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Sample records for accessible toilets wc

  1. Toilet Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    Caregivers must build a trusting, loving relationship before trying to toilet train any child. Before toilet training begins, myelinization, a neurological development necessary for controlling sphincter muscles, must be complete and toddlers must be able to sit easily for long periods. To help children recognize toilet needs, caregivers should…

  2. Toilet training.

    PubMed

    Choby, Beth A; George, Shefaa

    2008-11-01

    Toilet training is a developmental task that impacts families with small children. All healthy children are eventually toilet trained, and most complete the task without medical intervention. Most research on toilet training is descriptive, although some is evidence based. In the United States, the average age at which training begins has increased over the past four decades from earlier than 18 months of age to between 21 and 36 months of age. Newer studies suggest no benefit of intensive training before 27 months of age. Mastery of the developmental skills required for toilet training occurs after 24 months of age. Girls usually complete training earlier than boys. Numerous toilet-training methods are available. The Brazelton child-oriented approach uses physiologic maturity, ability to understand and respond to external feedback, and internal motivation to assess readiness. Dr. Spock's toilet-training approach is another popular method used by parents. The American Academy of Pediatrics incorporates components of the child-oriented approach into its guidelines for toilet training. "Toilet training in a day," a method by Azrin and Foxx, emphasizes operant conditioning and teaches specific toileting components. Because each family and child are unique, recommendations about the ideal time or optimal method must be customized. Family physicians should provide guidance about toilet-training methods and identify children who have difficulty reaching developmental milestones.

  3. Toilet Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    1993-01-01

    Offers 20 tips for parents and child caregivers to help them reframe ideas about children's toilet-learning timetables and to understand this developmental step toward maturity from a toddler's point of view. (HTH)

  4. MedlinePlus: Toilet Training

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Use the Toilet (Zero to Three) Toilet Teaching Your Child (Nemours Foundation) Toilet Training Your Child (American Academy of Family Physicians) Also in Spanish Related Issues Cognitive and Verbal Skills Needed for ...

  5. Creating a Toilet Training Plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size Email Print Share Creating a Toilet Training Plan Page Content Article Body These are the tools ... will need to create your own toilet-training plan and implement it at the best time for ...

  6. Control issues in toilet training.

    PubMed

    Kinservik, M A; Friedhoff, M M

    2000-01-01

    There are many control issues surrounding toilet training that involve the child, the family, and the environment. Loss of control by the child during this period can result in significant physical and psychologic consequences as well as a failure to complete the developmental task of autonomy. A review of both professional and lay literature showed various approaches to toilet training with little reference to the control issues involved. Toilet training is a dynamic process that does not always go smoothly. Constipation often develops during toilet training and may be related to control issues. Neuman's Systems Model is used to identify the types of control issues often involved in toilet training. Anticipatory guidance specifically developed to address issues of control may help alleviate problems in the toilet training process. Changes for current practice are recommended.

  7. The toilet tripod: understanding successful sanitation in rural India.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Kathleen; Louis, Elizabeth

    2014-09-01

    Building toilets and getting people to use them is critical for public health. We deployed a political ecology approach specifically to identify the multi-scalar political, economic, and environmental factors influencing toilet adoption in rural India. The research used ethnographic and technical methods in rural villages of West Bengal and Himachal Pradesh over the period September 2012 to May 2013. The elements of successful sanitation adoption depended on three factors (i.e., toilet tripod): (1) multi-scalar political will on the part of both government and NGOs over the long term; (2) proximate social pressure, i.e., person-to-person contact between rural inhabitants and toilets; (3) political ecology, i.e., assured access to water, compatible soil type, and changing land use. This research contributes to studies of sustainable development and global public health by developing a theory and framework for successful sanitation. PMID:24954614

  8. The toilet tripod: understanding successful sanitation in rural India.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Kathleen; Louis, Elizabeth

    2014-09-01

    Building toilets and getting people to use them is critical for public health. We deployed a political ecology approach specifically to identify the multi-scalar political, economic, and environmental factors influencing toilet adoption in rural India. The research used ethnographic and technical methods in rural villages of West Bengal and Himachal Pradesh over the period September 2012 to May 2013. The elements of successful sanitation adoption depended on three factors (i.e., toilet tripod): (1) multi-scalar political will on the part of both government and NGOs over the long term; (2) proximate social pressure, i.e., person-to-person contact between rural inhabitants and toilets; (3) political ecology, i.e., assured access to water, compatible soil type, and changing land use. This research contributes to studies of sustainable development and global public health by developing a theory and framework for successful sanitation.

  9. Toilet Training the Retarded Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Jeffrey K.

    The booklet offers guidelines in both Spanish and English to parents who are toilet training a mentally retarded child. The toilet training process is broken down into tasks that the child must learn, and the importance of positive reinforcement for each successfully accomplished task is emphasized. It is recommended that parents keep charts…

  10. 20 CFR 654.411 - Toilets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., constructed of nonabsorbent materials, may be substituted for men's toilet seats on the basis of one urinal or... toilet seats. (d) Except in individual family units, separate toilet accommodations for men and women shall be provided. If toilet facilities for men and women are in the same building, they shall...

  11. 20 CFR 654.411 - Toilets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., constructed of nonabsorbent materials, may be substituted for men's toilet seats on the basis of one urinal or... toilet seats. (d) Except in individual family units, separate toilet accommodations for men and women shall be provided. If toilet facilities for men and women are in the same building, they shall...

  12. Toilet Training and Behaviors of People with Autism: Parent Views.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalrymple, Nancy J.; Ruble, Lisa A.

    1992-01-01

    This investigation surveyed 100 parents of people with autism (mean age 19.5 years) concerning toilet training and toileting problems. Results focus on ages at toilet training, toilet training methods, toileting skills, behavior problems related to toileting, and fears related to toileting. (DB)

  13. Automatic toilet seat lowering apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Guerty, Harold G.

    1994-09-06

    A toilet seat lowering apparatus includes a housing defining an internal cavity for receiving water from the water supply line to the toilet holding tank. A descent delay assembly of the apparatus can include a stationary dam member and a rotating dam member for dividing the internal cavity into an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber and controlling the intake and evacuation of water in a delayed fashion. A descent initiator is activated when the internal cavity is filled with pressurized water and automatically begins the lowering of the toilet seat from its upright position, which lowering is also controlled by the descent delay assembly. In an alternative embodiment, the descent initiator and the descent delay assembly can be combined in a piston linked to the rotating dam member and provided with a water channel for creating a resisting pressure to the advancing piston and thereby slowing the associated descent of the toilet seat. A toilet seat lowering apparatus includes a housing defining an internal cavity for receiving water from the water supply line to the toilet holding tank. A descent delay assembly of the apparatus can include a stationary dam member and a rotating dam member for dividing the internal cavity into an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber and controlling the intake and evacuation of water in a delayed fashion. A descent initiator is activated when the internal cavity is filled with pressurized water and automatically begins the lowering of the toilet seat from its upright position, which lowering is also controlled by the descent delay assembly. In an alternative embodiment, the descent initiator and the descent delay assembly can be combined in a piston linked to the rotating dam member and provided with a water channel for creating a resisting pressure to the advancing piston and thereby slowing the associated descent of the toilet seat.

  14. Reducing Sexual Violence by Increasing the Supply of Toilets in Khayelitsha, South Africa: A Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Gonsalves, Gregg S.; Kaplan, Edward H.; Paltiel, A. David

    2015-01-01

    Background Sexual violence is a major public health issue, affecting 35% of women worldwide. Major risk factors for sexual assault include inadequate indoor sanitation and the need to travel to outdoor toilet facilities. We estimated how increasing the number of toilets in an urban township (Khayelitsha, South Africa) might reduce both economic costs and the incidence and social burden of sexual assault. Methods We developed a mathematical model that links risk of sexual assault to the number of sanitation facilities and the time a woman must spend walking to a toilet. We defined a composite societal cost function, comprising both the burden of sexual assault and the costs of installing and maintaining public chemical toilets. By expressing total social costs as a function of the number of available toilets, we were able to identify an optimal (i.e., cost-minimizing) social investment in toilet facilities. Findings There are currently an estimated 5600 toilets in Khayelitsha. This results in 635 sexual assaults and US$40 million in combined social costs each year. Increasing the number of toilets to 11300 would minimize total costs ($35 million) and reduce sexual assaults to 446. Higher toilet installation and maintenance costs would be more than offset by lower sexual assault costs. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis shows that the optimal number of toilets exceeds the original allocation of toilets in the township in over 80% of the 5000 iterations of the model. Interpretation Improving access to sanitation facilities in urban settlements will simultaneously reduce the incidence of sexual assaults and overall cost to society. Since our analysis ignores the many additional health benefits of improving sanitation in resource-constrained urban areas (e.g., potential reductions in waterborne infectious diseases), the optimal number of toilets identified here should be interpreted as conservative. PMID:25923105

  15. Time to Terminate Toilet Papering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscinski, David

    2008-01-01

    Each September in Wisconsin students return to school, football games draw enthusiastic crowds, and homecoming week is celebrated. Trees lose their leaves only to be re-adorned in white in that generation bridging tradition known as toilet papering. Community residents have differing opinions on "tp"ing, in large part determined by whether they…

  16. The Leaking-Toilet Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2008-01-01

    Leaking toilets can cost homeowners big dollars--often before it is even realized. Homeowners do not necessarily hear it leaking. It just does, and when the water bill comes due, it can be a most unpleasant surprise. This article presents a classroom challenge to try to develop leak-detection ideas that would be inexpensive and easily added to…

  17. Thermoelectric energy harvesting for a solid waste processing toilet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, C. David; Baldasaro, Nicholas G.; Bulman, Gary E.; Stoner, Brian R.

    2014-06-01

    Over 2.5 billion people do not have access to safe and effective sanitation. Without a sanitary sewer infrastructure, self-contained modular systems can provide solutions for these people in the developing world and remote areas. Our team is building a better toilet that processes human waste into burnable fuel and disinfects the liquid waste. The toilet employs energy harvesting to produce electricity and does not require external electrical power or consumable materials. RTI has partnered with Colorado State University, Duke University, and Roca Sanitario under a Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Reinvent the Toilet Challenge (RTTC) grant to develop an advanced stand-alone, self-sufficient toilet to effectively process solid and liquid waste. The system operates through the following steps: 1) Solid-liquid separation, 2) Solid waste drying and sizing, 3) Solid waste combustion, and 4) Liquid waste disinfection. Thermoelectric energy harvesting is a key component to the system and provides the electric power for autonomous operation. A portion of the exhaust heat is captured through finned heat-sinks and converted to electricity by thermoelectric (TE) devices to provide power for the electrochemical treatment of the liquid waste, pumps, blowers, combustion ignition, and controls.

  18. 49 CFR 228.317 - Toilets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION HOURS OF SERVICE OF RAILROAD EMPLOYEES; RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING; SLEEPING QUARTERS Safety and Health Requirements for Camp Cars Provided by Railroads as Sleeping Quarters § 228.317 Toilets. (a) Number of toilets provided. Each individual camp car that provides sleeping facilities must have one...

  19. 49 CFR 228.317 - Toilets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION HOURS OF SERVICE OF RAILROAD EMPLOYEES; RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING; SLEEPING QUARTERS Safety and Health Requirements for Camp Cars Provided by Railroads as Sleeping Quarters § 228.317 Toilets. (a) Number of toilets provided. Each individual camp car that provides sleeping facilities must have one...

  20. 49 CFR 228.317 - Toilets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION HOURS OF SERVICE OF RAILROAD EMPLOYEES; RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING; SLEEPING QUARTERS Safety and Health Requirements for Camp Cars Provided by Railroads as Sleeping Quarters § 228.317 Toilets. (a) Number of toilets provided. Each individual camp car that provides sleeping facilities must have one...

  1. Caregivers' Corner: Toilet Learning Takes Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Michelle; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The current trend of hurrying a child's development, as evidenced by the popularity of disposable pants for toilet training, is criticized. The pants frustrate both parents and children and, it is concluded, serve no useful purpose in the toilet-learning process. (LB)

  2. 30 CFR 56.20008 - Toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Miscellaneous § 56.20008... sanitary. Separate toilet facilities shall be provided for each sex except where toilet rooms will...

  3. Sampling and analysis of the inactive waste tanks TH-2, WC-1, and WC-15

    SciTech Connect

    Autrey, J.W.; Keller, J.M.; Griest, W.H.; Botts, J.L.; Schenley, R.L.; Sipe, M.A.

    1992-02-01

    Thirty-eight inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste tanks are currently managed by the Environmental Restoration Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The contents of these tanks are to be characterized in preparation for future corrective actions and remediation activities as part of compliance with the pending Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Twenty-nine of these tanks were sampled and analyzed in 1989. Three of the tanks (TH-2, WC-1, and WC-15) were not accessible from the surface and thus were not sampled until 1990. This report presents the sampling and analytical results of that campaign. All three tanks in this report had negligible regulatory organic compounds in the samples that were collected. There were no US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Target Compound List (TCL) constituents for volatile organics detected in any of the aqueous samples. The only semivolatile organics detected were 2-chlorophenol (52 {mu}g/L) in tank TH-2 and dichloroethane (14--15 {mu}g/L) and diethyl either (15--17 {mu}g/L) in tank WC-15. A thin oil layer was discovered floating on top of the aqueous contents in tank WC-15. The analysis of the oil layer detected no volatile organics and showed only one EPA TCL constituent, di-n-butylphthalate, at 1900 {mu}g/L. Low levels of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals were observed in the samples from tank TH-2, but only the mercury level exceeded the RCRA limit. Samples from tank WC-1 had elevated levels of the RCRA metals barium, chromium, and lead. There were also finely suspended particles in one of the samples from tank WC-1, which was filtered and analyzed separately. This solid fines have levels of transuranium elements {sup 238}Pu and {sup 241}Am high enough to classified as transuranic waste.

  4. Toilet Habits: Suggestions for Training a Child Who Is Blind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moor, Pauline M.

    Intended for parents, the pamphlet provides suggestions for toilet training a blind child. Among the 12 tips presented are to establish a regular and convenient toileting schedule, provide a comfortable toilet arrangement, and give the child something to play with. Common problems in toilet training blind children are reported as fear of sitting…

  5. We love our school toilets: involving primary school students in improving their school toilets.

    PubMed

    Senior, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    This article reports on the planning, implementation and evaluation of an intervention to improve school students' experience of using the school toilet in a primary school in Melbourne, Australia. 20 students from grades 2-6 participated in focus groups, to discuss what they valued about the school and raise awareness of issues they were not happy about. A common theme from all of the focus groups was that students reported avoiding use of the school toilets. Using the ideas generated from the focus groups, the student council (with input from staff), developed a self-administered pre- and post-test questionnaire. This was given to 220 students in grades 1-4, aged 6-10 years. Improvements suggested by the students were made to the toilet block, and then a post-test was administered. Independent t tests were conducted. The pre-test indicated that 71% of girls and 65% of boys feared the behaviour of other students in the toilet. Overwhelmingly, the qualitative comments focused on poor student behaviour in the toilets, with lack of privacy due to student misbehaviour mentioned in 90% of the comments. After the toilets were revamped, the greatest gains were made in students' attitudes toward the toilets, with a 37% increase in students who indicated they now liked the toilet facility. Incidents of vandalism also decreased; however, student misconduct in the toilets was still regarded as a problem. Involving students in refurbishing their toilets improved how students viewed the toilets and reduced vandalism; however, a different intervention is required to change inappropriate behaviours in the toilet.

  6. Toilet training for children with autism.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Davina

    2016-03-01

    Toilet training is one of the key developmental milestones of early childhood and there is growing evidence that it is now being initiated later than it was 50 years ago. This article explores the reasons why this is happening and considers the effect on children with autism and related conditions. It also examines the literature to discover the approaches to toilet training for this group. Research into this area has generally focused on small numbers of children and incorporated modified versions of Azrin and Foxx's ( 1971 ) rapid toilet training method. Suggestions are offered about the most appropriate advice to give parents and carers of children with autism and related disorders, and the importance of addressing toilet training at an early stage.

  7. Effectiveness of the Modified Intensive Toilet Training Method on Teaching Toilet Skills to Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardiç, Avsar; Cavkaytar, Atilla

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine effectiveness of a modified version of Azrin and Foxx's (1971) intensive toilet training method on teaching of toilet skills to children with autism. This method consists of administering extra fluids and a time schedule, but does not use overcorrection procedures. Implementation requires a study of…

  8. Off the couch, into the toilet: exploring the psychic uses of the analyst's toilet.

    PubMed

    Lemma, Alessandra

    2014-02-01

    The analyst's consulting room toilet lends itself to myriad uses in the context of the analytic relationship. It is a place where "dirty" secrets may be excitedly deposited and where perverse fantasies can be fueled and acted out, as illustrated in the analysis of Mr. D. This perverse use of the analyst's toilet is contrasted with the case of Ms. C., whose anxieties about the destructiveness of her aggression led initially to a phobic avoidance of the toilet and then evolved toward its use as a container for parts of herself she felt were bad and unacceptable, thereby protecting the relationship with the analyst, who could not yet be trusted to receive and survive her projections. In these cases the toilet becomes quite concretely the location of the "toilet-breast" (Meltzer 1967), a means of preserving a more idealized relationship with the analyst.

  9. Sampling and analysis of inactive radioactive waste tanks W-17, W-18, WC-5, WC-6, WC-8, and WC-11 through WC-14 at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, M.B.; Giaquinto, J.M.; Griest, W.H.; Pack, R.T.; Ross, T.; Schenley, R.L.

    1995-12-01

    The sampling and analysis of nine inactive liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are described-tanks W-17, W-18, WC-5, WC-6, WC-8, and WC-11 through WC-14. Samples of the waste tank liquids and sludges were analyzed to determine (1) the major chemical constituents, (2) the principal radionuclides, (3) metals listed on the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Contract Laboratory Program Inorganic Target Analyte List, (4) organic compounds, and (5) some physical properties. The organic chemical characterization consisted of determinations of the EPA Contract Laboratory Program Target Compound List volatile and semivolatile compounds, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyis (PCBs). This report provides data (1) to meet requirements under the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation to characterize the contents of LLLW tanks which have been removed from service and (2) to support planning for the treatment and disposal of the wastes.

  10. Men's toilet (room 207, representing rooms 306, 406, and 506; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Men's toilet (room 207, representing rooms 306, 406, and 506; also women's toilets, rooms 102, 104, 204, 204A, 303, 403, and 503), looking north. - California State Office Building No. 1, 915 Capitol Mall, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  11. Caring for the Little Ones--Toilet Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Karen

    1997-01-01

    Discusses keys to successful toilet learning in child care settings. Includes tips from practitioners and a quiz to identify readiness for toilet learning. Examines cultural influences regarding toilet learning strategies and how to convince parents not to use pull-ups. Includes recommended books for adults and children. (KDFB)

  12. 46 CFR 168.15-30 - Toilet rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toilet rooms. 168.15-30 Section 168.15-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS CIVILIAN NAUTICAL SCHOOL VESSELS Accommodations § 168.15-30 Toilet rooms. (a) There must be provided 1 toilet for each 10 persons or...

  13. Toilet Training: Children Step Up to Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that mastering the toilet is a significant step for young children, and one of childhood's earliest rites of passage. Suggests that in learning to control body functions, toddlers step toward independence, self-reliance and personal responsibility. Urges child care workers to work with parents to identify a child's readiness and to agree…

  14. 24 CFR 3280.111 - Toilet compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Toilet compartments. 3280.111 Section 3280.111 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Planning Considerations §...

  15. 24 CFR 3280.111 - Toilet compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Toilet compartments. 3280.111 Section 3280.111 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Planning Considerations §...

  16. Applying Structured Teaching Principles to Toilet Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boswell, Susan; Gray, Debbie

    This paper discusses toilet training children with autism using techniques recommended by TEACCH consultants. It recommends looking at the problem from the perspective of the student with autism in order to build in many elements of visual structure that will help the child understand exactly what is expected. Teachers are urged to look at each…

  17. 24 CFR 3280.111 - Toilet compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Planning Considerations § 3280.111... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Toilet compartments. 3280.111 Section 3280.111 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  18. 24 CFR 3280.111 - Toilet compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Planning Considerations § 3280.111... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Toilet compartments. 3280.111 Section 3280.111 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  19. An Epiphany in a Toilet Factory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Catlin

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares her experiences of the universality of art making and artistic experience of being a dancer and teaching artist. She describes her performance at Kohler, a worldwide leader in plumbing products in Spartanburg, South Carolina, where she had an epiphany dancing in a toilet factory--a sudden, intuitive moment of…

  20. 30 CFR 57.20008 - Toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Miscellaneous § 57... kept clean and sanitary. Separate toilet facilities shall be provided for each sex except where...

  1. 20 CFR 654.411 - Toilets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Toilets. 654.411 Section 654.411 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE... shall be constructed, located and maintained so as to prevent any nuisance or public health hazard....

  2. 20 CFR 654.411 - Toilets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Toilets. 654.411 Section 654.411 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE... shall be constructed, located and maintained so as to prevent any nuisance or public health hazard....

  3. Toilet Training and the Older Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... husband likes to tease me by calling my parenting style the ‘lazy parent’s method’ for raising a child,” writes one mother. “I like to just wait for my son to move on to the next stage of development and then follow his lead. He toilet-trained ...

  4. Perceptions of School Toilets as a Cause for Irregular Toilet Habits among Schoolchildren Aged 6 to 16 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundblad, Barbro; Hellstrom, Anna-Lena

    2005-01-01

    Irregular bladder and bowel habits can contribute to urinary and bowel problems. Schoolchildren undergoing treatment for these problems often do not follow the recommendation of regular toilet visits at school, claiming negative perceptions of school toilets. This study examined 6- to 16-year-old schoolchildren's perceptions of school toilets and…

  5. Sampling and analysis of the inactive waste tanks TH-2, WC-1, and WC-15. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Autrey, J.W.; Keller, J.M.; Griest, W.H.; Botts, J.L.; Schenley, R.L.; Sipe, M.A.

    1992-02-01

    Thirty-eight inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste tanks are currently managed by the Environmental Restoration Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The contents of these tanks are to be characterized in preparation for future corrective actions and remediation activities as part of compliance with the pending Federal Facility Agreement for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Twenty-nine of these tanks were sampled and analyzed in 1989. Three of the tanks (TH-2, WC-1, and WC-15) were not accessible from the surface and thus were not sampled until 1990. This report presents the sampling and analytical results of that campaign. All three tanks in this report had negligible regulatory organic compounds in the samples that were collected. There were no US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Target Compound List (TCL) constituents for volatile organics detected in any of the aqueous samples. The only semivolatile organics detected were 2-chlorophenol (52 {mu}g/L) in tank TH-2 and dichloroethane (14--15 {mu}g/L) and diethyl either (15--17 {mu}g/L) in tank WC-15. A thin oil layer was discovered floating on top of the aqueous contents in tank WC-15. The analysis of the oil layer detected no volatile organics and showed only one EPA TCL constituent, di-n-butylphthalate, at 1900 {mu}g/L. Low levels of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals were observed in the samples from tank TH-2, but only the mercury level exceeded the RCRA limit. Samples from tank WC-1 had elevated levels of the RCRA metals barium, chromium, and lead. There were also finely suspended particles in one of the samples from tank WC-1, which was filtered and analyzed separately. This solid fines have levels of transuranium elements {sup 238}Pu and {sup 241}Am high enough to classified as transuranic waste.

  6. Toilet training age and influencing factors: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Tarhan, Hüseyin; Çakmak, Özgür; Akarken, İlker; Ekin, Rahmi Gökhan; Ün, Sıtkı; Uzelli, Derya; Helvacı, Mehmet; Aksu, Nejat; Yavaşcan, Önder; Mutlubaş Özsan, Fatma; Cun, Selma; Koç, Feyza; Özkarakaş, Özlem; İlbey, Yusuf Özlem; Zorlu, Ferruh

    2015-01-01

    To determine toilet training age and the factors influencing this in our country, 1500 children who had completed toilet training were evaluated in a multicenter study. The mean age of toilet training was 22.32 ± 6.57 months. The duration it took to complete toilet training was 6.60 ± 2.20 months on the average. In univariant analysis, toilet training age increased as the parental education level, specifically that of the mother, increased. The training age of children whose mothers had over 12 years of education differed significantly from that of children of mothers with less education. There was no significant difference in toilet training age with regard to the education level of the father, or the employment status of the mother. We also found significant differences with respect to family income level, toilet type and training method. In multivariant analysis, family income >5000 TL and use of a potty chair were determined to be factors affecting toilet training age. In conclusion, toilet training age in Turkey, a developing country, was found to be lower than that in developed countries.

  7. Comparative study of nanocrystalline diamond deposition on WC-Ni and WC-Co substrates.

    PubMed

    Santos, J A; Neto, V F; Cabral, G; Ruch, D; Grácio, J

    2011-06-01

    Tungsten carbide alloys possess a large number of applications, due to its high hardness, high resistance to heat and to wear, which makes it ideal to be used in wear parts of machinery or on surfaces liable to corrosion, abrasion or high temperatures. For practical applications, it is alloyed with cobalt (Co) or nickel (Ni) in order to improve its properties. The increasing demand of broadening the operation limits of some components, impose the need to improve its life time. Coating these parts with hard and smooth diamond thin film may improve the wear performance and decrease their roughness and friction coefficient. In this work, a comparative study of nanodiamond films deposit onto WC-Co and WC-Ni, by means of a hot-filament Chemical Vapour Deposition (HFCVD) system, is presented. The study was accomplished by varying the CH4/H2/Ar gas ratio of the deposition process. The substrate temperature was kept low (< 700 degrees C) to minimize the thermal stress in the coating-substrate system. The microstructure of the deposited diamond film was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. Roughness of the working surfaces were also accessed prior and after the depositions. PMID:21770193

  8. 21 CFR 1250.44 - Drinking utensils and toilet articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drinking utensils and toilet articles. 1250.44 Section 1250.44 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... toilet articles. (a) No cup, glass, or other drinking utensil which may be used by more than one...

  9. 21 CFR 1250.44 - Drinking utensils and toilet articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drinking utensils and toilet articles. 1250.44 Section 1250.44 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... toilet articles. (a) No cup, glass, or other drinking utensil which may be used by more than one...

  10. 21 CFR 1250.44 - Drinking utensils and toilet articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drinking utensils and toilet articles. 1250.44 Section 1250.44 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... toilet articles. (a) No cup, glass, or other drinking utensil which may be used by more than one...

  11. A Parent Training Model for Toilet Training Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroeger, K.; Sorensen, R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Azrin & Foxx pioneered an intensive toilet training protocol for individuals with intellectual disability living in a residential setting. Since the development of the Rapid Toilet Training (RTT) protocol, many have replicated the efficacy, most notably in educational and outpatient treatment settings, but often training over longer…

  12. Reduction of Microbial Aerosols by Automatic Toilet Bowl Cleaners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahya, Moyasar; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study of the impact of automatic toilet bowl cleaners on aerosol generation. Three toilet bowl cleaners containing 2.5, 6.7 or 18.2 percent surfactant materials were evaluated. Results indicate these cleaners significantly (p 0.05) reduce bacteria ejected from the bowl, and the cleaner containing the greatest amount of surfactant was the most…

  13. Toileting. Functional Programming for People with Autism: Revised. A Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalrymple, Nancy; Boarman, Margaret

    Self-care in toileting is one of the areas that persons with autism frequently have difficulty managing and are often confused by training. In developing a toilet training plan, critical factors include teaching the skill where it will be used, considering modesty concerns, communicating clear expectations, ruling out medical problems, and…

  14. Can't Make 'em Do It: Sleeping, Eating, Toileting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Roslyn

    2008-01-01

    Sleeping, eating, and toileting battles frustrate most adults--mainly because they cannot make children do it. Falling asleep (or not) is within a child's control. The same is true for chewing and swallowing, or withholding and releasing urine and feces. Sleeping, Eating, and Toileting (S.E.T.) create lots of frustration. An exhausted adult wants…

  15. 30 CFR 71.501 - Sanitary toilet facilities; maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sanitary toilet facilities; maintenance. 71.501 Section 71.501 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Sanitary Toilet Facilities...

  16. Factors associated with pupil toilet use in kenyan primary schools.

    PubMed

    Garn, Joshua V; Caruso, Bethany A; Drews-Botsch, Carolyn D; Kramer, Michael R; Brumback, Babette A; Rheingans, Richard D; Freeman, Matthew C

    2014-09-17

    The purpose of this study was to quantify how school sanitation conditions are associated with pupils' use of sanitation facilities. We conducted a longitudinal assessment in 60 primary schools in Nyanza Province, Kenya, using structured observations to measure facility conditions and pupils' use at specific facilities. We used multivariable mixed regression models to characterize how pupil to toilet ratio was associated with toilet use at the school-level and also how facility conditions were associated with pupils' use at specific facilities. We found a piecewise linear relationship between decreasing pupil to toilet ratio and increasing pupil toilet use (p < 0.01). Our data also revealed significant associations between toilet use and newer facility age (p < 0.01), facility type (p < 0.01), and the number of toilets in a facility (p < 0.01). We found some evidence suggesting facility dirtiness may deter girls from use (p = 0.06), but not boys (p = 0.98). Our study is the first to rigorously quantify many of these relationships, and provides insight into the complexity of factors affecting pupil toilet use patterns, potentially leading to a better allocation of resources for school sanitation, and to improved health and educational outcomes for children.

  17. Factors Associated With Pupil Toilet Use in Kenyan Primary Schools

    PubMed Central

    Garn, Joshua V.; Caruso, Bethany A.; Drews-Botsch, Carolyn D.; Kramer, Michael R.; Brumback, Babette A.; Rheingans, Richard D.; Freeman, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify how school sanitation conditions are associated with pupils’ use of sanitation facilities. We conducted a longitudinal assessment in 60 primary schools in Nyanza Province, Kenya, using structured observations to measure facility conditions and pupils’ use at specific facilities. We used multivariable mixed regression models to characterize how pupil to toilet ratio was associated with toilet use at the school-level and also how facility conditions were associated with pupils’ use at specific facilities. We found a piecewise linear relationship between decreasing pupil to toilet ratio and increasing pupil toilet use (p < 0.01). Our data also revealed significant associations between toilet use and newer facility age (p < 0.01), facility type (p < 0.01), and the number of toilets in a facility (p < 0.01). We found some evidence suggesting facility dirtiness may deter girls from use (p = 0.06), but not boys (p = 0.98). Our study is the first to rigorously quantify many of these relationships, and provides insight into the complexity of factors affecting pupil toilet use patterns, potentially leading to a better allocation of resources for school sanitation, and to improved health and educational outcomes for children. PMID:25233014

  18. Interior view of bath room 05 with original toilet stall, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of bath room 0-5 with original toilet stall, marble surround, and urinal, facing west. - Marine Barracks, Panama Canal, Barracks Building, 100' North of Thatcher Highway, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  19. Women's toilet with marble stalls and wooden doors, east end ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Women's toilet with marble stalls and wooden doors, east end of first floor. View to southwest. - San Bernardino Valley College, Life Science Building, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  20. 46 CFR 92.20-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms must be located convenient to the sleeping quarters of the... private or semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the sleeping rooms....

  1. 46 CFR 92.20-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms must be located convenient to the sleeping quarters of the... private or semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the sleeping rooms....

  2. 46 CFR 92.20-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms must be located convenient to the sleeping quarters of the... private or semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the sleeping rooms....

  3. 46 CFR 92.20-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms must be located convenient to the sleeping quarters of the... private or semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the sleeping rooms....

  4. 46 CFR 92.20-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms must be located convenient to the sleeping quarters of the... private or semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the sleeping rooms....

  5. Assisted infant toilet training in a Western family setting.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Rugolotto, Simone

    2004-04-01

    In the Western world, independent toilet training usually starts at age 18 months or later. In Asia and Africa, assisted toilet training traditionally starts between one and three months and is completed within approximately one year. This article reports a male infant who started caregiver-assisted toilet training at age 33 days in a Western family setting. During the first days, the caregiver made observations of the infant's bowel movement schedule and the cues he provided, from which she learned when to assist him to eliminate in the bathroom. During the elimination process, the infant was held in an "in-arms" position, with close contact between the infant's back and the caregiver's chest. Meanwhile, the caregiver gave vocal signals to prompt the infant to eliminate. Successful bowel training was completed at five months. This case report shows that early infant toilet training is possible in a Western family setting if the caregiver properly learns the infant's natural elimination timing and signals.

  6. Psychological Readiness and Motor Skills Needed for Toilet Training

    MedlinePlus

    ... fully toilet-trained. Awareness of the Need to Go At around her first birthday, your child will ... child’s awareness of the feeling of needing to go so that she can build on this understanding ...

  7. FACILITY 846, TOILET AND SHOWER WINGS, QUADRANGLE J, OBLIQUE VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 846, TOILET AND SHOWER WINGS, QUADRANGLE J, OBLIQUE VIEW FACING WEST. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Quadrangles I & J Barracks Type, Between Wright-Smith & Capron Avenues near Williston Avenue, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  8. 11. BEACH TOILET BUILDING, OFFICE AND FIRST AID BUILDING, PLANS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. BEACH TOILET BUILDING, OFFICE AND FIRST AID BUILDING, PLANS, ELEVATIONS AND SECTIONS Drawing No. 103-07 - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD

  9. 9. View inside Building 802, "Toilet", facing east. Naval ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. View inside Building 802, "Toilet", facing east. - Naval Air Station Fallon, 100-man Fallout Shelter, 800 Complex, off Carson Road near intersection of Pasture & Berney Roads, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  10. Method and device for disinfecting a toilet bowl

    DOEpatents

    Almon, Amy C.

    1997-01-01

    Method and device for disinfecting a flush toilet. The device is an electrocell mounted in the tank of the toilet, with two wire mesh electrodes immersed in the water in the tank and a battery applying approximately one to two volts of electric potential to the electrodes so that they chemically reduce a portion of the water in the tank to hydrogen peroxide. Then, when the tank is flushed, the peroxide is carried into the bowl where it can kill bacteria.

  11. Harry Potter and the Terrors of the Toilet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Alice

    2006-01-01

    The Harry Potter series focuses upon the toilet as a site for heroic action and a threshold between worlds as well as a more traditional place for boys to be bullied and girls to weep. This article offers a Kristevan reading of the toilets as abject in Harry Potter, and shows how this concept helps us make sense of wider issues within the series,…

  12. Palaeoparasitology in Japan--discovery of toilet features.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Akira; Kanehara, Masaaki; Kanehara, Masako

    2003-01-01

    The development of palaeoparasitology in Japan has occurred in recent decades. Despite the fact that archaeology in Japan has been slow to develop techniques for excavating ancient toilets, important information about the development of sanitation has been derived from the analysis of a few sites. This shows that the earliest people had very simple methods of sanitation. As populations increased, sanitation became more complex. Ditches surrounding early towns were used for excrement disposal. Eventually distinct toilets were developed followed by cesspit type toilets and flushing toilets. The parasites recovered from these toilets include many species that infect humans today. These parasite spectra reflect local use of aquatic, marine, and land animals. Fecal borne disease was an increasing problem as represented by whipworm and ascarid roundworm eggs. Interestingly, ascarid roundworms were absent in the earliest cultures and only became common with rice agriculture. Finds of pollen and seeds in toilet sediments reveal the use of medicinal plants to control the emerging problem of parasites. PMID:12687772

  13. Deformation enhanced decarburization of WC-Co

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaram, V.; Sinclair, R.; Rowcliffe, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The paper describes an unusual transformation that takes place only within the deformed region of identations. Under a suitable ambient temperature decarburization of cemented WC-Co on annealing is enhanced by prior localized deformation. Within individual WC grains, plate-like growth of a mixed carbide (either Co/sub 3/W/sub 3/C or Co/sub 6/W/sub 6/C) occurs preferentially. On some occasions intrusion of the substoichiometric carbide is preceded by a structural transformation in the WC slip band. This transformation is consistent with the formation of an orthorhombic (pseudo-hexagonal) WC phase that may be derived from the original structure by the passage of one partial dislocation on every sucessive slip plane.

  14. Solar energy utilization in composting toilets. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kroschel, M.L.

    1981-02-01

    The goal of the study was to utilize solar energy in lieu of electricity to help alleviate the basic problems with compost toilets. Solar devices were first used to improve the performance of existing facilities and additional systems were designed from inception with solar heating and venting systems. Four independent studies were initiated and executed over the two years of the grant period: the design and construction of a solar pasteurization unit for treatment of 55-gal drum waste collection units; retrofit of an existing Clivus Multrum toilet for direct passive solar heat gain; design and construction of an owner-built flow-through compost toilet with a solar hot air heating system for hill side installation; and design and construction of an integrated bathroom facility that included a solar heated flow-through compost toilet with a solar chimney venting system. In general, the use of high temperature solar devices to enhance the biological process of composting within a privy vault was not successful. The compost toilets in the study demonstrated their vulnerability to shock over loading characteristic of public facilities and therefore demonstrated their unsuitability for such applications. However, their performance under more controlled use rates (at or below design maximum) merits further study.

  15. Overflow encopresis and stool toileting refusal during toilet training: a prospective study on the effect of therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Taubman, B; Buzby, M

    1997-11-01

    We determined the incidence of stool toileting refusal in 53 children with overflow encopresis; 24 (45%) experienced difficulty toilet training for bowel movements. One-year follow-up data were obtained for 43 children, 31 with secondary encopresis and 12 with primary encopresis. Among the children with secondary encopresis, no difference was observed in response to treatment between children with and without difficulty toilet training. Ninety-one percent (11 of 12) of the children who had been soiling for less than 1 year at the time of presentation were free of soiling and no longer required therapeutic medication, compared with 55% (10 of 18) of the children who had been soiling for a longer period. Only 1 of 12 children with primary encopresis was free of soiling and no longer receiving therapeutic medication at 1 year, compared with 21 of 37 with secondary encopresis (p = 0.003). We concluded that children with primary encopresis who demonstrated stool toileting refusal during toilet training were resistant to medical treatment.

  16. Solving the enigma: toilet training children with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Rogers, June

    Promoting continence with children with a learning difficulty has traditionally taken second place to managing their other needs. Previous studies have given the impression that children are not ready for toilet training unless they are able to experience awareness of self and respond to the stimulus of a full bladder. This has resulted in assumptions regarding the ability of some children with learning difficulties to become toilet trained and consequently they are 'labelled' as incontinent and automatically issued with nappies. This approach means that any underlying problems such as constipation are not addressed. By taking a different approach, and focusing on assessing bladder and bowel maturation the author has found that children who were once considered incapable of toilet training can become continent.

  17. A sustainable approach towards rural development: dry toilets in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Regmi, M R

    2005-01-01

    Existing inadequate sewerage systems and direct disposal of household waste into water courses has tremendously increased water pollution. Dry toilets are feasible in rural and peri-urban areas to reduce the consumption of costlier water that is required for flushing. As conventional treatment technologies require high investment, and operation and maintenance costs, dry toilets are the only suitable option left for sanitation in the 21st century when working with limited financial resources. To reduce environmental degradation and overcome this problem, the dry toilet is only the realistic option in Nepal. Two reactors, one exposed to sunrays and the other without sunrays, were constructed. In the model with sunrays, it was found that in 48 days of observation faecal coliform presence depleted to 610 cells per gm from the initial value of 7 x 10(10) and volatile organic matter came down from 98.09% to 70.18%. Similarly, in the other model, the destruction of faecal coliform in 65 days was found to be 920 cells/gm while the destruction of organic matter took 75 days. Also, observing from 313 people in a cluster on the pilot project, the annually recovered value of N, P and K was found to be 1565 kg, 125 kg, 344 kg, respectively. This paper deals with the different types of dry ecological toilet, their performance and feasibility study in Nepal, with the full involvement of local people, based on complete laboratory analysis and regular monitoring. Using dry toilets will save 14 LPCD, which is equivalent to 14 MLD and the resulting demand will become only 80 MLD for the urban area of Kathmandu. The result advocates the implementation of ecological dry toilets to save valuable water wasted in flushing, as well as saving the resources needed to treat the waste. PMID:16477967

  18. One step at a time: how to toilet train children with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Rogers, June

    Toilet training children with learning disabilities can present challenges and requires careful assessmentand management. This article examines strategies for toilet training using a five step approach bladder and bowel control.

  19. Method and device for disinfecting a toilet bowl

    SciTech Connect

    Almon, A.C.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a method and device for disinfecting a flush toilet. The device is an electrocell mounted in the tank of the toilet, with two wire mesh electrodes immersed in the water in the tank and a battery applying approximately one to two volts of electric potential to the electrodes so that they chemically reduce a portion of the water in the tank to hydrogen peroxide. Then, when the tank is flushed, the peroxide is carried into the bowl where it can kill bacteria.

  20. Method and device for disinfecting a toilet bowl

    DOEpatents

    Almon, A.C.

    1997-03-18

    Method and device are disclosed for disinfecting a flush toilet. The device is an electrolytic cell mounted in the tank of the toilet, with two wire mesh electrodes immersed in the water in the tank and a battery applying approximately one to two volts of electric potential to the electrodes so that they chemically reduce a portion of the water in the tank to hydrogen peroxide. Then, when the tank is flushed, the peroxide is carried into the bowl where it can kill bacteria. 2 figs.

  1. Metal modified tungsten carbide (WC) for catalytic and electrocatalytic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellinger, Zachary J.

    One of the major challenges in the commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is the cost, and low CO tolerance of the anode electrocatalyst material. The anode typically requires a high loading of precious metal electrocatalyst (Pt or Pt--Ru) to obtain a useful amount of electrical energy from the electrooxidation of methanol (CH3OH) or ethanol (C2H5OH). The complete electro--oxidation of methanol or ethanol on these catalysts produces strongly adsorbed CO on the surface, which reduces the activity of the Pt or Pt--Ru catalysts. Another major disadvantage of these electrocatalyst components is the scarcity and consequently high price of both Pt and Ru. Tungsten monocarbide (WC) has shown similar catalytic properties to Pt, leading to the utilization of WC and metal modified WC as replacements to Pt and Pt--Ru. In this thesis we investigated WC and Pt--modified WC as a potentially more CO--tolerant electrocatalysts as compared to pure Pt. These catalysts would reduce or remove the high loading of Pt used industrially. The binding energy of CO, estimated using temperature programmed desorption, is weaker on WC and Pt/WC than on Pt, suggesting that it should be easier to oxidize CO on WC and Pt/WC. This hypothesis was verified using cyclic voltammetry to compare the electro--oxidation of CO on WC, Pt/WC, and Pt supported on carbon substrates, which showed a lower voltage for the onset of oxidation of CO on WC and Pt/WC than on Pt. After observing these improved properties on the Pt/WC catalysts, we decided to expand our studies to investigate Pd--modified WC as Pd is less expensive than Pt and has shown more ideal properties for alcohol electrocatalysis in alkaline media. Pd/WC showed a lower binding energy of CO than both its parent metal Pd as well as Pt. Then, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to determine how the presence of Pd affected the bonding of methanol and ethanol on the WC surface. The DFT studies showed

  2. Single-Case Evaluation of a Negative Reinforcement Toilet Training Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luiselli, James K.

    2007-01-01

    A negative reinforcement intervention was used to toilet train a child with multiple disabilities. The child appeared to actively withhold urinating in the toilet and was unresponsive to two positive reinforcement training programs. Negative reinforcement required that the child remain in the bathroom during toileting opportunities until he…

  3. Why is toilet training occurring at older ages? A study of factors associated with later training.

    PubMed

    Blum, Nathan J; Taubman, Bruce; Nemeth, Nicole

    2004-07-01

    Recent studies suggest that children are completing toilet training much later than the preceding generation. Our objective was to identify factors associated with later toilet training. Children between 17 and 19 months of age (n=406) were enrolled in the study. At enrollment, parents completed the Parenting Stress Index and the Receptive-Expressive Emergent Language Scale. Follow-up parent interviews were conducted every 2 to 3 months until children completed daytime toilet training. Information obtained at follow-up interviews included steps parents were taking to toilet train their child, child toilet training behaviors, presence and frequency of constipation, birth of a sibling, and child care arrangements. In a stepwise linear regression model predicting age at completion of toilet training, 3 factors were consistently associated with later training: initiation of toilet training at an older age, presence of stool toileting refusal, and presence of frequent constipation. Models including these variables explained 25% to 39% of the variance in age at completion of toilet training. In conclusion, a later age at initiation of toilet training, stool toileting refusal, and constipation may explain some of the trend toward completion of toilet training at later ages.

