Science.gov

Sample records for accessible temperature range

  1. Access to warm drinking water prevents rumen temperature drop without affecting in situ NDF disappearance in grazing winter range cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ingestion of large quantities of cold water or frozen forage may result in changes in temperature of ruminal contents. Rumen microorganisms may be sensitive to temperature changes in the ruminal environment. Therefore, this study was conducted to assess the variability in ruminal temperature and e...

  2. Contrails reduce daily temperature range.

    PubMed

    Travis, David J; Carleton, Andrew M; Lauritsen, Ryan G

    2002-08-08

    The potential of condensation trails (contrails) from jet aircraft to affect regional-scale surface temperatures has been debated for years, but was difficult to verify until an opportunity arose as a result of the three-day grounding of all commercial aircraft in the United States in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on 11 September 2001. Here we show that there was an anomalous increase in the average diurnal temperature range (that is, the difference between the daytime maximum and night-time minimum temperatures) for the period 11-14 September 2001. Because persisting contrails can reduce the transfer of both incoming solar and outgoing infrared radiation and so reduce the daily temperature range, we attribute at least a portion of this anomaly to the absence of contrails over this period.

  3. Wide temperature range seal for demountable joints

    DOEpatents

    Sixsmith, Herbert; Valenzuela, Javier A.; Nutt, William E.

    1991-07-23

    The present invention is directed to a seal for demountable joints operating over a wide temperature range down to liquid helium temperatures. The seal has anti-extrusion guards which prevent extrusion of the soft ductile sealant material, which may be indium or an alloy thereof.

  4. Wide temperature range seal for demountable joints

    DOEpatents

    Sixsmith, H.; Valenzuela, J.A.; Nutt, W.E.

    1991-07-23

    The present invention is directed to a seal for demountable joints operating over a wide temperature range down to liquid helium temperatures. The seal has anti-extrusion guards which prevent extrusion of the soft ductile sealant material, which may be indium or an alloy thereof. 6 figures.

  5. Wide-Temperature-Range Integrated Operational Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad; Levanas, Greg; Chen, Yuan; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Cozy, Raymond; Blalock, Benjamin; Greenwell, Robert; Terry, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    A document discusses a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated- circuit operational amplifier to be replicated and incorporated into sensor and actuator systems of Mars-explorer robots. This amplifier is designed to function at a supply potential less than or equal to 5.5 V, at any temperature from -180 to +120 C. The design is implemented on a commercial radiation-hard SOI CMOS process rated for a supply potential of less than or equal to 3.6 V and temperatures from -55 to +110 C. The design incorporates several innovations to achieve this, the main ones being the following: NMOS transistor channel lengths below 1 m are generally not used because research showed that this change could reduce the adverse effect of hot carrier injection on the lifetimes of transistors at low temperatures. To enable the amplifier to withstand the 5.5-V supply potential, a circuit topology including cascade devices, clamping devices, and dynamic voltage biasing was adopted so that no individual transistor would be exposed to more than 3.6 V. To minimize undesired variations in performance over the temperature range, the transistors in the amplifier are biased by circuitry that maintains a constant inversion coefficient over the temperature range.

  6. Extended temperature range ACPS thruster investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blubaugh, A. L.; Schoenman, L.

    1974-01-01

    The successful hot fire demonstration of a pulsing liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen/liquid oxygen attitude control propulsion system thruster is described. The test was the result of research to develop a simple, lightweight, and high performance reaction control system without the traditional requirements for extensive periods of engine thermal conditioning, or the use of complex equipment to convert both liquid propellants to gas prior to delivery to the engine. Significant departures from conventional injector design practice were employed to achieve an operable design. The work discussed includes thermal and injector manifold priming analyses, subscale injector chilldown tests, and 168 full scale and 550 N (1250 lbF) rocket engine tests. Ignition experiments, at propellant temperatures ranging from cryogenic to ambient, led to the generation of a universal spark ignition system which can reliably ignite an engine when supplied with liquid, two phase, or gaseous propellants. Electrical power requirements for spark igniter are very low.

  7. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with...

  8. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with...

  9. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with...

  10. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with...

  11. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with...

  12. 33 CFR 159.115 - Temperature range test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Temperature range test. 159.115...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.115 Temperature range test. (a) The device must be held at a temperature of 60 °C or higher for a period of 16 hours. (b) The...

  13. 33 CFR 159.115 - Temperature range test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Temperature range test. 159.115...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.115 Temperature range test. (a) The device must be held at a temperature of 60 °C or higher for a period of 16 hours. (b) The...

  14. 33 CFR 159.115 - Temperature range test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Temperature range test. 159.115...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.115 Temperature range test. (a) The device must be held at a temperature of 60 °C or higher for a period of 16 hours. (b) The...

  15. 33 CFR 159.115 - Temperature range test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temperature range test. 159.115...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.115 Temperature range test. (a) The device must be held at a temperature of 60 °C or higher for a period of 16 hours. (b) The...

  16. 33 CFR 159.115 - Temperature range test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Temperature range test. 159.115...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.115 Temperature range test. (a) The device must be held at a temperature of 60 °C or higher for a period of 16 hours. (b) The...

  17. The complex kinetics of protein folding in wide temperature ranges.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin

    2004-10-01

    The complex protein folding kinetics in wide temperature ranges is studied through diffusive dynamics on the underlying energy landscape. The well-known kinetic chevron rollover behavior is recovered from the mean first passage time, with the U-shape dependence on temperature. The fastest folding temperature T0 is found to be smaller than the folding transition temperature Tf. We found that the fluctuations of the kinetics through the distribution of first passage time show rather universal behavior, from high-temperature exponential Poissonian kinetics to the relatively low-temperature highly non-exponential kinetics. The transition temperature is at Tk and T0 < Tk < Tf. In certain low-temperature regimes, a power law behavior at long time emerges. At very low temperatures (lower than trapping transition temperature T < T0/(4 approximately 6)), the kinetics is an exponential Poissonian process again.

  18. Effects of Preconditioning and Temperature During Germination of 73 Natural Accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    SCHMUTHS, HEIKE; BACHMANN, KONRAD; WEBER, W. EBERHARD; HORRES, RALF; HOFFMANN, MATTHIAS H.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Germination and establishment of seeds are complex traits affected by a wide range of internal and external influences. The effects of parental temperature preconditioning and temperature during germination on germination and establishment of Arabidopsis thaliana were examined. • Methods Seeds from parental plants grown at 14 and at 22 °C were screened for germination (protrusion of radicle) and establishment (greening of cotyledons) at three different temperatures (10, 18 and 26 °C). Seventy-three accessions from across the entire distribution range of A. thaliana were included. • Key Results Multifactorial analyses of variances revealed significant differences in the effects of genotypes, preconditioning, temperature treatment, and their interactions on duration of germination and establishment. Reaction norms showed an enormous range of plasticity among the preconditioning and different germination temperatures. Correlations of percentage total germination and establishment after 38 d with the geographical origin of accessions were only significant for 14 °C preconditioning but not for 22 °C preconditioning. Correlations with temperature and precipitation on the origin of the accessions were mainly found at the lower germination temperatures (10 and 18 °C) and were absent at higher germination temperatures (26 °C). • Conclusions Overall, the data show huge variation of germination and establishment among natural accessions of A. thaliana and might serve as a valuable source for further germination and plasticity studies. PMID:16464878

  19. Temperature inversion in long-range interacting systems.

    PubMed

    Teles, Tarcísio N; Gupta, Shamik; Di Cintio, Pierfrancesco; Casetti, Lapo

    2015-08-01

    Temperature inversions occur in nature, e.g., in the solar corona and in interstellar molecular clouds: Somewhat counterintuitively, denser parts of the system are colder than dilute ones. We propose a simple and appealing way to spontaneously generate temperature inversions in systems with long-range interactions, by preparing them in inhomogeneous thermal equilibrium states and then applying an impulsive perturbation. In similar situations, short-range systems would typically relax to another thermal equilibrium, with a uniform temperature profile. By contrast, in long-range systems, the interplay between wave-particle interaction and spatial inhomogeneity drives the system to nonequilibrium stationary states that generically exhibit temperature inversion. We demonstrate this mechanism in a simple mean-field model and in a two-dimensional self-gravitating system. Our work underlines the crucial role the range of interparticle interaction plays in determining the nature of steady states out of thermal equilibrium.

  20. Diel Surface Temperature Range Scales with Lake Size

    PubMed Central

    Woolway, R. Iestyn; Jones, Ian D.; Maberly, Stephen C.; French, Jon R.; Livingstone, David M.; Monteith, Donald T.; Simpson, Gavin L.; Thackeray, Stephen J.; Andersen, Mikkel R.; Battarbee, Richard W.; DeGasperi, Curtis L.; Evans, Christopher D.; de Eyto, Elvira; Feuchtmayr, Heidrun; Hamilton, David P.; Kernan, Martin; Krokowski, Jan; Rimmer, Alon; Rose, Kevin C.; Rusak, James A.; Ryves, David B.; Scott, Daniel R.; Shilland, Ewan M.; Smyth, Robyn L.; Staehr, Peter A.; Thomas, Rhian; Waldron, Susan; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.

    2016-01-01

    Ecological and biogeochemical processes in lakes are strongly dependent upon water temperature. Long-term surface warming of many lakes is unequivocal, but little is known about the comparative magnitude of temperature variation at diel timescales, due to a lack of appropriately resolved data. Here we quantify the pattern and magnitude of diel temperature variability of surface waters using high-frequency data from 100 lakes. We show that the near-surface diel temperature range can be substantial in summer relative to long-term change and, for lakes smaller than 3 km2, increases sharply and predictably with decreasing lake area. Most small lakes included in this study experience average summer diel ranges in their near-surface temperatures of between 4 and 7°C. Large diel temperature fluctuations in the majority of lakes undoubtedly influence their structure, function and role in biogeochemical cycles, but the full implications remain largely unexplored. PMID:27023200

  1. Diel Surface Temperature Range Scales with Lake Size.

    PubMed

    Woolway, R Iestyn; Jones, Ian D; Maberly, Stephen C; French, Jon R; Livingstone, David M; Monteith, Donald T; Simpson, Gavin L; Thackeray, Stephen J; Andersen, Mikkel R; Battarbee, Richard W; DeGasperi, Curtis L; Evans, Christopher D; de Eyto, Elvira; Feuchtmayr, Heidrun; Hamilton, David P; Kernan, Martin; Krokowski, Jan; Rimmer, Alon; Rose, Kevin C; Rusak, James A; Ryves, David B; Scott, Daniel R; Shilland, Ewan M; Smyth, Robyn L; Staehr, Peter A; Thomas, Rhian; Waldron, Susan; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A

    2016-01-01

    Ecological and biogeochemical processes in lakes are strongly dependent upon water temperature. Long-term surface warming of many lakes is unequivocal, but little is known about the comparative magnitude of temperature variation at diel timescales, due to a lack of appropriately resolved data. Here we quantify the pattern and magnitude of diel temperature variability of surface waters using high-frequency data from 100 lakes. We show that the near-surface diel temperature range can be substantial in summer relative to long-term change and, for lakes smaller than 3 km2, increases sharply and predictably with decreasing lake area. Most small lakes included in this study experience average summer diel ranges in their near-surface temperatures of between 4 and 7°C. Large diel temperature fluctuations in the majority of lakes undoubtedly influence their structure, function and role in biogeochemical cycles, but the full implications remain largely unexplored.

  2. Braze alloy holds bonding strength over wide temperature range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Copper-based quaternary alloys of the solid solution type is used for vacuum furnace brazing of large stainless steel components at a maximum temperature of 1975 deg F. The alloy has high bonding strength and good ductility over a temperature range extending from the cryogenic region to approximately 800 deg F.

  3. Thermodynamics of Quantum Gases for the Entire Range of Temperature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biswas, Shyamal; Jana, Debnarayan

    2012-01-01

    We have analytically explored the thermodynamics of free Bose and Fermi gases for the entire range of temperature, and have extended the same for harmonically trapped cases. We have obtained approximate chemical potentials for the quantum gases in closed forms of temperature so that the thermodynamic properties of the quantum gases become…

  4. Measuring Systems for Thermometer Calibration in Low-Temperature Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmyrka-Grzebyk, A.; Lipiński, L.; Manuszkiewicz, H.; Kowal, A.; Grykałowska, A.; Jancewicz, D.

    2011-12-01

    The national temperature standard for the low-temperature range between 13.8033 K and 273.16 K has been established in Poland at the Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research (INTiBS). The standard consists of sealed cells for realization of six fixed points of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) in the low-temperature range, an adiabatic cryostat and Isotech water and mercury triple-point baths, capsule standard resistance thermometers (CSPRT), and AC and DC bridges with standard resistors for thermometers resistance measurements. INTiBS calibrates CSPRTs at the low-temperature fixed points with uncertainties less than 1 mK. In lower temperature range—between 2.5 K and about 25 K — rhodium-iron (RhFe) resistance thermometers are calibrated by comparison with a standard which participated in the EURAMET.T-K1.1 comparison. INTiBS offers a calibration service for industrial platinum resistance thermometers and for digital thermometers between 77 K and 273 K. These types of thermometers may be calibrated at INTiBS also in a higher temperature range up to 550°C. The Laboratory of Temperature Standard at INTiBS acquired an accreditation from the Polish Centre for Accreditation. A management system according to EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005 was established at the Laboratory and presented on EURAMET QSM Forum.

  5. Silicon device performance measurements to support temperature range enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromstead, James; Weir, Bennett; Johnson, R. Wayne; Askew, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Semiconductor power devices are typically rated for operation below 150 C. Little data is known for power semiconductors over 150 C. In most cases, the device is derated to zero operating power at 175 C. At the high temperature end of the temperature range, the intrinsic carrier concentration increases to equal the doping concentration level and the silicon behaves as an intrinsic semiconductor. The increase in intrinsic carrier concentration results in a shift of the Fermi level toward mid-bandgap at elevated temperatures. This produces a shift in devices characteristics as a function of temperature. By increasing the doping concentration higher operating temperatures can be achieved. This technique was used to fabricate low power analog and digital devices in silicon with junction operating temperatures in excess of 300 C. Additional temperature effects include increased p-n junction leakage with increasing temperature, resulting in increased resistivity. The temperature dependency of physical properties results in variations in device characteristics. These must be quantified and understood in order to develop extended temperature range operation.

  6. Faraday isolator stably operating in a wide temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, E. A.; Voitovich, A. V.; Palashov, O. V.

    2016-03-01

    A method of stabilizing Faraday isolator characteristics at varying temperatures is proposed in this letter. The method is based on the use of a magnetic system with an inhomogeneous magnetic field and a magneto-optical element holder made of a material with a high value of thermal expansion coefficient. Changing the rotation angle of the polarization plane of radiation caused by the temperature variation of the magneto-optical element and the temperature dependence of its Verdet constant is compensated by its shifting in the magnetic field. The developed device demonstrates an isolation ratio of more than 40 dB at a temperature range of 25 °C. Estimates show the possibility of providing an isolation ratio of more than 45 dB in a temperature range of 60 °C.

  7. [Temperature range for growth of the Antarctic microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Romanovaskaia, V A; Tashirev, A B; Gladka, G B; Tashireva, A A

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of a temperature range for growth of microorganisms isolated at various temperatures (1-5 degrees C or 30 degrees C) from biotopes of the Antarctic region (soil, grass Deschampcia antarctica, grass Colobanthus, a green moss, crustose black lichens and encrustation biofilm on vertical rocks) is made. From 40 to 70% of the investigated Antarctic microorganisms, irrespective of temperature conditions of their isolation, were capable of growing in a wide temperature range (from 1 degrees C to 30 degrees C), i.e. they are psychrotolerant. In selective conditions (1 degrees C or 5 degrees C) the psychrophilic Antarctic bacteria and yeast are isolated which grew in the range from 1 degrees C to 20 degrees C and did not grow at 30 degrees C. At the same time, among the Antarctic microorganisms isolated in nonselective conditions (at 30 degrees C), almost 50% are capable of growing at the lowest temperature (5 degrees C), and a smaller number of strains--at 1 degrees C. However with a decrease of cultivation temperature the growth lag-phase of the Antarctic bacteria increased. Thus the level of the final biomass of the investigated strains did not depend on cultivation temperature. When comparing the temperature range of growth of the mesophilic Antarctic bacteria and collection strains of the same species isolated more than 10 years ago from the region with a temperate climate, the psychrotolerant forms were also revealed among the latter. So, it is shown that the investigated Antarctic bacteria can exist in the temperature range characteristic of terrestrial biotopes of the Antarctic Region (from 1 degrees C to 10 degrees C).

  8. Improved Wide Operating Temperature Range of Li-Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2013-01-01

    Future NASA missions aimed at exploring the Moon, Mars, and the outer planets require rechargeable batteries that can operate over a wide temperature range (-60 to +60 C) to satisfy the requirements of various applications including landers, rovers, penetrators, CEV, CLV, etc. This work addresses the need for robust rechargeable batteries that can operate well over a wide temperature range. The Department of Energy (DoE) has identified a number of technical barriers associated with the development of Liion rechargeable batteries for PHEVs. For this reason, DoE has interest in the development of advanced electrolytes that will improve performance over a wide range of temperatures, and lead to long life characteristics (5,000 cycles over a 10-year life span). There is also interest in improving the high-voltage stability of these candidate electrolyte systems to enable the operation of up to 5 V with high specific energy cathode materials. Currently, the state-of-the-art lithium-ion system has been demonstrated to operate over a wide range of temperatures (-40 to +40 C); however, the rate capability at the lower temperatures is very poor. In addition, the low-temperature performance typically deteriorates rapidly upon being exposed to high temperatures. A number of electrolyte formulations were developed that incorporate the use of electrolyte additives to improve the high-temperature resilience, low-temperature power capability, and life characteristics of methyl propionate (MP)-based electrolyte solutions. These electrolyte additives include mono-fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC), lithium oxalate, vinylene carbonate (VC), and lithium bis(oxalate borate) (LiBOB), which have previously been shown to result in improved high-temperature resilience of all carbonate-based electrolytes. These MP-based electrolytes with additives have been shown to have improved performance in experiments with MCMB-LiNiCoAlO2 cells.

  9. Nylon coil actuator operating temperature range and stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kianzad, Soheil; Pandit, Milind; Bahi, Addie; Rafie Ravandi, Ali; Ko, Frank; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Madden, John D. W.

    2015-04-01

    Components in automotive and aerospace applications require a wide temperature range of operation. Newly discovered thermally active Baughman muscle potentially provides affordable and viable solutions for driving mechanical devices by heating them from room temperature, but little is known about their operation below room temperature. We study the mechanical behavior of nylon coil actuators by testing elastic modulus and by investigating tensile stroke as a function of temperature. Loads that range from 35 MPa to 155 MPa were applied. For the nylon used and the coiling conditions, active thermal contraction totals 19.5 % when the temperature is raised from -40 °C to 160 °C. The thermal contraction observed from -40 °C to 20°C is only ~2 %, whereas between 100 and 160 °C the contraction is 10 %. A marked increase in thermal contraction is occurs in the vicinity of the glass transition temperature (~ 45°C). The elastic modulus drops as temperature increases, from ~155 MPa at - 40 °C to 35 MPa at 200 °C. Interestingly the drop in active contraction with increasing load is small and much less than might be expected given the temperature dependence of modulus.

  10. Silicon device performance measurements to support temperature range enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromstead, James; Weir, Bennett; Nelms, R. Mark; Johnson, R. Wayne; Askew, Ray

    1994-01-01

    Silicon based power devices can be used at 200 C. The device measurements made during this program show a predictable shift in device parameters with increasing temperature. No catastrophic or abrupt changes occurred in the parameters over the temperature range. As expected, the most dramatic change was the increase in leakage currents with increasing temperature. At 200 C the leakage current was in the milliAmp range but was still several orders of magnitude lower than the on-state current capabilities of the devices under test. This increase must be considered in the design of circuits using power transistors at elevated temperature. Three circuit topologies have been prototyped using MOSFET's and IGBT's. The circuits were designed using zero current or zero voltage switching techniques to eliminate or minimize hard switching of the power transistors. These circuits have functioned properly over the temperature range. One thousand hour life data have been collected for two power supplies with no failures and no significant change in operating efficiency. While additional reliability testing should be conducted, the feasibility of designing soft switched circuits for operation at 200 C has been successfully demonstrated.

  11. Amplifier circuit operable over a wide temperature range

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Ronald D.; Cannon, William L.

    1979-01-01

    An amplifier circuit having stable performance characteristics over a wide temperature range from approximately 0.degree. C up to as high as approximately 500.degree. C, such as might be encountered in a geothermal borehole. The amplifier utilizes ceramic vacuum tubes connected in directly coupled differential amplifier pairs having a common power supply and a cathode follower output stage. In an alternate embodiment, for operation up to 500.degree. C, positive and negative power supplies are utilized to provide improved gain characteristics, and all electrical connections are made by welding. Resistor elements in this version of the invention are specially heat treated to improve their stability with temperature.

  12. High accuracy magnetic field sensors with wide operation temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'evskii, I. S.; Vinichenko, A. N.; Rubakin, D. I.; Bolshakova, I. A.; Kargin, N. I.

    2016-10-01

    n+InAs(Si) epitaxial thin films heavily doped by silicon and Hall effect magnetic field sensors based on this structures have been fabricated and studied. We have demonstrated the successful formation of highly doped InAs thin films (∼100 nm) with the different intermediate layer arrangement and appropriate electron mobility values. Hall sensors performance parameters have been measured in wide temperature range. Obtained sensitivity varied from 1 to 40 Ω/T, while the best linearity and lower temperature coefficient have been found in the higher doped samples with lower electron mobility. We attribute this to the electron system degeneracy and decreased phonon contribution to electron mobility and resistance.

  13. Increased risk of muscle tears below physiological temperature ranges

    PubMed Central

    Scott, E. E. F.; Hamilton, D. F.; Wallace, R. J.; Muir, A. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Temperature is known to influence muscle physiology, with the velocity of shortening, relaxation and propagation all increasing with temperature. Scant data are available, however, regarding thermal influences on energy required to induce muscle damage. Methods Gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were harvested from 36 male rat limbs and exposed to increasing impact energy in a mechanical test rig. Muscle temperature was varied in 5°C increments, from 17°C to 42°C (to encompass the in vivo range). The energy causing non-recoverable deformation was recorded for each temperature. A measure of tissue elasticity was determined via accelerometer data, smoothed by low-pass fifth order Butterworth filter (10 kHz). Data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and significance was accepted at p = 0.05. Results The energy required to induce muscle failure was significantly lower at muscle temperatures of 17°C to 32°C compared with muscle at core temperature, i.e., 37°C (p < 0.01). During low-energy impacts there were no differences in muscle elasticity between cold and warm muscles (p = 0.18). Differences in elasticity were, however, seen at higher impact energies (p < 0.02). Conclusion Our findings are of particular clinical relevance, as when muscle temperature drops below 32°C, less energy is required to cause muscle tears. Muscle temperatures of 32°C are reported in ambient conditions, suggesting that it would be beneficial, particularly in colder environments, to ensure that peripheral muscle temperature is raised close to core levels prior to high-velocity exercise. Thus, this work stresses the importance of not only ensuring that the muscle groups are well stretched, but also that all muscle groups are warmed to core temperature in pre-exercise routines. Cite this article: Professor A. H. R. W. Simpson. Increased risk of muscle tears below physiological temperature ranges. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:61–65. DOI: 10

  14. Wide temperature range electronic device with lead attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A electronic device including lead attachment structure which permits operation of the devices over a wide temperature range is reported. The device comprises a core conductor having a thin coating of metal thereon whereby only a limited amount of coating material is available to form an alloy which bonds the core conductor to the device electrode, the electrode composition thus being affected only in the region adjacent to the lead.

  15. Solid oxide fuel cell operable over wide temperature range

    DOEpatents

    Baozhen, Li; Ruka, Roswell J.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    2001-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells having improved low-temperature operation are disclosed. In one embodiment, an interfacial layer of terbia-stabilized zirconia is located between the air electrode and electrolyte of the solid oxide fuel cell. The interfacial layer provides a barrier which controls interaction between the air electrode and electrolyte. The interfacial layer also reduces polarization loss through the reduction of the air electrode/electrolyte interfacial electrical resistance. In another embodiment, the solid oxide fuel cell comprises a scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte having high electrical conductivity. The scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolyte may be provided as a very thin layer in order to reduce resistance. The scandia-stabilized electrolyte is preferably used in combination with the terbia-stabilized interfacial layer. The solid oxide fuel cells are operable over wider temperature ranges and wider temperature gradients in comparison with conventional fuel cells.

  16. Temperature range of the liquid-glass transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanditov, D. S.; Darmaev, M. V.; Sanditov, B. D.

    2016-02-01

    It has been shown that the currently used method for calculating the temperature range of δ T g in the glass transition equation qτ g = δ T g as the difference δ T g = ( T 12- T 13) results in overestimated values, which is explained by the assumption of a constant activation energy of glass transition in deriving the calculation equation ( T 12 and T 13 are the temperatures corresponding to the logarithmic viscosity values of logη = 12 and logη = 13). The methods for the evaluation of δ T g using the Williams-Landel-Ferry equation and the model of delocalized atoms are considered, the results of which are in satisfactory agreement with the product qτ g ( q is the cooling rate of the melt and τ g is the structural relaxation time at the glass transition temperature). The calculation of τ g for inorganic glasses and amorphous organic polymers is proposed.

  17. Alleviating a form of electric vehicle range anxiety through on-demand vehicle access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Christopher; Griggs, Wynita; Wirth, Fabian; Quinn, Karl; Shorten, Robert

    2015-04-01

    On-demand vehicle access is a method that can be used to reduce types of range anxiety problems related to planned travel for electric vehicle owners. Using ideas from elementary queueing theory, basic quality of service (QoS) metrics are defined to dimension a shared fleet to ensure high levels of vehicle access. Using mobility data from Ireland, it is argued that the potential cost of such a system is very low.

  18. Large diurnal temperature range increases bird sensitivity to climate change.

    PubMed

    Briga, Michael; Verhulst, Simon

    2015-11-13

    Climate variability is changing on multiple temporal scales, and little is known of the consequences of increases in short-term variability, particularly in endotherms. Using mortality data with high temporal resolution of zebra finches living in large outdoor aviaries (5 years, 359.220 bird-days), we show that mortality rate increases almost two-fold per 1°C increase in diurnal temperature range (DTR). Interestingly, the DTR effect differed between two groups with low versus high experimentally manipulated foraging costs, reflecting a typical laboratory 'easy' foraging environment and a 'hard' semi-natural environment respectively. DTR increased mortality on days with low minimum temperature in the easy foraging environment, but on days with high minimum temperature in the semi-natural environment. Thus, in a natural environment DTR effects will become increasingly important in a warming world, something not detectable in an 'easy' laboratory environment. These effects were particularly apparent at young ages. Critical time window analyses showed that the effect of DTR on mortality is delayed up to three months, while effects of minimum temperature occurred within a week. These results show that daily temperature variability can substantially impact the population viability of endothermic species.

  19. Short-Range Correlations in Magnetite above the Verwey Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosak, Alexey; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Hoesch, Moritz; Piekarz, Przemysław; Le Tacon, Mathieu; Krisch, Michael; Kozłowski, Andrzej; Oleś, Andrzej M.; Parlinski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite, Fe3O4, is the first magnetic material discovered and utilized by mankind in Ancient Greece, yet it still attracts attention due to its puzzling properties. This is largely due to the quest for a full and coherent understanding of the Verwey transition that occurs at TV=124 K and is associated with a drop of electric conductivity and a complex structural phase transition. A recent detailed analysis of the structure, based on single crystal diffraction, suggests that the electron localization pattern contains linear three-Fe-site units, the so-called trimerons. Here, we show that whatever the electron localization pattern is, it partially survives up to room temperature as short-range correlations in the high-temperature cubic phase, easily discernible by diffuse scattering. Additionally, ab initio electronic structure calculations reveal that characteristic features in these diffuse scattering patterns can be correlated with the Fermi surface topology.

  20. Accessing Recent Trend of Land Surface Temperature from Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, S.; Leptoukh, G. G.; Romanov, P.

    2011-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is an important element to measure the state of the terrestrial ecosystems and to study the surface energy budgets. In support of the land cover/land use change related international program MAIRS (Monsoon Asia Integrated Regional Study), we have collected the global monthly LST measured by MODIS since the beginning of the missions. The MODIS LST time series have ~11 years of data from Terra since 2000 and ~9 years of data from Aqua since 2002, which makes possible to study the recent climate, such as trend and variability. In this study, monthly climatology from two satellite platforms are calculated and compared. The spatial patterns of LST trends are accessed, focusing on the Asian Monsoon region. Furthermore, the MODIS LST trends are compared with the skin temperature trend from the NASA's atmospheric assimilation model, MERRA (MODERN ERA RETROSPECTIVE-ANALYSIS FOR RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS), which has longer data record since 1979. The calculated climatology and anomaly of MODIS LST will be integrated into the online visualization system, Giovanni, at NASA GES DISC for easy access and use by scientists and general public.

  1. The association between diurnal temperature range and childhood bacillary dysentery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Li-ying; Zhao, Ke-fu; Cheng, Jian; Wang, Xu; Yang, Hui-hui; Li, Ke-sheng; Xu, Zhi-wei; Su, Hong

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have found that mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures were associated with bacillary dysentery (BD). However, little is known about whether the within-day variation of temperature has any impact on bacillary dysentery. The current study aimed to identify the relationship between diurnal temperature range (DTR) and BD in Hefei, China. Daily data on BD counts among children aged 0-14 years from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2012 were retrieved from Hefei Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Daily data on ambient temperature and relative humidity covering the same period were collected from the Hefei Bureau of Meteorology. A Poisson generalized linear regression model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) was used in the analysis after controlling the effects of season, long-term trends, mean temperature, and relative humidity. The results showed that there existed a statistically significant relationship between DTR and childhood BD. The DTR effect on childhood bacillary dysentery increased when DTR was over 8 °C. And it was greatest at 1-day lag, with an 8 % (95 % CI = 2.9-13.4 %) increase of BD cases per 5 °C increment of DTR. Male children and children aged 0-5 years appeared to be more vulnerable to the DTR effect. The data indicate that large DTR may increase the incidence of childhood BD. Caregivers and health practitioners should be made aware of the potential threat posed by large DTR. Therefore, DTR should be taken into consideration when making targeted health policies and programs to protect children from being harmed by climate impacts.

  2. The association between diurnal temperature range and childhood bacillary dysentery.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li-ying; Zhao, Ke-fu; Cheng, Jian; Wang, Xu; Yang, Hui-hui; Li, Ke-sheng; Xu, Zhi-wei; Su, Hong

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have found that mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures were associated with bacillary dysentery (BD). However, little is known about whether the within-day variation of temperature has any impact on bacillary dysentery. The current study aimed to identify the relationship between diurnal temperature range (DTR) and BD in Hefei, China. Daily data on BD counts among children aged 0-14 years from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2012 were retrieved from Hefei Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Daily data on ambient temperature and relative humidity covering the same period were collected from the Hefei Bureau of Meteorology. A Poisson generalized linear regression model combined with a distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) was used in the analysis after controlling the effects of season, long-term trends, mean temperature, and relative humidity. The results showed that there existed a statistically significant relationship between DTR and childhood BD. The DTR effect on childhood bacillary dysentery increased when DTR was over 8 °C. And it was greatest at 1-day lag, with an 8% (95% CI = 2.9-13.4%) increase of BD cases per 5 °C increment of DTR. Male children and children aged 0-5 years appeared to be more vulnerable to the DTR effect. The data indicate that large DTR may increase the incidence of childhood BD. Caregivers and health practitioners should be made aware of the potential threat posed by large DTR. Therefore, DTR should be taken into consideration when making targeted health policies and programs to protect children from being harmed by climate impacts.

  3. Changes in diurnal temperature range and national cereal yields

    SciTech Connect

    Lobell, D

    2007-04-26

    Models of yield responses to temperature change have often considered only changes in average temperature (Tavg), with the implicit assumption that changes in the diurnal temperature range (DTR) can safely be ignored. The goal of this study was to evaluate this assumption using a combination of historical datasets and climate model projections. Data on national crop yields for 1961-2002 in the 10 leading producers of wheat, rice, and maize were combined with datasets on climate and crop locations to evaluate the empirical relationships between Tavg, DTR, and crop yields. In several rice and maize growing regions, including the two major nations for each crop, there was a clear negative response of yields to increased DTR. This finding reflects a nonlinear response of yields to temperature, which likely results from greater water and heat stress during hot days. In many other cases, the effects of DTR were not statistically significant, in part because correlations of DTR with other climate variables and the relatively short length of the time series resulted in wide confidence intervals for the estimates. To evaluate whether future changes in DTR are relevant to crop impact assessments, yield responses to projected changes in Tavg and DTR by 2046-2065 from 11 climate models were estimated. The mean climate model projections indicated an increase in DTR in most seasons and locations where wheat is grown, mixed projections for maize, and a general decrease in DTR for rice. These mean projections were associated with wide ranges that included zero in nearly all cases. The estimated impacts of DTR changes on yields were generally small (<5% change in yields) relative to the consistently negative impact of projected warming of Tavg. However, DTR changes did significantly affect yield responses in several cases, such as in reducing US maize yields and increasing India rice yields. Because DTR projections tend to be positively correlated with Tavg, estimates of yields

  4. Relaxor ferroelectric-based electrocaloric polymer nanocomposites with a broad operating temperature range and high cooling energy.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Zhang, Guangzu; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Jiang, Shenglin; Zeng, Yike; Wang, Qing

    2015-04-01

    Electrocaloric nanocomposites simultaneously derive high electrocaloric strength from inorganic inclusions and high dielectric strength from the polymer matrix to display a pronounced electrocaloric effect (ECE). By designing the inorganic filler and polymer matrix, which are both relaxor ferroelectrics with the ambient-temperature phase transition and minimized hysteresis, a large ECE becomes accessible with high cooling efficiency over a broad temperature range at and near room temperature.

  5. Temperature effects on failure and annealing behavior in dynamic random access memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkin, N. D.; Self, C. T.

    1982-12-01

    Total dose failure levels and long time anneal characteristics of dynamic random access memories are measured while the devices are exercised under actual use conditions. These measurements were performed over the temperature range of -60 C to +70 C. The total dose failure levels are shown to decrease with increasing temperature. The anneal characteristics are shown to result in both an increase and decrease in the measured number of errors as a function of time. Finally a description of the test instrumentation and irradiation procedures are given.

  6. Microcalorimetry: Wide Temperature Range, High Field, Small Sample Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellman, Frances

    2000-03-01

    We have used Si micromachining techniques to fabricate devices for measuring specific heat or other calorimetric signals from microgram-quantity samples over a temperature range from 1 to 900K in magnetic fields to date up to 8T. The devices are based on a relatively robust silicon nitride membrane with thin film heaters and thermometers. Different types of thermometers are used for different purposes and in different temperature ranges. These devices are particularly useful for thin film samples (typically 200-400 nm thick at present) deposited directly onto the membrane through a Si micromachined evaporation mask. They have also been used for small single crystal samples attached by conducting grease or solder, and for powder samples dissolved in a solvent and dropped onto devices. The measurement technique used (relaxation method) is particularly suited to high field measurements because the thermal conductance can be measured once in zero field and is field independent, while the time constant of the relaxation does not depend on thermometer calibration. Present development efforts include designs which show promise for time-resolved calorimetry measurements of biological samples in small amounts of water. Samples measured to date include amorphous magnetic thin films (a-TbFe2 and giant negative magnetoresistance a-Gd-Si alloys), empty and filled fullerenes (C_60, K_3C_60, C_82, La@C_82, C_84, and Sc_2@C_84), single crystal manganites (La_1-xSr_xMnO_3), antiferromagnetic multilayers (NiO/CoO, NiO/MgO, and CoO/MgO), and nanoparticle magnetic materials (CoO in a Ag matrix).

  7. Observations of a "weekend effect" in diurnal temperature range.

    PubMed

    Forster, Piers M de F; Solomon, Susan

    2003-09-30

    Using surface measurements of maximum and minimum temperatures from the Global Daily Climatological Network data set, we find evidence of a weekly cycle in diurnal temperature range (DTR) for many stations in the United States, Mexico, Japan, and China. The "weekend effect," which we define as the average DTR for Saturday through Monday minus the average DTR for Wednesday through Friday, can be as large as 0.5 K, similar to the magnitude of observed long-term trends in DTR. This weekend effect has a distinct large-scale pattern that has changed only slightly over time, but its sign is not the same in all locations. The station procedures and the statistical robustness of both the individual station data and the patterns of DTR differences are thoroughly examined. We conclude that the weekend effect is a real short time scale and large spatial scale geophysical phenomenon, which is necessarily human in origin. We thus provide strong evidence of an anthropogenic link to DTR, an important climate indicator. Several possible anthropogenic mechanisms are discussed; we speculate that aerosol-cloud interactions are the most likely cause of this weekend effect, but we do not rule out others.

  8. Long-Range Correlations of Global Sea Surface Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lei; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Scaling behaviors of the global monthly sea surface temperature (SST) derived from 1870–2009 average monthly data sets of Hadley Centre Sea Ice and SST (HadISST) are investigated employing detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The global SST fluctuations are found to be strong positively long-range correlated at all pertinent time-intervals. The value of scaling exponent is larger in the tropics than those in the intermediate latitudes of the northern and southern hemispheres. DFA leads to the scaling exponent α = 0.87 over the globe (60°S~60°N), northern hemisphere (0°N~60°N), and southern hemisphere (0°S~60°S), α = 0.84 over the intermediate latitude of southern hemisphere (30°S~60°S), α = 0.81 over the intermediate latitude of northern hemisphere (30°N~60°N) and α = 0.90 over the tropics 30°S~30°N [fluctuation F(s) ~ sα], which the fluctuations of monthly SST anomaly display long-term correlated behaviors. Furthermore, the larger the standard deviation is, the smaller long-range correlations (LRCs) of SST in the corresponding regions, especially in three distinct upwelling areas. After the standard deviation is taken into account, an index χ = α * σ is introduced to obtain the spatial distributions of χ. There exists an obvious change of global SST in central east and northern Pacific and the northwest Atlantic. This may be as a clue on predictability of climate and ocean variabilities. PMID:27100397

  9. Long-Range Correlations of Global Sea Surface Temperature.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Zhao, Xia; Wang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Scaling behaviors of the global monthly sea surface temperature (SST) derived from 1870-2009 average monthly data sets of Hadley Centre Sea Ice and SST (HadISST) are investigated employing detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The global SST fluctuations are found to be strong positively long-range correlated at all pertinent time-intervals. The value of scaling exponent is larger in the tropics than those in the intermediate latitudes of the northern and southern hemispheres. DFA leads to the scaling exponent α = 0.87 over the globe (60°S~60°N), northern hemisphere (0°N~60°N), and southern hemisphere (0°S~60°S), α = 0.84 over the intermediate latitude of southern hemisphere (30°S~60°S), α = 0.81 over the intermediate latitude of northern hemisphere (30°N~60°N) and α = 0.90 over the tropics 30°S~30°N [fluctuation F(s) ~ sα], which the fluctuations of monthly SST anomaly display long-term correlated behaviors. Furthermore, the larger the standard deviation is, the smaller long-range correlations (LRCs) of SST in the corresponding regions, especially in three distinct upwelling areas. After the standard deviation is taken into account, an index χ = α * σ is introduced to obtain the spatial distributions of χ. There exists an obvious change of global SST in central east and northern Pacific and the northwest Atlantic. This may be as a clue on predictability of climate and ocean variabilities.

  10. Carbon nanotube dry adhesives with temperature-enhanced adhesion over a large temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ming; Du, Feng; Ganguli, Sabyasachi; Roy, Ajit; Dai, Liming

    2016-11-01

    Conventional adhesives show a decrease in the adhesion force with increasing temperature due to thermally induced viscoelastic thinning and/or structural decomposition. Here, we report the counter-intuitive behaviour of carbon nanotube (CNT) dry adhesives that show a temperature-enhanced adhesion strength by over six-fold up to 143 N cm-2 (4 mm × 4 mm), among the strongest pure CNT dry adhesives, over a temperature range from -196 to 1,000 °C. This unusual adhesion behaviour leads to temperature-enhanced electrical and thermal transports, enabling the CNT dry adhesive for efficient electrical and thermal management when being used as a conductive double-sided sticky tape. With its intrinsic thermal stability, our CNT adhesive sustains many temperature transition cycles over a wide operation temperature range. We discover that a `nano-interlock' adhesion mechanism is responsible for the adhesion behaviour, which could be applied to the development of various dry CNT adhesives with novel features.

  11. Carbon nanotube dry adhesives with temperature-enhanced adhesion over a large temperature range

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Du, Feng; Ganguli, Sabyasachi; Roy, Ajit; Dai, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Conventional adhesives show a decrease in the adhesion force with increasing temperature due to thermally induced viscoelastic thinning and/or structural decomposition. Here, we report the counter-intuitive behaviour of carbon nanotube (CNT) dry adhesives that show a temperature-enhanced adhesion strength by over six-fold up to 143 N cm−2 (4 mm × 4 mm), among the strongest pure CNT dry adhesives, over a temperature range from −196 to 1,000 °C. This unusual adhesion behaviour leads to temperature-enhanced electrical and thermal transports, enabling the CNT dry adhesive for efficient electrical and thermal management when being used as a conductive double-sided sticky tape. With its intrinsic thermal stability, our CNT adhesive sustains many temperature transition cycles over a wide operation temperature range. We discover that a ‘nano-interlock' adhesion mechanism is responsible for the adhesion behaviour, which could be applied to the development of various dry CNT adhesives with novel features. PMID:27849052

  12. Hydrogen-atmosphere induction furnace has increased temperature range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caves, R. M.; Gresslin, C. H.

    1966-01-01

    Improved hydrogen-atmosphere induction furnace operates at temperatures up to 5,350 deg F. The furnace heats up from room temperature to 4,750 deg F in 30 seconds and cools down to room temperature in 2 minutes.

  13. Accessing Recent Trend of Land Surface Temperature from Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Romanov, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Land surface temperature (Ts) is an important element to measure the state of terrestrial ecosystems and to study surface energy budgets. In support of the land cover/land use change-related international program MAIRS (Monsoon Asia Integrated Regional Study), we have collected global monthly Ts measured by MODIS since the beginning of the missions. The MODIS Ts time series have approximately 11 years of data from Terra since 2000 and approximately 9 years of data from Aqua since 2002, which makes possible to study the recent climate, such as trend. In this study, monthly climatology from two platforms are calculated and compared with that from AIRS. The spatial patterns of Ts trends are accessed, focusing on the Eurasia region. Furthermore, MODIS Ts trends are compared with those from AIRS and NASA's atmospheric assimilation model, MERRA (Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications). The preliminary results indicate that the recent 8-year Ts trend shows an oscillation-type spatial variation over Eurasia. The pattern is consistent for data from MODIS, AIRS, and MERRA, with the positive center over Eastern Europe, and the negative center over Central Siberia. The calculated climatology and anomaly of MODIS Ts will be integrated into the online visualization system, Giovanni, at NASA GES DISC for easy use by scientists and general public.

  14. The Temperature Dependence of a Large Dynamic Range Photodetector Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    to achieve a logarithmic steady state response. This paper analyzes the temperature dependence of the circuit operation and presents experimental results demonstrating the capabilities and limitations of the model.

  15. Ultrasonic Multiple-Access Ranging System Using Spread Spectrum and MEMS Technology for Indoor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Segers, Laurent; Tiete, Jelmer; Braeken, An; Touhafi, Abdellah

    2014-01-01

    Indoor localization of persons and objects poses a great engineering challenge. Previously developed localization systems demonstrate the use of wideband techniques in ultrasound ranging systems. Direct sequence and frequency hopping spread spectrum ultrasound signals have been proven to achieve a high level of accuracy. A novel ranging method using the frequency hopping spread spectrum with finite impulse response filtering will be investigated and compared against the direct sequence spread spectrum. In the first setup, distances are estimated in a single-access environment, while in the second setup, two senders and one receiver are used. During the experiments, the micro-electromechanical systems are used as ultrasonic sensors, while the senders were implemented using field programmable gate arrays. Results show that in a single-access environment, the direct sequence spread spectrum method offers slightly better accuracy and precision performance compared to the frequency hopping spread spectrum. When two senders are used, measurements point out that the frequency hopping spread spectrum is more robust to near-far effects than the direct sequence spread spectrum. PMID:24553084

  16. Influence of ambient temperature and diurnal temperature range on incidence of cardiac arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jayeun; Kim, Ho

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the association between ambient temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR) and the exacerbation of arrhythmia symptoms, using data from 31,629 arrhythmia-related emergency department (ED) visits in Seoul, Korea. Linear regression analyses with allowances for over-dispersion were applied to temperature variables and ED visits, adjusted for various environmental factors. The effects were expressed as percentage changes in the risk of arrhythmia-related ED visits up to 5 days later, with 95 % confidence intervals (CI), per 1 °C increase in DTR and 1 °C decrease in mean temperature. The overall risk of ED visits increased by 1.06 % (95 % CI 0.39 %, 1.73 %) for temperature and by 1.84 % (0.34, 3.37 %) for DTR. A season-specific effect was detected for temperature during both fall (1.18 % [0.01, 2.37 %]) and winter (0.87 % [0.07, 1.67 %]), and for DTR during spring (3.76 % [0.34, 7.29 %]). Females were more vulnerable, with 1.57 % [0.56, 2.59 %] and 3.84 % [1.53, 6.20 %] for the changes in temperature and DTR, respectively. An age-specific effect was detected for DTR, with 3.13 % [0.95, 5.36 %] for age ≥ 65 years, while a greater increased risk with temperature decrease was observed among those aged <65 (1.08 % [0.17, 2.00 %]) than among those aged ≥65 (1.02 % [0.06, 1.99 %]). Cardiac arrest was inversely related with temperature (1.61 % [0.46, 2.79 %]), while other cardiac arrhythmias depended more on the change in DTR (4.72 % [0.37, 9.26 %]). These findings provide evidence that low-temperature and elevated DTR influence the occurrence of arrhythmia exacerbations or symptoms, suggesting a possible strategy for reducing risk by encouraging vulnerable populations to minimize exposure.

  17. Influence of ambient temperature and diurnal temperature range on incidence of cardiac arrhythmias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jayeun; Kim, Ho

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the association between ambient temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR) and the exacerbation of arrhythmia symptoms, using data from 31,629 arrhythmia-related emergency department (ED) visits in Seoul, Korea. Linear regression analyses with allowances for over-dispersion were applied to temperature variables and ED visits, adjusted for various environmental factors. The effects were expressed as percentage changes in the risk of arrhythmia-related ED visits up to 5 days later, with 95 % confidence intervals (CI), per 1 °C increase in DTR and 1 °C decrease in mean temperature. The overall risk of ED visits increased by 1.06 % (95 % CI 0.39 %, 1.73 %) for temperature and by 1.84 % (0.34, 3.37 %) for DTR. A season-specific effect was detected for temperature during both fall (1.18 % [0.01, 2.37 %]) and winter (0.87 % [0.07, 1.67 %]), and for DTR during spring (3.76 % [0.34, 7.29 %]). Females were more vulnerable, with 1.57 % [0.56, 2.59 %] and 3.84 % [1.53, 6.20 %] for the changes in temperature and DTR, respectively. An age-specific effect was detected for DTR, with 3.13 % [0.95, 5.36 %] for age ≥ 65 years, while a greater increased risk with temperature decrease was observed among those aged <65 (1.08 % [0.17, 2.00 %]) than among those aged ≥65 (1.02 % [0.06, 1.99 %]). Cardiac arrest was inversely related with temperature (1.61 % [0.46, 2.79 %]), while other cardiac arrhythmias depended more on the change in DTR (4.72 % [0.37, 9.26 %]). These findings provide evidence that low-temperature and elevated DTR influence the occurrence of arrhythmia exacerbations or symptoms, suggesting a possible strategy for reducing risk by encouraging vulnerable populations to minimize exposure.

  18. Wide temperature range testing with ROTEM coagulation analyses.

    PubMed

    Kander, Thomas; Brokopp, Jens; Friberg, Hans; Schött, Ulf

    2014-09-01

    Mild induced hypothermia is used for neuroprotection in patients successfully resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Temperature-dependent effects on rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM(®)) assays with EXTEM(®), FIBTEM(®), or APTEM(®) in cardiac arrest patients have not previously been studied. Ten patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who underwent induced hypothermia were studied during stable hypothermia at 33°C. ROTEM temperature effects on EXTEM, FIBTEM, and APTEM assays were studied at temperatures set between 30°C and 42°C. Citrated whole blood test tubes were incubated in temperature-adjusted heating blocks and then investigated at respective temperature in the temperature-adjusted ROTEM. The following variables were determined: clotting time (CT), clot formation time (CFT), α-angle, and maximum clot firmness (MCF). The results from hypo- and hyperthermia samples were compared with the samples incubated at 37°C using the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test. A p-value of <0.05 was considered significant. CT-EXTEM(®) and CT-APTEM(®) were prolonged by hypothermia at 30°C (p<0.01 for both) and 33°C (p<0.05 for both). Hyperthermia at 42°C shortened CT-EXTEM (p<0.05) and CT-APTEM (p<0.01). CFT-EXTEM(®) and CFT-APTEM(®) were markedly prolonged by hypothermia at 30°C, 33°C, and 35°C (p<0.01 for all except CFT-EXTEM, 35°C [p<0.05]). The α-angle-EXTEM was markedly decreased at 30°C, 33°C, and 35°C (p<0.01) but increased at 40°C (p<0.05) and 42°C (p<0.01); α-angle-APTEM showed similar results. MCF was unchanged at different temperatures for all tests. ROTEM (EXTEM, FIBTEM, and APTEM assays) revealed a hypocoagulative response to in vitro-applied hypothermia in the blood of cardiac arrest patients reflected in the prolonged clot initiation and decreased clot propagation. Hyperthermia showed the opposite effects. Clot firmness was not affected by temperature.

  19. An Ultrasonic Multiple-Access Ranging Core Based on Frequency Shift Keying Towards Indoor Localization.

    PubMed

    Segers, Laurent; Van Bavegem, David; De Winne, Sam; Braeken, An; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2015-07-30

    This paper describes a new approach and implementation methodology for indoor ranging based on the time difference of arrival using code division multiple access with ultrasound signals. A novel implementation based on a field programmable gate array using finite impulse response filters and an optimized correlation demodulator implementation for ultrasound orthogonal signals is developed. Orthogonal codes are modulated onto ultrasound signals using frequency shift keying with carrier frequencies of 24.5 kHz and 26 kHz. This implementation enhances the possibilities for real-time, embedded and low-power tracking of several simultaneous transmitters. Due to the high degree of parallelism offered by field programmable gate arrays, up to four transmitters can be tracked simultaneously. The implementation requires at most 30% of the available logic gates of a Spartan-6 XC6SLX45 device and is evaluated on accuracy and precision through several ranging topologies. In the first topology, the distance between one transmitter and one receiver is evaluated. Afterwards, ranging analyses are applied between two simultaneous transmitters and one receiver. Ultimately, the position of the receiver against four transmitters using trilateration is also demonstrated. Results show enhanced distance measurements with distances ranging from a few centimeters up to 17 m, while keeping a centimeter-level accuracy.

  20. An Ultrasonic Multiple-Access Ranging Core Based on Frequency Shift Keying Towards Indoor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Segers, Laurent; Van Bavegem, David; De Winne, Sam; Braeken, An; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach and implementation methodology for indoor ranging based on the time difference of arrival using code division multiple access with ultrasound signals. A novel implementation based on a field programmable gate array using finite impulse response filters and an optimized correlation demodulator implementation for ultrasound orthogonal signals is developed. Orthogonal codes are modulated onto ultrasound signals using frequency shift keying with carrier frequencies of 24.5 kHz and 26 kHz. This implementation enhances the possibilities for real-time, embedded and low-power tracking of several simultaneous transmitters. Due to the high degree of parallelism offered by field programmable gate arrays, up to four transmitters can be tracked simultaneously. The implementation requires at most 30% of the available logic gates of a Spartan-6 XC6SLX45 device and is evaluated on accuracy and precision through several ranging topologies. In the first topology, the distance between one transmitter and one receiver is evaluated. Afterwards, ranging analyses are applied between two simultaneous transmitters and one receiver. Ultimately, the position of the receiver against four transmitters using trilateration is also demonstrated. Results show enhanced distance measurements with distances ranging from a few centimeters up to 17 m, while keeping a centimeter-level accuracy. PMID:26263986

  1. Gap/silicon Tandem Solar Cell with Extended Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A two-junction solar cell has a bottom solar cell junction of crystalline silicon, and a top solar cell junction of gallium phosphide. A three (or more) junction solar cell has bottom solar cell junctions of silicon, and a top solar cell junction of gallium phosphide. The resulting solar cells exhibit improved extended temperature operation.

  2. Water temperature impacts water consumption by range cattle in winter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water consumption and DMI have been found to be positively correlated, which may interact with ingestion of cold water or grazed frozen forage due to transitory reductions in temperature of ruminal contents. The hypothesis underpinning the study explores the potential that cows provided warm drinkin...

  3. Silicon device performance measurements to support temperature range enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromstead, James; Weir, Bennett; Cosby, Melvin; Johnson, R. Wayne; Nelms, R. Mark; Askew, Ray

    1992-01-01

    Characterization results of a MOS controlled thyristor (MCTA60P60) are presented. This device is rated for 60A and for an anode to cathode voltage of -600 V. As discussed in the last report, the MCT failed during 500 V leakage tests at 200 C. In contrast to the BJT (bipolar junction transistor), MOSFET, and IGBT (insulated gate bipolar transistor) devices tested, the breakdown voltage of the MCT decreases significantly with increasing temperature.

  4. Silicon device performance measurements to support temperature range enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromstead, James; Weir, Bennett; Johnson, R. Wayne; Askew, Ray

    1992-01-01

    Testing of the metal oxide semiconductor (MOS)-controlled thyristor (MCT) has uncovered a failure mechanism at elevated temperature. The failure appears to be due to breakdown of the gate oxide. Further testing is underway to verify the failure mode. Higher current level inverters were built to demonstrate 200 C operation of the N-MOSFET's and insulated-gate-bipolar transistors (IGBT's) and for life testing. One MOSFET failed early in testing. The origin of this failure is being studied. No IGBT's have failed. A prototype 28-to-42 V converter was built and is being tested at room temperature. The control loop is being finalized. Temperature stable, high value (10 micro-F) capacitors appear to be the limiting factor in the design at this time. In this application, the efficiency will be lower for the IGBT version due to the large V sub(cesat) (3.5-4 V) compared to the input voltage of 28 V. The MOSFET version should have higher efficiency; however, the MOSFET does not appear to be as robust at 200 C. Both versions are built for comparison.

  5. Exploring the accessible frequency range of phase-resolved ferromagnetic resonance detected with x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnicke, P.; Knut, R.; Wahlström, E.; Karis, O.; Bailey, W. E.; Arena, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    We present time- and element-resolved measurements of the magnetization dynamics in a ferromagnetic trilayer structure. A pump-probe scheme was utilized with a microwave magnetic excitation field phase-locked to the photon bunches and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism in transmission geometry. Using a relatively large photon bunch length with a full width at half maximum of 650 ps, the precessional motion of the magnetization was resolved up to frequencies of 2.5 GHz, thereby enabling sampling at frequencies significantly above the inverse bunch length. By simulating the experimental data with a numerical model based on a forced harmonic oscillator, we obtain good correlation between the two. The model, which includes timing jitter analysis, is used to predict the accessible frequency range of x-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance.

  6. Zero-Temperature Fluctuations in Short-Range Spin Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arguin, L.-P.; Newman, C. M.; Stein, D. L.; Wehr, J.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the energy difference restricted to a finite volume for certain pairs of incongruent ground states (if they exist) in the d-dimensional Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glass at zero temperature. We prove that the variance of this quantity with respect to the couplings grows proportionally to the volume in any d ≥ 2. An essential aspect of our result is the use of the excitation metastate. As an illustration of potential applications, we use this result to restrict the possible structure of spin glass ground states in two dimensions.

  7. Relationships between range access as monitored by radio frequency identification technology, fearfulness, and plumage damage in free-range laying hens.

    PubMed

    Hartcher, K M; Hickey, K A; Hemsworth, P H; Cronin, G M; Wilkinson, S J; Singh, M

    2016-05-01

    Severe feather-pecking (SFP), a particularly injurious behaviour in laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus), is thought to be negatively correlated with range use in free-range systems. In turn, range use is thought to be inversely associated with fearfulness, where fearful birds may be less likely to venture outside. However, very few experiments have investigated the proposed association between range use and fearfulness. This experiment investigated associations between range use (time spent outside), fearfulness, plumage damage, and BW. Two pens of 50 ISA Brown laying hens (n=100) were fitted with radio frequency identification (RFID) transponders (contained within silicone leg rings) at 26 weeks of age. Data were then collected over 13 days. A total of 95% of birds accessed the outdoor run more than once per day. Birds spent an average duration of 6.1 h outside each day over 11 visits per bird per day (51.5 min per visit). The top 15 and bottom 15 range users (n=30), as determined by the total time spent on the range over 13 days, were selected for study. These birds were tonic immobility (TI) tested at the end of the trial and were feather-scored and weighed after TI testing. Birds with longer TI durations spent less time outside (P=0.01). Plumage damage was not associated with range use (P=0.68). The small group sizes used in this experiment may have been conducive to the high numbers of birds utilising the outdoor range area. The RFID technology collected a large amount of data on range access in the tagged birds, and provides a potential means for quantitatively assessing range access in laying hens. The present findings indicate a negative association between fearfulness and range use. However, the proposed negative association between plumage damage and range use was not supported. The relationships between range use, fearfulness, and SFP warrant further research.

  8. Satellite range delay simulator for a matrix-switched time division multiple-access network simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Lawrence A.

    1989-01-01

    The Systems Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility at NASA Lewis Research Center is presently configured as a satellite-switched time division multiple access (SS-TDMA) network simulator. The purpose of SITE is to demonstrate and evaluate advanced communication satellite technologies, presently embodied by POC components developed under NASA contracts in addition to other hardware, such as ground terminals, designed and built in-house at NASA Lewis. Each ground terminal in a satellite communications system will experience a different aspect of the satellite's motion due mainly to daily tidal effects and station keeping, hence a different duration and rate of variation in the range delay. As a result of this and other effects such as local oscillator instability, each ground terminal must constantly adjust its transmit burst timing so that data bursts from separate ground terminals arrive at the satellite in their assigned time slots, preventing overlap and keeping the system in synchronism. On the receiving end, ground terminals must synchronize their local clocks using reference transmissions received through the satellite link. A feature of the SITE facility is its capability to simulate the varying propagation delays and associated Doppler frequency shifts that the ground terminals in the network have to cope with. Delay is achieved by means of two NASA Lewis designed and built range delay simulator (RDS) systems, each independently controlled locally with front panel switches or remotely by an experiment control and monitor (EC/M) computer.

  9. Cascaded optical isolator configuration having high-isolation characteristics over a wide temperature and wavelength range.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, K; Kawakami, S

    1987-07-01

    A new configuration of a cascaded optical isolator with high isolation over a wide range of temperature and wavelength is proposed. The configuration consists of two unit isolators, each of which is optimized for a different temperature and wavelength.

  10. Heart rate, multiple body temperature, long-range and long-life telemetry system for free-ranging animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, G. F.; Westbrook, R. M.; Fryer, T. B.

    1980-01-01

    The design details and rationale for a versatile, long-range, long-life telemetry data acquisition system for heart rates and body temperatures at multiple locations from free-ranging animals are presented. The design comprises an implantable transmitter for short to medium range transmission, a receiver retransmitter collar to be worn for long-range transmission, and a signal conditioner interface circuit to assist in signal discrimination and demodulation of receiver or tape-recorded audio outputs. Implanted electrodes are used to obtain an ECG, from which R-wave characteristics are selected to trigger a short RF pulse. Pulses carrying heart rate information are interrupted periodically by a series of pulse interval modulated RF pulses conveying temperature information sensed at desired locations by thermistors. Pulse duration and pulse sequencing are used to discriminate between heart rate and temperature pulses as well as radio frequency interference. The implanted transmitter may be used alone for medium and short-range tracking, or with a receiver-transmitter collar that employs commercial tracking equipment for transmissions of up to 12 km. A system prototype has been tested on a dog.

  11. Temperature-driven range expansion of an irruptive insect heightened by weakly coevolved plant defenses

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, Kenneth F.; Powell, Erinn N.; Townsend, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    Warming climate has increased access of native bark beetles to high-elevation pines that historically received only intermittent exposure to these tree-killing herbivores. Here we show that a dominant, relatively naïve, high-elevation species, whitebark pine, has inferior defenses against mountain pine beetle compared with its historical lower-elevation host, lodgepole pine. Lodgepole pines respond by exuding more resin and accumulating higher concentrations of toxic monoterpenes than whitebark pine, where they co-occur. Furthermore, the chemical composition of whitebark pine appears less able to inhibit the pheromonal communication beetles use to jointly overcome tree defenses. Despite whitebark pine’s inferior defenses, beetles were more likely to attack their historical host in mixed stands. This finding suggests there has been insufficient sustained contact for beetles to alter their complex behavioral mechanisms driving host preference. In no-choice assays, however, beetles readily entered and tunneled in both hosts equally, and in stands containing less lodgepole pine, attacks on whitebark pines increased. High-elevation trees in pure stands may thus be particularly vulnerable to temperature-driven range expansions. Predators and competitors were more attracted to volatiles from herbivores attacking their historical host, further increasing risk in less coevolved systems. Our results suggest cold temperatures provided a sufficient barrier against herbivores for high-elevation trees to allocate resources to other physiological processes besides defense. Changing climate may reduce the viability of that evolutionary strategy, and the life histories of high-elevation trees seem unlikely to foster rapid counter adaptation. Consequences extend from reduced food supplies for endangered grizzly bears to altered landscape and hydrological processes. PMID:23277541

  12. Natural variation in tocochromanols content in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions - the effect of temperature and light intensity.

    PubMed

    Gabruk, Michał; Habina, Iwona; Kruk, Jerzy; Dłużewska, Jolanta; Szymańska, Renata

    2016-06-01

    In this study, 25 accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana originating from a variety of climate conditions were grown under controlled circumstances of different light intensity and temperature. The accessions were analyzed for prenyllipids content and composition, as well as expression of the genes involved in tocochromanol biosynthesis (vte1-5). It was found that the applied conditions did not strongly affect total tocochromanols content and there was no apparent correlation of the tocochromanol content with the origin of the accessions. However, the presented results indicate that the temperature, more than the light intensity, affects the expression of the vte1-5 genes and the content of some prenyllipids. An interesting observation was that under low growth temperature, the hydroxy-plastochromanol (PC-OH) to plastochromanol (PC) ratio was considerably increased regardless of the light intensity in most of the accessions. PC-OH is known to be formed as a result of singlet oxygen stress, therefore this observation indicates that the singlet oxygen production is enhanced under low temperature. Unexpectedly, the highest increase in the PC-OH/PC ratio was found for accessions originating from cold climate (Shigu, Krazo-1 and Lov-5), even though such plants could be expected to be more resistant to low temperature stress.

  13. Temperature coefficients of crystalline-quartz elastic constants over the cryogenic range [4 K, 15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bon, Jérémy; Galliou, Serge; Bourquin, Roger

    2016-12-01

    This paper brings out the temperature coefficients of synthetic-quartz elastic constants at liquid helium temperature. The method is based on the relationship between the resonance frequencies of a quartz acoustic cavity and the elastic constants of the material. The temperature coefficients of the elastic constants are extracted from experimental frequency-temperature data collected within the very useful cryogenic range [4 K-15 K] from a set of resonators of various cut angles, because of the anisotropy of quartz.

  14. Alternate method for achieving temperature control in the -160 to +90 Celcius range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth R. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A single-pass method for accurate and precise temperature control in the -160 to +90 C range is discussed. The method exhibited minimal set-point overshoot during temperature transitions. Control to +/-2 C with transitions between set-points of 7 C per minute were achieved. The method uses commercially available temperature controllers and a gaseous nitrogen/liquid nitrogen mixer to dampen the amplitude of cold temperature spikes caused by liquid nitrogen pulsing.

  15. Performance of Wide Operating Temperature Range Electrolytes in Quallion Prototype Li-Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Tomcsi, M. R.; Nagata, M.; Visco, V.; Tsukamoto, H.

    2010-01-01

    For a number of applications, there is a continued interest in the development of rechargeable lithium-based batteries that can effectively operate over a wide temperature range (i.e., -40 to +70 deg C). These applications include powering future planetary rovers for NASA, enabling the next generation of automotive batteries for DOE, and supporting many DOD applications. Li-ion technology has been demonstrated to have good performance over a reasonably wide temperature range with many systems; however, there is still a desire to improve the low temperature rate capacity as well as the high temperature resilience. In the current study, we would like to present recent results obtained with prototype Li-Ion cells (manufactured by Quallion, LLC) which include various wide operating temperature range electrolytes developed by both JPL and Quallion. To demonstrate the viability of the technology, a number of performance tests were carried out, including: (a) discharge rate characterization over a wide temperature range (down to -60 deg C) using various rates (up to 20C rates), (b) discharge rate characterization at low temperatures with low temperature charging, (c) variable temperature cycling over a wide temperature range (-40 to +70 deg C), and (d) cycling at high temperature (50 deg C). As will be discussed, impressive rate capability was observed at low temperatures with many systems, as well as good resilience to high temperature cycling. To augment the performance testing on the prototype cells, a number of experimental three electrodes cells were fabricated (including Li reference electrodes) to allow the determination of the lithium kinetics of the respective electrodes and interfacial properties as a function of temperatures.

  16. Wide-Range Temperature Sensors with High-Level Pulse Train Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad; Patterson, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Two types of temperature sensors have been developed for wide-range temperature applications. The two sensors measure temperature in the range of -190 to +200 C and utilize a thin-film platinum RTD (resistance temperature detector) as the temperature-sensing element. Other parts used in the fabrication of these sensors include NPO (negative-positive- zero) type ceramic capacitors for timing, thermally-stable film or wirewound resistors, and high-temperature circuit boards and solder. The first type of temperature sensor is a relaxation oscillator circuit using an SOI (silicon-on-insulator) operational amplifier as a comparator. The output is a pulse train with a period that is roughly proportional to the temperature being measured. The voltage level of the pulse train is high-level, for example 10 V. The high-level output makes the sensor less sensitive to noise or electromagnetic interference. The output can be read by a frequency or period meter and then converted into a temperature reading. The second type of temperature sensor is made up of various types of multivibrator circuits using an SOI type 555 timer and the passive components mentioned above. Three configurations have been developed that were based on the technique of charging and discharging a capacitor through a resistive element to create a train of pulses governed by the capacitor-resistor time constant. Both types of sensors, which operated successfully over the wide temperature range, have potential use in extreme temperature environments including jet engines and space exploration missions.

  17. The impact of seasonality in temperature on thermal tolerance and elevational range size.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Kimberly S; Tewksbury, Joshua J

    2014-08-01

    Environmental temperature variation can influence physiology, biogeography, and life history, with large consequences for ecology, evolution, and the impacts of climate change. Based on the seasonality hypothesis, greater annual temperature variation at high latitudes should result in greater thermal tolerance and, consequently, larger elevational ranges in temperate compared to tropical species. Despite the mechanistic nature of this hypothesis, most research has used latitude as a proxy for seasonality, failing to directly examine the impact of temperature variation on physiology and range size. We used phylogenetically matched beetles from locations spanning 60 degrees of latitude to explore links between seasonality, physiology and elevational range. Thermal tolerance increased with seasonality across all beetle groups, but realized seasonality (temperature variation restricted to the months species are active) was a better predictor of thermal tolerance than was annual seasonality. Additionally, beetles with greater thermal tolerance had larger elevational ranges. Our results support a mechanistic framework linking variation in realized temperature to physiology and distributions.

