Science.gov

Sample records for accessible targets study

  1. The Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) List of Near-Earth Asteroids: Identifying Potential Targets for Future Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abell, Paul; Barbee, B. W.; Mink, R. G.; Adamo, D. R.; Alberding, C. M.; Mazanek, D. D.; Johnson, L. N.; Yeomans, D. K.; Chodas, P. W.; Chamberlin, A. B.; Benner, L. A. M.; Drake, B. G.; Friedensen, V. P.

    2012-10-01

    Introduction: Much attention has recently been focused on human exploration of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). Detailed planning for deep space exploration and identification of potential NEA targets for human space flight requires selecting objects from the growing list of known NEAs. NASA therefore initiated the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Target Study (NHATS), which uses dynamical trajectory performance constraints to identify potentially accessible NEAs. Accessibility Criteria: Future NASA human space flight capability is being defined while the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle and Space Launch System are under development. Velocity change and mission duration are two of the most critical factors in any human spaceflight endeavor, so the most accessible NEAs tend to be those with orbits similar to Earth’s. To be classified as NHATS-compliant, a NEA must offer at least one round-trip trajectory solution satisfying purposely inclusive constraints, including total mission change in velocity ≤ 12 km/s, mission duration ≤ 450 days (with at least 8 days at the NEA), Earth departure between Jan 1, 2015 and Dec 31, 2040, Earth departure C3 ≤ 60 km2/s2, and Earth return atmospheric entry speed ≤ 12 km/s. Monitoring and Updates: The NHATS list of potentially accessible targets is continuously updated as NEAs are discovered and orbit solutions for known NEAs are improved. The current list of accessible NEAs identified as potentially viable for future human exploration under the NHATS criteria is available to the international community via a website maintained by NASA’s NEO Program Office (http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/nhats/). This website also lists predicted optical and radar observing opportunities for each NHATS-compliant NEA to facilitate acquisition of follow-up observations. Conclusions: This list of NEAs will be useful for analyzing robotic mission opportunities, identifying optimal round trip human space flight trajectories, and

  2. Accurate guidance for percutaneous access to a specific target in soft tissues: preclinical study of computer-assisted pericardiocentesis.

    PubMed

    Chavanon, O; Barbe, C; Troccaz, J; Carrat, L; Ribuot, C; Noirclerc, M; Maitrasse, B; Blin, D

    1999-06-01

    In the field of percutaneous access to soft tissues, our project was to improve classical pericardiocentesis by performing accurate guidance to a selected target, according to a model of the pericardial effusion acquired through three-dimensional (3D) data recording. Required hardware is an echocardiographic device and a needle, both linked to a 3D localizer, and a computer. After acquiring echographic data, a modeling procedure allows definition of the optimal puncture strategy, taking into consideration the mobility of the heart, by determining a stable region, whatever the period of the cardiac cycle. A passive guidance system is then used to reach the planned target accurately, generally a site in the middle of the stable region. After validation on a dynamic phantom and a feasibility study in dogs, an accuracy and reliability analysis protocol was realized on pigs with experimental pericardial effusion. Ten consecutive successful punctures using various trajectories were performed on eight pigs. Nonbloody liquid was collected from pericardial effusions in the stable region (5 to 9 mm wide) within 10 to 15 minutes from echographic acquisition to drainage. Accuracy of at least 2.5 mm was demonstrated. This study demonstrates the feasibility of computer-assisted pericardiocentesis. Beyond the simple improvement of the current technique, this method could be a new way to reach the heart or a new tool for percutaneous access and image-guided puncture of soft tissues. Further investigation will be necessary before routine human application. PMID:10414543

  3. Vascular Accessibility of Endothelial Targeted Ferritin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Khoshnejad, Makan; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Pulsipher, Katherine W; Dai, Chuanyun; Hood, Elizabeth D; Arguiri, Evguenia; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Dmochowski, Ivan J; Greineder, Colin F; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2016-03-16

    Targeting nanocarriers to the endothelium, using affinity ligands to cell adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, holds promise to improve the pharmacotherapy of many disease conditions. This approach capitalizes on the observation that antibody-targeted carriers of 100 nm and above accumulate in the pulmonary vasculature more effectively than free antibodies. Targeting of prospective nanocarriers in the 10-50 nm range, however, has not been studied. To address this intriguing issue, we conjugated monoclonal antibodies (Ab) to ICAM-1 and PECAM-1 or their single chain antigen-binding fragments (scFv) to ferritin nanoparticles (FNPs, size 12 nm), thereby producing Ab/FNPs and scFv/FNPs. Targeted FNPs retained their typical symmetric core-shell structure with sizes of 20-25 nm and ∼4-5 Ab (or ∼7-9 scFv) per particle. Ab/FNPs and scFv/FNPs, but not control IgG/FNPs, bound specifically to cells expressing target molecules and accumulated in the lungs after intravenous injection, with pulmonary targeting an order of magnitude higher than free Ab. Most intriguing, the targeting of Ab/FNPs to ICAM-1, but not PECAM-1, surpassed that of larger Ab/carriers targeted by the same ligand. These results indicate that (i) FNPs may provide a platform for targeting endothelial adhesion molecules with carriers in the 20 nm size range, which has not been previously reported; and (ii) ICAM-1 and PECAM-1 (known to localize in different domains of endothelial plasmalemma) differ in their accessibility to circulating objects of this size, common for blood components and nanocarriers. PMID:26718023

  4. The Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS) List of Near-Earth Asteroids: Identifying Potential Targets for Future Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, Paul A.; Barbee, B. W.; Mink, R. G.; Alberding, C. M.; Adamo, D. R.; Mazanek, D. D.; Johnson, L. N.; Yeomans, D. K.; Chodas, P. W.; Chamberlin, A. B.; Benner, L. A. M.; Drake, B. G.; Friedensen, V. P.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several years, much attention has been focused on the human exploration of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). Two independent NASA studies examined the feasibility of sending piloted missions to NEAs [1, 2], and in 2009, the Augustine Commission identified NEAs as high profile destinations for human exploration missions beyond the Earth-Moon system [3]. More recently the current U.S. presidential administration directed NASA to include NEAs as destinations for future human exploration with the goal of sending astronauts to a NEA in the mid to late 2020s. This directive became part of the official National Space Policy of the United States of America as of June 28, 2010 [4]. Detailed planning for such deep space exploration missions and identifying potential NEAs as targets for human spaceflight requires selecting objects from the ever growing list of newly discovered NEAs. Hence NASA developed and implemented the Near-Earth Object (NEO) Human Space Flight (HSF) Accessible Target Study (NHATS), which identifies potential candidate objects on the basis of defined dynamical trajectory performance constraints.

  5. [Reaching Target Groups--Shaping Accessibility].

    PubMed

    Walter, U; Jahn, I

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes the public health discourse on the accessibility and access paths, theoretical approaches as well as factors influencing the utilisation of prevention and health promotion interventions, and requirements for their evaluation. Various projects funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research address many aspects of accessibility and describe extensive experiences with access paths, approaches to information transfer, target group-driven supply chain design, etc. Recommendations for practice and research are given at the end of the article. PMID:24081569

  6. Methodology and Results of the Near-Earth Object (NEO) Human Space Flight (HSF) Accessible Targets Study (NHATS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Brent; Mink, Ronald; Adamo, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) have been identified by the current administration as potential destinations for human explorers during the mid-2020s. While the close proximity of these objects' orbits to Earth's orbit creates a risk of highly damaging or catastrophic impacts, it also makes some of these objects particularly accessible to spacecraft departing Earth, and this presents unique opportunities for solar system science and humanity's first ventures beyond cislunar space. Planning such ambitious missions first requires the selection of potentially accessible targets from the growing population of nearly 7,800 NEAs. To accomplish this, NASA is conducting the Near-Earth Object (NEO) Human Space Flight (HSF) Accessible Targets Study (NHATS). Phase I of the NHATS was executed during September of 2010, and Phase II was completed by early March of 2011. The study is ongoing because previously undetected NEAs are being discovered constantly, which has motivated an effort to automate the analysis algorithms in order to provide continuous monitoring of NEA accessibility. The NHATS analysis process consists of a trajectory filter and a minimum maximum estimated size criterion. The trajectory filter employs the method of embedded trajectory grids to compute all possible ballistic round-trip mission trajectories to every NEA in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Small-Body Database (SBDB) and stores all solutions that satisfy the trajectory filter criteria. An NEA must offer at least one qualifying trajectory solution to pass the trajectory filter. The Phase II NHATS filter criteria were purposely chosen to be highly inclusive, requiring Earth departure date between January 1st, 2015 and December 31st, 2040, total round-trip flight time <= 450 days, stay time at the NEA >= 8 days, Earth departure C(sub 3) energy <= 60 km(exp 2)/s(exp 2), total mission delta-v <= 12 km/s (including an Earth departure maneuver from a 400 km altitude circular parking orbit), and a maximum

  7. Open access chemical probes for epigenetic targets

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Peter J; Müller, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Background High attrition rates in drug discovery call for new approaches to improve target validation. Academia is filling gaps, but often lacks the experience and resources of the pharmaceutical industry resulting in poorly characterized tool compounds. Discussion The SGC has established an open access chemical probe consortium, currently encompassing ten pharmaceutical companies. One of its mandates is to create well-characterized inhibitors (chemical probes) for epigenetic targets to enable new biology and target validation for drug development. Conclusion Epigenetic probe compounds have proven to be very valuable and have not only spurred a plethora of novel biological findings, but also provided starting points for clinical trials. These probes have proven to be critical complementation to traditional genetic targeting strategies and provided sometimes surprising results. PMID:26397018

  8. Access to space studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James A.

    1993-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is currently considering possible directions in Earth-to-orbit vehicle development under a study called 'Access to Space.' This agency-wide study is considering commercial launch vehicles, human transportation, space station logistics, and other space transportation requirements over the next 40 years. Three options are being considered for human transportation: continued use of the Space Shuttle; development of a small personnel carrier (personnel logistics system (PLS)); or development of an advanced vehicle such as a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO). Several studies related to the overall Access to Space study are reported in this document.

  9. Access to space study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a comprehensive NASA in-house study to identify and assess alternate approaches to access to space through the year 2030, and to select and recommend a preferred cause of action. The goals of the study were to identify the best vehicles and transportation architectures to make major reductions in the cost of space transportation (at least 50%), while at the same time increasing safety for flight crews by at least an order of magnitude. In addition, vehicle reliability was to exceed 0.98 percent, and, as important, the robustness, pad time, turnaround time, and other aspects of operability were to be vastly improved. This study examined three major optional architectures: (1) retain and upgrade the Space Shuttle and expendable launch vehicles; (2) develop new expendable vehicles using conventional technologies and transition from current vehicles beginning in 2005; and (3) develop new reusable vehicles using advanced technology, and transition from current vehicles beginning in 2008. The launch-needs, mission model utilized for for the study was based upon today's projection of civil, defense, and commercial mission payload requirements.

  10. Multiple Access Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motamedi, Masoud

    1990-01-01

    The Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) strawman design uses a hybrid Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA)/Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA) implementation. TDMA is used for the forward direction (from Suppliers to Users), and FDMA for the return direction (from Users to Suppliers). An alternative architecture is proposed that will require minimal real time coordination and yet provide a fast access method by using random access Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA). The CDMA system issues are addressed such as connecting suppliers and users, both of whom may be located anywhere in the CONUS, when the user terminals are constrained in size and weight; and providing efficient traffic routing under highly variable traffic requirements. It is assumed that bandwidth efficiency is not of paramount importance. CDMA or Spread Spectrum Multiple Access (SSMA) communication is a method in which a group of carriers operate at the same nominal center frequency but are separable from each other by the low cross correlation of the spreading codes used. Interference and multipath rejection capability, ease of selective addressing and message screening, low density power spectra for signal hiding and security, and high resolution ranging are among the benefits of spread spectrum communications.

  11. Disentangling Mathematics Target and Access Skills: Implications for Accommodation Assignment Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketterlin-Geller, Leanne R.; Jamgochian, Elisa M.; Nelson-Walker, Nancy J.; Geller, Joshua P.

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate assignment of accommodations is predicated on a clear distinction between target skills and access skills. In this study, we examine the agreement between test developer/researchers' and educators' classification of target and access skills as a possible explanatory mechanism for assigning accommodations. Findings indicate that…

  12. Mobile multiple access study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Multiple access techniques (FDMA, CDMA, TDMA) for the mobile user and attempts to identify the current best technique are discussed. Traffic loading is considered as well as voice and data modulation and spacecraft and system design. Emphasis is placed on developing mobile terminal cost estimates for the selected design. In addition, design examples are presented for the alternative techniques of multiple access in order to compare with the selected technique.

  13. The state of a central inhibition system predicts access to visual targets: An ERP study on distractor-induced blindness (DIB).

    PubMed

    Niedeggen, Michael; Busch, Niko A; Winther, Gesche N

    2015-09-01

    Distractor-induced blindness (DIB) is elicited in a temporal selection task based on rapid serial visual presentation: Following the onset of a central cue (color change of fixation), a target in a global stream has to be detected (orientation change of tilted bars). Distractors are occasional target-like events presented prior to the onset of the cue. Depending on the number of distractor episodes, a frontal ERP negativity (FN) is evoked, and the detection rate of the forthcoming target is reduced. Here, we provide a concise review of the DIBs' functional characteristics, and examine the relationship between FN activation on target processing and detectability. To this end, ERP responses collected in a set of participants (n=14) were analysed separately with respect to detection performance (hits vs. misses). A gradual increase in the amplitude of the FN with increasing number of distractor events was only observed for forthcoming misses, but not for hits. The FN activation can be linked to a target-related ERP component: The amplitude of a late centro-parietal positivity (LPC) was significantly diminished for misses. In sum, the data support the notion that the DIB reflects the controlled activation of a central inhibition system. Depending on its state of activation, conscious access to stimuli defined by distinctive visual features is restricted. PMID:25724342

  14. Remote Memory Access Protocol Target Node Intellectual Property

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Omar

    2013-01-01

    The MagnetoSpheric Multiscale (MMS) mission had a requirement to use the Remote Memory Access Protocol (RMAP) over its SpaceWire network. At the time, no known intellectual property (IP) cores were available for purchase. Additionally, MMS preferred to implement the RMAP functionality with control over the low-level details of the design. For example, not all the RMAP standard functionality was needed, and it was desired to implement only the portions of the RMAP protocol that were needed. RMAP functionality had been previously implemented in commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products, but the IP core was not available for purchase. The RMAP Target IP core is a VHDL (VHSIC Hardware Description Language description of a digital logic design suitable for implementation in an FPGA (field-programmable gate array) or ASIC (application-specific integrated circuit) that parses SpaceWire packets that conform to the RMAP standard. The RMAP packet protocol allows a network host to access and control a target device using address mapping. This capability allows SpaceWire devices to be managed in a standardized way that simplifies the hardware design of the device, as well as the development of the software that controls the device. The RMAP Target IP core has some features that are unique and not specified in the RMAP standard. One such feature is the ability to automatically abort transactions if the back-end logic does not respond to read/write requests within a predefined time. When a request times out, the RMAP Target IP core automatically retracts the request and returns a command response with an appropriate status in the response packet s header. Another such feature is the ability to control the SpaceWire node or router using RMAP transactions in the extended address range. This allows the SpaceWire network host to manage the SpaceWire network elements using RMAP packets, which reduces the number of protocols that the network host needs to support.

  15. An imaging calorimeter for ACCESS concept study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell, T. A.; Adams, J. H.; Binns, R. W.; Christl, M. J.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Howell, L. W.; Gregory, J. C.; Hink, P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Kippen, R. M.; Lee, J.; Pendleton, G. N.; Takahashi, Y.; Watts, J. W.

    2001-08-01

    A mission concept study to define the "Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for Space Station (ACCESS)" was sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The ACCESS instrument complement contains a transition radiation detector and an ionization calorimeter to measure the spectrum of protons, helium, and heavier nuclei up to ~1015 eV to search for the limit of S/N shock wave acceleration, or evidence for other explanations of the spectra. Several calorimeter configurations have been studied, including the "baseline" totally active bismuth germanate instrument and sampling calorimeters utilizing various detectors. The Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS (ICA) concept comprises a carbon target and a calorimeter using a high atomic number absorber sampled approximately each radiation length (rl) by thin scintillating fiber (SCIFI) detectors. The main features and options of the ICA instrument configuration are described in this paper. Since direct calibration is not possible over most of the energy range, the best approach must be decided from simulations of calorimeter performance extrapolated from CERN calibrations at 0.375 TeV. This paper presents results from the ICA simulations study.

  16. Quantity and accessibility for specific targeting of receptors in tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Sajid; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Maria; Braun, Gary B.; Doyle, Francis J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2014-06-01

    Synaphic (ligand-directed) targeting of drugs is an important potential new approach to drug delivery, particularly in oncology. Considerable success with this approach has been achieved in the treatment of blood-borne cancers, but the advances with solid tumours have been modest. Here, we have studied the number and availability for ligand binding of the receptors for two targeting ligands. The results show that both paucity of total receptors and their poor availability are major bottlenecks in drug targeting. A tumour-penetrating peptide greatly increases the availability of receptors by promoting transport of the drug to the extravascular tumour tissue, but the number of available receptors still remains low, severely limiting the utility of the approach. Our results emphasize the importance of using drugs with high specific activity to avoid exceeding receptor capacity because any excess drug conjugate would lose the targeting advantage. The mathematical models we describe make it possible to focus on those aspects of the targeting mechanism that are most likely to have a substantial effect on the overall efficacy of the targeting.

  17. Policies and Programs to Facilitate Access to Targeted Cancer Therapies in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Sruamsiri, Rosarin; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Lu, Christine Y.; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn; Wagner, Anita K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasing access to clinically beneficial targeted cancer medicines is a challenge in every country due to their high cost. We describe the interplay of innovative policies and programs involving multiple stakeholders to facilitate access to these medicines in Thailand, as well as the utilization of selected targeted therapies over time. Methods We selected two medicines on the 2013 Thai national list of essential medicines (NLEM) [letrozole and imatinib] and three unlisted medicines for the same indications [trastuzumab, nilotinib and dasatinib]. We created timelines of access policies and programs for these products based on scientific and grey literature. Using IMS Health sales data, we described the trajectories of sales volumes of the study medicines between January 2001 and December 2012. We compared estimated average numbers of patients treated before and after the implementation of policies and programs for each product. Results Different stakeholders implemented multiple interventions to increase access to the study medicines for different patient populations. During 2007–2009, the Thai Government created a special NLEM category with different coverage requirements for payers and issued compulsory licenses; payers negotiated prices with manufacturers and engaged in pooled procurement; pharmaceutical companies expanded patient assistance programs and lowered prices in different ways. Compared to before the interventions, estimated numbers of patients treated with each medicine increased significantly afterwards: for letrozole from 645 (95% CI 366–923) to 3683 (95% CI 2,748–4,618); for imatinib from 103 (95% CI 72–174) to 350 (95% CI 307–398); and for trastuzumab from 68 (95% CI 45–118) to 412 (95% CI 344–563). Conclusions Government, payers, and manufacturers implemented multi-pronged approaches to facilitate access to targeted cancer therapies for the Thai population, which differed by medicine. Routine monitoring is needed to

  18. Finding a Target with an Accessible Global Positioning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponchillia, Paul E.; MacKenzie, Nancy; Long, Richard G.; Denton-Smith, Pamela; Hicks, Thomas L.; Miley, Priscilla

    2007-01-01

    This article presents two target-location experiments. In the first experiment, 19 participants located a 25-foot chalk circle 93% of the time with a Global Positioning System (GPS) compared to 12% of the time without it. In a single-subject follow-up experiment, the participant came within 1 foot of the target on all GPS trials. Target-location…

  19. Artificial MicroRNAs highly accessible to targets confer efficient virus resistance in plants.

    PubMed

    Duan, Cheng-Guo; Wang, Chun-Han; Fang, Rong-Xiang; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2008-11-01

    Short-hairpin RNAs based on microRNA (miRNA) precursors to express the artificial miRNAs (amiRNAs) can specifically induce gene silencing and confer virus resistance in plants. The efficacy of RNA silencing depends not only on the nature of amiRNAs but also on the local structures of the target mRNAs. However, the lack of tools to accurately and reliably predict secondary structures within long RNAs makes it very hard to predict the secondary structures of a viral genome RNA in the natural infection conditions in vivo. In this study, we used an experimental approach to dissect how the endogenous silencing machinery acts on the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) genome. Transiently expressed 3'UTR RNAs were degraded by site-specific cleavage. By comparing the natural cleavage hotspots within the 3'UTR of the CMV-infected wild-type Arabidopsis to those of the triple dcl2/3/4 mutant, we acquired true small RNA programmed RNA-induced silencing complex (siRISC)-mediated cleavage sites to design valid amiRNAs. We showed that the tRNA-like structure within the 3'UTR impeded target site access and restricted amiRNA-RISC-mediated cleavage of the target viral RNA. Moreover, target recognition in the less-structured area also influenced siRISC catalysis, thereby conferring different degrees of resistance to CMV infection. Transgenic plants expressing the designed amiRNAs that target the putative RISC accessible target sites conferred high resistance to the CMV challenge from both CMV subgroup strains. Our work suggests that the experimental approach is credible for studying the course of RISC target recognition to engineer effective gene silencing and virus resistance in plants by amiRNAs. PMID:18768978

  20. Summary of Recent Target Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.; O'Day, S.

    1993-02-04

    This report describes recent measurements that have been performed with the new target stack (Fig. 1). Highlights of these measurements are: (1) Pbar yields of nickel and powdered rhenium are comparable to that of copper. (2) Enhancement of pbar yield at the interface between copper and aluminum disks in the target stack has been observed. This effect occurs only when the lens is focused near the upstream edge of the target. (3) The target density depletion study in powdered rhenium showed an apparent yield reduction on the time scale of a single proton pulse, accompanied by release of airborne radioactive material.

  1. Suppressing NOM access to controlled porous TiO2 particles enhances the decomposition of target water contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Suppressing access of natural organic matter (NOM) to TiO2 is a key to the successful photocatalytic decomposition of a target contaminant in water. This study first demonstrates simply controlling the porous structure of TiO2 can significantly improve the selective oxidation.

  2. Pilot evaluation of a web-based intervention targeting sexual health service access.

    PubMed

    Brown, K E; Newby, K; Caley, M; Danahay, A; Kehal, I

    2016-04-01

    Sexual health service access is fundamental to good sexual health, yet interventions designed to address this have rarely been implemented or evaluated. In this article, pilot evaluation findings for a targeted public health behavior change intervention, delivered via a website and web-app, aiming to increase uptake of sexual health services among 13-19-year olds are reported. A pre-post questionnaire-based design was used. Matched baseline and follow-up data were identified from 148 respondents aged 13-18 years. Outcome measures were self-reported service access, self-reported intention to access services and beliefs about services and service access identified through needs analysis. Objective service access data provided by local sexual health services were also analyzed. Analysis suggests the intervention had a significant positive effect on psychological barriers to and antecedents of service access among females. Males, who reported greater confidence in service access compared with females, significantly increased service access by time 2 follow-up. Available objective service access data support the assertion that the intervention may have led to increases in service access. There is real promise for this novel digital intervention. Further evaluation is planned as the model is licensed to and rolled out by other local authorities in the United Kingdom. PMID:26928566

  3. Program for Access to Science Study (PASS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Millicent; Weiner, Michael

    The Program for Access to Science Study (PASS) consists of a preparatory science course which is taught in tandem with a special counseling seminar. Problem solving is taught using content in chemistry and physics. The curriculum is divided into cycles, each built around a single topic. A problem set related to the topic and an illustrative lab…

  4. Accessing primary care: a simulated patient study

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, John L; Carter, Mary; Davey, Antoinette; Roberts, Martin J; Elliott, Marc N; Roland, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Background Simulated patient, or so-called ‘mystery-shopper’, studies are a controversial, but potentially useful, approach to take when conducting health services research. Aim To investigate the construct validity of survey questions relating to access to primary care included in the English GP Patient Survey. Design and setting Observational study in 41 general practices in rural, urban, and inner-city settings in the UK. Method Between May 2010 and March 2011, researchers telephoned practices at monthly intervals, simulating patients requesting routine, but prompt, appointments. Seven measures of access and appointment availability, measured from the mystery-shopper contacts, were related to seven measures of practice performance from the GP Patient Survey. Results Practices with lower access scores in the GP Patient Survey had poorer access and appointment availability for five out of seven items measured directly, when compared with practices that had higher scores. Scores on items from the national survey that related to appointment availability were significantly associated with direct measures of appointment availability. Patient-satisfaction levels and the likelihood that patients would recommend their practice were related to the availability of appointments. Patients’ reports of ease of telephone access in the national survey were unrelated to three out of four measures of practice call handling, but were related to the time taken to resolve an appointment request, suggesting responders’ possible confusion in answering this question. Conclusion Items relating to the accessibility of care in a the English GP patient survey have construct validity. Patients’ satisfaction with their practice is not related to practice call handling, but is related to appointment availability. PMID:23561783

  5. Urban Studies: A Study of Bibliographic Access and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Barbara E.

    This paper analyzes: (1) the bibliographic access to publications in urban studies via printed secondary sources; (2) development and scope of classification systems and of vocabulary control for urban studies; and (3) currently accessible automated collections of bibliographic citations. Urban studies is defined as "an agglomeration of…

  6. Report on the 4-h rule and National Emergency Access Target (NEAT) in Australia: time to review.

    PubMed

    Staib, Andrew; Sullivan, Clair; Griffin, Bronwyn; Bell, Anthony; Scott, Ian

    2016-06-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to provide a summary of a systematic review of literature reporting benefits and limitations of implementing National Emergency Access Target (NEAT), a target stipulating that a certain proportion of patients presenting to hospital emergency departments are admitted or discharged within 4h of presentation. Methods A systematic review of published literature using specific search terms, snowballing techniques applied to retrieved references and Google searches was performed. Results are presented as a narrative synthesis given the heterogeneity of included studies. Results Benefits of a time-based target for emergency care are improved timeliness of emergency care and reduced in-hospital mortality for emergency admissions to hospital. Limitations centre on using a process measure (time) alone devoid of any monitoring of patient outcomes, the threshold nature of a time target and the fact that currently NEAT combines the measurement of clinical management of two very different patient cohorts seeking emergency care: less acute patients discharged home and more acute patients admitted to hospital. Conclusions Time-based access targets for emergency presentations are associated with significant improvements in in-hospital mortality for emergency admissions. However, other patient-important outcomes are deserving of attention, choice of targets needs to be validated by empirical evidence of patient benefit and single targets need to be partitioned into separate targets pertaining to admitted and discharged patients. What is known about the topic? Time targets for emergency care originated in the UK. The introduction of NEAT in Australia has been controversial. NEAT directs that a certain proportion of patients will be admitted or discharged from an emergency department (ED) within 4h. Recent dissolution of the Australian National Partnership Agreement (which provided hospitals with financial incentives for achieving NEAT

  7. Pilot Evaluation of a Web-Based Intervention Targeting Sexual Health Service Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, K. E.; Newby, K.; Caley, M.; Danahay, A.; Kehal, I.

    2016-01-01

    Sexual health service access is fundamental to good sexual health, yet interventions designed to address this have rarely been implemented or evaluated. In this article, pilot evaluation findings for a targeted public health behavior change intervention, delivered via a website and web-app, aiming to increase uptake of sexual health services among…

  8. Accessibility

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/accessibility.html MedlinePlus Accessibility To use the sharing features on this page, ... Subscribe to RSS Follow us Disclaimers Copyright Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs ...

  9. [Reaching Target Groups--Shaping Accessibility. Results of a Survey Among Experts on Recommendations for Science and Practice].

    PubMed

    Jahn, I; Gansefort, D; Lehmann, F; Walter, U; Brand, T

    2015-09-01

    In an online survey, in which 18 experts participated, recommendations for research and practice to improve access to target groups were discussed. The recommendations were developed within the context of the KNP project. For the implementation of the recommendations, not only is an increased cooperation between science and practice particularly important, but also materials and training as well as standardization of methods. Furthermore, financial resources, especially for conducting evaluation studies are needed. PMID:26406533

  10. An Imaging Calorimeter for Access-Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parnell, T. A.; Adams, James H.; Binns, R. W.; Christl, M. J.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Howell, L. W.; Gregory, J. C.; Hink, P. L.; Israel, M. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A mission concept study to define the "Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for Space Station (ACCESS)" was sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The ACCESS instrument complement contains a transition radiation detector and an ionization calorimeter to measure tile spectrum of protons, helium, and heavier nuclei up to approximately 10(exp 15) eV to search for the limit of S/N shock wave acceleration, or evidence for other explanations of the spectra. Several calorimeter configurations have been studied, including the "baseline" totally active bismuth germanate instrument and sampling calorimeters utilizing various detectors. The Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS (ICA) concept comprises a carbon target and a calorimeter using a high atomic number absorber sampled approximately each radiation length (rl) by thin scintillating fiber (SCIFI) detectors. The main features and options of the ICA instrument configuration are described in this paper. Since direct calibration is not possible over most of the energy range, the best approach must be decided from simulations of calorimeter performance extrapolated from CERN calibrations at 0.375 TeV. This paper presents results from the ICA simulations study.

  11. Scaling the Drosophila Wing: TOR-Dependent Target Gene Access by the Hippo Pathway Transducer Yorkie

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Joseph; Struhl, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Organ growth is controlled by patterning signals that operate locally (e.g., Wingless/Ints [Wnts], Bone Morphogenetic Proteins [BMPs], and Hedgehogs [Hhs]) and scaled by nutrient-dependent signals that act systemically (e.g., Insulin-like peptides [ILPs] transduced by the Target of Rapamycin [TOR] pathway). How cells integrate these distinct inputs to generate organs of the appropriate size and shape is largely unknown. The transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki, a YES-Associated Protein, or YAP) acts downstream of patterning morphogens and other tissue-intrinsic signals to promote organ growth. Yki activity is regulated primarily by the Warts/Hippo (Wts/Hpo) tumour suppressor pathway, which impedes nuclear access of Yki by a cytoplasmic tethering mechanism. Here, we show that the TOR pathway regulates Yki by a separate and novel mechanism in the Drosophila wing. Instead of controlling Yki nuclear access, TOR signaling governs Yki action after it reaches the nucleus by allowing it to gain access to its target genes. When TOR activity is inhibited, Yki accumulates in the nucleus but is sequestered from its normal growth-promoting target genes—a phenomenon we term “nuclear seclusion.” Hence, we posit that in addition to its well-known role in stimulating cellular metabolism in response to nutrients, TOR also promotes wing growth by liberating Yki from nuclear seclusion, a parallel pathway that we propose contributes to the scaling of wing size with nutrient availability. PMID:26474042

  12. Scaling the Drosophila Wing: TOR-Dependent Target Gene Access by the Hippo Pathway Transducer Yorkie.

    PubMed

    Parker, Joseph; Struhl, Gary

    2015-10-01

    Organ growth is controlled by patterning signals that operate locally (e.g., Wingless/Ints [Wnts], Bone Morphogenetic Proteins [BMPs], and Hedgehogs [Hhs]) and scaled by nutrient-dependent signals that act systemically (e.g., Insulin-like peptides [ILPs] transduced by the Target of Rapamycin [TOR] pathway). How cells integrate these distinct inputs to generate organs of the appropriate size and shape is largely unknown. The transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki, a YES-Associated Protein, or YAP) acts downstream of patterning morphogens and other tissue-intrinsic signals to promote organ growth. Yki activity is regulated primarily by the Warts/Hippo (Wts/Hpo) tumour suppressor pathway, which impedes nuclear access of Yki by a cytoplasmic tethering mechanism. Here, we show that the TOR pathway regulates Yki by a separate and novel mechanism in the Drosophila wing. Instead of controlling Yki nuclear access, TOR signaling governs Yki action after it reaches the nucleus by allowing it to gain access to its target genes. When TOR activity is inhibited, Yki accumulates in the nucleus but is sequestered from its normal growth-promoting target genes--a phenomenon we term "nuclear seclusion." Hence, we posit that in addition to its well-known role in stimulating cellular metabolism in response to nutrients, TOR also promotes wing growth by liberating Yki from nuclear seclusion, a parallel pathway that we propose contributes to the scaling of wing size with nutrient availability. PMID:26474042

  13. Targeted Access to the Genomes of Low Abundance Organisms in Complex Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Podar, Mircea; Abulencia, Carl; Walcher, Marion; Hutchinson, Don; Zengler, Karsten; Garcia, Joseph; Holland, Trevin; Cotton, Dave; Hauser, Loren John; Keller, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Current metagenomic approaches to the study of complex microbial consortia provide a glimpse into the community metabolism, and occasionally allow genomic assemblies for the most abundant organisms. However, little information is gained for the members of the community present at low frequency, especially those representing yet uncultured taxa-which includes the bulk of the diversity present in most environments. Here we used phylogenetically directed cell separation by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry, followed by amplification and sequencing of a fraction of the genomic DNA of several bacterial cells that belong to the TM7 phylum. Partial genomic assembly allowed, for the first time, a look into the evolution and potential metabolism of a soil representative from this group of organisms for which there are no species in stable laboratory cultures. Genomic reconstruction from targeted cells of uncultured organisms directly isolated from the environment represents a powerful approach to access any specific members of a community and an alternative way to assess the community metabolic potential.

  14. Availability and Accessibility in an Open Access Institutional Repository: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jongwook; Burnett, Gary; Vandegrift, Micah; Baeg, Jung Hoon; Morris, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study explores the extent to which an institutional repository makes papers available and accessible on the open Web by using 170 journal articles housed in DigiNole Commons, the institutional repository at Florida State University. Method: To analyse the repository's impact on availability and accessibility, we conducted…

  15. New Insights into Dialysis Vascular Access: Molecular Targets in Arteriovenous Fistula and Arteriovenous Graft Failure and Their Potential to Improve Vascular Access Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Timmy; Misra, Sanjay

    2016-08-01

    Vascular access dysfunction remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients. At present there are few effective therapies for this clinical problem. The poor understanding of the pathobiology that leads to arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and graft (AVG) dysfunction remains a critical barrier to development of novel and effective therapies. However, in recent years we have made substantial progress in our understanding of the mechanisms of vascular access dysfunction. This article presents recent advances and new insights into the pathobiology of AVF and AVG dysfunction and highlights potential therapeutic targets to improve vascular access outcomes. PMID:27401527

  16. Does Curriculum Matter?: Revisiting Women's Access and Rights to Education in the Context of the UN Millennium Development Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Lyn

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the relevance of curriculum to current UN Millennium targets to extend access to education and equality in education for women. It argues, firstly, that it is contradictory to be concerned about women's access to education but leave curriculum out of the discussion; secondly, that curriculum is not adequately seen as a…

  17. Determination of drill paths for percutaneous cochlear access accounting for target positioning error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Jack H.; Warren, Frank M.; Labadie, Robert F.; Dawant, Benoit; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael

    2007-03-01

    In cochlear implant surgery an electrode array is permanently implanted to stimulate the auditory nerve and allow deaf people to hear. Current surgical techniques require wide excavation of the mastoid region of the temporal bone and one to three hours time to avoid damage to vital structures. Recently a far less invasive approach has been proposed-percutaneous cochlear access, in which a single hole is drilled from skull surface to the cochlea. The drill path is determined by attaching a fiducial system to the patient's skull and then choosing, on a pre-operative CT, an entry point and a target point. The drill is advanced to the target, the electrodes placed through the hole, and a stimulator implanted at the surface of the skull. The major challenge is the determination of a safe and effective drill path, which with high probability avoids specific vital structures-the facial nerve, the ossicles, and the external ear canal-and arrives at the basal turn of the cochlea. These four features lie within a few millimeters of each other, the drill is one millimeter in diameter, and errors in the determination of the target position are on the order of 0.5mm root-mean square. Thus, path selection is both difficult and critical to the success of the surgery. This paper presents a method for finding optimally safe and effective paths while accounting for target positioning error.

  18. Potential of Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) markers to estimate genetic diversity and relationships among Chinese Elymus sibiricus accessions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junchao; Xie, Wengang; Wang, Yanrong; Zhao, Xuhong

    2015-01-01

    Elymus sibiricus as an important forage grass and gene pool for improving cereal crops, that is widely distributed in West and North China. Information on its genetic diversity and relationships is limited but necessary for germplasm collection, conservation and future breeding. Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) markers were used for studying the genetic diversity and relationships among 53 E. sibiricus accessions from its primary distribution area in China. A total of 173 bands were generated from 16 SCoT primers, 159 bands of which were polymorphic with the percentage of polymorphic bands (PPB) of 91.91%. Based upon population structure analysis five groups were formed. The cluster analysis separated the accessions into two major clusters and three sub-clusters, similar to results of principal coordinate analysis (PCoA). The molecular variance analysis (AMOVA) showed that genetic variation was greater within geographical regions (50.99%) than between them (49.01%). Furthermore, the study also suggested that collecting and evaluating E. sibiricus germplasm for major geographic regions and special environments broadens the available genetic base and illustrates the range of variation. The results of the present study showed that SCoT markers were efficient in assessing the genetic diversity among E. sibiricus accessions. PMID:25853316

  19. A Conserved Target Site in HIV-1 Gag RNA is Accessible to Inhibition by Both an HDV Ribozyme and a Short Hairpin RNA

    PubMed Central

    Scarborough, Robert J; Lévesque, Michel V; Boudrias-Dalle, Etienne; Chute, Ian C; Daniels, Sylvanne M; Ouellette, Rodney J; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Gatignol, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Antisense-based molecules targeting HIV-1 RNA have the potential to be used as part of gene or drug therapy to treat HIV-1 infection. In this study, HIV-1 RNA was screened to identify more conserved and accessible target sites for ribozymes based on the hepatitis delta virus motif. Using a quantitative screen for effects on HIV-1 production, we identified a ribozyme targeting a highly conserved site in the Gag coding sequence with improved inhibitory potential compared to our previously described candidates targeting the overlapping Tat/Rev coding sequence. We also demonstrate that this target site is highly accessible to short hairpin directed RNA interference, suggesting that it may be available for the binding of antisense RNAs with different modes of action. We provide evidence that this target site is structurally conserved in diverse viral strains and that it is sufficiently different from the human transcriptome to limit off-target effects from antisense therapies. We also show that the modified hepatitis delta virus ribozyme is more sensitive to a mismatch in its target site compared to the short hairpin RNA. Overall, our results validate the potential of a new target site in HIV-1 RNA to be used for the development of antisense therapies. PMID:25072692

  20. Targeted health insurance in a low income country and its impact on access and equity in access: Egypt's school health insurance.

    PubMed

    Yip, W; Berman, P

    2001-04-01

    Governments are constantly faced with competing demands for public funds, thereby necessitating careful use of scarce resources. In Egypt, the School Health Insurance Programme (SHIP) is a government subsidized health insurance system that targets school children. The primary goals of the SHIP include improving access and equity in access to health care for children while, at the same time, ensuring programme sustainability. Using the Egyptian Household Health Utilization and Expenditure Survey (1995), this paper empirically assesses the extent to which the SHIP achieves its stated goals. Our findings show that the SHIP significantly improved access by increasing visit rates and reducing financial burden of use (out-of-pocket expenditures). With regard to the success of targeting the poor, conditional upon being covered, the SHIP reduced the differentials in visit rates between the highest and lowest income children. However, only the middle-income children benefitted from reduced financial burden (within group equity). Moreover, by targeting the children through school enrollment, the SHIP increased the differentials in the average level of access between school-going children and those not attending school (overall equity). Children not attending school tend to be poor and living in rural areas. Our results also indicate that original calculations may underestimate the SHIP financial outlays, thereby threatening the long run financial sustainability of the programme. PMID:11288187

  1. Accessing Digital Libraries: A Study of ARL Members' Digital Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Chad M.; Williams, Sarah C.

    2006-01-01

    To ensure efficient access to and integrated searching capabilities for their institution's new digital library projects, the authors studied Web sites of the Association of Research Libraries' (ARL) 111 academic, English-language libraries. Data were gathered on 1117 digital projects, noting library Web site and project access, metadata, and…

  2. Study Abroad in Egypt: Identity, Access, and Arabic Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trentman, Emma Gale

    2012-01-01

    Study abroad is often viewed as an ideal setting to improve target language proficiency due to opportunities for extensive contact with locals in the target language. However, research on study abroad demonstrates that this local contact and target language use can be quite limited, and that there is considerable variation in the linguistic…

  3. Target Acquisition and Positioning Study (TAPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The Scientific Instruments for the Large Space Telescope (LST) require a high degree of accuracy for positioning targets within their respective entrance apertures. The acquisition, verification of position, and guidance during an experiment must be accomplished with a minimum loss of observing time for the maximum effectiveness of the total mission. This study evaluates several viable concepts and modes of operation that are applicable for a Target Acquisition and Positioning System (TAPS) that is responsive to the LST instrument requirements.

  4. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF ACCESSIBLE SURROGATE TISSUES TO MONITOR MOLECULAR CHANGES IN INACCESSIBLE TARGET TISSUES FOLLOWING TOXICANT EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene Expression Profiling Of Accessible Surrogate Tissues To Monitor Molecular Changes In Inaccessible Target Tissues Following Toxicant Exposure
    John C. Rockett, Chad R. Blystone, Amber K. Goetz, Rachel N. Murrell, Judith E. Schmid and David J. Dix
    Reproductive Toxicology ...

  5. Study of Laser Interaction with Thin Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Cutter, K P; Fochs, S N; Pax, P H; Rotter, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Yamamoto, R M

    2009-03-06

    For many targets of interest, the thickness is small compared to the conduction length during the engagement. In addition, the laser-material interaction region can be treated as flat. We have studied this regime with our 25 kW solid-state laser. We have demonstrated that airflow can reduce by approximately 40% the energy required to break through a thin target. This reduction is caused by the bulging of the softened material and the tearing and removal of the material by aerodynamic forces. We present elastic modeling which explains these results.

  6. Advanced Cosmic-Ray Composition Experiment for Space Station (ACCESS): ACCESS Accommodation Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L. (Editor); Wefel, John P. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    In 1994 NASA Administrator selected the first high-energy particle physics experiment for the Space Station, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), to place a magnetic spectrometer in Earth orbit and search for cosmic antimatter. A natural consequence of this decision was that NASA would begin to explore cost-effective ways through which the design and implementation of AMS might benefit other promising payload experiments. The first such experiment to come forward was Advanced Cosmic-Ray Composition Experiment for Space Station (ACCESS) in 1996. It was proposed as a new mission concept in space physics to attach a cosmic-ray experiment of weight, volume, and geometry similar to the AMS on the International Space Station (ISS), and replace the latter as its successor when the AMS is returned to Earth. This was to be an extension of NASA's suborbital balloon program, with balloon payloads serving as the precursor flights and heritage for ACCESS. The balloon programs have always been a cost-effective NASA resource since the particle physics instrumentation for balloon and space applications are directly related. The next step was to expand the process, pooling together expertise from various NASA centers and universities while opening up definition of the ACCESS science goals to the international community through the standard practice of peer review. This process is still ongoing, and the accommodation study presented here will discuss the baseline definition of ACCESS as we understand it today.

  7. Target prediction for an open access set of compounds active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Jiménez, Francisco; Papadatos, George; Yang, Lun; Wallace, Iain M; Kumar, Vinod; Pieper, Ursula; Sali, Andrej; Brown, James R; Overington, John P; Marti-Renom, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects an estimated two billion people worldwide and is the leading cause of mortality due to infectious disease. The development of new anti-TB therapeutics is required, because of the emergence of multi-drug resistance strains as well as co-infection with other pathogens, especially HIV. Recently, the pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline published the results of a high-throughput screen (HTS) of their two million compound library for anti-mycobacterial phenotypes. The screen revealed 776 compounds with significant activity against the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain, including a subset of 177 prioritized compounds with high potency and low in vitro cytotoxicity. The next major challenge is the identification of the target proteins. Here, we use a computational approach that integrates historical bioassay data, chemical properties and structural comparisons of selected compounds to propose their potential targets in M. tuberculosis. We predicted 139 target--compound links, providing a necessary basis for further studies to characterize the mode of action of these compounds. The results from our analysis, including the predicted structural models, are available to the wider scientific community in the open source mode, to encourage further development of novel TB therapeutics. PMID:24098102

  8. Target Prediction for an Open Access Set of Compounds Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Jiménez, Francisco; Papadatos, George; Yang, Lun; Wallace, Iain M.; Kumar, Vinod; Pieper, Ursula; Sali, Andrej; Brown, James R.; Overington, John P.; Marti-Renom, Marc A.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects an estimated two billion people worldwide and is the leading cause of mortality due to infectious disease. The development of new anti-TB therapeutics is required, because of the emergence of multi-drug resistance strains as well as co-infection with other pathogens, especially HIV. Recently, the pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline published the results of a high-throughput screen (HTS) of their two million compound library for anti-mycobacterial phenotypes. The screen revealed 776 compounds with significant activity against the M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain, including a subset of 177 prioritized compounds with high potency and low in vitro cytotoxicity. The next major challenge is the identification of the target proteins. Here, we use a computational approach that integrates historical bioassay data, chemical properties and structural comparisons of selected compounds to propose their potential targets in M. tuberculosis. We predicted 139 target - compound links, providing a necessary basis for further studies to characterize the mode of action of these compounds. The results from our analysis, including the predicted structural models, are available to the wider scientific community in the open source mode, to encourage further development of novel TB therapeutics. PMID:24098102

  9. Systemic barriers accessing HIV treatment among people who inject drugs in Russia: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Sarang, Anya; Rhodes, Tim; Sheon, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Achieving ‘universal access’ to antiretroviral HIV treatment (ART) in lower income and transitional settings is a global target. Yet, access to ART is shaped by local social condition and is by no means universal. Qualitative studies are ideally suited to describing how access to ART is socially situated. We explored systemic barriers to accessing ART among people who inject drugs (PWID) in a Russian city (Ekaterinburg) with a large burden of HIV treatment demand. We undertook 42 in-depth qualitative interviews with people living with HIV with current or recent experience of injecting drug use. Accounts were analysed thematically, and supplemented here with an illustrative case study. Three core themes were identified: ‘labyrinthine bureaucracy’ governing access to ART; a ‘system Catch 22’ created by an expectation that access to ART was conditional upon treated drug use in a setting of limited drug treatment opportunity; and ‘system verticalization’, where a lack of integration across HIV, tuberculosis (TB) and drug treatment compromised access to ART. Taken together, we find that systemic factors play a key role in shaping access to ART with the potential adverse effects of reproducing treatment initiation delay and disengagement from treatment. We argue that meso-level systemic factors affecting access to ART for PWID interact with wider macro-level structural forces, including those related to drug treatment policy and the social marginalization of PWID. We note the urgent need for systemic and structural changes to improve access to ART for PWID in this setting, including to simplify bureaucratic procedures, foster integrated HIV, TB and drug treatment services, and advocate for drug treatment policy reform. PMID:23197431

  10. Widening Access to Higher Education: An Evaluative Case Study of a Foundation Year Alternative to Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Peter A.; Moores, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    Universities are encouraged to widen access to a broad range of applicants, including mature students taking Access qualifications. Admissions tutors can find it difficult to compare and choose between Access and A-level applications, and Access applicants for popular courses may be disadvantaged relative to students with good A-levels. In this…

  11. Policies to Spur Energy Access. Executive Summary; Volume 1, Engaging the Private Sector in Expanding Access to Electricity; Volume 2, Case Studies to Public-Private Models to Finance Decentralized Electricity Access

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Terri; Rai, Neha; Esterly, Sean; Cox, Sadie; Reber, Tim; Muzammil, Maliha; Mahmood, Tasfiq; Kaur, Nanki; Tesfaye, Lidya; Mamuye, Simret; Knuckles, James; Morris, Ellen; de Been, Merijn; Steinbach, Dave; Acharya, Sunil; Chhetri, Raju Pandit; Bhushal, Ramesh

    2015-09-01

    Government policy is one of the most important factors in engaging the private sector in providing universal access to electricity. In particular, the private sector is well positioned to provide decentralized electricity products and services. While policy uncertainty and regulatory barriers can keep enterprises and investors from engaging in the market, targeted policies can create opportunities to leverage private investment and skills to expand electricity access. However, creating a sustainable market requires policies beyond traditional electricity regulation. The report reviews the range of policy issues that impact the development and expansion of a market for decentralized electricity services from establishing an enabling policy environment to catalyzing finance, building human capacity, and integrating energy access with development programs. The case studies in this report show that robust policy frameworks--addressing a wide range of market issues--can lead to rapid transformation in energy access. The report highlights examples of these policies in action Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Mali, Mexico, and Nepal.

  12. Coalition in New York studies improving access to capital.

    PubMed

    Pallarito, K

    1992-11-16

    A coalition convened by the Greater New York Hospital Association is studying ways to improve access to capital, an area of healthcare reform the group says has been largely overlooked. The group, including representatives from hospitals, investment banking, accounting firms and the state, will issue a report outlining its recommendations. The findings also will be presented to the White House. PMID:10122217

  13. [Arabidopsis thaliana accessions - a tool for biochemical and phylogentical studies].

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Renata; Gabruk, Michał; Kruk, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana since a few decades is used as a model for biological and plant genetic research. Natural variation of this species is related to its geographical range which covers different climate zones and habitats. The ability to occupy such a wide area by Arabidopsis is possible due to its stress tolerance and adaptability. Arabidopsis accessions exhibit phenotypic and genotypic variation, which is a result of adaptation to local environmental conditions. During development, plants are subjected to various stress factors. Plants show a spectrum of reactions, processes and phenomena that determine their survival in these adverse conditions. The response of plants to stress involves signal detection and transmission. These reactions are different and depend on the stressor, its intensity, plant species and life strategy. It is assumed that the populations of the same species from different geographical regions acclimated to the stress conditions develop a set of alleles, which allow them to grow and reproduce. Therefore, the study of natural variation in response to abiotic stress among Arabidopsis thaliana accessions allows to find key genes or alleles, and thus the mechanisms by which plants cope with adverse physical and chemical conditions. This paper presents an overview of recent findings, tools and research directions used in the study of natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. Additionally, we explain why accessions can be used in the phylogenetic analyses and to study demography and migration of Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:26281359

  14. Boston solar retrofits: studies of solar access and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, M.

    1980-11-01

    Studies of solar access and solar retrofit economics are described for residential applications in the City of Boston. The study of solar access was based upon a random sample of 94 buildings; the sample was stratified to ensure a broad geographic representation from the city's various sections. Using available data on the heights and orientations of the sampled structures and surrounding buildings, each building's hourly access to sunlight was computed separately for the roof and south facing walls. These data were then aggregated by broad structural classifications in order to provide general measures of solar access. The second study was a comparative analysis of the economics of several solar heating and hot water systems. An active hot water system, installed using pre-assembled, commercially purchased equipment, was selected as a reference technology. A variety of measures of economic performance were computed for this system, with and without existing tax credits and under various financing arrangements. Next, a number of alternative approaches for solar space and water heating were identified from interviews with individuals and groups involved in solar retrofit projects in the Boston area. The objective was to identify approaches that many of those interviewed believe to be low-cost means of applying solar energy in residential settings. The approaches selected include thermal window covers, wall collectors, bread box water heaters, and sun spaces. Preliminary estimates of the performance of several representative designs were developed and the economics of these designs evaluated.

  15. Genomic Access to Monarch Migration Using TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Targeted Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Markert, Matthew J; Zhang, Ying; Enuameh, Metewo S; Reppert, Steven M; Wolfe, Scot A; Merlin, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The eastern North American monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, is an emerging model system to study the neural, molecular, and genetic basis of animal long-distance migration and animal clockwork mechanisms. While genomic studies have provided new insight into migration-associated and circadian clock genes, the general lack of simple and versatile reverse-genetic methods has limited in vivo functional analysis of candidate genes in this species. Here, we report the establishment of highly efficient and heritable gene mutagenesis methods in the monarch butterfly using transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and CRISPR-associated RNA-guided nuclease Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9). Using two clock gene loci, cryptochrome 2 and clock (clk), as candidates, we show that both TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 generate high-frequency nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)-mediated mutations at targeted sites (up to 100%), and that injecting fewer than 100 eggs is sufficient to recover mutant progeny and generate monarch knockout lines in about 3 months. Our study also genetically defines monarch CLK as an essential component of the transcriptional activation complex of the circadian clock. The methods presented should not only greatly accelerate functional analyses of many aspects of monarch biology, but are also anticipated to facilitate the development of these tools in other nontraditional insect species as well as the development of homology-directed knock-ins. PMID:26837953

  16. Genomic Access to Monarch Migration Using TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Targeted Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Markert, Matthew J.; Zhang, Ying; Enuameh, Metewo S.; Reppert, Steven M.; Wolfe, Scot A.; Merlin, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The eastern North American monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, is an emerging model system to study the neural, molecular, and genetic basis of animal long-distance migration and animal clockwork mechanisms. While genomic studies have provided new insight into migration-associated and circadian clock genes, the general lack of simple and versatile reverse-genetic methods has limited in vivo functional analysis of candidate genes in this species. Here, we report the establishment of highly efficient and heritable gene mutagenesis methods in the monarch butterfly using transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and CRISPR-associated RNA-guided nuclease Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9). Using two clock gene loci, cryptochrome 2 and clock (clk), as candidates, we show that both TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 generate high-frequency nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)-mediated mutations at targeted sites (up to 100%), and that injecting fewer than 100 eggs is sufficient to recover mutant progeny and generate monarch knockout lines in about 3 months. Our study also genetically defines monarch CLK as an essential component of the transcriptional activation complex of the circadian clock. The methods presented should not only greatly accelerate functional analyses of many aspects of monarch biology, but are also anticipated to facilitate the development of these tools in other nontraditional insect species as well as the development of homology-directed knock-ins. PMID:26837953

  17. Combining apps targeting professionals and senior citizens to improve housing accessibility and influence housing provision policies.

    PubMed

    Helle, Tina; Iwarsson, Susanne; Lunn, Tine Bieber; Iversen, Mogens Holm; Jonsson, Oskar; Mårtensson, Knut; Svarre, Tanja; Slaug, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Two separate apps that address the increasingly important issue of accessible housing for senior citizens have been developed in different project settings. One of the apps was developed to facilitate the process for professional raters to assess housing accessibility in the context of individual housing adaptations. The other app was developed for senior citizens to raise their awareness of possible accessibility problems in their current dwelling and in other apartments within the available housing stock. Both apps were developed with a high degree of active user involvement in processes utilizing multiple state of the art methods. The results are two well accepted prototype apps perceived as user-friendly and appropriate for the intended user groups. By combining these two apps, our ambition is for the professional raters to benefit by gaining knowledge of their clients' perceived needs and desires, and for senior citizens to benefit by getting access to a database of professionally rated dwellings. The ultimate goal is the generation of sound knowledge reflecting the needs and desires of senior citizens and professional requirements regarding accessible housing as a means to inform and influence housing provision policies. PMID:26294488

  18. Next generation communications satellites: Multiple access and network studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, T. E.; Schwartz, M.; Meadows, H. E.; Ahmadi, H. K.; Gadre, J. G.; Gopal, I. S.; Matsmo, K.

    1980-01-01

    Following an overview of issues involved in the choice of promising system architectures for efficient communication with multiple small inexpensive Earth stations serving hetergeneous user populations, performance evaluation via analysis and simulation for six SS/TDMA (satellite-switched/time-division multiple access) system architectures is discussed. These configurations are chosen to exemplify the essential alternatives available in system design. Although the performance evaluation analyses are of fairly general applicability, whenever possible they are considered in the context of NASA's 30/20 GHz studies. Packet switched systems are considered, with the assumption that only a part of transponder capacit is devoted to packets, the integration of circuit and packet switched traffic being reserved for further study. Three types of station access are distinguished: fixed (FA), demand (DA), and random access (RA). Similarly, switching in the satellite can be assigned on a fixed (FS) or demand (DS) basis, or replaced by a buffered store-and-forward system (SF) onboard the satellite. Since not all access/switching combinations are practical, six systems are analyzed in detail: three FS SYSTEMS, FA/FS, DA/ES, RA/FS; one DS system, DA/DS; and two SF systems, FA/SF, DA/SF. Results are presented primarily in terms of delay-throughput characteristics.

  19. Study Identifies New Lymphoma Treatment Target

    Cancer.gov

    NCI researchers have identified new therapeutic targets for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Drugs that hit these targets are under clinical development and the researchers hope to begin testing them in clinical trials of patients with DLBCL.

  20. Flightless I (Drosophila) homolog facilitates chromatin accessibility of the estrogen receptor α target genes in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Kwang Won

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • H3K4me3 and Pol II binding at TFF1 promoter were reduced in FLII-depleted MCF-7 cells. • FLII is required for chromatin accessibility of the enhancer of ERalpha target genes. • Depletion of FLII causes inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 cells. - Abstract: The coordinated activities of multiple protein complexes are essential to the remodeling of chromatin structure and for the recruitment of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to the promoter in order to facilitate the initiation of transcription in nuclear receptor-mediated gene expression. Flightless I (Drosophila) homolog (FLII), a nuclear receptor coactivator, is associated with the SWI/SNF-chromatin remodeling complex during estrogen receptor (ER)α-mediated transcription. However, the function of FLII in estrogen-induced chromatin opening has not been fully explored. Here, we show that FLII plays a critical role in establishing active histone modification marks and generating the open chromatin structure of ERα target genes. We observed that the enhancer regions of ERα target genes are heavily occupied by FLII, and histone H3K4me3 and Pol II binding induced by estrogen are decreased in FLII-depleted MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE)-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments showed that depletion of FLII resulted in reduced chromatin accessibility of multiple ERα target genes. These data suggest FLII as a key regulator of ERα-mediated transcription through its role in regulating chromatin accessibility for the binding of RNA Polymerase II and possibly other transcriptional coactivators.

  1. Access to a polymerase chain reaction assay method targeting 13 respiratory viruses can reduce antibiotics: a randomised, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Viral respiratory infections are common worldwide and range from completely benign disease to life-threatening illness. Symptoms can be unspecific, and an etiologic diagnosis is rarely established because of a lack of suitable diagnostic tools. Improper use of antibiotics is common in this setting, which is detrimental in light of the development of bacterial resistance. It has been suggested that the use of diagnostic tests could reduce antibiotic prescription rates. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether access to a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay panel for etiologic diagnosis of acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) would have an impact on antibiotic prescription rate in primary care clinical settings. Methods Adult patients with symptoms of ARTI were prospectively included. Nasopharyngeal and throat swabs were analysed by using a multiplex real-time PCR method targeting thirteen viruses and two bacteria. Patients were recruited at 12 outpatient units from October 2006 through April 2009, and samples were collected on the day of inclusion (initial visit) and after 10 days (follow-up visit). Patients were randomised in an open-label treatment protocol to receive a rapid or delayed result (on the following day or after eight to twelve days). The primary outcome measure was the antibiotic prescription rate at the initial visit, and the secondary outcome was the total antibiotic prescription rate during the study period. Results A total sample of 447 patients was randomised. Forty-one were excluded, leaving 406 patients for analysis. In the group of patients randomised for a rapid result, 4.5% (9 of 202) of patients received antibiotics at the initial visit, compared to 12.3% (25 of 204) (P = 0.005) of patients in the delayed result group. At follow-up, there was no significant difference between the groups: 13.9% (28 of 202) in the rapid result group and 17.2% (35 of 204) in the delayed result group (P = 0

  2. PLUTONIUM-238 PRODUCTION TARGET DESIGN STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Christopher J; Wham, Robert M; Hobbs, Randall W; Owens, R Steven; Chandler, David; Freels, James D; Maldonado, G Ivan

    2014-01-01

    A new supply chain is planned for plutonium-238 using existing reactors at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and existing chemical recovery facilities at ORNL. Validation and testing activities for new irradiation target designs have been conducted in three phases over a 2 year period to provide data for scale-up to production. Target design, qualification, target fabrication, and irradiation of fully-loaded targets have been accomplished. Data from post-irradiation examination (PIE) supports safety analysis and irradiation of future target designs.

  3. Charge Detector Study for a Thin Sampling Calorimeter for ACCESS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeongin; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Advanced Cosmic ray Composition Experiment for Space Station (ACCESS) is a NASA's new mission concept that is now being studied. The scientific objective is to measure cosmic ray elemental energy spectra in the energy range from I TeV up to 1000 TeV. ACCESS will carry two instruments and measure the energy and charge of incoming particles. One of these will be a calorimeter with a charge detector. The charge detector will see not only signals from the incident cosmic rays but also signals from radiation backscattered from the calorimeter. In that case, bias information on particle identification is unavoidable. This study shows how much the charge detector will be affected by backscatter and how it can be designed with a minimized effect.