  4. Developing a Program To Improve Toileting Skills of Prekindergarten Handicapped Students in a Suburban Elementary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Ellen

    A program was developed to improve the toileting skills of four prekindergarten students (ages 3-5) with developmental delays. A daily toileting chart was employed over a 12-week period. During toileting attempts, each child was encouraged to pull down and pull up pants by using verbal prompts. Success at this activity resulted in placement of a…

  5. Effectiveness of a Modified Rapid Toilet Training Workshop for Parents of Children with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinald, Katherine; Mirenda, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with developmental disabilities often experience challenges in acquiring toileting skills, which highlights a need for effective toilet training strategies that can be readily disseminated to caregivers. The purpose of this multiple baseline study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a modified rapid toilet training workshop provided…

  6. 33. Elevation of Doors / Typical Cement Toilet Partitions / ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Elevation of Doors / Typical Cement Toilet Partitions / Typical Cement Shower Bath Partitions / Typical Marble Shower Bath Partitions / Dispensary Cupboard Supply Room Cupboard Similar / Section / Kitchen Cupboard and Sink / Screened Porch Cupboard (drawing 10) - Whittier State School, Hospital & Receiving Building, 11850 East Whittier Boulevard, Whittier, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. 46 CFR 72.20-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... who do not occupy sleeping accommodations to which private or semi-private facilities are attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms shall be located convenient to the sleeping quarters of the crew to... semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the sleeping rooms. (e) Where...

  8. 46 CFR 72.20-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... who do not occupy sleeping accommodations to which private or semi-private facilities are attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms shall be located convenient to the sleeping quarters of the crew to... semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the sleeping rooms. (e) Where...

  9. 46 CFR 72.20-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... who do not occupy sleeping accommodations to which private or semi-private facilities are attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms shall be located convenient to the sleeping quarters of the crew to... semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the sleeping rooms. (e) Where...

  10. 46 CFR 72.20-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... who do not occupy sleeping accommodations to which private or semi-private facilities are attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms shall be located convenient to the sleeping quarters of the crew to... semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the sleeping rooms. (e) Where...

  11. 46 CFR 72.20-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... who do not occupy sleeping accommodations to which private or semi-private facilities are attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms shall be located convenient to the sleeping quarters of the crew to... semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the sleeping rooms. (e) Where...

  12. Attic still life southsoutheast looking northnorthwest. Shows an early toilet, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Attic still life south-southeast looking north-northwest. Shows an early toilet, what is possibly the original front door, and a lead lined reservoir. Also shows the attic framing. - Samuel P. Grindle House, 13 School Street, Castine, Hancock County, ME

  13. 30 CFR 75.1712 - Bath houses and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bath houses and toilet facilities. 75.1712 Section 75.1712 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712 Bath...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1712 - Bath houses and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bath houses and toilet facilities. 75.1712 Section 75.1712 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712 Bath...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1712 - Bath houses and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bath houses and toilet facilities. 75.1712 Section 75.1712 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712 Bath...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1712 - Bath houses and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bath houses and toilet facilities. 75.1712 Section 75.1712 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712 Bath...

  17. 30 CFR 75.1712 - Bath houses and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bath houses and toilet facilities. 75.1712 Section 75.1712 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712 Bath...

  18. Continuity of Treatment: Toilet Training in Multiple Community Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Glen; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Results showed no consistent trends toward acquisition when training for severely disabled autistic Ss (5-7 years old) was provided in only some settings. However, the continuity approach which coordinated all of the children's daily activities produced immediate and steady gains in successful toileting. (Author)

  19. 17. INTERIOR OF BATHROOM SHOWING TOILET AT EXTREME PHOTO LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. INTERIOR OF BATHROOM SHOWING TOILET AT EXTREME PHOTO LEFT, SINK, MIRROR AND ELECTRIC LIGHT AT LEFT PHOTO CENTER, OPEN AND CLOSED BUILT-IN CABINETRY AT PHOTO CENTER AND THE BATHTUB AT EXTREME PHOTO RIGHT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  20. Detail of women's toilet room in the Cannery, note the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of women's toilet room in the Cannery, note the single-panel doors and tongue-and-groove partitions view facing northwest - Kahului Cannery, Plant No. 28, Cannery Building and Dryer House/Feed Storage Building, 120 Kane Street, Kahului, Maui County, HI

  1. 46 CFR 169.319 - Washrooms and toilets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Living Spaces § 169.319 Washrooms and toilets. (a) Sailing school vessels must... sufficient size and situated in the lowest part of the space. (c) Each sailing school vessel must meet...

  2. 46 CFR 169.319 - Washrooms and toilets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Living Spaces § 169.319 Washrooms and toilets. (a) Sailing school vessels must... sufficient size and situated in the lowest part of the space. (c) Each sailing school vessel must meet...

  3. 46 CFR 169.319 - Washrooms and toilets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Living Spaces § 169.319 Washrooms and toilets. (a) Sailing school vessels must... sufficient size and situated in the lowest part of the space. (c) Each sailing school vessel must meet...

  4. 46 CFR 169.319 - Washrooms and toilets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Living Spaces § 169.319 Washrooms and toilets. (a) Sailing school vessels must... sufficient size and situated in the lowest part of the space. (c) Each sailing school vessel must meet...

  5. 46 CFR 169.319 - Washrooms and toilets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction and Arrangement Living Spaces § 169.319 Washrooms and toilets. (a) Sailing school vessels must... sufficient size and situated in the lowest part of the space. (c) Each sailing school vessel must meet...

  6. 46 CFR 190.20-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Washrooms and toilet rooms. 190.20-25 Section 190.20-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Accomodations for Officers, Crew, and Scientific Personnel § 190.20-25...

  7. 21 CFR 1250.50 - Toilet and lavatory facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Toilet and lavatory facilities. 1250.50 Section 1250.50 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION INTERSTATE...

  8. 21 CFR 211.52 - Washing and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Washing and toilet facilities. 211.52 Section 211.52 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Buildings and...

  9. 21 CFR 211.52 - Washing and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Washing and toilet facilities. 211.52 Section 211.52 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Buildings and...

  10. 21 CFR 211.52 - Washing and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Washing and toilet facilities. 211.52 Section 211.52 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Buildings and...

  11. 21 CFR 211.52 - Washing and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Washing and toilet facilities. 211.52 Section 211.52 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Buildings and...

  12. 21 CFR 211.52 - Washing and toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Washing and toilet facilities. 211.52 Section 211.52 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR FINISHED PHARMACEUTICALS Buildings and...

  13. Microstructure and Sliding Wear Resistance of Laser Cladded WC/Ni Composite Coatings with Different Contents of WC Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J. S.; Zhang, X. C.; Xuan, F. Z.; Wang, Z. D.; Tu, S. T.

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this article was to address the effect of WC content on the microstructure, microhardness, and sliding wear resistance of laser cladded WC/Ni composite coatings. The content of WC particle in the feed powder varied in the range of 0-80 wt.%. Experimental results showed that the laser cladded coatings exhibited homogeneous microstructure without pores or cracks. By comparing with the 45# steel substrate, the microhardness of WC/Ni composite coatings was relatively high. The microhardness of coating increased with increasing the content of WC particles. The wear resistance of WC/Ni composite coatings was strongly dependent on the content of WC particle and their microstructure. When the WC content was lower than 40 wt.% in the feed powder, the wear rate of the coatings decreased with increasing WC content. The two-body abrasive wear was identified as the main wear mechanisms. For the coatings with WC content higher than 40 wt.% in the feed powder, their wear rate increased with increasing WC content. The three-body abrasive wear and fatigue wear were the main failures. The coating with 40 wt.% WC in the feed powder exhibited the best wear resistance.

  14. The Potential of Wash-and-Dry Toilets to Improve the Toileting Experience for Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Biddison, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the feasibility of using a "wash-and-dry" toilet in the nursing home. Design and Methods: We used a controlled comparison baseline-versus-treatment design with 22 female nursing home residents aged 75 and older living in a 562-bed, not-for-profit nursing home facility in Maryland. The Luscence Luxury Lavage wash-and-dry…

  15. Toilet training in primary care: current practice and recommendations from behavioral pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Polaha, Jodi; Warzak, William J; Dittmer-Mcmahon, Karen

    2002-12-01

    This article is the first to evaluate pediatricians' (1). current practices regarding recommendations for toilet training typically developing first-time learners and (2). opinions on an intensive procedure for rapid toilet training. Results of surveys obtained from 103 pediatricians indicate that physicians' recommendations lean toward a gradual, passive approach to toilet training with 72% endorsing "child interest" in the toilet as one of the top criteria children must exhibit before beginning training. Respondents had a somewhat unfavorable view of intensive toilet training for first-time learners with 29% endorsing the use of such a procedure, although in most cases without all of the components. It is recommended that some components of the intensive procedure could easily "fit" with physicians' current practices to increase toilet-training effectiveness within a shorter training interval. These recommendations, including compliance training as a part of teaching, increased fluid intake to promote toileting trials, and multiple training sits, are described.

  16. Effectiveness of a modified rapid toilet training workshop for parents of children with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Rinald, Katherine; Mirenda, Pat

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with developmental disabilities often experience challenges in acquiring toileting skills, which highlights a need for effective toilet training strategies that can be readily disseminated to caregivers. The purpose of this multiple baseline study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a modified rapid toilet training workshop provided to the parents of six children with developmental disabilities. In the workshop, parents were taught to implement an instructional protocol that included increased fluid intake, positive reinforcement for correct toileting, scheduled toilet sittings, scheduled chair sittings to teach initiation, neutral redirection for accidents, and procedures to enhance maintenance and generalization. Following the workshop, parents implemented the toilet training protocol at home with their children for 5-8 days, with telephone support from a researcher. Results indicate that the workshop resulted in increased in-toilet urination and defecation and decreased accidents for the five children who completed the study. The results are discussed in relation to previous and future research and implications for practice.

  17. Electrochemical disinfection of toilet wastewater using wastewater electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao; Qu, Yan; Cid, Clément A; Finke, Cody; Hoffmann, Michael R; Lim, Keahying; Jiang, Sunny C

    2016-04-01

    The paucity of proper sanitation facilities has contributed to the spread of waterborne diseases in many developing countries. The primary goal of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using a wastewater electrolysis cell (WEC) for toilet wastewater disinfection. The treated wastewater was designed to reuse for toilet flushing and agricultural irrigation. Laboratory-scale electrochemical (EC) disinfection experiments were performed to investigate the disinfection efficiency of the WEC with four seeded microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, recombinant adenovirus serotype 5, and bacteriophage MS2). In addition, the formation of organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAA5) at the end of the EC treatment was also investigated. The results showed that at an applied cell voltage of +4 V, the WEC achieved 5-log10 reductions of all four seeded microorganisms in real toilet wastewater within 60 min. In contrast, chemical chlorination (CC) disinfection using hypochlorite [NaClO] was only effective for the inactivation of bacteria. Due to the rapid formation of chloramines, less than 0.5-log10 reduction of MS2 was observed in toilet wastewater even at the highest [NaClO] dosage (36 mg/L, as Cl2) over a 1 h reaction. Experiments using laboratory model waters showed that free reactive chlorine generated in situ during EC disinfection process was the main disinfectant responsible for the inactivation of microorganisms. However, the production of hydroxyl radicals [OH], and other reactive oxygen species by the active bismuth-doped TiO2 anode were negligible under the same electrolytic conditions. The formation of THMs and HAA5 were found to increase with higher applied cell voltage. Based on the energy consumption estimates, the WEC system can be operated using solar energy stored in a DC battery as the sole power source.

  18. Electrochemical disinfection of toilet wastewater using wastewater electrolysis cell

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao; Qu, Yan; Cid, Clément A.; Finke, Cody; Hoffmann, Michael R.; Lim, Keahying; Jiang, Sunny C.

    2016-01-01

    The paucity of proper sanitation facilities has contributed to the spread of waterborne diseases in many developing countries. The primary goal of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using a wastewater electrolysis cell (WEC) for toilet wastewater disinfection. The treated wastewater was designed to reuse for toilet flushing and agricultural irrigation. Laboratory-scale electrochemical (EC) disinfection experiments were performed to investigate the disinfection efficiency of the WEC with four seeded microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, recombinant adenovirus serotype 5, and bacteriophage MS2). In addition, the formation of organic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAA5) at the end of the EC treatment was also investigated. The results showed that at an applied cell voltage of +4 V, the WEC achieved 5-log10 reductions of all four seeded microorganisms in real toilet wastewater within 60 min. In contrast, chemical chlorination (CC) disinfection using hypochlorite [NaClO] was only effective for the inactivation of bacteria. Due to the rapid formation of chloramines, less than 0.5-log10 reduction of MS2 was observed in toilet wastewater even at the highest [NaClO] dosage (36 mg/L, as Cl2) over a 1 h reaction. Experiments using laboratory model waters showed that free reactive chlorine generated in situ during EC disinfection process was the main disinfectant responsible for the inactivation of microorganisms. However, the production of hydroxyl radicals [•OH], and other reactive oxygen species by the active bismuth-doped TiO2 anode were negligible under the same electrolytic conditions. The formation of THMs and HAA5 were found to increase with higher applied cell voltage. Based on the energy consumption estimates, the WEC system can be operated using solar energy stored in a DC battery as the sole power source. PMID:26854604

  19. Do piped water and flush toilets prevent child diarrhea in rural Philippines?

    PubMed

    Capuno, Joseph J; Tan, Carlos Antonio R; Fabella, Vigile Marie

    2015-03-01

    Similar to other developing countries, diarrhea in the Philippines continues to be among the top causes of child mortality and morbidity. In pursuit of its Millennium Development Goals, the Philippine government commits to reduce child deaths and provide water and sanitation services to more rural households by 2015. Applying propensity score matching on the 1993, 1998, 2003, and 2008 rounds of the National Demographic and Health Survey to estimate the average treatment effect on the treated, it is found that the incidence of diarrhea among under-5 children is lower by as much as 4.5% in households with access to piped water and 10% in those with their own flush toilets, relative to comparable households. These findings underscore the need to ensure the quality of drinking water from the pipe or from other improved sources at the point of use, and the provision of improved and own sanitation facilities.

  20. Slum inhabitants' perceptions and decision-making processes related to an innovative sanitation service: evaluating the Blue Diversion Toilet in Kampala (Uganda).

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Mark; Messmer, Ulrike; Lüthi, Christoph; Tobias, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The inadequate provision of sanitation in informal urban settlements, also known as slums, continues to be an important issue. New technologies and services are being designed to solve this problem. However, the history of failed sanitation programmes and projects highlights a lack of understanding of how slum inhabitants decide on investing in such products and services. In this paper, we gather perspectives from potential clients and investigate how slum inhabitants (1) perceive the current situation and whether they desire improvements of sanitation, (2) how they evaluate a new toilet that is still in development, and how (3) social processes and (4) constraints affect decisions. Data were collected through interviewing 1538 people within a general household survey. People using shared and public latrines desire an improvement of their sanitation facilities. The lack of water for washing is perceived by residents as a the biggest problem when accessing current latrines. The new toilet was mostly evaluated positively: people like it, expect large health benefits from it and it complies with cultural norms. However, people also expect some problems with the functioning of the toilet and expect opposition to pay for the service, due to the high costs and a lack of space to set up new toilets. PMID:25684115

  1. Better design quality of public toilets for visually impaired persons: an all-round concept in design for the promotion of health.

    PubMed

    Siu, Kin Wai Michael

    2008-11-01

    According to United Nations statistics, about one-thirtieth of the world's population is visually impaired. These visually impaired persons (VIPs) face a variety of difficulties in their daily lives. This is the case not only in countries with a shortage of resources or with relatively low living standards, but also in developed countries. Most of the time, such difficulties in daily life come from the misunderstanding of VIPs' wants and needs and in turn poor design quality. To enhance equal opportunities in society, promote public health and improve the design quality of the public environment and facilities, a project on how VIPs access public toilets has been under way since 2004. To maintain better design quality in public toilets, the FISH concept has been initiated. This design concept includes the design considerations of friendly, informative, safe, and hygienic. This paper reviews the wants and needs of VIPs that should be considered in using public toilets, and the help that they need to be given. Based on the findings of the project, this paper then discusses how better quality designs for public toilets to promote public health can be obtained by implementing FISH.

  2. Slum inhabitants' perceptions and decision-making processes related to an innovative sanitation service: evaluating the Blue Diversion Toilet in Kampala (Uganda).

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Mark; Messmer, Ulrike; Lüthi, Christoph; Tobias, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The inadequate provision of sanitation in informal urban settlements, also known as slums, continues to be an important issue. New technologies and services are being designed to solve this problem. However, the history of failed sanitation programmes and projects highlights a lack of understanding of how slum inhabitants decide on investing in such products and services. In this paper, we gather perspectives from potential clients and investigate how slum inhabitants (1) perceive the current situation and whether they desire improvements of sanitation, (2) how they evaluate a new toilet that is still in development, and how (3) social processes and (4) constraints affect decisions. Data were collected through interviewing 1538 people within a general household survey. People using shared and public latrines desire an improvement of their sanitation facilities. The lack of water for washing is perceived by residents as a the biggest problem when accessing current latrines. The new toilet was mostly evaluated positively: people like it, expect large health benefits from it and it complies with cultural norms. However, people also expect some problems with the functioning of the toilet and expect opposition to pay for the service, due to the high costs and a lack of space to set up new toilets.

  3. A component analysis of toilet-training procedures recommended for young children.

    PubMed

    Greer, Brian D; Neidert, Pamela L; Dozier, Claudia L

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated the combined and sequential effects of 3 toilet-training procedures recommended for use with young children: (a) underwear, (b) a dense sit schedule, and (c) differential reinforcement. A total of 20 children participated. Classroom teachers implemented a toilet-training package consisting of all 3 procedures with 6 children. Of the 6 children, 2 showed clear and immediate improvements in toileting performance, and 3 showed delayed improvements. Teachers implemented components of the training package sequentially with 12 children. At least 2 of the 4 children who experienced the underwear component after baseline improved. Toileting performance did not improve for any of the 8 children who were initially exposed to either the dense sit schedule or differential reinforcement. When initial training components were ineffective, teachers implemented additional components sequentially until toileting performance improved or all components were implemented. Toileting performance often improved when underwear or differential reinforcement was later added.

  4. Analysis of Formation and Interfacial WC Dissolution Behavior of WC-Co/Invar Laser-TIG Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, P. Q.; Ren, J. W.; Zhang, P. L.; Gong, H. Y.; Yang, S. L.

    2013-02-01

    During the valve fabrication, hard metal is welded to stainless steel or invar alloy for sealing purposes because of its good heat resistance operating at 500 °C. However, WC (tungsten carbide) dissolution in weld pool softens the hard metal and decreases mechanical properties near the hard metal/weld interface. In order to analyze the WC dissolution in welded joint, joining of hard metal and invar alloy was carried out using laser-tungsten inert gas hybrid welding method. Microstructures of the weld region, chemical composition were investigated using optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy, and EDAX, respectively. Mechanical properties such as microhardness and four-point bend strength test were performed. Larger and smaller WC dissolution and WC dissolution through transition layer based on thermo-dynamics were discussed. The results thus indicate that WC dissolution led to cellular microstructure, columnar crystal, and transition layer under the effect of laser beam and tungsten arc. WC dissolution was affected by metal ions Fe+, Ni+, Co+ exchange in W-M-C system, and WC grain growth was driven by forces caused by laser beam and tungsten arc in larger WC, smaller WC, and liquid Fe, Ni systems.

  5. Assisted infant toilet training: is it time for a critical revision?

    PubMed

    Rugolotto, S; Sun, M; Boucke, L; Chen, B B; Tatò, L

    2008-01-01

    Toilet training is an essential issue in child education, and its completion represents a developmental milestone. Although for the last 40 years the Western medical community has recommended to start toilet training after 18 months of age, today a growing number of parents are accepting assistant infant toilet training that can begin relatively soon after birth. As currently practiced, assisted infant toilet training emphasizes infant-caregiver communication for the gradual acquisition of bowel and bladder control. Signals emitted by the infant lead the caregiver during elimination assistance. This review will help the reader to understand this new phenomenon.

  6. Lifting the lid on toilet plume aerosol: A literature review with suggestions for future research

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David L.; Mead, Kenneth R.; Lynch, Robert A.; Hirst, Deborah V.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The potential risks associated with “toilet plume” aerosols produced by flush toilets is a subject of continuing study. This review examines the evidence regarding toilet plume bioaerosol generation and infectious disease transmission. Methods The peer-reviewed scientific literature was searched to identify articles related to aerosol production during toilet flushing, as well as epidemiologic studies examining the potential role of toilets in infectious disease outbreaks. Results The studies demonstrate that potentially infectious aerosols may be produced in substantial quantities during flushing. Aerosolization can continue through multiple flushes to expose subsequent toilet users. Some of the aerosols desiccate to become droplet nuclei and remain adrift in the air currents. However, no studies have yet clearly demonstrated or refuted toilet plume-related disease transmission, and the significance of the risk remains largely uncharacterized. Conclusion Research suggests that toilet plume could play a contributory role in the transmission of infectious diseases. Additional research in multiple areas is warranted to assess the risks posed by toilet plume, especially within health care facilities. PMID:23040490

  7. Survival of Fecal Coliforms in Dry-Composting Toilets

    PubMed Central

    Redlinger, Thomas; Graham, Jay; Corella-Barud, Verónica; Avitia, Raquel

    2001-01-01

    The dry-composting toilet, which uses neither water nor sewage infrastructure, is a practical solution in areas with inadequate sewage disposal and where water is limited. These systems are becoming increasingly popular and are promoted to sanitize human excreta and to recycle them into fertilizer for nonedible plants, yet there are few data on the safety of this technology. This study analyzed fecal coliform reduction in approximately 90 prefabricated, dry-composting toilets (Sistema Integral de Reciclamiento de Desechos Orgánicos [SIRDOs]) that were installed on the U.S.-Mexico border in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico. The purpose of this study was to determine fecal coliform reduction over time and the most probable method of this reduction. Biosolid waste samples were collected and analyzed at approximately 3 and 6 months and were classified based on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards. Results showed that class A compost (high grade) was present in only 35.8% of SIRDOs after 6 months. The primary mechanism for fecal coliform reduction was found to be desiccation rather than biodegradation. There was a significant correlation (P = 0.008) between classification rating and percent moisture categories of the biosolid samples: drier samples had a greater proportion of class A samples. Solar exposure was critical for maximal class A biosolid end products (P = 0.001). This study only addressed fecal coliforms as an indicator organism, and further research is necessary to determine the safety of composting toilets with respect to other pathogenic microorganisms, some of which are more resistant to desiccation. PMID:11526002

  8. Survival of fecal coliforms in dry-composting toilets.

    PubMed

    Redlinger, T; Graham, J; Corella-Barud, V; Avitia, R

    2001-09-01

    The dry-composting toilet, which uses neither water nor sewage infrastructure, is a practical solution in areas with inadequate sewage disposal and where water is limited. These systems are becoming increasingly popular and are promoted to sanitize human excreta and to recycle them into fertilizer for nonedible plants, yet there are few data on the safety of this technology. This study analyzed fecal coliform reduction in approximately 90 prefabricated, dry-composting toilets (Sistema Integral de Reciclamiento de Desechos Orgánicos [SIRDOs]) that were installed on the U.S.-Mexico border in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico. The purpose of this study was to determine fecal coliform reduction over time and the most probable method of this reduction. Biosolid waste samples were collected and analyzed at approximately 3 and 6 months and were classified based on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards. Results showed that class A compost (high grade) was present in only 35.8% of SIRDOs after 6 months. The primary mechanism for fecal coliform reduction was found to be desiccation rather than biodegradation. There was a significant correlation (P = 0.008) between classification rating and percent moisture categories of the biosolid samples: drier samples had a greater proportion of class A samples. Solar exposure was critical for maximal class A biosolid end products (P = 0.001). This study only addressed fecal coliforms as an indicator organism, and further research is necessary to determine the safety of composting toilets with respect to other pathogenic microorganisms, some of which are more resistant to desiccation.

  9. WC-Co Composite Coating Deposited by Cold Spraying of a Core-Shell-Structured WC-Co Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiao-Tao; Li, Cheng-Xin; Shang, Fu-Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Wang, Yu-Yue; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a core-shell-structured WC-Co powder was used to develop a heterogeneously structured WC-Co coating with tens micrometers of WC-10Co as strengthening phase and Co-rich WC-Co as the binder in order to realize simultaneous strengthening and toughening. Spray powder particles contain WC-10Co core coated with a Co-rich WC-Co shell by mechanical milling. WC-Co coating with dual-scale strengthening phases was deposited by cold spraying. Post-spray annealing was carried out to further modify the coating microstructure. Microstructures of the spray powder and the coating were characterized by SEM. Mechanical properties of the coating in terms of microhardness and fracture toughness were examined. Results show that a biomodal WC-Co coating with a porosity of only 0.7% was deposited by cold spray. The Co-rich matrix phase contains submicrometer-sized carbide and primary hard phase is WC-10Co particles. The measurement yielded a Vickers microhardness of 1493 ± 76.7 HV0.1 for WC-10Co core and 693 ± 47.3 HV0.1 for Co-rich binder phase. After annealed at 900 °C for 5 h, a remarkable increase in fracture toughness from 21.2 ± 3.8 to 35.7±5.2 MPa m-0.5 was achieved while no evident change occurred to the hardness of WC-10Co cores.

  10. Ni-WC/C nanocluster catalysts for urea electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Li, Mingtao; Huang, Zhiyu; Li, Yingming; Qi, Suitao; Yi, Chunhai; Yang, Bolun

    2014-10-01

    A nanocluster Ni-WC/C electrocatalyst is prepared through a sequential impregnation method and is used for the urea electrooxidation in alkaline conditions. The micro-morphology, lattice parameter, composition and surface states of Ni-WC/C particles are determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) analysis. The electrooxidation activity and stability of the Ni-WC/C catalyst are also investigated by cyclic voltammograms and chronoamperograms. Characterization results indicate that the Ni nanoclusters are uniformly distributed on the WC/C framework, and the Ni-WC/C catalyst shows high electrocatalytic activity and stability for urea electrooxidation. The maximum current density at the Ni-WC/C electrode is almost 700 mA cm-2 mg-1 which is one order of magnitude higher than that at the Ni/C electrode, and the steady current density at the Ni-WC/C electrode is also markedly improved. Furthermore, the ESA values and XPS spectra indicate that the enhanced performance of the Ni-WC/C catalyst could be attributed to the structure effect and electron effect between nickel and tungsten carbide.

  11. Corrosion behavior of rare earth modified WC-12Co coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Chen, Hui; Ceng, Shengbo; Gou, Guoqing; Tu, Mingjing

    2015-03-01

    Rare earth has been widely used in materials manufacturing to improve hardness and toughness. In this paper, conventional, nano-modified and CeO2 modified WC-12Co coatings are produced by using high speed oxygen flaming (HVOF) spraying technology. Long-term immersion and electrochemical tests of these coatings in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution are conducted. The surface morphologies were observed to investigate the corrosion mechanisms. The results show CeO2 modified WC-12Co coatings to possess the best corrosion resistance but the nano-modified WC-12Co coating has the worst performance. Results suggest that the improvement of corrosion resistance for CeO2 modified WC-12Co coating can be attributed to the enhancement of interfacial strength between Co binder phase and WC particles.

  12. Teaching a Child with Challenging Behaviour to Use the Toilet: A Clinical Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Freddy Jackson; Peace, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Learning to use the toilet is an important developmental step for a child's independence, health and dignity. It can be particularly difficult to teach continence skills to disabled children with aggressive or challenging behaviour. This study showed how Azrin & Foxx's (1971) basic toilet training procedure could be modified to teach a 13-year-old…

  13. Fifteen-minute consultation: problems in the healthy child-toilet training.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Hannah; Grodzinski, Ben; Fertleman, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Toilet training is a process that all healthy children go through. It is one of the developmental milestones for which parents most often seek medical help. Despite this, many paediatricians feel unconfident managing children presenting with a toilet training problem. We address some common questions arising when assessing and managing such a child, including identifying rare but important diagnoses not to miss.

  14. Toilet Training Individuals with Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroeger, K. A.; Sorensen-Burnworth, Rena

    2009-01-01

    The following article reviews the current literature addressing toilet training individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities. The review addresses programs typical to toilet training the developmental disability population, most of which are modeled after the original Foxx and Azrin [Azrin, N. H., & Foxx, R. M. (1971). A rapid…

  15. Listening to carers talking about the subjects of continence and toileting.

    PubMed

    Forbat, Liz

    Toilets and continence play critical roles in the lives of people who care for a relative at home. Issues around toileting are central to the relationship between the carer and the person being cared for, with the bathroom often becoming the most important place in the house. PMID:14768154

  16. The Use of Priming To Introduce Toilet Training to a Child with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bainbridge, Nicole; Myles, Brenda Smith

    1999-01-01

    This case study analyzed effects of priming in introducing toilet training to a 3-year-old boy with autism. Using an ABAB design, analysis found an increase in initiation of toilet use and a decrease in wet diapers when priming was used. (Author/DB)

  17. A Component Analysis of Toilet-Training Procedures Recommended for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Brian D.; Neidert, Pamela L.; Dozier, Claudia L.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the combined and sequential effects of 3 toilet-training procedures recommended for use with young children: (a) underwear, (b) a dense sit schedule, and (c) differential reinforcement. A total of 20 children participated. Classroom teachers implemented a toilet-training package consisting of all 3 procedures with 6 children. Of the 6…

  18. 21 CFR 1250.38 - Toilet and lavatory facilities for use of food-handling employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Toilet and lavatory facilities of suitable design and construction shall be provided for use of food... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Toilet and lavatory facilities for use of food-handling employees. 1250.38 Section 1250.38 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...

  19. 46 CFR 108.205 - Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. 108.205... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.205 Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. (a) For the purposes of this section— (1) “Private facility” means...

  20. 46 CFR 108.205 - Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. 108.205... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.205 Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. (a) For the purposes of this section— (1) “Private facility” means...

  1. 46 CFR 108.205 - Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. 108.205... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.205 Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. (a) For the purposes of this section— (1) “Private facility” means...

  2. 46 CFR 108.205 - Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. 108.205... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.205 Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. (a) For the purposes of this section— (1) “Private facility” means...

  3. 46 CFR 108.205 - Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. 108.205... DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.205 Wash spaces; toilet spaces; and shower spaces. (a) For the purposes of this section— (1) “Private facility” means...

  4. Hygienic quality of faeces treated in urine diverting vermicomposting toilets.

    PubMed

    Lalander, Cecilia H; Hill, Geoffrey B; Vinnerås, Björn

    2013-11-01

    On-site sanitation solutions have gained much interest in recent years. One such solution is the urine diverting vermicomposting toilet (UDVT). This study evaluated the hygienic quality of the composted material in six UDVTs in operation in France. Samples were taken from three sampling positions in each toilet, with increasing distance from the fresh material. The concentration of Salmonella spp., Enterococcus spp., thermotolarent coliforms and coliphages were analysed and plotted against a number of variables. The variables found to have the greatest impact was the pH (for Enterococcus spp. and thermotolarent coliforms (TTC)) and time since last maintenance (coliphages). The pH was found to correlate with the material maturity. The current practise of maintenance can cause recontamination of the stabilised material and increase the risk of regrowth of pathogenic microorganisms. A modification in the maintenance procedure, in which a fourth maturation point is introduced, would eliminate this risk. UDVTs were found to be a good on-site sanitation option as the maintenance requirement is small and the system effectively reduced odour and concentration of pathogen and indicator organisms in human waste while keeping the accumulation of material down to a minimum. If the vermicompost is to be used for crops consumed raw, an additional sanitisation step is recommended. PMID:23932466

  5. Annual Performance Evaluation of a Pair of Energy Efficient Houses (WC3 and WC4) in Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Christian, Jeffrey E; Gehl, Anthony C; Jackson, Roderick K; Boudreaux, Philip R

    2012-04-01

    Beginning in 2008, two pairs of energy-saver houses were built at Wolf Creek in Oak Ridge, TN. These houses were designed to maximize energy efficiency using new ultra-high-efficiency components emerging from ORNL s Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partners and others. The first two houses contained 3713 square feet of conditioned area and were designated as WC1 and WC2; the second pair consisted of 2721 square feet conditioned area with crawlspace foundation and they re called WC3 and WC4. This report is focused on the annual energy performance of WC3 and WC4, and how they compare against a previously benchmarked maximum energy efficient house of a similar footprint. WC3 and WC4 are both about 55-60% more efficient than traditional new construction. Each house showcases a different envelope system: WC3 is built with advanced framing featured cellulose insulation partially mixed with phase change materials (PCM); and WC4 house has cladding composed of an exterior insulation and finish system (EIFS). The previously benchmarked house was one of three built at the Campbell Creek subdivision in Knoxville, TN. This house (CC3) was designed as a transformation of a builder house (CC1) with the most advanced energy-efficiency features, including solar electricity and hot water, which market conditions are likely to permit within the 2012 2015 period. The builder house itself was representative of a standard, IECC 2006 code-certified, all-electric house built by the builder to sell around 2005 2008.

  6. Solid-Particle Erosion Behaviour of WC/Ni Composite Clad layers with Different Contents of WC Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, C. P.; Mishra, S. K.; Tiwari, P.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the solid particle erosion behaviour of WC-reinforced Ni-matrix based laser clad layers to improve the performance of engineering components for potential power plant applications. WC-reinforced Ni-matrix based laser clad layers having various compositions of WC (5, 10 and 15wt%) were deposited on austenitic stainless steel substrates. The laser clad layers were characterised using optical and scanning electron microscopy, microhardness testing and air-jet erosion testing. In solid particle erosion studies using the air-jet erosion tester, the set of testing parameters, including air-erodent compositions, erodent particle velocities and impact angles, was selected by using the Taguchi technique. The morphologies of the worn surfaces were used to predict the wear mechanisms. The results of a microstructural examination of the cross-sections of laser clad revealed a good metallurgical bond between the WC-reinforced Ni matrix and the austenitic stainless steel substrate. Dissociation/partial melting/full melting of WC particles was not observed in the laser clad layers. The microhardness value in the laser cladding zone was between 900-2400 VHN, while it was 230-270 VHN on the substrate. The results of erosion wear studies of the WC-Ni laser clad surface revealed that the erosion behaviour of the WC-Ni laser clad is primarily governed by erodent jet velocity followed by impact angle. The erosion does not much depend on the Ni-concentration in the MMC or the erodent feed rate. The wear signature at the erosion wear surface indicated that the erosion was primarily governed by a ductile erosion mechanism followed by the removal of WC particles from the matrix. The erosion resistance of the Ni-clad layer with WC was found to be at least four times higher than that without WC particles. The quantified contribution of various erosion parameters is useful for function-based design of components with extended service life.

  7. Toilet training children with autism and developmental delays: an effective program for school settings.

    PubMed

    Cocchiola, Michael A; Martino, Gayle M; Dwyer, Lisa J; Demezzo, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Current research literature on toilet training for children with autism or developmental delays focuses on smaller case studies, typically with concentrated clinical support. Limited research exists to support an effective school-based program to teach toileting skills implemented by public school staff. We describe an intervention program to toilet train 5 children with autism or developmental delays who demonstrated no prior success in the home or school setting. Intervention focused on (a) removal of diapers during school hours, (b) scheduled time intervals for bathroom visits, (c) a maximum of 3 min sitting on the toilet, (d) reinforcers delivered immediately contingent on urination in the toilet, and (e) gradually increased time intervals between bathroom visits as each participant met mastery during the preceding, shorter time interval. The program was effective across all 5 cases in a community-based elementary school. Paraprofessional staff implemented the program with minimal clinical oversight.

  8. Hybrid Co-Cr/W-WC and Ni-W-Cr-B/W-WC Coating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernhes, L.; Azzi, M.; Bousser, E.; Schmitt, T.; Lamarre, J. M.; Klemberg-Sapieha, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of subsurface materials on the performance of a wear-resistant thin film. The mechanical, tribological, and corrosion properties were assessed for two hybrid coating systems: (1) W-WC thin film and a laser cladded Co-Cr interlayer applied to a 316 stainless steel substrate and (2) the same W-WC thin film and a spray-and-fused Ni-W-Cr-B interlayer applied to an Inconel® 718 substrate. They were then compared to the same systems without an interlayer. The microstructures were analyzed by XRD, EDS, and SEM. The hardness and surface load-carrying capacity of the coating systems were determined by micro- and macrohardness testing. Rockwell indentation was used to assess coating adhesion (CEN/TS 1071-8). Tribological properties were assessed with a reciprocating tribometer, and corrosion resistance was determined by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The originality of this work lies in the finding that, except for the Inconel 718/Ni-W-Cr-B/W-WC system, the wear rate decreases with decreasing hardness of the subsurface materials carrying the thin film due to the decreasing contact pressure for a given load. Another novel finding is the stress-induced phase transformation of the Co-Cr interlayer, which occurs beneath the thin film under high load.

  9. 30 CFR 75.1712-3 - Minimum requirements of surface bathing facilities, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... facilities, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities. 75.1712-3 Section 75.1712-3 Mineral Resources MINE... facilities, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities. (a) All bathing facilities, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities shall be provided with adequate light, heat, and ventilation so as to maintain...

  10. Acute, short-lasting rhinitis due to camomile-scented toilet paper in patients allergic to compositae.

    PubMed

    Scala, Guglielmo

    2006-01-01

    A 20-year-old woman with a proven allergy to camomile suffered from short-lasting rhinitis when using a camomile-scented toilet paper. The prick-by-prick test performed with the toilet paper was positive. Diagnosis was confirmed by a challenge test that also resulted positive. This is the first reported case of toilet-paper-induced acute rhinitis. The removal of the toilet paper from the bathroom was sufficient to obtain the disappearance of symptoms. Patients allergic to camomile should avoid a camomile-scented toilet paper.

  11. Bidet toilet seats with warm-water tanks: residual chlorine, microbial community, and structural analyses.

    PubMed

    Iyo, Toru; Asakura, Keiko; Nakano, Makiko; Yamada, Mutsuko; Omae, Kazuyuki

    2016-02-01

    Despite the reported health-related advantages of the use of warm water in bidets, there are health-related disadvantages associated with the use of these toilet seats, and the bacterial research is sparse. We conducted a survey on the hygienic conditions of 127 warm-water bidet toilet seats in restrooms on a university campus. The spray water from the toilet seats had less residual chlorine than their tap water sources. However, the total viable microbial count was below the water-quality standard for tap water. In addition, the heat of the toilet seats' warm-water tanks caused heterotrophic bacteria in the source tap water to proliferate inside the nozzle pipes and the warm-water tanks. Escherichia coli was detected on the spray nozzles of about 5% of the toilet seats, indicating that the self-cleaning mechanism of the spray nozzles was largely functioning properly. However, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected on about 2% of the toilet seats. P. aeruginosa was found to remain for long durations in biofilms that formed inside warm-water tanks. Infection-prevention measures aimed at P. aeruginosa should receive full consideration when managing warm-water bidet toilet seats in hospitals in order to prevent opportunistic infections in intensive care units, hematology wards, and other hospital locations. PMID:26837831

  12. Bidet toilet seats with warm-water tanks: residual chlorine, microbial community, and structural analyses.

    PubMed

    Iyo, Toru; Asakura, Keiko; Nakano, Makiko; Yamada, Mutsuko; Omae, Kazuyuki

    2016-02-01

    Despite the reported health-related advantages of the use of warm water in bidets, there are health-related disadvantages associated with the use of these toilet seats, and the bacterial research is sparse. We conducted a survey on the hygienic conditions of 127 warm-water bidet toilet seats in restrooms on a university campus. The spray water from the toilet seats had less residual chlorine than their tap water sources. However, the total viable microbial count was below the water-quality standard for tap water. In addition, the heat of the toilet seats' warm-water tanks caused heterotrophic bacteria in the source tap water to proliferate inside the nozzle pipes and the warm-water tanks. Escherichia coli was detected on the spray nozzles of about 5% of the toilet seats, indicating that the self-cleaning mechanism of the spray nozzles was largely functioning properly. However, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected on about 2% of the toilet seats. P. aeruginosa was found to remain for long durations in biofilms that formed inside warm-water tanks. Infection-prevention measures aimed at P. aeruginosa should receive full consideration when managing warm-water bidet toilet seats in hospitals in order to prevent opportunistic infections in intensive care units, hematology wards, and other hospital locations.

  13. 78 FR 38101 - Passenger Vessels Accessibility Guidelines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... vessels present greater challenges due to space constraints and other considerations. The proposed...; accessible means of escape; doorways and coamings; toilet rooms; wheelchair spaces in assembly areas and.... See 69 FR 69244 and 69245, November 26, 2004. The ANPRM requested comment on whether and how...

  14. Investigation of a reinforcement-based toilet training procedure for children with autism.

    PubMed

    Cicero, Frank R; Pfadt, Al

    2002-01-01

    Independent toileting is an important developmental skill which individuals with developmental disabilities often find a challenge to master. Effective toilet training interventions have been designed which rely on a combination of basic operant principles of positive reinforcement and punishment. In the present study, the effectiveness of a reinforcement-based toilet training intervention was investigated with three children with a diagnosis of autism. Procedures included a combination of positive reinforcement, graduated guidance, scheduled practice trials and forward prompting. Results indicated that all procedures were implemented in response to urination accidents. A three participants reduced urination accidents to zero and learned to spontaneously request use of the bathroom within 7-11 days of training. Gains were maintained over 6-month and 1-year follow-ups. Findings suggest that the proposed procedure is an effective and rapid method of toilet training, which can be implemented within a structured school setting with generalization to the home environment.

  15. Toilet training children with learning difficulties: what the literature tells us.

    PubMed

    Harris, Alison

    Nurses and health visitors are the professional group most likely to be involved in advising and supporting parents of children with disabilities (Bliss and Watson, 1992). Little research has been done into assessing and treating urinary continence difficulties of children with learning difficulties and many questions remain unanswered: what is the extent of the problem; what specific intervention do children with learning difficulties require to attain toileting skills; what expectation can the parent and clinician have that children with learning difficulties can be toilet trained and who is best placed to promote toileting skills? The main findings from the literature will support health and education professionals and carers who are involved in toilet training children with learning difficulties.

  16. Variable-Volume Flushing (V-VF) device for water conservation in toilets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasper, Louis J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Thirty five percent of residential indoor water used is flushed down the toilet. Five out of six flushes are for liquid waste only, which requires only a fraction of the water needed for solid waste. Designers of current low-flush toilets (3.5-gal. flush) and ultra-low-flush toilets (1.5-gal. flush) did not consider the vastly reduced amount of water needed to flush liquid waste versus solid waste. Consequently, these toilets are less practical than desired and can be improved upon for water conservation. This paper describes a variable-volume flushing (V-VF) device that is more reliable than the currently used flushing devices (it will not leak), is simple, more economical, and more water conserving (allowing one to choose the amount of water to use for flushing solid and liquid waste).

  17. Crouching over the toilet seat: prevalence among British gynaecological outpatients and its effect upon micturition.

    PubMed

    Moore, K H; Richmond, D H; Sutherst, J R; Imrie, A H; Hutton, J L

    1991-06-01

    This study investigated whether British women prefer to crouch over public toilet seats, and measured the effect of such a voiding position on urine flow rate and residual urine volume. Of 528 consecutive women who attended a general gynaecological clinic and completed an anonymous questionnaire, 85% usually crouched over the toilet when using a public convenience, 12% applied paper to the seat and 2% sat directly on public toilet seats. When using a friend's bathroom 38% of the women voided by crouching. Results were similar for 155 patients attending a urodynamic clinic, 80 of whom were studied while voiding in both positions. There was a 21% reduction in average urine flow rate and a 149% increase in residual urine volume in the crouching position. Women undergoing urodynamic tests should be asked which voiding position they used before abnormal results are interpreted. Patients with a reduced functional bladder capacity may benefit from being encouraged to sit comfortably on the toilet whenever possible. PMID:1873247

  18. 21 CFR 1250.38 - Toilet and lavatory facilities for use of food-handling employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... directing food-handling employees to wash their hands after each use of toilet facilities shall be posted so as to be readily observable by such employees. Hand washing facilities shall include soap,...

  19. 21 CFR 1250.38 - Toilet and lavatory facilities for use of food-handling employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... directing food-handling employees to wash their hands after each use of toilet facilities shall be posted so as to be readily observable by such employees. Hand washing facilities shall include soap,...

  20. Composting toilets as a sustainable alternative to urban sanitation – A review

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Chirjiv K. Apul, Defne S.

