, reversible 100% opening/closing of pore actuation showing accurate responsiveness, reproducibility and structural flexibility, including uniform structure assembly, is currently very difficult. Here, we report a reversible, thermo-responsive self-activated pore membrane that achieves opening and closing of pores. The reversible, self-actuated thermo-responsive pore membrane was fabricated with hybrid materials of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), (PNIPAM) within polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to form a multi-dimensional pore array. Using Multiphysics simulation of heat transfer and structural mechanics based on finite element analysis, we demonstrated that pore opening and closing dynamics can be self-activated at environmentally relevant temperatures. Temperature cycle characterizations of the pore structure revealed 100% opening ratio at T = 40 °C and 0% opening ratio at T = 20 °C. The flexibility of the membrane showed an accurate temperature-responsive function at a maximum bending angle of 45°. Addressing the importance of self-regulation, this reversible self-actuated thermo-responsive pore membrane will advance the development of future large-scale smart membranes needed for sustainable indoor climate control.

  5. Piezo1 ion channel pore properties are dictated by C-terminal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coste, Bertrand; Murthy, Swetha E.; Mathur, Jayanti; Schmidt, Manuela; Mechioukhi, Yasmine; Delmas, Patrick; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-05-01

    Piezo1 and Piezo2 encode mechanically activated cation channels that function as mechanotransducers involved in vascular system development and touch sensing, respectively. Structural features of Piezos remain unknown. Mouse Piezo1 is bioinformatically predicted to have 30-40 transmembrane (TM) domains. Here, we find that nine of the putative inter-transmembrane regions are accessible from the extracellular side. We use chimeras between mPiezo1 and dPiezo to show that ion-permeation properties are conferred by C-terminal region. We further identify a glutamate residue within a conserved region adjacent to the last two putative TM domains of the protein, that when mutated, affects unitary conductance and ion selectivity, and modulates pore block. We propose that this amino acid is either in the pore or closely associates with the pore. Our results describe important structural motifs of this channel family and lay the groundwork for a mechanistic understanding of how Piezos are mechanically gated and conduct ions.

  6. HIV-1 uses dynamic capsid pores to import nucleotides and fuel encapsidated DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, David A.; McEwan, William A.; Hilditch, Laura; Price, Amanda J.; Towers, Greg J.; James, Leo C.

    2016-01-01

    During the early stages of infection, the HIV-1 capsid protects viral components from cytosolic sensors, such as cGAS, and nucleases, such as TREX, while allowing access to nucleotides for efficient reverse transcription1. Here we show that each capsid hexamer has a size-selective pore bounded by a ring of six arginine residues and a ‘molecular iris’ formed by the N-terminal β-hairpin. The arginine ring creates a strongly positively charged channel that recruits the four nucleotides with on-rates that near diffusion limits. Progressive removal of pore arginines results in a dose-dependent and concomitant decrease in nucleotide affinity, reverse transcription and infectivity. This positively charged channel is universally conserved in lentiviral capsids despite the fact that it is strongly destabilising without nucleotides to counteract charge repulsion. We also describe a channel inhibitor, hexacarboxybenzene, which competes for nucleotide binding and efficiently blocks encapsidated reverse transcription demonstrating the tractability of the pore as a novel drug target. PMID:27509857

  7. Effect of pore pressure on damage accumulation in salt

    SciTech Connect

    PFEIFLE,T.W.; HURTADO,L. DIANE

    2000-06-12

    Laboratory data acquired from two multistage, triaxial compression creep experiments are presented for bedded salt. The experiments were conducted to study the effect of pore pressure changes on the accumulation of damage (dilatant volumetric strain). The first experiment comprised five constant total stress tests in which the internal pore pressure was incremented during successive stages, while the externally applied axial and radial stresses were maintained constant. The second experiment comprised three constant effective stress tests in which the pore pressure and the externally applied axial and radial stresses were increased in equal increments in successive stages. Volumetric strain rates were determined both before and after the pore pressure changes were made in all tests. The data suggest pore pressure changes made during the constant total stress tests have a greater effect on salt dilation than do changes made during the constant effective stress tests.

  8. Optimal conditions for opening of membrane pore by amphiphilic peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabelka, Ivo; Vácha, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Amphiphilic peptides can interact with biological membranes and severely affect their barrier and signaling functions. These peptides, including antimicrobial peptides, can self-assemble into transmembrane pores that cause cell death. Despite their medical importance, the conditions required for pore formation remain elusive. Monte Carlo simulations with coarse-grained models enabled us to calculate the free energies of pore opening under various conditions. In agreement with oriented circular dichroism experiments, a high peptide-to-lipid ratio was found to be necessary for spontaneous pore assembly. The peptide length has a non-monotonic impact on pore formation, and the optimal length matches with the membrane thickness. Furthermore, the hydrophobicity of the peptide ends and the mutual positions of peptides on the membrane play a role.

  9. Open-closed switching of synthetic tubular pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongju; Kang, Jiheong; Shen, Bowen; Wang, Yanqiu; He, Ying; Lee, Myongsoo

    2015-10-01

    While encouraging progress has been made on switchable nanopores to mimic biological channels and pores, it remains a great challenge to realize long tubular pores with a dynamic open-closed motion. Here we report μm-long, dynamic tubular pores that undergo rapid switching between open and closed states in response to a thermal signal in water. The tubular walls consist of laterally associated primary fibrils stacked from disc-shaped molecules in which the discs readily tilt by means of thermally regulated dehydration of the oligoether chains placed on the wall surfaces. Notably, this pore switching mediates a controlled water-pumping catalytic action for the dehydrative cyclization of adenosine monophosphate to produce metabolically active cyclic adenosine monophosphate. We believe that our work may allow the creation of a variety of dynamic pore structures with complex functions arising from open-closed motion.