  4. Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) study. Fiscal year 1989 results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sue, Miles K. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is exploring the potential and feasibility of a personal access satellite system (PASS) that will offer the user greater freedom and mobility than existing or currently planned communications systems. Studies performed in prior years resulted in a strawman design and the identification of technologies that are critical to the successful implementation of PASS. The study efforts in FY-89 were directed towards alternative design options with the objective of either improving the system performance or alleviating the constraints on the user terminal. The various design options and system issues studied this year and the results of the study are presented.

  5. Target studies for surface muon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, F.; Desorgher, L.; Fuchs, A.; Hajdas, W.; Hodge, Z.; Kettle, P.-R.; Knecht, A.; Lüscher, R.; Papa, A.; Rutar, G.; Wohlmuther, M.

    2016-02-01

    Meson factories are powerful drivers of diverse physics programs. With beam powers already in the MW-regime attention has to be turned to target and beam line design to further significantly increase surface muon rates available for experiments. For this reason we have explored the possibility of using a neutron spallation target as a source of surface muons by performing detailed Geant4 simulations with pion production cross sections based on a parametrization of existing data. While the spallation target outperforms standard targets in the backward direction by more than a factor 7 it is not more efficient than standard targets viewed under 90°. Not surprisingly, the geometry of the target plays a large role in the generation of surface muons. Through careful optimization, a gain in surface muon rate of between 30% and 60% over the standard "box-like" target used at the Paul Scherrer Institute could be achieved by employing a rotated slab target. An additional 10% gain could also be possible by utilizing novel target materials such as, e.g., boron carbide.

  6. Accessible GPS: Reorientation and Target Location among Users with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponchillia, Paul E.; Rak, Eniko C.; Freeland, Amy L.; LaGrow, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the results of two single-subject experiments that were designed to determine consumers' ability to use a BrailleNote GPS. The participants decreased their mean orientation time from 6 minutes to 45 seconds and increased their target-location efficiency fourfold with BGPS than without BGPS. Additional results and implications…

  7. Hard-to-reach? Using health access status as a way to more effectively target segments of the Latino audience.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Holley A; Ball-Rokeach, Sandra J

    2011-04-01

    Health issues disproportionately affect Latinos, but variations within this ethnic group may mean that some Latinos are harder to reach with health messages than others. This paper introduces a methodology grounded in communication infrastructure theory to better target 'hard-to-reach' audiences. A random digit dialing telephone survey of 739 Latinos living in two Los Angeles communities was conducted. The relationships between health access difficulties and connections to an integrated storytelling network as well as individual health communication source connections were explored. Findings suggest that Latinos who are connected to an integrated storytelling network report marginally greater ease finding healthcare, despite not being any more likely to have insurance or a regular place for healthcare. Latinos who have health access problems tended to rely more upon Spanish-language television for health information. In addition, those without healthcare access problems are more likely to indicate that they use health professionals, the Internet, mainstream TV and printed materials like health pamphlets for health information. The theoretical and methodological contributions of this work, its major findings, implications, limitations and policy guidelines are discussed. PMID:21303816

  8. Accessing sea quark's angular momentum through polarized target Drell-Yan single-spin asymmetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaodong; P-1039 Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    A Letter-Of-Intent (P-1039) has been submitted to the Fermilab's Program Advisory Committee in May 2013, for a measurement of transversely polarized proton target (NH3) single-spin asymmetry (SSA) in Drell-Yan reaction with a 120 GeV/c unpolarized proton beam using a similar setup as in the ongoing unpolarized target experiment (E906). The goal of this LOI is to clearly pin down the u -quark Sivers distribution in the x range of 0.1-0.3, where a large sea flavor asymmetry (d / u) has been observed. A non-vanishing quark Sivers distribution arises from the imaginary piece of amplitudes interference between quark angular momentum L = 0 , and L ≠ 0 wave functions. Existing semi-inclusive DIS Sivers-type SSA data from HERMES, COMPASS and JLab-Hall A, while sensitive to valence quarks' Sivers distributions, do not provide much constrains on sea quarks' Sivers distributions. In the case that u -quark carries zero angular momentum, one expects u -quark's Sivers distribution to vanish, therefore observing a zero target SSA in Drell-Yan reaction in P-1039.

  9. Introduction to the Personal Access Satellite System Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sue, Miles K.

    1990-01-01

    A recent study by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) has concluded that the 21st century will be the age of information in which the telecommunication infrastructure will be vital to the social and economic well being of society. To meet the challenge of the coming age, JPL has been performing studies on a personal access satellite system (PASS) for the 21st century. The PASS study can be traced back to a study in which the technical feasibility and potential applications of a high frequency, low data rate satellite system were identified using small fixed terminals. Herein, the PASS concept is described along with the strawman design. Then the key challenges are identified along with possible solutions. Finally, the plan for the future is summarized from the key results.

  10. A Study of Innovative Features in Scholarly Open Access Journals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The emergence of the Internet has triggered tremendous changes in the publication of scientific peer-reviewed journals. Today, journals are usually available in parallel electronic versions, but the way the peer-review process works, the look of articles and journals, and the rigid and slow publication schedules have remained largely unchanged, at least for the vast majority of subscription-based journals. Those publishing firms and scholarly publishers who have chosen the more radical option of open access (OA), in which the content of journals is freely accessible to anybody with Internet connectivity, have had a much bigger degree of freedom to experiment with innovations. Objective The objective was to study how open access journals have experimented with innovations concerning ways of organizing the peer review, the format of journals and articles, new interactive and media formats, and novel publishing revenue models. Methods The features of 24 open access journals were studied. The journals were chosen in a nonrandom manner from the approximately 7000 existing OA journals based on available information about interesting journals and include both representative cases and highly innovative outlier cases. Results Most early OA journals in the 1990s were founded by individual scholars and used a business model based on voluntary work close in spirit to open-source development of software. In the next wave, many long-established journals, in particular society journals and journals from regions such as Latin America, made their articles OA when they started publishing parallel electronic versions. From about 2002 on, newly founded professional OA publishing firms using article-processing charges to fund their operations have emerged. Over the years, there have been several experiments with new forms of peer review, media enhancements, and the inclusion of structured data sets with articles. In recent years, the growth of OA publishing has also been

  11. How Accessible Are Public Libraries' Web Sites? A Study of Georgia Public Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingle, Emma; Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    One issue that public librarians must consider when planning Web site design is accessibility for patrons with disabilities. This article reports a study of Web site accessibility of public libraries in Georgia. The focus of the report is whether public libraries use accessible guidelines and standards in making their Web sites accessible. An…

  12. Ontology-based federated data access to human studies information.

    PubMed

    Sim, Ida; Carini, Simona; Tu, Samson W; Detwiler, Landon T; Brinkley, James; Mollah, Shamim A; Burke, Karl; Lehmann, Harold P; Chakraborty, Swati; Wittkowski, Knut M; Pollock, Brad H; Johnson, Thomas M; Huser, Vojtech

    2012-01-01

    Human studies are one of the most valuable sources of knowledge in biomedical research, but data about their design and results are currently widely dispersed in siloed systems. Federation of these data is needed to facilitate large-scale data analysis to realize the goals of evidence-based medicine. The Human Studies Database project has developed an informatics infrastructure for federated query of human studies databases, using a generalizable approach to ontology-based data access. Our approach has three main components. First, the Ontology of Clinical Research (OCRe) provides the reference semantics. Second, a data model, automatically derived from OCRe into XSD, maintains semantic synchrony of the underlying representations while facilitating data acquisition using common XML technologies. Finally, the Query Integrator issues queries distributed over the data, OCRe, and other ontologies such as SNOMED in BioPortal. We report on a demonstration of this infrastructure on data acquired from institutional systems and from ClinicalTrials.gov. PMID:23304360

  13. Ontology-Based Federated Data Access to Human Studies Information

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Ida; Carini, Simona; Tu, Samson W.; Detwiler, Landon T.; Brinkley, James; Mollah, Shamim A.; Burke, Karl; Lehmann, Harold P.; Chakraborty, Swati; Wittkowski, Knut M.; Pollock, Brad H.; Johnson, Thomas M.; Huser, Vojtech

    2012-01-01

    Human studies are one of the most valuable sources of knowledge in biomedical research, but data about their design and results are currently widely dispersed in siloed systems. Federation of these data is needed to facilitate large-scale data analysis to realize the goals of evidence-based medicine. The Human Studies Database project has developed an informatics infrastructure for federated query of human studies databases, using a generalizable approach to ontology-based data access. Our approach has three main components. First, the Ontology of Clinical Research (OCRe) provides the reference semantics. Second, a data model, automatically derived from OCRe into XSD, maintains semantic synchrony of the underlying representations while facilitating data acquisition using common XML technologies. Finally, the Query Integrator issues queries distributed over the data, OCRe, and other ontologies such as SNOMED in BioPortal. We report on a demonstration of this infrastructure on data acquired from institutional systems and from ClinicalTrials.gov. PMID:23304360

  14. Accessing the Soil Metagenome for Studies of Microbial Diversity▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Delmont, Tom O.; Robe, Patrick; Cecillon, Sébastien; Clark, Ian M.; Constancias, Florentin; Simonet, Pascal; Hirsch, Penny R.; Vogel, Timothy M.

    2011-01-01

    Soil microbial communities contain the highest level of prokaryotic diversity of any environment, and metagenomic approaches involving the extraction of DNA from soil can improve our access to these communities. Most analyses of soil biodiversity and function assume that the DNA extracted represents the microbial community in the soil, but subsequent interpretations are limited by the DNA recovered from the soil. Unfortunately, extraction methods do not provide a uniform and unbiased subsample of metagenomic DNA, and as a consequence, accurate species distributions cannot be determined. Moreover, any bias will propagate errors in estimations of overall microbial diversity and may exclude some microbial classes from study and exploitation. To improve metagenomic approaches, investigate DNA extraction biases, and provide tools for assessing the relative abundances of different groups, we explored the biodiversity of the accessible community DNA by fractioning the metagenomic DNA as a function of (i) vertical soil sampling, (ii) density gradients (cell separation), (iii) cell lysis stringency, and (iv) DNA fragment size distribution. Each fraction had a unique genetic diversity, with different predominant and rare species (based on ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis [RISA] fingerprinting and phylochips). All fractions contributed to the number of bacterial groups uncovered in the metagenome, thus increasing the DNA pool for further applications. Indeed, we were able to access a more genetically diverse proportion of the metagenome (a gain of more than 80% compared to the best single extraction method), limit the predominance of a few genomes, and increase the species richness per sequencing effort. This work stresses the difference between extracted DNA pools and the currently inaccessible complete soil metagenome. PMID:21183646

  15. A study of the bio-accessibility of welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Berlinger, Balázs; Ellingsen, Dag G; Náray, Miklós; Záray, Gyula; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2008-12-01

    The respiratory bio-accessibility of a substance is the fraction that is soluble in the respiratory environment and is available for absorption. In the case of respiratory exposure the amount of absorbed substance plays a main role in the biological effects. Extensive bio-accessibility studies have always been an essential requirement for a better understanding of the biological effects of different workplace aerosols, such as welding fumes. Fumes generated using three different welding techniques, manual metal arc (MMA) welding, metal inert gas (MIG) welding, and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding were investigated in the present study. Each technique was used for stainless steel welding. Welding fumes were collected on PVC membrane filters in batches of 114 using a multiport air sampler. Three different fluids were applied for the solubility study: deionised water and two kinds of lung fluid simulants: lung epithelial lining fluid simulant (Gamble's solution) and artificial lung lining fluid simulant (Hatch's solution). In order to obtain sufficient data to study the tendencies in solubility change with time, seven different leaching periods were used (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24 h), each of them with three replicates. The effect of dissolution temperature was also studied. The total amounts of selected metals in the three different welding fumes were determined after microwave-assisted digestion with the mixture of aqua regia and hydrofluoric acid. The most obvious observation yielded by the results is that the solubility of individual metals varies greatly depending on the welding technique, the composition of the leaching fluid and leaching time. This study shows that the most reasonable choice as a media for the bio-assessment of solubility might be Hatch's solution by a dissolution time of 24 h. PMID:19037486

  16. Conceptual studies for a mercury target circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Sigg, B.

    1996-06-01

    For the now favored target design of the European Spallation Source project, i.e. the version using mercury as target material, a basic concept of the primary system has been worked out. It does not include a detailed design of the various components of the target circuit, but tries to outline a feasible solution for the system. Besides the removal of the thermal power of about 3MW produced in the target by the proton beam, the primary system has to satisfy a number of other requirements related to processing, safety, and operation. The basic proposal uses an electromagnetic pump and a mercury-water intermediate heat excanger, but other alternatives are also being discussed. Basic safety requirements, i.e. protection against radiation and toxic mercury vapours, are satisfied by a design using an air-tight primary system containment, double-walled tubes in the intermediate heat exchanger, a fail-safe system for decay heat removal, and a remote handling facility for the active part of the system. Much engineering work has still to be done, because many details of the design of the mercury and gas processing systems remain to be clarified, the thermal-hydraulic components need further optimisation, the system for control and instrumentation is only known in outline and a through safety analysis will be required.

  17. Target Study for the RACE HP Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Agostini, P.; Ciotti, M.; Beneamati, G.; Sansone, L.; Elmi, N.; Carta, M.; Petrovich, C.; Bergeron, A.; Krakowiak, C.; Beller, D.

    2006-07-01

    The full development of a multi-disks uranium target is described, including neutron production analysis, power deposition distributions, thermo-mechanical simulations and cooling schemes. A detailed material choice and a geometrical optimization were carried on in order to maximize the neutron production. (authors)

  18. Open access and openly accessible: a study of scientific publications shared via the internet

    PubMed Central

    Wren, Jonathan D

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To determine how often reprints of scientific publications are shared online, whether journal readership level is a predictor, how the amount of file sharing changes with the age of the article, and to what degree open access publications are shared on non-journal websites. Design The internet was searched using an application programming interface to Google, a popular and freely available search engine. Main outcome measures The proportion of reprints of journal articles published between 1994 and 2004 from within 13 subscription based and four open access journals that could be located online at non-journal websites. Results The probability that an article could be found online at a non-journal website correlated with the journal impact factor and the time since initial publication. Papers from higher impact journals and more recent articles were more likely to be located. On average, for the high impact journal articles published in 2003, over a third could be located at non-journal websites. Similar trends were observed for the delayed or full open access publications. Conclusions Decentralised sharing of scientific reprints through the internet creates a degree of de facto open access that, though highly incomplete in its coverage, is none the less biased towards publications of higher popular demand. PMID:15827063

  19. Understanding delayed access to antenatal care: a qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Delayed access to antenatal care ('late booking’) has been linked to increased maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. The aim of this qualitative study was to understand why some women are late to access antenatal care. Methods 27 women presenting after 19 completed weeks gestation for their first hospital booking appointment were interviewed, using a semi-structured format, in community and maternity hospital settings in South Yorkshire, United Kingdom. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and entered onto NVivo 8 software. An interdisciplinary, iterative, thematic analysis was undertaken. Results The late booking women were diverse in terms of: age (15–37 years); parity (0–4); socioeconomic status; educational attainment and ethnicity. Three key themes relating to late booking were identified from our data: 1) 'not knowing’: realisation (absence of classic symptoms, misinterpretation); belief (age, subfertility, using contraception, lay hindrance); 2) 'knowing’: avoidance (ambivalence, fear, self-care); postponement (fear, location, not valuing care, self-care); and 3) 'delayed’ (professional and system failures, knowledge/empowerment issues). Conclusions Whilst vulnerable groups are strongly represented in this study, women do not always fit a socio-cultural stereotype of a 'late booker’. We report a new taxonomy of more complex reasons for late antenatal booking than the prevalent concepts of denial, concealment and disadvantage. Explanatory sub-themes are also discussed, which relate to psychological, empowerment and socio-cultural factors. These include poor reproductive health knowledge and delayed recognition of pregnancy, the influence of a pregnancy 'mindset’ and previous pregnancy experience, and the perceived value of antenatal care. The study also highlights deficiencies in early pregnancy diagnosis and service organisation. These issues should be considered by practitioners and service commissioners in order to promote

  20. Optimization Studies for ISOL Type High-Powered Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, Igor; Ronningen, Reginald Martin

    2013-09-24

    The research studied one-step and two-step Isotope Separation on Line (ISOL) targets for future radioactive beam facilities with high driver-beam power through advanced computer simulations. As a target material uranium carbide in the form of foils was used because of increasing demand for actinide targets in rare-isotope beam facilities and because such material was under development in ISAC at TRIUMF when this project started. Simulations of effusion were performed for one-step and two step targets and the effects of target dimensions and foil matrix were studied. Diffusion simulations were limited by availability of diffusion parameters for UCx material at reduced density; however, the viability of the combined diffusion?effusion simulation methodology was demonstrated and could be used to extract physical parameters such as diffusion coefficients and effusion delay times from experimental isotope release curves. Dissipation of the heat from the isotope-producing targets is the limiting factor for high-power beam operation both for the direct and two-step targets. Detailed target models were used to simulate proton beam interactions with the targets to obtain the fission rates and power deposition distributions, which were then applied in the heat transfer calculations to study the performance of the targets. Results indicate that a direct target, with specification matching ISAC TRIUMF target, could operate in 500-MeV proton beam at beam powers up to ~40 kW, producing ~8 1013 fission/s with maximum temperature in UCx below 2200 C. Targets with larger radius allow higher beam powers and fission rates. For the target radius in the range 9-mm to 30-mm the achievable fission rate increases almost linearly with target radius, however, the effusion delay time also increases linearly with target radius.

  1. Accessibility of School Districts' Web Sites: A Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Marty; Flowers, Claudia; Gibson, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Many school districts (SDs) use the World Wide Web (WWW or Web) to disseminate a wide variety of information about things such as district events, policies, and a wide variety of student information. On-line barriers limit the accessibility of the WWW for persons and students with disabilities and thus can limit their access to vital information.…

  2. Web Site Accessibility: A Study of Six Genres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson-Sanborn, Emily; Odess-Harnish, Kerri; Warren, Nikki

    2002-01-01

    Examines the accessibility of six categories of Web sites using the evaluation software Bobby. Discusses universal access for users with disabilities; application of the Americans with Disabilities Act and Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998; government sites versus commercial sites; and Web site design. (Author/LRW)

  3. Perceived Barriers to Health Care Access among Rural Older Adults: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, R. Turner; Williams, Kimberly A.; Carter, Mary W.; Spencer, S. Melinda; Solovieva, Tatiana

    2005-01-01

    Context: Many rural elders experience limited access to health care. The majority of what we know about this issue has been based upon quantitative studies, yet qualitative studies might offer additional insight into individual perceptions of health care access. Purpose: To examine what barriers rural elders report when accessing needed health…

  4. Perceived Barriers to Health Care Access Among Rural Older Adults: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, R. Turner; Williams, Kimberly A.; Carter, Mary W.; Spencer, S. Melinda; Solovieva, Tatiana

    2005-01-01

    Context: Many rural elders experience limited access to health care. The majority of what we know about this issue has been based upon quantitative studies, yet qualitative studies might offer additional insight into individual perceptions of health care access. Purpose: To examine what barriers rural elders report when accessing needed health…

  5. Power System Trade Studies for the Lunar Surface Access Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohout, Lisa, L.

    2008-01-01

    A Lunar Lander Preparatory Study (LLPS) was undertaken for NASA's Lunar Lander Pre-Project in 2006 to explore a wide breadth of conceptual lunar lander designs. Civil servant teams from nearly every NASA center responded with dozens of innovative designs that addressed one or more specific lander technical challenges. Although none of the conceptual lander designs sought to solve every technical design issue, each added significantly to the technical database available to the Lunar Lander Project Office as it began operations in 2007. As part of the LLPS, a first order analysis was performed to identify candidate power systems for the ascent and descent stages of the Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). A power profile by mission phase was established based on LSAM subsystem power requirements. Using this power profile, battery and fuel cell systems were modeled to determine overall mass and volume. Fuel cell systems were chosen for both the descent and ascent stages due to their low mass. While fuel cells looked promising based on these initial results, several areas have been identified for further investigation in subsequent studies, including the identification and incorporation of peak power requirements into the analysis, refinement of the fuel cell models to improve fidelity and incorporate ongoing technology developments, and broadening the study to include solar power.

  6. Group disparities and health information: a study of online access for the underserved.

    PubMed

    Lorence, Daniel; Park, Heeyoung

    2008-03-01

    The Internet is an oft-cited learning resource, useful to consumers who seek to educate themselves on specific technical issues or knowledge-intensive topics. Availability of public-access Internet portals and decreasing costs of personal computers have created a consensus that unequal access to information, or a "Digital Divide", presents a like problem specific to information for uninsured or under-insured healthcare consumers. Access to information, however, is now an essential part of consumer-centric healthcare management. To date little research has been done to differentiate levels of health information access on the Web by different subgroups, linking online socioeconomic characteristics and health seeking behaviors. This analysis of a landmark Pew Foundation survey seeks to differentiate and delineate information access, or lack of desired access, across targeted, "digitally underserved" subgroups. PMID:18258673

  7. Start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism in toxic and non-toxic accessions of Jatropha curcas L. and development of a codominant SCAR marker.

    PubMed

    Mulpuri, Sujatha; Muddanuru, Tarakeswari; Francis, George

    2013-06-01

    Thirty six start codon targeted (SCoT) primers were used for characterization of 48 accessions of Jatropha curcas from different countries and include material with genetic variation for levels of phorbol esters, yield, seed oil content, test weight and plant type. SCoT analysis revealed high polymorphism and 74% of the primers generated polymorphic profiles. The SCoT6 primer discriminated edible and toxic accessions in a single reaction while the SCoT26 and 27 primers produced amplicons specific to toxic and non-toxic accessions, respectively. The polymorphic SCoT markers obtained with these three primers were converted to sequence characterized amplicon regions (SCARs) which resulted in codominant SCARs with SCoT6 primer and dominant SCARs with SCoT 26 and 27 primers. The codominant nature of SCoT6 primer and the resultant SCAR6 primer were validated on intraspecific hybrids derived from a cross between non-toxic and toxic accessions. The accession JP38 from Madagascar was found to be distinct and showed accession specific bands with 9 different SCoT primers. Sequence analysis of polymorphic amplicons obtained with SCoT6 primer showed a 65 bp deletion in accessions with low/zero phorbol esters. Diversity analysis separated the toxic and non-toxic accessions into two groups and the accessions JP29 and JP48 from Mexico formed a third cluster. PMID:23602106

  8. Identification of Novel Ezrin Inhibitors Targeting Metastatic Osteosarcoma by Screening Open Access Malaria Box.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Haydar; Hong, Sung-Hyeok; Colón-López, Daisy D; Han, Jenny; Kont, Yasemin Saygideger; Minas, Tsion Z; Swift, Matthew; Paige, Mikell; Glasgow, Eric; Toretsky, Jeffrey A; Bosch, Jürgen; Üren, Aykut

    2015-11-01

    Ezrin is a member of the ERM (ezrin, radixin, moesin) family of proteins and functions as a linker between the plasma membrane and the actin cytoskeleton. Ezrin is a key driver of tumor progression and metastatic spread of osteosarcoma. We discovered a quinoline-based small molecule, NSC305787, that directly binds to ezrin and inhibits its functions in promoting invasive phenotype. NSC305787 possesses a very close structural similarity to commonly used quinoline-containing antimalarial drugs. On the basis of this similarity and of recent findings that ezrin has a likely role in the pathogenesis of malaria infection, we screened antimalarial compounds in an attempt to identify novel ezrin inhibitors with better efficacy and drug properties. Screening of Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) Malaria Box compounds for their ability to bind to recombinant ezrin protein yielded 12 primary hits with high selective binding activity. The specificity of the hits on ezrin function was confirmed by inhibition of the ezrin-mediated cell motility of osteosarcoma cells. Compounds were further tested for phenocopying the morphologic defects associated with ezrin suppression in zebrafish embryos as well as for inhibiting the lung metastasis of high ezrin-expressing osteosarcoma cells. The compound MMV667492 exhibited potent anti-ezrin activity in all biologic assays and had better physicochemical properties for drug-likeness than NSC305787. The drug-like compounds MMV020549 and MMV666069 also showed promising activities in functional assays. Thus, our study suggests further evaluation of antimalarial compounds as a novel class of antimetastatic agents for the treatment of metastatic osteosarcoma. PMID:26358752

  9. Design study of the accessible focal plane telescope for shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design and cost analysis of an accessible focal plane telescope for Spacelab is presented in blueprints, tables, and graphs. Topics covered include the telescope tube, the telescope mounting, the airlock plus Spacelab module aft plate, the instrument adapter, and the instrument package. The system allows access to the image plane with instrumentation that can be operated by a scientist in a shirt sleeve environment inside a Spacelab module.

  10. Reexamining microRNA Site Accessibility in Drosophila: A Population Genomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kevin; Maaskola, Jonas; Siegal, Mark L.; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2009-01-01

    Kertesz et al. (Nature Genetics 2008) described PITA, a miRNA target prediction algorithm based on hybridization energy and site accessibility. In this note, we used a population genomics approach to reexamine their data and found that the PITA algorithm had lower specificity than methods based on evolutionary conservation at comparable levels of sensitivity. We also showed that deeply conserved miRNAs tend to have stronger hybridization energies to their targets than do other miRNAs. Although PITA had higher specificity in predicting targets than a naïve seed-match method, this signal was primarily due to the use of a single cutoff score for all miRNAs and to the observed correlation between conservation and hybridization energy. Overall, our results clarify the accuracy of different miRNA target prediction algorithms in Drosophila and the role of site accessibility in miRNA target prediction. PMID:19478854

  11. A Bibliometric Study of Scholarly Articles Published by Library and Information Science Authors about Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandbois, Jennifer; Beheshti, Jamshid

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study aims to gain a greater understanding of the development of open access practices amongst library and information science authors, since their role is integral to the success of the broader open access movement. Method: Data were collected from scholarly articles about open access by library and information science authors…

  12. Secondary structure prediction and in vitro accessibility of mRNA as tools in the selection of target sites for ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Amarzguioui, Mohammed; Brede, Gaute; Babaie, Eshrat; Grøtli, Morten; Sproat, Brian; Prydz, Hans

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the relative merits of two commonly used methods for target site selection for ribozymes: secondary structure prediction (MFold program) and in vitro accessibility assays. A total of eight methylated ribozymes with DNA arms were synthesized and analyzed in a transient co-transfection assay in HeLa cells. Residual expression levels ranging from 23 to 72% were obtained with anti-PSKH1 ribozymes compared to cells transfected with an irrelevant control ribozyme. Ribozyme efficacy depended on both ribozyme concentration and the steady state expression levels of the target mRNA. Allylated ribozymes against a subset of the target sites generally displayed poorer efficacy than their methylated counterparts. This effect appeared to be influenced by in vivo accessibility of the target site. Ribozymes designed on the basis of either selection method displayed a wide range of efficacies with no significant differences in the average activities of the two groups of ribozymes. While in vitro accessibility assays had limited predictive power, there was a significant correlation between certain features of the predicted secondary structure of the target sequence and the efficacy of the corresponding ribozyme. Specifically, ribozyme efficacy appeared to be positively correlated with the presence of short stem regions and helices of low stability within their target sequences. There were no correlations with predicted free energy or loop length. PMID:11058107

  13. Doctors accessing mental-health services: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Randal, Patte

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop a more in-depth understanding of how doctors do and do not access mental healthcare from the perspectives of doctors themselves and people they have contact with through the process. Design Qualitative methodology was used with semistructured interviews transcribed and analysed using Grounded Theory. Participants were 11 doctors with experience as patients of psychiatrists, four doctor and four non-doctor personal contacts (friends, family and colleagues) and eight treating psychiatrists. Results Participants described experiencing unrealistic expectations and a harsh work environment with poor self care and denial and minimisation of signs of mental health difficulties. Doctor contacts described particular difficulty in responding effectively to doctor friends, family and colleagues in need of mental healthcare. In contrast, non-doctor personal contacts were more able to identify and speak about concerns but not necessarily to enable accessing adequate mental-health services. Conclusions Three areas with potential to address in supporting doctors' accessing of appropriate healthcare have been identified: (1) processes to enable doctors to maintain high standards of functioning with less use of minimisation and denial; (2) improving the quality and effectiveness of informal doctor-to-doctor conversations about mental-health issues among themselves; (3) role of non-doctor support people in identifying doctors' mental-health needs and enabling their access to mental healthcare. Further research in all these areas has the potential to contribute to improving doctors' access to appropriate mental healthcare and may be of value for the general population. PMID:22021726

  14. Minority Access and Persistence Study: A Working Bibliography with Annotations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowart, Vinette; And Others

    One of the working papers in the final report of the Arizona Board of Regents' Task Force on Excellence, Efficiency and Competitiveness, this contribution offers an annotated bibliography on minority access and persistence. It cites the following: nine books (e.g., "Student Outcome Questionnaires: An Implementation Handbook" by P. Ewell and…

  15. Automated Access to Multilingual Information: A Brazilian Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopes, Roseane R. Velho

    1989-01-01

    Identifies some of the problems the foreign language barrier creates in the handling of scientific and technical texts in Brazil and suggests the creation of some automated tools to overcome these problems. It is suggested that international efforts to maximize access to technical and scientific information will improve multilingual communication…

  16. Widening Access, Widening Participation, Widening Success: An Indian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Multiple deprivations are widespread in rural India. Literacy levels remain stubbornly low, albeit gradually improving. Caste, class, religion, gender, age and disability all impact on access to education, participation and successful completion. The education of girls remains problematic given the higher value attached to sons, especially in…

  17. Communicating the Open Access Message: A Case Study from Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, Aoife

    2016-01-01

    Since 2009, Open Access (OA) Week has been celebrated worldwide in October each year. It is an opportunity for librarians to engage with the research community and demonstrate the value that they bring to their organisations in the area of disseminating scholarly output. Although thousands of events have been held since the inception of OA Week, a…

  18. 75 FR 56919 - Port Access Route Study: The Approaches to San Francisco

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Information on Service for Individuals With Disabilities For information on... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 167 Port Access Route Study: The Approaches to San Francisco AGENCY: Coast... a public meeting to receive comments on the study entitled ``Port Access Route Study: Off...

  19. 75 FR 68568 - Port Access Route Study: In the Bering Strait

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... SECURITY United States Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 167 Port Access Route Study: In the Bering Strait AGENCY... the Bering Strait. The goal of the study is to help reduce the risk of marine casualties and increase... did not consider areas north of the Bering Strait. Necessity for a New Port Access Route Study...

  20. 76 FR 27287 - Port Access Route Study: In the Bering Strait; Extension of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... of Study and request for comments for the Port Access Route Study: In the Bering Strait (75 FR 68568... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 167 Port Access Route Study: In the Bering Strait; Extension of Comment...: In the Bering Strait. In this action, USCG is providing notice that the public comment period...

  1. Comparison of injection drug users accessing syringes from pharmacies, syringe exchange programs, and other syringe sources to inform targeted HIV prevention and intervention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Abby E.; Crawford, Natalie D.; Ompad, Danielle C.; Benjamin, Ebele O.; Stern, Rachel J.; Fuller, Crystal M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective In New York, syringe exchange programs (SEPs) and pharmacies provide syringe access for IDUs but may be unable to meet the needs of all IDUs. This analysis aims to describe IDUs who access syringes through different outlets to help inform the prevention needs of IDUs who under-utilize safe syringe sources in a city where syringe availability is high relative to other U.S. cities. Design Cross-sectional study Setting New York City (2005–2007) Participants 285 IDUs recruited using street-intercept sampling Intervention(s) Not Applicable Main outcome measure(s) IDUs using SEPs, pharmacies, or other outlets as a primary syringe source were compared by sociodemographic characteristics, injection practices and medical service utilization. Results Chi-square tests and polytomous logistic regression were used to compare IDUs with different self-reported primary syringe sources used 6 months prior to study entry. Compared with IDUs using other syringe sources, those using primarily SEPs were less likely to be Black (AOR:0.26 95%CI:0.11–0.57), more likely to inject daily (AOR:3.32; 95%CI:1.58–6.98), and more likely to inject with a new syringe (AOR:2.68; 95%CI:1.30–5.54). Compared with IDUs using other syringe sources, those using primarily pharmacies were less likely to be Black (AOR:0.39; 95%CI0.17–0.90). Conclusion These data suggest that pharmacies and SEPs may be reaching different populations of IDUs and highlight a sub-population of highly marginalized IDUs (Black and infrequent injectors) who are under-utilizing safe syringe sources in New York City. Targeted interventions are needed to reduce racial disparities and increase utilization of safe syringe outlets. PMID:20199954

  2. Study on dim target detection and discrimination from sea clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-guang; Sun, Zuo-wei; Li, Chen-ming; Wang, Jun

    2013-04-01

    Dim target detection from sea clutter is one of the difficult topics in ocean remote sensing application. By aiming at the shortcoming of false alarms when using track before detect (TBD) based on dynamic programming, a new discrimination method called statistics of direction histogram (SDH) is proposed, which is based on different features of trajectories between the true target and false one. Moreover, a new series of discrimination schemes of SDH and Local Extreme Value method (LEV) are studied and applied to simulate the actually measured radar data. The results show that the given discrimination is effective to reduce false alarms during dim targets detection.

  3. Taking Targets to Task Revisited: How Indicators of Progress on Access to Education can Mislead. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 54

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Keith M.

    2011-01-01

    "Education for All" (EFA) identifies goals and targets and translates these into indicators which are used to evaluate progress and influence flows of external financing. The search for evidence based policy depends on measures of performance that can link cause and effect and that represent real gains in progress towards desired outcomes.…

  4. Postsecondary Web Accessibility for Students with Disabilities: A Collective Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forgione-Barkas, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This collective case study reviewed the current state of Web accessibility at 102 postsecondary colleges and universities in North Carolina. The study examined themes within Web-accessibility compliance and identified which disability subgroups were most and least affected, why the common errors were occurring, and how the errors could be fixed.…

  5. The Physical Accessibility of Public Libraries to Users: A GIS Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sung Jae

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to gain a finer-grained picture and better understanding of the travel patterns of library users, and the activities, demographics, and other factors that affect library access. Previous studies of physical accessibility of public libraries, which have focused on library users' single-destination trips and their travel…

  6. Developing an agenda for research about policies to improve access to healthy foods in rural communities: a concept mapping study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Policies that improve access to healthy, affordable foods may improve population health and reduce health disparities. In the United States most food access policy research focuses on urban communities even though residents of rural communities face disproportionately higher risk for nutrition-related chronic diseases compared to residents of urban communities. The purpose of this study was to (1) identify the factors associated with access to healthy, affordable food in rural communities in the United States; and (2) prioritize a meaningful and feasible rural food policy research agenda. Methods This study was conducted by the Rural Food Access Workgroup (RFAWG), a workgroup facilitated by the Nutrition and Obesity Policy Research and Evaluation Network. A national sample of academic and non-academic researchers, public health and cooperative extension practitioners, and other experts who focus on rural food access and economic development was invited to complete a concept mapping process that included brainstorming the factors that are associated with rural food access, sorting and organizing the factors into similar domains, and rating the importance of policies and research to address these factors. As a last step, RFAWG members convened to interpret the data and establish research recommendations. Results Seventy-five participants in the brainstorming exercise represented the following sectors: non-extension research (n = 27), non-extension program administration (n = 18), “other” (n = 14), policy advocacy (n = 10), and cooperative extension service (n = 6). The brainstorming exercise generated 90 distinct statements about factors associated with rural food access in the United States; these were sorted into 5 clusters. Go Zones were established for the factors that were rated highly as both a priority policy target and a priority for research. The highest ranked policy and research priorities include strategies designed to

  7. Human Exploration of Near-Earth Objects Accessibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, Paul; Drake, Bret; Friedensen, Victoria; Mazanek, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Key questions addressed: How short can the trip times be reduced in order to reduce crew exposure to the deep-space radiation and microgravity environment? Are there options to conduct easy, early missions?. What is the affect of infusion of advanced propulsion technologies on target availability When do the departure opportunities open up, how frequent and how long are they? How many launches are required to conduct a round trip human mission to a NEA? And, based on the above, how many Near-Earth Asteroids are available

  8. Rebuilding Haiti's Educational Access: A Phenomenological Study of Technology Use in Education Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandiford, Gladwyn A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a lack of access to technology blended with face-to-face instruction and learning in Haiti. Despite this lack of access, some Haitian college students have nevertheless leveraged technology to overcome the obstacles of poverty and obtain a higher education. This phenomenological study explored the lived experiences of 20 adult…

  9. Access to and Use of Internet by Adolescents Who Have a Physical Disability: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lathouwers, Karen; de Moor, Jan; Didden, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine access to and use of Internet by 97 physically disabled adolescents. Four main objectives were to: (1) explore frequency and nature of Internet use and the role of care givers, (2) compare these results with non-disabled adolescents, (3) explore associations between access to and use of Internet and…

  10. Electronic doors to education: study of high school website accessibility in Iowa.

    PubMed

    Klein, David; Myhill, William; Hansen, Linda; Asby, Gary; Michaelson, Susan; Blanck, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Sections 504 and 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, prohibit discrimination against people with disabilities in all aspects of daily life, including education, work, and access to places of public accommodations. Increasingly, these antidiscrimination laws are used by persons with disabilities to ensure equal access to e-commerce, and to private and public Internet websites. To help assess the impact of the anti-discrimination mandate for educational communities, this study examined 157 website home pages of Iowa public high schools (52% of high schools in Iowa) in terms of their electronic accessibility for persons with disabilities. We predicted that accessibility problems would limit students and others in obtaining information from the web pages as well as limiting ability to navigate to other web pages. Findings show that although many web pages examined included information in accessible formats, none of the home pages met World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) standards for accessibility. The most frequent accessibility problem was lack of alternative text (ALT tags) for graphics. Technical sophistication built into pages was found to reduce accessibility. Implications are discussed for schools and educational institutions, and for laws, policies, and procedures on website accessibility. PMID:12579616

  11. Molecular genetic variability of commercial and wild accessions of passion fruit (Passiflora spp.) targeting ex situ conservation and breeding.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira-Silva, Carlos Bernard M; Santos, Elisa S L; Jesus, Onildo N; Vieira, João G P; Mori, Gustavo M; Corrêa, Ronan X; Souza, Anete P

    2014-01-01

    Passiflora species are distributed throughout Latin America, and Brazil and Colombia serve as the centers of diversity for this genus. We performed cross-species amplification to evaluate 109 microsatellite loci in 14 Passiflora species and estimated the diversity and genetic structure of Passiflora cincinnata, Passiflora setaceae and Passiflora edulis. A total of 127 accessions, including 85 accessions of P. edulis, a commercial species, and 42 accessions of 13 wild species, were examined. The cross-species amplification was effective for obtaining microsatellite loci (average cross-amplification of 70%). The average number of alleles per locus (five) was relatively low, and the average diversity ranged from 0.52 in P. cincinnata to 0.32 in P. setacea. The Bayesian analyses indicated that the P. cincinnata and P. setacea accessions were distributed into two groups, and the P. edulis accessions were distributed into five groups. Private alleles were identified, and suggestions for core collections are presented. Further collections are necessary, and the information generated may be useful for breeding and conservation. PMID:25514245

  12. Molecular Genetic Variability of Commercial and Wild Accessions of Passion Fruit (Passiflora spp.) Targeting ex Situ Conservation and Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira-Silva, Carlos Bernard M.; Santos, Elisa S. L.; Jesus, Onildo N.; Vieira, João G. P.; Mori, Gustavo M.; Corrêa, Ronan X.; Souza, Anete P.

    2014-01-01

    Passiflora species are distributed throughout Latin America, and Brazil and Colombia serve as the centers of diversity for this genus. We performed cross-species amplification to evaluate 109 microsatellite loci in 14 Passiflora species and estimated the diversity and genetic structure of Passiflora cincinnata, Passiflora setaceae and Passiflora edulis. A total of 127 accessions, including 85 accessions of P. edulis, a commercial species, and 42 accessions of 13 wild species, were examined. The cross-species amplification was effective for obtaining microsatellite loci (average cross-amplification of 70%). The average number of alleles per locus (five) was relatively low, and the average diversity ranged from 0.52 in P. cincinnata to 0.32 in P. setacea. The Bayesian analyses indicated that the P. cincinnata and P. setacea accessions were distributed into two groups, and the P. edulis accessions were distributed into five groups. Private alleles were identified, and suggestions for core collections are presented. Further collections are necessary, and the information generated may be useful for breeding and conservation. PMID:25514245

  13. Access to electronic health knowledge in five countries in Africa: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen; Bukirwa, Hasifa; Mukasa, Oscar; Snell, Paul; Adeh-Nsoh, Sylvester; Mbuyita, Selemani; Honorati, Masanja; Orji, Bright; Garner, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Background Access to medical literature in developing countries is helped by open access publishing and initiatives to allow free access to subscription only journals. The effectiveness of these initiatives in Africa has not been assessed. This study describes awareness, reported use and factors influencing use of on-line medical literature via free access initiatives. Methods Descriptive study in four teaching hospitals in Cameroon, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda plus one externally funded research institution in The Gambia. Survey with postgraduate doctors and research scientists to determine Internet access patterns, reported awareness of on-line medical information and free access initiatives; semi structured interviews with a sub-sample of survey participants to explore factors influencing use. Results In the four African teaching hospitals, 70% of the 305 postgraduate doctors reported textbooks as their main source of information; 66% had used the Internet for health information in the last week. In two hospitals, Internet cafés were the main Internet access point. For researchers at the externally-funded research institution, electronic resources were their main source, and almost all had used the Internet in the last week. Across all 333 respondents, 90% had heard of PubMed, 78% of BMJ on line, 49% the Cochrane Library, 47% HINARI, and 19% BioMedCentral. HINARI use correlates with accessing the Internet on computers located in institutions. Qualitative data suggested there are difficulties logging into HINARI and that sometimes it is librarians that limit access to passwords. Conclusion Text books remain an important resource for postgraduate doctors in training. Internet use is common, but awareness of free-access initiatives is limited. HINARI and other initiatives could be more effective with strong institutional endorsement and management to promote and ensure access. PMID:17509132

  14. Target Material Irradiation Studies for High-Intensity Accelerator Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Kirk, H.; Ludewig, H.; Thieberger, P.; Weng, W.T.; McDonald, K.; Sheppard, J.; Evangelakis, G.; Yoshimura, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-08-16

    This paper presents results of recent experimental studies focusing on the behavior of special materials and composites under irradiation conditions and their potential use as accelerator targets. The paper also discusses the approach and goals of on-going investigations on an expanded material matrix geared toward the neutrino superbeam and muon collider initiatives.

  15. Noise Studies of Polarimetry Systems for Polarized 3 He Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katugampola, Sumudu K.; Matyas, Daniel J.; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Wang, Yunxiao; Cates, Gordon D.

    2015-04-01

    The NMR technique of adiabatic fast passage (AFP) plays an important role in 3 He targets polarized using spin-exchange optical pumping. Since AFP signals before amplification are generally small, identifying these signals amidst noise caused by external electromagnetic interference and micro-phonics can be challenging. When using thermally polarized water samples for absolute calibration of AFP signals, electromagnetic and micro-phonic noise can easily dominate. Although both types of interference have often been cited as the predominant sources of noise during AFP, few studies of these effects have been done under the conditions that are typical for a polarized 3 He target. This talk will describe studies of electromagnetic and micro-phonic noise using a small-scale prototype NMR system similar to those we use to study polarized 3 He targets. We will describe the effect of using aluminum metal shielding and other methods to minimize noise. We are using these studies to inform the design of a full-scale set up that will be used to test next-generation targets for use at Jefferson Lab, and measure atomic parameters relevant to polarimetry.

  16. Studies of Unstable Nuclei with Spin-Polarized Proton Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Wakui, Takashi; Chebotaryov, Sergey; Kawahara, Tomomi; Kawase, Shoichiro; Milman, Evgeniy; Tang, Tsz Leung; Tateishi, Kenichiro; Teranishi, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Roles of spin-dependent interactions in unstable nuclei have been investigated via the direct reaction of radioactive ions with a solid spin-polarized proton target. The target has a unique advantage of a high polarization of 20-30% under low magnetic field of 0.1 T and at a high temperature of 100 K, which allow us to detect recoil protons with good angular resolution. Present status of on-going experimental studies at intermediate energies, such as proton elastic scattering and (p, 2p) knockout reaction, and new physics opportunities expected with low-energy RI beams are overviewed.

  17. Written words supersede pictures in priming semantic access: a P300 study.

    PubMed

    Dorjee, Dusana; Devenney, Lydia; Thierry, Guillaume

    2010-09-15

    The dynamic interplay of semantic access during information integration across the verbal and nonverbal domains and sensory modalities is poorly understood. Here, we compared the priming effects of four types of meaningful stimuli (pictures, written words, spoken words, and environmental sounds) on picture and written word targets referring to the same concept in all cases. P3b event-related brain potentials indexed automatic access to semantic memory in the different modalities. As expected, P3b amplitudes were large in the repetition priming condition, but also for word-picture and picture-word visual stimulus pairs. Critically, written word primes resulted in the largest P3b amplitudes whether elicited by written word or picture targets, suggesting a semantic priming supremacy of written words. PMID:20671578

  18. Latino adults' access to mental health care: a review of epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J; Zayas, Luis H; Hansen, Marissa C

    2006-05-01

    Since the early 1980s, epidemiological studies using state-of-the-art methodologies have documented the unmet mental health needs of Latinos adults in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. This paper reviews 16 articles based on seven epidemiological studies, examines studies methodologies, and summarizes findings about how Latino adults access mental health services. Studies consistently report that, compared to non-Latino Whites, Latinos underutilize mental health services, are less likely to receive guideline congruent care, and rely more often on primary care for services. Structural, economic, psychiatric, and cultural factors influence Latinos' service access. In spite of the valuable information these studies provide, methodological limitations (e.g., reliance on cross-sectional designs, scarcity of mixed Latino group samples) constrict knowledge about Latinos access to mental health services. Areas for future research and development needed to improve Latinos' access and quality of mental health care are discussed. PMID:16598658

  19. Lexical Access in Early Stages of Visual Word Processing: A Single-Trial Correlational MEG Study of Heteronym Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomyak, Olla; Marantz, Alec

    2009-01-01

    We present an MEG study of heteronym recognition, aiming to distinguish between two theories of lexical access: the "early access" theory, which entails that lexical access occurs at early (pre 200 ms) stages of processing, and the "late access" theory, which interprets this early activity as orthographic word-form identification rather than…

  20. Accelerators/decelerators of achieving universal access to sexual and reproductive health services: a case study of Iranian health system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background At the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), held in Cairo, the global community agreed to the goal of achieving universal access to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and rights by 2015. This research explores the accelerators and decelerators of achieving universal access to the sexual and reproductive health targets and accordingly makes some suggestions. Method We have critically reviewed the latest national reports and extracted the background data on each SRH indicator. The key stakeholders, both national and international, were visited and interviewed at two sites. A total of 55 in-depth interviews were conducted with religious leaders, policy-makers, senior managers, senior academics, and health care managers. Six focus-group discussions were also held among health care providers. The study was qualitative in nature. Results Obstacles on the road to achieving universal access to SRH can be viewed from two perspectives. One gap exists between current achievements and the targets. The other gap arises due to age, marital status, and residency status. The most recently observed trends in the indicators of the universal access to SRH shows that the achievements in the “unmet need for family planning” have been poor. Unmet need for family planning could directly be translated to unwanted pregnancies and unwanted childbirths; the former calls for sexual education to underserved people, including adolescents; and the latter calls for access to safe abortion. Local religious leaders have not actively attended international goal-setting programs. Therefore, they usually do not presume a positive attitude towards these goals. Such negative attitudes seem to be the most important factors hindering the progress towards universal access to SRH. Lack of international donors to fund for SRH programs is also another barrier. In national levels both state and the society are interactively playing their roles. We have used a

  1. MREdictor: a two-step dynamic interaction model that accounts for mRNA accessibility and Pumilio binding accurately predicts microRNA targets

    PubMed Central

    Incarnato, Danny; Neri, Francesco; Diamanti, Daniela; Oliviero, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of pairing between microRNAs (miRNAs) and the miRNA recognition elements (MREs) on mRNAs is expected to be an important tool for understanding gene regulation. Here, we show that mRNAs that contain Pumilio recognition elements (PRE) in the proximity of predicted miRNA-binding sites are more likely to form stable secondary structures within their 3′-UTR, and we demonstrated using a PUM1 and PUM2 double knockdown that Pumilio proteins are general regulators of miRNA accessibility. On the basis of these findings, we developed a computational method for predicting miRNA targets that accounts for the presence of PRE in the proximity of seed-match sequences within poorly accessible structures. Moreover, we implement the miRNA-MRE duplex pairing as a two-step model, which better fits the available structural data. This algorithm, called MREdictor, allows for the identification of miRNA targets in poorly accessible regions and is not restricted to a perfect seed-match; these features are not present in other computational prediction methods. PMID:23863844

  2. Assessing potential spatial accessibility of health services in rural China: a case study of Donghai county

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is a great health services disparity between urban and rural areas in China. The percentage of people who are unable to access health services due to long travel times increases. This paper takes Donghai County as the study unit to analyse areas with physician shortages and characteristics of the potential spatial accessibility of health services. We analyse how the unequal health services resources distribution and the New Cooperative Medical Scheme affect the potential spatial accessibility of health services in Donghai County. We also give some advice on how to alleviate the unequal spatial accessibility of health services in areas that are more remote and isolated. Methods The shortest traffic times of from hospitals to villages are calculated with an O-D matrix of GIS extension model. This paper applies an enhanced two-step floating catchment area (E2SFCA) method to study the spatial accessibility of health services and to determine areas with physician shortages in Donghai County. The sensitivity of the E2SFCA for assessing variation in the spatial accessibility of health services is checked using different impedance coefficient valuesa. Geostatistical Analyst model and spatial analyst method is used to analyse the spatial pattern and the edge effect of potential spatial accessibility of health services. Results The results show that 69% of villages have access to lower potential spatial accessibility of health services than the average for Donghai County, and 79% of the village scores are lower than the average for Jiangsu Province. The potential spatial accessibility of health services diminishes greatly from the centre of the county to outlying areas. Using a smaller impedance coefficient leads to greater disparity among the villages. The spatial accessibility of health services is greater along highway in the county. Conclusions Most of villages are in underserved health services areas. An unequal distribution of health service

  3. Right to health, essential medicines, and lawsuits for access to medicines--a scoping study.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Peláez, Claudia Marcela; Rover, Marina Raijche Mattozo; Leite, Silvana Nair; Rossi Buenaventura, Francisco; Farias, Mareni Rocha

    2014-11-01

    Despite countries' efforts to ensure access to essential medicines, some people do not have their needs met, and often resort to the Judiciary to get access to the medicines they need. This phenomenon, known as "judicialization of access to medicines", has aroused the academia's interest in law, health and social fields. In this context, this scoping study investigates, through qualitative thematic analysis, the approach to judicialization of access to medicines (normative or social) and its possible impacts (positive or negative) described in articles published in scientific journals indexed in the main health databases prior to July 2012. 65 of 384 papers met the inclusion criteria of focusing on lawsuits for access to medicines or judicialization of access to medicines as a phenomenon; empiric studies, review articles or theoretical discussions, written in English, Portuguese or Spanish; most of them were about Brazil, Colombia and England. Results show that judicialization is a complex phenomenon that involves technical-scientific, legal and social aspects. The judicialization impacts mentioned have changed over time. In the late 1990s and early 2000s the emphasis of positive impacts predominated both on the normative and social approaches, having as main reference the movements that claimed from the States the guarantee of access to HIV/AIDS treatment. In the mid-2000s, however, there was an emphasis of the negative effects of judicial intervention, when lawsuits for access to medicines became a problem in some countries. Few studies used the social approach to judicialization. For this reason, there is not enough information about whether lawsuits for access to medicines are related to a real recognition of the right to health as an exercise of citizenship. Such aspects need to be further studied. PMID:25306409

  4. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  5. Taking the Plunge: Open Access at the "Canadian Journal of Sociology." Case Studies in Open Access Publishing. Number Five

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggerty, Kevin D.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Presents a personal account of the transfer to open access of the leading Canadian journal of sociology. Background: The Canadian Journal of Sociology had established a strong position, internationally, among sociology journals. However, subscriptions were falling as readers increasingly accessed the resource through libraries and a…

  6. Active targets for the study of nuclei far from stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beceiro-Novo, S.; Ahn, T.; Bazin, D.; Mittig, W.

    2015-09-01

    Weakly bound nuclear systems can be considered to represent a good testing-ground of our understanding of non-perturbative quantum systems. Reactions leading to bound and unbound states in systems with very unbalanced neutron-to-proton ratios are used to understand the properties of these systems. Radioactive beams with energies from below the Coulomb barrier up to several hundreds MeV/nucleon are now available, and with these beams, a broad variety of studies of nuclei near the drip-line can be performed. To compensate for the low intensity of secondary beams as compared to primary beams, thick targets and high efficiency detection is necessary. In this context, a new generation of detectors was developed, called active target detectors: the detector gas is used as target, and the determination of the reaction vertex in three dimensions allows for good resolution even with thick targets. The reaction products can be measured over essentially 4 π. The physics explored with these detectors together with the technology developed will be described.

  7. Computer-aided target tracking in motion analysis studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdick, Dominic C.; Marcuse, M. L.; Mislan, J. D.

    1990-08-01

    Motion analysis studies require the precise tracking of reference objects in sequential scenes. In a typical situation, events of interest are captured at high frame rates using special cameras, and selected objects or targets are tracked on a frame by frame basis to provide necessary data for motion reconstruction. Tracking is usually done using manual methods which are slow and prone to error. A computer based image analysis system has been developed that performs tracking automatically. The objective of this work was to eliminate the bottleneck due to manual methods in high volume tracking applications such as the analysis of crash test films for the automotive industry. The system has proven to be successful in tracking standard fiducial targets and other objects in crash test scenes. Over 95 percent of target positions which could be located using manual methods can be tracked by the system, with a significant improvement in throughput over manual methods. Future work will focus on the tracking of clusters of targets and on tracking deformable objects such as airbags.

  8. An observational study of consumers' accessing of nutrition information in chain restaurants.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Christina A; Agnew, Henry; Brownell, Kelly D

    2009-05-01

    In this observational study, we determined how frequently consumers accessed on-premises nutrition information provided at chain restaurants. The number of patrons entering and accessing nutrition information was recorded at 8 locations that were part of 4 major restaurant chains (McDonald's, Burger King, Starbucks, and Au Bon Pain). Only 6 (0.1%) of 4311 patrons accessed on-premises nutrition information before purchasing food. This very small percentage suggests that such information should be more prominently displayed, such as on restaurant menu boards, to help customers make informed decisions. PMID:19299679

  9. A factor analytic study of attitudinal structure and its impact on rural landowners' access policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Brett A.; Fesenmaier, Daniel R.

    1990-03-01

    Previous research has shown that rural landowners' hunter access policies are determined in large part by their attitudes towards hunters, legal liability, conservation, and economic incentives. The results of this study support this research and indicate that East Texas, USA, landowners' decisions to allow or restrict access are based, in part, on attitudes toward hunter behavior, hunting as a social activity, leasing as a management practice, and a perceived obligation toward wildlife stewardship. Attitude-based profiles of landowners who adopted one of four access policies are compared.

  10. Targeted pharmacogenetic analysis of antipsychotic response in the CATIE study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Jamba, Maidar; Patrick, Calvin; Padmanabhan, Saranya; Brennan, Mark D

    2012-01-01

    Aim This study evaluated the impact of 6789 SNPs on treatment response to antipsychotics in Caucasian patients from the CATIE study. Materials & methods An Illumina (CA, USA) BeadChip was designed that targeted genes potentially impacting disease risk, disease presentation or antipsychotic response. SNPs tagged regions of linkage disequilibrium or functional variants not detectable using previous genotypes for CATIE. Change in Positive and Negative Syndrome scale total score was modeled using a mixed model repeated measures method that assumed a 30-day lag period. Genetic association analysis was performed using linear regression. Results Association analysis identified 20 SNPs with p-values of ≤5 × 10−4. Many of these are in genes previously implicated in schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric diseases. Conclusion The targeted approach identified SNPs possibly influencing response to antipsychotic drugs in Caucasian patients suffering from schizophrenia. The findings support a biological link between disease risk and presentation and antipsychotic response. PMID:22920393

  11. Regional University Access: A Case Study from the South West.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eversole, Robyn

    A study examined university service delivery in an isolated, inland region of south Western Australia. Surveys, focus groups, and interviews with students and former students found that many pre-university youths leave the area because education is only offered through year 10. Therefore, college students in the area tend to be mature-aged. Key…

  12. Frame Your Images: Making Digital Images Accessible for Study & Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gepner, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Images, whether at the level of molecules, cells, organs, organisms, or environments, are at the core of many biological disciplines. Even with the contemporary emphasis on molecular analysis, biology has retained its traditional strong visual component. In courses that rely on the study of biological structure, the presentation of images for…

  13. Lessons Learned from a Disabilities Accessible Study Abroad Trip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twill, Sarah E.; Guzzo, Gaetano R.

    2012-01-01

    In the summer of 2009, a two-week study abroad program was specifically designed and executed to include students with disabilities. Recruitment efforts resulted in 11 student participants, six of who were identified as having a disability by the University's Office of Disability Services. Students participated in a two-course academic program;…

  14. Women's Access to Higher Education in Tanzania: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Megan Patricia

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to reveal the ways in which first-generation women in Tanzania explained their success in pursuing a university education despite cultural and social obstacles. Such obstacles include social policies, socio-cultural factors, and academic factors. A review of the literature revealed that issues such as patriarchy,…

  15. Avenues of access to future science teachers: An interview study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Richard

    2007-12-01

    This research study explored the experiences of individuals who chose careers in secondary science education by examining two cohorts of science education students in a teacher credential program and a group of current secondary science teachers in their first five years of teaching. Issues of how these individuals became interested in science education and the characteristics common among them were examined. This study explored the educational experiences that appeared to contribute to people becoming science teachers. This study also explored the participants' motivation and key turning point moments that appeared to contribute to their choice to pursue a career in science education. The research design used in this study was a two-year, semi-structured interview protocol. Research was conducted at one main university site and within one local unified school district. During the 2004-2005 and 2005-2006 academic years, twenty-five secondary science pre-service teacher candidates at a University of California were interviewed, and during the 2005-2006 academic year, twenty-five current practicing science teachers within a Southern California unified school district were also interviewed. Data collection consisted of interviews with the fifty participants typically between 30-45 minutes in length. The EZ-Text software program was employed to aid in the analysis of the transcribed interview data. This study found that much of the previous research on the characteristics of entrants to teaching in general was supported, but that some specific differences exist among science teachers and the general population of teachers. The majority of the participants had exposure to internships or tutoring experiences and indicated that this made them more willing to pursue science teaching as a profession. This study found that high achieving female students constituted the entire female portion of the sample and cited teaching as a friendly avenue for females in science. Teacher

  16. Lexical access changes in patients with multiple sclerosis: a two-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Sepulcre, Jorge; Peraita, Herminia; Goni, Joaquin; Arrondo, Gonzalo; Martincorena, Inigo; Duque, Beatriz; Velez de Mendizabal, Nieves; Masdeu, Joseph C; Villoslada, Pablo

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze lexical access strategies in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and their changes over time. We studied lexical access strategies during semantic and phonemic verbal fluency tests and also confrontation naming in a 2-year prospective cohort of 45 MS patients and 20 healthy controls. At baseline, switching lexical access strategy (both in semantic and in phonemic verbal fluency tests) and confrontation naming were significantly impaired in MS patients compared with controls. After 2 years follow-up, switching score decreased, and cluster size increased over time in semantic verbal fluency tasks, suggesting a failure in the retrieval of lexical information rather than an impairment of the lexical pool. In conclusion, these findings underline the significant presence of lexical access problems in patients with MS and could point out their key role in the alterations of high-level communications abilities in MS. PMID:20835944

  17. Study of compact stereoscopic system for target distance estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankman, Daniel J.