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Composting toilets can be an alternative to flush based sanitation. • Many different composting toilet designs are available. • Composting is affected by moisture content, temperature, carbon to nitrogen ratio. • There are many barriers to composting toilets. • Research is needed in science based design of composting toilets. - Abstract: In today’s flush based urban sanitation systems, toilets are connected to both the centralized water and wastewater infrastructures. This approach is not a sustainable use of our water and energy resources. In addition, in the U.S., there is a shortfall in funding for maintenance and upgrade of the water and wastewater infrastructures. The goal of this paper was to review the current knowledge on composting toilets since this technology is decentralized, requires no water, creates a value product (fertilizer) and can possibly reduce the burden on the current infrastructure as a sustainable sanitation approach. We found a large variety of composting toilet designs and categorized the different types of toilets as being self contained or central; single or multi chamber; waterless or with water/foam flush, electric or non-electric, and no-mix or combined collection. Factors reported as affecting the composting process and their optimum values were identified as; aeration, moisture content (50–60%), temperature (40–65 °C), carbon to nitrogen ratio (25–35), pH (5.5–8.0), and porosity (35–50%). Mass and energy balance models have been created for the composting process. However there is a literature gap in the use of this knowledge in design and operation of composting toilets. To evaluate the stability and safety of compost for use as fertilizer, various methods are available and the temperature–time criterion approach is the most common one used. There are many barriers to the use of composting toilets in urban settings including public acceptance, regulations, and lack of knowledge and

  1. Understanding the prevalence of inpatient falls associated with toileting in adult acute care settings.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study determined the prevalence of inpatient falls that were associated with toileting in a Michigan community hospital. Of all falls, 45.2% were related to toileting. The most common theme was falling on the way from the bed or chair to the bathroom. Nurses should focus on safe patient transfers and on using the completed risk assessment and should develop an individualized prevention plan for each patient based on their needs. PMID:19553863

  2. Differences in toileting habits between children with chronic encopresis, asymptomatic siblings, and asymptomatic nonsiblings.

    PubMed

    Borowitz, S M; Cox, D J; Sutphen, J L

    1999-06-01

    No studies have compared toileting-specific behaviors of encopretic children with those of asymptomatic children and have controlled for environmental factors such as parental attitudes, parenting styles, and bathroom facilities. This study prospectively examined the toileting habits of 86 chronically encopretic children compared with those of 27 asymptomatic siblings and 35 asymptomatic nonsiblings. Although encopretic children experienced significantly more soiling than did controls, the total number of daily bowel movements passed in the toilet (+/-SD) was comparable in the three groups (.92 +/- .76 in encopretic children compared with 1.14 +/- .43 and 1.08 +/- .47 in siblings and nonsiblings, respectively). Encopretic children experienced pain with defecation more often than did controls. During the 14-day study period, encopretic children complained of pain on 2.75 +/- 4.03 days compared with .58 +/- 1.84 days among sibling controls and 2.31 +/- 3.21 days among nonsibling controls. The mean pain score in encopretic children was .76 +/- 1.00 compared with .05 +/- .15 and .26 +/- .38 among siblings and nonsiblings, respectively. All three groups of children sat on the toilet without parental prompting the same number of times each day. In summary, children with chronic encopresis do not seem to avoid toileting, and they exhibit toileting behaviors that are very similar to those of asymptomatic siblings as well as to those of nonsibling controls. PMID:10393070

  3. Impingement Resistance of HVAF WC-Based Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, C.; Liu, M.; Wu, C.; Zhou, K.; Song, J.

    2007-12-01

    High-velocity oxygen/air fuel (HVO/AF) WC-17Co and WC-10Co4Cr coatings exhibit great potential in the replacement of electrolytic hard chrome (EHC) plating, and comprehensive properties of such coatings should be superior to those of electrolytic hard chrome plating. The impingement resistance of HVAF WC-based coatings sprayed on 300M ultrahigh-strength steel was studied in this paper. As an important property index, the fracture toughness of HVAF WC-based coatings was measured using the microindentation method at loads of 9.8, 19.6, 24.5, 29.4, and 49.0 N, respectively. The cracks resulting from stress concentration in the microindentation were analyzed. The impingement resistance for two HVAF WC coatings and EHC was evaluated according to the ASTM D 3170 standard, and steel ball free-fall experiment was performed at the height of 0.61, 1.52, 1.83, 2.36, and 2.59 m, respectively. The cracks caused by both impingements were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM) in comparison with the cracks in microindentation test.

  4. Decision support for workload assessment - Introducing WC FIELDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casper, Patricia A.; Shively, Robert J.; Hart, Sandra G.

    1987-01-01

    Currently there is a great demand for mental workload evaluation in the course of system design and modification. In light of this demand, a microprocessor-based decision support system has been created called WC FIELDE: Workload Consultant for FIELD Evaluation. The system helps the user select workload measures appropriate to his or her application from the large pool of currently available techniques. Both novices and those with some workload experience may benefit from using WC FIELDE, since the system's operation is entirely transparent and all rules involved in the decision process are available for the user to examine. WC FIELDE recommends several assessment methodologies in decreasing order of appropriateness, and provides additional information on each measure at the end of the program in the form of text files.

  5. Detection of WC9 stars in NGC 1365

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Andrew C.; Conti, Peter S.

    1992-01-01

    We report the discovery of a broad emission feature at 5696 A in a giant extragalactic H II region in the barred spiral galaxy NGC 1365, identified with a C III emission line seen in some Wolf-Rayet stars. The absence of comparable C IV emission in 5808 A implies the observed feature is from stars of WC9 subtype. This constitutes the first unequivocal detection of WC9 stars in a giant H II region and the first example of these stars outside our Galaxy. Their presence in the high-abundance environment of NGC 1365 supports the notion that late WC-type progenitors form only in "metal-rich" circumstances.

  6. The Toileting Habit Profile Questionnaire: Screening for Sensory-Based Toileting Difficulties in Young Children with Constipation and Retentive Fecal Incontinence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudry-Bellefeuille, Isabelle; Lane, Shelly J.; Ramos-Polo, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the face and preliminary content validity of the Toileting Habit Profile Questionnaire, a tool designed to screen for sensory-based defecation difficulties in children. A panel of experts reviewed a pilot version of the questionnaire and responded to probe questions. Two reviewers conducted direct content analysis of responses;…

  7. Maternal literacy modifies the effect of toilets and piped water on infant survival in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Esrey, S A; Habicht, J P

    1988-05-01

    The effect of toilets, piped water, and maternal literacy on infant mortality was analyzed using data from the Malaysian Family Life Survey collected in 1976-1977. The effect of toilets and piped water on infant mortality was dependent on whether or not mothers were literate. The impact of having toilets was greater among the illiterate than among the literate, but the impact of piped water was greater among the literate than among the illiterate. The effect on the infant mortality rate for toilets decreased from 130.7 +/- 17.2 deaths in the absence of literate mothers to 76.2 +/- 25.9 deaths in the presence of literate mothers. The reduction in the mortality rate for maternal literacy dropped from 44.4 +/- 14.1 deaths without toilets to -10.1 +/- 23.9 deaths with toilets. Reductions in mortality rates for piped water increased from 16.7 +/- 12.7 deaths without literate mothers to 36.8 +/- 21.0 deaths with literate mothers. Similarly, reductions in the mortality rate for maternal literacy rose from 44.4 +/- 14.1 deaths in the absence of piped water to 64.5 +/- 19.5 deaths in the presence of piped water. The results from a logistic model provided inferences similar to those from ordinary least squares. The authors infer that literate mothers protect their infants especially in unsanitary environments lacking toilets, and that when piped water is introduced, they use it more effectively to practice better hygiene for their infants. PMID:3358408

  8. Composting toilets as a sustainable alternative to urban sanitation--a review.

    PubMed

    Anand, Chirjiv K; Apul, Defne S

    2014-02-01

    In today's flush based urban sanitation systems, toilets are connected to both the centralized water and wastewater infrastructures. This approach is not a sustainable use of our water and energy resources. In addition, in the U.S., there is a shortfall in funding for maintenance and upgrade of the water and wastewater infrastructures. The goal of this paper was to review the current knowledge on composting toilets since this technology is decentralized, requires no water, creates a value product (fertilizer) and can possibly reduce the burden on the current infrastructure as a sustainable sanitation approach. We found a large variety of composting toilet designs and categorized the different types of toilets as being self contained or central; single or multi chamber; waterless or with water/foam flush, electric or non-electric, and no-mix or combined collection. Factors reported as affecting the composting process and their optimum values were identified as; aeration, moisture content (50-60%), temperature (40-65°C), carbon to nitrogen ratio (25-35), pH (5.5-8.0), and porosity (35-50%). Mass and energy balance models have been created for the composting process. However there is a literature gap in the use of this knowledge in design and operation of composting toilets. To evaluate the stability and safety of compost for use as fertilizer, various methods are available and the temperature-time criterion approach is the most common one used. There are many barriers to the use of composting toilets in urban settings including public acceptance, regulations, and lack of knowledge and experience in composting toilet design and operation and program operation.

  9. Maternal literacy modifies the effect of toilets and piped water on infant survival in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Esrey, S A; Habicht, J P

    1988-05-01

    The effect of toilets, piped water, and maternal literacy on infant mortality was analyzed using data from the Malaysian Family Life Survey collected in 1976-1977. The effect of toilets and piped water on infant mortality was dependent on whether or not mothers were literate. The impact of having toilets was greater among the illiterate than among the literate, but the impact of piped water was greater among the literate than among the illiterate. The effect on the infant mortality rate for toilets decreased from 130.7 +/- 17.2 deaths in the absence of literate mothers to 76.2 +/- 25.9 deaths in the presence of literate mothers. The reduction in the mortality rate for maternal literacy dropped from 44.4 +/- 14.1 deaths without toilets to -10.1 +/- 23.9 deaths with toilets. Reductions in mortality rates for piped water increased from 16.7 +/- 12.7 deaths without literate mothers to 36.8 +/- 21.0 deaths with literate mothers. Similarly, reductions in the mortality rate for maternal literacy rose from 44.4 +/- 14.1 deaths in the absence of piped water to 64.5 +/- 19.5 deaths in the presence of piped water. The results from a logistic model provided inferences similar to those from ordinary least squares. The authors infer that literate mothers protect their infants especially in unsanitary environments lacking toilets, and that when piped water is introduced, they use it more effectively to practice better hygiene for their infants.

  10. Effect of WC/Co coherency phase boundaries on Fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline cemented carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hongxian; Song, Xiaoyan; Yin, Fuxing; Zhang, Yongguang

    2016-08-01

    The effect of coherency WC/Co phase boundaries on the fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline WC-Co cemented carbides is studied by MD simulation method. The simulation results show that the nanocrystalline WC-Co cemented carbides with coherency WC/Co phase boundaries has higher fracture toughness than that without coherency WC/Co phase boundaries. Moreover, the mechanism of why coherency WC/Co phase boundaries can improve the fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline cemented carbides is also investigated. It is found the fact that the separation energy of the coherent WC/Co phase boundary is larger than that of the incoherent WC/Co phase boundaries is the main reason for this excellent mechanical property.

  11. Effect of WC/Co coherency phase boundaries on Fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline cemented carbides

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongxian; Song, Xiaoyan; Yin, Fuxing; Zhang, Yongguang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of coherency WC/Co phase boundaries on the fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline WC-Co cemented carbides is studied by MD simulation method. The simulation results show that the nanocrystalline WC-Co cemented carbides with coherency WC/Co phase boundaries has higher fracture toughness than that without coherency WC/Co phase boundaries. Moreover, the mechanism of why coherency WC/Co phase boundaries can improve the fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline cemented carbides is also investigated. It is found the fact that the separation energy of the coherent WC/Co phase boundary is larger than that of the incoherent WC/Co phase boundaries is the main reason for this excellent mechanical property. PMID:27485922

  12. Toilet training in daycare centers in Flanders, Belgium.

    PubMed

    Kaerts, Nore; Van Hal, Guido; Vermandel, Alexandra; Wyndaele, Jean-Jacques

    2012-06-01

    Several changes have occurred in the toilet training (TT) process in recent decades. There has been an increase in the use of daycare as both parents now often work outside the home. Most children attend daycare centers during the period TT usually takes place, and daytime training has shifted from home to daycare. This study is the first to evaluate the way TT is done in daycare centers. A questionnaire was sent to 1,500 daycare centers, of which 429 replied (response rate of 28.6%). The results show that half of the childcare workers base the decision to start TT on readiness signs. The combination of age and readiness signs is used by 44.5%. The majority of the respondents spent more than 1 h per day on TT (81.8%); 79.8% considered that daycare and parents should play an equal role in TT. However, more than a third of the respondents thought that parents pass the responsibility for TT on to daycare and that not enough attention was paid to TT in the home. Most respondents stated that daycare centers had the facilities and means to be able to give the children proper TT (88.5%). Other research indicated that the outcome of TT is not that good overall and that there is room for improvement in the methods used. More research is needed on the role division and on the interaction between daycare and parents and their combined influence on the process and outcome of TT.

  13. Toilet training in daycare centers in Flanders, Belgium.

    PubMed

    Kaerts, Nore; Van Hal, Guido; Vermandel, Alexandra; Wyndaele, Jean-Jacques

    2012-06-01

    Several changes have occurred in the toilet training (TT) process in recent decades. There has been an increase in the use of daycare as both parents now often work outside the home. Most children attend daycare centers during the period TT usually takes place, and daytime training has shifted from home to daycare. This study is the first to evaluate the way TT is done in daycare centers. A questionnaire was sent to 1,500 daycare centers, of which 429 replied (response rate of 28.6%). The results show that half of the childcare workers base the decision to start TT on readiness signs. The combination of age and readiness signs is used by 44.5%. The majority of the respondents spent more than 1 h per day on TT (81.8%); 79.8% considered that daycare and parents should play an equal role in TT. However, more than a third of the respondents thought that parents pass the responsibility for TT on to daycare and that not enough attention was paid to TT in the home. Most respondents stated that daycare centers had the facilities and means to be able to give the children proper TT (88.5%). Other research indicated that the outcome of TT is not that good overall and that there is room for improvement in the methods used. More research is needed on the role division and on the interaction between daycare and parents and their combined influence on the process and outcome of TT. PMID:22207492

  14. Design Factors Affecting the Reaction Time for Identifying Toilet Signs: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Lang; Sie, Cai-Cin

    2016-04-01

    This study focused on the manner in which design factors affect the reaction time for identifying toilet signs. Taiwanese university students and staff members (50 men, 50 women; M age = 23.5 year, SD = 5.7) participated in the study. The 36 toilet signs were modified on three factors (six presenting styles, two figure-ground exchanges, and three colors), and the reaction time data of all participants were collected when the signs were presented in a simulation onscreen. Participants were quickest when reading Chinese text, followed by graphics and English texts. The findings also showed that men and women had different reaction times across various design combinations. These findings can serve as a reference for practically designing toilet signs, since design factors can lead to difficulties with comprehension based on reaction time measurements.

  15. Toileting concerns, parenting stress, and behavior problems in children with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Macias, Michelle M; Roberts, Kathryn M; Saylor, Conway F; Fussell, Jill J

    2006-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between toileting concerns, behavior problems, and parenting stress in parents of children with special health care needs (CSHCN). Participants included parents of 99 males and 71 females aged 4 to 12 years with neural tube defects (NTD), developmental-behavioral disabilities (DBD), or history of perinatal intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH). Parents completed the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF). Parents expressing toileting concerns on the CBCL reported significantly more personal distress and more externalizing problems versus those with continent children. Variation within subsamples suggested that expectations based on nature of disability may be a factor in parent adjustment. Direct assessment and intervention of toileting issues should be a high priority in secondary stress prevention with CSHCN and their families.

  16. Economic and environmental analysis of standard, high efficiency, rainwater flushed, and composting toilets.

    PubMed

    Anand, C; Apul, D S

    2011-03-01

    The current sanitation technology in developed countries is based on diluting human excreta with large volumes of centrally provided potable water. This approach is a poor use of water resources and is also inefficient, expensive, and energy intensive. The goal of this study was to compare the standard sanitation technology (Scenario 1) with alternative technologies that require less or no potable water use in toilets. The alternative technologies considered were high efficiency toilets flushed with potable water (Scenario 2), standard toilets flushed with rainwater (Scenario 3), high efficiency toilets flushed with rainwater (Scenario 4), and composting toilets (Scenario 5). Cost, energy, and carbon implications of these five design scenarios were studied using two existing University of Toledo buildings. The results showed that alternative systems modeled in Scenarios 2, 4, and 5 were viable options both from an investment and an environmental performance perspective. High efficiency fixtures that use potable water (Scenario 2) is often the most preferred method in high efficiency buildings due to reduced water use and associated reductions in annual water and wastewater costs. However, the cost, energy, and CO(2)EE analyses all showed that Scenarios 4 and 5 were preferable over Scenario 2. Cost payback periods of scenarios 2, 4 and 5 were less than 10 years; in the future, increase in water and wastewater services would further decrease the payback periods. The centralized water and wastewater services have high carbon footprints; therefore if carbon footprint reduction is a primary goal of a building complex, alternative technologies that require less potable water and generate less wastewater can largely reduce the carbon footprint. High efficiency fixtures flushed with rainwater (Scenario 4) and composting toilets (Scenario 5) required considerably less energy than direct energy demands of buildings. However, the annual carbon footprint of these technologies

  17. 30 CFR 71.402 - Minimum requirements for bathing facilities, change rooms, and sanitary flush toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Showers shall be provided with both hot and cold water. (ii) At least one shower head shall be provided..., change rooms, and sanitary flush toilet facilities. 71.402 Section 71.402 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY... Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.402 Minimum requirements...

  18. Use of urine alarms in toilet training children with intellectual and developmental disabilities: A review.

    PubMed

    Levato, Lynne E; Aponte, Courtney A; Wilkins, Jonathan; Travis, Rebekah; Aiello, Rachel; Zanibbi, Katherine; Loring, Whitney A; Butter, Eric; Smith, Tristram; Mruzek, Daniel W

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe and evaluate the existing research on the use of urine alarms in the daytime toilet training of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). A systematic literature search yielded 12 studies, many of which were published over a decade ago. The findings suggest that interventions that incorporate the use of urine alarms are promising in the treatment of daytime enuresis for children with IDD; however, more carefully controlled research is needed to confirm these findings and elucidate the precise role urine alarms may play in toileting interventions. Methodological strengths and limitations of the body of research are discussed.

  19. Atomic layer deposition synthesis and evaluation of core–shell Pt-WC electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Irene J.; Chen, Jingguang G. E-mail: bgwillis@engr.uconn.edu; Jiang, Xiaoqiang; Willis, Brian G. E-mail: bgwillis@engr.uconn.edu

    2015-01-15

    Pt-WC core shell particles were produced using atomic layer deposition (ALD) to deposit Pt layers onto WC particle substrates. A range of Pt depositions were used to determine the growth mechanism for the Pt-WC powder system. TEM imaging and Cu stripping voltammetry found that Pt ALD growth on WC powder substrates was similar to that on WC thin films. However, excess free carbon was found to affect Pt ALD by blocking adsorption sites on WC. The Pt-WC samples were evaluated for the oxygen reduction reaction using a rotating disk electrode to obtain quantitative activity information. The mass and specific activities for the 30 and 50 ALD cycle samples were found to be comparable to a 10 wt. % Pt/C catalyst. However, higher overpotentials and lower limiting currents were observed with ALD Pt-WC compared to Pt/C catalysts, indicating that the oxygen reduction mechanism is not as efficient on Pt-WC as on bulk Pt. Additionally, these Pt-WC catalysts were used to demonstrate hydrogen evolution reaction activity and were found to perform as well as bulk Pt catalyst but with a fraction of the Pt loading, in agreement with the previous work on Pt-WC thin film catalysts.

  20. Readiness signs used to define the proper moment to start toilet training: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kaerts, Nore; Van Hal, Guido; Vermandel, Alexandra; Wyndaele, Jean-Jacques

    2012-04-01

    Confusion exists about when to start toilet training, which causes stress and anxiety. Another consequence can be the actual postponement of the toilet training process, which has created extra social problems. Therefore, in this review we will focus on the proper moment to start toilet training, more specific on readiness signs. This will clarify on which topics further research is necessary. We searched databases for publications on toilet training. Next, we gathered information about the normal development of healthy children and at which age skills needed for each readiness sign are acquired. Twenty-one readiness signs were found. Our results show that there is no consensus on which or how many readiness signs to use. Depending on the readiness sign, the moment to start toilet training can vary a lot. More studies are needed to define which readiness signs are most important and how to detect them easily.

  1. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Saves Water With High-Efficiency Toilet and Urinal Program: Best Management Practice Case Study #6 - Toilets and Urinals (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has a longstanding, successful sustainability program that focuses on energy and water efficiency as well as environmental protection. Because MSFC was built in the 1960s, most of the buildings house outdated, inefficient restroom fixtures. The facility engineering team at MSFC developed an innovative efficiency model for replacing these older toilets and urinals.

  2. A Case Study Evaluation of a Transfer-of-Stimulus Control Toilet Training Procedure for a Child with Pervasive Developmental Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luiselli, James K.

    1996-01-01

    This case study describes the use of transfer-of-stimulus prompting procedures to develop toilet skills with a seven-year-old child with pervasive developmental disorder. By first having the child sit on the toilet with her diaper on for two weeks and then taking the diaper off, the child learned to urinate in the toilet. (CR)

  3. WC WAVE - Integrating Diverse Hydrological-Modeling Data and Services Into an Interoperable Geospatial Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudspeth, W. B.; Baros, S.; Barrett, H.; Savickas, J.; Erickson, J.

    2015-12-01

    WC WAVE (Western Consortium for Watershed Analysis, Visualization and Exploration) is a collaborative research project between the states of Idaho, Nevada, and New Mexico that is funded under the National Science Foundation's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR). The goal of the project is to understand and document the effects of climate change on interactions between precipitation, vegetation growth, soil moisture and other landscape properties. These interactions are modeled within a framework we refer to as a virtual watershed (VW), a computer infrastructure that simulates watershed dynamics by linking scientific modeling, visualization, and data management components into a coherent whole. Developed and hosted at the Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico, the virtual watershed has a number of core functions which include: a) streamlined access to data required for model initialization and boundary conditions; b) the development of analytic scenarios through interactive visualization of available data and the storage of model configuration options; c) coupling of hydrological models through the rapid assimilation of model outputs into the data management system for access and use by sequent models. The WC-WAVE virtual watershed accomplishes these functions by provision of large-scale vector and raster data discovery, subsetting, and delivery via Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) and REST web service standards. Central to the virtual watershed is the design and use of an innovative array of metadata elements that permits the stepwise coupling of diverse hydrological models (e.g. ISNOBAL, PRMS, CASiMiR) and input data to rapidly assess variation in outcomes under different climatic conditions. We present details on the architecture and functionality of the virtual watershed, results from three western U.S. watersheds, and discuss the realized benefits to watershed science of employing this integrated solution.

  4. 46 CFR 32.40-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... portion thereof in the crew who do not occupy sleeping accommodations to which private or semi-private facilities are attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms must be located convenient to the sleeping..., except where private or semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the...

  5. 46 CFR 32.40-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... portion thereof in the crew who do not occupy sleeping accommodations to which private or semi-private facilities are attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms must be located convenient to the sleeping..., except where private or semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the...

  6. 46 CFR 32.40-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... portion thereof in the crew who do not occupy sleeping accommodations to which private or semi-private facilities are attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms must be located convenient to the sleeping..., except where private or semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the...

  7. 46 CFR 32.40-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... portion thereof in the crew who do not occupy sleeping accommodations to which private or semi-private facilities are attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms must be located convenient to the sleeping..., except where private or semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the...

  8. 46 CFR 32.40-25 - Washrooms and toilet rooms-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... portion thereof in the crew who do not occupy sleeping accommodations to which private or semi-private facilities are attached. (b) The toilet rooms and washrooms must be located convenient to the sleeping..., except where private or semi-private facilities are provided and washbasins are installed in the...

  9. Training Autistic Children to Urinate in the Toilet Through Operant Conditioning Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ando, Haruhiko

    1977-01-01

    Five profoundly retarded males (6 to 9 years old) with clinical manifestations of autism were used to evaluate the use of operant conditioning techniques to toilet train children in an autism ward of a hospital for developmentally disturbed children. (Author/SBH)

  10. Variables That Predict Success in the Acquisition of Toileting Skills. Report-78-02.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosek, Robert J.

    Ten developmentally delayed children and adolescents participated in a rapid method toilet training program. Ss' success in the program was correlated with 11 variables recorded prior to the inception of the program. Response to simple commmands, assaultiveness, destructiveness and social age were found to correlate positively with toileting…

  11. Systems Analysis in Designing Toilet Training Procedures for Developmentally Disabled Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooking, Emerson D.; Anderson, Dana M.

    The use of systems analysis may help child developmental specialists improve the success rates of toilet training programs with developmentally disabled children. Such a systems analysis includes the sociocultural, family, and/or individual ecosystems of the individual. Two detailed case studies of mentally retarded elementary school age children…

  12. Investigation of a Reinforcement-Based Toilet Training Procedure for Children with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cicero, Frank R.; Pfadt, Al

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a reinforcement-based toilet training intervention with three children with autism. Procedures included positive reinforcement, graduated guidance, scheduled practice trials, and forward prompting. All three children reduced urination accidents to zero and learned to request bathroom use spontaneously…

  13. Are Three Sheets Enough? Using Toilet Paper to Teach Science and Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolverton, Christopher J.; Woolverton, Lyssa N.

    2006-01-01

    Toilet paper (TP) composition and physical characteristics were used to model scientific investigations that combined several "National Science Education Standards." Experiments with TP permitted the integration of TP history, societal change resulting from invention, mathematics (including geometry and statistics), germ theory, and personal…

  14. 30 CFR 71.400 - Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary flush toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.400 Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary flush...

  15. 30 CFR 71.400 - Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary flush toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.400 Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary flush...

  16. 30 CFR 71.400 - Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary flush toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.400 Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary flush...

  17. 30 CFR 71.400 - Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary flush toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.400 Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary flush...

  18. 30 CFR 71.400 - Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary flush toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Bathing Facilities, Change Rooms, and Sanitary Flush Toilet Facilities at Surface Coal Mines § 71.400 Bathing facilities; change rooms; sanitary flush...

  19. 16. 3RD FLOOR, J.M. LEHMANN CO. FIVEROLL TOILET SOAP MILL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. 3RD FLOOR, J.M. LEHMANN CO. FIVE-ROLL TOILET SOAP MILL INSTALLED 1950, TO WEST; BUCKET CONVEYOR AT RIGHT MOVED WASTE FROM 2ND FLOOR SOAP PRESSES TO 5TH FLOOR RE-MANUFACTURE - Colgate & Company Jersey City Plant, Building No. B-14, 54-58 Grand Street, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  20. 21 CFR 1250.38 - Toilet and lavatory facilities for use of food-handling employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Toilet and lavatory facilities for use of food-handling employees. 1250.38 Section 1250.38 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION INTERSTATE...

  1. How Long is my Toilet Roll?--A Simple Exercise in Mathematical Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    The simple question of how much paper is left on my toilet roll is studied from a mathematical modelling perspective. As is typical with applied mathematics, models of increasing complexity are introduced and solved. Solutions produced at each step are compared with the solution from the previous step. This process exposes students to the typical…

  2. Themes and Symbols in Two Plays by LeRoi Jones: "The Baptism" and "The Toilet"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mootry, Maria K.

    1969-01-01

    Shows the dramatization of a dichotomy in attitudes toward the Church among Black people in the play The Baptism", and the dilemma of a young Black man torn between the code of violence of his Black friends and the more socially acceptable ways of his white friends in the play The Toilet". (KG)

  3. Tungsten Carbide Grain Size Computation for WC-Co Dissimilar Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dongran; Cui, Haichao; Xu, Peiquan; Lu, Fenggui

    2016-06-01

    A "two-step" image processing method based on electron backscatter diffraction in scanning electron microscopy was used to compute the tungsten carbide (WC) grain size distribution for tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds and laser welds. Twenty-four images were collected on randomly set fields per sample located at the top, middle, and bottom of a cross-sectional micrograph. Each field contained 500 to 1500 WC grains. The images were recognized through clustering-based image segmentation and WC grain growth recognition. According to the WC grain size computation and experiments, a simple WC-WC interaction model was developed to explain the WC dissolution, grain growth, and aggregation in welded joints. The WC-WC interaction and blunt corners were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The WC grain size distribution and the effects of heat input E on grain size distribution for the laser samples were discussed. The results indicate that (1) the grain size distribution follows a Gaussian distribution. Grain sizes at the top of the weld were larger than those near the middle and weld root because of power attenuation. (2) Significant WC grain growth occurred during welding as observed in the as-welded micrographs. The average grain size was 11.47 μm in the TIG samples, which was much larger than that in base metal 1 (BM1 2.13 μm). The grain size distribution curves for the TIG samples revealed a broad particle size distribution without fine grains. The average grain size (1.59 μm) in laser samples was larger than that in base metal 2 (BM2 1.01 μm). (3) WC-WC interaction exhibited complex plane, edge, and blunt corner characteristics during grain growth. A WC ( { 1 {bar{{1}}}00} ) to WC ( {0 1 1 {bar{{0}}}} ) edge disappeared and became a blunt plane WC ( { 10 1 {bar{{0}}}} ) , several grains with two- or three-sided planes and edges disappeared into a multi-edge, and a WC-WC merged.

  4. Experiments to investigate the effect of water in the cavity on direct containment heating (DCH) in the Surtsey Test Facility: The WC-1 and WC-2 tests

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.; Griffith, R.O.; Nichols, R.T.

    1992-03-01

    The goal of the wet cavity (WC) test series was to investigate the effect of water in a reactor cavity on direct containment heating (DCH). The WC-1 experiment was performed with a dry cavity to obtain baseline data for comparison to the WC-2 experiment. WC-2 was conducted with water 3 cm deep (11.76 kg) in a 1:10 linear scale model of the Zion reactor cavity. The initial conditions for the experiments were similar. For both experiments the molten core debris was simulated by a thermitically generated melt formed from 50 kg of iron oxide/aluminum/chromium powders. After the charge was ignited, the debris was melted by the chemical reaction and was forcibly ejected through a nominal 3.5 cm hole into the scaled reactor cavity by superheated steam at an initial driving pressure of 4.58 MPa. The peak pressure increase in the containment due to the high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) was 0.272 MPa in WC-1 and 0.286 MPa in WC-2. The total amount of hydrogen generated in the experiments was 145 moles of H{sub 2} in WC-1 and 179 moles of H{sub 2} in WC-2. The total mass of debris ejected into the containment was identical for both experiments. These results suggest that water in the cavity slightly enhanced DCH.

  5. Influence of Nickel-Coated Nanostructured WC-Co Powders on Microstructural and Tribological Properties of HVOF Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, M.; Enayati, M. H.; Salehi, M.; Nahvi, S. M.; Hosseini, S. N.; Park, C. G.

    2014-12-01

    In this research, a novel nickel-coated nanostructured WC-12Co powder (Ni/nc-WC) was developed and used as feedstock material for high velocity oxygen fuel process. The Ni/nc-WC powders with average WC grain size of ~15 nm were produced by mechanical milling and electroless plating processes. The microstructural and tribological characteristics of Ni/nc-WC coating were investigated and compared with those of microcrystalline WC-12Co (mc-WC) and nanostructured WC-12Co (nc-WC) coatings. X-ray diffractometry, high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were used to evaluate the microstructure of the powders and coatings. A ball-on-disk technique was used to probe the wear behavior of the coatings. The Ni/nc-WC coating showed negligible decarburization of ~5.4%, while mc-WC and nc-WC coatings suffered from higher decarburization levels of 16.3 and 36.8%. The wear rate of Ni/nc-WC coating was 2.5 × 10-4 mg/m indicating ~ 75 and 82% increase in wear resistance compared with mc-WC and nc-WC coatings. The wear track analysis of mc-WC and nc-WC coatings showed evidences of delamination mechanism. Besides, a severe carbide pullout mechanism was operative in wear of nc-WC coating. As for Ni/nc-WC coating, individual carbide pullout following the elimination of Ni(Co) matrix was the predominant wear mechanism.

  6. A novel Ni-WC/AC catalyst with enhanced electroactivity for glucose oxidation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Suitao; Yue, Jiaqi; Hao, Chen; Li, Yingying; Yi, Chunhai; Yang, Bolun

    2015-03-01

    WC-doped Ni over an active carbon catalyst (Ni-WC/AC), prepared by incipient wetness impregnation, is proposed as an anode for the amplified electrochemical oxidation of glucose in 0.1 M KOH solution. Cyclic voltammetry and morphology characterizations were used to explore these electrocatalysts. It was found that Ni-WC/AC catalysts were nanoparticles with a diameter of 10 nm and the 20%wtNi-20%wtWC/AC catalyst showed superior electrocatalytic activity toward glucose oxidation. The extraordinary activity obtained at the 20%wtNi-20%wtWC/AC modified glass carbon electrode (GCE) is attributed to the synergistic effect between Ni and WC toward glucose electroxidation. PMID:25656011

  7. Cr-rich layer at the WC/Co interface in Cr-doped WC Co cermets: segregation or metastable carbide?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delanoë, A.; Bacia, M.; Pauty, E.; Lay, S.; Allibert, C. H.

    2004-09-01

    The effect of Cr on the microstructure of WC-Co alloys after liquid-phase sintering is studied as a function of the C content of the alloy and for two Cr for Co substitution ratio. The distribution of Cr is investigated using X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry. A Cr enrichment at WC/Co interfaces is detected for both C- and W-rich alloys. The observations by high-resolution electron microscopy point out a thin face centred cubic layer at the interface between WC and Co. This layer has grown epitaxially on the surface of the WC grains with two orientation relationships depending on the WC plane. The lattice parameter mismatch is close to 0.2% for the basal plane and less than 3% for the prismatic plane of WC. The composition and crystal structure of this compound correspond to the metastable (Cr,W)C phase that is stabilized by the low energy of the WC/(Cr,W)C interface.

  8. The anisotropic work-hardening of WC crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Luyckx, S.B.; Nabarro, F.R.N.; Wai, S.W.; James, M.N. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper reports that it has been found that indented (1010) surfaces of WC crystals exhibit piled-up material next to the indentations while (0001) surfaces exhibit sunk-in material. Since in some metals sunk-in material around indenters indicates a higher work-hardening capacity than piled-up material, slip line and etch pit patterns around indentations were analyzed, in order to deduce the dislocation reactions occurring in each case. It was found that 1/6(1210) sessile dislocations can be produced only when indenting (0001) surfaces, which is consistent with a higher work-hardening capacity of (0001) surfaces.

  9. Proposal for a zero-gravity toilet facility for the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleri, Edgar L., Jr.; Galliano, Paul A.; Harrison, Mark E.; Johnson, William B.; Meyer, Gregory J.

    1989-01-01

    This proposed toilet facility has a straightforward design. It has few moving parts and is easily maintained. Air and water flow provide sanitary movement of the waste. The toilet's chambers are coated with Teflon which, along with the water flow, makes it self-cleaning. An added disinfectant called Betadiene kills any bacteria that may form on the chamber walls. The chair is contoured to take into account the neutral body position and the necessary strain position for defecation. Restraints at the ankles, knees, and midsection hold the body in the chair. The waste is stored in discs of Gortex material which are inside a replaceable storage chamber. This chamber can be removed, capped and stored until eventual return to earth.

  10. Training autistic children to urinate in the toilet through operant conditioning techniques.

    PubMed

    Ando, H

    1977-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of operant conditioning techniques to toilet train children in an autism ward of a hospital for developmentally disturbed children. Five profoundly retarded males with clear clinical manifestations of autism were selected as subjects. Records of the urination behavior of these subjects were kept during a baseline period and throughout the application of procedures. Appropriate urination behavior was immediately followed by positive reinforcers, such as candy, verbal praise, and physical affection. Inappropriate urination behavior was immediately followed by negative reinforces, verbal as well as physical. The results of this study show that operant conditioning techniques can be used to change the urination behavior of profoundly retarded autistic children even where other methods have failed. Factors requiring further investigation for their possible impact on the effectiveness of these procedures in toilet training autistic children are also discussed.

  11. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Saves Water With High-Efficiency Toilet and Urinal Program

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-22

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has a longstanding, successful sustainability program that focuses on energy and water efficiency as well as environmental protection. Because MSFC was built in the 1960s, most of the buildings house outdated, inefficient restroom fixtures. The facility engineering team at MSFC developed an innovative efficiency model for replacing these older toilets and urinals.

  12. Friction and wear properties of high-velocity oxygen fuel sprayed WC-17Co coating under rotational fretting conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jun; Cai, Zhenbing; Mo, Jiliang; Peng, Jinfang; Zhu, Minhao

    2016-05-01

    Rotational fretting which exist in many engineering applications has incurred enormous economic loss. Thus, accessible methods are urgently needed to alleviate or eliminate damage by rotational fretting. Surface engineering is an effective approach that is successfully adopted to enhance the ability of components to resist the fretting damage. In this paper, using a high-velocity oxygen fuel sprayed (HVOF) technique WC-17Co coating is deposited on an LZ50 steel surface to study its properties through Vickers hardness testing, scanning electric microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffractrometry (XRD). Rotational fretting wear tests are conducted under normal load varied from 10 N to 50 N, and angular displacement amplitudes vary from 0.125° to 1°. Wear scars are examined using SEM, EDX, optical microscopy (OM), and surface topography. The experimental results reveal that the WC-17Co coating adjusted the boundary between the partial slip regime (PSR) and the slip regime (SR) to the direction of smaller amplitude displacement. As a result, the coefficients of friction are consistently lower than the substrate's coefficients of friction both in the PSR and SR. The damage to the coating in the PSR is very slight. In the SR, the coating exhibits higher debris removal efficiency and load-carrying capacity. The bulge is not found for the coating due to the coating's higher hardness to restrain plastic flow. This research could provide experimental bases for promoting industrial application of WC-17Co coating in prevention of rotational fretting wear.

  13. Binary WC- and Cr3C2-containing hardmetal compositions for thermally sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, L.-M.

    2016-03-01

    Compositions of thermally sprayed hardmetal coatings for wear protection are based on the hard materials WC and Cr3C2 with Co and Ni as the most important binders, which are often alloyed with Cr. There are a few commercial compositions containing WC and Cr3C2 together, which have a high potential for the improvement of coating properties, in particular for service in corrosive environments and high temperature applications. However, the combined application of WC and Cr3C2 in the coating compositions leads to very complex reactions between these components both during feedstock powder preparation and the spray process. This contribution summarizes the knowledge about the interactions of WC and Cr3C2 for the most important commercially available compositions: WC-10Co-4Cr, WC-20‘CrC’-7Ni, 45Cr3C2- 37WC-18NiCo. These three compositions show remarkable differences of the interaction between WC and Cr3C2 and the coating properties.

  14. Adhesion at WC/diamond interfaces - A theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, Haricharan; Rao, M. S. Ramachandra; Nanda, B. R. K.

    2015-06-24

    We investigate the adhesion at the interface of face-centered tungsten-carbide (001) and diamond (001) from density-functional calculations. Four high-symmetry model interfaces, representing different lattice orientations for either side of the interface, are constructed to incorporate different degrees of strain arising due to lattice mismatch. The adhesion, estimated from the ideal work of separation, is found to be in the range of 4 - 7 J m{sup −2} and is comparable to that of metal-carbide interfaces. Maximum adhesion occurs when WC and diamond slabs have the same orientation, even though such a growth induces large epitaxial strain at the interface. From electronic structure calculations, we attribute the adhesion to covalent interaction between carbon p-orbitals as well as partial ionic interaction between the tungsten d- and carbon p-orbitals across the interface.

  15. Microstructure and Abrasive Wear Performance of Ni-Wc Composite Microwave Clad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Amit; Zafar, Sunny; Sharma, Apurbba Kumar

    2015-10-01

    In the present work, Ni-WC powder was deposited on mild steel substrate to develop clads through microwave hybrid heating technique. The cladding trials were carried out in an industrial microwave applicator at 1.1 kW for 540 s. The Ni-WC composite clads were characterized for microstructure and abrasive wear performance through combination of x-ray diffraction, electron and optical microscopy, microhardness, and wear tests. Phase analysis of the Ni-WC clad indicated the presence of stable carbides such as WC, W2C, Ni2W4C, and Fe6W6C. The microstructure study of the clad layer revealed the presence of a uniformly distributed interlocked WC-based reinforcement embedded in the Ni-based matrix. The average Vicker's microhardness in the clad layer was observed to be 1028 ± 90 HV, which was approximately three times the microhardness of the substrate. Abrasive wear resistance of the microwave clads was superior to the MS substrate. Abrasion was the main wear mechanism in the Ni-WC clads and the substrate samples. However, the presence of WC-based reinforcement in the composite clads reduced microcutting, resulting in enhanced wear resistance.

  16. Effects of WC size and amount on the thermal residual stress in WC–Ni composites

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, K.; Krawitz, A. D.; Richardson, J. W.; Weisbrook, C. M.

    2005-05-01

    We studied the effects of WC particle size and volume fraction on the magnitude and distribution of thermal residual stresses (TRS) in WC–Ni cemented carbide composites by neutron powder diffraction. Samples of high (0.3) and low (0.1) Ni volume fraction and coarse (1.7 m) and fine (0.5 m) WC particle size were employed. Thermal residual strain and stress values were obtained at temperatures between 100 and 900 K. Moreover, the magnitude of the mean (compressive) WC stress increased as WC fraction decreased, while the mean (tensile) Ni stress did the opposite. For both phases, stresses were highest for fine WC particles, reaching over 3 GPa in Ni. Elastic strain distributions, due to the sharp edges and corners of WC particles, were characterized by analyzing diffraction peak widths. The range of stress increased with the magnitude of the TRS. Even though the mean TRS is compressive in WC, regions of tension exist, and, for Ni, regions of compression are present.

  17. Spectroscopic studies of Wolf-Rayet stars. III - The WC subclass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, A. V.; Conti, P. S.; Massey, P.

    1986-01-01

    Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars, which are the descendants of massive O-type stars, can be subdivided into three groups depending on their spectral appearance. These groups include the nitrogen class (WN), the carbon class (WC), and the oxygen class (WO). The present paper is concerned with the WC stars. The assignment of WC subtypes has been based on visual inspections of photographic plates. One of the aims of this study is related to the quantification of the visual estimates. The measured ratios of equivalent widths and the FWHM of the 4650 A line for Galactic and LMC stars are presented, and the reclassification of some stars is proposed on this basis. In particular, it is shown that the majority of the LMC WC stars should logically be classified WC4 instead of WC5. Comments on individual stars are provided, and terminal velocities are discussed. It is attempted to give a complete overview of the most important spectroscopic features of the WC stars in the optical region.

  18. A child death as a result of physical violence during toilet training.

    PubMed

    Alpaslan, Ahmet Hamdi; Coşkun, Kerem Şenol; Yeşil, Arda; Cobanoğlu, Cansu

    2014-11-01

    Enuresis and delayed bladder control are a common source of psychosocial concern for both parents and children. Different cultures have different norms with regard to parenting attitudes. The fact that in Turkey, parents consider enuresis or encopresis as a sign of laziness, misbehavior, or disobedience rather than a medical disorder may cause children to be exposed to physical and emotional violence and maltreatment by the family as a corrective strategy. We present a case in this paper which had a fatal outcome due to physical violence against a child as an educational measure and a toilet training method.