  10. Open–closed switching of synthetic tubular pores

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yongju; Kang, Jiheong; Shen, Bowen; Wang, Yanqiu; He, Ying; Lee, Myongsoo

    2015-01-01

    While encouraging progress has been made on switchable nanopores to mimic biological channels and pores, it remains a great challenge to realize long tubular pores with a dynamic open–closed motion. Here we report μm-long, dynamic tubular pores that undergo rapid switching between open and closed states in response to a thermal signal in water. The tubular walls consist of laterally associated primary fibrils stacked from disc-shaped molecules in which the discs readily tilt by means of thermally regulated dehydration of the oligoether chains placed on the wall surfaces. Notably, this pore switching mediates a controlled water-pumping catalytic action for the dehydrative cyclization of adenosine monophosphate to produce metabolically active cyclic adenosine monophosphate. We believe that our work may allow the creation of a variety of dynamic pore structures with complex functions arising from open–closed motion. PMID:26456695

  11. Voltage Dependent Charge Storage Modes and Capacity in Subnanometer Pores

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Rui; Meunier, V.; Huang, Jingsong; Wu, Peng; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2012-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we show that charge storage in subnanometer pores follows a distinct voltage-dependent behavior. Specifically, at lower voltages, charge storage is achieved by swapping co-ions in the pore with counterions in the bulk electrolyte. As voltage increases, further charge storage is due mainly to the removal of co-ions from the pore, leading to a capacitance increase. The capacitance eventually reaches a maximum when all co-ions are expelled from the pore. At even higher electrode voltages, additional charge storage is realized by counterion insertion into the pore, accompanied by a reduction of capacitance. The molecular mechanisms of these observations are elucidated and provide useful insight for optimizing energy storage based on supercapacitors.

  12. Electroosmotic flow rectification in pyramidal-pore mica membranes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Pu; Mukaibo, Hitomi; Horne, Lloyd P; Bishop, Gregory W; Martin, Charles R

    2010-02-24

    We demonstrate here a new electrokinetic phenomenon, Electroosmotic flow (EOF) rectification, in synthetic membranes containing asymmetric pores. Mica membranes with pyramidally shaped pores prepared by the track-etch method were used. EOF was driven through these membranes by using an electrode in solutions on either side to pass a constant ionic current through the pores. The velocity of EOF depends on the polarity of the current. A high EOF velocity is obtained when the polarity is such that EOF is driven from the larger base opening to the smaller tip opening of the pore. A smaller EOF velocity is obtained when the polarity is reversed such that EOF goes from tip to base. We show that this rectified EOF phenomenon is the result of ion current-rectification observed in such asymmetric-pore membranes.

  13. Electroosmotic Flow Rectification in Pyramidal-Pore Mica Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, P.; Mukaibo, H.; Horne, L.; Bishop, G.; Martin, C. R.

    2010-02-01

    We demonstrate here a new electrokinetic phenomenon, Electroosmotic flow (EOF) rectification, in synthetic membranes containing asymmetric pores. Mica membranes with pyramidally shaped pores prepared by the track-etch method were used. EOF was driven through these membranes by using an electrode in solutions on either side to pass a constant ionic current through the pores. The velocity of EOF depends on the polarity of the current. A high EOF velocity is obtained when the polarity is such that EOF is driven from the larger base opening to the smaller tip opening of the pore. A smaller EOF velocity is obtained when the polarity is reversed such that EOF goes from tip to base. We show that this rectified EOF phenomenon is the result of ion current-rectification observed in such asymmetric-pore membranes.

  14. Influence of Pore Structure on Compressive Strength of Cement Mortar

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haitao; Xiao, Qi; Huang, Donghui

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation into the pore structure of cement mortar using mercury porosimeter. Ordinary Portland cement, manufactured sand, and natural sand were used. The porosity of the manufactured sand mortar is higher than that of natural sand at the same mix proportion; on the contrary, the probable pore size and threshold radius of manufactured sand mortar are finer. Besides, the probable pore size and threshold radius increased with increasing water to cement ratio and sand to cement ratio. In addition, the existing models of pore size distribution of cement-based materials have been reviewed and compared with test results in this paper. Finally, the extended Bhattacharjee model was built to examine the relationship between compressive strength and pore structure. PMID:24757414

  15. Role of pore-forming toxins in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Henneke, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    Protein toxins are important virulence factors contributing to neonatal sepsis. The major pathogens of neonatal sepsis, group B Streptococci, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, secrete toxins of different molecular nature, which are key for defining the disease. Amongst these toxins are pore-forming exotoxins that are expressed as soluble monomers prior to engagement of the target cell membrane with subsequent formation of an aqueous membrane pore. Membrane pore formation is not only a means for immediate lysis of the targeted cell but also a general mechanism that contributes to penetration of epithelial barriers and evasion of the immune system, thus creating survival niches for the pathogens. Pore-forming toxins, however, can also contribute to the induction of inflammation and hence to the manifestation of sepsis. Clearly, pore-forming toxins are not the sole factors that drive sepsis progression, but they often act in concert with other bacterial effectors, especially in the initial stages of neonatal sepsis manifestation.