    2006-05-01

    Distance measurement is necessary in a variety of fields, including targeting, surveillance, reconnaissance, robotics, and cartography. Today, the most commonly used method for distance measurement is laser ranging. However, laser rangers being active systems require more energy and cost more than passive systems, and they can be detected by the adversary. Stereoscopic vision, a passive system, requires low levels of power and allows covert operation. This study considers stereoscopic vision with a compact, portable system, and investigates its essential parameters that can be optimized for accurate distance measurement. The main parameters addressed in this study are the distance between the two cameras, the kernel size used for correlation between the two images, and the quality of the image measured by the standard deviation of pixel values. The distance estimation accuracy is determined as a function of these parameters and the range to target. To represent a compact, portable system, the study considered parallel camera pairs placed 6 inches or 12 inches apart. Using small, visible light digital cameras, the slant range measurement error is less than 3% with 12 inches camera spacing, and a correlation kernel of 30 pixels in width. Larger camera spacing and shorter ranges to target increase the disparity and decrease the distance estimate error. Analytical error predictions explain the experimental results.

  18. Condensed Matter Deuterium Cluster Target for Study of Pycnonuclear Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoling; George, Miley

    2009-11-01

    Fusion reactions have two main classes: thermonuclear and the pycnonuclear. Thermonuclear fusion occurs in low density high temperature plasmas, and is very sensitive to the ion temperature due to Columbic repulsion effects. As the density increases, the Columbic potential barrier is depressed by increased electron screening, allowing fusion at lower temperatures. This type of nuclear reaction is termed a pycnonuclear fusion and is the basis for astrophysical fusion. Ichimarua [1] proposed a laboratory study of this process using explosive mechanical compression of H/D to metallic densities, which would be extremely difficult to implement. Instead, our recent research suggests that metallic-like H/D ``clusters'' can be formed in dislocation loops of thin Palladium foils through electrochemical processes. [2] If this technique is used as a laser compression target, the compressed cluster density would allow study of pycnonuclear reactions. This provides a means of studying astrophysical fusion process, and could also lead to an important non-cryogenic ICF target. [2] [4pt] [1] S. Ichimaru, H. Kitamura. Phys. Plasmas, 6, 2649 (1999) [0pt] [2] G. Miley and X. Yang, Deuterium Cluster Target for Ultra-High Density, 18TH TOFE, San Francisco, CA Sep. 28 -- Oct. 2, 2008

  19. Marine-target craters on Mars? An assessment study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ormo, J.; Dohm, J.M.; Ferris, J.C.; Lepinette, A.; Fairen, A.G.

    2004-01-01

    Observations of impact craters on Earth show that a water column at the target strongly influences lithology and morphology of the resultant crater. The degree of influence varies with the target water depth and impactor diameter. Morphological features detectable in satellite imagery include a concentric shape with an inner crater inset within a shallower outer crater, which is cut by gullies excavated by the resurge of water. In this study, we show that if oceans, large seas, and lakes existed on Mars for periods of time, marine-target craters must have formed. We make an assessment of the minimum and maximum amounts of such craters based on published data on water depths, extent, and duration of putative oceans within "contacts 1 and 2," cratering rate during the different oceanic phases, and computer modeling of minimum impactor diameters required to form long-lasting craters in the seafloor of the oceans. We also discuss the influence of erosion and sedimentation on the preservation and exposure of the craters. For an ocean within the smaller "contact 2" with a duration of 100,000 yr and the low present crater formation rate, only ???1-2 detectable marine-target craters would have formed. In a maximum estimate with a duration of 0.8 Gyr, as many as 1400 craters may have formed. An ocean within the larger "contact 1-Meridiani," with a duration of 100,000 yr, would not have received any seafloor craters despite the higher crater formation rate estimated before 3.5 Gyr. On the other hand, with a maximum duration of 0.8 Gyr, about 160 seafloor craters may have formed. However, terrestrial examples show that most marine-target craters may be covered by thick sediments. Ground penetrating radar surveys planned for the ESA Mars Express and NASA 2005 missions may reveal buried craters, though it is uncertain if the resolution will allow the detection of diagnostic features of marine-target craters. The implications regarding the discovery of marine-target craters on

  20. A Qualitative Study of Barriers to Accessing Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for Disabled People in Malawi.

    PubMed

    White, Sian; Kuper, Hannah; Itimu-Phiri, Ambumulire; Holm, Rochelle; Biran, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Globally, millions of people lack access to improved water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). Disabled people, disadvantaged both physically and socially, are likely to be among those facing the greatest inequities in WASH access. This study explores the WASH priorities of disabled people and uses the social model of disability and the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework to look at the relationships between impairments, contextual factors and barriers to WASH access. 36 disabled people and 15 carers from urban and rural Malawi were purposively selected through key informants. The study employed a range of qualitative methods including interviews, emotion mapping, free-listing of priorities, ranking, photo voice, observation and WASH demonstrations. A thematic analysis was conducted using nVivo 10. WASH access affected all participants and comprised almost a third of the challenges of daily living identified by disabled people. Participants reported 50 barriers which related to water and sanitation access, personal and hand hygiene, social attitudes and participation in WASH programs. No two individuals reported facing the same set of barriers. This study found that being female, being from an urban area and having limited wealth and education were likely to increase the number and intensity of the barriers faced by an individual. The social model proved useful for classifying the majority of barriers. However, this model was weaker when applied to individuals who were more seriously disabled by their body function. This study found that body function limitations such as incontinence, pain and an inability to communicate WASH needs are in and of themselves significant barriers to adequate WASH access. Understanding these access barriers is important for the WASH sector at a time when there is a global push for equitable access. PMID:27171520

  1. A Qualitative Study of Barriers to Accessing Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for Disabled People in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Kuper, Hannah; Itimu-Phiri, Ambumulire; Holm, Rochelle; Biran, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Globally, millions of people lack access to improved water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). Disabled people, disadvantaged both physically and socially, are likely to be among those facing the greatest inequities in WASH access. This study explores the WASH priorities of disabled people and uses the social model of disability and the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework to look at the relationships between impairments, contextual factors and barriers to WASH access. 36 disabled people and 15 carers from urban and rural Malawi were purposively selected through key informants. The study employed a range of qualitative methods including interviews, emotion mapping, free-listing of priorities, ranking, photo voice, observation and WASH demonstrations. A thematic analysis was conducted using nVivo 10. WASH access affected all participants and comprised almost a third of the challenges of daily living identified by disabled people. Participants reported 50 barriers which related to water and sanitation access, personal and hand hygiene, social attitudes and participation in WASH programs. No two individuals reported facing the same set of barriers. This study found that being female, being from an urban area and having limited wealth and education were likely to increase the number and intensity of the barriers faced by an individual. The social model proved useful for classifying the majority of barriers. However, this model was weaker when applied to individuals who were more seriously disabled by their body function. This study found that body function limitations such as incontinence, pain and an inability to communicate WASH needs are in and of themselves significant barriers to adequate WASH access. Understanding these access barriers is important for the WASH sector at a time when there is a global push for equitable access. PMID:27171520

  2. 76 FR 27288 - Port Access Route Study: The Atlantic Coast From Maine to Florida

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ...In order to provide safe access routes for the movement of vessel traffic proceeding to or from ports or places along the eastern seaboard of the United States, the Coast Guard is conducting a Port Access Route Study (PARS) to evaluate the continued applicability of, and the need for modifications to, current vessel routing measures. The data gathered during this Atlantic Coast PARS may result......

  3. Feasibility study of an active target for the MEG experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papa, A.; Cavoto, G.; Ripiccini, E.

    2014-03-01

    We consider the possibility to have an active target for the upgrade of the MEG experiment (MEG II). The active target should work as (1) a beam monitoring, to continuously measure the muon stopping rate and therefore provide a direct evaluation of the detector acceptance (or an absolute normalization of the stopped muon); and as (2) an auxiliary device for the spectrometer, to improve the determination of the muon decay vertex and consequently to achieve a better positron momentum and angular resolutions, detecting the positron from the muon decay. In this work we studied the feasibility of detecting minimum ionizing particle with a single layer of 250 μm fiber and the capability to discriminate between the signal induced by either a muon or a positron.

  4. Fast ignitor target studies for the HiPER project

    SciTech Connect

    Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A.; Honrubia, J. J.; Ribeyre, X.; Schurtz, G.; Nicolaie, Ph.; Olazabal-Loume, M.; Bellei, C.; Evans, R. G.; Davies, J. R.

    2008-05-15

    Target studies for the proposed High Power Laser Energy Research (HiPER) facility [M. Dunne, Nature Phys. 2, 2 (2006)] are outlined and discussed. HiPER will deliver a 3{omega} (wavelength {lambda}=0.35 {mu}m), multibeam, multi-ns pulse of about 250 kJ and a 2{omega} or 3{omega} pulse of 70-100 kJ in about 15 ps. Its goal is the demonstration of laser driven inertial fusion via fast ignition. The baseline target concept is a direct-drive single shell capsule, ignited by hot electrons generated by a conically guided ultraintense laser beam. The paper first discusses ignition and compression requirements, and presents gain curves, based on an integrated model including ablative drive, compression, ignition and burn, and taking the coupling efficiency {eta}{sub ig} of the igniting beam as a parameter. It turns out that ignition and moderate gain (up to 100) can be achieved, provided that adiabat shaping is used in the compression, and the efficiency {eta}{sub ig} exceeds 20%. Using a standard ponderomotive scaling for the hot electron temperature, a 2{omega} or 3{omega} ignition beam is required to make the hot electron range comparable to the desired size of the hot spot. A reference target family is then presented, based on one-dimensional fluid simulation of compression, and two-dimensional fluid and hybrid simulations of fast electron transport, ignition, and burn. The sensitivity to compression pulse shape, as well as to hot electron source location, hot electron range, and beam divergence is also discussed. Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the ablation front has been addressed by a model and a perturbation code. Simplified simulations of code-guided target implosions have also been performed.

  5. Video game access, parental rules, and problem behavior: a study of boys with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Christopher R; Mazurek, Micah O

    2014-07-01

    Environmental correlates of problem behavior among individuals with autism spectrum disorder remain relatively understudied. The current study examined the contribution of in-room (i.e. bedroom) access to a video game console as one potential correlate of problem behavior among a sample of 169 boys with autism spectrum disorder (ranging from 8 to 18 years of age). Parents of these children reported on (1) whether they had specific rules regulating their child's video game use, (2) whether their child had in-room access to a variety of screen-based media devices (television, computer, and video game console), and (3) their child's oppositional behaviors. Multivariate regression models showed that in-room access to a video game console predicted oppositional behavior while controlling for in-room access to other media devices (computer and television) and relevant variables (e.g. average number of video game hours played per day). Additionally, the association between in-room access to a video game console and oppositional behavior was particularly large when parents reported no rules on their child's video game use. The current findings indicate that both access and parental rules regarding video games warrant future experimental and longitudinal research as they relate to problem behavior in boys with autism spectrum disorder. PMID:24104510

  6. Access to Tuberculosis Services for Individuals with Disability in Rural Malawi, a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Grut, Lisbet; Sanudi, Lifah; Braathen, Stine Hellum; Jürgens, Thomas; Eide, Arne H.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis occurs in all populations, but with higher prevalence in poor contexts. Vulnerable groups, including individuals with disability, run a particular risk due to poorer access to information and health services. Studying access to tuberculosis services for vulnerable groups in poor contexts may provide useful insight into the quality of such services in low-income contexts. This article aims to present a contextual understanding of access to tuberculosis services for people with disabilities in one district in southern Malawi. A qualitative method with semi-structured interviews and site observations was applied. In all, 89 participants were interviewed: 47 persons with disability, 11 parents/guardians of youths with disability, and the remaining 31 comprising eight health workers, four community rehabilitation assistants and volunteers, and 19 leaders in the community.Our main findings are that lack of information and knowledge, and considerable confusion related to tuberculosis, its cause and how to protect oneself, are major barrier to accessing services. Disease awareness and personal risk perception are key factors in this regard. Further findings concerns the pathways to tuberculosis related health services, in particular having a test and completing the treatment. The combination of lack of knowledge and barriers in accessing tests implies substantial availability and access problems.It is of importance to understand the combined impact of individual, social, contextual, and systems barriers to fully address the complexity of accessing tuberculosis services for vulnerable groups in poor populations. Lack of disability specific strategies in the local health services may be part of the reason why individuals with disability to not access such services. PMID:25830950

  7. Access to tuberculosis services for individuals with disability in rural Malawi, a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Grut, Lisbet; Sanudi, Lifah; Braathen, Stine Hellum; Jürgens, Thomas; Eide, Arne H

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis occurs in all populations, but with higher prevalence in poor contexts. Vulnerable groups, including individuals with disability, run a particular risk due to poorer access to information and health services. Studying access to tuberculosis services for vulnerable groups in poor contexts may provide useful insight into the quality of such services in low-income contexts. This article aims to present a contextual understanding of access to tuberculosis services for people with disabilities in one district in southern Malawi. A qualitative method with semi-structured interviews and site observations was applied. In all, 89 participants were interviewed: 47 persons with disability, 11 parents/guardians of youths with disability, and the remaining 31 comprising eight health workers, four community rehabilitation assistants and volunteers, and 19 leaders in the community.Our main findings are that lack of information and knowledge, and considerable confusion related to tuberculosis, its cause and how to protect oneself, are major barrier to accessing services. Disease awareness and personal risk perception are key factors in this regard. Further findings concerns the pathways to tuberculosis related health services, in particular having a test and completing the treatment. The combination of lack of knowledge and barriers in accessing tests implies substantial availability and access problems.It is of importance to understand the combined impact of individual, social, contextual, and systems barriers to fully address the complexity of accessing tuberculosis services for vulnerable groups in poor populations. Lack of disability specific strategies in the local health services may be part of the reason why individuals with disability to not access such services. PMID:25830950

  8. Low copy target detection by Droplet Digital PCR through application of a novel open access bioinformatic pipeline, ‘definetherain’

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Mathew; Williams, James; Gärtner, Kathleen; Phillips, Rodney; Hurst, Jacob; Frater, John

    2014-01-01

    Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) represents a new and alternative platform to conventional quantitative-PCR (qPCR) for the quantitation of DNA templates. However, the proposed improvement in sensitivity and reproducibility offered by ddPCR is not yet fully proven, partly because the delineation between positive and negative responses is not always clear. Data are presented demonstrating the sensitivity of the ddPCR system to both reagent concentrations and choice of cut-off for defining positive and negative results. By implementing k-nearest clustering, cut-offs are produced that improve the accuracy of ddPCR where target DNA is present at low copy numbers, a key application of ddPCR. This approach is applied to human albumin and HIV-1 proviral DNA ddPCR quantitative protocols. This tool is coded in JavaScript and has been made available for free in a web browser at http://www.definetherain.org.uk. Optimisation of the analyses of raw ddPCR data using ‘definetherain’ indicates that low target number detection can be improved by its implementation. Further application to patient samples will help define the clinical utility of this approach. PMID:24598230

  9. Low copy target detection by Droplet Digital PCR through application of a novel open access bioinformatic pipeline, 'definetherain'.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mathew; Williams, James; Gärtner, Kathleen; Phillips, Rodney; Hurst, Jacob; Frater, John

    2014-06-01

    Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) represents a new and alternative platform to conventional quantitative-PCR (qPCR) for the quantitation of DNA templates. However, the proposed improvement in sensitivity and reproducibility offered by ddPCR is not yet fully proven, partly because the delineation between positive and negative responses is not always clear. Data are presented demonstrating the sensitivity of the ddPCR system to both reagent concentrations and choice of cut-off for defining positive and negative results. By implementing k-nearest clustering, cut-offs are produced that improve the accuracy of ddPCR where target DNA is present at low copy numbers, a key application of ddPCR. This approach is applied to human albumin and HIV-1 proviral DNA ddPCR quantitative protocols. This tool is coded in JavaScript and has been made available for free in a web browser at http://www.definetherain.org.uk. Optimisation of the analyses of raw ddPCR data using 'definetherain' indicates that low target number detection can be improved by its implementation. Further application to patient samples will help define the clinical utility of this approach. PMID:24598230

  10. Public Access and Use of Health Research: An Exploratory Study of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Public Access Policy Using Interviews and Surveys of Health Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Willinsky, John; Maggio, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2008, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Public Access Policy mandated open access for publications resulting from NIH funding (following a 12-month embargo). The large increase in access to research that will take place in the years to come has potential implications for evidence-based practice (EBP) and lifelong learning for health personnel. Objective This study assesses health personnel’s current use of research to establish whether grounds exist for expecting, preparing for, and further measuring the impact of the NIH Public Access Policy on health care quality and outcomes in light of time constraints and existing information resources. Methods In all, 14 interviews and 90 surveys of health personnel were conducted at a community-based clinic and an independent teaching hospital in 2010. Health personnel were asked about the research sources they consulted and the frequency with which they consulted these sources, as well as motivation and search strategies used to locate articles, perceived level of access to research, and knowledge of the NIH Public Access Policy. Results In terms of current access to health information, 65% (57/88) of the health personnel reported being satisfied, while 32% (28/88) reported feeling underserved. Among the sources health personnel reported that they relied upon and consulted weekly, 83% (73/88) reported turning to colleagues, 77% (67/87) reported using synthesized information resources (eg, UpToDate and Cochrane Systematic Reviews), while 32% (28/88) reported that they consulted primary research literature. The dominant resources health personnel consulted when actively searching for health information were Google and Wikipedia, while 27% (24/89) reported using PubMed weekly. The most prevalent reason given for accessing research on a weekly basis, reported by 35% (31/88) of survey respondents, was to help a specific patient, while 31% (26/84) were motivated by general interest in research. Conclusions

  11. Refractoriness and the Healthy Brain: A Behavioural Study on Semantic Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campanella, Fabio; Shallice, Tim

    2011-01-01

    While many behavioural studies on refractory phenomena in lexical/semantic access have focused on the mechanisms involved in the oral production of names, comprehension tasks have been almost exclusively used in neuropsychological studies on brain damaged patients. We report the results of two experiments on healthy participants conducted by means…

  12. Does Internet Access Matter for Rural Industry? A Case Study of Jiangsu, China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Y.; Wang, H.

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the digital divide in rural Jiangsu, one of the most developed areas in China. First, it reveals that only a small portion of rural enterprises have access to the Internet, and the penetration rate of the Internet in rural enterprises of China is much lower than that in urban enterprises revealed by previous studies. Second, a…

  13. Lesson Study for Accessible Science: Building Expertise to Improve Practice in Inclusive Science Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutch-Jones, Karen; Puttick, Gillian; Minner, Daphne

    2012-01-01

    The Lesson Study for Accessible Science (LSAS) project created middle school teams comprised of both science and special education teachers who engaged in collaborative work to improve instruction in inclusive classrooms. The intervention is based on Lesson Study, a professional development approach that originated in Japan, which supports the…

  14. Decomposition into Multiple Morphemes during Lexical Access: A Masked Priming Study of Russian Nouns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanina, Nina; Dukova-Zheleva, Galina; Geber, Dana; Kharlamov, Viktor; Tonciulescu, Keren

    2008-01-01

    The study reports the results of a masked priming experiment with morphologically complex Russian nouns. Participants performed a lexical decision task to a visual target that differed from its prime in one consonant. Three conditions were included: (1) "transparent," in which the prime was morphologically related to the target and contained the…

  15. Experimental and theoretical studies of implant assisted magnetic drug targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles, Misael O.

    One way to achieve drug targeting in the body is to incorporate magnetic nanoparticles into drug carriers and then retain them at the site using an externally applied magnetic field. This process is referred to as magnetic drug targeting (MDT). However, the main limitation of MDT is that an externally applied magnetic field alone may not be able to retain a sufficient number of magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) to justify its use. Such a limitation might not exist when high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) principles are applied to assist MDT by means of ferromagnetic implants. It was hypothesized that an Implant Assisted -- MDT (IA-MDT) system would increase the retention of the MDCPs at a target site where an implant had been previously located, since the magnetic forces are produced internally. With this in mind, the overall objective of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of an IA-MDT system through mathematical modeling and in vitro experimentation. The mathematical models were developed and used to demonstrate the behavior and limitations of IA-MDT, and the in vitro experiments were designed and used to validate the models and to further elucidate the important parameters that affect the performance of the system. IA-MDT was studied with three plausible implants, ferromagnetic stents, seed particles, and wires. All implants were studied theoretically and experimentally using flow through systems with polymer particles containing magnetite nanoparticles as MDCPs. In the stent studies, a wire coil or mesh was simply placed in a flow field and the capture of the MDCPs was studied. In the other cases, a porous polymer matrix was used as a surrogate capillary tissue scaffold to study the capture of the MDCPs using wires or particle seeds as the implant, with the seeds either fixed within the polymer matrix or captured prior to capturing the MDCPs. An in vitro heart tissue perfusion model was also used to study the use of stents. In general, all

  16. Exploring Situational Factors Shaping Access in a Laptop Program for Socially Disadvantaged Children in India: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padmanabhan, Poornima; Wise, Alyssa Friend

    2012-01-01

    Low-cost laptop programs attempt to address gaps in access to computers in developing countries. However, the translation of computing access from intention to actuality is mediated by many situational factors. This research presents a case study of how access to a set of laptops donated to a school for socially disadvantaged children in India was…

  17. The effect of Doppler flow screening studies and elective revisions on dialysis access failure.

    PubMed

    Sands, J; Young, S; Miranda, C

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to see if screening ultrasounds and elective surgical revision could decrease access failure. Two hundred fifty-three accesses [177 gortex grafts, 76 arteriovenous (AV) fistulas] were studied with duplex imaging. Patients were subdivided by access type, flow, percent stenosis, and whether they were surgically revised. Data was examined to determine access failure within 6 months. Ten of 76 fistulas clotted (13.1%), while 53 of 177 grafts clotted (29.9%) (p = 0.005). In Gortex grafts, stenosis (p < 0.05) and decreased flow (p = 0.005) correlated with clotting. In unrevised grafts with flow < or = 801 ml/min, 13 of 14 (92.8%) clotted, whereas of those with flow > or = 1603 ml/min only, 10 of 38 (26.3%) clotted (chi-square = 24.74; p < 0.0001). Only 1 of 18 (5.6%) revised grafts with flow < or = 1300 ml/min clotted, while 29 of 69 (42%) unrevised grafts clotted (p = 0.004). We were unable to demonstrate decreased clotting in fistulae with revisions. In conclusion, screening duplex scanning was able to select groups with a higher risk of access failure over the subsequent 6 months. Elective revision with correction of areas of stenosis in grafts with flows < or = 1300 ml/min significantly decreased the incidence of clotting. PMID:1457916

  18. A study of institutional spending on open access publication fees in Germany.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Najko; Tullney, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Publication fees as a revenue source for open access publishing hold a prominent place on the agendas of researchers, policy makers, and academic publishers. This study contributes to the evolving empirical basis for funding these charges and examines how much German universities and research organisations spent on open access publication fees. Using self-reported cost data from the Open APC initiative, the analysis focused on the amount that was being spent on publication fees, and compared these expenditure with data from related Austrian (FWF) and UK (Wellcome Trust, Jisc) initiatives, in terms of both size and the proportion of articles being published in fully and hybrid open access journals. We also investigated how thoroughly self-reported articles were indexed in Crossref, a DOI minting agency for scholarly literature, and analysed how the institutional spending was distributed across publishers and journal titles. According to self-reported data from 30 German universities and research organisations between 2005 and 2015, expenditures on open access publication fees increased over the years in Germany and amounted to € 9,627,537 for 7,417 open access journal articles. The average payment was € 1,298, and the median was € 1,231. A total of 94% of the total article volume included in the study was supported in accordance with the price cap of € 2,000, a limit imposed by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) as part of its funding activities for open access funding at German universities. Expenditures varied considerably at the institutional level. There were also differences in how much the institutions spent per journal and publisher. These differences reflect, at least in part, the varying pricing schemes in place including discounted publication fees. With an indexing coverage of 99%, Crossref thoroughly indexed the open access journals articles included in the study. A comparison with the related openly available cost data from Austria and

  19. A study of institutional spending on open access publication fees in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Tullney, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Publication fees as a revenue source for open access publishing hold a prominent place on the agendas of researchers, policy makers, and academic publishers. This study contributes to the evolving empirical basis for funding these charges and examines how much German universities and research organisations spent on open access publication fees. Using self-reported cost data from the Open APC initiative, the analysis focused on the amount that was being spent on publication fees, and compared these expenditure with data from related Austrian (FWF) and UK (Wellcome Trust, Jisc) initiatives, in terms of both size and the proportion of articles being published in fully and hybrid open access journals. We also investigated how thoroughly self-reported articles were indexed in Crossref, a DOI minting agency for scholarly literature, and analysed how the institutional spending was distributed across publishers and journal titles. According to self-reported data from 30 German universities and research organisations between 2005 and 2015, expenditures on open access publication fees increased over the years in Germany and amounted to € 9,627,537 for 7,417 open access journal articles. The average payment was € 1,298, and the median was € 1,231. A total of 94% of the total article volume included in the study was supported in accordance with the price cap of € 2,000, a limit imposed by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) as part of its funding activities for open access funding at German universities. Expenditures varied considerably at the institutional level. There were also differences in how much the institutions spent per journal and publisher. These differences reflect, at least in part, the varying pricing schemes in place including discounted publication fees. With an indexing coverage of 99%, Crossref thoroughly indexed the open access journals articles included in the study. A comparison with the related openly available cost data from Austria and

  20. Targeting lipopolyplexes using bifunctional peptides incorporating hydrophobic spacer amino acids: synthesis, transfection, and biophysical studies.

    PubMed

    Pilkington-Miksa, Michael A; Writer, Michele J; Sarkar, Supti; Meng, Qing-Hai; Barker, Suzie E; Shamlou, Parviz Ayazi; Hailes, Helen C; Hart, Stephen L; Tabor, Alethea B

    2007-01-01

    We have developed efficient synthetic routes to two hydrophobic amino acids, suitably protected for solid-phase peptide synthesis, and have successfully synthesized peptides containing these or other hydrophobic amino acids as spacers between a Lys16 moiety and an integrin-targeting motif. These peptides have in turn been used to formulate a range of lipopolyplex vectors with Lipofectin and plasmid DNA. The transfection efficiencies of these vectors and their aggregation behavior in buffers and in serum have been studied. We have shown that vectors containing peptides incorporating long linkers that are entirely hydrophobic are less efficient transfection agents. However, linkers of equivalent length that are in part hydrophobic show improved transfection properties, which is probably due to the improved accessibility of the integrin-binding motif. PMID:17915956

  1. Visual target detection paradigm for the study of selective attention.

    PubMed

    Tabert, M H; Chokron, S; Tang, C Y; Wei, T; Brickman, A M; Buchsbaum, M S

    2000-11-01

    The current protocol can be used to examine selective attention. It has been used to acquire behavioral performance data in neurologically healthy normal control subjects and schizophrenic patients. A modified version, also described here, has been used to acquire functional neuroimaging data in normal subjects using positron emission tomography. Subject response accuracy and reaction times are recorded while subjects detect visual stimuli in either hemifield (left vs. right of a fixation point) or along the vertical meridian (above or below fixation). The lateralized presentation of stimuli permits the study of hemispheric specialization for selective attentional processes. Attentional load is manipulated by presenting larger-sized target stimuli alone (i.e., the letter 'O') or smaller-sized target stimuli surrounded by flanking letters. This protocol report includes a description of subject exclusion criteria, procedural details, relevant experimental conditions and variables, suggestions for data analysis, expected results, and a discussion of the protocol's significance for attentional research along with suggestions for future research. PMID:11086266

  2. Multimodality molecular imaging--from target description to clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Schober, O; Rahbar, K; Riemann, B

    2009-02-01

    This highlight lecture was presented at the closing session of the Annual Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) in Munich on 15 October 2008. The Congress was a great success: there were more than 4,000 participants, and 1,597 abstracts were submitted. Of these, 1,387 were accepted for oral or poster presentation, with a rejection rate of 14%. In this article a choice was made from 100 of the 500 lectures which received the highest scores by the scientific review panel. This article outlines the major findings and trends at the EANM 2008, and is only a brief summary of the large number of outstanding abstracts presented. Among the great number of oral and poster presentations covering nearly all fields of nuclear medicine some headlines have to be defined highlighting the development of nuclear medicine in the 21st century. This review focuses on the increasing impact of molecular and multimodality imaging in the field of nuclear medicine. In addition, the question may be asked as to whether the whole spectrum of nuclear medicine is nothing other than molecular imaging and therapy. Furthermore, molecular imaging will and has to go ahead to multimodality imaging. In view of this background the review was structured according to the single steps of molecular imaging, i.e. from target description to clinical studies. The following topics are addressed: targets, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy, devices and computer science, animals and preclinical evaluations, and patients and clinical evaluations. PMID:19130054

  3. 3D studies of the NIF symmetry tuning targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovich, J.; Jones, O.; Edwards, M.; Weber, S.; Dewald, E.; Landen, O.; Marinak, M.

    2009-11-01

    Minimizing radiation drive asymmetries is necessary for a successful ignition campaign. Since the ignition capsule symmetry is most sensitive to the foot (first 2 ns) and the peak of the laser pulse, two different targets will be fielded on the NIF: re-emit and symmetry capsules (Sym-Caps). The first measures the incoming flux asymmetries during the foot by observing the re-radiated flux of a high-Z ball in place of the ignition capsule. The Sym-Caps resemble the ignition target with the frozen DT layer replaced by an equivalent mass of ablator material, thus preserving the hydrodynamic implosion properties. By measuring the x-ray self-emission near peak compression the ignition capsule core shape can be tuned. Simulations with 2D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations codes omit 3D effects in the hohlraum such as diagnostic holes, capsule roughness, shot-to-shot variations caused by laser beam power imbalances and pointing errors. We study these effects by performing 3D simulations using HYDRA and found that tuning the laser pulse using a finite number of shots is not substantially compromised.

  4. Low-income individuals’ perceptions about fruit and vegetable access programs: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; Auvergne, Lauriane; Mark, Barbara; Ammerman, Alice; Weiner, Bryan J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine how fruit and vegetable (F&V) programs address barriers to F&V access and consumption as perceived by low-income individuals. Design From 2011–2012 thirteen focus groups were used to better understand low-income individuals’ perceptions about F&V programs. Setting Five North Carolina counties at community-serving organizations. Participants Low-income participants ages 18 or older were included in the study. A majority were African American females with a high school education or less and received government assistance. Phenomenon of Interest Low-income individuals’ perceptions about how F&V access programs can reduce barriers and increase consumption. Analysis A socioecological framework guided data analysis, and 2 trained researchers coded transcripts, identified major themes, and summarized findings. Results A total of 105 participants discussed that mobile markets could overcome barriers such as availability, convenience, transportation, and quality/variety. Some were worried about safety in higher crime communities. Participants’ opinions about how successful food assistance programs were at overcoming cost barriers were mixed. Participants agreed that community gardens could increase access to affordable, conveniently located produce, but worried about feasibility/implementation issues. Implications for Research and Practice Addressing access barriers through F&V programs could improve consumption. Programs have the potential to be successful if they address multiple access barriers. (200 words). PMID:25910929

  5. Fluorescence-Guided Probes of Aptamer-Targeted Gold Nanoparticles with Computed Tomography Imaging Accesses for in Vivo Tumor Resection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Hung; Kuo, Tsung-Rong; Su, Hsin-Jan; Lai, Wei-Yun; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Wang, Di-Yan; Wu, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chia-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Recent development of molecular imaging probes for fluorescence-guided surgery has shown great progresses for determining tumor margin to execute the tissue resection. Here we synthesize the fluorescent gold nanoparticles conjugated with diatrizoic acid and nucleolin-targeted AS1411 aptamer. The nanoparticle conjugates exhibit high water-solubility, good biocompatibility, visible fluorescence and strong X-ray attenuation for computed tomography (CT) contrast enhancement. The fluorescent nanoparticle conjugates are applied as a molecular contrast agent to reveal the tumor location in CL1-5 tumor-bearing mice by CT imaging. Furthermore, the orange-red fluorescence emitting from the conjugates in the CL1-5 tumor can be easily visualized by the naked eyes. After the resection, the IVIS measurements show that the fluorescence signal of the nanoparticle conjugates in the tumor is greatly enhanced in comparison to that in the controlled experiment. Our work has shown potential application of functionalized nanoparticles as a dual-function imaging agent in clinical fluorescence-guided surgery. PMID:26507179

  6. Fluorescence-Guided Probes of Aptamer-Targeted Gold Nanoparticles with Computed Tomography Imaging Accesses for in Vivo Tumor Resection.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Hung; Kuo, Tsung-Rong; Su, Hsin-Jan; Lai, Wei-Yun; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Wang, Di-Yan; Wu, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chia-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Recent development of molecular imaging probes for fluorescence-guided surgery has shown great progresses for determining tumor margin to execute the tissue resection. Here we synthesize the fluorescent gold nanoparticles conjugated with diatrizoic acid and nucleolin-targeted AS1411 aptamer. The nanoparticle conjugates exhibit high water-solubility, good biocompatibility, visible fluorescence and strong X-ray attenuation for computed tomography (CT) contrast enhancement. The fluorescent nanoparticle conjugates are applied as a molecular contrast agent to reveal the tumor location in CL1-5 tumor-bearing mice by CT imaging. Furthermore, the orange-red fluorescence emitting from the conjugates in the CL1-5 tumor can be easily visualized by the naked eyes. After the resection, the IVIS measurements show that the fluorescence signal of the nanoparticle conjugates in the tumor is greatly enhanced in comparison to that in the controlled experiment. Our work has shown potential application of functionalized nanoparticles as a dual-function imaging agent in clinical fluorescence-guided surgery. PMID:26507179

  7. Retina-on-a-chip: a microfluidic platform for point access signaling studies.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Kirsten H; Echevarria, Franklin D; Li, Deyu; Sappington, Rebecca M; Edd, Jon F

    2015-12-01

    We report on a microfluidic platform for culture of whole organs or tissue slices with the capability of point access reagent delivery to probe the transport of signaling events. Whole mice retina were maintained for multiple days with negative pressure applied to tightly but gently bind the bottom of the retina to a thin poly-(dimethylsiloxane) membrane, through which twelve 100 μm diameter through-holes served as fluidic access points. Staining with toluidine blue, transport of locally applied cholera toxin beta, and transient response to lipopolysaccharide in the retina demonstrated the capability of the microfluidic platform. The point access fluidic delivery capability could enable new assays in the study of various kinds of excised tissues, including retina. PMID:26559199

  8. Retina-on-a-chip: a microfluidic platform for point access signaling studies

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Kirsten H.; Echevarria, Franklin D.; Li, Deyu; Sappington, Rebecca M.; Edd, Jon F.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a microfluidic platform for culture of whole organs or tissue slices with the capability of point access reagent delivery to probe the transport of signaling events. Whole mice retina were maintained for multiple days with negative pressure applied to tightly but gently bind the bottom of the retina to a thin poly-(dimethylsiloxane) membrane, through which twelve 100 μm diameter through-holes served as fluidic access points. Staining with toluidine blue, transport of locally applied cholera toxin beta, and transient response to lipopolysaccharide in the retina demonstrated the capability of the microfluidic platform. The point access fluidic delivery capability could enable new assays in the study of various kinds of excised tissues, including retina. PMID:26559199

  9. Access through the Ages at an Elite Boarding School: A Case Study of Phillips Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    This study is about access for low-income students at an elite boarding school. As "feeder schools" to elite colleges and universities, elite boarding schools play a significant role in determining which students will be in the upper class in America; however, little is known about the history of low-income students at these schools. The…

  10. Local Music Collections: Strategies for Digital Access, Presentation, and Preservation--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doi, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The Saskatchewan Music Collection (SMC) is a local music collection held at the University of Saskatchewan. This case study examines a project to digitize and present this unique special collection in the online environment. The project aims to facilitate access to the collection, preserve the collection and promote scholarship and interest in the…

  11. Factors Influencing Access Students' Persistence in an Undergraduate Science Programme: A South African Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubben, Fred; Davidowitz, Bette; Buffler, Andy; Allie, Saalih; Scott, Ian

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the reasons underlying access students' decisions on their study programmes as they progress through their extended science degree, including the role of career aspirations in these decisions. Data from semi-structured interviews with 20 third year undergraduates show two groups according to their decision criteria.…

  12. Building College Access with Families in New Bedford, Massachusetts: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Sue Anne

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study was an investigation into improving college access through family engagement with minority and low-income students in an urban school district. Critical theory concepts of cultural capital, field, and habitus, as well as organizational communication theory, formed the theoretical framework that guided a literature review and…

  13. Using Case Study Methodology to Examine Practices in Exemplary College Access Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stillisano, Jacqueline R.; Waxman, Hersh C.; Brown, Danielle B.; Alford, Beverly L.

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on the unique qualities of selected college access centers established in Texas high schools with the dual goal of assisting students with college preparation activities and of creating a school-wide college going culture. Six centers demonstrating estimable outcomes on at least one of several different variables were…

  14. Enhancing Digital Access to Learning Materials for Canadians with Perceptual Disabilities: A Pilot Study. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockerby, Christina; Breau, Rachel; Zuvela, Biljana

    2006-01-01

    By exploring the experiences of participants with DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) Talking Books, the study reported in this article not only discovered how people who are blind, visually impaired, and/or print-disabled read DAISY books, but also identified participants' perceptions of DAISY as being particularly useful in their…

  15. Minority Access to Information Technology: Lessons Learned. Occasional Paper No. 67. Latino Studies Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pachon, Harry P.; Macias, Elsa E.; Bagasao, Paula Y.

    The Digital Steppingstones (DSS) project is a 3-year study exploring access to advanced information technologies and related training in low-income and minority communities. The project is also identifying exemplary information technology programs in schools, libraries, and community centers in disadvantaged areas of five large cities. Site…

  16. Video Game Access, Parental Rules, and Problem Behavior: A Study of Boys with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Christopher R.; Mazurek, Micah O.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental correlates of problem behavior among individuals with autism spectrum disorder remain relatively understudied. The current study examined the contribution of in-room (i.e. bedroom) access to a video game console as one potential correlate of problem behavior among a sample of 169 boys with autism spectrum disorder (ranging from 8 to…

  17. Mobilizing Curriculum Studies in a (Virtual) World: Open Access, Edupunks, and the Public Good

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Julie Ann; Ng-A-Fook, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Despite societal imperatives for equity--whether espoused by nation states or transnational agencies like UNESCO--current models of higher education are unequivocally failing to provide universal access. This paper seeks to explore the (cyber)spaces (un)occupied by higher education, specifically in the area of curriculum studies, arguing that the…

  18. Restrictive Access to Books in School Library Media Centers in Georgia. Research Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPree, Vi

    This study sought to determine the extent of restrictive access to books in Georgia school library media centers and to discover by whose authority and for what reason these books might be placed on restrictive shelves. Questionnaires were completed and received from a stratified random sampling of 119 media specialists in high schools, middle or…

  19. 77 FR 55781 - Port Access Route Study: The Atlantic Coast from Maine to Florida

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). II. Background and Purpose The Coast Guard announced in the Federal Register (76 FR 27288, May 11, 2011) that it was conducting a Port Access Route Study (PARS) to evaluate... summer 2012. The Coast Guard is also contracting the services of a Geographic Information System...

  20. Access Barriers to Dental Health Care in Children with Disability. A Questionnaire Study of Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerreth, Karolina; Borysewicz-Lewicka, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: A patient's with disability everyday life is rife with many limitations such as architectural, transport, information as well as medical, psychological, legal, economic and social barriers. The aim of this study was to evaluate access to dental health care of special-care schoolchildren with intellectual disability on the basis of…

  1. Knowing, Acting and Being: Epistemological and Ontological Access in a Science Extended Studies Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellery, K.

    2011-01-01

    Gross participation and throughput rates in higher education institutions in South Africa indicate an inequitable and poorly functioning system. This interpretive study argues for an approach that enhances epistemological and ontological access and examines how an intervention that includes an overt approach in dealing with the nature of science,…

  2. Training of Library Personnel in Remote Areas (The ACCESS Videotape Project). Final Report, and Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Ruth M.; John, Jane

    The ACCESS video tape series was designed as continuing education for librarians working in public libraries in rural areas of the Rocky Mountain and Plains states. Twelve documentary style and four panel shows were produced. A study guide supplemented the video material and included program outlines and further discussion suggestions. All tapes…

  3. A Study of Six Online Public Access Catalogs: A Review of Findings. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Joseph R.

    Results from one of a series of cooperative projects to study public access to online catalogs are discussed. This report focuses on a survey of 1,152 users and 1,315 non-users of six computer systems at seven libraries, with library participants including (1) Claremont Colleges Library, which uses the Claremont Total Library System; (2) the…

  4. A Study of the Access to the Scholarly Record From a Hospital Health Science Core Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, James F., II; Pings, Vern M.

    This study is an effort to determine possible service performance levels in hospital libraries, based on access to the scholarly record of medicine through selected lists of clinical journals and indexing and abstracting journals. Specific emphasis is placed on (1) the citation verification through the use of the index and abstract journals, (2)…

  5. Access to the Archives of United Nations Agencies: A RAMP Study with Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulate-Segura, Bodil

    Prepared under contract with the International Council on Archives (ICA), this study reviews expanded applications of archival research, the growing popular demand for information, and the resultant effect on the role of archives and archivists, especially in terms of access to records. Following an introductory discussion of the concept and role…

  6. 76 FR 35805 - Port Access Route Study: The Approaches to San Francisco

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... within which the direction of traffic flow may be recommended. Traffic lane means an area within defined..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have... study in the Federal Register on December 10, 2009 (74 FR 65543), entitled ``Port Access Route...

  7. A Comparative Study of Ethylene Emanation upon Nitrogen Deficiency in Natural Accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    De Gernier, Hugues; De Pessemier, Jérôme; Xu, Jiajia; Cristescu, Simona M; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Hermans, Christian

    2016-01-01

    An original approach to develop sustainable agriculture with less nitrogen fertilizer inputs is to tackle the cross-talk between nitrogen nutrition and plant growth regulators. In particular the gaseous hormone, ethylene, is a prime target for that purpose. The variation of ethylene production in natural accessions of the model species Arabidopsis thaliana was explored in response to the nitrate supply. Ethylene was measured with a laser-based photoacoustic detector. First, experimental conditions were established with Columbia-0 (Col-0) accession, which was grown in vitro on horizontal plates across a range of five nitrate concentrations (0.5, 1, 2.5, 5, or 10 mM). The concentrations of 1 and 10 mM nitrate were retained for further characterization. Along with a decrease of total dry biomass and higher biomass allocation to the roots, the ethylene production was 50% more important at 1 mM than at 10 mM nitrate. The total transcript levels of 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID SYNTHASES (ACS) in roots and those of ACC OXIDASES (ACO) in shoots increased by 100% between the same treatments. This was mainly due to higher transcript levels of ACS6 and of ACO2 and ACO4 respectively. The assumption was that during nitrogen deficiency, the greater biomass allocation in favor of the roots was controlled by ethylene being released in the shoots after conversion of ACC originating from the roots. Second, biomass and ethylene productions were measured in 20 additional accessions. Across all accessions, the total dry biomass and ethylene production were correlated negatively at 1 mM but positively at 10 mM nitrate. Furthermore, polymorphism was surveyed in ACC and ethylene biosynthesis genes and gene products among accessions. Very few substitutions modifying the amino acids properties in conserved motifs of the enzymes were found in the accessions. Natural variation of ethylene production could be further explored to improve Nitrogen Use Efficiency (NUE), in particular by

  8. A Comparative Study of Ethylene Emanation upon Nitrogen Deficiency in Natural Accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    De Gernier, Hugues; De Pessemier, Jérôme; Xu, Jiajia; Cristescu, Simona M.; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Hermans, Christian

    2016-01-01

    An original approach to develop sustainable agriculture with less nitrogen fertilizer inputs is to tackle the cross-talk between nitrogen nutrition and plant growth regulators. In particular the gaseous hormone, ethylene, is a prime target for that purpose. The variation of ethylene production in natural accessions of the model species Arabidopsis thaliana was explored in response to the nitrate supply. Ethylene was measured with a laser-based photoacoustic detector. First, experimental conditions were established with Columbia-0 (Col-0) accession, which was grown in vitro on horizontal plates across a range of five nitrate concentrations (0.5, 1, 2.5, 5, or 10 mM). The concentrations of 1 and 10 mM nitrate were retained for further characterization. Along with a decrease of total dry biomass and higher biomass allocation to the roots, the ethylene production was 50% more important at 1 mM than at 10 mM nitrate. The total transcript levels of 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID SYNTHASES (ACS) in roots and those of ACC OXIDASES (ACO) in shoots increased by 100% between the same treatments. This was mainly due to higher transcript levels of ACS6 and of ACO2 and ACO4 respectively. The assumption was that during nitrogen deficiency, the greater biomass allocation in favor of the roots was controlled by ethylene being released in the shoots after conversion of ACC originating from the roots. Second, biomass and ethylene productions were measured in 20 additional accessions. Across all accessions, the total dry biomass and ethylene production were correlated negatively at 1 mM but positively at 10 mM nitrate. Furthermore, polymorphism was surveyed in ACC and ethylene biosynthesis genes and gene products among accessions. Very few substitutions modifying the amino acids properties in conserved motifs of the enzymes were found in the accessions. Natural variation of ethylene production could be further explored to improve Nitrogen Use Efficiency (NUE), in particular by

  9. Household food access and child malnutrition: results from the eight-country MAL-ED study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stunting results from decreased food intake, poor diet quality, and a high burden of early childhood infections, and contributes to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although food insecurity is an important determinant of child nutrition, including stunting, development of universal measures has been challenging due to cumbersome nutritional questionnaires and concerns about lack of comparability across populations. We investigate the relationship between household food access, one component of food security, and indicators of nutritional status in early childhood across eight country sites. Methods We administered a socioeconomic survey to 800 households in research sites in eight countries, including a recently validated nine-item food access insecurity questionnaire, and obtained anthropometric measurements from children aged 24 to 60 months. We used multivariable regression models to assess the relationship between household food access insecurity and anthropometry in children, and we assessed the invariance of that relationship across country sites. Results Average age of study children was 41 months. Mean food access insecurity score (range: 0–27) was 5.8, and varied from 2.4 in Nepal to 8.3 in Pakistan. Across sites, the prevalence of stunting (42%) was much higher than the prevalence of wasting (6%). In pooled regression analyses, a 10-point increase in food access insecurity score was associated with a 0.20 SD decrease in height-for-age Z score (95% CI 0.05 to 0.34 SD; p = 0.008). A likelihood ratio test for heterogeneity revealed that this relationship was consistent across countries (p = 0.17). Conclusions Our study provides evidence of the validity of using a simple household food access insecurity score to investigate the etiology of childhood growth faltering across diverse geographic settings. Such a measure could be used to direct interventions by identifying children at risk of illness and death related to

  10. Target and Non-Target Processing during Oddball and Cyberball: A Comparative Event-Related Potential Study.

    PubMed

    Weschke, Sarah; Niedeggen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of social exclusion can be investigated by using a virtual ball-tossing game called Cyberball. In neuroimaging studies, structures have been identified which are activated during social exclusion. But to date the underlying mechanisms are not fully disclosed. In previous electrophysiological studies it was shown that the P3 complex is sensitive to exclusion manipulations in the Cyberball paradigm and that there is a correlation between P3 amplitude and self-reported social pain. Since this posterior event-related potential (ERP) was widely investigated using the oddball paradigm, we directly compared the ERP effects elicited by the target (Cyberball: "ball possession") and non-target (Cyberball: "ball possession of a co-player) events in both paradigms. Analyses mainly focused on the effect of altered stimulus probabilities of the target and non-target events between two consecutive blocks of the tasks. In the first block, the probability of the target and non-target event was 33% (Cyberball: inclusion), in the second block target probability was reduced to 17%, and accordingly, non-target probability was increased to 66% (Cyberball: exclusion). Our results indicate that ERP amplitude differences between inclusion and exclusion are comparable to ERP amplitude effects in a visual oddball task. We therefore suggest that ERP effects-especially in the P3 range-in the Oddball and Cyberball paradigm rely on similar mechanisms, namely the probability of target and non-target events. Since the simulation of social exclusion (Cyberball) did not trigger a unique ERP response, the idea of an exclusion-specific neural alarm system is not supported. The limitations of an ERP-based approach will be discussed. PMID:27100787

  11. Target and Non-Target Processing during Oddball and Cyberball: A Comparative Event-Related Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Weschke, Sarah; Niedeggen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of social exclusion can be investigated by using a virtual ball-tossing game called Cyberball. In neuroimaging studies, structures have been identified which are activated during social exclusion. But to date the underlying mechanisms are not fully disclosed. In previous electrophysiological studies it was shown that the P3 complex is sensitive to exclusion manipulations in the Cyberball paradigm and that there is a correlation between P3 amplitude and self-reported social pain. Since this posterior event-related potential (ERP) was widely investigated using the oddball paradigm, we directly compared the ERP effects elicited by the target (Cyberball: “ball possession”) and non-target (Cyberball: “ball possession of a co-player) events in both paradigms. Analyses mainly focused on the effect of altered stimulus probabilities of the target and non-target events between two consecutive blocks of the tasks. In the first block, the probability of the target and non-target event was 33% (Cyberball: inclusion), in the second block target probability was reduced to 17%, and accordingly, non-target probability was increased to 66% (Cyberball: exclusion). Our results indicate that ERP amplitude differences between inclusion and exclusion are comparable to ERP amplitude effects in a visual oddball task. We therefore suggest that ERP effects–especially in the P3 range–in the Oddball and Cyberball paradigm rely on similar mechanisms, namely the probability of target and non-target events. Since the simulation of social exclusion (Cyberball) did not trigger a unique ERP response, the idea of an exclusion-specific neural alarm system is not supported. The limitations of an ERP-based approach will be discussed. PMID:27100787

  12. Are transnational tobacco companies’ market access strategies linked to economic development models? A case study of South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungkyu; Holden, Chris; Lee, Kelley

    2013-01-01

    Transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) have used varied strategies to access previously closed markets. Using TTCs’ efforts to enter the South Korean market from the late 1980s as a case study, this article asks whether there are common patterns in these strategies that relate to the broader economic development models adopted by targeted countries. An analytical review of the existing literature on TTCs’ efforts to access emerging markets was conducted to develop hypotheses relating TTCs’ strategies to countries’ economic development models. A case study of Korea was then undertaken based on analysis of internal tobacco industry documents. Findings were consistent with the hypothesis that TTCs’ strategies in Korea were linked to Korea’s export-oriented economic development model and its hostile attitude toward foreign investment. A fuller understanding of TTCs’ strategies for expansion globally can be derived by locating them within the economic development models of specific countries or regions. Of foremost importance is the need for governments to carefully balance economic and public health policies when considering liberalisation. PMID:23327486

  13. Are transnational tobacco companies' market access strategies linked to economic development models? A case study of South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungkyu; Holden, Chris; Lee, Kelley

    2013-01-01

    Transnational tobacco companies (TTCs) have used varied strategies to access previously closed markets. Using TTCs' efforts to enter the South Korean market from the late 1980s as a case study, this article asks whether there are common patterns in these strategies that relate to the broader economic development models adopted by targeted countries. An analytical review of the existing literature on TTCs' efforts to access emerging markets was conducted to develop hypotheses relating TTCs' strategies to countries' economic development models. A case study of Korea was then undertaken based on analysis of internal tobacco industry documents. Findings were consistent with the hypothesis that TTCs' strategies in Korea were linked to Korea's export-oriented economic development model and its hostile attitude towards foreign investment. A fuller understanding of TTCs' strategies for expansion globally can be derived by locating them within the economic development models of specific countries or regions. Of foremost importance is the need for governments to carefully balance economic and public health policies when considering liberalisation. PMID:23327486

  14. Access to the carotid artery bifurcation: Cadaveric study with application to nasotracheal intubation as a technique to improve access to a high carotid artery bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Paul M; Harrigan, Mark R; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2015-12-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is a common and efficacious surgical procedure for the prevention of ischemic stroke due to atherosclerosis of the internal carotid artery (ICA). A high common carotid artery bifurcation can make CEA technically difficult due to limited carotid artery exposure. A cadaveric study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of nasotracheal intubation for improving access to a high carotid artery bifurcation. Based on this study, nasotracheal intubation does not improve access to a high carotid artery bifurcation as compared with orotracheal intubation. PMID:26312946

  15. Review of target studies for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.D.; Mark, J.W.K.; Pan, Y.L.

    1986-10-24

    We present an updated set of gain curves for radiation driven ion beam targets. The improved target performance calculated with nuclear spin polarized fuel will also be discussed. We discuss the conditions required for efficient conversion to x-rays of ion beam energy. These requirements are compared with those obtained for lasers. Recent results on symmetry requirements for direct drive ion beam targets are presented.

  16. Increasing access to healthful foods: a qualitative study with residents of low-income communities

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Inadequate access to healthful foods has been identified as a significant barrier to healthful dietary behaviors among individuals who live in low-income communities. The purpose of this study was to gather low-income community members’ opinions about their food purchasing choices and their perceptions of the most effective ways to increase access to healthful foods in their communities. Methods Spanish and English focus groups were conducted in low-income, ethnically-diverse communities. Participants were asked about their knowledge, factors influencing their food purchasing decisions, and their perceptions regarding solutions to increase access to healthful foods. Results A total of 148 people participated in 13 focus groups. The majority of participants were female and ethnically diverse (63% Hispanic, 17% African American, 16% Caucasian, and 4% “other”). More than 75% of the participants reported making less than $1999 USD per month. Participants reported high levels of knowledge and preference for healthful foods. The most important barriers influencing healthful shopping behaviors included high price of healthful food, inadequate geographical access to healthful food, poor quality of available healthful food, and lack of overall quality of the proximate retail stores. Suggested solutions to inadequate access included placement of new chain supermarkets in their communities. Strategies implemented in convenience stores were not seen as effective. Farmers’ markets, with specific stipulations, and community gardens were regarded as beneficial supplementary solutions. Conclusion The results from the focus groups provide important input from a needs assessment perspective from the community, identify gaps in access, and offer potential effective solutions to provide direction for the future. PMID:26222910

  17. Inequity of access to ACE inhibitors in Swedish heart failure patients: a register-based study

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Bertil; Hanning, Marianne; Westerling, Ragnar

    2016-01-01

    Background Several international studies suggest inequity in access to evidence-based heart failure (HF) care. Specifically, studies of ACE inhibitors (ACEIs) point to reduced ACEI access related to female sex, old age and socioeconomic position. Thus far, most studies have either been rather small, lacking diagnostic data, or lacking the possibility to account for several individual-based sociodemographic factors. Our aim was to investigate differences, which could reflect inequity in access to ACEIs based on sex, age, socioeconomic status or immigration status in Swedish patients with HF. Methods Individually linked register data for all Swedish adults hospitalised for HF in 2005–2010 (n=93 258) were analysed by multivariate regression models to assess the independent risk of female sex, high age, low employment status, low income level, low educational level or foreign country of birth, associated with lack of an ACEI dispensation within 1 year of hospitalisation. Adjustment for possible confounding was made for age, comorbidity, Angiotensin receptor blocker therapy, period and follow-up time. Results Analysis revealed an adjusted OR for no ACEI dispensation for women of 1.31 (95% CI 1.27 to 1.35); for the oldest patients of 2.71 (95% CI 2.53 to 2.91); and for unemployed patients of 1.59 (95% CI 1.46 to 1.73). Conclusions Access to ACEI treatment was reduced in women, older patients and unemployed patients. We conclude that access to ACEIs is inequitable among Swedish patients with HF. Future studies should include clinical data, as well as mortality outcomes in different groups. PMID:26261264

  18. Study of underwater laser propulsion using different target materials.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Hao; Chen, Jun; Han, Bing; Shen, Zhong-Hua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiao-Wu

    2014-07-14

    In order to investigate the influence of target materials, including aluminum (Al), titanium (Ti) and copper (Cu), on underwater laser propulsion, the analytical formula of the target momentum IT is deduced from the enhanced coupling theory of laser propulsion in atmosphere with transparent overlay metal target. The high-speed photography method and numerical simulation are employed to verify the IT model. It is shown that the enhanced coupling theory, which was developed originally for laser propulsion in atmosphere, is also applicable to underwater laser propulsion with metal targets. PMID:25090568

  19. Vascular targets for cannabinoids: animal and human studies

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Christopher; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2014-01-01

    Application of cannabinoids and endocannabinoids to perfused vascular beds or individual isolated arteries results in changes in vascular resistance. In most cases, the result is vasorelaxation, although vasoconstrictor responses are also observed. Cannabinoids also modulate the actions of vasoactive compounds including acetylcholine, methoxamine, angiotensin II and U46619 (thromboxane mimetic). Numerous mechanisms of action have been proposed including receptor activation, potassium channel activation, calcium channel inhibition and the production of vasoactive mediators such as calcitonin gene-related peptide, prostanoids, NO, endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factor and hydrogen peroxide. The purpose of this review is to examine the evidence for the range of receptors now known to be activated by cannabinoids. Direct activation by cannabinoids of CB1, CBe, TRPV1 (and potentially other TRP channels) and PPARs in the vasculature has been observed. A potential role for CB2, GPR55 and 5-HT1A has also been identified in some studies. Indirectly, activation of prostanoid receptors (TP, IP, EP1 and EP4) and the CGRP receptor is involved in the vascular responses to cannabinoids. The majority of this evidence has been obtained through animal research, but recent work has confirmed some of these targets in human arteries. Vascular responses to cannabinoids are enhanced in hypertension and cirrhosis, but are reduced in obesity and diabetes, both due to changes in the target sites of action. Much further work is required to establish the extent of vascular actions of cannabinoids and the application of this research in physiological and pathophysiological situations. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids 2013. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-6 PMID:24329566

  20. A bibliometric study of publication patterns in access to medicines research in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, Lindsay Sarah; Adam, Taghreed; Laing, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Developing countries face considerable problems in both accessing and properly utilizing essential medicines. One challenge to achieving these goals in resource-poor settings is a limited knowledge base as to what works to improve the selection, access and use of essential medicines including; ways to ensure affordable prices, increase sustainable financing, and strengthen reliable supply systems that are relevant to these settings. The objective of this study was to search the existing evidence base on access to medicine issues in developing countries and to assess publication patterns regarding the nature of topics studied, areas where gaps of information exist and the general trends in publications in this area. Methods: A PubMed search was conducted to retrieve publications on access to medicines in developing countries between 1999-2008. Our search strategy builds and expands on a search strategy developed for a Cochrane review to include a wider range of topics related to access to medicines and pharmaceutical policy. Retrieved articles were categorized by research topics, year of publication, study area, and country of residence of corresponding author to establish patterns in publications with respect to these categories over the past 10 years. Results: Medicine selection, intellectual property rights, and monitoring and quality assurance were among the top topics studied over the last 10 years. Corresponding authors residing in high-income countries represented around 50% of all publications relative to low-income (18%) and middle-income countries (32%). Although an increasing trend in the number of publications per year was found, the increase was relatively small and variable over a 10-year period. Conclusions: There are few peer-reviewed publications on access to medicines in developing countries with an average of only 76 publications per year over the past 10 years. Increasing the local evidence base as to what works to improve access to

  1. Study of optoelectronic switch for satellite-switched time-division multiple access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Shing-Fong; Jou, Liz; Lenart, Joe

    1987-01-01

    The use of optoelectronic switching for satellite switched time division multiple access will improve the isolation and reduce the crosstalk of an IF switch matrix. The results are presented of a study on optoelectronic switching. Tasks include literature search, system requirements study, candidate switching architecture analysis, and switch model optimization. The results show that the power divided and crossbar switching architectures are good candidates for an IF switch matrix.

  2. Intraosseous Vascular Access through the Anterior Mandible – A Cadaver Model Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Goldschalt, Christin; Doll, Sara; Ihle, Brit; Kirsch, Joachim; Mutzbauer, Till Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Background Several insertion sites have been described for intraosseous puncture in cases of emergencies when a conventional vascular access cannot be established. This pilot study has been designed to evaluate the feasibility of the mandibular bone for the use of an intraosseous vascular access in a cadaver model. Methodology/Principal Findings 17 dentistry and 16 medical students participating in a voluntary course received a short introduction into the method and subsequently used the battery powered EZ-IO system with a 15 mm cannula for a puncture of the anterior mandible in 33 cadavers. The time needed to perform each procedure was evaluated. India ink was injected into the accesses and during the anatomy course cadavers were dissected to retrace the success or failure of the puncture. Dental students needed 25.5±18.9(mean±standard deviation)s and medical students 33±20.4 s for the procedure (p = 0.18). Floor of mouth extravasation occurred in both groups in 3 cases. Success rates were 82 and 75% (p = 0.93). Conclusions/Significance Despite floor of mouth extravasation of injected fluid into a mandibular intraosseous access might severely complicate this procedure, the anterior mandible may be helpful as an alternative to other intraosseous and intravenous insertion sites when these are not available in medical emergencies. PMID:25405476

  3. Bridging the Gap between Access and Success: A Study of the Impact of an Access and Success Program on Academic Outcomes of Low-Income College Freshmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Sarah R.