  19. Development and kinetic analysis of cobalt gradient formation in WC-Co composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jun

    2011-12-01

    Functionally graded cemented tungsten carbide (FG WC-Co) is one of the main research directions in the field of WC-Co over decades. Although it has long been recognized that FG WC-Co could outperform conventional homogeneous WC-Co owing to its potentially superior combinations of mechanical properties, until recently there has been a lack of effective and economical methods to make such materials. The lack of the technology has prevented the manufacturing and industrial applications of FG WC-Co from becoming a reality. This dissertation is a comprehensive study of an innovative atmosphere heat treatment process for producing FG WC-Co with a surface cobalt compositional gradient. The process exploited a triple phase field in W-C-Co phase diagram among three phases (solid WC, solid Co, and liquid Co) and the dependence of the migration of liquid Co on temperature and carbon content. WC-Co with a graded surface cobalt composition can be achieved by controlling the diffusion of carbon transported from atmosphere during sintering or during postsintering heat treatment. The feasibility of the process was validated by the successful preparations of FG WC-Co via both carburization and decarburization process following conventional liquid phase sintering. A study of the carburization process was undertaken to further understand and quantitatively modeled this process. The effects of key processing parameters (including heat treating temperature, atmosphere, and time) and key materials variables (involving Co content, WC grain size, and addition of grain growth inhibitors) on the formation of Co gradients were examined. Moreover, a carbon-diffusion controlled kinetic model was developed for simulating the formation of the gradient during the process. The parameters involved in this model were determined by thermodynamic calculations and regression-fit of simulation results with experimental data. In summary, this research first demonstrated the principle of the approach

  20. The endocytosis and signaling of the γδ T cell coreceptor WC1 are regulated by a dileucine motif.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Haoting; Baldwin, Cynthia L; Telfer, Janice C

    2015-03-01

    WC1 proteins, which are specifically expressed by bovine γδ T cells from a gene array containing 13 members, are part of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich family. WC1 cytoplasmic domains contains multiple tyrosines, one of which is required to be phosphorylated for TCR coreceptor activity, and a dileucine endocytosis motif. Like the TCR coreceptor CD4, WC1 is endocytosed in response to PMA. Because WC1 endocytosis may play a role in the activation of γδ T cells, we examined WC1 endocytosis in the adherent cell 293T and Jurkat T cell lines using a fusion protein of extracellular CD4 and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain of WC1. Individual mutation of the two leucine residues of the endocytic dileucine motif in the WC1 cytoplasmic domain significantly reduced PMA-induced endocytosis in both cell types and enhanced IL-2 production stimulated by cocross-linking of CD3/TCR and CD4/WC1 in Jurkat cells, suggesting that the sustained membrane coligation of CD3/TCR with WC1 caused by a decrease in endocytosis increases T cell activation. Mutation of two serines upstream of the endocytic dileucine motif affected endocytosis only in adherent 293T cells. Although the two upstream serines were not required for WC1 endocytosis in Jurkat cells, the pan-protein kinase C inhibitor Gö6983 blocked endocytosis of CD4/WC1, and mutation of the upstream serines in WC1 inhibited IL-2 production stimulated by cocross-linking of CD3/TCR and CD4/WC1. These studies provide insights into the signaling of WC1 gene arrays that are present in most mammals and play critical roles in γδ T cell responses to bacterial pathogens.

  1. Experimental results of tests to investigate the effects of hole diameter resulting from bottom head failure on Direct Containment Heating (DCH) in the Surtsey Test Facility. The WC-1 and WC-3 Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.; Griffith, R.O.; Nichols, R.T.

    1992-03-01

    The WC-1 and WC-3 experiments were conducted using a dry, 1:10 linear scale model of the Zion reactor cavity to obtain baseline data for comparison to future experiments that will have water in the cavity. WC-1 and WC-3 were performed with similar initial conditions except for the exit hole between the melt generator and the scaled model of the reactor cavity. For both experiments the molten core debris was simulated by a thermitically generated melt formed from 50 kg of iron oxide/aluminum/chromium powders. After the thermite was ignited in WC-1, the melt was forcibly ejected by 374 moles of slightly superheated steam at an initial driving pressure of 4.6 MPa through an exit hole with an actual diameter of 4.14 cm into the scaled model of the reactor cavity. In WC-3, the molten thermite was ejected by 300 moles of slightly superheated steam at an initial driving pressure of 3.8 MPa through an exit hole with an actual diameter of 10.1 cm into the scaled model of the reactor cavity. Because of the larger exit hole diameter, WC-3 had a shorter blowdown time than WC-1, 0.8`s compared to 3.0`s. WC-3 also had a higher debris velocity than WC-1, 54 m/s compared to 17.5 m/s. Posttest sieve analysis of debris recovered from the Surtsey vessel gave identical results in WC-1 and WC-3 for the sieve mass median particle diameter, i.e. 1.45 mm. The total mass ejected into the Surtsey vessel in WC-3 was 45.0 kg compared to 47.9 kg in WC-1. The peak pressure increase in Surtsey due to the high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) was 0.275 MPa in WC-3 and 0.272 in WC-1. Steam/metal reactions produced 181 moles of of hydrogen in WC-3 and 145 moles of hydrogen in WC-1.

  2. Effects of Functional Communication Training (FCT) on the Communicative, Self-Initiated Toileting Behavior for Students with Developmental Disabilities in a School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jinnie

    2012-01-01

    Far less is known about the effects of functional communication-based toileting interventions for students with developmental disabilities in a school setting. Furthermore, the currently available toileting interventions for students with disabilities include some undesirable procedures such as the use of punishment, unnatural clinic/university…

  3. Performance evaluation of biofil toilet waste digester technologies in Ghana: the efficacy of effluent treatment options.

    PubMed

    Amoah, Philip; Gbenatey Nartey, Eric; Schrecongost, Alyse

    2016-12-01

    The study was carried out to assess the efficacy of a standard Biofil toilet digester with regard to its effluent quality and to evaluate the performance of new effluent polishing options being developed by BiofilCom. Influent and effluent were collected from 18 standard Biofil digesters connected to full-flush toilets. Effluent from five pilot installations with improved effluent polishing options were also taken for analyses. Ten other Biofil installations were selected to assess the impact of digester effluent discharge on the surrounding soil. Pollutant concentrations in the Biofil effluent exceeded both Ghana EPA and WHO standards for discharge though pollutant removal efficiencies were high: 84% for biochemical oxygen demand, 86.1% for chemical oxygen demand and 82.4% for total suspended solids. Escherichia coli and total coliform levels were significantly reduced by 63% and 95.6%, respectively, and nutrients were the least removed from effluents. Generally, effluents from the majority of the pilot polishing options met most of the discharge standards. E. coli were present in the soil at all study sites, except one. Biofil digester effluent is discharged subsurface but comparing their effluent quality with standards for discharge into water courses is relevant especially in areas of frequent flooding and high water tables.

  4. Isolation and characterization of an early colonizing Rhizobium sp. R8 from a household toilet bowl.

    PubMed

    Fukano, Toru; Gomi, Mitsuhiro; Osaki, Yukihiko; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial community structure was compared between the third days', one week', and three weeks' biofilm samples from the surface of a household toilet bowl. It was found that the PCR-DGGE band pattern of 16S rRNA gene was dramatically changed after the third day and was not further changed until three weeks. This result suggests that there are early and late colonizing bacterial groups. One of the early colonizers isolated from the third days' sample was Rhizobium sp. R8, a closest relative to Rhizobium giardinii, which exhibited the highest biofilm formation activity in an artificial urine condition. R8 produced extracellular polysaccharides containing galactose, glucose, and mannose at the molar ratio of 8:1:1, which were probably responsible for the biofilm formation. Its excelled biofilm formation and urease activities together with the lack of nodulation and nitrogen fixing genes in R8 suggest that this strain has been specifically adapted to urine condition in a toilet bowl. PMID:25707633

  5. Potential fresh water saving using greywater in toilet flushing in Syria.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Khaldoon A; Berndtsson, Justyna C; Berndtsson, Ronny

    2011-10-01

    Greywater reuse is becoming an increasingly important factor for potable water saving in many countries. Syria is one of the most water scarce countries in the Middle East. However, greywater reuse is still not common in the country. Regulations and standards for greywater reuse are not available. Recently, however, several stakeholders have started to plan for greywater reuse. The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential for potable water saving by using greywater for toilet flushing in a typical Syrian city. The Sweida city in the southern part of Syria was chosen for this purpose. Interviews were made in order to reflect the social acceptance, water consumption, and the percentage of different indoor water uses. An artificial wetland (AW) and a commercial bio filter (CBF) were proposed to treat the greywater, and an economic analysis was performed for the treatment system. Results show that using treated greywater for toilet flushing would save about 35% of the drinking water. The economic analyses of the two proposed systems showed that, in the current water tariff, the payback period for AW and CBF in block systems is 7 and 52 years, respectively. However, this period will reduce to 3 and 21 years, respectively, if full water costs are paid by beneficiaries. Hence, introducing artificial wetlands in order to make greywater use efficient appears to be a viable alternative to save potable water.

  6. Compartment A123 crews WC (head) looking aft; to forward; note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Compartment A-123 crews WC (head) looking aft; to forward; note wire lockers for transient stowage of clothing while showering. (026) - USS Olympia, Penn's Landing, 211 South Columbus Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  7. A Study on the Abrasive Resistance of Ni Based Laser Coatings with WC Hard Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iždinská, Zita; Brusilová, Alena; Iždinský, Karol

    2011-12-01

    Wear properties of composite laser cladding on the basis of Ni with a 50% presence of WC particles on the dependence of laser beam power output and speed of cladding were investigated in this paper. Properties are compared with reference Ni based laser claddings without WC particles. Laser beam power output of 4.3 and 3.7 kW and cladding speed of 3, 5 and 7 mm/s were used for the preparation of test pieces. All types of prepared claddings were compact without visible internal defects. With increased cladding speed, the hardness of Ni matrix decreased. Wear resistance of Ni based laser claddings with WC particles were dependent on the speed of laser cladding. The presence of WC particles increased the wear resistance of Ni based laser claddings 5 fold.

  8. Long-Term Stability of WC-C Peritectic Fixed Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlevnoy, B. B.; Grigoryeva, I. A.

    2015-03-01

    The tungsten carbide-carbon peritectic (WC-C) melting transition is an attractive high-temperature fixed point with a temperature of . Earlier investigations showed high repeatability, small melting range, low sensitivity to impurities, and robustness of WC-C that makes it a prospective candidate for the highest fixed point of the temperature scale. This paper presents further study of the fixed point, namely the investigation of the long-term stability of the WC-C melting temperature. For this purpose, a new WC-C cell of the blackbody type was built using tungsten powder of 99.999 % purity. The stability of the cell was investigated during the cell aging for 50 h at the cell working temperature that tooks 140 melting/freezing cycles. The method of investigation was based on the comparison of the WC-C tested cell with a reference Re-C fixed-point cell that reduces an influence of the probable instability of a radiation thermometer. It was shown that after the aging period, the deviation of the WC-C cell melting temperature was with an uncertainty of.

  9. Characterizations of WC-10Co nanocomposite powders and subsequently sinterhip sintered cemented carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, X.L. . E-mail: sxl071932@126.com; Shao, G.Q.; Duan, X.L.; Xiong, Z.; Yang, H.

    2006-12-15

    Ultrafine WC-Co cemented carbides, combining high hardness and high toughness, are expected to find broad applications. In this study, WC-10Co-0.4VC-0.4Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} (wt.%) nanocomposite powders, whose average grain size was about 30 nm, were fabricated by spray pyrolysis-continuous reduction and carbonization technology. The as-prepared nanocomposite powders were characterized and analyzed by chemical methods, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), BET analysis and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Furthermore, 'sinterhip' was used in the sintering process, by which ultrafine WC-10Co cemented carbides with an average grain size of 240 nm were prepared. The material exhibited high Rockwell A hardness of HRA 92.8, Vickers hardness HV{sub 1} 1918, and transverse rapture strength (TRS) of 3780 MPa. The homogeneously dispersed grain growth inhibitors such as VC, Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} in nanocomposite powder and the special nonmetal-metal nanocomposite structure of WC-10Co nanocomposite powder played very important roles in obtaining ultrafine WC-10Co cemented carbide with the desired properties and microstructure. There was an abundance of triple junctions in the ultrafine WC-10Co cemented carbide; these triple junctions endowed the sintered specimen with high mechanical properties.

  10. Obtaining Crack-free WC-Co Alloys by Selective Laser Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmyrov, R. S.; Safronov, V. A.; Gusarov, A. V.

    Standard hardmetals of WC-Co system are brittle and often crack at selective laser melting (SLM). The objective of this study is to estimate the range of WC/Co ratio where cracking can be avoided. Micron-sized Co powder was mixed with WC nanopowder in a ball mill to obtain uniform distribution of WC over the surface of Co particles. Continuous layers of remelted material on the surface of a hardmetal plate were obtained from this composite powder by SLM at 1.07μm wavelength. The layers have satisfactory porosity and are well bound to the substrate. The chemical composition of the layers matches the composition of the initial powder mixtures. The powder mixture with 25wt.%WC can be used for SLM to obtain materials without cracks. The powder mixture with 50wt.%WC cracks because of formation of brittle W3Co3C phase. Cracking can considerably reduce the mechanical strength, so that the use of this composition is not advised.

  11. Microstructure characteristics of Ni/WC composite cladding coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gui-rong; Huang, Chao-peng; Song, Wen-ming; Li, Jian; Lu, Jin-jun; Ma, Ying; Hao, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    A multilayer tungsten carbide particle (WCp)-reinforced Ni-based alloy coating was fabricated on a steel substrate using vacuum cladding technology. The morphology, microstructure, and formation mechanism of the coating were studied and discussed in different zones. The microstructure morphology and phase composition were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In the results, the coating presents a dense and homogeneous microstructure with few pores and is free from cracks. The whole coating shows a multilayer structure, including composite, transition, fusion, and diffusion-affected layers. Metallurgical bonding was achieved between the coating and substrate because of the formation of the fusion and diffusion-affected layers. The Ni-based alloy is mainly composed of γ-Ni solid solution with finely dispersed Cr7C3/Cr23C6, CrB, and Ni+Ni3Si. WC particles in the composite layer distribute evenly in areas among initial Ni-based alloying particles, forming a special three-dimensional reticular microstructure. The macrohardness of the coating is HRC 55, which is remarkably improved compared to that of the substrate. The microhardness increases gradually from the substrate to the composite zone, whereas the microhardness remains almost unchanged in the transition and composite zones.

  12. Parents as Teachers: Teaching Parents How to Teach Toilet Skills to Their Children with Autism and Mental Retardation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozcan, Nihal; Cavkaytar, Atilla

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a parent training program for teaching toilet skills to children with autism and mental retardation. The study was conducted with three mothers and their children. A multiple probe design using probe sessions across subjects was used. The experimental procedure consisted of two…

  13. 30 CFR 75.1712-3 - Minimum requirements of surface bathing facilities, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minimum requirements of surface bathing... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712-3 Minimum requirements of surface bathing facilities, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities. (a) All bathing facilities, change rooms,...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1712-3 - Minimum requirements of surface bathing facilities, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Minimum requirements of surface bathing... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1712-3 Minimum requirements of surface bathing facilities, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities. (a) All bathing facilities, change rooms,...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1712-3 - Minimum requirements of surface bathing facilities, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minimum requirements of surface bathing facilities, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities. 75.1712-3 Section 75.1712-3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1712-3 - Minimum requirements of surface bathing facilities, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minimum requirements of surface bathing facilities, change rooms, and sanitary toilet facilities. 75.1712-3 Section 75.1712-3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous...

  17. Performance of UV disinfection and the microbial quality of greywater effluent along a reuse system for toilet flushing.

    PubMed

    Friedler, Eran; Gilboa, Yael

    2010-04-01

    This paper examines the microbial quality of treated RBC (Rotating Biological Contactor) and MBR (Membrane Bioreactor) light greywater along a continuous pilot-scale reuse system for toilet flushing, quantifies the efficiency of UV disinfection unit, and evaluates the regrowth potential of selected microorganisms along the system. The UV disinfection unit was found to be very efficient in reducing faecal coliforms and Staphylococcus aureus. On the other hand, its efficiency of inactivation of HPC (Heterotrophic Plate Count) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was lower. Some regrowth occurred in the reuse system as a result of HPC regrowth which included opportunistic pathogens such as P. aeruginosa. Although the membrane (UF) of the MBR system removed all bacteria from the greywater, bacteria were observed in the reuse system due to "hopping phenomenon." The microbial quality of the disinfected greywater was found to be equal or even better than the microbial quality of "clean" water in toilet bowls flushed with potable water (and used for excretion). Thus, the added health risk associated with reusing the UV-disinfected greywater for toilet flushing (regarding P. aeruginosa and S. aureus), was found to be insignificant. The UV disinfection unit totally removed (100%) the viral indicator (F-RNA phage, host: E. coli F(amp)(+)) injected to the treatment systems simulating transient viral contamination. To conclude, this work contributes to better design of UV disinfection reactors and provides an insight into the long-term behavior of selected microorganisms along on-site greywater reuse systems for toilet flushing.

  18. Biofilm-forming activity of bacteria isolated from toilet bowl biofilms and the bactericidal activity of disinfectants against the isolates.

    PubMed

    Mori, Miho; Gomi, Mitsuhiro; Matsumune, Norihiko; Niizeki, Kazuma; Sakagami, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the sanitary conditions of toilets, the bacterial counts of the toilet bowl biofilms in 5 Kansai area and 11 Kansai and Kanto area homes in Japan were measured in winter and summer seasons, respectively. Isolates (128 strains) were identified by analyzing 16S ribosomal RNA sequences. The number of colonies and bacterial species from biofilms sampled in winter tended to be higher and lower, respectively, than those in summer. Moreover, the composition of bacterial communities in summer and winter samples differed considerably. In summer samples, biofilms in Kansai and Kanto areas were dominated by Blastomonas sp. and Mycobacterium sp., respectively. Methylobacterium sp. was detected in all toilet bowl biofilms except for one sample. Methylobacterium sp. constituted the major presence in biofilms along with Brevundimonas sp., Sphingomonas sp., and/or Pseudomonas sp. The composition ratio of the sum of their genera was 88.0 from 42.9% of the total bacterial flora. The biofilm formation abilities of 128 isolates were investigated, and results suggested that Methylobacterium sp. and Sphingomonas sp. were involved in biofilm formation in toilet bowls. The biofilm formation of a mixed bacteria system that included bacteria with the highest biofilm-forming ability in a winter sample was greater than mixture without such bacteria. This result suggests that isolates possessing a high biofilm-forming activity are involved in the biofilm formation in the actual toilet bowl. A bactericidal test against 25 strains indicated that the bactericidal activities of didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) tended to be higher than those of polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) and N-benzyl-N,N-dimethyldodecylammonium chloride (ADBAC). In particular, DDAC showed high bactericidal activity against approximately 90% of tested strains under the 5 h treatment.

  19. Exploring the potential role of tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) nanoparticle internalization in observed toxicity toward lung epithelial cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Armstead, Andrea L.; Arena, Christopher B.; Li, Bingyun

    2014-07-01

    Tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) has been recognized as a workplace inhalation hazard in the manufacturing, mining and drilling industries by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health. Exposure to WC-Co is known to cause “hard metal lung disease” but the relationship between exposure, toxicity and development of disease remain poorly understood. To better understand this relationship, the present study examined the role of WC-Co particle size and internalization on toxicity using lung epithelial cells. We demonstrated that nano- and micro-WC-Co particles exerted toxicity in a dose- and time-dependent manner and that nano-WC-Co particles caused significantly greater toxicity at lower concentrations and shorter exposure times compared to micro-WC-Co particles. WC-Co particles in the nano-size range (not micron-sized) were internalized by lung epithelial cells, which suggested that internalization may play a key role in the enhanced toxicity of nano-WC-Co particles over micro-WC-Co particles. Further exploration of the internalization process indicated that there may be multiple mechanisms involved in WC-Co internalization such as actin and microtubule based cytoskeletal rearrangements. These findings support our hypothesis that WC-Co particle internalization contributes to cellular toxicity and suggest that therapeutic treatments inhibiting particle internalization may serve as prophylactic approaches for those at risk of WC-Co particle exposure. - Highlights: • Hard metal (WC-Co) particle toxicity was established in lung epithelial cells. • Nano-WC-Co particles caused greater toxicity than micro-WC-Co particles. • Nano- and micro-WC-Co particles were capable of inducing cellular apoptosis. • Nano-WC-Co particles were internalized by lung epithelial cells. • WC-Co particle internalization was mediated by actin dynamics.

  20. The Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of HVOF-Sprayed WC: Metal Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Liam P.; Pilkington, Antony

    2014-09-01

    WC-based cermet coatings containing various metallic binders such as Ni, Co, and Cr are known for their superior tribological properties, particularly abrasion resistance and enhanced surface hardness. Consequently, these systems are considered as replacements for traditional hard chrome coatings in critical aircraft components such as landing gear. The purpose of this investigation was to conduct a comparative study on the dry sliding wear behavior of three WC-based cermet coatings (WC-12Ni, WC-20Cr2C3-7Ni, and WC-10Co-4Cr), when deposited on carbon steel substrates. Ball on disk wear tests were performed on the coatings using a CSEM Tribometer (pin-on-disk) with a 6-mm ruby ball at 20 N applied load, 0.2 m/s sliding velocity, and sliding distances up to 2000 m. Analysis of both the coating wear track and worn ruby ball was performed using optical microscopy and an Alphastep-250 profilometer. The results of the study revealed both wear of the ruby ball and coated disks allowed for a comparison of both the ball wear and coating wear for the systems considered. Generally, the use of Co and Cr as a binder significantly improved the sliding wear resistance of the coating compared to Ni and/or Cr2C3.

  1. Erosion-Corrosion Property of CeO2-Modified HVOF WC-Co Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Hang, Zongqiu; Chen, Hui; Ceng, Shengbo; Gou, Guoqing; Wang, Xiaomin; Tu, Mingjing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2016-04-01

    Rare-earth elements have been widely used in materials manufacturing to improve hardness and toughness. In this work, conventional, nanostructured, and CeO2-modified WC-12Co powders were sprayed using high-velocity oxygen flame spraying. The erosion-corrosion behavior and interaction of erosion and corrosion of the coatings in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution were investigated. In situ observation was employed to analyze the failure mechanism. The results showed that the CeO2-modified WC-12Co coating possessed the best erosion-corrosion resistance, while the lowest corrosion resistance was exhibited by the conventional WC-12Co coating. The results also suggested that the erosion-corrosion mechanism in the three coatings was dominated by corrosion-accelerated erosion. However, the extent of acceleration of erosion by corrosion differed.

  2. Physical vapor deposition synthesis of tungsten monocarbide (WC) thin films on different carbon substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Weigert, E. C.; Humbert, M. P.; Mellinger, Z. J.; Ren, Q.; Beebe, T. P. Jr.; Bao, L.; Chen, J. G.

    2008-01-15

    The synthesis of tungsten monocarbide (WC) thin films has been performed by physical vapor deposition on various substrates including glassy carbon, carbon fiber sheet, carbon foam, and carbon cloth. The WC and W{sub 2}C phase contents of these films have been evaluated with bulk and surface analysis techniques such as x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. These characterization techniques were also used to determine the effects of synthesis by nonreactive and reactive sputtering. The synthesis of WC particles supported on the carbon fiber substrate has also been accomplished using the temperature programmed reaction method. Overall, the results demonstrate that the phase purity of tungsten carbides can be controlled by the deposition environment and annealing temperatures.

  3. Dissimilar joint characteristics of SiC and WC-Co alloy by laser brazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsuka, K.; Sechi, Y.; Nakata, K.

    2012-08-01

    SiC and WC-Co alloys were joined by laser brazing with an active braze metal. The braze metal based on eutectic Ag-Cu alloy with additional Ti as an active element ranging from 0 to 2.8 mass% was sandwiched by the SiC block and WC-Co alloy plate. The brazing was carried out by selective laser beam irradiation on the WC-Co alloy plate. The content of Ti in the braze metal was required to exceed 0.6 mass% in order to form a brazed joint with a measurable shear strength. The shear strength increased with increasing Ti content up to 2.3 mass%Ti and decreased with a higher content.

  4. Investigation of TiC C Eutectic and WC C Peritectic High-Temperature Fixed Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasajima, Naohiko; Yamada, Yoshiro

    2008-06-01

    TiC C eutectic (2,761°C) and WC C peritectic (2,749°C) fixed points were investigated to compare their potential as high-temperature thermometric reference points. Two TiC C and three WC C fixed-point cells were constructed, and the melting and freezing plateaux were evaluated by means of radiation thermometry. The repeatability of the TiC C eutectic within a day was 60 mK with a melting range roughly 200 mK. The repeatability of the melting temperature of the WC C peritectic within 1 day was 17 mK with a melting range of ˜70 mK. The repeatability of the freezing temperature of the WC C peritectic was 21 mK with a freezing range less than 20 mK. One of the TiC C cells was constructed from a TiC and graphite powder mixture. The filling showed the reaction with the graphite crucible was suppressed and the ingot contained less voids, although the lack of high-purity TiC powder poses a problem. The WC C cells were easily constructed, like metal carbon eutectic cells, without any evident reaction with the crucible. From these results, it is concluded that the WC C peritectic has more potential than the TiC C eutectic as a high-temperature reference point. The investigation of the purification of the TiC C cell during filling and the plateau observation are also reported.

  5. Finite element analysis of WC-Al2O3 composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Satyanarayan; Vaish, Rahul

    2014-02-01

    Object oriented finite element analysis (OOF2) is used to estimate the thermal and mechanical properties of WC-Al2O3 composites. In the present work, five compositions of 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% Al2O3 (by volume) are studied. Young's modulus, thermal conductivity and thermal expansion coefficient are estimated using OOF2 and compared with other known analytical methods. Stress and strain contours are plotted to study the thermal and mechanical behavior of composites. It is found that the stresses are largely concentrated at the interfaces of the WC-Al2O3 phases.

  6. Deformation and elastic properties of WC-Co system sintered carbides in micro- and macroindentation

    SciTech Connect

    Tumanov, V.I.; Gerasechko, N.N.; Konyukhova, L.A.; Ochkasov, V.F.; Ragozin, I.P.

    1985-11-01

    This paper investigates the deformation properties of the WC-Co alloys and their constituents in micro- and macroindentation with recording of the force-indentation depth curve. The investigatins in microindenttion were made on an MINT-6 microinterference hardness tester. Tests were made both on specimens and on finished sintered carbide parts with a rate of movement of the indentor of 8 X 10/sup -7/ m/sec. For the WC-Co alloys with different cobalt contents the modulus of elasticity determined from the indentation curve agrees satisfactorily with that obtained by the ultrasonic method.

  7. The Effect of Processing Parameters on the Performance of Spark Plasma Sintered cBN-WC-Co Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Cong; Zhang, Mingjun; Zhang, Jian; Tang, Kun; Gan, Hangyu; Zhang, Gaofeng

    2015-12-01

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles were mixed into superfine tungsten carbide (WC), and then cBN-WC-cobalt (Co) composites were prepared using spark plasma sintering method. The influence of the processing parameters on the microstructures and the mechanical properties of the cBN-WC-Co composites were investigated. The results indicated that the cBN particles arranged uniformly and had an excellent adhesion with WC matrix. There was no evidence of phase transformation from cBN to hBN. With the increasing of the sintering temperature, the liquid-phase Co was increased and entered the micro-pores between WC and cBN particles easily. Correspondingly, the density, the flexural strength, and the hardness of the cBN-WC-Co composites also increased. With the further increasing of the sintering temperature, WC grains grew leading to the reduction of the hardness. Therefore, the hardness of the samples increased to a maximum value of 2978 HV at 1250 °C, and then decreased with the sintering temperature. The experimental results also showed that the density, the flexural strength, and the hardness of cBN-WC-Co composites increased with the holding time, whereas the hardness presented a decreasing tendency when the holding time exceeded 7 min.

  8. [Toilet training in mental retardation; approach to diurnal enuresis in a 12-year-old boy with hemiparesis].

    PubMed

    de Moor, Jan H M; Frielink, Noud; Roijen, L E G Ruud

    2010-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy with hemiparesis, severe mental retardation, reduced mobility and behavioural problems was not yet toilet trained. He was successfully trained using a behavioural treatment. The training program was based on gradual prolongation of urine retention, the introduction of behaviour restrictions, rewards for using the toilet and overcorrection using repeated exercises if diurnal enuresis occurred. A third of 4- to 18-year-olds with a cerebral palsy do not have diurnal bladder control at the age of 6, in contrast to 1-3% in the general population. An important cause of this difference is the believe that bladder control is dependent on the time of development of bladder control muscles and that it cannot be affected by external methods. This case study shows that even in a relatively older and severely and multiply disabled boy diurnal enuresis can be solved.

  9. Combined seawater toilet flushing and urine separation for economic phosphorus recovery and nitrogen removal: a laboratory-scale trial.

    PubMed

    Mackey, H R; Zheng, Y-S; Tang, W-T; Dai, J; Chen, G-H

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater toilet flushing consumes 20-35% of typical household water demand. Seawater toilet flushing, as practised by Hong Kong since 1958, provides an alternative water source. To maximise the benefits of this unique dual water supply, urine separation could be combined to allow low-cost struvite production and subsequent urine nitrification - in-sewer denitrification. This paper reports on a laboratory-scale study of seawater urine phosphate recovery (SUPR) and seawater-urine nitrification. A laboratory-scale SUPR reactor was run under three phases with hydraulic retention time between 1.5 and 6 h, achieving 91-96% phosphorus recovery. A urine nitrification sequencing batch reactor (UNSBR) was also run for a period of over 650 days, averaging 90% ammonia removal and loading of up to 750 mg-N/L.d. Careful control of the SUPR phosphate removal was found necessary for operation of the downstream UNSBR, and system integration considerations are discussed.

  10. Characterization of microorganisms isolated from the black dirt of toilet bowls and componential analysis of the black dirt.

    PubMed

    Mori, Miho; Nagata, Yusuke; Niizeki, Kazuma; Gomi, Mitsuhiro; Sakagami, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    We have previously conducted a microflora analysis and examined the biofilm-forming activity of bacteria isolated from toilet bowl biofilms. In the present investigation, to reveal the strain involved in the formation of black dirt in toilet bowls, we performed a microflora analysis of the bacteria and fungi isolated from the black dirt of toilet bowls at ten homes. Among samples from different isolation sites and sampling seasons, although a similar tendency was not seen in bacterial microflora, Exophiala sp. was detected in the fungal microflora from all samples of black dirt except for one, and constituted the major presence. By scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis of the formed black dirt, SEM image at × 1,000 and × 5,000 magnification showed objects like hyphae and many bacteria adhering to them, respectively. Micro fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro FT-IR) and SEM with X-ray microanalysis (SEM-XMA) were used to investigate the components of black dirt. IR spectra of micro-FT-IR showed typical absorptions associated with amide compounds and protein, and the elements such as C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, K, and Ba were detected with SEM-XMA. These results showed that black dirt had living body ingredients. Furthermore, Exophiala sp. and Cladosporium sp. strains, which were observed at a high frequency, accumulated 2-hydroxyjuglone (2-HJ) and flaviolin as one of the intermediates in the melanin biosynthetic pathway by the addition of a melanin synthesis inhibitor (tricyclazole) at the time of cultivation. These results suggested strongly that the pigment of black dirt in toilet bowls was melanin produced by Exophiala sp. and Cladosporium sp. strains. PMID:25744213

  11. An analysis of the breakdown of paper products (toilet paper, tissues and tampons) in natural environments, Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Bridle, Kerry L; Kirkpatrick, J B

    2005-01-01

    An examination of the relative breakdown rates of unused toilet paper, facial tissues and tampons was undertaken in nine different environments typical of Tasmanian natural areas. Bags of the paper products (toilet paper, facial tissues, tampons) were buried for periods of 6, 12 and 24 months at depths of 5 and 15 cm. A nutrient solution simulating human body wastes was added to half of the samples, to test the hypothesis that the addition of nutrients would enhance the breakdown of paper products buried in the soil. Mean annual rainfall was the most important measured variable determining mean breakdown in the nutrient addition treatment between sites, with high rainfall sites (mean annual rainfall of greater than 650 mm) recording less decayed products than the drier sites (mean annual rainfall of 500-650 mm). Temperature and soil organic content were important influences on the breakdown of the unfertilised products. Toilet paper and tissues decayed more readily than tampons. Nutrient addition enhanced decay for all products across all sites. Depth of burial was not important in determining the degree to which products decayed. In alpine environments, burial under rocks at the surface did not increase the speed of decay of any product. The Western Alpine site, typical of alpine sites in the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area, showed very little decay over the two-year period, even for nutrient enhanced products. Management prescriptions should be amended to dissuade people from depositing human toilet waste in the extreme (montane to alpine) environments in western Tasmania. Tampons should continue to be carried out as currently prescribed.

  12. Effectiveness of UV-C light irradiation on disinfection of an eSOS(®) smart toilet evaluated in a temporary settlement in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Fiona; Harelimana, Bertin; Ćurko, Josip; van de Vossenberg, Jack; Garcia, Hector A; Hooijmans, Christine Maria; Brdjanovic, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet germicidal (short wavelength UV-C) light was studied as surface disinfectant in an Emergency Sanitation Operation System(®) smart toilet to aid to the work of manual cleaning. The UV-C light was installed and regulated as a self-cleaning feature of the toilet, which automatically irradiate after each toilet use. Two experimental phases were conducted i.e. preparatory phase consists of tests under laboratory conditions and field testing phase. The laboratory UV test indicated that irradiation for 10 min with medium-low intensity of 0.15-0.4 W/m(2) could achieve 6.5 log removal of Escherichia coli. Field testing of the toilet under real usage found that UV-C irradiation was capable to inactivate total coliform at toilet surfaces within 167-cm distance from the UV-C lamp (UV-C dose between 1.88 and 2.74 mW). UV-C irradiation is most effective with the support of effective manual cleaning. Application of UV-C for surface disinfection in emergency toilets could potentially reduce public health risks. PMID:27666295

  13. Effectiveness of UV-C light irradiation on disinfection of an eSOS(®) smart toilet evaluated in a temporary settlement in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Fiona; Harelimana, Bertin; Ćurko, Josip; van de Vossenberg, Jack; Garcia, Hector A; Hooijmans, Christine Maria; Brdjanovic, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet germicidal (short wavelength UV-C) light was studied as surface disinfectant in an Emergency Sanitation Operation System(®) smart toilet to aid to the work of manual cleaning. The UV-C light was installed and regulated as a self-cleaning feature of the toilet, which automatically irradiate after each toilet use. Two experimental phases were conducted i.e. preparatory phase consists of tests under laboratory conditions and field testing phase. The laboratory UV test indicated that irradiation for 10 min with medium-low intensity of 0.15-0.4 W/m(2) could achieve 6.5 log removal of Escherichia coli. Field testing of the toilet under real usage found that UV-C irradiation was capable to inactivate total coliform at toilet surfaces within 167-cm distance from the UV-C lamp (UV-C dose between 1.88 and 2.74 mW). UV-C irradiation is most effective with the support of effective manual cleaning. Application of UV-C for surface disinfection in emergency toilets could potentially reduce public health risks.

  14. Modelling the effects of on-site greywater reuse and low flush toilets on municipal sewer systems.

    PubMed

    Penn, R; Schütze, M; Friedler, E

    2013-01-15

    On-site greywater reuse (GWR) and installation of water-efficient toilets (WET) reduce urban freshwater demand. Research on GWR and WET has generally overlooked the effects that GWR may have on municipal sewer systems. This paper discusses and quantifies these effects. The effects of GWR and WET, positive and negative, were studied by modelling a representative urban sewer system. GWR scenarios were modelled and analysed using the SIMBA simulation system. The results show that, as expected, the flow, velocity and proportional depth decrease as GWR increases. Nevertheless, the reduction is not evenly distributed throughout the day but mainly occurs during the morning and evening peaks. Examination of the effects of reduced toilet flush volumes revealed that in some of the GWR scenarios flows, velocities and proportional depths in the sewer were reduced, while in other GWR scenarios discharge volumes, velocities and proportional depths did not change. Further, it is indicated that as a result of GWR and installation of WET, sewer blockage rates are not expected to increase significantly. The results support the option to construct new sewer systems with smaller pipe diameters. The analysis shows that as the penetration of GWR systems increase, and with the installation of WET, concentrations of pollutants also increase. In GWR scenarios (when toilet flush volume is not reduced) the increase in pollutant concentrations is lower than the proportional reduction of sewage flow. Moreover, the results show that the spatial distribution of houses reusing GW does not significantly affect the parameters examined.

  15. Exploring the potential role of tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) nanoparticle internalization in observed toxicity toward lung epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Armstead, Andrea L.; Arena, Christopher B.; Li, Bingyun

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) has been recognized as a workplace inhalation hazard in the manufacturing, mining and drilling industries by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health. Exposure to WC-Co is known to cause “hard metal lung disease” but the relationship between exposure, toxicity and development of disease remain poorly understood. To better understand this relationship, the present study examined the role of WC-Co particle size and internalization on toxicity using lung epithelial cells. We demonstrated that nano- and micro-WC-Co particles exerted toxicity in a dose- and time-dependent manner and that nano-WC-Co particles caused significantly greater toxicity at lower concentrations and shorter exposure times compared to micro-WC-Co particles. WC-Co particles in the nano-size range (not micron-sized) were internalized by lung epithelial cells, which suggested that internalization may play a key role in the enhanced toxicity of nano-WC-Co particles over micro-WC-Co particles. Further exploration of the internalization process indicated that there may be multiple mechanisms involved in WC-Co internalization such as actin and microtubule based cytoskeletal rearrangements. These findings support our hypothesis that WC-Co particle internalization contributes to cellular toxicity and suggests that therapeutic treatments inhibiting particle internalization may serve as prophylactic approaches for those at risk of WC-Co particle exposure. PMID:24746988

  16. Single house on-site grey water treatment using a submerged membrane bioreactor for toilet flushing.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, M S; Markakis, N; Petousi, I; Manios, T

    2016-05-01

    Wastewater recycling has been and continues to be practiced all over the world for a variety of reasons including: increasing water availability, combating water shortages and drought, and supporting environmental and public health protection. Nowadays, one of the most interesting issues for wastewater recycling is the on-site treatment and reuse of grey water. During this study the efficiency of a compact Submerged Membrane Bioreactor (SMBR) system to treat real grey water in a single house in Crete, Greece, was examined. In the study, grey water was collected from a bathtub, shower and washing machine containing significant amounts of organic matter and pathogens. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal in the system was approximately 87%. Total suspended solids (TSS) were reduced from 95mgL(-1) in the influent to 8mgL(-1) in the effluent. The efficiency of the system to reduce anionic surfactants was about 80%. Fecal and total coliforms decreased significantly using the SMBR system due to rejection, by the membrane, used in the study. Overall, the SMBR treatment produces average effluent values that would satisfy international guidelines for indoor reuse applications such as toilet flushing. PMID:26901745

  17. Approaches for improving the toileting problems of hemiplegic stroke patients with poor standing balance.

    PubMed

    Koike, Yuji; Sumigawa, Koshi; Koeda, Shuhei; Shiina, Miyuki; Fukushi, Haruka; Tsuji, Takahiro; Hara, Chisaya; Tsushima, Hitoshi

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] Our objective was to evaluate the residual dynamic and static functionality in the sitting position of hemiplegic stroke patients who require help to pull their lower garments up and down during toileting. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 11 hemiplegic patients. We gathered data on the patients' motor paralysis, sensory capacity, lower extremity muscle strength, trunk control, ability to roll and sit up from a lying position, sitting balance, and ability to pull the lower garments up and down. We then compared 2 groups: those able to pull the lower garments up and down independently while standing (the "independent group"), and those who were unable to do so (the "non-independent group"). [Results] Though the non-independent group had severely and significantly reduced trunk control and abilities as a whole, there was no significant difference from the independent group in static and dynamic sitting balance. [Conclusion] We conclude that, to enable hemiplegic patients with poor standing balance to pull their lower garments up and down, it is necessary to do these maneuvers in a sitting, rather than a standing, position, or to develop garments that are easier to put on and take off.

  18. Monitoring of Bio-signal of People on Flooring, Tatami and in Bathtub, Toilet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Yosuke; Kawanishi, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Kajiro; Kobayashi, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    In the graying Japanese society, monitoring health-related human data with sensors embedded in the living environment is quite meaningful in terms of emergency response and of long-term health management. In using the body data monitoring system daily at home, the lack of invasiveness during the monitoring and the maintenance of the system are of great importance. We have proposed the method to surmise the sleep stages of sleeping subjects by measuring the heartbeats and the respirations without invasiveness using the pneumatic method with an air mattress. This method, however, has a problem in the maintenance, since it requires periodic refilling of the air into the mattress. In this paper, another pneumatic method, which applies silicon tubes instead of the air mattress, is proposed. The change of S/N ratio in heartbeat and respiration signals, while having the environmental noises increased, are compared among a room with wooden flooring, another with tatami mats, a bath tub, and a toilet room. The result shows that both the pulse waves and the breaths can be measured with the accuracy of around 30dB, and the identification of each pulse from among the pulse waves is also feasible, under the condition that the environmental noises in the room with wooden flooring, that with tatami mats, the bath tub, and the rest room are 0.01G, 0.09G, 100ml, and 0.01G respectively.

  19. The Waterless Portable Private Toilet: An Innovative Sanitation Solution in Disaster Zones.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongkyun; Hashemi, Shervin; Han, Mooyoung; Kim, Tschungil; Sohn, Hong-Gyoo

    2016-04-01

    Catastrophes can occur without warning and inevitably cause short-term and long-term problems. In disaster zones, having an action plan to alleviate difficulties can reduce or prevent many long-lasting complications. One of the most critical and urgent issues is sanitation. Water, energy, personnel, transportation, and the allocation of resources in disaster areas tend to become very limited during emergencies. Sanitation systems suffer in the process, potentially leading to crises due to unsafe and unhygienic surroundings. This article explores the problems of current sanitation practices in disaster areas and identifies the essential characteristics of sustainable sanitation systems. This study also presents a plan for an innovative and sustainable sanitation system using a waterless, portable, private toilet, in addition to a procedure for collecting and disposing waste. The system is agronomic, is socially acceptable, prevents contact with human waste, and can be used for individuals or families. Environmental pollution and social problems (such as sexual harassment) can be reduced both during and after restoration. PMID:26781752

  20. Charting a path for innovative toilet technology using multicriteria decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Borsuk, Mark E; Maurer, Max; Lienert, Judit; Larsen, Tove A

    2008-03-15

    Practical and theoretically sound methods for analyzing innovative environmental technologies are needed to inform public and private decisions regarding research and development, risk management, and stakeholder communication. By integrating scientific assessments with a characterization of values, multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) supports the ranking of alternative technology pathways on the basis of technical, financial, and social concerns. We applied MCDAto evaluate the use of NoMix urine separating toilets for managing environmental risk and postponing expensive upgrades to a large wastewater treatment plant near Zürich, Switzerland. Results indicate that, given current priorities, no single, fixed course of action (including the status quo) will be desirable to all stakeholders over the considered time horizon. However, a path forward is suggested that is not significantly disadvantageous to any stakeholder now and leaves open future options, allowing society to achieve overall greater benefits if priorities change, new environmental risks are revealed, or technology improves. While our analysis focuses on a particular catchment in Switzerland, many communities worldwide are faced with an aging and inefficient wastewater treatment infrastructure while also experiencing growth and development. Our framework can help these communities balance the conflicting objectives of diverse stakeholders and gain insight into the role that urine separation can play in transitioning to a more comprehensive and sustainable urban water management system. PMID:18409604

  1. Effect of W and WC on the oxidation resistance of yttria-doped silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuon, S.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of W and WC contamination on the oxidation and cracking in air of sintered Si3N4 - 8 w/o Y2O3 ceramics at 500, 750, and 1350 C is examined. A mixture of Si3N4 - 8Y2O3, milled with alumina balls, was divided into four portions. Three portions were doped with 2 w/o WC W, and 4 w/o W respectively, in order to simulate contamination during milling. The fourth portion was undoped and used on a control. The addition of W or WC did not affect the phase relationships in the system, as all bars with or without additions contained melilite as the major Si-Y-O-N phase after sintering. At 750 C, instability (rapid oxidation and cracking) of W-doped bars appears to have occurred as a result of oxidation of the tungsten containing melilite phase. No intermediate temperature instability was observed in bars containing 2 w/o WC or in bars with no additive. Specimens exposed at 1350 C had good oxidation resistance due to the formation of a protective siliceous oxide layer. A specimen containing 4 w/o W which was preoxidized at 1350 C had improved oxidation resistance at 750 C. The tendency towards oxidation and cracking of Si3N4 - 8 Y2O3 at 750 C is concluded to be related to tungsten content of the sintered bars.

  2. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of WC-9 Analogues as Antiparasitic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Elicio, Pablo D.; Chao, María N.; Galizzi, Melina; Li, Catherine; Szajnman, Sergio H.; Docampo, Roberto; Moreno, Silvia N. J.; Rodriguez, Juan B.

    2013-01-01

    As a part of our project pointed at the search of new safe chemotherapeutic and chemoprophylactic agents against parasitic diseases, several compounds structurally related to 4-phenoxyphenoxyethyl thiocyanate (WC-9), which were modified at the terminal aromatic ring, were designed, synthesized and evaluated as antiproliferative agents against Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite responsible of American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease) and Toxoplasma gondii, the etiological agent of toxoplasmosis. Most of the synthetic analogues exhibited similar antiparasitic activity being slightly more potent than the reference compound WC-9. For example, the nitro derivative 13 showed an ED50 value of 5.2 μM. Interestingly, the regioisomer of WC-9, compound 36 showed similar inhibitory action than WC-9 indicating that para-phenyl substitution pattern is not necessarily required for biological activity. The biological evaluation against T. gondii was also very promising. The ED50 values corresponding for 13, 36 and 37 were at the very low micromolar level against tachyzoites of T. gondii. PMID:24090919

  3. Neurospora WC-1 recruits SWI/SNF to remodel frequency and initiate a circadian cycle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Kettenbach, Arminja N; Gerber, Scott A; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C

    2014-09-01

    In the negative feedback loop comprising the Neurospora circadian oscillator, the White Collar Complex (WCC) formed from White Collar-1 (WC-1) and White Collar-2 (WC-2) drives transcription of the circadian pacemaker gene frequency (frq). Although FRQ-dependent repression of WCC has been extensively studied, the mechanism by which the WCC initiates a circadian cycle remains elusive. Structure/function analysis of WC-1 eliminated domains previously thought to transactivate frq expression but instead identified amino acids 100-200 as essential for frq circadian expression. A proteomics-based search for coactivators with WCC uncovered the SWI/SNF (SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable) complex: SWI/SNF interacts with WCC in vivo and in vitro, binds to the Clock box in the frq promoter, and is required both for circadian remodeling of nucleosomes at frq and for rhythmic frq expression; interestingly, SWI/SNF is not required for light-induced frq expression. These data suggest a model in which WC-1 recruits SWI/SNF to remodel and loop chromatin at frq, thereby activating frq expression to initiate the circadian cycle.