  16. Structure and dynamics of the pore of inwardly rectifying K(ATP) channels.

    PubMed

    Loussouarn, G; Makhina, E N; Rose, T; Nichols, C G

    2000-01-14

    Inwardly rectifying K(+) currents are generated by a complex of four Kir (Kir1-6) subunits. Pore properties are conferred by the second transmembrane domain (M2) of each subunit. Using cadmium ions as a cysteine-interacting probe, we examined the accessibility of substituted cysteines in M2 of the Kir6.2 subunit of inwardly rectifying K(ATP) channels. The ability of Cd(2+) ions to inhibit channels was used as the estimate of accessibility. The distribution of Cd(2+) accessibility is consistent with an alpha-helical structure of M2. The apparent surface of reactivity is broad, and the most reactive residues correspond to the solvent-accessible residues in the bacterial KcsA channel crystal structure. In several mutants, single channel measurements indicated that inhibition occurred by a single transition from the open state to a zero-conductance state. Analysis of currents expressed from mixtures of control and L164C mutant subunits indicated that at least three cysteines are required for coordination of the Cd(2+) ion. Application of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate to inside-out membrane patches stabilized the open state of all mutants and also reduced cadmium sensitivity. Moreover, the Cd(2+) sensitivity of several mutants was greatly reduced in the presence of inhibitory ATP concentrations. Taken together, these results are consistent with state-dependent accessibility of single Cd(2+) ions to coordination sites within a relatively narrow inner vestibule.

  17. Biophysics, pathophysiology, and pharmacology of ion channel gating pores

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Adrien; Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Chahine, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Voltage sensor domains (VSDs) are a feature of voltage gated ion channels (VGICs) and voltage sensitive proteins. They are composed of four transmembrane (TM) segments (S1–S4). Currents leaking through VSDs are called omega or gating pore currents. Gating pores are caused by mutations of the highly conserved positively charged amino acids in the S4 segment that disrupt interactions between the S4 segment and the gating charge transfer center (GCTC). The GCTC separates the intracellular and extracellular water crevices. The disruption of S4–GCTC interactions allows these crevices to communicate and create a fast activating and non-inactivating alternative cation-selective permeation pathway of low conductance, or a gating pore. Gating pore currents have recently been shown to cause periodic paralysis phenotypes. There is also increasing evidence that gating pores are linked to several other familial diseases. For example, gating pores in Nav1.5 and Kv7.2 channels may underlie mixed arrhythmias associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) phenotypes and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH), respectively. There is little evidence for the existence of gating pore blockers. Moreover, it is known that a number of toxins bind to the VSD of a specific domain of Na+ channels. These toxins may thus modulate gating pore currents. This focus on the VSD motif opens up a new area of research centered on developing molecules to treat a number of cell excitability disorders such as epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmias, and pain. The purpose of the present review is to summarize existing knowledge of the pathophysiology, biophysics, and pharmacology of gating pore currents and to serve as a guide for future studies aimed at improving our understanding of gating pores and their pathophysiological roles. PMID:24772081

  18. Thermodynamic and hydrodynamic constraints on overpressure caused by hydrate dissociation: A pore-scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtzman, R.; Juanes, R.

    2011-07-01

    It has been suggested that volume expansion caused by hydrate dissociation in sediment pores can result in large overpressure, which in turn may destabilize the sediment and trigger massive submarine landslides. Here, we investigate the pressure evolution during thermally-induced dissociation, by means of a pore-scale model that couples dissociation kinetics, multiphase flow and geomechanics. Dissociation is controlled by a self-preservation mechanism: increasing pore pressure reduces the driving force for dissociation. Hence, the overpressure is constrained by the phase equilibrium pressure, regardless of the kinetic rate of dissociation, heat supply, and sediment permeability. Furthermore, we find that the timescale for buildup of pressure by dissociation is typically much larger than that for its dissipation by drainage. Consequently, the overpressure is controlled by the capillary entry thresholds, which depend on the mode of gas invasion. In low-permeability systems, fracturing is the preferred mechanism, occurring at capillary pressures lower than the entry thresholds in the undeformed sediment. Our results suggest that while large overpressures cannot be sustained by rapid dissociation in natural systems, dissociation can induce important geomechanical effects. Gas migration by fracturing provides a possible link between dissociation, sediment deformation and methane venting.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of thermally stable large-pore mesoporous nanocrystallineanatase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermokhina, Natalia I.; Nevinskiy, Vitaly A.; Manorik, Piotr A.; Ilyin, Vladimir G.; Novichenko, Viktor N.; Shcherbatiuk, Mykola M.; Klymchuk, Dmitro O.; Tsyba, Mykola M.; Puziy, Alexander M.

    2013-04-01

    Thermally stable mesoporous nanocrystalline ТiО2 with a pure anatase structure was obtained by sol-gel synthesis (in combination with hydrothermal treatment) using titanium tetrabutoxide and dibenzo-18-crown-6 as a structure-directing agent in presence of surfactant and/or La3+ ions additives. Nanocrystalline TiO2 demonstrates various textures with a well-defined spherical morphology (micro- and nanospheres), a crystallite size of no greater than 10 nm (XRD), and a narrow pore size distribution. Spherical particles of micrometer scale in the presence of La3+ ions do not form. TiO2 calcined (at 500 °C) after hydrothermal treatment (at 175 °C) has a significantly more developed porous structure as compared with TiO2 which was not treated hydrothermally. For example, specific surface area amounts 137 m2 g-1 and 69 m2 g-1, pore volume 0.98 cm3 g-1 and 0.21 cm3 g-1, pore diameter 17.5 nm and 12.5 nm respectively for samples hydrothermally treated and not treated.