    2012-01-01

    In response to the increasing cost of college, colleges and universities are leveraging financial aid and academic support services to implement access and success programs intended to help financially disadvantaged students afford and persist through a baccalaureate degree program. This research is a study of the efficacy of one such program at a…

  4. A study of HIV positive undocumented African migrants' access to health services in the UK.

    PubMed

    Whyte, James; Whyte, Maria D; Hires, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Newly immigrated persons, whatever their origin, tend to fall in the lower socioeconomic levels. In fact, failure of an asylum application renders one destitute in a large proportion of cases, often resulting in a profound lack of access to basic necessities. With over a third of HIV positive failed asylum seekers reporting no income, and the remainder reporting highly limited resources, poverty is a reality for the vast majority. The purpose of the study was to determine the basic social processes that guide HIV positive undocumented migrant's efforts to gain health services in the UK. The study used the Grounded Theory Approach. Theoretical saturation occurred after 16 participants were included in the study. The data included reflections of the prominent factors related to the establishment of a safe and productive life and the ability of individuals to remain within the UK. The data reflected heavily upon the ability of migrants to enter the medical care system during their asylum period, and on an emerging pattern of service denial after loss on immigration appeal. The findings of this study are notable in that they have demonstrated sequence of events along a timeline related to the interaction between the asylum process and access to health-related services. The results reflect that African migrants maintain a degree of formal access to health services during the period that they possess legal access to services and informal access after the failure of their asylum claim. The purpose of this paper is to examine the basic social processes that characterize efforts to gain access to health services among HIV positive undocumented African migrants to the UK. The most recent estimates indicate that there are a total of 618,000 migrants who lack legal status within the UK. Other studies have placed the number of undocumented migrants within the UK in the range of 525,000-950,000. More than 442,000 are thought to dwell in the London metropolitan area. Even in

  5. Modeling to Target Conservation Practices: A Case Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Targeted placement of agricultural conservation practices within rural watersheds can significantly increase the cost-effectiveness of these nonpoint source pollution reduction measures. However, agricultural management decisions are made primarily at the farm-level, with confidentiality concerns an...

  6. TCGA bladder cancer study reveals potential drug targets

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with TCGA have identified new potential therapeutic targets for a major form of bladder cancer, including important genes and pathways that are disrupted in the disease. They also discovered that, at the molecular level, some subtypes of bla

  7. Study of the Effects of Target Geometry on Synthetic Aperture Radar Images using Simulation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tummala, K.; Jha, A. K.; Kumar, S.

    2014-11-01

    Synthetic aperture radar technology has revolutionized earth observation with very high resolutions of below 5m, making it possible to distinguish individual urban features like buildings and even cars on the surface of the earth. But, the difficulty in interpretation of these images has hindered their use. The geometry of target objects and their orientation with respect to the SAR sensor contribute enormously to unexpected signatures on SAR images. Geometry of objects can cause single, double or multiple reflections which, in turn, affect the brightness value on the SAR images. Occlusions, shadow and layover effects are present in the SAR images as a result of orientation of target objects with respect to the incident microwaves. Simulation of SAR images is the best and easiest way to study and understand the anomalies. This paper discusses synthetic aperture radar image simulation, with the study of effect of target geometry as the main aim. Simulation algorithm has been developed in the time domain to provide greater modularity and to increase the ease of implementation. This algorithm takes into account the sensor and target characteristics, their locations with respect to the earth, 3-dimensional model of the target, sensor velocity, and SAR parameters. two methods have been discussed to obtain position and velocity vectors of SAR sensor - the first, from the metadata of real SAR image used to verify the simulation algorithm, and the second, from satellite orbital parameters. Using these inputs, the SAR image coordinates and backscatter coefficients for each point on the target are calculated. The backscatter coefficients at target points are calculated based on the local incidence angles using Muhleman's backscatter model. The present algorithm has been successfully implemented on radarsat-2 image of San Francisco bay area. Digital elevation models (DEMs) of the area under consideration are used as the 3d models of the target area. DEMs of different

  8. Simultaneous nuclear data target accuracy study for innovative fast reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Aliberti, G.; Palmiotti, G.; Salvatores, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division; INL; CEA Cadarache

    2007-01-01

    The present paper summarizes the major outcomes of a study conducted within a Nuclear Energy Agency Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (NEA WPEC) initiative aiming to investigate data needs for future innovative nuclear systems, to quantify them and to propose a strategy to meet them. Within the NEA WPEC Subgroup 26 an uncertainty assessment has been carried out using covariance data recently processed by joint efforts of several US and European Labs. In general, the uncertainty analysis shows that for the wide selection of fast reactor concepts considered, the present integral parameters uncertainties resulting from the assumed uncertainties on nuclear data are probably acceptable in the early phases of design feasibility studies. However, in the successive phase of preliminary conceptual designs and in later design phases of selected reactor and fuel cycle concepts, there will be the need for improved data and methods, in order to reduce margins, both for economic and safety reasons. It is then important to define as soon as possible priority issues, i.e. which are the nuclear data (isotope, reaction type, energy range) that need improvement, in order to quantify target accuracies and to select a strategy to meet the requirements needed (e.g. by some selected new differential measurements and by the use of integral experiments). In this context one should account for the wide range of high accuracy integral experiments already performed and available in national or, better, international data basis, in order to indicate new integral experiments that will be needed to account for new requirements due to innovative design features, and to provide the necessary full integral data base to be used for validation of the design simulation tools.

  9. Accessing Suicide-Related Information on the Internet: A Retrospective Observational Study of Search Behavior

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Internet’s potential impact on suicide is of major public health interest as easy online access to pro-suicide information or specific suicide methods may increase suicide risk among vulnerable Internet users. Little is known, however, about users’ actual searching and browsing behaviors of online suicide-related information. Objective To investigate what webpages people actually clicked on after searching with suicide-related queries on a search engine and to examine what queries people used to get access to pro-suicide websites. Methods A retrospective observational study was done. We used a web search dataset released by America Online (AOL). The dataset was randomly sampled from all AOL subscribers’ web queries between March and May 2006 and generated by 657,000 service subscribers. Results We found 5526 search queries (0.026%, 5526/21,000,000) that included the keyword "suicide". The 5526 search queries included 1586 different search terms and were generated by 1625 unique subscribers (0.25%, 1625/657,000). Of these queries, 61.38% (3392/5526) were followed by users clicking on a search result. Of these 3392 queries, 1344 (39.62%) webpages were clicked on by 930 unique users but only 1314 of those webpages were accessible during the study period. Each clicked-through webpage was classified into 11 categories. The categories of the most visited webpages were: entertainment (30.13%; 396/1314), scientific information (18.31%; 240/1314), and community resources (14.53%; 191/1314). Among the 1314 accessed webpages, we could identify only two pro-suicide websites. We found that the search terms used to access these sites included “commiting suicide with a gas oven”, “hairless goat”, “pictures of murder by strangulation”, and “photo of a severe burn”. A limitation of our study is that the database may be dated and confined to mainly English webpages. Conclusions Searching or browsing suicide-related or pro-suicide webpages was

  10. A Study of Minority Group Student Access to Vocational-Technical Schools in the Boston and Springfield Metropolitan Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Advisory Council on Vocational-Technical Education, Boston.

    The express purpose of the study reported here is to examine whether minority group students (including female students) have equal access to vocational-technical schools. The study assessed whether or not such access, as measured through enrollment in vocational-technical school programs, currently exists. The kinds of information gathered and…

  11. A study of Iranian immigrants’ experiences of accessing Canadian health care services: a grounded theory

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Immigration is not a new phenomenon but, rather, has deep roots in human history. Documents from every era detail individuals who left their homelands and struggled to reestablish their lives in other countries. The aim of this study was to explore and understand the experience of Iranian immigrants who accessed Canadian health care services. Research with immigrants is useful for learning about strategies that newcomers develop to access health care services. Methods The research question guiding this study was, “What are the processes by which Iranian immigrants learn to access health care services in Canada?” To answer the question, a constructivist grounded theory approach was applied. Initially, unstructured interviews were conducted with 17 participants (11 women and six men) who were adults (at least 18 years old) and had immigrated to Canada within the past 15 years. Eight participants took part in a second interview, and four participants took part in a third interview. Results Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, “tackling the stumbling blocks of access” emerged as the core category. The basic social process (BSP), becoming self-sufficient, was a transitional process and had five stages: becoming a stranger; feeling helpless; navigating/seeking information; employing strategies; and becoming integrated and self-sufficient. We found that “tackling the stumbling blocks of access” was the main struggle throughout this journey. Some of the immigrants were able to overcome these challenges and became proficient in accessing health care services, but others were unable to make the necessary changes and thus stayed in earlier stages/phases of transition, and sometimes returned to their country of origin. Conclusion During the course of this journey a substantive grounded theory was developed that revealed the challenges and issues confronted by this particular group of immigrants. This process explains why some Iranian

  12. Scaling formula of ICF ignition targets and study of targets optimized in stability performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Dai, Zhensheng; Zheng, Wudi

    2014-10-01

    LPI and RTI are the two main ingredients affecting the success of ignition. The gas fill near the Au wall along the inner laser cone is the main region which stimulates SRS instabilities. At this region, pressure balance and energy balance between the inside and the outside of inner laser cone path are obtained. A plasma scaling model in ignition hohlraums of ICF has been developed. RTI could be described by IFAR(InFlight Aspect Ratio) according to linear theory. Considering other scaling formula in capsule, a index, SPI (Stability performance Index), has been proposed, which describes the balance between SPI and RTI. Designing of ignition targets is directed by using this index to obtain more margin for LPI and RTI.

  13. Target studies for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1996-03-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron ``filter``, which has a deep ``window`` in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is reaccelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator -- target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production -- resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons -- while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current.

  14. Studies of wave phenomena using HF-induced scatter target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N.; Borisova, T.; Kornienko, V.; Rietveld, M.; Frolov, V.; Uryadov, V.; Kagan, L.; Yampolski, Y.; Vertogradov, G.; Kelley, M.

    Experimental results from Tromso and Sura heating experiments at high and mid-latitudes are examined It was shown that the combination of HF-induced target and bi-static HF Doppler radio scatter observations is a profitable method for the identification and studies of wave phenomena of different origin We analysed the ULF activity in the Pc 3-4 range and the medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances TIDs at high and mid-latitudes Bi-static HF Doppler radio scatter observations were carried out on the London-Tromso-St Petersburg path in the course of Tromso heating experiments During Sura heating experiments multi-position bi-static HF Doppler radio scatter observations were simultaneously performed at three reception points including St Petersburg Kharkov and Rostov-on-Don Ray tracing and Doppler shift simulations were made for all experiments Parameters of ULF waves were found The interesting feature detected from Sura heating experiment was the dependence of the ULF wave parameters from the effective radiated power of the heating facility Medium-scale TIDs were observed in the evening and pre-midnight hours TIDs in the auroral E region with periods of 20-25 min were traveling southward at speeds from 190-250 m s TIDs in the mid-latitudinal F region with periods from 15 to 45 min were at speeds between 40 and 120 m s During quiet magnetic conditions the waves were traveling in the north-east direction In disturbed conditions the waves were moving in the south-west direction with higher speeds as compared with quiet conditions Possible mechanisms

  15. A global assessment of market accessibility and market influence for global environmental change studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verburg, Peter H.; Ellis, Erle C.; Letourneau, Aurelien

    2011-07-01

    Markets influence the global patterns of urbanization, deforestation, agriculture and other land use systems. Yet market influence is rarely incorporated into spatially explicit global studies of environmental change, largely because consistent global data are lacking below the national level. Here we present the first high spatial resolution gridded data depicting market influence globally. The data jointly represent variations in both market strength and accessibility based on three market influence indices derived from an index of accessibility to market locations and national level gross domestic product (purchasing power parity). These indices show strong correspondence with human population density while also revealing several distinct and useful relationships with other global environmental patterns. As market influence grows, the need for high resolution global data on market influence and its dynamics will become increasingly important to understanding and forecasting global environmental change.

  16. Performance study of hybrid spread-spectrum random-access communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, Theodore; Geraniotis, Evaggelos

    1991-06-01

    A numerical study of the performance of hybrid direct-sequence slow-frequency-hopped spread-spectrum random-access schemes using Reed-Solomon forward-error control coding is performed. The performance measures of interest are the maximum numbers of simultaneous transmitters that can be tolerated in the vicinity of a receiver at a desirable level of the bit (or symbol) error probability, the normalized throughput, and the packet error probability. For the case where all simultaneous signals have the same received power levels, a critical comparison of the performance of direct-sequence, frequency-hopped, and hybrid spread-spectrum systems with the same overall bandwidth expansion is conducted, and ranges of parameters, for which each system outperforms the others, are identified. Hybrid spread-spectrum random-access schemes are found to have considerably higher throughput than the uncoded nonspread-spectrum ones.

  17. Physical and Visual Accessibilities in Intensive Care Units: A Comparative Study of Open-Plan and Racetrack Units.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mahbub; Khan, Nayma; Jones, Belinda

    2016-01-01

    This study compared physical and visual accessibilities and their associations with staff perception and interaction behaviors in 2 intensive care units (ICUs) with open-plan and racetrack layouts. For the study, physical and visual accessibilities were measured using the spatial analysis techniques of Space Syntax. Data on staff perception were collected from 81 clinicians using a questionnaire survey. The locations of 2233 interactions, and the location and length of another 339 interactions in these units were collected using systematic field observation techniques. According to the study, physical and visual accessibilities were different in the 2 ICUs, and clinicians' primary workspaces were physically and visually more accessible in the open-plan ICU. Physical and visual accessibilities affected how well clinicians' knew their peers and where their peers were located in these units. Physical and visual accessibilities also affected clinicians' perception of interaction and communication and of teamwork and collaboration in these units. Additionally, physical and visual accessibilities showed significant positive associations with interaction behaviors in these units, with the open-plan ICU showing stronger associations. However, physical accessibilities were less important than visual accessibilities in relation to interaction behaviors in these ICUs. The implications of these findings for ICU design are discussed. PMID:27575795

  18. Crater morphology in sandstone targets: The MEMIN impact parameter study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufresne, Anja; Poelchau, Michael H.; Kenkmann, Thomas; Deutsch, Alex; Hoerth, Tobias; SchńFer, Frank; Thoma, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Hypervelocity (2.5-7.8 km s-1) impact experiments into sandstone were carried out to investigate the influence of projectile velocity and mass, target pore space saturation, target-projectile density contrast, and target layer orientation on crater size and shape. Crater size increases with increasing projectile velocity and mass as well as with increasing target pore space saturation. Craters in water-saturated porous targets are generally shallower and larger in volume and in diameter than craters from equivalent impacts into dry porous sandstone. Morphometric analyses of the resultant craters, 5-40 cm in diameter, reveal features that are characteristic of all of our experimental craters regardless of impact conditions (I) a large central depression within a fragile, light-colored central part, and (II) an outer spallation zone with areas of incipient spallation. Two different mechanical processes, grain fragmentation and intergranular tensile fracturing, are recorded within these crater morphologies. Zone (I) approximates the shape of the transient crater formed by material compression, displacement, comminution, and excavation flow, whereas (II) is the result of intergranular tensile fracturing and spallation. The transient crater dimensions are reconstructed by fitting quadric parabolas to crater profiles from digital elevation models. The dimensions of this transient and of the final crater show the same trends: both increase in volume with increasing impact energy, and with increasing water saturation of the target pore space. The relative size of the transient crater (in percent of the final crater volume) decreases with increasing projectile mass and velocity, signifying a greater contribution of spallation on the final crater size when projectile mass and velocity are increased.

  19. Comparative analysis of linker histone H1, MeCP2, and HMGD1 on nucleosome stability and target site accessibility.

    PubMed

    Riedmann, Caitlyn; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne N

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin architectural proteins (CAPs) bind the entry/exit DNA of nucleosomes and linker DNA to form higher order chromatin structures with distinct transcriptional outcomes. How CAPs mediate nucleosome dynamics is not well understood. We hypothesize that CAPs regulate DNA target site accessibility through alteration of the rate of spontaneous dissociation of DNA from nucleosomes. We investigated the effects of histone H1, high mobility group D1 (HMGD1), and methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2), on the biophysical properties of nucleosomes and chromatin. We show that MeCP2, like the repressive histone H1, traps the nucleosome in a more compact mononucleosome structure. Furthermore, histone H1 and MeCP2 hinder model transcription factor Gal4 from binding to its cognate DNA site within the nucleosomal DNA. These results demonstrate that MeCP2 behaves like a repressor even in the absence of methylation. Additionally, MeCP2 behaves similarly to histone H1 and HMGD1 in creating a higher-order chromatin structure, which is susceptible to chromatin remodeling by ISWI. Overall, we show that CAP binding results in unique changes to nucleosome structure and dynamics. PMID:27624769

  20. Using health markets to improve access to medicines: three case studies.

    PubMed

    Shroff, Zubin; Bigdeli, Maryam; Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din; Wagner, Anita; Ghaffar, Abdul; Peters, David H

    2016-01-01

    This editorial introduces a series of case studies that together highlight the use of health market interventions to improve access to medicines in low-and-middle income countries (LMICs). It underscores the added value of using a systems approach for a holistic understanding of how these interventions interact with the rest of the health system and the intended and unintended consequences that result. It goes on to summarize key findings from each of the studies and concludes with lessons for decision-makers on the design and implementation of market based interventions in LMIC health systems. PMID:27158514

  1. A Unique, Optically Accessible Flame Tube Facility for Lean Combustor Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Yolanda R.; Locke, Randy J.; Wey, Chowen C.; Bianco, Jean

    1995-01-01

    A facility that allows interrogation of combusting flows by advanced diagnostic methods and instrumentation has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. An optically accessible flame tube combustor is described which has high temperature, pressure, and air flow capabilities. The windows in the combustor measure 3.8 cm axially by 5.1 cm radially, providing 67% optical access to the 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm cross section flow chamber. Advanced gas analysis instrumentation is available through a gas chromatography/mass spectrometer system (GC/MS), which has on-line capability for heavy hydrocarbon measurement with resolution to the parts per billion level. The instrumentation allows one to study combusting flows and combustor subcomponents, such as fuel injectors and air swirlers. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) can measure unstable combustion species, which cannot be obtained with traditional gas sampling. This type of data is especially useful to combustion modellers. The optical access allows measurements to have high spatial and temporal resolution. GC/MS data and PLIF images of OH- are presented from experiments using a lean direct injection (LDI) combustor burning Jet-A fuel at inlet temperatures ranging from 810 K to 866 K, combustor pressures up to 1380 kPa, and equivalence ratios from 0.41 to 0.59.

  2. Challenges with participant reimbursement: experiences from a post-trial access study.

    PubMed

    Mngadi, Kathryn Therese; Frohlich, Janet; Montague, Carl; Singh, Jerome; Nkomonde, Nelisiwe; Mvandaba, Nomzamo; Ntombeka, Fanelesibonge; Luthuli, Londiwe; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Mansoor, Leila

    2015-11-01

    Reimbursement of trial participants remains a frequently debated issue, with specific guidance lacking. Trials combining post-trial access and implementation science may necessitate new strategies and models. CAPRISA 008, a post-trial access study testing the feasibility of using family planning services to rollout a prelicensure HIV prevention intervention, tried to balance the real-life scenario of no reimbursement for attendance at public sector clinics with that of a trial including some visits that focused on research procedures and others that focused on standard of care procedures. A reduced reimbursement was offered for 'standard of care' visits, meant primarily to cover transport costs to and from the clinic only. This impacted negatively on accrual, retention and participant morale, primarily due to the protracted delay in regulatory approval, during which time, the costs of living, including travel costs had increased. Relevant guidelines were reviewed and institutional policy was updated to incorporate the South African National Health Research Ethics Committee guidelines on reimbursement (taking into account participant time, travel and inconvenience). The reimbursement amount for 'standard of care' visits was increased accordingly. The question remains whether a trial that combines post-trial access with implementation science, with clear benefits for the participants and the provision of above standard medical care, should have reimbursement rates that approach those of a proof-of-concept trial, for 'standard of care' visits. PMID:26392172

  3. Radar target classification studies: Software development and documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamis, A.; Garber, F.; Walton, E.

    1985-09-01

    Three computer programs were developed to process and analyze calibrated radar returns. The first program, called DATABASE, was developed to create and manage a random accessed data base. The second program, called FTRAN DB, was developed to process horizontal and vertical polarizations radar returns into different formats (i.e., time domain, circular polarizations and polarization parameters). The third program, called RSSE, was developed to simulate a variety of radar systems and to evaluate their ability to identify radar returns. Complete computer listings are included in the appendix volumes.

  4. A Cross-Sectional Study about Meaning Access Processes for Homographs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nievas, Francisco; Justicia, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    A cross-sectional study examined the effect of meaning frequency, referred to as ''dominance'' in the semantic priming paradigm, where ambiguous words (primes) were processed in isolation. Participants made lexical decisions to target words that were associates of the more frequent (dominant) or less frequent (subordinate) meaning of a homograph…

  5. 34 CFR Appendix A to Subpart C of... - Grants for Access and Persistence Program (GAP) State Grant Allotment Case Study

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grants for Access and Persistence Program (GAP) State Grant Allotment Case Study A Appendix A to Subpart C of Part 692 Education Regulations of the Offices of..., Subpt. C, App. A Appendix A to Subpart C of Part 692—Grants for Access and Persistence Program...

  6. Access to Academic Curriculum in Australian Secondary Schools: A Case Study of a Highly Marketised Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Laura B.; Southwell, Leonie

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how access to academic curriculum differs between secondary schools in Australia, a country whose education system is marked by high levels of choice, privatisation and competition. Equitable access to academic curriculum is important for both individual students and their families as well as the larger society. Previous…

  7. Who is less likely to die in association with improved National Emergency Access Target (NEAT) compliance for emergency admissions in a tertiary referral hospital?

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Clair; Staib, Andrew; Eley, Rob; Griffin, Bronwyn; Cattell, Rohan; Flores, Judy; Scott, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to identify patient and non-patient factors associated with reduced mortality among patients admitted from the emergency department (ED) to in-patient wards in a major tertiary hospital that had previously reported a near halving in mortality in association with a doubling in National Emergency Access Target (NEAT) compliance over a 2-year period from 2012 to 2014. Methods We retrospectively analysed routinely collected data from the Emergency Department Information System (EDIS) and hospital discharge abstracts on all emergency admissions during calendar years 2011 (pre-NEAT interventions) and 2013 (post-NEAT interventions). Patients admitted to short-stay wards and then discharged home, as well as patients dying in the ED, were excluded. Patients included in the study were categorised according to age, time and day of arrival to the ED, mode of transport to the ED, emergency triage category, type of clinical presentation and major diagnostic codes. Results The in-patient mortality rate for emergency admissions decreased from 1.9% (320/17022) in 2011 to 1.2% (202/17162) in 2013 (P<0.001). There was no change from 2011 to 2013 in the percentage of deaths in the ED (0.19% vs 0.17%) or those coded as in-patient palliative care (17.9% vs 22.2%). Although deaths were not associated with age by itself, the mortality rate of older patients admitted to medical wards decreased significantly from 3.5% to 1.7% (P=0.011). A higher mortality rate was seen among patients presenting to ED triage between midnight and 12 noon than at other times in 2011 (2.5% vs 1.5%; P<0.001), but this difference disappeared by 2013 (1.3% vs 1.1%; P=0.150). A similar pattern was seen among patients presenting on weekends versus weekdays: 2.2% versus 1.7% (P=0.038) in 2011 and 1.3% versus 1.1% (P=0.150) in 2013. Fewer deaths were noted among patients with acute cardiovascular or respiratory disease in 2013 than in 2011 (1.7% vs 3.6% and 1.5% vs 3

  8. Radiation transport effects in heavy-ion beam--target interaction studies: Measurement of target opacity and beam conversion efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Tahir, N. A.; Arnold, R. C.

    1989-07-01

    In this paper detailed simulations are presented of radiation-hydrodynamicresponse of gaseous cylindrical targets irradiated with heavy-ion beams thatwill be produced at the Gesellschaft f/umlt u/r Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt,using a heavy-ion synchrotron (SIS) (/ital Heavy/ /ital Ion//usion/, AIP Conference Proceedings No. 152 (AIP, NewYork, 1986), p. 23). The purpose of this work is to explore material conditionsfor which the thermal radiation effects can be maximized. This is desirable inorder to study a number of interesting and important effects includingmaximization of conversion efficiency of the ion beam energy to thermalradiation and measurement of the target opacity in the SIS experiments. It isexpected that the SIS beams will produce a specific deposition power of 10 TW/g.The simulations in this paper show that a temperature of the order of 10 eVcould be achieved by the SIS beams using homogeneous, cylindrical Xe targets. Ithas been shown that with the help of these computer simulations one should beable to measure the target opacity in these experiments within a factor of 3.Also these calculations show that in the SIS experiments one should be able tohave a 50% conversion efficiency using a Xe target under optimum conditions. Ithas been found that the radiation effects will be optimized in the SISexperiments if the initial target density is of the order of 10/sup /minus/3/ g/cm/sup 3/.If the initial density is too high (of the order of 10/sup /minus/1/ g/cm/sup 3/ or more),hydrodynamic effects will dominate, while, on the other hand, if the initialdensity is too low (of the order of 10/sup /minus/4/ g/cm/sup 3/ or less), the electronthermal conductivity will take over.

  9. A study on the utilization of tritide titanium targets for monoenergetic neutron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamanis, D.

    2002-10-01

    Proton beam interaction with a tritide titanium target in an electrostatic accelerator was studied by measuring the produced neutron rate as a function of bombarding time. The results are analyzed in the frame of target temperature increase, extension of existing low energy interaction model and SRIM simulation. Special emphasis is put on the evaluation of the release of radiotoxic tritium from the solid target.

  10. Cryogneic-Target Performance and Implosion Physics Studies on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V.A.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Craxton, R.S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.H.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Hu, S.X.; Knauer, J.P.; Marshall, F.J.; McCrory, R.L.; McKenty, P.W.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Radha, R.B.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Seka, W.; Short, R.W.; Shvarts, D.; Skupsky, S.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Frenje, J.A.; Li, C.K.; Petrasso, R.D.; Seguin, F.H.

    2009-03-06

    Recent progress in direct-drive cryogenic implosions on the OMEGA Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] is reviewed. Ignition-relevant areal densities of ~200 mg/cm^2 in cryogenic D2 implosions with peak laser-drive intensities of ~5 x 10^14 W/cm^2 were previously reported [T. C. Sangster et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 185006 (2008)]. The laser intensity is increased to ~10^15 W/cm^2 to demonstrate ignition-relevant implosion velocities of 3–4 x 10^7 cm/ s, providing an understanding of the relevant target physics. Planar-target acceleration experiments show the importance of the nonlocal electron-thermal-transport effects for modeling the laser drive. Nonlocal and hot-electron preheat is observed to stabilize the Rayleigh–Taylor growth at a peak drive intensity of ~10^15 W/cm^2. The shell preheat caused by hot electrons generated by two-plasmon-decay instability was reduced by using Si-doped ablators. The measured compressibility of planar plastic targets driven with high-compression shaped pulses agrees well with one-dimensional simulations at these intensities. Shock mistiming has contributed to compression degradation of recent cryogenic implosions driven with continuous pulses. Multiple-picket (shock-wave) target designs make it possible for a more robust tuning of the shock-wave arrival times. Cryogenic implosions driven with double-picket pulses demonstrate somewhat improved compression performance at a peak drive intensity of ~10^15 W/cm^2.

  11. Demand and access to mental health services: a qualitative formative study in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nepal is experiencing a significant ‘treatment gap’ in mental health care. People with mental disorders do not always receive appropriate treatment due to a range of structural and individual issues, including stigma and poverty. The PRIME (Programme for Improving Mental Health Care) programme has developed a mental health care plan to address this issue in Nepal and four other low and middle income countries. This study aims to inform the development of this comprehensive care plan by investigating the perceptions of stakeholders at different levels of the care system in the district of Chitwan in southern Nepal: health professionals, lay workers and community members. It focuses specifically on issues of demand and access to care, and aims to identify barriers and potential solutions for reaching people with priority mental disorders. Methods This qualitative study consisted of key informant interviews (33) and focus group discussions (83 participants in 9 groups) at community and health facility levels. Data were analysed using a framework analysis approach. Results As well as pragmatic barriers at the health facility level, mental health stigma and certain cultural norms were found to reduce access and demand for services. Respondents perceived the lack of awareness about mental health problems to be a major problem underlying this, even among those with high levels of education or status. They proposed strategies to improve awareness, such as channelling education through trusted and respected community figures, and responding to the need for openness or privacy in educational programmes, depending on the issue at hand. Adapting to local perceptions of stigmatised treatments emerged as another key strategy to improve demand. Conclusions This study identifies barriers to accessing care in Nepal that reach beyond the health facility and into the social fabric of the community. Stakeholders in PRIME’s integrated care plan advocate strategic

  12. A qualitative study of limited access permit dental hygienists in Oregon.

    PubMed

    Battrell, Ann M; Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Overman, Pamela R

    2008-03-01

    Many states have adopted alternative oral health care delivery systems that include expanded roles for dental hygienists. This qualitative study was designed to evaluate the impact of the Limited Access Permit (LAP) legislation in Oregon and to understand the relationship between dental hygienists and dentists within this delivery system. The snowball sampling technique was used to identify LAP dental hygienists and collaborating dentists. The snowball sampling technique begins with the identification of a known expert in the field who serves as the initial "sampling unit." Subsequent individuals are then recommended, or nominated, to the investigator by the initial study participant and are selected based upon the need to fill in or extend information. The final sample consisted of seven LAP dental hygienists and two collaborating dentists. Interviews, field observations, and document analysis were utilized for data collection. Factors that led to the creation of LAP dental hygiene practice, current LAP practice, personal characteristics, relationships between LAP dental hygienists and dentists, and the impact that LAP dental hygienists have had on access to oral health care were explored. Data revealed that the Oregon legislature twice expanded the LAP scope of practice to increase access to oral health care services. LAP dental hygienists practice in community and school-based settings. Common characteristics of LAP dental hygienists include entrepreneurship, lifelong learning, and a commitment to underserved populations. The findings from this study indicate that LAP dental hygienists and collaborating dentists have positive relationships. No evidence of lower quality of care in unsupervised dental hygiene practices was found. However, the impact of the LAP legislation is still unknown due to the limited numbers of LAP dental hygienists and the early nature of the LAP practice. PMID:18316537

  13. Advancing Migrant Access to Health Services in Europe (AMASE): Protocol for a Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-del Arco, Débora; Monge, Susana; Copas, Andrew J; Gennotte, Anne-Francoise; Volny-Anne, Alain; Göpel, Siri; Touloumi, Giota; Prins, Maria; Barros, Henrique; Staehelin, Cornelia; del Amo, Julia; Burns, Fiona M

    2016-01-01

    Background Migrants form a substantial proportion of the population affected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic in Europe, yet HIV prevention for this population is hindered by poor understanding of access to care and of postmigration transmission dynamics. Objective We present the design and methods of the advancing Migrant Access to health Services in Europe (aMASE) study, the first European cross-cultural study focused on multiple migrant populations. It aims to identify the structural, cultural, and financial barriers to HIV prevention, diagnosis, and treatment and to determine the likely country of HIV acquisition in HIV-positive migrant populations. Methods We delivered 2 cross-sectional electronic surveys across 10 countries (Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, and United Kingdom). A clinic survey aimed to recruit up to 2000 HIV-positive patients from 57 HIV clinics in 9 countries. A unique study number linked anonymized questionnaire data to clinical records data (viral loads, CD4 cell counts, viral clades, etc). This questionnaire was developed by expert panel consensus and cognitively tested, and a pilot study was carried out in 2 countries. A Web-based community survey (n=1000) reached those living with HIV but not currently accessing HIV clinics, as well as HIV-negative migrants. It was developed in close collaboration with a community advisory group (CAG) made up of representatives from community organizations in 9 of the participating countries. The CAG played a key role in data collection by promoting the survey to higher-risk migrant groups (sub-Saharan Africans, Latin Americans, men who have sex with men, and people who inject drugs). The questionnaires have considerable content overlap, allowing for comparison. Questions cover ethnicity, migration, immigration status, HIV testing and treatment, health-seeking behavior, sexual risk, and drug use. The electronic questionnaires

  14. The FODA-TDMA satellite access scheme - Presentation, study of the system, and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celandroni, Nedo; Ferro, Erina

    1991-12-01

    A description is given of FODA-TDMA, a satellite access scheme designed for mixed traffic. The study of the system is presented and the choice of some parameters is justified. A simplified analytic solution is found, describing the steady-state behavior of the system. Some results of the simulation tests for an already existing hardware environment are also presented for the channel speeds of 2 and 8 Mb/s, considering both the stationary and the transient cases. The results of the experimentation at 2 Mb/s on the satellite Eutelsat-F2 are also presented and compared with the results of the simulation.

  15. Estimating solar access of typical residential rooftops: A case study in San Jose, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, Ronnen M.; Gupta, Smita; Akbari, Hashem; Pomerantz, Melvin

    2008-03-03

    Shadows cast by trees and buildings can limit the solar access of rooftop solar-energy systems, including photovoltaic panels and thermal collectors. This study characterizes rooftop shading in a residential neighborhood of San Jose, CA, one of four regions analyzed in a wider study of the solar access of California homes.High-resolution orthophotos and LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) measurements of surface height were used to create a digital elevation model of all trees and buildings in a 4 km2 residential neighborhood. Hourly shading of roofing planes (the flat elements of roofs) was computed geometrically from the digital elevation model. Parcel boundaries were used to determine the extent to which roofing planes were shaded by trees and buildings in neighboring parcels.In the year in which surface heights were measured (2005), shadows from all sources ("total shading") reduced the insolation received by S-, SW-, and W-facing residential roofing planes in the study area by 13 - 16percent. Shadows cast by trees and buildings in neighboring parcels reduced insolation by no more than 2percent. After 30 years of simulated maximal tree growth, annual total shading increased to 19 - 22percent, and annual extraparcel shading increased to 3 - 4percent.

  16. Access to Interdental Brushing in Periodontal Healthy Young Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Santamaria, Julie; Bravo, Manuel; Bourgeois, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Interdental diameter space is largely undefined in adults, which compromises the decision support for daily interdental cleaning during routine practice in individual oral prophylaxis. This study assesses the distribution of diameter access of interdental spaces in an 18- to 25-year-old adult population free of periodontal disease. Methods In March-April 2015, a cross-sectional study using random sampling was performed at the University Lyon 1, France. The interproximal dental spaces of 99 individuals were examined using a colorimetric calibrated probe associated with the corresponding calibrated interdental brush (IDB). Results Of the 2,408 out of 2,608 sites, the overall accessibility prevalence of any interdental brushing was 92.3%. In total, 80.6% of the sites required interdental brushes with smaller diameters (0.6–0.7 mm). In anterior sites, the diameter of the interdental brushes used was smaller (55.8% of IDB with 0.6 mm) than the diameter of the interdental brushes used in posterior sites (26.1% of IDB with 0.6 mm) (p < 0.01). The adjusted ORs indicate a significant association with the location of the sites (approximately doubling the risk of bleeding, i.e., OR = 1.9, in posterior sites). Conclusions Most interdental sites can be cleaned using interdental brushes. Even in healthy people, interdental hygiene requirements are very high. Strengthening the oral hygiene capacity by specifically using interdental brushes can have an effect on the health of the entire population. Screening of the accessibility of the interdental space should be a component of a routine examination for all patients. PMID:27192409

  17. Montreal Archive of Sleep Studies: an open-access resource for instrument benchmarking and exploratory research.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Christian; Gosselin, Nadia; Carrier, Julie; Nielsen, Tore

    2014-12-01

    Manual processing of sleep recordings is extremely time-consuming. Efforts to automate this process have shown promising results, but automatic systems are generally evaluated on private databases, not allowing accurate cross-validation with other systems. In lacking a common benchmark, the relative performances of different systems are not compared easily and advances are compromised. To address this fundamental methodological impediment to sleep study, we propose an open-access database of polysomnographic biosignals. To build this database, whole-night recordings from 200 participants [97 males (aged 42.9 ± 19.8 years) and 103 females (aged 38.3 ± 18.9 years); age range: 18-76 years] were pooled from eight different research protocols performed in three different hospital-based sleep laboratories. All recordings feature a sampling frequency of 256 Hz and an electroencephalography (EEG) montage of 4-20 channels plus standard electro-oculography (EOG), electromyography (EMG), electrocardiography (ECG) and respiratory signals. Access to the database can be obtained through the Montreal Archive of Sleep Studies (MASS) website (http://www.ceams-carsm.ca/en/MASS), and requires only affiliation with a research institution and prior approval by the applicant's local ethical review board. Providing the research community with access to this free and open sleep database is expected to facilitate the development and cross-validation of sleep analysis automation systems. It is also expected that such a shared resource will be a catalyst for cross-centre collaborations on difficult topics such as improving inter-rater agreement on sleep stage scoring. PMID:24909981

  18. In Silico Study of Rotavirus VP7 Surface Accessible Conserved Regions for Antiviral Drug/Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Ambarnil; Chattopadhyay, Shiladitya; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta; Nandy, Papiya; Nandy, Ashesh

    2012-01-01

    Background Rotaviral diarrhoea kills about half a million children annually in developing countries and accounts for one third of diarrhea related hospitalizations. Drugs and vaccines against the rotavirus are handicapped, as in all viral diseases, by the rapid mutational changes that take place in the DNA and protein sequences rendering most of these ineffective. As of now only two vaccines are licensed and approved by the WHO (World Health Organization), but display reduced efficiencies in the underdeveloped countries where the disease is more prevalent. We approached this issue by trying to identify regions of surface exposed conserved segments on the surface glycoproteins of the virion, which may then be targeted by specific peptide vaccines. We had developed a bioinformatics protocol for these kinds of problems with reference to the influenza neuraminidase protein, which we have refined and expanded to analyze the rotavirus issue. Results Our analysis of 433 VP7 (Viral Protein 7 from rotavirus) surface protein sequences across 17 subtypes encompassing mammalian hosts using a 20D Graphical Representation and Numerical Characterization method, identified four possible highly conserved peptide segments. Solvent accessibility prediction servers were used to identify that these are predominantly surface situated. These regions analyzed through selected epitope prediction servers for their epitopic properties towards possible T-cell and B-cell activation showed good results as epitopic candidates (only dry lab confirmation). Conclusions The main reasons for the development of alternative vaccine strategies for the rotavirus are the failure of current vaccines and high production costs that inhibit their application in developing countries. We expect that it would be possible to use the protein surface exposed regions identified in our study as targets for peptide vaccines and drug designs for stable immunity against divergent strains of the rotavirus. Though this

  19. Personality trait inferences of Turkish immigrant and neutral targets: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Sandal, Gro M; Bye, Hege H; Pallesen, Ståle

    2012-12-01

    The study investigated whether personality traits attributed to immigrant targets differ from personality inferences made for a neutral target, and whether trait attributions differ for assimilated and integrated immigrant targets. Participants (n = 340) were randomized to one of three conditions in which they read the same story about a person, but where the person was described as either: (a) an assimilated Turkish immigrant; (b) an integrated Turkish immigrant; or (c) neutral (no nationality or religious practice indicated). Subsequently, they rated the personality of the described person on the NEO-Five Factor Inventory (observer rating version) and completed the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (Impression Management scale) with reference to themselves. Both immigrant targets were rated as significantly higher on extraversion and lower on neuroticism than the neutral target. The integrated target was rated as more open than the neutral target, and as higher than the assimilated target on neuroticism when controlling for impression management. PMID:23170867

  20. Open Access Theses in Institutional Repositories: An Exploratory Study of the Perceptions of Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Kate Valentine; Liew, Chern Li

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: We examine doctoral students' awareness of and attitudes to open access forms of publication. Levels of awareness of open access and the concept of institutional repositories, publishing behaviour and perceptions of benefits and risks of open access publishing were explored. Method: Qualitative and quantitative data were collected…

  1. The Road from the NASA Access-to-Space Study to a Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Richard W.; Lockwood, Mary Kae; Cook, Stephen A.

    1998-01-01

    NASA has established a goal of providing low-cost reliable access to space. While this goal has been around for many years, it received a major impetus when the U.S Congress mandated the Access-to-Space study in 1993. This study concluded that a rocket powered single-stage-to-orbit vehicle offered the best opportunity for low-cost reliable space transportation by the first decade of the new millennium. This required a focused technology development program before such a vehicle could be built. NASA recognized that no commercial entity would commit to the development of a single-stage-to-orbit vehicle without the U.S. Government's participation. To this end, NASA entered into a cooperative agreement with industry to mature the required technologies. This effort includes the development of an experimental subscale-vehicle known as the X-33, an extensive ground-based program to provide the required additional technology development, and conceptual through preliminary design of an operational reusable launch vehicle. Following this effort, a decision will be made whether or not to proceed with the detailed design and fabrication of an operational vehicle.

  2. The Road from the NASA Access-to-Space Study to a Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Richard W.; Lockwood, Mary Kae; Cook, Stephen A.

    1998-01-01

    NASA has established a goal of providing low-cost reliable access to space. While this goal has been around for many years, it received a major impetus when the U.S. Congress mandated the Access-to-Space study in 1993. This study concluded that a rocket powered single-state-to-orbit vehicle offered the best opportunity for low-cost reliable space transportation by the first decade of the new millennium. This required a focused technology development program before such a vehicle could be built. NASA recognized that no commercial entity would commit to the development of a single-stage-to-orbit vehicle without the U.S. Government's participation. To this end, NASA entered into a cooperative agreement with industry to mature the required technologies. This effort includes the development of an experimental subscale-vehicle known as the X-33, an extensive ground-based program to provide the required additional technology development, and conceptual through preliminary design of an operational reusable launch vehicle. Following this effort, a decision will be made whether or not to proceed with the detailed design and fabrication of an operational vehicle.

  3. National Study of Changes in Community Access to School Physical Activity Facilities: The School Health Policies and Programs Study

    PubMed Central

    Evenson, Kelly R.; Wen, Fang; Lee, Sarah M.; Heinrich, Katie M.; Eyler, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Background A Healthy People 2010 developmental objective (22-12) was set to increase the proportion of the nation’s public and private schools that provide access to their physical activity spaces and facilities for all persons outside of normal school hours. The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence of indoor and outdoor facilities at schools and the availability of those facilities to the public in 2000 and 2006. Methods In 2000 and 2006, the School Health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) was conducted in each state and in randomly selected districts, schools, and classrooms. This analysis focused on the school level questionnaire from a nationally representative sample of public and nonpublic elementary, middle, and high schools (n = 921 in 2000 and n = 984 in 2006). Results No meaningful changes in the prevalence of access to school physical activity facilities were found from 2000 to 2006, for youth or adult community sports teams, classes, or open gym. Conclusions These national data indicate a lack of progress from 2000 and 2006 toward increasing the proportion of the nation’s public and private schools that provide access to their physical activity facilities for all persons outside of normal school hours. PMID:20440007

  4. Protocol for ACCESS: a qualitative study exploring barriers and facilitators to accessing the emergency contraceptive pill from community pharmacies in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Hussainy, Safeera Yasmeen; Ghosh, Ayesha; Taft, Angela; Mazza, Danielle; Black, Kirsten Isla; Clifford, Rhonda; Mc Namara, Kevin Peter; Ryan, Kath; Jackson, John Keith

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The rate of unplanned pregnancy in Australia remains high, which has contributed to Australia having one of the highest abortion rates of developed countries with an estimated 1 in 5 women having an abortion. The emergency contraceptive pill (ECP) offers a safe way of preventing unintended pregnancy after unprotected sex has occurred. While the ECP has been available over-the-counter in Australian pharmacies for over a decade, its use has not significantly increased. This paper presents a protocol for a qualitative study that aims to identify the barriers and facilitators to accessing the ECP from community pharmacies in Australia. Methods and analysis Data will be collected through one-on-one interviews that are semistructured and in-depth. Partnerships have been established with 2 pharmacy groups and 2 women's health organisations to aid with the recruitment of women and pharmacists for data collection purposes. Interview questions explore domains from the Theoretical Domains Framework in order to assess the factors aiding and/or hindering access to ECP from community pharmacies. Data collected will be analysed using deductive content analysis. The expected benefits of this study are that it will help develop evidence-based workforce interventions to strengthen the capacity and performance of community pharmacists as key ECP providers. Ethics and dissemination The findings will be disseminated to the research team and study partners, who will brainstorm ideas for interventions that would address barriers and facilitators to access identified from the interviews. Dissemination will also occur through presentations and peer-reviewed publications and the study participants will receive an executive summary of the findings. The study has been evaluated and approved by the Monash Human Research Ethics Committee. PMID:26656987

  5. Disparities in access to preventive health care services among insured children in a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    King, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Children with insurance have better access to care and health outcomes if their parents also have insurance. However, little is known about whether the type of parental insurance matters. This study attempts to determine whether the type of parental insurance affects the access to health care services of children. I used data from the 2009–2013 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and estimated multivariate logistic regressions (N = 26,152). I estimated how family insurance coverage affects the probability that children have a usual source of care, well-child visits in the past year, unmet medical and prescription needs, less than 1 dental visit per year, and unmet dental needs. Children in families with mixed insurance (child publicly insured and parent privately insured) were less likely to have a well-child visit than children in privately insured families (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.76–0.98). When restricting the sample to publicly insured children, children with privately insured parents were less likely to have a well-child visit (odds ratio = 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.73–0.92), less likely to have a usual source of care (odds ratio = 0.79, 95% confidence interval 0.67–0.94), and more likely to have unmet dental needs (odds ratio = 1.68, 95% confidence interval 1.10–2.58). Children in families with mixed insurance tend to fare poorly compared to children in publicly insured families. This may indicate that children in these families may be underinsured. Expanding parental eligibility for public insurance or subsidizing private insurance for children would potentially improve their access to preventive care. PMID:27428239

  6. Parametric study of spallation targets for the MYRRHA reactor using MCNPX simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebello, A. L. P.; Martinez, A. S.; Gonçalves, A. C.

    2014-06-01

    The present work aims to evaluate the behavior of neutron multiplicity in a spallation target using MCNPX simulations, focusing on its application in the MYRRHA reactor. It was studied the two types of spallation target proposed for the MYRRHA project, windowless and windows target, in order to compare them and find saturation boundaries. Some saturation boundaries were found and the windowless target proved to be as viable as the windows one. Each one produced nearly the same number of neutrons per incident proton. Using the concept of neutron cost, it was also observed that the optimum conditions on neutron production occur at about 1GeV, for both target designs.

  7. An experimental study on target recognition using white canes.

    PubMed

    Nunokawa, Kiyohiko; Ino, Shuichi

    2010-01-01

    To understand basic tactile perception using white canes, we compared tapping (two times) and pushing (two times) methods using the index finger and using a white cane, with and without accompanying auditory information. Participants were six visually impaired individuals who used a white cane to walk independently in their daily lives. For each of the tapping and pushing and sound or no sound conditions, participants gave magnitude estimates for the hardness of rubber panels. Results indicated that using a white cane produces sensitivity levels equal to using a finger when accompanied by auditory information, and suggested that when using a white cane to estimate the hardness of a target, it is most effective to have two different modalities of tactile and auditory information derived from tapping. PMID:21096512

  8. Novel Epigenetic Target Therapy for Prostate Cancer: A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Gherardini, Lisa; Pelosi, Gualtiero; Viglione, Federica; Grimaldi, Settimio; Pani, Luca; Cinti, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic events are critical contributors to the pathogenesis of cancer, and targeting epigenetic mechanisms represents a novel strategy in anticancer therapy. Classic demethylating agents, such as 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine (Decitabine), hold the potential for reprograming somatic cancer cells demonstrating high therapeutic efficacy in haematological malignancies. On the other hand, epigenetic treatment of solid tumours often gives rise to undesired cytotoxic side effects. Appropriate delivery systems able to enrich Decitabine at the site of action and improve its bioavailability would reduce the incidence of toxicity on healthy tissues. In this work we provide preclinical evidences of a safe, versatile and efficient targeted epigenetic therapy to treat hormone sensitive (LNCap) and hormone refractory (DU145) prostate cancers. A novel Decitabine formulation, based on the use of engineered erythrocyte (Erythro-Magneto-Hemagglutinin Virosomes, EMHVs) drug delivery system (DDS) carrying this drug, has been refined. Inside the EMHVs, the drug was shielded from the environment and phosphorylated in its active form. The novel magnetic EMHV DDS, endowed with fusogenic protein, improved the stability of the carried drug and exhibited a high efficiency in confining its delivery at the site of action in vivo by applying an external static magnetic field. Here we show that Decitabine loaded into EMHVs induces a significant tumour mass reduction in prostate cancer xenograft models at a concentration, which is seven hundred times lower than the therapeutic dose, suggesting an improved pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of drug. These results are relevant for and discussed in light of developing personalised autologous therapies and innovative clinical approach for the treatment of solid tumours. PMID:24851905

  9. Overcoming barriers to health-care access: A qualitative study among African migrants in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lavinia; Brown, Katherine B; Hall, Brian J; Yu, Fan; Yang, Jingqi; Wang, Jason; Schrock, Joshua M; Bodomo, Adams B; Yang, Ligang; Yang, Bin; Nehl, Eric J; Tucker, Joseph D; Wong, Frank Y

    2016-10-01

    Guangzhou is China's third most populous city, and the region's burgeoning manufacturing economy has attracted many young African businessmen and entrepreneurs to the city. The aims of this study were to examine strategies that African migrants in Guangzhou have adopted in response to health-care barriers, and explore their perceptions of how to address their needs. Twenty-five semi-structured interviews and two focus groups were conducted among African migrants residing in Guangzhou, China. Facing multiple barriers to care, African migrants have adopted a number of suboptimal and unsustainable approaches to access health care. These included: using their Chinese friends or partners as interpreters, self-medicating, using personal connections to medical doctors, and travelling to home countries or countries that offer English-speaking doctors for health care. Health-care providers and health organisations in Guangzhou have not yet acquired sufficient cultural competence to address the needs of African migrants residing in the city. Introducing linguistically and culturally competent health-care services in communities concentrated with African migrants may better serve the population. With the growing international migration to China, it is essential to develop sustainable approaches to improving health-care access for international migrants, particularly those who are marginalised. PMID:26400191

  10. Income Related Inequality of Health Care Access in Japan: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Misuzu; Hata, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to analyze the association between income level and health care access in Japan. Data from a total of 222,259 subjects (age range, 0–74 years) who submitted National Health Insurance claims in Chiba City from April 2012 to March 2014 and who declared income for the tax period from January 1 to December 31, 2012 were integrated and analyzed. The generalized estimating equation, in which household was defined as a cluster, was used to evaluate the association between equivalent income and utilization and duration of hospitalization and outpatient care services. A significant positive linear association was observed between income level and outpatient visit rates among all age groups of both sexes; however, a significantly higher rate and longer period of hospitalization, and longer outpatient care, were observed among certain lower income subgroups. To control for decreased income due to hospitalization, subjects hospitalized during the previous year were excluded, and the data was then reanalyzed. Significant inverse associations remained in the hospitalization rate among 40–59-year-old men and 60–69-year-old women, and in duration of hospitalization among 40–59 and 60–69-year-olds of both sexes and 70–74-year-old women. These results suggest that low-income individuals in Japan have poorer access to outpatient care and more serious health conditions than their higher income counterparts. PMID:26978270

  11. The Road from the NASA Access to Space Study to a Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Richard W.; Cook, Stephen A.; Lockwood, Mary Kae

    1998-01-01

    NASA is cooperating with the aerospace industry to develop a space transportation system that provides reliable access-to-space at a much lower cost than is possible with today's launch vehicles. While this quest has been on-going for many years it received a major impetus when the U.S. Congress mandated as part of the 1993 NASA appropriations bill that: "In view of budget difficulties, present and future..., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration shall ... recommend improvements in space transportation." NASA, working with other organizations, including the Department of Transportation, and the Department of Defense identified three major transportation architecture options that were to be evaluated in the areas of reliability, operability and cost. These architectural options were: (1) retain and upgrade the Space Shuttle and the current expendable launch vehicles; (2) develop new expendable launch vehicles using conventional technologies and transition to these new vehicles beginning in 2005; and (3) develop new reusable vehicles using advanced technology, and transition to these vehicles beginning in 2008. The launch needs mission model was based on 1993 projections of civil, defense, and commercial payload requirements. This "Access to Space" study concluded that the option that provided the greatest potential for meeting the cost, operability, and reliability goals was a rocket-powered single-stage-to-orbit fully reusable launch vehicle (RLV) fleet designed with advanced technologies.

  12. Enhanced heme accessibility in horse heart mini-myoglobin: Insights from molecular modelling and reactivity studies.

    PubMed

    Polticelli, Fabio; Zobnina, Veranika; Ciaccio, Chiara; de Sanctis, Giampiero; Ascenzi, Paolo; Coletta, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Mini-myoglobin (mini-HHMb) is a fragment of horse-heart myoglobin (HHMb) considered to be the prototype of the product encoded by the central exon of the HHMb gene. For this reason, mini-HHMb has been studied extensively showing that carbonylation and oxygenation properties of the ferrous form are similar to those of the full-length protein, while kinetics and thermodynamics of azide binding to the ferric form are significantly different from those of HHMb. To analyze the structure-function relationships in mini-HHMb and the role of conformational fluctuations in ligand accessibility, the molecular model of mini-HHMb has been built and refined by molecular dynamics simulations, and analyzed in parallel with that of full length HHMb. Moreover, imidazole binding parameters of ferric mini-HHMb and HHMb have been determined. Furthermore, structural data of ferric mini-HHMb and HHMb have been correlated with the imidazole and previously determined azide binding properties. Present results indicate that, despite the extensive trimming, the heme-α-helices E-F substructure is essentially unaltered in mini-HHMb with respect to HHMb. However, the heme-Fe atom displays an enhanced accessibility in mini-HHMb, which may affect both ligand association and dissociation kinetics. PMID:26363214

  13. Intravenous access during pre-hospital emergency care of non-injured patients: a population-based outcome study

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Christopher W.; Cooke, Colin R.; Hebert, Paul L.; Rea, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Study objective Advanced, pre-hospital procedures such as intravenous access are commonly performed by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel, yet little evidence supports their use among non-injured patients. We evaluated the association between pre-hospital, intravenous access and mortality among non-injured, non-arrest patients. Methods We analyzed a population-based cohort of adult (aged ≥18 years) non-injured, non-arrest patients transported by four advanced life support agencies to one of 16 hospitals from January 1, 2002 until December 31, 2006. We linked eligible EMS records to hospital administrative data, and used multivariable logistic regression to determine the risk-adjusted association between pre-hospital, intravenous access and hospital mortality. We also tested whether this association differed by patient acuity using a previously published, out-of-hospital triage score. Results Among 56,332 eligible patients, one half (N=28,978, 50%) received pre-hospital intravenous access from EMS personnel. Overall hospital mortality in patients who did and did not receive intravenous access was 3%. However, in multivariable analyses, the placement of pre-hospital, intravenous access was associated with an overall reduction in odds of hospital mortality (OR=0.68, 95%CI: 0.56, 0.81). The beneficial association of intravenous access appeared to depend on patient acuity (p=0.13 for interaction). For example, the OR of mortality associated with intravenous access was 1.38 (95%CI: 0.28, 7.0) among those with lowest acuity (score = 0). In contrast, the OR of mortality associated with intravenous access was 0.38 (95%CI: 0.17, 0.9) among patients with highest acuity (score ≥ 6). Conclusions In this population-based cohort, pre-hospital, intravenous access was associated with a reduction in hospital mortality among non-injured, non-arrest patients with the highest acuity. PMID:21872970

  14. Periodicity in tumor vasculature targeting kinetics of ligand-functionalized nanoparticles studied by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cebulla, Jana; Huuse, Else Marie; Davies, Catharina de L.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Larsson, Henrik B.W.; Haraldseth, Olav

    2014-01-01

    In the past two decades advances in the development of targeted nanoparticles have facilitated their application as molecular imaging agents and targeted drug delivery vehicles. Nanoparticle-enhanced molecular imaging of the angiogenic tumor vasculature has been of particular interest. Not only because angiogenesis plays an important role in various pathologies, but also since endothelial cell surface receptors are directly accessible for relatively large circulating nanoparticles. Typically, nanoparticle targeting towards these receptors is studied by analyzing the contrast distribution on tumor images acquired before and at set time points after administration. Although several exciting proof-of-concept studies demonstrated qualitative assessment of relative target concentration and distribution, these studies did not provide quantitative information on the nanoparticle targeting kinetics. These kinetics will not only depend on nanoparticle characteristics, but also on receptor binding and recycling. In this study, we monitored the in vivo targeting kinetics of αvβ3-integrin specific nanoparticles with intravital microscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and using compartment modeling we were able to quantify nanoparticle targeting rates. As such, this approach can facilitate optimization of targeted nanoparticle design and it holds promise for providing more quantitative information on in vivo receptor levels. Interestingly, we also observed a periodicity in the accumulation kinetics of αvβ3-integrin targeted nanoparticles and hypothesize that this periodicity is caused by receptor binding, internalization and recycling dynamics. Taken together, this demonstrates that our experimental approach provides new insights in in vivo nanoparticle targeting, which may proof useful for vascular targeting in general. PMID:23982332

  15. Semantic Priming from Letter-Searched Primes Occurs for Low- but Not High-Frequency Targets: Automatic Semantic Access May Not Be a Myth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tse, Chi-Shing; Neely, James H.

    2007-01-01

    Letter-search (LS) within a prime often eliminates semantic priming. In 2 lexical decision experiments, the authors found that priming from LS primes occurred for low-frequency (LF) but not high-frequency (HF) targets whether the target's word frequency was manipulated between or within participants and whether the prime-target pairs were…

  16. Anatomy of open access publishing: a study of longitudinal development and internal structure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Open access (OA) is a revolutionary way of providing access to the scholarly journal literature made possible by the Internet. The primary aim of this study was to measure the volume of scientific articles published in full immediate OA journals from 2000 to 2011, while observing longitudinal internal shifts in the structure of OA publishing concerning revenue models, publisher types and relative distribution among scientific disciplines. The secondary aim was to measure the share of OA articles of all journal articles, including articles made OA by publishers with a delay and individual author-paid OA articles in subscription journals (hybrid OA), as these subsets of OA publishing have mostly been ignored in previous studies. Methods Stratified random sampling of journals in the Directory of Open Access Journals (n = 787) was performed. The annual publication volumes spanning 2000 to 2011 were retrieved from major publication indexes and through manual data collection. Results An estimated 340,000 articles were published by 6,713 full immediate OA journals during 2011. OA journals requiring article-processing charges have become increasingly common, publishing 166,700 articles in 2011 (49% of all OA articles). This growth is related to the growth of commercial publishers, who, despite only a marginal presence a decade ago, have grown to become key actors on the OA scene, responsible for 120,000 of the articles published in 2011. Publication volume has grown within all major scientific disciplines, however, biomedicine has seen a particularly rapid 16-fold growth between 2000 (7,400 articles) and 2011 (120,900 articles). Over the past decade, OA journal publishing has steadily increased its relative share of all scholarly journal articles by about 1% annually. Approximately 17% of the 1.66 million articles published during 2011 and indexed in the most comprehensive article-level index of scholarly articles (Scopus) are available OA through journal

  17. [Study of access to health care and drugs in Cameroon: 1. Methods and validation].