  18. 'Optimal thermal range' in ectotherms: Defining criteria for tests of the temperature-size-rule.

    PubMed

    Walczyńska, Aleksandra; Kiełbasa, Anna; Sobczyk, Mateusz

    2016-08-01

    Thermal performance curves for population growth rate r (a measure of fitness) were estimated over a wide range of temperature for three species: Coleps hirtus (Protista), Lecane inermis (Rotifera) and Aeolosoma hemprichi (Oligochaeta). We measured individual body size and examined if predictions for the temperature-size rule (TSR) were valid for different temperatures. All three organisms investigated follow the TSR, but only over a specific range between minimal and optimal temperatures, while maintenance at temperatures beyond this range showed the opposite pattern in these taxa. We consider minimal and optimal temperatures to be species-specific, and moreover delineate a physiological range outside of which an ectotherm is constrained against displaying size plasticity in response to temperature. This thermal range concept has important implications for general size-temperature studies. Furthermore, the concept of 'operating thermal conditions' may provide a new approach to (i) defining criteria required for investigating and interpreting temperature effects, and (ii) providing a novel interpretation for many cases in which species do not conform to the TSR.

  19. The solubility of hydrogen in plutonium in the temperature range 475 to 825 degrees centigrade

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    The solubility of hydrogen (H) in plutonium metal (Pu) was measured in the temperature range of 475 to 825{degree}C for unalloyed Pu (UA) and in the temperature range of 475 to 625{degree}C for Pu containing two-weight-percent gallium (TWP). For TWP metal, in the temperature range 475 to 600{degree}C, the saturated solution has a maximum hydrogen to plutonium ration (H/Pu) of 0.00998 and the standard enthalpy of formation ({Delta}H{degree}{sub f(s)}) is (-0.128 {plus minus} 0.0123) kcal/mol. The phase boundary of the solid solution in equilibrium with plutonium dihydride (PuH{sub 2}) is temperature independent. In the temperature range 475 to 625{degree}C, UA metal has a maximum solubility at H/Pu = 0.011. The phase boundary between the solid solution region and the metal+PuH{sub 2} two-phase region is temperature dependent. The solubility of hydrogen in UA metal was also measured in the temperature range 650 to 825{degree}C with {Delta}H{degree}{sub f(s)} = (-0.104 {plus minus} 0.0143) kcal/mol and {Delta}S{degree}{sub f(s)} = 0. The phase boundary is temperature dependent and the maximum hydrogen solubility has H/Pu = 0.0674 at 825{degree}C. 52 refs., 28 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Temperature Dependence of Thin Film Spiral Inductors on Alumina Over a Temperature Range of 25 to 475 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of inductors on an Alumina substrate over the temperature range of 25 to 475 C. Five sets of inductors, each set consisting of a 1.5, 2.5, 3.5, and a 4.5 turn inductor with different line width and spacing, were measured on a high temperature probe station from 10 MHz to 30 GHz. From these measured characteristics, it is shown that the inductance is nearly independent of temperature for low frequencies compared to the self resonant frequency, the parasitic capacitances are independent of temperature, and the resistance varies nearly linearly with temperature. These characteristics result in the self resonant frequency decreasing by only a few percent as the temperature is increased from 25 to 475 C, but the maximum quality factor decreases by a factor of 2 to 3. These observations based on measured data are confirmed through 2D simulations using Sonnet software.

  1. The direction and range of ambient temperature change influences yawning in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Gallup, Andrew C; Miller, Michael L; Clark, Anne B

    2010-05-01

    Comparative research suggests that yawning is a thermoregulatory behavior in homeotherms. Our previous experiments revealed that yawning increased in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) as ambient temperature was raised toward body temperature (22-->34 degrees C). In this study, we identify the range of temperatures that triggers yawning to rule out the possible effect of changing temperature in any range. To corroborate its thermoregulatory function, we also related the incidence of yawning to other avian thermoregulatory behaviors in budgerigars (e.g., panting, wing venting). In a repeated measures design, 16 budgerigars were exposed to 4 separate 10-min periods of changing temperatures: (a) low-increasing (23-->27 degrees C), (b) high-increasing (27-->33 degrees C), (c) high-decreasing (34-->28 degrees C), and (d) low-decreasing (28-->24 degrees C). Birds yawned significantly more during the high-increasing temperature range, and yawning was positively correlated with ambient temperature across trials. Yawning was also positively correlated with other thermoregulatory behaviors. This research clarifies the previously demonstrated relationship between yawning rate and temperature by providing evidence that the physiological trigger for yawning is related to increasing body temperatures rather than the detection of changing external temperatures.

  2. Soil moisture sensing with aircraft observations of the diurnal range of surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Blanchard, B.; Anderson, A.; Wang, V.

    1977-01-01

    Aircraft observations of the surface temperature were made by measurements of the thermal emission in the 8-14 micrometers band over agricultural fields around Phoenix, Arizona. The diurnal range of these surface temperature measurements were well correlated with the ground measurement of soil moisture in the 0-2 cm layer. The surface temperature observations for vegetated fields were found to be within 1 or 2 C of the ambient air temperature indicating no moisture stress. These results indicate that for clear atmospheric conditions remotely sensed surface temperatures are a reliable indicator of soil moisture conditions and crop status.

  3. Accessibility

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Federal laws, including Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, mandate that people with disabilities have access to the same information that someone without a disability would have. 508 standards cover electronic and information technology (EIT) products.

  4. Diurnal temperature range compression hastens berry development and modifies flavonoid partitioning in grapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperatures during the day and night are known to influence grape berry metabolism and resulting composition. In this study, the flavonoid composition of field-grown Vitis vinifera L. cv. Merlot berries was investigated as a function of diurnal temperature range (DTR). The DTR was compressed by c...

  5. Serial temperature monitoring and comparison of rectal and muscle temperatures in immobilized free-ranging black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis).

    PubMed

    vdB Morkel, Peter; Miller, Michele; Jago, Mark; Radcliffe, Robin W; du Preez, Pierre; Olea-Popelka, Francisco; Sefton, Jennifer; Taft, Arthur; Nydam, Daryl; Gleed, Robin D

    2012-03-01

    Control of body temperature is critical to a successful anesthetic outcome, particularly during field immobilization of wild animals. Hyperthermia associated with exertion can lead to serious and potentially life-threatening complications such as organ damage (including myopathy) and death. Methods for monitoring core body temperature must accurately reflect the physiologic status of the animal in order for interventions to be effective. The goal of this preliminary study was to compare serial rectal and muscle temperatures in field-immobilized black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) and evaluate a possible association. Twenty-four free-ranging black rhinoceros were immobilized between February and March of 2010 in Ethosha National Park, Namibia. Pairwise comparisons showed a correlation of 0.73 (95% CI; 0.70-0.75) between rectal and muscle temperature measurements. Results from a multivariable model indicate that muscle temperature readings were, on average, 0.46 degrees C (95% CI; 0.36-0.57 degrees C) higher than rectal temperatures while adjusting for repeated measurements on the same rhinoceros, effect of duration of immobilization, and effect of ambient temperature on rhinoceroses' temperature readings. As immobilization time increased, muscle and rectal temperature values within an individual rhinoceros tended to equilibrate. The overall temperatures decreased by an average of 0.00059 degrees C/min (95% CI; -0.0047 to -0.0035 degrees C/min; P = 0.779). As the ambient temperature at time of immobilization increased by 1 degree C, the average rhinoceros temperature increased by 0.09 degrees C (95% CI; 0.06-0.11 degrees C, P < 0.0001). Higher body temperature creates a potential for cellular damage leading to complications that include myopathy. Methods for monitoring rectal, muscle, and ambient temperatures should be incorporated into anesthetic monitoring protocols for large ungulates, particularly under field conditions.

  6. Physiological and antioxidant responses of two accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana in different light and temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Renata; Nowicka, Beatrycze; Gabruk, Michał; Glińska, Sława; Michlewska, Sylwia; Dłużewska, Jolanta; Sawicka, Anna; Kruk, Jerzy; Laitinen, Roosa

    2015-06-01

    During their lifetime, plants need to adapt to a changing environment, including light and temperature. To understand how these factors influence plant growth, we investigated the physiological and antioxidant responses of two Arabidopsis accessions, Shahdara (Sha) from the Shahdara valley (Tajikistan, Central Asia) in a mountainous area and Lovvik-5 (Lov-5) from northern Sweden to different light and temperature conditions. These accessions originate from different latitudes and have different life strategies, both of which are known to be influenced by light and temperature. We showed that both accessions grew better in high-light and at a lower temperature (16°C) than in low light and at 23°C. Interestingly, Sha had a lower chlorophyll content but more efficient non-photochemical quenching than Lov-5. Sha, also showed a higher expression of vitamin E biosynthetic genes. We did not observe any difference in the antioxidant prenyllipid level under these conditions. Our results suggest that the mechanisms that keep the plastoquinone (PQ)-pool in more oxidized state could play a role in the adaptation of these accessions to their local climatic conditions.

  7. Associations of day-to-day temperature change and diurnal temperature range with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito

    2017-01-01

    Background Although the impacts of temperature on mortality and morbidity have been documented, few studies have investigated whether day-to-day temperature change and diurnal temperature range (DTR) are independent risk factors for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Design This was a prospective, population-based, observational study. Methods We obtained all OHCA data from 2005-2013 from six major prefectures in Japan: Hokkaido, Tokyo, Kanagawa, Aichi, Kyoto, and Osaka. We used a quasi-Poisson regression analysis with a distributed-lag non-linear model to assess the associations of day-to-day temperature change and DTR with OHCA for each prefecture. Results In total, 271,698 OHCAs of presumed cardiac origin were reported during the study period. There was a significant increase in the risk of OHCA associated with cold temperature in five prefectures, with relative risks (RRs) ranging from 1.298 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.022-1.649) in Hokkaido to 3.893 (95% CI 1.713-8.845) in Kyoto. DTR was adversely associated with OHCA on hot days in Aichi (RR 1.158; 95% CI 1.028-1.304) and on cold days in Tokyo (RR 1.030; 95% CI 1.000-1.060), Kanagawa (RR 1.042; 95% CI 1.005-1.082), Kyoto (RR 1.060; 95% CI 1.001-1.122), and Osaka (RR 1.050; 95% CI 1.014-1.088), whereas there was no significant association between day-to-day temperature change and OHCA. Conclusion We found that associations between day-to-day temperature change and DTR and OHCA were generally small compared with the association with mean temperature. Our findings suggest that preventative measures for temperature-related OHCA may be more effective when focused on mean temperature and DTR.

  8. Brain and arterial blood temperatures of free-ranging oryx ( Oryx gazella).

    PubMed

    Maloney, Shane K; Fuller, Andrea; Mitchell, Graham; Mitchell, Duncan

    2002-01-01

    We used implanted miniature data loggers to measure brain and arterial blood temperatures every 5 min for up to 15 days in four free-ranging oryx ( Oryx gazella) in their natural habitat. Globe temperatures exceeded 45 degrees C and average peak radiant heat load was 800 W.m(-2). Arterial blood temperature exhibited a moderate amplitude nychthemeral rhythm of 1.8+/-0.3 degrees C (mean +/-SD). The amplitude of the nychthemeral rhythm was not influenced by variations in ambient heat load. Average brain temperature exceeded carotid arterial blood temperature by 0.29 degrees C but there was a range of body temperatures over which the brain could be up to 0.4 degrees C cooler or 0.5 degrees C warmer than arterial blood. At high body temperatures (>39.5 degrees C) at rest, three of the animals tended to maintain the brain cooler than arterial blood. During exercise the brain was always warmer than arterial blood. The slope of the regression line relating brain temperature to carotid blood temperature was less than one. At short time scales of 5-20 min, brain temperature varied significantly more than did carotid blood temperature. We attribute part of the variability in brain temperature to transient stress responses and the influence of sympathetic activation attenuating selective brain cooling. We conclude that, contrary to the widely cited postulate, the carotid rete does not protect the brain during hyperthermia. Oryx also do not show adaptive heterothermy and, over short time intervals, have a brain temperature more variable than carotid blood temperature.

  9. High temperature adhesive silicone foam composition, foam generating system and method of generating foam. [For access denial

    DOEpatents

    Mead, J.W.; Montoya, O.J.; Rand, P.B.; Willan, V.O.

    1983-12-21

    Access to a space is impeded by generation of a sticky foam from a silicone polymer and a low boiling solvent such as a halogenated hydrocarbon. In a preferred aspect, the formulation is polydimethylsiloxane gel mixed with F502 Freon as a solvent and blowing agent, and pressurized with CO/sub 2/ in a vessel to about 250 PSI, whereby when the vessel is opened, a sticky and solvent resistant foam is deployed. The foam is deployable, over a wide range of temperatures, adhering to wet surfaces as well as dry, is stable over long periods of time and does not propagate flame or lose adhesive properties during an externally supported burn.

  10. Electrolytes for Use in High Energy Lithium-Ion Batteries with Wide Operating Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; West, W. C.; Whitcanack, L. D.; Huang, C.; Soler, J.; Krause, F. C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives of this work are: (1) Develop advanced Li -ion electrolytes that enable cell operation over a wide temperature range (i.e., -30 to +60C). (2) Improve the high temperature stability and lifetime characteristics of wide operating temperature electrolytes. (3) Improve the high voltage stability of these candidate electrolytes systems to enable operation up to 5V with high specific energy cathode materials. (4) Define the performance limitations at low and high temperature extremes, as well as, life limiting processes. (5) Demonstrate the performance of advanced electrolytes in large capacity prototype cells.

  11. Dual fluorescence sensor for trace oxygen and temperature with unmatched range and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Baleizão, Carlos; Nagl, Stefan; Schäferling, Michael; Berberan-Santos, Mário N; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2008-08-15

    An optical dual sensor for oxygen and temperature is presented that is highly oxygen sensitive and covers a broad temperature range. Dual sensing is based on luminescence lifetime measurements. The novel sensor contains two luminescent compounds incorporated into polymer films. The temperature-sensitive dye (ruthenium tris-1,10-phenanthroline) has a highly temperature-dependent luminescence and is incorporated in poly(acrylonitrile) to avoid cross-sensitivity to oxygen. Fullerene C70 was used as the oxygen-sensitive probe owing to its strong thermally activated delayed fluorescence at elevated temperatures that is extremely oxygen sensitive. The cross-sensitivity of C70 to temperature is accounted for by means of the temperature sensor. C70 is incorporated into a highly oxygen-permeable polymer, either ethyl cellulose or organosilica. The two luminescent probes have different emission spectra and decay times, and their emissions can be discriminated using both parameters. Spatially resolved sensing is achieved by means of fluorescence lifetime imaging. The response times of the sensor to oxygen are short. The dual sensor exhibits a temperature operation range between at least 0 and 120 degrees C, and detection limits for oxygen in the ppbv range, operating for oxygen concentrations up to at least 50 ppmv. These ranges outperform all dual oxygen and temperature sensors reported so far. The dual sensor presented in this study is especially appropriate for measurements under extreme conditions such as high temperatures and ultralow oxygen levels. This dual sensor is a key step forward in a number of scientifically or commercially important applications including food packaging, for monitoring of hyperthermophilic microorganisms, in space technology, and safety and security applications in terms of detection of oxygen leaks.

  12. Measurement of effective temperature range of fire service thermal imaging cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amon, Francine; Bryner, Nelson

    2008-04-01

    The use of thermal imaging cameras (TIC) by the fire service is increasing as fire fighters become more aware of the value of these tools. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) is currently developing a consensus standard for design and performance requirements of TIC as used by the fire service. The National Institute of Standards and Technology facilitates this process by providing recommendations for science-based performance metrics and test methods to the NFPA technical committee charged with the development of this standard. A suite of imaging performance metrics and test methods, based on the harsh operating environment and limitations of use particular to the fire service, has been proposed for inclusion in the standard. The Effective Temperature Range (ETR) measures the range of temperatures that a TIC can view while still providing useful information to the user. Specifically, extreme heat in the field of view tends to inhibit a TIC's ability to discern surfaces having intermediate temperatures, such as victims and fire fighters. The ETR measures the contrast of a target having alternating 25 °C and 30 °C bars while an increasing temperature range is imposed on other surfaces in the field of view. The ETR also indicates the thermal conditions that trigger a shift in integration time common to TIC employing microbolometer sensors. The reported values for this imaging performance metric are the hot surface temperature range within which the TIC provides adequate bar contrast, and the hot surface temperature at which the TIC shifts integration time.

  13. HTP kinetics studies on isolated elementary combustion reactions over wide temperature ranges

    SciTech Connect

    Fontijn, A.; Adusei, G.Y.; Hranisavlevic, J.; Bajaj, P.N.

    1993-12-01

    The goals of this project are to provide accurate data on the temperature dependence of the kinetics of elementary combustion reactions, (i) for use by combustion modelers, and (ii) to gain a better fundamental understanding of, and hence predictive ability for, the chemistry involved. Experimental measurements are made mainly by using the pseudo-static HTP (high-temperature photochemistry) technique. While continuing rate coefficient measurements, further aspects of kinetics research are being explored. Thus, starting from the data obtained, a method for predicting the temperature dependence of rate coefficients of oxygen-atom olefin experiment and confirms the underlying mechanistic assumptions. Mechanistic information of another sort, i.e. by product analysis, has recently become accessible with the inauguration of our heated flow tube mass spectrometer facility; early results are reported here. HTP experiments designed to lead to measurements of product channels by resonance fluorescence have started.

  14. Increasing sea surface temperature and range shifts of intertidal gastropods along the Iberian Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubal, Marcos; Veiga, Puri; Cacabelos, Eva; Moreira, Juan; Sousa-Pinto, Isabel

    2013-03-01

    There are well-documented changes in abundance and geographical range of intertidal invertebrates related to climate change at north Europe. However, the effect of sea surface warming on intertidal invertebrates has been poorly studied at lower latitudes. Here we analyze potential changes in the abundance patterns and distribution range of rocky intertidal gastropods related to climate change along the Iberian Peninsula. To achieve this aim, the spatial distribution and range of sub-tropical, warm- and cold-water species of intertidal gastropods was explored by a fully hierarchical sampling design considering four different spatial scales, i.e. from region (100 s of km apart) to quadrats (ms apart). Variability on their patterns of abundance was explored by analysis of variance, changes on their distribution ranges were detected by comparing with previous records and their relationship with sea water temperature was explored by rank correlation analyses. Mean values of sea surface temperature along the Iberian coast, between 1949 and 2010, were obtained from in situ data compiled for three different grid squares: south Portugal, north Portugal, and Galicia. Lusitanian species did not show significant correlation with sea water temperature or changes on their distributional range or abundance, along the temperature gradient considered. The sub-tropical species Siphonaria pectinata has, however, increased its distribution range while boreal cold-water species showed the opposite pattern. The latter was more evident for Littorina littorea that was almost absent from the studied rocky shores of the Iberian Peninsula. Sub-tropical and boreal species showed significant but opposite correlation with sea water temperature. We hypothesized that the energetic cost of frequent exposures to sub-lethal temperatures might be responsible for these shifts. Therefore, intertidal gastropods at the Atlantic Iberian Peninsula coast are responding to the effect of global warming as it

  15. Preserving Range and Airspace Access for the Air Force Mission: Striving for a Strategic Vantage Point

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    turbines on land now set aside for Air Force use, and the increasing demand for airspace to accom- modate the growth in civilian air traffic. • next...to ranges, energy development that seeks to place wind turbines on land now set aside for Air Force use, and increasing demand for sufficient... turbine towers may create a hazard to low-flying aircraft and thus preclude low-level training. Wind turbines tend to be located in gaps with higher

  16. Analysis of the Dryden Wet Bulb GLobe Temperature Algorithm for White Sands Missile Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaQuay, Ryan Matthew

    2011-01-01

    In locations where workforce is exposed to high relative humidity and light winds, heat stress is a significant concern. Such is the case at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. Heat stress is depicted by the wet bulb globe temperature, which is the official measurement used by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. The wet bulb globe temperature is measured by an instrument which was designed to be portable and needing routine maintenance. As an alternative form for measuring the wet bulb globe temperature, algorithms have been created to calculate the wet bulb globe temperature from basic meteorological observations. The algorithms are location dependent; therefore a specific algorithm is usually not suitable for multiple locations. Due to climatology similarities, the algorithm developed for use at the Dryden Flight Research Center was applied to data from the White Sands Missile Range. A study was performed that compared a wet bulb globe instrument to data from two Surface Atmospheric Measurement Systems that was applied to the Dryden wet bulb globe temperature algorithm. The period of study was from June to September of2009, with focus being applied from 0900 to 1800, local time. Analysis showed that the algorithm worked well, with a few exceptions. The algorithm becomes less accurate to the measurement when the dew point temperature is over 10 Celsius. Cloud cover also has a significant effect on the measured wet bulb globe temperature. The algorithm does not show red and black heat stress flags well due to shorter time scales of such events. The results of this study show that it is plausible that the Dryden Flight Research wet bulb globe temperature algorithm is compatible with the White Sands Missile Range, except for when there are increased dew point temperatures and cloud cover or precipitation. During such occasions, the wet bulb globe temperature instrument would be the preferred method of measurement. Out of the 30

  17. Electrolytes for Use in High Energy Lithium-ion Batteries with Wide Operating Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; West, W. C.; Whitcanack, L. D.; Huang, C.; Soler, J.; Krause, F. C.

    2012-01-01

    Met programmatic milestones for program. Demonstrated improved performance with wide operating temperature electrolytes containing ester co-solvents (i.e., methyl butyrate) containing electrolyte additives in A123 prototype cells: Previously demonstrated excellent low temperature performance, including 11C rates at -30 C and the ability to perform well down to -60 C. Excellent cycle life at room temperature has been displayed, with over 5,000 cycles being demonstrated. Good high temperature cycle life performance has also been achieved. Demonstrated improved performance with methyl propionate-containing electrolytes in large capacity prototype cells: Demonstrated the wide operating temperature range capability in large cells (12 Ah), successfully scaling up technology from 0.25 Ah size cells. Demonstrated improved performance at low temperature and good cycle life at 40 C with methyl propionate-based electrolyte containing increasing FEC content and the use of LiBOB as an additive. Utilized three-electrode cells to investigate the electrochemical characteristics of high voltage systems coupled with wide operating temperature range electrolytes: From Tafel polarization measurements on each electrode, it is evident the NMC-based cathode displays poor lithium kinetics (being the limiting electrode). The MB-based formulations containing LiBOB delivered the best rate capability at low temperature, which is attributed to improved cathode kinetics. Whereas, the use of lithium oxalate as an additive lead to the highest reversible capacity and lower irreversible losses.

  18. Broadening of mesophase temperature range induced by doping calamitic mesogen with banana-shaped mesogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetinov, Miroslav; Stojanović, Maja; Obadović, Dušanka; Vajda, Aniko; Fodor-Csorba, Katalin; Eber, Nandor

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated three binary mixtures composed of selected banana-shaped dopant in low concentrations and calamitic mesogen in high. Banana-shaped dopant forms a B7 phase, while the calamitic mesogen exhibit nematic and smectic SmA and SmC phases. The occurring mesophases have been identified by their optical textures. At dopant concentrations of 2.2 and 3.1 mol%, there is evident broadening of nematic and smectic SmA temperature ranges in respect to the pure calamitic compound. Yet, the mixture with dopant concentration of 7 mol% exhibits narrower temperature ranges of mesophases. Increasing dopant concentration caused lowering of all phase transitions temperatures (TI-N, TN-SmA, TSmA-SmC) in all investigated mixtures. Therefore, mixing classic calamitic compounds with novel banana-shaped compound in low concentrations is viable way to attain useful mesophase range for application in industry.

  19. Digital predistortion of 75-110 GHz W-band frequency multiplier for fiber wireless short range access systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Deng, Lei; Pang, Xiaodan; Yu, Xianbin; Zheng, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hanyi; Monroy, Idelfonso Tafur

    2011-12-12

    We present a W-band fiber-wireless transmission system based on a nonlinear frequency multiplier for high-speed wireless short range access applications. By implementing a baseband digital signal predistortion scheme, intensive nonlinear distortions induced in a sextuple frequency multiplier can be effectively pre-compensated. Without using costly W-band components, a transmission system with 26 km fiber and 4 m wireless transmission operating at 99.6 GHz is experimentally validated. Adjacent-channel power ratio (ACPR) improvements for IQ-modulated vector signals are guaranteed and transmission performances for fiber and wireless channels are studied. This W-band predistortion technique is a promising candidate for applications in high capacity wireless-fiber access systems.

  20. Implications of the corneal temperature range in the prediction of laser thermal damage. [Monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Mikesell, G.W. Jr.; Schepler, K.L.

    1980-04-01

    Corneal temperatures of the rhesus monkeys have been measured under conditions that may exist during laser experiments. The minimum and maximum temperatures found for all experimental conditions were 29.54/sup 0/C and 39.16/sup 0/C, respectively, a range of 9.62/sup 0/C. A computer model of thermal damage due to laser irradiation was used to determine the effect varying initial temperature could have on corneal damage thresholds (ED50's). The range of 9.62/sup 0/C found in monkeys for all experimental conditions corresponded to a 39% difference in threshold power. The dependence of damage thresholds on initial temperature could be an important factor to consider when basing laser safety standards on damage threshold data.

  1. Surprises from quenches in long-range-interacting systems: temperature inversion and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shamik; Casetti, Lapo

    2016-10-01

    What happens when one of the parameters governing the dynamics of a long-range interacting system of particles in thermal equilibrium is abruptly changed (quenched) to a different value? While a short-range system, under the same conditions, will relax in time to a new thermal equilibrium with a uniform temperature across the system, a long-range system shows a fast relaxation to a non-equilibrium quasistationary state (QSS). The lifetime of such an off-equilibrium state diverges with the system size, and the temperature is non-uniform across the system. Quite surprisingly, the density profile in the QSS obtained after the quench is anticorrelated with the temperature profile in space, thus exhibiting the phenomenon of temperature inversion: denser regions are colder than sparser ones. We illustrate with extensive molecular dynamics simulations the ubiquity of this scenario in a prototypical long-range interacting system subject to a variety of quenching protocols, and in a model that mimics an experimental setup of atoms interacting with light in an optical cavity. We further demonstrate how a procedure of iterative quenching combined with filtering out the high-energy particles in the system may be employed to cool the system. Temperature inversion is observed in nature in some astrophysical settings; our results imply that such a phenomenon should be observable, and could even be exploitable to advantage, also in controlled laboratory experiments.

  2. Temperature Range Shifts for Three European Tree Species over the Last 10,000 Years

    PubMed Central

    Cheddadi, Rachid; Araújo, Miguel B.; Maiorano, Luigi; Edwards, Mary; Guisan, Antoine; Carré, Matthieu; Chevalier, Manuel; Pearman, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    We quantified the degree to which the relationship between the geographic distribution of three major European tree species, Abies alba, Fagus sylvatica and Picea abies and January temperature (Tjan) has remained stable over the past 10,000 years. We used an extended data-set of fossil pollen records over Europe to reconstruct spatial variation in Tjan values for each 1000-year time slice between 10,000 and 3000 years BP (before present). We evaluated the relationships between the occurrences of the three species at each time slice and the spatially interpolated Tjan values, and compared these to their modern temperature ranges. Our results reveal that F. sylvatica and P. abies experienced Tjan ranges during the Holocene that differ from those of the present, while A. alba occurred over a Tjan range that is comparable to its modern one. Our data suggest the need for re-evaluation of the assumption of stable climate tolerances at a scale of several thousand years. The temperature range instability in our observed data independently validates similar results based exclusively on modeled Holocene temperatures. Our study complements previous studies that used modeled data by identifying variation in frequencies of occurrence of populations within the limits of suitable climate. However, substantial changes that were observed in the realized thermal niches over the Holocene tend to suggest that predicting future species distributions should not solely be based on modern realized niches, and needs to account for the past variation in the climate variables that drive species ranges. PMID:27826308

  3. Micromechanical properties of C70 single crystals in the temperature range 77-350 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubenets, S. V.; Natsik, V. D.; Fomenko, L. S.; Rusakova, A. V.; Osipyan, Yu. A.; Orlov, V. I.; Sidorov, N. S.; Izotov, A. N.

    2012-03-01

    Hexagonal single crystals of C70 down to 1-2 mm in size were grown, which allowed the investigation of their low-temperature mechanical properties for the first time. Morphology, microplasticity anisotropy, and the temperature dependence of Vickers microhardness HV (T) of the C70 crystals involving all known phase transitions were studied with the aid of optical microscopy and microindentation in the temperature range 77-350 K. The association of the features of HV (T) dependence with orientation phase transformations was analyzed. It is suggested that microplasticity anisotropy of the C70 crystals correlates with the active slip systems.

  4. Dynamics of chromatin accessibility and long-range interactions in response to glucocorticoid pulsing.

    PubMed

    Stavreva, Diana A; Coulon, Antoine; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; John, Sam; Stixova, Lenka; Tesikova, Martina; Hakim, Ofir; Miranda, Tina; Hawkins, Mary; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Chow, Carson C; Hager, Gordon L

    2015-06-01

    Although physiological steroid levels are often pulsatile (ultradian), the genomic effects of this pulsatility are poorly understood. By utilizing glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling as a model system, we uncovered striking spatiotemporal relationships between receptor loading, lifetimes of the DNase I hypersensitivity sites (DHSs), long-range interactions, and gene regulation. We found that hormone-induced DHSs were enriched within ± 50 kb of GR-responsive genes and displayed a broad spectrum of lifetimes upon hormone withdrawal. These lifetimes dictate the strength of the DHS interactions with gene targets and contribute to gene regulation from a distance. Our results demonstrate that pulsatile and constant hormone stimulations induce unique, treatment-specific patterns of gene and regulatory element activation. These modes of activation have implications for corticosteroid function in vivo and for steroid therapies in various clinical settings.

  5. High Temperature Extends the Range of Size Discrimination of Nonionic Polymers by a Biological Nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Piguet, Fabien; Ouldali, Hadjer; Discala, Françoise; Breton, Marie-France; Behrends, Jan C.; Pelta, Juan; Oukhaled, Abdelghani

    2016-01-01

    We explore the effect of temperature on the interaction of polydisperse mixtures of nonionic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) polymers of different average molar masses with the biological nanopore α-hemolysin. In contrast with what has been previously observed with various nanopores and analytes, we find that, for PEGs larger than a threshold molar mass (2000 g/mol, PEG 2000), increasing temperature increases the duration of the PEG/nanopore interaction. In the case of PEG 3400 the duration increases by up to a factor of 100 when the temperature increases from 5 °C to 45 °C. Importantly, we find that increasing temperature extends the polymer size range of application of nanopore-based single-molecule mass spectrometry (Np-SMMS)-type size discrimination. Indeed, in the case of PEG 3400, discrimination of individual molecular species of different monomer number is impossible at room temperature but is achieved when the temperature is raised to 45 °C. We interpret our observations as the consequence of a decrease of PEG solubility and a collapse of PEG molecules with higher temperatures. In addition to expanding the range of application of Np-SMMS to larger nonionic polymers, our findings highlight the crucial role of the polymer solubility for the nanopore detection. PMID:27924860

  6. High Temperature Extends the Range of Size Discrimination of Nonionic Polymers by a Biological Nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piguet, Fabien; Ouldali, Hadjer; Discala, Françoise; Breton, Marie-France; Behrends, Jan C.; Pelta, Juan; Oukhaled, Abdelghani

    2016-12-01

    We explore the effect of temperature on the interaction of polydisperse mixtures of nonionic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) polymers of different average molar masses with the biological nanopore α-hemolysin. In contrast with what has been previously observed with various nanopores and analytes, we find that, for PEGs larger than a threshold molar mass (2000 g/mol, PEG 2000), increasing temperature increases the duration of the PEG/nanopore interaction. In the case of PEG 3400 the duration increases by up to a factor of 100 when the temperature increases from 5 °C to 45 °C. Importantly, we find that increasing temperature extends the polymer size range of application of nanopore-based single-molecule mass spectrometry (Np-SMMS)-type size discrimination. Indeed, in the case of PEG 3400, discrimination of individual molecular species of different monomer number is impossible at room temperature but is achieved when the temperature is raised to 45 °C. We interpret our observations as the consequence of a decrease of PEG solubility and a collapse of PEG molecules with higher temperatures. In addition to expanding the range of application of Np-SMMS to larger nonionic polymers, our findings highlight the crucial role of the polymer solubility for the nanopore detection.

  7. Equatorial range limits of an intertidal ectotherm are more linked to water than air temperature.

    PubMed

    Seabra, Rui; Wethey, David S; Santos, António M; Gomes, Filipa; Lima, Fernando P

    2016-10-01

    As climate change is expected to impose increasing thermal stress on intertidal organisms, understanding the mechanisms by which body temperatures translate into major biogeographic patterns is of paramount importance. We exposed individuals of the limpet Patella vulgata Linnaeus, 1758, to realistic experimental treatments aimed at disentangling the contribution of water and air temperature for the buildup of thermal stress. Treatments were designed based on temperature data collected at the microhabitat level, from 15 shores along the Atlantic European coast spanning nearly 20° of latitude. Cardiac activity data indicated that thermal stress levels in P. vulgata are directly linked to elevated water temperature, while high air temperature is only stressful if water temperature is also high. In addition, the analysis of the link between population densities and thermal regimes at the studied locations suggests that the occurrence of elevated water temperature may represent a threshold P. vulgata is unable to tolerate. By combining projected temperatures with the temperature threshold identified, we show that climate change will likely result in the westward expansion of the historical distribution gap in the Bay of Biscay (southwest France), and northward contraction of the southern range limit in south Portugal. These findings suggest that even a minor relaxing of the upwelling off northwest Iberia could lead to a dramatic increase in thermal stress, with major consequences for the structure and functioning of the intertidal communities along Iberian rocky shores.

  8. Rapid poleward range expansion of tropical reef corals in response to rising sea surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamano, Hiroya; Sugihara, Kaoru; Nomura, Keiichi

    2011-02-01

    Rising temperatures caused by climatic warming may cause poleward range shifts and/or expansions in species distribution. Tropical reef corals (hereafter corals) are some of the world's most important species, being not only primary producers, but also habitat-forming species, and thus fundamental ecosystem modification is expected according to changes in their distribution. Although most studies of climate change effects on corals have focused on temperature-induced coral bleaching in tropical areas, poleward range shifts and/or expansions may also occur in temperate areas. We show the first large-scale evidence of the poleward range expansion of modern corals, based on 80 years of national records from the temperate areas of Japan, where century-long measurements of in situ sea-surface temperatures have shown statistically significant rises. Four major coral species categories, including two key species for reef formation in tropical areas, showed poleward range expansions since the 1930s, whereas no species demonstrated southward range shrinkage or local extinction. The speed of these expansions reached up to 14 km/year, which is far greater than that for other species. Our results, in combination with recent findings suggesting range expansions of tropical coral-reef associated organisms, strongly suggest that rapid, fundamental modifications of temperate coastal ecosystems could be in progress.

  9. Influences of activity wheel access on the body temperature response to MDMA and methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, N W; Wright, M J; Dickinson, G; Vandewater, S A; Price, J U; Taffe, M A

    2011-09-01

    Recreational ingestion of the drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") can result in pathologically elevated body temperature and even death in humans. Such incidents are relatively rare which makes it difficult to identify the relative contributions of specific environmental and situational factors. Although animal models have been used to explore several aspects of MDMA-induced hyperthermia and it is regularly hypothesized that prolonged physical activity (e.g., dancing) in the nightclub environment increases risk, this has never been tested directly. In this study the rectal temperature of male Wistar rats was monitored after challenge with doses of MDMA and methamphetamine (MA), another drug frequently ingested in the rave/nightclub environment, either with or without access to an activity wheel. Results showed that wheel activity did not modify the hyperthermia produced by 10.0mg/kg MDMA. However, individual correlations were observed in which wheel activity levels after a locomotor stimulant dose of MDMA were positively related to body temperature change and lethal outcome. A modest increase in the maximum body temperature observed after 5.6mg/kg MA was caused by wheel access but this was mostly attributable to a drop in temperature relative to vehicle treatment in the absence of wheel activity. These results suggest that nightclub dancing in the human Ecstasy consumer may not be a significant factor in medical emergencies.

  10. Wide Pressure Range Measurement due to the Exchange of Heater Driving of the Temperature Difference Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Noriaki; Kimura, Mitsuteru

    We have extended measurable pressure range of the thin film Pirani vacuum sensor that is still sensitive above 1×105 Pa (1 atmosphere). In our thin film Pirani vacuum sensor, our proposed temperature difference sensor of the short circuit Seebeck-current detection type thermocouple is used in order to get extremely high sensitivity, especially both in very low pressure range and in higher pressure range than 1×104 Pa. In our new pressure sensor the cantilever type sensing region, in which a microheater and two thermocouples are formed to measure the temperature difference, is adopted. Therefore, we can use the null method to measure very small pressure accurately in the high vacuum range (low pressure range). On the other hand in the higher pressure than 1×104 Pa., we could expand the pressure range by adoption of the vibration of the sensing cantilever based on the sudden heating due to the exchange of heater driving. We have achieved much wider measurable pressure range over 8 digits by use of our new simple thin film Pirani vacuum sensor than that of the traditional one.

  11. Development of ceramic lithium-electrolyte based carbon dioxide sensors for temperatures ranging from ambient to high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Inhee

    Solid-state electrochemical CO2 gas sensors composed of an electrolyte and two porous electrodes have been used extensively in the automobile and bio-chemical industry. Based on the field of application, the working temperature of the sensor ranges from room temperature to 600°C. Two potentiometric CO2 sensors that work at different temperature ranges were developed in this work. A potentiometric CO2 gas sensor with Li3PO 4 electrolyte and BaCO3 coated Li2CO3 sensing electrode was developed and the sensing electrode was characterized in order to understand its sensing mechanism under humid conditions. This potentiometric CO2 sensor showed humidity-interference-free sensing response for high CO2 concentrations (5˜25%) at high temperatures (T > 400°C). In addition, the sensor showed good reproducibility and long-term stability under humid conditions. In the sensing electrode, the BaCO 3 layer improved the resistance against humidity as a chemical barrier, while the inner Li2CO3 layer was responsible for the CO2 sensing. However, the sensor in which the eutectic layer covered the entire sensing electrode showed good sensing behavior under dry and humid conditions. Lately, low-temperature CO2 sensors have been attracting attention due to their low power consumption and easy sensor miniaturization, since a heater is unnecessary. We have developed a low-temperature CO2 sensor based on lithium lanthanum titanate (LLT) electrolyte in dry conditions that requires further improvement. Lithium lanthanum titanate (LLT) electrolytes were prepared by a conventional solid-state method. The impedance of the LLT electrolyte was measured over the temperature range of 300 to 473 K and the frequency range of 5 Hz and 13 MHz. Activation energies for the Li ionic conduction for grain boundary and grain were estimated to be 0.47 and 0.31 eV, respectively. It was found that LLT is a good ionic conductor at low temperatures and a good candidate as an electrolyte for low-temperature

  12. Wide-temperature range operation supercapacitors from nanostructured activated carbon fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Kaihsuan; Masarapu, Charan; Ko, Tsehao; Wei, Bingqing

    Electrochemical power sources that offer high energy and power densities and, can also withstand a harsh temperature range have become extremely desirable in applications ranging from civilian portable electronic devices to military weapons. In this report, we demonstrated a wide temperature withstanding supercapacitor which can be operated from 100 °C to -40 °C within a voltage window from -2 V to 2 V. The performance of the supercapacitor coin cells, assembled with nanostructured activated carbon fabric (ACF) as the electrode material and 1 M tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF 4) in polypropylene carbonate (PC) solution as the electrolyte, was systematically studied within the set temperature window. The ACF supercapacitor yielded ideal rectangular shapes in cyclic voltammograms within 0-100 °C with an average mass capacitance of 90 F g -1 and, 60 F g -1 at -25 °C. The capacitance was still over 20 F g -1 at the extremely low temperature of -40 °C. Another exciting feature of the ACF supercapacitors was that they resumed their room temperature capacitance when cooled from 100 °C and defrosted from -40 °C, demonstrating an excellent repeatability and stability. The charge-discharge behavior of the ACF supercapacitors showed long-cycle stability at extreme temperatures. These high electrochemical performances make this type of supercapacitors very promising in many practical applications.

  13. An objective approach to determining the weight ranges of prey preferred by and accessible to the five large African carnivores.

    PubMed

    Clements, Hayley S; Tambling, Craig J; Hayward, Matt W; Kerley, Graham I H

    2014-01-01

    Broad-scale models describing predator prey preferences serve as useful departure points for understanding predator-prey interactions at finer scales. Previous analyses used a subjective approach to identify prey weight preferences of the five large African carnivores, hence their accuracy is questionable. This study uses a segmented model of prey weight versus prey preference to objectively quantify the prey weight preferences of the five large African carnivores. Based on simulations of known predator prey preference, for prey species sample sizes above 32 the segmented model approach detects up to four known changes in prey weight preference (represented by model break-points) with high rates of detection (75% to 100% of simulations, depending on number of break-points) and accuracy (within 1.3±4.0 to 2.7±4.4 of known break-point). When applied to the five large African carnivores, using carnivore diet information from across Africa, the model detected weight ranges of prey that are preferred, killed relative to their abundance, and avoided by each carnivore. Prey in the weight ranges preferred and killed relative to their abundance are together termed "accessible prey". Accessible prey weight ranges were found to be 14-135 kg for cheetah Acinonyx jubatus, 1-45 kg for leopard Panthera pardus, 32-632 kg for lion Panthera leo, 15-1600 kg for spotted hyaena Crocuta crocuta and 10-289 kg for wild dog Lycaon pictus. An assessment of carnivore diets throughout Africa found these accessible prey weight ranges include 88±2% (cheetah), 82±3% (leopard), 81±2% (lion), 97±2% (spotted hyaena) and 96±2% (wild dog) of kills. These descriptions of prey weight preferences therefore contribute to our understanding of the diet spectrum of the five large African carnivores. Where datasets meet the minimum sample size requirements, the segmented model approach provides a means of determining, and comparing, the prey weight range preferences of any carnivore species.

  14. Dissociation and ionization equilibria of deuterium fluid over a wide range of temperatures and densities

    SciTech Connect

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R.

    2015-06-15

    We investigate the dissociation and ionization equilibria of deuterium fluid over a wide range of temperatures and densities. The partition functions for molecular and atomic species are evaluated, in a statistical-mechanically consistent way, implementing recent developments in the literature and taking high-density effects into account. A new chemical model (free energy function) is introduced in which the fluid is considered as a mixture of diatomic molecules, atoms, ions, and free electrons. Intensive short range hard core repulsion is taken into account together with partial degeneracy of free electrons and Coulomb interactions among charged particles. Samples of computational results are presented as a set of isotherms for the degree of ionization, dissociated fraction of molecules, pressure, and specific internal energy for a wide range of densities and temperatures. Predictions from the present model calculations show an improved and sensible physical behavior compared to other results in the literature.

  15. Temperature and frequency characteristics of low-loss MnZn ferrite in a wide temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ke; Lan, Zhongwen; Yu, Zhong; Xu, Zhiyong; Jiang, Xiaona; Wang, Zihui; Liu, Zhi; Luo, Ming

    2011-05-01

    A low-loss Mn0.7Zn0.24Fe2.06O4 ferrite has been prepared by a solid-state reaction method. The MnZn ferrite has a high initial permeability, μi (3097), a high saturation induction, Bs (526 mT), a high Curie temperature, Tc (220 °C), and a low core loss, PL (≤ 415 kW/m3) in a wide temperature (25-120 °C) and frequency (10-100 kHz) range. As the temperature increases, an initial decrease followed by a subsequent increase of hysteresis loss, Ph, and eddy current loss, Pe is observed. Both Ph and Pe increase with increasing frequency. When f ≥ 300 kHz, a residual loss, Pr, appears. Pe increases with increasing temperature and frequency. The temperature and frequency dependence of Ph can be explained by irreversible domain wall movements, Pe by the skin effect, and Pr by domain wall resonance, respectively.

  16. An alternate method for achieving temperature control in the -130 C to 75 C range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Anderson, Mark R.; Lane, Robert W.; Cortez, Maximo G.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal vacuum testing often requires temperature control of chamber shrouds and heat exchangers within the -130 C to 75 C range. There are two conventional methods which are normally employed to achieve control through this intermediate temperature range: (1) single-pass flow where control is achieved by alternately pulsing hot gaseous nitrogen (GN2) and cold LN2 into the feed line to yield the setpoint temperature; and (2) closed-loop circulation where control is achieved by either electrically heating or LN2 cooling the circulating GN2 to yield the setpoint temperature. A third method, using a mass flow ratio controller along with modulating control valves on GN2 and LN2 lines, provides excellent control but equipment for this method is expensive and cost-prohibitive for all but long-term continuous processes. The single-pass method provides marginal control and can result in unexpected overcooling of the test article from even a short pulse of LN2. The closed-loop circulation method provides excellent control but requires an expensive blower capable of operating at elevated pressures and cryogenic temperatures. Where precise control is needed (plus or minus 2 C), single-pass flow systems typically have not provided the precision required, primarily because of overcooling temperature excursions. Where several individual circuits are to be controlled at different temperatures, the use of expensive cryogenic blowers for each circuit is also cost-prohibitive, especially for short duration of one-of-a-kind tests. At JPL, a variant of the single-pass method was developed that was shown to provide precise temperature control in the -130 C to 75 C range while exhibiting minimal setpoint overshoot during temperature transitions. This alternate method uses a commercially available temperature controller along with a GN2/LN2 mixer to dampen the amplitude of cold temperature spikes caused by LN2 pulsing. The design of the GN2/LN2 mixer, the overall control system

  17. Temperature-dependent Goos-Hänchen shift in the terahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Mengdi; He, Ting; Zhang, Bo; Zhong, Liang; Shen, Jingling

    2016-07-01

    In this work, an observation of Goos-Hänchen shift in the terahertz range on a metal surface with a change in temperature is reported. A s-polarized terahertz wave incident at 45° onto an aluminum surface produces a positive GH shift that increases with temperature. We used an interference method by observing the change of interference fringes of two THz beams to verify the existence of the GH shift and indirectly measured the quantity of it. Based on experimental data and theoretical analysis, the increase of GH shift on the aluminum surface as a function of temperature between 23 °C and 101 °C has been obtained. Considering the effect of the thermal expansion, the maximum variation of GH shift is 267.2 μm with the temperature changing 78 °C.

  18. Communication: Anomalous temperature dependence of the intermediate range order in phosphonium ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Hettige, Jeevapani J.; Kashyap, Hemant K.; Margulis, Claudio J.

    2014-03-21

    In a recent article by the Castner and Margulis groups [Faraday Discuss. 154, 133 (2012)], we described in detail the structure of the tetradecyltrihexylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-amide ionic liquid as a function of temperature using X-ray scattering, and theoretical partitions of the computationally derived structure function. Interestingly, and as opposed to the case in most other ionic-liquids, the first sharp diffraction peak or prepeak appears to increase in intensity as temperature is increased. This phenomenon is counter intuitive as one would expect that intermediate range order fades as temperature increases. This Communication shows that a loss of hydrophobic tail organization at higher temperatures is counterbalanced by better organization of polar components giving rise to the increase in intensity of the prepeak.

  19. Temperature variability in the Iberian Range since 1602 inferred from tree-ring records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejedor, Ernesto; Ángel Saz, Miguel; María Cuadrat, José; Esper, Jan; de Luis, Martín

    2017-02-01

    Tree rings are an important proxy to understand the natural drivers of climate variability in the Mediterranean Basin and hence to improve future climate scenarios in a vulnerable region. Here, we compile 316 tree-ring width series from 11 conifer sites in the western Iberian Range. We apply a new standardization method based on the trunk basal area instead of the tree cambial age to develop a regional chronology which preserves high- to low-frequency variability. A new reconstruction for the 1602-2012 period correlates at -0.78 with observational September temperatures with a cumulative mean of the 21 previous months over the 1945-2012 calibration period. The new IR2Tmax reconstruction is spatially representative for the Iberian Peninsula and captures the full range of past Iberian Range temperature variability. Reconstructed long-term temperature variations match reasonably well with solar irradiance changes since warm and cold phases correspond with high and low solar activity, respectively. In addition, some annual temperature downturns coincide with volcanic eruptions with a 3-year lag.

  20. Effects of regional temperature on electric vehicle efficiency, range, and emissions in the United States.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Tugce; Michalek, Jeremy J

    2015-03-17

    We characterize the effect of regional temperature differences on battery electric vehicle (BEV) efficiency, range, and use-phase power plant CO2 emissions in the U.S. The efficiency of a BEV varies with ambient temperature due to battery efficiency and cabin climate control. We find that annual energy consumption of BEVs can increase by an average of 15% in the Upper Midwest or in the Southwest compared to the Pacific Coast due to temperature differences. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from BEVs vary primarily with marginal regional grid mix, which has three times the GHG intensity in the Upper Midwest as on the Pacific Coast. However, even within a grid region, BEV emissions vary by up to 22% due to spatial and temporal ambient temperature variation and its implications for vehicle efficiency and charging duration and timing. Cold climate regions also encounter days with substantial reduction in EV range: the average range of a Nissan Leaf on the coldest day of the year drops from 70 miles on the Pacific Coast to less than 45 miles in the Upper Midwest. These regional differences are large enough to affect adoption patterns and energy and environmental implications of BEVs relative to alternatives.

  1. Effect of diurnal temperature range on cardiovascular markers in the elderly in Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Youn-Hee; Kim, Ho; Kim, Jin Hee; Bae, Sanghyuk; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2013-07-01

    While diurnal temperature range (DTR) has been found to be a risk factor for mortality, evaluation of the underlying mechanisms involved in this association are lacking. To explain the association between DTR and health effects, we investigated how cardiovascular markers responded to DTR. Data was obtained from 560 participants who regularly attended a community elderly welfare center located in Seoul, Korea. Data collection was conducted a total of five times over a 3-year period beginning in August, 2008. We examined systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV). Mixed-effects models and generalized additive mixed models were used to assess the relationship of DTR with BP, HR, and HRV. BP was not associated significantly with rapid temperature changes during the day. While HR was associated linearly with increments of DTR, the relationship between DTR and HRV showed nonlinear associations, or the presence of a cutoff around median DTR. At the cutoff level of DTR determined by an inflection point in the graph, standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN) and root mean square successive difference (RMSSD) were peaked, whereas the low frequency:high frequency (LF:HF) ratio was elevated with decreasing DTR below the cutoff level. The study demonstrated that HR increases with increasing temperature range during the day, and that HRV is reduced at small or large DTR, which suggests minimal cardiovascular stress around the median level of temperature range during the day.

  2. Atmosphere-only GCM (ACCESS1.0) simulations with prescribed land surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerley, Duncan; Dommenget, Dietmar

    2016-06-01

    General circulation models (GCMs) are valuable tools for understanding how the global ocean-atmosphere-land surface system interacts and are routinely evaluated relative to observational data sets. Conversely, observational data sets can also be used to constrain GCMs in order to identify systematic errors in their simulated climates. One such example is to prescribe sea surface temperatures (SSTs) such that 70 % of the Earth's surface temperature field is observationally constrained (known as an Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project, AMIP, simulation). Nevertheless, in such simulations, land surface temperatures are typically allowed to vary freely, and therefore any errors that develop over the land may affect the global circulation. In this study therefore, a method for prescribing the land surface temperatures within a GCM (the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator, ACCESS) is presented. Simulations with this prescribed land surface temperature model produce a mean climate state that is comparable to a simulation with freely varying land temperatures; for example, the diurnal cycle of tropical convection is maintained. The model is then developed further to incorporate a selection of "proof of concept" sensitivity experiments where the land surface temperatures are changed globally and regionally. The resulting changes to the global circulation in these sensitivity experiments are found to be consistent with other idealized model experiments described in the wider scientific literature. Finally, a list of other potential applications is described at the end of the study to highlight the usefulness of such a model to the scientific community.

  3. Stability of a Crystal Oscillator, Type Si530, Inside and Beyond its Specified Operating Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Data acquisition and control systems depend on timing signals for proper operation and required accuracy. These clocked signals are typically provided by some form of an oscillator set to produce a repetitive, defined signal at a given frequency. Crystal oscillators are commonly used because they are less expensive, smaller, and more reliable than other types of oscillators. Because of the inherent characteristics of the crystal, the oscillators exhibit excellent frequency stability within the specified range of operational temperature. In some cases, however, some compensation techniques are adopted to further improve the thermal stability of a crystal oscillator. Very limited data exist on the performance and reliability of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) crystal oscillators at temperatures beyond the manufacturer's specified operating temperature range. This information is very crucial if any of these parts were to be used in circuits designed for use in space exploration missions where extreme temperature swings and thermal cycling are encountered. This report presents the results of the work obtained on the operation of Silicon Laboratories crystal oscillator, type Si530, under specified and extreme ambient temperatures.

  4. An improved approach for measuring immersion freezing in large droplets over a wide temperature range

    PubMed Central

    Tobo, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Immersion freezing (ice nucleation by particles immersed in supercooled water) is a key process for forming ice in mixed-phase clouds. Immersion freezing experiments with particles in microliter-sized (millimeter-sized) water droplets are often applied to detecting very small numbers of ice nucleating particles (INPs). However, the application of such large droplets remains confined to the detection of INPs active at temperatures much higher than the homogeneous freezing limit, because of artifacts related to freezing of water droplets without added INPs at temperatures of −25 °C or higher on a supporting substrate. Here I report a method for measuring immersion freezing in super-microliter-sized droplets over a wide temperature range. To reduce possible artifacts, droplets are pipetted onto a thin layer of Vaseline and cooled in a clean booth. In the Cryogenic Refrigerator Applied to Freezing Test (CRAFT) system, freezing of pure (Milli-Q) water droplets are limited at temperatures above −30 °C. An intercomparison of various techniques for immersion freezing experiments with reference particles (Snomax and illite NX) demonstrates that despite the use of relatively large droplets, the CRAFT setup allows for evaluating the immersion freezing activity of the particles over almost the entire temperature range (about −30 °C to 0 °C) relevant for mixed-phase cloud formation. PMID:27596247

  5. Experimental Investigation of Soil Thermal Conductivity Over a Wide Temperature Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, Ivan V.; Leong, Wey H.; Rosen, Marc A.

    2013-06-01

    The results are reported of an experimental investigation of the soil thermal conductivity over a wide temperature range, for various water contents and two soil types. The results are particularly important in predictions of underground heat transfer, which require a quantitative understanding of the coupled dependence of the soil thermal conductivity on texture, temperature, and water content. In the research, comprehensive sets of thermal conductivity for Ottawa sand (coarse soil) and Richmond Hill fine sandy loam (medium soil) are experimentally obtained using the guarded hot-plate method, for temperatures ranging from 2° C to 92° C and water contents varying from complete dryness to full saturation. For both soils, the thermal conductivity is observed to vary in three stages with respect to increasing water content: a very minor increase as water content increases to the permanent wilting point, a steep increase as water content further increases to field capacity, and a minor increase (for temperatures less than 72° C) or decrease for (temperatures greater than 72° C) when the field capacity is exceeded. Then, on the basis of gathered datasets, a similar Ke(Sr,T) form of the soil thermal conductivity model by Tarnawski et al. is used to empirically fit the data. The resulted correlations fit the data well with their overall root-relative-mean-square percentage errors of 4.7 % and 6.1 % for Ottawa sand and Richmond Hill fine sandy loam, respectively, and are suitable for most engineering applications.

  6. Thermal stimulated current response in cupric oxide single crystal thin films over a wide temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kungan; Wu, Shuxiang; Yu, Fengmei; Zhou, Wenqi; Wang, Yunjia; Meng, Meng; Wang, Gaili; Zhang, Yueli; Li, Shuwei

    2017-01-01

    Cupric oxide single crystal thin films (~26 nm) were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra and in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction show that the thin films are 2  ×  2 reconstructed with an in-plane compression and out-of-plane stretching. A thermal stimulated current measurement indicates that the electric polarization response is shown in the special 2D cupric oxide single crystal thin film over a wide temperature range from 130 K to near-room temperature. We infer that the abnormal electric response involves the changing of phase transition temperature induced by structure distortion, the spin frustration and the magnetic fluctuation effect of a short-range magnetic order, or the combined action of both of the two factors mentioned above. This work suggests a promising clue for finding new room temperature single phase multiferroics or tuning phase transition temperatures.

  7. A compound carbon thermometer for the temperature range 0.3-100 K.

    PubMed

    Adolf, A; Djerassi, H; Leszczyszyn, J

    1979-09-01

    A compound carbon thermometer consisting of an abreast connection of a carbon Speer resistor and a carbon Allen-Bradley resistor was tested in the temperature interval 0.3-100 K, an interval which generally requires two independent resistors to be covered. The characteristics, sensitivity, and analytical handling of the resistance versus temperature data are discussed and compared with the corresponding behavior of other thermometers. The satisfactory performance of the compound carbon device contributes to the extension of wide-range thermometry to 0.3 K.

  8. Factors affecting temperature variation and habitat use in free-ranging diamondback terrapins.

    PubMed

    Akins, C D; Ruder, C D; Price, S J; Harden, L A; Gibbons, J W; Dorcas, M E

    2014-08-01

    Measuring the thermal conditions of aquatic reptiles with temperature dataloggers is a cost-effective way to study their behavior and habitat use. Temperature dataloggers are a particularly useful and informative approach to studying organisms such as the estuarine diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin) that inhabits a dynamic environment often inaccessible to researchers. We used carapace-mounted dataloggers to measure hourly carapace temperature (Tc) of free-ranging terrapins in South Carolina from October 2007 to 2008 to examine the effects of month, sex, creek site, and tide on Tc and to determine the effects of month, sex, and time of day on terrapin basking frequency. Simultaneous measurements of environmental temperatures (Te; shallow mud, deep mud, water) allowed us to make inferences about terrapin microhabitat use. Terrapin Tc differed significantly among months and creek and between sexes. Terrapin microhabitat use also varied monthly, with shallow mud temperature being the best predictor of Tc November-March and water temperature being the best predictor of Tc April-October. Terrapins basked most frequently in spring and fall and males basked more frequently than females. Our study contributes to a fuller understanding of terrapin thermal biology and provides support for using dataloggers to investigate behavior and habitat use of aquatic ectotherms inhabiting dynamic environments.

  9. Feeding behaviour of free-ranging penguins determined by oesophageal temperature.

    PubMed

    Charrassin, J B; Kato, A; Handrich, Y; Sato, K; Naito, Y; Ancel, A; Bost, C A; Gauthier-Clerc, M; Ropert-Coudert, Y; Le Maho, Y

    2001-01-22

    Sea birds play a major role in marine food webs, and it is important to determine when and how much they feed at sea. A major advance has been made by using the drop in stomach temperature after ingestion of ectothermic prey. This method is less sensitive when birds eat small prey or when the stomach is full. Moreover, in diving birds, independently of food ingestion, there are fluctuations in the lower abdominal temperature during the dives. Using oesophageal temperature, we present here a new method for detecting the timing of prey ingestion in free-ranging sea birds, and, to our knowledge, report the first data obtained on king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus). In birds ashore, which were hand-fed 2-15 g pieces of fish, all meal ingestions were detected with a sensor in the upper oesophagus. Detection was poorer with sensors at increasing distances from the beak. At sea, slow temperature drops in the upper oesophagus and stomach characterized a diving effect per se. For the upper oesophagus only, abrupt temperature variations were superimposed, therefore indicating prey ingestions. We determined the depths at which these occurred. Combining the changes in oesophageal temperatures of marine predators with their diving pattern opens new perspectives for understanding their foraging strategy, and, after validation with concurrent applications of classical techniques of prey survey, for assessing the distribution of their prey.

  10. Computer prediction of human thermoregulatory and temperature responses to a wide range of environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiala, D.; Lomas, K. J.; Stohrer, M.

    A mathematical model for predicting human thermal and regulatory responses in cold, cool, neutral, warm, and hot environments has been developed and validated. The multi-segmental passive system, which models the dynamic heat transport within the body and the heat exchange between body parts and the environment, is discussed elsewhere. This paper is concerned with the development of the active system, which simulates the regulatory responses of shivering, sweating, and peripheral vasomotion of unacclimatised subjects. Following a comprehensive literature review, 26 independent experiments were selected that were designed to provoke each of these responses in different circumstances. Regression analysis revealed that skin and head core temperature affect regulatory responses in a non-linear fashion. A further signal, i.e. the rate of change of the mean skin temperature weighted by the skin temperature error signal, was identified as governing the dynamics of thermoregulatory processes in the cold. Verification and validation work was carried out using experimental data obtained from 90 exposures covering a range of steady and transient ambient temperatures between 5°C and 50°C and exercise intensities between 46 W/m2 and 600 W/m2. Good general agreement with measured data was obtained for regulatory responses, internal temperatures, and the mean and local skin temperatures of unacclimatised humans for the whole spectrum of climatic conditions and for different activity levels.

  11. A lithium-ion capacitor model working on a wide temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcellona, S.; Piegari, L.

    2017-02-01

    Energy storage systems are spreading both in stationary and transport applications. Among innovative storage devices, lithium ion capacitors (LiCs) are very interesting. They combine the advantages of both traditional electric double layer capacitors (EDLCs) and lithium ion batteries (LiBs). The behavior of this device is much more similar to ELDCs than to batteries. For this reason, several models developed for traditional ELDCs were extended to LiCs. Anyway, at low temperatures LiCs behavior is quite different from ELDCs and it is more similar to a LiB. Consequently, EDLC models works fine at room temperature but give worse results at low temperatures. This paper proposes a new electric model that, overcoming this issue, is a valid solution in a wide temperature range. Based on only five parameters, depending on polarization voltage and temperature, the proposed model is very simple to be implemented. Its accuracy is verified through experimental tests. From the reported results, it is also shown that, at very low temperatures, the dependence of the resistance from the current has to be taken into account.

  12. Optical Measurement of the Speed of Sound in Air Over the Temperature Range 300-650 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey; Herring, G. C.

    2000-01-01

    Using laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA), the speed of sound in room air (1 atm) is measured over the temperature range 300-650 K. Since the LITA apparatus maintains a fixed sound wavelength as temperature is varied, this temperature range simultaneously corresponds to a sound frequency range of 10-15 MHz. The data are compared to a published model and typically agree within 0.1%-0.4% at each of 21 temperatures.

  13. Two-phase working fluids for the temperature range of 50 to 350 deg, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.; Hartl, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Several two phase heat transfer fluids were tested in aluminum and carbon steel reflux capsules for over 25,000 hours at temperatures up to 300 C. Several fluids showed very good stability and would be useful for long duration heat transfer applications over the range 100 to 350 C. Instrumentation for the measurement of surface tension and viscosity were constructed for use with heat transfer fluids over the temperature range 0 to 300 C and with pressures from 0 to 10 atmospheres. The surface tension measuring device constructed requires less than a 1.0 cc sample and displays an accuracy of about 5 percent in preliminary tests, while the viscometer constructed for this program requires a 0.05 cc sample and shows an accuracy of about 5 percent in initial tests.

  14. Temperature-dependent alterations in host use drive rapid range expansion in a butterfly.

    PubMed

    Pateman, Rachel M; Hill, Jane K; Roy, David B; Fox, Richard; Thomas, Chris D

    2012-05-25

    Responses of species to climate change are extremely variable, perhaps because of climate-related changes to interactions among species. We show that temperature-related changes in the dependence of the butterfly Aricia agestis on different larval host plants have facilitated rapid range expansion. Historically, the butterfly was largely restricted to a single plant species, Helianthemum nummularium, but recent warmer conditions have enabled the butterfly to increasingly use the more widespread plant species Geranium molle. This has resulted in a substantial increase in available habitat and rapid range expansion by the butterfly (79 kilometers northward in Britain in 20 years). Interactions among species are often seen as constraints on species' responses to climate change, but we show that temperature-dependent changes to interspecific interactions can also facilitate change.

  15. V-structures of ethylene glycol and monoethanolamine in the temperature range of the liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabaev, N. K.; Rodnikova, M. N.; Solonina, I. A.; Shirokova, E. V.; Sirotkin, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Vibration-averaged V-structures for liquid ethylene glycol (EG) and monoethanolamine (MEA) are found in the temperature range of the solvents' liquid phase by means of molecular dynamics. The obtained V-structures' characteristics are compared to X-ray diffraction data on the crystalline phases of these compounds. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental data is observed. The V-structures are compared to that of water.

  16. Artificial Temperature Anisotropy of Crystals in X-Ray Frequency Range

    SciTech Connect

    Mkrtchyan, Vahram P.; Gasparyan, Laura G.; Balyan, Minas K.

    2010-04-06

    The effect of artificial temperature anisotropy of crystals in X-ray frequency range was observed for the first time and an effort to theoretically interpret this effect in Bragg-Laue diffraction case was made. It was established that an isotropic crystal optically turns into an artificially anisotropic one with optical axis along the direction of applied external influence as a symmetry axis, giving rise to the double refraction.

  17. Two-Phase Working Fluids for the Temperature Range 50 to 350 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.; Owzarski, P. C.

    1977-01-01

    The decomposition and corrosion of two-phase heat transfer liquids and metal envelopes have been investigated on the basis of molecular bond strengths and chemical thermodynamics. Potentially stable heat transfer fluids for the temperature range 100 C to 350 C have been identified, and reflux heat pipes tests initiated with 10 fluids and carbon steel and aluminum envelopes to experimentally establish corrosion behavior and noncondensable gas generation rates.

  18. Study of special ceramics with a dilatometer in the temperature range 25 2000°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaisersberger, E.; Kelly, J.

    1989-03-01

    Many properties of special ceramic materials, often closely related, such as sintering temperature, shrinkage in firing, mineral reaction, and strength can be studied with thermal analysis. Also the influence of type, structure, and preparation of raw materials and, of plasticizers and binding materials for forming and compressing, as well as the compatibility with protective coatings (glazes, varnishes, metal films), are investigated by thermal analysis. The development of a new dilatometer for the temperature range 25 2000°C with maximum heating rates of 20 K·min-1 and sample sizes 25 50 mm in length and 6 12 mm in diameter for measurements in an argon atmosphere and vacuum has opened up new horizons. Sintering studies at high temperatures are described.

  19. Reassessing changes in diurnal temperature range: A new data set and characterization of data biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, P. W.; Menne, M. J.; Williams, C. N.; Rennie, J. J.; Lawrimore, J. H.; Vose, R. S.; Peterson, T. C.; Durre, I.; Davy, R.; Esau, I.; Klein-Tank, A. M. G.; Merlone, A.

    2016-05-01

    It has been a decade since changes in diurnal temperature range (DTR) globally have been assessed in a stand-alone data analysis. The present study takes advantage of substantively improved basic data holdings arising from the International Surface Temperature Initiative's databank effort and applies the National Centers for Environmental Information's automated pairwise homogeneity assessment algorithm to reassess DTR records. It is found that breakpoints are more prevalent in DTR than other temperature elements and that the resulting adjustments have a broader distribution. This strongly implies that there is an overarching tendency, across the global meteorological networks, for nonclimatic artifacts to impart either random or anticorrelated rather than correlated biases in maximum and minimum temperature series. Future homogenization efforts would likely benefit from simultaneous consideration of DTR and maximum and minimum temperatures, in addition to average temperatures. Estimates of change in DTR are relatively insensitive to whether adjustments are calculated directly or inferred from adjustments returned for the maximum and minimum temperature series. The homogenized series exhibit a reduction in DTR since the midtwentieth century globally (-0.044 K/decade). Adjustments serve to approximately halve the long-term global reduction in DTR in the basic "raw" data. Most of the estimated DTR reduction occurred over 1960-1980. In several regions DTR has apparently increased over 1979-2012, while globally it has exhibited very little change (-0.016 K/decade). Estimated changes in DTR are an order of magnitude smaller than in maximum and minimum temperatures, which have both been increasing rapidly on multidecadal timescales (0.186 K/decade and 0.236 K/decade, respectively, since the midtwentieth century).