  20. Induced polarization dependence on pore space geometry: Empirical observations and mechanistic predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, A.; Slater, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    We use an extensive database to compare empirical observations and previously proposed empirical models against recently developed mechanistic formulations for the induced polarization (IP) response in porous media as a function of pore space geometry and interfacial chemistry. These comparisons support the argument that the pore-volume normalized internal surface (Spor) is the most important geometric parameter influencing the polarization. The specific polarizability derived from the empirical relationship between imaginary conductivity σ″ and Spor is independent of the porosity. By contrast, equivalent specific polarizability terms in recently proposed mechanistic models are found to be significantly correlated with porosity, and thus do not appear to represent an interfacial chemistry factor independent of the pore space geometry. Furthermore, the database shows no evidence for a significant decrease in the counterion mobility of clayey materials relative to clay-free materials, as postulated in recent studies. On the contrary, a single value of cp is consistent with no significant differences in ionic mobility given that all samples were saturated with a NaCl solution close to a common salinity of about 100 mS/m.

  1. Enhanced submarine ground water discharge form mixing of pore water and estuarine water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Jonathan B.; Cable, Jaye E.; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Lindenberg, Mary K.

    2004-01-01

    Submarine ground water discharge is suggested to be an important pathway for contaminants from continents to coastal zones, but its significance depends on the volume of water and concentrations of contaminants that originate in continental aquifers. Ground water discharge to the Banana River Lagoon, Florida, was estimated by analyzing the temporal and spatial variations of Cl− concentration profiles in the upper 230 cm of pore waters and was measured directly by seepage meters. Total submarine ground water discharge consists of slow discharge at depths > ∼70 cm below seafloor (cmbsf) of largely marine water combined with rapid discharge of mixed pore water and estuarine water above ∼70 cmbsf. Cl− profiles indicate average linear velocities of ∼0.014 cm/d at depths > ∼70 cmbsf. In contrast, seepage meters indicate water discharges across the sediment-water interface at rates between 3.6 and 6.9 cm/d. The discrepancy appears to be caused by mixing in the shallow sediment, which may result from a combination of bioirrigation, wave and tidal pumping, and convection. Wave and tidal pumping and convection would be minor because the tidal range is small, the short fetch of the lagoon limits wave heights, and large density contacts are lacking between lagoon and pore water. Mixing occurs to ∼70 cmbsf, which represents depths greater than previously reported. Mixing of oxygenated water to these depths could be important for remineralization of organic matter.

  2. Preparation of microporous films with sub nanometer pores and their characterization using stress and FTIR measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, J.; Hurd, A.J.; Swoll, F. van; Frink, L.J.D.; Contakes, S.C.; Brinker, C.J. |

    1996-06-01

    The authors have used a novel technique, measurement of stress isotherms in microporous thin films, as a means of characterizing porosity. The stress measurement was carried out by applying sol-gel thin films on a thin silicon substrate and monitoring the curvature of the substrate under a controlled atmosphere of various vapors. The magnitude of macroscopic bending stress developed in microporous films depends on the relative pressure and molar volume of the adsorbate and reaches a value of 180 MPa for a relative vapor pressure, P/Po = 0.001, of methanol. By using a series of molecules, and observing both the magnitude and the kinetics of stress development while changing the relative pressure, they have determined the pore size of microporous thin films. FTIR measurements were used to acquire adsorption isotherms and to compare pore emptying to stress development, about 80% of the change in stress takes place with no measurable change in the amount adsorbed. The authors show that for sol-gel films, pore diameters can be controlled in the range of 5--8 {angstrom} by ``solvent templating``.

  3. Modeling ozone removal to indoor materials, including the effects of porosity, pore diameter, and thickness.

    PubMed

    Gall, Elliott T; Siegel, Jeffrey A; Corsi, Richard L

    2015-04-07

    We develop an ozone transport and reaction model to determine reaction probabilities and assess the importance of physical properties such as porosity, pore diameter, and material thickness on reactive uptake of ozone to five materials. The one-dimensional model accounts for molecular diffusion from bulk air to the air-material interface, reaction at the interface, and diffusive transport and reaction through material pore volumes. Material-ozone reaction probabilities that account for internal transport and internal pore area, γ(ipa), are determined by a minimization of residuals between predicted and experimentally derived ozone concentrations. Values of γ(ipa) are generally less than effective reaction probabilities (γ(eff)) determined previously, likely because of the inclusion of diffusion into substrates and reaction with internal surface area (rather than the use of the horizontally projected external material areas). Estimates of γ(ipa) average 1 × 10(-7), 2 × 10(-7), 4 × 10(-5), 2 × 10(-5), and 4 × 10(-7) for two types of cellulose paper, pervious pavement, Portland cement concrete, and an activated carbon cloth, respectively. The transport and reaction model developed here accounts for observed differences in ozone removal to varying thicknesses of the cellulose paper, and estimates a near constant γ(ipa) as material thickness increases from 0.02 to 0.16 cm.

  4. Discontinuous pore fluid distribution under microgravity--KC-135 flight investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddi, Lakshmi N.; Xiao, Ming; Steinberg, Susan L.