    PubMed

    Commeyras, Christophe; Ndo, Jean Rolin; Merabet, Omar; Koné, Hamidou; Rakotondrabé, Faraniaina Patricia

    2005-01-01

    During the 1980s, an economic depression and the concomitant decrease in the national health budget modified the population's health behavior. Improvement of the economy since the late 1990s makes it possible to renew the national health policy. To prepare the highly indebted and poor countries' program (HIPC), the Minister of Health and its partners commissioned a survey to measure the population's real access to health care and the factors that determine this accessibility and to propose concrete corrective actions. To fulfill these objectives, the steering committee decided to analyze health care demand, through a national population survey, and supply capacity, through a national survey of pharmacies and other drug dispensers. A survey of persons using medications will also be conducted (Fig.1). Focusing on this component of health care is justified by these findings: 95% of persons feeling ill buy drugs, whereas only 31% consult a physician or other healthcare provider, and half of the average household's health expenditures are for drugs. Financial, geographic, social and quality indicators were defined to measure accessibility and its determining factors (Table 1). The smallest administrative unit, the health area (HA), was chosen as the sampling unit, to enable us to survey together healthcare demand, supply and consumption according to different concentrations of supply and demand . It behaves as a cluster of sampling units of different populations: drug retailers of all sectors, drug users, households, and ill persons within the households. The HA samples include Yaounde and Douala, with urban and rural sub-samples, for which sampling ratios increase with the diversity of supply and demand, according to several pre-defined factors. The study includes 400 HAs, covering more than one third of the population (Table 2). Within these HAs, 900 pharmacies and other formal drug retailers, 709 street vendors, 4,505 households, 2,532 ill persons in these households

  18. Characteristics and mechanism study of cerium oxide based random access memories

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Roy, Anupam; Rai, Amritesh; Chang, Yao-Feng; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2015-04-27

    In this work, low operating voltage and high resistance ratio of different resistance states of binary transition metal oxide based resistive random access memories (RRAMs) are demonstrated. Binary transition metal oxides with high dielectric constant have been explored for RRAM application for years. However, CeO{sub x} is considered as a relatively new material to other dielectrics. Since research on CeO{sub x} based RRAM is still at preliminary stage, fundamental characteristics of RRAM such as scalability and mechanism studies need to be done before moving further. Here, we show very high operation window and low switching voltage of CeO{sub x} RRAMs and also compare electrical performance of Al/CeO{sub x}/Au system between different thin film deposition methods and discuss characteristics and resistive switching mechanism.

  19. S-band multiple-access interference study for advanced tracking and data relay satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Wei-Chung; Yang, Chau-Chin

    1990-01-01

    The results of a study on the effect of mutual interference among S-band multiple access (SMA) system users of advanced tracking and data relay satellite system (ATDRSS) are presented. In the ATDRSS era, the SMA system is required to support data rates ranging from 10 kb/s to 3 Mb/s. The system will consist of four advanced tracking and data relay satellites (ATDRS) each supporting up to five telemetry links. All users have 10 MHz bandwidth with their carrier frequency equal to 2.2875 GHz. A hybrid SDMA/CDMA scheme is used to mitigate the effect of the interference among system users. SMA system interference probability is evaluated with CLASS software. User link margin degradation due to mutual interference between two users is evaluated. System interference probability is evaluated for the projected 1996 mission model, a reference mission model, and a modified reference mission model.

  20. S4AC Case Study: Enhancing Underserved Seniors' Access to Health Promotion Programs.

    PubMed

    Koehn, Sharon; Habib, Sanzida; Bukhari, Syeda

    2016-03-01

    The Seniors Support Services for South Asian Community (S4AC) project was developed in response to the underutilization of available recreation and seniors' facilities by South Asian seniors who were especially numerous in a suburban neighbourhood in British Columbia. Addressing the problem required the collaboration of the municipality and a registered non-profit agency offering a wide range of services and programs to immigrant and refugee communities. Through creative outreach and accommodation, the project has engaged more than 100 Punjabi-speaking seniors annually in diverse exercise activities. Case study research methods with staff and current and former senior participants of S4AC include participant observation, individual interviews, and focus groups. Viewed through the critical interpretive lens of the "candidacy framework", findings reveal the myriad ways in which access to health promotion and physical activity for immigrant older adults is a complex iterative process of negotiation at multiple levels. PMID:26731695

  1. Atomistic study of dynamics for metallic filament growth in conductive-bridge random access memory.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shengjun; Liu, Zhan; Zhang, Guo; Zhang, Jinyu; Sun, Yaping; Wu, Huaqiang; Qian, He; Yu, Zhiping

    2015-04-14

    The growth dynamics for metallic filaments in conductive-bridge resistive-switching random access memory (CBRAM) are studied using the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method. The physical process at the atomistic level is revealed in explaining the experimental observation that filament growth can originate at either the cathode or the anode. The statistical nature of the filament growth is best shown by the random topography of dendrite-like conductive paths obtained. Critical material properties, such as charged-particle mobility in the switching layer of a solid electrolyte or a dielectric, are mapped to KMC model parameters through activation energy, etc. The accuracy of the simulator is established by the good agreement between the simulated forming time and the measured data. PMID:25750983

  2. Breaking inertia: increasing access to journals during a period of declining budgets: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Fought, Rick L.

    2014-01-01

    Beginning in January 2012, a 1-year pilot pay-per-view (PPV) service was implemented. Twenty-four journal subscriptions were canceled to fund the service, and through the PPV service, the library was able to offer patrons access to over 700 previously unavailable biomedical journals. At the end of the pilot period, the total PPV cost for each journal accessed was compared to the subscription cost to determine if PPV was an effective use of library money. While remaining essentially budget neutral, the number of full-text articles accessed increased over 400%. PPV can be a cost-effective method for expanding access to journals. PMID:25031560

  3. Sizing the Problem of Improving Discovery and Access to NIH-Funded Data: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study informs efforts to improve the discoverability of and access to biomedical datasets by providing a preliminary estimate of the number and type of datasets generated annually by research funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). It focuses on those datasets that are “invisible” or not deposited in a known repository. Methods We analyzed NIH-funded journal articles that were published in 2011, cited in PubMed and deposited in PubMed Central (PMC) to identify those that indicate data were submitted to a known repository. After excluding those articles, we analyzed a random sample of the remaining articles to estimate how many and what types of invisible datasets were used in each article. Results About 12% of the articles explicitly mention deposition of datasets in recognized repositories, leaving 88% that are invisible datasets. Among articles with invisible datasets, we found an average of 2.9 to 3.4 datasets, suggesting there were approximately 200,000 to 235,000 invisible datasets generated from NIH-funded research published in 2011. Approximately 87% of the invisible datasets consist of data newly collected for the research reported; 13% reflect reuse of existing data. More than 50% of the datasets were derived from live human or non-human animal subjects. Conclusion In addition to providing a rough estimate of the total number of datasets produced per year by NIH-funded researchers, this study identifies additional issues that must be addressed to improve the discoverability of and access to biomedical research data: the definition of a “dataset,” determination of which (if any) data are valuable for archiving and preservation, and better methods for estimating the number of datasets of interest. Lack of consensus amongst annotators about the number of datasets in a given article reinforces the need for a principled way of thinking about how to identify and characterize biomedical datasets. PMID:26207759

  4. Fearful contextual expression impairs the encoding and recognition of target faces: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huiyan; Schulz, Claudia; Straube, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Previous event-related potential (ERP) studies have shown that the N170 to faces is modulated by the emotion of the face and its context. However, it is unclear how the encoding of emotional target faces as reflected in the N170 is modulated by the preceding contextual facial expression when temporal onset and identity of target faces are unpredictable. In addition, no study as yet has investigated whether contextual facial expression modulates later recognition of target faces. To address these issues, participants in the present study were asked to identify target faces (fearful or neutral) that were presented after a sequence of fearful or neutral contextual faces. The number of sequential contextual faces was random and contextual and target faces were of different identities so that temporal onset and identity of target faces were unpredictable. Electroencephalography (EEG) data was recorded during the encoding phase. Subsequently, participants had to perform an unexpected old/new recognition task in which target face identities were presented in either the encoded or the non-encoded expression. ERP data showed a reduced N170 to target faces in fearful as compared to neutral context regardless of target facial expression. In the later recognition phase, recognition rates were reduced for target faces in the encoded expression when they had been encountered in fearful as compared to neutral context. The present findings suggest that fearful compared to neutral contextual faces reduce the allocation of attentional resources towards target faces, which results in limited encoding and recognition of target faces. PMID:26388751

  5. Clinical Validation Study of Percutaneous Cochlear Access Using Patient Customized Micro-Stereotactic Frames

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Ramya; Mitchell, Jason; Noble, Jack H.; Majdani, Omid; Haynes, David; Bennett, Marc; Dawant, Benoit M.; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objective Percutaneous cochlear implant (PCI) surgery consists of drilling a single trough from the lateral skull to the cochlea avoiding vital anatomy. To accomplish PCI, we utilize a patient-customized, micro-stereotactic frame, which we call a “microtable” because it consists of a small tabletop sitting on legs. The orientation of the legs controls the alignment of the tabletop such that it is perpendicular to a specified trajectory. Study design Prospective. Setting Tertiary referral center. Patients Thirteen patients (eighteen ears) undergoing traditional CI surgery. Intervention(s) With IRB approval, each patient had three fiducial markers implanted in bone surrounding the ear. Temporal bone CT scans were obtained and the markers were localized, as was vital anatomy. A linear trajectory from the lateral skull through the facial recess to the cochlea was planned. A microtable was fabricated to follow the specified trajectory. Main outcome measure(s) After mastoidectomy and posterior tympanotomy, accuracy of trajectories was validated by mounting microtables on bone-implanted markers and then passing sham drill bits across the facial recess to the cochlea. Distance from the drill to vital anatomy was measured. Results Microtables were constructed on a CNC milling machine in under 5 minutes each. Successful access across the facial recess to the cochlea was achieved in all 18 cases. The mean ± standard deviation from mid-portion of the drill to the facial nerve was 1.20 ± 0.36 mm and from the chorda tympani was 1.25 ± 0.33 mm. Conclusions These results demonstrate the feasibility of PCI access using customized, micro-stereotactic frames. PMID:20019561

  6. Comparative Study of Periodical Literature Indexing: Print versus Electronic Access. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, Charles B.

    This 2-year project at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) was conducted to determine the feasibility of providing online periodical indexing to the journal holdings of the UTA libraries by demonstrating an extended use of the libraries' NOTIS Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) to provide better access to local resources. Three approaches…

  7. Providing Internet Access to the Ohio Career Information System for All Residents: A Feasibility Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Morgan V.

    Expanded Internet access to the Ohio Career Information System (OCIS) would provide adults in Ohio who need to or wish to make career changes with the best available information about occupations, education and training programs, and financial aid. In order to determine the feasibility of improving access without cost to users, an advisory group,…

  8. A Tale of Two Cities: A Study of Access to Food, Lessons for Public Health Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caraher, Martin; Lloyd, Susan; Lawton, Julie; Singh, Gulab; Horsley, Kayt; Mussa, Fozia

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To map food access in the city of Preston in the north-west of England in order to determine access, availability and affordability of healthy food options. Design and methodology: The research design employed a number of distinct methods including: surveys of shops; interviews with local people and shopkeepers; a cost and availability…

  9. Computational Studies of Venom Peptides Targeting Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2015-12-01

    Small peptides isolated from the venom of animals are potential scaffolds for ion channel drug discovery. This review article mainly focuses on the computational studies that have advanced our understanding of how various toxins interfere with the function of K⁺ channels. We introduce the computational tools available for the study of toxin-channel interactions. We then discuss how these computational tools have been fruitfully applied to elucidate the mechanisms of action of a wide range of venom peptides from scorpions, spiders, and sea anemone. PMID:26633507

  10. Computational Studies of Venom Peptides Targeting Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Small peptides isolated from the venom of animals are potential scaffolds for ion channel drug discovery. This review article mainly focuses on the computational studies that have advanced our understanding of how various toxins interfere with the function of K+ channels. We introduce the computational tools available for the study of toxin-channel interactions. We then discuss how these computational tools have been fruitfully applied to elucidate the mechanisms of action of a wide range of venom peptides from scorpions, spiders, and sea anemone. PMID:26633507

  11. Target Practice: A Batesonian "Field" Guide for Communication Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb, Horace

    1993-01-01

    Uses three quotations from Gregory Bateson to inform the author's comments on the discipline of communication. Argues that communication teachers and scholars must aim for a curriculum and a mode of study, research, and teaching that leads to means of recognizing, addressing, and responding to truly significant questions, rather than disciplinary,…

  12. Comparative genomics study for identification of putative drug targets in Salmonella typhi Ty2.

    PubMed

    Batool, Nisha; Waqar, Maleeha; Batool, Sidra

    2016-01-15

    Typhoid presents a major health concern in developing countries with an estimated annual infection rate of 21 million. The disease is caused by Salmonella typhi, a pathogenic bacterium acquiring multiple drug resistance. We aim to identify proteins that could prove to be putative drug targets in the genome of S. typhi str. Ty2. We employed comparative and subtractive genomics to identify targets that are absent in humans and are essential to S. typhi Ty2. We concluded that 46 proteins essential to pathogen are absent in the host genome. Filtration on the basis of drug target prioritization singled out 20 potentially therapeutic targets. Their absence in the host and specificity to S. typhi Ty2 makes them ideal targets for treating typhoid in Homo sapiens. 3D structures of two of the final target enzymes, MurA and MurB have been predicted via homology modeling which are then used for a docking study. PMID:26555890

  13. Investigation of infertility management in primary care with open access hysterosalpingography (HSG): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Scott; Murdoch, Alison; Rubin, Greg; Chinn, David; Wilsdon, John

    2006-03-01

    Infertility affects one in seven couples in the United Kingdom. The National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) issued guidance on the management of the infertile couple in February 2004, which included the statement "for the assessment of tubal damage, women not known to have co-morbidities (pelvic inflammatory disease, endometriosis or previous ectopic pregnancy) should be offered hysterosalpingography (HSG)". We made HSG available to six general practices in Newcastle upon Tyne as an open access investigation. Our aim was to evaluate the uptake of open access HSG, speed of access to specialist services and the quality of the information recorded in the referral letter. Using hospital clinical records we tracked the outcome of all infertile couples from the six pilot practices over a nine-month period. Of the 39 referrals identified, 10 women were eligible for open access HSG, of which six HSGs were organized by GPs. Couples who had open access HSG reached a diagnosis and management plan four weeks earlier than those who were referred directly (mean difference 4.0 weeks, 95% confidence interval (CI) -8.8 to 0.4 weeks). The information recorded in the referral letter was generally poor. However, all referrals made via the open access HSG service had the prerequisite tests done. Open access HSG allowed prompter access to specialist services with more complete information passed on in the referral letter. Open access HSG was used in 15% of all infertile couples and 60% of those who fitted the criteria for its use. Open access HSG together with semen analysis and endocrine blood tests may allow GPs to manage the initial stages of the infertile couple and make a diagnosis. PMID:16581721

  14. Usage Trends of Open Access and Local Journals: A Korean Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hosik; Yun, Jungmin; Park, Jin Young; Park, Eunsun; Ahn, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Articles from open access and local journals are important resources for research in Korea and the usage trends of these articles are important indicators for the assessment of the current research practice. We analyzed an institutional collection of published papers from 1998 to 2014 authored by researchers from Seoul National University, and their references from papers published between 1998 and 2011. The published papers were collected from Web of Science or Scopus and were analyzed according to the proportion of articles from open access journals. Their cited references from published papers in Web of Science were analyzed according to the proportion of local (South Korean) or open access journals. The proportion of open access papers was relatively stable until 2006 (2.5 ~ 5.2% in Web of Science and 2.7 ~ 4.2% in Scopus), but then increased to 15.9% (Web of Science) or 18.5% (Scopus) in 2014. We analyzed 2,750,485 cited references from 52,295 published papers. We found that the overall proportion of cited articles from local journals was 1.8% and that for open access journals was 3.0%. Citations of open access articles have increased since 2006 to 4.1% in 2011, although the increase in open access article citations was less than for open access publications. The proportion of citations from local journals was even lower. We think that the publishing / citing mismatch is a term to describe this difference, which is an issue at Seoul National University, where the number of published papers at open access or local journals is increasing but the number of citations is not. The cause of this discrepancy is multi-factorial but the governmental / institutional policies, social / cultural issues and authors' citing behaviors will explain the mismatch. However, additional measures are also necessary, such as the development of an institutional citation database and improved search capabilities with respect to local and open access documents. PMID:27195948

  15. Usage Trends of Open Access and Local Journals: A Korean Case Study.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeong-Wook; Chung, Hosik; Yun, Jungmin; Park, Jin Young; Park, Eunsun; Ahn, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Articles from open access and local journals are important resources for research in Korea and the usage trends of these articles are important indicators for the assessment of the current research practice. We analyzed an institutional collection of published papers from 1998 to 2014 authored by researchers from Seoul National University, and their references from papers published between 1998 and 2011. The published papers were collected from Web of Science or Scopus and were analyzed according to the proportion of articles from open access journals. Their cited references from published papers in Web of Science were analyzed according to the proportion of local (South Korean) or open access journals. The proportion of open access papers was relatively stable until 2006 (2.5 ~ 5.2% in Web of Science and 2.7 ~ 4.2% in Scopus), but then increased to 15.9% (Web of Science) or 18.5% (Scopus) in 2014. We analyzed 2,750,485 cited references from 52,295 published papers. We found that the overall proportion of cited articles from local journals was 1.8% and that for open access journals was 3.0%. Citations of open access articles have increased since 2006 to 4.1% in 2011, although the increase in open access article citations was less than for open access publications. The proportion of citations from local journals was even lower. We think that the publishing / citing mismatch is a term to describe this difference, which is an issue at Seoul National University, where the number of published papers at open access or local journals is increasing but the number of citations is not. The cause of this discrepancy is multi-factorial but the governmental / institutional policies, social / cultural issues and authors' citing behaviors will explain the mismatch. However, additional measures are also necessary, such as the development of an institutional citation database and improved search capabilities with respect to local and open access documents. PMID:27195948

  16. Study finds Devonian gas resources of western Canada attractive target

    SciTech Connect

    Reinson, G.E.; Lee, P.J. )

    1993-09-13

    This report summarizes results of a recently completed study on the conventional natural gas resources estimated to be contained in Devonian strata of the Western Canada sedimentary basin. This study is the first in a series dealing with conventional gas resources of the basin south of 62[degree] N. Lat. Estimates of regional resource potential have been prepared periodically by the Geological Survey of Canada, using systematic geological basin analysis and statistical resource evaluation methods. The major play groups in the western Canada gas project are Devonian, Permo-Carboniferous, Triassic, Deformed Belt, Lower Cretaceous Mannville group, Middle Cretaceous Colorado group, and Upper Cretaceous-Tertiary. The Devonian assessment was undertaken first because of the existing comprehensive geological data base and because there is an upside potential for finding significant reserves in relatively large economic pools. The paper describes the assessment procedures andanalyzes mature plays and conceptual plays of gas.

  17. A targeted genetic association study of epithelial ovarian cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Earp, Madalene; Winham, Stacey J.; Larson, Nicholas; Permuth, Jennifer B.; Sicotte, Hugues; Chien, Jeremy; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Bandera, Elisa V.; Berchuck, Andrew; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Goodman, Marc T.; Levine, Douglas A.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Ness, Roberta B.; Pearce, Celeste L.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Bisogna, Maria; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Carney, Michael E.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Edwards, Robert P.; Fogarty, Zachary C.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Kraft, Peter; Larson, Melissa C.; Le, Nhu D.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Lissowska, Jolanta; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Olson, Sara H.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Rider, David N.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; van den Berg, David; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vitonis, Allison F.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah P.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Phelan, Catherine M.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Chen, Yian Ann; Sellers, Thomas A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Goode, Ellen L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies have identified several common susceptibility alleles for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). To further understand EOC susceptibility, we examined previously ungenotyped candidate variants, including uncommon variants and those residing within known susceptibility loci. Results At nine of eleven previously published EOC susceptibility regions (2q31, 3q25, 5p15, 8q21, 8q24, 10p12, 17q12, 17q21.31, and 19p13), novel variants were identified that were more strongly associated with risk than previously reported variants. Beyond known susceptibility regions, no variants were found to be associated with EOC risk at genome-wide statistical significance (p <5×10−8), nor were any significant after Bonferroni correction for 17,000 variants (p< 3×10-6). Methods A customized genotyping array was used to assess over 17,000 variants in coding, non-coding, regulatory, and known susceptibility regions in 4,973 EOC cases and 5,640 controls from 13 independent studies. Susceptibility for EOC overall and for select histotypes was evaluated using logistic regression adjusted for age, study site, and population substructure. Conclusion Given the novel variants identified within the 2q31, 3q25, 5p15, 8q21, 8q24, 10p12, 17q12, 17q21.31, and 19p13 regions, larger follow-up genotyping studies, using imputation where necessary, are needed for fine-mapping and confirmation of low frequency variants that fall below statistical significance. PMID:26848776

  18. Influence of the membrane lipophilic environment on the structure and on the substrate access/egress routes of the human aromatase enzyme. A computational study.

    PubMed

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Magistrato, Alessandra

    2012-06-25

    Human aromatase (HA), an enzyme located on the membrane of the endoplasmatic reticulum, is of crucial biological importance in the biosynthesis of estrogens. High levels of estrogens are related with important pathologies, conferring to HA a key role as a pharmacological target. In this study we provide, for the first time, an atomistic model of HA embedded on a membrane model to understand the influence of the membrane lipophilic environment on the structural and dynamical properties of HA and on the access/egress pathways of the substrate (androstenedione, ASD) and of the oxygen molecule (involved in the enzymatic process) into/from the HA active site. To this end we used several computational techniques such as force field-based molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, Random Expulsion MD, Steered MD, and Implicit Ligand Sampling. Our results show that the membrane anchoring does not markedly affect the structural properties and the flexibility of the protein, but they clearly point out that the membrane has a marked effect on the access/egress routes of the reactants, stabilizing the formation of different channels for both ASD and O(2) with respect to those observed in pure water solution. Due to the importance of HA in medicine and since access/egress channels may influence its substrate selectivity, a detailed understanding of the role of the membrane in shaping these channels may be of valuable help in drug design. PMID:22621202

  19. Quality Assessment of Studies Published in Open Access and Subscription Journals: Results of a Systematic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Pastorino, Roberta; Milovanovic, Sonja; Stojanovic, Jovana; Efremov, Ljupcho; Amore, Rosarita; Boccia, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Along with the proliferation of Open Access (OA) publishing, the interest for comparing the scientific quality of studies published in OA journals versus subscription journals has also increased. With our study we aimed to compare the methodological quality and the quality of reporting of primary epidemiological studies and systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in OA and non-OA journals. Methods In order to identify the studies to appraise, we listed all OA and non-OA journals which published in 2013 at least one primary epidemiologic study (case-control or cohort study design), and at least one systematic review or meta-analysis in the field of oncology. For the appraisal, we picked up the first studies published in 2013 with case-control or cohort study design from OA journals (Group A; n = 12), and in the same time period from non-OA journals (Group B; n = 26); the first systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in 2013 from OA journals (Group C; n = 15), and in the same time period from non-OA journals (Group D; n = 32). We evaluated the methodological quality of studies by assessing the compliance of case-control and cohort studies to Newcastle and Ottawa Scale (NOS) scale, and the compliance of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) scale. The quality of reporting was assessed considering the adherence of case-control and cohort studies to STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist, and the adherence of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) checklist. Results Among case-control and cohort studies published in OA and non-OA journals, we did not observe significant differences in the median value of NOS score (Group A: 7 (IQR 7–8) versus Group B: 8 (7–9); p = 0.5) and in the adherence to STROBE checklist (Group A, 75% versus Group B, 80%; p = 0.1). The

  20. Collaborative studies target volcanic hazards in Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluth, Gregg J. S.; Rose, William I.

    Central America is the second-most consistently active volcanic zone on Earth, after Indonesia. Centuries of volcanic activity have produced a spectacular landscape of collapsed calderas, debris flows, and thick blankets of pyroclastic materials. Volcanic activity dominates the history, culture, and daily life of Central American countries.January 2002 marked the third consecutive year in which a diverse group of volcanologists and geophysicists conducted focused field studies in Central America. This type of multi-institutional collaboration reflects the growing involvement of a number of U.S. and non-U.S. universities, and of other organizations, in Guatemala and El Salvador (Table 1).

  1. A Comparative experimental study of media access protocols for wireless radio networks

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C. L.; Drozda, M.; Marathe, M. V.

    2001-05-24

    We conduct a comparative experimental analysis of three well known media access protocols: 802.11, CSMA, and MACA for wireless radio networks. Both fixed and ad-hoc networks are considered. The experimental analysis was carried out using GloMoSim: a tool for simulating wireless networks. The main focus of experiments was to study how (i) the size of the network, (ii) number of open connections, (iii) the spatial location of individual connections, (iv) speed with which individual nodes move and (v) protocols higher up in the protocol stack (e,g. routing layer) affect the performance of the media access sublayer protocols. The performance of the protocols was measured w.r.t. three important parameters: (1) number of received packets, (2) average latency of each packet, and (3) throughput. The following general qualitative conclusions were obtained; some of the conclusions reinforce the earlier claims by other researchers. (1) Although 802.11 performs better than the other two protocols with respect to fairness of transmission, packets dropped, and latency, its performance is found to (i) show a lot of variance with changing input parameters and (ii) the overall performance still leaves a lot of room for improvement. (2) CSMA does not perform too well under the fairness criteria, however, was the best in terms of the latency criteria. (3) MACA also shows fairness problems and has poor performance at high packet injection rates. (4) Protocols in the higher level of the protocol stack affect the MAC layer performance. The main general implications of our work is two folds: (1) No single protocol dominated the other protocols across various measures of efficiency. This motivates the design of a new class of parameterized protocols that adapt to changes in the network connectivity and loads. We refer to these class of protocols as parameterized dynamically adaptive efficient protocols and as a first step suggest key design requirements for such a class of protocols. (2

  2. [Analysis on accessibility of urban park green space: the case study of Shenyang Tiexi District].

    PubMed

    Lu, Ning; Li, Jun-Ying; Yan, Hong-Wei; Shi, Tuo; Li, Ying

    2014-10-01

    The accessibility of urban park green space is an important indicator to reflect how much the natural service supplied by parks could be enjoyed by citizens conveniently and fairly. This paper took Shenyang Tiexi District as an example to evaluate the accessibility of urban park green space based on QuickBird imagery and GIS software, with four modes of transportation, walking, non-motor vehicle, motor vehicle and public transport being considered. The research compared and analyzed the distribution of the accessible area and the accessible people of park green space. The result demonstrated that park green space in Shenyang Tiexi District was not enough and the distribution was not even. To be precise, the accessibility in southwest part and central part was relatively good, that in marginal sites was worse, and that in east part and north part was the worst. Furthermore, the accessibility based on different modes of transportation varied a lot. The accessibility of motor vehicle was the best, followed by non-motor vehicle and public transport, and walking was the worst. Most of the regions could be reached within 30 minutes by walking, 15 minutes by non-motor vehicle and public transport, and 10 minutes by motor vehicle. This paper had a realistic significance in terms of further, systematic research on the green space spatial pattern optimization. PMID:25796905

  3. Access to Specialist Care in Rural Saskatchewan: The Saskatchewan Rural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Karunanayake, Chandima P.; Rennie, Donna C.; Hagel, Louise; Lawson, Joshua; Janzen, Bonnie; Pickett, William; Dosman, James A.; Pahwa, Punam

    2015-01-01

    The role of place has emerged as an important factor in determining people’s health experiences. Rural populations experience an excess in mortality and morbidity compared to those in urban settings. One of the factors thought to contribute to this rural-urban health disparity is access to healthcare. The objective of this analysis was to examine access to specialized medical care services and several possible determinants of access to services in a distinctly rural population in Canada. In winter 2010, we conducted a baseline mail survey of 11,982 households located in rural Saskatchewan, Canada. We obtained 4620 completed household surveys. A key informant for each household responded to questions about access to medical specialists and the exact distance traveled to these services. Correlates of interest included the location of the residence within the province and within each household, socioeconomic status, household smoking status, median age of household residents, number of non-respiratory chronic conditions and number of current respiratory conditions. Analyses were conducted using log binomial regression for the outcome of interest. The overall response rate was 52%. Of households who required a visit to a medical specialist in the past 12 months, 23% reported having difficulty accessing specialist care. The magnitude of risk for encountering difficulty accessing medical specialist care services increased with the greatest distance categories. Accessing specialist care professionals by rural residents was particularly difficult for persons with current respiratory conditions.

  4. Humanized Mouse Model to Study Bacterial Infections Targeting the Microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Melican, Keira; Aubey, Flore; Duménil, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis causes a severe, frequently fatal sepsis when it enters the human blood stream. Infection leads to extensive damage of the blood vessels resulting in vascular leak, the development of purpuric rashes and eventual tissue necrosis. Studying the pathogenesis of this infection was previously limited by the human specificity of the bacteria, which makes in vivo models difficult. In this protocol, we describe a humanized model for this infection in which human skin, containing dermal microvessels, is grafted onto immunocompromised mice. These vessels anastomose with the mouse circulation while maintaining their human characteristics. Once introduced into this model, N. meningitidis adhere exclusively to the human vessels, resulting in extensive vascular damage, inflammation and in some cases the development of purpuric rash. This protocol describes the grafting, infection and evaluation steps of this model in the context of N. meningitidis infection. The technique may be applied to numerous human specific pathogens that infect the blood stream. PMID:24747976

  5. Targeted Acoustic Data Processing for Ocean Ecological Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorovskaia, N.; Li, K.; Tiemann, C.; Ackleh, A. S.; Tang, T.; Ioup, G. E.; Ioup, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is home to many species of deep diving marine mammals. In recent years several ecological studies have collected large volumes of Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) data to investigate the effects of anthropogenic activities on protected and endangered marine mammal species. To utilize these data to their fullest potential for abundance estimates and habitat preference studies, automated detection and classification algorithms are needed to extract species acoustic encounters from a continuous stream of data. The species which phonate in overlapping frequency bands represent a particular challenge. This paper analyzes the performance of a newly developed automated detector for the classification of beaked whale clicks in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Current used beaked whale classification algorithms rely heavily on experienced human operator involvement in manually associating potential events with a particular species of beaked whales. Our detection algorithm is two-stage: the detector is triggered when the species-representative phonation band energy exceeds the baseline detection threshold. Then multiple event attributes (temporal click duration, central frequency, frequency band, frequency sweep rate, Choi-Williams distribution shape indices) are measured. An attribute vector is then used to discriminate among different species of beaked whales present in the Gulf of Mexico and Risso's dolphins which were recognized to mask the detections of beaked whales in the case of widely used energy-band detectors. The detector is applied to the PAM data collected by the Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center to estimate abundance trends of beaked whales in the vicinity of the 2010 oil spill before and after the disaster. This algorithm will allow automated processing with minimal operator involvement for new and archival PAM data. [The research is supported by a BP/GOMRI 2015-2017 consortium grant.

  6. Immigrant mothers and access to prenatal care: evidence from a regional population study in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Chiavarini, Manuela; Lanari, Donatella; Minelli, Liliana; Pieroni, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We addressed the question of whether use of adequate prenatal care differs between foreign-born and Italian mothers and estimated the extent to which unobservable characteristics bias results. Setting This study is on primary care and especially on adequate access to prenatal healthcare services by immigrant mothers. Participants Approximately 37 000 mothers of both Italian and foreign nationality were studied. Data were obtained from the Standard Certificate of Live Birth between 2005 and 2010 in Umbria. Results Estimates from the bivariate probit model indicate that immigrant mothers are three times more likely to make fewer than four prenatal visits (OR=3.35) and 1.66 times more likely to make a late first visit (OR=1.66). The effect is found to be strongest for Asian women. Conclusions Standard probit models lead to underestimation of the probability of inadequate use of prenatal care services by immigrant women, whereas bivariate probit models, which allow us to consider immigrant status as an endogenous variable, estimated ORs to be three times larger than those obtained with univariate models. PMID:26861935

  7. A longitudinal study of independent scholar-published open access journals.

    PubMed

    Björk, Bo-Christer; Shen, Cenyu; Laakso, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Open Access (OA) is nowadays increasingly being used as a business model for the publishing of scholarly peer reviewed journals, both by specialized OA publishing companies and major, predominantly subscription-based publishers. However, in the early days of the web OA journals were mainly founded by independent academics, who were dissatisfied with the predominant print and subscription paradigm and wanted to test the opportunities offered by the new medium. There is still an on-going debate about how OA journals should be operated, and the volunteer model used by many such 'indie' journals has been proposed as a viable alternative to the model adopted by big professional publishers where publishing activities are funded by authors paying expensive article processing charges (APCs). Our longitudinal quantitative study of 250 'indie' OA journals founded prior to 2002, showed that 51% of these journals were still in operation in 2014 and that the median number of articles published per year had risen from 11 to 18 among the survivors. Of these surviving journals, only 8% had started collecting APCs. A more detailed qualitative case study of five such journals provided insights into how such journals have tried to ensure the continuity and longevity of operations. PMID:27190709

  8. A longitudinal study of independent scholar-published open access journals

    PubMed Central

    Björk, Bo-Christer; Laakso, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Open Access (OA) is nowadays increasingly being used as a business model for the publishing of scholarly peer reviewed journals, both by specialized OA publishing companies and major, predominantly subscription-based publishers. However, in the early days of the web OA journals were mainly founded by independent academics, who were dissatisfied with the predominant print and subscription paradigm and wanted to test the opportunities offered by the new medium. There is still an on-going debate about how OA journals should be operated, and the volunteer model used by many such ‘indie’ journals has been proposed as a viable alternative to the model adopted by big professional publishers where publishing activities are funded by authors paying expensive article processing charges (APCs). Our longitudinal quantitative study of 250 ‘indie’ OA journals founded prior to 2002, showed that 51% of these journals were still in operation in 2014 and that the median number of articles published per year had risen from 11 to 18 among the survivors. Of these surviving journals, only 8% had started collecting APCs. A more detailed qualitative case study of five such journals provided insights into how such journals have tried to ensure the continuity and longevity of operations. PMID:27190709

  9. Challenges Women with Disability Face in Accessing and Using Maternal Healthcare Services in Ghana: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Ganle, John Kuumuori; Otupiri, Easmon; Obeng, Bernard; Edusie, Anthony Kwaku; Ankomah, Augustine; Adanu, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background While a number of studies have examined the factors affecting accessibility to and utilisation of healthcare services by persons with disability in general, there is little evidence about disabled women's access to maternal health services in low-income countries and few studies consult disabled women themselves to understand their experience of care and the challenges they face in accessing skilled maternal health services. The objective of this paper is to explore the challenges women with disabilities encounter in accessing and using institutional maternal healthcare services in Ghana. Methods and Findings A qualitative study was conducted in 27 rural and urban communities in the Bosomtwe and Central Gonja districts of Ghana with a total of 72 purposively sampled women with different physical, visual, and hearing impairments who were either lactating or pregnant at the time of this research. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were used to gather data. Attride-Stirling’s thematic network framework was used to analyse the data. Findings suggest that although women with disability do want to receive institutional maternal healthcare, their disability often made it difficult for such women to travel to access skilled care, as well as gain access to unfriendly physical health infrastructure. Other related access challenges include: healthcare providers’ insensitivity and lack of knowledge about the maternity care needs of women with disability, negative attitudes of service providers, the perception from able-bodied persons that women with disability should be asexual, and health information that lacks specificity in terms of addressing the special maternity care needs of women with disability. Conclusions Maternal healthcare services that are designed to address the needs of able-bodied women might lack the flexibility and responsiveness to meet the special maternity care needs of women with disability. More disability-related cultural competence and

  10. Preparation of radioactive rare earth targets for neutron capture study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G. G.; Rogers, P. S. Z.; Palmer, P. D.; Dry, D. E.; Rundberg, R. S.; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    The understanding of thc details of nucleosynthesis in stars remains a great challenge. Though the basic mechanisms governing the processes have been known since the pioneering work of Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle (l), we are now evolving into a condition where we can ask more specific questions. Of particular interest are the dynamics of the s ('slow') process. In this process the general condition is one in which sequential neutron captures occur at time scales long compared with the beta decay half lives of the capturing nuclides. The nucleosynthesis period for C or Ne burning stellar shells is believed to be in the year to few year time frame (2). This means that radionuclides with similar half lives to this burning period serve as 'branch point' nuclides. That is, there will be a competition between a capture to the next heavier isotope and a beta decay to the element of nexl higher atomic number. By understanding the abundances of these competing reactions we can learn about the dynamics of the nucleosynthesis process in the stellar medium. Crucial to this understanding is that we have a knowledge of the underlying neutron reaction cross sections on these unstable nuclides in the relevant stellar energy regions (neutrons of 0.1-100 KeV). Tm (1.9 years) and ls'Sm (90 ycws) have decay properties that permit their handling in an open fume hood. These Iwo were therefore selected to be the first radionuclides for neutron capture study in what will be an ongoing effort.

  11. Semiparametric Estimation of the Impacts of Longitudinal Interventions on Adolescent Obesity using Targeted Maximum-Likelihood: Accessible Estimation with the ltmle Package

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Anna L.; Hubbard, Alan; Crespi, Catherine M.; Seto, Edmund Y.W.; Wang, May C.

    2015-01-01

    While child and adolescent obesity is a serious public health concern, few studies have utilized parameters based on the causal inference literature to examine the potential impacts of early intervention. The purpose of this analysis was to estimate the causal effects of early interventions to improve physical activity and diet during adolescence on body mass index (BMI), a measure of adiposity, using improved techniques. The most widespread statistical method in studies of child and adolescent obesity is multi-variable regression, with the parameter of interest being the coefficient on the variable of interest. This approach does not appropriately adjust for time-dependent confounding, and the modeling assumptions may not always be met. An alternative parameter to estimate is one motivated by the causal inference literature, which can be interpreted as the mean change in the outcome under interventions to set the exposure of interest. The underlying data-generating distribution, upon which the estimator is based, can be estimated via a parametric or semi-parametric approach. Using data from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study, a 10-year prospective cohort study of adolescent girls, we estimated the longitudinal impact of physical activity and diet interventions on 10-year BMI z-scores via a parameter motivated by the causal inference literature, using both parametric and semi-parametric estimation approaches. The parameters of interest were estimated with a recently released R package, ltmle, for estimating means based upon general longitudinal treatment regimes. We found that early, sustained intervention on total calories had a greater impact than a physical activity intervention or non-sustained interventions. Multivariable linear regression yielded inflated effect estimates compared to estimates based on targeted maximum-likelihood estimation and data-adaptive super learning. Our analysis demonstrates that sophisticated

  12. A Study of Women's Access to Higher Education in Kenya with a Special Reference to Mathematics and Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshiwani, George S.

    Results of a study of women's access to higher education in Kenya, especially in the areas of science and mathematics, are presented. Forty secondary school teachers completed a questionnaire, and women students studying science and science-based subjects were interviewed. Enrollment at the elementary, secondary, and college levels and the…

  13. Negotiating Power and Access to Second Language Resources: A Study on Short-Term Chinese MBA Students in America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Xingsong

    2011-01-01

    By looking into a group of 13 Chinese master's in business administration students' study abroad experience in the United States, this study contends that being situated in the second language (L2) communicative context does not guarantee international students complete access to language and cultural resources in the host society. Due to limited…

  14. The Cost of More Accessible Higher Education: What Is the Monetary Value of the Various Academic Degrees? A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidovitch, Nitza; Byalsky, Michael; Soen, Dan; Sinuani-Stern, Zilla

    2013-01-01

    One of the main reasons for acquiring a Bachelor's Degree is the perception of higher education as a means of improving graduates' financial status. In light of the increased accessibility of higher education, a growing number of students hope to use their studies as a financial springboard. In the current study we sought to examine this…

  15. The Influence of High Computer Access on Schoolwork and Student Empowerment: An Exploratory Study of the Nashville ACOT Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Charles W.

    This study examines the relationship between high computer access and "student empowerment" at the Nashville, Tennessee, site of the Apple Classroom of Tomorrow (ACOT) project. The study rests on the premise that school learning is a function of the work carried out by students in school, and that schoolwork is experienced by students as a series…

  16. General Educational Requirements for Access to Manual Skills Training in Botswana. Final Report. Surveys and Studies in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, N.; And Others

    This report of a study to analyze the problems of access to institutional skills training of the manual work force is divided into five chapters. Chapter l introduces the study and explains the work plan and methodology. Chapter 2 discusses patterns of employment and overviews the provision of manual skills training in Botswana. Chapter 3 concerns…

  17. The space of access to primary mental health care: a qualitative case study.

    PubMed

    Kovandžić, Marija; Funnell, Emma; Hammond, Jonathan; Ahmed, Abdi; Edwards, Suzanne; Clarke, Pam; Hibbert, Derek; Bristow, Katie; Dowrick, Christopher

    2012-05-01

    Guided by theoretical perspectives of relational social science, this paper draws on reanalyses of multiple qualitative datasets related to a multi-ethnic, economically disadvantaged area in Liverpool, UK, with the aim to advance general understanding of access to primary mental health care while using local Somali minority as an instrumental focus. The findings generate a novel concept: the space of access. The shape and dynamics of the space of access are determined by at least four fields of tensions: understandings of area and community; cognitive mapping of mental well-being, illness and care; positioning of primary care services; and dynamics of resources beyond the 'medical zone' of care. The conclusions indicate a need for de-centring and re-connecting the role of medical professionals within primary care which itself needs to be transformed by endorsement of multiple avenues of access to diverse support and intrepid communication among all involved actors. PMID:22386985

  18. Citizens' Access to Their Digital Health Data in Eleven Countries - A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Nohr, Christian; Wong, Ming Chao; Turner, Paul; Almond, Helen; Parv, Liisa; Gilstad, Heidi; Koch, Sabine; Harðardóttir, Guðrún Auður; Hyppönen, Hannele; Marcilly, Romaric; Sheik, Aziz; Day, Karen; Kushniruk, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Governments around the world are actively promoting citizens electronic access to their health data as one of a number of ways to respond to the challenges of health care delivery in the 21st century. While numerous approaches have been utilized it is evident from cross-country comparisons that there are different conceptualizations of: both the expected and desired roles for citizens in the management of their own health; the benefits that will be delivered by citizen access and how these benefits should be measured and benchmarked over-time. This paper presents comparative analyses of the methods by which citizens are provided with access to their own health data across 11 countries. The paper aims to stimulate debate on electronic citizen access to health data and the challenges of measuring benefit as well as reflection on capacity of different citizens to engage with e-health. PMID:27577472

  19. Access to medicines in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC): a scoping study

    PubMed Central

    Emmerick, Isabel Cristina Martins; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Azeredo, Thiago Botelho; Bigdeli, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess scientific publication and map research gaps on access to medicines (ATM) in Latin American and the Caribbean low-income and middle-income countries (LMIC). Design Scoping review. Two independent reviewers assessed studies for inclusion and extracted data from each study. Information sources Search strategies were developed and the following databases were searched: MEDLINE, ISI, SCOPUS and Lilacs, from 2000 to 2010. Eligibility criteria Research articles and reviews published in English, Spanish and Portuguese were included. Studies including only high-income countries were excluded, as well as those carried out in very limited settings and discussion papers. Results The 77 articles retained were categorised through consensus among the research team according to the level of the health system addressed, ATM domain and research issues covered. Publications on ATM have increased over time during the study period (r 0.93, p=0.00; R2 0.85). The top five countries covered were Brazil (68.8%), Mexico (15.6%), Colombia (11.7%), Argentina (10.4%) and Peru (10.4%). ‘Health services delivery’ and ‘patients, household and communities’ were the health system levels most frequently covered. The ATM domains ‘leadership and governance’, ‘sustainable financing, affordability and price of medicines’, ‘medicines selection and use’ and ‘availability of medicines’ were the top four explored. There are research gaps in important areas such as ‘human resources for health’, ‘global policies and human rights’, ‘production of medicines’ and ‘traditional medicine’. Conclusions The upward trend on scientific publication reflects a growing research capacity in the region, which is concentrated on research teams in selected countries. The gaps on research capacity could be overcome through research collaboration among countries. It is important to strengthen these collaborations, assuring that interests and needs from the LMIC are

  20. [Intraosseous access for in-hospital emergencies. Intensive medical care case study].

    PubMed

    Werner, M; Daniel, H-P; Hoitz, J

    2010-07-01

    Since the release of the 2005 resuscitation guidelines intraosseous infusion has been recognized as the favorite alternative vascular access in emergency patients. It is no longer restricted to paediatric emergencies but is also considered the vascular access of choice for adult patients with difficult venous access. Intraosseous access has been used in an increasing proportion of patients especially in an out-of-hospital emergency care setting while only limited experience exists for in-hospital usage of this technique. This article reports on a case of intraosseous access performed in a critically ill patient directly after admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) due to difficult peripheral venous access. Despite the extensive medical resources available in the ICU (i.e. central venous catheterization) less invasive means were used to render appropriate care. Based on this case different strategies of critical care and possible improvements will be discussed. Intraosseous infusion should be regarded as an infrequently needed but potentially life-saving procedure that is still too often considered as an option at later stages during in-hospital emergency care. PMID:20628712

  1. Mind the gap: An empirical study of post-trial access in HIV biomedical prevention trials.

    PubMed

    Haire, Bridget; Jordens, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    The principle of providing post-trial access for research participants to successful products of that research is widely accepted and has been enshrined in various declarations and guidelines. While recent ethical guidelines recognise that the responsibility to provide post-trial access extends to sponsors, regulators and government bodies as well as to researchers, it is the researchers who have the direct duty of care to participants. Researchers may thus need to act as advocates for trial participants, especially where government bodies, sponsors, and regulatory bodies have complex interests vested in decisions about whether or not new interventions are made available, how, and to whom. This paper provides an empirical account of post-trial access in the context of HIV prevention research. It describes both access to the successful products of research and the provision antiretroviral drugs for trial participants who acquire HIV. First, we provide evidence that, in the current system, there is considerable variation in the duration and timeliness of access. We then argue that by analysing the difficulties faced by researchers to this point, and their efforts to meet this obligation, much can be learned about how to secure post-trial access in HIV biomedical preventions trials. While researchers alone have a limited obligation, their advocacy on behalf of trial participants may be necessary to call the other parties to account. PMID:26193849

  2. RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF MICROORGANISMS ASSOCIATED WITH VASCULAR ACCESS INFECTIONS IN HEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    D’Amato-Palumbo, S; Kaplan, AA; Feinn, RS; Lalla, RV

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess microorganisms associated with vascular access-associated infections (VAIs) in hemodialysis patients, with respect to possible origin from the mouth. Study Design A retrospective and comparative analysis of the microbes associated with VAI in hemodialysis patients treated during a 10-year period was performed using the Human Oral Microbiome Database (HOMD). Results Of 218 patient records identified, 65 patients collectively experienced 115 VAI episodes. The most common microorganisms involved were Staphylococcus aureus (49.6% of infections), Staphylococcus epidermidis (10.4%), Serratia marcescens (10.4%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (9.6%), and Enterococcus faecalis / fecum (8.7%). None of these was found in 1% or more of HOMD clone libraries, indicating that they very rarely colonize the teeth or plaque. Conclusions Most VAIs were associated with microorganisms more likely to originate from other body sites than from the oral cavity. The risk of a VAI being caused by microorganisms originating from the oral cavity is very small. PMID:23217535

  3. Impact on staff of improving access to the school breakfast program: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Haesly, Blair; Nanney, Marilyn S.; Coulter, Sara; Fong, Sherri; Pratt, Rebekah J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Project BREAK! was designed to test the efficacy of an intervention to increase student participation in the reimbursable School Breakfast Program (SBP). Two schools developed grab-n-go menus, added convenient serving locations, and allowed eating in the hallway. This follow-up study investigated faculty and staff perspectives of how the SBP changes influenced schools. METHODS Project BREAK! high schools were located near Minneapolis, Minnesota, enrolled over 1200 students each and were 70%–90% white. Interviews with school personnel (N=11) and focus groups with teachers (N=16) from the 2 intervention schools were conducted. The Diffusion of Innovation (DOI) framework guided the question development. RESULTS Analysis of the interviews identified the following DOI constructs as most prominently mentioned by school personnel and teachers: advantages for students and faculty/staff, minimal staff time required, communication of the changes, support of social relations between students and faculty/staff and trialability of the program. CONCLUSION There appears to be numerous advantages for both students and school personnel to improving SBP access. The relative advantages of Project BREAK! appear to outweigh the negatives associated with extra time and effort required by staff. Communication about the changes is an area that needs strengthening. PMID:24617910

  4. Safety zone for surgical access in the middle third of the clavicle: study on cadavers☆

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Fabiano Rebouças; de Marchi Bosi Porto, Fernanda; Silva, Marcio Vieira Sanches; Tenor Junior, Antonio Carlos; da Costa, Miguel Pereira; Filardi, Cantidio

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to establish a neurovascular safety zone for surgical access in the middle third of the clavicle, by means of dissection on cadavers. Methods Twenty shoulders were dissected in 10 cadavers, with deep dissection of the middle third of the clavicle. The following structures were identified: subclavian vein, upper trunk of the brachial plexus (anterior and posterior divisions) and suprascapular nerve. These structures were marked out in order to measure their distances from the most proximal point of the middle third of the clavicle. Results The mean distances from the middle third of the clavicle to the suprascapular nerve, subclavian vein, upper trunk, anterior division of the upper trunk and posterior division of the upper trunk were respectively, for the right side: 15.92 cm, 10.77 cm, 23.68 cm, 14.60 cm and 15.42 cm; and for the left side: 12.69 cm; 9.82 cm; 22.19 cm; 12.16 cm and 13.46 cm. Conclusion There was a statistical difference in the distances to the suprascapular nerve and anterior division of the upper trunk, in comparing between the right and left sides. The closest neurovascular structures to the middle third of the clavicle were the suprascapular nerve and subclavian vein. PMID:26229929

  5. Potential mechanical blood trauma in vascular access devices: a comparison of case studies.

    PubMed

    Grigioni, M; Daniele, C; Morbiducci, U; Di Benedetto, G; D'Avenio, G; Barbaro, V

    2002-09-01

    Since vascular access devices may cause disturbances in blood flow, possibly damaging red blood cells (RBCs), the correlated risk of lysis must be assessed. The monodimensional approach for the evaluation of cannulae hydrodynamic behaviour (in vitro measured flow curves) does not furnish information on the local flow field occurring in specific clinical conditions. Researchers consider the prediction of blood trauma, induced by mechanical loading, to optimize the design phase, and to furnish indications on their optimal clinical use. In this study, a model of cannula inserted in a non compliant wall vessel was used as a test bench in a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) problem. By means of CFD the flow field was 3D analysed to achieve information on velocity and shear stress local values, when cannula is used for inflow and outflow cannulation. A prediction of potential blood corpuscle damage, based on a power law, quantified the potential blood damage. Several numerical simulations, with different cannula/vessel flow rate ratios were provided, to investigate the incidence of local sites in the design on blood damaging potential during cannulation. Several regions appeared to be sensitive to the flow rate not only inside the cannula but also in the space between cannula and vessel, suggesting new indications for the assessment of a quality factor based on the evaluation of induced blood cells injury. PMID:12403405

  6. A systematic study of protein labeling by fluorogenic probes using cysteine targeting vinyl sulfone-cyclooctyne tags.

    PubMed

    Söveges, B; Imre, T; Szende, T; Póti, Á L; Cserép, G B; Hegedűs, T; Kele, P; Németh, K

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescent tagging of proteins via accessible cysteine residues is of paramount importance. In this study, model proteins of interest (mitogen-activated protein kinases) were labeled successfully in native state on their free thiols by direct fluorescence derivatization, or in a sequential manner where conjugation of the site specific linker and the fluorophore is carried out in two steps. To this end we designed and prepared two novel chemical reporters carrying vinyl sulfone as Cys targeting function and cyclooctyne motifs, suitable for subsequent conjugation with fluorogenic azides via copper free strain-promoted azide-alkyne click chemistry. Direct and sequential labeling reaction steps were analyzed by native PAGE, capillary zone electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry. The efficiency of tagging was correlated with solvent accessibility of the Cys residues. Our results indicated that conjugation of native proteins by vinyl sulfone linkers was fast and thiol-selective. Subsequent click reaction with fluorogenic dyes generates intensive fluorescence signals and fulfills all requirements of bioorthogonality. PMID:27244693

  7. Study of Fast-Electron Transport in Laser-Illuminated Spherical Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Yaakobi, B.; Gotchev, O.V.; Betti, R.; Stoeckl, C.

    2009-10-22

    The transport and scattering of fast electrons created by the two-plasmon-decay instability are studied by comparing the hard x-ray signal from two identically irradiated targets: a 1-mm-diam solid Cu sphere and a 1-mm-diam solid CH sphere, both coated with a 15 um layer of CH. Comparing the results with Monte Carlo code simulations shows the role of scattering in the higher-Z Cu target. We find evidence that the fast electrons are created with a wide angular divergence and that higher-energy electrons transmitted through the target are reflected back into the target. Because of scattering, the fast-electron energy deposition (preheat) in Cu is about half that in CH, namely, ~0.15% of the laser energy for Cu as compared with ~0.30% for CH. Embedded high-Z layers in imploding fusion targets, because of the scattering, could provide protection against preheat.

  8. Utilizing Task Shifting to Increase Access to Maternal and Infant Health Interventions: A Case Study of Midwives for Haiti.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Barbara O'Malley; Brunk, Nadene

    2016-01-01

    The shortage of health workers worldwide has been identified as a barrier to achieving targeted health goals. Task shifting has been recommended by the World Health Organization to increase access to trained and skilled birth attendants. One example of task shifting is the use of cadres of health care workers, such as nurses and auxiliary nurse-midwives, who can successfully deliver skilled care to women and infants in low-resource areas where women would otherwise lack access to critical health interventions during the childbearing years. Midwives for Haiti is an organization demonstrating the use of task shifting in its education program for auxiliary midwives. Graduates of the Midwives for Haiti education program are employed and working with women in hospitals, birth centers, and clinics across Haiti. This article reviews the Midwives for Haiti education program and presents successes and challenges in task shifting as a strategy to increase access to skilled maternal and newborn care and to meet international health goals to reduce maternal and infant mortality in a low-resource country. PMID:26824199

  9. A Population-based Study of Age Inequalities in Access to Palliative Care Among Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Burge, Frederick I.; Lawson, Beverley J.; Johnston, Grace M.; Grunfeld, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Background Inequalities in access to palliative care programs (PCP) by age have been shown to exist in Canada and elsewhere. Few studies have been able to provide greater insight by simultaneously adjusting for multiple demographic, health service, and socio-cultural indicators. Objective To re-examine the relationship between age and registration to specialized community-based PCP programs among cancer patients and identify the multiple indicators contributing to these inequalities. Methods This retrospective, population-based study was a secondary data analysis of linked individual level information extracted from 6 administrative health databases and contextual (neighborhood level) data from provincial and census information. Subjects included all adults who died due to cancer between 1998 and 2003 living within 2 District Health Authorities in the province of Nova Scotia, Canada. The relationship between registration in a PCP and age was examined using hierarchical nonlinear regression modeling techniques. Identification of potential patient and ecologic contributing indicators was guided by Andersen’s conceptual model of health service utilization. Results Overall, 66% of 7511 subjects were registered with a PCP. Older subjects were significantly less likely than those <65 years of age to be registered with a PCP, in particular those aged 85 years and older (adjusted odds ratio: 0.4; 95% confidence interval: 0.3–0.5). Distance to the closest cancer center had a major impact on registration. Conclusions Age continues to be a significant predictor of PCP registration in Nova Scotia even after controlling for the confounding effects of many new demographic, health service, and ecologic indicators. PMID:19300309

  10. The alloantigenic sites of alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen: pathogenic X-linked alport alloantibodies target two accessible conformational epitopes in the alpha5NC1 domain.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong Suk; Kashtan, Clifford E; Turner, A Neil; Heidet, Laurence; Hudson, Billy G; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2007-04-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody nephritis is caused by an autoimmune or alloimmune reaction to the NC1 domains of alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen. Some patients with X-linked Alport syndrome (XLAS) develop post-transplant nephritis mediated by pathogenic anti-GBM alloantibodies to collagen IV chains present in the renal allograft but absent from the tissues of the patient. In this work, the epitopes targeted by alloantibodies from these patients were identified and characterized. All XLAS alloantibodies recognized conformational epitopes in the NC1 domain of alpha5(IV) collagen, which were mapped using chimeric alpha1/alpha5 NC1 domains expressed in mammalian cells. Allograft-eluted alloantibodies mainly targeted two conformational alloepitopes mapping to alpha5NC1 residues 1-45 and 114-168. These regions also encompassed the major epitopes of circulating XLAS alloantibodies, which in some patients additionally targeted alpha5NC1 residues 169-229. Both kidney-eluted and circulating alloantibodies to alpha5NC1 distinctively targeted epitopes accessible in the alpha3alpha4alpha5NC1 hexamers of human GBM, unlike anti-GBM autoantibodies, which targeted sequestered alpha3NC1 epitopes. The results identify two immunodominant alpha5NC1 epitopes as major alloantigenic sites of alpha3alpha4alpha5(IV) collagen specifically implicated in the pathogenesis of post-transplant nephritis in XLAS patients. The contrast between the accessibility of these alloepitopes and the crypticity of autoepitopes indicates that distinct molecular forms of antigen may initiate the immunopathogenic processes in the two forms of anti-GBM disease. PMID:17293596

  11. Analyzing green/open space accessibility by using GIS: case study of northern Cyprus cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, Can; Akçit, Nuhcan

    2015-06-01

    It is well known that green spaces are vital for increasing the quality of life within the urban environment. World Health Organization states that it should be 9 square meters per person at least. European Environment Agency defines that 5000 square meters of green space should be accessible within 300 meters distance from households. Green structure in Northern Cyprus is not sufficient and effective in this manner. In Northern Cyprus, they have neglected the urban planning process and they have started to lose significance and importance. The present work analyzes the accessibility of green spaces in Northern Cyprus cities. Kioneli, Famagusta, Kyrenia and the northern part of Nicosia are analyzed in this manner. To do that, green space structure is analyzed by using digital data. Additionally, accessibility of the green space is measured by using 300-meter buffers for each city. Euclidean distance is used from each building and accessibility maps are generated. Kyrenia and Famagusta have shortage in green space per capita. The amount of green space in these cities is less than 4 square meters. The factors affecting the accessibility and utilization of public spaces are discussed to present better solutions to urban planning.

  12. In vitro study of deep capture of paramagnetic particle for targeting therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Ning; Huang, Zheyong; Ma, Wenli; Ge, Junbo; Zheng, Wenling

    2009-09-01

    Magnetic targeting, a promising therapeutic strategy for localizing systemically delivered drug to target tissue, is limited by magnetic attenuation. To satisfy the need of deep magnetic targeting, a special apparatus in which the magnetic flux density can be focused at a distance from the pole was designed. To test the aggregation property of this apparatus, we observed the accumulation of 500-nm paramagnetic particles as flowing through a tube served as a model of blood vessels. The relationship of the accumulation of the paramagnetic particles, the magnetic flux density, the magnetic field gradient and the fluid velocity was studied by theoretical considerations.

  13. Grain protein concentration and harvestable protein under future climate conditions. A study of 108 spring barley accessions.

    PubMed

    Ingvordsen, Cathrine H; Gislum, René; Jørgensen, Johannes R; Mikkelsen, Teis N; Stockmarr, Anders; Jørgensen, Rikke B

    2016-04-01

    In the present study a set of 108 spring barley (H. vulgareL.) accessions were cultivated under predicted future levels of temperature and [CO2] as single factors and in combination (IPCC, AR5, RCP8.5). Across all genotypes, elevated [CO2] (700 ppm day/night) slightly decreased protein concentration by 5%, while elevated temperature (+5 °C day/night) substantially increased protein concentration by 29%. The combined treatment increased protein concentration across accessions by 8%. This was an increase less than predicted from strictly additive effects of the individual treatments. Despite the increase in grain protein concentration, the decrease in grain yield at combined elevated temperature and elevated [CO2] resulted in 23% less harvestable protein. There was variation in the response of the 108 accessions, which might be exploited to at least maintain if not increase harvestable grain protein under future climate change conditions. PMID:26889013

  14. A Study on Automated Context-aware Access Control Model Using Ontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Bokman; Jang, Hyokyung; Choi, Euiin

    Applications in context-aware computing environment will be connected wireless network and various devices. According to, recklessness access of information resource can make trouble of system. So, access authority management is very important issue both information resource and adapt to system through founding security policy of needed system. But, existing security model is easy of approach to resource through simply user ID and password. This model has a problem that is not concerned about user's environment information. In this paper, propose model of automated context-aware access control using ontology that can more efficiently control about resource through inference and judgment of context information that collect user's information and user's environment context information in order to ontology modeling.