  20. SiC JFET Transistor Circuit Model for Extreme Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    2008-01-01

    A technique for simulating extreme-temperature operation of integrated circuits that incorporate silicon carbide (SiC) junction field-effect transistors (JFETs) has been developed. The technique involves modification of NGSPICE, which is an open-source version of the popular Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (SPICE) general-purpose analog-integrated-circuit-simulating software. NGSPICE in its unmodified form is used for simulating and designing circuits made from silicon-based transistors that operate at or near room temperature. Two rapid modifications of NGSPICE source code enable SiC JFETs to be simulated to 500 C using the well-known Level 1 model for silicon metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). First, the default value of the MOSFET surface potential must be changed. In the unmodified source code, this parameter has a value of 0.6, which corresponds to slightly more than half the bandgap of silicon. In NGSPICE modified to simulate SiC JFETs, this parameter is changed to a value of 1.6, corresponding to slightly more than half the bandgap of SiC. The second modification consists of changing the temperature dependence of MOSFET transconductance and saturation parameters. The unmodified NGSPICE source code implements a T(sup -1.5) temperature dependence for these parameters. In order to mimic the temperature behavior of experimental SiC JFETs, a T(sup -1.3) temperature dependence must be implemented in the NGSPICE source code. Following these two simple modifications, the Level 1 MOSFET model of the NGSPICE circuit simulation program reasonably approximates the measured high-temperature behavior of experimental SiC JFETs properly operated with zero or reverse bias applied to the gate terminal. Modification of additional silicon parameters in the NGSPICE source code was not necessary to model experimental SiC JFET current-voltage performance across the entire temperature range from 25 to 500 C.

  1. Long-range energy transport in single supramolecular nanofibres at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haedler, Andreas T.; Kreger, Klaus; Issac, Abey; Wittmann, Bernd; Kivala, Milan; Hammer, Natalie; Köhler, Jürgen; Schmidt, Hans-Werner; Hildner, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Efficient transport of excitation energy over long distances is a key process in light-harvesting systems, as well as in molecular electronics. However, in synthetic disordered organic materials, the exciton diffusion length is typically only around 10 nanometres (refs 4, 5), or about 50 nanometres in exceptional cases, a distance that is largely determined by the probability laws of incoherent exciton hopping. Only for highly ordered organic systems has the transport of excitation energy over macroscopic distances been reported--for example, for triplet excitons in anthracene single crystals at room temperature, as well as along single polydiacetylene chains embedded in their monomer crystalline matrix at cryogenic temperatures (at 10 kelvin, or -263 degrees Celsius). For supramolecular nanostructures, uniaxial long-range transport has not been demonstrated at room temperature. Here we show that individual self-assembled nanofibres with molecular-scale diameter efficiently transport singlet excitons at ambient conditions over more than four micrometres, a distance that is limited only by the fibre length. Our data suggest that this remarkable long-range transport is predominantly coherent. Such coherent long-range transport is achieved by one-dimensional self-assembly of supramolecular building blocks, based on carbonyl-bridged triarylamines, into well defined H-type aggregates (in which individual monomers are aligned cofacially) with substantial electronic interactions. These findings may facilitate the development of organic nanophotonic devices and quantum information technology.

  2. Long-range energy transport in single supramolecular nanofibres at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Haedler, Andreas T; Kreger, Klaus; Issac, Abey; Wittmann, Bernd; Kivala, Milan; Hammer, Natalie; Köhler, Jürgen; Schmidt, Hans-Werner; Hildner, Richard

    2015-07-09

    Efficient transport of excitation energy over long distances is a key process in light-harvesting systems, as well as in molecular electronics. However, in synthetic disordered organic materials, the exciton diffusion length is typically only around 10 nanometres (refs 4, 5), or about 50 nanometres in exceptional cases, a distance that is largely determined by the probability laws of incoherent exciton hopping. Only for highly ordered organic systems has the transport of excitation energy over macroscopic distances been reported--for example, for triplet excitons in anthracene single crystals at room temperature, as well as along single polydiacetylene chains embedded in their monomer crystalline matrix at cryogenic temperatures (at 10 kelvin, or -263 degrees Celsius). For supramolecular nanostructures, uniaxial long-range transport has not been demonstrated at room temperature. Here we show that individual self-assembled nanofibres with molecular-scale diameter efficiently transport singlet excitons at ambient conditions over more than four micrometres, a distance that is limited only by the fibre length. Our data suggest that this remarkable long-range transport is predominantly coherent. Such coherent long-range transport is achieved by one-dimensional self-assembly of supramolecular building blocks, based on carbonyl-bridged triarylamines, into well defined H-type aggregates (in which individual monomers are aligned cofacially) with substantial electronic interactions. These findings may facilitate the development of organic nanophotonic devices and quantum information technology.

  3. VCSEL based transmitter module for automotive temperature range between -55° C and +125° C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poferl, Stefan G.; Krieg, Marcel; Hocky, Oliver; Zeeb, Eberhard

    2003-04-01

    Robust, high speed optical data bus systems are increasingly required in automobiles, not only for entertainment applications within the passenger compartment but also for engine management systems and safety sensor networks. Optoelectronic components and modules intended to be used in cars have to withstand harsh environmental conditions, e.g. they have to be operational within a wide temperature range of up to - 55 °C to +1 25 °C for several thousand hours and at the same time they have to be of very low-cost. In this paper we describe a 500 MBit/s transmitter module based on a commercial available 850 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser and a bias-T driving circuit. The optical output power of the module varies only by -0.5 dBm +/- 1dB in the required temperature range without active temperature control. In addition we describe a packaging solution for the VCSEL transmitters allowing the operation of the module even in an extreme engine compartment environment, where short term temperature peaks above 125 °C appear.

  4. Elevational Ranges of Birds on a Tropical Montane Gradient Lag behind Warming Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Forero-Medina, German; Terborgh, John; Socolar, S. Jacob; Pimm, Stuart L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Species may respond to a warming climate by moving to higher latitudes or elevations. Shifts in geographic ranges are common responses in temperate regions. For the tropics, latitudinal temperature gradients are shallow; the only escape for species may be to move to higher elevations. There are few data to suggest that they do. Yet, the greatest loss of species from climate disruption may be for tropical montane species. Methodology/Principal Findings We repeat a historical transect in Peru and find an average upward shift of 49 m for 55 bird species over a 41 year interval. This shift is significantly upward, but also significantly smaller than the 152 m one expects from warming in the region. To estimate the expected shift in elevation we first determined the magnitude of warming in the locality from historical data. Then we used the temperature lapse rate to infer the required shift in altitude to compensate for warming. The range shifts in elevation were similar across different trophic guilds. Conclusions Endothermy may provide birds with some flexibility to temperature changes and allow them to move less than expected. Instead of being directly dependent on temperature, birds may be responding to gradual changes in the nature of the habitat or availability of food resources, and presence of competitors. If so, this has important implications for estimates of mountaintop extinctions from climate change. PMID:22163309

  5. Modelling the effect of temperature on the range expansion of species by reaction-diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Richter, Otto; Moenickes, Sylvia; Suhling, Frank

    2012-02-01

    The spatial dynamics of range expansion is studied in dependence of temperature. The main elements population dynamics, competition and dispersal are combined in a coherent approach based on a system of coupled partial differential equations of the reaction-diffusion type. The nonlinear reaction terms comprise population dynamic models with temperature dependent reproduction rates subject to an Allee effect and mutual competition. The effect of temperature on travelling wave solutions is investigated for a one dimensional model version. One main result is the importance of the Allee effect for the crossing of regions with unsuitable habitats. The nonlinearities of the interaction terms give rise to a richness of spatio-temporal dynamic patterns. In two dimensions, the resulting non-linear initial boundary value problems are solved over geometries of heterogeneous landscapes. Geo referenced model parameters such as mean temperature and elevation are imported into the finite element tool COMSOL Multiphysics from a geographical information system. The model is applied to the range expansion of species at the scale of middle Europe.

  6. Accessibility and occlusion of biopolymers, ray tracing of radiating tubes, and the temperature of a tangle.

    PubMed

    Buck, Gregory; Scharein, Robert G; Schnick, Jeffrey; Simon, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a measure of complexity, an energy, for any conformation of filaments. It is the occlusion, the portion hidden when viewed from an arbitrary exterior point. By inverting we get the exposure, a first approximation of the accessibility of the filaments. Assuming the filament is a source, we get the self-irradiation, which leads to both an interpretation as the temperature and a visualization technique: ray tracing as a virtual laboratory. There is a wide variety of applications, from enzyme action on and radiation damage of biopolymers, to the geometry of light bulb filaments. Energy minimization provides automatic detangling, resulting in symmetric and pleasing conformations.

  7. Effects of reproductive status and high ambient temperatures on the body temperature of a free-ranging basoendotherm.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Danielle L; Lobban, Kerileigh D; Lovegrove, Barry G

    2014-12-01

    Tenrecs (Order Afrosoricida) exhibit some of the lowest body temperatures (T b) of any eutherian mammal. They also have a high level of variability in both active and resting T bs and, at least in cool temperatures in captivity, frequently employ both short- and long-term torpor. The use of heterothermy by captive animals is, however, generally reduced during gestation and lactation. We present data long-term T b recordings collected from free-ranging S. setosus over the course of two reproductive seasons. In general, reproductive females had slightly higher (~32 °C) and less variable T b, whereas non-reproductive females and males showed both a higher propensity for torpor as well as lower (~30.5 °C) and more variable rest-phase T bs. Torpor expression defined using traditional means (using a threshold or cut-off T b) was much lower than predicted based on the high degree of heterothermy in captive tenrecs. However, torpor defined in this manner is likely to be underestimated in habitats where ambient temperature is close to T b. Our results caution against inferring metabolic states from T b alone and lend support to the recent call to define torpor in free-ranging animals based on mechanistic and not descriptive variables. In addition, lower variability in T b observed during gestation and lactation confirms that homeothermy is essential for reproduction in this species and probably for basoendothermic mammals in general. The relatively low costs of maintaining homeothermy in a sub-tropical environment might help shed light on how homeothermy could have evolved incrementally from an ancestral heterothermic condition.

  8. Implications of a temperature increase for host plant range: predictions for a butterfly

    PubMed Central

    Audusseau, Hélène; Nylin, Sören; Janz, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Although changes in phenology and species associations are relatively well-documented responses to global warming, the potential interactions between these phenomena are less well understood. In this study, we investigate the interactions between temperature, phenology (in terms of seasonal timing of larval growth) and host plant use in the polyphagous butterfly Polygonia c-album. We found that the hierarchy of larval performance on three natural host plants was not modified by a temperature increase as such. However, larval performance on each host plant and temperature treatment was affected by rearing season. Even though larvae performed better at the higher temperature regardless of the time of the rearing, relative differences between host plants changed with the season. For larvae reared late in the season, performance was always better on the herbaceous plant than on the woody plants. In this species, it is likely that a prolonged warming will lead to a shift from univoltinism to bivoltinism. The demonstrated interaction between host plant suitability and season means that such a shift is likely to lead to a shift in selective regime, favoring specialization on the herbaceous host. Based on our result, we suggest that host range evolution in response to temperature increase would in this species be highly contingent on whether the population undergoes a predicted shift from one to two generations. We discuss the effect of global warming on species associations and the outcome of asynchrony in rates of phenological change. PMID:24101991

  9. A Study on Flow Behavior of AA5086 Over a Wide Range of Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgharzadeh, A.; Jamshidi Aval, H.; Serajzadeh, S.

    2016-03-01

    Flow stress behavior of AA5086 was determined using tensile testing at different temperatures from room temperature to 500 °C and strain rates varying between 0.002 and 1 s-1. The strain rate sensitivity parameter and occurrence of dynamic strain aging were then investigated in which an Arrhenius-type model was employed to study the serrated flow. Additionally, hot deformation behavior at temperatures higher than 320 °C was evaluated utilizing hyperbolic-sine constitutive equation. Finally, a feed forward artificial neural network model with back propagation learning algorithm was proposed to predict flow stress for all deformation conditions. The results demonstrated that the strain rate sensitivity at temperature range of 25-270 °C was negative due to occurrence of dynamic strain aging leading to significant reduction in fracture strain. The serrated yielding activation energy was found to be 46.1 kJ/mol. It indicated that the migration of Mg-atoms could be the main reason for this phenomenon. The hot deformation activation energy of AA5086 was also calculated about 202.3 kJ/mol while the dynamic recovery was the main softening process. Moreover, the ANN model having two hidden layers was shown to be an efficient structure for determining flow stress of the examined alloy for all temperatures and strain rates.

  10. Future Arctic temperature change resulting from a range of aerosol emissions scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wobus, Cameron; Flanner, Mark; Sarofim, Marcus C.; Moura, Maria Cecilia P.; Smith, Steven J.

    2016-06-01

    The Arctic temperature response to emissions of aerosols -- specifically black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and sulfate -- depends on both the sector and the region where these emissions originate. Thus, the net Arctic temperature response to global aerosol emissions reductions will depend strongly on the blend of emissions sources being targeted. We use recently published equilibrium Arctic temperature response factors for BC, OC, and sulfate to estimate the range of present-day and future Arctic temperature changes from seven different aerosol emissions scenarios. Globally, Arctic temperature changes calculated from all of these emissions scenarios indicate that present-day emissions from the domestic and transportation sectors generate the majority of present-day Arctic warming from BC. However, in all of these scenarios, this warming is more than offset by cooling resulting from SO2 emissions from the energy sector. Thus, long-term climate mitigation strategies that are focused on reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the energy sector could generate short-term, aerosol-induced Arctic warming. A properly phased approach that targets BC-rich emissions from the transportation sector as well as the domestic sectors in key regions -- while simultaneously working toward longer-term goals of CO2 mitigation -- could potentially avoid some amount of short-term Arctic warming.

  11. FTIR study of carbonate loss from carbonated apatites in the wide temperature range.

    PubMed

    Rau, J V; Cesaro, S Nunziante; Ferro, D; Barinov, S M; Fadeeva, I V

    2004-11-15

    The mineral constituent of bone tissue is a carbonate-substituted apatite (CHA). The thermal stability of the CHA has been revealed to depend on the substitution type and degree, although relatively little is known about this behavior. The aim of this study was to investigate the carbonate loss from synthetic CHAs in equilibrium conditions in a wide temperature range. An approach based on FTIR spectroscopy of condensed gas phase was applied to evaluate the CO and CO2 release with increasing temperature. Four different CHAs were studied, which were prepared by either precipitation from solution or the solid-state interaction. The samples differ from each other by the substitution degree. In one of the samples calcium was partially substituted by magnesium. Decomposition was shown to start at surprisingly low temperature, about 400 degrees C, and the CO content increases monotonously with the increase of temperature. The CO2 content goes through a maximum due to its decomposition into carbon monoxide and oxygen, the temperature of this maximum being strongly dependent on the chemical synthesis route. Therefore, control of the sintering atmosphere with respect to the CO2/CO ratio is needed when preparing the carbonated apatite bioceramics.

  12. Implications of a temperature increase for host plant range: predictions for a butterfly.

    PubMed

    Audusseau, Hélène; Nylin, Sören; Janz, Niklas

    2013-09-01

    Although changes in phenology and species associations are relatively well-documented responses to global warming, the potential interactions between these phenomena are less well understood. In this study, we investigate the interactions between temperature, phenology (in terms of seasonal timing of larval growth) and host plant use in the polyphagous butterfly Polygonia c-album. We found that the hierarchy of larval performance on three natural host plants was not modified by a temperature increase as such. However, larval performance on each host plant and temperature treatment was affected by rearing season. Even though larvae performed better at the higher temperature regardless of the time of the rearing, relative differences between host plants changed with the season. For larvae reared late in the season, performance was always better on the herbaceous plant than on the woody plants. In this species, it is likely that a prolonged warming will lead to a shift from univoltinism to bivoltinism. The demonstrated interaction between host plant suitability and season means that such a shift is likely to lead to a shift in selective regime, favoring specialization on the herbaceous host. Based on our result, we suggest that host range evolution in response to temperature increase would in this species be highly contingent on whether the population undergoes a predicted shift from one to two generations. We discuss the effect of global warming on species associations and the outcome of asynchrony in rates of phenological change.

  13. TSDC study of XLPE recrystallization effects in the melting range of temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego, J. A.; Belana, J.; Òrrit, J.; Sellarès, J.; Mudarra, M.; Cañadas, J. C.

    2006-05-01

    The electrical properties of crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE), employed in mid-voltage cable insulation are studied using thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction. A complex heteropolar peak appears by TSDC between 50 and 110 °C, with a maximum at 105 °C. These measurements reveal that there is an optimal polarization temperature (Tpo) around 90 °C. For this polarization temperature, the measured discharge peak area is maximum. Although the presence of a Tpo is common in the study of relaxations by TSDC, in this case one would expect a monotonic decrease in the TSDC response with increasing polarization temperatures due to the decrease in the total crystalline fraction. In this paper, TSDC curves obtained under several conditions are interpreted in terms of recrystallization processes in XLPE during the polarization stage, if the sample is polarized in the melting temperature range. In this case, the recrystallization of a fraction of the material molten at this temperature promotes the formation of more stable and defect-free crystals. The presence of recrystallization processes is detected by DSC and confirmed by x-ray diffractometry. TSDC measurements have been performed with samples polarized at several temperatures (Tp) cooling from the melt or heating from room temperature. Also, TSDC results are obtained with previous annealing or with several cooling rates. These results allow us to infer that crystalline material grown from recrystallization processes that take place in the polarization stage attains a particularly stable polarization. Possible microscopical causes of this effect are discussed.

  14. Size effect on high temperature variable range hopping in Al+ implanted 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisini, Antonella; Parisini, Andrea; Nipoti, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    The hole transport properties of heavily doped 4H-SiC (Al) layers with Al implanted concentrations of 3  ×  1020 and 5  ×  1020 cm-3 and annealed in the temperature range 1950-2100 °C, have been analyzed to determine the main transport mechanisms. This study shows that the temperature dependence of the resistivity (conductivity) may be accounted for by a variable range hopping (VRH) transport into an impurity band. Depending on the concentration of the implanted impurities and the post-implantation annealing treatment, this VRH mechanism persists over different temperature ranges that may extend up to room temperature. In this framework, two different transport regimes are identified, having the characteristic of an isotropic 3D VRH and an anisotropic nearly 2D VRH. The latter conduction mechanism appears to take place in a rather thick layer (about 400 nm) that is too large to induce a confinement effect of the carrier hops. The possibility that an anisotropic transport may be induced by a structural modification of the implanted layer because of a high density of basal plane stacking faults (SF) in the implanted layers is considered. The interpretation of the conduction in the heaviest doped samples in terms of nearly 2D VRH is supported by the results of the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation on one of the 5  ×  1020 cm-3 Al implanted samples of this study. In this context, the average separation between basal plane SFs, measured along the c-axis, which is orthogonal to the carrier transport during electrical characterization, appears to be in keeping with the estimated value of the optimal hopping length of the VRH theory. Conversely, no SFs are detected by TEM in a sample with an Al concentration of 1  ×  1019 cm-3 where a 3D nearest neighbor hopping (NNH) transport is observed.

  15. High flow rate microfluidic device for blood plasma separation using a range of temperatures.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Villarreal, Angeles Ivón; Arundell, Martin; Carmona, Manuel; Samitier, Josep

    2010-01-21

    A hybrid microfluidic device that uses hydrodynamic forces to separate human plasma from blood cells has been designed and fabricated and the advantageous effects of temperature and flow rates are investigated in this paper. The blood separating device includes an inlet which is reduced by approximately 20 times to a small constrictor channel, which then opens out to a larger output channel with a small lateral channel for the collection of plasma. When tested the device separated plasma from whole blood using a wide range of flow rates, between 50 microl min(-1) and 200 microl min(-1), at the higher flow rates injected by hand and at temperatures ranging from 23 degrees C to 50 degrees C, the latter resulting in an increase in the cell-free layer of up to 250%. It was also tested continuously using between 5% and 40% erythrocytes in plasma and whole blood without blocking the channels or hemolysis of the cells. The mean percentage of plasma collected after separation was 3.47% from a sample of 1 ml. The percentage of cells removed from the plasma varied depending on the flow rate used, but at 37 degrees C ranged between 95.4 +/- 1% and 97.05 +/- 05% at 100 microl min(-1) and 200 microl min(-1), respectively. The change in temperature also had an effect on the number of cells removed from the plasma which was between 93.5 +/- 0.65% and 97.01 +/- 0.3% at 26.9 degrees C and 37 degrees C, respectively, using a flow rate of 100 microl min(-1). Due to its ability to operate in a wide range of conditions, it is envisaged that this device can be used in in vitro 'lab on a chip' applications, as well as a hand-held point of care (POC) device.

  16. High-density magnetoresistive random access memory operating at ultralow voltage at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jia-Mian; Li, Zheng; Chen, Long-Qing; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The main bottlenecks limiting the practical applications of current magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) technology are its low storage density and high writing energy consumption. Although a number of proposals have been reported for voltage-controlled memory device in recent years, none of them simultaneously satisfy the important device attributes: high storage capacity, low power consumption and room temperature operation. Here we present, using phase-field simulations, a simple and new pathway towards high-performance MRAMs that display significant improvements over existing MRAM technologies or proposed concepts. The proposed nanoscale MRAM device simultaneously exhibits ultrahigh storage capacity of up to 88 Gb inch−2, ultralow power dissipation as low as 0.16 fJ per bit and room temperature high-speed operation below 10 ns. PMID:22109527

  17. Substrate material selection method for multilayer diffractive optics in a wide environmental temperature range.

    PubMed

    Piao, Mingxu; Cui, Qingfeng; Zhao, Chunzhu; Zhang, Bo; Mao, Shan; Zhao, Yuanming; Zhao, Lidong

    2017-04-01

    We present a substrate material selection method for multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) to obtain high polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency (PIDE) in a wide environmental temperature range. The extended expressions of the surface relief heights for the MLDOEs are deduced with consideration of the influence of the environmental temperature. The PIDE difference Δη¯(λ) and PIDE change factor F are introduced to select a reasonable substrate material combination. A smaller value of Δη¯(λ) or F indicates a smaller decrease of the PIDE in a wide temperature range, and the corresponding substrate material combination is better. According to the deduced relation, double-layer and three-layer DOEs with different combinations are discussed. The results show that IRG26 and zinc sulfide is the best substrate material combination in the infrared waveband for double-layer DOEs, and polycarbonate is more reasonable than polymethyl methacrylate as the middle filling optical material for three-layer DOEs when the two substrate materials are the same.

  18. National Inter-laboratory Comparison of Thermocouples in the Temperature Range from to

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifoviç, N.; Kalemci, M.

    2015-08-01

    One of the main criteria demonstrating the competence of a calibration laboratory is successful participation in inter-laboratory comparisons. Real capability of the laboratory including claimed uncertainties could be demonstrated based on the results of comparisons, evaluated either through -criteria or other acceptable measures. As a number of accredited laboratories with scopes covering calibration services in the field of thermometry have been increasing, the demand for organization of inter-laboratory comparisons with participation of accredited laboratories occurs. Based on this fact, a national inter-laboratory comparison of thermocouple calibrations in the temperature range from to in the field of temperature was launched by TUBITAK UME in 2011. The purpose of the inter-laboratory comparison was to compare the results of the participating laboratories during calibration of the thermocouples in the range from to . Three type S thermocouples were constructed and calibrated by TUBITAK UME which is the pilot laboratory of the comparison. It was recommended that the participants use their standard procedure for the calibration of thermocouples and follow the instructions of comparison protocol during the calibration. The inter-laboratory comparison was carried out among eleven national accredited laboratories. In this paper, the temperature differences obtained by participating laboratories with associated uncertainties of the results and values will be presented. The metrological equivalence of all laboratories was demonstrated, with all values being less than 1.0.

  19. Satellite range delay simulator for a matrix-switched time division multiple-access network simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Lawrence A.

    1990-01-01

    The Systems Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility at NASA Lewis Research Center is presently configured as a satellite-switched time division multiple access (SS-TDMA) network simulator. The purpose of SITE is to demonstrate and evaluate advanced communication satellite technologies, presently embodied by POC components developed under NASA contracts in addition to other hardware, such as ground terminals, designed and built in-house at NASA Lewis. Each ground terminal in a satellite communications system will experience a different aspect of the satellite's motion due mainly to daily tidal effects and station keeping, hence a different duration and rate of variation in the range delay. As a result of this and other effects such as local oscillator instability, each ground terminal must constantly adjust its transmit burst timing so that data bursts from separate ground terminals arrive at the satellite in their assigned time slots, preventing overlap and keeping the system in synchronism. On the receiving end, ground terminals must synchronize their local clocks using reference transmissions received through the satellite link. A feature of the SITE facility is its capability to simulate the varying propagation delays and associated Doppler frequency shifts that the ground terminals in the network have to cope with. Delay is ahcieved by means of two NASA Lewis designed and built range delay simulator (RDS) systems, each independently controlled locally with front panel switches or remotely by an experiment control and monitor (EC/M) computer.

  20. Thermal analysis of the mixtures of paraffin with aluminum in wide temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubin, S. A.; Maklashova, I. V.; Levitskaya, I. S.

    2016-09-01

    The mixtures and composites of wax, paraffin and metals are widely used as energy efficient formulations and phase change materials for heat storage. Aluminum is frequently employed in the formulations of many composite explosives or propellants. Metal fuel additives are used in advanced explosive formulations to achieve higher combustion temperatures and longer pressure pulses. In this project, Al-paraffin wax composite materials were prepared and characterized. The thermal stability of the prepared powders was determined by differential scanning calorimeter, simultaneous thermogravimetry analysis- differential thermal analysis in the temperature range 30-1300°C at atmospheric pressure. The results of differential scanning calorimeter showed that the thermal performance and structure of the composite materials are stable up to 200°C.The paraffindecompositionwith an energy release is possible at temperatures over 200°C and the oxidation of aluminum may be at a temperature above its melting point.It is shown that the maximum total amount of heat generated by the thermal decomposition of the composition was at the mass fraction of aluminum of 16% - 18%.

  1. Low temperature pyrotechnic smokes: A potential low cost alternative to nonpyrotechnic smoke for access delay applications

    SciTech Connect

    Greenholt, C.J.

    1995-07-01

    Smokes are frequently used as visual obscurants in access delay applications. A new generation of low temperature pyrotechnic smokes is being developed. Terephthalic Acid (TPA) smoke was developed by the U.S. Army and Sebacic Acid (SA) smoke is being developed by Thiokol Corp. The advantages these smokes offer over traditional pyrotechnic smokes include; low generation temperature (approximately 450{degree}C), lower toxicity, and lower corrosivity. The low generation temperature reduces smoke layering effects and allows the addition of sensory irritants, such as o-Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile (CS), to the formulation. Some advantages low temperature pyrotechnic smokes offer over nonpyrotechnic smokes include; low cost, simplicity, compactness, light weight, long storage life, and orientation insensitive operation. Low cost permits distribution of multiple units for reduced vulnerability and refill flexibility. Some disadvantages may include the combustibility of the smoke particulate; however, the published lower explosive limit of the mentioned materials is approximately ten times greater than the concentration required for effective obscuration. The TPA smoke cloud contains small quantities of benzene, formaldehyde, and carbon monoxide; no benzene or formaldehyde was identified during preliminary SA smoke analyses performed by Thiokol Corp. Sandia performed tests and analyses on TPA smoke to determine the smoke cloud composition, the quantity of particulate produced per canister, and the relationship between airborne particulate concentration and measured optical density values. Current activities include characterization of SA smoke.

  2. A new method for achieving enhanced dielectric response over a wide temperature range

    DOE PAGES

    Maurya, Deepam; Sun, Fu -Chang; Pamir Alpay, S.; ...

    2015-10-19

    We report a novel approach for achieving high dielectric response over a wide temperature range. In this approach, multilayer ceramic heterostructures with constituent compositions having strategically tuned Curie points (TC) were designed and integrated with varying electrical connectivity. Interestingly, these multilayer structures exhibited different dielectric behavior in series and parallel configuration due to variations in electrical boundary conditions resulting in the differences in the strength of the electrostatic coupling. The results are explained using nonlinear thermodynamic model taking into account electrostatic interlayer interaction. We believe that present work will have huge significance in design of high performance ceramic capacitors.

  3. Oxidation characteristics of Beta-21S in air in the temperature range 600 to 800 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, Terryl A.; Clark, Ronald K.; Wiedemann, Karl E.

    1992-01-01

    The metastable beta-Ti alloy Beta-21S, Ti-15Mo-2.7Nb-3Al-0.2Si (weight percent), has been proposed as a candidate for use in metal matrix composites in future hypersonic vehicles. The present study investigated the oxidation behavior of Beta-21S over the temperature range 600 C to 800 C. Oxidation weight gain was evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis. Oxidized specimens were evaluated using x ray diffraction techniques, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x ray analysis, and electron microprobe analysis to identify oxidation products and evaluate oxidation damage to the alloy.

  4. Modulation in Tl2SeO4 in the temperature range 298-90 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fábry, Jan; Kopecký, Miloš; Kub, Jiří

    2010-10-01

    Synchrotron experiments have revealed a structural modulation in Thallium selenate, Tl2SeO4, in the temperature range 298-90 K. The modulation is manifested by the presence of the first-order satellites. In difference to the majority of β-K2SO4 compounds where the modulation takes place along the axis a (Pnma setting), the incommensurate modulation in Tl2SeO4 takes place along the b setting emphasizing exceptionality of Tl2SeO4 in this structural family. The modulation vector q = (0.0, 0.397(9), 0.0); the space group Pnma(0b0)000.

  5. Research on temperature distribution of combustion flames based on high dynamic range imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Feng, Huajun; Xu, Zhihai; Li, Qi

    2007-10-01

    The imaging-based three-color method is widely used in the field of non-contact temperature measurement of combustion flames. In this paper, by analyzing the imaging process of a combustion flame in detail, we re-derivate the three-color method by adopting a theory of high dynamic range imaging. Instead of using white balanced, gamma calibrated or other algorithms applied 8-bit pixel values, we use irradiance values on the image plane; these values are obtained by combining two differently exposed raw images into one high dynamic range irradiance map with the help of the imaging system's response function. An instrumentation system is presented and a series of experiments have been carried out, the results of which are satisfactory.

  6. Evaluation of Heat Pipe Working Fluids In The Temperature Range 450 to 700 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, William G.; Rosenfeld, John H.; Angirasa, Devarakonda; Mi, Ye

    2004-02-01

    In the temperature range of 450-700 K, there are currently no working fluids that have been validated for heat pipes and loop heat pipes, with the exception of water in the lower portion of the range. This paper reviews a number of potential working fluid including several organic fluids, mercury, sulfur/iodine, and halides. Physical property data are used where available, and estimated where unavailable using standard methods. The halide salts appear to possess attractive properties, with good liquid transport factors, and suitable vapor pressures. Where nuclear radiation is not a consideration, other potential working fluids are aniline, naphthalene, toluene, and phenol. The limited available life test data available suggests that toluene, naphthalene, and some of the halides are compatible with stainless steel, while the other fluids have not been tested.

  7. Liquid state DNP for water accessibility measurements on spin-labeled membrane proteins at physiological temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doll, Andrin; Bordignon, Enrica; Joseph, Benesh; Tschaggelar, René; Jeschke, Gunnar

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate the application of continuous wave dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 0.35 T for site-specific water accessibility studies on spin-labeled membrane proteins at concentrations in the 10-100 μM range. The DNP effects at such low concentrations are weak and the experimentally achievable dynamic nuclear polarizations can be below the equilibrium polarization. This sensitivity problem is solved with an optimized home-built DNP probe head consisting of a dielectric microwave resonator and a saddle coil as close as possible to the sample. The performance of the probe head is demonstrated with both a modified pulsed EPR spectrometer and a dedicated CW EPR spectrometer equipped with a commercial NMR console. In comparison to a commercial pulsed ENDOR resonator, the home-built resonator has an FID detection sensitivity improvement of 2.15 and an electron spin excitation field improvement of 1.2. The reproducibility of the DNP results is tested on the water soluble maltose binding protein MalE of the ABC maltose importer, where we determine a net standard deviation of 9% in the primary DNP data in the concentration range between 10 and 100 μM. DNP parameters are measured in a spin-labeled membrane protein, namely the vitamin B12 importer BtuCD in both detergent-solubilized and reconstituted states. The data obtained in different nucleotide states in the presence and absence of binding protein BtuF reveal the applicability of this technique to qualitatively extract water accessibility changes between different conformations by the ratio of primary DNP parameters ɛ. The ɛ-ratio unveils the physiologically relevant transmembrane communication in the transporter in terms of changes in water accessibility at the cytoplasmic gate of the protein induced by both BtuF binding at the periplasmic region of the transporter and ATP binding at the cytoplasmic nucleotide binding domains.

  8. Retrieval and Mapping of Soil Texture Based on Land Surface Diurnal Temperature Range Data from MODIS.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Cai; Zhang, Gan-Lin; Zhao, Ming-Song; Pan, Xian-Zhang; Zhao, Yu-Guo; Li, De-Cheng; Macmillan, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the direct retrieval of soil properties, including soil texture, using remotely sensed images. However, few have considered how soil properties influence dynamic changes in remote images or how soil processes affect the characteristics of the spectrum. This study investigated a new method for mapping regional soil texture based on the hypothesis that the rate of change of land surface temperature is related to soil texture, given the assumption of similar starting soil moisture conditions. The study area was a typical flat area in the Yangtze-Huai River Plain, East China. We used the widely available land surface temperature product of MODIS as the main data source. We analyzed the relationships between the content of different particle soil size fractions at the soil surface and land surface day temperature, night temperature and diurnal temperature range (DTR) during three selected time periods. These periods occurred after rainfalls and between the previous harvest and the subsequent autumn sowing in 2004, 2007 and 2008. Then, linear regression models were developed between the land surface DTR and sand (> 0.05 mm), clay (< 0.001 mm) and physical clay (< 0.01 mm) contents. The models for each day were used to estimate soil texture. The spatial distribution of soil texture from the studied area was mapped based on the model with the minimum RMSE. A validation dataset produced error estimates for the predicted maps of sand, clay and physical clay, expressed as RMSE of 10.69%, 4.57%, and 12.99%, respectively. The absolute error of the predictions is largely influenced by variations in land cover. Additionally, the maps produced by the models illustrate the natural spatial continuity of soil texture. This study demonstrates the potential for digitally mapping regional soil texture variations in flat areas using readily available MODIS data.

  9. Using Diurnal Temperature Range to Examine the Climatology of Solar Energy Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zercher, C. N.; Hanrahan, J.; Murphy, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The potential for annual solar energy production largely depends on the amount of incoming shortwave radiation which is dependent on cloud cover. Due to natural large-scale climate variability, long-term cloud cover can vary substantially, therefore modifying the total energy that can be produced by solar cells in individual locations. Under anthropogenic climate change, future precipitation is expected to significantly deviate from observed values, therefore suggesting that cloud cover, and thus solar energy potential, will also change. The expected changes are both positive and negative depending on geographic region and can be highly spatially variable, particularly in regions of complex terrain. Because of the short-term availability of observed radiation and cloud cover data, it is difficult to study the historical climatology of solar energy potential, thus making future projections uncertain. Research has shown that another readily available climate variable, the diurnal temperature range, correlates well with daily averaged shortwave radiation values during months of minimal/no snow cover, and can thus serve as a proxy for shortwave radiation during the warm season throughout the period of record. In the present study, the diurnal temperature range is shown to be an excellent predictor of shortwave radiation around the state of Vermont, independent of latitude and elevation. Monte Carlo significance testing is also used to examine recent trends in this region.

  10. Gas-Phase Reaction of Hydroxyl Radical with p-Cymene over an Extended Temperature Range.

    PubMed

    Bedjanian, Yuri; Morin, Julien; Romanias, Manolis N

    2015-11-12

    The kinetics of the reaction of OH radicals with p-cymene has been studied in the temperature range of 243-898 K using a flow reactor combined with a quadrupole mass spectrometer: OH + p-cymene → products. The reaction rate constant was determined as a result of absolute measurements, from OH decay kinetics in excess of p-cymene and employing the relative rate method with OH reactions with n-pentane, n-heptane,1,3-dioxane, HBr, and Br2 as the reference ones. For the rate coefficient of the H atom abstraction channel, the expression k1b = (3.70 ± 0.42) × 10(-11) exp[-(772 ± 72)/T] was obtained over the temperature range of 381-898 K. The total rate constant (addition + abstraction) determined at T = 243-320 K was k1 = (1.82 ± 0.48) × 10(-12) exp[(607 ± 70)/T] or, in a biexponential form, k1 = k1a + k1b = 3.7 × 10(-11) exp(-772/T) + 6.3 × 10(-13) exp(856/T), independent of the pressure between 1 and 5 Torr of helium. In addition, our results indicate that the reaction pathway involving alkyl radical elimination upon initial addition of OH to p-cymene is most probably unimportant.

  11. Effects of diurnal temperature range and drought on wheat yield in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Barrera, S.; Rodriguez-Puebla, C.; Challinor, A. J.

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to provide new insight on the wheat yield historical response to climate processes throughout Spain by using statistical methods. Our data includes observed wheat yield, pseudo-observations E-OBS for the period 1979 to 2014, and outputs of general circulation models in phase 5 of the Coupled Models Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) for the period 1901 to 2099. In investigating the relationship between climate and wheat variability, we have applied the approach known as the partial least-square regression, which captures the relevant climate drivers accounting for variations in wheat yield. We found that drought occurring in autumn and spring and the diurnal range of temperature experienced during the winter are major processes to characterize the wheat yield variability in Spain. These observable climate processes are used for an empirical model that is utilized in assessing the wheat yield trends in Spain under different climate conditions. To isolate the trend within the wheat time series, we implemented the adaptive approach known as Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition. Wheat yields in the twenty-first century are experiencing a downward trend that we claim is a consequence of widespread drought over the Iberian Peninsula and an increase in the diurnal range of temperature. These results are important to inform about the wheat vulnerability in this region to coming changes and to develop adaptation strategies.

  12. The creation of high-temperature superconducting cables of megawatt range in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sytnikov, V. E.; Bemert, S. E.; Krivetsky, I. V.; Romashov, M. A.; Popov, D. A.; Fedotov, E. V.; Komandenko, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Urgent problems of the power industry in the 21st century require the creation of smart energy systems, providing a high effectiveness of generation, transmission, and consumption of electric power. Simultaneously, the requirements for controllability of power systems and ecological and resource-saving characteristics at all stages of production and distribution of electric power are increased. One of the decision methods of many problems of the power industry is the development of new high-efficiency electrical equipment for smart power systems based on superconducting technologies to ensure a qualitatively new level of functioning of the electric power industry. The intensive research and development of new types of electrical devices based on superconductors are being carried out in many industrialized advanced countries. Interest in such developments has especially increased in recent years owing to the discovery of so-called high-temperature superconductors (HTS) that do not require complicated and expensive cooling devices. Such devices can operate at cooling by inexpensive and easily accessible liquid nitrogen. Taking into account the obvious advantages of superconducting cable lines for the transmission of large power flows through an electrical network, as compared with conventional cables, the Federal Grid Company of Unified Energy System (JSC FGC UES) initiated a research and development program including the creation of superconducting HTS AC and DC cable lines. Two cable lines for the transmitted power of 50 MVA/MW at 20 kV were manufactured and tested within the framework of the program.

  13. The creation of high-temperature superconducting cables of megawatt range in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Sytnikov, V. E. Bemert, S. E.; Krivetsky, I. V.; Romashov, M. A.; Popov, D. A.; Fedotov, E. V.; Komandenko, O. V.

    2015-12-15

    Urgent problems of the power industry in the 21st century require the creation of smart energy systems, providing a high effectiveness of generation, transmission, and consumption of electric power. Simultaneously, the requirements for controllability of power systems and ecological and resource-saving characteristics at all stages of production and distribution of electric power are increased. One of the decision methods of many problems of the power industry is the development of new high-efficiency electrical equipment for smart power systems based on superconducting technologies to ensure a qualitatively new level of functioning of the electric power industry. The intensive research and development of new types of electrical devices based on superconductors are being carried out in many industrialized advanced countries. Interest in such developments has especially increased in recent years owing to the discovery of so-called high-temperature superconductors (HTS) that do not require complicated and expensive cooling devices. Such devices can operate at cooling by inexpensive and easily accessible liquid nitrogen. Taking into account the obvious advantages of superconducting cable lines for the transmission of large power flows through an electrical network, as compared with conventional cables, the Federal Grid Company of Unified Energy System (JSC FGC UES) initiated a research and development program including the creation of superconducting HTS AC and DC cable lines. Two cable lines for the transmitted power of 50 MVA/MW at 20 kV were manufactured and tested within the framework of the program.

  14. Ductile long range ordered alloys with high critical ordering temperature and wrought articles fabricated therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.; Inouye, Henry

    1979-01-01

    Malleable long range ordered alloys having high critical ordering temperatures exist in the V(Fe, Co).sub.3 and V(Fe, Co, Ni).sub.3 systems. These alloys have the following compositions comprising by weight: 22-23% V, 14-30% Fe, and the remainder Co or Co and Ni with an electron density no more than 7.85. The maximum combination of high temperature strength, ductility and creep resistance are manifested in the alloy comprising by weight 22-23% V, 14-20% Fe and the remainder Co and having an atomic composition of V(Fe .sub.0.20-0.26 C Co.sub.0.74-0.80).sub.3. The alloy comprising by weight 22-23% V, 16-17% Fe and 60-62% Co has excellent high temperature properties. The alloys are fabricable into wrought articles by casting, deforming, and annealing for sufficient time to provide ordered structure.

  15. Performance of MEMS Silicon Oscillator, ASFLM1, under Wide Operating Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few years, MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) resonator-based oscillators began to be offered as commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) parts by a few companies [1-2]. These quartz-free, miniature silicon devices could compete with the traditional crystal oscillators in providing the timing (clock function) for many digital and analog electronic circuits. They provide stable output frequency, offer great tolerance to shock and vibration, and are immune to electro-static discharge [1-2]. In addition, they are encapsulated in compact lead-free packages, cover a wide frequency range (1 MHz to 125 MHz), and are specified, depending on the grade, for extended temperature operation from -40 C to +85 C. The small size of the MEMS oscillators along with their reliability and thermal stability make them candidates for use in space exploration missions. Limited data, however, exist on the performance and reliability of these devices under operation in applications where extreme temperatures or thermal cycling swings, which are typical of space missions, are encountered. This report presents the results of the work obtained on the evaluation of an ABRACON Corporation MEMS silicon oscillator chip, type ASFLM1, under extreme temperatures.

  16. Magnetic Properties of the Stack of HTSC Tapes in a Wide Temperature Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnev, Igor; Abin, Dmitriy; Osipov, Maxim; Pokrovskiy, Sergey; Ermolaev, Yuriy; Mineev, Nikolay

    The trapped field strength of HTSC stacks were measured in the temperature range T=4-80 K and dc magnetic fields up to 8 Т. A single 12 mm by 12 mm square samples were cut from commercial (RE)BCO tape 12 mm wide and then stacked together. The number of layers in the stacks was varied from n=5 to n=250. Trapped field strength was measured by means of Hall probe which was placed directly on the stacks surface. The dependences of remnant field strength Brem on number of layers in the stacks at different temperature Brem (n) as well as on temperature dependences Brem (T) at various n were obtained. It was found that Brem (n) dependences have a nonlinear character with a tendency to saturation for n > 60. The maximum remnant (trapped) field was found to be more than 2.5 Т at T=4 К. The relaxation of trapped field was studied also and it was determined that the rate of relaxation processes tends to decrease with the increase in a number of tapes in the stack. The correlation between dependency Brem (n) and dependency of magnetic levitation force measured at T=77 K at zero field cooling were found.

  17. Thermodynamic Properties of He Gas in the Temperature Range 4.2-10 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosameh, S. M.; Sandouqa, A. S.; Ghassib, H. B.; Joudeh, B. R.

    2014-05-01

    The thermodynamic properties of He gas are investigated in the temperature-range 4.2-10 K, with special emphasis on the second virial coefficient in both the classical and quantum regimes. The main input in computing the quantum coefficient is the `effective' phase shifts. These are calculated within the framework of the Galitskii-Migdal-Feynman (GMF) formalism, using the HFDHE2 and Sposito potentials. The virial equation of state is constructed. Extensive calculations are carried out for the pressure-volume-temperature (P-V-T) behavior, as well as chemical potential, and nonideality of the system. The following results are obtained. First, the validity of the GMF formalism for the present system is demonstrated beyond any doubt. Second, the boiling point (phase-transition point) of He gas is determined from the P-V behavior using the virial equation of state, its value being closest than all previous results to the experimental value. Third, the chemical potential is evaluated from the quantum second virial coefficient. It is found that increases (becomes less negative) as the temperature decreases or the number density n increases. Further, shows no sensitivity to the differences between the potentials used up to n = 10 m. Finally, the compressibility Z is computed and discussed as a measure of the nonideality of the system.

  18. Discriminating low frequency components from long range persistent fluctuations in daily atmospheric temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanfredi, M.; Simoniello, T.; Cuomo, V.; Macchiato, M.

    2009-07-01

    This study originated from recent results reported in literature, which support the existence of long-range (power-law) persistence in atmospheric temperature fluctuations on monthly and inter-annual scales. We investigated the results of Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) carried out on twenty-two historical daily time series recorded in Europe in order to evaluate the reliability of such findings in depth. More detailed inspections emphasized systematic deviations from power-law and high statistical confidence for functional form misspecification. Rigorous analyses did not support scale-free correlation as an operative concept for Climate modelling, as instead suggested in literature. In order to understand the physical implications of our results better, we designed a bivariate Markov process, parameterised on the basis of the atmospheric observational data by introducing a slow dummy variable. The time series generated by this model, analysed both in time and frequency domains, tallied with the real ones very well. They accounted for both the deceptive scaling found in literature and the correlation details enhanced by our analysis. Our results seem to evidence the presence of slow fluctuations from another climatic sub-system such as ocean, which inflates temperature variance up to several months. They advise more precise re-analyses of temperature time series before suggesting dynamical paradigms useful for Climate modelling and for the assessment of Climate Change.

  19. Discriminating low frequency components from long range persistent fluctuations in daily atmospheric temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanfredi, M.; Simoniello, T.; Cuomo, V.; Macchiato, M.

    2009-02-01

    This study originated from recent results reported in literature, which support the existence of long-range (power-law) persistence in atmospheric temperature fluctuations on monthly and inter-annual scales. We investigated the results of Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) carried out on twenty-two historical daily time series recorded in Europe in order to evaluate the reliability of such findings in depth. More detailed inspections emphasized systematic deviations from power-law and high statistical confidence for functional form misspecification. Rigorous analyses did not support scale-free correlation as an operative concept for Climate modelling, as instead suggested in literature. In order to understand the physical implications of our results better, we designed a bivariate Markov process, parameterised on the basis of the atmospheric observational data by introducing a slow dummy variable. The time series generated by this model, analysed both in time and frequency domains, tallied with the real ones very well. They accounted for both the deceptive scaling found in literature and the correlation details enhanced by our analysis. Our results seem to evidence the presence of slow fluctuations from another climatic sub-system such as ocean, which inflates temperature variance up to several months. They advise more precise re-analyses of temperature time series before suggesting dynamical paradigms useful for Climate modelling and for the assessment of Climate Change.

  20. Estimation of Temperature Range for Cryo Cutting of Frozen Mackerel using DSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kiyoshi; Hagura, Yoshio; Suzuki, Kanichi

    Frozen mackerel flesh was subjected to measurement of its fracture stress (bending energy) in a low temperature range. The optimum conditions for low temperature cutting, "cryo cutting," were estimated from the results of enthalpy changes measured by a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). There were two enthalpy changes for gross transition on the DSC chart for mackerel, one was at -63°C to -77°C and the other at -96°C to -112°C. Thus we estimated that mackerel was able to cut by bending below -63°C and that there would be a great decrease in bending energy occurring at around -77°C and -112°C. In testing, there were indeed two great decreases of bending energy for the test pieces of mackerel that had been frozen at -40°C, one was at -70°C to -90°C and the other was at -100°C to -120°C. Therefore, the test pieces of mackerel could be cut by bending at -70°C. The results showed that the DSC measurement of mackerel flesh gave a good estimation of the appropriate cutting temperature of mackerel.

  1. Reassessing changes in diurnal temperature range: Intercomparison and evaluation of existing global data set estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, P. W.; Donat, M. G.; Dunn, R. J. H.; Williams, C. N.; Alexander, L. V.; Caesar, J.; Durre, I.; Harris, I.; Hausfather, Z.; Jones, P. D.; Menne, M. J.; Rohde, R.; Vose, R. S.; Davy, R.; Klein-Tank, A. M. G.; Lawrimore, J. H.; Peterson, T. C.; Rennie, J. J.

    2016-05-01

    Changes in diurnal temperature range (DTR) over global land areas are compared from a broad range of independent data sets. All data sets agree that global-mean DTR has decreased significantly since 1950, with most of that decrease occurring over 1960-1980. The since-1979 trends are not significant, with inter-data set disagreement even over the sign of global changes. Inter-data set spread becomes greater regionally and in particular at the grid box level. Despite this, there is general agreement that DTR decreased in North America, Europe, and Australia since 1951, with this decrease being partially reversed over Australia and Europe since the early 1980s. There is substantive disagreement between data sets prior to the middle of the twentieth century, particularly over Europe, which precludes making any meaningful conclusions about DTR changes prior to 1950, either globally or regionally. Several variants that undertake a broad range of approaches to postprocessing steps of gridding and interpolation were analyzed for two of the data sets. These choices have a substantial influence in data sparse regions or periods. The potential of further insights is therefore inextricably linked with the efficacy of data rescue and digitization for maximum and minimum temperature series prior to 1950 everywhere and in data sparse regions throughout the period of record. Over North America, station selection and homogeneity assessment is the primary determinant. Over Europe, where the basic station data are similar, the postprocessing choices are dominant. We assess that globally averaged DTR has decreased since the middle twentieth century but that this decrease has not been linear.

  2. Evidence of both phenological and range shifts in birds in response to increasing temperature in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Alison; Cooney, Tom; Stirnemann, Rebecca; O'Halloran, John

    2010-05-01

    It is well established that the timing of arrival of long-distance migrant birds in spring is advancing throughout Europe and that this response is, at least in part, due to an increase in temperature in line with current global warming. In Ireland, we have seen a number of sub-Saharan species, such as, barn swallow (Hirundo rustica), northern wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe) and sand martin (Riparia riparia) advance their arrival time over a 31-year period. In addition, a medium-distance winter migrant, the whooper swan (Cygnus cygnus), has significantly advanced its spring departure time from its wintering ground in Ireland. Furthermore, a number of species, such as the little egret (Egretta garzetta), more typically associated with a warmer climate than Ireland, was considered to be a ‘rare visitor' up to 1990 and has now begun to breed and to establish a population on the island. All of these phenological and range shifts have been correlated with various temperature variables. The consequences of early arrival at wintering and breeding grounds could result in increased fitness but only if an appropriate food resource is in adequate supply at the new earlier time. If temperatures continue to rise as predicted, the status of some bird species in Ireland may change from ‘rare' to ‘common' or from ‘visitor' to ‘resident' with a possible concurrent increase in population size. Equally, the opposite trend may occur, for birds that prefer cold temperatures, whereby we may see a decrease in population size followed by the loss of certain species.

  3. Long-range persistence in the global mean surface temperature and the global warming "time bomb"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rypdal, M.; Rypdal, K.

    2012-04-01

    Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) and Maximum Likelihood Estimations (MLE) based on instrumental data over the last 160 years indicate that there is Long-Range Persistence (LRP) in Global Mean Surface Temperature (GMST) on time scales of months to decades. The persistence is much higher in sea surface temperature than in land temperatures. Power spectral analysis of multi-model, multi-ensemble runs of global climate models indicate further that this persistence may extend to centennial and maybe even millennial time-scales. We also support these conclusions by wavelet variogram analysis, DFA, and MLE of Northern hemisphere mean surface temperature reconstructions over the last two millennia. These analyses indicate that the GMST is a strongly persistent noise with Hurst exponent H>0.9 on time scales from decades up to at least 500 years. We show that such LRP can be very important for long-term climate prediction and for the establishment of a "time bomb" in the climate system due to a growing energy imbalance caused by the slow relaxation to radiative equilibrium under rising anthropogenic forcing. We do this by the construction of a multi-parameter dynamic-stochastic model for the GMST response to deterministic and stochastic forcing, where LRP is represented by a power-law response function. Reconstructed data for total forcing and GMST over the last millennium are used with this model to estimate trend coefficients and Hurst exponent for the GMST on multi-century time scale by means of MLE. Ensembles of solutions generated from the stochastic model also allow us to estimate confidence intervals for these estimates.

  4. A Polynucleotide Repeat Expansion Causing Temperature-Sensitivity Persists in Wild Irish Accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Tabib, Amanda; Vishwanathan, Sailaja; Seleznev, Andrei; McKeown, Peter C; Downing, Tim; Dent, Craig; Sanchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; Colling, Luana; Spillane, Charles; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar

    2016-01-01

    Triplet repeat expansions underlie several human genetic diseases such as Huntington's disease and Friedreich's ataxia. Although such mutations are primarily known from humans, a triplet expansion associated genetic defect has also been reported at the IIL1 locus in the Bur-0 accession of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The IIL1 triplet expansion is an example of cryptic genetic variation as its phenotypic effects are seen only under genetic or environmental perturbation, with high temperatures resulting in a growth defect. Here we demonstrate that the IIL1 triplet expansion associated growth defect is not a general stress response and is specific to particular environmental perturbations. We also confirm and map genetic modifiers that suppress the effect of IIL1 triplet repeat expansion. By collecting and analyzing accessions from the island of Ireland, we recover the repeat expansion in wild populations suggesting that the repeat expansion has persisted at least 60 years in Ireland. Through genome-wide genotyping, we show that the repeat expansion is present in diverse Irish populations. Our findings indicate that even deleterious alleles can persist in populations if their effect is conditional. Our study demonstrates that analysis of groups of wild populations is a powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of cryptic genetic variation.

  5. A Polynucleotide Repeat Expansion Causing Temperature-Sensitivity Persists in Wild Irish Accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tabib, Amanda; Vishwanathan, Sailaja; Seleznev, Andrei; McKeown, Peter C.; Downing, Tim; Dent, Craig; Sanchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; Colling, Luana; Spillane, Charles; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar

    2016-01-01

    Triplet repeat expansions underlie several human genetic diseases such as Huntington's disease and Friedreich's ataxia. Although such mutations are primarily known from humans, a triplet expansion associated genetic defect has also been reported at the IIL1 locus in the Bur-0 accession of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The IIL1 triplet expansion is an example of cryptic genetic variation as its phenotypic effects are seen only under genetic or environmental perturbation, with high temperatures resulting in a growth defect. Here we demonstrate that the IIL1 triplet expansion associated growth defect is not a general stress response and is specific to particular environmental perturbations. We also confirm and map genetic modifiers that suppress the effect of IIL1 triplet repeat expansion. By collecting and analyzing accessions from the island of Ireland, we recover the repeat expansion in wild populations suggesting that the repeat expansion has persisted at least 60 years in Ireland. Through genome-wide genotyping, we show that the repeat expansion is present in diverse Irish populations. Our findings indicate that even deleterious alleles can persist in populations if their effect is conditional. Our study demonstrates that analysis of groups of wild populations is a powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of cryptic genetic variation. PMID:27630650

  6. Variability and trends in daily minimum and maximum temperatures and in the diurnal temperature range in Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia in 1951-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaagus, Jaak; Briede, Agrita; Rimkus, Egidijus; Remm, Kalle

    2014-10-01

    Spatial distribution and trends in mean and absolute maximum and minimum temperatures and in the diurnal temperature range were analysed at 47 stations in the eastern Baltic region (Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia) during 1951-2010. Dependence of the studied variables on geographical factors (latitude, the Baltic Sea, land elevation) is discussed. Statistically significant increasing trends in maximum and minimum temperatures were detected for March, April, July, August and annual values. At the majority of stations, the increase was detected also in February and May in case of maximum temperature and in January and May in case of minimum temperature. Warming was slightly higher in the northern part of the study area, i.e. in Estonia. Trends in the diurnal temperature range differ seasonally. The highest increasing trend revealed in April and, at some stations, also in May, July and August. Negative and mostly insignificant changes have occurred in January, February, March and June. The annual temperature range has not changed.

  7. Testing fault growth models with low-temperature thermochronology in the northwest Basin and Range, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Magdalena A. E.; Barnes, Jason B.; Colgan, Joseph P.

    2016-10-01

    Common fault growth models diverge in predicting how faults accumulate displacement and lengthen through time. A paucity of field-based data documenting the lateral component of fault growth hinders our ability to test these models and fully understand how natural fault systems evolve. Here we outline a framework for using apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology (AHe) to quantify the along-strike growth of faults. To test our framework, we first use a transect in the normal fault-bounded Jackson Mountains in the Nevada Basin and Range Province, then apply the new framework to the adjacent Pine Forest Range. We combine new and existing cross sections with 18 new and 16 existing AHe cooling ages to determine the spatiotemporal variability in footwall exhumation and evaluate models for fault growth. Three age-elevation transects in the Pine Forest Range show that rapid exhumation began along the range-front fault between approximately 15 and 11 Ma at rates of 0.2-0.4 km/Myr, ultimately exhuming approximately 1.5-5 km. The ages of rapid exhumation identified at each transect lie within data uncertainty, indicating concomitant onset of faulting along strike. We show that even in the case of growth by fault-segment linkage, the fault would achieve its modern length within 3-4 Myr of onset. Comparison with the Jackson Mountains highlights the inadequacies of spatially limited sampling. A constant fault-length growth model is the best explanation for our thermochronology results. We advocate that low-temperature thermochronology can be further utilized to better understand and quantify fault growth with broader implications for seismic hazard assessments and the coevolution of faulting and topography.

  8. Testing fault growth models with low-temperature thermochronology in the northwest Basin and Range, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curry, Magdalena A. E.; Barnes, Jason B.; Colgan, Joseph P.

    2016-01-01

    Common fault growth models diverge in predicting how faults accumulate displacement and lengthen through time. A paucity of field-based data documenting the lateral component of fault growth hinders our ability to test these models and fully understand how natural fault systems evolve. Here we outline a framework for using apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology (AHe) to quantify the along-strike growth of faults. To test our framework, we first use a transect in the normal fault-bounded Jackson Mountains in the Nevada Basin and Range Province, then apply the new framework to the adjacent Pine Forest Range. We combine new and existing cross sections with 18 new and 16 existing AHe cooling ages to determine the spatiotemporal variability in footwall exhumation and evaluate models for fault growth. Three age-elevation transects in the Pine Forest Range show that rapid exhumation began along the range-front fault between approximately 15 and 11 Ma at rates of 0.2–0.4 km/Myr, ultimately exhuming approximately 1.5–5 km. The ages of rapid exhumation identified at each transect lie within data uncertainty, indicating concomitant onset of faulting along strike. We show that even in the case of growth by fault-segment linkage, the fault would achieve its modern length within 3–4 Myr of onset. Comparison with the Jackson Mountains highlights the inadequacies of spatially limited sampling. A constant fault-length growth model is the best explanation for our thermochronology results. We advocate that low-temperature thermochronology can be further utilized to better understand and quantify fault growth with broader implications for seismic hazard assessments and the coevolution of faulting and topography.

  9. An effective method to enhance working temperature range of lasers from dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, JianLong; Zhang, YaTing; Cao, MingXuan; Song, XiaoXian; Che, YongLi; Dai, HaiTao; Zhang, GuiZhong; Yao, JianQuan

    2016-10-01

    Stable and homogeneous dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystals (DDCLCs) were prepared. The lasers generated from DDCLCs can be tuned by temperature, and the working temperature range of DDCLCs was from 20 °C to 60 °C. After adding bi-functional monomer RM257 and photoinitiator Irgacure 2959, the working temperature range of lasers from DDCLCs was enhanced from 20-60 °C to 20-70 °C.

  10. Methane storage in nanoporous material at supercritical temperature over a wide range of pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Keliu; Chen, Zhangxin; Li, Xiangfang; Dong, Xiaohu

    2016-09-01

    The methane storage behavior in nanoporous material is significantly different from that of a bulk phase, and has a fundamental role in methane extraction from shale and its storage for vehicular applications. Here we show that the behavior and mechanisms of the methane storage are mainly dominated by the ratio of the interaction between methane molecules and nanopores walls to the methane intermolecular interaction, and a geometric constraint. By linking the macroscopic properties of the methane storage to the microscopic properties of a system of methane molecules-nanopores walls, we develop an equation of state for methane at supercritical temperature over a wide range of pressures. Molecular dynamic simulation data demonstrates that this equation is able to relate very well the methane storage behavior with each of the key physical parameters, including a pore size and shape and wall chemistry and roughness. Moreover, this equation only requires one fitted parameter, and is simple, reliable and powerful in application.

  11. Epitaxial growth of 6H silicon carbide in the temperature range 1320 C to 1390 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, H. A.; Powell, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    High-quality epitaxial layers of 6H SiC have been grown on 6H SiC substrates with the grown direction perpendicular to the crystal c-axis. The growth was by chemical vapor deposition from methyltrichlorosilane (CH3SiCl3) in hydrogen at temperatures in the range of 1320 to 1390 C. Epitaxial layers up to 80 microns thick were grown at rates of 0.4 microns/min. Attempts at growth on the (0001) plane of 6H SiC substrates under similar conditions resulted in polycrystalline cubic SiC layers. Optical and X-ray diffraction techniques were used to characterize the grown layers.

  12. Radiative Vaporization of Graphite in the Temperature Range of 4000 to 4500 deg K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundell, John H.; Dickey, Robert R.

    1976-01-01

    The vaporization of graphite under intense laser radiation is considered both theoretically and experimentally. Under intense radiation, the mass-loss rate can be high enough to cause the flow in the laser plume to be supersonic. Under these conditions, the vaporization process is coupled to the plume gasdynamics. Experimental results are presented for surface temperatures of 3985 to 4555 K and mass-loss rates from 0.52 to 27.0 g/sq cm sec. The data are used to determine the vapor pressure of graphite in a range of 2 to 11 atm, and the results are shown to be in good agreement with the JANAF vapor pressure curve, if the vaporization coefficients are unity. The assumption of unity vaporization coefficients is shown to be reasonable by a comparison of the present results with other recent vapor pressure results for graphite.

  13. Vaporization of graphite in the temperature range of 4000 to 4500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundell, J. H.; Dickey, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    The vaporization of graphite under intense laser radiation is considered both theoretically and experimentally. Under intense radiation, the mass-loss rate can be high enough to cause the flow in the laser plume to be supersonic. It is shown that under these conditions the vaporization process is coupled to the plume gasdynamics and the mass-loss rate for graphite is 62% of the free vaporization rate. Experimental results are presented for surface temperatures from 3985 to 4555 K and mass-loss rates from 0.56 to 27.0 g per sq cm sec. The results are used to determine the vapor pressure of graphite in a pressure range of 2 to 11 atm, and the values are shown to be in agreement with the JANAF vapor pressure curve.

  14. A 3He gas heat switch for the 0.5-2 K temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Eric N.; Parpia, Jeevak M.; Beamish, John R.

    2000-07-01

    We have constructed a prototype heat switch for use in a cyclic demagnetization apparatus. The desired operating range of the switch is from 0.5 to 1.8 K. The measured conductivity of the switch is 50 μW/ K at 1.5 K when ‘off ’ and 8 mW/K at 0.5 K when ‘on’. The switching is carried out by 3He gas which is admitted and extracted from the device by a miniature charcoal adsorption pump which is controlled by electrical heat and a weak thermal link to a pumped 4He bath. In this paper we discuss details of construction and the performance as a function of temperature, and consider the switching time between on and off states.

  15. Effect of glass composition on activation energy of viscosity in glass-melting-temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Han, Sang Soo

    2012-08-01

    In the high-temperature range, where the viscosity (Eta) of molten glass is <10{sup 3} Pa s, the activation energy (B) is virtually ln(Eta) = A + B/T, is nearly independent of melt composition. Hence, the viscosity-composition relationship for Eta < 10{sup 3} Pa s is defined by B as a function of composition. Using a database encompassing over 1300 compositions of high-level waste glasses with nearly 7000 viscosity data, we developed mathematical models for B(x), where x is the composition vector in terms of mass fractions of components. In this paper, we present 13 versions of B(x) as first- and second-order polynomials with coefficients for 15 to 39 components, including Others, a component that sums constituents having little effect on viscosity.

  16. Methane storage in nanoporous material at supercritical temperature over a wide range of pressures

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Keliu; Chen, Zhangxin; Li, Xiangfang; Dong, Xiaohu

    2016-01-01

    The methane storage behavior in nanoporous material is significantly different from that of a bulk phase, and has a fundamental role in methane extraction from shale and its storage for vehicular applications. Here we show that the behavior and mechanisms of the methane storage are mainly dominated by the ratio of the interaction between methane molecules and nanopores walls to the methane intermolecular interaction, and a geometric constraint. By linking the macroscopic properties of the methane storage to the microscopic properties of a system of methane molecules-nanopores walls, we develop an equation of state for methane at supercritical temperature over a wide range of pressures. Molecular dynamic simulation data demonstrates that this equation is able to relate very well the methane storage behavior with each of the key physical parameters, including a pore size and shape and wall chemistry and roughness. Moreover, this equation only requires one fitted parameter, and is simple, reliable and powerful in application. PMID:27628747

  17. Assessment of Operation of EMK21 MEMS Silicon Oscillator Over Wide Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Electronic control systems, data-acquisition instrumentation, and microprocessors require accurate timing signals for proper operation. Traditionally, ceramic resonators and crystal oscillators provided this clock function for the majority of these systems. Over the last few years, MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) resonator-based oscillators began to surface as commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) parts by a few companies. These quartz-free, miniature silicon devices could easily replace the traditional crystal oscillators in providing the timing/clock function for many digital and analog circuits. They are reported to provide stable output frequency, offer great tolerance to shock and vibration, and are immune to electro-static discharge [ 1-2]. In addition, they are encapsulated in compact lead-free packages and cover a wide frequency range (1 MHz to 125 MHz). The small size of the MEMS oscillators along with their thermal stability make them ideal candidates for use in space exploration missions. Limited data, however, exist on the performance and reliability of these devices under operation in applications where extreme temperatures or thermal cycling swings, which are typical of space missions, are encountered. This report presents the results of the work obtained on the evaluation of an Ecliptek Corporation MEMS silicon oscillator chip under extreme temperatures.