    2005-01-01

    Designing a reliable plant growth system for crop production in space requires the understanding of pore fluid distribution in porous media under microgravity. The objective of this experimental investigation, which was conducted aboard NASA KC-135 reduced gravity flight, is to study possible particle separation and the distribution of discontinuous wetting fluid in porous media under microgravity. KC-135 aircraft provided gravity conditions of 1, 1.8, and 10(-2) g. Glass beads of a known size distribution were used as porous media; and Hexadecane, a petroleum compound immiscible with and lighter than water, was used as wetting fluid at residual saturation. Nitrogen freezer was used to solidify the discontinuous Hexadecane ganglia in glass beads to preserve the ganglia size changes during different gravity conditions, so that the blob-size distributions (BSDs) could be measured after flight. It was concluded from this study that microgravity has little effect on the size distribution of pore fluid blobs corresponding to residual saturation of wetting fluids in porous media. The blobs showed no noticeable breakup or coalescence during microgravity. However, based on the increase in bulk volume of samples due to particle separation under microgravity, groups of particles, within which pore fluid blobs were encapsulated, appeared to have rearranged themselves under microgravity.

  5. IMPACT OF COMPOSITION AND HEAT TREATMENT ON PORE SIZE IN POROUS WALLED HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Raszewski, F; Erich Hansen, E; Ray Schumacher, R; David Peeler, D

    2007-12-04

    porosity of PWHGMs. Pore diameter in a non-heat treated baseline sample is approximately 100 {angstrom} and with heat treatment at 600 C for 8 hours, the diameter is approximately 1000 {angstrom}; an increase of a factor of 10. The results of this study also indicate significant microstructural differences with only a 20 C difference in heat treatment temperature (580 C and 600 C) for constant times. The microstructural changes observed via electron microscopy as a function of heat treatment temperature were confirmed by mercury porosimetry measurements, where considerable increases in pore volume were measured. Under constant heat treatment conditions, composition may impose a secondary effect on the resulting microstructure as micrographs indicate variations in the degree of porosity. Although microstructural differences were observed among the compositions assessed, the magnitude of the impact (i.e., difference in pore size or pore volume) appears to be smaller than that associated with heat treatment temperature. With respect to heat treatment time, the results suggest that the change in the degree of porosity is minimal for samples heat treated between 8 and 24 hours (it should be noted that the assessment of the impact of time on the resulting microstructure was limited to two compositions). The minimal impact of heat treatment time (on the two glasses evaluated) was confirmed by mercury porosimetry measurements indicating that there was a very slight shift in pore diameter and very little increase in pore volume in the baseline sample. Another important parameter, which will need to be considered under manufacturing or operational conditions, is the yield of the HGM and/or PWHGM and the characteristics of the final product (i.e., not only microstructure characteristics, but perhaps strength of the PWHGM for use under certain applications). In this report, yield is defined as the percentage of feed material converted to HGMs or the percentage of HGMs converted to

  6. Modeling pore corrosion in normally open gold- plated copper connectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moffat, Harry K.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Enos, David George; Serna, Lysle M.; Sorensen, Neil Robert

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study is to model the electrical response of gold plated copper electrical contacts exposed to a mixed flowing gas stream consisting of air containing 10 ppb H{sub 2}S at 30 C and a relative humidity of 70%. This environment accelerates the attack normally observed in a light industrial environment (essentially a simplified version of the Battelle Class 2 environment). Corrosion rates were quantified by measuring the corrosion site density, size distribution, and the macroscopic electrical resistance of the aged surface as a function of exposure time. A pore corrosion numerical model was used to predict both the growth of copper sulfide corrosion product which blooms through defects in the gold layer and the resulting electrical contact resistance of the aged surface. Assumptions about the distribution of defects in the noble metal plating and the mechanism for how corrosion blooms affect electrical contact resistance were needed to complete the numerical model. Comparisons are made to the experimentally observed number density of corrosion sites, the size distribution of corrosion product blooms, and the cumulative probability distribution of the electrical contact resistance. Experimentally, the bloom site density increases as a function of time, whereas the bloom size distribution remains relatively independent of time. These two effects are included in the numerical model by adding a corrosion initiation probability proportional to the surface area along with a probability for bloom-growth extinction proportional to the corrosion product bloom volume. The cumulative probability distribution of electrical resistance becomes skewed as exposure time increases. While the electrical contact resistance increases as a function of time for a fraction of the bloom population, the median value remains relatively unchanged. In order to model this behavior, the resistance calculated for large blooms has been weighted more heavily.

  7. Pore corrosion model for gold-plated copper contacts.

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, Harry K.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Glauner, Carly S.; Enos, David George

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this study is to model the electrical response of gold plated copper electrical contacts exposed to a mixed flowing gas stream consisting of air containing 10ppb H2S at 30 C and a relative humidity of 70%. This environment accelerates the attack normally observed in a light industrial environment (essentially a simplified version of the Battelle class 2 environment). Corrosion rates were quantified by measuring the corrosion site density, size distribution, and the macroscopic electrical resistance of the aged surface as a function of exposure time. A pore corrosion numerical model was used to predict both the growth of copper sulfide corrosion product which blooms through defects in the gold layer and the resulting electrical contact resistance of the aged surface. Assumptions about the distribution of defects in the noble metal plating and the mechanism for how corrosion blooms affect electrical contact resistance were needed to close the numerical model. Comparisons are made to the experimentally observed number density of corrosion sites, the size distribution of corrosion product blooms, and the cumulative probability distribution of the electrical contact resistance. Experimentally, the bloom site density increases as a function of time, whereas the bloom size distribution remains relatively independent of time. These two effects are included in the numerical model by adding a corrosion initiation probability proportional to the surface area along with a probability for bloom-growth extinction proportional to the corrosion product bloom volume. The cumulative probability distribution of electrical resistance becomes skewed as exposure time increases. While the electrical contact resistance increases as a function of time for a fraction of the bloom population, the median value remains relatively unchanged. In order to model this behavior, the resistance calculated for large blooms has been weighted more heavily.