  15. The Internationalization of Experiential Learning for Deaf and Hard of Hearing College Students: A Case Study of Accessibility and Globalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peisner, Elizabeth Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing a qualitative case study, this dissertation analyzed how one university provided accessibility to international experiential learning opportunities for a primarily disabled student population. The Council for the Advancement of Standards (CAS, 2006) in Higher Education consists of a self-assessment guide adapted as a framework to analyze…

  16. Neighbourhood Deprivation, Health Inequalities and Service Access by Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Cross-Sectional Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, S. A.; McConnachie, A.; Allan, L. M.; Melville, C.; Smiley, E.; Morrison, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs) experience health inequalities and are more likely to live in deprived areas. The aim of this study was to determine whether the extent of deprivation of the area a person lives in affects their access to services, hence contributing to health inequalities. Method: A cross-sectional study…

  17. Catalog Use Studies--Since the Introduction of Online Interactive Catalogs: Impact on Design for Subject Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Pauline A.; Markey, Karen

    1983-01-01

    This review of the transition from library card catalogs to online public access catalogs (OPAC) (1981-1982) discusses methods employed by online catalog use studies (self-administered questionnaires, OPAC transaction logs, focused-group interviews, feature analysis, online search and retrieval experiments) and new directions for OPAC research…

  18. Identifiability and Accessibility in Learning Definite Article Usages: A Quasi-Experimental Study with Japanese Learners of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinenoya, Kimiko; Lyster, Roy

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of instruction on the use of the definite article "the" by Japanese learners of English by implementing two instructional treatments that varied in the extent to which they emphasized identifiability and accessibility. One instructional treatment, referred to as the traditional (TR) treatment,…

  19. Home Schooling and the Request for Access to Public School Extracurricular Activities: A Legal and Policy Study of Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lett, David R.

    This paper reports on a study that examines legal and policy issues surrounding access to public-school extracurricular activities for home-school students. Chapter 1, "The Problem and Its Background," reviews such relevant issues as the history of choice in America and Illinois, legal foundations, regulatory disparities, research questions,…

  20. Students with Disabilities and Online Learning: A Cross-Institutional Study of Perceived Satisfaction with Accessibility Compliance and Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jodi B.; Crittenden, Laura A.; Crittenden, Jason C.

    2011-01-01

    Distance education has grown significantly over the past two decades, and the need to evaluate and enforce online course federal accessibility standards is gaining momentum among educators, students, and legislators. The purpose of this study was to determine if students with disabilities, who are enrolled in online courses, certifications, and…

  1. Reviews and Practice of College Students Regarding Access to Scientific Knowledge: A Case Study in Two Spanish Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Jose Manuel Saez; Ruiz Ruiz, Jose Maria; Gonzalez, Maria-Luz Cacheiro

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes the concepts, attitudes, and practices of 327 pedagogy students from two major Spanish universities related to the process of finding academic information utilizing open access. A training program has been developed through an innovation project (PIMCD) to address the problem of the lack of university training designed to…

  2. Deconstructing the Student Experience on an Educational Studies Degree, with Reference to Student Choice, Access and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Angela Joy

    2011-01-01

    Educational studies as a discipline is now a feature in many British universities, but little research has been undertaken to explore what kinds of student choose the subject, how easily they access it or how they fare as undergraduate students. This article attempts to address this paucity of research by drawing on a selection of findings from a…

  3. Access to Transplantation and Transplant Outcome Measures (ATTOM): study protocol of a UK wide, in-depth, prospective cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oniscu, Gabriel C; Ravanan, Rommel; Wu, Diana; Gibbons, Andrea; Li, Bernadette; Tomson, Charles; Forsythe, John L; Bradley, Clare; Cairns, John; Dudley, Christopher; Watson, Christopher J E; Bolton, Eleanor M; Draper, Heather; Robb, Matthew; Bradbury, Lisa; Pruthi, Rishi; Metcalfe, Wendy; Fogarty, Damian; Roderick, Paul; Bradley, J Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is significant intercentre variability in access to renal transplantation in the UK due to poorly understood factors. The overarching aims of this study are to improve equity of access to kidney and kidney–pancreas transplantation across the UK and to optimise organ allocation to maximise the benefit and cost-effectiveness of transplantation. Methods and analysis 6844 patients aged 18–75 years starting dialysis and/or receiving a transplant together with matched patients active on the transplant list from all 72 UK renal units were recruited between November 2011 and March 2013 and will be followed for at least 3 years. The outcomes of interest include patient survival, access to the transplant list, receipt of a transplant, patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) including quality of life, treatment satisfaction, well-being and health status on different forms of renal replacement therapy. Sociodemographic and clinical data were prospectively collected from case notes and from interviews with patients and local clinical teams. Qualitative process exploration with clinical staff will help identify unit-specific factors that influence access to renal transplantation. A health economic analysis will explore costs and outcomes associated with alternative approaches to organ allocation. The study will deliver: (1) an understanding of patient and unit-specific factors influencing access to renal transplantation in the UK, informing potential changes to practices and policies to optimise outcomes and reduce intercentre variability; (2) a patient-survival probability model to standardise access to the renal transplant list and (3) an understanding of PROMs and health economic impact of kidney and kidney–pancreas transplantation to inform the development of a more sophisticated and fairer organ allocation algorithm. Ethics and dissemination The protocol has been independently peer reviewed by National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and

  4. Computer and cell phone access for individuals with mobility impairments: an overview and case studies.

    PubMed

    Burgstahler, Sheryl; Comden, Dan; Lee, Sang-Mook; Arnold, Anthony; Brown, Kayla

    2011-01-01

    Computers, telephones, and assistive technology hold promise for increasing the independence, productivity, and participation of individuals with disabilities in academic, employment, recreation, and other activities. However, to reach this goal, technology must be accessible to, available to, and usable by everyone. The authors of this article share computer and telephone access challenges faced by individuals with neurological and other impairments, assistive technology solutions, issues that impact product adoption and use, needs for new technologies, and recommendations for practitioners and researchers. They highlight the stories of three individuals with neurological/mobility impairments, the technology they have found useful to them, and their recommendations for future product development. PMID:21558625

  5. A study on new nursing information accessibility mechanism using the digital broadcasting network.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jina

    2006-01-01

    There have been efforts to add an interoperability function to TV systems. The digital technology has changed all our lifestyles. Now TV systems do indeed have interoperability functions. However, this means more than interoperable TV. It announces the birth of a digital broadcasting network (one-source and many-destination digital communication mechanism)--the new digital communication network as a broadcasting style. As a viewpoint of nursing informatics, this mechanism provides a new accessibility mechanism to structured and interoperable data. This paper introduces the technology and the basic scenarios on the data accessibility mechanism using the digital broadcasting network. PMID:17102340

  6. Safe Corridor to Access Clivus for Endoscopic Trans-Sphenoidal Surgery: A Radiological and Anatomical Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ye; Zhang, Siwen; Chen, Yong; Zhao, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Penetration of the clivus is required for surgical access of the brain stem. The endoscopic transclivus approach is a difficult procedure with high risk of injury to important neurovascular structures. We undertook a novel anatomical and radiological investigation to understand the structure of the clivus and neurovascular structures relevant to the extended trans-nasal trans-sphenoid procedure and determine a safe corridor for the penetration of the clivus. Method We examined the clivus region in the computed tomographic angiography (CTA) images of 220 adults, magnetic resonance (MR) images of 50 adults, and dry skull specimens of 10 adults. Multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) of the CT images was performed, and the anatomical features of the clivus were studied in the coronal, sagittal, and axial planes. The data from the images were used to determine the anatomical parameters of the clivus and neurovascular structures, such as the internal carotid artery and inferior petrosal sinus. Results The examination of the CTA and MR images of the enrolled subjects revealed that the thickness of the clivus helped determine the depth of the penetration, while the distance from the sagittal midline to the important neurovascular structures determined the width of the penetration. Further, data from the CTA and MR images were consistent with those retrieved from the examination of the cadaveric specimens. Conclusion Our findings provided certain pointers that may be useful in guiding the surgery such that inadvertent injury to vital structures is avoided and also provided supportive information for the choice of the appropriate endoscopic equipment. PMID:26368821

  7. Watershed Dynamics: Using Web-based GIS to Access Data and Study the Hydrosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzby, C. K.; Jona, K.

    2010-12-01

    The Watershed Dynamics project has developed online GIS tools and curriculum to provide high school earth science students with access to data and analysis tools to perform investigations on their local watershed. Using FieldScope web-based GIS tools from National Geographic, students investigate precipitation, stream discharge, and land cover data for the US. Students use the data to study water availability across the US and the world, human impacts on the watershed, and more. Curriculum developers at the Office of STEM Education Partnerships (OSEP) at Northwestern University and the GLOBE Program have created two complete units which scaffold students on their way to independent research using GIS. In the Water Availability unit, students work with precipitation, evaporation, and surface runoff to investigate the water cycle and how it varies regionally and seasonally. In the Human Impact unit, students analyze land cover change over time and investigate stream discharge to figure out how humans are impacting their watershed. These units can be used together or individually, but provide students progressively more research independence, leading them to ask their own questions about the watershed using GIS data. Both units have been pilot tested in high school classrooms and found to be successful at increasing student content knowledge about the water cycle. They are being modified for use at the undergraduate level. The web-based GIS interface has the functionality of desktop GIS, but allows for a simpler user-experience and direct links to relevant data. Students can use these tools to learn scientific content and as a stepping-stone for further GIS investigations.

  8. Spatial access to sterile syringes and the odds of injecting with an unsterile syringe among injectors: a longitudinal multilevel study.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Hannah; Des Jarlais, Don; Ross, Zev; Tempalski, Barbara; Bossak, Brian H; Friedman, Samuel R

    2012-08-01

    Despite the 2010 repeal of the ban on spending federal monies to fund syringe exchange programs (SEPs) in the U.S.A., these interventions--and specifically SEP site locations--remain controversial. To further inform discussions about the location of SEP sites, this longitudinal multilevel study investigates the relationship between spatial access to sterile syringes distributed by SEPs in New York City (NYC) United Hospital Fund (UHF) districts and injecting with an unsterile syringe among injectors over time (1995-2006). Annual measures of spatial access to syringes in each UHF district (N = 42) were created using data on SEP site locations and site-specific syringe distribution data. Individual-level data on unsterile injecting among injectors (N = 4,067) living in these districts, and on individual-level covariates, were drawn from the Risk Factors study, an ongoing cross-sectional study of NYC drug users. We used multilevel models to explore the relationship of district-level access to syringes to the odds of injecting with an unsterile syringe in >75% of injection events in the past 6 months, and to test whether this relationship varied by district-level arrest rates (per 1,000 residents) for drug and drug paraphernalia possession. The relationship between district-level access to syringes and the odds of injecting with an unsterile syringe depended on district-level arrest rates. In districts with low baseline arrest rates, better syringe access was associated with a decline in the odds of frequently injecting with an unsterile syringe (AOR, 0.95). In districts with no baseline syringe access, higher arrest rates were associated with increased odds of frequently injecting with an unsterile syringe (AOR, 1.02) When both interventions were present, arrest rates eroded the protective effects of spatial access to syringes. Spatial access to syringes in small geographic areas appears to reduce the odds of injecting with an unsterile syringe among local

  9. A scintillating fiber-optic active target (SFT) for studies of high energy photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ruchti, R.; Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Busenitz, J.; Cason, N.; Cunningham, J.; Gardner, R.; Kennedy, C.; Mannel, E.; Mountain, R.J.

    1988-02-01

    A high resolution, gateable, Scintillating Fiber Target (SFT) has been developed for Fermilab Experiment E687 to study charm and beauty particle production and decay in high energy photon interactions. The detector consists of a scintillating target of either GS1 Cerium glass fibers or polystyrene fibers of 29..mu..m cross section, a multi-stage image intensifier and an intensified CCD or SIT/VIDICON camera system used in conjunction with a custom-built video data acquisition system.

  10. The study of target damage assessment system based on image change detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ping; Yang, Fan; Feng, Xinxi

    2009-10-01

    Target Damage Assessment (TDA) system is an important component of the intelligent command and control system. The method of building TDA based on Image Change Detection can greatly improve the system efficiency and accuracy, thus get a fast and precise assessment results. This paper firstly analyzes the structure of TDA system. Then studies the key technology in this system. Finally, gives an evaluation criteria based on image change detection of the target damage assessment system.

  11. Studies of Transverse-Momentum-Dependent Distributions with a Fixed-Target ExpeRiment Using the LHC Beams (AFTER@LHC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massacrier, L.; Anselmino, M.; Arnaldi, R.; Brodsky, S. J.; Chambert, V.; den Dunnen, W.; Didelez, J. P.; Genolini, B.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Fleuret, F.; Gao, Y.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Lansberg, J. P.; Lorcé, C.; Mikkelsen, R.; Pisano, C.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Rosier, P.; Schienbein, I.; Schlegel, M.; Scomparin, E.; Trzeciak, B.; Uggerhøj, U. I.; Ulrich, R.; Yang, Z.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the studies of Transverse-Momentum-Dependent distributions (TMDs) at a future fixed-target experiment -AFTER@LHC- using the p+ or Pb ion LHC beams, which would be the most energetic fixed-target experiment ever performed. AFTER@LHC opens new domains of particle and nuclear physics by complementing collider-mode experiments, in particular those of RHIC and the EIC projects. Both with an extracted beam by a bent crystal or with an internal gas target, the luminosity achieved by AFTER@LHC surpasses that of RHIC by up to 3 orders of magnitude. With an unpolarised target, it allows for measurements of TMDs such as the Boer-Mulders quark distributions and the distribution of unpolarised and linearly polarised gluons in unpolarised protons. Using polarised targets, one can access the quark and gluon Sivers TMDs through single transverse-spin asymmetries in Drell-Yan and quarkonium production. In terms of kinematics, the fixed-target mode combined with a detector covering ηlab ∈ [1, 5] allows one to measure these asymmetries at large x↑ in the polarised nucleon.

  12. Making Physical Activity Accessible to Older Adults with Memory Loss: A Feasibility Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logsdon, Rebecca G.; McCurry, Susan M.; Pike, Kenneth C.; Teri, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: For individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), memory loss may prevent successful engagement in exercise, a key factor in preventing additional disability. The Resources and Activities for Life Long Independence (RALLI) program uses behavioral principles to make exercise more accessible for these individuals. Exercises are broken…

  13. Barriers to accessing generic health and social care services: a qualitative study of injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Neale, Joanne; Tompkins, Charlotte; Sheard, Laura

    2008-03-01

    While research has clearly documented the difficulties injectors encounter in accessing specialist addiction services, there is less evidence of the problems they face when securing general health care and non-substance-misuse-specific support. This paper seeks to fill some of these knowledge gaps. Between January and May 2006, 75 current injectors were recruited and interviewed through three needle exchange programmes located in diverse geographical areas of West Yorkshire. Interview data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using Framework. Findings showed that injectors were often positive about the help they received from generic health and social care services. Nonetheless, they identified a range of barriers relating to inability to access desired assistance, the burden of appointments, travel to services, stigma and negative staff attitudes, personal ill-health, lack of material resources, and anxieties about accessing support. Although some types of barriers were more evident at some services than at others and/or affected particular subgroups of injector more than others, the impact of any barrier was contingent on a range of factors. These included the attitudes of individual professionals, the circumstances and needs of individual injectors, the local availability of suitable alternative services, and the frequency with which a service needed to be accessed. In order to better understand and potentially reduce service barriers, findings are linked to broader conceptual and theoretical debates relating to social exclusion and Foucault's analyses of power and knowledge. PMID:18290980

  14. Program Accessibility for the Handicapped: A Study of a Planning Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Eric

    The paper reports the development of a set of planning materials (a series of eight booklets) to assist local special and vocational education administrators to overcome barriers to program and facility accessibility for handicapped students in vocational, occupational, and technical education. The project was conducted in three phases: (1)…

  15. Web-Based Online Public Access Catalogues of IIT Libraries in India: An Evaluative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madhusudhan, Margam; Aggarwal, Shalini

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to examine the various features and components of web-based online public access catalogues (OPACs) of IIT libraries in India with the help of a specially designed evaluation checklist. Design/methodology/approach: The various features of the web-based OPACs in six IIT libraries (IIT Delhi, IIT Bombay, IIT…

  16. Access, Quality, and Opportunity: A Case Study of Zambia Open Community Schools (ZOCS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwalimu, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Community schools and other approaches to Alternative Primary Education or APE have increased access to primary education for underserved populations in Africa, Asia, and Latin America as a major goal of the Education for All (EFA) movement. In Zambia, a country where an estimated 20 percent of the basic education enrollment now attends community…

  17. Institutional Repositories, Open Access, and Scholarly Communication: A Study of Conflicting Paradigms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Rowena; Chawner, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    The Open Access movement of the past decade, and institutional repositories developed by universities and academic libraries as a part of that movement, have openly challenged the traditional scholarly communication system. This article examines the growth of repositories around the world, and summarizes a growing body of evidence of the response…

  18. Access vs. Ownership: A SUNY University Center Libraries Study of the Economics of Document Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Wahlde, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Examines issues surrounding ownership versus borrowing costs of scientific journals at the four State University of New York (SUNY) Centers. Compares access to journal articles through a consortial approach, traditional interlibrary loan (ILL), and commercial delivery services. Analyzes user satisfaction with ILL and willingness to pay for…

  19. Access to College: A Reconsideration of the National Education Longitudinal Study (NELS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daun-Barnett, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Student's access to college is influenced both by their level of academic preparation to do college-level work and the cost of participating in postsecondary education--on this point researchers and policy makers seem to agree (Perna, 2006). The relative importance of each, however, is very much a subject of disagreement and that debate has…

  20. Assessment and Access: Hispanics in Higher Education. SUNY Series, United States Hispanic Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Gary D., Ed.; And Others

    This book contains 10 papers on solutions and barriers to improving the access of Hispanic American students to higher education. Following an introductory essay on: "Advances in Assessment and the Potential for Increasing the Number of Hispanics in Higher Education" (G. D. Keller), the papers are organized into four parts. Papers in part I…

  1. Patterns of Student Enrolment and Attrition in Australian Open Access Online Education: A Preliminary Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenland, Steven J.; Moore, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Swinburne University of Technology has experienced tremendous growth in open access online learning and as such is typical of the many Australian institutions that have ventured into online tertiary education. While research in online education continues to expand, comparatively little investigates students' enrolment and attrition. This research…

  2. Access to general practitioner services amongst underserved Australians: a microsimulation study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background One group often identified as having low socioeconomic status, those living in remote or rural areas, are often recognised as bearing an unequal burden of illness in society. This paper aims to examine equity of utilisation of general practitioner services in Australia. Methods Using the 2005 National Health Survey undertaken by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, a microsimulation model was developed to determine the distribution of GP services that would occur if all Australians had equal utilisation of health services relative to need. Results It was estimated that those who are unemployed would experience a 19% increase in GP services. Persons residing in regional areas would receive about 5.7 million additional GP visits per year if they had the same access to care as Australians residing in major cities. This would be a 18% increase. There would be a 20% increase for inner regional residents and a 14% increase for residents of more remote regional areas. Overall there would be a 5% increase in GP visits nationally if those in regional areas had the same access to care as those in major cities. Conclusion Parity is an insufficient goal and disadvantaged persons and underserved areas require greater access to health services than the well served metropolitan areas due to their greater poverty and poorer health status. Currently underserved Australians suffer a double disadvantage: poorer health and poorer access to health services. PMID:22264385

  3. New Advanced Technologies to Provide Decentralised and Secure Access to Medical Records: Case Studies in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Quantin, Catherine; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Allaert, François André; Fassa, Maniane; Bourquard, Karima; Boire, Jean-Yves; de Vlieger, Paul; Maigne, Lydia; Breton, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    The main problem for health professionals and patients in accessing information is that this information is very often distributed over many medical records and locations. This problem is particularly acute in cancerology because patients may be treated for many years and undergo a variety of examinations. Recent advances in technology make it feasible to gain access to medical records anywhere and anytime, allowing the physician or the patient to gather information from an “ephemeral electronic patient record”. However, this easy access to data is accompanied by the requirement for improved security (confidentiality, traceability, integrity, ...) and this issue needs to be addressed. In this paper we propose and discuss a decentralised approach based on recent advances in information sharing and protection: Grid technologies and watermarking methodologies. The potential impact of these technologies for oncology is illustrated by the examples of two experimental cases: a cancer surveillance network and a radiotherapy treatment plan. It is expected that the proposed approach will constitute the basis of a future secure “google-like” access to medical records. PMID:19718446

  4. Experimental studies of access graph based heuristics: Beating the LRU standard?

    SciTech Connect

    Fiat, A.; Rosen, Z.

    1997-06-01

    In this paper we devise new paging heuristics motivated by the access graph model of paging. Unlike the access graph model and the related Markov paging model our heuristics are truly on-line in that we do not assume any prior knowledge of the program just about to be executed. The Least Recently Used heuristic for paging is remarkably good, and is known experimentally to be superior to many of the suggested alternatives on real program traces. Experiments we`ve performed suggest that our heuristics beat LRU fairly consistently, over a wide range of cache sizes and programs. The number of page faults can be as low as {1/2} the number of page faults for LRU and is on average 7 to 9 percent less than the number of faults for LRU. (Depending on how this average is computed.) We have built a program tracer that gives the page access sequence for real program executions of 200 - 3,300 thousand page access requests, and our simulations are based on 25 of these program traces. Overall, we have performed several thousand such simulations. While we have no real evidence to suggest that the programs we`ve traced are typical in any sense, we have made use of an experimental {open_quotes}protocol{close_quotes} designed to avoid experimenter bias. We strongly emphasize that our results are only preliminary and that much further work needs to be done.

  5. Making Online Learning Accessible to Disabled Students: An Institutional Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Martyn

    2006-01-01

    Based on the authors' reflections on experience working at the Open University, approaches to making online learning accessible to disabled students are considered. The considerations are applicable to all concerned with online learning and indeed anyone seeking to trade, disseminate information and mediate services online. In reflecting on the…

  6. Public Internet Access Points (PIAPs) and Their Social Impact: A Case Study from Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afacan, Gulgun; Er, Erkan; Arifoglu, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Building public Internet access points (PIAPs) is a significant contribution of governments towards achieving an information society. While many developing countries are investing great amounts to establish PIAPs today, people may not use PIAPs effectively. Yet, the successful implementation of PIAPs is the result of citizens' acceptance to use…

  7. The Contributions of Economics to the Study of College Access and Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Bridget Terry

    2007-01-01

    Background/Context: The essay provides a comprehensive review of work by economists and others in related quantitative disciplines on the transition of students to college. A particular emphasis is given to the role of price and financial aid although issues related to college preparation, access, and persistence are also investigated. The final…

  8. 76 FR 76927 - Port Access Route Study: The Atlantic Coast From Maine to Florida

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... records notice regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). II. Background and Purpose The Coast Guard announced in the Federal Register (76 FR 27288, May...'' column. If you do not have access to the internet, you may view the docket online by visiting the...

  9. Factors that help injecting drug users to access and benefit from services: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Joanne; sheard, Laura; Tompkins, Charlotte NE

    2007-01-01

    Background International research shows that injecting drug users (IDUs) can encounter many barriers when they try to access drug treatment and other services. However, the existing literature is mostly quantitative and does not consider the kinds of factors that injectors themselves identify as enabling them to access and benefit from services. Responding to this gap in knowledge, our paper explores IDUs' own suggestions for improving service engagement and their reports of other factors enabling them to seek help. Methods Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 75 current illicit drug injectors in three geographically diverse areas of West Yorkshire, England. Recruitment was through needle exchange programmes, with additional snowball sampling to ensure inclusivity of gender, ethnicity and primary drug injected. Transcribed data were analysed thematically using Framework. Results Although participants were often satisfied with current access to services, they made three broad suggestions for improving engagement. These were: providing more services (more providers and more forms of support); better operation of existing services (including better communication systems and more flexibility around individual needs); and staffing-related improvements (particularly, less judgemental and more understanding staff attitudes). Other factors identified as important enablers of help seeking were: having supporting relationships (particularly with family members); personal circumstances/life events (especially becoming a parent); and an injector's state of mind (such as feeling motivated and positive). Conclusion A range of practical suggestions for improving IDUs' access to drug treatment and other services are identified. PMID:17971204

  10. Dielectric Resonator-Based Side-Access Probe for Muscle Fiber EPR Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Jaworski, Marek; Smith, Brian G.; Fajer, Piotr G.; Scholes, Charles P.

    2000-03-01

    We present a novel dielectric resonator (DR)-based resonant structure that accommodates aqueous sample capillaries in orientations that are either parallel (i.e., side-access) or perpendicular to the direction of an external (Zeeman) magnetic field, B0. The resonant structure consists of two commercially available X-band DRs that are separated by a Rexolite spacer and resonate in the fundamental TE01δ mode. The separator between the DRs is used to tune the resonator to the desired frequency and, by appropriately drilled sample holes, to provide access for longitudinal samples, notably capillaries containing oriented, spin-labeled muscle fibers. In contrast to the topologically similar cylindrical TE011 cavity, the DR-based structure has distinct microwave properties that favor its use for parallel orientation of lossy aqueous samples. For perpendicular orientation of a dilute (6.25 μM) aqueous solution of IASL spin label, the S/N ratio was at least one order of magnitude better for the side-access DR-based structure than for a standard TE102 cavity. EPR spectra acquired for maleimide spin-labeled myosin filaments also revealed ca. 10 times better S/N ratio than those obtained with a standard TE102 cavity. For the side-access DR with sample capillaries oriented either parallel or perpendicular to the external magnetic field, the Q- and filling factors are in good agreement with the theoretical estimates derived from the distribution of magnetic (H1) and electric (E1) components.

  11. "Medical Education Online": A Case Study of an Open Access Journal in Health Professional Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The development of the World Wide Web (WWW) has made it possible of small groups of colleagues or even single individuals to create peer-reviewed scholarly journals. This paper discusses the development of Medical Education Online (MEO) an open access peer-reviewed journal in health professional education. Description: MEO was first…

  12. Outsourcing a High Speed Internet Access Project: An Information Technology Class Case Study in Three Parts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Richard G.; Carper, William B.; McCool, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In early 2004, the Hilton Hotels Corporation (HHC) required that all of its hotels (both owned and franchised) install high-speed Internet access (HSIA) in all of their rooms by June 2004. This case focuses on how one of its franchise properties located on the northern gulf coast of Florida (the Hilton Sandestin Beach Golf Resort &…

  13. Factors that Prevent Children from Gaining Access to Schooling: A Study of Delhi Slum Households

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsujita, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the factors that prevent slum children aged 5-14 from gaining access to schooling in light of the worsening urban poverty and sizable increase in rural-to-urban migration. Bias against social disadvantage in terms of gender and caste is not clearly manifested in schooling, while migrated children are less likely to attend…

  14. Sorting Out the Web: Approaches to Subject Access. Contemporary Studies in Information Management, Policies, and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Candy

    This book examines what has been done in providing subject access to networked resources. The first chapter provides a historical overview of information services, developments in information technology, end users, and the Internet, as well as a discussion of the library response to these developments. The second chapter discusses metadata,…

  15. Exploring the Design, Development and Use of Websites through Accessibility and Usability Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Alan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, data obtained from a university website accessibility and usability validation process are analyzed and used to demonstrate how the design process can affect the online experience for users with disabilities. Interviews, observations, and use data (e.g. where users clicked on a page or what path taken through a site) were collected.…

  16. The acceptability and impact of a randomised controlled trial of welfare rights advice accessed via primary health care: qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Moffatt, Suzanne; Mackintosh, Joan; White, Martin; Howel, Denise; Sandell, Adam

    2006-01-01

    . Conclusion Participation in the trial and the intervention was acceptable to participants. Welfare rights advice targeted at people aged 60 years or over and accessed via primary care had a positive impact on quality of life and resulted in increased social participation. The divergence of qualitative and quantitative findings suggests that both methods make important contributions to the evaluation of complex social interventions. PMID:16790054

  17. Automated motion correction based on target tracking for dynamic nuclear medicine studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xinhua; Tetrault, Tracy; Fahey, Fred; Treves, Ted

    2008-03-01

    Nuclear medicine dynamic studies of kidneys, bladder and stomach are important diagnostic tools. Accurate generation of time-activity curves from regions of interest (ROIs) requires that the patient remains motionless for the duration of the study. This is not always possible since some dynamic studies may last from several minutes to one hour. Several motion correction solutions have been explored. Motion correction using external point sources is inconvenient and not accurate especially when motion results from breathing, organ motion or feeding rather than from body motion alone. Centroid-based motion correction assumes that activity distribution is only inside the single organ (without background) and uniform, but this approach is impractical in most clinical studies. In this paper, we present a novel technique of motion correction that first tracks the organ of interest in a dynamic series then aligns the organ. The implementation algorithm for target tracking-based motion correction consists of image preprocessing, target detection, target positioning, motion estimation and prediction, tracking (new search region generation) and target alignment. The targeted organ is tracked from the first frame to the last one in the dynamic series to generate a moving trajectory of the organ. Motion correction is implemented by aligning the organ ROIs in the image series to the location of the organ in the first image. The proposed method of motion correction has been applied to several dynamic nuclear medicine studies including radionuclide cystography, dynamic renal scintigraphy, diuretic renography and gastric emptying scintigraphy.

  18. Particle production and energy deposition studies for the neutrino factory target station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, John J.; Densham, Chris; Edgecock, Rob; Prior, Gersende

    2013-02-01

    We present FLUKA and MARS simulation studies of the pion production and energy deposition in the Neutrino Factory baseline target station, which consists of a 4 MW proton beam interacting with a liquid mercury jet target within a 20 T solenoidal magnetic field. We show that a substantial increase in the shielding is needed to protect the superconducting coils from too much energy deposition. Investigations reveal that it is possible to reduce the magnetic field in the solenoid capture system without adversely affecting the pion production efficiency. We show estimates of the amount of concrete shielding that will be required to protect the environment from the high radiation doses generated by the target station facility. We also present yield and energy deposition results for alternative targets: gallium liquid jet, tungsten powder jet, and solid tungsten bars.

  19. Measuring Land Uses Accessibility by Using Fuzzy Majority Gis-Based Multicriteria Decision Analysis Case Study: Malayer City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taravat, A.; Yari, A.; Rajaei, M.; Mousavian, R.

    2014-10-01

    Public spaces accessibility has become one of the important factors in urban planning. Therefore, considerable attention has been given to measure accessibility to public spaces on the UK, US and Canada, but there are few studies outside the anglophone world especially in developing countries such as Iran. In this study an attempt has been made to measure objective accessibility to public spaces (parks, school, library and administrative) using fuzzy majority GIS-based multicriteria decision analysis. This method is for defining the priority for distribution of urban facilities and utilities as the first step towards elimination of social justice. In order to test and demonstrate the presented model, the comprehensive plan of Malayer city has been considered for ranking in three objectives and properties in view of index per capital (Green space, sport facilities and major cultural centers like library and access index). The results can be used to inform the local planning process and the GIS approach can be expanded into other local authority domains. The results shows that the distribution of facilities in Malayer city has followed on the base of cost benefit law and the human aspect of resource allocation programming of facilities (from centre to suburbs of the city).

  20. Who is accessing public-sector anti-retroviral treatment in the Free State, South Africa? An exploratory study of the first three years of programme implementation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although South Africa has the largest public-sector anti-retroviral treatment (ART) programme in the world, anti-retroviral coverage in adults was only 40.2% in 2008. However, longitudinal studies of who is accessing the South African public-sector ART programme are scarce. This study therefore had one main research question: who is accessing public-sector ART in the Free State Province, South Africa? The study aimed to extend the current literature by investigating, in a quantitative manner and using a longitudinal study design, the participants enrolled in the public-sector ART programme in the period 2004-2006 in the Free State Province of South Africa. Methods Differences in the demographic (age, sex, population group and marital status) socio-economic (education, income, neo-material indicators), geographic (travel costs, relocation for ART), and medical characteristics (CD4, viral load, time since first diagnosis, treatment status) among 912 patients enrolled in the Free State public-sector ART programme between 2004 and 2006 were assessed with one-way analysis of variance, Bonferroni post-hoc analysis, and cross tabulations with the chi square test. Results The patients accessing treatment tended to be female (71.1%) and unemployed (83.4%). However, although relatively poor, those most likely to access ART services were not the most impoverished patients. The proportion of female patients increased (P < 0.05) and their socio-economic situation improved between 2004 and 2006 (P < 0.05). The increasing mean transport cost (P < 0.05) to visit the facility is worrying, because this cost is an important barrier to ART uptake and adherence. Encouragingly, the study results revealed that the interval between the first HIV-positive diagnosis and ART initiation decreased steadily over time (P < 0.05). This was also reflected in the increasing baseline CD4 cell count at ART initiation (P < 0.05). Conclusions Our analysis showed significant changes in the

  1. What Rural Women Want the Public Health Community to Know About Access to Healthful Food: A Qualitative Study, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Kristine; Peacock, Nadine R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Living in a rural food desert has been linked to poor dietary habits. Understanding community perspectives about available resources and feasible solutions may inform strategies to improve food access in rural food deserts. The objective of our study was to identify resources and solutions to the food access problems of women in rural, southernmost Illinois. Methods Fourteen focus groups with women (n = 110 participants) in 4 age groups were conducted in a 7-county region as part of a community assessment focused on women’s health. We used content analysis with inductive and deductive approaches to explore food access barriers and facilitators. Results Similar to participants in previous studies, participants in our study reported insufficient local food sources, which they believe contributed to poor dietary habits, high food prices, and the need to travel for healthful food. Participants identified existing local activities and resources that help to increase access, such as home and community gardens, food pantries, and public transportation, as well as local solutions, such as improving nutrition education and public transportation options. Conclusion Multilevel and collaborative strategies and policies are needed to address food access barriers in rural communities. At the individual level, education may help residents navigate geographic and economic barriers. Community solutions include collaborative strategies to increase availability of healthful foods through traditional and nontraditional food sources. Policy change is needed to promote local agriculture and distribution of privately grown food. Understanding needs and strengths in rural communities will ensure responsive and effective strategies to improve the rural food environment. PMID:27126555

  2. Accessible Near-Earth Objects (NEOs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Brent W.

    2015-01-01

    Near Earth Objects (NEOs) are asteroids and comets whose orbits are in close proximity to Earth's orbit; specifically, they have perihelia less than 1.3 astronomical units. NEOs particularly near Earth asteroids (NEAs) are identified as potential destinations for future human exploration missions. In this presentation I provide an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding the astrodynamical accessibility of NEAs according to NASA's Near Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS). I also investigate the extremes of NEA accessibility using case studies and illuminate the fact that a space-based survey for NEOs is essential to expanding the set of known accessible NEAs for future human exploration missions.

  3. A suite of methods for representing activity space in a healthcare accessibility study

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Jill E; Spencer, John; Preisser, John S; Gesler, Wilbert M; Arcury, Thomas A

    2005-01-01

    Background "Activity space" has been used to examine how people's habitual movements interact with their environment, and can be used to examine accessibility to healthcare opportunities. Traditionally, the standard deviational ellipse (SDE), a Euclidean measure, has been used to represent activity space. We describe the construction and application of the SDE at one and two standard deviations, and three additional network-based measures of activity space using common tools in GIS: the road network buffer (RNB), the 30-minute standard travel time polygon (STT), and the relative travel time polygon (RTT). We compare the theoretical and methodological assumptions of each measure, and evaluate the measures by examining access to primary care services, using data from western North Carolina. Results Individual accessibility is defined as the availability of healthcare opportunities within that individual's activity space. Access is influenced by the shape and area of an individual's activity space, the spatial distribution of opportunities, and by the spatial structures that constrain and direct movement through space; the shape and area of the activity space is partly a product of how it is conceptualized and measured. Network-derived measures improve upon the SDE by incorporating the spatial structures (roads) that channel movement. The area of the STT is primarily influenced by the location of a respondent's residence within the road network hierarchy, with residents living near primary roads having the largest activity spaces. The RNB was most descriptive of actual opportunities and can be used to examine bypassing. The area of the RTT had the strongest correlation with a healthcare destination being located inside the activity space. Conclusion The availability of geospatial technologies and data create multiple options for representing and operationalizing the construct of activity space. Each approach has its strengths and limitations, and presents a different

  4. The AEROPATH project targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa: crystallographic studies for assessment of potential targets in early-stage drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Moynie, Lucille; Schnell, Robert; McMahon, Stephen A.; Sandalova, Tatyana; Boulkerou, Wassila Abdelli; Schmidberger, Jason W.; Alphey, Magnus; Cukier, Cyprian; Duthie, Fraser; Kopec, Jolanta; Liu, Huanting; Jacewicz, Agata; Hunter, William N.; Naismith, James H.; Schneider, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial infections are increasingly difficult to treat owing to the spread of antibiotic resistance. A major concern is Gram-negative bacteria, for which the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs has been particularly scarce. In an effort to accelerate early steps in drug discovery, the EU-funded AEROPATH project aims to identify novel targets in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by applying a multidisciplinary approach encompassing target validation, structural characterization, assay development and hit identification from small-molecule libraries. Here, the strategies used for target selection are described and progress in protein production and structure analysis is reported. Of the 102 selected targets, 84 could be produced in soluble form and the de novo structures of 39 proteins have been determined. The crystal structures of eight of these targets, ranging from hypothetical unknown proteins to metabolic enzymes from different functional classes (PA1645, PA1648, PA2169, PA3770, PA4098, PA4485, PA4992 and PA5259), are reported here. The structural information is expected to provide a firm basis for the improvement of hit compounds identified from fragment-based and high-throughput screening campaigns. PMID:23295481

  5. Sampling 'hard-to-reach' populations in health research: yield from a study targeting Americans living in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Southern, Danielle A; Lewis, Steven; Maxwell, Colleen J; Dunn, James R; Noseworthy, Tom W; Corbett, Gail; Thomas, Karen; Ghali, William A

    2008-01-01

    Background Some populations targeted in survey research can be hard to reach, either because of lack of contact information, or non-existent databases to inform sampling. Here, we present a methodological "case-report" of the yield of a multi-step survey study assessing views on health care among American emigres to Canada, a hard-to-reach population. Methods To sample this hard-to-reach population, we held a live media conference, supplemented by a nation-wide media release announcing the study. We prepared an 'op-ed' piece describing the study and how to participate. We paid for advertisements in 6 newspapers. We sent the survey information to targeted organizations. And lastly, we asked those who completed the web survey to send the information to others. We use descriptive statistics to document the method's yield. Results The combined media strategies led to 4 television news interviews, 10 newspaper stories, 1 editorial and 2 radio interviews. 458 unique individuals accessed the on-line survey, among whom 310 eligible subjects provided responses to the key study questions. Fifty-six percent reported that they became aware of the survey via media outlets, 26% by word of mouth, and 9% through both the media and word of mouth. Conclusion Our multi-step communication method yielded a sufficient sample of Americans living in Canada. This combination of paid and unpaid media exposure can be considered by others as a unique methodological approach to identifying and sampling hard-to-reach populations. PMID:18710574

  6. A Comparative Study of Multiplexing Schemes for Next Generation Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imtiaz, Waqas A.; Khan, Yousaf; Shah, Pir Mehar Ali; Zeeshan, M.

    2014-09-01

    Passive optical network (PON) is a high bandwidth, economical solution which can provide the necessary bandwidth to end-users. Wavelength division multiplexed passive optical networks (WDM PONs) and time division multiplexed passive optical networks (TDM PONs) are considered as an evolutionary step for next-generation optical access (NGOA) networks. However they fail to provide highest transmission capacity, efficient bandwidth access, and robust dispersion tolerance. Thus future PONs are considered on simpler, efficient and potentially scalable, optical code division multiplexed (OCDM) PONs. This paper compares the performance of existing PONs with OCDM PON to determine a suitable scheme for NGOA networks. Two system parameter are used in this paper: fiber length, and bit rate. Performance analysis using Optisystem shows that; for a sufficient system performance parameters i.e. bit error rate (BER) ≤ 10-9, and maximum quality factor (Q) ≥ 6, OCDMA PON efficiently performs upto 50 km with 10 Gbit/s per ONU.

  7. Numerical parametric study of buried target ground-penetrating radar signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bosch, Idesbald C.; Druyts, Pascal; Acheroy, Marc; Huynen, Isabelle

    2006-05-01

    The assessment of the performances of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) in humanitarian demining is an important problem. These performances are related to the relative strength of the target radar response with respect to that of the soil. Many parameters influence both responses. The physical and geometrical parameters that influence the target signature include the soil electromagnetic (EM) constitutive parameters, the target depth and orientation with respect to the soil surface, the antenna height and the target EM and geometrical properties. This work presents a numerical parametric study of the soil and target radar signatures. The advantages of the numerical approach are: it allows for a separate study of the influence of each parameters on the radar responses, it is fast, cheap, generic with regards to hardware, and finally it is not prone to experimental errors and hardware failures or misuse. Moreover it is always possible to link the numerical experiments with a particular hardware by characterizing this latter. However, a number of simplifications, such as modeling the soil as a planar multilayered medium, are introduced to keep the problem tractable. This study yields surprising results, such as for example the possibility of considering the target in homogeneous space for computing its signature, as soon as it is a few centimeters deep. The target considered in the numerical experiments is a dielectric cylinder representing an AP mine, with diameter 6 cm and height 5 cm, and ɛ rt=3. These values are chosen to approach as much as possible the physical properties of the M35BG AP mine, which is small and therefore difficult to detect.

  8. Dielectric resonator-based side-access probe for muscle fiber EPR study.

    PubMed

    Sienkiewicz, A; Jaworski, M; Smith, B G; Fajer, P G; Scholes, C P

    2000-03-01

    We present a novel dielectric resonator (DR)-based resonant structure that accommodates aqueous sample capillaries in orientations that are either parallel (i.e., side-access) or perpendicular to the direction of an external (Zeeman) magnetic field, B(0). The resonant structure consists of two commercially available X-band DRs that are separated by a Rexolite spacer and resonate in the fundamental TE(01delta) mode. The separator between the DRs is used to tune the resonator to the desired frequency and, by appropriately drilled sample holes, to provide access for longitudinal samples, notably capillaries containing oriented, spin-labeled muscle fibers. In contrast to the topologically similar cylindrical TE(011) cavity, the DR-based structure has distinct microwave properties that favor its use for parallel orientation of lossy aqueous samples. For perpendicular orientation of a dilute (6.25 microM) aqueous solution of IASL spin label, the S/N ratio was at least one order of magnitude better for the side-access DR-based structure than for a standard TE(102) cavity. EPR spectra acquired for maleimide spin-labeled myosin filaments also revealed ca. 10 times better S/N ratio than those obtained with a standard TE(102) cavity. For the side-access DR with sample capillaries oriented either parallel or perpendicular to the external magnetic field, the Q- and filling factors are in good agreement with the theoretical estimates derived from the distribution of magnetic (H(1)) and electric (E(1)) components. PMID:10698655

  9. Synthesis and Preliminary Biological Study of Bisindolylmethanes Accessed by an Acid-Catalyzed Hydroarylation of Vinylindoles

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Tejas P.; Osiak, Jaroslaw G.; Vaden, Rachel M.; Welm, Bryan E.; Sigman, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01

    An acid-catalyzed hydroarylation reaction of vinyl indoles is reported, which tolerates a wide range of heterocycles as the exogenous nucleophile such as indoles, pyrroles, and indolizines. The method rapidly accesses the biologically relevant bisindolylmethane scaffold in good to excellent yields. Evaluation of the biological activity of several synthesized analogues reveals cytotoxic activity against and selectivity for the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. PMID:22778488

  10. Numerical studies of International Linear Collider positron target and optical matching device field effects on beam

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, Sergey; Spentzouris, Linda; Liu Wanming; Gai Wei

    2007-07-01

    For an International Linear Collider (ILC) undulator-based positron source target configuration, a strong optical matching device (OMD) field is needed inside the target to increase the positron yield (by more than 40%) [Y. K. Batygin, Proceedings of the 2005 ALCPG and ILC Workshops, Snowmas, CO, 14-27 August 2005 (unpublished)] It is also required that the positron target be constantly rotated to reduce thermal and radiation damages. Eddy currents, produced by an OMD field in turn, interact with the magnetic field and produce a drag (stopping) force. This force not only produces heat in the disk but also creates a dipole deflecting field, which affects the beam. Therefore it is important to simulate such a system in detail to design the motor and cooling system and also a correction magnet system. In order to guide the ILC target design, an exact simulation of the spinning disk in a magnetic field is required. In this paper we present a simulation method implemented using COMSOL and compare it with the experimental results recently obtained at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Good agreement between the simulation and the experiment gives confidence in the validity of the method. We give detailed results on the proposed ILC target system, such as parametric studies for reduction of the power required to keep the target spinning. We present simulation results of the induced deflection field and of the reduction of the OMD field effect.

  11. Study of spread spectrum multiple access systems for satellite communications with overlay on current services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Tri T.; Pratt, Timothy

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of using spread spectrum techniques to provide a low-cost multiple access system for a very large number of low data terminals was investigated. Two applications of spread spectrum technology to very small aperture terminal (VSAT) satellite communication networks are presented. Two spread spectrum multiple access systems which use a form of noncoherent M-ary FSK (MFSK) as the primary modulation are described and the throughput analyzed. The analysis considers such factors as satellite power constraints and adjacent satellite interference. Also considered is the effect of on-board processing on the multiple access efficiency and the feasibility of overlaying low data rate spread spectrum signals on existing satellite traffic as a form of frequency reuse is investigated. The use of chirp is examined for spread spectrum communications. In a chirp communication system, each data bit is converted into one or more up or down sweeps of frequency, which spread the RF energy across a broad range of frequencies. Several different forms of chirp communication systems are considered, and a multiple-chirp coded system is proposed for overlay service. The mutual interference problem is examined in detail and a performance analysis undertaken for the case of a chirp data channel overlaid on a video channel.

  12. Burglar Target Selection

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Michael; Bernasco, Wim; Ruiter, Stijn; Johnson, Shane D.; White, Gentry; Baum, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study builds on research undertaken by Bernasco and Nieuwbeerta and explores the generalizability of a theoretically derived offender target selection model in three cross-national study regions. Methods: Taking a discrete spatial choice approach, we estimate the impact of both environment- and offender-level factors on residential burglary placement in the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and Australia. Combining cleared burglary data from all study regions in a single statistical model, we make statistical comparisons between environments. Results: In all three study regions, the likelihood an offender selects an area for burglary is positively influenced by proximity to their home, the proportion of easily accessible targets, and the total number of targets available. Furthermore, in two of the three study regions, juvenile offenders under the legal driving age are significantly more influenced by target proximity than adult offenders. Post hoc tests indicate the magnitudes of these impacts vary significantly between study regions. Conclusions: While burglary target selection strategies are consistent with opportunity-based explanations of offending, the impact of environmental context is significant. As such, the approach undertaken in combining observations from multiple study regions may aid criminology scholars in assessing the generalizability of observed findings across multiple environments. PMID:25866418

  13. A metasynthesis of qualitative studies regarding opinions and perceptions about barriers and determinants of health services’ accessibility in economic migrants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Access to health services is an important health determinant. New research in health equity is required, especially amongst economic migrants from developing countries. Studies conducted on the use of health services by migrant populations highlight existing gaps in understanding which factors affect access to these services from a qualitative perspective. We aim to describe the views of the migrants regarding barriers and determinants of access to health services in the international literature (1997–2011). Methods A systematic review was conducted for Qualitative research papers (English/Spanish) published in 13 electronic databases. A selection of articles that accomplished the inclusion criteria and a quality evaluation of the studies were carried out. The findings of the selected studies were synthesised by means of metasynthesis using different analysis categories according to Andersen’s conceptual framework of access and use of health services and by incorporating other emergent categories. Results We located 3,025 titles, 36 studies achieved the inclusion criteria. After quality evaluation, 28 articles were definitively synthesised. 12 studies (46.2%) were carried out in the U.S and 11 studies (42.3%) dealt with primary care services. The participating population varied depending mainly on type of host country. Barriers were described, such as the lack of communication between health services providers and migrants, due to idiomatic difficulties and cultural differences. Other barriers were linked to the economic system, the health service characteristics and the legislation in each country. This situation has consequences for the lack of health control by migrants and their social vulnerability. Conclusions Economic migrants faced individual and structural barriers to the health services in host countries, especially those with undocumented situation and those experimented idiomatic difficulties. Strategies to improve the structures of

  14. In vitro study of ferromagnetic stents for implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avilés, Misael O.; Chen, Haitao; Ebner, Armin D.; Rosengart, Axel J.; Kaminski, Michael D.; Ritter, James A.

    2007-04-01

    Implant-assisted-magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) was studied in vitro using a coiled ferromagnetic wire stent made from stainless steel 430 or 304, and magnetic drug carrier particle (MDCP) surrogates composed of poly(styrene/divinylbenzene) embedded with 20 wt% magnetite. The fluid velocity, particle concentration, magnetic field strength, and stent material all proved to be important for capturing the MDCP surrogates. Overall, this in vitro study further confirmed the important role of the ferromagnetic implant for attracting and retaining MDCPs at the target zone.

  15. Active target studies of the αp-process at CRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, D.; Hashimoto, T.; Duy, N. N.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Binh, D. N.; Chen, A. A.; Cherubini, S.; Hayakawa, S.; He, J. J.; Ishiyama, H.; Iwasa, N.; Khiem, L. H.; Kwon, Y. K.; Michimasa, S.; Nakao, T.; Ota, S.; Teranishi, T.; Tokieda, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamada, T.; Zhang, L. Y.

    2014-05-01

    The αp-process is a sequence of (α, p)(p, γ) reactions important to the nuclear trajectory to higher masses in type I X-ray bursts. Specifically, the αp-process is schematically pure helium-burning, and thus unlike pure hydrogen-burning processes, does not require slow β+ decays. Explosive helium burning is responsible for the observed short rise-times of X-ray bursts but ultimately gives way to the rp-process as the Coulomb barrier increases. Because the stellar reaction rates of these (α, p) reactions are poorly known over the relevant astrophysical energies, we performed systematic studies of the 18Ne(α,p), 22Mg(α,p) and 30S(α,p) reactions at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) low-energy radioactive ion beam separator, called CRIB. We produce the radioactive beams in-flight and scan the center-of-mass energy down into the Gamow Window using a thick target in inverse kinematics. The helium target gas also serves as part of the detector system, an active target, which was newly designed for these measurements. The active target, which uses gas electron multiplier (GEM) foils, allows for higher beam injection rates than previous multi-sampling and tracking proportional counters (MSTPC). We present a summary of our recent results from these active target experiments at CRIB.

  16. Active target studies of the αp-process at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, D.; Yamaguchi, H.; Michimasa, S.; Nakao, T.; Ota, S.; Tokieda, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Duy, N. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Kubono, S.; Binh, D. N.; Chen, A. A.; Cherubini, S.; Hayakawa, S.; He, J. J.; Zhang, L. Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Iwasa, N.; Yamada, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; and others

    2014-05-02

    The αp-process is a sequence of (α, p)(p, γ) reactions important to the nuclear trajectory to higher masses in type I X-ray bursts. Specifically, the αp-process is schematically pure helium-burning, and thus unlike pure hydrogen-burning processes, does not require slow β{sup +} decays. Explosive helium burning is responsible for the observed short rise-times of X-ray bursts but ultimately gives way to the rp-process as the Coulomb barrier increases. Because the stellar reaction rates of these (α, p) reactions are poorly known over the relevant astrophysical energies, we performed systematic studies of the {sup 18}Ne(α,p), {sup 22}Mg(α,p) and {sup 30}S(α,p) reactions at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) low-energy radioactive ion beam separator, called CRIB. We produce the radioactive beams in-flight and scan the center-of-mass energy down into the Gamow Window using a thick target in inverse kinematics. The helium target gas also serves as part of the detector system, an active target, which was newly designed for these measurements. The active target, which uses gas electron multiplier (GEM) foils, allows for higher beam injection rates than previous multi-sampling and tracking proportional counters (MSTPC). We present a summary of our recent results from these active target experiments at CRIB.

  17. Access to the Superficial Femoral Artery in the Presence of a 'Hostile Groin': A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, Adrian J.; Lotzof, Kevin; Howard, Adam

    2007-06-15

    Purpose. Lower limb angioplasty is commonly performed via antegrade common femoral artery (CFA) puncture, followed by selective superficial femoral artery (SFA) catheterization. Arterial access can be complicated by a 'hostile groin' (scarring, obesity, or previous failed CFA puncture). We prospectively investigated color duplex ultrasound (CDU)-guided SFA access for radiological interventions. Methods. Antegrade CDU-guided CFA and SFA puncture were compared in 30 patients requiring intervention for severe leg ischemia who had hostile groins. Demographics, screen time, radiation dose, intervention, and complications were prospectively recorded. Results. Treatment in 30 patients involved 44 angioplasties (40 transluminal, 4 subintimal) and 2 diagnostic angiograms. Fifteen of these patients had CDU-guided CFA punctures; in 8 of these patients CDU-guided CFA puncture 'failed' (i.e., there was failure to pass a guidewire or catheter into the CFA or SFA), necessitating immediate direct CDU-guided SFA puncture. Overall, the mean screen time and radiation dosage, via direct CDU-guided SFA puncture in 30 patients, was 4.8 min and 464 Gy cm{sup 2} respectively. With CDU-guided CFA puncture, mean screen time (10 min), radiation dose (2023 Gy cm{sup 2}), and complications (13%) were greater when compared with the SFA puncture results overall and in the same patients at subsequent similar procedures (2.7 min, 379 Gy cm{sup 2} (p < 0.05), no complications in this subgroup). Five complications occurred: 2 each at CFA and SFA entry sites, and 1 angioplasty embolus. Conclusions. The CDU-guided SFA puncture technique was both more effective than CDU-guided CFA access in patients with scarred groins, obesity, or failed CFA punctures and safer, with reduced screen times, radiation doses, and complications.

  18. Transmission grid access and pricing in Norway, Spain, and California: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Gronli, H.; Gomez San Ramon, T.; Marnay, C.

    1999-09-01

    The openness of the transmission grid and the incentives given by transmission pricing form the foundation for retail and wholesale competition in the electricity market. The deregulated markets of Norway, Spain, and California all have introduced retail access and wholesale competition, although with different approaches to pricing of transmission grid services. This paper will briefly describe the three different solutions, and discuss some of their implications. Of the three electricity systems, Norway was the first to open the grid to competition in electricity trade. The Norwegian Energy Law of 1990 introduced open competition to wholesale and retail trade starting January 1991. In Spain, the Electricity Law of 1997 came into force early in 1998. Wholesale and retail markets in California were opened for competition on April 1, 1998, following the passage of Assembly Bill 1890, in August 1996. Introducing competition in electricity markets also implies introducing Third Party Access to the transmission grid. All potential competitors have to be given access to the grid in order to compete, no matter who owns the actual wires. This principle raises several challenges, notably, how to price transmission services. Who is to pay for which transmission services? The Norwegian grid is divided into three levels depending on its function. The transmission grid includes all parts of the national grid having a transmission function, meaning that some lower voltage levels also are included. In Spain, the definition of the transmission grid is similar, including the 400 kV and 220 kV national grid as well as lower voltage installations that could affect transmission operation or generation dispatch. For historic reasons, wholesale electricity transactions in the US are regulated by the federal government through the FERC. However, operations of utility systems within one state fall primarily under state jurisdiction. Because the utility systems in California generally are

  19. A Pilot Prospective Feasibility Study of Organ-at-Risk Definition using Target Contour Testing/Instructional Computer Software (TaCTICS), a Training and Evaluation Platform for Radiotherapy Target Delineation.

    PubMed Central

    Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Bedrick, Steven D.; Boccia, Kelly; Fuller, Clifton D.

    2011-01-01

    Target volume delineation is a critical, but time-consuming step in the creation of radiation therapy plans used in the treatment of many types of cancer. However, variability in target volume definitions can introduce substantial differences in resulting doses to tumors and critical structures. We developed TaCTICS, a web-based educational training software application targeted towards non-expert users. We report on a small, prospective study to evaluate the utility of this online tool in improving conformance of regions-of-interest (ROIs) with a reference set. Eight residents contoured a set of structures for a head-and-neck cancer case. Subsequently, they were provided access to TaCTICS as well as contouring atlases to allow evaluation of their contours in reference to other users as well as reference ROIs. The residents then contoured a second case using these resources. Volume overlap metrics between the users showed a substantial improvement following the intervention. Additionally, 66% of users reported that they found TaCTICS to be a useful educational tool and all participants reported they would like to use TaCTICS to track their contouring skills over the course of their residency. PMID:22195121

  20. A Study on the Stream Cipher Embedded Magic Square of Random Access Files

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chenglian; Zhao, Jian-Ming; Rafsanjani, Marjan Kuchaki; Shen, Yijuan

    2011-09-01

    Magic square and stream cipher issues are both interesting and well-tried topics. In this paper, we are proposing a new scheme which streams cipher applications for random access files based on the magic square method. There are two thresholds required to secure our data, if using only decrypts by the stream cipher. It isn't to recovery original source. On other hand, we improve the model of cipher stream to strengthen and defend efficiently; it also was its own high speed and calculates to most parts of the key stream generator.

  1. The fixed target experiment for studies of baryonic matter at the Nuclotron (BM@N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapishin, Mikhail

    2016-08-01

    BM@N (Baryonic Matter at Nuclotron) is the first experiment to be realized at the accelerator complex of NICA-Nuclotron. The aim of the BM@N experiment is to study interactions of relativistic heavy-ion beams with fixed targets. The BM@N setup, results of Monte Carlo simulations and the BM@N experimental program are presented.

  2. What's the Target? A Folk Linguistic Study of Young Stockholmers' Constructions of Linguistic Norm and Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bijvoet, Ellen; Fraurud, Kari

    2016-01-01

    To account for the full range of language use in contemporary multilingual urban contexts, the notion of target language (TL) needs to be reconsidered. In studies of second language acquisition and language variation, taking TL for granted implies that people agree on what constitutes "good" language, or the standard norm. The TL of…

  3. Feasibility study of an obesity "Prevention Plus" intervention targeting children and parenting practices: Helping HAND

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to test for feasibility and obesity intervention, targeting 5-8 year old children with BMI 85-99%tile in community primary care clinics. Randomized controlled trial with child and parenting data obtained pre and post intervention. Based on social cognitive and parenting...

  4. Is Privacy at Risk when Commercial Websites Target Primary School Children? A Case Study in Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sora; Yi, Soon-Hyung

    2010-01-01

    This study discusses privacy risk factors when commercial web sites target primary school children in Korea. Specifically, the authors examined types of personal information required for membership subscriptions and whether privacy policies at commercial sites for children abide by privacy guidelines. A total of 159 commercial sites targeting…

  5. Hitting the TARGET? A Case Study of the Experiences of Teachers in Steel Mill Learning Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Amy D.; Jeris, Laurel; Smith, Robert

    Part of a larger study on the experience of teaching in the steel mill learning environment was an inquiry focused on professional development. Teachers and coordinators were all members of the Teachers Action Research Group for Educational Technology (TARGET), a group of adult educators interested in improving learning and teaching in career…

  6. Studies on Training Ground Observers to Estimate Range to Aerial Targets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCluskey, Michael R.; And Others

    Six pilot studies were conducted to determine the effects of training on range estimation performance for aerial targets, and to identify some of the relevant variables. Observers were trained to estimate ranges of 350, 400, 800, 1,500, or 2,500 meters. Several variations of range estimation training methods were used, including immediate…

  7. Versatile gas gun target assembly for studying blast wave mitigation in materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartyczak, S.; Mock, W., Jr.

    2012-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a serious problem for military personnel returning from recent conflicts. This has increased interest in investigating blast mitigating materials for use in helmets. In this paper we describe a new versatile target assembly that is used with an existing gas gun for studying these materials.

  8. ACCESS Pointing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Alexander, James; Trauger, John; Moody, Dwight; Egerman, Robert; Vallone, Phillip; Elias, Jason; Hejal, Reem; Camelo, Vanessa; Bronowicki, Allen; O'Connor, David; Partrick, Richard; Orzechowski, Pawel; Spitter, Connie; Lillie, Chuck

    2010-01-01

    ACCESS (Actively-Corrected Coronograph for Exoplanet System Studies) was one of four medium-class exoplanet concepts selected for the NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study (ASMCS) program in 2008/2009. The ACCESS study evaluated four major coronograph concepts under a common space observatory. This paper describes the high precision pointing control system (PCS) baselined for this observatory.

  9. Neoadjuvant Window Studies of Metformin and Biomarker Development for Drugs Targeting Cancer Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lord, Simon R; Patel, Neel; Liu, Dan; Fenwick, John; Gleeson, Fergus; Buffa, Francesca; Harris, Adrian L

    2015-05-01

    There has been growing interest in the potential of the altered metabolic state typical of cancer cells as a drug target. The antidiabetes drug, metformin, is now under intense investigation as a safe method to modify cancer metabolism. Several studies have used window of opportunity in breast cancer patients before neoadjuvant chemotherapy to correlate gene expression analysis, metabolomics, immunohistochemical markers, and metabolic serum markers with those likely to benefit. We review the role metabolite measurement, functional imaging and gene sequencing analysis play in elucidating the effects of metabolically targeted drugs in cancer treatment and determining patient selection. PMID:26063894

  10. A scintillating fiber-optic active target (SFT) for studies of high energy photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ruchti, R.; Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Busenitz, J.; Cason, N.; Cunningham, J.; Gardner, R.; Kennedy, C.; Mannel, E.; Mountain, R.J.