  18. Constitutive modeling of polycarbonate over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitao; Zhou, Huamin; Huang, Zhigao; Zhang, Yun; Zhao, Xiaoxuan

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of polycarbonate was experimentally investigated over a wide range of strain rates ( 10^{-4} to 5× 103 s^{-1}) and temperatures (293 to 353 K). Compression tests under these conditions were performed using a SHIMADZU universal testing machine and a split Hopkinson pressure bar. Falling weight impact testing was carried out on an Instron Dynatup 9200 drop tower system. The rate- and temperature-dependent deformation behavior of polycarbonate was discussed in detail. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) tests were utilized to observe the glass ( α ) transition and the secondary ( β ) transition of polycarbonate. The DMA results indicate that the α and β transitions have a dramatic influence on the mechanical behavior of polycarbonate. The decompose/shift/reconstruct (DSR) method was utilized to decompose the storage modulus into the α and β components and extrapolate the entire modulus, the α-component modulus and the β-component modulus. Based on three previous models, namely, Mulliken-Boyce, G'Sell-Jonas and DSGZ, an adiabatic model is proposed to predict the mechanical behavior of polycarbonate. The model considers the contributions of both the α and β transitions to the mechanical behavior, and it has been implemented in ABAQUS/Explicit through a user material subroutine VUMAT. The model predictions are proven to essentially coincide with the experimental results during compression testing and falling weight impact testing.

  19. Impact of diurnal temperature range on human health: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jian; Xu, Zhiwei; Zhu, Rui; Wang, Xu; Jin, Liu; Song, Jian; Su, Hong

    2014-11-01

    Increasing epidemiological studies have shown that a rapid temperature change within 1 day is an independent risk factor for human health. This paper aimed to systematically review the epidemiological evidence on the relationship between diurnal temperature range (DTR) and human health and to propose future research directions. A literature search was conducted in October 2013 using the databases including PubMed, ScienceDirect, and EBSCO. Empirical studies regarding the relationship between DTR and mortality and morbidity were included. Twenty-five relevant studies were identified, among which, 11 investigated the relationship between DTR and mortality and 14 examined the impact of DTR on morbidity. The majority of existing studies reported that DTR was significantly associated with mortality and morbidity, particularly for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Notably, compared with adults, the elderly and children were more vulnerable to DTR effects. However, there were some inconsistencies regarding the susceptible groups, lag time, and threshold of DTR. The impact of DTR on human health may be confounded or modified by season, socioeconomic, and educational status. Further research is needed to further confirm the adverse effects of DTR in different geographical locations; examine the effects of DTR on the health of children aged one or under; explore extreme DTR effects on human health; analyze the difference of DTR effects on human health in different locations and the modified effects of potential confounding factors; and develop detailed preventive measures against large DTR, particularly for susceptible groups.

  20. Thermodynamic and Transport Properties of Real Air Plasma in Wide Range of Temperature and Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunlin; Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Yang, Fei; Feng, Ying; Rong, Mingzhe; Zhang, Hantian

    2016-07-01

    Air plasma has been widely applied in industrial manufacture. In this paper, both dry and humid air plasmas' thermodynamic and transport properties are calculated in temperature 300-100000 K and pressure 0.1-100 atm. To build a more precise model of real air plasma, over 70 species are considered for composition. Two different methods, the Gibbs free energy minimization method and the mass action law method, are used to determinate the composition of the air plasma in a different temperature range. For the transport coefficients, the simplified Chapman-Enskog method developed by Devoto has been applied using the most recent collision integrals. It is found that the presence of CO2 has almost no effect on the properties of air plasma. The influence of H2O can be ignored except in low pressure air plasma, in which the saturated vapor pressure is relatively high. The results will serve as credible inputs for computational simulation of air plasma. supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program)(No. 2015CB251002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51521065, 51577145), the Science and Technology Project Funds of the Grid State Corporation (SGTYHT/13-JS-177), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and State Grid Corporation Project (GY71-14-004)

  1. Global climate change: impact of diurnal temperature range on mortality in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Liu, Hua-Zhang; Ou, Chun-Quan; Lin, Guo-Zhen; Zhou, Qin; Shen, Gi-Chuan; Chen, Ping-Yan; Guo, Yuming

    2013-04-01

    Diurnal temperature range (DTR) is an important meteorological indicator associated with global climate change, but little is known about the effects of DTR on mortality. We examined the effects of DTR on cause-/age-/education-specific mortality in Guangzhou, a subtropical city in China during 2003-2010. A quasi-Poisson regression model combined with distributed lag non-linear model was used to examine the effects of DTR, after controlling for daily mean temperature, air pollutants, season and day of the week. A 1 °C increase in DTR at lag 0-4 days was associated with a 0.47% (95% confidence interval: 0.01%-0.93%) increase in non-accidental mortality. Stroke mortality was most sensitive to DTR. Female, the elderly and those with low education were more susceptible to DTR than male, the youth and those with high education, respectively. Our findings suggest that vulnerable subpopulations should pay more attention to protect themselves from unstable daily weather.

  2. Constitutive modeling of polycarbonate over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitao; Zhou, Huamin; Huang, Zhigao; Zhang, Yun; Zhao, Xiaoxuan

    2017-02-01

    The mechanical behavior of polycarbonate was experimentally investigated over a wide range of strain rates (10^{-4} to 5× 103 s^{-1}) and temperatures (293 to 353 K). Compression tests under these conditions were performed using a SHIMADZU universal testing machine and a split Hopkinson pressure bar. Falling weight impact testing was carried out on an Instron Dynatup 9200 drop tower system. The rate- and temperature-dependent deformation behavior of polycarbonate was discussed in detail. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) tests were utilized to observe the glass (α ) transition and the secondary (β ) transition of polycarbonate. The DMA results indicate that the α and β transitions have a dramatic influence on the mechanical behavior of polycarbonate. The decompose/shift/reconstruct (DSR) method was utilized to decompose the storage modulus into the α and β components and extrapolate the entire modulus, the α-component modulus and the β-component modulus. Based on three previous models, namely, Mulliken-Boyce, G'Sell-Jonas and DSGZ, an adiabatic model is proposed to predict the mechanical behavior of polycarbonate. The model considers the contributions of both the α and β transitions to the mechanical behavior, and it has been implemented in ABAQUS/Explicit through a user material subroutine VUMAT. The model predictions are proven to essentially coincide with the experimental results during compression testing and falling weight impact testing.

  3. Observations of a “weekend effect” in diurnal temperature range

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Piers M. de F.; Solomon, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Using surface measurements of maximum and minimum temperatures from the Global Daily Climatological Network data set, we find evidence of a weekly cycle in diurnal temperature range (DTR) for many stations in the United States, Mexico, Japan, and China. The “weekend effect,” which we define as the average DTR for Saturday through Monday minus the average DTR for Wednesday through Friday, can be as large as 0.5 K, similar to the magnitude of observed long-term trends in DTR. This weekend effect has a distinct large-scale pattern that has changed only slightly over time, but its sign is not the same in all locations. The station procedures and the statistical robustness of both the individual station data and the patterns of DTR differences are thoroughly examined. We conclude that the weekend effect is a real short time scale and large spatial scale geophysical phenomenon, which is necessarily human in origin. We thus provide strong evidence of an anthropogenic link to DTR, an important climate indicator. Several possible anthropogenic mechanisms are discussed; we speculate that aerosol-cloud interactions are the most likely cause of this weekend effect, but we do not rule out others. PMID:14500787

  4. Wide Operating Temperature Range Electrolytes for High Voltage and High Specific Energy Li-Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M. C.; Hwang, C.; Krause, F. C.; Soler, J.; West, W. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Amine, K.

    2012-01-01

    A number of electrolyte formulations that have been designed to operate over a wide temperature range have been investigated in conjunction with layered-layered metal oxide cathode materials developed at Argonne. In this study, we have evaluated a number of electrolytes in Li-ion cells consisting of Conoco Phillips A12 graphite anodes and Toda HE5050 Li(1.2)Ni(0.15)Co(0.10)Mn(0.55)O2 cathodes. The electrolytes studied consisted of LiPF6 in carbonate-based electrolytes that contain ester co-solvents with various solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) promoting additives, many of which have been demonstrated to perform well in 4V systems. More specifically, we have investigated the performance of a number of methyl butyrate (MB) containing electrolytes (i.e., LiPF6 in ethylene carbonate (EC) + ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) + MB (20:20:60 v/v %) that contain various additives, including vinylene carbonate, lithium oxalate, and lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB). When these systems were evaluated at various rates at low temperatures, the methyl butyrate-based electrolytes resulted in improved rate capability compared to cells with all carbonate-based formulations. It was also ascertained that the slow cathode kinetics govern the generally poor rate capability at low temperature in contrast to traditionally used LiNi(0.80)Co(0.15)Al(0.05)O2-based systems, rather than being influenced strongly by the electrolyte type.

  5. High-speed Imaging of Global Surface Temperature Distributions on Hypersonic Ballistic-Range Projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA-Ames ballistic range provides a unique capability for aerothermodynamic testing of configurations in hypersonic, real-gas, free-flight environments. The facility can closely simulate conditions at any point along practically any trajectory of interest experienced by a spacecraft entering an atmosphere. Sub-scale models of blunt atmospheric entry vehicles are accelerated by a two-stage light-gas gun to speeds as high as 20 times the speed of sound to fly ballistic trajectories through an 24 m long vacuum-rated test section. The test-section pressure (effective altitude), the launch velocity of the model (flight Mach number), and the test-section working gas (planetary atmosphere) are independently variable. The model travels at hypersonic speeds through a quiescent test gas, creating a strong bow-shock wave and real-gas effects that closely match conditions achieved during actual atmospheric entry. The challenge with ballistic range experiments is to obtain quantitative surface measurements from a model traveling at hypersonic speeds. The models are relatively small (less than 3.8 cm in diameter), which limits the spatial resolution possible with surface mounted sensors. Furthermore, since the model is in flight, surface-mounted sensors require some form of on-board telemetry, which must survive the massive acceleration loads experienced during launch (up to 500,000 gravities). Finally, the model and any on-board instrumentation will be destroyed at the terminal wall of the range. For these reasons, optical measurement techniques are the most practical means of acquiring data. High-speed thermal imaging has been employed in the Ames ballistic range to measure global surface temperature distributions and to visualize the onset of transition to turbulent-flow on the forward regions of hypersonic blunt bodies. Both visible wavelength and infrared high-speed cameras are in use. The visible wavelength cameras are intensified CCD imagers capable of integration

  6. Does tectonics drive topography ? Insights from low - temperature thermochronology and numerical modeling along the Himalayan range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, X.; van der Beek, P.; Braun, J.; Perry, C.; Mugnier, J. L.

    2009-12-01

    Although the Himalayan range is commonly presented as cylindrical along-strike, geological structures, topography, precipitation rate, convergence rates and low - temperature thermochronological ages all vary significantly from west to east. Here, we focus on the interpretation of thermochronological datasets in term of cylindricity in geometry and kinematics of the MHT along the Himalayan range. We propose a structural and kinematic model of the major crustal Himalayan thrust, the MHT, based on apatite fission-track (AFT) ages collected along north - south transects in western and eastern - central Nepal (Kali Gandaki and Trisuli Rivers). AFT ages are consistently young (≤3 My) along both N-S transects in the MCT zone and increase (4 to 6 My) toward the south in the Lesser Himalaya. We constrain the geometry of the MHT ramp with 2 age-elevation transects, one in the MCT zone and one in the outer Lesser Himalaya, interpreted in terms of exhumation rate. The data can be fit without invoking out-of-sequence thrusting in the Main Central Thrust zone by varying the geometry of the MHT along strike, in accord with independent geodetic and geophysical data. We compare our data to published low-temperature thermochronological datasets for western - central Nepal, eastern - central Nepal, western India and the Bhutan Himalaya. We use these data to constrain numerical thermal-kinematic models using a modified version of the PECUBE code, in order to quantify potential along-strike variations in the kinematics of the Himalayan range. Our results show that lateral variations in geometry of the MHT (in particular the presence or absence of a major ramp) strongly control the kinematics, the exhumation history and the topography of the orogen. Where a major crustal ramp is present, the topography shows a steep gradient that focuses exhumation and orographic precipitation whereas the topography is more gentle and exhumation less focused in the absence of a ramp. Our results

  7. Does tectonics drive topography ? Insights from low - temperature thermochronology and numerical modeling along the Himalayan range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Xavier; van der Beek, Peter; Braun, Jean; Perry, Claire; Mugnier, Jean-Louis

    2010-05-01

    Although the Himalayan range is commonly presented as cylindrical along-strike, geological structures, topography, precipitation rate, convergence rates and low - temperature thermochronological ages all vary significantly from west to east. Here, we focus on the interpretation of thermochronological datasets in term of cylindricity in geometry and kinematics of the MHT along the Himalayan range. We propose a structural and kinematic model of the major crustal Himalayan thrust, the MHT, based on apatite fission-track (AFT) ages collected along north - south transects in western and eastern - central Nepal (Kali Gandaki and Trisuli Rivers). AFT ages are consistently young (< 3 My) along both N-S transects in the MCT zone and increase (4 to 6 My) toward the south in the Lesser Himalaya. We constrain the geometry of the MHT ramp with 2 age-elevation transects, one in the MCT zone and one in the outer Lesser Himalaya, interpreted in terms of exhumation rate. The data can be fit without invoking out-of-sequence thrusting in the Main Central Thrust zone by varying the geometry of the MHT along strike, in accord with independent geodetic and geophysical data. We compare our data to published low-temperature thermochronological datasets for western - central Nepal, eastern - central Nepal, western India and the Bhutan Himalaya. We use these data to constrain numerical thermal-kinematic models using a modified version of the PECUBE code, in order to quantify potential along-strike variations in the kinematics of the Himalayan range. Our results show that lateral variations in geometry of the MHT (in particular the presence or absence of a major ramp) strongly control the kinematics, the exhumation history and the topography of the orogen. Where a major crustal ramp is present, the topography shows a steep gradient that focuses exhumation and orographic precipitation whereas the topography is more gentle and exhumation less focused in the absence of a ramp. Our results imply

  8. The Effect of a Pre-Lens Aperture on the Temperature Range and Image Uniformity of Microbolometer Infrared Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Parris, Larkin S.; Lindal, John M.; Kunc, Vlastimil

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the temperature range extension of long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) cameras by placing an aperture in front of the lens. An aperture smaller than the lens will reduce the radiance to the sensor, allowing the camera to image targets much hotter than typically allowable. These higher temperatures were accurately determined after developing a correction factor which was applied to the built-in temperature calibration. The relationship between aperture diameter and temperature range is linear. The effect of pre-lens apertures on the image uniformity is a form of anti-vignetting, meaning the corners appear brighter (hotter) than the rest of the image. An example of using this technique to measure temperatures of high melting point polymers during 3D printing provide valuable information of the time required for the weld-line temperature to fall below the glass transition temperature.

  9. Lagged Effect of Diurnal Temperature Range on Mortality in a Subtropical Megacity of China

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuan; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Tao; Rutherford, Shannon; Xu, Yanjun; Xu, Xiaojun; Wu, Wei; Xiao, Jianpeng; Zeng, Weilin; Chu, Cordia; Ma, Wenjun

    2013-01-01

    Background Many studies have found extreme temperature can increase the risk of mortality. However, it is not clear whether extreme diurnal temperature range (DTR) is associated with daily disease-specific mortality, and how season might modify any association. Objectives To better understand the acute effect of DTR on mortality and identify whether season is a modifier of the DTR effect. Methods The distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) was applied to assess the non-linear and delayed effects of DTR on deaths (non-accidental mortality (NAD), cardiovascular disease (CVD), respiratory disease (RD) and cerebrovascular disease (CBD)) in the full year, the cold season and the warm season. Results A non-linear relationship was consistently found between extreme DTR and mortality. Immediate effects of extreme low DTR on all types of mortality were stronger than those of extreme high DTR in the full year. The cumulative effects of extreme DTRs increased with the increment of lag days for all types of mortality in cold season, and they were greater for extreme high DTRs than those of extreme low DTRs. In hot season, the cumulative effects for extreme low DTRs increased with the increment of lag days, but for extreme high DTR they reached maxima at a lag of 13 days for all types of mortality except for CBD(at lag6 days), and then decreased. Conclusions Our findings suggest that extreme DTR is an independent risk factor of daily mortality, and season is a modifier of the association of DTR with daily mortality. PMID:23405130

  10. Medium-Range Predictability of Contrail-Cirrus Demonstrated during Experiments Ml-Cirrus and Access-Ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, U.

    2015-12-01

    The Contrail Cirrus Prediction model CoCiP (doi:10.5194/gmd-5-543-2012) has been applied quasi operationally to predict contrails for flight planning of ML-CIRRUS (C. Voigt, DLR, et al.) in Europe and for ACCESS II in California (B. Anderson, NASA, et al.) in March-May 2014. The model uses NWP data from ECMWF and past airtraffic data (actual traffic data are used for analysis). The forecasts provided a sequence of hourly forecast maps of contrail cirrus optical depth for 3.5 days, every 12 h. CoCiP has been compared to observations before, e.g. within a global climate-aerosol-contrail model (Schumann, Penner et al., ACPD, 2015, doi:10.5194/acpd-15-19553-2015). Good predictions would allow for climate optimal routing (see, e.g., US patent by Mannstein and Schumann, US 2012/0173147 A1). The predictions are tested by: 1) Local eyewitness reports and photos, 2) satellite observed cloudiness, 3) autocorrelation analysis of predictions for various forecast periods, 4) comparisons of computed with observed optical depth from COCS (doi:10.5194/amt-7-3233-2014, 2014) by IR METEOSAT-SEVIRI observations over Europe. The results demonstrate medium-range predictability of contrail cirrus to a useful degree for given traffic, soot emissions, and high-quality NWP data. A growing set of satellite, Lidar, and in-situ data from ML-CIRRUS and ACCENT are becoming available and will be used to further test the forecast quality. The autocorrelation of optical depth predictions is near 70% for 3-d forecasts for Europe (outside times with high Sahara dust loads), and only slightly smaller for continental USA. Contrail cirrus is abundant over Europe and USA. More than 1/3 of all cirrus measured with the research aircraft HALO during ML-CIRRUS was impacted by contrails. The radiative forcing (RF) is strongly daytime and ambience dependent. The net annual mean RF, based on our global studies, may reach up to 0.08 W/m2 globally, and may well exceed 1 W/m2 regionally, with maximum over Europe

  11. Diurnal temperature range trend over North Carolina and the associated mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayemuzzaman, Mohammad; Mekonnen, Ademe; Jha, Manoj K.

    2015-06-01

    This study seeks to investigate the variability and presence of trend in the diurnal surface air temperature range (DTR) over North Carolina (NC) for the period 1950-2009. The significance trend test and the magnitude of trends were determined using the non-parametric Mann-Kendall test and the Theil-Sen approach, respectively. Statewide significant trends (p < 0.05) of decreasing DTR were found in all seasons and annually during the analysis period. Highest (lowest) temporal DTR trends of magnitude - 0.19 (- 0.031) °C/decade were found in summer (winter). Potential mechanisms for the presence/absence of trend in DTR have been highlighted. Historical data sets of the three main moisture components (precipitation, total cloud cover (TCC), and soil moisture) and the two major atmospheric circulation modes (North Atlantic Oscillation and Southern Oscillation) were used for correlation analysis. The DTRs were found to be negatively correlated with the precipitation, TCC and soil moisture across the state for all the seasons and annual basis. It appears that the moisture components related better to the DTR than to the atmospheric circulation modes.

  12. Endurance and retention of mnos devices over the temperature range from -50°c to +125°c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. V.; Brown, W. D.

    1981-11-01

    The effect of temperature variation on the endurance and retention characteristics of MNOS devices has been studied over the temperature range from -50°c to +125°C. The endurance of MNOS devices is significantly degraded as temperature is increased. Retention, on the other hand, appears to be a more sensitive function of endurance cycling than increased temperature. Increased nitride conductivity, thermal excitation tunneling and charge centroid movement at higher temperatures along with increased surface state density caused by endurance cycling are suggested as mechanisms to explain observed degradation in device performance.

  13. Shallow subsurface temperature surveys in the basin and range province, U.S.A.-I. Review and evaluation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olmsted, F.H.; Welch, A.H.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature surveys at depths of 1-2 m have had varying success in geothermal exploration in the Basin and Range province. The most successful surveys have identified patterns of near-surface thermal-fluid flow within areas of less than 2 km2. Results have been less consistent in larger areas where zones of hydrothermal upflow are less well known, nongeothermal perturbing factors are significant and lateral variations in shallow subsurface temperature are small. Nongeothermal perturbations can be minimized by use of mean annual temperatures instead of synoptic temperatures, by physically based simulation of ground temperatures or by statistical modeling. ?? 1986.

  14. Study on the relationships between Raman shifts and temperature range for a-plane GaN using temperature-dependent Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dang-Hui; Xu, Sheng-Rui; Hao, Yue; Zhang, Jin-Cheng; Xu, Tian-Han; Lin, Zhi-Yu; Zhou, Hao; Xue, Xiao-Yong

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, Raman shifts of a-plane GaN layers grown on r-plane sapphire substrates by low-pressure metal—organic chemical vapor deposition (LPMOCVD) are investigated. We compare the crystal qualities and study the relationships between Raman shift and temperature for conventional a-plane GaN epilayer and insertion AlN/AlGaN superlattice layers for a-plane GaN epilayer using temperature-dependent Raman scattering in a temperature range from 83 K to 503 K. The temperature-dependences of GaN phonon modes (A1 (TO), E2 (high), and E1 (TO)) and the linewidths of E2 (high) phonon peak are studied. The results indicate that there exist two mechanisms between phonon peaks in the whole temperature range, and the relationship can be fitted to the pseudo-Voigt function. From analytic results we find a critical temperature existing in the relationship, which can characterize the anharmonic effects of a-plane GaN in different temperature ranges. In the range of higher temperature, the relationship exhibits an approximately linear behavior, which is consistent with the analyzed results theoretically.

  15. Linking temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition to its molecular structure, accessibility, and microbial physiology.

    PubMed

    Wagai, Rota; Kishimoto-Mo, Ayaka W; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Shirato, Yasuhito; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Yagasaki, Yasumi

    2013-04-01

    Temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition may have a significant impact on global warming. Enzyme-kinetic hypothesis suggests that decomposition of low-quality substrate (recalcitrant molecular structure) requires higher activation energy and thus has greater temperature sensitivity than that of high-quality, labile substrate. Supporting evidence, however, relies largely on indirect indices of substrate quality. Furthermore, the enzyme-substrate reactions that drive decomposition may be regulated by microbial physiology and/or constrained by protective effects of soil mineral matrix. We thus tested the kinetic hypothesis by directly assessing the carbon molecular structure of low-density fraction (LF) which represents readily accessible, mineral-free SOM pool. Using five mineral soil samples of contrasting SOM concentrations, we conducted 30-days incubations (15, 25, and 35 °C) to measure microbial respiration and quantified easily soluble C as well as microbial biomass C pools before and after the incubations. Carbon structure of LFs (<1.6 and 1.6-1.8 g cm(-3) ) and bulk soil was measured by solid-state (13) C-NMR. Decomposition Q10 was significantly correlated with the abundance of aromatic plus alkyl-C relative to O-alkyl-C groups in LFs but not in bulk soil fraction or with the indirect C quality indices based on microbial respiration or biomass. The warming did not significantly change the concentration of biomass C or the three types of soluble C despite two- to three-fold increase in respiration. Thus, enhanced microbial maintenance respiration (reduced C-use efficiency) especially in the soils rich in recalcitrant LF might lead to the apparent equilibrium between SOM solubilization and microbial C uptake. Our results showed physical fractionation coupled with direct assessment of molecular structure as an effective approach and supported the enzyme-kinetic interpretation of widely observed C quality-temperature relationship for

  16. Lead retention by broiler litter biochars in small arms range soil: impact of pyrolysis temperature.

    PubMed

    Uchimiya, Minori; Bannon, Desmond I; Wartelle, Lynda H; Lima, Isabel M; Klasson, K Thomas

    2012-05-23

    Phosphorus-rich manure biochar has a potential for stabilizing Pb and other heavy metal contaminants, as well as serving as a sterile fertilizer. In this study, broiler litter biochars produced at 350 and 650 °C were employed to understand how biochar's elemental composition (P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Cu, Pb, Sb, and Zn) affects the extent of heavy metal stabilization. Soil incubation experiments were conducted using a sandy, slightly acidic (pH 6.11) Pb-contaminated (19906 mg kg(-1) total Pb primarily as PbCO(3)) small arms range (SAR) soil fraction (<250 μm) amended with 2-20 wt % biochar. The Pb stabilization in pH 4.9 acetate buffer reached maximum at lower (2-10 wt %) biochar amendment rate, and 350 °C biochar containing more soluble P was better able to stabilize Pb than the 650 °C biochar. The 350 °C biochar consistently released greater amounts of P, K, Mg, Na, and Ca than 650 °C biochar in both unbuffered (pH 4.5 sulfuric acid) and buffered (pH 4.9 acetate) systems, despite 1.9-4.5-fold greater total content of the 650 °C biochar. Biochars, however, did not influence the total extractable Pb over three consecutive equilibration periods consisting of (1) 1 week in pH 4.5 sulfuric acid (simulated leaching by rainfall), (2) 1 week in pH 4.9 acetate buffer (standard solution for toxicity characteristic leaching procedure), and (3) 1 h in pH 1.5 glycine at 37 °C (in vitro bioaccessibility procedure). Overall, lower pyrolysis temperature was favorable for stabilizing Pb (major risk driver of SAR soils) and releasing P, K, Ca, and other plant nutrients in a sandy acidic soil.

  17. Kinetics of the reaction of Cl atoms with CHCl 3 over the temperature range 253-313 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Elna J. K.; Hoff, Janus; Nielsen, Ole John; Johnson, Matthew S.

    2010-07-01

    The reaction CHCl 3 + Cl → CCl 3 + HCl was studied in the atmospherically relevant temperature range from 253 to 313 K and in 930 mbar of N 2 diluent using the relative rate method. A temperature dependent reaction rate constant, valid in the temperature range 220-330 K, was determined by a fit to the result of the present study and that of Orlando (1999); k = (3.77 ± 0.32) × 10 -12 exp((-1011 ± 24)/T) cm 3 molecule -1 s -1.

  18. Carbon films embedded by nickel nanoparticles: fluctuation in hopping rate and variable-range hopping with respect to annealing temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalouji, Vali; Elahi, Smohammad; Solaymani, Shahram; Ghaderi, Atefeh; Elahi, Hossein

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the electrical properties of carbon-nickel films annealed at different temperatures (573, 773, 1073 and 1273 K) in the temperature range 15-300 K were investigated. The films were grown by radio frequency magnetron co-sputtering on quartz substrates at room temperature. The multiphonon hopping conduction mechanism is found to dominate the electrical transport in the temperature range 150-300 K. It can be seen that the room-temperature hopping rate (ΓRT) at 773 K has maximum value of 56.8 × 105 s-1. Our results of conductivity measurements at high temperature are in good agreement with strong carrier-lattice coupling model; on the other hand, the conductivity in the range 15-50 K is well described in terms of variable-range hopping (VRH) conduction mechanism. The localized state density around Fermi level N( E F) and the average hopping energy W hop at low temperature for the films annealed at 773 K have maximum value of 2.23 × 1023 (cm-3 eV-1) and minimum value of 9.74 × 10-4 eV, respectively.

  19. Kinetic Testing of Nitrate-Based Sodalite Formation Over the Temperature Range of 40 to 100 Degrees Centigrade (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Mattus, A.J.

    2001-09-07

    The focus of this study was the desilication kinetics of a Savannah River Site (SRS) tank farm 2H simulant over the temperature range of 40 to 100 C. Results showed that the formation of nitrate-nitrite-based sodalite over aluminum-to-silicon (Al:Si) molar ratios ranging from 1:1 to 20:1 exhibited overall-second order kinetics. The Arrhenius apparent activation energy associated with the crystal growth process of the sodalite was determined to be 35 kJ/mol over the temperature range investigated. Second-order rate constants were extrapolated to the 2H evaporator working temperature of {approx} 130 C and were found to be 0.012 L mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}. At this operating temperature, the half-life of a limiting reactant with a 0.1 M feed would be 14 min.

  20. Intraspecific variation in thermal acclimation of photosynthesis across a range of temperatures in a perennial crop

    PubMed Central

    Zaka, Serge; Frak, Ela; Julier, Bernadette; Gastal, François; Louarn, Gaëtan

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the thermal acclimation of photosynthesis has been stimulated by the increasing relevance of climate change. However, little is known about intra-specific variations in thermal acclimation and its potential for breeding. In this article, we examined the difference in thermal acclimation between alfalfa (Medicago sativa) cultivars originating from contrasting origins, and sought to analyze the mechanisms in play. A series of experiments was carried out at seven growth temperatures between 5 and 35 °C using four cultivars from temperate and Mediterranean origin. Leaf traits, the photosynthetic rate at 25 °C (A40025), the photosynthetic rate at optimal temperature (A400opt), the thermal optimum of photosynthesis (Topt), and the photosynthetic parameters from the Farqhuar model were determined. Irrespective of cultivar origin, a clear shift in the temperature responses of photosynthesis was observed as a function of growth temperature, affecting thermal optimum of photosynthesis, photosynthetic rate at optimal temperature and photosynthetic rate at 25 °C. For both cultivars, Topt values increased linearly in leaves grown between 5 and 35 °C. Relative homeostasis of A40025 and A400opt was found between 10 °C and 30 °C growth temperatures, but sharp declines were recorded at 5 and 35 °C. This homeostasis was achieved in part through modifications to leaf nitrogen content, which increased at extreme temperatures. Significant changes were also recorded regarding nitrogen partitioning in the photosynthetic apparatus and in the temperature dependence of photosynthetic parameters. The cultivars differed only in terms of the temperature response of photosynthetic parameters, with Mediterranean genotypes displaying a greater sensitivity of the maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylation to elevated temperatures. It was concluded that intra-specific variations in the temperature acclimation of photosynthesis exist among alfalfa cultivars, but that

  1. A Modified Johnson-Cook Model for Advanced High-Strength Steels Over a Wide Range of Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingdong, Zhang; Qiang, Cao; Xiaofeng, Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) is widely used in automotive industry. In order to investigate the mechanical behaviors of AHSS over a wide range of temperatures, quasi-static tensile experiments were conducted at the temperatures from 298 to 1073 K on a Gleeble-3500 thermo-simulation machine. The results show that flow behaviors are affected by testing temperature significantly. In order to describe the flow features of AHSS, the Johnson-Cook (JC) model is employed. By introducing polynomial functions to consider the effects of temperature on hardening behavior, the JC model is modified and used to predict flow behavior of AHSS at different experimental conditions. The accuracy of the modified JC model is verified and the predicted flow stress is in good agreement with experimental results, which confirms that the modified JC model can give an accurate and precise estimate over a wide range of temperatures.

  2. Determination of the elastic moduli of a machinable ceramic over the range from room temperature to 800/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H.; Nagai, S.; Imai, H.

    1987-07-01

    The ultrasonic velocities of a machinable ceramic were measured using the pulse echo overlap technique. The machinable ceramic consists of 5- to 10-..mu..m crystallite blocks of mica in a boroaluminosilicate glass matrix. The elastic moduli are deduced from the sound velocities over the temperature range from room temperature to 800/sup 0/C. Their temperature change is well described by a fourth-degree polynomial. Although the moduli decrease with increasing temperature, a plateau region appears at about 450/sup 0/C. This anomalous behavior is explained by applying the simple rule of mixtures to cnstitutent materials, the mica crystallites, and the glass matrix.

  3. Innovative use of Distributed Temperature Sensing and Meteorological Data to Understand Thermoregulation of Free-Ranging Howling Monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, F. I.; Vinyard, C. J.; Williams, S. H.; Hausner, M. B.; Tyler, S. W.; Glander, K.

    2011-12-01

    Temperature fluctuations are a major driver of change in natural habitats and influence the lifestyle of all organisms because temperature impacts molecular, physiological, and behavioral processes. However, there is a lack of understanding on how temperature affects metabolism, behavior, and ecology at the organismal level. Even though physiological responses to temperature fluctuations have been well documented in laboratory conditions, it has been challenging to collect the required environmental data to study thermoregulation of free-ranging mammals such as mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata). Fortunately, recent advances in fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) now permit the observation of temperature fields in the environment at scales ranging from millimeters to kilometers. This has opened an exciting opportunity for temperature monitoring at scales that were previously not feasible. This study addresses the main limitations of previous studies of primate behavior by integrating real-time environmental data with the behavior and physiological response of free-ranging primates. In this work, we present preliminary DTS data collected in a natural habitat of howling monkeys. Fiber-optic cables were hung between the ground and an elevation of approximately 15 m within the forest canopy, providing continuous profiles of temperature without any disturbance due to the animals and habitat. These measurements were integrated with conventional meteorological data and with the ambient temperature at the location of the animal, as well as with measurements of primate's subcutaneous and core body temperatures. These data will be utilized to determine how environmental conditions relate to primate behavioral and physiological responses in time and space. The methodologies used in this study provide tools to test theories of physiological thermoregulation of other free-ranging animals.

  4. Normal range and lateral symmetry in the skin temperature profile of pregnant women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Tânia; Nogueira-Silva, Cristina; Simoes, Ricardo

    2016-09-01

    Body skin temperature is a useful parameter for diagnosing diseases and infrared thermography can be a powerful tool in providing important information to detect body temperature changes in a noninvasive way. The aim of this work was to study the pattern of skin temperature during pregnancy, to establish skin temperature reference values and to find correlations between these and the pregnant population characteristics. Sixty-one healthy pregnant women (mean age 30.6 ± 5.1 years) in the 8th-40th gestational week with normal pregnancies were examined in 31 regions of interest (ROI). The ROIs were defined all over the body in order to determine the most influenced by factors such as age or body mass index (BMI). The results obtained in this work highlight that in normal pregnant women the skin temperature is symmetrically distributed, with the symmetrical areas differing less than 0.5 °C , with a mean value of 0.25 ± 0.23 °C . This study identified a significant negative correlation between the BMI and temperature. Age has been shown to have great influence on the skin temperature, with a significant increase of temperature observed with age. This work explores a novel medical application of infrared thermography and provides a characterization of thermal skin profile in human pregnancy for a large set of ROIs while also evaluating the effects of age and BMI.

  5. Relaxation dynamics of glasses along a wide stability and temperature range

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Tinoco, C.; Ràfols-Ribé, J.; González-Silveira, M.; Rodríguez-Viejo, J.

    2016-01-01

    While lots of measurements describe the relaxation dynamics of the liquid state, experimental data of the glass dynamics at high temperatures are much scarcer. We use ultrafast scanning calorimetry to expand the timescales of the glass to much shorter values than previously achieved. Our data show that the relaxation time of glasses follows a super-Arrhenius behaviour in the high-temperature regime above the conventional devitrification temperature heating at 10 K/min. The liquid and glass states can be described by a common VFT-like expression that solely depends on temperature and limiting fictive temperature. We apply this common description to nearly-isotropic glasses of indomethacin, toluene and to recent data on metallic glasses. We also show that the dynamics of indomethacin glasses obey density scaling laws originally derived for the liquid. This work provides a strong connection between the dynamics of the equilibrium supercooled liquid and non-equilibrium glassy states. PMID:27767071

  6. Relaxation dynamics of glasses along a wide stability and temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Tinoco, C.; Ràfols-Ribé, J.; González-Silveira, M.; Rodríguez-Viejo, J.

    2016-10-01

    While lots of measurements describe the relaxation dynamics of the liquid state, experimental data of the glass dynamics at high temperatures are much scarcer. We use ultrafast scanning calorimetry to expand the timescales of the glass to much shorter values than previously achieved. Our data show that the relaxation time of glasses follows a super-Arrhenius behaviour in the high-temperature regime above the conventional devitrification temperature heating at 10 K/min. The liquid and glass states can be described by a common VFT-like expression that solely depends on temperature and limiting fictive temperature. We apply this common description to nearly-isotropic glasses of indomethacin, toluene and to recent data on metallic glasses. We also show that the dynamics of indomethacin glasses obey density scaling laws originally derived for the liquid. This work provides a strong connection between the dynamics of the equilibrium supercooled liquid and non-equilibrium glassy states.

  7. Stomach temperature telemetry reveals temporal patterns of foraging success in a free-ranging marine mammal.

    PubMed

    Austin, Deborah; Bowen, W D; McMillan, J I; Boness, D J

    2006-03-01

    1. We studied feeding frequency in free-ranging grey seals using stomach temperature telemetry to test if previously reported sex differences in the diving, movement and diet were reflected in the temporal pattern of foraging success. 2. Data were retrieved from 21 of 32 grey seals from 1999 to 2001, totalling 343 days and 555 feeding events, with individual record length varying from 2 to 40 days (mean: 16.33 +/- 2.67 days/seal). 3. Seals fed on 57.8 +/- 6.46% of days sampled and had an average of 1.7 +/- 0.26 meals per day, but individual variability was apparent in the temporal distribution of feeding as evidenced by high coefficients of variation (coefficient of variation = 69.0%). 4. Bout analysis of non-feeding intervals of six grey seals suggests that feeding intervals of individuals were varied and probably reflect differences in prey availability. Grey seals tended to have many single feeding events with long periods separating each event, as would be expected for a large carnivore with a batch-reactor digestive system. 5. We found significant sex differences in the temporal distribution of feeding. The number of feeding events per day was greater in males (2.2 +/- 0.4 vs. 1.0 +/- 0.2), as was time associated with feeding per day (56.6 +/- 5.8 min vs. 43.9 +/- 9.4 min). 6. The number of feeding events varied with time of day with the least number occurring during dawn. Feeding event size differed significantly by time of day, with greater meal sizes during the dawn and the smallest meals during the night. 7. The length of time between meals increased with the size of the previous meal, and was significantly less in males (541.4 +/- 63.5 min) than in females (1092.6 +/- 169.9 min). 8. These results provide new insight into the basis of sex differences in diving and diet in this large size-dimorphic marine predator.

  8. Spatial and Temporal Stream Temperature Response to Contemporary Forest Harvesting in the Oregon Coast Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bladon, K. D.; Cook, N. A.; Light, J. T.; Segura, C.; Teply, M.

    2015-12-01

    Historical research at the Alsea Watershed Study (1958-1973), in the Oregon Coast Range, demonstrated that clear-cut harvesting, with complete removal of riparian vegetation, can result in large and dramatic changes in mean daily, maximum daily, diurnal variation, and annual patterns in stream temperature (Ts). This previous research was instrumental in the addition of regulations in the Oregon Forest Practices Act of 1971, necessitating retention of streamside vegetation (riparian management zones) in harvest units to maintain water quality and aquatic habitat. Due to the ecological importance of Ts, preventing or mitigating changes in the thermal regime following land use activities, such as forest harvesting, is a primary focus of contemporary forest watershed management. The Alsea Watershed Study Revisited (2006-Present) has provided a unique opportunity to investigate the Ts responses to contemporary forest harvesting practices and compare these with the impacts from the 1960's harvest. In general, Ts increases from late spring through about mid-July, with peak Ts occuring between about mid-July and mid-August, after which Ts decreases into the fall. During the pre-harvest period (2006-2008; n=244) the June to September mean daily maximum Ts was 13.0°C in Flynn Creek (control) and 12.0°C in Needle Branch (harvested). In the post-harvest period (2010-2012; n=240) the June to September mean daily maximum Ts was 12.4°C in Flynn Creek (control) and 12.0°C in Needle Branch (harvested). Similarly, the difference (Flynn Ck - Needle Branch) in 7 day moving mean of daily maximum Ts decreased from the pre-harvest (1.0°C) to the post-harvest (0.3°C) period, which was principally driven by a decrease in Ts in the control catchment. Longitudinal sampling of Ts within Needle Branch indicated a cooling trend such that the slight increases in post-harvest Ts weren't detectable in downstream, unharvested stream reaches.

  9. On the Trend of the Annual Mean, Maximum, and Minimum Temperature and the Diurnal Temperature Range in the Armagh Observatory, Northern Ireland, Dataset, 1844 -2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Examined are the annual averages, 10-year moving averages, decadal averages, and sunspot cycle (SC) length averages of the mean, maximum, and minimum surface air temperatures and the diurnal temperature range (DTR) for the Armagh Observatory, Northern Ireland, during the interval 1844-2012. Strong upward trends are apparent in the Armagh surface-air temperatures (ASAT), while a strong downward trend is apparent in the DTR, especially when the ASAT data are averaged by decade or over individual SC lengths. The long-term decrease in the decadaland SC-averaged annual DTR occurs because the annual minimum temperatures have risen more quickly than the annual maximum temperatures. Estimates are given for the Armagh annual mean, maximum, and minimum temperatures and the DTR for the current decade (2010-2019) and SC24.

  10. Environmental temperatures, physiology and behavior limit the range expansion of invasive Burmese pythons in southeastern USA.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Elliott R; Barker, David G; Barker, Tracy M; Mauldin, Richard; Avery, Michael L; Engeman, Richard; Secor, Stephen

    2012-09-01

    A well-established population of Burmese pythons resides in the Everglades of southern Florida. Prompted in part by a report that identified much of southern USA as suitable habitat for expansion or establishment of the Burmese python, we examined the plausibility of this snake to survive winters at sites north of the Everglades. We integrated daily low and high temperatures recorded from October to February from 2005-2011 at Homestead, Orlando and Gainesville, Florida; and Aiken, South Carolina, with minimum temperatures projected for python digestion (16 °C), activity (5 °C) and survival (0 °C). Mean low and high temperatures decreased northward from Homestead to Aiken and the number of days of freezing temperatures increased northward. Digestion was impaired or inhibited for 2 months in the Everglades and up to at least 5 months in Aiken, and activity was increasingly limited northward during these months. Reports of overwinter survivorship document that a single bout of low and freezing temperatures results in python death. The capacity for Burmese pythons to successfully overwinter in more temperate regions of the USA is seemingly prohibited because they lack the behaviors to seek refuge from, and the physiology to tolerate, cold temperatures. As tropical Southeast Asia is the source of the Everglades Burmese pythons, we predict it is unlikely that they will be able to successfully expand to or colonize more temperate areas of Florida and adjoining states due to their lack of behavioral and physiological traits to seek refuge from cold temperatures.

  11. High performance shape memory effect in nitinol wire for actuators with increased operating temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Riccardo; Biffi, Carlo Alberto; Vedani, Maurizio; Tuissi, Ausonio

    2014-07-01

    In this research, the high performance shape memory effect (HP-SME) is experimented on a shape memory NiTi wire, with austenite finish temperature higher than room temperature. The HP-SME consists in the thermal cycling of stress induced martensite and it allows achieving mechanical work higher than that produced by conventional shape memory actuators based on the heating/cooling of detwinned martensite. The Nitinol wire was able to recover about 5.5% of deformation under a stress of 600 MPa and to withstand about 5000 cycles before failure. HP-SME path increased the operating temperature of the shape memory actuator wire. Functioning temperatures higher than 100°C was reached.

  12. Impacts of diurnal temperature range on ecosystem carbon balance: an experimental test in grassland mesocosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. L.; Gregg, J. W.; Wilson, J. K.; Pangle, L. A.; Bailey, D.

    2009-12-01

    Although extensive research has determined ecosystem responses to equal increases in day and night temperatures, current temperature increases have generally been asymmetrical, with increases in minimum temperature (Tmin) exceeding increases in maximum temperature (Tmax), or vice versa, depending on location. We conducted an ecosystem warming experiment in a perennial grassland to determine the effects of asymmetrically elevated diel temperature profiles using precision climate-controlled sunlit environmental chambers. Asymmetrically warmed chambers (+5/+2°C, Tmin/Tmax) were compared with symmetrically warmed (+3.5°C continuously) and control chambers (ambient). We tested three alternative hypotheses comparing the carbon balance under symmetric (SYM) and asymmetric (ASYM) warming: H1) SYM < ASYM, due either to a shorter growing season in the SYM treatment from lower Tmin, or to higher respiratory costs from higher Tmax; H2) SYM > ASYM, because warmer nights in the ASYM treatment increase respiration more then photosynthesis, reducing plant growth; H3) SYM = ASYM, due to a combination of effects. Results from the third growing season support H3, that carbon balance is the same under the two elevated diel temperature profiles. During the early part of the growing season, asymmetric warming resulted in higher nighttime respiratory losses than symmetric warming, but these greater loses were compensated by increased early morning photosynthesis. As a result, carbon balance was not different in the two warming treatments at daily time steps. Furthermore, declines in soil moisture over the growing season may have important modulating impacts on the temperature sensitivity of carbon fluxes. As soils dried, carbon fluxes became less sensitive to diel temperature fluctuations, and more similar in the symmetric and asymmetric treatments.

  13. Enhancement of Curie temperature and transition temperature range induced by Al doping in Mn1-xAlxCoGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Xiaodong; Liu, Yongsheng; Lei, Wei; Xu, Juan; Du, Wenlong; Lin, Jia; Zhou, Tao; Lu, Xiaofei

    2016-12-01

    Mn1-xAlxCoGe alloys with a second order transition were produced by arc-melting method. The substitution of Mn by Al increased the Curie temperature (TC) from 260.5 K to 300.8 K, the magnetic entropy change (|ΔSM|) decreased from 3.78 J·Kg-1K-1 to 2.35 J·Kg-1K-1 under a field change of Δμ0H=5 T. In addition, the |ΔSM| well linearly depends on the H2/3 around TC. Furthermore, the relative cooling power (RCP) can reach 242.3 J·Kg-1 with a large full width at half maximum of |ΔSM| (75.5 K) for x=0.02. The decrease of |ΔSM| is explained by the corresponding monotonical decrease of magnetic moment per formula unit.

  14. Ultrahigh vacuum holder-positioner for in situ studies of conductive nanostructures in a wide temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsov, D. V.; Lyaschenko, S. A.; Varnakov, S. N.

    2016-11-01

    A holder-positioner was developed in order to be used in high vacuum systems designed for synthesis and in situ samples investigation by optical methods in 77÷1171 K temperature range. During tests of holder- positioner the designed system demonstrated independence from other process chamber components, compactness, a large number of the sample degrees of freedom and the stability of maintaining temperatures in the range from 77 to 1171 K with a maximum sample cooling rate about 0.1 K/s.

  15. The impact of temperature on the bionomics of Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti, with special reference to the cool geographic range margins.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Lars; Monaghan, Andrew J; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul; Steinhoff, Daniel F; Hayden, Mary H; Bieringer, Paul E

    2014-05-01

    The mosquito Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (L.), which occurs widely in the subtropics and tropics, is the primary urban vector of dengue and yellow fever viruses, and an important vector of chikungunya virus. There is substantial interest in how climate change may impact the bionomics and pathogen transmission potential of this mosquito. This Forum article focuses specifically on the effects of temperature on the bionomics of Ae. aegypti, with special emphasis on the cool geographic range margins where future rising temperatures could facilitate population growth. Key aims are to: 1) broadly define intra-annual (seasonal) patterns of occurrence and abundance of Ae. aegypti, and their relation to climate conditions; 2) synthesize the existing quantitative knowledge of how temperature impacts the bionomics of different life stages of Ae. aegypti; 3) better define the temperature ranges for which existing population dynamics models for Ae. aegypti are likely to produce robust predictions; 4) explore potential impacts of climate warming on human risk for exposure to Ae. aegypti at its cool range margins; and 5) identify knowledge or data gaps that hinder our ability to predict risk of human exposure to Ae. aegypti at the cool margins of its geographic range now and in the future. We first outline basic scenarios for intra-annual occurrence and abundance patterns for Ae. aegypti, and then show that these scenarios segregate with regard to climate conditions in selected cities where they occur. We then review how near-constant and intentionally fluctuating temperatures impact development times and survival of eggs and immatures. A subset of data, generated in controlled experimental studies, from the published literature is used to plot development rates and survival of eggs, larvae, and pupae in relation to water temperature. The general shape of the relationship between water temperature and development rate is similar for eggs, larvae, and pupae. Once the lower

  16. The potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts: sustained temperature and pressure exposures on a marine ectotherm, Palaemonetes varians.

    PubMed

    Morris, J P; Thatje, S; Cottin, D; Oliphant, A; Brown, A; Shillito, B; Ravaux, J; Hauton, C

    2015-11-01

    Range shifts are of great importance as a response for species facing climate change. In the light of current ocean-surface warming, many studies have focused on the capacity of marine ectotherms to shift their ranges latitudinally. Bathymetric range shifts offer an important alternative, and may be the sole option for species already at high latitudes or those within enclosed seas; yet relevant data are scant. Hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature have wide ranging effects on physiology, importantly acting in synergy thermodynamically, and therefore represent key environmental constraints to bathymetric migration. We present data on transcriptional regulation in a shallow-water marine crustacean (Palaemonetes varians) at atmospheric and high HP following 168-h exposures at three temperatures across the organisms' thermal scope, to establish the potential physiological limit to bathymetric migration by neritic fauna. We observe changes in gene expression indicative of cellular macromolecular damage, disturbances in metabolic pathways and a lack of acclimation after prolonged exposure to high HP. Importantly, these effects are ameliorated (less deleterious) at higher temperatures, and exacerbated at lower temperatures. These data, alongside previously published behavioural and heat-shock analyses, have important implications for our understanding of the potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts.

  17. The potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts: sustained temperature and pressure exposures on a marine ectotherm, Palaemonetes varians

    PubMed Central

    Morris, J. P.; Thatje, S.; Cottin, D.; Oliphant, A.; Brown, A.; Shillito, B.; Ravaux, J.; Hauton, C.

    2015-01-01

    Range shifts are of great importance as a response for species facing climate change. In the light of current ocean-surface warming, many studies have focused on the capacity of marine ectotherms to shift their ranges latitudinally. Bathymetric range shifts offer an important alternative, and may be the sole option for species already at high latitudes or those within enclosed seas; yet relevant data are scant. Hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature have wide ranging effects on physiology, importantly acting in synergy thermodynamically, and therefore represent key environmental constraints to bathymetric migration. We present data on transcriptional regulation in a shallow-water marine crustacean (Palaemonetes varians) at atmospheric and high HP following 168-h exposures at three temperatures across the organisms’ thermal scope, to establish the potential physiological limit to bathymetric migration by neritic fauna. We observe changes in gene expression indicative of cellular macromolecular damage, disturbances in metabolic pathways and a lack of acclimation after prolonged exposure to high HP. Importantly, these effects are ameliorated (less deleterious) at higher temperatures, and exacerbated at lower temperatures. These data, alongside previously published behavioural and heat-shock analyses, have important implications for our understanding of the potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts PMID:26716003

  18. Reduced diurnal temperature range does not change warming impacts on ecosystem carbon balance of Mediterranean grassland mesocosms

    DOE PAGES

    Phillips, Claire L.; Gregg, Jillian W.; Wilson, John K.

    2011-11-01

    Daily minimum temperature (Tmin) has increased faster than daily maximum temperature (Tmax) in many parts of the world, leading to decreases in diurnal temperature range (DTR). Projections suggest these trends are likely to continue in many regions, particularly northern latitudes and in arid regions. Despite wide speculation that asymmetric warming has different impacts on plant and ecosystem production than equal-night-and-day warming, there has been little direct comparison of these scenarios. Reduced DTR has also been widely misinterpreted as a result of night-only warming, when in fact Tmin occurs near dawn, indicating higher morning as well as night temperatures. We reportmore » on the first experiment to examine ecosystem-scale impacts of faster increases in Tmin than Tmax, using precise temperature controls to create realistic diurnal temperature profiles with gradual day-night temperature transitions and elevated early morning as well as night temperatures. Studying a constructed grassland ecosystem containing species native to Oregon, USA, we found the ecosystem lost more carbon at elevated than ambient temperatures, but was unaffected by the 3ºC difference in DTR between symmetric warming (constantly ambient +3.5ºC) and asymmetric warming (dawn Tmin=ambient +5ºC, afternoon Tmax= ambient +2ºC). Reducing DTR had no apparent effect on photosynthesis, likely because temperatures were most different in the morning and late afternoon when light was low. Respiration was also similar in both warming treatments, because respiration temperature sensitivity was not sufficient to respond to the limited temperature differences between asymmetric and symmetric warming. We concluded that changes in daily mean temperatures, rather than changes in Tmin/Tmax, were sufficient for predicting ecosystem carbon fluxes in this reconstructed Mediterranean grassland system.« less

  19. Reduced diurnal temperature range does not change warming impacts on ecosystem carbon balance of Mediterranean grassland mesocosms

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Claire L.; Gregg, Jillian W.; Wilson, John K.

    2011-11-01

    Daily minimum temperature (Tmin) has increased faster than daily maximum temperature (Tmax) in many parts of the world, leading to decreases in diurnal temperature range (DTR). Projections suggest these trends are likely to continue in many regions, particularly northern latitudes and in arid regions. Despite wide speculation that asymmetric warming has different impacts on plant and ecosystem production than equal-night-and-day warming, there has been little direct comparison of these scenarios. Reduced DTR has also been widely misinterpreted as a result of night-only warming, when in fact Tmin occurs near dawn, indicating higher morning as well as night temperatures. We report on the first experiment to examine ecosystem-scale impacts of faster increases in Tmin than Tmax, using precise temperature controls to create realistic diurnal temperature profiles with gradual day-night temperature transitions and elevated early morning as well as night temperatures. Studying a constructed grassland ecosystem containing species native to Oregon, USA, we found the ecosystem lost more carbon at elevated than ambient temperatures, but was unaffected by the 3ºC difference in DTR between symmetric warming (constantly ambient +3.5ºC) and asymmetric warming (dawn Tmin=ambient +5ºC, afternoon Tmax= ambient +2ºC). Reducing DTR had no apparent effect on photosynthesis, likely because temperatures were most different in the morning and late afternoon when light was low. Respiration was also similar in both warming treatments, because respiration temperature sensitivity was not sufficient to respond to the limited temperature differences between asymmetric and symmetric warming. We concluded that changes in daily mean temperatures, rather than changes in Tmin/Tmax, were sufficient for predicting ecosystem carbon fluxes in this reconstructed Mediterranean grassland system.

  20. Caloric characteristics of PbTiO3 in the temperature range of the ferroelectric phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaleva, E. A.; Flerov, I. N.; Gorev, M. V.; Molokeev, M. S.; Cherepakhin, A. V.; Kartashev, A. V.; Mikhashenok, N. V.; Sablina, K. A.

    2012-09-01

    The heat capacity and thermal expansion of the PbTiO3 ceramic sample have been measured in the temperature range 80-970 K. The electrocaloric and barocaloric efficiencies of lead titanate in the ferroelectric phase transition range have been investigated by analyzing the experimental data in terms of the thermodynamic theory of phase transitions, the electrical equation of state P( T, E), the Pippard equation, and the S( T, p) diagram.

  1. Electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric-paraelectric superlattices controlled by the thickness of paraelectric layer in a wide temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, D. C.; Lin, S. P.; Chen, W. J.; Zheng, Yue Xiong, W. M.; Wang, Biao

    2014-10-15

    As functions of the paraelectric layer thickness, misfit strain and temperature, the electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric-paraelectric superlattices are investigated using a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau thermodynamic model. Ferroelectric phase transition driven by the relative thickness of the superlattice is found to dramatically impact the electrocaloric response. Near the phase transition temperature, the magnitude of the electrocaloric effect is maximized and shifted to lower temperatures by increasing the relative thickness of paraelectric layer. Theoretical calculations also imply that the electrocaloric effect of the superlattices depends not only on the relative thickness of paraelectric layer but also on misfit strain. Furthermore, control of the relative thickness of paraelectric layer and the misfit strain can change availably both the magnitude and the temperature sensitivity of the electrocaloric effect, which suggests that ferroelectric-paraelectric superlattices may be promising candidates for use in cooling devices in a wide temperature range.

  2. Wheat responses to a wide range of temperatures: The hot serial cereal experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Concomitant with the increase in Earth’s atmospheric CO2 concentration, temperatures are warming on a global scale. Crop growth models are useful tools to predict the likely effects of these global changes on agricultural productivity and to develop strategies to maximize the benefits and minimize t...

  3. All-solid-state lithium-oxygen battery with high safety in wide ambient temperature range.

    PubMed

    Kitaura, Hirokazu; Zhou, Haoshen

    2015-08-21

    There is need to develop high energy storage devices with high safety to satisfy the growing industrial demands. Here, we show the potential to realize such batteries by assembling a lithium-oxygen cell using an inorganic solid electrolyte without any flammable liquid or polymer materials. The lithium-oxygen battery using Li1.575Al0.5Ge1.5(PO4)3 solid electrolyte was examined in the pure oxygen atmosphere from room temperature to 120 °C. The cell works at room temperature and first full discharge capacity of 1420 mAh g(-1) at 10 mA g(-1) (based on the mass of carbon material in the air electrode) was obtained. The charge curve started from 3.0 V, and that the majority of it lay below 4.2 V. The cell also safely works at high temperature over 80 °C with the improved battery performance. Furthermore, fundamental data of the electrochemical performance, such as cyclic voltammogram, cycle performance and rate performance was obtained and this work demonstrated the potential of the all-solid-state lithium-oxygen battery for wide temperature application as a first step.

  4. Influence of Strain Rate on Tensile Strength of Woven Geotextile in the Selected Range of Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stępień, Sylwia; Szymański, Alojzy

    2015-06-01

    Investigation of geosynthetics behaviour has been carried out for many years. Before using geosynthetics in practice, the standard laboratory tests had been carried out to determine basic mechanical parameters. In order to examine the tensile strength of the sample which extends at a constant strain rate, one should measure the value of the tensile force and strain. Note that geosynthetics work under different conditions of stretching and temperatures, which significantly reduce the strength of these materials. The paper presents results of the tensile test of geotextile at different strain rates and temperatures from 20 °C to 100 °C. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of temperature and strain rate on tensile strength and strain of the woven geotextile. The article presents the method of investigation and the results. The data obtained allowed us to assess the parameters of material which should be considered in the design of the load-bearing structures that work at temperatures up to 100 °C.

  5. Range-Wide Latitudinal and Elevational Temperature Gradients for the World's Terrestrial Birds: Implications under Global Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    La Sorte, Frank A.; Butchart, Stuart H. M.; Jetz, Walter; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Species' geographical distributions are tracking latitudinal and elevational surface temperature gradients under global climate change. To evaluate the opportunities to track these gradients across space, we provide a first baseline assessment of the steepness of these gradients for the world's terrestrial birds. Within the breeding ranges of 9,014 bird species, we characterized the spatial gradients in temperature along latitude and elevation for all and a subset of bird species, respectively. We summarized these temperature gradients globally for threatened and non-threatened species and determined how their steepness varied based on species' geography (range size, shape, and orientation) and projected changes in temperature under climate change. Elevational temperature gradients were steepest for species in Africa, western North and South America, and central Asia and shallowest in Australasia, insular IndoMalaya, and the Neotropical lowlands. Latitudinal temperature gradients were steepest for extratropical species, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. Threatened species had shallower elevational gradients whereas latitudinal gradients differed little between threatened and non-threatened species. The strength of elevational gradients was positively correlated with projected changes in temperature. For latitudinal gradients, this relationship only held for extratropical species. The strength of latitudinal gradients was better predicted by species' geography, but primarily for extratropical species. Our findings suggest threatened species are associated with shallower elevational temperature gradients, whereas steep latitudinal gradients are most prevalent outside the tropics where fewer bird species occur year-round. Future modeling and mitigation efforts would benefit from the development of finer grain distributional data to ascertain how these gradients are structured within species' ranges, how and why these gradients vary among species, and the capacity

  6. Range-wide latitudinal and elevational temperature gradients for the world's terrestrial birds: implications under global climate change.

    PubMed

    La Sorte, Frank A; Butchart, Stuart H M; Jetz, Walter; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Species' geographical distributions are tracking latitudinal and elevational surface temperature gradients under global climate change. To evaluate the opportunities to track these gradients across space, we provide a first baseline assessment of the steepness of these gradients for the world's terrestrial birds. Within the breeding ranges of 9,014 bird species, we characterized the spatial gradients in temperature along latitude and elevation for all and a subset of bird species, respectively. We summarized these temperature gradients globally for threatened and non-threatened species and determined how their steepness varied based on species' geography (range size, shape, and orientation) and projected changes in temperature under climate change. Elevational temperature gradients were steepest for species in Africa, western North and South America, and central Asia and shallowest in Australasia, insular IndoMalaya, and the Neotropical lowlands. Latitudinal temperature gradients were steepest for extratropical species, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. Threatened species had shallower elevational gradients whereas latitudinal gradients differed little between threatened and non-threatened species. The strength of elevational gradients was positively correlated with projected changes in temperature. For latitudinal gradients, this relationship only held for extratropical species. The strength of latitudinal gradients was better predicted by species' geography, but primarily for extratropical species. Our findings suggest threatened species are associated with shallower elevational temperature gradients, whereas steep latitudinal gradients are most prevalent outside the tropics where fewer bird species occur year-round. Future modeling and mitigation efforts would benefit from the development of finer grain distributional data to ascertain how these gradients are structured within species' ranges, how and why these gradients vary among species, and the capacity

  7. Defining the response of a microorganism to temperatures that span its complete growth temperature range (-2°C to 28°C) using multiplex quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Williams, Timothy J; Lauro, Federico M; Ertan, Haluk; Burg, Dominic W; Poljak, Anne; Raftery, Mark J; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2011-08-01

    The growth of all microorganisms is limited to a specific temperature range. However, it has not previously been determined to what extent global protein profiles change in response to temperatures that incrementally span the complete growth temperature range of a microorganism. As a result it has remained unclear to what extent cellular processes (inferred from protein abundance profiles) are affected by growth temperature and which, in particular, constrain growth at upper and lower temperature limits. To evaluate this, 8-plex iTRAQ proteomics was performed on the Antarctic microorganism, Methanococcoides burtonii. Methanococcoides burtonii was chosen due to its importance as a model psychrophilic (cold-adapted) member of the Archaea, and the fact that proteomic methods, including subcellular fractionation procedures, have been well developed. Differential abundance patterns were obtained for cells grown at seven different growth temperatures (-2°C, 1°C, 4°C, 10°C, 16°C, 23°C, 28°C) and a principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to identify trends in protein abundances. The multiplex analysis enabled three largely distinct physiological states to be described: cold stress (-2°C), cold adaptation (1°C, 4°C, 10°C and 16°C), and heat stress (23°C and 28°C). A particular feature of the thermal extremes was the synthesis of heat- and cold-specific stress proteins, reflecting the important, yet distinct ways in which temperature-induced stress manifests in the cell. This is the first quantitative proteomic investigation to simultaneously assess the response of a microorganism to numerous growth temperatures, including the upper and lower growth temperatures limits, and has revealed a new level of understanding about cellular adaptive responses.

  8. Comparison of calculated and experimental thermal attachment rate constants for SF6 in the temperature range 200-600 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orient, O. J.; Chutjian, A.

    1986-01-01

    Electron-attachment cross sections are calcualted for the process e(-) + SF6 yields SF6(-) in the energy range 1-200 meV. An electron scattering approximation is used in which diatomiclike potential energy curves near the equilibrium SF6 ground state are constructed from recent spectroscopic data. Excellent agreement is found over the entire energy range with experimental attachment cross sections at a temperature of 300 K for s-wave (l = 0) scattering. The same calculation, with appropriate adjustment of the thermal populations, is used to calculate attachment rate constants in the range 50-600 K for both s- and p-wave scattering.

  9. Statistics of regional surface temperatures post year 1900. Long-range versus short-range dependence, and significance of warming trends.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Løvsletten, Ola; Rypdal, Martin; Rypdal, Kristoffer; Fredriksen, Hege-Beate

    2015-04-01

    We explore the statistics of instrumental surface temperature records on 5°× 5°, 2°× 2°, and equal-area grids. In particular, we compute the significance of determinstic trends against two parsimonious null models; auto-regressive processes of order 1, AR(1), and fractional Gaussian noises (fGn's). Both of these two null models contain a memory parameter which quantifies the temporal climate variability, with white noise nested in both classes of models. Estimates of the persistence parameters show significant positive serial correlation for most grid cells, with higher persistence over occeans compared to land areas. This shows that, in a trend detection framework, we need to take into account larger spurious trends than what follows from the frequently used white noise assumption. Tested against the fGn null hypothesis, we find that ~ 68% (~ 47%) of the time series have significant trends at the 5% (1%) significance level. If we assume an AR(1) null hypothesis instead, then the result is that ~ 94% (~ 88%) of the time series have significant trends at the 5% (1%) significance level. For both null models, the locations where we do not find significant trends are mostly the ENSO regions and the North-Atlantic. We try to discriminate between the two null models by means of likelihood-ratios. If we at each grid point choose the null model preferred by the model selection test, we find that ~ 82% (~ 73%) of the time series have significant trends at the 5% (1%). We conclude that there is emerging evidence of significant warming trends also at regional scales, although with a much lower signal-to-noise ratio compared to global mean temperatures. Another finding is that many temperature records are consistent with error models for internal variability that exhibit long-range dependence, whereas the temperature fluctuations of the tropical oceans are strongly influenced by the ENSO, and therefore seemingly more consistent with random processes with short-range

  10. Analysis of Er{sup 3+} and Ho{sup 3+} codoped fluoroindate glasses as wide range temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Haro-Gonzalez, P.

    2011-07-15

    Graphical abstract: The sensor sensitivity as a function of the temperature of erbium and holmium doped fluoroindate glasses. A wide temperature range from 20 K to 425 K is covered with a sensitivity larger than 0.0005. Highlights: {yields} The FIR technique has been carried out in fluoroindate glass sample. {yields} The Er doped fluoroindate sample has a maximum sensitivity of 0.0028 K{sup -1} at 425 K. {yields} The Ho doped fluoroindate sample has a maximum sensitivity of 0.0036 K{sup -1} at 59 K. -- Abstract: The fluorescence intensity ratio technique for two fluoroindate glass samples has been carried out. The green emissions at 523 nm and at 545 nm in a 0.1 mol% of Er{sup 3+} doped fluoroindate glass was studied in a wide range of temperature from 125 K to 425 K with a maximum sensitivity of 0.0028 K{sup -1} for 425 K. In a sample doped with 0.1 mol% of Ho{sup 3+} the emissions at 545 nm and at 750 nm were analyzed as a function of temperature from 20 K to 300 K obtaining a maximum sensitivity of 0.0036 K{sup -1} at 59 K. Using both fluoroindate glass samples a wide temperature range from 20 K to 425 K is easily covered pumping with two low-cost diode laser at 406 nm and 473 nm.

  11. Study of the Spectral Properties of Nanocomposites with CdSe Quantum Dots in a Wide Range of Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaryan, K. A.; Eremchev, I. Y.; Karimullin, K. R.; Knyazev, M. V.; Mikhailov, M. A.; Vasilieva, I. A.; Klimusheva, G. V.

    2015-09-01

    Luminescence spectra of the colloidal solution of CdSe quantum dots (in toluene) were studied in a wide range of low temperatures. Samples were synthesized in the liquid crystal matrix of cadmium octanoate (CdC8). A comparative analysis of the obtained data with previous results was performed.

  12. Calculation of the density of solutions (sunflower oil + n-hexane) over a wide range of temperatures and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarov, M. M.; Abdukhamidova, Z.

    1995-09-01

    We present the results from an experimental investigation of the density of the sunflower oil system as a function of the mass concentration of n-hexane in the ranges of temperatures T=290 520 K and pressures P=0.101 98.1 MPa. A method of hydrostatic weighing was used to measure the density of the solutions under study.

  13. Long range forecasts of the Northern Hemisphere anomalies with antecedent sea surface temperature patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kung, Ernest C.

    1994-01-01

    The contract research has been conducted in the following three major areas: analysis of numerical simulations and parallel observations of atmospheric blocking, diagnosis of the lower boundary heating and the response of the atmospheric circulation, and comprehensive assessment of long-range forecasting with numerical and regression methods. The essential scientific and developmental purpose of this contract research is to extend our capability of numerical weather forecasting by the comprehensive general circulation model. The systematic work as listed above is thus geared to developing a technological basis for future NASA long-range forecasting.