  4. EDITORIAL: World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering (WC2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Barry J.

    2004-08-01

    The World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering was held in Sydney on 24--29 August 2003. This special issue contains a selection of papers that serve as a snapshot of the state of the art in medical physics today, as represented in WC2003. The PDF file contains the full text of this editorial.

  5. Getting the Right Wheelchair for Travel: A WC19-Compliant Wheelchair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manary, Miriam A.; Hobson, Douglas A.; Schneider, Lawrence W.

    2007-01-01

    Children and adults who must remain seated in their wheelchairs while traveling are often at a disadvantage in terms of crash safety. The new voluntary wheelchair industry standard WC19 (short for Section 19 of the ANSI/RESNA wheelchair standards) works to close the safety gap by providing design and performance criteria and test methods to assess…

  6. Tensile and creep rupture behavior of P/M processed Nb-base alloy, WC-3009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G.; Titran, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    Due to its high strength at temperatures up to 1600 K, fabrication of niobium base alloy WC-3009 (Nb30Hf9W) by traditional methods is difficult. Powder metallurgy (P/M) processing offers an attractive fabrication alternative for this high strength alloy. Spherical powders of WC-3009 produced by electron beam atomizing (EBA) process were successfully consolidated into a one inch diameter rod by vacuum hot pressing and swaging techniques. Tensile strength of the fully dense P/M material at 300-1590 K were similar to the arc-melted material. Creep rupture tests in vacuum indicated that WC-3009 exhibits a class 1 solid solution (glide controlled) creep behavior in the 1480 to 1590 K temperature range and stress range of 14 to 70 MPa. The creep behavior was correlated with temperature and stress using a power law relationship. The calculated stress exponent n, was about 3.2 and the apparent activation energy, Q, was about 270 kJ/mol. The large creep ductility exhibited by WC-3009 was attributed to its high strain rate sensitivity.

  7. Structure-property correlations in nanostructured WC-12Co microwave clad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Sunny; Sharma, Apurbba Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructured materials are known for enhanced properties as compared to their conventional counterparts. In the present work, microwave cladding technique was explored for depositing nanostructured WC-12Co clads on stainless steel substrates. Phase analysis of the WC-12Co microwave clads revealed the presence of Co6W6C, Co7W6, Co3W9C4, W2C and WC phases. The microstructure of the WC-12Co clads confirmed uniform distribution of nano-carbides in the form of clusters enclosed in the carbide network. Mechanical characterisation of the nanostructured clads was carried in terms of microhardness assessment and flexural strength measurement. The microwave induced clads exhibited excellent metallurgical bonding with the substrate and were free from interfacial cracks. The average microhardness of the developed clads was found in the order of 1760 ± 128HV. The flexural strength of the developed clads was observed to be 671 ± 28 MPa. The nanostructured clads exhibited good adhesion with the substrate without getting peeled-off under a load of 3.75 kN and a displacement of 3.72 mm.

  8. Microstructure and Wear Behavior of Conventional and Nanostructured Plasma-Sprayed WC-Co Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, E.; Bannier, E.; Salvador, M. D.; Bonache, V.; García, J. C.; Morgiel, J.; Grzonka, J.

    2010-09-01

    WC-12%Co coatings were deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying using conventional and nanostructured powders and two secondary plasmogenous gases (He and H2). Coating microstructure and phase composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray diffraction techniques (XRD) techniques. This study examined wear and friction properties of the coatings under dry friction conditions. SEM was used to analyze abraded surface microstructure. Coating microhardness and fracture toughness were also determined. All coatings displayed strong decarburization as a result of WC decomposition, which gave rise to the formation of secondary phases (W2C and W). A very fine undissolved WC crystalline dispersion coexisted with these new phases. TEM observation confirmed that the matrix was predominantly amorphous and filled with block-type, frequently dislocated crystallites. Wear was observed to follow a three-body abrasive mechanism, since debris between the ball and the coating surface was detected. The main wear mechanism was based on subsurface cracking, owing to the arising debris. WC grain decomposition and dissolution were concluded to be critical factors in wear resistance. The level of decomposition and dissolution could be modified by changing the plasmogenous gas or feed powder grain size. The influence of the plasmogenous gas on wear resistance was greater than the influence of feedstock particle size.

  9. Analysis of WC/Ni-Based Coatings Deposited by Controlled Short-Circuit MIG Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vespa, P.; Pinard, P. T.; Gauvin, R.; Brochu, M.

    2012-06-01

    This study investigates the recently developed controlled short-circuit metal inert gas (CSC-MIG) welding system for depositing WC/Ni-based claddings on carbon steel substrates. WC/Ni-based coatings deposited by CSC-MIG were analyzed by optical light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) capabilities. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and hardness measurements of depositions are also reported. The CSC-MIG welding system provides a significant amount of user control over the current waveform during welding and has lower heat input when compared with traditional MIG welding. Heat input for the analyzed coatings ranged from 10.1 to 108.7 J/mm. Metallurgically bonded coatings free from spatter and with 0.75% average porosity were produced. It was found that the detrimental decarburization of the WC particles seen in thermal spray systems does not occur when welding with the CSC-MIG. Precipitation of a reaction layer around the reinforcing phase was identified as WC; the average thickness of which increases from 3.8 to 7.2 μm for the low and high heat input condition, respectively. Precipitation of newly formed WC particles was observed; their size distribution increased from D 50 of 2.4 μm in the low heat input weldment to 6.75 μm in the high heat input weldment. The level of dilution of the reinforcing phase increases significantly with heat input. The hardness of the deposited coatings decreases from 587 HV10 to 410 HV10 when the energy input was increased from 10.1 to 108.7 J/mm.

  10. Improvement in tribological properties of atmospheric plasma-sprayed WC-Co coating followed by Cu electrochemical impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jianhui; Zhu, Yingchun; Zheng, Xuebing; Ruan, Qichao; Ji, Heng

    2009-06-01

    The WC-Co coating obtained by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) was modified by Cu electrochemical impregnation. The copper has infiltrated into and filled up the pores in WC-Co coating. The tribological properties of the coating against the stainless steel ball as sliding pairs were investigated with a ball-on-disc (BOD) configuration in air at room temperature. The as-prepared samples were characterized by means of optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. It was found that the frictional behavior of the WC-Co coating followed by Cu electrochemical impregnation was superior to that of WC-Co coating. The wear mechanism of the WC-Co coating followed by Cu electrochemical impregnation was microcutting, whilst that of a WC-Co coating was the fatigue wear. The improvement in tribological properties of the WC-Co coating followed by Cu electrochemical impregnation was attributed to the formation of self-lubricating Cu film on the wear surface which induces the transformation of wear mechanism.

  11. Survey of attitudes and perceptions of urine-diverting toilets and human waste recycling in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Krishna M; Babcock, Roger W

    2013-01-15

    Urine constitutes only about 1% of domestic sewage but contains 50% or more of the excreted nutrients and chemicals like hormones and pharmaceutical residues. Urine diverting toilet (UDT) systems can be considered a more sustainable alternative to wastewater management because they allow nutrient recycling, reduce water use, and allow source-separation of hormones and chemicals that can harm the environment. An online survey was conducted to determine whether UDTs are acceptable to the general public in Hawaii and if attitudes and perceptions towards it and human waste (HW) recycling vary with age, sex, level of education, religious affiliation, ethnicity, and employment status. The survey was also intended to detect possible drivers and barriers for the UDTs. Variations on variables were tested at 5% significance (p=0.05) level (Chi-squared test or ANOVA) and considered significantly different if the p-value was less than 0.05. The results were encouraging as more than 60% are willing to pay extra for the UDT, while only 22% knew that such systems existed. No statistically significant difference was found between males and females on all survey questions at the 5% level. However, females had higher willingness to pay (WTP) than males and WTP increased with age and income. The WTP of Caucasians was higher than Asians and differed significantly. Some respondents expressed concern about the legal provisions for recycling of HW. The survey results indicate that with a public education program, it is possible that most people would be willing to adopt UDTs and HW recycling with incurred societal benefits of reduced water and fertilizer use, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, and collection of micropollutants at the source to prevent their entry into waterways. Because of the small sample size (N=132, 13% response rate) the survey is not representative but may be indicative of the general attitude of Hawaiian people. PMID:23228720

  12. The Geometry of HD 165763: A Polarization Study of a WC Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosawa, R.; Hillier, D. J.; Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.

    1999-07-01

    We have obtained spectropolarimetric data of HD 165763 (WR 111, WC 5) with a spectral resolution of 1.24 Å, covering the wavelength range from 4950 to 6200 Å. The continuum is polarized at a level of 0.39% at 5805 Å, but there is no polarization variation across the emission lines. The latter indicates that most of the polarization arises from the interstellar medium. It further suggests that any global deviation of the atmosphere from spherical symmetry, if it exists, is small. Radiative transfer calculations of axisymmetric stellar wind models are used to predict polarization changes across the very strong C IV (lambda5805) emission line. We fitted the observational data with the models by using the continuum polarization as a constraint and by treating the interstellar polarization as a free parameter instead of using unreliable values of interstellar polarization estimated from analysis of field stars. The results from the chi^2 testing of the model suggest that the global deviation from spherical symmetry of this object is no larger than 20%, and it is probably less than 10%. In our formulation, the ratio of the equatorial density and the polar density (rho_eq/rho_pole) corresponding to the 20% upper limit is about 1.25. A similar conclusion is obtained from comparison of ``continuum-minus-line'' polarization of the observations with that of our models. None of the single WC stars (except for WR 103) with spectropolarimetric data show a variation in polarization across emission lines. Therefore, global deviations from spherical symmetry of WC stars are expected to be small in general. The relatively low value of the upper limit for WR 111 indicates that mass-loss enhancement due to rotation is unlikely to explain the difference between the observed and the predicted WC mass-loss rates. It also suggests that a significant amount of angular momentum is removed by mass loss during the pre-WC star stage of stellar evolution. A low value for the upper limit of

  13. Wear Evaluation of AISI 4140 Alloy Steel with WC/C Lamellar Coatings Sliding Against EN 8 Using Taguchi Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, Nikhil Rajendra; Karthikeyan, Ganesarethinam

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the experiments in this paper is to use the Taguchi methods to investigate the wear of WC/C coated nitrided AISI 4140 alloy steel. A study of lamellar WC/C coating which were deposited by a physical vapor deposition on nitrided AISI 4140 alloy steel. The investigation includes wear evaluation using Pin-on-disk configuration. When WC/C coated AISI 4140 alloy steel slides against EN 8 steel, it was found that carbon-rich coatings show much lower wear of the countersurface than nitrogen-rich coatings. The results were correlated with the properties determined from tribological and mechanical characterization, therefore by probably selecting the proper processing parameters the deposition of WC/C coating results in decreasing the wear rate of the substrate which shows a potential for tribological application.

  14. Adhesion strength of sputtered TiAlN-coated WC insert tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, Esmar; Razali, M. Mohd.; Nizam, A. R. Md.

    2013-09-01

    The adhesion strength of TiAlN coating that deposited by using DC magnetron sputtering on WC insert tool are studied. TiAlN coating are deposited on Tungsten Carbide (WC) insert tool by varying negatively substrate bias from 79 to 221 volt and nitrogen flow rate from 30 to 72 sccm. The adhesion strength are obtained by using Rockwell indentation test method with a Brale diamond at applied load of 60,100 and 150 kgf. The lateral diameter of indentation is plotted on three different applied loads and the adhesion strength of TiAlN coating was obtained from the curved slopes at 100 and 150 kgf. The lower curve slop indicated better adhesion strength. The results shows that the adhesion strength of sputterred TiAlN coating tend to increase as the negatively substrate bias and nitrogen flow rate are increased.

  15. Cross-sectional AEM preparation technique for ceramic-coated WC-Co cutting tools.

    PubMed

    Ostreicher, K; Sung, C

    1993-04-15

    The preparation of cross-sectional specimens for AEM studies of materials such as ceramic coated tungsten carbide presents some unique problems. Pieces joined by the use of epoxides often separate at the interface between the WC and ceramic coating during the initial mechanical grinding and subsequent thinning process as a result of the vibration and physical strain placed on the sample. These problems have been overcome through the use of a preparation process which essentially encapsulates the sample within the confines of an epoxy filled quartz tube. This preparation process has allowed for facile AEM cross-sectional analysis of TiN/TiCN coatings on WC-Co substrates, and has revealed two distinct grain morphologies within the TiCN coating.

  16. Adhesion strength of sputtered TiAlN-coated WC insert tool

    SciTech Connect

    Budi, Esmar; Razali, M. Mohd.; Nizam, A. R. Md.

    2013-09-09

    The adhesion strength of TiAlN coating that deposited by using DC magnetron sputtering on WC insert tool are studied. TiAlN coating are deposited on Tungsten Carbide (WC) insert tool by varying negatively substrate bias from 79 to 221 volt and nitrogen flow rate from 30 to 72 sccm. The adhesion strength are obtained by using Rockwell indentation test method with a Brale diamond at applied load of 60,100 and 150 kgf. The lateral diameter of indentation is plotted on three different applied loads and the adhesion strength of TiAlN coating was obtained from the curved slopes at 100 and 150 kgf. The lower curve slop indicated better adhesion strength. The results shows that the adhesion strength of sputterred TiAlN coating tend to increase as the negatively substrate bias and nitrogen flow rate are increased.

  17. Reduction of WO 3 to nano-WC by thermo-chemical reaction route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Akshay; Singh, K.; Pandey, O. P.

    2009-02-01

    Thermo-chemical reaction route has been used to synthesize WC-nanoparticles from WO 3. Two different carbon sources are used to study the effect of these sources on synthesis. The as-prepared samples are characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analyzer (DTA), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results indicate that reduction of WO 3 to WC takes place by the adsorption of carbon at the surface of WO 3 forming porous structure at the defect sites through which carbon diffuses. As the concentration of adsorbed carbon increases the growth of carbon nanotube starts from this site which ultimately gets converted to carbon nano-fibers of higher chemical activity.

  18. Nano- and microcrystalline diamond deposition on pretreated WC-Co substrates: structural properties and adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, M. A.; Contin, A.; Rodríguez, L. A. A.; Vieira, J.; Campos, R. A.; Corat, E. J.; Trava Airoldi, V. J.

    2016-02-01

    Many developments have been made to improve the quality and adherence of CVD diamond films onto WC-Co hard metal tools by the removing the cobalt from the substrate surface through substrate pretreatments. Here we compare the efficiency of three chemical pretreatments of WC-Co substrates for this purpose. First, the work was focused on a detailed study of the composition and structure of as-polished and pretreated substrate surfaces to characterize the effects of the substrate preparation. Considering this objective, a set of WC-9% Co substrates, before and after pretreatment, was analyzed by FEG-SEM, EDS and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The second stage of the work was devoted to the evaluation of the influence of seeding process, using 4 nm diamond nanoparticles, on the morphology and roughness of the pretreated substrates. The last and most important stage was to deposit diamond coatings with different crystallite sizes (nano and micro) by hot-filament CVD to understand fully the mechanism of growth and adhesion of CVD diamond films on pretreated WC-Co substrates. The transition from nano to microcrystalline diamond was achieved by controlling the CH4/H2 gas ratio. The nano and microcrystalline samples were grown under same time at different substrate temperatures 600 °C and 800 °C, respectively. The different substrate temperatures allowed the analysis of the cobalt diffusion from the bulk to the substrate surface during CVD film growth. Furthermore, it was possible to evaluate how the coating adhesion is affected by the diffusion. The diamond coatings were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, XRD, EDS, FEG-SEM, atomic force microscope and 1500 N Rockwell indentation to evaluate the adhesion.

  19. W and WC layers deposition by shielded inductively coupled plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpo, P.; Meziani, T.; Sauvageot, P.; Ceccone, G.; Gibson, P. N.; Rossi, F.; Monge-Cadet, P.

    2002-09-01

    Tungsten and carbon tungsten films have been deposited by a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique. The plasma-assisted deposition was performed by inductively coupled plasma source (ICP). A Faraday shield was arranged within the plasma chamber to prevent electrically conductive film deposition on the dielectric chamber wall that would screen the electromagnetic field. External electrical parameters and ion densities of the shielded inductive plasma source are measured and compared to classical ICPs source characteristics. Tungsten deposition has been performed from WF6 diluted in argon and hydrogen. A deposition rate of 5 mum/h was obtained. Hardness measurements show that the tungsten hardness can be increased from 5 to 20 GPA by biasing the substrate. WC films were deposited by adding methane or acetylene to the WF6/H2 mixture. The hardness of the WC films depends strongly on the methane or acetylene flow rate, i.e., on the film carbon content. The WC hardness has been correlated to the crystallographic structure. The first hardness maximum peak corresponds to a solid solution of carbon in the tungsten. Correlation between the deposition parameters, such as the gas composition, dc bias and coating properties has been investigated by means of AES, XRD, and nanoindentation analysis. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  20. Effect of W and WC on the oxidation resistance of yttria-doped silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuon, S.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of tungsten and tungsten carbide contamination on the oxidation and cracking in air of yttria-doped silicon nitride ceramics is investigated. Silicon nitride powder containing 8 wt % Y2O3 was doped with 2 wt % W, 4 wt % W, 2 wt % WC or left undoped, and sintered in order to simulate contamination during milling, and specimens were exposed in air to 500, 750 and 1350 C for various lengths of time. Scanning electron and optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction of the specimens in the as-sintered state reveals that the addition of W or WC does not affect the phase relationships in the system, composed of alpha and beta Si3N4, melilite and an amorphous phase. Catastrophic oxidation is observed at 750 C in specimens containing 2 and 4 wt % W, accompanied by the disappearance of alpha Si3N4 and melilite from the structure. At 1350 C, the formation of a protective glassy oxide layer was observed on all specimens without catastrophic oxidation, and it is found that pre-oxidation at 1350 C also improved the oxidation resistance at 750 C of bars doped with 4 wt % W. It is suggested that tungsten contamination from WC grinding balls may be the major cause of the intermediate-temperature cracking and instability frequently observed in Si3N4-8Y2O3.

  1. Sliding and Abrasive Wear Behavior of WC-CoCr Coatings with Different Carbide Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Lalit; Arora, Navneet

    2013-02-01

    This study examines the sliding and abrasive wear behaviors of high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed WC-CoCr coatings with different WC grain sizes. The HVOF coating deposition was assisted by in-flight particle temperature and velocity measurement system. The powder feedstocks and their corresponding coatings were characterized by means of XRD and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope analysis. Hardness, porosity, and indentation fracture toughness of these coatings were calculated and compared with each other. Sliding wear resistance of these coatings was calculated using pin-on-disk tribometer (ASTM G99-90). The two-body abrasion was quantified by sliding the samples over silicon carbide (SiC) abrasive paper bonded to a rotating flat disk of auto-polisher. The mechanism of materials' removal in both the sliding and abrasive wears was studied and discussed on microstructural investigations. It was observed that fine grain WC-CoCr cermet coating exhibits higher sliding and abrasive wear resistances as compared with conventional cermet coating.

  2. Microstructure and corrosion properties of thick WC composite coating formed by plasma cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guozhi, Xie; Xiaolong, Song; Dongjie, Zhang; Yuping, Wu; Pinghua, Lin

    2010-08-01

    The thick Ni-coated WC coatings, in a matrix of Nickel-based alloys, were prepared on AISI 1045 steel using plasma cladding equipment. A pre-placed layer of uniform mixture, with different weight fractions of Ni-coated WC powder and Nickel-based alloy powder, on the steel substrate was melted at the high temperature of the plasma jet. The coating composition, microstructure and microhardness were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and microhardness testing. The experimental results show that the metallurgical bond was formed between the coating and substrate. The XRD results show that the coatings contain γ-Ni, carbides (such as M 23C 6 and M 7C 3) and boride (such as Fe 2B, Fe 3B phases). SEM shows that all the coatings are crack-free with lower porosity (<1%). It is found that the microhardness and the electrochemical behavior of the coatings are depended on the content of Ni-coated WC powder. The corrosion mechanism for the coatings may be due to the microgalvance corrosion between the phases in the cladding coatings.

  3. Preparation and Characterization of Ir Coating on WC Ceramic by Double Glow Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongwei; Xu, Zhenghui; Wang, Jinming; Wu, Wangping; Chen, Zhaofeng

    2012-10-01

    Dense and adherent Ir coating was deposited on porous WC ceramic by double glow plasma (DGP). There were two cathodes in the vacuum deposition chamber. The bias voltage of Ir target and WC substrate were -900 and -350 V, respectively. The Ir coating was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, nanoindentation instrument, and scratch tester to examine the microstructure and the mechanical properties. The results indicated that the deposition rate by DGP was up to 5-6 μm/h which was faster than that by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition and magnetron sputtering. The Ir coating had a preferential growth orientation of (220) crystal face. The hardness was 800 HV. The elastic modulus was 644 GPa. The excellent mechanical properties were attributed to the preferential growth, the large compressive stress, and the shrinkage of the lattice parameters. The adhesive force was up to 51 N. The strong adhesion was attributed to the mechanical locking and chemical reaction between the Ir coating and the porous WC substrate.

  4. UV-visible marker confirms that environmental persistence of Clostridium difficile spores in toilets of patients with C. difficile-associated diarrhea is associated with lack of compliance with cleaning protocol.e

    PubMed Central

    Alfa, Michelle J; Dueck, Christine; Olson, Nancy; DeGagne, Pat; Papetti, Selena; Wald, Alana; Lo, Evelyn; Harding, Godfrey

    2008-01-01

    Background An ultraviolet visible marker (UVM) was used to assess the cleaning compliance of housekeeping staff for toilets in a tertiary healthcare setting. Methods The UVM was applied to the toilets of patients who were on isolation precautions due to Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) as well as for patients who were not on isolation precautions. Cleaning was visually scored using a numeric system where 0, 1, 2, and 3 represented; no, light, moderate or heavy residual UVM. Rodac plates containing CDMN selective agar were used to test for the presence of C. difficile on the surfaces of patient's toilets. Results Despite twice daily cleaning for the toilets of patients who were on CDAD isolation precautions, the average cleaning score was 1.23 whereas the average cleaning score for toilets of patients not on isolation precautions was 0.9. Even with optimal cleaning (UVM score of 0) C. difficile was detected from 33% of the samples taken from toilets of patients with CDAD (4% detection in toilet samples from patients who had diarrhea not due to CDAD). Conclusion Our data demonstrated the value of UVM for monitoring the compliance of housekeeping staff with the facility's toilet cleaning protocol. In addition to providing good physical cleaning action, agents with some sporicidal activity against C. difficile may be needed to effectively reduce the environmental reservoir. PMID:18474086

  5. Crack initiation and propagation behavior of WC particles reinforced Fe-based metal matrix composite produced by laser melting deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiandong; Li, Liqun; Tao, Wang

    2016-08-01

    It is generally believed that cracks in metal matrix composites (MMC) parts manufacturing are crucial to the reliable material properties, especially for the reinforcement particles with high volume fraction. In this paper, WC particles (WCp) reinforced Fe-based metal matrix composites (WCp/Fe) were manufactured by laser melting deposition (LMD) technology to investigate the characteristics of cracks formation. The section morphology of composites were analyzed by optical microscope (OM), and microstructure of WCp, matrix and interface were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), in order to study the crack initiation and propagation behavior under different laser process conditions. The temperature of materials during the laser melting deposition was detected by the infrared thermometer. The results showed that the cracks often appeared after five layers laser deposition in this experiment. The cracks crossed through WC particles rather than the interface, so the strength of interface obtained by the LMD was relatively large. When the thermal stress induced by high temperature gradient during LMD and the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between WC and matrix was larger than yield strength of WC, the cracks would initiate inside WC particle. Cracks mostly propagated along the eutectic phases whose brittleness was very large. The obtained thin interface was beneficial to transmitting the stress from particle to matrix. The influence of volume fraction of particles, laser power and scanning speed on cracks were investigated. This paper investigated the influence of WC particles size on cracks systematically, and the smallest size of cracked WC in different laser processing parameters was also researched.

  6. Physical association of the WC-1 photoreceptor and the histone acetyltransferase NGF-1 is required for blue light signal transduction in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Brenna, Andrea; Grimaldi, Benedetto; Filetici, Patrizia; Ballario, Paola

    2012-10-01

    In Neurospora crassa and other filamentous fungi, light-dependent-specific phenomena are regulated by transcription factors WC-1 and WC-2. In addition to its transcriptional activity, WC-1 is able to directly sense light stimuli through a LOV sensor domain. Its location in the nucleus and heterodimerization with WC-2, together with the presence of a zinc-finger DNA-binding domain and an environmental sensor domain, all resemble the functional evolutionary architecture adopted by vertebrate nuclear receptors (NRs). Here we describe a scenario in which WC-1 represents a functional orthologue of NRs and acts through association with the chromatin-modifying coactivator NGF-1, which encodes a homologue of the yeast Gcn5p acetyltransferase. To support this view, we show a direct association between WC-1 and NGF-1 that depends on a WC-1 region containing a conserved functional LXXLL motif, a signature previously described as being an exclusive feature of NR/coactivator interaction. Our data suggest that a WC-1/NGF-1 complex is preassembled in the dark on light-inducible promoters and that, after exposure to light stimulation, NGF-1-associated HAT activity leads to histone H3 acetylation and transcriptional activation. Finally, we provide evidence for a NGF-1-independent acetylated form of WC-1. Overall our data indicate that Neurospora and higher eukaryotes share a common mechanism for the signal transduction of environmental stimuli.

  7. Safety aspects of handling and using fecal material from urine-diversion toilets--a field investigation.

    PubMed

    Austin, L M; Cloete, T E

    2008-04-01

    The most advantageous approach to pathogen destruction in a urine-diversion toilet vault is to maximize the effects of various environmental factors (i.e., pH, temperature, moisture content, type of bulking agent, and storage time). To quantify these effects, a field experiment was set up, consisting of 6 urine-diversion toilet vaults, each with a different combination of feces and bulking agent (soil, ash, wood shavings, sodium hydroxide, or straw) and ventilation (ventpipe/no ventpipe). The pH of the mixes varied from 6.37 to 10.09. Temperature probes, which were connected to a data logger, were inserted to the heaps, and the logger monitored over a period of nearly 10 months. Mean heap temperatures ranged from 16.8 degrees C in winter to 27.6 degrees C in summer. In addition, samples were taken at intervals from the various heaps in the vaults and also from an open heap exposed to the elements. The samples were subjected to microbiological testing to quantify the pathogen dieoff over time. In the vaults, there was a 3log10 (99.9%) reduction of total coliform between 130 and 250 days, fecal coliform between 100 and 250 days, and fecal streptococci from 125 days and longer. In the open heap, these times varied, from 115 days for both total and fecal coliform, to 140 days for fecal streptococci. Viable Ascaris ova were reduced to zero between 44 and 174 days in the vaults and by 44 days in the open heap. The results of this research showed that ventilation of the vault by means of a ventpipe does not result in any meaningful difference in the vault temperature or the rate of pathogen dieoff. While the type of bulking agent used does not significantly affect the temperature of the heap, it does have an effect on the rate of pathogen dieoff. The ordinary soil mix was seen to give the best results, and this was ascribed to the effect of competing microorganisms in the soil itself. It is concluded that, for safety, vaults of urine-diversion toilets should be sized for

  8. Implementation of a scheduled toileting program in a long term care facility: evaluating the impact on injury risk to caregiving staff.

    PubMed

    Engst, Chris; Chhokar, Rahul; Robinson, Dan; Earthy, Ann; Tate, Robert B; Yassi, Annalee

    2004-10-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a scheduled toileting program on the risk of injury to caregivers and on resident agitation or aggressive behaviors. Injury data, ergonomic assessments, staff questionnaires, and resident agitation checklists were used to evaluate the program in a 75 bed unit, with a similar unit acting as a comparison. The program resulted in an increased percentage of residents toileted regularly in the intervention unit, while aggressive incidents declined in both groups. Staff in the intervention unit reported a significantly lower perceived risk of injury to the head and neck than the comparison group. Although the program resulted in increased workload to manage multitasking, monitor an additional aspect of scheduled care, and perform more toileting transfers, overall risk of physical injury was reduced. The toileting program, a shift toward resident focused care, and enhanced agitation awareness combined to reduce resident handling injuries and resident agitation expressed as verbal behaviors or emotional upset, but not as physical behaviors. Clear communication, mentoring, and monitoring were important for successfully changing care practices.

  9. Structure, optical properties and thermal stability of Al2O3-WC nanocomposite ceramic spectrally selective solar absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang-Hu; Wang, Cheng-Bing; Guo, Zhi-Ming; Geng, Qing-Fen; Theiss, Wolfgang; Liu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    Traditional metal-dielectric composite coating has found important application in spectrally selective solar absorbers. However, fine metal particles can easily diffuse, congregate, or be oxidized at high temperature, which causes deterioration in the optical properties. In this work, we report a new spectrally selective solar absorber coating, composed of low Al2O3 ceramic volume fraction (Al2O3(L)-WC) layer, high Al2O3 ceramic volume fraction (Al2O3(H)-WC layer) and Al2O3 antireflection layer. The features of our work are: 1) compared with the metal-dielectric composites concept, Al2O3-WC nanocomposite ceramic successfully achieves the all-ceramic concept, which exhibits a high solar absorptance of 0.94 and a low thermal emittance of 0.08, 2) Al2O3 and WC act as filler material and host material, respectively, which are different from traditional concept, 3) Al2O3-WC nanocomposite ceramic solar absorber coating exhibits good thermal stability at 600 °C. In addition, the solar absorber coating is successfully modelled by a commercial optical simulation programme, the result of which agrees with the experimental results.

  10. Electrideposition and Wear Behavior of Nano-Structured Cr-WC Composite Coatings from a Trivalent Chromium Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadeh, A.; Nadali, S.; Lari Baghal, S. M.; Moradi, H.

    Electrodeposition of nano-structured Cr-WC had been carried out from a trivalent chromium bath using a square shaped pulse current. The average size of WC particles was 70 nm. The effect of sodium saccharin and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) additives as well as pulse electroplating parameters such as current density, duty cycle and frequency on the amount of incorporated WC particles and morphology of the coatings was investigated. The structure and morphology of the coatings were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. In addition, the hardness and tribological behavior of the coatings were investigated by microhardness and pin on disk methods, respectively. The results showed that although the addition of saccharin and SDS decreased the amount of WC particles in the coating, but reduced the size of WC agglomerates which, in turn, increased the wear resistance of the coatings. Also, the optimum wear resistance was achieved at the current density of 8 A/dm2, duty cycle of 50% and frequency of 10 Hz.

  11. Effect of Atmospheric Plasma Spraying Power on Microstructure and Properties of WC-(W,Cr)2C-Ni Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Guoliang; An, Yulong; Liu, Guang; Zhou, Huidi; Chen, Jianmin; Chen, Zujun

    2011-12-01

    WC-(W,Cr)2C-Ni coatings were prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) with different spraying powers. The effect of spraying power on microstructure, phase composition, hardness, fracture toughness, and oscillating dry friction and wear behaviors of the coatings were studied. Simultaneously, the microstructure and properties of the as-sprayed coatings were compared with those of WC-17Co coating prepared under the optimal spraying power. It was found that spraying power had significant effect on the molten degree of feedstock powder and phase composition as well as microstructure and properties of WC-(W,Cr)2C-Ni coatings. WC-(W,Cr)2C-Ni coating deposited at a moderate spraying power of 22.5 kW had the highest fracture toughness and the best wear resistance. WC-17Co coating obtained under the moderate spraying power had poor fracture toughness and wear resistance. Moreover, the four kinds of coatings were all dominated by subsurface cracking and removal of materials when sliding against Si3N4 ball under unlubricated conditions.

  12. Accessibility Videos.

    PubMed

    Kurppa, Ari; Nordlund, Marika

    2016-01-01

    It can be difficult to understand accessibility, if you do not have the personal experience. The Accessibility Centre ESKE produced short videos which demonstrate the meaning of accessibility in different situations. Videos will raise accessibility awareness of architects, other planners and professionals in the construction field and maintenance. PMID:27534282

  13. Long-term semiregular dust formation by the WC9+B0I system WR 70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Peredur M.; van der Hucht, Karel A.; van Wyk, Francois; Marang, Fred; Whitelock, Patricia A.; Bouchet, Patrice; Gunawan, Diah Y. A. Setia

    2013-02-01

    We present infrared (IR) photometry of the WC9+B0I Wolf-Rayet binary system HD 137603 (WR 70) observed with telescopes at the European Southern Observatory, the South African Astronomical Observatory and the Anglo-Australian Telescope between 1983 and 2010 which shows persistent but variable circumstellar dust emission. Optical spectroscopy confirms the classification of the companion as a B0 supergiant and suggests that the Balmer lines in its spectrum suffer in-fill from wind emission. Re-examination of the reddening suggests a revised distance of 3.5 kpc. In the near-IR, the amplitude of variation increases with wavelength, with no significant variation in J (nor is there in the visible), implying that it is the amount of dust in the wind of WR 70 that is varying. Period searches show a period near 2.82 yr (1030 d) but the variations are not strictly regular and there are other factors affecting the dust formation and repeatability of the light curves. There may be a secondary period near 5.88 yr but there is no evidence for periods less than a year. A model of the spectral energy distribution in 1991 gives a dust formation rate of 5.9 × 10-7 M⊙ yr-1, around one-third of the available carbon from the WC9 wind going into the wind-collision region, estimating its size from average WC9 and B0Ia wind properties. The fraction of carbon going into dust varied between ˜11 and 46 per cent during our campaign, possibly as a consequence of the stars moving in an elliptical orbit.

  14. Lamellipodia and Membrane Blebs Drive Efficient Electrotactic Migration of Rat Walker Carcinosarcoma Cells WC 256

    PubMed Central

    Sroka, Jolanta; Krecioch, Izabela; Zimolag, Eliza; Lasota, Slawomir; Rak, Monika; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Borowicz, Pawel; Gajek, Marta; Madeja, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    The endogenous electric field (EF) may provide an important signal for directional cell migration during wound healing, embryonic development and cancer metastasis but the mechanism of cell electrotaxis is poorly understood. Additionally, there is no research addressing the question on the difference in electrotactic motility of cells representing various strategies of cell movement—specifically blebbing vs. lamellipodial migration. In the current study we constructed a unique experimental model which allowed for the investigation of electrotactic movement of cells of the same origin but representing different modes of cell migration: weakly adherent, spontaneously blebbing (BC) and lamellipodia forming (LC) WC256 cells. We report that both BC and LC sublines show robust cathodal migration in a physiological EF (1–3 V/cm). The directionality of cell movement was completely reversible upon reversing the field polarity. However, the full reversal of cell direction after the change of EF polarity was much faster in the case of BC (10 minutes) than LC cells (30 minutes). We also investigated the distinct requirements for Rac, Cdc42 and Rho pathways and intracellular Ca2+ in electrotaxis of WC256 sublines forming different types of cell protrusions. It was found that Rac1 is required for directional movement of LC to a much greater extent than for BC, but Cdc42 and RhoA are more crucial for BC than for LC cells. The inhibition of ROCK did not affect electrotaxis of LC in contrast to BC cells. The results also showed that intracellular Ca2+ is essential only for the electrotactic reaction of BC cells. Moreover, inhibition of MLCK and myosin II did not affect the electrotaxis of LC in contrast to BC cells. In conclusion, our results revealed that both lamellipodia and membrane blebs can efficiently drive electrotactic migration of WC 256 carcinosarcoma cells, however directional migration is mediated by different signalling pathways. PMID:26863616

  15. Safety analysis report for packaging: the ORNL DOT Specification 20WC-5 - special form packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schaich, R.W.

    1982-10-01

    The ORNL DOT Specification 20WC-5 - Special Form Package was fabricated for the transport of large quantities of solid nonfissile radioactive materials in special form. The package was evaluated on the basis of tests performed at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico on an identical fire and impact shield and special form tests performed on a variety of stainless steel capsules at ORNL by Operations Division personnel. The results of these evaluations demonstrate that the package is in compliance with the applicable regulations for the transport of large quantities of nonfissile radioactive materials in special form.

  16. Safety-analysis report for packaging: the ORNL DOT specification 20WC-5 - special form packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schaich, R.W.

    1983-03-01

    The ORNL DOT Specification 20WC-5 - Special Form Packaging was fabricated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the transport of large quantities of solid non-fissile radioactive materials in special form. the package was evaluated on the basis of tests performed at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (formerly Sandia Corporation), on an identical fire and impact shield and special form tests performed on a variety of stainless steel capsules at ORNL by Operations Division personnel. The results of these evaluations demonstrate that the package is in compliance with the applicable regulations for the transport of large quantities of non-fissile radioactive materials in special form. 7 figures.

  17. When friendship formation goes down the toilet: design features of shared accommodation influence interpersonal bonds and well-being.

    PubMed

    Easterbrook, Matthew J; Vignoles, Vivian L

    2015-03-01

    Despite its omnipresence, the influence of the built environment on human psychology is not well understood. In a five-wave longitudinal study, we investigated whether physical design features within shared student accommodation predicted the frequency of coincidental meetings between new flatmates, and whether these meetings predicted the strength of their interpersonal bonds and psychological well-being. Multilevel latent growth modelling on responses from 462 new university residents supported our hypotheses: Respondents living in flats with design features that encouraged the use of communal areas--a shared common area and an absence of ensuite toilets--reported unintentionally meeting their flatmates more frequently within their flats. This in turn predicted the initial strength of their interpersonal bonds with their flatmates, which in turn positively predicted their well-being. These effects were maintained throughout the 10-week study. Our findings provide an empirical basis for the development of shared housing designed to foster positive relationships and well-being among residents.

  18. The friction coefficient evolution of a MoS2/WC multi-layer coating system during sliding wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, T. Y.; Hu, Y.; Gharbi, Mohammad M.; Politis, D. J.; Wang, L.

    2016-08-01

    This paper discusses the evolution of friction coefficient for the multi-layered Molybdenum Disulphide (MoS2) and WC coated substrate during sliding against Aluminium AA 6082 material. A soft MoS2 coating was prepared over a hard WC coated G3500 cast iron tool substrate and underwent friction test using a pin-on-disc tribometer. The lifetime of the coating was reduced with increasing load while the Aluminium debris accumulated on the WC hard coating surfaces, accelerated the breakdown of the coatings. The lifetime of the coating was represented by the friction coefficient and the sliding distance before MoS2 coating breakdown and was found to be affected by the load applied and the wear mechanism.

  19. COBRA-WC: a version of COBRA for single-phase multiassembly thermal hydraulic transient analysis. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.L.; Basehore, K.L.; Wheeler, C.L.; Prather, W.A.; Masterson, R.E.

    1980-07-01

    The objective of this report is to provide the user of the COBRA-WC (Whole Core) code a basic understanding of the code operation and capabilities. Included in this manual are the equations solved and the assumptions made in their derivations, a general description of the code capabilities, an explanation of the numerical algorithms used to solve the equations, and input instructions for using the code. Also, the auxiliary programs GEOM and SPECSET are described and input instructions for each are given. Input for COBRA-WC sample problems and the corresponding output are given in the appendices. The COBRA-WC code has been developed from the COBRA-IV-I code to analyze liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) assembly transients. It was specifically developed to analyze a core flow coastdown to natural circulation cooling.

  20. Free energies of formation of WC and WzC and the thermodynamic properties of carbon in solid tungsten

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, D. K.; Seigle, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    The activity of carbon in the two-phase regions - W + WC and W + W2C was obtained from the carbon content of iron rods equilibrated with mixtures of metal plus carbide powders. From this activity data the standard free energies of formation of WC and W2C were calculated. The temperature of the invariant reaction W2C = W + WC was fixed at 1570 + or - 5K. Using available solubility data for C in solid W, the partial molar free energy of C in the dilute solid solution was also calculated. The heat of solution of C in W, and the excess entropy for the interstitial solid solution, were computed, assuming that the carbon atoms reside in the octahedral interstices of bcc W.

  1. Condensation of Dust around the WC7 Star HD192641 = WR137

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. M.; Longmore, A. J.; van der Hucht, K. A.; Talevera, A.; Wamsteker, W. M.; Abbott, D. C.; Telesco, C. M.

    1985-07-01

    The WC7+ absorption class Wolf-Rayet star WR 137 (=HD 192641) is shown to have brightened significantly in the infrared since 1978, most rapidly between 1983 and mid-1984. This is ascribed to an increase in the mass loss rate and the condensation of dust grains in the stellar wind. At maximum, the dust mass was about 10-8 Msun with a formation rate near 10-7 Msun yr-1, about 0.5 per cent of the mass loss rate. This was not accompanied by any strengthening of the 2200 Å absorption feature measured by the IUE between 1980 and 1984 although the shell was too weak to rule out any connection between the 2200 Å absorption feature and the carbon grains presumed to comprise the shell. The fading of WR 137 in the infrared between 1973 and 1978 may have been due to the dissipation of an earlier dust shell and WR 137 may resemble WR 140 (=HD 193793, also WC7+abs) in showing sporadic dust formation episodes.

  2. High-pressure shock behavior of WC and Ta2O5 powders.

    SciTech Connect

    Knudson, Marcus D.; Reinhart, William Dodd; Vogler, Tracy John; Root, Seth

    2011-10-01

    Planar shock experiments were conducted on granular tungsten carbide (WC) and tantalum oxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) using the Z machine and a 2-stage gas gun. Additional shock experiments were also conducted on a nearly fully dense form of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The experiments on WC yield some of the highest pressure results for granular materials obtained to date. Because of the high distention of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, the pressures obtained were significantly lower, but the very high temperatures generated led to large contributions of thermal energy to the material response. These experiments demonstrate that the Z machine can be used to obtain accurate shock data on granular materials. The data on Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} were utilized in making improvements to the P-{lambda} model for high pressures; the model is found to capture the results not only of the Z and gas gun experiments but also those from laser experiments on low density aerogels. The results are also used to illustrate an approach for generating an equation of state using only the limited data coming from nanoindentation. Although the EOS generated in this manner is rather simplistic, for this material it gives reasonably good results.

  3. Associations between depression and different measures of obesity (BMI, WC, WHtR, WHR)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Growing evidence suggests that abdominal obesity is a more important risk factor for the prognosis of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases than BMI. Somatic-affective symptoms of depression have also been linked to cardiovascular risk. The relationship between obesity and depression, however, has remained contradictory. Our aim was therefore to relate body mass index (BMI) and different measures for abdominal obesity (waist circumference, WC, waist-to-hip ratio, WHR, waist-to-height ratio, WHtR) to somatic vs. cognitive-affective symptoms of depression. Methods In a cross-sectional population based study, data on the first N = 5000 participants enrolled in the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS) are reported. To analyze the relationship between depression and obesity, we computed linear regression models with the anthropometric measure (BMI, WC, WHR, WHtR) as the dependent variable and life style factors, cardiovascular risk factors and psychotropic medications as potential confounders of obesity/depression. Results We found that only the somatic, but not the cognitive-affective symptoms of depression are consistently positively associated with anthropometric measures of obesity. Conclusions We could demonstrate that the somatic-affective symptoms of depression rather than the cognitive-affective symptoms are strongly related to anthropometric measures. This is also true for younger obese starting at the age of 35 years. Our results are in line with previous studies indicating that visceral adipose tissue plays a key role in the relationship between obesity, depression and cardiovascular disease. PMID:24028572

  4. Stripping methods studies for HVOF WC-10Co-4Cr coating removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menini, Richard; Salah, Nihad Ben; Nciri, Rachid

    2004-04-01

    The use of high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) cermet coatings is considered to be a valuable and innovative alternative technology to replace Cr(VI) electroplating. Among others, a WC-10Co-4Cr coating is one of the best choices for landing gear components due to its excellent tribology and corrosion properties. The stripping process of such a cermet coating was studied due to its importance for the repair and overhaul of landing gear components. Stripping solutions fulfill the following criteria: keep substrate integrity; exhibit a high strip rate (SR); lead to uniform dissolution; show no galvanic corrosion; and be environmentally friendly. Three different high-strength steel substrates (4340, 300M, and Aermet100) were studied. Five different stripping solutions were selected for the electrochemical study. Only three met the targeted criteria: the meta-nitrobenzane sulfonate-sodium cyanide solution; the Rochelle salt; and a commercial nickel stripper. It was found that the process must be electrolytic, and that ultrasonic agitation is needed to enhance the overall mass transport and removal of WC particles and metallic matrix residues. When choosing the most efficient solution and conditions, the SR was found to be as high as 162 µm h-1, which is a very acceptable SR for productivity sake.