  8. Pore Scale Dynamics of Microemulsion Formation.

    PubMed

    Unsal, Evren; Broens, Marc; Armstrong, Ryan T

    2016-07-19

    consequences on the pore scale mixing behavior and resulting microemulsion properties.

  9. Experimental investigation of the link between pore scale velocities, transport and reactivity in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meheust, Y.; Turuban, R.; Jimenez-Martinez, J.; De Anna, P.; Tabuteau, H.; Le Borgne, T.

    2014-12-01

    Pore scale characterization of flow velocities and concentration spatial distributions is a key to understanding non-Fickian transport and mixing in porous media. We present a millifluidic setup aimed at investigating those processes in transparent porous media, at the pore scale. The porous media are quasi-2D, consisting of a Hele-Shaw cell containing cylindrical grains. They are made by soft lithography from a numerical model and provide full control on the geometry (medium porosity, permeability and heterogeneity). The setup allows for the study of primary drainage/imbibition, or the joint continuous injection of two fluids (e. g. water and air). A camera records the distributions of fluid phases, the position of solid tracers, and spatially-resolved images of light emissions inside the flow cell. The pore scale velocity field is thus measured from particle tracking, while pore scale concentration fields are measured accurately in passive transport experiments, using fluorescein; both continuous injection and finite volume solute injections can be achieved. Using two chemo-luminescent liquids, the reaction of which produces photons in addition to the reaction product, we are also able to study the local production rate of the reaction product as the reactive liquids flow through the system [1]. Pressure drops across the medium are also measured. This complete characterization (phase distributions, velocity and concentration fields, pressure drops) of the system allows to explain non-Fickian behaviors and test models that upscale transport and mixing properties from pore scale data. As examples, we shall discuss the upscaling of transport from the knowledge of Lagrangian velocities and the relationships between conservative and reactive transport under mixing-limited conditions (very large Damkhöler number). Other applications include the prediction of the mixing rate from the sole knowledge of the flow stretching [2], and the characterization of mixing by

  10. Pore size and pore throat types in a heterogeneous dolostone reservoir, Devonian Grosmont formation, western Canada sedimentary basin

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, P.; Machel, H. G.

    1995-11-01

    The Devonian Grosmont Formation in northeastern Alberta, Canada, is a giant heavy-oil reservoir. The main reservoir rocks are dolomitized and karstified platform and ramp carbonates, and the best reservoir facies occur in the upper Grosmont (UGM) units 3 and 2. In these units, reservoir properties are highly heterogeneous. Hand specimen, thin section, UV, and SEM petrography, as well as grading scales, mercury capillary pressure curve analysis, and statistics, have been used to characterize reservoir heterogeneity. Our investigation led to a new pore size classification for carbonate reservoirs; this new classification has four pore sizes: microporosity (pore diameters <1 {mu}m), mesoporosity (pore diameters 1-1000 {mu}m), macroporosity (pore diameters 1-256 mm), and megaporosity (pore diameters >256 mm). A combination of microscopic observations and capillary pressure curve characteristics led to the recognition of four pore throat texture types on the microporosity scale, and to five types on the mesoporosity scale. Microporosity pore types include (1) intracrystal dissolution porosity, (2) pervasive intercrystal and intracrystal dissolution porosity, (3) intergranular and/or intercrystal porosity in grainstones, and (4) primary or solution microporosity in mud matrix (only in limestones). Mesoporosity pore types include (1) intercrystal porosity, (2) solution-enhanced intercrystal porosity, (3) oversized porosity, (4) intragranular solution porosity, and (5) intergranular solution porosity. Some of these types are homogeneous (e.g., non-fabric selective dissolution porosity and intercrystal primary porosity), whereas others are heterogeneous. Generally, hydrocarbon recovery efficiency is good in the homogeneous pore throat types, but poor in the heterogeneous types.

  11. Moving metal ions through ferritin-protein nanocages from three-fold pores to catalytic sites.

    PubMed

    Tosha, Takehiko; Ng, Ho-Leung; Bhattasali, Onita; Alber, Tom; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2010-10-20

    Ferritin nanocages synthesize ferric oxide minerals, containing hundreds to thousands of Fe(III) diferric oxo/hydroxo complexes, by reactions of Fe(II) ions with O(2) at multiple di-iron catalytic centers. Ferric-oxy multimers, tetramers, and/or larger mineral nuclei form during postcatalytic transit through the protein cage, and mineral accretion occurs in the central cavity. We determined how Fe(II) substrates can access catalytic sites using frog M ferritins, active and inactivated by ligand substitution, crystallized with 2.0 M Mg(II) ± 0.1 M Co(II) for Co(II)-selective sites. Co(II) inhibited Fe(II) oxidation. High-resolution (<1.5 Å) crystal structures show (1) a line of metal ions, 15 Å long, which penetrates the cage and defines ion channels and internal pores to the nanocavity that link external pores to the cage interior, (2) metal ions near negatively charged residues at the channel exits and along the inner cavity surface that model Fe(II) transit to active sites, and (3) alternate side-chain conformations, absent in ferritins with catalysis eliminated by amino acid substitution, which support current models of protein dynamics and explain changes in Fe-Fe distances observed during catalysis. The new structural data identify a ∼27-Å path Fe(II) ions can follow through ferritin entry channels between external pores and the central cavity and along the cavity surface to the active sites where mineral synthesis begins. This "bucket brigade" for Fe(II) ion access to the ferritin catalytic sites not only increases understanding of biological nanomineral synthesis but also reveals unexpected design principles for protein cage-based catalysts and nanomaterials.