  14. Processing of waxy starch/xanthan gum mixtures within the gelatinization temperature range.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Bart; Depypere, Frédéric; Van der Meeren, Paul; Dewettinck, Koen

    2013-07-25

    Pasting experiments of waxy potato and waxy maize starch systems were set up in which temperatures close to the gelatinization temperature were selected (67.5, 70 and 72.5°C). DSC measurements showed that under these conditions small fractions of the starches remained ungelatinized. During the pasting process two different shear rates were imposed (50s(-1) and 150s(-1)) to investigate the shear stability of the different starch containing systems. Swelling of the granules occurred in a more controlled manner and granule breakdown during pasting could be limited. As a result of these heating conditions more swollen granules are present, as confirmed by laser light diffraction. This positive effect was clearly noticeable in the flow curves of the cooled pastes. Xanthan gum addition could further reduce breakdown either by restricting the swelling or by stabilizing the granules. At higher starch contents the former is most likely dominating.

  15. Optical properties of bismuth-doped silica fibres in the temperature range 300 - 1500 K

    SciTech Connect

    Dvoretskii, D A; Bufetov, Igor' A; Vel'miskin, V V; Zlenko, Alexander S; Khopin, V F; Semjonov, S L; Guryanov, Aleksei N; Denisov, L K; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2012-09-30

    The visible and near-IR absorption and luminescence bands of bismuth-doped silica and germanosilicate fibres have been measured for the first time as a function of temperature. The temperature-dependent IR luminescence lifetime of a bismuth-related active centre associated with silicon in the germanosilicate fibre has been determined. The Bi{sup 3+} profile across the silica fibre preform is shown to differ markedly from the distribution of IR-emitting bismuth centres associated with silicon. The present results strongly suggest that the IR-emitting bismuth centre comprises a lowvalence bismuth ion and an oxygen-deficient glass network defect. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

  16. Design and Synthesis of an MOF Thermometer with High Sensitivity in the Physiological Temperature Range.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dian; Rao, Xingtang; Yu, Jiancan; Cui, Yuanjing; Yang, Yu; Qian, Guodong

    2015-12-07

    An important result of research on mixed-lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (M'LnMOFs) is the realization of highly sensitive ratiometric luminescent thermometers. Here, we report the design and synthesis of the new M'LnMOF Tb0.80Eu0.20BPDA with high relative sensitivity in the physiological temperature regime (298-318 K). The emission intensity and luminescence lifetime were investigated and compared to those of existing materials. It was found that the temperature-dependent luminescence properties of Tb0.80Eu0.20BPDA are strongly associated with the distribution of the energy levels of the ligand. Such a property can be useful in the design of highly sensitive M'LnMOF thermometers.

  17. Dilatometer setup for low coefficient of thermal expansion materials measurements in the 140 K-250 K temperature range.

    PubMed

    Spannagel, Ruven; Hamann, Ines; Sanjuan, Josep; Schuldt, Thilo; Gohlke, Martin; Johann, Ulrich; Weise, Dennis; Braxmaier, Claus

    2016-10-01

    Space applications demand light weight materials with excellent dimensional stability for telescopes, optical benches, optical resonators, etc. Glass-ceramics and composite materials can be tuned to reach very low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) at different temperatures. In order to determine such CTEs, very accurate setups are needed. Here we present a dilatometer that is able to measure the CTE of a large variety of materials in the temperature range of 140 K to 250 K. The dilatometer is based on a heterodyne interferometer with nanometer noise levels to measure the expansion of a sample when applying small amplitude controlled temperature signals. In this article, the CTE of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer sample has been determined with an accuracy in the 10(-8) K(-1) range.

  18. Single-ion polymer electrolyte membranes enable lithium-ion batteries with a broad operating temperature range.

    PubMed

    Cai, Weiwei; Zhang, Yunfeng; Li, Jing; Sun, Yubao; Cheng, Hansong

    2014-04-01

    Conductive processes involving lithium ions are analyzed in detail from a mechanistic perspective, and demonstrate that single ion polymeric electrolyte (SIPE) membranes can be used in lithium-ion batteries with a wide operating temperature range (25-80 °C) through systematic optimization of electrodes and electrode/electrolyte interfaces, in sharp contrast to other batteries equipped with SIPE membranes that display appreciable operability only at elevated temperatures (>60 °C). The performance is comparable to that of batteries using liquid electrolyte of inorganic salt, and the batteries exhibit excellent cycle life and rate performance. This significant widening of battery operation temperatures coupled with the inherent flexibility and robustness of the SIPE membranes makes it possible to develop thin and flexible Li-ion batteries for a broad range of applications.

  19. Dilatometer setup for low coefficient of thermal expansion materials measurements in the 140 K-250 K temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spannagel, Ruven; Hamann, Ines; Sanjuan, Josep; Schuldt, Thilo; Gohlke, Martin; Johann, Ulrich; Weise, Dennis; Braxmaier, Claus

    2016-10-01

    Space applications demand light weight materials with excellent dimensional stability for telescopes, optical benches, optical resonators, etc. Glass-ceramics and composite materials can be tuned to reach very low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) at different temperatures. In order to determine such CTEs, very accurate setups are needed. Here we present a dilatometer that is able to measure the CTE of a large variety of materials in the temperature range of 140 K to 250 K. The dilatometer is based on a heterodyne interferometer with nanometer noise levels to measure the expansion of a sample when applying small amplitude controlled temperature signals. In this article, the CTE of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer sample has been determined with an accuracy in the 10-8 K-1 range.

  20. A broadening temperature sensitivity range with a core-shell YbEr@YbNd double ratiometric optical nanothermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciniak, L.; Prorok, K.; Francés-Soriano, L.; Pérez-Prieto, J.; Bednarkiewicz, A.

    2016-02-01

    The chemical architecture of lanthanide doped core-shell up-converting nanoparticles can be engineered to purposely design the properties of luminescent nanomaterials, which are typically inaccessible to their homogeneous counterparts. Such an approach allowed to shift the up-conversion excitation wavelength from ~980 to the more relevant ~808 nm or enable Tb or Eu up-conversion emission, which was previously impossible to obtain or inefficient. Here, we address the issue of limited temperature sensitivity range of optical lanthanide based nano-thermometers. By covering Yb-Er co-doped core nanoparticles with the Yb-Nd co-doped shell, we have intentionally combined temperature dependent Er up-conversion together with temperature dependent Nd --> Yb energy transfer, and thus have expanded the temperature response range ΔT of a single nanoparticle based optical nano-thermometer under single ~808 nm wavelength photo-excitation from around ΔT = 150 K to over ΔT = 300 K (150-450 K). Such engineered nanocrystals are suitable for remote optical temperature measurements in technology and biotechnology at the sub-micron scale.The chemical architecture of lanthanide doped core-shell up-converting nanoparticles can be engineered to purposely design the properties of luminescent nanomaterials, which are typically inaccessible to their homogeneous counterparts. Such an approach allowed to shift the up-conversion excitation wavelength from ~980 to the more relevant ~808 nm or enable Tb or Eu up-conversion emission, which was previously impossible to obtain or inefficient. Here, we address the issue of limited temperature sensitivity range of optical lanthanide based nano-thermometers. By covering Yb-Er co-doped core nanoparticles with the Yb-Nd co-doped shell, we have intentionally combined temperature dependent Er up-conversion together with temperature dependent Nd --> Yb energy transfer, and thus have expanded the temperature response range ΔT of a single nanoparticle

  1. Analysis of electrical conduction mechanism in the high temperature range of the nanostructured photoabsorber Cu2SnS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahlali, S.; Essaleh, L.; Belaqziz, M.; Chehouani, H.; Djessas, K.; Viallet, B.

    2016-11-01

    The dynamic electrical conduction in the bulk ternary semiconductor compound Cu2SnS3 is studied for the first time in the high temperature range from 300 °C to 440 °C in the frequency range 1 kHz-1 MHz. New activation energy for conduction mechanism is obtained and its frequency dependence is analyzed. The Cole-Cole representation is almost half circular indicating a single contribution to total electrical conduction through the material. The activation energy for the mean relaxation process, obtained separately from the analysis of imaginary part Z″ of complex impedance Z* and from the equivalent electric circuit, is estimated to be (942 ± 74) meV . The correlated barrier hopping model is considered to analyze the experimental data. The results are compared with those obtained previously in low temperature range.

  2. Nonlinear properties of multiphase high-temperature superconductors of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system in the temperature range of the superconducting transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golev, I. M.; Sergeev, A. V.; Kalyadin, O. V.

    2017-01-01

    The nonlinear characteristics of high-temperature superconductors of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system have been experimentally investigated in the temperature range of the superconducting transition under the influence of a harmonic alternating magnetic field. The effect of the generation of odd harmonics in the signal of response to a harmonic alternating magnetic field for multiphase high-temperature superconductors containing regions with different values of the critical temperature in their bulk has been observed for the first time. The mechanism of harmonic generation in a superconductor in the resistive state, which is associated with the switch effect, i.e., with the redistribution of eddy current density between the local regions of the superconductor, has been considered.

  3. Thermal degradation of concrete in the temperature range from ambient to 315{degrees}C (600{degrees}F)

    SciTech Connect

    Kassir, M.K.; Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Reich, M.

    1993-06-01

    This report is concerned with determining the effect of elevated temperatures on the behavior of concrete. Emphasis is placed on quantifying the degree of potential degradation of the physical properties of concrete in high-level waste storage tanks. The range in the temperature elevation of interest covers from ambient to 315{degrees}C (600{degrees}F). The literature has been reviewed to examine the applicable experimental data and quantify the degradation in the concrete and reinforcing steel. Since many variables and test conditions control the results in the data base, upper and lower bounds of the degraded properties at temperatures applicable to the environments of the storage tanks are summarized and presented in explicit forms. Such results are useful in assessing the effect of elevated temperatures on the structural behavior of the tanks. Also, they provide the technical basis for a parametric study that may be necessary to investigate the thermal aspects of the structural integrity of the tanks.

  4. Web-based interactive access, analysis and comparison of remotely sensed and in situ measured temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Jonas; Urban, Marcel; Hüttich, Christian; Schmullius, Christiane

    2014-05-01

    Numerous datasets providing temperature information from meteorological stations or remote sensing satellites are available. However, the challenging issue is to search in the archives and process the time series information for further analysis. These steps can be automated for each individual product, if the pre-conditions are complied, e.g. data access through web services (HTTP, FTP) or legal rights to redistribute the datasets. Therefore a python-based package was developed to provide data access and data processing tools for MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) data, which is provided by NASA Land Processed Distributed Active Archive Center (LPDAAC), as well as the Global Surface Summary of the Day (GSOD) and the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) daily datasets provided by NOAA National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). The package to access and process the information is available as web services used by an interactive web portal for simple data access and analysis. Tools for time series analysis were linked to the system, e.g. time series plotting, decomposition, aggregation (monthly, seasonal, etc.), trend analyses, and breakpoint detection. Especially for temperature data a plot was integrated for the comparison of two temperature datasets based on the work by Urban et al. (2013). As a first result, a kernel density plot compares daily MODIS LST from satellites Aqua and Terra with daily means from GSOD and GHCN datasets. Without any data download and data processing, the users can analyze different time series datasets in an easy-to-use web portal. As a first use case, we built up this complimentary system with remotely sensed MODIS data and in situ measurements from meteorological stations for Siberia within the Siberian Earth System Science Cluster (www.sibessc.uni-jena.de). References: Urban, Marcel; Eberle, Jonas; Hüttich, Christian; Schmullius, Christiane; Herold, Martin. 2013. "Comparison of Satellite-Derived Land Surface Temperature and Air

  5. High temperature range recuperator. Phase II. Prototype demonstration and material and analytical studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-04-01

    A summary of the work performed to fully evaluate the commercial potential of a unique ceramic recuperator for use in recovering waste heat from high temperature furnace exhaust gases is presented. The recuperator concept being developed consists of a vertical cylindrical heat exchange column formed from modular sections. Within the column, the gasketed modules form two helical flow passages - one for high temperature exhaust gases and one for pre-heating combustion air. The column is operated in a counterflow mode, with the exhaust gas entering at the bottom and the combustion air entering at the top of the column. Activities included design and procurement of prototype recuperator modules, construction and testing of two prototype recuperator assemblies, exposure and mechanical properties testing of candidate materials, structural analysis of the modules, and assessment of the economic viability of the concept. The results of the project indicated that the proposed recuperator concept was feasible from a technical standpoint. Economic analysis based upon recuperator performance characteristics and module manufacturing costs defined during the program indicated that 3 to 10 years (depending upon pre-heat temperature) would be required to recover the capital cost of the system in combustion air preheat applications. At this stage in the development of the recuperator, many factors in the analysis had to be assumed. Significant changes in some of the assumptions could dramatically affect the economics. For example, utilizing $2.85 per mcf for the natural gas price (as opposed to $2.00 per mcf) could reduce the payback period by more than half in certain cases. In addition, future commercial application will depend upon ceramic component manufacturing technique advances and cost reduction.

  6. Data Transfer for Multiple Sensor Networks Over a Broad Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasowski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    At extreme temperatures, cryogenic and over 300 C, few electronic components are available to support intelligent data transfer over a common, linear combining medium. This innovation allows many sensors to operate on the same wire bus (or on the same airwaves or optical channel: any linearly combining medium), transmitting simultaneously, but individually recoverable at a node in a cooler part of the test area. This innovation has been demonstrated using room-temperature silicon microcircuits as proxy. The microcircuits have analog functionality comparable to componentry designed using silicon carbide. Given a common, linearly combining medium, multiple sending units may transmit information simultaneously. A listening node, using various techniques, can pick out the signal from a single sender, if it has unique qualities, e.g. a voice. The problem being solved is commonly referred to as the cocktail party problem. The human brain uses the cocktail party effect when it is able to recognize and follow a single conversation in a party full of talkers and other noise sources. High-temperature sensors have been used in silicon carbide electronic oscillator circuits. The frequency of the oscillator changes as a function of the changes in the sensed parameter, such as pressure. This change is analogous to changes in the pitch of a person s voice. The output of this oscillator and many others may be superimposed onto a single medium. This medium may be the power lines supplying current to the sensors, a third wire dedicated to data transmission, the airwaves through radio transmission, an optical medium, etc. However, with nothing to distinguish the identities of each source that is, the source separation this system is useless. Using digital electronic functions, unique codes or patterns are created and used to modulate the output of the sensor.

  7. Long-Range Forecasting of Surface Air Temperature and Precipitation for the Korean Peninsula

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Murphree David Meyer THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704–0188 Public reporting burden for this...ABSTRACT Unclassified 20. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU NSN 7540–01–280–5500 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 2–89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239–18 ii THIS...the Heidke Skill Scores ( HSS ) at a 1.5 month lead for Jan–Mar temperature forecasts. In this example, the HSS for the Korean region is between 0.0

  8. Reply to "Comment on 'Temperature inversion in long-range interacting systems' ".

    PubMed

    Teles, Tarcísio N; Gupta, Shamik; Di Cintio, Pierfrancesco; Casetti, Lapo

    2016-06-01

    We present evidence that the mechanism proposed in Teles et al. [Phys. Rev. E 92, 020101 (2015)PRESCM1539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.92.020101], referred to as the TGDC mechanism, does apply to a model with repulsive mean-field interactions where it produces temperature inversion in a state whose inhomogeneity is due to an external field. Such evidence contradicts the core statement of the Comment. We also discuss a related issue, concerning the possible application of the TGDC mechanism to the solar corona.

  9. An evaluation of the transition temperature range of super-elastic orthodontic NiTi springs using differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Barwart, O; Rollinger, J M; Burger, A

    1999-10-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to determine the transition temperature ranges (TTR) of four types of super-elastic orthodontic nickel-titanium coil springs (Sentalloy). A knowledge of the TTR provides information on the temperature at which a NiTi wire or spring can assume superelastic properties and when this quality disappears. The spring types in this study can be distinguished from each other by their characteristic TTR during cooling and heating. For each tested spring type a characteristic TTR during heating (austenite transformation) and cooling (martensite transformation) was evaluated. The hysteresis of the transition temperature, found between cooling and heating, was 3.4-5.2 K. Depending on the spring type the austenite transformation started (As) at 9.7-17.1 degrees C and finished (Af) at 29.2-37 degrees C. The martensite transformation starting temperature (Ms) was evaluated at 32.6-25.4 degrees C, while Mf (martensite transformation finishing temperature) was 12.7-6.5 degrees C. The results show that the springs become super-elastic when the temperature increases and As is reached. They undergo a loss of super-elastic properties and a rapid decrease in force delivery when they are cooled to Mf. For the tested springs, Mf and As were found to be below room temperature. Thus, at room temperature and some degrees lower, all the tested springs exert super-elastic properties. For orthodontic treatment this means the maintenance of super-elastic behaviour, even when mouth temperature decreases to about room temperature as can occur, for example, during meals.

  10. KEX2 mutations suppress RNA polymerase II mutants and alter the temperature range of yeast cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, C; Young, R A

    1989-01-01

    Suppressors of a temperature-sensitive RNA polymerase II mutation were isolated to identify proteins that interact with RNA polymerase II in yeast cells. Ten independently isolated extragenic mutations that suppressed the temperature-sensitive mutation rpb1-1 and produced a cold-sensitive phenotype were all found to be alleles of a single gene, SRB1. An SRB1 partial deletion mutant was further investigated and found to exhibit several pleiotropic phenotypes. These included suppression of numerous temperature-sensitive RNA polymerase II mutations, alteration of the temperature growth range of cells containing wild-type RNA polymerase, and sterility of cells of alpha mating type. The ability of SRB1 mutations to suppress the temperature-sensitive phenotype of RNA polymerase II mutants did not extend to other temperature-sensitive mutants investigated. Isolation of the SRB1 gene revealed that SRB1 is KEX2. These results indicate that the KEX2 protease, whose only known substrates are hormone precursors, can have an important influence on RNA polymerase II and the temperature-dependent growth properties of yeast cells. Images PMID:2668732

  11. Physical activity profile of 2014 FIFA World Cup players, with regard to different ranges of air temperature and relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmura, Paweł; Konefał, Marek; Andrzejewski, Marcin; Kosowski, Jakub; Rokita, Andrzej; Chmura, Jan

    2016-09-01

    The present study attempts to assess changes in soccer players' physical activity profiles under the simultaneous influence of the different combinations of ambient temperature and relative humidity characterising matches of the 2014 FIFA World Cup hosted by Brazil. The study material consisted of observations of 340 players representing 32 national teams taking part in the tournament. The measured indices included total distances covered; distances covered with low, moderate, or high intensity; numbers of sprints performed, and peak running speeds achieved. The analysis was carried out using FIFA official match data from the Castrol Performance Index system. Ultimately, consideration was given to a combination of three air temperature ranges, i.e. below 22 °C, 22-28 °C, and above 28 °C; and two relative humidity ranges below 60 % and above 60 %. The greatest average distance recorded (10.54 ± 0.91 km) covered by players at an air temperature below 22 °C and a relative humidity below 60 %, while the shortest (9.83 ± 1.08 km) characterised the same air temperature range, but conditions of relative humidity above 60 % (p ≤ 0.001). Two-way ANOVA revealed significant differences (p ≤ 0.001) in numbers of sprints performed by players, depending on whether the air temperature range was below 22 °C (40.48 ± 11.17) or above 28 °C (30.72 ± 9.40), but only where the relative humidity was at the same time below 60 %. Results presented indicate that the conditions most comfortable for physical activity on the part of players occur at 22 °C, and with relative humidity under 60 %.

  12. Physical activity profile of 2014 FIFA World Cup players, with regard to different ranges of air temperature and relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Chmura, Paweł; Konefał, Marek; Andrzejewski, Marcin; Kosowski, Jakub; Rokita, Andrzej; Chmura, Jan

    2017-04-01

    The present study attempts to assess changes in soccer players' physical activity profiles under the simultaneous influence of the different combinations of ambient temperature and relative humidity characterising matches of the 2014 FIFA World Cup hosted by Brazil. The study material consisted of observations of 340 players representing 32 national teams taking part in the tournament. The measured indices included total distances covered; distances covered with low, moderate, or high intensity; numbers of sprints performed, and peak running speeds achieved. The analysis was carried out using FIFA official match data from the Castrol Performance Index system. Ultimately, consideration was given to a combination of three air temperature ranges, i.e. below 22 °C, 22-28 °C, and above 28 °C; and two relative humidity ranges below 60 % and above 60 %. The greatest average distance recorded (10.54 ± 0.91 km) covered by players at an air temperature below 22 °C and a relative humidity below 60 %, while the shortest (9.83 ± 1.08 km) characterised the same air temperature range, but conditions of relative humidity above 60 % (p ≤ 0.001). Two-way ANOVA revealed significant differences (p ≤ 0.001) in numbers of sprints performed by players, depending on whether the air temperature range was below 22 °C (40.48 ± 11.17) or above 28 °C (30.72 ± 9.40), but only where the relative humidity was at the same time below 60 %. Results presented indicate that the conditions most comfortable for physical activity on the part of players occur at 22 °C, and with relative humidity under 60 %.

  13. One year in the life of Bufo punctatus: annual patterns of body temperature in a free-ranging desert anuran.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Candice M; Starkweather, Peter L; van Breukelen, Frank

    2008-06-01

    The Mojave Desert is characterized by hot dry summers and cold winters. The red-spotted toad (Bufo (Anaxyrus) punctatus) is the predominant anuran species; yet little is known of their thermal histories and strategies to avoid temperature extremes. We measured body temperature (T(b)) in free-ranging adult toads across all four seasons of a year using implanted data loggers. There is marked individual variation in the temperatures experienced by these toads. As expected, toads generally escape extreme seasonal and diel temperature fluctuations. However, our data demonstrate a much wider estimated T(b) range than was previously assumed. Though often for short periods, red-spotted toads do experience T(b) as low as 3.1 degrees C and as high as 39.1 degrees C. All animals showed periods of prolonged thermal stability in cooler months and wider diel oscillations in warmer months. Red-spotted toad thermal history is likely a function of site choice; the exploitation of different refuges results in diverse thermal experiences. These data represent the most complete record of thermal experiences for a desert anuran and reveal greater extremes in body temperature than previously suggested.

  14. Respiratory response of the deep-sea amphipod Stephonyx biscayensis indicates bathymetric range limitation by temperature and hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alastair; Thatje, Sven

    2011-01-01

    Depth zonation of fauna on continental margins is well documented. Whilst increasing hydrostatic pressure with depth has long been considered a factor contributing significantly to this pattern, discussion of the relative significance of decreasing temperature with depth has continued. This study investigates the physiological tolerances of fed and starved specimens of the bathyal lysianassoid amphipod Stephonyx biscayensis at varying temperature to acute pressure exposure by measuring the rate of oxygen consumption. Acclimation to atmospheric pressure is shown to have no significant interaction with temperature and/or pressure effects. Similarly, starvation is shown to have no significant effect on the interaction of temperature and pressure. Subsequently, the effect of pressure on respiration rate is revealed to be dependent on temperature: pressure equivalent to 2000 m depth was tolerated at 1 and 3°C; pressure equivalent to 2500 m depth was tolerated at 5.5°C; at 10°C pressure equivalent to 3000 m depth was tolerated. The variation in tolerance is consistent with the natural distribution range reported for this species. There are clear implications for hypotheses relating to the observed phenomenon of a biodiversity bottleneck between 2000 and 3000 metres, and for the potential for bathymetric range shifts in response to global climate change.

  15. One year in the life of Bufo punctatus: annual patterns of body temperature in a free-ranging desert anuran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rausch, Candice M.; Starkweather, Peter L.; van Breukelen, Frank

    2008-06-01

    The Mojave Desert is characterized by hot dry summers and cold winters. The red-spotted toad ( Bufo ( Anaxyrus) punctatus) is the predominant anuran species; yet little is known of their thermal histories and strategies to avoid temperature extremes. We measured body temperature ( T b) in free-ranging adult toads across all four seasons of a year using implanted data loggers. There is marked individual variation in the temperatures experienced by these toads. As expected, toads generally escape extreme seasonal and diel temperature fluctuations. However, our data demonstrate a much wider estimated T b range than was previously assumed. Though often for short periods, red-spotted toads do experience T b as low as 3.1°C and as high as 39.1°C. All animals showed periods of prolonged thermal stability in cooler months and wider diel oscillations in warmer months. Red-spotted toad thermal history is likely a function of site choice; the exploitation of different refuges results in diverse thermal experiences. These data represent the most complete record of thermal experiences for a desert anuran and reveal greater extremes in body temperature than previously suggested.

  16. Temperature-modulated annealing of c-plane sapphire for long-range-ordered atomic steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsui, Takashi; Kuribara, Kazunori; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Someya, Takao; Yoshimoto, Mamoru

    2016-03-01

    High-quality single-crystalline sapphire is used to prepare various semiconductors because of its thermal stability. Here, we applied the tempering technique, which is well known in the production of chocolate, to prepare a sapphire substrate. Surprisingly, we successfully realised millimetre-range ordering of the atomic step of the sapphire substrate. We also obtained a sapphire atomic step with nanometre-scale uniformity in the terrace width and atomic-step height. Such sapphire substrates will find applications in the preparation of various semiconductors and devices.

  17. Tribological behavior and self-healing functionality of TiNbCN-Ag coatings in wide temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarev, A. V.; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, Ph. V.; Levashov, E. A.; Shtansky, D. V.

    2017-02-01

    Ag- and Nb-doped TiCN coatings with about 2 at.% of Nb and Ag contents varied between 4.0 and 15.1 at.% were designed as promising materials for tribological applications in a wide temperature range. We report on the structure, mechanical, and tribological properties of TiNbCN-Ag coatings fabricated by simultaneous co-sputtering of TiC0.5 + 10%Nb2C and Ag targets in comparison with those of Ag-free coating. The tribological characteristics were evaluated during constant-temperature tests both at room temperature and 300 °C, as well as during dynamic temperature ramp tests in the range of 25-700 °C. The coating structure and elemental composition were studied by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The coating microstructures and elemental compositions inside wear tracks, as well as the wear products, were examined by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that simultaneous alloying with Nb and Ag permits to overcome the main drawbacks of TiCN coatings such as their relatively high values of friction coefficient at elevated temperatures and low oxidation resistance. It is shown that a relatively high amount of Ag (15 at.%) is required to provide enhanced tribological behavior in a wide temperature range of 25-700 °C. In addition, the prepared Ag-doped coatings demonstrated active oxidation protection and self-healing functionality due to the segregation of Ag metallic particles in damage areas such as cracks, pin-holes, or oxidation sites.

  18. Experimental study of surface tension of ethane-methane solution in temperature range 213-283 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andbaeva, V. N.; Khotienkova, M. N.

    2013-09-01

    The differential variation of the method of capillary rise was used to measure the capillary constant and to determine the surface tension of ethane-methane solution at "high" temperatures. Measurements were performed on the isotherms in the range of temperatures 213.15 ÷ 283.15 K at pressures up to 4 MPa. Decrease of ethane surface tension with the increase of pressure and concentration of methane in the solution is shown. The experimental data are compared with the results of surface tension calculation according to Rowlinson theory. Methane adsorption in the interface layer of solution is calculated.

  19. Reduced state relationship for limiting electrical conductances of aqueous ions over wide ranges of temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, William L.

    1987-09-01

    A reduced state relationship for limiting electrical conductances of aqueous ions to high temperatures and pressures is presented in which ionic conductance is a simple function of solvent density. Walden's rule is not observed. Specific parameters for 13 ions are included that can be used to calculate ionic conductances by the relationship. From these values, limiting equivalent conductances of many single and mixed aqueous electrolyte systems may be obtained over temperature-pressure ranges of 0-800 °C and up to 400 MPa (4000 bar), with reasonable estimates to 1000 °C and 1000 MPa.

  20. Fully automated dual-frequency three-pulse-echo 2DIR spectrometer accessing spectral range from 800 to 4000 wavenumbers.

    PubMed

    Leger, Joel D; Nyby, Clara M; Varner, Clyde; Tang, Jianan; Rubtsova, Natalia I; Yue, Yuankai; Kireev, Victor V; Burtsev, Viacheslav D; Qasim, Layla N; Rubtsov, Grigory I; Rubtsov, Igor V

    2014-08-01

    A novel dual-frequency two-dimensional infrared instrument is designed and built that permits three-pulse heterodyned echo measurements of any cross-peak within a spectral range from 800 to 4000 cm(-1) to be performed in a fully automated fashion. The superior sensitivity of the instrument is achieved by a combination of spectral interferometry, phase cycling, and closed-loop phase stabilization accurate to ~70 as. The anharmonicity of smaller than 10(-4) cm(-1) was recorded for strong carbonyl stretching modes using 800 laser shot accumulations. The novel design of the phase stabilization scheme permits tuning polarizations of the mid-infrared (m-IR) pulses, thus supporting measurements of the angles between vibrational transition dipoles. The automatic frequency tuning is achieved by implementing beam direction stabilization schemes for each m-IR beam, providing better than 50 μrad beam stability, and novel scheme for setting the phase-matching geometry for the m-IR beams at the sample. The errors in the cross-peak amplitudes associated with imperfect phase matching conditions and alignment are found to be at the level of 20%. The instrument can be used by non-specialists in ultrafast spectroscopy.

  1. Fully automated dual-frequency three-pulse-echo 2DIR spectrometer accessing spectral range from 800 to 4000 wavenumbers

    SciTech Connect

    Leger, Joel D.; Nyby, Clara M.; Varner, Clyde; Tang, Jianan; Rubtsova, Natalia I.; Yue, Yuankai; Kireev, Victor V.; Burtsev, Viacheslav D.; Qasim, Layla N.; Rubtsov, Igor V.; Rubtsov, Grigory I.

    2014-08-15

    A novel dual-frequency two-dimensional infrared instrument is designed and built that permits three-pulse heterodyned echo measurements of any cross-peak within a spectral range from 800 to 4000 cm{sup −1} to be performed in a fully automated fashion. The superior sensitivity of the instrument is achieved by a combination of spectral interferometry, phase cycling, and closed-loop phase stabilization accurate to ∼70 as. The anharmonicity of smaller than 10{sup −4} cm{sup −1} was recorded for strong carbonyl stretching modes using 800 laser shot accumulations. The novel design of the phase stabilization scheme permits tuning polarizations of the mid-infrared (m-IR) pulses, thus supporting measurements of the angles between vibrational transition dipoles. The automatic frequency tuning is achieved by implementing beam direction stabilization schemes for each m-IR beam, providing better than 50 μrad beam stability, and novel scheme for setting the phase-matching geometry for the m-IR beams at the sample. The errors in the cross-peak amplitudes associated with imperfect phase matching conditions and alignment are found to be at the level of 20%. The instrument can be used by non-specialists in ultrafast spectroscopy.

  2. Chromosomal dynamics predicted by an elastic network model explains genome-wide accessibility and long-range couplings.

    PubMed

    Sauerwald, Natalie; Zhang, She; Kingsford, Carl; Bahar, Ivet

    2017-03-16

    Understanding the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of chromatin and its relation to gene expression and regulation is fundamental to understanding how the genome functions. Advances in Hi-C technology now permit us to study 3D genome organization, but we still lack an understanding of the structural dynamics of chromosomes. The dynamic couplings between regions separated by large genomic distances (>50 Mb) have yet to be characterized. We adapted a well-established protein-modeling framework, the Gaussian Network Model (GNM), to model chromatin dynamics using Hi-C data. We show that the GNM can identify spatial couplings at multiple scales: it can quantify the correlated fluctuations in the positions of gene loci, find large genomic compartments and smaller topologically-associating domains (TADs) that undergo en bloc movements, and identify dynamically coupled distal regions along the chromosomes. We show that the predictions of the GNM correlate well with genome-wide experimental measurements. We use the GNM to identify novel cross-correlated distal domains (CCDDs) representing pairs of regions distinguished by their long-range dynamic coupling and show that CCDDs are associated with increased gene co-expression. Together, these results show that GNM provides a mathematically well-founded unified framework for modeling chromatin dynamics and assessing the structural basis of genome-wide observations.

  3. Operating Range for High Temperature Borosilicate Waste Glasses: (Simulated Hanford Enveloped)

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammad, J.; Ramsey, W. G.; Toghiani, R. K.

    2003-02-24

    The following results are a part of an independent thesis study conducted at Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory-Mississippi State University. A series of small-scale borosilicate glass melts from high-level waste simulant were produced with waste loadings ranging from 20% to 55% (by mass). Crushed glass was allowed to react in an aqueous environment under static conditions for 7 days. The data obtained from the chemical analysis of the leachate solutions were used to test the durability of the resulting glasses. Studies were performed to determine the qualitative effects of increasing the B2O3 content on the overall waste glass leaching behavior. Structural changes in a glass arising due to B2O3 were detected indirectly by its chemical durability, which is a strong function of composition and structure. Modeling was performed to predict glass durability quantitatively in an aqueous environment as a direct function of oxide composition.

  4. Long-range order in a high-density electron-hole system at room temperature during superradiant phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, Peter P.; Olle, Vojtech; Penty, Richard V.; White, Ian H.

    2013-11-01

    We have experimentally investigated the formation of off-diagonal long-range order and non-equilibrium BEC-like condensation in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures during superradiant (SR) emission at room temperature. The conclusive evidence of the establishment of phase coherence over a macroscopic range during the superradiant quantum phase transition is reported. The first-order spatial correlation function of the e-h system is determined by evaluating interference patterns of SR emission using Young's double slit.

  5. Effect of water saturation and temperature in the range of 193 to 373 K on the thermal conductivity of sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, P. Y.; Zhang, N.; He, M. C.; Bai, B. H.

    2017-03-01

    The thermal conductivity of porous media is crucial for many geological and engineering projects. Although the thermal conductivity at low temperatures is often overlooked, it is of great significance to calculate the amount of heat that the ice sheet absorbs from the Earth. In this study, the thermal conductivity of dry and water-saturated sandstone was measured in the temperature range of 193 to 373 K using a transient hot wire method. All samples were collected from East China, with a sample porosity distribution of 5 to 13%. The effects of temperature, water saturation and phase transition of fluid in the pores were investigated. The results indicate that the thermal conductivity decreases with an increase in temperature and that the decrease is steeper when the temperature is below 273 K. Moreover, it is found that the thermal conductivity of the saturated sandstone is larger than that of the dry sandstone. With an increase in porosity, the thermal conductivity significantly increases in saturated sandstone but remains almost the same or even decreases in dry sandstones. Finally, it is revealed that the effect of phase transformation on the thermal conductivity is significant. When the water in pores becomes ice, the thermal conductivity increases significantly and increases further as the temperature decreases.

  6. Natural variability of atmospheric temperatures and geomagnetic intensity over a wide range of time scales

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Jon D.

    2002-01-01

    The majority of numerical models in climatology and geomagnetism rely on deterministic finite-difference techniques and attempt to include as many empirical constraints on the many processes and boundary conditions applicable to their very complex systems. Despite their sophistication, many of these models are unable to reproduce basic aspects of climatic or geomagnetic dynamics. We show that a simple stochastic model, which treats the flux of heat energy in the atmosphere by convective instabilities with random advection and diffusive mixing, does a remarkable job at matching the observed power spectrum of historical and proxy records for atmospheric temperatures from time scales of one day to one million years (Myr). With this approach distinct changes in the power-spectral form can be associated with characteristic time scales of ocean mixing and radiative damping. Similarly, a simple model of the diffusion of magnetic intensity in Earth's core coupled with amplification and destruction of the local intensity can reproduce the observed 1/f noise behavior of Earth's geomagnetic intensity from time scales of 1 (Myr) to 100 yr. In addition, the statistics of the fluctuations in the polarity reversal rate from time scales of 1 Myr to 100 Myr are consistent with the hypothesis that reversals are the result of variations in 1/f noise geomagnetic intensity above a certain threshold, suggesting that reversals may be associated with internal fluctuations rather than changes in mantle thermal or magnetic boundary conditions. PMID:11875208

  7. Natural variability of atmospheric temperatures and geomagnetic intensity over a wide range of time scales.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Jon D

    2002-02-19

    The majority of numerical models in climatology and geomagnetism rely on deterministic finite-difference techniques and attempt to include as many empirical constraints on the many processes and boundary conditions applicable to their very complex systems. Despite their sophistication, many of these models are unable to reproduce basic aspects of climatic or geomagnetic dynamics. We show that a simple stochastic model, which treats the flux of heat energy in the atmosphere by convective instabilities with random advection and diffusive mixing, does a remarkable job at matching the observed power spectrum of historical and proxy records for atmospheric temperatures from time scales of one day to one million years (Myr). With this approach distinct changes in the power-spectral form can be associated with characteristic time scales of ocean mixing and radiative damping. Similarly, a simple model of the diffusion of magnetic intensity in Earth's core coupled with amplification and destruction of the local intensity can reproduce the observed 1/f noise behavior of Earth's geomagnetic intensity from time scales of 1 (Myr) to 100 yr. In addition, the statistics of the fluctuations in the polarity reversal rate from time scales of 1 Myr to 100 Myr are consistent with the hypothesis that reversals are the result of variations in 1/f noise geomagnetic intensity above a certain threshold, suggesting that reversals may be associated with internal fluctuations rather than changes in mantle thermal or magnetic boundary conditions.

  8. Rate constant for the reaction of hydroxyl radical with formaldehyde over the temperature range 228-362 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A.; Michael, J. V.

    1980-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the reaction OH + H2CO have been measured over the temperature range 228-362 K using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique. The results were independent of variations in forbidden H2CO, total pressure of forbidden Ar and flash intensity (i.e., initial forbidden OH). The rate constant was found to be invariant with temperature in this range, the best representation being k1 = (1.05 + or - 0.11) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/molecule sec where the error is two standard deviations. This result is compared with previous absolute and relative determinations of k1. The reaction is also discussed from a theoretical point of view.

  9. Performance of a 100V Half-Bridge MOSFET Driver, Type MIC4103, Over a Wide Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    The operation of a high frequency, high voltage MOSFET (metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors) driver was investigated over a wide temperature regime that extended beyond its specified range. The Micrel MIC4103 is a 100V, non-inverting, dual driver that is designed to independently drive both high-side and low-side N-channel MOSFETs. It features fast propagation delay times and can drive 1000 pF load with 10ns rise times and 6 ns fall times [1]. The device consumes very little power, has supply under-voltage protection, and is rated for a -40 C to +125 C junction temperature range. The floating high-side driver of the chip can sustain boost voltages up to 100 V. Table I shows some of the device manufacturer s specification.

  10. Rate constant for the reaction of hydroxyl radical with formaldehyde over the temperature range 228-362 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A.; Michael, J. V.

    1980-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the reaction OH ? H2CO measured over the temperature range 228-362 K using the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence technique are given. The results are independent of variations in H2CO concentration, total pressure Ar concentration, and flash intensity (i.e., initial OH concentration). The rate constant is found to be invariant with temperature in this range, the best representation being k sub 1 = (1.05 ? or - 0.11) x 10 to the 11th power cu cm molecule(-1) s(-1) where the error is two standard deviations. This result is compared with previous absolute and relative determinations of k sub 1. The reaction is also discussed from a theoretical point of view.

  11. Mangrove expansion and contraction at a poleward range limit: Climate extremes and land-ocean temperature gradients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osland, Michael J.; Day, Richard H.; Hall, Courtney T.; Brumfield, Marisa D; Dugas, Jason; Jones, William R.

    2017-01-01

    Within the context of climate change, there is a pressing need to better understand the ecological implications of changes in the frequency and intensity of climate extremes. Along subtropical coasts, less frequent and warmer freeze events are expected to permit freeze-sensitive mangrove forests to expand poleward and displace freeze-tolerant salt marshes. Here, our aim was to better understand the drivers of poleward mangrove migration by quantifying spatiotemporal patterns in mangrove range expansion and contraction across land-ocean temperature gradients. Our work was conducted in a freeze-sensitive mangrove-marsh transition zone that spans a land-ocean temperature gradient in one of the world's most wetland-rich regions (Mississippi River Deltaic Plain; Louisiana, USA). We used historical air temperature data (1893-2014), alternative future climate scenarios, and coastal wetland coverage data (1978-2011) to investigate spatiotemporal fluctuations and climate-wetland linkages. Our analyses indicate that changes in mangrove coverage have been controlled primarily by extreme freeze events (i.e., air temperatures below a threshold zone of -6.3 to -7.6 °C). We expect that in the past 121 years, mangrove range expansion and contraction has occurred across land-ocean temperature gradients. Mangrove resistance, resilience, and dominance were all highest in areas closer to the ocean where temperature extremes were buffered by large expanses of water and saturated soil. Under climate change, these areas will likely serve as local hotspots for mangrove dispersal, growth, range expansion, and displacement of salt marsh. Collectively, our results show that the frequency and intensity of freeze events across land-ocean temperature gradients greatly influences spatiotemporal patterns of range expansion and contraction of freeze-sensitive mangroves. We expect that, along subtropical coasts, similar processes govern the distribution and abundance of other freeze

  12. Mangrove expansion and contraction at a poleward range limit: climate extremes and land-ocean temperature gradients.

    PubMed

    Osland, Michael J; Day, Richard H; Hall, Courtney T; Brumfield, Marisa D; Dugas, Jason L; Jones, William R

    2017-01-01

    Within the context of climate change, there is a pressing need to better understand the ecological implications of changes in the frequency and intensity of climate extremes. Along subtropical coasts, less frequent and warmer freeze events are expected to permit freeze-sensitive mangrove forests to expand poleward and displace freeze-tolerant salt marshes. Here, our aim was to better understand the drivers of poleward mangrove migration by quantifying spatiotemporal patterns in mangrove range expansion and contraction across land-ocean temperature gradients. Our work was conducted in a freeze-sensitive mangrove-marsh transition zone that spans a land-ocean temperature gradient in one of the world's most wetland-rich regions (Mississippi River Deltaic Plain; Louisiana, USA). We used historical air temperature data (1893-2014), alternative future climate scenarios, and coastal wetland coverage data (1978-2011) to investigate spatiotemporal fluctuations and climate-wetland linkages. Our analyses indicate that changes in mangrove coverage have been controlled primarily by extreme freeze events (i.e., air temperatures below a threshold zone of -6.3 to -7.6°C). We expect that in the past 121 yr, mangrove range expansion and contraction has occurred across land-ocean temperature gradients. Mangrove resistance, resilience, and dominance were all highest in areas closer to the ocean where temperature extremes were buffered by large expanses of water and saturated soil. Under climate change, these areas will likely serve as local hotspots for mangrove dispersal, growth, range expansion, and displacement of salt marsh. Collectively, our results show that the frequency and intensity of freeze events across land-ocean temperature gradients greatly influences spatiotemporal patterns of range expansion and contraction of freeze-sensitive mangroves. We expect that, along subtropical coasts, similar processes govern the distribution and abundance of other freeze

  13. Altitudinal ranging of black-crested gibbons at Mt. Wuliang, Yunnan: effects of food distribution, temperature and human disturbance.

    PubMed

    Fan, Peng-Fei; Jiang, Xue-Long

    2010-01-01

    We studied the altitudinal ranging of one habituated group of black-crested gibbons (Nomascus concolor) at Dazhaizi, Mt. Wuliang, Yunnan, China, between March 2005 and April 2006. The group ranged from 1,900 to 2,680 m above sea level. Food distribution was the driving force behind the altitudinal ranging patterns of the study group. They spent 83.2% of their time ranging between 2,100 and 2,400 m, where 75.8% of important food patches occurred. They avoided using the area above 2,500 m despite a lack of human disturbance there, apparently because there were few food resources. Temperature had a limited effect on seasonal altitudinal ranging but probably explained the diel altitudinal ranging of the group, which tended to use the lower zone in the cold morning and the higher zone in the warm afternoon. Grazing goats, the main disturbance, were limited to below 2,100 m, which was defined as the high-disturbance area (HDA). Gibbons spent less time in the HDA and, when ranging there, spent more time feeding and travelling and less time resting and singing. Human activities directly influenced gibbon behaviour, might cause forest degradation and create dispersal barriers between populations.

  14. Structural development of high-temperature mylonites in the Archean Wyoming province, northwestern Madison Range, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, Karl S.; Mogk, David W.

    2009-01-01

    The Crooked Creek mylonite, in the northwestern Madison Range, southwestern Montana, is defined by several curved lenses of high non-coaxial strain exposed over a 7-km-wide, northeast-trending strip. The country rocks, part of the Archean Wyoming province, are dominantly trondhjemitic to granitic orthogneiss with subordinate amphibolite, quartzite, aluminous gneiss, and sills of metabasite (mafic granulite). Data presented here support an interpretation that the mylonite formed during a period of rapid, heterogeneous strain at near-peak metamorphic conditions during an early deformational event (D1) caused by northwest–southeast-directed transpression. The mylonite has a well-developed L-S tectonite fabric and a fine-grained, recrystallized (granoblastic) texture. The strong linear fabric, interpreted as the stretching direction, is defined by elongate compositional “fish,” fold axes, aligned elongate minerals, and mullion axes. The margins of the mylonitic zones are concordant with and grade into regions of unmylonitized gneiss. A second deformational event (D2) has folded the mylonite surface to produce meter- to kilometer-scale, tight-to-isoclinal, gently plunging folds in both the mylonite and country rock, and represents a northwest–southeast shortening event. Planar or linear fabrics associated with D2 are remarkably absent. A third regional deformational event (D3) produced open, kilometer-scale folds generally with gently north-plunging fold axes. Thermobarometric measurements presented here indicate that metamorphic conditions during D1 were the same in both the mylonite and the country gneiss, reaching upper amphibolite- to lower granulite-facies conditions: 700 ± 50° C and 8.5 ± 0.5 kb. Previous geochronological studies of mylonitic and cross-cutting rocks in the Jerome Rock Lake area, east of the Crooked Creek mylonite, bracket the timing of this high-grade metamorphism and mylonitization between 2.78 and 2.56 Ga, nearly a billion years

  15. Two-phase working fluids for the temperature range 100-350 C. [in heat pipes for solar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.; Tower, L.

    1977-01-01

    The decomposition and corrosion of two-phase heat transfer liquids and metal envelopes have been investigated on the basis of molecular, bond strengths and chemical thermodynamics. Potentially stable heat transfer fluids for the temperature range 100 to 350 C have been identified, and reflux heat pipe tests initiated with 10 fluids and carbon steel and aluminum envelopes to experimentally establish corrosion behavior and noncondensable gas generation rates.

  16. Thermal annealing of radiation damage in CMOS ICs in the temperature range -140 C to +375 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchenko, V.; Fang, P. H.; Brashears, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    Annealing of radiation damage was investigated in the commercial, Z- and J-processes of the RCA CD4007A ICs in the temperature range from -140 C to +375 C. Tempering curves were analyzed for activation energies of thermal annealing, following irradiation at -140 C. It was found that at -140 C, the radiation-induced shifts in the threshold potentials were similar for all three processes. The radiation hardness of the Z- and J-process is primarily due to rapid annealing of radiation damage at room temperature. In the region -140 to 20 C, no dopant-dependent charge trapping is seen, similar to that observed at higher temperatures. In the unbiased Z-process n-channels, after 1 MeV electron irradiation, considerable negative charge remains in the gate oxide.

  17. Temperature-dependent Sellmeier equation at terahertz frequency range for 1 mol % MgO-doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyu-Sup; Ko, Do-Kyeong; Yu, Nan Ei

    2017-04-01

    We first examined a temperature-dependent Sellmeier equation for the extraordinary refractive index of MgO-doped stoichiometric LiTaO3 (MgO:SLT) crystal via frequency-tunable narrowband terahertz (THz) generation at 0.4–1.8 THz and at a low temperature range of 80–300 K. The mean deviation of Sellmeier equation fit was less than 0.3%, being equivalent with the predicted measurement uncertainty of 0.3%. The temperature effect (dn THz/dT) was 2.02 × 10‑3/K at 1 THz. Moreover, we showed the smaller birefringence for MgO:SLT than MgO-doped stoichiometric LiNbO3 at 300 K from THz time-domain spectroscopy. This study is crucial for material study itself and THz device engineering.

  18. A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Reaction OH + 2-Butene in the 400-800 K Temperature Range.

    PubMed

    Antonov, Ivan O; Kwok, Justin; Zádor, Judit; Sheps, Leonid

    2015-07-16

    We report a combined experimental and theoretical study of the OH + cis-2-butene and OH + trans-2-butene reactions at combustion-relevant conditions: pressures of 1-20 bar and temperatures of 400-800 K. We probe the OH radical time histories by laser-induced fluorescence and analyze these experimental measurements with aid from time-dependent master-equation calculations. Importantly, our investigation covers a temperature range where experimental data on OH + alkene chemistry in general are lacking, and interpretation of such data is challenging due to the complexity of the competing reaction pathways. Guided by theory, we unravel this complex behavior and determine the temperature- and pressure-dependent rate coefficients for the three most important OH + 2-butene reaction channels at our conditions: H abstraction, OH addition to the double bond, and back-dissociation of the OH-butene adduct.

  19. Study of special ceramics with a dilatometer for the temperature range up to 2000°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaisersberger, E.; Kelly, J. E.

    1988-03-01

    Many properties of special ceramic materials, often closely related, such as sintering temperature, shrinkage in firing, mineral reaction, and strength can be studied with thermal analysis. Also, the influence of type, structure, and preparation of raw materials, plasticizers, and binding materials for forming and compressing, as well as the compatibility with protective coatings (glazes, varnishes, metal films), is investigated by thermal analysis. The development of a new dilatometer for the temperature range 25 2000°C with maximum heating rates of 20 K·min-1 and samples 25 50 mm in length and 6 12 mm in diameter for measurements in argon armosphere and vacuum has opened up new horizons. Sintering studies at high temperatures are described.

  20. Evaluation of reusable surface insulation for space shuttle over a range of heat-transfer rate and surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    Reusable surface insulation materials, which were developed as heat shields for the space shuttle, were tested over a range of conditions including heat-transfer rates between 160 and 620 kW/sq m. The lowest of these heating rates was in a range predicted for the space shuttle during reentry, and the highest was more than twice the predicted entry heating on shuttle areas where reusable surface insulation would be used. Individual specimens were tested repeatedly at increasingly severe conditions to determine the maximum heating rate and temperature capability. A silica-base material experienced only minimal degradation during repeated tests which included conditions twice as severe as predicted shuttle entry and withstood cumulative exposures three times longer than the best mullite material. Mullite-base materials cracked and experienced incipient melting at conditions within the range predicted for shuttle entry. Neither silica nor mullite materials consistently survived the test series with unbroken waterproof surfaces. Surface temperatures for a silica and a mullite material followed a trend expected for noncatalytic surfaces, whereas surface temperatures for a second mullite material appeared to follow a trend expected for a catalytic surface.

  1. Assessment of some soil thermal conductivity models via variations in temperature and bulk density at low moisture range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Seyed Mohamad; Neyshabouri, Mohammad Reza; Fujimaki, Haruyuki

    2016-08-01

    Simulation of heat transfer in soil under steady and unsteady situations requires reliable estimate of soil thermal conductivity (λ) at varying environmental conditions. In the current work several soil thermal conductivity predicting models including I) de Vries, II) Campbell, III) combined de Vries and Campbell and IV) de Vries-Nobre were evaluated for the four soils of coarse sand, sandy loam, loam and clay loam textured at varying in temperature and bulk density at low moisture range. Thermal conductivities measured by the cylindrical probe method served as the reference for models assessment. Results showed that approximately same thermal conductivities obtained by the five methods at low moisture range (θ ≤ 0.05 m3/m3). Also the de Vries and de Vries-Campbell models produced accurate than Campbell and de vries-Nobre models. The accuracy of the two models increased with soil compaction but decreased with temperature rise. Campbell model showed more reliability at higher (311.16 and 321.16 K) temperatures; but its accuracy declined with soil compaction in current work. It seems that assuming needle shape for the soil particles is far away from the reality whereas assuming spherical shapes may be more realistic and produced more satisfactory prediction of thermal conductivity. The compaction would alter particle arrangement and may increase the contact area of particles; and then make them behave more or less spherical shape.it seems thermal conductivity in solid particles increase via increasing in temperature. Since a modified mineral shape factor, g m , was developed as a combination between sphere and needle according to geometric mean particle diameter as well as bulk density and temperature as modifying factors. This factor increased the accuracy of de Vries-Nobre model up to 10.37%. Regarding nonlinear regression model, moisture content, bulk density, temperature and quartz content demonstrated significant effect on soil thermal conductivity in our

  2. Microwave dielectric properties of Nextel-440 fiber fabrics with pyrolytic carbon coatings in the temperature range from room temperature to 700 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hui-Hui; Wan-Cheng, Zhou; Luo, Fa; Luo, Fa; Qing, Yu-Chang; Chen, Ma-Lin

    2015-08-01

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) coatings are deposited on the Nextel-440 fiber fabrics by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The dielectric properties of the Nextel-440 fiber fabrics with PyC coatings (Nextel-440/PyC) are investigated in a temperature range from room temperature to 700 °C in X-band. Compared with the permittivity of the original Nextel-440 received, the complex permittivity of the Nextel-440/PyC (the real part ε‧ and the imaginary part ε″), is significantly improved: ε‧ of the Nextel-440/PyC has a positive temperature coefficient, in contrast, ε″ of the Nextel-440/PyC exhibits a negative temperature coefficient. Moreover, the reflection loss in units of dB is calculated. The results indicate that the microwave absorbing properties of the Nextel-440/PyC coatings is enhanced at 700 °C compared with that at lower temperatures. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51072165) and the Fund of the State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing in Northwestern Polytechnical University, China (Grant Nos. KP201307 and SKLSP201313).

  3. Design Strategies for Optically-Accessible, High-Temperature, High-Pressure Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. F. Rice; R. R. Steeper; C. A. LaJeunesse; R. G. Hanush; J. D. Aiken

    2000-02-01

    The authors have developed two optical cell designs for high-pressure and high-temperature fluid research: one for flow systems, and the other for larger batch systems. The flow system design uses spring washers to balance the unequal thermal expansions of the reactor and the window materials. A typical design calculation is presented showing the relationship between system pressure, operating temperature, and torque applied to the window-retaining nut. The second design employs a different strategy more appropriate for larger windows. This design uses two seals: one for the window that benefits from system pressure, and a second one that relies on knife-edge, metal-to-metal contact.

  4. Design strategies for optically-accessible, high-temperature, high-pressure reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. F. Rice; R. R. Steeper; C. A. LaJeunesse; R. G. Hanush; J. D. Aiken

    2000-02-01

    The authors have developed two optical cell designs for high-pressure and high-temperature fluid research: one for flow systems, and the other for larger batch systems. The flow system design uses spring washers to balance the unequal thermal expansions of the reactor and the window materials. A typical design calculation is presented showing the relationship between system pressure, operating temperature, and torque applied to the window-retaining nut. The second design employs a different strategy more appropriate for larger windows. This design uses two seals: one for the window that benefits from system pressure, and a second one that relies on knife-edge, metal-to-metal contact.

  5. Static and Statistical Properties of Hot Rotating Nuclei in a Macroscopic Temperature-Dependent Finite-Range Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabov, E.G.; Adeev, G.D.

    2005-09-01

    A macroscopic temperature-dependent model that takes into account nuclear forces of finite range is used to calculate the static and statistical properties of hot rotating compound nuclei. The level-density parameter is approximated by an expression of the leptodermous type. The resulting expansion coefficients are in good agreement with their counterparts proposed previously by A.V. Ignatyuk and his colleagues. The effect of taking simultaneously into account the temperature of a nucleus and its angular momentum on the quantities under study, such as the heights and positions of fission barriers and the effective moments of inertia of nuclei at the barrier, is considered, and the importance of doing this is demonstrated. The fissility parameter (Z{sup 2}/A){sub crit} and the position of the Businaro-Gallone point are studied versus temperature. It is found that, with increasing temperature, both parameters are shifted to the region of lighter nuclei. It is shown that the inclusion of temperature leads to qualitatively the same effects as the inclusion of the angular momentum of a nucleus, but, quantitatively, thermal excitation leads to smaller effects than rotational excitation.

  6. Improvement of Surface Temperature Prediction Using SVR with MOGREPS Data for Short and Medium range over South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S. J.; Choi, R. K.; Ahn, K. D.; Ha, J. C.; Cho, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    As the Korea Meteorology Administration (KMA) has operated Met Office Global and Regional Ensemble Prediction System (MOGREPS) with introduction of Unified Model (UM), many attempts have been made to improve predictability in temperature forecast in last years. In this study, post-processing method of MOGREPS for surface temperature prediction is developed with machine learning over 52 locations in South Korea. Past 60-day lag time was used as a training phase of Support Vector Regression (SVR) method for surface temperature forecast model. The selected inputs for SVR are followings: date and surface temperatures from Numerical Weather prediction (NWP), such as GDAPS, individual 24 ensemble members, mean and median of ensemble members for every 3hours for 12 days.To verify the reliability of SVR-based ensemble prediction (SVR-EP), 93 days are used (from March 1 to May 31, 2014). The result yielded improvement of SVR-EP by RMSE value of 16 % throughout entire prediction period against conventional ensemble prediction (EP). In particular, short range predictability of SVR-EP resulted in 18.7% better RMSE for 1~3 day forecast. The mean temperature bias between SVR-EP and EP at all test locations showed around 0.36°C and 1.36°C, respectively. SVR-EP is currently extending for more vigorous sensitivity test, such as increasing training phase and optimizing machine learning model.

  7. Communication: Temperature derivative of the dielectric constant gives access to multipoint correlations in polar liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.; Richert, Ranko

    2016-01-01

    Fluctuations of the dipole moment of a macroscopic dielectric sample are induced by thermal motions. The variance of the sample dipole moment, characterizing the extent of thermal fluctuations, is a decaying function of temperature for many polar liquids. This result is inconsistent with the Nyquist (fluctuation-dissipation) theorem predicting the variance of a macroscopic property to grow linearly with temperature. The reason for a qualitatively different behavior is in strong multi-particle correlations of dipolar orientations. An equation connecting the temperature slope of the dielectric constant to a static three-point correlation function is derived. When applied to experimental data for polar and hydrogen-bonding liquids at normal conditions, the three-point correlations of different liquids fall on a single master curve as a function of the dielectric constant. Static three-point correlation functions can potentially reflect the growing spatial correlation length on approach to the glass transition. However, the measured temperature slope of the dielectric constant of glycerol does not indicate a change in such a lengthscale.

  8. Reaction rate constant for OH + HOONO/sub 2/. -->. products over the temperature range 246 to 324 K

    SciTech Connect

    Trevor, P.L.; Black, G.; Barker, J.R.

    1982-04-29

    Absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants for the title reaction have been determined for temperatures ranging from 246 to 324 K. The laser flash-photolysis resonance-fluorescence (LFPRF) technique was used to generate O(/sup 1/D) which reacted with H/sub 2/ and/or H/sub 2/O to produce OH radicals. The bimolecular rate constants for the title reaction showed no dependence on total (He) pressure over the range approx. 3 to 15 torr, and they did not depend upon initial (OH) or upon its mode of formation. The H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ impurity was explicitly measured in all experiments, and the rate constants were corrected for its contribution. A weighted least-squares analysis of the data obtained at nine temperatures (226 data points) gave the Arrhenius expression (k +- 1sigma) = (8.05 +- 5.69) x 10/sup -12/ exp (-193 +- 194/T) cm/sup 3/ s/sup -1/ with covariance 1.098 x 10/sup -9/. A simple weighted average (temperature independent) fits the data just as well, and when the effects of systematic errors are taken into account, our recommended rate constant is (k +- 2sigma) = (4.0 +- 1.6) x 10/sup -12/ cm/sup 3/ s/sup -1/.

  9. Plastic deformation mechanisms of ultrafine-grained copper in the temperature range of 4.2-300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, N. V.; Grigorova, T. V.; Mendiuk, O. V.; Davydenko, O. A.; Polishchuk, S. S.; Geidarov, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    Main microstructural features of ultrafine-grained (UFG) polycrystalline oxygen-free copper (Cu-OF) obtained by direct and equal-channel angular hydrostatic extrusion were studied by EBSD and XRD methods. The effect of microstructure on the temperature dependences of the yield stress and strain rate sensitivity of the deforming stress was investigated using tensile and stress relaxation tests in the insufficiently studied temperature range of 4.2-300 K. Using thermal activation analysis it was established that in the range 77-200 K the rate of plastic deformation is controlled by the thermally activated mechanism of crossing the forest dislocations and its empirical parameters were obtained. The experimental anomalies below 77 K unaccountable by the forest crossing mechanism were explained by the inertial properties of dislocations revealed under conditions of high effective stress and low dynamic friction. The inversion of the temperature dependences of the activation volume observed above 200 K was attributed to the thermally activated detachment of dislocations from local pinning centers within the grain boundaries.

  10. Thermoregulation during flight: body temperature and sensible heat transfer in free-ranging Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Reichard, Jonathan D; Fellows, Spenser R; Frank, Alexander J; Kunz, Thomas H

    2010-01-01

    Bat wings are important for thermoregulation, but their role in heat balance during flight is largely unknown. More than 80% of the energy consumed during flight generates heat as a by-product, and thus it is expected that bat wings should dissipate large amounts of heat to prevent hyperthermia. We measured rectal (T(r)) and surface (T(s)) temperatures of Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) as they emerged from and returned to their daytime roosts and calculated sensible heat transfer for different body regions (head, body, wings, and tail membrane). Bats' T(r) decreased from 36.8°C during emergence flights to 34.4°C during returns, and T(s) scaled positively with ambient temperature (T(a)). Total radiative heat loss from bats was significantly greater for a radiative sink to the night sky than for a sink with temperature equal to T(a). We found that free-ranging Brazilian free-tailed bats, on average, do not dissipate heat from their wings by convection but instead dissipate radiative heat (L) to the cloudless night sky during flight ([Formula: see text] W). However, within the range of T(a) measured in this study, T. brasiliensis experienced net heat loss between evening emergence and return flights. Regional hypothermia reduces heat loss from wings that are exposed to potentially high convective fluxes. Additional research is needed to establish the role of wings in evaporative cooling during flight in bats.

  11. The Current-Voltage Characteristics of the Au/MBEn-GaAs Schottky Diodes in a Wide Temperature Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EfeoǦLU, Hasan; Turut, Abdulmecit

    2013-07-01

    The Au/MBEn-GaAs Schottky diodes have been fabricated by us. The slope of the conventional ln(I0/T2) versus (kT)-1 plotted in the temperature range of 120-350 K has given a Richardson constant (RC) of 7.69 A (cmK)-2 which is in close agreement with the value of 8.16 A/cm2K2 known for n-type GaAs. The barrier height (BH) value in 40-160 K range has decreased obeying to Gaussian distribution (GD) model of the BH based on thermionic emission current theory. The modified RC plot according to the GD model has given a RC value of 2.45 A (cmK)-2 or a value of 2.38 A (cmK)-2 by taking into account the temperature dependence of the standard deviation. Therefore, we have modified the Richardson's plot using the temperature dependent values of the effective area of the patches introduced by lateral inhomogeneity of the BHs and we have obtained a RC value of 8.10 A (cmK)-2.

  12. The thermodynamic properties of 2-ethylhexyl acrylate over the temperature range from T → 0 to 350 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulagina, T. G.; Samosudova, Ya. S.; Letyanina, I. A.; Sevast'yanov, E. V.; Smirnova, N. N.; Smirnova, L. A.; Mochalova, A. E.

    2012-05-01

    The temperature dependence of the heat capacity C {/p o}= f( T) 2 of 2-ethylhexyl acrylate was studied in an adiabatic vacuum calorimeter over the temperature range 6-350 K. Measurement errors were mainly of 0.2%. Glass formation and vitreous state parameters were determined. An isothermic shell calorimeter with a static bomb was used to measure the energy of combustion of 2-ethylhexyl acrylate. The experimental data were used to calculate the standard thermodynamic functions C {/p o}( T), H o( T)- H o(0), S o( T)- S o(0), and G o( T)- H o(0) of the compound in the vitreous and liquid states over the temperature range from T → 0 to 350 K, the standard enthalpies of combustion Δc H o, and the thermodynamic characteristics of formation Δf H o, Δf S o, and Δf G o at 298.15 K and p = 0.1 MPa.

  13. Seasonal rhythms of body temperature in the free-ranging raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) with special emphasis on winter sleep.

    PubMed

    Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Asikainen, Juha; Kauhala, Kaarina; Paakkonen, Tommi; Nieminen, Petteri

    2007-01-01

    The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is the only canid with passive overwintering in areas with cold winters, but the depth and rhythmicity of wintertime hypothermia in the wild raccoon dog are unknown. To study the seasonal rhythms of body temperature (T(b)), seven free-ranging animals were captured and implanted with intra-abdominal T(b) loggers and radio-tracked during years 2004-2006. The average size of the home ranges was 306+/-26 ha, and the average 24 h T(b) was 38.0+/-<0.01 degrees C during the snow-free period (May-November). The highest and lowest T(b) were usually recorded around midnight (21:00-02:00 h) and between 05:00-11:00 h, respectively, and the range of the 24 h oscillations was 1.2+/-0.01 degrees C. The animals lost approximately 43+/-6% of body mass in winter (December-April), when the average size of the home ranges was 372+/-108 ha. During the 2-9-wk periods of passivity in January-March, the average 24 h T(b) decreased by 1.4-2.1 degrees C compared to the snow-free period. The raccoon dogs were hypothermic for 5 h in the morning (06:00-11:00 h), whereas the highest T(b) values were recorded between 16:00-23:00 h. The range of the 24 h oscillations increased by approximately 0.6 degrees C, and the rhythmicity was more pronounced than in the snow-free period. The ambient temperature and depth of snow cover were important determinants of the seasonal T(b) rhythms. The overwintering strategy of the raccoon dog resembled the patterns of winter sleep in bears and badgers, but the wintertime passivity of the species was more intermittent and the decrease in the T(b) less pronounced.

  14. Organic liquid thermal conductivity: A prediction method in the reduced temperature range 0.3 to 0.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroncini, C.; di Filippo, P.; Latini, G.; Pacetti, M.

    1981-03-01

    A general correlation for organic liquid thermal conductivity, λ, estimation is proposed of the following type: λ = A \\cdot {(1 - T_r)} /{T_r^{{1 6}} }}^{0.38} where T r is the reduced temperature and the factor A is practically temperature independent and characteristic of the particular compound investigated. The values of the factor A for 144 organic liquids are calculated (through selected experimental λ data) and are listed. The proposed correlation is tested, and the mean general deviation between calculated and selected experimental λ values is found to be smaller than 2% over wide temperature ranges (generally from T r = 0.3 to T r =0.8); the maximum deviations are normally smaller than 6%. Successively, the compounds are investigated as members of the respective families in order to provide an expression for A by means of the best available physical properties of the liquids. Correlations are proposed (for alcohols, aromatics, esters, refrigerant fluids, paraffins, cycloparaffins, ketones, organic acids, ethers, and olefins) that contain the same reduced temperature dependence evidenced in the above equation and that differ in the expression suggested for the factor A. In this way, the thermal conductivity of the organic liquids can be evaluated, with a mean deviation generally less than 5%, in absence of experimental λ data.

  15. Dielectric and thermophysical properties of different beef meat blends over a temperature range of -18 to +10°C.

    PubMed

    Farag, K W; Lyng, J G; Morgan, D J; Cronin, D A

    2008-08-01

    Dielectric and thermophysical properties of three different beef meat blends (lean, fat and 50:50 mixture) were evaluated over a range of temperatures from -18 to +10°C. In the region of thawing (-3 to -1°C), dielectric constant (ε') and dielectric loss factor (ε') values for radio frequency (RF) and microwave (MW) were significantly higher (P<0.05) than at other measured temperatures for the three blends. In the same region, thermal conductivity (k), specific heat (c) and thermal diffusivity (α) also showed significant changes (P<0.05). k and α values were significantly lower, while c values were significantly higher in this region than at other measured temperatures for the three blends. RF (27.12MHz) vs. MW (896 and 2450MHz) frequencies had an important effect (P<0.05) on the measured dielectric properties of the beef meat blends, with a general tendency towards higher values at the RF frequency. Finally, composition significantly influenced (P<0.05) the measured dielectric and thermophysical properties at all temperatures used. These data are of potential value to food technologists in the context of rapid defrosting of meat products.