  5. Arecibo and Goldstone Radar Imaging of Near-Earth Asteroid 2005 WC1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Kenneth J.; Benner, Lance A. M.; Brozovic, Marina; Jao, Joseph S.; Giorgini, Jon D.; Slade, Martin A.; Jurgens, Raymond F.; Nolan, Michael C.; Howell, Ellen S.; Taylor, Patrick A.

    2016-10-01

    We report radar observations of near-Earth asteroid 2005 WC1 that were obtained at Arecibo (2380 MHz, 13 cm) and Goldstone (8560 MHz, 3.5 cm) on 2005 December 14-15 during the asteroid's approach within 0.020 au (7.7 lunar distances). The asteroid was a strong radar target and we obtained a sequence of delay-Doppler images with resolutions as fine as 7.5 m/pixel. The radar images reveal an angular object with several pronounced facets, radar-dark regions, and an estimated diameter of ~0.4 km. The rotation of the facets in the images gives a rotation period of 2.57 h that is consistent with the estimate of 2.582 h ± 0.002 h reported by Miles et al. (private communication). 2005 WC1 has a circular polarization ratio of 1.12 ± 0.02 that is one of the highest values known, suggesting a structurally-complex near-surface at centimeter decimeter spatial scales. This work has been performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA.

  6. Realization of the WC-C peritectic fixed point at NIM and NMIJ

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Bai, C.; Yuan, Z.; Dong, W.; Lu, X.; Sasajima, N.; Yamada, Y.; Ara, C.

    2013-09-11

    Three WC-C peritectic fixed point cells, constructed from different sources of tungsten with different nominal purities, were measured at NIM and NMIJ. The three cells were constructed at NMIJ by NIM and NMIJ staffs, and T{sub 90} values of the three cells were measured at NMIJ during the period 31 Aug. to 25 Dec. 2009. Thereafter, the three cells were then transported to NIM, and T{sub 90} values of these cells were measured from 7 Dec. 2011 to 9 Jan. 2012. The results showed that T{sub 90} values of the three cells measured at the two institutes agreed within 0.4 °C with the combined scale comparison uncertainty of 1.7 °C (k= 2). The main component of the uncertainty is not the uncertainty due to impurities of the cells but the scale uncertainty and the stability of the measurement system. From these results it can be concluded that the WC-C cell is stable enough to provide new means of international high-temperature scale comparison above 3000 K.

  7. Microstructure Evolution and Its Effect on the Wear Performance of HVOF-Sprayed Conventional WC-Co Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Dingfa; Xiong, Haoqi; Wang, Qun

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a conventional tungsten carbide 12% cobalt (WC-12Co) coating was deposited by using a liquid fuel JP-8000 high velocity oxyfuel spray system. The properties of the coating namely phase content, microstructure, hardness, porosity, and fracture toughness were examined. The microstructure evolution and its influence on the abrasive wear behavior of the coatings were evaluated in detail by in-situ scanning electron microscopy and a comprehensive model for decarburization of WC has been established using x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analyses.

  8. Microstructure Evolution and Its Effect on the Wear Performance of HVOF-Sprayed Conventional WC-Co Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Dingfa; Xiong, Haoqi; Wang, Qun

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a conventional tungsten carbide 12% cobalt (WC-12Co) coating was deposited by using a liquid fuel JP-8000 high velocity oxyfuel spray system. The properties of the coating namely phase content, microstructure, hardness, porosity, and fracture toughness were examined. The microstructure evolution and its influence on the abrasive wear behavior of the coatings were evaluated in detail by in-situ scanning electron microscopy and a comprehensive model for decarburization of WC has been established using x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analyses.

  9. Pt catalysts on PANI coated WC/C nanocomposites for methanol electro-oxidation and oxygen electro-reduction in DMFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaldagard, Maryam; Jahanshahi, Mohsen; Seghatoleslami, Naser

    2014-10-01

    In the present study a Pt/PANI/WC/C electrocatalyst was developed to increase the methanol electro-oxidation and oxygen electro-reduction activity and stability of commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst. WC/C was coated with protonated polyaniline (PANI) in situ during the polymerization of aniline. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) results illustrate the presence of PANI in the composite. The conductivity of PANI coated - WC/C has been compared with the conductivity of the corresponding mixtures of WC/C and Vulcan XC-72. X-ray diffraction results showed that Pt particles were dispersed on the support with mean particle size of about 10.56 nm. Transition electron microscopy images showed that the nanosized WC/C were successfully coated by PANI. Based on the electrochemical properties characterized by cyclic voltammetry, CO stripping and rotating disk electrode measurements it was found that the as prepared Pt/PANI/WC/C electrocatalyst exhibited a comparable activity for methanol oxidation reaction and oxygen reduction reaction with respect to the commercial one. A significant reduction in the potential of CO electro-oxidation peak from 0.75 V for Pt/C to 0.52 V for Pt/PANI/WC/C electrocatalyst indicates that an increase in the activity for CO electro-oxidation is achieved by replacing the carbon support by PANI coated WC/C. Chronoamerometry results also showed, in the presence of methanol the Pt/PANI/WC/C electrocatalyst still maintains a higher current density than Pt/WC/C and Pt/C.

  10. Determination and modeling of residual stress in functionally graded WC-Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahvilian, Leila

    Gradual variations in composition and/or structure through the volume of functionally graded materials (FGMs) generally result in corresponding continuous spatial variations in mechanical/physical properties, and often in significant residual stresses that develop during processing. Due to inhomogeneous properties in these materials, residual stress measurement in FGMs can be a very challenging problem. In this study, residual stresses in functionally graded cemented tungsten carbide (FG-WC-Co) were investigated by numerical, analytical and experimental approaches by means of a layer removal technique. The numerical method consisted of finite element analysis (FEA) modeling for the FGM plate, in order to calculate residual stress distribution over the volume and to develop a method for predicting residual stress levels in closely related materials. The analytical procedure embodied a mathematical approach to determine residual stress distributions, and analytically determined values are compared with those obtained from FEA modeling and experimental results. The experimental approach consisted of fabricating and heat treating FG-WC-Co flat samples, then measuring strain changes by strain gauge after each sequential layer removal from the opposite side of the specimen from the graded region. Good agreement was found between analytical, numerical and experimental results. Furthermore, thermal residual stress distribution in FG-WC-Co hollow cylinder was examined with an emphasis on the effects of key variables, the gradient profile and the gradient thickness, on the magnitude and distribution of the stress field. An analytical direct solution based on solving the governing equations of a cylinder composed of a uniform inner core and a functionally graded outer shell was developed. The cylindrical compound was considered as two separate elements: homogeneous cylinder and functionally graded shell. Material properties, such as the elastic modulus and the coefficient of

  11. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  12. Powder/processing/structure relationships in WC-Co thermal spray coatings: A review of the published literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Villiers Lovelock, H. L.

    1998-09-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings based on tungsten carbide are widely used but not yet fully understood, particularly with regard to the chemical, microstructural, and phase changes that occur during spraying and their influence on properties such as wear resistance. The available literature on thermally sprayed WC-Co coatings is considerable, but it is generally difficult to synthesize all of the findings to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the subject. This is due to the many different starting powders, spray system types, spray parameters, and other variables that influence the coating structures and cause difficulties when comparing results from different workers. The purpose of this review is to identify broad trends in the powder/processing/structure relationships of WC-Co coatings, classified according to powder type and spray method. Detailed comparisons of coating microstructures, powder phase compositions and coating phase compositions as reported by different researchers are given in tabular form and discussed. The emphasis is on the phase changes that occur during spraying. This review concerns only WC-12% Co and WC-17% Co coatings, and contrasts the coatings obtained from the cast and crushed, sintered and crushed, and agglomerated and densified powder types. Properties such as hardness, wear, or corrosion resistance are not reviewed here.

  13. Microstructural study of MMC layers produced by combining wire and coaxial WC powder feeding in laser direct metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fuquan; Gao, Zhenzeng; Li, Liqun; Chen, Yanbin

    2016-03-01

    Combined wire and powder deposition by laser (WPDL) has proven to be a promising method for fabricating Metal Matrix Compounds (MMC). Here we demonstrate the deposition of a MMC layer onto Ti6Al4V substrate by WPDL. WC powder was fed from a coaxial nozzle whilst titanium wire was fed from a lateral nozzle into a laser generated melt pool. The appearance of the MMC layer was controlled by process parameters including wire feeding rate, powder feeding rate and laser power. The microstructure of these compound layers were subsequently analyzed by SEM, EDS and XRD. It has shown that compound layer are comprised of α-Ti, WC, W2C, TiC, W and (W,Ti) C1-x phase. The W2C phase and TiC phase was formed and distributed in titanium matrix with different shape at the different location of MMC layer. WC particles were distributed throughout the MMC layer as enforcement phase, which occurring metallic bonding with matrix. The presence of WC and TiC phase in the MMC layer enhanced its microhardness and abrasive.

  14. WC Nanocrystals Grown on Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes: An Efficient and Stable Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiujun; Zhou, Haiqing; Guo, Xia

    2015-05-26

    Single nanocrystalline tungsten carbide (WC) was first synthesized on the tips of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs) with a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) method through the directly reaction of tungsten metal with carbon source. The VA-CNTs with preservation of vertical structure integrity and alignment play an important role to support the nanocrystalline WC growth. With the high crystallinity, small size, and uniform distribution of WC particles on the carbon support, the formed WC-CNTs material exhibited an excellent catalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), giving a η10 (the overpotential for driving a current of 10 mA cm(-2)) of 145 mV, onset potential of 15 mV, exchange current density@ 300 mV of 117.6 mV and Tafel slope values of 72 mV dec(-1) in acid solution, and η10 of 137 mV, onset potential of 16 mV, exchange current density@ 300 mV of 33.1 mV and Tafel slope values of 106 mV dec(-1) in alkaline media, respectively. Electrochemical stability test further confirms the long-term operation of the catalyst in both acidic and alkaline media. PMID:25869150

  15. Evaluation of Solvita compost stability and maturity tests for assessment of quality of end-products from mixed latrine style compost toilets

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Geoffrey B.; Baldwin, Susan A.; Vinnerås, Bjorn

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Solvita® stability and maturity tests used on composting toilet end-product. • Solvita® ammonia better suited in evaluation of feedstock suitability for vermicomposting. • No clear value of Solvita® stability test due to prevalent inhibition of decomposition by ammonia. - Abstract: It is challenging and expensive to monitor and test decentralized composting toilet systems, yet critical to prevent the mismanagement of potentially harmful and pathogenic end-product. Recent studies indicate that mixed latrine composting toilets can be inhibited by high ammonia content, a product of urea hydrolysis. Urine-diverting vermicomposting toilets are better able to accomplish the goals of remote site human waste management by facilitating the consumption of fecal matter by earthworms, which are highly sensitive to ammonia. The reliability of Solvita® compost stability and maturity tests were evaluated as a means of determining feedstock suitability for vermicomposting (ammonia) and end-product stability/completeness (carbon dioxide). A significant linear regression between Solvita® ammonia and free ammonia gas was found. Solvita® ranking of maturity did not correspond to ranking assigned by ammonium:nitrate standards. Solvita® ammonia values 4 and 5 contained ammonia levels below earthworm toxicity limits in 80% and 100% of samples respectively indicative of their use in evaluating feedstock suitability for vermicomposting. Solvita® stability tests did not correlate with carbon dioxide evolution tests nor ranking of stability by the same test, presumably due to in situ inhibition of decomposition and microbial respiration by ammonia which were reported by the Solvita® CO{sub 2} test as having high stability values.

  16. Ammonia decomposition activity on monolayer Ni supported on Ru, Pt and WC substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansgen, Danielle A.; Vlachos, Dionisios G.; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2011-12-01

    Catalyst design for specific reactions currently involves using atomic or molecular descriptors to identify promising catalysts. In this paper, we explore three surfaces that have similar computed nitrogen binding energies, which is a descriptor for the ammonia decomposition reaction. The surfaces studied include a monolayer of Ni on Pt(111), Ru(0001) and tungsten monocarbide (WC). The activity of these surfaces toward the ammonia decomposition reaction was compared using density functional theory and temperature programmed desorption. It was found that while the NHx-H bond scission is similar on each of the surfaces, the temperature of nitrogen desorption is very different. The differences are explained and the implications for ammonia decomposition activity and catalyst design are discussed.

  17. Thermal Behaviour of W+C Ion Implanted Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Urkac, E. Sokullu; Oztarhan, A.; Tihminlioglu, F.; Ila, D.; Chhay, B.; Muntele, C.; Budak, S.; Oks, E.; Nikolaev, A.

    2009-03-10

    The aim of this work was to examine thermal behavior of the surface modified Ultra High Molecular Weight Poly Ethylene (UHMWPE ) in order to understand the effect of ion implantation on the properties of this polymer which is widely used especially for biomedical applications. UHMWPE samples were Tungsten and Carbon (W+C) hybrid ion implanted by using Metal Vapour Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion implantation technique with a fluence of 10 17 ions/cm2 and extraction voltage of 30 kV. Untreated and surface-treated samples were investigated by Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) Analysis, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) Spectrometry, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). This study has shown that ion implantation represents a powerful tool on modifying thermal properties of UHMWPE surfaces. This combination of properties can make implanted UHMWPE a preferred material for biomedical applications.

  18. Simulation of spectroscopic patterns obtained in W/C test-limiter sputtering experiment at TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratyev, D.; Borodin, D.; Kirschner, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J. W.; Laengner, M.; Stoschus, H.; Vainshtein, L.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Samm, U.

    2013-07-01

    On the TEXTOR tokamak various experiments aimed at investigation of tungsten erosion and transport are performed. In one experiment a spherical W/C twin limiter positioned close to the last-closed flux surface in the near scrape-off layer was exposed to a number of comparable plasma discharges with stepwise variations of edge plasma parameters. Spatial distribution of tungsten and carbon light emission was recorded with two dimensional CCD cameras and spectrometer systems with high spectral and spatial resolution. Penetration depths, tungsten sputtering fluxes and erosion yields were measured. Comparison between experimental data and the results of modelling with the 3D Monte-Carlo code ERO is performed. The main objective of this study was to test the adequacy of the existing atomic data for neutral tungsten. The modelled penetration depths of the light emission of tungsten are a factor of 2-3 smaller than in experiment, which may indicate the overestimation of ionization rates.

  19. Dry sliding wear behavior of TIG welding clad WC composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buytoz, Soner; Ulutan, Mustafa; Yildirim, M. Mustafa

    2005-12-01

    In this study, melted tungsten carbide powders on the surface of AISI 4340 steel was applied by using tungsten inert gas (TIG) method. It was observed that it has been solidified in different microstructures depending on the production parameters. As a result of microstructure examinations, in the surface modified layers an eutectic and dendrite solidification was observed together with WC, W 2C phases. In the layer produced, the hardness values varied between 950 and 1200 HV. The minimum mass loss was observed in the sample, which was treated in 1.209 mm/s production rate, 0.5 g/s powder feed rate and 13.9 kJ/cm heat input.

  20. Improved tribological behaviour of MoS2 thin solid films alloyed with WC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oñate, J. I.; Brizuela, M.; Garcia-Luis, A.; Braceras, I.; Viviente, J. L.; Gomez-Elvira, J.

    2001-09-01

    MoS2 is a broadly accepted solid lubricant for space mechanisms. However, the tribological properties can be affected by the deposition parameters that can in turn influence structure and composition of the films. One important drawback of MoS2 is its sensitivity to atmospheric water vapour which renders the film unsuitable for use under high humidity levels and forces the taking of precautions during ground qualification testing and storage of solid lubricated space mechanisms. Recently, and with developments made in magnetron sputtering PVD technology an interest has arisen in the production of more wear and moisture resistant MoS2 films. This has been evaluated by alloying the film by co-depositing a range of metallic and non-metallic elements. This paper follows a previous report in which Ti metal was co-deposited with MoS2 and a low friction under vacuum and atmospheric conditions was demonstrated. However, it was felt that extended durability was still needed for the benefit of space community. In this work, preliminary results on the deposition of WC-MoSx films by magnetron sputtering are presented. Vacuum tribology of these films, at 0.75 and 0.95 GPa contact stresses, shows that the friction coefficients are similar to those obtained in conventional MoS2 films, but there is a significant improvement in durability. When evaluating the performance of these films under atmospheric conditions and at various humidity levels (from 40 to 60% RH), the tribological response has also been very good, with average friction coefficients as low as 0.07 and a durability as high as 450.000 wear cycles. XPS analyses have shown that the films consist mainly of a MoSx lubricating matrix in which a carbidic wear resistant WC phase is embedded. This combination ensures a low friction behaviour while providing a higher resistance to wear.

  1. An IRAS-based search for new Dusty Late-Type WC Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin

    1995-01-01

    I have examined all Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) data relevant to the 173 Galactic Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars in an updated catalog, including the 13 stars newly discovered by Shara and coworkers. Using the W-R coordinates in these lists, I have examined the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC), the Faint Source Catalog, and the Faint Source Reject Catalog, and have generated one-dimensional spatial profiles ('ADDSCANs') and two-dimensional full-resolution images ('FRESCOs'). The goal was to assemble the best set of observed IRAS color indices for different W-R types, in particular for known dusty late-type WC Wolf-Rayet (WCL) objects. I have also unsuccessfully sought differences in IRAS colors and absolute magnitudes between single and binary W-R stars. The color indices for the entire ensemble of W-R stars define zones in the IRAS color-color plane. By searching the PSC for otherwise unassociated sources that satisfy these colors, I have identified potential new W-R candidates, perhaps too faint to have been recognized in previous optical searches. I have extracted these candidates' IRAS low-resolution spectrometer (LRS) data and compared the spectra with the highly characteristic LRS shape for known dusty WCL stars. The 13 surviving candidates must now be examined by optical spectroscopy. This work represents a much more rigorous and exhaustive version of the LRS study that identified IRAS 17380 - 3031 (WR98a) as the first new W-R (WC9) star discovered by IRAS. This search should have detected dusty WCL stars to a distance of 7.0 kpc from the Sun, for the absolute value of l greater than 30 deg, and to 2.9 kpc even in the innermost Galaxy. For free-free-dominated W-R stars the corresponding distances are 2.5 and 1.0 kpc, respectively.

  2. An IRAS-Based Search for New Dusty Late-Type WC Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin

    1995-01-01

    I have examined all Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) data relevant to the 173 Galactic Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars in an updated catalog, including the 13 stars newly discovered by Shara and coworkers. Using the W-R coordinates in these lists, I have examined the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC), the Faint Source Catalog, and the Faint Source Reject Catalog, and have generated one-dimensional spatial profiles, 'ADDSCANs', and two-dimensional full-resolution images, 'FRESCOS'. The goal was to assemble the best set of observed IRAS color indices for different W-R types, in particular for known dusty late-type WC Wolf-Rayet (WCL) objects. I have also unsuccessfully sought differences in IRAS colors and absolute magnitudes between single and binary W-R stars. The color indices for the entire ensemble of W-R stars define zones in the IRAS color-color ([12] - [25], [25] - [60])-plane. By searching the PSC for otherwise unassociated sources that satisfy these colors, I have identified potential new W-R candidates, perhaps too faint to have been recognized in previous optical searches. I have extracted these candidates' IRAS low-resolution spectrometer (LRS) data and compared the spectra with the highly characteristic LRS shape for known dusty WCL stars. The 13 surviving candidates must now be ex amined by optical spectroscopy. This work represents a much more rigorous and exhaustive version of the LRS study that identified IRAS 17380 - 3031 (WR98a) as the first new W-R (WC9) star discovered by IPAS. This search should have detected dusty WCL stars to a distance of 7.0 kpc from the Sun, for l is greater than 30 degrees, and to 2.9 kpc even in the innermost galaxy. For free-free-dominated W-R stars the corresponding distances are 2.5 and 1.0 kpc, respectively.

  3. Time-Resolved FUSE Spectroscopy of the LMC WC + O Binaries Br 22 and Br 32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, Philippe; Marchenko, Sergey V.; St-Louis, Nicole; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    2008-08-01

    Using the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer satellite, we obtained series of spectra for two of the three known WC + O binaries in the LMC, Br 22, and Br 32 (HD 36521). Compared to Br 22, we detect a higher ratio of C IV to He II lines in Br 32, which could indicate a more advanced evolutionary stage for the latter. The orbit of the O star in Br 32 has been determined from its P V absorption lines. We find that continuum fluxes in both systems are substantially diluted by a third-light source. The maximum extension of the black absorption troughs in P Cygni profiles provides the terminal velocities of the WC winds: 3775 +/- 125 km s-1 for Br 22 and 4400 +/- 150 km s-1 for Br 32. From the phase-dependent displacements of the blue absorption edges of prominent emission lines we estimate the half-opening angles of the wind-wind collision zones and their Coriolis deflections. In both binaries we fitted, via iterative procedure, the phase-dependent changes in the O VI λ1032-1037 and C III λ1175 profiles as a function of the wind, stellar, and orbital parameters. This allowed us to isolate the excess emission produced in the wind-wind collision zone and reproduce profile changes caused by atmospheric eclipses. A strong extra emission component is observed in Br 22 (P = 14.9 days), while it is negligible in Br 32 (P = 1.9 days). Based on observations made with the NASA-CNES-CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). FUSE is operated for NASA by The Johns Hopkins University under NASA contract NAS5-32985.

  4. A comparative human health risk assessment of p-dichlorobenzene-based toilet rimblock products versus fragrance/surfactant-based alternatives.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Dallas B; Bosch, Stephen; Gray, D Anthony; Howard, Philip H; Guiney, Patrick D

    2007-10-01

    A comparison of the human health risk to consumers using one of two types of toilet rimblock products, either a p-dichlorobenzene-based rimblock or two newer fragrance/surfactant-based alternatives, was conducted. Rimblock products are designed for global use by consumers worldwide and function by releasing volatile compounds into indoor air with subsequent exposure presumed to be mainly by inhalation of indoor air. Using the THERdbASE exposure model and experimentally determined emission data, indoor air concentrations and daily intake values were determined for both types of rimblock products. Modeled exposure concentrations from a representative p-dichlorobenzene rimblock product are an order of magnitude higher than those from the alternative rimblock products due to its nearly pure composition and high sublimation rate. Lifetime exposure to p-dichlorobenzene or the subset of fragrance components with available RfD values is not expected to lead to non-cancer-based adverse health effects based on the exposure concentrations estimated using the THERdbASE model. A similar comparison of cancer-based effects was not possible as insufficient data were available for the fragrance components.

  5. Inactivation of Pathogens in Feces by Desiccation and Urea Treatment for Application in Urine-Diverting Dry Toilets

    PubMed Central

    Philippi, Luiz Sérgio; Vinnerås, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Ecological sanitation technologies can be effective in providing health and environmental pollution control if they can efficiently reduce the pathogenicity of microorganisms carried in fecal material to safe levels. This study evaluated the sanitizing effects of different additives for dry treatment of feces from urine-diverting dry toilets, based on inactivation of Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, bacteriophages MS2 and ΦX, and Ascaris suum. The additives, ash (A) and oyster shell (O) in different amounts and urea (U) to optimize the process, were compared with no additive, solely urea, and sawdust as controls (C) and were covered ([x%O:A]) or uncovered (x%O:A). The main inactivation factors found were desiccation, ammonia content, and pH. S. Typhimurium and E. faecalis were more affected by the ammonia content. A combination of neutral to high pH and desiccation was most effective for inactivation of MS2, and desiccation was most effective for inactivation of ΦX and A. suum. The inactivation rate was modeled for all combinations studied. The most promising treatments were [150%O:A+U], 150%O:A+U, and 150%O:A. According to the models, these could inactivate, for example, 7 log10 units of all bacteria and bacteriophages within 83, 125, and 183 days, respectively. The inactivation of A. suum was modeled, albeit the measured decay in egg viability was low. PMID:23335764

  6. Liquid chromatographic separation and fluorometric determination of cis- and trans-isoeugenol in perfumes, colognes, and toilet waters.

    PubMed

    Wisneski, H H; Yates, R L; Wenninger, J A

    1988-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic (LC)-fluorometric method is described for the determination of cis- and trans-isoeugenol (2-methoxy-4-propenylphenol) in perfumes, colognes, and toilet waters. A test portion of the product is added to diethyl ether, and the isoeugenol isomers are extracted with sodium hydroxide solution. The basic extract is then acidified, and the isoeugenol isomers are extracted with isooctane. Aliquots of the isooctane extract are analyzed by using a silver ion cation exchange LC column interfaced to a spectrophotofluorometer. Each isomer in the product is determined by comparing its fluorescence emission intensity with that of an external standard consisting of a mixture of both isomers in which the relative concentration of each has been determined. Average recoveries from various commercial fragrances fortified with a mixture of cis- and trans-isoeugenol with total isoeugenol content of 0.1, 0.5, and 4.0 mg/mL ranged from 87 to 105% for the trans-isomer (SD = 4.6%) and from 83 to 113% for the cis-isomer (SD = 6.7%). The limit of determination is approximately 0.002 mg/mL.

  7. Toilet compost and human urine used in agriculture: fertilizer value assessment and effect on cultivated soil properties.

    PubMed

    Sangare, D; Sou Dakoure, M; Hijikata, N; Lahmar, R; Yacouba, H; Coulibaly, L; Funamizu, N

    2015-01-01

    Toilet compost (TC) and human urine are among natural fertilizers, which raise interest due to their double advantages to combine sanitation and nutrient recovery. However, combination of urine and TC is not so spread probably because the best ratio (urine/TC) is still an issue and urine effect on soil chemical properties remains poorly documented. This study aims to determine the best ratio of urine and TC in okra cultivation, by targeting higher fertilization effect combined with lower impact on soil chemical properties. Based on Nitrogen requirement of okra, seven treatments were compared: (T0) no fertilizer, (T1) chemical fertilizer (NPK: 14-23-14), (T2) 100% urine, (T3) 100% TC, (T4) ratio of 75% urine+25% TC, (T5) 50% urine+50% TC and (T6) 25% urine+75% TC. Results indicated that T4 (75% urine+25% TC) gave the highest plant height and yield. In contrast, T2 (100% urine) gave the lowest results among all treatments, indicating toxicity effects on plant growth and associated final yield. Such toxicity is confirmed by soil chemical properties at T2 with soil acidification and significant increase in soil salinity. In contrast, application of urine together with TC mitigates soil acidification and salinity, highlighting the efficiency of urine and TC combination on soil chemical properties. However, further investigation is necessary to refine better urine/TC ratio for okra production. PMID:25371046

  8. Toilet compost and human urine used in agriculture: fertilizer value assessment and effect on cultivated soil properties.

    PubMed

    Sangare, D; Sou Dakoure, M; Hijikata, N; Lahmar, R; Yacouba, H; Coulibaly, L; Funamizu, N

    2015-01-01

    Toilet compost (TC) and human urine are among natural fertilizers, which raise interest due to their double advantages to combine sanitation and nutrient recovery. However, combination of urine and TC is not so spread probably because the best ratio (urine/TC) is still an issue and urine effect on soil chemical properties remains poorly documented. This study aims to determine the best ratio of urine and TC in okra cultivation, by targeting higher fertilization effect combined with lower impact on soil chemical properties. Based on Nitrogen requirement of okra, seven treatments were compared: (T0) no fertilizer, (T1) chemical fertilizer (NPK: 14-23-14), (T2) 100% urine, (T3) 100% TC, (T4) ratio of 75% urine+25% TC, (T5) 50% urine+50% TC and (T6) 25% urine+75% TC. Results indicated that T4 (75% urine+25% TC) gave the highest plant height and yield. In contrast, T2 (100% urine) gave the lowest results among all treatments, indicating toxicity effects on plant growth and associated final yield. Such toxicity is confirmed by soil chemical properties at T2 with soil acidification and significant increase in soil salinity. In contrast, application of urine together with TC mitigates soil acidification and salinity, highlighting the efficiency of urine and TC combination on soil chemical properties. However, further investigation is necessary to refine better urine/TC ratio for okra production.

  9. Composting toilets a misnomer: excessive ammonia from urine inhibits microbial activity yet is insufficient in sanitizing the end-product.

    PubMed

    Hill, Geoffrey B; Baldwin, Susan A; Vinnerås, Björn

    2013-04-15

    End-product from 16 public mixed latrine style composting toilets (CTs) at 12 sites between 50 and 2100 m.a.s.l. in Western North America was tested in order to evaluate the effect of composting variables (TS%, NH3-N, temperature, and material age) on compost quality and hygiene (VS%, Escherichia coli, [Formula: see text] -N, and pH). Principal component analysis indicated that TS%, temperature, and material age equally contributed to reduction in VS%. NH3-N had the greatest effect on [Formula: see text] -N, E. coli, and pH. Nitrification was significantly inhibited above 386 mg/kg NH3-N, but no such limit was found for E. coli, despite a significant (p = 0.016) but weak (r(2) = 0.11) negative relationship. It may be possible to amplify the sanitizing effect of ammonia and overcome pathogen resistance due to low temperatures and re-contamination (caused by poor design) with generous dosing of urea and ash. However, even sanitized, the fertilization effect of discharged material on the natural environment may not be desired or permitted in parks or protected areas where many CTs were found. To this end, operators of CTs need to evaluate their primary management objectives and ensure congruency with proven system capabilities. PMID:23435183

  10. Anaerobic digestion of blackwater from vacuum toilets and kitchen refuse in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR).

    PubMed

    Wendland, C; Deegener, S; Behrendt, J; Toshev, P; Otterpohl, R

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this research was mesophilic anaerobic digestion of blackwater from vacuum toilets (BW) and kitchen refuse (KR) in a CSTR within an ecological sanitation system. A detailed investigation of the BW characteristics was carried out. Research on anaerobic digestion was performed with CSTR of 101 volume at HRT of 10, 15 and 20 days. The digestion of BW at 20 days HRT showed stable performance without inhibition effects, in spite of relatively high ammonium concentrations. The removal of total and particulate COD was 61% and 53%, respectively, and the methane yield 10/CH4/cap/day. The addition of kitchen refuse (KR) improved the performance of the CSTR in terms of COD removal efficiency and methane yield. At 20 days HRT the removal of total and particulate COD increased up to 71% and 67%, respectively, and the methane yield to 27/CH4/cap/day. The results at 15 days HRT showed similar performance. At HRT of 10 days, the anaerobic treatment was limited but reached steady state conditions at higher VFA concentrations in the effluent, with a decrease of COD removal of 30 to 33% and of methane yields of 19 to 21%.

  11. Action memorandum for the Waste Area Grouping 1 Tank WC-14 removal action at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    This action memorandum documents approval for a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended (CERCLA), time-critical action. The action will remove radiologically contaminated water from Tank WC-14. The water contains a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) at a level below regulatory concern. Tank WC-14 is located in the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 WC-10 Tank Farm at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Contaminated sludge remaining in the tank after removal of the liquid will be the subject of a future action.

  12. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building access control (BAC)--a catchall phrase to describe the systems that control access to facilities across campus--has traditionally been handled with remarkably low-tech solutions: (1) manual locks; (2) electronic locks; and (3) ID cards with magnetic strips. Recent improvements have included smart cards and keyless solutions that make use…

  13. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  14. Where There Is No Toilet: Water and Sanitation Environments of Domestic and Facility Births in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Benova, Lenka; Cumming, Oliver; Gordon, Bruce A.; Magoma, Moke; Campbell, Oona M. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Inadequate water and sanitation during childbirth are likely to lead to poor maternal and newborn outcomes. This paper uses existing data sources to assess the water and sanitation (WATSAN) environment surrounding births in Tanzania in order to interrogate whether such estimates could be useful for guiding research, policy and monitoring initiatives. Methods We used the most recent Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) to characterise the delivery location of births occurring between 2005 and 2010. Births occurring in domestic environments were characterised as WATSAN-safe if the home fulfilled international definitions of improved water and improved sanitation access. We used the 2006 Service Provision Assessment survey to characterise the WATSAN environment of facilities that conduct deliveries. We combined estimates from both surveys to describe the proportion of all births occurring in WATSAN-safe environments and conducted an equity analysis based on DHS wealth quintiles and eight geographic zones. Results 42.9% (95% confidence interval: 41.6%–44.2%) of all births occurred in the woman's home. Among these, only 1.5% (95% confidence interval: 1.2%–2.0%) were estimated to have taken place in WATSAN-safe conditions. 74% of all health facilities conducted deliveries. Among these, only 44% of facilities overall and 24% of facility delivery rooms were WATSAN-safe. Combining the estimates, we showed that 30.5% of all births in Tanzania took place in a WATSAN-safe environment (range of uncertainty 25%–42%). Large wealth-based inequalities existed in the proportion of births occurring in domestic environments based on wealth quintile and geographical zone. Conclusion Existing data sources can be useful in national monitoring and prioritisation of interventions to improve poor WATSAN environments during childbirth. However, a better conceptual understanding of potentially harmful exposures and better data are needed in order to devise and apply

  15. The effects of sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium saccharin on morphology, hardness and wear behavior of Cr-WC nano composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei-Sameti, M.; Nadali, S.; Falahatpisheh, A.; Rakhshi, M.

    2013-04-01

    The effects of sodium saccharin and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) additives on the amount of incorporated tungsten carbide (WC) particles and morphology of the coatings are investigated. The structure and morphology of the coatings are determined by scanning electron microscopy techniques (SEM). The hardness and tribological behavior of the coatings are studied by micro hardness and pin on disk methods. The experimental results show that with the addition of sodium saccharin and SDS the amount of WC particles in the coating decreases and the size of WC agglomerates reduces. The average size of WC particles is 70 nm. On the other hand the wear resistances of the coatings increase and the optimum wear resistance is 1 g/L.

  16. Gaining Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Discusses issues schools and universities have encountered in complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and making their facilities more accessible to the disabled. The ADA's vagueness and the architect's need for understanding the regulations is highlighted. (GR)

  17. Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Patta, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Stephen McCarthy, co-partner and president of Equal Access ADA Consulting Architects of San Diego, California, about designing schools to naturally integrate compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (EV)

  18. Capital access.

    PubMed

    Towne, Jennifer

    2004-06-01

    To maintain their viability, hospitals are being compelled to invest in big capital projects such as information technology and renovation and construction. This gatefold examines the trends in credit and capital, and how they affect hospitals' access to money.

  19. An Experimental Study on Slurry Erosion Resistance of Single and Multilayered Deposits of Ni-WC Produced by Laser-Based Powder Deposition Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Prabu; Hamid, Syed; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2013-11-01

    Single and multilayered deposits containing different mass fractions of tungsten carbide (WC) in nickel (Ni)-matrix (NT-20, NT-60, NT-80) are deposited on a AISI 4140 steel substrate using a laser-based powder deposition process. The transverse cross section of the coupons reveals that the higher the mass fraction of WC in Ni-matrix leads to a more uniform distribution through Ni-matrix. The slurry erosion resistance of the fabricated coupons is tested at three different impingement angles using an abrasive water jet cutting machine, which is quantified based on the erosion rate. The top layer of a multilayered deposit (i.e., NT-60 in a two-layer NT-60 over NT-20 deposit) exhibits better erosion resistance at all three tested impingement angles when compared to a single-layer (NT-60) deposit. A definite increase in the erosion resistance is noted with an addition of nano-size WC particles. The relationship between the different mass fractions of reinforcement (WC) in the deposited composite material (Ni-WC) and their corresponding matrix (Ni) hardness on the erosion rate is studied. The eroded surface is analyzed in the light of a three-dimensional (3-D) profilometer and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results show that a volume fraction of approximately 62% of WC with a Ni-matrix hardness of 540 HV resulting in the gouging out of WC from the Ni-matrix by the action of slurry. It is concluded that the slurry erosion resistance of the AISI 4140 steel can be significantly enhanced by introducing single and multilayered deposits of Ni-WC composite material fabricated by the laser-based powder deposition process.

  20. The blue-light receptor CmWC-1 mediates fruit body development and secondary metabolism in Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Guo, Mingmin; Yang, Huaijun; Guo, Suping; Dong, Caihong

    2016-01-01

    Light is an essential factor for pigment formation and fruit body development in Cordyceps militaris, a well-known edible and medicinal fungus. Cmwc-1, a homolog of the blue-light receptor gene white collar-1 (wc-1) in Neurospora crassa, was cloned from the C. militaris genome in our previous study. Here, Cmwc-1 gene inactivation results in thicker aerial hyphae, disordered fruit body development, a significant reduction in conidial formation, and carotenoid and cordycepin production. These characteristics were restored when the ΔCmwc-1 strains were hybridized with wild-type strains of the opposite mating type. A genome-wide expression analysis revealed that there were 1042 light-responsive genes in the wild-type strain and only 458 in the ΔCmwc-1 strain. Among five putative photoreceptors identified, Vivid, cryptochrome-1, and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase are strongly induced by light in a Cmwc-1-dependent manner, while phytochrome and cryptochrome-2 were not induced. The transcription factors involved in the fungal light reaction were mainly of the Zn2Cys6 type. CmWC-1 regulates adenylosuccinate synthase, an important enzyme for adenosine de novo synthesis, which could explain the reduction in cordycepin production. Some G protein-coupled receptors that control fungal fruit body formation and the sexual cycle were regulated by CmWC-1, and the cAMP pathway involved in light signal transduction in N. crassa was not critical for the photoreaction in the fungus here. A transcriptional analysis indicated that steroid biosynthesis was more active in the ΔCmwc-1 strain, suggesting that CmWC-1 might switch the vegetative growth state to primordia differentiation by suppressing the expression of related genes. PMID:26476643

  1. The Structure and Bond Strength of Composite Carbide Coatings (WC-Co + Ni) Deposited on Ductile Cast Iron by Thermal Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksiazek, Marzanna; Boron, Lukasz; Radecka, Marta; Richert, Maria; Tchorz, Adam

    2016-02-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the role of Ni particles in the WC-Co coating produced with the supersonic method on microstructure, mechanical, and wear properties in a system of type: WC-Co coating/ductile cast iron. The microstructure of the thermal-sprayed WC-Co + Ni coating was characterized by scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes as well as the analysis of chemical and phase composition in microareas (EDS, XRD). The microstructure of the WC-Co + Ni coating consisted of large, partially molten Ni particles and very fine grains of WC embedded in cobalt matrix, coming to the size of nanocrystalline. Moreover, the results were discussed in reference to examination of bending strength considering cracking and delamination in the system of (WC-Co + Ni)/ductile cast iron as well as hardness and wear resistance of the coating. It was found that the addition of Ni particles was significantly increase resistance to cracking and wear behavior in the studied system.

  2. Effect of thermal fatigue on the wear resistance of graphite cast iron with bionic units processed by laser cladding WC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Zhengjun; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Chuanwei; Meng, Chao; Cong, Dalong

    2013-04-01

    Thermal fatigue and wear exist simultaneously during the service life of brake discs. Previous researchers only studied thermal fatigue resistance or abrasion resistance of compact graphite cast iron (CGI), rather than combining them together. In this paper, wear resistance after thermal fatigue of CGI was investigated basing on the principle of bionics, which was close to actual service condition of the brake discs. In the meanwhile, the effect of thermal fatigue on wear resistance was also discussed. Non-smooth bionic units were fabricated by laser cladding WC powder with different proportions (50 wt.%, 60 wt.%, 70 wt.%). Microstructure and microhardness of the units were investigated, and wear mass losses of the samples were also compared. The results indicate that thermal fatigue has a negative effect on the wear resistance. After the same thermal fatigue cycles times, the wear resistance of laser cladding WC samples is superior to that of laser remelting ones and their wear resistance enhances with the increase of WC content.

  3. Hybrid-toroidal anvil: a replacement for the conventional WC anvil used for the large volume cubic high pressure apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qi-Gang; Yang, Wen-Ke; Jia, Xiao-Peng; Ma, Hong-An

    2014-10-01

    We propose a design and operation of a hybrid-toroidal anvil used for the large volume cubic high pressure apparatus (LV-CHPA), such that it is possible to obtain a higher sintered quality, less weight and cost of tungsten carbide (WC) anvil than the conventional anvil. We use the finite element simulations to show the distributions of the stress on the surface and in the bulk of the WC anvils, and conclude that, for a given load on the hybrid-toroidal anvil, the volume of the compressed press medium has increased by 4.88%, and the rate of the transmitted pressure has increased by 6.72% compared with the conventional anvil. Furthermore, the advantages of the hybrid-toroidal anvil are that the movement of anvils increases by 37.14% and the growth rate of the fatigue crack decreases by 40%. This has been proved by the high pressure experiments. This work gives an approach to optimize the WC anvils used for the LV-CHPA and presents a simple method to achieve the higher sample pressure and the larger sample volume.

  4. Evaluation of Cyclic Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Behavior of HVOF-Sprayed WC-Co/NiCrAlY Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, B.; Kadoli, Ravikiran; Ramesh, M. R.

    2014-08-01

    Corrosion of metallic structural materials at an elevated temperature in complex multicomponent gas environments are potential problems in many fossil energy systems, especially those using coal as a feedstock. Combating these problems involves a number of approaches, one of which is the use of protective coatings. The high velocity oxy fuel (HVOF) process has been used to deposit WC-Co/NiCrAlY composite powder on two types of Fe-based alloys. Thermocyclic oxidation behavior of coated alloys was investigated in the static air as well as in molten salt (Na2SO4-60%V2O5) environment at 700 °C for 50 cycles. The thermogravimetric technique was used to approximate the kinetics of oxidation. WC-Co/NiCrAlY coatings showed a lower oxidation rate in comparison to uncoated alloys. The oxidation resistance of WC-Co/NiCrAlY coatings can be ascribed to the oxide layer of Al2O3 and Cr2O3 formed on the outermost surface. Coated alloys extend a protective oxide scale composed of oxides of Ni and Cr that are known to impart resistance to the hot corrosion in the molten salt environment.

  5. Micro electrical discharge milling of WC-Co using a deionized water spray and a bipolar pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ki Young; Chung, Do Kwan; Park, Min Soo; Chu, Chong Nam

    2010-04-01

    Micro electrical discharge milling (ED-milling) is an effective machining process for manufacturing micro structures on hard metals. This method of machining generally uses kerosene or deionized water as the working fluid, both of which are associated with some problems. Kerosene results in considerable electrode wear and deionized water causes electrolytic corrosion in workpieces. In particular, when cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co), which has superior strength, hardness and wear resistance, is machined by electrical discharge machining (EDM), the problem of electrolytic corrosion arises as a matter of course since the material is very susceptible to electrolyzation. In this study, spray ED-milling with a bipolar pulsed power source and deionized water was conducted to solve the above problems. This method uses a water spray, which is a mixture of compressed air and deionized water. The spray is injected into the machining gap between the electrode and the workpiece. WC-Co was used for the workpiece and micro grooves were machined on the workpiece. As a result, using the spray ED-milling method, high-quality micro grooves were manufactured on the WC-Co workpiece with no electrolytic corrosion and almost-zero electrode wear.

  6. Erosion behaviour of WC-10Co-4Cr coating on 23-8-N nitronic steel by HVOF thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kumar, Avnish; Sharma, Ashok; Goel, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    WC-10Co-4Cr coating was deposited by high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) process on cast and solution treated (1220 °C/150 min) 23-8-N nitronic steel substrates. Solution treated substrate has shown higher toughness, ductility and impact energy with a marginal reduction in hardness as compared to cast substrate. This influence the coating deposition efficiency and erosion behaviour. Erosion resistance of coatings was evaluated by air jet erosion tester on two different impact angles (30° and 90°). Phases, microstructure and eroded surface of the coating were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) respectively. It is observed that coating on solution treated substrate was superior to cast substrate. The reason being that coating has dense and well-bonded structure with low porosity, less decarburization and inter-splat oxidation. Higher erosion resistance of coated solution treated 23-8-N nitronic steel was attributed to combination of high fracture toughness and hardness of coating including optimum mechanical properties of the substrate. FESEM analysis reveals that erosion response of WC-10Co-4Cr coating also dependent on the relative size of the impact crater with respect to the WC grain size. Coating is removed by combined mode of ductile and brittle erosion.

  7. Residual Stress in Brazing of Submicron Al2O3 to WC-Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunder, T.; Piquerez, A.; Bach, M.; Mille, P.