  12. NOTE: Hydrodynamic effects on the solute transport across endothelial pores and hepatocyte membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Dumitru; Movileanu, Liviu; Ion, Stelian; Flonta, Maria-Luiza

    2000-11-01

    In this short note we propose a simple and rapid procedure to calculate the net quantity of metabolites absorbed by hepatocytes from blood plasma. The blood movement through sinusoids determines an opposed circulation of plasma through the space of Disse. Hydrodynamic considerations lead to the conclusion that hepatocytes absorb for their own synthesis processes a quantity of metabolites in a volume flow of the order of 10-12 nl s-1 through a sieve plate surface with an area of 1 µm2. At pathological temperature (40 °C), the excess of the net absorbed volume flow for the entire sinusoidal surface of the mammalian liver may be as high as 1.9 nl s-1. Some observations on the effect of red and white blood cells on the chylomicron traffic through endothelial pores are made.

  13. Hierarchical porous carbon with designed pore architecture and study of its adsorptive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Cabero, Mónica; Esteve-Turrillas, Francesc A.; Beltrán, Daniel; Amorós, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Ordered mesoporous carbon nanoparticles have been synthesized by a nanocasting procedure from furfuryl alcohol impregnation into alumino-silica UVM-7 material. By a proper adjustment of the synthesis parameters, furfuryl alcohol volume vs. template pore volume, it was possible to obtain a carbonaceous templated material which keeps the hierarchical bimodal porosity of the silica together with its high surface area (>1000 m 2/g), as it was confirmed by means of electron transmission microscopy and N 2 adsorption isotherms. This carbon material was evaluated by testing it as a sorbent for several pesticides in aqueous solutions. Its absorption efficiency was compared with typical commercial solid phase extraction materials such as silica C 18 and graphitized carbon black GCB.

  14. Nuclear Pore-Like Structures in a Compartmentalized Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Sagulenko, Evgeny; Green, Kathryn; Yee, Benjamin; Morgan, Garry; Leis, Andrew; Lee, Kuo-Chang; Butler, Margaret K.; Chia, Nicholas; Pham, Uyen Thi Phuong; Lindgreen, Stinus; Catchpole, Ryan; Poole, Anthony M.; Fuerst, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Planctomycetes are distinguished from other Bacteria by compartmentalization of cells via internal membranes, interpretation of which has been subject to recent debate regarding potential relations to Gram-negative cell structure. In our interpretation of the available data, the planctomycete Gemmata obscuriglobus contains a nuclear body compartment, and thus possesses a type of cell organization with parallels to the eukaryote nucleus. Here we show that pore-like structures occur in internal membranes of G.obscuriglobus and that they have elements structurally similar to eukaryote nuclear pores, including a basket, ring-spoke structure, and eight-fold rotational symmetry. Bioinformatic analysis of proteomic data reveals that some of the G. obscuriglobus proteins associated with pore-containing membranes possess structural domains found in eukaryote nuclear pore complexes. Moreover, immunogold labelling demonstrates localization of one such protein, containing a β-propeller domain, specifically to the G. obscuriglobus pore-like structures. Finding bacterial pores within internal cell membranes and with structural similarities to eukaryote nuclear pore complexes raises the dual possibilities of either hitherto undetected homology or stunning evolutionary convergence. PMID:28146565

  15. Clostridial pore-forming toxins: powerful virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Popoff, Michel R

    2014-12-01

    Pore formation is a common mechanism of action for many bacterial toxins. More than one third of clostridial toxins are pore-forming toxins (PFTs) belonging to the β-PFT class. They are secreted as soluble monomers rich in β-strands, which recognize a specific receptor on target cells and assemble in oligomers. Then, they undergo a conformational change leading to the formation of a β-barrel, which inserts into the lipid bilayer forming functional pore. According to their structure, clostridial β-PFTs are divided into several families. Clostridial cholesterol-dependent cytolysins form large pores, which disrupt the plasma membrane integrity. They are potent virulence factors mainly involved in myonecrosis. Clostridial heptameric β-PFTs (aerolysin family and staphylococcal α-hemolysin family) induce small pores which trigger signaling cascades leading to different cell responses according to the cell types and toxins. They are mainly responsible for intestinal diseases, like necrotic enteritis, or systemic diseases/toxic shock from intestinal origin. Clostridial intracellularly active toxins exploit pore formation through the endosomal membrane to translocate the enzymatic component or domain into the cytosol. Single chain protein toxins, like botulinum and tetanus neurotoxins, use hydrophobic α-helices to form pores, whereas clostridial binary toxins encompass binding components, which are structurally and functionally related to β-PFTs, but which have acquired the specific activity to internalize their corresponding enzymatic components. Structural analysis suggests that β-PFTs and binding components share a common evolutionary origin.