  16. Compressive behavior and constitutive analysis of AZ31B magnesium alloy over wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jing; Shu, Dong Wei

    2015-09-01

    Magnesium and its alloys with low specific weight, high specific strength, vast resources, easy recyclability and biodegradation have attracted extensive interest in recent years as an ideal candidate to aluminium and steel alloys. The knowledge of the mechanical properties under high strain rate loading and elevated temperature is necessary for the structural application of magnesium alloy in automotive, aerospace and defence industries. Compressive tests on AZ31B magnesium alloy were carried out at both quasi-static and high strain rate loading in a range between 10-3 s-1 and 3300 s-1 while temperature varies from -30 °C to 200 °C. Strain rate and temperature effect on flow stress, hardening behavior, rate sensitivity, ductility and energy absorption capability of the alloy is discussed. Optical and scanning electron microscopy was performed on selected specimens at quasi-static and high strain rates under room temperature. The Johnson-Cook model is fit to the measured data and predictions from the model are compared with the experimental data.

  17. A PdMn Based High Resolution Thermometer for the Temperature Range of 0.7-1 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, Peter K.

    2005-01-01

    Experiments Along the Coexistence near Tricriticality (EXACT) will test exact predictions made by Renormalization Group theory by mapping the phase diagram of liquid He-3 and He-4 mixtures at the tricritical point, Tcp=0.867 K. A PdMn based High Resolution Thermometer (HRT) will be utilized by EXACT to make accurate measurements with a resolution that has never been attained for the temperature range 0.7-1 K. The basic design of this mini high resolution thermometer comprises a sensing element whose magnetic susceptibility changes with temperature, a thermal connector, magnetic shielding, and some permanent magnets to apply a constant magnetic field. In this study, we will quantitatively determine the resolution of possible sensing element candidates of 0.15%, 0.20%, and 0.25% ppm Mn and compare them with an annealed group of PdMn with the corresponding concentrations to see how this processing technique affects sensitivity.

  18. Oxygen nonstoichiometry and thermodynamic characterization of Zr doped ceria in the 1573-1773 K temperature range.

    PubMed

    Takacs, M; Scheffe, J R; Steinfeld, A

    2015-03-28

    This work encompasses the thermodynamic characterization and critical evaluation of Zr(4+) doped ceria, a promising redox material for the two-step solar thermochemical splitting of H2O and CO2 to H2 and CO. As a case study, we experimentally examine 5 mol% Zr(4+) doped ceria and present oxygen nonstoichiometry measurements at elevated temperatures ranging from 1573 K to 1773 K and oxygen partial pressures ranging from 4.50 × 10(-3) atm to 2.3 × 10(-4) atm, yielding higher reduction extents compared to those of pure ceria under all conditions investigated, especially at the lower temperature range and at higher pO2. In contrast to pure ceria, a simple ideal solution model accounting for the formation of isolated oxygen vacancies and localized electrons accurately describes the defect chemistry. Thermodynamic properties are determined, namely: partial molar enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs free energy. In general, partial molar enthalpy and entropy values of Zr(4+) doped ceria are lower. The equilibrium hydrogen yields are subsequently extracted as a function of the redox conditions for dopant concentrations as high as 20%. Although reduction extents increase greatly with dopant concentration, the oxidation of Zr(4+) doped ceria is thermodynamically less favorable compared to pure ceria. This leads to substantially larger temperature swings between reduction and oxidation steps, ultimately resulting in lower theoretical solar energy conversion efficiencies compared to ceria under most conditions. In effect, these results point to the importance of considering oxidation thermodynamics in addition to reduction when screening potential redox materials.

  19. Experimental investigation of the dynamics of a vibrating grid in superfluid 4He over a range of temperatures and pressures.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, D; Skrbek, L; Hendry, P C; McClintock, P V E; Vinen, W F

    2006-09-01

    In an earlier paper [Nichol, Phys. Rev. E, 70, 056307 (2004)] some of the present authors presented the results of an experimental study of the dynamics of a stretched grid driven into vibration at or near its resonant frequency in isotopically pure superfluid 4He over a range of pressures at a very low temperature, where the density of normal fluid is negligible. In this paper we present the results of a similar study, based on a different grid, but now including the temperature range where the normal fluid density is no longer insignificant. The new grid is very similar to the old one except for a small difference in the character of its surface roughness. In many respects the results at low temperature are similar to those for the old grid. At low amplitudes the results are somewhat history dependent, but in essence there is no damping greater than that in vacuo. At a critical amplitude corresponding to a velocity of about 50 mms(-1) there is a sudden and large increase in damping, which can be attributed to the generation of new vortex lines. Strange shifts in the resonant frequency at intermediate amplitudes observed with the old grid are no longer seen, however they must therefore have been associated with the different surface roughness, or perhaps were due simply to some artifact of the old grid, the details of which we are currently unable to determine. With the new grid we have studied both the damping at low amplitudes due to excitations of the normal fluid, and the dependence of the supercritical damping on temperature. We present evidence that in helium at low amplitudes there may be some enhancement in the effective mass of the grid in addition to that associated with potential flow of the helium. In some circumstances small satellite resonances are seen near the main fundamental grid resonance, which are attributed to coupling to some other oscillatory system within the experimental cell.

  20. The correlation between dengue incidence and diurnal ranges of temperature of Colombo district, Sri Lanka 2005–2014

    PubMed Central

    Ehelepola, N. D. B.; Ariyaratne, Kusalika

    2016-01-01

    Background Meteorological factors affect dengue transmission. Mechanisms of the way in which different diurnal temperatures, ranging around different mean temperatures, influence dengue transmission were published after 2011. Objective We endeavored to determine the correlation between dengue incidence and diurnal temperature ranges (DTRs) in Colombo district, Sri Lanka, and to explore the possibilities of using our findings to improve control of dengue. Design We calculated the weekly dengue incidence in Colombo during 2005–2014, after data on all of the reported dengue patients and estimated mid-year populations were collected. We obtained daily maximum and minimum temperatures from two Colombo weather stations, averaged, and converted them into weekly data. Weekly averages of DTR versus dengue incidence graphs were plotted and correlations observed. The count of days per week with a DTR of >7.5°C and <7.5°C were also calculated. Wavelet time series analysis was performed to determine the correlation between dengue incidence and DTR. Results We obtained a negative correlation between dengue incidence and a DTR>7.5°C with an 8-week lag period, and a positive correlation between dengue incidence and a DTR<7.5°C, also with an 8-week lag. Conclusions Large DTRs were negatively correlated with dengue transmission in Colombo district. We propose to take advantage of that in local dengue control efforts. Our results agree with previous studies on the topic and with a mathematical model of relative vectorial capacity of Aedes aegypti. Global warming and declining DTR are likely to favor a rise of dengue, and we suggest a simple method to mitigate this. PMID:27566717

  1. Calibrating a new proxy for Pleistocene climate change in southern Africa: the Mutual Ostracod Temperature Range method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, David; Martens, Koen

    2010-05-01

    The Mutual Ostracod Temperature Range (MOTR) method has so far been applied only in the European Pleistocene, where it is proving effective in producing past air temperature range estimates that compare well with those obtained by other proxy methods (Horne, 2007; Horne & Mezquita, 2008; Holmes et al., in press). As an essential preliminary step towards applying the method in southern Africa, we have calibrated a training set of living ostracod species' distributions against a modern climate dataset and other available environmental data. The modern ostracod dataset is based on material held by the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences in Brussels, which constitutes the most diverse and comprehensive collection of southern African nonmarine ostracods available anywhere in the world. To date, c. 150 nominal species have been described from southern Africa (Martens, 2001) out of c. 450 species in the total Afrotropical area (Martens et al., 2008). We used an edited dataset comprising a total of 2,118 records of ostracod species from 748 localities in southern Africa, ranging in latitude from approximately 17 degrees S to 35 degrees S. We have explored the potential value and limitations of this training set for the estimation of past climatic parameters including mean July, January and annual air temperatures, precipitation, water conductivity and pH. Holmes, J. A., Atkinson, T., Darbyshire, D. P. F., Horne, D. J., Joordens, J., Roberts, M. B., Sinka, K. J. & Whittaker, J. E. (accepted, in press). Middle Pleistocene climate and hydrological environment at the Boxgrove hominin site (West Sussex, UK) from ostracod records. Quaternary Science Reviews, doi:10.1016/j.quascirev.2009.02.024, 1-13. Horne, D. J. 2007. A Mutual Temperature Range method for Quaternary palaeoclimatic analysis using European nonmarine Ostracoda. Quaternary Science Reviews, 26, 1398-1415. Horne, D. J. & Mezquita, F. 2008. Palaeoclimatic applications of large databases: developing and testing

  2. Raman spectroscopy of SrB4O7 single crystals in the temperature range 300-1273 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, A. A.; Shukshin, V. E.; Zaitsev, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    The polarized Raman spectra of SrB4O7 (SBO) single crystals are studied in detail in the temperature range of 300-1273 K. The TO, LO, and IO phonon lines of A 1, A 2, B 1, and B 2 symmetries of rhombic SBO at 300 K are identified. The behavior of the Raman spectra of SBO crystals is studied upon heating up to their melting. The relation of Raman spectra with the structure of boron-oxygen fragments, as well as the transformation of spectra in the process of melting of SBO crystals, is discussed.

  3. Evaluation of simulated climatological diurnal temperature range in CMIP5 models from the perspective of planetary boundary layer turbulent mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Nan; Zhou, Liming; Dai, Yongjiu

    2016-08-01

    This study examines the effects of modeled planetary boundary layer (PBL) mixing on the simulated temperature diurnal cycle climatology over land in 20 CMIP5 models with AMIP simulations. When compared with observations, the magnitude of diurnal temperature range (DTR) is systematically underestimated over almost all land areas due to a widespread warm bias of daily minimum temperature (Tmin) and mostly a cold bias of daily maximum temperature (Tmax). Analyses of the CMIP5 multi-model ensemble means suggest that the biases of the simulated PBL mixing could very likely contribute to the temperature biases. For the regions with the cold bias in Tmax, the daytime PBL mixing is generally underestimated. The consequent more dry air entrainment from the free atmosphere could help maintain the surface humidity gradient, and thus produce more surface evaporation and potentially lower the Tmax. The opposite situation holds true for the regions with the warm bias of Tmax. This mechanism could be particularly applicable to the regions with moderate and wet climate conditions where surface evaporation depends more on the surface humidity gradient, but less on the available soil moisture. For the widespread warm bias of Tmin, the widely-recognized overestimated PBL mixing at nighttime should play a dominant role by transferring more heat from the atmosphere to the near-surface to warm the Tmin. Further analyses using the high resolution CFMIP2 output also support the CMIP5 results about the connections of the biases between the simulated turbulent mixing and the temperature diurnal cycle. The large inter-model variations of the simulated temperature diurnal cycle primarily appear over the arid and semi-arid regions and boreal arctic regions where the model differences in the PBL turbulence mixing could make equally significant contributions to the inter-model variations of DTR, Tmax and Tmin compared to the model differences in surface radiative processes. These results

  4. Three Agt1 transporters from brewer's yeasts exhibit different temperature dependencies for maltose transport over the range of brewery temperatures (0–20 °C).

    PubMed

    Vidgren, Virve; Viljanen, Kaarina; Mattinen, Laura; Rautio, Jari; Londesborough, John

    2014-06-01

    Zero-trans rates of maltose transport by brewer's yeasts exert strong control over fermentation rates and are strongly temperature-dependent over the temperature range (20–0 °C) of brewery fermentations. Three α-glucoside transporters, ScAgt1(A60) (a Saccharomyces cerevisiae version of Agt1 from an ale strain), ScAgt1-A548V (a variant of ScAgt1(A60) with a single amino acid change in a transmembrane domain), and SbAgt1 (a Saccharomyces (eu)bayanus version from a lager strain), were compared. When expressed in the same laboratory yeast, grown at 24 °C and assayed at 0, 10, and 20 °C, SbAgt1 had the lowest absolute maltose uptake activity at 20 °C but smallest temperature dependence, ScAgt1-A548V had the highest activity but greatest temperature dependence, and ScAgt1(A60) had intermediate properties. ScAgt1(A60) exhibited higher absolute rates and smaller temperature dependencies when expressed in laboratory rather than brewer's strains. Absolute rates closely reflected the amounts of GFP-tagged ScAgt1(A60) transporter in each host's plasma membrane. Growth at 15 °C instead of 24 °C decreased the absolute activities of strains expressing ScAgt1(A60) by two- to threefold. Evidently, the kinetic characteristics of at least ScAgt1(A60) depended on the nature of the host plasma membrane. However, no consistent correlation was observed between transport activities and fatty acid or ergosterol compositions.

  5. Aerial perches and free-range laying hens: the effect of access to aerial perches and of individual bird parameters on keel bone injuries in commercial free-range laying hens.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, C J; Ball, M E E; O'Connell, N E

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this trial was to determine the effect of aerial perches on keel bone injuries and tibia bone characteristics in free-range laying hens. The relationship between keel bone injuries and individual bird parameters, such as weight, girth, wing:girth ratio, feather coverage, and tibia bone characteristics, was also assessed. Five commercial free-range houses, each containing between 7,000 and 8,000 birds, were used. The houses and range areas were divided in half; in half of the house, birds had access to aerial perches (P) and in the other half, they did not (NP). On 13 occasions between 17 and 70 wk of age, 20 birds per treatment were randomly selected from the slatted area and palpated for keel bone injury. At 72 wk of age, 30 birds per treatment in each of 4 houses were selected at random, weighed, and then euthanized. Girth and wing area and feather coverage were measured. The keel and left tibia bones were removed and keel bones were scored for injury. Tibia bones were weighed and diameter, length, breaking strength, and ash content recorded. Results indicated that access to aerial perches did not affect tibia bone measures (P > 0.05). Average palpated keel bone score increased with age of the hens (P < 0.001) but was not significantly affected by perch treatment (P > 0.05). There was a significant interaction between treatment and farm on keel bone injuries measured at dissection (P < 0.05), with the probability of birds having high keel-damage scores increasing in the perched treatment in some farms but not others. In general, as the keel bone injury score measured at dissection increased, the breaking strength (P < 0.001) and ash content (P < 0.05) of the tibia bone decreased. It is suggested that individual variation in bone strength contributes to differences in susceptibility to keel injury. No relationship existed between keel-injury score measured at dissection and individual parameters, such as weight, girth, or wing:girth ratio (P > 0

  6. Live cell plasma membranes do not exhibit a miscibility phase transition over a wide range of temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Il-Hyung; Saha, Suvrajit; Polley, Anirban; Huang, Hector; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan; Groves, Jay T

    2015-03-26

    Lipid/cholesterol mixtures derived from cell membranes as well as their synthetic reconstitutions exhibit well-defined miscibility phase transitions and critical phenomena near physiological temperatures. This suggests that lipid/cholesterol-mediated phase separation plays a role in the organization of live cell membranes. However, macroscopic lipid-phase separation is not generally observed in cell membranes, and the degree to which properties of isolated lipid mixtures are preserved in the cell membrane remain unknown. A fundamental property of phase transitions is that the variation of tagged particle diffusion with temperature exhibits an abrupt change as the system passes through the transition, even when the two phases are distributed in a nanometer-scale emulsion. We support this using a variety of Monte Carlo and atomistic simulations on model lipid membrane systems. However, temperature-dependent fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of labeled lipids and membrane-anchored proteins in live cell membranes shows a consistently smooth increase in the diffusion coefficient as a function of temperature. We find no evidence of a discrete miscibility phase transition throughout a wide range of temperatures: 14-37 °C. This contrasts the behavior of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) blebbed from the same cells, which do exhibit phase transitions and macroscopic phase separation. Fluorescence lifetime analysis of a DiI probe in both cases reveals a significant environmental difference between the live cell and the GPMV. Taken together, these data suggest the live cell membrane may avoid the miscibility phase transition inherent to its lipid constituents by actively regulating physical parameters, such as tension, in the membrane.

  7. Versatile Approach to Access the Low Temperature Thermodynamics of Lattice Polymers and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüst, Thomas; Landau, David P.

    2009-05-01

    We show that Wang-Landau sampling, combined with suitable Monte Carlo trial moves, provides a powerful method for both the ground state search and the determination of the density of states for the hydrophobic-polar (HP) protein model and the interacting self-avoiding walk (ISAW) model for homopolymers. We obtain accurate estimates of thermodynamic quantities for HP sequences with >100 monomers and for ISAWs up to >500 monomers. Our procedure possesses an intrinsic simplicity and overcomes the limitations inherent in more tailored approaches making it interesting for a broad range of protein and polymer models.

  8. Interactive effects of water limitation and elevated temperature on the physiology, development and fitness of diverse accessions of Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Des Marais, David L; Lasky, Jesse R; Verslues, Paul E; Chang, Trent Z; Juenger, Thomas E

    2017-04-01

    An enduring question in plant physiology and evolution is how single genotypes of plants optimize performance in diverse, often highly variable, environments. We grew 35 natural accessions of the grass Brachypodium distachyon in four environments in the glasshouse, contrasting soil water deficit, elevated temperature and their interaction. We modeled treatment, genotype and interactive effects on leaf-level and whole-plant traits, including fecundity. We also assessed the relationship between glasshouse-measured traits and parameters related to climate at the place of origin. We found abundant genetic variation in both constitutive and induced traits related to plant-water relations. Most traits showed strong interaction between temperature and water availability, and we observed genotype-by-environment interaction for several traits. Notably, leaf free proline abundance showed a strong effect of genotype × temperature × water. We found strong associations between phenology, biomass and water use efficiency (WUE) with parameters describing climate of origin. Plants respond to multiple stressors in ways not directly predictable from single stressors, underscoring the complex and trait-specific mechanisms of environmental response. Climate-trait correlations support a role for WUE and phenology in local adaptation to climate in B. distachyon.

  9. Debye temperature of metallic nanowires--an experimental determination from the resistance of metallic nanowires in the temperature range 4.2 K-300 K.

    PubMed

    Bid, Aveek; Bora, Achyut; Raychaudhuri, A K

    2007-06-01

    We have studied the resistance of metallic nanowires (silver and copper) as a function of the wire diameter in the temperature range 4.2 K-300 K. The nanowires with an average diameter of 15 nm-200 nm and length 6 microm were electrochemically deposited using polycarbonate membranes as template from AgNO3 and CuSO4, respectively. The wires after growth were removed from the membranes by dissolving the polymer in dichloromethane and their crystalline nature confirmed by XRD and TEM studies. The TEM study establishes that the nanowires are single crystalline and can have twin in them. The resistivity data was fitted to Bloch-Gruneisen theorem with the values of Debye temperature and the electron-acoustic phonon coupling constant as the two fit variables. The value of the Debye temperature obtained for the Ag wires was seen to match well with that of the bulk while for Cu wires a significant reduction was observed. The observed increase in resistivity with a decrease in the wire diameter could be explained as due to diffuse surface scattering of the conduction electrons.

  10. The effect of temperature, interaction range, and pair potential on the formation of dodecagonal quasicrystals in core-corona systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattabhiraman, Harini; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2017-03-01

    A two-dimensional dodecagonal quasicrystal was previously reported by Dotera et al (2014 Nature 506 208) in a system of particles interacting with a hard core of diameter σ and a repulsive square shoulder of diameter δ =1.40σ . In the current work, we examine the formation of this quasicrystal using bond orientational order parameters, correlation functions and tiling distributions. We find that this dodecagonal quasicrystal forms from a fluid phase. We further study the effect of the width of the repulsive shoulder by simulating the system over a range of values of δ. For the range of densities and temperatures considered, we observe the formation of the dodecagonal quasicrystal between δ =1.30σ and 1.44σ . We also study the effect of shape of the interaction potential by simulating the system using three other interaction potentials with two length scales, namely hard-core plus a linear ramp, modified exponential, or Buckingham (exp-6) potential. We observe the presence of the quasicrystal in all three systems. However, depending on the shape of the potential, the formation of the quasicrystal takes place at lower temperatures (or higher interaction strengths). Using free-energy calculations, we demonstrate that the quasicrystal is thermodynamically stable in the square-shoulder and linear-ramp system.

  11. Amylose Phase Composition As Analyzed By FTIR In A Temperature Ramp: Influence Of Short Range Order On The Thermodynamic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernazzani, Paul; Delmas, Genevieve

    1998-03-01

    Amylose, a major component of starch, is one of the most important biopolymers, being mainly associated with the pharmacological and food industries. Although widely studied, a complete control and understanding of the physical properties of amylose is still lacking. It is well known that structure and phase transition are important aspects of the functionality of biopolymers since they influence physical attributes such as appearance, digestibility, water holding capacity, etc. In the past, we have studied polyethylene phase composition by DSC in a very slow temperature (T) ramp (1K/h) and have demonstrated the presence and importance of short-range order on the polymer and its characteristics. In this study, we evaluated the phase composition of potato amylose and associated the thermodynamic properties with the presence of short-range order. Two methods were correlated, DSC (in a 1K/h T-ramp) and FTIR as a function of temperature, also in a 1K/h T-ramp. The effects of the various phases on thermodynamic properties such as gelation and enzyme or chemical resistance are discussed.

  12. The effect of temperature, interaction range, and pair potential on the formation of dodecagonal quasicrystals in core-corona systems.

    PubMed

    Pattabhiraman, Harini; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2017-03-08

    A two-dimensional dodecagonal quasicrystal was previously reported by Dotera et al (2014 Nature 506 208) in a system of particles interacting with a hard core of diameter σ and a repulsive square shoulder of diameter [Formula: see text]. In the current work, we examine the formation of this quasicrystal using bond orientational order parameters, correlation functions and tiling distributions. We find that this dodecagonal quasicrystal forms from a fluid phase. We further study the effect of the width of the repulsive shoulder by simulating the system over a range of values of δ. For the range of densities and temperatures considered, we observe the formation of the dodecagonal quasicrystal between [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. We also study the effect of shape of the interaction potential by simulating the system using three other interaction potentials with two length scales, namely hard-core plus a linear ramp, modified exponential, or Buckingham (exp-6) potential. We observe the presence of the quasicrystal in all three systems. However, depending on the shape of the potential, the formation of the quasicrystal takes place at lower temperatures (or higher interaction strengths). Using free-energy calculations, we demonstrate that the quasicrystal is thermodynamically stable in the square-shoulder and linear-ramp system.

  13. Development of Superior Sorbents for Separation of CO2 from Flue Gas at a Wide Temperature range during Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Panagiotis Smirniotis

    2002-09-17

    A number basic sorbents based on CaO were synthesized, characterized with novel techniques and tested for sorption of CO{sub 2} and selected gas mixtures simulating flue gas from coal fired boilers. Our studies resulted in highly promising sorbents which demonstrated zero affinity for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, and NO very low affinity for water, ultrahigh CO{sub 2} sorption capacities, and rapid sorption characteristics, CO{sub 2} sorption at a very wide temperature range, durability, and low synthesis cost. One of the 'key' characteristics of the proposed materials is the fact that we can control very accurately their basicity (optimum number of basic sites of the appropriate strength) which allows for the selective chemisorption of CO{sub 2} at a wide range of temperatures. These unique characteristics of this family of sorbents offer high promise for development of advanced industrial sorbents for the effective CO{sub 2} removal.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF SUPERIOR SORBENTS FOR SEPARATION OF CO2 FROM FLUE GAS AT A WIDE TEMPERATURE RANGE DURING COAL COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    Panagiotis G. Smirniotis

    2005-01-30

    For this part of the project the studies focused on the development of novel sorbents for reducing the carbon dioxide emissions at high temperatures. Our studies focused on cesium doped CaO sorbents with respect to other major flue gas compounds in a wide temperature range. The thermo-gravimetric analysis of sorbents with loadings of CaO doped on 20 wt% cesium demonstrated high CO{sub 2} sorption uptakes (up to 66 wt% CO{sub 2}/sorbent). It is remarkable to note that zero adsorption affinity for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and NO at temperatures as high as 600 C was observed. For water vapor and nitrogen oxide we observed a positive effect for CO{sub 2} adsorption. In the presence of steam, the CO{sub 2} adsorption increased to the highest adsorption capacity of 77 wt% CO{sub 2}/sorbent. In the presence of nitrogen oxide, the final CO{sub 2} uptake remained same, but the rate of adsorption was higher at the initial stages (10%) than the case where no nitrogen oxide was fed.

  15. High-dynamic-range linear analog data links (1-20 GHz) using room temperature DFB laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Ian H.; Hartmann, Peter; Ingham, Jonathan D.; Webster, Matthew; Wake, David; Wonfor, Adrian; Penty, Richard V.; Seeds, Alwyn J.; White, J. Kenton

    2004-02-01

    We report the analysis and application of uncooled, directly-modulated high-speed DFB lasers with emphasis on their analogue transmission performance. Fibre-optic links employing such lasers are shown to meet the most stringent requirements of analogue systems at both high carrier frequencies and high temperatures. Spurious-free dynamic ranges (SFDR) exceeding 100dB×Hz2/3 and 90dB×Hz2/3 and input third-order intercept points (IIP3) above 20dBm and 18dBm are reported for carrier frequencies up to 20GHz at 25°C and up to 10GHz at 85°C, respectively. The error-vector magnitude (EVM) for a 256-QAM modulated signal transmitted over 15km of SMF remains below 1.9% for carrier frequencies of both 2GHz and 5GHz for all measured temperatures. The link performance is assessed by using 3GPP W-CDMA, IEEE 802.11a and IEEE 802.11b signals. In all cases the EVM remains within the standard specification, for fibre-optic link lengths of up to 10km and laser operating temperatures of up to 70°C. Finally, an IEEE 802.11b WLAN demonstrator is presented, allowing antenna remoting over up to 1000m of 62.5/125μm MMF.

  16. Winter body temperature patterns in free-ranging Cape ground squirrel, Xerus inauris: no evidence for torpor.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Wendy A; O'Riain, M Justin; Hetem, Robyn S; Fuller, Andrea; Fick, Linda G

    2010-10-01

    The body temperature (T(b)) of Cape ground squirrels (Xerus inauris, Sciuridae) living in their natural environment during winter has not yet been investigated. In this study we measured abdominal T(b) of eight free-ranging Cape ground squirrels over 27 consecutive days during the austral winter. Mean daily T(b) was relatively stable at 37.0 ± 0.2°C (range 33.4 to 40.2°C) despite a marked variation in globe temperature (T(g)) (range -7 to 37°C). Lactating females (n = 2) consistently had a significantly higher mean T (b) (0.7°C) than non-lactating females (n = 3) and males. There was a pronounced nychthemeral rhythm with a mean active phase T(b) of 38.1 ± 0.1°C and a mean inactive phase T(b) of 36.3 ± 0.3°C for non-lactating individuals. Mean daily amplitude of T(b) rhythm was 3.8 ± 0.2°C. T(b) during the active phase closely followed T(g) and mean active phase T(b) was significantly correlated with mean active phase T(g) (r(2) = 0.3-0.9; P < 0.01). There was no evidence for daily torpor or pronounced hypothermia during the inactive phase, and mean minimum inactive phase T(b) was 35.7 ± 0.3°C for non-lactating individuals. Several alternatives (including nocturnal huddling, an aseasonal breeding pattern and abundant winter food resources) as to why Cape ground squirrels do not employ nocturnal hypothermia are discussed.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of Skin Lipids: Effects of the Molar Ratio of Individual Components over a Wide Temperature Range.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rakesh; Rai, Beena

    2015-09-03

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to systematically investigate the effects of the molar ratio of the individual components cholesterol (CHOL), free fatty acid (FFA), and ceramides (CER) on the properties of the skin lipid bilayer over a wide temperature range (300-400 K). Several independent simulations were performed for bilayers comprised of only CER, CHOL, or FFA molecules as well as those made up of a mixture of CER:CHOL:FFA molecules in different molar ratios. It was found that CHOL increases the stability of the bilayer, since the mixed (CER:CHOL:FFA) 1:1:0, 1:1:1, and 2:2:1 bilayers remained stable until 400 K while the pure ceramide bilayer disintegrated around ∼390 K. It was also observed that CHOL reduces the volume spanned by ceramide molecules, thereby leading to a higher area per CER and FFA molecule in the mixed bilayer system. The CHOL molecule provided more rigidity to the mixed bilayer and led to a more ordered phase at elevated temperatures. The CHOL molecule provided fluidity to the bilayer below the phase transition temperature of CER and kept the bilayer rigid above the phase transition temperature. The FFA interdigitizes with CER molecules and increases the thickness of the bilayer, while rigid CHOL decreases the bilayer thickness. The presence of CHOL increases the compressibility of the bilayer which is responsible for the high barrier function of skin. The CER molecule forms inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds, while CHOL only forms intermolecular hydrogen bonds.

  18. SNCR De-NOx within a moderate temperature range using urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate as reductant.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Chen, D Z; Fan, S; Hong, L; Wang, D

    2016-10-01

    In this research, urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate solutions are used as reductants for the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) De-NOx process below 650 °C. The urea concentration in the urea/hydrazine hydrate solutions is chosen through experimental and theoretical studies. To determine the mechanism of the De-NOx process, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the urea/hydrazine hydrate solutions and their thermal decomposition in air and nitrogen atmospheres were studied to understand their decomposition behaviours and redox characteristics. Then a plug flow reactor (PFR) model was adopted to simulate the De-NOx processes in a pilot scale tubular reactor, and the calculated De-NOx efficiency vs. temperature profiles were compared with experimental results to support the mechanism and choose the proper reductant and its reaction temperature. Both the experimental and calculated results show that when the urea is spiked into hydrazine hydrate solution to make the urea-N content approximately 16.7%-25% of the total N content in the solution, better De-NOx efficiencies can be obtained in the temperature range of 550-650 °C, under which NH3 is inactive in reducing NOx. And it is also proved that for these urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate solutions, the hydrazine decomposition through the pathway N2H4 + M = N2H3 + H + M is enhanced to provide radical H, which is active to reduce NO. Finally, the reaction routes for SNCR De-NOx process based on urea-spiked hydrazine hydrate at the proper temperature are proposed.

  19. Impact of Solar Control PVB Glass on Vehicle Interior Temperatures, Air-Conditioning Capacity, Fuel Consumption, and Vehicle Range

    SciTech Connect

    Rugh, J.; Chaney, L.; Venson, T.; Ramroth, L.; Rose, M.

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the impact of Saflex1 S-series Solar Control PVB (polyvinyl butyral) configurations on conventional vehicle fuel economy and electric vehicle (EV) range. The approach included outdoor vehicle thermal soak testing, RadTherm cool-down analysis, and vehicle simulations. Thermal soak tests were conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility in Golden, Colorado. The test results quantified interior temperature reductions and were used to generate initial conditions for the RadTherm cool-down analysis. The RadTherm model determined the potential reduction in air-conditioning (A/C) capacity, which was used to calculate the A/C load for the vehicle simulations. The vehicle simulation tool identified the potential reduction in fuel consumption or improvement in EV range between a baseline and modified configurations for the city and highway drive cycles. The thermal analysis determined a potential 4.0% reduction in A/C power for the Saflex Solar PVB solar control configuration. The reduction in A/C power improved the vehicle range of EVs and fuel economy of conventional vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

  20. Long-term patterns of air temperatures, daily temperature range, precipitation, grass-reference evapotranspiration and aridity index in the USA Great Plains: Part I. Spatial trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukal, M.; Irmak, S.

    2016-11-01

    Due to their substantial spatio-temporal behavior, long-term quantification and analyses of important hydrological variables are essential for practical applications in water resources planning, evaluating the water use of agricultural crop production and quantifying crop evapotranspiration patterns and irrigation management vs. hydrologic balance relationships. Observed data at over 800 sites across the Great Plains of USA, comprising of 9 states and 2,307,410 km2 of surface area, which is about 30% of the terrestrial area of the USA, were used to quantify and map large-scale and long-term (1968-2013) spatial trends of air temperatures, daily temperature range (DTR), precipitation, grass-reference evapotranspiration (ETo) and aridity index (AI) at monthly, growing season and annual time steps. Air temperatures had a strong north to south increasing trend, with annual average varying from -1 to 24 °C, and growing season average temperature varying from 8 to 30 °C. DTR gradually decreased from western to eastern parts of the region, with a regional annual and growing season averages of 14.25 °C and 14.79 °C, respectively. Precipitation had a gradual shift towards higher magnitudes from west to east, with the average annual and growing season (May-September) precipitation ranging from 163 to 1486 mm and from 98 to 746 mm, respectively. ETo had a southwest-northeast decreasing trend, with regional annual and growing season averages of 1297 mm and 823 mm, respectively. AI increased from west to east, indicating higher humidity (less arid) towards the east, with regional annual and growing season averages of 0.49 and 0.44, respectively. The spatial datasets and maps for these important climate variables can serve as valuable background for climate change and hydrologic studies in the Great Plains region. Through identification of priority areas from the developed maps, efforts of the concerned personnel and agencies and resources can be diverted towards development

  1. A long-range and long-life telemetry data-acquisition system for heart rate and multiple body temperatures from free-ranging animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, G. F.; Westbrook, R. M.; Fryer, T. B.; Miranda, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The system includes an implantable transmitter, external receiver-retransmitter collar, and a microprocessor-controlled demodulator. The size of the implant is suitable for animals with body weights of a few kilograms or more; further size reduction of the implant is possible. The ECG is sensed by electrodes designed for internal telemetry and to reduce movement artifacts. The R-wave characteristics are then specifically selected to trigger a short radio frequency pulse. Temperatures are sensed at desired locations by thermistors and then, based on a heartbeat counter, transmitted intermittently via pulse interval modulation. This modulation scheme includes first and last calibration intervals for a reference by ratios with the temperature intervals to achieve good accuracy even over long periods. Pulse duration and pulse sequencing are used to discriminate between heart rate and temperature pulses as well as RF interference.

  2. Metallographic anlaysis and strength investigation of different Be-Cu joints in the temperature range RT-3500C

    SciTech Connect

    Gervash, A.A.; Giniatouline, R.N.; Mazul, I.V.

    1995-09-01

    The goal of this work is to estimate the strength and structure of different Be-Cu joining techniques. Brazing, diffusion bonding and joint rolling methods were chosen as ITER Be-Cu joint method candidates. Selected for ITER application Be-Cu joints were produced as technological plates (30-50 mm x 50-100 mm x thickness). AR samples for farther investigations were cutted out from initial technological plates. To compare mechanical strength of selected Be-Cu joints tensile and shearing tests of chosen candidates were carried out in the temperature range RT - 350{degrees}C. The metallographic analysis of Be-Cu crosssection was also done. Preliminary results of these tests as well as metallographic analysis data are presented. The industrial possibilities of producing required for ITER full scale Be-Cu joints are discussed.

  3. Absolute rate of the reaction of O/3-P/ with hydrogen sulfide over the temperature range 263 to 495 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whytock, D. A.; Timmons, R. B.; Lee, J. H.; Michael, J. V.; Payne, W. A.; Stief, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    The technique of flash photolysis coupled with time resolved detection of O via resonance fluorescence has been used to obtain rate constants for the reaction of O(3-P) with H2S at temperatures from 263 to 495 K and at pressures in the range 10-400 torr. Under conditions where secondary reactions are avoided, the measured rate constants for the primary step obey the Arrhenius equation k = (7.24 plus or minus 1.07) x 10 to the -12th exp(-3300 plus or minus 100/1.987 T) cu cm/molecules/s. Experiments with D2S show that the reaction exhibits a primary isotope effect, in support of a hydrogen abstraction mechanism.

  4. Evaluation of a Programmable Voltage-Controlled MEMS Oscillator, Type SiT3701, Over a Wide Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Semiconductor chips based on MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) technology, such as sensors, transducers, and actuators, are becoming widely used in today s electronics due to their high performance, low power consumption, tolerance to shock and vibration, and immunity to electro-static discharge. In addition, the MEMS fabrication process allows for the miniaturization of individual chips as well as the integration of various electronic circuits into one module, such as system-on-a-chip. These measures would simplify overall system design, reduce parts count and interface, improve reliability, and reduce cost; and they would meet requirements of systems destined for use in space exploration missions. In this work, the performance of a recently-developed MEMS voltage-controlled oscillator was evaluated under a wide temperature range. Operation of this new commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) device was also assessed under thermal cycling to address some operational conditions of the space environment

  5. GlidCop® DSC properties in the temperature range of 20-350°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Ronald R.; Troxell, Jack D.; Nadkarni, Anil V.

    1996-10-01

    GlidCop® AL-25 LOX-80 grade plates manufactured by processes relevant to ITER first wall copper alloy requirements were tested in the temperature range of 20-350°C. Plate manufacturing methods included hot isotatic pressing (HIP), extrusion (EXT), and extrusion followed by cross-rolling (EXT + XROLL). Tests that were performed included tensile, fracture toughness, impact toughness, and creep. The EXT + XROLL plate was found to have higher total elongation, reduction of area, and fracture toughness values than the EXT and HIP plates. All three processes had similar ultimate tensile and 0.2% yield strengths. The HIP material exhibited a lower creep rate than EXT + XROLL. The EXT and the EXT + XROLL plates had similar impact toughness values, which were higher than the HIP plate. Overall, the EXT + XROLL plate had the best combination of properties of the three processes examined.

  6. Fluoride salts and container materials for thermal energy storage applications in the temperature range 973 - 1400 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.; Whittenberger, J. Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Multicomponent fluoride salt mixtures were characterized for use as latent heat of fusion heat storage materials in advanced solar dynamic space power systems with operating temperatures in the range of 973 to 1400 K. The melting points and eutectic composition for many systems with published phase diagrams were verified, and several new eutectic compositions were identified. Additionally, the heats of fusion of several binary and ternary eutectics and congruently melting intermediate compounds were measured by differential scanning calorimetry. The extent of corrosion of various metals by fluoride melts was estimated from thermodynamic considerations, and equilibrium conditions inside a containment vessel were calculated as functions of the initial moisture content of the salt and free volume above the molten salt. Preliminary experimental data on the corrosion of commercial, high-temperature alloys in LiF-19.5CaF2 and NaF-27CaF2-36MgF2 melts are presented and compared to the thermodynamic predictions.

  7. Thermal Conductivity of Magnesium Alloys in the Temperature Range from -125 °C to 400 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sanghyun; Ham, Hye Jeong; Kwon, Su Yong; Kim, Sok Won; Suh, Chang Min

    2013-12-01

    Magnesium alloys have been widely used in recent years as lightweight structural materials in the manufacturing of automobiles, airplanes, and portable computers. Magnesium alloys have extremely low density (as low as 1738 kg · m-3) and high rigidity, which makes them suitable for such applications. In this study, the thermal conductivity of two different magnesium alloys made by twin-roll casting was investigated using the laser-flash technique and differential scanning calorimetry for thermal diffusivity and specific heat capacity measurements, respectively. The thermal diffusivity of the magnesium alloys, AZ31 and AZ61, was measured over the temperature range from -125 °C to 400 °C. The alloys AZ31 and AZ61 are composed of magnesium, aluminum, and zinc. The thermal conductivity gradually increased with temperature. The densities of AZ31 and AZ61 were 1754 kg · m-3 and 1777 kg · m-3, respectively. The thermal conductivity of AZ31 was about 25 % higher than that of AZ61, and this is attributed to the amount of precipitation.

  8. Fluoride salts and container materials for thermal energy storage applications in the temperature range 973 to 1400 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.; Whittenberger, J. Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Multicomponent fluoride salt mixtures were characterized for use as latent heat of fusion heat storage materials in advanced solar dynamic space power systems with operating temperatures in the range of 973 to 1400 K. The melting points and eutectic composition for many systems with published phase diagrams were verified, and several new eutectic compositions were identified. Additionally, the heats of fusion of several binary and ternary eutectics and congruently melting intermediate compounds were measured by differential scanning calorimetry. The extent of corrosion of various metals by fluoride melts was estimated from thermodynamic considerations, and equilibrium conditions inside a containment vessel were calculated as functions of the initial moisture content of the salt and free volume above the molten salt. Preliminary experimental data on the corrosion of commercial, high-temperature alloys in LiF-19.5CaF2 and NaF-27CaF2-36MgF2 melts are presented and compared to the thermodynamic predictions.

  9. Computing Highly Accurate Spectroscopic Line Lists that Cover a Large Temperature Range for Characterization of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T. J.; Huang, X.; Schwenke, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade, it has become apparent that the most effective approach for determining highly accurate rotational and rovibrational line lists for molecules of interest in planetary atmospheres is through a combination of high-resolution laboratory experiments coupled with state-of-the art ab initio quantum chemistry methods. The approach involves computing the most accurate potential energy surface (PES) possible using state-of-the art electronic structure methods, followed by computing rotational and rovibrational energy levels using an exact variational method to solve the nuclear Schrödinger equation. Then, reliable experimental data from high-resolution experiments is used to refine the ab initio PES in order to improve the accuracy of the computed energy levels and transition energies. From the refinement step, we have been able to achieve an accuracy of approximately 0.015 cm-1 for rovibrational transition energies, and even better for purely rotational transitions. This combined 'experiment / theory' approach allows for determination of essentially a complete line list, with hundreds of millions of transitions, and having the transition energies and intensities be highly accurate. Our group has successfully applied this approach to determine highly accurate line lists for NH3 and CO2 (and isotopologues), and very recently for SO2 and isotopologues. Here I will report our latest results for SO2 including all isotopologues. Comparisons to the available data in HITRAN2012 and other available databases will be shown, though we note that our line lists SO2 are significantly more complete than any other databases. Since it is important to span a large temperature range in order to model the spectral signature of exoplanets, we will also demonstrate how the spectra change on going from low temperatures (100 K) to higher temperatures (500 K).

  10. State of water in starch-water systems in the gelatinization temperature range as investigated using dielectric relaxation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motwani, Tanuj

    Starch-water interactions occurring during gelatinization are critical for developing a mechanistic understanding of the gelatinization process. The overall goal of this project was to investigate the state of water in starch-water systems in the gelatinization temperature range using dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. In the first part of the project, the dielectric response of native wheat starch-water slurries was measured at seven different starch concentrations between 5--60% starch (w/w) in the frequency range of 200 MHz--20 GHz at 25°C. The deconvolution of the dielectric spectra using the Debye model revealed presence of up to three relaxation processes. The relaxation time range of what were considered to be the high, intermediate and low frequency relaxations were 4--9 ps, 20--25 ps and 230--620 ps, respectively. The high frequency relaxation was observed at all starch concentrations, while the intermediate and low frequency relaxation were only observed at starch concentrations of 10% and above, and 30% and above, respectively. The high frequency relaxation was attributed to bulk water, while the intermediate and low frequency relaxations were attributed to rotationally restrained water molecules present in the starch-water system. To investigate the state of water in the gelatinization temperature range, the dielectric response, gelatinization enthalpy and water absorption by 10%, 30% or 50% starch slurries were measured after heating the slurries to different end temperatures between 40--90°C for 30 min. The high frequency relaxation time for 10% starch slurry dropped significantly (P<0.001) upon heating up to 60°C. For 30% and 50% starch slurries, high frequency relaxation times were not significantly influenced (P>0.159) by heating up to 80°C. The intermediate and low frequency relaxation times were not significantly influenced (P>0.712) by heating for all starch concentrations. Also, the amount of water associated with the three relaxations was

  11. A technique for extending the precision and the range of temperature programmed desorption toward extremely low coverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haegel, Stefan; Zecho, Thomas; Wehner, Stefan

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, an improvement of the temperature programmed desorption (TPD) technique is introduced, which facilitates fully automated sampling of TPD spectra with excellent reproducibility, especially useful for extremely low coverages. By averaging many sampled TPD spectra, the range of the TPD technique can be extended toward lower coverages, as well as the quality of the spectra can be improved. This allows for easy extraction of information about the adsorbate-surface bond. A state of the art TPD apparatus with a two chamber setup and a high quality quadrupole mass spectrometer was extended by automated components. These are an automated gas dosing system, ensuring precise dosing of gas, combined with a motor driven sample manipulation unit and a liquid nitrogen cryostat with automatic refilling. In addition all components were controlled by a computer. A large number of TPD cycles could be sampled without the need of interaction of an operator. Here, it is shown for up to more than 400 TPD cycles. This opens a wide range of new interesting applications for the TPD technique, especially in the limit of zero coverage. Here, basic experiments on well known adsorbate systems are shown to view the ability and limit of this approach.

  12. Gd(III)-Gd(III) EPR distance measurements--the range of accessible distances and the impact of zero field splitting.

    PubMed

    Dalaloyan, Arina; Qi, Mian; Ruthstein, Sharon; Vega, Shimon; Godt, Adelheid; Feintuch, Akiva; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2015-07-28

    Gd(III) complexes have emerged as spin labels for distance determination in biomolecules through double-electron-electron resonance (DEER) measurements at high fields. For data analysis, the standard approach developed for a pair of weakly coupled spins with S = 1/2 was applied, ignoring the actual properties of Gd(III) ions, i.e. S = 7/2 and ZFS (zero field splitting) ≠ 0. The present study reports on a careful investigation on the consequences of this approach, together with the range of distances accessible by DEER with Gd(III) complexes as spin labels. The experiments were performed on a series of specifically designed and synthesized Gd-rulers (Gd-PyMTA-spacer-Gd-PyMTA) covering Gd-Gd distances of 2-8 nm. These were dissolved in D2O-glycerol-d8 (0.03-0.10 mM solutions) which is the solvent used for the corresponding experiments on biomolecules. Q- and W-band DEER measurements, followed by data analysis using the standard data analysis approach, used for S = 1/2 pairs gave the distance-distribution curves, of which the absolute maxima agreed very well with the expected distances. However, in the case of the short distances of 2.1 and 2.9 nm, the distance distributions revealed additional peaks. These are a consequence of neglecting the pseudo-secular term in the dipolar Hamiltonian during the data analysis, as is outlined in a theoretical treatment. At distances of 3.4 nm and above, disregarding the pseudo-secular term leads to a broadening of a maximum of 0.4 nm of the distance-distribution curves at half height. Overall, the distances of up to 8.3 nm were determined, and the long evolution time of 16 μs at 10 K indicates that a distance of up to 9.4 nm can be accessed. A large distribution of the ZFS parameter, D, as is found for most Gd(III) complexes in a frozen solution, is crucial for the application of Gd(III) complexes as spin labels for distance determination via Gd(III)-Gd(III) DEER, especially for short distances. The larger ZFS of Gd-PyMTA, in

  13. Stress-induced rise in body temperature is repeatable in free-ranging Eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus).

    PubMed

    Careau, Vincent; Réale, Denis; Garant, Dany; Speakman, John R; Humphries, Murray M

    2012-04-01

    In response to handling or other acute stressors, most mammals, including humans, experience a temporary rise in body temperature (T(b)). Although this stress-induced rise in T(b) has been extensively studied on model organisms under controlled environments, individual variation in this interesting phenomenon has not been examined in the field. We investigated the stress-induced rise in T(b) in free-ranging eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) to determine first if it is repeatable. We predicted that the stress-induced rise in T(b) should be positively correlated to factors affecting heat production and heat dissipation, including ambient temperature (T(a)), body mass (M(b)), and field metabolic rate (FMR). Over two summers, we recorded both T(b) within the first minute of handling time (T(b1)) and after 5 min of handling time (T(b5)) 294 times on 140 individuals. The mean ∆T(b) (T(b5) - T(b1)) during this short interval was 0.30 ± 0.02°C, confirming that the stress-induced rise in T(b) occurs in chipmunks. Consistent differences among individuals accounted for 40% of the total variation in ∆T(b) (i.e. the stress-induced rise in T(b) is significantly repeatable). We also found that the stress-induced rise in T(b) was positively correlated to T(a), M(b), and mass-adjusted FMR. These results confirm that individuals consistently differ in their expression of the stress-induced rise in T(b) and that the extent of its expression is affected by factors related to heat production and dissipation. We highlight some research constraints and opportunities related to the integration of this laboratory paradigm into physiological and evolutionary ecology.

  14. The long-term trend in the diurnal temperature range over Asia and its natural and anthropogenic causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Li, Zhanqing; Yang, Xin; Gong, Hainan; Li, Chao; Xiong, Anyuan

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the causes of long-term temperature trends is at the core of climate change studies. Any observed trend can result from natural variability or anthropogenic influences or both. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of 18 climate models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 on simulating the Asian diurnal temperature range (DTR) and explored the potential causes of the long-term trend in the DTR by examining the response of the DTR to natural forcing (volcanic aerosols and solar variability) and anthropogenic forcing (anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHG) and aerosols) in the historical period of 1961-2005. For the climatology, the multimodel ensemble mean reproduced the geographical distribution and amplitude of the DTR over eastern China and India but underestimated the magnitudes of the DTR over the Tibetan Plateau and the high-latitude regions of the Asian continent. These negative biases in the DTR over frigid zones existed in most models. Seasonal biases in the DTR pattern from models were similar to the bias in the annual mean DTR pattern. Based on three selected state-of-the-art models, the observed decreasing trend in the DTR over Asia was reasonably reproduced in the all-forcing run. A comparison of separate forcing experiments revealed that anthropogenic forcing plays the dominant role in the declining trend in the DTR. Observations and model simulations showed that GHG forcing is mainly responsible for the negative trends in the DTR over Asia but that anthropogenic aerosol forcing was also behind the decreasing trend in the DTR over China and especially over eastern China.

  15. Multiphase Binary Mixture Flows in Porous Media in a Wide Pressure and Temperature Range Including Critical Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, A.

    2011-12-01

    Multiphase flows in porous media with a transition between sub- and supercritical thermodynamic conditions occur in many natural and technological processes (e.g. in deep regions of geothermal reservoirs where temperature reaches critical point of water or in gas-condensate fields where subject to critical conditions retrograde condensation occurs and even in underground carbon dioxide sequestration processes at high formation pressure). Simulation of these processes is complicated due to degeneration of conservation laws under critical conditions and requires non-classical mathematical models and methods. A new mathematical model is proposed for efficient simulation of binary mixture flows in a wide range of pressures and temperatures that includes critical conditions. The distinctive feature of the model lies in the methodology for mixture properties determination. Transport equations and Darcy law are solved together with calculation of the entropy maximum that is reached in thermodynamic equilibrium and determines mixture composition. To define and solve the problem only one function - mixture thermodynamic potential - is required. Such approach allows determination not only single-phase states and two-phase states of liquid-gas type as in classical models but also two-phase states of liquid-liquid type and three-phase states. The proposed mixture model was implemented in MUFITS (Multiphase Filtration Transport Simulator) code for hydrodynamic simulations. As opposed to classical approaches pressure, enthalpy and composition variables together with fully implicit method and cascade procedure are used. The code is capable of unstructured grids, heterogeneous porous media, relative permeability and capillary pressure dependence on temperature and pressure, multiphase diffusion, optional number of sink and sources, etc. There is an additional module for mixture properties specification. The starting point for the simulation is a cubic equation of state that is

  16. Development of Superior Sorbents for Separation of CO2 from Flue Gas at a Wide Temperature Range During Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Panagiotis G. Smirniotis

    2007-06-30

    In chapter 1, the studies focused on the development of novel sorbents for reducing the carbon dioxide emissions at high temperatures. Our studies focused on cesium doped CaO sorbents with respect to other major flue gas compounds in a wide temperature range. The thermo-gravimetric analysis of sorbents with loadings of CaO doped on 20 wt% cesium demonstrated high CO{sub 2} sorption uptakes (up to 66 wt% CO{sub 2}/sorbent). It is remarkable to note that zero adsorption affinity for N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and NO at temperatures as high as 600 C was observed. For water vapor and nitrogen oxide we observed a positive effect for CO{sub 2} adsorption. In the presence of steam, the CO{sub 2} adsorption increased to the highest adsorption capacity of 77 wt% CO{sub 2}/sorbent. In the presence of nitrogen oxide, the final CO{sub 2} uptake remained same, but the rate of adsorption was higher at the initial stages (10%) than the case where no nitrogen oxide was fed. In chapter 2, Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 4H{sub 2}O, CaO, Ca(OH){sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, and Ca(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O were used as precursors for synthesis of CaO sorbents on this work. The sorbents prepared from calcium acetate (CaAc{sub 2}-CaO) resulted in the best uptake characteristics for CO{sub 2}. It possessed higher BET surface area and higher pore volume than the other sorbents. According to SEM images, this sorbent shows 'fluffy' structure, which probably contributes to its high surface area and pore volume. When temperatures were between 550 and 800 C, this sorbent could be carbonated almost completely. Moreover, the carbonation progressed dominantly at the initial short period. Under numerous adsorption-desorption cycles, the CaAc{sub 2}-CaO demonstrated the best reversibility, even under the existence of 10 vol % water vapor. In a 27 cyclic running, the sorbent sustained fairly high carbonation conversion of 62%. Pore size distributions indicate that their pore volume

  17. A versatile telemetry system for continuous measurement of heart rate, body temperature and locomotor activity in free-ranging ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Signer, Claudio; Ruf, Thomas; Schober, Franz; Fluch, Gerhard; Paumann, Thomas; Arnold, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Summary 1. Measuring physiological and behavioural parameters in free-ranging animals – and therefore under fully natural conditions – is of general biological concern but difficult to perform. 2. We have developed a minimally invasive telemetry system for ruminants that is capable of measuring heart rate (HR), body temperature (Tb) and locomotor activity (LA). A ruminal transmitter unit was per os placed into the reticulum and therefore located in close proximity to the heart. The unit detected HR by the use of an acceleration sensor and also measured Tb. HR and Tb signals were transmitted via short-distance UHF link to a repeater system located in a collar unit. The collar unit decoded and processed signals received from the ruminal unit, measured LA with two different activity sensors and transmitted pulse interval-modulated VHF signals over distances of up to 10 km. 3. HR data measured with the new device contained noise caused by reticulum contractions and animal movements that triggered the acceleration sensor in the ruminal unit. We have developed a software filter to remove this noise. Hence, the system was only capable of measuring HR in animals that showed little or no activity and in the absence of rumen contractions. Reliability of this ‘stationary HR’ measurement was confirmed with a second independent measurement of HR detected by an electrocardiogram in a domestic sheep (Ovis aries). 4. In addition, we developed an algorithm to correctly classify an animal as ‘active’ or ‘at rest’ during each 3-min interval from the output of the activity sensors. Comparison with direct behavioural observations on free-ranging Alpine ibex (Capra ibex) showed that 87% of intervals were classified correctly. 5. First results from applications of this new technique in free-ranging Alpine ibex underlined its suitability for reliable and long-term monitoring of physiological and behavioural parameters in ruminants under harsh field conditions. With the

  18. Variability and trend of diurnal temperature range in China and their relationship to total cloud cover and sunshine duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, X.

    2013-05-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of total cloud cover (TCC) and sunshine duration (SSD) in the variation of diurnal temperature range (DTR) in China during 1954-2009. As expected, the inter-annual variation of DTR was mainly determined by TCC. Analysis of trends of 30-year moving windows of DTR and TCC time series showed that TCC changes could account for that of DTR in some cases. However, TCC decreased during 1954-2009, which did not support DTR reduction across China. DTRs under sky conditions such as clear, cloudy and overcast showed nearly the same decreasing rate that completely accounted for the overall DTR reduction. Nevertheless, correlation between SSD and DTR was weak and not significant under clear sky conditions in which aerosol direct radiative effect should be dominant. Furthermore, 30-60% of DTR reduction was associated with DTR decrease under overcast conditions in south China. This implies that aerosol direct radiative effect appears not to be one of the main factors determining long-term changes in DTR in China.

  19. Large Magnetocaloric Effect Around Room Temperature in Amorphous Fe-Gd-Zr Alloy Ribbon with Short-Range Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh, Tran Dang; Yen, Nguyen Hai; Duc, Nguyen Huu; Phan, The-Long; Dan, Nguyen Huy; Yu, Seong-Cho

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present a detailed study on the magnetocaloric effect and the critical behaviors of an amorphous Fe88Gd2Zr10 alloy ribbon prepared by using a rapid quenching method. We point out that the value of maximum magnetic entropy change (|∆ S max|) of amorphous Fe88Gd2Zr10 alloy ribbon appeared at near room temperature and versus Δ H obeys a power law, |∆ S max| = a·Δ H n. In addition, all Δ S m( T, Δ H) data measured at different Δ H values are collapsed onto a universal master curve. Interestingly, M 2 versus H/ M curves prove amorphous Fe88Gd2Zr10 ribbon exhibitied a second-order magnetic phase transition. The critical exponents ( β, γ, and δ) obtained from the modified Arrott plots and the Kouvel-Fisher methods, and critical isotherm analysis are very close to those expected for the 3D-Heisenberg model, proving ferromagnetic short-range interactions exist in amorphous Fe88Gd2Zr10 ribbon.

  20. Fluoride salts as phase change materials for thermal energy storage in the temperature range 1000-1400 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Eutectic compositions and congruently melting intermediate compounds in binary and ternary fluoride salt systems were characterized for potential use as latent heat of fusion phase change materials to store thermal energy in the temperature range 1000-1400 K. The melting points and eutectic compositions for many systems with published phase diagrams were experimentally verified and new eutectic compositions having melting points between 1000 and 1400 K were identified. Heats of fusion of several binary and ternary eutectics and congruently melting compounds were experimentally measured by differential scanning calorimetry. For a few systems in which heats of mixing in the melts have been measured, heats of fusion of the eutectics were calculated from thermodynamic considerations and good agreement was obtained between the measured and calculated values. Several combinations of salts with high heats of fusion per unit mass (greater than 0.7 kJ/g) have been identified for possible use as phase change materials in advanced solar dynamic space power applications.

  1. Big Data, Small Data: Accessing and Manipulating Geoscience Data Ranging From Repositories to Student-Collected Data Sets Using GeoMapApp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    We often demand information and data to be accessible over the web at no cost, and no longer do we expect to spend time labouriously compiling data from myriad sources with frustratingly-different formats. Instead, we increasingly expect convenience and consolidation. Recent advances in web-enabled technologies and cyberinfrastructure are answering those calls by providing data tools and resources that can transform undergraduate education. By freeing up valuable classroom time, students can focus upon gaining deeper insights and understanding from real-world data. GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org) is a map-based data discovery and visualisation tool developed at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. GeoMapApp promotes U-Learning by working across all major computer platforms and functioning anywhere with internet connectivity, by lowering socio-economic barriers (it is free), by seamlessly integrating thousands of built-in research-grade data sets under intuitive menus, and by being adaptable to a range of learning environments - from lab sessions, group projects, and homework assignments to in-class pop-ups. GeoMapApp caters to casual and specialist users alike. Contours, artificial illumination, 3-D displays, data point manipulations, cross-sectional profiles, and other display techniques help students better grasp the content and geospatial context of data. Layering capabilities allow easy data set comparisons. The core functionality also applies to imported data sets: Student-collected data can thus be imported and analysed using the same techniques. A new Save Session function allows educators to preserve a pre-loaded state of GeoMapApp. When shared with a class, the saved file allows every student to open GeoMapApp at exactly the same starting point from which to begin their data explorations. Examples of built-in data sets include seafloor crustal age, earthquake locations and focal mechanisms, analytical geochemistry, ocean water physical properties, US and

  2. INFLUENCE OF SUMMER STREAM TEMPERATURES ON BLACK SPOT INFESTATION OF JUVENILE COHO SALMON IN THE OREGON COAST RANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    High summer water temperatures can adversely affect stream salmonids in numerous ways. The direct effects of temperature associated with increased metabolic demand can be exacerbated by other factors, including decreased resistance to disease and increased susceptibility to para...

  3. Long-term patterns of air temperatures, daily temperature range, precipitation, grass-reference evapotranspiration and aridity index in the USA great plains: Part II. Temporal trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukal, M.; Irmak, S.

    2016-11-01

    Detection of long-term changes in climate variables over large spatial scales is a very important prerequisite to the development of effective mitigation and adaptation measures for the future potential climate change and for developing strategies for future hydrologic balance analyses under changing climate. Moreover, there is a need for effective approaches of providing information about these changes to decision makers, water managers and stakeholders to aid in efficient implementation of the developed strategies. This study involves computation, mapping and analyses of long-term (1968-2013) county-specific trends in annual, growing-season (1st May-30th September) and monthly air temperatures [(maximum (Tmax), minimum (Tmin) and average (Tavg)], daily temperature range (DTR), precipitation, grass reference evapotranspiration (ETo) and aridity index (AI) over the USA Great Plains region using datasets from over 800 weather station sites. Positive trends in annual Tavg, Tmax and Tmin, DTR, precipitation, ETo and AI were observed in 71%, 89%, 85%, 31%, 61%, 38% and 66% of the counties in the region, respectively, whereas these proportions were 48%, 89%, 62%, 20%, 57%, 28%, and 63%, respectively, for the growing-season averages of the same variables. On a regional average basis, the positive trends in growing-season Tavg, Tmax and Tmin, DTR, precipitation, ETo and AI were 0.18 °C decade-1, 0.19 °C decade-1, 0.17 °C decade-1, 0.09 °C decade-1, 1.12 mm yr-1, 0.4 mm yr-1 and 0.02 decade-1, respectively, and the negative trends were 0.21 °C decade-1, 0.06 °C decade-1, 0.09 °C decade-1, 0.22 °C decade-1, 1.16 mm yr-1, 0.76 mm yr-1 and 0.02 decade-1, respectively. The temporal trends were highly variable in space and were appropriately represented using monthly, annual and growing-season maps developed using Geographic Information System (GIS) techniques. The long-term and spatial and temporal information and data for a large region provided in this study can be

  4. Improved Wide Operating Temperature Range of LiNiCoAiO2-based Li-ion Cells with Methyl Propionate-based Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Tomcsi, Michael R.; Hwang, C.; Whitcanack, L. D.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Nagata, Mikito; Visco, Vince; Tsukamoto, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    Demonstration of wide operating temperature range Li-ion electrolytes Methyl propionate-based wide operating temperature range electrolytes were demonstrated to provide dramatic improvement of the low temperature capability of Quallion prototype Li-ion cells (MCMB-LiNiCoAlO2). Some formulations were observed to deliver over 60% of the room temperature capacity using a 5C rate at - 40oC !! Represents over a 4-fold improvement over the baseline electrolyte system. Demonstrated operational capability of a number of systems over a wide temperature range (-40 to +70 C) Demonstrated reasonably good long term cycle life performance at high temperature (i.e., at +40deg and +50 C) A number of formulations containing electrolytes additives (i.e., FEC, VC, LiBOB, and lithium oxalate) have been shown to have enhanced lithium kinetics at low temperature and promising high temperature resilience. Demonstrated good performance in larger capacity (12 Ah) Quallion Li-ion cells with methyl propionate-based electrolytes. Current efforts focused upon performing life studies and the impact upon low temperature capability.

  5. A low temperature comparator for calibration of industrial thermometers in the range -190 °C to -25 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosma, R.; de Bruin-Barendregt, C. K.; van Breugel, R.; Peruzzi, A.

    2013-09-01

    A new low temperature comparator was developed for the purpose of calibrating industrial thermometers in the range -190 °C to -25 °C. The system is based on passive liquid nitrogen cooling and two independent control loops: one loop to control the temperature of a shield in between the comparator block and the vacuum chamber and liquid nitrogen, another loop to control the temperature of the comparator block itself. The test performed on both industrial thermometers and standard platinum resistance thermometers showed that calibration uncertainties of better than 5 mK can be achieved over the whole range.

  6. Forced flow He vapor cooled critical current testing facility for measurements of superconductors in a wide temperature and magnetic field range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskys, Algirdas; Hopkins, Simon C.; Bader, Jakob; Glowacki, Bartek A.

    2016-10-01

    As superconducting materials find their way into applications, there is increasing need to verify their performance at operating conditions. Testing of critical current with respect to temperature and magnetic field is of particular importance. However, testing facilities covering a range of temperatures and magnetic fields can be costly, especially when considering the cooling power required in the cryogenic system in the temperature range below 65 K (inaccessible for LN2). Critical currents in excess of 500 A are common for commercial samples, making the testing of such samples difficult in setups cooled via a cryocooler, moreover it often does not represent the actual cooling conditions that the sample will experience in service. This work reports the design and operation of a low-cost critical current testing facility, capable of testing samples in a temperature range of 10-65 K, with magnetic field up to 1.6 T and measuring critical currents up to 900 A with variable cooling power.

  7. Conductivity of single-crystal Y1-yPryBa2Cu3O7-δ over a wide range of temperatures and Pr concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadzhai, G. Ya.; Vovk, N. R.; Vovk, R. V.

    2014-06-01

    The in-plane electrical resistance of Y1-yPryBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystals with a high degree of perfection is studied for temperatures in the range TC-300 K, where TC ranges from 92 to 52 K, with varying praseodymium content. The experimental data are approximated by an expression that takes electron scattering on phonons and defects into account, as well as fluctuation conductivity in a 3D Aslamazov-Larkin model. According to the approximation data the Debye temperature ranges from 350-370 K, depending on the praseodymium content. The transverse coherence length is ˜1 Å.

  8. Shallow subsurface temperature surveys in the basin and range province-II. Ground temperatures in the upsal hogback geothermal area, West-Central Nevada, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olmsted, F.H.; Ingebritsen, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    Numerous temperature surveys at a depth of 1 m were made in 1973-1985 in the Upsal Hogback and Soda Lakes geothermal areas in west-central Nevada. Whereas the surveys effectively delineated temperature at depth and heat flow within the relatively intense Soda Lakes thermal anomaly, they were not effective at the diffuse Upsal Hogback anomaly, where several perturbing factors that affect shallow subsurface temperatures are exceedingly variable. Albedo is the most important factor in the Upsal Hogback area, even at a depth of 30 m. All possible perturbing factors should be considered when designing a shallow temperature-based prospecting scheme. ?? 1986.

  9. Note: A heated-air curtain design using the Coanda effect to protect optical access windows in high-temperature, condensing, and corrosive stack environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gustavious Paul; Keenan, Thomas L.; Herning, James; Kimblin, Clare; DiBenedetto, John; Anthony, Glen

    2011-01-01

    We present an air knife design for creating a heated air curtain to protect optical infrared access windows in high-temperature, condensing, and corrosive stack environments. The design uses the Coanda effect to turn the air curtain and to attach the air curtain to the window surface. The design was tested and verified on our 24 m stack and used extensively over a 6 yr period on several release stacks. During testing and subsequent use no detrimental changes to access window materials have been noted. This design allows stack monitoring without significantly affecting the stack flow profile or chemical concentration.

  10. Note: A heated-air curtain design using the Coanda effect to protect optical access windows in high-temperature, condensing, and corrosive stack environments.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gustavious Paul; Keenan, Thomas L; Herning, James; Kimblin, Clare; DiBenedetto, John; Anthony, Glen

    2011-01-01

    We present an air knife design for creating a heated air curtain to protect optical infrared access windows in high-temperature, condensing, and corrosive stack environments. The design uses the Coanda effect to turn the air curtain and to attach the air curtain to the window surface. The design was tested and verified on our 24 m stack and used extensively over a 6 yr period on several release stacks. During testing and subsequent use no detrimental changes to access window materials have been noted. This design allows stack monitoring without significantly affecting the stack flow profile or chemical concentration.