    1987-10-01

    A high resolution, gateable, Scintillating Fiber Target (SFT) has been developed for Fermilab Experiment E687 to study charm and beauty particle production and decay in high energy photon interactions. The detector consists of a scintillating target of either GS1 Cerium glass fibers or polystyrene fibers of 29..mu..m cross section, a multi-stage image intensifier and an intensified CCD or SIT/VIDICON camera system used in conjunction with a custom-built video data acquisition system. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Recent results from the NN-interaction studies with polarized beams and targets at ANKE-COSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymov, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    Adding to the nucleon-nucleon scattering database is one of the major priorities of the ANKE collaboration. Such data are necessary ingredients, not only for the understanding of nuclear forces, but also for the description of meson production and other nuclear reactions at intermediate energies. By measuring the cross section, deuteron analysing powers, and spin-correlation parameters in the dp → {pp}sn reaction, where {pp}s represents the 1S0 state, information has been obtained on small-angle neutron-proton spin-flip charge-exchange amplitudes. The measurements of pp elastic scattering by the COSY-EDDA have had a major impact on the partial wave analysis of this reaction above 1 GeV. However, these experiments only extended over the central region of c.m. angles, 300 < θcm < 1500, that has left major ambiguities in the phase shift analysis by the SAID group. In contrast, the small angle region is accessible at ANKE-COSY, that allowed measurement of the differential cross section and the analysing power at 50 < θcm < 300 in the 0.8 — 2.8 GeV energy range. The data on the pn elastic scattering are much more scarce than those of pp, especially in the region above 1.15 GeV. The study of the dp → {pp}s n reaction provides the information about the pn elastic scattering at large angles. The small angle scattering was studied with the polarized proton COSY beam and an unpolarised deuterium gas target. The detection the spectator proton in the ANKE vertex silicon detector allowed to use the deuterium target as an effective neutron one. The analysing powers of the process were obtained at six beam energies from 0.8 to 2.4 GeV.

  12. A USANS/SANS study of the accessibility of pores in the Barnett Shale to methane and water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Sakurovs, Richard; Blach, Tomasz P.; He, Lilin; Melnichenko, Yuri B.; Mildner, David F.; Alcantar-Lopez, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Shale is an increasingly important source of natural gas in the United States. The gas is held in fine pores that need to be accessed by horizontal drilling and hydrofracturing techniques. Understanding the nature of the pores may provide clues to making gas extraction more efficient. We have investigated two Mississippian Barnett Shale samples, combining small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS) to determine the pore size distribution of the shale over the size range 10 nm to 10 μm. By adding deuterated methane (CD4) and, separately, deuterated water (D2O) to the shale, we have identified the fraction of pores that are accessible to these compounds over this size range. The total pore size distribution is essentially identical for the two samples. At pore sizes >250 nm, >85% of the pores in both samples are accessible to both CD4 and D2O. However, differences in accessibility to CD4 are observed in the smaller pore sizes (~25 nm). In one sample, CD4 penetrated the smallest pores as effectively as it did the larger ones. In the other sample, less than 70% of the smallest pores (4, but they were still largely penetrable by water, suggesting that small-scale heterogeneities in methane accessibility occur in the shale samples even though the total porosity does not differ. An additional study investigating the dependence of scattered intensity with pressure of CD4 allows for an accurate estimation of the pressure at which the scattered intensity is at a minimum. This study provides information about the composition of the material immediately surrounding the pores. Most of the accessible (open) pores in the 25 nm size range can be associated with either mineral matter or high reflectance organic material. However, a complementary scanning electron microscopy investigation shows that most of the pores in these shale samples are contained in the organic components. The neutron scattering results indicate that the pores are

  13. Multi-lingual search engine to access PubMed monolingual subsets: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Darmoni, Stéfan J; Soualmia, Lina F; Griffon, Nicolas; Grosjean, Julien; Kerdelhué, Gaétan; Kergourlay, Ivan; Dahamna, Badisse

    2013-01-01

    PubMed contains many articles in languages other than English but it is difficult to find them using the English version of the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Thesaurus. The aim of this work is to propose a tool allowing access to a PubMed subset in one language, and to evaluate its performance. Translations of MeSH were enriched and gathered in the information system. PubMed subsets in main European languages were also added in our database, using a dedicated parser. The CISMeF generic semantic search engine was evaluated on the response time for simple queries. MeSH descriptors are currently available in 11 languages in the information system. All the 654,000 PubMed citations in French were integrated into CISMeF database. None of the response times exceed the threshold defined for usability (2 seconds). It is now possible to freely access biomedical literature in French using a tool in French; health professionals and lay people with a low English language may find it useful. It will be expended to several European languages: German, Spanish, Norwegian and Portuguese. PMID:23920740

  14. Accessing characters in spoken Chinese disyllables: An ERP study on the resolution of auditory ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuqian; Huang, Guoliang; Huang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Chinese differs from most Indo-European languages in its phonological, lexical, and syntactic structures. One of its unique properties is the abundance of homophones at the monosyllabic/morphemic level, with the consequence that monosyllabic homophones are all ambiguous in speech perception. Two-morpheme Chinese words can be composed of two high homophone-density morphemes (HH words), two low homophone-density morphemes (LL words), or one high and one low homophone-density morphemes (LH or HL words). The assumption of a simple inhibitory homophone effect is called into question in the case of disyllabic spoken word recognition, in which the recognition of one morpheme is affected by semantic information given by the other. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were used to trace on-line competitions among morphemic homophones in accessing Chinese disyllables. Results showing significant differences in ERP amplitude when comparing LL and LH words, but not when comparing LL and HL words, suggested that the first morpheme cannot be accessed without feedback from the second morpheme. Most importantly, analyses of N400 amplitude among different densities showed a converse homophone effect in which LL words, rather than LH or HL words, triggered larger N400. These findings provide strong evidence of a dynamic integration system at work during spoken Chinese disyllable recognition. PMID:26589544

  15. Archives, accessibility, and advocacy: a case study of strategies for creating and maintaining relevance

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Jennifer M; Hoffius, Susan D; Fox, E. Brooke

    2011-01-01

    Question/Objective: How can a special collection maintain or increase its profile in its parent institution, when that parent institution emphasizes scientific and clinical learning? Setting/Context: The Waring Historical Library, Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), preserves and promotes the history of health sciences at MUSC and in South Carolina. As a state entity, MUSC has suffered significant budget cuts for the past several years. In this climate, the Waring had to find ways to maintain relevance in the MUSC community. Methods: The Waring partnered with the MUSC College of Nursing to explore new ways to build institutional allies. By combining traditional archival administration with innovative uses of digital collections aimed at institutional promotion and outreach, the Waring's digital library became an advocacy tool that led to the Waring's enhanced value to its parent institution. Outcomes: The Waring Library is a resource for MUSC development and alumni relations. Tangible outcomes include additional funding from grants, increased staff, no loss of institutional funding, increased access to collections, increased accessions, cultivation of institutional allies for long-term support of the Waring, and development of a template for future partnerships. PMID:21243056

  16. SPRAY FOAM IN ACCESSIBLE SPACES:BEST PRACTICES AND CASE STUDIES FOR RETROFIT IN MIXED-HUMID CLIMATE

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, Jeffrey E; Gant, Kathy

    2013-12-01

    Heating and cooling the house is one of the homeowners major expenses. Reducing these costs, saving energy, and creating a healthier, more comfortable indoor environment are good reasons to consider improving the building thermal envelope. Improvements usually consider increasing the amount of insulation, reducing the infiltration of outside air, and controlling moisture in existing buildings. This report describes the use of spray foam materials to insulate, seal, and control moisture. This discussion is limited to treating areas that are accessible. What is accessible, however, can vary depending on the type of renovation. If the building has been gutted or exterior surfaces removed, there are more options. This report will look at areas to consider for spray foam application and discuss the types of spray foams available and their uses. A number of case studies are presented to show the effectiveness of this retrofit in existing houses based on performance data.

  17. Target selection and comparison of mission design for space debris removal by DLR's advanced study group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Pas, Niels; Lousada, Joao; Terhes, Claudia; Bernabeu, Marc; Bauer, Waldemar

    2014-09-01

    Space debris is a growing problem. Models show that the Kessler syndrome, the exponential growth of debris due to collisions, has become unavoidable unless an active debris removal program is initiated. The debris population in LEO with inclination between 60° and 95° is considered as the most critical zone. In order to stabilize the debris population in orbit, especially in LEO, 5 to 10 objects will need to be removed every year. The unique circumstances of such a mission could require that several objects are removed with a single launch. This will require a mission to rendezvous with a multitude of objects orbiting on different altitudes, inclinations and planes. Removal models have assumed that the top priority targets will be removed first. However this will lead to a suboptimal mission design and increase the ΔV-budget. Since there is a multitude of targets to choose from, the targets can be selected for an optimal mission design. In order to select a group of targets for a removal mission the orbital parameters and political constraints should also be taken into account. Within this paper a number of the target selection criteria are presented. The possible mission targets and their order of retrieval is dependent on the mission architecture. A comparison between several global mission architectures is given. Under consideration are 3 global missions of which a number of parameters are varied. The first mission launches multiple separate deorbit kits. The second launches a mother craft with deorbit kits. The third launches an orbital tug which pulls the debris in a lower orbit, after which a deorbit kit performs the final deorbit burn. A RoM mass and cost comparison is presented. The research described in this paper has been conducted as part of an active debris removal study by the Advanced Study Group (ASG). The ASG is an interdisciplinary student group working at the DLR, analyzing existing technologies and developing new ideas into preliminary

  18. Provider imposed restrictions to clients’ access to family planning in urban Uttar Pradesh, India: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical barriers refer to unnecessary policies or procedures imposed by health care providers that are not necessarily medically advised; these restrictions impede clients’ access to family planning (FP). This mixed methods study investigates provider imposed barriers to provision of FP using recent quantitative and qualitative data from urban Uttar Pradesh, India. Methods Baseline quantitative data were collected in six cities in Uttar Pradesh, India from service delivery points (SDP), using facility audits, exit interviews, and provider surveys; for this study, the focus is on the provider surveys. More than 250 providers were surveyed in each city. Providers were asked about the FP methods they provide, and if they restrict clients’ access to each method based on age, parity, partner consent, or marital status. For the qualitative research, we conducted one-on-one interviews with 21 service providers in four of the six cities in Uttar Pradesh. Each interview lasted approximately 45 minutes. Results The quantitative findings show that providers restrict clients’ access to spacing and long-acting and permanent methods of FP based on age, parity, partner consent and marital status. Qualitative findings reinforce that providers, at times, make judgments about their clients’ education, FP needs and ability to understand FP options thereby imposing unnecessary barriers to FP methods. Conclusions Provider restrictions on FP methods are common in these urban Uttar Pradesh sites. This means that women who are young, unmarried, have few or no children, do not have the support of their partner, or are less educated may not be able to access or use FP or their preferred method. These findings highlight the need for in-service training for staff, with a focus on reviewing current guidelines and eligibility criteria for provision of methods. PMID:24365015

  19. Pre-Experimental Familiarization Increases Hippocampal Activity for Both Targets and Lures in Recognition Memory: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Zubicaray, Greig I.; McMahon, Katie L.; Hayward, Lydia; Dunn, John C.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, items pre-exposed in a familiarization series were included in a list discrimination task to manipulate memory strength. At test, participants were required to discriminate strong targets and strong lures from weak targets and new lures. This resulted in a concordant pattern of increased "old" responses to strong targets and…

  20. Computational Hydrocode Study of Target Damage due to Fragment-Blast Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch-Aguilar, T; Najjar, F; Szymanski, E

    2011-03-24

    ), Pressure-Impulse (PI) and Time of Duration (TD). Other peculiarities include the radial decrease in pressure from the source, any fireball size measurement, and subsequent increase in temperature from the passing of the shockwave through the surrounding medium. In light of all of these metrics, the loading any object receives from a blast event becomes intricately connected to the distance between itself and the source. Because of this, a clear distinction is made between close-in effects and those from a source far away from the object of interest. Explosively generated fragments on the other hand are characterized by means of their localized damage potential. Metrics such as whether the fragment penetrates or perforates a given object is quantified as well as other variables including fragment's residual velocity, % kinetic energy decrease, residual fragment mass and other exit criteria. A fragment launched under such violent conditions could easily be traveling at speeds in excess of 2500 ft/s. Given these speeds it is conceivable to imagine how any given fragment could deliver a concentrated load to a target and penetrates through walls, vehicles or even the protection systems of nearby personnel. This study will focus on the individual fragment-target impact event with the hopes of expanding it to eventually include statistical procedures. Since this is a modeling excursion into the combined frag-blast target damage effects the numerical methods used to frame this problem become important in-so-far as the simulations are done in a consistent manner. For this study a Finite-Element based Hydrocode solution called ALE3D (ALE=Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) was utilized. ALE3D is developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore, CA), and as this paper will show, successfully implemented a converged ALE formulation including as many of the different aspects needed to query the synergistic damage on a given target. Further information on the modeling setup is

  1. Simulation study on heat conduction of a nanoscale phase-change random access memory cell.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junho; Song, Ki-Bong

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated heat transfer characteristics of a nano-scale phase-change random access memory (PRAM) cell using finite element method (FEM) simulation. Our PRAM cell is based on ternary chalcogenide alloy, Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST), which is used as a recording layer. For contact area of 100 x 100 nm2, simulations of crystallization and amorphization processes were carried out. Physical quantities such as electric conductivity, thermal conductivity, and specific heat were treated as temperature-dependent parameters. Through many simulations, it is concluded that one can reduce set current by decreasing both electric conductivities of amorphous GST and crystalline GST, and in addition to these conditions by decreasing electric conductivity of molten GST one can also reduce reset current significantly. PMID:17252792

  2. Dialysis Access Graft Thrombolysis: Randomized Study of Pulse-Spray Versus Continuous Urokinase Infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, Scott C.; Arora, Lokesh C.; Razavi, Mahmood K.; Sayre, James; McNamara, Thomas O.; Yoon, Chun

    1998-03-15

    Purpose: To compare pulse-spray to continuous-infusion thrombolysis with high-dose urokinase in thrombosed dialysis access grafts. Methods: A prospective randomized controlled trial was performed. From August 1992 to September 1993, 30 thrombosed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts in 24 patients were included, 15 grafts in each group. The success of thrombolysis, mean time to thrombolysis, mean urokinase dose, and 60-day patency rate were evaluated. Results: In the pulse-spray group, the mean time to thrombolysis was 72 min with a mean urokinase dose of 560,000 U. The 60-day patency rate was 71%. In the continuous-infusion group, the mean infusion time to thrombolysis was 55 min with a mean dose of 479,000 U. The 60-day patency rate was 73%. Conclusion: No statistically significant difference was found between the two techniques in the mean time to thrombolysis, the mean urokinase dose used, or the 60-day patency rate.

  3. EU Accession and Civil Aviation Regimes: Malta and Cyprus as a Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papatheodorou, Andreas; Busuttil, Louis

    2003-01-01

    Aviation deregulation is usually a challenging and demanding task and accession to the European Union requires that all candidate states should harmonize their legislation in the context of the European Common Aviation Area. Malta and Cyprus, the small Mediterranean island-states to join the EU in 2004, will have to abandon any protectionist policies in favour of their flag-carriers and let them survive in a liberal framework. The paper discusses the implications of this regime change for civil aviation in Malta and Cyprus and in addition to the airline industry, it examines the impacts on the complementary tourism sector. Unless carrying capacity limits are understood, the islands may become victims of successful airline liberalisation. The paper concludes by stressing the need for sustainable development and active policy making. Keywords: carrying capacity, Cyprus, air transport deregulation, Malta, tourism

  4. A ROTATING INCONEL BAND TARGET FOR PION PRODUCTION AT A NEUTRINO FACTORY, USING STUDY II PARAMETERS.

    SciTech Connect

    KING,B.J.; SIMOS,N.P.; WEGGEL,R.V.; MOKHOV,N.V.

    2001-05-04

    A conceptual design is presented for a high power pion production target, based on a rotating band of inconel alloy 718, that is intended to provide a back-up targetry option for the Neutrino Factory Study II. The target band has a 2.5 m radius and has an I-beam cross section that is 6 cm high and with a 0.6 cm thick webbing. The pion capture scenario and proton beam parameters are as specified for the Study II base-line targetry option, i.e. capture into a 20 Tesla tapered solenoidal channel with proton beam fills at 2.5 Hz containing 6 short bunches, each spaced by 20 milliseconds, of 1.67 x 10{sup 13} 24 GeV protons. The target is continuously rotated at 1 m/s to Carey heat away from the production region and through a water cooling tank. The mechanical layout and cooling setup are described and results are presented from realistic MARS Monte Carlo computer simulations of the pion yield and energy deposition in the target and from ANSYS finite element calculations for the corresponding shock heating stresses.

  5. Study on the effect of target on plasma parameters of magnetron sputtering discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, P.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K.

    2013-10-15

    In this study, the effect of magnetron target on different plasma parameters of Argon/Hydrogen (Ar - H{sub 2}) direct current (DC) magnetron discharge is examined. Here, Copper (Cu) and Chromium (Cr) are used as magnetron targets. The value of plasma parameters such as electron temperature (kT{sub e}), electron density (N{sub e}), ion density (N{sub i}), degree of ionization of Ar, and degree of dissociation of H{sub 2} for both the target are studied as a function of input power and hydrogen content in the discharge. The plasma parameters are determined by using Langmuir probe and Optical emission spectroscopy. On the basis of the different reactions in the gas phase, the variation of plasma parameters and sputtering rate are explained. The obtained results show that electron and ion density decline with gradual addition of Hydrogen in the discharge and increase with rising input power. It brings significant changes on the degree of ionization of Ar and dissociation of H{sub 2}. The enhanced value of electron density (N{sub e}), ion density (N{sub i}), degree of Ionization of Ar, and degree of dissociation of H{sub 2} for Cr compared to Cu target is explained on the basis of it's higher Ion Induced Secondary Electron Emission Coefficient (ISEE) value.

  6. Perceptions of emergency care in Kenyan communities lacking access to formalised emergency medical systems: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Broccoli, Morgan C; Calvello, Emilie J B; Skog, Alexander P; Wachira, Benjamin; Wallis, Lee A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We undertook this study in Kenya to understand the community's emergency care needs and barriers they face when trying to access care, and to seek community members’ thoughts regarding high impact solutions to expand access to essential emergency services. Design We used a qualitative research methodology to conduct 59 focus groups with 528 total Kenyan community member participants. Data were coded, aggregated and analysed using the content analysis approach. Setting Participants were uniformly selected from all eight of the historical Kenyan provinces (Central, Coast, Eastern, Nairobi, North Eastern, Nyanza, Rift Valley and Western), with equal rural and urban community representation. Results Socioeconomic and cultural factors play a major role both in seeking and reaching emergency care. Community members in Kenya experience a wide range of medical emergencies, and seem to understand their time-critical nature. They rely on one another for assistance in the face of substantial barriers to care—a lack of: system structure, resources, transportation, trained healthcare providers and initial care at the scene. Conclusions Access to emergency care in Kenya can be improved by encouraging recognition and initial treatment of emergent illness in the community, strengthening the pre-hospital care system, improving emergency care delivery at health facilities and creating new policies at a national level. These community-generated solutions likely have a wider applicability in the region. PMID:26586324

  7. A Case Study of Performance Degradation Attributable to Run-Time Bounds Checks on C++ Vector Access

    PubMed Central

    Flater, David; Guthrie, William F

    2013-01-01

    Programmers routinely omit run-time safety checks from applications because they assume that these safety checks would degrade performance. The simplest example is the use of arrays or array-like data structures that do not enforce the constraint that indices must be within bounds. This report documents an attempt to measure the performance penalty incurred by two different implementations of bounds-checking in C and C++ using a simple benchmark and a desktop PC with a modern superscalar CPU. The benchmark consisted of a loop that wrote to array elements in sequential order. With this configuration, relative to the best performance observed for any access method in C or C++, mean degradation of only (0.881 ± 0.009) % was measured for a standard bounds-checking access method in C++. This case study showed the need for further work to develop and refine measurement methods and to perform more comparisons of this type. Comparisons across different use cases, configurations, programming languages, and environments are needed to determine under what circumstances (if any) the performance advantage of unchecked access is actually sufficient to outweigh the negative consequences for security and software quality. PMID:26401432

  8. Access to Care for Multiple Sclerosis in Times of Economic Crisis in Greece – the HOPE II Study

    PubMed Central

    Souliotis, Kyriakos; Alexopoulou, Elena; Papageorgiou, Manto; Politi, Anastasia; Litsa, Panagiota; Contiades, Xenophon

    2016-01-01

    Background: While there is currently no cure for multiple sclerosis (MS), treatment with biologic disease-modifying drugs (bDMDs) can reduce the impact of the condition on the lives of patients. In Greece, the regulatory change in the distribution system of bDMDs, limited their administration through the designated pharmacies of the National Organization for Healthcare Services Provision (EOPYY) or the National Health System (ESY) hospitals, thus potentially impacting access to MS treatment. In this context, the aim of this paper was to assess the barriers to bDMDs, by recording MS patients’ experiences. Methods: A survey research was conducted between January and February 2014 in Athens and 5 other major Greek cities with the methods of personal and telephone interview. A structured questionnaire was used to elicit socio-economic and medical information, information related to obstacles in accessing bDMDs and medical treatment, from MS patients that visited EOPYY pharmacies during the study period. Results: During the last year 69% of 179 participants reported that the distribution system of bDMDs has improved. Thirteen percent of participants encountered problems in accessing their medication, and 16.9% of participants in accessing their physician, with the obstacles being more pronounced for non-Athens residents. Frequent obstacles to bDMDs were the distance from EOPYY pharmacies and difficulties in obtaining a diagnosis from an EOPYY/ESY physician, while obstacles to medical care were delays in appointment booking and travel difficulties. Conclusion: Even though the major weaknesses of the distribution system of bDMDs have improved, further amelioration of the system could be achieved through the home delivery of medicines to patients living in remote areas, and through the development of a national MS registry. PMID:26927393

  9. Remote direct memory access

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.

    2012-12-11

    Methods, parallel computers, and computer program products are disclosed for remote direct memory access. Embodiments include transmitting, from an origin DMA engine on an origin compute node to a plurality target DMA engines on target compute nodes, a request to send message, the request to send message specifying a data to be transferred from the origin DMA engine to data storage on each target compute node; receiving, by each target DMA engine on each target compute node, the request to send message; preparing, by each target DMA engine, to store data according to the data storage reference and the data length, including assigning a base storage address for the data storage reference; sending, by one or more of the target DMA engines, an acknowledgment message acknowledging that all the target DMA engines are prepared to receive a data transmission from the origin DMA engine; receiving, by the origin DMA engine, the acknowledgement message from the one or more of the target DMA engines; and transferring, by the origin DMA engine, data to data storage on each of the target compute nodes according to the data storage reference using a single direct put operation.

  10. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  11. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building access control (BAC)--a catchall phrase to describe the systems that control access to facilities across campus--has traditionally been handled with remarkably low-tech solutions: (1) manual locks; (2) electronic locks; and (3) ID cards with magnetic strips. Recent improvements have included smart cards and keyless solutions that make use…

  12. WWC Review of the Report "Looking beyond Enrollment: The Causal Effect of Need-Based Grants on College Access, Persistence, and Graduation." What Works Clearinghouse Single Study Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 study, "Looking Beyond Enrollment: The Causal Effect of Need-Based Grants on College Access, Persistence, and Graduation," examined whether eligibility for the Florida Student Access Grant (FSAG), a need-based grant for low-income students in Florida, affects college enrollment, credit accumulation, persistence over time in…

  13. Exploring the Relationship between Access Technology and Standardized Test Scores for Youths with Visual Impairments: Secondary Analysis of the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, Amy L.; Emerson, Robert Wall; Curtis, Amy B.; Fogarty, Kieran

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a secondary analysis of the National Longitudinal Transition Study 2 that explored the predictive association between training in access technology and performance on the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Academic Achievement: III. The results indicated that the use of access technology had a limited predictive…

  14. To study percentage distribution of target genes encoding proteins of different classes in Helicobacter pylori strain J99 and identification of potential therapeutic targets to reduce its proliferation.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Megha; Panchal, Hetalkumar

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori are one of the most common bacterial pathogens in humans whose seropositivity increases with age and low socio-economic status. Due to presence of its pathogenic-island causes chronic persistent and atrophic gastritis in adults and children that often culminate in development of gastric and duodenal ulcers. Studies indicate that infected individuals have two to sixfold increased risk of developing gastric cancer and mucosal associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma compared to their uninfected counterparts. The complete genome sequences have provided a plethora of potential drug targets. Subtractive study holds the promise of providing a conceptual framework for identification of potential drug targets and providing insights to understand the biological regulatory mechanisms in diseases, which are playing an increasingly important role in searching for novel drug targets from the information contained in genomics. In this paper, we discuss subtractive study approaches for identifying drug targets, with the emphasis on the modelling of target protein and docking of the modelled protein with probable ligand by using computational tools. PMID:25667382

  15. Subliminal access to abstract face representations does not rely on attention.

    PubMed

    Harry, Bronson; Davis, Chris; Kim, Jeesun

    2012-03-01

    The present study used masked repetition priming to examine whether face representations can be accessed without attention. Two experiments using a face recognition task (fame judgement) presented masked repetition and control primes in spatially unattended locations prior to target onset. Experiment 1 (n=20) used the same images as primes and as targets and Experiment 2 (n=17) used different images of the same individual as primes and targets. Repetition priming was observed across both experiments regardless of whether spatial attention was cued to the location of the prime. Priming occurred for both famous and non-famous targets in Experiment 1 but was only reliable for famous targets in Experiment 2, suggesting that priming in Experiment 1 indexed access to view-specific representations whereas priming in Experiment 2 indexed access to view-invariant, abstract representations. Overall, the results indicate that subliminal access to abstract face representations does not rely on attention. PMID:22200591

  16. Targeting brain cells with glutathione-modulated nanoliposomes: in vitro and in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Heba F; Ahmed, Sayed M; Hassaballah, Ashraf E; Omar, Mahmoud M

    2015-01-01

    Background The blood–brain barrier prevents many drug moieties from reaching the central nervous system. Therefore, glutathione-modulated nanoliposomes have been engineered to enhance the targeting of flucytosine to the brain. Methods Glutathione-modulated nanoliposomes were prepared by thin-film hydration technique and evaluated in the primary brain cells of rats. Lecithin, cholesterol, and span 65 were mixed at 1:1:1 molar ratio. The molar percentage of PEGylated glutathione varied from 0 mol% to 0.75 mol%. The cellular binding and the uptake of the targeted liposomes were both monitored by epifluorescent microscope and flow cytometry techniques. A biodistribution and a pharmacokinetic study of flucytosine and flucytosine-loaded glutathione–modulated liposomes was carried out to evaluate the in vivo brain-targeting efficiency. Results The size of glutathione-modulated nanoliposomes was <100 nm and the zeta potential was more than −65 mV. The cumulative release reached 70% for certain formulations. The cellular uptake increased as molar percent of glutathione increased to reach the maximum at 0.75 mol%. The uptake of the targeted liposomes by brain cells of the rats was three times greater than that of the nontargeted liposomes. An in vivo study showed that the relative efficiency was 2.632±0.089 and the concentration efficiency was 1.590±0.049, and also, the drug-targeting index was 3.670±0.824. Conclusion Overall, these results revealed that glutathione-PEGylated nanoliposomes enhance the effective delivery of flucytosine to brain and could become a promising new therapeutic option for the treatment of the brain infections. PMID:26229435

  17. Comparative Effectiveness of Targeted Prostate Biopsy Using MRI-US Fusion Software and Visual Targeting: a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel J.; Recabal, Pedro; Sjoberg, Daniel D.; Thong, Alan; Lee, Justin K.; Eastham, James A.; Scardino, Peter T.; Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Coleman, Jonathan; Ehdaie, Behfar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare diagnostic outcomes between 2 different techniques for targeting regions-of-interest on prostate multiparametric Magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI); MRI-ultrasound fusion (MR-F) and visually targeted (VT) biopsy. Materials and Methods Patients presenting for prostate biopsy with regions-of-interest on mpMRI underwent MRI-targeted biopsy. For each region-of-interest two VT cores were obtained, followed by 2 cores using an MR-F device. Our primary endpoint was the difference in the detection of high-grade (Gleason ≥7) and any-grade cancer between VT and MR-F, investigated using McNemar’s method. Secondary endpoints were the difference in detection rate by biopsy location using a logistic regression model, and difference in median cancer length using Wilcoxon sign-rank test. Results We identified 396 regions-of-interest in 286 men. The difference in high-grade cancer detection between MR-F biopsy and VT biopsy was −1.4% (95% CI −6.4% to 3.6%; p=0.6); for any-grade cancer the difference was 3.5% (95% CI −1.9% to 8.9%; p=0.2). Median cancer length detected by MR-F and VT were 5.5mm vs. 5.8mm, respectively (p=0.8). MR-F biopsy detected 15% more cancers in the transition zone (p=0.046), and VT biopsy detected 11% more high-grade cancer at the prostate base (p=0.005). Only 52% of all high-grade cancers were detected by both techniques. Conclusions We found no evidence of a significant difference in the detection of high-grade or any-grade cancer between VT and MR-F biopsy. However, the performance of each technique varied in specific biopsy locations, and the outcomes of both techniques were complementary. Combining VT biopsy and MR-F biopsy may optimize prostate cancer detection. PMID:27038768

  18. Targeting Endothelial Adhesion Molecule Transcription for Treatment of Inflammatory Disease: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Ashander, Liam M.; Appukuttan, Binoy; Ma, Yuefang; Gardner-Stephen, Dione; Smith, Justine R.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting the endothelial adhesion molecules that control leukocyte trafficking into a tissue has been explored as a biological therapy for inflammatory diseases. However, these molecules also participate in leukocyte migration for immune surveillance, and inhibiting the physiological level of an adhesion molecule might promote infection or malignancy. We explored the concept of targeting endothelial adhesion molecule transcription during inflammation in a human system. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) mediates leukocyte migration across the retinal endothelium in noninfectious posterior uveitis. We observed an increase in the transcription factor, nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells 1 (NF-κB1), in parallel with ICAM-1, in human retinal endothelial cells treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and identified putative binding sites for NF-κB1 within the ICAM-1 regulatory region. We targeted induced NF-κB1 expression in endothelial cells with small interfering (si)RNA. Knockdown of NF-κB1 significantly decreased cell surface expression of ICAM-1 protein induced by TNF-α but did not reduce constitutive ICAM-1 expression. Consistently, NF-κB1 knockdown significantly reduced leukocyte binding to cell monolayers in the presence of TNF-α but did not impact baseline binding. Findings of this proof-of-concept study indicate that induced transcription of endothelial adhesion molecules might be targeted therapeutically for inflammatory disease in humans. PMID:27293321

  19. Theoretical studies of defect formation and target heating by intense pulsed ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, J. J.; Schenkel, T.; Persaud, A.; Seidl, P. A.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I.

    2015-11-01

    We present results of three studies related to experiments on NDCX-II, the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, a short-pulse (~ 1ns), high-current (~ 70A) linear accelerator for 1.2 MeV ions at LBNL. These include: (a) Coupled transverse and longitudinal envelope calculations of the final non-neutral ion beam transport, followed by neutralized drift and final focus, for a number of focus and drift lengths and with a series of ion species (Z =1-19). Predicted target fluences were obtained and target temperatures in the 1 eV range estimated. (b) HYDRA simulations of the target response for Li and He ions and for Al and Au targets at various ion fluences (up to 1012 ions/pulse/mm2) and pulse durations, benchmarking temperature estimates from the envelope calculations. (c) Crystal-Trim simulations of ion channeling through single-crystal lattices, with comparisons to ion transmission data as a function of orientation angle of the crystal foil and for different ion intensities and ion species. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE under contracts DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), DE-AC02-05CH11231 (LBNL) and DE-AC02-76CH0307 (PPPL) and was supported by the US DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences. LLNL-ABS-67521.

  20. Access to HAART in HIV-infected immigrants: a retrospective multicenter Italian study.

    PubMed

    Saracino, A; El-Hamad, I; Prato, R; Cibelli, D C; Tartaglia, A; Palumbo, E; Pezzoli, M C; Angarano, G; Scotto, G

    2005-09-01

    Since 1996, AIDS has declined in the Italian population, but cases in foreign patients, including both recent immigrants and long-term residents, have increased from 3.9% in 1995-1996 to 15.4% in 2001-2002. This increase can only be partly explained by a higher migratory flow and might reflect a delayed access to health facilities and to antiretroviral therapy in migrants. We performed a survey for the year 2003 of HIV-infected immigrants to Italy from countries outside the European Union to verify which factors might influence a lack of access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Italian centers of infectious diseases were requested to send sociodemographic and clinical data of HIV-infected immigrant patients. A total of 553 HIV-infected immigrants (49.9% women) were evaluated, representing 6.5% of all HIV-infected patients from these centers. The mean duration of residency in Italy was 6.6 +/- 5.0 years. The country of origin was Africa (64.5%), North and South America (24.2%), Eastern Europe (7.0%), and Asia (3.8%). A total of 407 of 553 patients (73.6%) were taking antiretroviral drugs at the time of screening. Females presented a younger age (p = 0.001), a lower frequency of Centers for Disease Control (CDC) stage B/C (p = 0.008) and a more frequent heterosexual exposure to HIV (p < 0.001), while no differences were observed for time of first positive serology (p = 0.7). CD4 cell count (p = 0.9) and log plasma HIV-RNA (p = 0.1). Characteristics of HAART patients were compared to those of nontreated patients, despite a CD4 cell count less than 350 cells/mm(3). No significant difference was found for gender, country of origin, risk factor, and years of Italian residence, while legal immigrants (p = 0.018) and registered in the National Health Service (p = 0.014) were significantly more likely to receive HAART compared to illegal immigrants. PMID:16164386

  1. A review of potable water accessibility and sustainability issues in developing countries - case study of Uganda.

    PubMed

    Nayebare, Shedrack R; Wilson, Lloyd R; Carpenter, David O; Dziewulski, David M; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2014-01-01

    Providing sources of sustainable and quality potable water in Uganda is a significant public health issue. This project aimed at identifying and prioritizing possible actions on how sustainable high quality potable water in Uganda's water supply systems could be achieved. In that respect, a review of both the current water supply systems and government programs on drinking water in Uganda was completed. Aspects of quantity, quality, treatment methods, infrastructure, storage and distribution of water for different water systems were evaluated and compared with the existing water supply systems in the U.S., Latin America and the Caribbean, for purposes of generating feasible recommendations and opportunities for improvement. Uganda utilizes surface water, groundwater, and rainwater sources for consumption. Surface water covers 15.4% of the land area and serves both urban and rural populations. Lake Victoria contributes about 85% of the total fresh surface water. Potable water quality is negatively affected by the following factors: disposal of sewage and industrial effluents, agricultural pesticides and fertilizers, and surface run-offs during heavy rains. The total renewable groundwater resources in Uganda are estimated to be 29 million m3/year with about 20,000 boreholes, 3000 shallow-wells and 200,000 springs, serving more than 80% of the rural and slum communities. Mean annual rainfall in Uganda ranges from 500 mm to 2500 mm. Groundwater and rainwater quality is mainly affected by poor sanitation and unhygienic practices. There are significant regional variations in the accessibility of potable water, with the Northeastern region having the least amount of potable water from all sources. Uganda still lags behind in potable water resource development. Priorities should be placed mainly on measures available for improvement of groundwater and rainwater resource utilization, protection of watersheds, health education, improved water treatment methods and

  2. [Achievement of therapeutic target in subjects on statin treatment in clinical practice. Results of the STAR (Statins Target Assessment in Real practice) study].

    PubMed

    Degli Esposti, Luca; Sangiorgi, Diego; Arca, Marcello; Vigna, Giovanni B; Budal, Stefano; Degli Esposti, Ezio

    2011-12-01

    The primary aim of the STAR Study (Statins Target Assessment in Real practice) was to determine the LDL-cholesterol reduction and to analyse patient's and therapeutic factors associated to LDL-cholesterol target attainment in newly treated subjects with statins in an unselected population in clinical practice setting. Administrative databases (including pharmaceutical prescriptions and hospital admissions) and laboratory test databases (including LDL-cholesterol values) of five local health units, distributed in Emilia Romagna, Toscana and Umbria, were linked. A retrospective cohort study was conducted and all subjects aged > or =18 years with a first prescription for statins (newly treated subjects) between January 1st, 2007 and June 30th, 2008 were included. All statin prescriptions over a 12 months follow-up period were considered and used to calculate adherence to treatment. Baseline and follow-up LDL-cholesterol, respectively, were defined according to the nearest determination to the first prescription for statins and to the end of the follow-up period. A total of 3.232 subjects was included, 1.516 males (47%) and 1.716 females (53%), with an average age equal to 65.9 +/- 11.3 years. Among included subjects, 22.,6% had a gap to LDL-cholesterol target <10%, 30.0% between 10 and 29%, 20.7% between 30 and 49%, and 26.7% . or =50%. Among those with a gap to target > or =50%, 30-49%, and 10-29%, respectively, LDL-cholesterol target was attained by 7.1%, 41.8%, and 62.% of subjects. LDL-cholesterol target attainment was associated to gap to target, adherence with treatment, and type of statin. PMID:22567731

  3. Access to and utilisation of GP services among Burmese migrants in London: a cross-sectional descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An estimated 10,000 Burmese migrants are currently living in London. No studies have been conducted on their access to health services. Furthermore, most studies on migrants in the United Kingdom (UK) have been conducted at the point of service provision, carrying the risk of selection bias. Our cross-sectional study explored access to and utilisation of General Practice (GP) services by Burmese migrants residing in London. Methods We used a mixed-method approach: a quantitative survey using self-administered questionnaires was complemented by qualitative in-depth interviews for developing the questionnaire and triangulating the findings of the survey. Overall, 137 questionnaires were received (a response rate of 57%) and 11 in-depth interviews conducted. The main outcome variables of the study included GP registration, barriers towards registration, GP consultations, barriers towards consultations, and knowledge on entitlements to health care. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics, association tests, and a multivariate analysis using logistic regression. The qualitative information was analysed using content analysis. Results The respondents were young, of roughly equal gender (51.5% female), well educated, and had a fair level of knowledge on health services in the UK. Although the GP registration rate was relatively high (80%, 109 out of 136), GP service utilisation during the last episode of illness, at 56.8% (54 out of 95), was low. The statistical analysis showed that age being younger than 35 years, lacking prior overseas experience, having an unstable immigration status, having a shorter duration of stay, and resorting to self-medication were the main barriers hindering Burmese migrants from accessing primary health care services. These findings were corroborated by the in-depth interviews. Conclusions Our study found that having formal access to primary health care was not sufficient to ensure GP registration and health

  4. Synthesis of the biotinylated anti-HIV compound BMMP and the target identification study.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Masahiro; Tateishi, Hiroshi; Koga, Ryoko; Okamoto, Yoshinari; Otsuka, Masami; Fujita, Mikako

    2016-01-01

    BMMP [2-(benzothiazol-2-ylmethylthio)-4-methylpyrimidine], an inhibitor of HIV-1 replication, was linked to biotin to study the interaction with the presumed target, HIV-1 Pr55(Gag) or CA, by means of surface plasmon resonance. The synthesized Biotin-BMMP inhibited HIV-1 replication to a similar extent as BMMP alone, but did not interact with Pr55(Gag) or CA, suggesting that BMMP exerts its activity by a different mechanism. PMID:26615887

  5. Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling (WISSARD): Integrative Study of Marine Ice Sheet Stability and Subglacial Life Habitats (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulaczyk, S. M.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Behar, A. E.; Christner, B. C.; Fisher, A. T.; Fricker, H. A.; Holland, D. M.; Jacobel, R. W.; Mikucki, J.; Mitchell, A. C.; Powell, R. D.; Priscu, J. C.; Scherer, R. P.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    The WISSARD project is a large, NSF-funded, interdisciplinary initiative focused on scientific drilling, exploration, and investigation of Antarctic subglacial aquatic environments. The project consists of three interrelated components: (1) LISSARD - Lake and Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling, (2) RAGES - Robotic Access to Grounding-zones for Exploration and Science, and (3) GBASE - GeomicroBiology of Antarctic Subglacial Environments). A number of previous studies in West Antarctica highlighted the importance of understanding ice sheet interactions with water, either at the basal boundary where ice streams come in contact with active subglacial hydrologic and geological systems or at the marine margin where the ice sheet is exposed to forcing from the global ocean and sedimentation. Recent biological investigations of Antarctic subglacial environments show that they provide a significant habitat for life and source of bacterial carbon in a setting that was previously thought to be inhospitable. Subglacial microbial ecosystems also enhance biogeochemical weathering, mobilizing elements from long term geological storage. The overarching scientific objective of WISSARD is to examine the subglacial hydrological system of West Antarctica in glaciological, geological, microbiological, geochemical, and oceanographic contexts. Direct sampling will yield seminal information on these systems and test the overarching hypothesis that active hydrological systems connect various subglacial environments and exert major control on ice sheet dynamics, subglacial sediment transfer, geochemistry, metabolic and phylogenetic diversity, and biogeochemical transformations and geological records of ice sheet history. Technological advances during WISSARD will provide the US-science community with a capability to access and study sub-ice sheet environments. Developing this technological infrastructure will benefit the broader science community and it will be available for

  6. Revising the high-density lipoprotein targeting strategies - insights from human and preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Nesan, Dinushan; Ng, Dominic S

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) hypothesis has been challenged. Several completed randomized clinical trials continue to fall short in demonstrating HDL, or at least HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, as being a consistent target in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. However, population studies and findings in lipid modifying trials continue to strongly support HDL-C as a superb risk predictor. It is increasingly evident that the complexity of HDL metabolism confounds the use of HDL-C concentration as a unified target. However, important insights continue to emerge from the post hoc analyses of recently completed (i) fibrate-based FIELD and ACCORD trials, including the unexpected beneficial effect of fibrates in microvascular diseases, (ii) the niacin-based AIM-HIGH and HPS2-THRIVE studies, (iii) recombinant HDL-based as well as (iv) the completed CETP inhibitor-based trials. These together with on-going mechanistic studies on novel pathways, which include the unique roles of microRNAs, post-translational remodeling of HDL and novel pathways related to HDL modulators will provide valuable insights to guide how best to refocus and redesign the conceptual framework for selecting HDL-based targets. PMID:25115413

  7. National targets, process transformation and local consequences in an NHS emergency department (ED): a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the attempt to reduce waiting times in emergency departments, various national health services have used benchmarking and the optimisation of patient flows. The aim of this study was to examine staff attitudes and experience of providing emergency care following the introduction of a 4 hour wait target, focusing on clinical, organisational and spatial issues. Methods A qualitative research design was used and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 28 clinical, managerial and administrative staff members working in an inner-city emergency department. A thematic analysis method was employed and NVivo 8 qualitative data analysis software was used to code and manage the emerging themes. Results The wait target came to regulate the individual and collective timescales of healthcare work. It has compartmentalised the previous unitary network of emergency department clinicians and their workspace. It has also speeded up clinical performance and patient throughput. It has disturbed professional hierarchies and facilitated the development of new professional roles. A new clinical information system complemented these reconfigurations by supporting advanced patient tracking, better awareness of time, and continuous, real-time management of emergency department staff. The interviewees had concerns that this target-oriented way of working forces them to have a less personal relationship with their patients. Conclusions The imposition of a wait-target in response to a perceived “crisis” of patients’ dissatisfaction led to the development of a new and sophisticated way of working in the emergency department, but with deep and unintended consequences. We show that there is a dynamic interrelation of the social and the technical in the complex environment of the ED. While the 4 hour wait target raised the profile of the emergency department in the hospital, the added pressure on clinicians has caused some concerns over the future of their

  8. A Criticality Safety Study on Storing Unirradiated Cintichem-Type Targets at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, D.J.; Parma, E.J.; Busch, R.D.

    1999-04-21

    This criticality safety analysis is performed to determine the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for a storage cabinet filled with unirradiated Cintichem-type targets. These targets will be used to produce {sup 99}Mo at Sandia National Laboratories and will be stored on-site prior to irradiation in the Annular Core Research Reactor. The analysis consisted of using the Monte Carlo code MCNP (Version 4A) to model and predict the k{sub eff} for the proposed dry storage configuration under credible loss of geometry and moderator control. Effects of target pitch, non-uniform loading, and target internal/external flooding are evaluated. Further studies were done with deterministic methods to verify the results obtained from MCNP and to obtain a clearer understanding of the parameters affecting system criticality. The diffusion accelerated neutral particle transport code ONEDANT was used to model the target in a one-dimensional, infinite half-slab geometry and determine the critical slab thickness. Hand calculations were also completed to determine the critical slab thickness with modified one-group, and one-group, two region approximations. Results obtained from ONEDANT and the hand calculations were compared to applicable cases in a commonly used criticality safety analysis handbook. Overall, the critical slab thicknesses obtained in the deterministic analysis were much larger than the dimensions of the cabinet and further support the predictions by MCNP that a critical system cannot be attained for the base case or in conditions where loss of geometry and moderation control occur.

  9. The Quik Fix study: a randomised controlled trial of brief interventions for young people with alcohol-related injuries and illnesses accessing emergency department and crisis support care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol is a major preventable cause of injury, disability and death in young people. Large numbers of young people with alcohol-related injuries and medical conditions present to hospital emergency departments (EDs). Access to brief, efficacious, accessible and cost effective treatment is an international health priority within this age group. While there is growing evidence for the efficacy of brief motivational interviewing (MI) for reducing alcohol use in young people, there is significant scope to increase its impact, and determine if it is the most efficacious and cost effective type of brief intervention available. The efficacy of personality-targeted interventions (PIs) for alcohol misuse delivered individually to young people is yet to be determined or compared to MI, despite growing evidence for school-based PIs. This study protocol describes a randomized controlled trial comparing the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of telephone-delivered MI, PI and an Assessment Feedback/Information (AF/I) only control for reducing alcohol use and related harm in young people. Methods/design Participants will be 390 young people aged 16 to 25 years presenting to a crisis support service or ED with alcohol-related injuries and illnesses (including severe alcohol intoxication). This single blinded superiority trial randomized young people to (i) 2 sessions of MI; (ii) 2 sessions of a new PI or (iii) a 1 session AF/I only control. Participants are reassessed at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months on the primary outcomes of alcohol use and related problems and secondary outcomes of mental health symptoms, functioning, severity of problematic alcohol use, alcohol injuries, alcohol-related knowledge, coping self-efficacy to resist using alcohol, and cost effectiveness. Discussion This study will identify the most efficacious and cost-effective telephone-delivered brief intervention for reducing alcohol misuse and related problems in young people presenting to crisis support

  10. Influence of Municipality-Level Mean Income on Access to Aortic Valve Surgery: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study under Japan's Universal Health-Care Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seitetsu L.; Hashimoto, Hideki; Kohro, Takahide; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Koide, Daisuke; Komuro, Issei; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Background Universal health-care coverage has attracted the interest of policy makers as a way of achieving health equity. However, previous reports have shown that despite universal coverage, socioeconomic disparity persists in access to high-tech invasive care, such as cardiac treatment. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between socioeconomic status and care of aortic stenosis in the context of Japan's health-care system, which is mainly publicly funded. Methods We chose aortic stenosis in older people as a target because such patients are likely to be affected by socioeconomic disparity. Using a large Japanese claim-based inpatient database, we identified 12,893 isolated aortic stenosis patients aged over 65 years who were hospitalized between July 2010 and March 2012. Municipality socioeconomic status was represented by the mean household income of the patients' residential municipality, categorized into quartiles. The likelihood of undergoing aortic valve surgery and in-hospital mortality was regressed against socioeconomic status level with adjustments for hospital volume, regional number of cardiac surgeons per 1 million population, and patients' clinical status. Results We found no significant differences between the highest and lowest quartile groups in surgical indication (odds ratio, 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.69–1.03) or in-hospital mortality (1.00; 0.68–1.48). Hospital volume was significantly associated with lower postoperative mortality (odds ratio of the highest volume tertile to the lowest, 0.49; 0.34–0.71). Conclusions Under Japan's current universal health-care coverage, municipality socioeconomic status did not appear to have a systematic relationship with either treatment decision for surgical intervention or postoperative survival following aortic valve surgery among older patients. Our results imply that universal health-care coverage with high publicly funded coverage offers equal access to high

  11. Observational cohort study: deprivation and access to anti-dementia drugs in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Claudia; Lodwick, Rebecca; Walters, Kate; Raine, Rosalind; Manthorpe, Jill; Iliffe, Steve; Petersen, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Background: UK National Dementia Strategies prioritise fair access to dementia treatments for the whole population. We investigated for the first time inequalities in NHS national dementia prescribing and how they have varied between UK countries and over time. Method: we investigated the association between Townsend deprivation score and anti-dementia drug prescribing in 77,045 dementia patients from UK primary care records from 2002 to 2013. Results: we included 77,045 patients with recorded dementia diagnosis or anti-dementia drug prescription. Least deprived patients were 25% more likely to be initiated on anti-dementia drugs than the most deprived (adjusted incidence rate ratio 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.19–1.31). This was driven by data from English practices where prescribing rates were consistently lower in more deprived patients compared with Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales, where prescribing was not related to deprivation quintile. Compared with English practices, anti-dementia medication was prescribed more often in Northern Irish (1.81, 1.41–2.34) and less in Welsh practices (0.68, 0.55–0.82), with a trend towards more prescribing in Scottish practices (1.14, 0.98–1.32). Drug initiation rates were also higher in younger people and men. Conclusion: four years after the English National Dementia Strategy, there is no evidence that the Strategy's key objective of reducing treatment inequalities is being achieved. Higher overall anti-dementia drug prescribing in Scottish and Northern Irish practices, and differing clinical guidelines in Scotland from other UK countries might explain greater equality in prescribing in these countries. Strategies to offer treatment to more deprived people with dementia in England are needed. PMID:26582758

  12. The importance of a multi-dimensional approach for studying the links between food access and consumption.

    PubMed

    Rose, Donald; Bodor, J Nicholas; Hutchinson, Paul L; Swalm, Chris M

    2010-06-01

    Research on neighborhood food access has focused on documenting disparities in the food environment and on assessing the links between the environment and consumption. Relatively few studies have combined in-store food availability measures with geographic mapping of stores. We review research that has used these multi-dimensional measures of access to explore the links between the neighborhood food environment and consumption or weight status. Early research in California found correlations between red meat, reduced-fat milk, and whole-grain bread consumption and shelf space availability of these products in area stores. Subsequent research in New York confirmed the low-fat milk findings. Recent research in Baltimore has used more sophisticated diet assessment tools and store-based instruments, along with controls for individual characteristics, to show that low availability of healthy food in area stores is associated with low-quality diets of area residents. Our research in southeastern Louisiana has shown that shelf space availability of energy-dense snack foods is positively associated with BMI after controlling for individual socioeconomic characteristics. Most of this research is based on cross-sectional studies. To assess the direction of causality, future research testing the effects of interventions is needed. We suggest that multi-dimensional measures of the neighborhood food environment are important to understanding these links between access and consumption. They provide a more nuanced assessment of the food environment. Moreover, given the typical duration of research project cycles, changes to in-store environments may be more feasible than changes to the overall mix of retail outlets in communities. PMID:20410084

  13. HIV/AIDS and access to water: A case study of home-based care in Ngamiland, Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngwenya, B. N.; Kgathi, D. L.

    This case study investigates access to potable water in HIV/AIDS related home-based care households in five rural communities in Ngamiland, Botswana. Primary data collected from five villages consisted of two parts. The first survey collected household data on demographic and rural livelihood features and impacts of HIV/AIDS. A total of 129 households were selected using a two-stage stratified random sampling method. In the second survey, a total of 39 family primary and community care givers of continuously ill, bed-ridden or non-bed-ridden HIV/AIDS patients were interviewed. A detailed questionnaire, with closed and open-ended questions, was used to collect household data. In addition to using the questionnaire, data were also collected through participant observation, informal interviews and secondary sources. The study revealed that there are several sources of water for communities in Ngamiland such as off-plot, outdoor (communal) and on-plot outdoor and/or indoor (private) water connections, as well as other sources such as bowsed water, well-points, boreholes and open perennial/ephemeral water from river channels and pans. There was a serious problem of unreliable water supply caused by, among other things, the breakdown of diesel-powered water pumps, high frequency of HIV/AIDS related absenteeism, and the failure of timely delivery of diesel fuel. Some villages experienced chronic supply disruptions while others experienced seasonal or occasional water shortages. Strategies for coping with unreliability of water supply included economizing on water, reserve storage, buying water, and collection from river/dug wells or other alternative sources such as rain harvesting tanks in government institutions. The unreliability of water supply resulted in an increase in the use of water of poor quality and other practices of poor hygiene as well as a high opportunity cost of water collection. In such instances, bathing of patients was cut from twice daily to once or

  14. Access to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Felecia; De Oliver, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    This case study researches the degree to which the location and services offered by a multicampus university, geographically situated consistent with the commercial principles of a large mass-market enterprise, facilitate access for educationally underserved groups. First, the necessity of democratizing educational access to an underprivileged…

  15. A comparative study of folate receptor-targeted doxorubicin delivery systems: dosing regimens and therapeutic index.

    PubMed

    Scomparin, Anna; Salmaso, Stefano; Eldar-Boock, Anat; Ben-Shushan, Dikla; Ferber, Shiran; Tiram, Galia; Shmeeda, Hilary; Landa-Rouben, Natalie; Leor, Jonathan; Caliceti, Paolo; Gabizon, Alberto; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit

    2015-06-28

    Ligand-receptor mediated targeting may affect differently the performance of supramolecular drug carriers depending on the nature of the nanocarrier. In this study, we compare the selectivity, safety and activity of doxorubicin (Dox) entrapped in liposomes versus Dox conjugated to polymeric nanocarriers in the presence or absence of a folic acid (FA)-targeting ligand to cancer cells that overexpress the folate receptor (FR). Two pullulan (Pull)-based conjugates of Dox were synthesized, (FA-PEG)-Pull-(Cyst-Dox) and (NH2-PEG)-Pull-(Cyst-Dox). The other delivery systems are Dox loaded PEGylated liposomes (PLD, Doxil®) and the FR-targeted version (PLD-FA) obtained by ligand post-insertion into the commercial formulation. Both receptor-targeted drug delivery systems (DDS) were shown to interact in vitro specifically with cells via the folate ligand. Treatment of FR-overexpressing human cervical carcinoma KB tumor-bearing mice with three-weekly injections resulted in slightly enhanced anticancer activity of PLD-FA compared to PLD and no activity for both pullulan-based conjugates. When the DDS were administered intravenously every other day, the folated-Pull conjugate and the non-folated-Pull conjugate displayed similar and low antitumor activity as free Dox. At this dosing regimen, the liposome-based formulations displayed enhanced antitumor activity with an advantage to the non-folated liposome. However, both liposomal formulations suffered from toxicity that was reversible following treatment discontinuation. Using a daily dosing schedule, with higher cumulative dose, the folated-Pull conjugate strongly inhibited tumor growth while free Dox was toxic at this regimen. For polymeric constructs, increasing dose intensity and cumulative dose strongly affects the therapeutic index and reveals a major therapeutic advantage for the FR-targeted formulation. All DDS were able to abrogate doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. This study constitutes the first side

  16. Navigating Access and Maintaining Established Practice: Social Studies Teachers' Technology Integration at Three Florida Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffield, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    This mixed methods multiple case study explored middle school social studies teachers' instructional use of digital technology at three suburban middle schools This mixed methods, multiple-case study explored middle school social studies teachers' instructional use of digital technology at three suburban middle schools in a large Florida school…

  17. A signature correlation study of ground target VHF/UHF ISAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatesman, Andrew J.; Beaudoin, Christopher J.; Giles, Robert H.; Kersey, William T.; Waldman, Jerry; Carter, Steve; Nixon, William E.

    2003-09-01

    VV and HH-polarized radar signatures of several ground targets were acquired in the VHF/UHF band (171-342 MHz) by using 1/35th scale models and an indoor radar range operating from 6 to 12 GHz. Data were processed into medianized radar cross sections as well as focused, ISAR imagery. Measurement validation was confirmed by comparing the radar cross section of a test object with a method of moments radar cross section prediction code. The signatures of several vehicles from three vehicle classes (tanks, trunks, and TELs) were measured and a signature cross-correlation study was performed. The VHF/UHF band is currently being exploited for its foliage penetration ability, however, the coarse image resolution which results from the relatively long radar wavelengths suggests a more challenging target recognition problem. One of the study's goals was to determine the amount of unique signature content in VHF/UHF ISAR imagery of military ground vehicles. Open-field signatures are compared with each other as well as with simplified shapes of similar size. Signatures were also acquired on one vehicle in a variety of configurations to determine the impact of monitor target variations on the signature content at these frequencies.

  18. Effects of Targeted Subsidies Policy on Health Behavior in Iranian Households: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    DOSHMANGIR, Leila; DOSHMANGIR, Parinaz; ABOLHASSANI, Nazanin; MOSHIRI, Esmaeil; JAFARI, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to explore the effects of national targeted subsidies policy on health behavior of Iranian households. Methods: In this qualitative study, data were collected between January 2012 and December 2013 through face-to-face interviews (23 experts in national and provincial levels of health system and 18 household heads) and through a comprehensive and purposive document analysis. The data was analyzed using a thematic analysis method (inductive-deductive) and assisted by Atlas-ti software. Results: Rising health care costs, removing some food subsidies and the increase in price of most goods and services due to the implementation of economic policy of targeted subsidies have led to significant changes in the demand for health services, changes in the consumption trends of goods and services affecting health as well as changes in the health habits of households. Conclusion: Targeted subsidies and the cash subsidy policy have some negative effects on population health behavior especially among poor people. Hence, maintaining or increasing the cash subsidy is not an efficient allocation of resources toward health care system. So, it is necessary to identify appropriate strategies and policies and apply interventions in order to moderate negative effects and enhance positive effects resulted from implementing this economic reform on population health behavior. PMID:26056676

  19. Effects study on the thermal stresses in a LEU metal foil annular target.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Srisharan G; Solbrekken, Gary L

    2015-09-01

    The effects of fission gas pressure, uranium swelling and thermal contact conductance on the thermal-mechanical behavior of an annular target containing a low-enriched uranium foil (LEU) encapsulated in a nickel foil have been presented in this paper. The draw-plug assembly method is simulated to obtain the residual stresses, which are applied to the irradiation model as initial inputs, and the integrated assembly-irradiation process is simulated as an axisymmetric problem using the commercial finite element code Abaqus FEA. Parametric studies were performed on the LEU heat generation rate and the results indicate satisfactory irradiation performance of the annular target. The temperature and stress margins have been provided along with a discussion of the results. PMID:26036440

  20. Active Target detectors for studies with exotic beams: Present and next future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittig, W.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Fritsch, A.; Abu-Nimeh, F.; Bazin, D.; Ahn, T.; Lynch, W. G.; Montes, F.; Shore, A.; Suzuki, D.; Usher, N.; Yurkon, J.; Kolata, J. J.; Howard, A.; Roberts, A. L.; Tang, X. D.; Becchetti, F. D.

    2015-06-01

    Reaccelerated radioactive beams near the Coulomb barrier, which are starting to be available from the ReA3 accelerator at NSCL and in next future at FRIB, will open up new opportunities for the study of nuclear structure near the drip lines. Efficient measurement techniques must be developed to compensate for the limited intensity of the most exotic beams. The Active-Target Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC) constructed at MSU solves this problem by providing the increased luminosity of a thick target while maintaining a good energy resolution by tracking the reaction vertex over an essentially 4 π solid angle. The AT-TPC and similar detectors allow us to take full advantage of the radioactive ion beams at present and future nuclear physics facilities to explore the frontier of rare isotopes.