  16. Lipid flow through fusion pores connecting membranes of different tensions.

    PubMed

    Chizmadzhev, Y A; Kumenko, D A; Kuzmin, P I; Chernomordik, L V; Zimmerberg, J; Cohen, F S

    1999-06-01

    When two membranes fuse, their components mix; this is usually described as a purely diffusional process. However, if the membranes are under different tensions, the material will spread predominantly by convection. We use standard fluid mechanics to rigorously calculate the steady-state convective flux of lipids. A fusion pore is modeled as a toroid shape, connecting two planar membranes. Each of the membrane monolayers is considered separately as incompressible viscous media with the same shear viscosity, etas. The two monolayers interact by sliding past each other, described by an intermonolayer viscosity, etar. Combining a continuity equation with an equation that balances the work provided by the tension difference, Deltasigma, against the energy dissipated by flow in the viscous membrane, yields expressions for lipid velocity, upsilon, and area of lipid flux, Phi. These expressions for upsilon and Phi depend on Deltasigma, etas, etar, and geometrical aspects of a toroidal pore, but the general features of the theory hold for any fusion pore that has a roughly hourglass shape. These expressions are readily applicable to data from any experiments that monitor movement of lipid dye between fused membranes under different tensions. Lipid velocity increases nonlinearly from a small value for small pore radii, rp, to a saturating value at large rp. As a result of velocity saturation, the flux increases linearly with pore radius for large pores. The calculated lipid flux is in agreement with available experimental data for both large and transient fusion pores.

  17. Lipid flow through fusion pores connecting membranes of different tensions.

    PubMed Central

    Chizmadzhev, Y A; Kumenko, D A; Kuzmin, P I; Chernomordik, L V; Zimmerberg, J; Cohen, F S

    1999-01-01

    When two membranes fuse, their components mix; this is usually described as a purely diffusional process. However, if the membranes are under different tensions, the material will spread predominantly by convection. We use standard fluid mechanics to rigorously calculate the steady-state convective flux of lipids. A fusion pore is modeled as a toroid shape, connecting two planar membranes. Each of the membrane monolayers is considered separately as incompressible viscous media with the same shear viscosity, etas. The two monolayers interact by sliding past each other, described by an intermonolayer viscosity, etar. Combining a continuity equation with an equation that balances the work provided by the tension difference, Deltasigma, against the energy dissipated by flow in the viscous membrane, yields expressions for lipid velocity, upsilon, and area of lipid flux, Phi. These expressions for upsilon and Phi depend on Deltasigma, etas, etar, and geometrical aspects of a toroidal pore, but the general features of the theory hold for any fusion pore that has a roughly hourglass shape. These expressions are readily applicable to data from any experiments that monitor movement of lipid dye between fused membranes under different tensions. Lipid velocity increases nonlinearly from a small value for small pore radii, rp, to a saturating value at large rp. As a result of velocity saturation, the flux increases linearly with pore radius for large pores. The calculated lipid flux is in agreement with available experimental data for both large and transient fusion pores. PMID:10354423

  18. Cation and anion transport through hydrophilic pores in lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, Senthil K.; Larson, Ronald G.

    2006-08-01

    To understand the origin of transmembrane potentials, formation of transient pores, and the movement of anions and cations across lipid membranes, we have performed systematic atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) lipids. A double bilayer setup was employed and different transmembrane potentials were generated by varying the anion (Cl-) and cation (Na+) concentrations in the two water compartments. A transmembrane potential of ˜350mV was thereby generated per bilayer for a unit charge imbalance. For transmembrane potential differences of up to ˜1.4V, the bilayers were stable, over the time scale of the simulations (10-50ns). At larger imposed potential differences, one of the two bilayers breaks down through formation of a water pore, leading to both anion and cation translocations through the pore. The anions typically have a short residence time inside the pore, while the cations show a wider range of residence times depending on whether they bind to a lipid molecule or not. Over the time scale of the simulations, we do not observe the discharge of the entire potential difference, nor do we observe pore closing, although we observe that the size of the pore decreases as more ions translocate. We also observed a rare lipid flip-flop, in which a lipid molecule translocated from one bilayer leaflet to the opposite leaflet, assisted by the water pore.

  19. Impedance nanopore biosensor: influence of pore dimensions on biosensing performance.

    PubMed

    Kant, Krishna; Yu, Jingxian; Priest, Craig; Shapter, Joe G; Losic, Dusan

    2014-03-07

    Knowledge about electrochemical and electrical properties of nanopore structures and the influence of pore dimensions on these properties is important for the development of nanopore biosensing devices. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of nanopore dimensions (diameter and length) on biosensing performance using non-faradic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Nanoporous alumina membranes (NPAMs) prepared by self-ordered electrochemical anodization of aluminium were used as model nanopore sensing platforms. NPAMs with different pore diameters (25-65 nm) and lengths (4-18 μm) were prepared and the internal pore surface chemistry was modified by covalently attaching streptavidin and biotin. The performance of this antibody nanopore biosensing platform was evaluated using various concentrations of biotin as a model analyte. EIS measurements of pore resistivity and conductivity were carried out for pores with different diameters and lengths. The results showed that smaller pore dimensions of 25 nm and pore lengths up to 10 μm provide better biosensing performance.

  20. EFFECT OF PORE SIZE ON TRAPPING ZINC VAPORS

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2010-12-17

    A series of experiments were conducted to determine the effect of pore size on pumping efficiency and zinc vapor trapping efficiency. A simple pumping efficiency test was conducted for all five pore diameters where it was observed that evacuation times were adversely affected by reducing the pore size below 5 {micro}m. Common test conditions for the zinc trapping efficiency experiments were used. These conditions resulted in some variability, to ascribe different efficiencies to the filter media. However, the data suggest that there is no significant difference in trapping efficiency for filter media with pores from 0.2 to 20 {micro}m with a thickness of 0.065-inch. Consequently, the 20 {micro}m pore filter media that is currently used at SRS is a suitable filter material for to utilize for future extractions. There is evidence that smaller pore filter will adversely affect the pumping times for the TEF and little evidence to suggest that a smaller pore diameters have significant impact on the trapping efficiency.