  11. Vapor pressures and calculated heats of vaporization of concentrated nitric acid solutions in the composition range 71 to 89 percent nitrogen dioxide, 1 to 10 percent water, and in the temperature range 10 to 60 degrees C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeown, A B; Belles, Frank E

    1954-01-01

    Total vapor pressures were measured for 16 acid mixtures of the ternary system nitric acid, nitrogen dioxide, and water within the temperature range 10 degrees to 60 degrees Celsius, and with the composition range 71 to 89 weight percent nitric acid, 7 to 20 weight percent nitrogen dioxide, and 1 to 10 weight percent water. Heats of vaporization were calculated from the vapor pressure measurements for each sample for the temperatures 25, 40, and 60 degrees Celsius. The ullage of the apparatus used for the measurements was 0.46. Ternary diagrams showing isobars as a function of composition of the system were constructed from experimental and interpolated data for the temperatures 25, 40, 45, and 60 degrees C and are presented herein.

  12. Nonlinear reflection of a nanosecond laser pulse from thin aluminum film in the temperature range 2-14 kK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabutov, A. A.; Kaptilniy, A. G.; Ksenofontov, D. M.; Makarov, V. A.; Cherepetskaya, E. B.; Podymova, N. B.

    2015-11-01

    This letter aims to experimentally demonstrate the possibility of measuring the temporal dependencies of the surface temperature of an aluminum film confined by a transparent dielectric in the range below and above the critical temperature of aluminum (from 2 kK to 14 kK). Such temperatures are achieved under the action of a powerful linearly-polarized laser pulse of one nanosecond in duration onto the film’s surface. To find the temporal dependencies of the temperature of the aluminum film the nonlinear reflection coefficient of its irradiated surface is measured to determine the radiation of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at the fundamental wavelength.

  13. Development and evaluation of magnetic and electrical materials capable of operating in the 800 to 1600 F temperature range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kueser, P. E.; Toth, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The results are summarized of a research program on electrical materials for advanced space electric power systems. The areas investigated included improved high-temperature magnetic materials, high-temperature capacitor materials, ceramic-to-metal bore-seal technology, and simulated-space environmental testing of electric-power system components

  14. Graft copolymers that exhibit temperature-induced phase transitions over a wide range of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guohua; Hoffman, Allan S.

    1995-01-01

    THERE are many potential applications of 'intelligent' aqueous polymer systems1-8 in medicine, biotechnology, industry and in environmental problems9-13. Many of these polymer systems undergo reversible phase transitions-for example, abrupt changes in volume-in response to external stimuli such as temperature, pH or the nature of the solvent. Most of the polymers studied previously are responsive to only one kind of stimulus. But for some applications, independent responsiveness to several factors, such as temperature and pH, may be required. Here we describe a polymer that undergoes marked solubility changes in water in response to temperature and/or pH changes. The polymer is prepared by grafting temperature-sensitive side chains onto a pH-sensitive backbone. We also find that block copolymers, in which the temperature- and pH-sensitive units alternate along the chain, show similar behaviour.

  15. Magnetic relaxations arising from spin-phonon interactions in the nonthermally activated temperature range for a double-decker terbium phthalocyanine single molecule magnet.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Takamitsu; Shigeyoshi, Natsuko; Yamamura, Tomoo; Ishikawa, Naoto

    2014-09-02

    Magnetic relaxations arising from spin-phonon interactions for a magnetically diluted double-decker terbium phthalocyanine single molecule magnet, dil1, in the nonthermally activated temperature range have been investigated. While the relaxation time, τ, is independent of the external static magnetic field, H(dc), in the high temperature range, where linear relationships between -ln τ and T(-1) are observed in the Arrhenius plot, magnetic field dependences for τ are observed in the lower temperature range. The τ(-1) vs H(dc) plot at 12 K fits the quadric curve when H(dc) < 12 kOe, while linear relationships are observed in the τ(-1) vs T plots in the temperature range of 12-20 K. These results indicate that the direct process is the dominant magnetic relaxation pathway in the nonthermally activated temperature range, while the contribution from the Raman process, if any, is not observable. We emphasize in this paper that the contribution from the thermal relaxation processes and the quantum tunneling of magnetizations (QTMs) to the experimentally observed magnetic relaxations must be evaluated carefully in order to avoid confusion between the thermal and quantum-mechanical relaxation pathways.

  16. Density measurements of subcooled water in the temperature range of (243 and 283) K and for pressures up to 400 MPa.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Raffaella; Giuliano Albo, P Alberto; Lorefice, Salvatore; Lago, Simona

    2016-02-21

    In this work, accurate density measurements of subcooled water (freshly double-distilled water) were performed along eight constant-mass curves in the temperature range of (243 to 283) K and in the pressure range of (140 to 400) MPa, by a pseudo-isochoric method. The experimental apparatus mainly consisted of a high pressure vessel, especially designed for this experiment, of known volume as a function of temperature and pressure, used to perform measurements in the T-p range under study. The density of subcooled water was obtained by measuring the equilibrium pressure at different temperatures, keeping the mass constant. All terms contributing to the uncertainty of subcooled water density measurements were considered; the estimated relative uncertainty, in the investigated temperature and pressure range, is about 0.07%. The experimental results were compared with the literature densities. In particular, the trend of density versus temperature for a constant mass of sample observed experimentally differs from the trend calculated by the equation provided by the International Association for Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS-95) outside the range of validity, i.e., in the metastable region.

  17. Temperature increase due to Joule heating in a nanostructured MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction over a wide current-pulse range.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Boram; Lim, Sang Ho

    2011-07-01

    The temperature increase due to Joule heating in a nanopillar of a magnetic tunnel junction sandwiched by top and bottom electrodes was calculated by the finite element method. The results for the critical condition for the current-induced magnetization switching measured over a wide current-pulse range were taken from the literature. At long pulse widths, the temperature increase was solely dependent on the magnitude of the critical current density. However, no saturation in the temperature increase occurred for short pulse widths. In this case, the temperature increase additionally depended on the pulse width, so that a broad maximum occurred in the pulse width (or the critical current density) dependence of the temperature increase. The original results for the critical condition were corrected by accounting for the temperature increase and these corrected results, together with the Slonczewski equation, were used to extract an accurate value for the thermal stability factor.

  18. Determination of Germination Response to Temperature and Water Potential for a Wide Range of Cover Crop Species and Related Functional Groups

    PubMed Central

    Tribouillois, Hélène; Dürr, Carolyne; Demilly, Didier; Wagner, Marie-Hélène; Justes, Eric

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of species can be sown as cover crops during fallow periods to provide various ecosystem services. Plant establishment is a key stage, especially when sowing occurs in summer with high soil temperatures and low water availability. The aim of this study was to determine the response of germination to temperature and water potential for diverse cover crop species. Based on these characteristics, we developed contrasting functional groups that group species with the same germination ability, which may be useful to adapt species choice to climatic sowing conditions. Germination of 36 different species from six botanical families was measured in the laboratory at eight temperatures ranging from 4.5–43°C and at four water potentials. Final germination percentages, germination rate, cardinal temperatures, base temperature and base water potential were calculated for each species. Optimal temperatures varied from 21.3–37.2°C, maximum temperatures at which the species could germinate varied from 27.7–43.0°C and base water potentials varied from -0.1 to -2.6 MPa. Most cover crops were adapted to summer sowing with a relatively high mean optimal temperature for germination, but some Fabaceae species were more sensitive to high temperatures. Species mainly from Poaceae and Brassicaceae were the most resistant to water deficit and germinated under a low base water potential. Species were classified, independent of family, according to their ability to germinate under a range of temperatures and according to their base water potential in order to group species by functional germination groups. These groups may help in choosing the most adapted cover crop species to sow based on climatic conditions in order to favor plant establishment and the services provided by cover crops during fallow periods. Our data can also be useful as germination parameters in crop models to simulate the emergence of cover crops under different pedoclimatic conditions and crop

  19. Electron spin-lattice relaxation of nitroxyl radicals in temperature ranges that span glassy solutions to low-viscosity liquids.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hideo; Bottle, Steven E; Blinco, James P; Micallef, Aaron S; Eaton, Gareth R; Eaton, Sandra S

    2008-03-01

    Electron spin-lattice relaxation rates, 1/T1, at X-band of nitroxyl radicals (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, 4-oxo-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidin-1-oxyl and 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolin-1-oxyl) in glass-forming solvents (decalin, glycerol, 3-methylpentane, o-terphenyl, 1-propanol, sorbitol, sucrose octaacetate, and 1:1 water:glycerol) at temperatures between 100 and 300K were measured by long-pulse saturation recovery to investigate the relaxation processes in slow-to-fast tumbling regimes. A subset of samples was also studied at lower temperatures or at Q-band. Tumbling correlation times were calculated from continuous wave lineshapes. Temperature dependence and isotope substitution (2H and 15N) were used to distinguish the contributions of various processes. Below about 100K relaxation is dominated by the Raman process. At higher temperatures, but below the glass transition temperature, a local mode process makes significant contributions. Above the glass transition temperature, increased rates of molecular tumbling modulate nuclear hyperfine and g anisotropy. The contribution from spin rotation is very small. Relaxation rates at X-band and Q-band are similar. The dependence of 1/T1 on tumbling correlation times fits better with the Cole-Davidson spectral density function than with the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound model.

  20. Electron spin lattice relaxation of nitroxyl radicals in temperature ranges that span glassy solutions to low-viscosity liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hideo; Bottle, Steven E.; Blinco, James P.; Micallef, Aaron S.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2008-03-01

    Electron spin-lattice relaxation rates, 1/ T1, at X-band of nitroxyl radicals (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, 4-oxo-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl, 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidin-1-oxyl and 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolin-1-oxyl) in glass-forming solvents (decalin, glycerol, 3-methylpentane, o-terphenyl, 1-propanol, sorbitol, sucrose octaacetate, and 1:1 water:glycerol) at temperatures between 100 and 300 K were measured by long-pulse saturation recovery to investigate the relaxation processes in slow-to-fast tumbling regimes. A subset of samples was also studied at lower temperatures or at Q-band. Tumbling correlation times were calculated from continuous wave lineshapes. Temperature dependence and isotope substitution ( 2H and 15N) were used to distinguish the contributions of various processes. Below about 100 K relaxation is dominated by the Raman process. At higher temperatures, but below the glass transition temperature, a local mode process makes significant contributions. Above the glass transition temperature, increased rates of molecular tumbling modulate nuclear hyperfine and g anisotropy. The contribution from spin rotation is very small. Relaxation rates at X-band and Q-band are similar. The dependence of 1/ T1 on tumbling correlation times fits better with the Cole-Davidson spectral density function than with the Bloembergen-Purcell-Pound model.

  1. Temperature dependent dielectric function in the near-infrared to vacuum-ultraviolet ultraviolet spectral range of alumina and yttria stabilized zirconia thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-Grund, R. Lühmann, T.; Böntgen, T.; Franke, H.; Lorenz, M.; Grundmann, M.; Opper, D.

    2013-12-14

    The dielectric function of nano-/polycrystalline alumina and yttria stabilised zirconia thin films has been investigated in a wide spectral range from 1.0 eV to 7.5 eV and temperatures between 10 K and room temperature. In the near band-edge spectral range, we found a broad distribution of optical transitions within the band gap, the so-called Urbach absorption tail which is typical for amorphous or polycrystalline materials due to the lack of long range order in the crystal structure. The coupling properties of the electronic system to the optical phonon bath and thermal lattice vibrations strongly depend on the ratio of the spectral extent of these disorder states to the main phonon energy, which we correlate with the different crystalline structure of our samples. The films have been grown at room temperature and 650 °C by pulsed laser deposition.

  2. Effect of daily temperature range on respiratory health in Argentina and its modification by impaired socio-economic conditions and PM10 exposures

    PubMed Central

    Carreras, Hebe; Zanobetti, Antonella; Koutrakis, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological investigations regarding temperature influence on human health have focused on mortality rather than morbidity. In addition, most information comes from developed countries despite the increasing evidence that climate change will have devastating impacts on disadvantaged populations living in developing countries. In the present study, we assessed the impact of daily temperature range on upper and lower respiratory infections in Cordoba, Argentina, and explored the effect modification of socio-economic factors and influence of airborne particles We found that temperature range is a strong risk factor for admissions due to both upper and lower respiratory infections, particularly in elderly individuals, and that these effects are more pronounced in sub-populations with low education level or in poor living conditions. These results indicate that socio-economic factors are strong modifiers of the association between temperature variability and respiratory morbidity, thus they should be considered in risk assessments. PMID:26164202

  3. Acid-base equilibria in aqueous solutions of meta-cresolsulfophthalein in the temperature range of 25 to 200°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanchikova, S. A.; Galay, G. I.

    2017-01-01

    Values of the second thermodynamic ionization constant of pH indicator m-Cresol Purple are determined spectrophotometrically in slightly alkaline aqueous solutions in the temperature range of 25 to 200°C at saturated vapor pressure. Data required for studies on acid-base equilibria in weakly alkaline aqueous solution of rare-earth elements at elevated temperatures are obtained to characterize their behavior in geochemical systems.

  4. Laboratory calibration of the calcium carbonate clumped isotope thermometer in the 25-250 °C temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, Tobias; John, Cédric M.; Jourdan, Anne-Lise; Davis, Simon; Crawshaw, John

    2015-05-01

    Many fields of Earth sciences benefit from the knowledge of mineral formation temperatures. For example, carbonates are extensively used for reconstruction of the Earth's past climatic variations by determining ocean, lake, and soil paleotemperatures. Furthermore, diagenetic minerals and their formation or alteration temperature may provide information about the burial history of important geological units and can have practical applications, for instance, for reconstructing the geochemical and thermal histories of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is a relatively new technique that can provide the formation temperature of carbonate minerals without requiring a priori knowledge of the isotopic composition of the initial solution. It is based on the temperature-dependent abundance of the rare 13C-18O bonds in carbonate minerals, specified as a Δ47 value. The clumped isotope thermometer has been calibrated experimentally from 1 °C to 70 °C. However, higher temperatures that are relevant to geological processes have so far not been directly calibrated in the laboratory. In order to close this calibration gap and to provide a robust basis for the application of clumped isotopes to high-temperature geological processes we precipitated CaCO3 (mainly calcite) in the laboratory between 23 and 250 °C. We used two different precipitation techniques: first, minerals were precipitated from a CaCO3 supersaturated solution at atmospheric pressure (23-91 °C), and, second, from a solution resulting from the mixing of CaCl2 and NaHCO3 in a pressurized reaction vessel at a pressure of up to 80 bar (25-250 °C). The calibration lines of both experimental approaches overlap and agree in the slopes with theoretical estimates and with other calibration experiments in which carbonates were reacted with phosphoric acid at temperatures above 70 °C. Our study suggests a universal Δ47-T calibration (T in K, Δ47 in ‰):

  5. Measurement and modeling of density and viscosity of n-octanol-kerosene-phosphoric acid solutions in a temperature range 293.15-333.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Changwen; Pei, Xiangjun; Liu, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Densities and viscosities have been measured for the n-octanol + aviation kerosene (AK) + phosphoric acid (H3PO4) system with the mass fraction of H3PO4 in the range from w = 0 to 0.26 and in the temperature of 293.15-333.15 K. According to the experimental data, the measured viscosities were found well correlated with the temperature and mass fraction of H3PO4, which were fitted to regression equations. The result shows that the dilution effect of AK is obvious under the same temperature and mass fraction of H3PO4.

  6. Implications of low-temperature cooling history on a transect across the Colorado Plateau-Basin and Range boundary, west central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bryant, B.; Naeser, C.W.; Fryxell, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Fission track ages of apatite and zircon from metamorphic, plutonic, and sedimentary rocks along a 80-km transect across the Colorado Plateau-Basin and Range boundary in west central Arizona show differences in the low-temperature cooling histories between the provinces. The transect extends from Cypress Mountain in the Colorado Plateau transition zone to the eastern Buckskin Mountains in the Basin and Range. -from Authors

  7. Comparison of clumped isotope signatures of dolomite cements to fluid inclusion thermometry in the temperature range of 74-180 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Came, R. E.; Azmy, K.; Tripati, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Widespread application of the novel clumped isotope paleothermometer (Δ47) using carbonate samples from shallow crustal settings has been hindered by a lack of knowledge about clumped isotope systematics in carbonate minerals forming at temperatures greater than 50ºC. Furthermore, the utility of the Δ47 proxy in the mineral dolomite is limited because calibration data for dolomites that formed at any temperature are lacking. Consequently, applications involving diagenetic temperatures have required extrapolations beyond the range of most Δ47-temperature calibrations. Here we compare Δ47 values in dolomite cements to temperatures independently determined using fluid-inclusion microthermometry, and compare this rock-based "calibration" to previously published laboratory-derived calibrations for synthetic carbonates. This combination of approaches yields results that are consistent with the shallow calibration slope that has been reported from some laboratory experiments.

  8. Radiance Temperatures (in the Wavelength Range 530 to 1500 nm) of Nickel at Its Melting Point by a Pulse-Heating Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschnitz, E.; McClure, J. L.; Cezairliyan, A.

    1998-11-01

    The radiance temperatures (at seven wavelengths in the range 530 to 1500 nm) of nickel at its melting point were measured by a pulse-heating technique. The method is based on rapid resistive self-heating of the specimen from room temperature to its melting point in less than 1 s and on simultaneously measuring specimen radiance temperatures every 0.5 ms. Melting of the specimen was manifested by a plateau in the radiance temperature-versus-time function for each wavelength. The melting-point radiance temperatures for a given specimen were determined by averaging the measured temperatures along the plateau at each wavelength. The melting-point radiance temperatures for nickel, as determined by averaging the results at each wavelength for 25 specimens, are: 1641 K at 530 nm, 1615 K at 627 nm, 1606 K at 657 nm, 1589 K at 722 nm, 1564 K at 812 nm, 1538 K at 908 nm, and 1381 K at 1500 nm. Based on uncertainties arising from pyrometry and specimen conditions, the combined uncertainty (two standard-deviation level) is about ± 6 K for the reported values in the range 530 to 900 nm and is about ± 8 K for the reported value at 1500 nm.

  9. Evolution of structure and magnetic properties for BaFe11.9Al0.1O19 hexaferrite in a wide temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trukhanov, A. V.; Trukhanov, S. V.; Panina, L. V.; Kostishyn, V. G.; Kazakevich, I. S.; Trukhanov, An. V.; Trukhanova, E. L.; Natarov, V. O.; Turchenko, V. A.; Salem, M. M.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2017-03-01

    M-type BaFe11.9Al0.1O19 hexaferrite was successfully synthesized by solid state reactions. Precision investigations of crystal and magnetic structures of BaFe11.9Al0.1O19 powder by neutron diffraction in the temperature range 4.2-730 K have been performed. Magnetic and electrical properties investigations were carried out in the wide temperature range. Neutron powder diffraction data were successfully refined in approximation for both space groups (SG): centrosymmetric #194 (standard non-polar phase) and non-centrosymmetric #186 (polar phase). It has been shown that at low temperatures (below room temperature) better fitting results (value χ2) were for the polar phase (SG: #186) or for the two phases coexistence (SG: #186 and SG: #194). At high temperatures (400-730 K) better fitting results were for SG: #194. It was established coexistence of the dual ferroic properties (specific magnetization and spontaneous polarization) at room temperature. Strong correlation between magnetic and electrical subsystems was demonstrated (magnetoelectrical effect). Temperature dependences of the spontaneous polarization, specific magnetization and magnetoelectrical effect were investigated.

  10. The interrelationship between dengue incidence and diurnal ranges of temperature and humidity in a Sri Lankan city and its potential applications

    PubMed Central

    Ehelepola, N. D. B.; Ariyaratne, Kusalika

    2015-01-01

    Background Temperature, humidity, and other weather variables influence dengue transmission. Published studies show how the diurnal fluctuations of temperature around different mean temperatures influence dengue transmission. There are no published studies about the correlation between diurnal range of humidity and dengue transmission. Objective The goals of this study were to determine the correlation between dengue incidence and diurnal fluctuations of temperature and humidity in the Sri Lankan city of Kandy and to explore the possibilities of using that information for better control of dengue. Design We calculated the weekly dengue incidence in Kandy during the period 2003–2012, after collecting data on all of the reported dengue patients and estimated midyear populations. Data on daily maximum and minimum temperatures and night-time and daytime humidity were obtained from two weather stations, averaged, and converted into weekly data. The number of days per week with a diurnal temperature range (DTR) of >10°C and <10°C and the number of days per week with a diurnal humidity range (DHR) of >20 and <15% were calculated. Wavelet time series analysis was performed to determine the correlation between dengue incidence and diurnal ranges of temperature and humidity. Results There were negative correlations between dengue incidence and a DTR >10°C and a DHR >20% with 3.3-week and 4-week lag periods, respectively. Additionally, positive correlations between dengue incidence and a DTR <10°C and a DHR <15% with 3- and 4-week lag periods, respectively, were discovered. Conclusions These findings are consistent with the results of previous entomological studies and theoretical models of DTR and dengue transmission correlation. It is important to conduct similar studies on diurnal fluctuations of humidity in the future. We suggest ways and means to use this information for local dengue control and to mitigate the potential effects of the ongoing global reduction of

  11. Douglas-fir displays a range of growth responses to temperature, water, and Swiss needle cast in western Oregon, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) growth in the Pacific Northwest is affected by climatic, edaphic factors and Swiss needle cast (SNC) disease. We examine Douglas-fir growth responses to temperature, dewpoint deficit (DPD), soil moisture, and SNC ...

  12. Standard thermodynamic properties of H3PO4(aq) over a wide range of temperatures and pressures.

    PubMed

    Ballerat-Busserolles, Karine; Sedlbauer, Josef; Majer, Vladimir

    2007-01-11

    The densities and heat capacities of solutions of phosphoric acid, 0.05 to 1 mol kg-1, were measured using flow vibrating tube densitometry and differential Picker-type calorimetry at temperatures up to 623 K and at pressures up to 28 MPa. The standard molar volumes and heat capacities of molecular H3PO4(aq) were obtained, via the apparent molar properties corrected for partial dissociation, by extrapolation to infinite dilution. The data on standard derivative properties were correlated simultaneously with the dissociation constants of phosphoric acid from the literature using the theoretically founded SOCW model. This made it possible to describe the standard thermodynamic properties, particularly the standard chemical potential, of both molecular and ionized phosphoric acid at temperatures up to at least 623 K and at pressures up to 200 MPa. This representation allows one to easily calculate the first-degree dissociation constant of H3PO4(aq). The performance of the SOCW model was compared with the other approaches for calculating the high-temperature dissociation constant of the phosphoric acid. Using the standard derivative properties, sensitively reflecting the interactions between the solute and the solvent, the high-temperature behavior of H3PO4(aq) is compared with that of other weak acids.

  13. Differential growth of Legionella pneumophila strains within a range of amoebae at various temperatures associated with in-premise plumbing

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential effect of in-premise plumbing temperatures (24, 32, 37 and 41 °C) on the growth of five different L. pneumophila strains within free-living amoebae (Acanthamoeba polyphaga, Hartmannella vermiformis and Naegleria fowleri) was examined. Compared to controls only fed E...

  14. The effect of non-uniform temperature and velocity fields on long range ultrasonic measurement systems in MYRRHA

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Wyer, Nicolas; Schram, Christophe; Van Dyck, Dries; Dierckx, Marc

    2015-07-01

    SCK.CEN, the Belgian Nuclear Research Center, is developing MYRRHA, a generation IV liquid metal cooled nuclear research reactor. As the liquid metal coolant is opaque to light, normal visual feedback during fuel manipulations is not available and must therefore be replaced by a system that is not hindered by the opacity of the coolant. In this respect ultrasonic based instrumentation is under development at SCK.CEN to provide feedback during operations under liquid metal. One of the tasks that will be tackled using ultrasound is the detection and localization of a potentially lost fuel assembly. In this application, the distance between ultrasonic sensor and target may be as large as 2.5 m. At these distances, non uniform velocity and temperature fields in the liquid metal potentially influence the propagation of the ultrasonic signals, affecting the performance of the ultrasonic systems. In this paper, we investigate how relevant temperature and velocity gradients inside the liquid metal influence the propagation of ultrasonic waves. The effect of temperature and velocity gradients are simulated by means of a newly developed numerical ray-tracing model. The performance of the model is validated by dedicated water experiments. The setup is capable of creating velocity and temperature gradients representative for MYRRHA conditions. Once validated in water, the same model is used to make predictions for the effect of gradients in the MYRRHA liquid metal environment. (authors)

  15. Experimental study of phase change materials for thermal storage in the temperature range of 300-400°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adinberg, R.; Zvegilsky, D.

    2014-12-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) based on inorganic salts having a temperature of fusion between 300 and 400°C, were investigated using a lab scale set-up dedicated for studying latent heat storage for concentrating solar thermal power (CSP) technology. This experimental system provides thermal measurements of PCM specimens of about 1000 g under the heating temperature up to 450°C and enables simultaneous investigation of calorimetric properties of the loaded materials and heat transfer effects developed in the thermal storage during the charge and discharge phases. The measurement technique comprised temperature and pressure sensors, a control and data acquisition system and a thermal analysis model used to evaluate the experimental data. Results of the thermochemical tests conducted with a thermal storage medium composed of the ternary eutectic mixture of carbonate salts (34.5% K2CO3-33.4% Na2CO3-32.1% Li2CO3) and Diphyl (synthetic thermal oil, max working temperature 400°C) used as the heat transfer fluid are presented and discussed in this paper.

  16. Flexible and High Performance Supercapacitors Based on NiCo2O4for Wide Temperature Range Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ram K.; Candler, John; Palchoudhury, Soubantika; Ramasamy, Karthik; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Binder free nanostructured NiCo2O4 were grown using a facile hydrothermal technique. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the phase purity of NiCo2O4. The surface morphology and microstructure of the NiCo2O4 analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed flower-like morphology composed of needle-like structures. The potential application of binder free NiCo2O4 as an electrode for supercapacitor devices was investigated using electrochemical methods. The cyclic voltammograms of NiCo2O4 electrode using alkaline aqueous electrolytes showed the presence of redox peaks suggesting pseudocapacitance behavior. Quasi-solid state supercapacitor device fabricated by sandwiching two NiCo2O4 electrodes and separating them by ion transporting layer. The performance of the device was tested using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The device showed excellent flexibility and cyclic stability. The temperature dependent charge storage capacity was measured for their variable temperature applications. Specific capacitance of the device was enhanced by ~150% on raising the temperature from 20 to 60 °C. Hence, the results suggest that NiCo2O4 grown under these conditions could be a suitable material for high performance supercapacitor devices that can be operated at variable temperatures.

  17. Flexible and High Performance Supercapacitors Based on NiCo2O4for Wide Temperature Range Applications

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ram K.; Candler, John; Palchoudhury, Soubantika; Ramasamy, Karthik; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Binder free nanostructured NiCo2O4 were grown using a facile hydrothermal technique. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the phase purity of NiCo2O4. The surface morphology and microstructure of the NiCo2O4 analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed flower-like morphology composed of needle-like structures. The potential application of binder free NiCo2O4 as an electrode for supercapacitor devices was investigated using electrochemical methods. The cyclic voltammograms of NiCo2O4 electrode using alkaline aqueous electrolytes showed the presence of redox peaks suggesting pseudocapacitance behavior. Quasi-solid state supercapacitor device fabricated by sandwiching two NiCo2O4 electrodes and separating them by ion transporting layer. The performance of the device was tested using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The device showed excellent flexibility and cyclic stability. The temperature dependent charge storage capacity was measured for their variable temperature applications. Specific capacitance of the device was enhanced by ~150% on raising the temperature from 20 to 60 °C. Hence, the results suggest that NiCo2O4 grown under these conditions could be a suitable material for high performance supercapacitor devices that can be operated at variable temperatures. PMID:26482921

  18. Flexible and High Performance Supercapacitors Based on NiCo2O4for Wide Temperature Range Applications.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ram K; Candler, John; Palchoudhury, Soubantika; Ramasamy, Karthik; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2015-10-20

    Binder free nanostructured NiCo2O4 were grown using a facile hydrothermal technique. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the phase purity of NiCo2O4. The surface morphology and microstructure of the NiCo2O4 analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed flower-like morphology composed of needle-like structures. The potential application of binder free NiCo2O4 as an electrode for supercapacitor devices was investigated using electrochemical methods. The cyclic voltammograms of NiCo2O4 electrode using alkaline aqueous electrolytes showed the presence of redox peaks suggesting pseudocapacitance behavior. Quasi-solid state supercapacitor device fabricated by sandwiching two NiCo2O4 electrodes and separating them by ion transporting layer. The performance of the device was tested using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The device showed excellent flexibility and cyclic stability. The temperature dependent charge storage capacity was measured for their variable temperature applications. Specific capacitance of the device was enhanced by ~150% on raising the temperature from 20 to 60 °C. Hence, the results suggest that NiCo2O4 grown under these conditions could be a suitable material for high performance supercapacitor devices that can be operated at variable temperatures.

  19. Front curvature rate stick measurements and detonation shock dynamics calibration for PBX 9502 over a wide temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.G.; Bdzil, J.B.; Aslam, T.D.

    1998-12-31

    Detonation velocity and wave shape are measured for PBX 9502 (95 wt.% TATB, 5 wt.% Kel-F 800) rate sticks at the temperatures {minus}55, 25, and 75 C. At each temperature three different diameters were fired: 50 mm, 18 mm, and 8, 10, and 12 mm respectively for the hot, ambient, and cold sticks. The measured wave shapes are fit with an analytic form and the fitting parameters are tabulated along with thermal expansion and diameter effect data. The simplest detonation shock dynamics (DSD) model assumes a unique calibration function relating the local normal wave speed D{sub n} to the local total curvature {kappa}. The data confirm this notion for sufficiently small curvature, but at large curvature the curves for different charge diameters diverge. Global optimization is used to determine a best single D{sub n}-{kappa} function at each initial temperature T{sub 0}. From these curves a D{sub n}({kappa},T{sub 0}) calibration surface is generated that allows computation of problems with temperature gradients.

  20. Time-Series Analysis of Natural Tracers: Comparison of Electrical Conductivity and Temperature in Different Frequency Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Tobias; Schirmer, Mario; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2010-05-01

    Natural tracers can be used for quantification of exchange fluxes between surface waters and groundwater. Especially temperature has become a widely-used parameter due to progress in sensor technique and data loggers. Compared to solute mass, heat is retarded. The retardation depends on porosity, heat capacity and heat conductivity of the saturated riverbed sediments. As the porosity and mineral composition of the sediments can only be roughly estimated, the retardation factor remains uncertain. Electrical conductivity (EC) is a valuable amendment to temperature in losing river systems, if distinctive fluctuations exist. EC is an easy to measure parameter, but it is not conservative due to mineralization processes and cation exchange in the aquifer. However, the propagation of the EC signal into the aquifer reflects solute transport. We present results of a study on bank filtration at a test site in northeast Switzerland. The field site has been established by the RECORD Project (Assessment and Modeling of Coupled Ecological and Hydrological Dynamics in the Restored Corridor of a River (Restored Corridor Dynamics)); it is located at a channelized and a restored section of the prealpine losing River Thur. We analyze time series of temperature and EC in the river and riparian groundwater wells to quantify travel times. Both signals show variations on various time scales, which we analyze by different methods. For the diurnal and seasonal signal, sinusoidal functions are fitted to the data and the time shifts are determined. Cross-correlation and non-parametric deconvolution methods are used to calculated mean travel times and mixing ratios from filtered data sets without diurnal and seasonal signal. The comparison of the travel times of temperature and EC shows that the retardation of the temperature signal varies in space.

  1. Simultaneous and in situ analysis of thermal and volumetric properties of starch gelatinization over wide pressure and temperature ranges.

    PubMed

    Randzio, Stanislaw L; Orlowska, Marta

    2005-01-01

    A method for simultaneous and in situ analysis of thermal and volumetric properties of starch gelatinization from 0.1 to 100 MPa and from 283 to 430 K is described. The temperature of a very sensitive calorimetric detector containing a starch-water emulsion at a selected pressure is programmed to rise at a slow rate; volume variations are performed automatically to keep the selected pressure constant while the heat exchange rate and the volume are recorded. The method is demonstrated with a novel investigation of pressure effects on a sequence of three phase transitions in an aqueous emulsion of wheat starch (56 wt % water). The volume changes during the main endothermic transition (M), associated with melting of the crystalline part of the starch granules and a helix-coil transformation in amylopectin, but also with an important swelling, were separated into a volume increase associated with swelling and a volume decrease associated with the transition itself. Thermodynamic parameters for this transition together with their pressure dependencies have been obtained from four independent experiments at each pressure. The data are thermodynamically consistent, but are poorly described by the Clapeyron equation. The negative volume change of the slow exothermic transition (A) appearing just after the main endothermic transition (M) is small, spread out over a wide temperature interval, and occurs at higher temperatures with increasing pressures. This transition is probably associated with reassociation of the unwound helixes of amylopectin with parts of amylopectin molecules other than their original helix duplex partner. The positive volume change of the high-temperature, endothermic transition (N) with a small enthalpy change is probably associated with a nematic-isotropic transformation ending the formation of a homogeneous SOL phase (in the sense of Flory), and is also pushed to higher temperatures with increasing pressures. Knowledge of the state of wheat starch

  2. Measurement and Estimation of High-Vacuum Effective Thermal Conductivity of Polyimide Foam in the Temperature Range from 160 K to 370 K for Outer Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Ryuichi; Tachikawa, Sumitaka; Ohmura, Takahiro; Nagasaka, Yuji

    2014-02-01

    Polyimide foam (PF) is a low-thermal conductivity and lightweight material with high resistances against heat, protons, and UV irradiation. A new thermal insulation composed of PFs and multiple aluminized films (PF-MLI) has potential to be used in outer space as an alternative to conventional multilayer insulation (MLI). As fundamental numerical data, the effective thermal conductivity of PF in wide ranges of density and temperature need to be determined. In the present study, thermal-conductivity measurements were performed by both the periodic heating method and the guarded hot-plate method in the temperature range from 160 K to 370 K and the density range from 6.67 to 242.63 . The experiments were carried out in a vacuum and under atmospheric pressure. For confirmation of the validity of the present guarded hot-plate apparatus under atmospheric pressure, the effective thermal conductivity of the lowest-density PF was measured with the aid of the heat flow meter apparatus calibrated by the standard reference material (NIST SRM 1450c) in the temperature range from 303 K to 323 K. In order to cross-check the present experimental results, the temperature and density dependences of the effective thermal conductivity of PF were estimated by means of the lattice Boltzmann method based on a dodecahedron inner microscopic complex structure model which reflects a real 3D X-ray CT image of PF.

  3. Kinetic improvement of olive leaves' bioactive compounds extraction by using power ultrasound in a wide temperature range.

    PubMed

    Khemakhem, Ibtihel; Ahmad-Qasem, Margarita Hussam; Catalán, Enrique Barrajón; Micol, Vicente; García-Pérez, Jose Vicente; Ayadi, Mohamed Ali; Bouaziz, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effect of temperature and ultrasonic application on extraction kinetics of polyphenols from dried olive leaf was investigated. Conventional (CVE) and ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) were performed at 10, 20, 30, 50 and 70°C using water as solvent. Extracts were characterized by measuring the total phenolic content, the antioxidant capacity and the oleuropein content (HPLC-DAD/MS-MS). Moreover, Naik's model was used to mathematically describe the extraction kinetics. The experimental results showed that phenolic extraction was faster in UAE (ultrasonic-assisted extraction) than in CVE (conventional extraction), being extraction kinetics satisfactorily described using Naik model (include VAR>98%). Besides, the total phenolic content, the antioxidant capacity and the oleuropein content were significantly (p<0.05) improved by increasing the temperature in both CVE and UAE. Oleuropein content reached 6.57±0.18 being extracted approximately 88% in the first minute for UAE experiments.

  4. Mechanical and microstructural responses and microcrack formation in titanium aluminides at a wide range of strain rate and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Z.; Cady, C.; Vaidya, R.U.; Butt, D.P.; Gray, G.T. III; Kim, Y.W.; Yamaguchi, Masaharu

    1996-12-31

    Significant progress has been made in the development of titanium aluminide alloys for high temperature and high performance applications in the last decade. An extensive database on the mechanical and microstructural responses of titanium aluminides under various quasi-static loading conditions has been developed. However, knowledge of the mechanical and microstructural responses of titanium aluminides under dynamic loading conditions remains poorly understood. A systematic investigation of the strain rate and temperature effect on mechanical and microstructural responses, microcrack nucleation and microcrack propagation in three titanium aluminide alloys, a polysynthetically twinned (PST) TiAl crystal, a duplex {gamma}-TiAl alloy and a polycrystalline Ti{sub 3}Al-based alloy, was carried out in this study. The mechanical behavior observed in these three alloys will be interpreted based on the characterized deformation microstructures. Microcrack nucleation and propagation mechanisms will be discussed in detail in terms of the observed mechanical and microstructural responses of these alloys.

  5. Effect of hydrostatic pressure on the conductivity of YBa2Cu3O7-δsingle crystals in a broad range of temperature and oxygen content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, R. V.; Khadzhai, G. Ya.; Dobrovolskiy, O. V.; Nazyrov, Z. F.; Kamchatnaya, S. N.

    2017-04-01

    The effect of external hydrostatic pressure on the electrical resistance of optimally doped and underdoped YBa2Cu3O7-δ single crystals is investigated in a broad temperature range, which includes the normal state and the region of superconducting fluctuations. The temperature dependences of the resistivity in the normal state are determined by scattering of charge carriers by phonons and defects. The application of pressure leads to significant changes in the electronic structure of the sample and reduces the degree of their defectiveness. This is accompanied by changeû in the lattice characteristics as the sample volume decreases. The fluctuation conductivity only exists within the range of ∼ 0.1Tc . With increasing δ the superconducting characteristics are close to the values typical for conventional low-temperature superconductors.

  6. The Mechanical Properties of Wood of Different Moisture Content Within -200 Degrees to +200 Degrees C Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kollmann, Franz

    1941-01-01

    Systematic experiments were undertaken with special reference to the effect of gross specific weight (specific weight inclusive of pores) and the moisture content of wood. It was found that the modules of elasticity of wood at room temperature and frozen at -8 degrees is practically the same. The effect of moisture on the compression strength of frozen wood was explored as well as the flexural and impact strength of frozen wood and frozen laminated wood.

  7. Ignition Delays of Alkyl Thiophosphites with White and Red Fuming Nitric Acids Within Temperature Range 80 to -105 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Riley O; Ladanyi, Dezso J

    1953-01-01

    Ignition delays of alkyl thiophosphites were obtained in a modified open-cup apparatus and a small-scale rocket engine apparatus. At -40 F, mixed alkyl thiophosphites gave short delays with white fuming nitric acid containing 2 percent water and red fuming nitric acids of widely varying compositions. At -40 F and higher, triethyl trithiophosphite blended with as much as 40 percent n-heptane gave satisfactory self-igniting properties at temperatures as low as -76 F.

  8. GASEOUS MEAN OPACITIES FOR GIANT PLANET AND ULTRACOOL DWARF ATMOSPHERES OVER A RANGE OF METALLICITIES AND TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Richard S.; Lustig-Yaeger, Jacob; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Lupu, Roxana E.; Marley, Mark S.; Lodders, Katharina

    2014-10-01

    We present new calculations of Rosseland and Planck gaseous mean opacities relevant to the atmospheres of giant planets and ultracool dwarfs. Such calculations are used in modeling the atmospheres, interiors, formation, and evolution of these objects. Our calculations are an expansion of those presented in Freedman et al. to include lower pressures, finer temperature resolution, and also the higher metallicities most relevant for giant planet atmospheres. Calculations span 1 μbar to 300 bar, and 75-4000 K, in a nearly square grid. Opacities at metallicities from solar to 50 times solar abundances are calculated. We also provide an analytic fit to the Rosseland mean opacities over the grid in pressure, temperature, and metallicity. In addition to computing mean opacities at these local temperatures, we also calculate them with weighting functions up to 7000 K, to simulate the mean opacities for incident stellar intensities, rather than locally thermally emitted intensities. The chemical equilibrium calculations account for the settling of condensates in a gravitational field and are applicable to cloud-free giant planet and ultracool dwarf atmospheres, but not circumstellar disks. We provide our extensive opacity tables for public use.

  9. Gaseous Mean Opacities for Giant Planet and Ultracool Dwarf Atmospheres over a Range of Metallicities and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Richard S.; Lustig-Yaeger, Jacob; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Lupu, Roxana E.; Marley, Mark S.; Lodders, Katharina

    2014-10-01

    We present new calculations of Rosseland and Planck gaseous mean opacities relevant to the atmospheres of giant planets and ultracool dwarfs. Such calculations are used in modeling the atmospheres, interiors, formation, and evolution of these objects. Our calculations are an expansion of those presented in Freedman et al. to include lower pressures, finer temperature resolution, and also the higher metallicities most relevant for giant planet atmospheres. Calculations span 1 μbar to 300 bar, and 75-4000 K, in a nearly square grid. Opacities at metallicities from solar to 50 times solar abundances are calculated. We also provide an analytic fit to the Rosseland mean opacities over the grid in pressure, temperature, and metallicity. In addition to computing mean opacities at these local temperatures, we also calculate them with weighting functions up to 7000 K, to simulate the mean opacities for incident stellar intensities, rather than locally thermally emitted intensities. The chemical equilibrium calculations account for the settling of condensates in a gravitational field and are applicable to cloud-free giant planet and ultracool dwarf atmospheres, but not circumstellar disks. We provide our extensive opacity tables for public use.

  10. Dielectric relaxation study of amorphous TiTaO thin films in a large operating temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Rouahi, A.; Kahouli, A.; Challali, F.; Besland, M. P.; Salimy, S.; Goullet, A.; Vallee, C.; Pairis, S.; Yangui, B.; Sylvestre, A.

    2012-11-01

    Two relaxation processes have been identified in amorphous TiTaO thin films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering. The parallel angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy analyses have shown that this material is composed of an agglomerates mixture of TiO{sub 2}, Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and Ti-Ta bonds. The first relaxation process appears at low temperature with activation energy of about 0.26 eV and is related to the first ionisation of oxygen vacancies and/or the reduction of Ti{sup 4+} to Ti{sup 3+}. The second relaxation process occurs at high temperature with activation energy of 0.95 eV. This last peak is associated to the diffusion of the doubly ionized oxygen vacancies V{sub O}e. The dispersion phenomena observed at high temperature can be attributed to the development of complex defect such as (V{sub O}e - 2Ti{sup 3+}).

  11. Possible combined influences of absorbing aerosols and anomalous atmospheric circulation on summertime diurnal temperature range variation over the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jiaxi; Guan, Zhaoyong; Ma, Fenhua

    2016-12-01

    Based on the temperature data from the China Meteorological Administration, NCEP-NCAR reanalysis data, and the TOMS Aerosol Index (AI), we analyze the variations in the summertime diurnal temperature range (DTR) and temperature maxima in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River (MLRYR) in China. The possible relationships between the direct warming effect of the absorbing aerosol and temperature variations are further investigated, although with some uncertainties. It is found that the summertime DTR exhibits a decreasing trend over the most recent 50 years, along with a slight increasing tendency since the 1980s. The trend of the maximum temperature is in agreement with those of the DTR and the absorbing aerosols. To investigate the causes of the large anomalies in the temperature maxima, composite analyses of the circulation anomalies are performed. When anomalous AI and anomalous maximum temperature over the MLRYR have the same sign, an anomalous circulation with a quasi-barotropic structure occurs there. This anomalous circulation is modulated by the Rossby wave energy propagations from the regions northwest of the MLRYR and influences the northwestern Pacific subtropical high over the MLRYR. In combination with aerosols, the anomalous circulation may increase the maximum temperature in this region. Conversely, when the anomalous AI and anomalous maximum temperature in the MLRYR have opposite signs, the anomalous circulation is not equivalently barotropic, which possibly offsets the warming effect of aerosols on the maximum temperature changes in this region. These results are helpful for a better understanding of the DTR changes and the occurrences of temperature extremes in the MLRYR region during boreal summer.

  12. Higher growth temperatures decreased net carbon assimilation and biomass accumulation of northern red oak seedlings near the southern limit of the species range.

    PubMed

    Wertin, Timothy M; McGuire, Mary Anne; Teskey, Robert O

    2011-12-01

    increase in growth temperature, declining by 6% per 1 °C increase in mean growing season temperature. Our observations suggest that increases in air temperature above current ambient conditions will be detrimental to Q. rubra seedlings growing near the southern limit of the species range.

  13. WRF-simulated sensitivity to land surface schemes in short and medium ranges for a high-temperature event in East China: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xin-Min; Wang, Ning; Wang, Yang; Zheng, Yiqun; Zhou, Zugang; Wang, Guiling; Chen, Chaohui; Liu, Huaqiang

    2015-09-01

    We designed simulations for the high-temperature event that occurred on 23 July 2003 in East China using a series of forecast lead times, from short-range to medium-range, and four land surface schemes (LSSs) (i.e., SLAB, NOAH, RUC, and PX) in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF), Version 3. The sensitivities of short and medium-range simulations to the LSSs systematically varied with the lead times. In general, the model reproduced short-range, high-temperature distributions. The simulated weather was sensitive to the LSSs, and the LSS-induced sensitivity was higher in the medium range than in the short-range. Furthermore, the LSS performances were complex, i.e., the PX errors apparently increased in the medium range (longer than 6 days), RUC produced the maximum errors, and SLAB and NOAH had approximately equivalent errors that slightly increased. Additional sensitivity simulations revealed that the WRF modeling system assigns relatively low initial soil moisture for RUC and that soil moisture initialization plays an important role that is comparable to the LSS choice in the simulations. LSS-induced negative feedback between surface air temperature (SAT) and atmospheric circulation in the lower atmosphere was found in the medium range. These sensitivities were mainly caused by the LSS-induced differences in surface sensible heat flux and by errors associated with the lead times. Using the SAT equation, further diagnostic analyses revealed LSS deficiencies in simulating surface fluxes and physical processes that modify the SAT and indicated the main reasons for these deficiencies. These results have implications for model improvement and application.

  14. Self-compliance Pt/HfO2/Ti/Si one-diode-one-resistor resistive random access memory device and its low temperature characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chao; Yu, Jue; Chi, Xiao-Wei; Lin, Guang-Yang; Lan, Xiao-Ling; Huang, Wei; Wang, Jian-Yuan; Xu, Jian-Fang; Wang, Chen; Li, Cheng; Chen, Song-Yan; Liu, Chunli; Lai, Hong-Kai

    2016-04-01

    A bipolar one-diode-one-resistor (1D1R) device with a Pt/HfO2/Ti/n-Si(001) structure was demonstrated. The 1D1R resistive random access memory (RRAM) device consists of a Ti/n-Si(001) diode and a Pt/HfO2/Ti resistive switching cell. By using the Ti layer as the shared electrode for both the diode and the resistive switching cell, the 1D1R device exhibits the property of stable self-compliance and the characteristic of robust resistive switching with high uniformity. The high/low resistance ratio reaches 103. The electrical RESET/SET curve does not deteriorate after 68 loops. Low-temperature studies show that the 1D1R RRAM device has a critical working temperature of 250 K, and at temperatures below 250 K, the device fails to switch its resistances.

  15. Characterization of 6H-SiC JFET Integrated Circuits Over A Broad Temperature Range from -150 C to +500 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Prokop, Norman F.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has previously reported prolonged stable operation of simple prototype 6H-SiC JFET integrated circuits (logic gates and amplifier stages) for thousands of hours at +500 C. This paper experimentally investigates the ability of these 6H-SiC JFET devices and integrated circuits to also function at cold temperatures expected to arise in some envisioned applications. Prototype logic gate ICs experimentally demonstrated good functionality down to -125 C without changing circuit input voltages. Cascaded operation of gates at cold temperatures was verified by externally wiring gates together to form a 3-stage ring oscillator. While logic gate output voltages exhibited little change across the broad temperature range from -125 C to +500 C, the change in operating frequency and power consumption of these non-optimized logic gates as a function of temperature was much larger and tracked JFET channel conduction properties.

  16. Pyrolysis of waste materials: Characterization and prediction of sorption potential across a wide range of mineral contents and pyrolysis temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kah, Melanie; Sun, Huichao; Sigmund, Gabriel; Hüffer, Thorsten; Hofmann, Thilo

    2016-08-01

    Sewage sludge (50% mineral), manure (29%) and wood (<1%) were pyrolyzed at 200, 350 and 500°C with the aim to study the characteristics and sorption potential of materials undergoing pyrolysis across a wide range of mineral contents. A commercial plant-derived biochar (41% mineral) was also considered. The materials were extensively characterized and tested for their sorption towards the model sorbates benzene, naphthalene and pyrene. Plant-derived materials, regardless of their mineral content, developed micropores causing size exclusion of pyrene. Changes in properties and sorption behavior upon pyrolysis were generally consistent for the manure and wood series. A single regression equation developed on our data (including the sorbate hydrophobicity and sorbent polarity) provided excellent prediction of previously reported changes in sorption upon pyrolysis across a wide range of mineral content (up to 500°C). The sewage sludge series, however, followed a particular behavior, possibly due to very high mineral content (up to 67%).

  17. A high temperature fatigue life prediction computer code based on the total strain version of StrainRange Partitioning (SRP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGaw, Michael A.; Saltsman, James F.

    1993-10-01

    A recently developed high-temperature fatigue life prediction computer code is presented and an example of its usage given. The code discussed is based on the Total Strain version of Strainrange Partitioning (TS-SRP). Included in this code are procedures for characterizing the creep-fatigue durability behavior of an alloy according to TS-SRP guidelines and predicting cyclic life for complex cycle types for both isothermal and thermomechanical conditions. A reasonably extensive materials properties database is included with the code.

  18. A high temperature fatigue life prediction computer code based on the total strain version of StrainRange Partitioning (SRP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.; Saltsman, James F.

    1993-01-01

    A recently developed high-temperature fatigue life prediction computer code is presented and an example of its usage given. The code discussed is based on the Total Strain version of Strainrange Partitioning (TS-SRP). Included in this code are procedures for characterizing the creep-fatigue durability behavior of an alloy according to TS-SRP guidelines and predicting cyclic life for complex cycle types for both isothermal and thermomechanical conditions. A reasonably extensive materials properties database is included with the code.

  19. A triarylmethyl spin label for long-range distance measurement at physiological temperatures using T1 relaxation enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhongyu; Bridges, Michael D.; López, Carlos J.; Rogozhnikova, Olga Yu.; Trukhin, Dmitry V.; Brooks, Evan K.; Tormyshev, Victor; Halpern, Howard J.; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    2016-08-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has become an important tool for measuring distances in proteins on the order of a few nm. For this purpose pairs of spin labels, most commonly nitroxides, are site-selectively introduced into the protein. Recent efforts to develop new spin labels are focused on tailoring the intrinsic properties of the label to either extend the upper limit of measurable distances at physiological temperature, or to provide a unique spectral lineshape so that selective pairwise distances can be measured in a protein or complex containing multiple spin label species. Triarylmethyl (TAM) radicals are the foundation for a new class of spin labels that promise to provide both capabilities. Here we report a new methanethiosulfonate derivative of a TAM radical that reacts rapidly and selectively with an engineered cysteine residue to generate a TAM containing side chain (TAM1) in high yield. With a TAM1 residue and Cu2+ bound to an engineered Cu2+ binding site, enhanced T1 relaxation of TAM should enable measurement of interspin distances up to 50 Å at physiological temperature. To achieve favorable TAM1-labeled protein concentrations without aggregation, proteins are tethered to a solid support either site-selectively using an unnatural amino acid or via native lysine residues. The methodology is general and readily extendable to complex systems, including membrane proteins.

  20. Medium-range objective predictions of thunderstorms on the McIDAS/CSIS interactive computer system. [Computer Interactive Data Access System/Centralized Storm Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    Until recently, all operational meteorological data has been made available to forecasters in a variety of different forms. Predictions based upon these different data formats have been complicated by the inability of forecasters to easily assimilate, in real-time, all data to provide an optimum decision regarding future weather occurrences. By March 1980, a joint NASA/NOAA effort had been initiated to develop the Centralized Storm Information System (CSIS). The primary objectives of this joint project are related to an improvement of the overall severe storm forecast and warning procedure and to a demonstration of the operational utility of techniques developed within the applied research community. CSIS is to utilize the Man Computer Interactive Data Access System (McIDAS). The present investigation is concerned with one of the first attempts to employ the CSIS system for the evaluation of a new research technique involving the prediction of thunderstorms over a forecast period of 12-48 hours.

  1. Effect of grain size and partial disordering on ductility of Ti{sub 3}Al in the temperature range of 20--600 C

    SciTech Connect

    Imayev, R.M.; Gabdullin, N.K.; Salishchev, G.A.; Imayev, V.M.; Senkov, O.N.; Froes, F.H.

    1999-04-23

    The effect of grain size and partial disordering on ductility and flow stress of an intermetallic Ti{sub 3}Al was studied in the temperature range of 20--600 C using tension and compression testing. The ductility of the fully ordered material increased considerably when the grain size decreased from 27 to 0.1 {micro}m, and, at the smaller grain size, an elongation of 4.8% was achieved at room temperature. Partial disordering of the crystal lattice led to a decrease in ductility at temperatures below 500 C, but had no influence on the ductility at 500 or 600 C. The critical grain size at which a brittle-to-ductile transition occurred in the fully ordered material was determined for each temperature studied. This critical grain size increased as the temperature was increased. It was found that, when the mean grain size decreased and temperature increased, the fracture mode changed from a brittle transcrystalline mode to a brittle intercrystalline mode and, finally, to a ductile transgranular mode. The increased ductility was correlated with an enhanced grain boundary relaxation capability at increased temperatures and decreased grain sizes.

  2. The thermodynamic properties of 5-vinyltetrazole and poly-5-vinyltetrazole over the temperature range from T → 0 to 350 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, N. N.; Kulagina, T. G.; Bykova, T. A.; Kizhnyaev, V. N.; Petrova, T. L.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependences of the heat capacities of 5-vinyltetrazole and poly-5-vinyltetrazole were measured by adiabatic vacuum calorimetry over the temperature range 6-(350-370) K with errors of ˜0.2%. The results were used to calculate the thermodynamic functions of the compounds, C {/p ∘}, H ∘( T) - H ∘(0), S ∘( T), and G ∘( T) - H ∘(0), over the temperature range from T → 0 to 350-370 K. The energy of combustion of 5-vinyltetrazole and poly-5-vinyltetrazole was measured in an isothermic-shell static bomb calorimeter. The standard enthalpies of combustion Δ c H ∘ and thermodynamic characteristics of formation Δf H ∘, Δf S ∘, and Δf G ∘ at 298.15 K and p = 0.1 MPa were calculated. The results were used to determine the thermodynamic characteristics of polymerization of 5-vinyltetrazole over the temperature range from T → 0 to 350 K.

  3. Measurements of complex permittivity of microwave substrates in the 20 to 300 K temperature range from 26.5 to 40.0 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Gordon, William L.; Heinen, Vernon O.; Ebihara, Ben T.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1989-01-01

    A knowledge of the dielectric properties of microwave substrates at low temperatures is useful in the design of superconducting microwave circuits. Results are reported for a study of the complex permittivity of sapphire (Al2O3), magnesium oxide (MgO), silicon oxide (SiO2), lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO3), and zirconium oxide (ZrO2), in the 20 to 300 Kelvin temperature range, at frequencies from 26.5 to 40.0 GHz. The values of the real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity were obtained from the scattering parameters, which were measured using a HP-8510 automatic network analyzer. For these measurements, the samples were mounted on the cold head of a helium gas closed cycle refrigerator, in a specially designed vacuum chamber. An arrangement of wave guides, with mica windows, was used to connect the cooling system to the network analyzer. A decrease in the value of the real part of the complex permittivity of these substrates, with decreasing temperature, was observed. For MgO and Al2O3, the decrease from room temperature to 20 K was of 7 and 15 percent, respectively. For LaAlO3, it decreased by 14 percent, for ZrO2 by 15 percent, and for SiO2 by 2 percent, in the above mentioned temperature range.

  4. Measurements of complex permittivity of microwave substrates in the 20 to 300 K temperature range from 26.5 to 40.0 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.; Gordon, William L.; Heinen, Vernon O.; Ebihara, Ben T.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1990-01-01

    A knowledge of the dielectric properties of microwve substrates at low temperatures is useful in the design of superconducting microwave circuits. Results are reported for a study of the complex permittivity of sapphire (Al2O3), magnesium oxide (MgO), silicon oxide (SiO2), lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO3), and zirconium oxide (ZrO2), in the 20 to 300 Kelvin temperature range, at frequencies from 26.5 to 40.0 GHz. The values of the real and imaginary parts of the complex permittivity were obtained from the scattering parameters, which were measured using an HP-8510 automatic network analyzer. For these measurements, the samples were mounted on the cold head of a helium gas closed cycle refrigerator, in a specially designated vacuum chamber. An arrangement of wave guides, with mica windows, was used to connect the cooling system to the network analyzer. A decrease in the value of the real part of the complex permittivity of these substrates, with decreasing temperature, was observed. For MgO and Al2O3, the decrease from room temperature to 20 K was of 7 and 15 percent, respectively. For LaAlO3, it decreased by 14 percent, for ZrO2 by 15 percent, and for SiO2 by 2 percent, in the above mentioned temperature range.

  5. Absolute absorption coefficient of C6H2 in the mid-UV range at low temperature; implications for the interpretation of Titan atmospheric spectra.

    PubMed

    Bénilan, Y; Bruston, P; Raulin, F; Courtin, R; Guillemin, J C

    1995-01-01

    The interpretation of mid-UV albedo spectra of planetary atmospheres, especially that of Titan, is the main goal of the SIPAT (Spectroscopie uv d'Interet Prebiologique dans l'Atmosphere de Titan) research program. This laboratory experiment has been developed in order to systematically determine the absorption coefficients of molecular compounds which are potential absorbers of scattered sunlight in planetary atmospheres, with high spectral resolution, and at various temperatures below room temperature. From photochemical modelling and experimental simulations, we may expect triacetylene (C6H2) to be present in the atmosphere of Titan, even though it has not yet been detected. We present here the first determination of the absolute absorption coefficient of that compound in the 200-300 nm range and at two temperatures (296 K and 233 K). The temperature dependence of the C6H2 absorption coefficient in that wavelength range is compared to that previously observed in the case of cyanoacetylene (HC3N). We then discuss the implications of the present results for the interpretation of Titan UV spectra, where it appears that large uncertainities can be introduced either by the presence of trace impurities in laboratory samples or by the variations of absorption coefficients with temperature.

  6. Thermal degradation of concrete in the temperature range from ambient to 315{degree} C (600{degree} F). Revision 10/96

    SciTech Connect

    Kassir, M.K.; Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Reich, M.

    1996-10-01

    This report is concerned with determining the effect of elevated temperatures on the behavior of concrete. Emphasis is placed on quantifying the degree of potential degradation of the physical properties of concrete in high-level waste storage tanks. The temperature elevation range of interest is from ambient to 315 C (600 F). The literature has been reviewed to examine the applicable experimental data and quantify the degradation in the concrete and reinforcing steel. Since many variables and test conditions control the results in the data base, upper and lower bounds of the degraded properties at temperatures applicable to the environments of the storage tanks are summarized and presented in explicit forms. For properties with large data bases, a normal logarithmic distribution of the data is assumed and a statistical analysis is carried out to find the mean and 84% values of the degraded property in the temperature range of interest. Such results are useful in assessing the effect of elevated temperatures on the structural behavior of the tanks. In addition, the results provide the technical basis for a parametric study that may be necessary to investigate the thermal aspects of the structural integrity of the tanks. 50 refs., 23 figs.

  7. An apparatus for simultaneous measurement of electrical conductivity and thermopower of thin films in the temperature range of 300-750 K.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, J; Kardel, J T; Scullin, M L; Bahk, J-H; Heijmerikx, H; Bowers, J E; Majumdar, A

    2011-01-01

    An automated apparatus capable of measuring the electrical conductivity and thermopower of thin films over a temperature range of 300-750 K is reported. A standard dc resistance measurement in van der Pauw geometry was used to evaluate the electrical conductivity, and the thermopower was measured using the differential method. The design of the instrument, the methods used for calibration, and the measurement procedure are described in detail. Given the lack of a standard National Institute of Standards and Technology (Gaithersburg, Md.) sample for high temperature thermopower calibration, the disclosed calibration procedure shall be useful for calibration of new instruments.

  8. An apparatus for simultaneous measurement of electrical conductivity and thermopower of thin films in the temperature range of 300-750 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, J.; Kardel, J. T.; Scullin, M. L.; Bahk, J.-H.; Heijmerikx, H.; Bowers, J. E.; Majumdar, A.

    2011-01-01

    An automated apparatus capable of measuring the electrical conductivity and thermopower of thin films over a temperature range of 300-750 K is reported. A standard dc resistance measurement in van der Pauw geometry was used to evaluate the electrical conductivity, and the thermopower was measured using the differential method. The design of the instrument, the methods used for calibration, and the measurement procedure are described in detail. Given the lack of a standard National Institute of Standards and Technology (Gaithersburg, Md.) sample for high temperature thermopower calibration, the disclosed calibration procedure shall be useful for calibration of new instruments.

  9. Observation of vapor pressure enhancement of rare-earth metal-halide salts in the temperature range relevant to metal-halide lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, J. J.; Henins, A.; Hardis, J. E.; Estupinan, E. G.; Lapatovich, W. P.; Shastri, S. D.

    2012-02-20

    Total vapor-phase densities of Dy in equilibrium with a DyI{sub 3}/InI condensate and Tm in equilibrium with a TmI{sub 3}/TlI condensate have been measured for temperatures between 900 K and 1400 K. The measurements show strong enhancements in rare-earth vapor densities compared to vapors in equilibrium with the pure rare-earth metal-halides. The measurements were made with x-ray induced fluorescence on the sector 1-ID beam line at the Advanced Photon Source. The temperature range and salt mixtures are relevant to the operation of metal-halide high-intensity discharge lamps.

  10. Radiation pressure excitation of a low temperature atomic force/magnetic force microscope for imaging in 4-300 K temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćelik, Ümit; Karcı, Özgür; Uysallı, Yiǧit; Özer, H. Özgür; Oral, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    We describe a novel radiation pressure based cantilever excitation method for imaging in dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) for the first time. Piezo-excitation is the most common method for cantilever excitation, however it may cause spurious resonance peaks. Therefore, the direct excitation of the cantilever plays a crucial role in AFM imaging. A fiber optic interferometer with a 1310 nm laser was used both for the excitation of the cantilever at the resonance and the deflection measurement of the cantilever in a commercial low temperature atomic force microscope/magnetic force microscope (AFM/MFM) from NanoMagnetics Instruments. The laser power was modulated at the cantilever's resonance frequency by a digital Phase Locked Loop (PLL). The laser beam is typically modulated by ˜500 μW, and ˜141.8 nmpp oscillation amplitude is obtained in moderate vacuum levels between 4 and 300 K. We have demonstrated the performance of the radiation pressure excitation in AFM/MFM by imaging atomic steps in graphite, magnetic domains in CoPt multilayers between 4 and 300 K and Abrikosov vortex lattice in BSCCO(2212) single crystal at 4 K for the first time.

  11. Talc friction in the temperature range 25°–400 °C: relevance for fault-zone weakening

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Talc has a temperature–pressure range of stability that extends from surficial to eclogite-facies conditions, making it of potential significance in a variety of faulting environments. Talc has been identified in exhumed subduction zone thrusts, in fault gouge collected from oceanic transform and detachment faults associated with rift systems, and recently in serpentinite from the central creeping section of the San Andreas fault. Typically, talc crystallized in the active fault zones as a result of the reaction of ultramafic rocks with silica-saturated hydrothermal fluids. This mode of formation of talc is a prime example of a fault-zone weakening process. Because of its velocity-strengthening behavior, talc may play a role in stabilizing slip at depth in subduction zones and in the creeping faults of central and northern California that are associated with ophiolitic rocks.

  12. Precipitation and winter temperature predict long-term range-scale abundance changes in Western North American birds.

    PubMed

    Illán, Javier Gutiérrez; Thomas, Chris D; Jones, Julia A; Wong, Weng-Keen; Shirley, Susan M; Betts, Matthew G

    2014-11-01

    Predicting biodiversity responses to climate change remains a difficult challenge, especially in climatically complex regions where precipitation is a limiting factor. Though statistical climatic envelope models are frequently used to project future scenarios for species distributions under climate change, these models are rarely tested using empirical data. We used long-term data on bird distributions and abundance covering five states in the western US and in the Canadian province of British Columbia to test the capacity of statistical models to predict temporal changes in bird populations over a 32-year period. Using boosted regression trees, we built presence-absence and abundance models that related the presence and abundance of 132 bird species to spatial variation in climatic conditions. Presence/absence models built using 1970-1974 data forecast the distributions of the majority of species in the later time period, 1998-2002 (mean AUC = 0.79 ± 0.01). Hindcast models performed equivalently (mean AUC = 0.82 ± 0.01). Correlations between observed and predicted abundances were also statistically significant for most species (forecast mean Spearman's ρ = 0.34 ± 0.02, hindcast = 0.39 ± 0.02). The most stringent test is to test predicted changes in geographic patterns through time. Observed changes in abundance patterns were significantly positively correlated with those predicted for 59% of species (mean Spearman's ρ = 0.28 ± 0.02, across all species). Three precipitation variables (for the wettest month, breeding season, and driest month) and minimum temperature of the coldest month were the most important predictors of bird distributions and abundances in this region, and hence of abundance changes through time. Our results suggest that models describing associations between climatic variables and abundance patterns can predict changes through time for some species, and that changes in precipitation and winter temperature appear to

  13. Operation of a New Half-Bridge Gate Driver for Enhancement - Mode GaN FETs, Type LM5113, Over a Wide Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    A new commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) gate driver designed to drive both the high-side and the low-side enhancement-mode GaN FETs, National Semiconductor's type LM5113, was evaluated for operation at temperatures beyond its recommended specified limits of -40 C to +125 C. The effects of limited thermal cycling under the extended test temperature, which ranged from -194 C to +150 C, on the operation of this chip as well as restart capability at the extreme cryogenic and hot temperatures were also investigated. The driver circuit was able to maintain good operation throughout the entire test regime between -194 C and +150 C without undergoing any major changes in its outputs signals and characteristics. The limited thermal cycling performed on the device also had no effect on its performance, and the driver chip was able to successfully restart at each of the extreme temperatures of -194 C and +150 C. The plastic packaging of this device was also not affected by either the short extreme temperature exposure or the limited thermal cycling. These preliminary results indicate that this new commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) halfbridge eGaN FET driver integrated circuit has the potential for use in space exploration missions under extreme temperature environments. Further testing is planned under long-term cycling to assess the reliability of these parts and to determine their suitability for extended use in the harsh environments of space.

  14. Comparison of clumped isotope signatures of dolomite cements to fluid inclusion thermometry in the temperature range of 73-176 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Came, Rosemarie E.; Azmy, Karem; Tripati, Aradhna; Olanipekun, Babatunde-John

    2017-02-01

    Widespread application of the novel clumped isotope paleothermometer (Δ47) using dolomite samples from shallow crustal settings has been hindered by a lack of adequate constraints on clumped isotope systematics in dolomites that formed at temperatures greater than 50 °C. Consequently, many high-temperature applications involving diagenetic dolomites have required an assumption that the relationship between temperature and Δ47 in diagenetic dolomite resembles the theoretical temperature dependence for calcite. Here we present Δ47 results from dolomite cements for which precipitation temperatures were determined independently using fluid inclusion microthermometry. We compare a rock-based ;calibration; for samples from the temperature range of ∼73 to 176 °C to previously published laboratory-derived calibrations for synthetic calcites. This novel combination of approaches yields results that are broadly consistent with results reported from controlled laboratory experiments, providing an important confirmation of the utility of clumped isotopes in real-world systems. Our results suggest that the Δ47 of dolomite cements may provide key information in the reconstruction of burial and thermal histories and also in the recognition of potential petroleum reservoirs.