  1. Multi-Target Strategy and Experimental Studies of Traditional Chinese Medicine for Alzheimer's Disease Therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Lan; Yang, Cui-cui

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial complex disease. The pathogenesis of AD is very complicated, and involves the β-amyloid (Aβ) cascade, tau hyperphosphorylation, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced levels of neurotrophic factors, and damage and loss of synapses as well as cholinergic neurons. The multi-target characteristics of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) may be advantageous over single-target drugs in the treatment of complex diseases. These drugs have therefore attracted more attention in the research and development of AD therapies. This review describes advances made in experimental studies of TCM for AD treatment. It discusses research, from our group and other laboratories, on TCM compound drugs (Shenwu capsule) and approximately 10 Chinese medicinal herb extracts (tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside, epimedium flavonoid, icariin, cornel iridoid glycoside, ginsenoside, puerarin, clausenamide, huperzine A, and timosaponins). PMID:26268330

  2. Access to Higher Education. Programme of Study into the Future of Higher Education. Research into Higher Education Monographs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Oliver, Ed.; And Others

    Issues pertaining to access to higher education in Great Britain are considered in seven papers. Medium- and long-term policy issues concerning the demand for and access of British residents to higher education at the undergraduate level are reviewed by Oliver Fulton, who also outlines policies to increase demand and improve access, along with…

  3. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Samulyak, Roman V.; Parks, Paul

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  4. Improving Data Availability for Better Access Performance: A Study on Caching Scientific Data on Distributed Workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Xiaosong; Zhang, Zhe; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S

    2009-01-01

    Client-side data caching serves as an excellent mechanism to store and analyze the rapidly growing amount of scientific data. In our previous work, we built a distributed local cache on unreliable desktop storage contributions. This offers several desirable properties, such as performance impedance matching, improved space utilization, and high parallel I/O bandwidth. Such a low-cost, best-effort cache, however, is faced with the vagaries of storage node availability: these donated machines may be significantly less reliable than dedicated systems and cannot be controlled centrally. In this paper, we address %the tradeoffs between techniques that favor %availability or performance when it comes to cache management. the performance impact of data availability in the distributed scientific data cache setting. We then present a novel approach to storage cache management, {\\em remote partial data recovery (RPDR)}. We compare our approach to two standard techniques, namely replication and erasure coding, both extended to the target caching environment. Our evaluation uses a trace-driven simulation parameterized with benchmarking results from our distributed cache prototype. The results with multiple real-world traces indicate that RPDR significantly outperforms both replication and erasure coding in many cases and overall the combination of RPDR and erasure coding yields the best performance.

  5. The effect of socioeconomic status on access to primary care: an audit study

    PubMed Central

    Olah, Michelle E.; Gaisano, Gregory; Hwang, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    socioeconomic status received preferential access to primary care over those presenting themselves as having low socioeconomic status. PMID:23439620

  6. Microchannel arrays with improved accessibility and use for cell studies and emulsification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Yuji; Kikuchi, Hiroko E.; Kuboki, Yoshinori; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi

    2000-03-01

    Arrays of microgrooves (groove width; 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, and 14 micrometer, groove interval; width x3, x10, and x20, one size and interval per chip) each connecting a center well and a side edge of a silicon substrate were created by photolithography and anisotropic wet etching. A penetrating hole was made by sand blast at the substrate center for the access to the center well. By tightly covering the substrate surface with a glass plate, the microgroove arrays were converted to microchannel arrays having one ends open at the side edges of the substrate. These microchannel arrays were used for cell trapping for microinjection and also used for emulsification. Poplar (Populus alba) protoplasts were used for the test of cell trapping. Cells showed a very large variation in size and irregularity in shape, and, furthermore, the protoplast preparation contained a number of cell membrane fragments and chloroplasts. Despite the cell size and shape variations and obstruction by the admixtures, many cells could be trapped by aspiration at the channel ends because of their openness to the outside free space and also their large multiplicity in parallel. The free space outside the side of the substrate allowed a free manipulation of a glass micropipette under microscopic observation using transmitted illumination. The microscopic observation direction nearly perpendicular to the movement directions of the micropipette further allowed the movement of the pipette tip nearly always in focus. These led to an easy pointing and puncturing. In addition, the cell trapping points in a line made successive approach to adjacent cells easier. Soybean oil containing 1.5 wt% polyoxyethylene(20)sorbitan monoolete as a surfactant was forced to flow into physiological saline filling the outside of the substrate through the microchannels. Regularly sized oil particles were created by this process with a variation coefficient (S.D./mean) 16% of their diameter. This variation, which is

  7. Study of the performance of sealing systems for access shafts in a high-level waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Saotome, A.; Hara, K.; Okamoto, J.

    1993-12-31

    Shaft sealing in a high-level waste (HLW) disposal system functions to minimize the water flow passage, and retard the radionuclide transport from the repository to the accessible environment. It is important to estimate the radionuclide migration along the sealed shaft from the viewpoint of the design and the performance assessment of the sealing system. This study presents the results of sensitivity analyses on the radionuclide migration in the vicinity of the access shaft of a repository in order to evaluate the effects of the length of a plug, as well as the number of plugs, and curtain grouts. In this study, the upward hydraulic gradient of the groundwater flow along shafts was used, based on transient coupled thermo-hydraulic analyses around a repository. Hydraulic conductivities of the backfill material and the disturbed zones around the shaft tunnels were also assumed to be one order and two orders of magnitude higher than that of the host rock, respectively. The results show that the velocity of the groundwater within the shaft and the disturbed zone is reduced by a factor of one third by installing a few plugs into the shaft filled with backfill material. The curtain grouts have the effect of retarding the radionuclide migration from the repository to the ground surface at a factor of approximately five. A few plug installations have the same effect. The sealing system properly constituted with backfill, plugs, and grouts can provide the same performance, as the original host rock.

  8. Infrared thermal imaging as a physiological access pathway: a study of the baseline characteristics of facial skin temperatures.

    PubMed

    Nhan, B R; Chau, T

    2009-04-01

    In this study we examine the baseline characteristics of facial skin temperature, as measured by dynamic infrared thermal imaging, to gauge its potential as a physiological access pathway for non-verbal individuals with severe motor impairments. Frontal facial recordings were obtained from 12 asymptomatic adults in a resting state with a high-end infrared thermal imaging system. From the infrared thermal recordings, mean skin temperature time series were generated for regions of interest encompassing the nasal, periorbital and supraorbital areas. A 90% bandwidth for all regions of interest was found to be in the 1 Hz range. Over 70% of the time series were identified as nonstationary (p<0.05), with the nonstationary mean as the greatest contributing source. Correlation coefficients between regions were significant (p<0.05) and ranged from values of 0.30 (between periorbital and supraorbital regions) to 0.75 (between contralateral supraorbital regions). Using information measures, we concluded that the greatest degree of information existed in the nasal and periorbital regions. Mutual information existed across all regions but was especially prominent between the nasal and periorbital regions. Results from this study provide insight into appropriate analysis methods and potential discriminating features for the application of facial skin temperature as a physiological access pathway. PMID:19332894

  9. Parental influences on adolescent video game play: a study of accessibility, rules, limit setting, monitoring, and cybersafety.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lisa J; Gradisar, Michael; King, Daniel L

    2015-05-01

    Adolescents' video gaming is increasing at a rapid rate. Yet, little is known about what factors contribute toward more hours of gaming per week, as well as what factors may limit or protect adolescents from excessive gaming. The aim of the present study was to examine associations between adolescents' accessibility to video gaming devices, the locations played (i.e., bedroom, shared rooms), parental regulation of technology use, and the amount of hours spent video gaming during the week (weekdays vs. weekends). Adolescents (N=422; age 16.3±2.0 years, 41% male) completed an online questionnaire battery, including demographics, video gaming behaviors (e.g., hours played weekdays/weekends, time of day played, devices owned, locations played, etc.), and a questionnaire measuring aspects of parents' regulation of game playing (e.g., rules, limit setting, co-gaming). Accessibility to the adolescents' own devices, but not shared devices or device portability, was predictive of hours gaming on weekdays and weekends. Location (i.e., bedroom) was associated with increased gaming across the week. Parents discussing cybersafety was predictive of lower hours of gaming (weekdays and weekends). However, limit setting, monitoring, and co-gaming showed no significant effects. Adolescents' access to their own gaming equipped devices, as well as gaming in their bedrooms, were linked to increased hours of gaming. The findings suggest that in order to curb the increase in hours gaming, parents are advised to delay the ownership of adolescents' devices, encourage use in shared rooms, and discuss aspects of cybersafety with their teenage children. PMID:25965861

  10. Impact on access to medicines from TRIPS-Plus: a case study of Thai-US FTA.

    PubMed

    Kessomboon, Nusaraporn; Limpananont, Jiraporn; Kulsomboon, Vidhaya; Maleewong, Usawadee; Eksaengsri, Achara; Paothong, Prinya

    2010-05-01

    This study assessed the impact of the Thai-US Free Trade Agreement (FTA) on access to medicines in Thailand. We first interpreted the text of the sixth round of Thai-US negotiations in 2006 on intellectual property rights (IPR). The impact was estimated using a macroeconomic model of the impact of changes in IPR. The estimated impact is based on a comparison between the current IPR situation and the proposed changes to IPR. The FTA text involves the period of patent extension from the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights Agreement (TRIPS Agreement). The provisions involve the period of patent extension, which have to do with compensation for delays in patent registration and/or drug registration, data exclusivity that would result in a delay in generic drug entry, and the enforcing role of the Thai Food and Drug Administration of patent linkages. As a worst case scenario for this single provision, a 10 year patent extension would be given to compensate for delays in patent registration and/or drug registration. The impact on access to medicine, in the year 2027, would be: 1) A 32% increase in the medicine price index, 2) spending on medicines would increase to approximately USD 11,191 million, (USD1 = THB 33.9 on September 2, 2009), and 3) the domestic industry could loss USD 3.3 million. These results suggest there would be a severe restriction on the access to medicines under the TRIPS-Plus proposal. IPR protection of pharmaceuticals per the TRIPS-Plus proposal should be excluded from FTA negotiations. PMID:20578557

  11. Is the intraosseous access route fast and efficacious compared to conventional central venous catheterization in adult patients under resuscitation in the emergency department? A prospective observational pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Leidel, Bernd A; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Bogner, Viktoria; Stegmaier, Julia; Mutschler, Wolf; Kanz, Karl-Georg; Braunstein, Volker

    2009-01-01

    Background For patients' safety reasons, current American Heart Association and European Resuscitation Council guidelines recommend intraosseous (IO) vascular access as an alternative in cases of emergency, if prompt venous catheterization is impossible. The purpose of this study was to compare the IO access as a bridging procedure versus central venous catheterization (CVC) for in-hospital adult emergency patients under resuscitation with impossible peripheral intravenous (IV) access. We hypothesised, that CVC is faster and more efficacious compared to IO access. Methods A prospective observational study comparing success rates and procedure times of IO access (EZ-IO, Vidacare Corporation) versus CVC in adult (≥18 years of age) patients under trauma and medical resuscitation admitted to our emergency department with impossible peripheral IV catheterization was conducted. Procedure time was defined from preparation and insertion of vascular access type until first drug or infusion solution administration. Success rate on first attempt and procedure time for each access route was evaluated and statistically tested. Results Ten consecutive adult patients under resuscitation, each receiving IO access and CVC, were analyzed. IO access was performed with 10 tibial or humeral insertions, CVC in 10 internal jugular or subclavian veins. The success rate on first attempt was 90% for IO insertion versus 60% for CVC. Mean procedure time was significantly lower for IO cannulation (2.3 min ± 0.8) compared to CVC (9.9 min ± 3.7) (p < 0.001). As for complications, failure of IO access was observed in one patient, while two or more attempts of CVC were necessary in four patients. No other relevant complications, like infection, bleeding or pneumothorax were observed. Conclusion Preliminary data demonstrate that IO access is a reliable bridging method to gain vascular access for in-hospital adult emergency patients under trauma or medical resuscitation with impossible

  12. Embryos of the zebrafish Danio rerio in studies of non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Choi, V W Y; Yu, K N

    2015-01-01

    The use of embryos of the zebrafish Danio rerio as an in vivo tumor model for studying non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation was reviewed. The zebrafish embryo is an animal model, which enables convenient studies on non-targeted effects of both high-linear-energy-transfer (LET) and low-LET radiation by making use of both broad-beam and microbeam radiation. Zebrafish is also a convenient embryo model for studying radiobiological effects of ionizing radiation on tumors. The embryonic origin of tumors has been gaining ground in the past decades, and efforts to fight cancer from the perspective of developmental biology are underway. Evidence for the involvement of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI) and the radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) in zebrafish embryos were subsequently given. The results of RIGI were obtained for the irradiation of all two-cell stage cells, as well as 1.5 hpf zebrafish embryos by microbeam protons and broad-beam alpha particles, respectively. In contrast, the RIBE was observed through the radioadaptive response (RAR), which was developed against a subsequent challenging dose that was applied at 10 hpf when <0.2% and <0.3% of the cells of 5 hpf zebrafish embryos were exposed to a priming dose, which was provided by microbeam protons and broad-beam alpha particles, respectively. Finally, a perspective on the field, the need for future studies and the significance of such studies were discussed. PMID:24176822

  13. LC-MS based screening and targeted profiling methods for complex plant: coffee a case study.

    PubMed

    da Rosa, Jeane Santos; Freitas-Silva, Otniel; Pacheco, Sidney; de Oliveira Godoy, Ronoel Luiz; de Rezende, Claudia Moraes

    2012-11-01

    In the recent years the way of thinking about human health necessarily passes by human food. Recent discoveries are not only concerned about valuable biomolecules but also contaminants. Thus, the screening of substances in animal and vegetable matrices by analytical techniques is focused on the presence and absence of target substance. In both cases, the majority of these substances are present as traces or in very low levels. Contaminants could be naturally present in the food, inserted on it or even developed on it as a consequence of food processing or cooking. Pesticides, mycotoxins, dioxins, acrylamide, Sudan red, melamine and now 4(5)-methylimidazole can be, at present, be listed as some of the world big problems related to food contaminants and adulterants. With the development of liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS), in the last few decades, analysis of some food contaminants in trace levels trace become less laborious, more accurate and precise. The multiple approach of those techniques make possible to obtain many results in one single run. On the other hand, European Union (2002/657/EC) established regulations for analytical methods regarding mass spectrometry as detection tool, showing the importance of this technique in food quality control. The EU criteria uses identification points (IPs) that could be achieved basically with four product ions (including molecular ion) or reduced with the use of high resolution equipments. This kind of mass spectrometers made the IPs criteria more accessible, as the exact mass information is a differential tool. In view of this the aim of this review is to present the actual scenario for mass spectrometry analysis in a complex vegetable food matrix such as roasted coffee, with emphasis on needs and challenges regarding the LC-MS technique in order to meet and contribute to food safety standards in this complex matrix. PMID:22519371

  14. Accessing word meaning in two languages: an event-related brain potential study of beginning bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Ruben P; Holcomb, Phillip J; Grainger, Jonathan

    2003-11-01

    Twenty-eight native-English speakers enrolled in beginning and intermediate university Spanish courses participated in a mixed language semantic categorization task in which critical words were presented in English (L1) and Spanish (L2) and repetitions of these words (within- and between-languages) were presented on subsequent trials (i.e., immediate repetition). Event-related potentials were recorded to all items allowing for comparisons of the N400 component to repetitions within- and between-languages as well as to words presented for the first time. Three important findings were observed in this sample of participants during relatively early stages of acquiring a second language. First, in the typical N400 window (300-500ms), between-language repetition (translation) produced a smaller reduction in N400 amplitude than did within-language repetition. Second, the time-course of between-language repetition effects tended to be more extended in time and differed as a function of language with L2-L1 repetitions producing larger priming effects early (during the typical N400 window) and L1-L2 repetitions producing larger priming effects later (during windows after the typical N400). Third, a greater negativity in the ERP waveforms was observed when the word on the directly preceding trial was from the other language. Within the time frame of the N400, this language switch effect arose only when the target word was Spanish and the preceding word English (i.e., L1-L2). The results are discussed within the framework of current models of bilingual lexical processing. PMID:14585298

  15. Morphological Study of the Relationships between Weedy Rice Accessions (Oryza sativa Complex) and Commercial Rice Varieties in Pulau Pinang Rice Granary Area

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Zainudin PMD; Man, Azmi; Othman, Ahmad Sofiman

    2010-01-01

    Weedy rice (WR) is found in many direct-seeded rice fields. WR possesses morphological characteristics that are similar to cultivated rice varieties in the early stage of growth, making them more difficult to control than other weeds. A comparative morphological study was conducted by collecting WR accessions from four sites within the Pulau Pinang rice growing areas. The objective of the study was to characterise WR accessions of the Pulau Pinang rice granary by comparing their morphological characteristics to those of commercially grown rice in the area. Their morphometric relations were established by comparing 17 morphological characteristics of the WR accessions and the commercial varieties. A total of 36 WR morphotypes were identified from these 4 sites based on 17 characteristics, which included grain shattering habit and germination rate. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed that 45.88% of the variation observed among the WR accessions and commercial varieties were within the first 3 axes. PB6, PP2 and SGA5 WR accessions had a higher number of tillers and longer panicle lengths, culm heights and leaf lengths compared to the commercial rice. The grain sizes of the commercial varieties were slightly longer, and the chlorophyll contents at 60–70 days after sowing (DAS) were higher than those of the WR accessions. Results from this study are useful for predicting potential WR accession growth, which might improve WR management and agriculture practices that control WR in the future. PMID:24575197

  16. Blood Pressure Targets in CKD: Lessons Learned from SPRINT and Previous Observational Studies.

    PubMed

    Gosmanova, Elvira O; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2016-09-01

    Hypertension management is one of the most common clinical tasks in the care of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Elevated blood pressure (BP) is associated with greater risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular (CV) disease, and CKD progression in this population. However, it is still debated, to what target(s) BP should be lowered in patients with signs of kidney damage. The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) provided new and important information about the effects of lowering systolic BP to a target of <120 mmHg, which is lower than the levels currently recommended by the most guidelines (<140/90 mmHg). The SPRINT results were not only exciting but also surprising for many clinicians because evidence from well-conducted observational studies in CKD patient showed increased mortality in patients with CKD whose office systolic BP levels were <120 mmHg, as compared with systolic BP in 120-139 mmHg range. In the present review, we will discuss whether a systolic BP goal of <120 mmHg that was found to be beneficial for CV and all-cause mortality outcomes in the SPRINT can be generalized to the entire CKD population. PMID:27448402

  17. Study of the New Pulse NMR System for the Jefferson Lab Helium-3 Polarized Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Joseph

    2013-10-01

    At Jefferson Lab, a polarized Helium-3 target is used to study the neutron. The Helium-3 target is undergoing an upgrade to improve its polarization. Measuring it involved a new technique known as pulse Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). The focus of this project was to find noise in the Pulse NMR signal and to compute the calibration constant to make the polarization easier to deduce. Pulse NMR calibration tests were performed by doing AFP NMR measurements followed by Pulse NMR measurements while varying certain conditions. These included the convection heater, the operation of the oven, and the operation of the laser. Data analysis was done by fitting the pulse NMR signal from the oscilloscope and utilizing the Fourier Transform. Noise was analyzed in the fitting and the Fourier Transform. The calibration constants were affected by the convection heater. The values deviated between the pumping and target chambers of the cell when there was no convection but the values were closer when convection was induced. As far as the noise, it was found to be significant. These results will enable the calculation of the polarization with pulse NMR. In addition, the signal analysis provided insight into the influence of background noise on the pulse NMR measurement. This research was done though the SULI program of the Department of Energy.

  18. Development of Polarized Solid Targets for Spectroscopic Studies with Radioactive Ion Beams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrego-Blanco, J. P.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; van den Brandt, B.

    2005-04-01

    Exciting new findings with radioactive ion beams (RIBs) in nuclear spectroscopy have resulted in a growing interest in this field. In order to fully exploit the potential of RIBs it is necessary to develop appropriate experimental tools. We are investigating the possibility of introducing polarization observables in spectroscopic studies with RIBs, at energies around the Coulomb barrier, through polystyrene targets of polarized protons and deuterons in the thickness range between 20 and 100μm. The operation of such target systems requires a cooling scheme where the target is situated in the isolation vacuum of a cryostat in open connection to the vacuum of the beamline. This can be achieved by using two parallel polarized foils mounted on a copper tube, serving also as the NMR coil (for sampling the polarization), to form together a closed volume. Cooling of the foils is then achieved by a liquid helium bath (^4He or ^3He) via the copper tube, and subsequently via a superfluid ^4He film that can be added through the hollow NMR coil. The first tests of this proposed geometry are discussed and a status of the project is delivered.

  19. Nuclear Structure Studies in the 132Sn Region: Safe Coulex with Carbon Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Allmond, James M; Stuchbery, Andrew E; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Padilla-Rodal, Elizabeth; Radford, David C; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Howard, Meredith E; Liang, J Felix; Manning, Brett M; Pain, Steven D; Stone, N. J.; Varner, Jr, Robert L; Yu, Chang-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The collective and single-particle structure of nuclei in the 132Sn region was recently studied by Coulomb excitation and heavy-ion induced transfer reactions using carbon, beryllium, and titanium targets. In particular, Coulomb excitation was used determine a complete set of electromagnetic moments for the first 2+ states and one-neutron transfer was used to probe the purity and evolution of single-neutron states. These recent experiments were conducted at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at ORNL using a CsI-HPGe detector array (BareBall- CLARION) to detect scattered particles and emitted gamma rays from the in-beam reactions. A Bragg-curve detector was used to measure the energy loss of the various beams through the targets and to measure the radioactive beam compositions. A sample of the Coulomb excitation results is presented here with an emphasis placed on 116Sn. In particular, the safe Coulex criterion for carbon targets will be analyzed and discussed.

  20. Nuclear Structure Studies in the 132Sn Region: “Safe Coulex” with Carbon Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allmond, J. M.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Radford, D. C.; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Howard, M. E.; Liang, J. F.; Manning, B.; Pain, S. D.; Stone, N. J.; Varner, R. L.; Yu, C.-H.

    2015-09-01

    The collective and single-particle structure of nuclei in the 132Sn region was recently studied by Coulomb excitation and heavy-ion induced transfer reactions using carbon, beryllium, and titanium targets. In particular, Coulomb excitation was used determine a complete set of electromagnetic moments for the first 2+ states and one-neutron transfer was used to probe the purity and evolution of single-neutron states. These recent experiments were conducted at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at ORNL using a Csl-HPGe detector array (BareBall- CLARION) to detect scattered particles and emitted gamma rays from the in-beam reactions. A Bragg-curve detector was used to measure the energy loss of the various beams through the targets and to measure the radioactive beam compositions. A sample of the Coulomb excitation results is presented here with an emphasis placed on 116Sn. In particular, the “safe Coulex” criterion for carbon targets will be analyzed and discussed.

  1. A numerical study of the target system of an ADSS with different flow guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, K. Arul; Rathis Kumar, B. V.; Biswas, G.

    2007-02-01

    The mechanical design of the target module of an accelerator driven sub- critical nuclear reactor system (ADSS) calls for an analysis of the related thermal-hydraulic issues because of large amount of heat deposition in the spallation region during the course of nuclear interactions with the molten lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) target. The LBE also should carry the entire heat generated as a consequence of the spallation reaction. The problem of heat removal by the LBE is a challenging thermal-hydraulic issue. For this, one has to examine the flows of low Prandtl number fluids (LBE) in a complex ADSS geometry. In this study, the equations governing the laminar flow and thermal energy are solved numerically using the streamline upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) finite element (FE) method. The target systems with a straight and a nozzle guide have been considered. The principal purpose of the analysis is to trace the flow and temperature distribution and thereby to check the suitability of the flow guide in avoiding the recirculation or stagnation zones in the flow space that may lead to hot spots.

  2. 111In-cetuximab as a diagnostic agent by accessible epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor targeting in human metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ying-Hsia; Peng, Cheng-Liang; Lee, Shin-Yu; Chiang, Ping-Fang; Yao, Cheng-Jung; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Shieh, Ming-Jium

    2015-06-30

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma is a common cause death cancer in the whole world. The aim of this study is to define the 111In-cetuximab as a diagnosis tracer of human colorectal adenocarcinoma. In this research, cell uptake, nano-SPECT/CT scintigraphy, autoradiography, biodistribution and immunohitochemical staining of EGF receptor were included. HCT-116 and HT-29 cell expressed a relatively high and moderate level of EGF receptor, respectively. The nano-SPECT/CT image of 111In-cetuximab showed tumor radiation uptake of subcutaneous HCT-116 xenograft tumor was higher than SW-620. Autoradiography image also showed that tumor of HCT-116 had high 111In-cetuximab uptake. Mice that bearing CT-26 in situ xenograft colorectal tumors showed similar high uptake in vivo and ex vivo through nano-SPECT/CT imaging at 72 hours. Metastatic HCT-116/Luc tumors demonstrated the highest uptake at 72 hours after the injection of 111In-cetuximab. Relatively, results of 111In-DTPA showed that metabolism through urinary system, especially in the kidney. The quantitative analysis of biodistribution showed count value of metastatic HCT-116/Luc tumors that treated with 111In-cetuximab had a significant difference (P < 0.05) compared with that treated with 111In-DTPA after injection 72 hours. Result of immunohistologic staining of EGF receptor also showed high EGF receptor expression and uptake in metastatic colorectal tumors. In summary, we suggested that 111In-cetuximab will be a potential tool for detecting EGF receptor expression in human metastatic colorectal carcinoma. PMID:26062654

  3. Discordant indigenous and provider frames explain challenges in improving access to arthritis care: a qualitative study using constructivist grounded theory

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Access to health services is a determinant of population health and is known to be reduced for a variety of specialist services for Indigenous populations in Canada. With arthritis being the most common chronic condition experienced by Indigenous populations and causing high levels of disability, it is critical to resolve access disparities through an understanding of barriers and facilitators to care. The objective of this study was to inform future health services reform by investigating health care access from the perspective of Aboriginal people with arthritis and health professionals. Methods Using constructivist grounded theory methodology we investigated Indigenous peoples’ experiences in accessing arthritis care through the reports of 16 patients and 15 healthcare providers in Alberta, Canada. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between July 2012 and February 2013 and transcribed verbatim. The patient and provider data were first analyzed separately by two team members then brought together to form a framework. The framework was refined through further analysis following the multidisciplinary research team's discussions. Once the framework was developed, reports on the patient and provider data were shared with each participant group independently and participants were interviewed to assess validity of the summary. Results In the resulting theoretical framework Indigenous participants framed their experience with arthritis as 'toughing it out’ and spoke of racism encountered in the healthcare setting as a deterrent to pursuing care. Healthcare providers were frustrated by high disease severity and missed appointments, and framed Indigenous patients as lacking 'buy-in’. Constraints imposed by complex healthcare systems contributed to tensions between Indigenous peoples and providers. Conclusion Low specialist care utilization rates among Indigenous people cannot be attributed to cultural and social preferences. Further, the

  4. Associations Between Target Lesion Restenosis and Drug-Eluting Balloon Use: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Chieh; Wu, Chiung-Jen; Chen, Yung-Lung; Chung, Wen-Jung; Hsueh, Shu-Kai; Hang, Chi-Ling; Fang, Chih-Yuan; Fang, Hsiu-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) with drug-eluting balloons (DEBs) have emerged as an adjunctive treatment for in-stent restenosis (ISR) lesions. However, recurrent restenosis still occurs following DEB use. Our study aimed to identify the associations of target lesion restenosis following DEB use over a 1-year clinical follow-up.Between November 2011 and May 2014, 246 patients were diagnosed with coronary artery ISR in our hospital. A total of 335 coronary ISR lesions were treated with DEBs. The 1-year patent coronary artery group was defined as those with negative noninvasive examinations and no clinical symptoms, or those with no angiographic restenosis. The 1-year current restenosis group was defined as those with angiographic restenosis. Clinical results were compared between 2 groups. Univariate and multivariate cox regression analyses were performed to identify the associations of target lesion restenosis following DEB use.Patients' average age was 64.96 ± 10.68 years, and 77.2% were men. Non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction was more frequent as the clinical presentation in the 1-year current restenosis group, whereas stable angina was more frequent in the 1-year patent coronary artery group. The 1-year current restenosis group exhibited higher percentages of comorbidities, including hypertension, diabetes, prior myocardial infarction, heart failure, prior coronary artery bypass grafting, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Regardless of ostial ISR or nonostial ISR, the results of drug-eluting stent ISR were worse than those for bare-metal stent ISR. Multivariate analysis revealed that ESRD, and coronary ostial lesion, and the severity of pre-PCI stenosis were independently associated with target lesion restenosis following DEB use (P = 0.020, P = 0.009, P = 0.026, respectively).ESRD, and coronary ostial lesion, and the severity of pre-PCI stenosis were independently associated with recurrent target lesion restenosis

  5. Teaching Elderly Adults to Use the Internet to Access Health Care Information: Before-After Study

    PubMed Central

    Nolfi, David A

    2005-01-01

    Background Much has been written about the Internet's potential to revolutionize health care delivery. As younger populations increasingly utilize Internet-based health care information, it will be essential to ensure that the elderly become adept at using this medium for health care purposes, especially those from minority, low income, and limited educational backgrounds. Objective This paper presents the results of a program designed to teach elderly adults to use the Internet to access health care information. The objective was to examine whether the training led to changes in participant's perceptions of their health, perceptions of their interactions with health care providers, health information–seeking behaviors, and self-care activities. Methods Participants attended a 5-week training course held in public libraries and senior community centers within the greater Pittsburgh and Allegheny County region. Classes within each seminar lasted 2 hours and consisted of lecture and hands-on training. Baseline surveys were administered prior to the course, 5-week follow-up surveys were administered immediately after the course, and final surveys were mailed 1 year later. Instruments included the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) Scale, which measures three domains of locus of control (internal, external, and chance); the Krantz Health Opinion Survey (HOS); and the Lau, Hartman, and Ware Health Value Survey. Two additional questionnaires included multiple choice and qualitative questions designed to measure participants' Internet utilization and levels of health care participation. The Health Participation Survey was administered with the baseline survey. The Internet Use Survey was administered at the 1-year mark and contained several items from the Health Participation Survey, which allowed comparison between baseline and 1-year responses. Results Of the 60 elderly adults who began the training course, 42 (mean age 72) completed the entire 5-week

  6. The Richardson Study Dissemination and Implementation. A Leadership Accessing Monograph: Education of Gifted and Talented Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, June

    This monograph describes the organization, findings, and impact of a 4-year study which investigated programming options for able learners. The study had three goals: to find out what was being done in schools for able learners, to judge the effectiveness of current programs, and to recommend practices and programs which would result in…

  7. Studies in Art Therapy 1962-1998: Access to Fantasies and Cognitive Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Rawley A.

    This volume contains a compendium of the work of Rawley Silver. A founding member of the American Art Therapy Association, Silver is both an artist and a researcher; she is the originator of the Silver Drawing Test (SDT). In Part 1, nine studies in the area of "Hearing Impairments and Language Disorders" include three studies on art education for…

  8. Exploring Perspectives of Communications Students toward Media Access and Use: A Q Method Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Angel Noel

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to help news industry professionals and educators tailor their services to a young audience that has grown up among a plethora of media options. To better reach and educate today's up-and-coming media professionals, those in the industry need a better understanding of modern media students' perspectives of news. This study used Q…

  9. Improving Access to Elementary School Social Studies Instruction: Strategies to Support Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciullo, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Social studies instruction in upper elementary school (Grades 3-5) is important for building foundational content knowledge to equip students for the secondary school curriculum. Due to numerous school initiatives and demands on the time of teachers, social studies instruction can play second fiddle to reading and mathematics instruction, which…

  10. A Study of ICT Infrastructure and Access to Educational Information in the Outskirts of Malang

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmunsyah, Hakkun

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the readiness of disadvantaged areas in support of Electronic School Books (BSE), which could be downloaded free of charge by making use of Information Communication Technology (ICT). The present study was descriptive research which was approached quantitatively, and expected to expand the model of development of…

  11. Toward a Society Where Everyone Is Always Studying: Access at an Elite Chilean Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadlier, Stephen T.; Arancibia, María Cristina

    2015-01-01

    After the 1973 coup, Chile swung from a centralized state to a dictatorial decentralized one where education turned from a public to a private good. Since the 1990 restoration of democracy, market-based trends have endured, involving the fomentation of a knowledge society, one where everyone is always studying. The present study, drawn from an…

  12. Where We Are: Disability and Accessibility--Moving beyond Disability 2.0 in Composition Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Tara; Dolmage, Jay; Price, Margaret; Lewiecki-Wilson, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    The authors' perception, as specialists at the intersection of disability studies and composition studies, is that disability has arrived--in the sense that it is now on most peoples' radar. Most have come to think of it as "Disability 2.0": the state where acceptance of disabled students and teachers as belonging in our…

  13. Scholarly Learning as Vocation: A Study of Community and Broad Access Liberal Arts College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terosky, Aimee LaPointe; Gonzales, Leslie D.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we extended Neumann's scholarly learning theory (2009)?and Hansen's theory on vocation (1994, 1995) to explore the scholarly learning of faculty members employed at institutional types not typically recognized for faculty work beyond teaching. Through interviews with 22 participants, we studied the content of and reasons for…

  14. Exploring inequalities in access to care and the provision of choice to women seeking breast reconstruction surgery: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Potter, S; Mills, N; Cawthorn, S; Wilson, S; Blazeby, J

    2013-01-01

    Background: Breast reconstruction (BR) may improve psychosocial and cosmetic outcomes after mastectomy for breast cancer but currently, few women opt for surgery. Reasons for this are unclear. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore access to care and the provision of procedure choice to women seeking reconstructive surgery. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of patients who had undergone BR and professionals providing specialist care explored participants' experiences of information provision before BR. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the constant comparative technique of grounded theory. Sampling, data collection and analysis were performed concurrently and iteratively until data saturation was achieved. Results: Both patients and professionals expressed concerns about the provision of adequate procedure choice and access to care. Lack of information and/or time, involvement in decision making and issues relating to the evolution and organisation of reconstructive services, emerged as potential explanations for the inequalities seen. Interventions to improve cross-speciality collaboration were proposed to address these issues. Conclusion: Inequalities in the provision of choice in BR exist, which may be explained by a lack of integration between surgical specialities. Pathway restructuring, service reorganisation and standardisation of training may enhance cross-speciality collaboration and improve the patient experience. PMID:23928662

  15. Evidence supporting the 19 β-strand model for Tom40 from cysteine scanning and protease site accessibility studies.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Sebastian W K; Taylor, Rebecca D; Go, Nancy E; Wong, Annie; Sherman, E Laura; Nargang, Frank E

    2014-08-01

    Most proteins found in mitochondria are translated in the cytosol and enter the organelle via the TOM complex (translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane). Tom40 is the pore forming component of the complex. Although the three-dimensional structure of Tom40 has not been determined, the structure of porin, a related protein, has been shown to be a β-barrel containing 19 membrane spanning β-strands and an N-terminal α-helical region. The evolutionary relationship between the two proteins has allowed modeling of Tom40 into a similar structure by several laboratories. However, it has been suggested that the 19-strand porin structure does not represent the native form of the protein. If true, modeling of Tom40 based on the porin structure would also be invalid. We have used substituted cysteine accessibility mapping to identify several potential β-strands in the Tom40 protein in isolated mitochondria. These data, together with protease accessibility studies, support the 19 β-strand model for Tom40 with the C-terminal end of the protein localized to the intermembrane space. PMID:24947507

  16. Finding the loopholes: a cross-sectional qualitative study of systemic barriers to treatment access for women drug court participants

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Diane S.; Silverstein, Jennifer; Thomas, Katherine; Bedel, Precious; Cerulli, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic diversion courts seek to address justice-involved participants’ underlying problems leading to their legal system involvement, including substance use disorder, psychiatric illness, and intimate partner violence. The courts have not addressed systemic hurdles, which can contribute to a cycle of substance use disorder and recidivism, which in turn hinder health and wellness. The study purpose is to explore the systemic issues faced by women participants in drug treatment court from multiple perspectives to understand how these issues may relate to health and wellness in their lives. Methods Qualitative thematic framework analysis of five separate focus groups consisting of female drug treatment court participants, community providers, and court staff (n = 25). Themes were mapped across the socio-ecological framework and contextualized according to social determinants of health. Results Numerous systemic factors impacted women’s access to treatment. Laws and legal policies (governance) excluded those who could potentially have benefitted from therapeutic court and did not allow consideration of parenting issues. Macroeconomic policies limit housing options for those with convictions. Social policies limited transportation, education, and employment options. Public policies limited healthcare and social protection and ability to access available resources. Culture and societal values, including stigma, limited treatment options. Conclusions By understanding the social determinant of health for women in drug treatment court and stakeholder’s perceptions, the legal system can implement public policy to better address the health needs of women drug court participants. PMID:26478853

  17. Evidence Supporting the 19 β-Strand Model for Tom40 from Cysteine Scanning and Protease Site Accessibility Studies*

    PubMed Central

    Lackey, Sebastian W. K.; Taylor, Rebecca D.; Go, Nancy E.; Wong, Annie; Sherman, E. Laura; Nargang, Frank E.

    2014-01-01

    Most proteins found in mitochondria are translated in the cytosol and enter the organelle via the TOM complex (translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane). Tom40 is the pore forming component of the complex. Although the three-dimensional structure of Tom40 has not been determined, the structure of porin, a related protein, has been shown to be a β-barrel containing 19 membrane spanning β-strands and an N-terminal α-helical region. The evolutionary relationship between the two proteins has allowed modeling of Tom40 into a similar structure by several laboratories. However, it has been suggested that the 19-strand porin structure does not represent the native form of the protein. If true, modeling of Tom40 based on the porin structure would also be invalid. We have used substituted cysteine accessibility mapping to identify several potential β-strands in the Tom40 protein in isolated mitochondria. These data, together with protease accessibility studies, support the 19 β-strand model for Tom40 with the C-terminal end of the protein localized to the intermembrane space. PMID:24947507

  18. Endovascular Revascularization of Chronically Thrombosed Arteriovenous Fistulas and Grafts for Hemodialysis: A Retrospective Study in 15 Patients With 18 Access Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Weng Meijui; Chen, Matt Chiung-Yu; Chi Wenche; Liu Yichun; Liang, Huei-Lung; Pan, Huay-Ben

    2011-04-15

    The current study retrospectively evaluated whether endovascular revascularization of chronically thrombosed and long-discarded vascular access sites for hemodialysis was feasible. Technical and clinical success rates, postintervention primary and secondary patency rates, and complications were reported. During a 1-year period, we reviewed a total of 924 interventions performed for dysfunction and/or failed hemodialysis vascular access sites and permanent catheters in 881 patients. In patients whose vascular access-site problems were considered untreatable or were considered treatable with a high risk of failure and access-site abandonment, we attempted to revascularize (resurrect) the chronically occluded and long-discarded (mummy) vascular access sites. We attempted to resurrect a total of 18 mummy access sites (mean age 46.6 {+-} 38.7 months; range 5-144) in 15 patients (8 women and 7 men; mean age 66.2 {+-} 11.5 years; age range 50-85) and had an overall technical success rate of 77.8%. Resurrection failure occurred in 3 fistulas and in 1 straight graft. The clinical success rate was 100% at 2 months after resurrection. In the 14 resurrected vascular access sites, 6 balloon-assisted maturation procedures were required in 5 fistulas; after access-site maturation, a total of 22 interventions were performed to maintain access-site patency. The mean go-through time for successful resurrection procedures was 146.6 {+-} 34.3 min (range 74-193). Postmaturation primary patency rates were 71.4 {+-} 12.1% at 30 days, 57.1 {+-} 13.2% at 60 days, 28.6 {+-} 13.4% at 90 days, and 19 {+-} 11.8% at 180 days. Postmaturation secondary patency rates were 100% at 30, 60, and 90 days and 81.8 {+-} 11.6% at 180 days. There were 2 major complications consisting of massive venous ruptures in 2 mummy access sites during balloon dilation; in both cases, prolonged balloon inflation failed to achieve hemostasis, but percutaneous N-butyl cyanoacrylate glue seal-off was performed

  19. Access to antiretroviral therapy for adults and children with HIV infection in developing countries: Horizons studies, 2002-2008.

    PubMed

    Sarna, Avina; Kellerman, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The Access-to-Treatment research initiative of the Population Council's Horizons program undertook 11 projects across Asia and sub-Saharan Africa from 2002 to 2008. The projects included a variety of cross-sectional exploratory studies, situation analyses, and longitudinal randomized, controlled intervention studies that examined service delivery, community awareness, health-seeking behaviors, adherence, cost, and other factors affecting treatment for adults and children infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This article summarizes the key findings and lessons learned from these projects, and examines cross-cutting issues such as stigma, quality of life, and sexual-risk behaviors among people living with HIV and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome on antiretroviral therapy. The article concludes with recommendations for evidence-based programming and future research around treatment for both children and adults. PMID:20297759

  20. Erotized, AIDS-HIV information on public-access television: a study of obscenity, state censorship and cultural resistance.

    PubMed

    Lukenbill, W B

    1998-06-01

    This study analyzes court records of a county-level obscenity trial in Austin, Texas, and the appeal of the guilty verdict beginning with a Texas appellate court up to the U.S. Supreme Court of two individuals who broadcast erotized AIDS and HIV safer sex information on a public-access cable television. The trial and appellate court decisions are reviewed in terms of argument themes, and the nature of sexual value controversy is outlined. Erotic materials often conflict with broad-based sexual and community values, and providing erotized HIV and AIDS information products can be a form of radical political action designed to force societal change. This study raises question as to how this trial and this type of informational product might affect the programs and activities of information resource centers, community-based organizations, libraries, and the overall mission of public health education. PMID:9642421

  1. Rheumatology at the general practitioner/hospital interface: a study of prevalence and access to specialist care.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, F M; Barber, J H; Sturrock, R D

    1990-01-01

    Four general practices with a combined population of 23,300 in the west of Scotland participated in a record research and questionnaire assessment of 551 patients with rheumatic diseases. The study describes the prevalence, levels of disability found, and the types of service used. Even with this number of patients it was not possible to detect any significant differences in disability levels, use of second line drugs, or aids/appliances when comparing practices with adequate or inadequate access to rheumatological facilities (general practitioner perception). General practice is an appropriate setting in which to investigate the effect of service provision, but larger studies will be needed to reach more definite conclusions. PMID:2270971

  2. The German Thorotrast Cohort Study: a review and how to get access to the data.

    PubMed

    Grosche, B; Birschwilks, M; Wesch, H; Kaul, A; van Kaick, G

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that exposures like those from (226)Ra, (224)Ra and Thorotrast(®) injections increase the risk of neoplasia in bone marrow and liver. The thorium-based radioactive contrast agent Thorotrast(®) was introduced in 1929 and applied worldwide until the 1950s, especially in angiography and arteriography. Due to the extremely long half-life of several hundred years and the life-long retention of the thorium dioxide particles in the human body, patients suffer lifetime internal exposure. The health effects from the incorporated thorium were investigated in a few cohort studies with a German study being the largest among them. This retrospective cohort study was set up in 1968 with a follow-up until 2004. The study comprises 2326 Thorotrast patients and 1890 patients of a matched control group. For those being alive at the start of the study in 1968 follow-up was done by clinical examinations on a biannual basis. For the others, causes of death were collected in various ways. Additionally, clinical, radiological and biophysical studies of patients were conducted and large efforts were made to best estimate the radiation doses associated with incorporation of the Thorotrast. The aim of this paper is to describe the cohort, important results and some open questions. The data from the German Thorotrast Study are available to other interested researchers. Information can be found at http://storedb.org . PMID:27154786

  3. Neuropsychological Outcomes in Extremely Preterm Preschoolers Exposed to Tiered Low Oxygen Targets: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Baron, Ida Sue; Weiss, Brandi A; Baker, Robin; Ahronovich, Margot D; Litman, Fern R; Baveja, Rajiv

    2016-03-01

    An observational study of neuropsychological outcomes at preschool age of tiered lowered oxygen (O2) saturation targets in extremely preterm neonates. We studied 111 three-year-olds born <28 weeks' gestational age. Fifty-nine participants born in 2009-2010 during a time-limited quality improvement initiative each received three-tiered stratification of oxygen rates (83-93% until age 32 weeks, 85-95% until age 35 weeks, and 95% after age 35 weeks), the TieredO2 group. Comparisons were made with 52 participants born in 2007-2008 when pre-initiative saturation targets were non-tiered at 89-100%, the Non-tieredO2 group. Neuropsychological domains included general intellectual, executive, attention, language, visuoperceptual, visual-motor, and fine and gross motor functioning. Descriptive and inferential analyses were conducted. Group comparisons were not statistically significant. Descriptively, the TieredO2 group had better general intellectual, executive function, visual-motor, and motor performance and the Non-tieredO2 group had better language performance. Cohen's d and confidence intervals around d were in similar direction and magnitude across measures. A large effect size was found for recall of digits-forward in participants born at 23 and 24 weeks' gestation, d=0.99 and 1.46, respectively. Better TieredO2 outcomes in all domains except language suggests that the tiered oxygen saturation target method is not harmful and merits further investigation through further studies. Benefit in auditory attention appeared greatest in those born at 23 and 24 weeks. Participants in the tiered oxygen saturation group also had fewer ventilation days and a lower incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, perhaps explanatory for these neuropsychological outcomes at age 3. (JINS, 2015, 21, 322-331). PMID:26646724

  4. Associations between factors affecting access to care and health-related quality of life: results of a statewide HIV/AIDS cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Krause, Denise D; Butler, Kenneth R; May, Warren L

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to describe the relationship between access to care and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) for persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Mississippi by administering a statewide survey. A random probability sample of PLWHA was derived from the Mississippi State Department of Health's communicable disease tracking system. Interviews were conducted with 220 PLWHA to collect data on access to care, demographic and social characteristics, and HRQOL. Overall, most participants had access to care and reasonable HRQOL. Multivariate and univariate analyses were performed to measure associations between access to care and HRQOL. Univariate analyses showed that age, income, social networks, severity of disease, having been prescribed medications, and having experienced problems accessing care to be significantly associated with HRQOL scales. Multivariate analysis of variance models further demonstrated low-income level, having experienced problems accessing care, and having been prescribed antiretroviral medications to be significantly associated with HRQOL. Reducing barriers is a major factor in improving quality of life. This study provides needed insight into the relationship between access to care and HRQOL among PLWHA in Mississippi, which could be valuable to public health planners to help them better understand how to make the greatest impact on HRQOL. PMID:22612404

  5. Studies in Multifunctional Drug Development: Preparation and Evaluation of 11beta-Substituted Estradiol-Drug Conjugates, Cell Membrane Targeting Imaging Agents, and Target Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, KinhLuan Lenny D.

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death after cardiovascular disease in the United State. Despite extensive research in development of antitumor drugs, most of these therapeutic entities often possess nonspecific toxicity, thus they can only be used to treat tumors in higher doses or more frequently. Because of the cytotoxicity and severe side effects, the drug therapeutic window normally is limited. Beside the toxicity issue, antitumor drug are also not selectively taken up by tumor cells, thus the necessitating concentrations that would eradicate the tumor can often not be used. In addition, tumor cells tend to develop resistance against the anticancer drugs after prolonged treatment. Therefore, alleviating the systemic cytotoxicity and side effects, improving in tumor selectivity, high potency, and therapeutic efficacy are still major obstacles in the area of anticancer drug development. A more promising approach for developing a selective agent for cancer is to conjugate a potent therapeutic drug, or an imaging agent with a targeting group, such as antibody or a high binding-specificity small molecule, that selectively recognize the overexpressed antigens or proteins on tumor cells. My research combines several approaches to describe this strategy via using different targeting molecules to different diseases, as well as different potent cytotoxic drugs for different therapies. Three studies related to the preparation and biological evaluation of new therapeutic agents, such as estradiol-drug hybrids, cell membrane targeted molecular imaging agents, and multifunctional NPs will be discussed. The preliminary results of these studies indicated that our new reagents achieved their initial objectives and can be further improved for optimized synthesis and in vivo experiments. The first study describes the method in which we employed a modular assembly approach to synthesize a novel 11beta-substituted steroidal anti-estrogen. The key intermediate was synthesized

  6. Comparison of perceived and modelled geographical access to accident and emergency departments: a cross-sectional analysis from the Caerphilly Health and Social Needs Study

    PubMed Central

    Fone, David L; Christie, Stephen; Lester, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    Background Assessment of the spatial accessibility of hospital accident and emergency departments as perceived by local residents has not previously been investigated. Perceived accessibility may affect where, when, and whether potential patients attend for treatment. Using data on 11,853 respondents to a population survey in Caerphilly county borough, Wales, UK, we present an analysis comparing the accessibility of accident and emergency departments as reported by local residents and drive-time to the nearest accident and emergency department modelled using a geographical information system (GIS). Results Median drive-times were significantly shorter in the lowest perceived access category and longer in the best perceived access category (p < 0.001). The perceived access and GIS modelled drive-time variables were positively correlated (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, r = 0.38, p < 0.01). The strongest correlation was found for respondents living in areas in which nearly all households had a car or van (r = 0.47, p < 0.01). Correlations were stronger among respondents reporting good access to public transport and among those reporting a recent accident and emergency attendance for injury treatment compared to other respondents. Correlation coefficients did not vary substantially by levels of household income. Drive-time, road distance and straight-line distance were highly inter-correlated and substituting road distance or straight-line distance as the GIS modelled spatial accessibility measure only marginally decreased the magnitude of the correlations between perceived and GIS modelled access. Conclusion This study provides evidence that the accessibility of hospital-based health care services as perceived by local residents is related to measures of spatial accessibility modelled using GIS. For studies that aim to model geographical separation in a way that correlates well with the perception of local residents, there may be minimal advantage in using

  7. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - hemodialysis access; dialysis - hemodialysis access

  8. Time and motion study for the National Ignition Facility target area

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J.F.; Tobin, M.T.

    1996-06-10

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to construct the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to embark on a program to achieve ignition and modest gain in the laboratory. With annual fusion yields of up to 1200 MJ/year, neutron activation of nearby components is an important issue. Calculations must be performed to ensure that Target Area structures are designed and activities are planned in a way that ensures that such activities can be completed at the required times while meeting all requirements for occupational exposure to radiation. These calculations are referred to as {open_quotes}Lime-motion{close_quotes} studies. In the present work, key Target Area activities are identified and a detailed time-motion study has been completed for the task of debris shield change-out. Results of a preliminary time-motion study for debris shield change-out were used to influence the design. Subsequent analyses have been completed for several point designs of the NIF Final Optics Assembly (FOA). For each FOA point design, a total annual occupational dose equivalent, in person-Sv, has been estimated. Estimates range from 0.19 person-Sv/year (19 person-rem/year) for a composite FOA with a polyethylene plug to 1.38 person-Sv/year (138 person-rem/year) for the baseline FOA design.

  9. Small-molecule auxin inhibitors that target YUCCA are powerful tools for studying auxin function.

    PubMed

    Kakei, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Chiaki; Suzuki, Masashi; Nakamura, Ayako; Sato, Akiko; Ishida, Yosuke; Kikuchi, Rie; Higashi, Shouichi; Kokudo, Yumiko; Ishii, Takahiro; Soeno, Kazuo; Shimada, Yukihisa

    2015-11-01

    Auxin is essential for plant growth and development, this makes it difficult to study the biological function of auxin using auxin-deficient mutants. Chemical genetics have the potential to overcome this difficulty by temporally reducing the auxin function using inhibitors. Recently, the indole-3-pyruvate (IPyA) pathway was suggested to be a major biosynthesis pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana L. for indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the most common member of the auxin family. In this pathway, YUCCA, a flavin-containing monooxygenase (YUC), catalyzes the last step of conversion from IPyA to IAA. In this study, we screened effective inhibitors, 4-biphenylboronic acid (BBo) and 4-phenoxyphenylboronic acid (PPBo), which target YUC. These compounds inhibited the activity of recombinant YUC in vitro, reduced endogenous IAA content, and inhibited primary root elongation and lateral root formation in wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings. Co-treatment with IAA reduced the inhibitory effects. Kinetic studies of BBo and PPBo showed that they are competitive inhibitors of the substrate IPyA. Inhibition constants (Ki ) of BBo and PPBo were 67 and 56 nm, respectively. In addition, PPBo did not interfere with the auxin response of auxin-marker genes when it was co-treated with IAA, suggesting that PPBo is not an inhibitor of auxin sensing or signaling. We propose that these compounds are a class of auxin biosynthesis inhibitors that target YUC. These small molecules are powerful tools for the chemical genetic analysis of auxin function. PMID:26402640

  10. Study of image matching algorithm and sub-pixel fitting algorithm in target tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming-dong; Jia, Jianjun; Qiang, Jia; Wang, Jian-yu

    2015-03-01

    Image correlation matching is a tracking method that searched a region most approximate to the target template based on the correlation measure between two images. Because there is no need to segment the image, and the computation of this method is little. Image correlation matching is a basic method of target tracking. This paper mainly studies the image matching algorithm of gray scale image, which precision is at sub-pixel level. The matching algorithm used in this paper is SAD (Sum of Absolute Difference) method. This method excels in real-time systems because of its low computation complexity. The SAD method is introduced firstly and the most frequently used sub-pixel fitting algorithms are introduced at the meantime. These fitting algorithms can't be used in real-time systems because they are too complex. However, target tracking often requires high real-time performance, we put forward a fitting algorithm named paraboloidal fitting algorithm based on the consideration above, this algorithm is simple and realized easily in real-time system. The result of this algorithm is compared with that of surface fitting algorithm through image matching simulation. By comparison, the precision difference between these two algorithms is little, it's less than 0.01pixel. In order to research the influence of target rotation on precision of image matching, the experiment of camera rotation was carried on. The detector used in the camera is a CMOS detector. It is fixed to an arc pendulum table, take pictures when the camera rotated different angles. Choose a subarea in the original picture as the template, and search the best matching spot using image matching algorithm mentioned above. The result shows that the matching error is bigger when the target rotation angle is larger. It's an approximate linear relation. Finally, the influence of noise on matching precision was researched. Gaussian noise and pepper and salt noise were added in the image respectively, and the image

  11. Ethnic minority, young onset, rare dementia type, depression: A case study of a Muslim male accessing UK dementia health and social care services.

    PubMed

    Regan, Jemma L

    2016-07-01

    A case study comprised of formal interviews, formal observations and informal discussions investigated the motivations and experiences accessing dementia care health and social care services for a Muslim, Pakistani male with dementia. Motivations derived from 'desperation' and an inability to access support from family or religious community. Experiences of accessing services were mostly negative. Dementia services were ill-informed about how to support persons with young onset dementia, with pre-existing mental health conditions, from an ethnic minority. Education and training to remove barriers to all dementia care services is required for persons with dementia, their families and within dementia services and religious communities. PMID:24858552

  12. The Mission Accessibility of Near-Earth Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Brent W.; Abell, P. A.; Adamo, D. R.; Mazanek, D. D.; Johnson, L. N.; Yeomans, D. K.; Chodas, P. W.; Chamberlin, A. B.; Benner, L. A. M.; Taylor, P.; Friedensen, V. P.

    2015-01-01

    The population of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) that may be accessible for human space flight missions is defined by the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Targets Study (NHATS). The NHATS is an automated system designed to monitor the accessibility of, and particular mission opportunities offered by, the NEA population. This is analogous to systems that automatically monitor the impact risk posed to Earth by the NEA population. The NHATS system identifies NEAs that are potentially accessible for future round-trip human space flight missions and provides rapid notification to asteroid observers so that crucial follow-up observations can be obtained following discovery of accessible NEAs. The NHATS was developed in 2010 and was automated by early 2012. NHATS data are provided via an interactive web-site, and daily NHATS notification emails are transmitted to a mailing list; both resources are available to the public.

  13. Targeting Rural Students with Distance Learning Courses: A Comparative Study of Determinant Attributes and Satisfaction Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Melodie R.; Peters, Mary Jane

    1999-01-01

    A marketing course attended by 65 on-campus students and 30 accessing it via interactive video resulted in no differences in student satisfaction. Onsite students had more problems with instructor accessibility than did offsite students, possibly because instructors overcompensated to avoid isolation of the distant learners. (SK)

  14. Preclinical studies identify novel targeted pharmacological strategies for treatment of human malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Favoni, Roberto E; Daga, Antonio; Malatesta, Paolo; Florio, Tullio

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of human malignant pleural mesothelioma (hMPM) is still increasing worldwide. hMPM prognosis is poor even if the median survival time has been slightly improved after the introduction of the up-to-date chemotherapy. Nevertheless, large phase II/III trials support the combination of platinum derivatives and pemetrexed or raltitrexed, as preferred first-line schedule. Better understanding of the molecular machinery of hMPM will lead to the design and synthesis of novel compounds targeted against pathways identified as crucial for hMPM cell proliferation and spreading. Among them, several receptors tyrosine kinase show altered activity in subsets of hMPM. This observation suggests that these kinases might represent novel therapeutic targets in this chemotherapy-resistant disease. Over these foundations, several promising studies are ongoing at preclinical level and novel molecules are currently under evaluation as well. Yet, established tumour cell lines, used for decades to investigate the efficacy of anticancer agents, although still the main source of drug efficacy studies, after long-term cultures tend to biologically diverge from the original tumour, limiting the predictive potential of in vivo efficacy. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of malignant cells capable of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, are believed to play an essential role in cancer initiation, growth, metastasization and relapse, being responsible of chemo- and radiotherapy refractoriness. According to the current carcinogenesis theory, CSCs represent the tumour-initiating cell (TIC) fraction, the only clonogenic subpopulation able to originate a tumour mass. Consequently, the recently described isolation of TICs from hMPM, the proposed main pharmacological target for novel antitumoural drugs, may contribute to better dissect the biology and multidrug resistance pathways controlling hMPM growth. PMID:22289125

  15. Women's Access to Higher Education in Afghanistan: A Qualitative Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mashriqi, Khalida

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative, phenomenological study was conducted to explore the lived experiences of 12 Afghan women enrolled in higher education institutions in Afghanistan. The objective was to develop an understanding of the participants' perceptions of the factors that led to their enrollment in higher education and the factors that inhibit Afghan…

  16. Network Access to Visual Information: A Study of Costs and Uses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besser, Howard

    This paper summarizes a subset of the findings of a study of digital image distribution that focused on the Museum Educational Site Licensing (MESL) project--the first large-scale multi-institutional project to explore digital delivery of art images and accompanying text/metadata from disparate sources. This Mellon Foundation-sponsored study…

  17. Accessing best practice resources using mobile technology in an undergraduate nursing program: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Mann, Elizabeth G; Medves, Jennifer; Vandenkerkhof, Elizabeth G

    2015-03-01

    Mobile technology presents new opportunities for nursing education and ultimately the provision of nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore the utility of mobile technology in undergraduate nursing education. In this evaluation study, undergraduate nursing students were provided with iPod Touch devices containing best practice guidelines. Computer self-efficacy was assessed, and the Theory of Planned Behavior was used to identify potential predictors of the use of mobile technology. Questionnaires were completed at baseline (n = 33) and postimplementation (n = 23). Feedback on feasibility issues was recorded throughout the study period. Students generally found the devices useful, and few technical problems were identified; however, lack of skill in using the devices and lack of support from staff in the clinical setting were commonly identified issues. Self-efficacy scores were high throughout the study. Attitudes, perceptions of the desirability of use, perceived personal control over use, and intentions of using the device were lower postimplementation than at baseline. Attitude toward the technology predicted intention to use the device after graduation. Mobile technology may promote evidence-informed practice; however, supporting students' acquisition of related skills may optimize use. Successful integration of mobile technology into practice requires attention to factors that affect student attitudes. PMID:25636042

  18. Arabic and English during Study Abroad in Cairo, Egypt: Issues of Access and Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trentman, Emma

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a snapshot of the experiences of 18 students studying abroad in Cairo, Egypt. Using a modified version of the language contact profile (Freed, Segalowitz, & Dewey, 2004), I investigate their language use and find that students use English more than they use Arabic and that there is considerable individual variation in…

  19. Community Resources Accessed by Community-Based Rehabilitation Programs: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, William F.; And Others

    This study sought to determine what, if any, local funding sources are available to rehabilitation service providers as supplements to fee-for-service funding for specific consumers. Chief executive officers at 20 community-based vocational rehabilitation organizations in Minnesota and Wisconsin were interviewed to determine organization financial…

  20. Higher Education: Gaps in Access and Persistence Study. Statistical Analysis Report. NCES 2012-046

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Terris; Kena, Grace; Rathbun, Amy; KewalRamani, Angelina; Zhang, Jijun; Kristapovich, Paul; Manning, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies, including those of the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), have documented persistent gaps between the educational attainment of White males and that of Black, Hispanic, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander males. Further, there is evidence of growing gaps by sex within these…