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the residual stresses induced by brazing and grinding submicron Al2O3, using different methods. Energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry analysis (EDX) of 72Ag-Cu filler and filler/WC-Co interface showed evidence of atomic diffusion and possible formation of titanium oxide layers between the joint and the bonding materials. An analytical model supported by the finite element method (FEM) based on strain determination due to the difference in variation of thermal expansion was used to assess the stress distribution at the coupling interface and in bulk materials. The model took into account the evolution of the Young's modulus and of the thermal expansion with temperature. The model could be used to follow strain and stress evolutions of the bonded materials during the cooling cycle. The maximum stress rose above -300 MPa at the center of the 100 × 100 × 3 mm ceramic plates. The residual stresses on the external surface of ceramic were investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and indentation fracture method (IFM). After brazing and grinding the plate, the principal stresses were 128.1 and 94.9 MPa, and the shear stress was -20.1 MPa. Microscopic examination revealed grain pull-out promoted by the global residual stresses induced by the brazing and grinding processes. The surface stresses evaluated by the different methods were reasonably correlated.

  8. Dust Formation in the Hot Massive Binary HD 192641 = WR 137 (WC7 + OB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, Sergey V.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Grosdidier, Yves

    1999-09-01

    Medium band (H' and K') images of the episodic dust-forming, long-period (~13 yr) WC7 + OB binary WR 137 were obtained with the Near-Infrared Camera and Multiobject Spectrometer 2 camera of the Hubble Space Telescope during periastron passage in 1997-1998. We have resolved IR-emitting dust in the close environment of this system. The dust emission occurs in a few clumps within about 0.5" of the star, as well as in a jetlike structure with a total extension of ~0.25". The dust is likely either created or enhanced in the zone of gas shocked by wind-wind collision. We estimate the total mass of the resolved dust features during the 1997-1998 outburst to be ~2×10-7 Msolar (~0.1M⊕) within a factor of 3. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  9. Excimer laser assisted TiN and WC removal from tools as a novel decoating technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Emil; Schutte, K.; Emmel, A.; Bergmann, Hans W.

    1995-03-01

    Hard coatings, e.g. TiN or WC on high quality tools are regenerated several times, due to their high costs. Conventional decoating techniques are of chemical nature and problematically regarding the handling of the chemical residues. In addition to that the lifetime of recoated tools after chemical decoating of the damaged functional layers is drastically reduced compared to new tools. Excimer laser treatment using the so-called `Duplex-Technique' enables a damage-free removal of the hard coatings with much longer lifetime of recoated tools than those of chemically decoated. The handling of the waste material is extremely easy using a laser processing head with an integrated exhaust system, that was designed at ATZ- EVUS. The paper gives a detailed presentation of the developed Duplex-Technique, the influence of the laser parameters and the obtained surface properties. Results of internal stress measurements, roughness values, changes in chemical composition and the surface appearance are described. From the technological point of view the removal rates, the productivity and last not least the superior performance of excimer laser decoated and PVD recoated tools in a lifetime test are demonstrated, compared to newly coated and chemical decoated tools.

  10. Circumstellar Carbonaceous Material Associated with Late-Type Dusty WC Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiar, J. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2001-04-01

    We have studied the 5-8.5 μm infrared spectra of the late-type Wolf-Rayet stars WR 118, WR 112, and WR 104, the WN star WR 147, the B5 hypergiant Cygnus OB2 No. 12, and the Galactic center luminous blue variable Pistol Star using the Short Wavelength Spectrometer on the Infrared Space Observatory. We attribute an absorption feature at 6.2 μm in the spectra of WC stars to amorphous carbon dust. This absorption feature is not detected in the diffuse interstellar medium toward the WR 147, Cyg OB2 No. 12, or the Pistol Star, and therefore we suggest that it is circumstellar in nature. In addition, we detect a broad absorption feature extending from approximately 6.5 to 8 μm. We tentatively attribute this absorption to the CC stretching modes that accompany the 6.2 μm band in aromatic materials. Our analysis of the 6.2 μm absorption profile suggests that the dust grains have to be rather large (~1 μm) and point toward dense clumps as the sites of dust formation. Based on observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  11. Structure Property Relationship of Suspension Thermally Sprayed WC-Co Nanocomposite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, R.; Faisal, N. H.; Al-Anazi, Nayef M.; Al-Mutairi, S.; Toma, F.-L.; Berger, L.-M.; Potthoff, A.; Polychroniadis, E. K.; Sall, M.; Chaliampalias, D.; Goosen, M. F. A.

    2015-02-01

    Tribomechanical properties of nanostructured coatings deposited by suspension high velocity oxy-fuel (S-HVOF) and conventional HVOF (Jet Kote) spraying were evaluated. Nanostructured S-HVOF coatings were obtained via ball milling of the agglomerated and sintered WC-12Co feedstock powder, which were deposited via an aqueous-based suspension using modified HVOF (TopGun) process. Microstructural evaluations of these hardmetal coatings included transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The nanohardness and modulus of the coated specimens were investigated using a diamond Berkovich nanoindenter. Sliding wear tests were conducted using a ball-on-flat test rig. Results indicated that low porosity coatings with nanostructured features were obtained. High carbon loss was observed, but coatings showed a high hardness up to 1000 HV2.9N. S-HVOF coatings also showed improved sliding wear and friction behavior, which were attributed to nanosized particles reducing ball wear in three-body abrasion and support of metal matrix due to uniform distribution of nanoparticles in the coating microstructure.

  12. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - hemodialysis access; dialysis - hemodialysis access

  13. Easy Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    School and university restrooms, locker and shower rooms have specific ADA accessibility requirements that serve the needs of staff, students and campus visitors who are disabled as a result of injury, illness or age. Taking good care of them is good for the reputation of a sensitive community institution, and fosters positive public relations.…

  14. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    As faculty members add online and multimedia elements to their courses, colleges and universities across the country are realizing that there is a lot of work to be done to ensure that disabled students (and employees) have equal access to course material and university websites. Unfortunately, far too few schools consider the task a top priority.…

  15. Expanding Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    There is no question that the United States lags behind most industrialized nations in consumer access to broadband Internet service. For many policy makers and activists, this shortfall marks the latest phase in the struggle to overcome the digital divide. To remedy this lack of broadband affordability and availability, one start-up firm--with…

  16. Microbiological assessments of compost toilets: in situ measurements and laboratory studies on the survival of fecal microbial indicators using sentinel chambers.

    PubMed

    Tønner-Klank, L; Møller, J; Forslund, A; Dalsgaard, A

    2007-01-01

    Compost toilet systems were assessed for their ability to reduce microbial indicators and pathogens. Bacterial pathogens were not detected in any samples indicating a low survival rate in composting feces and/or an initial low occurrence. Indicator bacteria showed large variations with no clear trend of lower bacterial numbers after longer storage. In controlled composting experiments, thermophilic conditions were only reached when amendments were made (grass and a sugar solution). Even then it was impossible to ensure a homogenous temperature in the composting fecal material and therefore difficult to achieve a uniform reduction and killing of indicator organisms. Presumptive thermotolerant coliforms, Salmonella typhimurium Phage 28 B and eggs of Ascaridia galli, proved useful as indicators. However, regrowth was detected for enterococci and total numbers of bacteria grown at 36 degrees C. These indicator parameters may therefore overestimate the level of other (pathogenic) bacteria present in the material and can not be recommended for use as reliable indicator organisms in composting toilet systems. The addition of indicator bacteria to fecal material contained in semi-permeable capsules proved to be a useful technique to ensure that microorganisms were contained in a small test volume.

  17. Toilet Training Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be present when you go to the bathroom and make your child feel comfortable in the bathroom. Allow your child to see urine and bowel ... begin teaching your child to go to the bathroom. Keep your child in loose, easily removable pants. ...

  18. Toilet Teaching Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... child small rewards, such as stickers or time reading with Mommy, every time your child goes in ...

  19. Work function tuning of plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposited WC{sub x}N{sub y} electrodes for metal/oxide/semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Zonensain, Oren; Fadida, Sivan; Eizenberg, Moshe; Fisher, Ilanit; Gao, Juwen; Chattopadhyay, Kaushik; Harm, Greg; Mountsier, Tom; Danek, Michal

    2015-02-23

    One of the main challenges facing the integration of metals as gate electrodes in advanced MOS devices is control over the Fermi level position at the metal/dielectric interface. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to tune the effective work function (EWF) of W-based electrodes by process modifications of the atomic layer deposited (ALD) films. Tungsten carbo-nitrides (WC{sub x}N{sub y}) films were deposited via plasma-enhanced and/or thermal ALD processes using organometallic precursors. The process modifications enabled us to control the stoichiometry of the WC{sub x}N{sub y} films. Deposition in hydrogen plasma (without nitrogen based reactant) resulted in a stoichiometry of WC{sub 0.4} with primarily W-C chemical bonding, as determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These films yielded a relatively low EWF of 4.2 ± 0.1 eV. The introduction of nitrogen based reactant to the plasma or the thermal ALD deposition resulted in a stoichiometry of WC{sub 0.1}N{sub 0.6–0.8} with predominantly W-N chemical bonding. These films produced a high EWF of 4.7 ± 0.1 eV.

  20. The effect of spraying parameters on micro-structural properties of WC-12%Co coating deposited on copper substrate by HVOF process

    SciTech Connect

    Sathwara, Nishit; Jariwala, C. Chauhan, N.; Raole, P. M.; Basa, D. K.

    2015-08-28

    High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal sprayed coatingmade from Tungsten Carbide (WC) isconsidered as one of the most durable materials as wear resistance for industrial applications at room temperature. WC coating offers high wear resistance due to its high hardness and tough matrix imparts. The coating properties strongly depend on thermal spray processing parameters, surface preparation and surface finish. In this investigation, the effect of variousHVOF process parameters was studied on WC coating properties. The WC-12%Co coating was produced on Copper substrate. Prior to coating, theCopper substrate surface was prepared by grit blasting. WC-12%Co coatings were deposited on Coppersubstrates with varying process parameters such as Oxygen gas pressure, Air pressure, and spraying distance. Microstructure of coating was examined using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and characterization of phasespresentin the coating was examined by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Microhardness of all coatingswas measured by VickerMicrohardness tester. At low Oxygen Pressure(10.00 bar), high Air pressure (7bar) and short nozzle to substrate distance of 170mm, best coating adhesion and porosity less structure isachieved on Coppersubstrate.

  1. Replication of microchannel structures in WC-Co feedstock using elastomeric replica moulds by hot embossing process.

    PubMed

    Sahli, M; Gelin, J-C; Barrière, T

    2015-10-01

    Hot embossing is a net shaping process that is able to produce the micro-components of polymers with intrinsic and complex shapes at lower cost compared with machining and injection moulding. However, the emboss of hard metals, such as WC-Co, is more challenging due to their high thermal conductivity and ease of agglomeration. Thus, a WC-Co alloy mixed with a wax-based binder feedstock was selected. The formed feedstock exhibited pseudo-plastic flow and was successfully embossed (green part). Here, we developed a novel process that is used to replicate polymer microfluidic chips while simultaneously reducing the channel surface roughness of the mould insert, yielding optical-grade (less than 100 nm surface roughness) channels and reservoirs. This paper concerns the replication of metallic microfluidic mould inserts in WC-Co and the parameters associated with feedstock formation via a hot embossing process. A suitable formulation for micro-powder hot embossing has been established and characterised by thermogravimetric analyses and measurements of mixing torques to verify and quantify the homogeneity of the proposed feedstocks. The relative density of the samples increased with processing temperature, and almost fully dense materials were obtained. In this work, the effects of the sintering temperature on the physical properties were systematically analysed. The evolution of the metal surface morphology during the hot embossing process was also investigated. The results indicate that the feedstock can be used to manufacture micro-fluidic die mould cavities with a low roughness, proper dimensions and good shape retention. The shrinkage of the sintered part was approximately 19-24% compared with that of the brown part. PMID:26117760

  2. FeAl-TiC and FeAl-WC composites - melt infiltration processing, microstructure and mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, R.; Schneibel, J.H.

    1997-04-01

    TiC-based and WC-based cermets were processed with iron aluminide, an intermetallic, as a binder by pressureless melt infiltration to near full density (> 97 % theoretical density). Phase equilibria calculations in the quaternary Fe-Al-Ti-C and Fe-Al-W-C systems at 145{degrees}C were performed to determine the solubility of the carbide phases in liquid iron aluminide. This was done by using Thermocalc{trademark} and the results show that molten Fe-40 at.% Al in equilibrium with Ti{sub 0.512}C{sub 0.488} and graphite, dissolves 4.9 at% carbon and 64 atomic ppm titanium. In the Fe-Al-W-C system, liquid Fe-40 at.% Al in equilibrium with graphite dissolves about 5 at.% carbon and 1 at.% tungsten. Due to the low values for the solubility of the carbide phases in liquid iron aluminide, liquid phase sintering of mixed powders does not yield a dense, homogeneous microstructure for carbide volume fractions greater than 0.70. Melt infiltration of molten FeAl into TiC and WC preforms serves as a successful approach to process cermets with carbide contents ranging from 70 to 90 vol. %, to greater than 97% of theoretical density. Also, the microstructures of cermets prepared by melt infiltration were very homogeneous. Typical properties such as hardness, bend strength and fracture toughness are reported. SEM observations of fracture surfaces suggest the improved fracture toughness to result from the ductility of the intermetallic phase. Preliminary experiments for the evaluation of the oxidation resistance of iron aluminide bonded cermets indicate that they are more resistant than WC-Co cermets.

  3. Diamond film deposition on WC-Co and steel substrates with a CrN interlayer for tribological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Maneesh; Hoffman, Alon

    2016-06-01

    The most renowned property of diamond is its exceptional hardness. By depositing diamond films on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) and steel substrates, the hardness of diamond can be combined with the toughness of these materials, resulting in an excellent wear resistance material for tribological applications. However, poor adhesion of diamond coating on these substrates leads to a lesser lifetime for the diamond coated tools than expected. The prime reasons for the lack of proper adhesion are the preferential formation of graphitic layer at the interface due to the catalytic activities of cobalt/iron and the interfacial residual stresses due to the mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients of diamond (1.5  ×  10-6 K-1) and WC-Co (5.2  ×  10-6 K-1) or steel (12  ×  10-6 K-1). In this review, we discuss the possibility of using a Cr-N interlayer as a diffusion barrier to prevent the catalytic activities of cobalt/iron and also to relax the interfacial residual stresses to some extent to enhance the adhesion of diamond coatings on these substrates. An overview of the most pertinent results of the last two decades, including the recent progress is introduced. We describe in detail how the Cr-N interlayer with the desired properties is fabricated. We give a concise overview of diamond deposition process, including the methods to vary the grain size from microcrystalline to nanocrystalline, which are suitable for some tribological applications. We describe in detail on surface and interface analysis, residual stress measurements, assessment adhesion strength and tribological performance of diamond coated WC-Co and steel substrates using various characterization techniques. We conclude by highlighting the current progress and future perspectives of diamond coatings on these substrates for tribological applications.

  4. Hemodialysis access procedures

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-dialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-dialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency-dialysis access; Chronic kidney failure-dialysis access; Chronic renal failure-dialysis access

  5. Performance of an optical equalizer in a 10 G wavelength converting optical access network.

    PubMed

    Mendinueta, José Manuel D; Cao, Bowen; Thomsen, Benn C; Mitchell, John E

    2011-12-12

    A centralized optical processing unit (COPU) that functions both as a wavelength converter (WC) and optical burst equaliser in a 10 Gb/s wavelength-converting optical access network is proposed and experimentally characterized. This COPU is designed to consolidate drifting wavelengths generated with an uncooled laser in the upstream direction into a stable wavelength channel for WDM backhaul transmission and to equalize the optical loud/soft burst power in order to relax the burst-mode receiver dynamic range requirement. The COPU consists of an optical power equaliser composed of two cascaded SOAs followed by a WC. Using an optical packet generator and a DC-coupled PIN-based digital burst-mode receiver, the COPU is characterized in terms of payload-BER for back-to-back and backhaul transmission distances of 22, 40, and 62 km. We show that there is a compromise between the receiver sensitivity and overload points that can be optimized tuning the WC operating point for a particular backhaul fiber transmission distance. Using the optimized settings, sensitivities of -30.94, -30.17, and -27.26 dBm with overloads of -9.3, -5, and >-5 dBm were demonstrated for backhaul transmission distances of 22, 40 and 62 km, respectively. PMID:22274023

  6. Orbitally modulated dust formation by the WC7+O5 colliding-wind binary WR140

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. M.; Marchenko, S. V.; Marston, A. P.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Varricatt, W. P.; Dougherty, S. M.; Kidger, M. R.; Morbidelli, L.; Tapia, M.

    2009-05-01

    We present high-resolution infrared (2-18 μm) images of the archetypal periodic dust-making Wolf-Rayet binary system WR140 (HD 193793) taken between 2001 and 2005, and multi-colour (J - [19.5]) photometry observed between 1989 and 2001. The images resolve the dust cloud formed by WR140 in 2001, allowing us to track its expansion and cooling, while the photometry allows tracking the average temperature and total mass of the dust. The combination of the two data sets constrains the optical properties of the dust, and suggests that they differ from those of the dust made by the WC9 dust-makers, including the classical `pinwheel', WR104. The photometry of individual dust emission features shows them to be significantly redder in (nbL'-[3.99]), but bluer in ([7.9]-[12.5]), than the binary, as expected from the spectra of heated dust and the stellar wind of a Wolf-Rayet star. The most persistent dust features, two concentrations at the ends of a `bar' of emission to the south of the star, were observed to move with constant proper motions of 324 +/- 8 and 243 +/- 7 mas yr-1. Longer wavelength (4.68 and 12.5 μm) images show dust emission from the corresponding features from the previous (1993) periastron passage and dust formation episode, showing that the dust expanded freely in a low-density void for over a decade, with dust features repeating from one cycle to the next. A third persistent dust concentration to the east of the binary (the `arm') was found to have a proper motion ~320 mas yr-1, and a dust mass about one-quarter that of the `bar'. Extrapolation of the motions of the concentrations back to the binary suggests that the eastern `arm' began expansion four to five months earlier than those in the southern `bar', consistent with the projected rotation of the binary axis and wind-collision region (WCR) on the sky. A comparison of model dust images and the observations constrains the intervals when the WCR was producing sufficiently compressed wind for dust

  7. Microstructure and properties of WC-10%Co-4% Cr Spray powders and coatings: Part 1. Powder characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, L.-M.; Ettmayer, P.; Vuoristo, P.; Mäntylä, T.; Kunert, W.

    2001-06-01

    WC-10% Co-4% Cr1 represents an important composition for thermally sprayed hardmetal-like coatings that are applied when simultaneous wear and corrosion resistance is required. In this paper, four commercially available spray powders obtained by various production techniques (sintering and crushing, agglomeration and plasma densification) were thoroughly characterized using a broad variety of physical and chemical methods, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX), x-ray diffraction, adsorption, mercury intrusion, and helium pycnometry. Special emphasis is given to the interdependence of the chemical and phase compositions. The cooling rate applied during preparation of the spray powders seems to be responsible for the appearance of equilibrium or nonequilibrium phases, as was established from the investigation of the spray powders after heat treatment at 1000 °C. The amount of Cr added to the composition, 4%, is higher than the solubility limit of chromium in the binder phase in the presence of WC; hence, a second carbide phase is formed. The carbon content determines which carbide phase is formed and how both cobalt and chromium are distributed between the hard and the binder phases. A substantial carbon deficiency leads to nearly complete bonding of both chromium and cobalt into carbide phases. As was shown by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments, such spray powders do not form a melt in the temperature range up to 1465 °C, while powders containing clearly detectable amounts of metallic cobalt form a melt above 1210 °C.

  8. Chemical compatibility studies of GaAs and CdZnTe with the alloys WC-103 and TZM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beske, S. A.; Arikawa, Y.; Andrews, R. N.; Lundblad, W.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the chemical compatibility of gallium arsenide (GaAs) and cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) with WC-103, a niobium hafnium titanium alloy, and TZM, a titanium zirconium molybdenum alloy. Compatibility in these systems is of primary interest for crystal growth experiments during space shuttle missions. Crystal growth ampoules containing GaAs and CdZnTe must be encased in a sample ampoule cartridge assembly (SACA) during crystal growth, which is qualified as a level of safety containment. Two of the primary metal candidates for these containment cartridges for experiments conducted aboard the USML-1 shuttle mission were WC-103 and TZM. Reaction couples between the semiconductors and the metals were constructed and used to simulate failure of the growth ampoule. Experiments were designed to examine various stages of failure including the worst case situation, in which failure occurred at the beginning of the growth experiment. The couples were analyzed optically and using the scanning electron microscope to evaluate any metal loss or reaction products formed.

  9. Microstructure and Properties of DCP-Derived W-ZrC Composite Using Nontoxic Sodium Alginate to Fabricate WC Preform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafzadeh Khoee, Ali Asghar; Habibolahzadeh, Ali; Qods, Fathallah; Baharvandi, Hamidreza

    2015-04-01

    In the present work, tungsten carbide (WC) preforms were fabricated by gel-casting process, using different nontoxic Na-alginate to tertiary calcium phosphate ratios and different loadings of WC powder in the initial slurries. The gel-cast green bodies were dried and pre-sintered at 1723 K for 4 h and then reactively infiltrated by molten Zr2Cu at 1623 K for 0.5 h, to produce W-ZrC composite via displacive compensation of porosity process. The phases, microstructures, and mechanical properties of the preforms and the W-ZrC composites were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, x-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), image analyzer, and universal mechanical testing machine. XRD results, SEM micrographs, and elemental maps indicated uniform distribution of phases (W and ZrC) and elements (W, Zr, and C). Flexural strengths and hardness of the fabricated composites were in the ranges of 429-460 MPa and 7.5-9.5 GPa, respectively. Fractography studies revealed two types of dimple rupture and cleavage fracture modes in different composite samples. The W-ZrC composite was ablated by an oxyacetylene flame for 60 s. The mean value of mass and linear ablation rates of the composite were 2.1 ± 0.1 mg/s and 3.6 ± 0.5 µm/s, respectively.

  10. Abrasive Wear Behavior of WC Reinforced Ni-BASED Composite Coating Sprayed and Fused by Oxy-Acetylene Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qun; Chen, Zhenhua; Ding, Zhang Xiong; Chen, Ding

    Microstructure of WC reinforced Ni-based self-fluxing alloy composite coating sprayed and fused by oxy-acetylene flame was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray Spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The wear performance of the coating was studied by a MLS-225 wet sand rubber wheel abrasive wear tester at various loads and sizes of abrasive particles. Also, the wear resistance of the coating was compared with uncoated ASTM1020 steel. The results indicated that the coating is bonded metallurgically to the substrate and has a homogeneous microstructure composed of both coarse WC and fine carbide and boride grains such as Cr7C3, Cr23C6, and Ni2B which disperse uniformly in the matrix of γ-Ni solid solution and Ni3B. The worn mass loss of the coating and ASTM1020 steel both increased with the load and size of abrasive particles, also, the coating has exhibited excellent abrasive wear resistance compared with ASTM1020 steel.

  11. A study of thermal spray coated surface with nano composite powder of CNT+WC14C0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, K. N.; Valarmathi, T. N.; Nuttaki, Akhil; Sai Vivek Reddy, Arani; Sai Srinivas, Jammalamadaka K. M. K.; Nathanael, M. Antony

    2016-09-01

    Coatings obtained from thermal spray process are being developed for wide varieties of applications in aerospace and automotive industries. To enhance the wear resistance in the YAWING in wind mills, a new study is required to find out and analyze the surface properties of the surface of Yawing. In this study to enhance the surface properties, a new nano composite powder has been developed and coated on SS304. To synthesis of CNT+WC14Co, initially a binder material of 0.5% Poly Vinyl alcohol solution was prepared and made use as a binder between CNT and WC14Co particles. The synthesized nano composite powder is coated over SS304 samples as per Taguchi design of experiments by Detonation gun coating technique. The coated samples are undergone the tests of micro hardness and Surface roughness. It was found that a significant improvement in micro hardness and there is no significant improvement in surface finish. The best combination of input parameters is obtained through Taguchi method and untried combination's results also have been predicted through Taguchi method. Response surface methodology (RSM) is used to develop a mathematical model.

  12. Influence of Plasma Intensity on Wear and Erosion Resistance of Conventional and Nanometric WC-Co Coatings Deposited by APS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonache, V.; Salvador, M. D.; García, J. C.; Sánchez, E.; Bannier, E.

    2011-03-01

    The effects of plasma intensity and powder particle size on wear and erosion resistance have been evaluated for WC-12 wt.%Co coatings deposited by Air Plasma Spraying. Coatings were deposited from micrometric and nanostructured powders. SEM and XRD characterization showed the presence of WC, W2C, W, and an amorphous Co-rich matrix. The performance of the different coatings was compared in sliding wear tests (ball-on-disk), under dry friction conditions. Wear debris and tracks were analyzed by SEM. The debris generated during the test was found to have a great influence on the sliding properties. Wear follows a "three-body abrasive mechanism" and is dominated by coating spallation because of sub-surface cracking. In order to evaluate erosion behavior, solid particle erosion tests were conducted. Eroded coatings were analyzed by SEM, and erosion mainly occurs by a "cracking and chipping mechanism." The study shows that wear and erosion behavior is strongly affected by plasma arc intensity.

  13. The effects of changing angle and height of toilet seat on movements and ground reaction forces in the feet during sit-to-stand

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su-Kyoung; Lee, Sang-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to examine the effects of changes in the angle and height on movements and ground reaction forces in the feet. Subjects were instructed to sit and stand on different angles and heights; 0° (43 cm), 10° (51 cm), and 15° (58 cm). The motion required in this study is similar to that of standing up from sitting on a chair. The Tumble Forms Wedges (10° [8 cm], 15° [15 cm]) were placed on the toilet seat to create angles and heights at 0° (43 cm), 10° (51 cm), and 15° (58 cm). The side-to-side travel distances when the subjects stood up from sitting were 103.70±12.46 at 0° (43 cm), 96.99±12.11 at 10° (51 cm), and 99.12±12.00 at 15° (58 cm). The forward and backward travel distances when the subjects stood up from sitting were 235.93±10.60 at 0° (43 cm), 194.17±8.07 at 10° (51 cm), and 181.63±8.66 at 15° (58 cm). The ground reaction forces when the subjects stood up from sitting were 1.09±0.02 at 0° (43 cm), 1.08±0.22 at 10° (51 cm), and 1.07±0.21 at 15° (58 cm). Increases in the angle and height of the toilet seat affected forward-and-backward swaying during standing up, but did not affect the ground reaction force and side-to-side swaying. PMID:27807522

  14. An ergonomic evaluation of nursing assistants' job in a nursing home.

    PubMed

    Garg, A; Owen, B D; Carlson, B

    1992-09-01

    Thirty-eight nursing assistants (NAs) in a nursing home ranked and rated 16 different patient handling tasks for perceived stresses to the low back. The nursing assistants were observed for 79 4 h shifts and were videotaped for 14 4 h shifts to describe a typical workday and to determine the number of patient-handling tasks performed per shift, the use of assistive devices, and biomechanical stresses to the low back. In addition, data were collected on nursing assistants' and patients' characteristics. The top eight ranked tasks included transferring patient from toilet to wheelchair (WC), WC to toilet, WC to bed, bed to WC, bathtub to WC, chairlift to WC, weighing patients and lifting patients up in bed. The mean ratings of perceived exertion for these tasks were between 'somewhat hard' and 'hard'. The estimated compressive force on L5/S1 disc for the 50th percentile patient weight ranged from 3.7 to 4.9 KN. Nursing assistants worked in teams of two and performed 24 patient transfers per 8 h shift by manually lifting and carrying patients. Assistive devices (a hydraulic lift and gait belt) were used less than 2% of the time. Patient safety and comfort, lack of accessibility, physical stresses associated with the devices, lack of skill, increased transfer time, and lack of staffing were some of the reasons for not using these assistive devices. Environmental barriers (such as confined workplaces, an uneven floor surface, lack of adjustability of beds, stationary railings around the toilet, etc.) made the job more difficult. Nursing assistants had a high prevalence of low-back pain and 51% of nursing assistants visited a health care provider in the last three years for work related low-back pain. PMID:1387079

  15. Comparison of the Mechanical and Electrochemical Properties of WC-25Co Coatings Obtained by High Velocity Oxy-Fuel and Cold Gas Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, M.; Dosta, S.; Fernández, J.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Cold gas spray (CGS) coatings were previously produced by spraying WC-25Co cermet powders onto Al7075-T6 and low-carbon steel substrates. Unlike conventional flame spray techniques (e.g., high-velocity oxy-fuel; HVOF), no melting of the powder occurs; the particles are deformed and bond together after being sprayed by a supersonic jet of compressed gas, thereby building up several layers and forming a coating. WC-Co cermets are used in wear-resistant parts, because of their combination of mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. XRD tests were previously run on the initial powder and the coatings to determine possible phase changes during spraying. The bonding strength of the coatings was measured by adhesion tests. Here, WC-25Co coatings were also deposited on the same substrates by HVOF spraying. The wear resistance and fracture toughness of the coatings obtained previously by CGS and the HVOF coatings obtained here were studied. Their corrosion resistance was determined by electrochemical measurements. It was possible to achieve thick, dense, and hard CGS coatings on Al7075-T6 and low-carbon steel substrates, with better or the same mechanical and electrochemical properties as those of the HVOF coatings; making the former a highly competitive method for producing WC-25Co coatings.

  16. Synergistic effect of ultrasonic cavitation erosion and corrosion of WC-CoCr and FeCrSiBMn coatings prepared by HVOF spraying.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sheng; Wu, Yuping; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Yugui; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Jinran

    2016-07-01

    The high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) spraying process was used to fabricate conventional WC-10Co-4Cr coatings and FeCrSiBMn amorphous/nanocrystalline coatings. The synergistic effect of cavitation erosion and corrosion of both coatings was investigated. The results showed that the WC-10Co-4Cr coating had better cavitation erosion-corrosion resistance than the FeCrSiBMn coating in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. After eroded for 30 h, the volume loss rate of the WC-10Co-4Cr coating was about 2/5 that of the FeCrSiBMn coating. In the total cumulative volume loss rate under cavitation erosion-corrosion condition, the pure cavitation erosion played a key role for both coatings, and the total contribution of pure corrosion and erosion-induced corrosion of the WC-10Co-4Cr coating was larger than that of the FeCrSiBMn coating. Mechanical effect was the main factor for cavitation erosion-corrosion behavior of both coatings. PMID:26964984

  17. Southern Vermont College (SVC) and Wheelock College (WC): 2010 Urban and Rural Healthcare Academy Program (HAP) for College Progress and Workforce Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCiccio, Albert C.

    2010-01-01

    (Purpose) This is a report about the Urban and Rural Healthcare Academy Pilot Program (HAP) that launched at Southern Vermont College (SVC) and Wheelock College (WC) in summer 2010. HAP enabled 18 vulnerable high school students to learn about how to progress to college, how to transition when they arrive on a college campus, and how to prepare…

  18. Effect of SiC nanowhisker on the microstructure and mechanical properties of WC-Ni cemented carbide prepared by spark plasma sintering.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaoyong; Peng, Zhijian; Fu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Chengbiao

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafine tungsten carbide-nickel (WC-Ni) cemented carbides with varied fractions of silicon carbide (SiC) nanowhisker (0-3.75 wt.%) were fabricated by spark plasma sintering at 1350°C under a uniaxial pressure of 50 MPa with the assistance of vanadium carbide (VC) and tantalum carbide (TaC) as WC grain growth inhibitors. The effects of SiC nanowhisker on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the as-prepared WC-Ni cemented carbides were investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that during spark plasma sintering (SPS) Ni may react with the applied SiC nanowhisker, forming Ni2Si and graphite. Scanning electron microscopy examination indicated that, with the addition of SiC nanowhisker, the average WC grain size decreased from 400 to 350 nm. However, with the additional fractions of SiC nanowhisker, more and more Si-rich aggregates appeared. With the increase in the added fraction of SiC nanowhisker, the Vickers hardness of the samples initially increased and then decreased, reaching its maximum of about 24.9 GPa when 0.75 wt.% SiC nanowhisker was added. However, the flexural strength of the sample gradually decreased with increasing addition fraction of SiC nanowhisker.

  19. 75 FR 52435 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada (P&WC) PW530A, PW545A, and PW545B Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... Canada (P&WC) PW530A, PW545A, and PW545B Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... requirements affecting flight safety, and we did not precede it by notice and opportunity for public comment... in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78). Authority for This...

  20. The Different Effects of BMI and WC on Organ Damage in Patients from a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program after Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Zhao, Hui; Qiu, Jian; Zhu, Wei; Lei, Hongqiang; Cai, Zekun; Lin, Wan-Hua; Huang, Wenhua; Zhang, Heye; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    One of the purposes of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is to monitor and control weight of the patient. Our study is to compare the different obesity indexes, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC), through one well-designed CR program (CRP) with ACS in Guangzhou city of Guangdong Province, China, in order to identify different effects of BMI and WC on organ damage. In our work, sixty-one patients between October 2013 and January 2014 fulfilled our study. We collected the vital signs by medical records, the clinical variables of body-metabolic status by fasting blood test, and the organ damage variables by submaximal exercise treadmill test (ETT) and ultrasonic cardiogram (UCG) both on our inpatient and four-to-five weeks of outpatient part of CRP after ACS. We mainly used two-tailed Pearson's test and liner regression to evaluate the relationship of BMI/WC and organ damage. Our results confirmed that WC could be more accurate than BMI to evaluate the cardiac function through the changes of left ventricular structure on the CRP after ACS cases. It makes sense of early diagnosis, valid evaluation, and proper adjustment to ACS in CRP of the obesity individuals in the future. PMID:26247035

  1. Effect of SiC Nanowhisker on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of WC-Ni Cemented Carbide Prepared by Spark Plasma Sintering

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Chengbiao

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafine tungsten carbide-nickel (WC-Ni) cemented carbides with varied fractions of silicon carbide (SiC) nanowhisker (0–3.75 wt.%) were fabricated by spark plasma sintering at 1350°C under a uniaxial pressure of 50 MPa with the assistance of vanadium carbide (VC) and tantalum carbide (TaC) as WC grain growth inhibitors. The effects of SiC nanowhisker on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the as-prepared WC-Ni cemented carbides were investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that during spark plasma sintering (SPS) Ni may react with the applied SiC nanowhisker, forming Ni2Si and graphite. Scanning electron microscopy examination indicated that, with the addition of SiC nanowhisker, the average WC grain size decreased from 400 to 350 nm. However, with the additional fractions of SiC nanowhisker, more and more Si-rich aggregates appeared. With the increase in the added fraction of SiC nanowhisker, the Vickers hardness of the samples initially increased and then decreased, reaching its maximum of about 24.9 GPa when 0.75 wt.% SiC nanowhisker was added. However, the flexural strength of the sample gradually decreased with increasing addition fraction of SiC nanowhisker. PMID:25003143

  2. Synergistic effect of ultrasonic cavitation erosion and corrosion of WC-CoCr and FeCrSiBMn coatings prepared by HVOF spraying.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sheng; Wu, Yuping; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Yugui; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Jinran

    2016-07-01

    The high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) spraying process was used to fabricate conventional WC-10Co-4Cr coatings and FeCrSiBMn amorphous/nanocrystalline coatings. The synergistic effect of cavitation erosion and corrosion of both coatings was investigated. The results showed that the WC-10Co-4Cr coating had better cavitation erosion-corrosion resistance than the FeCrSiBMn coating in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. After eroded for 30 h, the volume loss rate of the WC-10Co-4Cr coating was about 2/5 that of the FeCrSiBMn coating. In the total cumulative volume loss rate under cavitation erosion-corrosion condition, the pure cavitation erosion played a key role for both coatings, and the total contribution of pure corrosion and erosion-induced corrosion of the WC-10Co-4Cr coating was larger than that of the FeCrSiBMn coating. Mechanical effect was the main factor for cavitation erosion-corrosion behavior of both coatings.

  3. 76 FR 255 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. (P&WC) PW305A and PW305B Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... 39-16524 (75 FR 72653, November 26, 2010), currently requires updating the airworthiness limitations section of the engine maintenance manuals for Pratt & Whitney Canada (P&WC) PW305A and PW305B turbofan...-23-AD; Amendment 39-16524; AD 2010-24-05] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Pratt &...

  4. The Different Effects of BMI and WC on Organ Damage in Patients from a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program after Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Zhao, Hui; Qiu, Jian; Zhu, Wei; Lei, Hongqiang; Cai, Zekun; Lin, Wan-Hua; Huang, Wenhua; Zhang, Heye; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    One of the purposes of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is to monitor and control weight of the patient. Our study is to compare the different obesity indexes, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference (WC), through one well-designed CR program (CRP) with ACS in Guangzhou city of Guangdong Province, China, in order to identify different effects of BMI and WC on organ damage. In our work, sixty-one patients between October 2013 and January 2014 fulfilled our study. We collected the vital signs by medical records, the clinical variables of body-metabolic status by fasting blood test, and the organ damage variables by submaximal exercise treadmill test (ETT) and ultrasonic cardiogram (UCG) both on our inpatient and four-to-five weeks of outpatient part of CRP after ACS. We mainly used two-tailed Pearson's test and liner regression to evaluate the relationship of BMI/WC and organ damage. Our results confirmed that WC could be more accurate than BMI to evaluate the cardiac function through the changes of left ventricular structure on the CRP after ACS cases. It makes sense of early diagnosis, valid evaluation, and proper adjustment to ACS in CRP of the obesity individuals in the future.

  5. Effectiveness and economic analysis of the whole cell/recombinant B subunit (WC/rbs) inactivated oral cholera vaccine in the prevention of traveller's diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Nowadays there is a debate about the indication of the oral whole-cell/recombinant B-subunit cholera vaccine (WC/rBS) in traveller's diarrhoea. However, a cost-benefit analysis based on real data has not been published. Methods A cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit study of the oral cholera vaccine (WC/rBS), Dukoral® for the prevention of traveller's diarrhoea (TD) was performed in subjects travelling to cholera risk areas. The effectiveness of WC/rBS vaccine in the prevention of TD was analyzed in 362 travellers attending two International Vaccination Centres in Spain between May and September 2005. Results The overall vaccine efficacy against TD was 42,6%. Direct healthcare-related costs as well as indirect costs (lost vacation days) subsequent to the disease were considered. Preventive vaccination against TD resulted in a mean saving of 79.26 € per traveller. Conclusion According to the cost-benefit analysis performed, the recommendation for WC/rBS vaccination in subjects travelling to zones at risk of TD is beneficial for the traveller, regardless of trip duration and visited continent. PMID:19445712

  6. The influence of nonstoichiometry on elastic characteristics of metastable β-WC1- x phase in ion plasma condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol', O. V.

    2016-09-01

    The dependence of elastic moduli for different directions on the nonstoichiometry with respect to carbon atoms in octahedral interstices of face-centered cubic crystalline lattice is established for the first time for metastable tungsten carbide (β-WC1- x phase). It is shown that with decreasing content of carbon atoms in the tungsten carbide lattice it is compressed, which is accompanied by the growth of the contribution of metallic component, thus determining higher density of the coating material and change of elastic characteristics for different crystallographic directions. This makes it possible to obtain carbide coatings with the required ratio of elastic constants via corresponding technological regimes, which is especially important in formation of coatings with predominant crystallite growth orientation.

  7. Adhesion of tungsten carbide reinforced amorphous hydrocarbon thin films (WC/a-C:H) to steel substrates for tribological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Ryan D.; Schiller, P. J; Howe, Jane Y

    2011-01-01

    We have explored the adhesive interlayer structure for a tungsten carbide reinforced amorphous hydrocarbon thin film coating (WC/a-C:H) that demonstrated excellent coating adhesion under highly stressed tribological contact. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis including cross-sectional imaging, electron diffraction, and energy dispersive spectroscopy was performed on abrupt and gradient interfaces within the multilayer film architecture. Interpretation of these results is aided by quantum mechanical calculations that were performed to investigate bonding interactions of the Cr adhesive interlayer to the Fe substrate surface within a - 3 nm thick interfacial region. Low levels of oxygen present in the coating deposition chamber during deposition were found at the Fe-Cr interface using high-resolution TEM. Molecular orbital calculations for a linear three-atom molecular model Fe-O-Cr demonstrate the role of O in strengthening Fe to Cr bonding within that interfacial region.

  8. Preparation and characterization of sulfonated PEEK-WC membranes for fuel cell applications. A comparison between polymeric and composite membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regina, A.; Fontananova, E.; Drioli, E.; Casciola, M.; Sganappa, M.; Trotta, F.

    Sulfonated poly(etheretherketone) with a cardo group (SPEEK-WC) exhibiting a wide range of degree of sulfonation (DS) was used to prepare polymeric membranes and composite membranes obtained by incorporation of an amorphous zirconium phosphate sulfophenylenphosphonate (Zr(HPO 4)(O 3PC 6H 4SO 3H), hereafter Zr(SPP)) in a SPEEK-WC matrix. The nominal composition of the composite membranes was fixed at 20 wt% of Zr(SPP). Both types of membrane were characterized for their proton conductivity, methanol permeability, water and/or methanol uptake, morphology by SEM and mechanical properties. For comparison, a commercial Nafion 117 membrane was characterized under the same operative conditions. The composite membranes exhibited a reduced water uptake in comparison with the polymeric membranes especially at high DS values and temperature higher than 50 °C. As a result, the water uptake into composite membranes remained about constant in the range 20-70 °C. The methanol permeability (P) of both polymeric and composite membranes was always lower than that of a commercial Nafion 117 membrane. At 22 °C and 100% relative humidity (RH), the proton conductivities (σ) of the polymeric membranes increased from 6 × 10 -4 to 1 × 10 -2 S cm -1 with the increase of DS from 0.1 to 1.04. The higher conductivity value was comparable with that of Nafion 117 membrane (3 × 10 -2 S cm -1) measured under the same operative conditions. The conductivities of the composite membranes are close to that of the corresponding polymeric membranes, but they are affected to a lesser extent by the polymer DS. The maximum value of the σ/ P ratio (about 7 × 10 4 at 25 °C) was found for the composite membrane with DS = 0.2 and was 2.5 times higher than the corresponding value of the Nafion membrane.

  9. United States Access Board

    MedlinePlus

    ... Communications & IT Access to information and communication technology (ICT) is addressed by Board standards and guidelines issued ... Engineer (November 3) Access Board Approves Rules on ICT Refresh and Medical Diagnostic Equipment (September 14) Access ...

  10. The link between access to urban environmental infrastructure services and health. USAID / Indonesia shifts program emphasis.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    This article describes urban women's role and access to sanitation and a safe water supply in Indonesia, and links potential improvements in women's health to improved access to urban infrastructure. In 1996, USAID discovered that morbidity was higher in female-headed households in urban areas. Female-headed households were only 6.5% of total households, but had 27% more illnesses than male-headed ones. USAID's study found that the health related problems of women were related to their poverty, illiteracy, lack of resources, and lack of access to the cleanest drinking water and wastewater disposal. Age was not a factor. Women had less access to clean drinking water, bathing, and toilet facilities. The USAID mission determined that its gender neutral approach to providing services was not reaching the neediest group. Women needed greater access to healthy urban environmental structures. The USAID shifted its erroneous assumption that female-headed households were headed by mostly old and widowed women and redesigned its infrastructure development to ensure that female-headed households received improved water and sanitation services. The USAID Mission also changed its practices by including women in planning and management of urban infrastructure services. The change was based on the belief that women decision-makers would improve how water, sanitation, and solid waste disposal services were provided. The Mission targeted 20% of its program funds for community participation of women. This effort will provide valuable insight into the role of women in urban service delivery.

  11. Learning to Question: The Roles of Multiple Hypotheses, Successive Approximations, Balloons and Toilet Paper in University Science Programs of Southwestern Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, I. Foster

    2008-06-01

    Learning to question is essential for determining pathways of conservation and development in southwestern Amazonia during a time of rapid global environmental change. Teaching such an approach in graduate science programs in regional universities can be done using play-acting and simulation exercises. Multiple working hypotheses help students learn to question their own research results and expert witnesses. The method of successive approximations enables students to question the results of complex calculations, such as estimates of forest biomass. Balloons and rolls of toilet paper provide means of questioning two-dimensional representations of a three-dimensional Earth and the value of pi. Generation of systematic errors can illustrate the pitfalls of blind acceptance of data. While learning to question is essential, it is insufficient by itself; students must also learn how to be solutionologists in order to satisfy societal demands for solutions to environmental problems. A little irreverence can be an excellent didactic tool for helping students develop the skills necessary to lead conservation and development efforts in the region.