  15. Dielectric and thermophysical properties of meat batters over a temperature range of 5-85 °C.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Lyng, J G; Brunton, N; Morgan, D; McKenna, B

    2004-10-01

    Dielectric (dielectric constant (ε(')) and loss factor (ε″)) and thermal (heat capacity (c), thermal conductivity (k) and thermal diffusivity (α))) properties of two meat batters (pork luncheon roll (PLR) and white pudding (WP)) were measured between 5 and 85 °C. Radio frequency (RF) and microwave (MW) ε″ values varied across 5-85 °C (P<0.05). MW ε(') and ε″ values for WP tended to peak at 45 °C and decrease thereafter, whereas for PLR, ε(') and ε″ peaked at 65 °C which appeared to match potato starch gelatinisation within this product. WP and PLR had significantly higher c values at 25 °C, which corresponded to the MP of pork fat. For PLR, an additional c peak was noted at 65 °C, which appeared to correspond to potato starch gelatinisation. At 85 °C, k values were higher (P<0.05) than at 5, 25 and 45 °C but were not higher than values at 65 °C. α values increased with temperature (P<0.05).

  16. On the synthesis atmosphere influence in the technology of complex composite materials in the wide temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspensky, A. A.; Yavshits, S.; Lipin, V.; Zhigalov, P.; Slobodov, A.

    2017-02-01

    Heterogeneous and homogeneous processes of synthesis for complex functional materials are studied by the methods of thermodynamic modeling and calculation, based on minimization of the Gibbs energy of the researched system. The conditions and products of gasification in the field of 0-2000 °C are determined for the synthesis conditions of a ceramic tile with complex composition (10-component system). All main products of interaction of components of ceramic mass (the system SiO2 – K2O – Na2O – Al2O3 – Fe2O3 – CaO – MgO – TiO2 – P2O5 – SO3) and main components of air (the system N2 – O2 – CO2 – H2O) are found for the synthesis of material in the conditions of the air atmosphere at various temperatures. The character of physico-chemical influence of each components on the occurring processes is revealed, that determines a theoretical and calculation base of management and optimization of the synthesis engineering process for various functional materials.

  17. Kinetic investigation of the reactions of NCO radicals with alkanes in the temperature range 294 to 1,113 K

    SciTech Connect

    Schuck, A.; Volpp, H.R.; Wolfrum, J. . Physikalisch-Chemisches Inst.)

    1994-12-01

    Absolute rate coefficients for the reaction of NCO radicals with methane (k[sub 1]), ethane (k[sub 2]), and propane (k[sub 3]) were measured as a function of temperature in a heatable quartz reactor by means of the laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence (LP/LIF) pump-probe technique. NCO radicals were produced by the fast precursor reaction NH(a[sup 1] [Delta]) + HNCO [yields] NH[sub 2] + NCO, following the 193-nm photolysis of isocyanic acid. The measure rate coefficients can be described by the following expressions: k[sub 1](512 < T < 1,113 K) = 10[sup 12.99 [+-] 0.12] [times] exp(-34.0[+-]1.8 kJ/mol/RT) cm[sup 3]/mol s; k[sub 2](296 < T < 922 K) = 10[sup 8.21] [times] (T/298 K)[sup (6.89[+-]0.02)] [times] exp(12.2[+-]0.5 kJ/mol/RT)cm[sup 3]/mol s; and k[sub 3](300 < T < 849 K) = 10[sup 11.49] [times] (T/298 K)[sup (2.15[+-]0.02)] [times] exp(-1.8[+-]0.4 kJ/mol/RT)cm[sup 3]/mol s. A comparison with the corresponding reactions of CN, Cl, and OH radicals with alkanes suggests that all these title reactions also proceed predominantly via a hydrogen atom abstraction mechanism to form HNCO.

  18. Comparison of experimental and calculated attachment rate constants for CFCl3 and CCl4 in the temperature range 294-500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orient, O. J.; Chutjian, A.; Crompton, R. W.; Cheung, B.

    1989-01-01

    Electron-attachment cross sections and rate constants have been measured and calculated for the dissociative attachment processes e + CFCl3 - Cl(-) + CFCl2 and e + CCl4 - Cl(-) + CCl3. Good agreement over the electron-energy range 1-200 meV is found in energy dependence between present calculated cross sections and experimental cross sections at 300 K. The same calculation, with suitable adjustment of thermal populations, was used to calculate electron-attachment rate constants in the range 50-600 K. Experimental rate constants for CFCl3 and CCl4 were measured at temperatures of 294, 404, and 496 K (CFCl3) and 294, 400, and 500 K (CCl4) using the Cavalleri electron-density sampling method. Good agreement is found between present measurements and calculations, poor agreement with flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe (FALP) data in CFCl3 at the higher temperatures, and reasonable agreement with FALP data for CCl4.

  19. Intended long-term permafrost monitoring in Austria: Observations from eight years (2006-2014) of ground temperature monitoring in the Tauern Range, Central Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas; Lintschnig, Michèle

    2015-04-01

    At present permafrost monitoring in Austria is carried out by several institutions at some 20 sites in the Austrian Alps. However, so far this monitoring is not coordinated and institutionalised in terms of monitoring strategy, organization, data management and funding. Within the currently running permAT project such an institutionalization is in progress. Permafrost in the Austrian mountains is rather warm and hence sensitive to present climate change. Consequently permafrost conditions and changes are of increasing importance also for the public. Therefore, it is evident that a coordinated and institutionalised long-term monitoring of ground temperature in Austria is essential for permafrost understanding and people's safety. In this contribution we present up to eight years of field data from nine different study sites in Austria. All sites are located in the highest mountain range in Austria, the Tauern Range (maximum elevation 3798 m asl) covering some 9000 km² of the national territory. The nine different study sites are located between latitude 46°55' to 47°22' and longitude 12°44' to 14°41'. Altogether 57 ground temperature monitoring sites have been installed in 2006 and 2007 at the nine study sites using one- (at 23 sites) and three-channel (at 34 sites) miniature temperature dataloggers produced by GeoPrecision, Germany. Therefore, more than 120 ground temperature data series are available from between the ground surface to maximum depths of 2.75 m. The 57 monitoring sites range from 1922 to 3002 m asl in elevation and consider flat terrain as well as step rock walls. All slope aspects are adequately considered. Relevant research questions we intend to address in this contribution include (a) general ground thermal conditions in 2006-2014, (b) the influence of different substrates and aspects on ground temperatures, (c) potential permafrost occurrence, (d) changes or stable conditions during the observation period, (e) regional pattern, and (f

  20. Giant elastocaloric effect covering wide temperature range in columnar-grained Cu71.5Al17.5Mn11 shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Sheng; Huang, Hai-You; Xie, Jianxin; Takekawa, Shouhei; Xu, Xiao; Omori, Toshihiro; Kainuma, Ryosuke

    2016-10-01

    The elastocaloric effect in a columnar-grained Cu71.5Al17.5Mn11 shape memory alloy fabricated by directional solidification was investigated. A large entropy change of 25.0 J/kg K generated by the reversible martensitic transformation was demonstrated. The adiabatic temperature change of 12-13 K was directly measured, covering a wide temperature range of more than 100 K. The low applied stress with a specific elastocaloric ability of 100.8 K/GPa was identified and the potentially attainable operational temperature window as wide as more than 215 K was also discussed. The outstanding elastocaloric refrigeration capability, together with the low applying stress and uniform phase transformation, makes the columnar-grained Cu-Al-Mn shape memory alloy a promising material for solid-state refrigeration.

  1. Wide-range temperature dependence of epitaxial graphene growth on 4H-SiC (0 0 0 -1): A study of ridge structures formation dynamics associated with temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushio, Shoji; Yoshii, Arata; Tamai, Naoto; Ohtani, Noboru; Kaneko, Tadaaki

    2011-03-01

    We investigated the temperature dependence (1200-2100 °C) of morphological features in the growth of epitaxial graphene on 4H-SiC (0 0 0 -1) C-face in ultra high vacuum (UHV). As a SiC initial surface preparation technique prior to the epitaxial graphene growth, Si-vapor etching was conducted to ensure a uniform step-terrace structure at 4H-SiC (0 0 0 -1) consisting of 0.5 nm step height. The epitaxial graphene growth has been performed in our original experimental setup with a TaC container inside an all metal chamber with radiative heating system, which allows to increase the graphitization temperature up to 2100 °C in UHV. The surface morphology of the epitaxially grown multilayer graphene, characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), exhibited a drastic change as a function of temperature. Ridge structures of the topmost graphene layer(s) appeared above 1600 °C, where the well-ordered step-terrace initial structure of the SiC vanished. In this high temperature range, the network of the ridges spread over the surface with an increase in temperature. Raman topography mapping for characterizing site dependent 2D-spectrum implies that rotational stacking disorder of graphene layers is accompanied by relatively small ridge network on the surface in a specific temperature range.

  2. Characterization and potential of three temperature ranges for hydrogen fermentation of cellulose by means of activity test and 16s rRNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Gadow, Samir I; Jiang, Hongyu; Li, Yu-You

    2016-06-01

    A series of standardized activity experiments were performed to characterize three different temperature ranges of hydrogen fermentation from different carbon sources. 16S rRNA sequences analysis showed that the bacteria were close to Enterobacter genus in the mesophilic mixed culture (MMC) and Thermoanaerobacterium genus in the thermophilic and hyper-thermophilic mixed cultures (TMC and HMC). The MMC was able to utilize the glucose and cellulose to produce methane gas within a temperature range between 25 and 45 °C and hydrogen gas from 35 to 60°C. While, the TMC and HMC produced only hydrogen gas at all temperature ranges and the highest activity of 521.4mlH2/gVSSd was obtained by TMC. The thermodynamic analysis showed that more energy is consumed by hydrogen production from cellulose than from glucose. The experimental results could help to improve the economic feasibility of cellulosic biomass energy using three-phase technology to produce hythane.

  3. Study of the dielectric properties of weathered granite, basalt and quartzite by means of broadband dielectric spectroscopy over a wide range of frequency and temperature.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, Steven; Delbreilh, Laurent; Antoine, Raphael; Dargent, Eric; Fauchard, Cyrille

    2016-04-01

    Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy (BDS) allows the measurement of the complex impedance of various materials over a wide range of frequency (0.1 Hz to 2 MHz) and temperature (-150 to 400°C). Other properties can be assessed from this measurement such as permittivity and conductivity. In this study, the BDS is presented to figure out the complex behaviour of several rock parameters as a function of the temperature and frequency. Indeed, multiple processes might occur such as interfacial polarization, AC and DC conductivity. The measurements of a weathered granite, basalt and quartzite were performed. The activation energy associated to each process involved during the measurement can be calculated by following the relaxation time as a function of the temperature, taking into account the Havriliak-Négami model. The principle of the technique and the whole study is presented here and several hypothesis are advanced to explain the dielectric behaviour of rocks. Finally, as the range of frequency and temperature of the BDS method is common to several electromagnetic and electrical techniques applied in subsurface geophysics, some perspectives are proposed to better understand geophysical measurements in hydrothermal systems.

  4. Influence of CO molecular impurity on the structural and thermodynamic properties of fullerite C60, in a broad range of sorption temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meleshko, V. V.; Legchenkova, I. V.; Stetsenko, Y. E.; Prokhvatilov, A. I.

    2016-02-01

    An x-ray diffraction study of how sorption of CO gas at a pressure of 30 atm in the temperature range of 150-600 °C influences the structural characteristics of polycrystalline and single crystal fullerite C60. The sorption kinetics are studied by constructing a dependence of the lattice parameter on the time it takes for fullerite to be saturated by CO molecules. At temperatures Tsorb > 300 °C there is an observed dissociation of carbon monoxide, accompanied by the precipitation of carbon powder and the chemical interaction of atomic oxygen with C60 and CO molecules, and possibly with the carbon condensate. These processes have a strong influence on the structural characteristics of fullerite, thus creating, in part, a nonmonotonic dependence of the parameter and lattice matrix volume on the impurity saturation temperature. The concentrations of solid solutions C60(CO)x poly- and single crystal samples are determined in the physisorption range for two modes (150 and 250 °C). It is found that the CO impurity has a linear effect on the lattice parameter and the temperature of the orientational transition of fullerite C60.

  5. A new method to calculate the threshold temperature of a perfect blackbody to protect cornea and lens in the range of 780-3,000 nm.

    PubMed

    Madjidi, Faramarz; Mohammadi, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to IR-A and IR-B radiation, in the wavelength region of 780 nm to 3,000 nm, may lead to the development of cataractogenesis. Estimation of the exposure levels is the first step in controlling adverse health effects. In the present study, the irradiance of a hot blackbody emitter is replaced by its temperature in the exposure limit values for cornea and lens in the range of 780-3,000 nm. This paper explains the development and implementation of a computer code to predict a temperature, defined as Threshold Temperature, which satisfies the exposure limits already proposed by the ICNIRP. To this end, first an infinite series was created for the calculation of spectral radiance by integration with Planck's law. For calculation of irradiance, the initial terms of this infinite series were selected, and integration was performed in the wavelength region of 780 nm to 3,000 nm. Finally, using a computer code, an unknown source temperature that can emit the same irradiance was found. Exposure duration, source area, and observer distance from the hot source were entered as input data in this proposed code. Consequently, it is possible only by measurement of a Planckian emitter temperature and taking into account the distance from source and exposure time for an observer to decide whether the exposure to IR radiation in the range of 780 to 3,000 nm is permissible or not. It seems that the substitution of irradiance by the source temperature is an easier and more convenient way for hygienists to evaluate IR exposures.

  6. GREENER AND RAPID ACCESS TO BIO-ACTIVE HETEROCYCLES: ROOM TEMPERATURE SYNTHESIS OF PYRAZOLES AND DIAZEPINES IN AQUEOUS MEDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    An expeditious room temperature synthesis of pyrazoles and diazepines by condensation of hydrazines/hydrazides and diamines with various 1,3-diketones is described. This greener protocol was catalyzed by polystyrene supported sulfonic acid (PSSA) and proceeded efficiently in wate...

  7. Relationship between peak spatial-averaged specific absorption rate and peak temperature elevation in human head in frequency range of 1-30 GHz.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Ryota; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the peak temperature elevation and the peak specific absorption rate (SAR) averaged over 10 g of tissue in human head models in the frequency range of 1-30 GHz. As a wave source, a half-wave dipole antenna resonant at the respective frequencies is located in the proximity of the pinna. The bioheat equation is used to evaluate the temperature elevation by employing the SAR, which is computed by electromagnetic analysis, as a heat source. The computed SAR is post-processed by calculating the peak spatial-averaged SAR with six averaging algorithms that consider different descriptions provided in international guidelines and standards, e.g. the number of tissues allowed in the averaging volume, different averaging shapes, and the consideration of the pinna. The computational results show that the SAR averaging algorithms excluding the pinna are essential when correlating the peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna. In the averaging scheme considering an arbitrary shape, for better correlation, multiple tissues should be included in the averaging volume rather than a single tissue. For frequencies higher than 3-4 GHz, the correlation for peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna is modest for the different algorithms. The 95th percentile value of the heating factor as well as the mean and median values derived here would be helpful for estimating the possible temperature elevation in the head.

  8. Sample environment for neutron scattering measurements of internal stresses in engineering materials in the temperature range of 6 K to 300 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichek, O.; Timms, J. D.; Kelleher, J. F.; Down, R. B. E.; Offer, C. D.; Kabra, S.; Zhang, S. Y.

    2017-02-01

    Internal stresses in materials have a considerable effect on material properties including strength, fracture toughness, and fatigue resistance. The ENGIN-X beamline is an engineering science facility at ISIS optimized for the measurement of strain and stress using the atomic lattice planes as a strain gauge. Nowadays, the rapidly rising interest in the mechanical properties of engineering materials at low temperatures has been stimulated by the dynamic development of the cryogenic industry and the advanced applications of the superconductor technology. Here we present the design and discuss the test results of a new cryogenic sample environment system for neutron scattering measurements of internal stresses in engineering materials under a load of up to 100 kN and in the temperature range of 6 K to 300 K. Complete cooling of the system starting from the room temperature down to the base temperature takes around 90 min. Understanding of internal stresses in engineering materials at cryogenic temperatures is vital for the modelling and designing of cutting-edge superconducting magnets and other superconductor based applications.

  9. Effects of increase in temperature and open water on transmigration and access to health care by the Nenets reindeer herders in northern Russia

    PubMed Central

    Amstislavski, Philippe; Zubov, Leonid; Chen, Herman; Ceccato, Pietro; Pekel, Jean-Francois; Weedon, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Background The indigenous Nenets reindeer herders in northern Russia annually migrate several hundred kilometers between summer and winter pastures. In the warming climate, ice-rich permafrost and glaciers are being significantly reduced and will eventually disappear from parts of the Arctic. The emergent changes in hydrological cycles have already led to substantial increases in open water that stays unfrozen for longer periods of time. This environmental change has been reported to compromise the nomadic Nenets’ traditional way of life because the presence of new water in the tundra reduces the Nenets’ ability to travel by foot, sled, or motor vehicle from the summer transitory tundra campsites in order to access healthcare centers in villages. New water can also impede their access to family and community at other herder camps and in the villages. Although regional and global models predicting hydrologic changes due to climate changes exist, the spatial resolution of these models is too coarse for studying how increases in open water affect health and livelihoods. To anticipate the full health impact of hydrologic changes, the current gap between globally forecasted scenarios and locally forecasted hydrologic scenarios needs to be bridged. Objectives We studied the effects of the autumn temperature anomalies and increases in open water on health care access and transmigration of reindeer herders on the Kanin Peninsula. Design Correlational and time series analyses were completed. Methods The study population consisted of 370 full-time, nomadic reindeer herders. We utilized clinical visit records, studied surface temperature anomalies during autumn migrations, and used remotely sensed imagery to detect water bodies. Spearman correlation was used to measure the relationship between temperature anomalies and the annual arrival of the herders at the Nes clinic for preventive and primary care. Piecewise regression was used to model change in mean autumnal

  10. Northern range expansion of European populations of the wasp spider Argiope bruennichi is associated with global warming-correlated genetic admixture and population-specific temperature adaptations.

    PubMed

    Krehenwinkel, Henrik; Tautz, Diethard

    2013-04-01

    Poleward range expansions are observed for an increasing number of species, which may be an effect of global warming during the past decades. However, it is still not clear in how far these expansions reflect simple geographical shifts of species ranges, or whether new genetic adaptations play a role as well. Here, we analyse the expansion of the wasp spider Argiope bruennichi into Northern Europe during the last century. We have used a range-wide sampling of contemporary populations and historical specimens from museums to trace the phylogeography and genetic changes associated with the range shift. Based on the analysis of mitochondrial, microsatellite and SNP markers, we observe a higher level of genetic diversity in the expanding populations, apparently due to admixture of formerly isolated lineages. Using reciprocal transplant experiments for testing overwintering tolerance, as well as temperature preference and tolerance tests in the laboratory, we find that the invading spiders have possibly shifted their temperature niche. This may be a key adaptation for survival in Northern latitudes. The museum samples allow a reconstruction of the invasion's genetic history. A first, small-scale range shift started around 1930, in parallel with the onset of global warming. A more massive invasion of Northern Europe associated with genetic admixture and morphological changes occurred in later decades. We suggest that the latter range expansion into far Northern latitudes may be a consequence of the admixture that provided the genetic material for adaptations to new environmental regimes. Hence, global warming could have facilitated the initial admixture of populations and this resulted in genetic lineages with new habitat preferences.

  11. Factors Affecting Date of Implantation, Parturition, and Den Entry Estimated from Activity and Body Temperature in Free-Ranging Brown Bears

    PubMed Central

    Friebe, Andrea; Evans, Alina L.; Arnemo, Jon M.; Blanc, Stéphane; Brunberg, Sven; Fleissner, Günther; Swenson, Jon E.; Zedrosser, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of factors influencing the timing of reproduction is important for animal conservation and management. Brown bears (Ursus arctos) are able to vary the birth date of their cubs in response to their fat stores, but little information is available about the timing of implantation and parturition in free-ranging brown bears. Body temperature and activity of pregnant brown bears is higher during the gestation period than during the rest of hibernation and drops at parturition. We compared mean daily body temperature and activity levels of pregnant and nonpregnant females during preimplantation, gestation, and lactation. Additionally we tested whether age, litter size, primiparity, environmental conditions, and the start of hibernation influence the timing of parturition. The mean date of implantation was 1 December (SD = 12), the mean date of parturition was 26 January (SD = 12), and the mean duration of the gestation period was 56 days (SD = 2). The body temperature of pregnant females was higher during the gestation and lactation periods than that of nonpregnant bears. The body temperature of pregnant females decreased during the gestation period. Activity recordings were also used to determine the date of parturition. The parturition dates calculated with activity and body temperature data did not differ significantly and were the same in 50% of the females. Older females started hibernation earlier. The start of hibernation was earlier during years with favorable environmental conditions. Dates of parturition were later during years with good environmental conditions which was unexpected. We suggest that free-ranging pregnant brown bears in areas with high levels of human activities at the beginning of the denning period, as in our study area, might prioritize investing energy in early denning than in early parturition during years with favorable environmental conditions, as a strategy to prevent disturbances caused by human. PMID:24988486

  12. Seasonal microbial and nutrient responses during a 5-year reduction in the daily temperature range of soil in a Chihuahuan Desert ecosystem.

    PubMed

    van Gestel, Natasja C; Dhungana, Nirmala; Tissue, David T; Zak, John C

    2016-01-01

    High daily temperature range of soil (DTRsoil) negatively affects soil microbial biomass and activity, but its interaction with seasonal soil moisture in regulating ecosystem function remains unclear. For our 5-year field study in the Chihuahuan Desert, we suspended shade cloth 15 cm above the soil surface to reduce daytime temperature and increase nighttime soil temperature compared to unshaded plots, thereby reducing DTRsoil (by 5 ºC at 0.2 cm depth) without altering mean temperatures. Microbial biomass production was primarily regulated by seasonal precipitation with the magnitude of the response dependent on DTRsoil. Reduced DTRsoil more consistently increased microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN; +38%) than microbial biomass carbon (MBC) with treatment responses being similar in spring and summer. Soil respiration depended primarily on soil moisture with responses to reduced DTRsoil evident only in wetter summer soils (+53%) and not in dry spring soils. Reduced DTRsoil had no effect on concentrations of dissolved organic C, soil organic matter (SOM), nor soil inorganic N (extractable NO3 (-)-N + NH4 (+)-N). Higher MBN without changes in soil inorganic N suggests faster N cycling rates or alternate sources of N. If N cycling rates increased without a change to external N inputs (atmospheric N deposition or N fixation), then productivity in this desert system, which is N-poor and low in SOM, could be negatively impacted with continued decreases in daily temperature range. Thus, the future N balance in arid ecosystems, under conditions of lower DTR, seems linked to future precipitation regimes through N deposition and regulation of soil heat load dynamics.

  13. Factors affecting date of implantation, parturition, and den entry estimated from activity and body temperature in free-ranging brown bears.

    PubMed

    Friebe, Andrea; Evans, Alina L; Arnemo, Jon M; Blanc, Stéphane; Brunberg, Sven; Fleissner, Günther; Swenson, Jon E; Zedrosser, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of factors influencing the timing of reproduction is important for animal conservation and management. Brown bears (Ursus arctos) are able to vary the birth date of their cubs in response to their fat stores, but little information is available about the timing of implantation and parturition in free-ranging brown bears. Body temperature and activity of pregnant brown bears is higher during the gestation period than during the rest of hibernation and drops at parturition. We compared mean daily body temperature and activity levels of pregnant and nonpregnant females during preimplantation, gestation, and lactation. Additionally we tested whether age, litter size, primiparity, environmental conditions, and the start of hibernation influence the timing of parturition. The mean date of implantation was 1 December (SD = 12), the mean date of parturition was 26 January (SD = 12), and the mean duration of the gestation period was 56 days (SD = 2). The body temperature of pregnant females was higher during the gestation and lactation periods than that of nonpregnant bears. The body temperature of pregnant females decreased during the gestation period. Activity recordings were also used to determine the date of parturition. The parturition dates calculated with activity and body temperature data did not differ significantly and were the same in 50% of the females. Older females started hibernation earlier. The start of hibernation was earlier during years with favorable environmental conditions. Dates of parturition were later during years with good environmental conditions which was unexpected. We suggest that free-ranging pregnant brown bears in areas with high levels of human activities at the beginning of the denning period, as in our study area, might prioritize investing energy in early denning than in early parturition during years with favorable environmental conditions, as a strategy to prevent disturbances caused by human.

  14. Zero thermal expansion and ferromagnetism in cubic Sc(1-x)M(x)F3 (M = Ga, Fe) over a wide temperature range.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lei; Chen, Jun; Fan, Longlong; Ren, Yang; Rong, Yangchun; Pan, Zhao; Deng, Jinxia; Yu, Ranbo; Xing, Xianran

    2014-10-01

    The rare physical property of zero thermal expansion (ZTE) is intriguing because neither expansion nor contraction occurs with temperature fluctuations. Most ZTE, however, occurs below room temperature. It is a great challenge to achieve isotropic ZTE at high temperatures. Here we report the unconventional isotropic ZTE in the cubic (Sc1-xMx)F3 (M = Ga, Fe) over a wide temperature range (linear coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), αl = 2.34 × 10(-7) K(-1), 300-900 K). Such a broad temperature range with a considerably negligible CTE has rarely been documented. The present ZTE property has been designed using the introduction of local distortions in the macroscopic cubic lattice by heterogeneous cation substitution for the Sc site. Even though the macroscopic crystallographic structure of (Sc0.85Ga0.05Fe0.1)F3 adheres to the cubic system (Pm3̅m) according to the results of X-ray diffraction, the local structure exhibits a slight rhombohedral distortion. This is confirmed by pair distribution function analysis of synchrotron radiation X-ray total scattering. This local distortion may weaken the contribution from the transverse thermal vibration of fluorine atoms to negative thermal expansion, and thus may presumably be responsible for the ZTE. In addition, the present ZTE compounds of (Sc1-xMx)F3 can be functionalized to exhibit high-Tc ferromagnetism and a narrow-gap semiconductor feature. The present study shows the possibility of obtaining ZTE materials with multifunctionality in future work.

  15. First theoretical global line lists of ethylene (12C2H4) spectra for the temperature range 50-700 K in the far-infrared for quantification of absorption and emission in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, M.; Delahaye, T.; Nikitin, A. V.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.

    2016-10-01

    We present the construction of complete and comprehensive ethylene line lists for the temperatures 50-700 K based on accurate ab initio potential and dipole moment surfaces and extensive first-principle calculations. Three lists spanning the [0-6400] cm-1 infrared region were built at T = 80, 160, and 296 K, and two lists in the range [0-5200] cm-1 were built at 500 and 700 K. For each of these five temperatures, we considered possible convergence problems to ensure reliable opacity calculations. Our final list at 700 K was computed up to J = 71 and contains almost 60 million lines for intensities I > 5 × 10-27 cm/molecule. Comparisons with experimental spectra carried out in this study showed that for the most active infrared bands, the accuracy of band centers in our theoretical lists is better on average than 0.3 cm-1, and the integrated absorbance errors in the intervals relevant for spectral analyses are about 1-3%. These lists can be applied to simulations of absorption and emission spectra, radiative and non-LTE processes, and opacity calculations for planetary and astrophysical applications. The lists are freely accessible through the TheoReTS information system at http://theorets.univ-reims.fr and http://theorets.tsu.ru

  16. Pyroelectric Properties of Potassium and Rubidium Titanyl-Arsenate Single Crystals in the Temperature Range of 4.2-300 K

    SciTech Connect

    Shaldin, Yu. V.; Matyjasik, S.; Novikova, N. E.; Tseitlin, M.; Mozhaev, E.; Roth, M.

    2010-11-15

    The temperature dependences of the pyroelectric coefficients of KTiOAsO{sub 4} and RbTiOAsO{sub 4} single crystals grown by flux crystallization have been investigated in the temperature range of 4.2-300 K. With an increase in temperature, superionic conductivity first arises in KTiOAsO4 (at T > 200 K) and then (at T > 270 K) in RbTiOAsO{sub 4}. This conductivity is much higher in the samples polarized at T = 4.2 K. An exponential change in the crystal resistivity along the polar direction is simultaneously observed. The results of measurements in the range of 4.2-200 K indicate larger values of pyroelectric coefficients when compared with potassium and rubidium titanyl-phosphate crystals. A correlation between the pyroelectric coefficients and a change in the lattice constants at isomorphic substitutions of K atoms for Rb and P atoms for As has been revealed within the symmetry approach.

  17. Magnetocaloric effect over a wide temperature range due to multiple magnetic transitions in GdNi0.8Al1.2 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, T. P.; Nallamuthu, S.; Arun, K.; Curlik, Ivan; Ilkovic, Sergej; Dzubinska, Andrea; Reiffers, Marian; Nagalakshmi, R.

    2016-05-01

    The magnetic properties, magnetocaloric effect (MCE) and refrigerant capacity (RC) of the novel polycrystalline GdNi0.8Al1.2 alloy are investigated. The temperature dependence of magnetization exhibits multiple magnetic transitions at T1=17.7 K, T2=46.7 K and T3=256 K thereby displaying a complex magnetic behaviour. The magnetocaloric effect is calculated in terms of the magnetic entropy change ( -Δ SM), from isothermal magnetization data using Maxwell relations. The maximum magnetic entropy change at major transitions T2 is 9.15 J kg-1K-1 (for a field change of 0-9 T) and 4.20 Jkg-1K-1 (0-5 T) and at T3 is 1.10 Jkg-1K-1 (0-9 T) and 0.67 Jkg-1K-1 (0-5 T). The overlap of the two -Δ SM peaks expeditiously expand the working temperature range of this material with substantial MCE which in turn yields moderate RC value of 120 J/kg for a field change of 0-5T. These results suggest that the GdNi0.8Al1.2 alloy may be a meaningful candidate for magnetic refrigeration working in a wide temperature range.

  18. Characteristics of individual reactions of the cardiovascular system of healthy people to changes in meteorological factors in a wide temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenchenko, T. A.; Skavulyak, A. N.; Khorseva, N. I.; Breus, T. K.

    2013-12-01

    Based on the results of 4-year observations of daily variations in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) in seven healthy volunteers, two distinct types of reaction of physiological indicators (PIs) to changes in meteorological parameters (first and foremost, atmospheric temperature T atm) are revealed. The first type is a monotonic (but nonuniform with respect to speed) decrease in systolic BP with increasing temperature, which is most pronounced for T atm < -5°C and T atm > 15°C, with a weaker reaction of diastolic BP and no reaction of HR (in four volunteers). The second type is a two-phase nonmonotonic dependence of BP indicators on T atm, which coincides with the first type in the range T atm < -5°C and is characterized by a positive correlation of BP and HR indicators with T atm for T atm > -5°C (in two volunteers). The physiological mechanisms that can provide the observed compensatory-adaptive reactions of healthy individuals to atmospheric factors in different temperature ranges are analyzed in detail. It has been shown that the revealed regularities can explain the results obtained by the authors in earlier studies.

  19. Ratiometric Nanothermometer Based on Rhodamine Dye-Incorporated F127-Melamine-Formaldehyde Polymer Nanoparticle: Preparation, Characterization, Wide-Range Temperature Sensing, and Precise Intracellular Thermometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Youshen; Liu, Jiajun; Ma, Jingwen; Liu, Yongchun; Wang, Ya; Wu, Daocheng

    2016-06-15

    A series of fluorescent nanothermometers (FTs) was prepared with Rhodamine dye-incorporated Pluronic F-127-melamine-formaldehyde composite polymer nanoparticles (R-F127-MF NPs). The highly soluble Rhodamine dye molecules were bound with Pluronic F127 micelles and subsequently incorporated in the cross-linked MF resin NPs during high-temperature cross-link treatment. The morphology and chemical structure of R-F127-MF NPs were characterized with dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra. Fluorescence properties and thermoresponsivities were analyzed using fluorescence spectra. R-F127-MF NPs are found to be monodispersed, presenting a size range of 88-105 nm, and have bright fluorescence and high stability in severe treatments such as autoclave sterilization and lyophilization. By simultaneously incorporating Rhodamine B and Rhodamine 110 (as reference) dyes at a doping ratio of 1:400 in the NPs, ratiometric FTs with a high sensibility of 7.6%·°C(-1) and a wide temperature sensing range from -20 to 110 °C were obtained. The FTs exhibit good stability in solutions with varied pH, ionic strengths, and viscosities and have similar working curves in both intracellular and extracellular environments. Cellular temperature variations in Hela cells during microwave exposure were successfully monitored using the FTs, indicating their considerable potential applications in the biomedical field.

  20. The effect of a diet containing grasshoppers and access to free-range on carcase and meat physicochemical and sensory characteristics in broilers.

    PubMed

    Sun, T; Long, R J; Liu, Z Y

    2013-01-01

    1. Research was conducted to evaluate the impact of a diet containing grasshoppers on the carcase, physicochemical and sensory characteristics in a free-range, grassland-based broiler production system. 2. A total of 80, 28-d-old male broilers were reared on grassland containing a large population of grasshoppers (treatment PB). Control birds were reared intensively on a maize-soybean diet (treatment CB). At 91 d of age, 24 birds from each treatment were slaughtered to evaluate carcase, meat and sensory characteristics. 3. Treatment PB produced birds with significantly lower live weights, breast, wing, thigh and drum weights, and higher dressing percentage and breast percentage of carcase, compared with CB. Treatment PB produced breast meat with significantly higher redness values, shear force and protein content, and lower pH values, cooking loss, moisture and fat content compared with CB. Sensory panel results for breast and thigh meats showed no treatment effect on colour and juiciness, but significantly higher scores for chewiness, flavour, aroma and overall appreciation, and lower scores for tenderness from treatment PB compared with CB. 4. Rearing chickens on rangeland may provide an alternative way to produce poultry meat which is considered superior by modern consumers.

  1. Poster 2:Ab initio calculations of low temperature hydrocarbon spectra for astrophysics: application to the modeling of methane absorption in the Titan atmosphere in a wide IR range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Michael; Nikitin, Andrei; Bezard, Bruno; Rannou, Pascal; Coustenis, Athena; Tyuterev, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of intensities of spectral transitions in various temperature ranges including very low-T conditions is essential for the modeling of optical properties of planetary atmospheres and for other astrophysical applications. The temperature dependence of spectral features is crucial, but quantified experimental information in a wide spectral range is generally missing. A significant progress has been recently achieved in first principles quantum mechanical predictions (ab initio electronic structure + variational nuclear motion calculations) of rotationally resolved spectra for hydrocarbon molecules such as methane , ethylene and their isotopic species [1,2] . We have recently reported the TheoReTS information system (theorets.univ-reims.fr, theorets.tsu.ru) for theoretical spectra based on variational predictions from molecular potential energy and dipole moment surfaces [3] that permits online simulation of radiative properties including low-T conditions of cold planets. In this work, we apply ab initio predictions of the spectra of methane isotopologues down to T=80 K for the modeling of the transmittance in the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest satellite explored by the Cassini-Huygens space mission. A very good agreement over the whole infrared range from 6,000 to 11,000 cm-1 compared with observations obtained by the Descent Imager / Spectral Radiometer (DISR) on the Huygens probe [4,5] at various altitudes will be reported.

  2. Shock Tube and Modeling Study of the H + O2 = OH + O Reaction over a Wide Range of Composition, Pressure, and Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Si-Ok; Hwang, Soon Muk; Rabinowitz, Martin Jay

    1995-01-01

    The rate coefficient of the reaction H + 02 = OH + 0 was determined using OH laser absorption spectroscopy behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range 1050-2500 K and the pressure range 0.7-4.0 atm. Eight mixtures and three stoichiometries were used. Two distinct and independent criteria were employed in the evaluation of k(sub 1). Our recommended expression for k(sub 1) is k(sub 1) = 7.13 x 10(exp 13)exp(-6957 K/T) cm(exp 3)mol(exp -1)s(exp -1) with a statistical uncertainty of 6%. A critical review of recent evaluations of k(sub 1) yields a consensus expression given by k(sub 1) = 7.82 x 10(exp 13)exp(-7105 K/7) cm(exp 3)mol(exp -1)s(exp -1) over the temperature range 960-5300 K. We do not support a non-Arrhenius rate coefficient expression, nor do we find evidence of composition dependence upon the determination of k(sub 1).

  3. Ro-vibrational quenching of CO (v = 1) by He impact in a broad range of temperatures: A benchmark study using mixed quantum/classical inelastic scattering theory.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Alexander; Ivanov, Mikhail; Babikov, Dmitri

    2013-08-21

    The mixed quantum/classical approach is applied to the problem of ro-vibrational energy transfer in the inelastic collisions of CO(v = 1) with He atom, in order to predict the quenching rate coefficient in a broad range of temperatures 5 < T < 2500 K. Scattering calculations are done in two different ways: direct calculations of quenching cross sections and, alternatively, calculations of the excitation cross sections plus microscopic reversibility. In addition, a symmetrized average-velocity method of Billing is tried. Combination of these methods allows reproducing experiment in a broad range of temperatures. Excellent agreement with experiment is obtained at 400 < T < 2500 K (within 10%), good agreement in the range 100 < T < 400 K (within 25%), and semi-quantitative agreement at 40 < T < 100 K(within a factor of 2). This study provides a stringent test of the mixed quantum/classical theory, because the vibrational quantum in CO molecule is rather large and the quencher is very light (He atom). For heavier quenchers and closer to dissociation limit of the molecule, the mixed quantum/classical theory is expected to work even better.

  4. In situ study of photo- and thermo-induced color centers in photochromic rutile TiO2 in the temperature range 90-720 K.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, V N; Glazkova, N I; Mikhaylov, R V; Serpone, N

    2016-10-05

    This article reports an in situ UV-Vis-NIR diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopic and kinetic study of the photoformation and thermal annealing of light absorbing electronic point defects (color centers) in photochromic TiO2 in the temperature range 90-720 K using a simple laboratory-made cryostat-type accessory (for a Cary 5000 spectrophotometer equipped with an integrating sphere). The accessory also allowed for UV-Vis-NIR DR studies to be undertaken either in vacuum or in an oxygen atmosphere at significantly high temperatures (to 720 K) to assess dark chemical events occurring in photochromic titania with the participation of color centers. The DR spectral and kinetic measurements provided the opportunity to examine the separation of photoinduced charge carriers at traps and thermally stimulated carrier detrapping and recombination, as well as the response of color centers to oxidative/reductive treatments of photochromic TiO2. Kinetic results also demonstrate the applicability of the fabricated DR accessory as a high-temperature reaction cell in the systematic study of the principal regularities in the formation and destruction of color centers in titania at various temperatures and gaseous atmospheres.

  5. Provide a suitable range to include the thermal creeping effect on slip velocity and temperature jump of an air flow in a nanochannel by lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimipour, Arash

    2017-01-01

    The thermal creeping effect on slip velocity of air forced convection through a nanochannel is studied for the first time by using a lattice Boltzmann method. The nanochannel side walls are kept hot while the cold inlet air streams along them. The computations are presented for the wide range of Reynolds number, Knudsen number and Eckert number while slip velocity and temperature jump effects are involved. Moreover appropriate validations are performed versus previous works concerned the micro-nanoflows. The achieved results are shown as the velocity and temperature profiles at different cross sections, streamlines and isotherms and also the values of slip velocity and temperature jump along the nanochannel walls. The ability of the lattice Boltzmann method to simulate the thermal creeping effects on hydrodynamic and thermal domains of flow is shown at this study; so that its effects should be involved at lower values of Eckert number and higher values of Reynolds number especially at entrance region where the most temperature gradient exists.

  6. Temperature dependence of the rate coefficient for the alpha-pinene reaction with ozone in the range between 243 K and 303 K.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, Ralf; Saathoff, Harald; Brauers, Theo; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Mentel, Thomas F

    2009-04-07

    The absolute rate coefficient for the reaction of alpha-pinene with ozone was determined in the temperature range between 243 K and 303 K at atmospheric pressure. In total, 30 experiments were performed in the large (85 m3) temperature-controlled simulation chamber AIDA, where the concentrations of the reactants ozone and alpha-pinene were measured directly. An Arrhenius expression for the alpha-pinene + ozone reaction was derived with a pre-exponential factor of (1.4 +/- 0.4) x 10(-15) cm3 s(-1) and a temperature coefficient of (833 +/- 86) K. This rate coefficient is in good agreement (-5%) with the current IUPAC (IUPAC 2007) recommendation at 298 K. The IUPAC recommendation is significantly larger (+27%), around 243 K where the recommended values were extrapolated from higher temperatures. This finding is relevant for tropical regions where strong updrafts can rapidly transport reactive hydrocarbons like alpha-pinene from the boundary layer into the cold regions of the free troposphere.

  7. Fracture behavior of a B2 Ni-30Al-20Fe-0.05Zr intermetallic alloy in the temperature range 300 to 1300 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.

    1992-01-01

    The fracture behavior of a B2 Ni-30Al-20Fe-0.05Zr (at. pct) alloy was investigated using results of tensile tests conducted in the temperature range 300-1300 K under initial strain rates that varied between 10 exp -6 and 10 exp -3/sec, together with results of deformation measurements reported by Raj et al. (1992). Microstructural observations revealed that the alloy had failed by transgranular cleavage fracture below 873 K and by ductile fracture, power-law cavitation, triple point cracking, and rupture above this temperautre. The fracture map constructed using fracture results is compared with those for other classes of materials, showing that the atomic bonding plays a significant role in the low-temperature ductility of NiAl-based alloys.

  8. SAFT-γ force field for the simulation of molecular fluids: 4. A single-site coarse-grained model of water applicable over a wide temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanova, Olga; Avendaño, Carlos; Lafitte, Thomas; Müller, Erich A.; Jackson, George

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we develop coarse-grained (CG) force fields for water, where the effective CG intermolecular interactions between particles are estimated from an accurate description of the macroscopic experimental vapour-liquid equilibria data by means of a molecular-based equation of state. The statistical associating fluid theory for Mie (generalised Lennard-Jones) potentials of variable range (SAFT-VR Mie) is used to parameterise spherically symmetrical (isotropic) force fields for water. The resulting SAFT-γ CG models are based on the Mie (8-6) form with size and energy parameters that are temperature dependent; the latter dependence is a consequence of the angle averaging of the directional polar interactions present in water. At the simplest level of CG where a water molecule is represented as a single bead, it is well known that an isotropic potential cannot be used to accurately reproduce all of the thermodynamic properties of water simultaneously. In order to address this deficiency, we propose two CG potential models of water based on a faithful description of different target properties over a wide range of temperatures: our CGW1-vle model is parameterised to match the saturated-liquid density and vapour pressure; our other CGW1-ift model is parameterised to match the saturated-liquid density and vapour-liquid interfacial tension. A higher level of CG corresponding to two water molecules per CG bead is also considered: the corresponding CGW2-bio model is developed to reproduce the saturated-liquid density and vapour-liquid interfacial tension in the physiological temperature range, and is particularly suitable for the large-scale simulation of bio-molecular systems. A critical comparison of the phase equilibrium and transport properties of the proposed force fields is made with the more traditional atomistic models.

  9. Improvements in the realization of the ITS-90 over the temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.; Zhang, J. T.; Ping, Q.

    2013-09-11

    The temperature primary standard over the range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver in National institute of Metrology (NIM), China, was established in the early 1990s. The performance of all of fixed-point furnaces degraded and needs to be updated due to many years of use. Nowadays, the satisfactory fixed point materials can be available with the development of the modern purification techniques. NIM plans to use a group of three cells for each defining fixed point temperature. In this way the eventual drift of individual cells can be evidenced by periodic intercomparison and this will increase the reliability in disseminating the ITS-90 in China. This article describes the recent improvements in realization of ITS-90 over temperature range from the melting point of gallium to the freezing point of silver at NIM. Taking advantages of the technological advances in the design and manufacture of furnaces, the new three-zone furnaces and the open-type fixed points were developed from the freezing point of indium to the freezing point of silver, and a furnace with the three-zone semiconductor cooling was designed to automatically realize the melting point of gallium. The reproducibility of the new melting point of gallium and the new open-type freezing points of In, Sn, Zn. Al and Ag is improved, especially the freezing points of Al and Ag with the reproducibility of 0.2mK and 0.5mK respectively. The expanded uncertainty in the realization of these defining fixed point temperatures is 0.34mK, 0.44mK, 0.54mK, 0.60mK, 1.30mK and 1.88mK respectively.

  10. Temperature controls on sediment production in the Oregon Coast Range - abiotic frost-cracking processes vs. biotic-dominated processes over the last 40 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. A.; Roering, J. J.; Praskievicz, S. J.; Hales, T. C.; Gavin, D. G.; Bartlein, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Oregon Coast Range (OCR) is a mid-latitude soil-mantled landscape wherein measured uplift rates are broadly consistent with long-term measured erosion rates. The OCR was unglaciated during the last glacial period (~ 26 to 13 ka) and therefore is considered an ideal steady-state landscape to study and model geomorphic processes. However, previously published paleoclimate data inferred from a 42 ka paleolake fossil archive in the OCR Little Lake watershed (3 km2) strongly suggest that temperatures in the OCR during the last glacial were well within the frost cracking temperature window of -3 to -8 °C. Therefore, we suggest that while present-day OCR sediment production is dominated by biota, specifically trees, frost-driven abiotic processes may have played a significant role in modulating erosion rates and landscape evolution during the last glacial interval. A new sediment core from the Little Lake basin at the lake's edge, centered proximal to hillslopes, spans ~ 50 ka to 20 ka. We observe a fourfold increase in sediment accumulation rates from the non-glacial interval (~50 ka to ~ 26 ka) to the last glacial interval (~ 26 ka to ~ 20 ka), including > 12 m of sediment from the last glacial maximum, dated at 23,062 - 23,581 cal yr B.P. The decreased inferred temperatures and increased sedimentation rates suggest increased sediment production and transport via frost processes during the last glacial interval, in contrast to sediment production and erosion rates controlled by biotic processes in the non-glacial intervals. We present a climate-time series scenario of likely frost-cracking intensity across the entire Oregon Coast Range from the non-glacial interval (at least 3 °C cooler than present-day temperatures) through the glacial interval (7 to 14 °C cooler) and into the Holocene (January temperatures ~ 5 °C). We use the PRISM dataset, which consists of monthly temperature and precipitation for the contiguous United States, to calculate local monthly

  11. Deformation behavior of a Ni-30Al-20Fe-0.05Zr intermetallic alloy in the temperature range 300 to 1300 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Locci, I. E.; Noebe, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    The deformation properties of an extruded Ni-30Al-20Fe-0.05Zr (at. pct) alloy in the temperature range 300-1300 K were investigated under initial tensile strain rates that varied between 10 exp -6 and 10 exp -3/sec and in constant load compression creep between 1073 and 1300 K. Three deformation regimes were observed: region I, occurring between 400 and 673 K, which consisted of an athermal regime of less than 0.3 percent tensile ductility; region II, between 673 and 1073, where exponential creep was dominant; and region III, between 1073 and 1300 K, where a significant improvement in tensile ductility was observed.

  12. A novel interferometric dilatometer in the 4-300 K temperature range: thermal expansion coefficient of SRM-731 borosilicate glass and stainless steel-304

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelli, V.; Bianchini, G.; Natale, E.; Scarpellini, D.; Ventura, G.

    2013-10-01

    We present a newly designed heterodyne interferometric dilatometer for the measurement of the coefficient of thermal expansion of solids in the 4-300 K temperature range. The instrument can measure non-monotonic thermal expansion curves and has an accuracy better than 200 nm across the whole 4-300 K measurement range. The compensation for the misalignment of the interferometer design and the configuration of the sample holder make the instrument suitable to carry out measurements on any kind of sample that can be produced in a bar or rod shape. The measurement of a standard SRM-731 borosilicate glass and an SS-304 sample are presented and compared with literature data.

  13. Comparative study of tunable room-temperature laser operation in the 900-1100-nm range: LiF:F2+ and Ti3+:sapphire.

    PubMed

    Rawle, C B; McKinnie, I T; Ter-Mikirtychev, V V; Sandle, W J

    2000-08-20

    We report on a comparative evaluation of efficient room-temperature solid-state lasers based on Ti:sapphire and LiF:F(2)(+) operating in the 900-1100-nm range. LiF:F(2)(+) lasers are shown to operate with substantially lower threshold, broader tuning, and higher output pulse energies. The shorter fluorescence lifetime in LiF:F(2)(+) leads to higher peak output powers and a considerable reduction in buildup-time fluctuations. The main limitations on LiF:F(2)(+) laser operation are identified as amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and long-term thermal degradation of the color centers. ASE restricts the tuning range, slope efficiency, and bandwidth of the LiF:F(2)(+) laser for high pump intensity, but broader tuning is achieved with longer pump pulses. The beam quality of the LiF:F(2)(+) laser is comparable with that of the Ti:sapphire laser.

  14. The Effect of Temperature on Hygroscopic Growth of Organic Aerosols Over The 273-303K Range as Derived From Bulk Solution Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, L. I.; Tabazadeh, A.; Golden, D. M.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2009-12-01

    Studies have shown that organic matter often constitutes up to 50% by mass of tropospheric aerosols. It is also known that these organics may considerably alter the water uptake properties of aerosol particles. Water uptake of a particle is typically quantified by the hygroscopic growth factor, defined as the ratio of the diameter of a spherical particle when it is exposed to humid conditions to that under dry conditions. In this study, we have assembled an apparatus to measure water activity over aqueous solutions as a function of temperature and solute concentration. We report the experimental precision of our vapor pressure apparatus, obtained by replicating several experiments. Using this apparatus, we studied aqueous solutions of organic compounds representing the categories found in atmospheric aerosols such as simple sugars, diacids, humic materials, and some of their mixtures with inorganic salts. From these measurements, we directly computed the hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) using a formulation that expresses HGF as a function of water activity. Our approach is based on the fact that water activity limits the growth of a particle that can be attributed to water uptake. While most studies report the hygroscopic growth factor of atmospheric aerosols at room temperature (20 - 30°C), we explored the temperature effect on hygroscopic growth of organic aerosols within the 0 - 30°C temperature range. Within experimental error, we found no temperature dependence of the HGF in the 0 - 30°C range, for solutes d-glucose, levoglucosan, succinic acid, phthalic acid, humic acid and Suwanne River fulvic acid. For example, the water activity of an aqueous solution of d-glucose corresponding to a HGF of 1.72 varied by only 1% from 0 to 30°C, well below the experimental error. We report hygroscopic growth curves as a function of temperature and relative humidity for these six organic solutes and some of their mixtures with inorganic salts. Finally, we compare our HGF

  15. A ∼32–70 K FORMATION TEMPERATURE RANGE FOR THE ICE GRAINS AGGLOMERATED BY COMET 67 P/CHURYUMOV–GERASIMENKO

    SciTech Connect

    Lectez, S.; Simon, J.-M.; Salazar, J. M.; Mousis, O.; Picaud, S.; Altwegg, K.; Rubin, M.

    2015-05-20

    Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations are used to reproduce the N{sub 2}/CO ratio ranging between 1.7 × 10{sup −3} and 1.6 × 10{sup −2} observed in situ in the Jupiter-family comet 67 P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko (67 P) by the ROSINA mass spectrometer on board the Rosetta spacecraft. By assuming that this body has been agglomerated from clathrates in the protosolar nebula (PSN), simulations are developed using elaborated interatomic potentials for investigating the temperature dependence of the trapping within a multiple-guest clathrate formed from a gas mixture of CO and N{sub 2} in proportions corresponding to those expected for the PSN. By assuming that 67 P agglomerated from clathrates, our calculations suggest the cometary grains must have been formed at temperatures ranging between ∼31.8 and 69.9 K in the PSN to match the N{sub 2}/CO ratio measured by the ROSINA mass spectrometer. The presence of clathrates in Jupiter-family comets could then explain the potential N{sub 2} depletion (factor of up to ∼87 compared to the protosolar value) measured in 67 P.

  16. The thermopower in the temperature range T(sub c)-1000K and the bank spectrum of Bi-based superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasumyants, V. E.; Vladimirskaya, E. V.; Smirnov, V. I.; Kazanskiy, S. V.

    1995-01-01

    The temperature dependencies of thermopower, S, in the range T = T(sub c)-1000K as well as of resistivity and Hall coefficient in the range T = T(sub c)-300K for the single-phase ceramic samples Bi2Sr2Ca(1-x)Nd(x)Cu2O(y) have been measured. It was found that the S(T) dependencies in normal phase have three characteristic regions. Despite the fact that the S(T) dependencies in Bi-based high-T(sub c) superconductors (HTSC) differ essentially from ones in Y-based HTSC at T = T(sub c)-300K, the main feature of theirs (S(T) = const at high temperatures) retains in samples investigated at T is greater than 620K. The results obtained have been analyzed on the basis of the narrow-band model with the use of assumption of slight asymmetry of the conductive band. The band spectrum parameters of the samples studied have been calculated. An analysis of the tendencies in these parameters changes with samples composition varying enables to make the conclusion about the similarity of the main features of the conductive band structure in Y- and Bi-based HTSC.

  17. Comparison of experimental and calculated attachment rate constants for CFCl/sub 3/ and CCl/sub 4/ in the temperature range 294--500 K

    SciTech Connect

    Orient, O.J.; Chutjian, A.; Crompton, R.W.; Cheung, B.

    1989-05-01

    Electron-attachment cross sections and rate constants have been measured and calculated for the dissociative attachment processes e+CFCl/sub 3/..-->..Cl/sup -/+CFCl/sub 2/ and e+CCl/sub 4/..-->..Cl/sup -/+CCl/sub 3/. Good agreement over the electron-energy range 1--200 meV is found in energy dependence between present calculated cross sections and experimental (krypton photoionization) cross sections at 300 K. The same calculation, with suitable adjustment of thermal populations, was used to calculate electron-attachment rate constants k(epsilon-c-bar) in the range 50--600 K. Experimental rate constants for CFCl/sub 3/ and CCl/sub 4/ were measured at temperatures of 294, 404, and 496 K (CFCl/sub 3/) and 294, 400, and 500 K (CCl/sub 4/) using the Cavalleri electron-density sampling method. Good agreement is found between present measurements and calculations, poor agreement with flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe (FALP) data in CFCl/sub 3/ at the higher temperatures, and reasonable agreement with FALP data for CCl/sub 4/.

  18. Room-temperature wide-range luminescence and structural, optical, and electrical properties of SILAR deposited Cu-Zn-S nano-structured thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Edwin; Kumar, M. C. Santhosh

    2016-09-01

    We report the deposition of nanostructured Cu-Zn-S composite thin films by Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction (SILAR) method on glass substrates at room temperature. The structural, morphological, optical, photoluminescence and electrical properties of Cu-Zn-S thin films are investigated. The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy studies indicate that the films exhibit a ternary Cu-Zn-S structure rather than the Cu xS and ZnS binary composite. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies show that the Cu-Zn-S films are covered well over glass substrates. The optical band gap energies of the Cu-Zn-S films are calculated using UV-visible absorption measurements, which are found in the range of 2.2 to 2.32 eV. The room temperature photoluminescence studies show a wide range of emissions from 410 nm to 565 nm. These emissions are mainly due to defects and vacancies in the composite system. The electrical studies using Hall effect measurements show that the Cu-Zn-S films are having p-type conductivity.

  19. Titanium carbide nanocube core induced interfacial growth of crystalline polypyrrole/polyvinyl alcohol lamellar shell for wide-temperature range supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Yu-Ting; Pan, Hsiao-An; Wu, Nae-Lih; Chen, Geroge Zheng

    2015-01-01

    This is the first investigation on electrically conducting polymers-based supercapacitor electrodes over a wide temperature range, from -18 °C to 60 °C. A high-performance supercapacitor electrode material consisting of TiC nanocube core and conformal crystalline polypyrrole (PPy)/poly-vinyl-alcohol (PVA) lamellar shell has been synthesized by heterogeneous nucleation-induced interfacial crystallization. PPy is induced to crystallize on the negatively charged TiC nanocube surfaces via strong interfacial interactions. In this organic-inorganic hybrid nanocomposite, the long chain PVA enables enhanced cycle life due to improved mechanical properties, and the TiC nanocube not only contributes to electron conduction, but also dictates the PPy morphology/crystallinity for maximizing the charging-discharging performance. The crystalline PPy/PAV layer on the TiC nanocube offers unprecedented high capacity (>350 F g-1-PPy at 300 mV s-1 with ΔV = 1.6 V) and cycling stability in a temperature range from -18 °C to 60 °C. The presented hybrid-filler and interfacial crystallization strategies can be applied to the exploration of new-generation high-power conducting polymer-based supercapacitor materials.

  20. Promotion of redox and stability features of doped Ce-W-Ti for NH3-SCR reaction over a wide temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Han, Weiliang; Lu, Gongxuan; Lu, Jiangyin; Tang, Zhicheng; Zhen, Xinping

    2016-08-01

    In this study, transition metals Co, Mn, and Cu were introduced into a Ce-W-Ti catalyst to promote low-temperature catalytic activity. Among these metal-modified M/Ce-W-Ti catalysts (M represents Co, Mn, or Cu), the Cu/Ce-W-Ti catalyst with an optimized Cu content of 5 wt.% exhibited more than 90% conversion of nitrogen oxide (NOx) in the selective catalytic reduction by NH3 over a wide temperature range (260-400 °C). This catalyst likewise exhibited higher resistance to SO2 gas and water vapor under severe test conditions. On the basis of the characterization results by powder X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we concluded that the superior catalytic properties of the Cu/Ce-W-Ti catalyst could be attributed to the highly dispersed Cu species, which increased the contents of Ce3+ species and adsorbed oxygen species in the catalysts. In addition, the NH3 temperature-programmed desorption results demonstrated that the Cu species doped into the Ce-W-Ti catalysts optimized surface acid content.

  1. Electronic transport of Au/(Ca1.9Pr0.1Co4Ox)/n-Si structures analysed over a wide temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alialy, S.; Kaya, A.; Marıl, E.; Altındal, Ş.; Uslu, İ.

    2015-05-01

    The barrier height (BH) of the Au/(Ca1.9Pr0.1Co4Ox)/n-Si structure was evaluated in the temperature range of 120-360 K using current-voltage (I-V) measurements. The zero-bias BH (ΦBo) and ideality factor (n) values deduced from standard thermionic emission theory were found to be 0.35 eV and 6.30 at 120 K and 0.83 eV and 5.1 at 360 K, respectively. Because such changes in ΦBo were not in agreement with the negative temperature coefficient (α) of the Si band gap, effects of tunnelling and BH inhomogeneity were added to the analysis of junction current. With this modification, the value of ΦBef. was found to decrease with temperature at a rate of -2.4 × 10-4 eVK-1 in approximate agreement with the known α of the Si band gap. Attempts to model the inhomogeneous BH with a single Gaussian distribution were also successful, rendering a mean value of BH (?) of 0.997 eV and a standard deviation (σo) of 0.12 eV. Similar conclusions were drawn from additional analyses, employing the modified Richardson plots. Our results suggest that the analysis of electronic transport at this and possibly other MIS junctions should include both the effect of tunnelling and that of BH inhomogeneity.

  2. Does diurnal temperature range influence seasonal suicide mortality? Assessment of daily data of the Helsinki metropolitan area from 1973 to 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holopainen, Jari; Helama, Samuli; Partonen, Timo

    2014-08-01

    Several studies show a peak in suicide rates during springtime and suggest differences in the seasonal variation of suicides. However, the seasonal distribution of the temperature impact on suicide is less clear. This study investigated the relationship between diurnal temperature range (DTR) on suicide mortality. Daily temperature and suicide data for Helsinki were analyzed for the period of 1973-2010 inclusive. Overall, DTR reached its maximum during the spring from mid-April to mid-June, which is also the season with highest suicide mortality in the study region. Specifically, the seasonal timing and maxima for both DTR and suicides vary from year to year. Time series analysis of DTR and suicide records revealed a significant ( P < 0.01) correlation between the springtime DTR maxima and suicide rates for males. No similar association could be found for females. These results provide evidence that a higher springtime DTR could be linked statistically to a higher seasonal suicide rate each spring, whereas the exact timing of the DTR peak did not associate with the seasonal suicide rate. A possible mechanism behind the springtime association between the DTR and suicides originates from brown adipose tissue (BAT) over-activity. Activation of BAT through the winter improves cold tolerance at the cost of heat tolerance. This might trigger anxiety and psychomotor agitation, affecting mood in a negative way. As a hypothesis, the compromised heat tolerance is suggested to increase the risk of death from suicide.

  3. Does diurnal temperature range influence seasonal suicide mortality? Assessment of daily data of the Helsinki metropolitan area from 1973 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Jari; Helama, Samuli; Partonen, Timo

    2014-08-01

    Several studies show a peak in suicide rates during springtime and suggest differences in the seasonal variation of suicides. However, the seasonal distribution of the temperature impact on suicide is less clear. This study investigated the relationship between diurnal temperature range (DTR) on suicide mortality. Daily temperature and suicide data for Helsinki were analyzed for the period of 1973-2010 inclusive. Overall, DTR reached its maximum during the spring from mid-April to mid-June, which is also the season with highest suicide mortality in the study region. Specifically, the seasonal timing and maxima for both DTR and suicides vary from year to year. Time series analysis of DTR and suicide records revealed a significant (P<0.01) correlation between the springtime DTR maxima and suicide rates for males. No similar association could be found for females. These results provide evidence that a higher springtime DTR could be linked statistically to a higher seasonal suicide rate each spring, whereas the exact timing of the DTR peak did not associate with the seasonal suicide rate. A possible mechanism behind the springtime association between the DTR and suicides originates from brown adipose tissue (BAT) over-activity. Activation of BAT through the winter improves cold tolerance at the cost of heat tolerance. This might trigger anxiety and psychomotor agitation, affecting mood in a negative way. As a hypothesis, the compromised heat tolerance is suggested to increase the risk of death from suicide.

  4. Hydrostatic, uniaxial, and triaxial compression tests on unpoled "Chem-prep" PZT 95/5-2Nb ceramic within temperature range of -55 to 75 degrees C.

    SciTech Connect

    Zeuch, David Henry; Montgomery, Stephen Tedford; Lee, Moo Yul; Hofer, John H.

    2003-10-01

    Sandia is currently developing a lead-zirconate-titanate ceramic 95/5-2Nb (or PNZT) from chemically prepared ('chem-prep') precursor powders. Previous PNZT ceramic was fabricated from the powders prepared using a 'mixed-oxide' process. The specimens of unpoled PNZT ceramic from batch HF803 were tested under hydrostatic, uniaxial, and constant stress difference loading conditions within the temperature range of -55 to 75 C and pressures to 500 MPa. The objective of this experimental study was to obtain mechanical properties and phase relationships so that the grain-scale modeling effort can develop and test its models and codes using realistic parameters. The stress-strain behavior of 'chem-prep' PNZT under different loading paths was found to be similar to that of 'mixed-oxide' PNZT. The phase transformation from ferroelectric to antiferroelectric occurs in unpoled ceramic with abrupt increase in volumetric strain of about 0.7 % when the maximum compressive stress, regardless of loading paths, equals the hydrostatic pressure at which the transformation otherwise takes place. The stress-volumetric strain relationship of the ceramic undergoing a phase transformation was analyzed quantitatively using a linear regression analysis. The pressure (P{sub T1}{sup H}) required for the onset of phase transformation with respect to temperature is represented by the best-fit line, P{sub T1}{sup H} (MPa) = 227 + 0.76 T (C). We also confirmed that increasing shear stress lowers the mean stress and the volumetric strain required to trigger phase transformation. At the lower bound (-55 C) of the tested temperature range, the phase transformation is permanent and irreversible. However, at the upper bound (75 C), the phase transformation is completely reversible as the stress causing phase transformation is removed.

  5. Solubility Measurements and Predictions of Gypsum, Anhydrite, and Calcite Over Wide Ranges of Temperature, Pressure, and Ionic Strength with Mixed Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zhaoyi; Kan, Amy T.; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Fangfu; Yan, Fei; Bhandari, Narayan; Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Ya; Ruan, Gedeng; Tomson, Mason B.

    2017-02-01

    Today's oil and gas production from deep reservoirs permits exploitation of more oil and gas reserves but increases risks due to conditions of high temperature and high pressure. Predicting mineral solubility under such extreme conditions is critical for mitigating scaling risks, a common and costly problem. Solubility predictions use solubility products and activity coefficients, commonly from Pitzer theory virial coefficients. However, inaccurate activity coefficients and solubility data have limited accurate mineral solubility predictions and applications of the Pitzer theory. This study measured gypsum solubility under its stable phase conditions up to 1400 bar; it also confirmed the anhydrite solubility reported in the literature. Using a novel method, the virial coefficients for Ca2+ and {{SO}}4^{2 - } (i.e., β_{{{{CaSO}}4 }}^{(0)} ,β_{{{{CaSO}}4 }}^{(2)} ,C_{{{{CaSO}}4 }}^{φ }) were calculated over wide ranges of temperature and pressure (0-250 °C and 1-1400 bar). The determination of this set of virial coefficients widely extends the applicable temperature and pressure ranges of the Pitzer theory in Ca2+ and SO 4 2- systems. These coefficients can be applied to improve the prediction of calcite solubility in the presence of high concentrations of Ca2+ and SO 4 2- ions. These new virial coefficients can also be used to predict the solubilities of gypsum and anhydrite accurately. Moreover, based on the derived β_{{{{CaSO}}4 }}^{(2)} values in this study, the association constants of {{CaSO}}4^{( 0 )} at 1 bar and 25 °C can be estimated by K_{{assoc}} = - 2β_{{{{CaSO}}4 }}^{(2)}. These values match very well with those reported in the literature based on other methods.

  6. Recent and historical range shifts of two canopy-forming seaweeds in North Spain and the link with trends in sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Linney; Viejo, Rosa M.; Martínez, Brezo; deCastro, Maite; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho; Gallardo, Tomás

    2013-08-01

    Geographical range shifts of two canopy-forming seaweeds, Himanthalia elongata (L.) S.F. Gray and Fucus serratus L. were investigated at their southern range boundary in Northern Spain from the end of nineteenth century to 2009. Given the good dispersal abilities of H. elongata and its short life-span, we hypothesize that this species will track environmental changes at a faster rate than the perennial and short-distance disperser F. serratus. Our results show a continuous and drastic westward retraction of H. elongata, which has nowadays virtually vanished in Northern Spain, whereas F. serratus is still found in the westernmost area. Despite this, the first species is still relatively abundant in the Iberian Peninsula, whereas the presence of the latter is scattered and reduced. Overall, range shifts fit with the warming trend in sea surface temperature (SST), whereas it is unlikely that increases in grazing pressure or coastal pollution have driven the observed changes, particularly the rapid trend in recent years. Differences in species traits are linked to range dynamics. The higher persistence of F. serratus at eastern shores may thus be related to its longer life span and its greater thermal tolerance. The presence of sporadic populations of H. elongata outside the zone of continuous distribution can be attributed to long-distance dispersal events during cold pulses. Relict populations in isolated and estuarine locations were left behind in the contracting range margins, particularly for F. serratus. In Northern Spain, the westward retreat of large canopy-forming algae seems to be a general phenomenon, involving other species such as kelps. Therefore, an evident reorganization of coastal assemblages is expected, though the temporal extent of changes and the consequences for ecosystem services need to be evaluated.

  7. Time constants for temperature elevation in human models exposed to dipole antennas and beams in the frequency range from 1 to 30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Ryota; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Ziskin, Marvin C.; Foster, Kenneth R.

    2017-03-01

    This study computes the time constants of the temperature elevations in human head and body models exposed to simulated radiation from dipole antennas, electromagnetic beams, and plane waves. The frequency range considered is from 1 to 30 GHz. The specific absorption rate distributions in the human models are first computed using the