  12. Meta-genomic analysis of toilet waste from long distance flights; a step towards global surveillance of infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Nordahl Petersen, Thomas; Rasmussen, Simon; Hasman, Henrik; Carøe, Christian; Bælum, Jacob; Schultz, Anna Charlotte; Bergmark, Lasse; Svendsen, Christina A; Lund, Ole; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2015-07-10

    Human populations worldwide are increasingly confronted with infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance spreading faster and appearing more frequently. Knowledge regarding their occurrence and worldwide transmission is important to control outbreaks and prevent epidemics. Here, we performed shotgun sequencing of toilet waste from 18 international airplanes arriving in Copenhagen, Denmark, from nine cities in three world regions. An average of 18.6 Gb (14.8 to 25.7 Gb) of raw Illumina paired end sequence data was generated, cleaned, trimmed and mapped against reference sequence databases for bacteria and antimicrobial resistance genes. An average of 106,839 (0.06%) reads were assigned to resistance genes with genes encoding resistance to tetracycline, macrolide and beta-lactam resistance genes as the most abundant in all samples. We found significantly higher abundance and diversity of genes encoding antimicrobial resistance, including critical important resistance (e.g. blaCTX-M) carried on airplanes from South Asia compared to North America. Presence of Salmonella enterica and norovirus were also detected in higher amounts from South Asia, whereas Clostridium difficile was most abundant in samples from North America. Our study provides a first step towards a potential novel strategy for global surveillance enabling simultaneous detection of multiple human health threatening genetic elements, infectious agents and resistance genes.

  13. Meta-genomic analysis of toilet waste from long distance flights; a step towards global surveillance of infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nordahl Petersen, Thomas; Rasmussen, Simon; Hasman, Henrik; Carøe, Christian; Bælum, Jacob; Charlotte Schultz, Anna; Bergmark, Lasse; Svendsen, Christina A.; Lund, Ole; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Aarestrup, Frank M.

    2015-01-01

    Human populations worldwide are increasingly confronted with infectious diseases and antimicrobial resistance spreading faster and appearing more frequently. Knowledge regarding their occurrence and worldwide transmission is important to control outbreaks and prevent epidemics. Here, we performed shotgun sequencing of toilet waste from 18 international airplanes arriving in Copenhagen, Denmark, from nine cities in three world regions. An average of 18.6 Gb (14.8 to 25.7 Gb) of raw Illumina paired end sequence data was generated, cleaned, trimmed and mapped against reference sequence databases for bacteria and antimicrobial resistance genes. An average of 106,839 (0.06%) reads were assigned to resistance genes with genes encoding resistance to tetracycline, macrolide and beta-lactam resistance genes as the most abundant in all samples. We found significantly higher abundance and diversity of genes encoding antimicrobial resistance, including critical important resistance (e.g. blaCTX-M) carried on airplanes from South Asia compared to North America. Presence of Salmonella enterica and norovirus were also detected in higher amounts from South Asia, whereas Clostridium difficile was most abundant in samples from North America. Our study provides a first step towards a potential novel strategy for global surveillance enabling simultaneous detection of multiple human health threatening genetic elements, infectious agents and resistance genes. PMID:26161690

  14. Floors and Toilets: Association of Floors and Sanitation Practices with Fecal Contamination in Peruvian Amazon Peri-Urban Households.

    PubMed

    Exum, Natalie G; Olórtegui, Maribel Paredes; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Davis, Meghan F; Heaney, Christopher D; Kosek, Margaret; Schwab, Kellogg J

    2016-07-19

    Over two billion people worldwide lack access to an improved sanitation facility that adequately retains or treats feces. This results in the potential for fecal material containing enteric pathogens to contaminate the environment, including household floors. This study aimed to assess how floor type and sanitation practices impacted the concentration of fecal contamination on household floors. We sampled 189 floor surfaces within 63 households in a peri-urban community in Iquitos, Peru. All samples were analyzed for colony forming units (CFUs) of E. coli, and households were evaluated for their water, sanitation, and hygiene characteristics. Results of multivariate linear regression indicated that households with improved sanitation and cement floors in the kitchen area had reduced fecal contamination to those with unimproved sanitation and dirt floors (Beta: -1.18 log10 E. coli CFU/900 cm(2); 95% confidence interval [CI]: -1.77, -0.60). Households that did not versus did share their sanitation facility also had less contaminated kitchen floors (Beta: -0.65 log10 E. coli CFU/900 cm(2); 95% CI: -1.15, -0.16). These findings suggest that the sanitation facilities of a home may impact the microbial load found on floors, contributing to the potential for household floors to serve as an indirect route of fecal pathogen transmission to children. PMID:27338564

  15. Floors and Toilets: Association of Floors and Sanitation Practices with Fecal Contamination in Peruvian Amazon Peri-Urban Households.

    PubMed

    Exum, Natalie G; Olórtegui, Maribel Paredes; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Davis, Meghan F; Heaney, Christopher D; Kosek, Margaret; Schwab, Kellogg J

    2016-07-19

    Over two billion people worldwide lack access to an improved sanitation facility that adequately retains or treats feces. This results in the potential for fecal material containing enteric pathogens to contaminate the environment, including household floors. This study aimed to assess how floor type and sanitation practices impacted the concentration of fecal contamination on household floors. We sampled 189 floor surfaces within 63 households in a peri-urban community in Iquitos, Peru. All samples were analyzed for colony forming units (CFUs) of E. coli, and households were evaluated for their water, sanitation, and hygiene characteristics. Results of multivariate linear regression indicated that households with improved sanitation and cement floors in the kitchen area had reduced fecal contamination to those with unimproved sanitation and dirt floors (Beta: -1.18 log10 E. coli CFU/900 cm(2); 95% confidence interval [CI]: -1.77, -0.60). Households that did not versus did share their sanitation facility also had less contaminated kitchen floors (Beta: -0.65 log10 E. coli CFU/900 cm(2); 95% CI: -1.15, -0.16). These findings suggest that the sanitation facilities of a home may impact the microbial load found on floors, contributing to the potential for household floors to serve as an indirect route of fecal pathogen transmission to children.

  16. A Theory of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribot, Jesse C.; Peluso, Nancy Lee

    2003-01-01

    The term "access" is frequently used by property and natural resource analysts without adequate definition. In this paper we develop a concept of access and examine a broad set of factors that differentiate access from property. We define access as "the "ability" to derive benefits from things," broadening from property's classical definition as…

  17. Assessment of Abrasive Wear of Nanostructured WC-Co and Fe-Based Coatings Applied by HP-HVOF, Flame, and Wire Arc Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, C. R. C.; Libardi, R.; Camargo, F.; Fals, H. C.; Ferraresi, V. A.

    2014-10-01

    Thermal spray processes have been widely used to minimize losses caused by wear mechanisms. Sprayed deposits using conventional wire and powder materials have been long solving tribological problems in engineering equipment. More recently, the option for new different technologies and consumables like nanostructured powder materials and nanocomposite cored wires have expanded the possibilities for technical solutions. Cored wire technology allows the use of compositions that cannot be drawn into wire form like carbides in metallic matrix and high-temperature materials, thus, intensifying the use of spraying processes with low operating cost to demanding wear and corrosion applications. The objective of this work was to study the mechanical characteristics and wear performance of coatings obtained by Flame, Wire Arc, and HVOF spraying using selected nanostructured WC10Co4Cr, WC12Co, and Fe-based 140 MXC powder and wire materials. Abrasive wear performance of the coatings was determinate following the ASTM G-65 standard. Based on the results, a higher abrasive wear resistance was found for the HVOF-sprayed WC10Co4Cr nanostructured coating.

  18. Microstructures and mechanical properties of metallic NiCrBSi and composite NiCrBSi-WC layers manufactured via hybrid plasma/laser process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serres, Nicolas; Hlawka, Françoise; Costil, Sophie; Langlade, Cécile; Machi, Frédérique

    2011-04-01

    Thermal spraying is already used in industry to protect mechanical parts against wear and/or corrosion, but results are not always satisfactory due to porosity and microstructures. In this study, atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) and in situ laser irradiation by diode laser processes were combined to modify structural characteristics of metallic NiCrBSi and composite NiCrBSi-WC coatings. The microstructure evolution was studied with the chemical composition analysis by XRD and SEM coupled with EDS techniques. Instrumented nanoindentation tests were also conducted employing a Berkovich indenter. Moreover, the effect of the influence of the volume fraction of the reinforcing WC particles on the formation and mechanical performances of the layer was also investigated. Results show that in situ laser remelting induces the growth of a dendritic structure which strongly decreases the porosity of as-sprayed coatings, without solidification cracking (one of the major defects that can occur during the solidification of metallic or composite alloys) and improves the mechanical properties of the layer. Indeed, the layer properties such as hardness, elastic modulus, shear strength and wear rate are dependent on the percentage of WC particles in the mixture.

  19. Laser treatment of dual matrix cast iron with presence of WC particles at the surface: Influence of self-annealing on stress fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Akhtar, S. S.; Karatas, C.; Boran, K.

    2016-01-01

    Laser control melting of dual matrix cast iron surface is carried out. A carbon film containing 15% WC particles is formed at the surface prior to the laser treatment and the spiral tracks are adopted for laser scanning at the workpiece surface. Morphological, metallurgical, microhardness, and scratch resistance of the laser treated surface are examined using analytical tools. Temperature and stress fields in the laser irradiated region are predicted incorporating ABAQUS finite element code. Predictions of temperature and residual stress at the laser treated surface are validated with the thermocouple and the X-ray diffraction data. It is found that surface temperature and residual stress predictions agree well with their counterparts corresponding to thermocouple data and findings of X-ray diffraction technique. Laser treated surface is free from asperities including voids and micro-cracks despite the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients of WC and dual matrix cast iron. This behavior is attributed to the self-annealing effects of recently formed spiral tracks on the previously formed tracks during the laser treatment process; in which case, the self-annealing effect modifies the cooling rates and lowers thermal stress levels in the laser treated layer. Laser treated layer consists of a dense region composing of fine grains and WC particles, dendritic and featherlike structures below the dense layer, and the heat affected zone.

  20. Effect of Silicon Doping in Cvd Diamond Films from Microcrystalline to Nanocrystalline on WC-Co Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Cui, Yuxiao; Shen, Bin; Sun, Fanghong

    2013-12-01

    Si-doped diamond films with various Si concentrations are deposited on WC-Co substrates using HFCVD method, with the mixture of acetone, tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and hydrogen as the reactant source. A variety of characterizations, including FE-SEM, AFM, Raman, XRD, surface profilometer and Rockwell indentation, are conducted to systematically investigate the influence of Si incorporation on diamond films. As the Si/C ratio from 0% to 5%, the grain size of as-deposited films decreases from 4 μm to about 50 nm, and the surface roughness reduces from Ra 290 nm to Ra 180 nm. Besides, the intensity ratio of I(111)/I(220) varies from 0.57 to 0, indicating the <110> preferred orientation of the nanocrystalline structure in the 5% doped diamond films. The silicon doping is beneficial for the formation of non-diamond carbide phases in the films, according to the Raman spectra. Moreover, the film adhesion is also improved with the increase of Si/C ratio.

  1. Effect of cobalt content on wear and corrosion behaviors of electrodeposited Ni-Co/WC nano-composite coatings.

    PubMed

    Amadeh, A; Ebadpour, R

    2013-02-01

    Metal-ceramic composite coatings are widely used in automotive and aerospace industries as well as micro-electronic systems. Electrodeposition is an economic method for application of these coatings. In this research, nickel-cobalt coatings reinforced by nano WC particles were applied on carbon steel substrate by pulse electrodeposition from modified Watts bath containing different amounts of cobalt sulphate as an additive. Saccharin and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) were also added to electroplating bath as grain refiner and surfactant, respectively. The effect of cobalt content on wear and corrosion behavior of the coatings was investigated. Wear and corrosion properties were assessed by pin-on-disk and potentiodynamic polarization methods, respectively. Phase analysis was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) using CuK(alpha) radiation and the worn surfaces were studied by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the addition of cobalt improved the wear resistance of the coatings. In the presence of 18 g/L cobalt in electrodeposition bath, the wear rate of the coating decreased to 0.002 mg/m and the coefficient of friction reduced to 0.695 while they were 0.004 mg/m and 0.77 in the absence of cobalt, respectively. This improvement in wear properties can be attributed to the formation of hcp phase in metallic matrix. Meanwhile, the corrosion resistance of the coatings slightly reduced because cobalt is more active metal with respect to nickel.

  2. Laser removal of TiN coatings from WC micro-tools and in-process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marimuthu, S.; Kamara, A. M.; Whitehead, D.; Mativenga, P.; Li, L.

    2010-11-01

    Current environmental challenges require sustainable and extended use and re-use of materials. For example, the service life of engineering tooling can be extended by using thin film coatings such as titanium nitride (TiN). However, when errors arise in the coating process or when the tooling needs to be re-used it is necessary to remove the coating. Decoating is also useful when a large batch of cutting tools needs to be re-directed for a different application, which requires a new generation of coating. Existing technology uses chemical methods which are not environmentally friendly or ideal for selective removal. In this work, excimer laser striping of TiN from coated tungsten carbide (WC) micro-tools has been demonstrated as a viable alternative to chemical methods. Also, in order to raise the integrity of the decoating process and to make the process more accurate and reliable, two online monitoring systems were developed exploiting probe beam reflection (PBR) and laser plume emission spectroscopy (PES). The online monitoring system facilitated a simultaneous prediction of surface elements as coating layers are progressively removed and ensures better control over the laser irradiation process so as to avoid under or over stripping of the coating.

  3. Influence of Processing Parameters on Residual Stress of High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermally Sprayed WC-Co-Cr Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, M.; Eybel, R.; Asselin, B.; Radhakrishnan, S.; Cerps, J.

    2012-10-01

    Residual stress in high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermally sprayed WC-10Co-4Cr coating was studied based on design of experiment (DOE) with five factors of oxygen flow, fuel gas hydrogen flow, powder feed rate, stand-off distance, and surface speed of substrate. In each DOE run, the velocity and temperature of in-flight particle in flame, and substrate temperature were measured. Almen-type N strips were coated, and their deflections after coating were used for evaluation of residual stress level in the coating. The residual stress in the coating obtained in all DOE runs is compressive. In the present case of HVOF thermally sprayed coating, the residual stress is determined by three types of stress: peening, quenching, and cooling stress generated during spraying or post spraying. The contribution of each type stress to the final compressive residual stress in the coating depends on material properties of coating and substrate, velocity and temperature of in-flight particle, and substrate temperature. It is found that stand-off distance is the most important factor to affect the final residual stress in the coating, following by two-factor interaction of oxygen flow and hydrogen flow. At low level of stand-off distance, higher velocity of in-flight particle in flame and higher substrate temperature post spraying generate more peening stress and cooling stress, resulting in higher compressive residual stress in the coating.

  4. WC-Co and Cr3C2-NiCr Coatings in Low- and High-Stress Abrasive Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kašparová, Michaela; Zahálka, František; Houdková, Šárka

    2011-03-01

    The article deals with the evaluation of abrasive wear resistance and adhesive strength of thermally sprayed coatings. The main attention was paid to differences between low- and high-stress abrasive conditions of the measuring. Conclusions include the evaluation of specific properties of the WC-Co and the Cr3C2-NiCr High Velocity Oxygen Fuel coatings and the evaluation of the changes in the behavior of the abrasive media. Mainly, the relationship between the low- and high-stress abrasion conditions and the wear mechanism in the tested materials was described. For the wear test, the abrasive media of Al2O3 and SiO2 sands were chosen. During wear tests, the volume loss of the tested materials and the surface roughness of the wear tracks were measured. The wear tracks on the tested materials and abrasive sands' morphologies were observed using Scanning Electron Microscopy. It was found that high-stress abrasive conditions change the coatings' behavior very significantly, particularly that of the Cr3C2-NiCr coating. Adhesive-cohesive properties of the coatings and relationships among individual structure particles were evaluated using tensile testing. It was found that the weak bond strength among the individual splats, structure particles, and phases plays a role in the poor wear resistance of the coatings.

  5. World Wide Access: Accessible Web Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper considers the application of "universal design" principles to Web page design in order to increase accessibility for people with disabilities. Suggestions are based on the World Wide Web Consortium's accessibility initiative, which has proposed guidelines for all Web authors and federal government standards. Seven guidelines for…

  6. PET imaging of in vivo caspase-3/7 activity following myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury with the radiolabeled isatin sulfonamide analogue [18F]WC-4-116

    PubMed Central

    Thukkani, Arun K; Shoghi, Kooresh I; Zhou, Dong; Xu, Jinbin; Chu, Wenhua; Novak, Eric; Chen, Delphine L; Gropler, Robert J; Mach, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    The utility of [18F]WC-4-116, a PET tracer for imaging caspase-3 activation, was evaluated in an animal model of myocardial apoptosis. [18F]WC-4-116 was injected into rats at 3 hours after a 30 min period of ischemia induced by temporary occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery in Sprague-Dawley rats. [18F]WC-4-116 uptake was quantified by 1) autoradiography, 2) microPET imaging studies, and 3) post-PET biodistribution studies. MicroPET imaging also assessed uptake of the non-caspase-3-targeted tracer [18F]ICMT-18 at 3 hours postischemia. Enzyme assays and Western blotting assessed caspase-3 activation in both at-risk and not-at-risk regions. Caspase-3 enzyme activity increased in the at-risk but not in the not-at-risk myocardium. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of [18F]WC-4-116 demonstrated nearly 2-fold higher uptake in the ischemia-reperfusion (IR) versus sham animals. [18F]WC-4-116 microPET imaging studies demonstrated that the IR animals was similarly elevated in relation to sham. [18F]ICMT-18 uptake did not increase in at-risk myocardium despite evidence of caspase-3 activation. Biodistribution studies with [18F]WC-4-116 confirmed the microPET findings. These data indicate that the caspase-3-PET tracer [18F]WC-4-116 can noninvasively image in vivo caspase activity during myocardial apoptosis and may be useful for clinical imaging in humans. PMID:27186438

  7. Open Access Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Open access publishing is a hot topic today. But open access publishing can have many different definitions, and pros and cons vary with the definitions. Open access publishing is especially attractive to companies and small colleges or universities that are likely to have many more readers than authors. A downside is that a membership fee sounds…

  8. [Accessible Rural Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Nick, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This issue of the quarterly newsletter "Rural Exchange" provides information and resources on accessible rural housing for the disabled. "Accessible Manufactured Housing Could Increase Rural Home Supply" (Nick Baker) suggests that incorporation of access features such as lever door handles and no-step entries into manufactured housing could help…

  9. Demystifying Remote Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Grant

    2009-01-01

    With money tight, more and more districts are considering remote access as a way to reduce expenses and budget information technology costs more effectively. Remote access allows staff members to work with a hosted software application from any school campus without being tied to a specific physical location. Each school can access critical…

  10. Open Access and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Shawn; Schmidt, Christian; Das, Chhaya; Tucker, Philip W

    2006-01-01

    Uncensored exchange of scientific results hastens progress. Open Access does not stop at the removal of price and permission barriers; still, censorship and reading disabilities, to name a few, hamper access to information. Here, we invite the scientific community and the public to discuss new methods to distribute, store and manage literature in order to achieve unfettered access to literature. PMID:16956402

  11. Reflective Database Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lars E.

    2009-01-01

    "Reflective Database Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a database privilege is expressed as a database query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of database access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…

  12. Safety of the Recombinant Cholera Toxin B Subunit, Killed Whole-Cell (rBS-WC) Oral Cholera Vaccine in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hashim, Ramadhan; Khatib, Ahmed M.; Enwere, Godwin; Park, Jin Kyung; Reyburn, Rita; Ali, Mohammad; Chang, Na Yoon; Kim, Deok Ryun; Ley, Benedikt; Thriemer, Kamala; Lopez, Anna Lena; Clemens, John D.; Deen, Jacqueline L.; Shin, Sunheang; Schaetti, Christian; Hutubessy, Raymond; Aguado, Maria Teresa; Kieny, Marie Paule; Sack, David; Obaro, Stephen; Shaame, Attiye J.; Ali, Said M.; Saleh, Abdul A.; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Jiddawi, Mohamed S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mass vaccinations are a main strategy in the deployment of oral cholera vaccines. Campaigns avoid giving vaccine to pregnant women because of the absence of safety data of the killed whole-cell oral cholera (rBS-WC) vaccine. Balancing this concern is the known higher risk of cholera and of complications of pregnancy should cholera occur in these women, as well as the lack of expected adverse events from a killed oral bacterial vaccine. Methodology/Principal Findings From January to February 2009, a mass rBS-WC vaccination campaign of persons over two years of age was conducted in an urban and a rural area (population 51,151) in Zanzibar. Pregnant women were advised not to participate in the campaign. More than nine months after the last dose of the vaccine was administered, we visited all women between 15 and 50 years of age living in the study area. The outcome of pregnancies that were inadvertently exposed to at least one oral cholera vaccine dose and those that were not exposed was evaluated. 13,736 (94%) of the target women in the study site were interviewed. 1,151 (79%) of the 1,453 deliveries in 2009 occurred during the period when foetal exposure to the vaccine could have occurred. 955 (83%) out of these 1,151 mothers had not been vaccinated; the remaining 196 (17%) mothers had received at least one dose of the oral cholera vaccine. There were no statistically significant differences in the odds ratios for birth outcomes among the exposed and unexposed pregnancies. Conclusions/Significance We found no statistically significant evidence of a harmful effect of gestational exposure to the rBS-WC vaccine. These findings, along with the absence of a rational basis for expecting a risk from this killed oral bacterial vaccine, are reassuring but the study had insufficient power to detect infrequent events. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00709410 PMID:22848772

  13. Study of interface correlation in W/C multilayer structure by specular and non-specular grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, A.; Maidul Haque, S.; Tripathi, S.; De, Rajnarayan; Rai, S.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2015-10-01

    W/C/W tri-layer thin film samples have been deposited on c-Si substrates in a home-built Ion Beam Sputtering system at 1.5 × 10-3 Torr Ar working pressure and 10 mA grid current. The tri-layer samples have been deposited at different Ar+ ion energies between 0.6 and 1.2 keV for W layer deposition and the samples have been characterized by specular and non-specular grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity (GIXR) measurements. By analyzing the GIXR spectra, various interface parameters have been obtained for both W-on-C and C-on-W interfaces and optimum Ar+ ion energy for obtaining interfaces with low imperfections has been found. Subsequently, multilayer W/C samples with 5-layer, 7-layer, 9-layer, and 13-layer have been deposited at this optimum Ar+ ion energy. By fitting the specular and diffused GIXR data of the multilayer samples with the parameters of each interface as fitting variables, different interface parameters, viz., interface width, in-plane correlation length, interface roughness, and interface diffusion have been estimated for each interface and their variation across the depth of the multilayers have been obtained. The information would be useful in realizing W/C multilayers for soft X-ray mirror application in the <100 Å wavelength regime. The applicability of the "restart of the growth at the interface" model in the case of these ion beam sputter deposited W/C multilayers has also been investigated in the course of this study.

  14. High-Temperature Exposure Studies of HVOF-Sprayed Cr3C2-25(NiCr)/(WC-Co) Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harpreet; Kaur, Manpreet; Prakash, Satya

    2016-08-01

    In this research, development of Cr3C2-25(NiCr) + 25%(WC-Co) composite coating was done and investigated. Cr3C2-25(NiCr) + 25%(WC-Co) composite powder [designated as HP2 powder] was prepared by mechanical mixing of [75Cr3C2-25(NiCr)] and [88WC-12Co] powders in the ratio of 75:25 by weight. The blended powders were used as feedstock to deposit composite coating on ASTM SA213-T22 substrate using High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) spray process. High-temperature oxidation/corrosion behavior of the bare and coated boiler steels was investigated at 700 °C for 50 cycles in air, as well as, in Na2SO4-82%Fe2(SO4)3 molten salt environment in the laboratory. Erosion-corrosion behavior was investigated in the actual boiler environment at 700 ± 10 °C under cyclic conditions for 1500 h. The weight-change technique was used to establish the kinetics of oxidation/corrosion/erosion-corrosion. X-ray diffraction, field emission-scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and EDS elemental mapping techniques were used to analyze the exposed samples. The uncoated boiler steel suffered from a catastrophic degradation in the form of intense spalling of the scale in all the environments. The oxidation/corrosion/erosion-corrosion resistance of the HVOF-sprayed HP2 coating was found to be better in comparison with standalone Cr3C2-25(NiCr) coating. A simultaneous formation of protective phases might have contributed the best properties to the coating.

  15. Study of interface correlation in W/C multilayer structure by specular and non-specular grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, A. Bhattacharyya, D.; Sahoo, N. K.; Maidul Haque, S.; Tripathi, S.; De, Rajnarayan; Rai, S.

    2015-10-28

    W/C/W tri-layer thin film samples have been deposited on c-Si substrates in a home-built Ion Beam Sputtering system at 1.5 × 10{sup −3} Torr Ar working pressure and 10 mA grid current. The tri-layer samples have been deposited at different Ar{sup +} ion energies between 0.6 and 1.2 keV for W layer deposition and the samples have been characterized by specular and non-specular grazing incidence X-ray reflectivity (GIXR) measurements. By analyzing the GIXR spectra, various interface parameters have been obtained for both W-on-C and C-on-W interfaces and optimum Ar{sup +} ion energy for obtaining interfaces with low imperfections has been found. Subsequently, multilayer W/C samples with 5-layer, 7-layer, 9-layer, and 13-layer have been deposited at this optimum Ar{sup +} ion energy. By fitting the specular and diffused GIXR data of the multilayer samples with the parameters of each interface as fitting variables, different interface parameters, viz., interface width, in-plane correlation length, interface roughness, and interface diffusion have been estimated for each interface and their variation across the depth of the multilayers have been obtained. The information would be useful in realizing W/C multilayers for soft X-ray mirror application in the <100 Å wavelength regime. The applicability of the “restart of the growth at the interface” model in the case of these ion beam sputter deposited W/C multilayers has also been investigated in the course of this study.

  16. Optical Zeeman spectroscopy of the [17.6]2-X3Δ1(1,0) band system of tungsten monocarbide, WC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Steimle, Timothy C.

    2011-09-01

    The Zeeman effect in the [17.6]2-X3Δ1(1,0) band system of tungsten monocarbide, WC, has been recorded and analyzed. Magnetic tuning of the spectral features recorded at high resolution (full width at half maximum ≅ 35 MHz) and at field strengths of 1101 and 2230 G are accurately modeled using an effective Zeeman Hamiltonian. The observed spectra were fit to produce gel -factors for the X3Δ1(υ = 0) and [17.6]2(υ = 1) states. The observed gel-factors are discussed in terms of the proposed electronic state distribution.

  17. Mathematical modelling in Matlab of the experimental results shows the electrochemical potential difference - temperature of the WC coatings immersed in a NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benea, M. L.; Benea, O. D.

    2016-02-01

    The method used for purchasing the corrosion behaviour the WC coatings deposited by plasma spraying, on a martensitic stainless steel substrate consists in measuring the electrochemical potential of the coating, respectively that of the substrate, immersed in a NaCl solution as corrosive agent. The mathematical processing of the obtained experimental results in Matlab allowed us to make some correlations between the electrochemical potential of the coating and the solution temperature is very well described by some curves having equations obtained by interpolation order 4.

  18. Optical Zeeman spectroscopy of the [17.6]2-X3Δ1(1,0) band system of tungsten monocarbide, WC.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Steimle, Timothy C

    2011-09-14

    The Zeeman effect in the [17.6]2-X(3)Δ(1)(1,0) band system of tungsten monocarbide, WC, has been recorded and analyzed. Magnetic tuning of the spectral features recorded at high resolution (full width at half maximum ≅ 35 MHz) and at field strengths of 1101 and 2230 G are accurately modeled using an effective Zeeman Hamiltonian. The observed spectra were fit to produce g(el)-factors for the X(3)Δ(1)(υ = 0) and [17.6]2(υ = 1) states. The observed g(el)-factors are discussed in terms of the proposed electronic state distribution.

  19. Access to improved water and its relationship with diarrhoea in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Salina; Aihara, Yoko; Yoden, Kanako; Yamagata, Zentaro; Nishida, Kei; Kondo, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the associations between diarrhoea and types of water sources, total quantity of water consumed and the quantity of improved water consumed in rapidly growing, highly populated urban areas in developing countries. Design Cross-sectional analysis using population-representative secondary data obtained from an interview survey conducted by the Asian Development Bank for the 2009 Kathmandu Valley Water Distribution, Sewerage and Urban Development Project. Setting Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. Participants 2282 households. Methods A structured questionnaire was used to collect information from households on the quantity and sources of water consumed; health, socioeconomic and demographic status of households; drinking water treatment practices and toilet facilities. Results Family members of 179 households (7.8%) reported having developed diarrhoea during the previous month. For households in which family members consumed less than 100 L of water per capita per day (L/c/d), which is the minimum quantity recommended by WHO, the risk of contracting diarrhoea doubled (1.56-fold to 2.92-fold). In households that used alternative water sources (such as wells, stone spouts and springs) in addition to improved water (provided by a water management authority), the likelihood of contracting diarrhoea was 1.81-fold higher (95% CI 1.00 to 3.29) than in those that used only improved water. However, access to an improved water source was not associated with a lower risk of developing diarrhoea if optimal quantities of water were not consumed (ie, <100 L/c/d). These results were independent of socioeconomic and demographic variables, daily drinking water treatment practices, toilet facilities and residential areas. Conclusions Providing access to a sufficient quantity of water—regardless of the source—may be more important in preventing diarrhoea than supplying a limited quantity of improved water. PMID:23811169

  20. Access to modern contraception.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Michael J; Stanback, John; Shelton, James

    2006-06-01

    Access to modern contraception has become a recognized human right, improving the health and well-being of women, families and societies worldwide. However, contraceptive access remains uneven. Irregular contraceptive supply, limited numbers of service delivery points and specific geographic, economic, informational, psychosocial and administrative barriers (including medical barriers) undermine access in many settings. Widening the range of providers enabled to offer contraception can improve contraceptive access, particularly where resources are most scarce. International efforts to remove medical barriers include the World Health Organization's Medical Eligibility Criteria. Based on the best available evidence, these criteria provide guidance for weighing the risks and benefits of contraceptive choice among women with specific clinical conditions. Clinical job aids can also improve access. More research is needed to further elucidate the pathways for expanding contraceptive access. Further progress in removing medical barriers will depend on systems for improving provider education and promoting evidence-based contraceptive service delivery. PMID:16443395

  1. Web Accessibility and Guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Simon; Yesilada, Yeliz

    Access to, and movement around, complex online environments, of which the World Wide Web (Web) is the most popular example, has long been considered an important and major issue in the Web design and usability field. The commonly used slang phrase ‘surfing the Web’ implies rapid and free access, pointing to its importance among designers and users alike. It has also been long established that this potentially complex and difficult access is further complicated, and becomes neither rapid nor free, if the user is disabled. There are millions of people who have disabilities that affect their use of the Web. Web accessibility aims to help these people to perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with, as well as contribute to, the Web, and thereby the society in general. This accessibility is, in part, facilitated by the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) currently moving from version one to two. These guidelines are intended to encourage designers to make sure their sites conform to specifications, and in that conformance enable the assistive technologies of disabled users to better interact with the page content. In this way, it was hoped that accessibility could be supported. While this is in part true, guidelines do not solve all problems and the new WCAG version two guidelines are surrounded by controversy and intrigue. This chapter aims to establish the published literature related to Web accessibility and Web accessibility guidelines, and discuss limitations of the current guidelines and future directions.

  2. Reoperative venous access.

    PubMed

    Juno, Russell J; Knott, Andrew W; Racadio, John; Warner, Brad W

    2003-05-01

    The maintenance of long-term venous access is critical to the livelihood of children in a variety of clinical situations, especially those who are dependent on parenteral nutrition. Whereas the traditional routes of either peripheral or central venous access are initially adequate, most of these sites eventually succumb to the pitfalls associated with long-term venous access. This review provides a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach to the management of reoperative venous access with regard to preoperative planning and imaging and specific techniques in interventional radiology and surgery.

  3. Access Interface Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Fager, Susan; Beukelman, David R.; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Jakobs, Tom; Baker, John

    2013-01-01

    Individuals who rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices to support their communication often have physical movement challenges that require alternative methods of access. Technology that supports access, particularly for those with the most severe movement deficits, have expanded substantially over the years. The purposes of this article are to review the state of the science of access technologies that interface with augmentative and alternative communication devices and to propose a future research and development agenda that will enhance access options for people with limited movement capability due to developmental and acquired conditions. PMID:22590797

  4. Channel Access in Erlang

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklaus, Dennis J.

    2013-10-13

    We have developed an Erlang language implementation of the Channel Access protocol. Included are low-level functions for encoding and decoding Channel Access protocol network packets as well as higher level functions for monitoring or setting EPICS process variables. This provides access to EPICS process variables for the Fermilab Acnet control system via our Erlang-based front-end architecture without having to interface to C/C++ programs and libraries. Erlang is a functional programming language originally developed for real-time telecommunications applications. Its network programming features and list management functions make it particularly well-suited for the task of managing multiple Channel Access circuits and PV monitors.

  5. Updating realistic access.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Mike

    2010-05-01

    Nearly six years ago Ira Mellman, then Editor-in-Chief of the JCB, published an editorial entitled "Providing realistic access" (1). It described the Journal's efforts to reconcile its subscription-based business model with the goal of providing public access to scholarly journal content. Since then, developments in the public-access movement are bringing us closer to the ideal of universal public access. But will there still be a place for selective journals like the JCB when we achieve that objective? PMID:20375430

  6. AccessAbility @ Cleveland Public Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mates, Barbara T.

    2003-01-01

    Describes several programs that were developed by staff at the Cleveland (Ohio) Public Library to be accessible to users with disabilities. Highlights include a Braille reading program; sensory garden; poetry club; book club based on talking books; wheelchair athletics; touching museum artifacts; and a mobile library for users who could not visit…

  7. Ultrasonic cavitation erosion of high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) sprayed near-nanostructured WC-10Co-4Cr coating in NaCl solution.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sheng; Wu, Yuping; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Yugui; Qin, Yujiao; Lin, Jinran

    2015-09-01

    The high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) spraying process was used to prepare near-nanostructured WC-10Co-4Cr coating. The cavitation erosion behavior and mechanism of the coating in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution were analyzed in detail. The results showed that the amorphous phase and WC grain were present in the coating. The cavitation erosion resistance of the coating was about 1.27 times that of the stainless steel 1Cr18Ni9Ti under the same testing conditions. The effects of erosion time on the microstructural evolution were discussed. It was revealed that cracks initiated at the edge of pre-existing pores and propagated along the carbide-binder interface, leading to the pull-out of carbide particle and the formation of pits and craters on the surface. The main failure mechanism of the coating was erosion of the binder phases, brittle detachment of hard phases and formation of pitting corrosion products. PMID:25617967

  8. Effect of Spray Particle Velocity on Cavitation Erosion Resistance Characteristics of HVOF and HVAF Processed 86WC-10Co4Cr Hydro Turbine Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R. K.; Kamaraj, M.; Seetharamu, S.; Pramod, T.; Sampathkumaran, P.

    2016-08-01

    The hydro plants utilizing silt-laden water for power generation suffer from severe metal wastage due to particle-induced erosion and cavitation. High-velocity oxy-fuel process (HVOF)-based coatings is widely applied to improve the erosion life. The process parameters such as particle velocity, size, powder feed rate, temperature, affect their mechanical properties. The high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) technology, with higher particle velocities and lower spray temperatures, gives dense and substantially nonoxidized coating. In the present study, the cavitation resistance of 86WC-10Co4Cr-type HVOF coating processed at 680 m/s spray particle velocity was compared with HVAF coatings made at 895, 960, and 1010 m/s. The properties such as porosity, hardness, indentation toughness, and cavitation resistance were investigated. The surface damage morphology has been analyzed in SEM. The cohesion between different layers has been examined qualitatively through scratch depth measurements across the cross section. The HVAF coatings have shown a lower porosity, higher hardness, and superior cavitation resistance. Delamination, extensive cracking of the matrix interface, and detachment of the WC grains were observed in HVOF coating. The rate of metal loss is low in HVAF coatings implying that process parameters play a vital role in achieving improved cavitation resistance.

  9. Microstructure and wear properties of WC particle reinforced composite coating on Ti6Al4V alloy produced by the plasma transferred arc method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik, Osman Nuri

    2013-06-01

    The microstructure and wear properties of a WC particle reinforced composite coating produced by the plasma transferred arc (PTA) method on Ti6Al4V alloy were investigated in this study. PTA processing was carried out using argon as the plasma gas at arc current values of 70 A, 80 A and 90 A. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the microstructure of the composite layer formed on the surface of a Ti6Al4V substrate. The results indicate that the WC, TiC and W2C carbide phases formed in the composite layers produced by PTA on the surface of the Ti6Al4V alloy. The distributions and volume fractions of these phases were found to vary with the arc current values. Wear tests were performed under dry sliding conditions using a linear ball-on-disc geometry. The microhardness and wear resistances of all of the composite layers produced by the PTA process were enhanced relative to those of the Ti6Al4V substrate. The homogeneity and volume fractions of the carbide phases in the composite layers were responsible for the improvement in the wear resistance of the alloy. The wear test results indicate that the alloy modified at 70 A shows better wear resistance than the alloys modified at 80 A and 90 A.

  10. New scheme of variable optical buffer for IP packets used in access control of HORNET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Nian; Wang, Lutang; Huang, Zhaoming

    2002-09-01

    A new scheme of variable optical buffer for IP packets is reported. It may be used in access control of HORNET (Hybrid Optoelectronic Ring NETwork), to avoid collision of added packet and the packet already on the ring and improve the loss ratio of the packets. In this scheme, a new multi-wavelength fiber loop memory technique is employed. This architecture uses the wavelength converter (WC) to specify the packets delay and wavelength conversion is accomplished by the technique of four-wave-mixing (FWM) with a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). The range of delay is 10 to 9990 bytes periods. First, architecture, operation principle, characteristics and applications of this scheme of variable optical buffer are introduced. Next, a new unslotted CSMA/CA MAC scheme based on the variable optical buffer is briefly introduced too. Finally, the simulation results are presented.

  11. Access to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Felecia; De Oliver, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    This case study researches the degree to which the location and services offered by a multicampus university, geographically situated consistent with the commercial principles of a large mass-market enterprise, facilitate access for educationally underserved groups. First, the necessity of democratizing educational access to an underprivileged…

  12. Accessing the Microform Publication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schindler, Stan

    1985-01-01

    Characterizes types of indexing programs used by Research Publications, Inc. and describes provision of access to four major projects: "The Official Washington Post Index" (provides access to newspaper and microfilm edition); "The Eighteenth Century"; "The Declassified Documents Reference System" (ongoing fiche project abstracted and indexed…

  13. Planning for Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassell, Marianne Kotch

    This practical manual provides useful, concrete ideas and suggestions to help public libraries make libraries more accessible to persons with disabilities. Most suggestions are for persons who have difficulty with mobility. Reviews of pertinent laws and regulations are followed by concrete, step-by step suggestions for planning for accessibility,…

  14. Intellectual Access to Images.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsin-Liang; Rasmussen, Edie M.

    1999-01-01

    The increased availability of digital images is accompanied by a need for solutions to the problems inherent in indexing them for retrieval. Problems in image description and access are discussed, with a perspective on traditional and new solutions. Recent developments in intellectual access to images are surveyed and contrasted with…

  15. Granting Each Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Linda Lucas

    1992-01-01

    Summarizes federal legislation regarding equal access for students with disabilities and discusses environmental barriers to accessibility in the library media center. Solutions to these design problems are suggested in the following areas: material formats and space requirements; the physical setting, including furniture, floor coverings,…

  16. Improving School Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Few things are more important for school safety and security than controlling access to buildings and grounds. It is relatively easy to incorporate effective access control measures in new school designs but more difficult in existing schools, where most building and site features cannot be readily altered or reconfigured. The National…

  17. Multiple Access Trade Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motamedi, Masoud

    1990-01-01

    The Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) strawman design uses a hybrid Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA)/Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA) implementation. TDMA is used for the forward direction (from Suppliers to Users), and FDMA for the return direction (from Users to Suppliers). An alternative architecture is proposed that will require minimal real time coordination and yet provide a fast access method by using random access Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA). The CDMA system issues are addressed such as connecting suppliers and users, both of whom may be located anywhere in the CONUS, when the user terminals are constrained in size and weight; and providing efficient traffic routing under highly variable traffic requirements. It is assumed that bandwidth efficiency is not of paramount importance. CDMA or Spread Spectrum Multiple Access (SSMA) communication is a method in which a group of carriers operate at the same nominal center frequency but are separable from each other by the low cross correlation of the spreading codes used. Interference and multipath rejection capability, ease of selective addressing and message screening, low density power spectra for signal hiding and security, and high resolution ranging are among the benefits of spread spectrum communications.

  18. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-01-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks

    Guest Editors Jun Zheng, University of Ottawa Nirwan Ansari, New Jersey Institute of Technology

    Submission Deadline: 1 June 2005

    Background

    With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the

  19. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CAH Conditions of Participation . What are the location requirements for CAH status? Critical Access Hospitals must be ... clinic that does not meet the CAH distance requirements? As of January 1, 2008, all CAHs, including ...

  20. HRP Data Accessibility 2009

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Clarence Sams spoke at the 2009 Human Research Program's Investigators Workshop on the current status of Data Accessibility. In this presentation he discusses the content of the Human Life Scie...

  1. Accessibility and assistive products

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Porrero, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Accessibility and assistive products and technologies are needed to ensure the rights of persons with disabilities and older persons. Many developments have been implemented in laws, standards, markets and from the consumers perspective, at international, European and national levels. The real issue is that not all the potential users benefit from the use of assistive products or accessible measures. Discussion Innovative methods are needed to allow all potential users to have real advantage of assistive technologies and accessible and design for all facilities. Best practices will be presented and existing gaps and recommendations will be discussed. Cost-benefits aspects will also be presented. Conclusion In order to get advantages from opportunities of globalization, hard work and responsibilities of all stakeholders are needed, so that assistive products and accessibility reach a whole range of situations and environments and contribute to ensure quality of life in a society for all.

  2. Extra- and intrathoracic access.

    PubMed

    Lazarides, Miltos K; Georgakarakos, Efstratios I; Schoretsanitis, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    The most complex patients requiring vascular access are those with bilateral central vein occlusions. Endovascular repair of the central lesions when feasible allow upper extremity use for access. When endovascular repair is not feasible, femoral vein transposition should be the next choice. When lower limb access sites have been exhausted or are contraindicated as in obese patients and in patients with peripheral arterial obstructive disease, a range of extrathoracic "exotic" extra-anatomic access procedures as the necklace cross-chest arteriovenous (AV) grafts, the ipsilateral axillo-axillary loops, the brachial-jugular AV grafts, the axillo-femoral AV grafts or even intra-thoracic ones as the right atrial AV bypasses represent the vascular surgeon's last resort. The selection among those extra-anatomical chest-wall procedures should be based upon each patient's anatomy or patient-specific factors. PMID:24817469

  3. Access cavity preparation.

    PubMed

    Adams, N; Tomson, P L

    2014-03-01

    Each stage of root canal treatment should be carried out to the highest possible standard. The access cavity is arguably the most important technical stage, as subsequent preparation of the root canal(s) can be severely comprised if this is not well executed. Inadequate access can lead to canals being left untreated, poorly disinfected, difficult to shape and obturate, and may ultimately lead to the failure of the treatment. This paper highlights common features in root canal anatomy and outlines basic principles for locating root canals and producing a good access cavity. It also explores each phase of the preparation in detail and offers suggestions of instruments that have been specifically designed to overcome potential difficulties in the process. Good access design and preparation will result in an operative environment which will facilitate cleaning, shaping and obturation of the root canal system in order to maximise success.

  4. Remote Access Astronomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Erin

    1994-01-01

    Describes the Remote Access Astronomy Project, a computerized optical telescope and dial-in data distribution system that places high-quality images and image processing techniques into computer workstations in junior and high school classrooms. (PR)

  5. Adapting Web Browsers for Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Paul; Birkmire, Mike

    This paper examines ways to make World Wide Web browsers accessible for individuals with disabilities, and through them, gain access to the information on the Web. It discusses which browsers can be made more accessible and evaluates different types of input. Mouse access, keyboard access, and voice input are reviewed. Processing aids, such as…

  6. Mobile multiple access study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Multiple access techniques (FDMA, CDMA, TDMA) for the mobile user and attempts to identify the current best technique are discussed. Traffic loading is considered as well as voice and data modulation and spacecraft and system design. Emphasis is placed on developing mobile terminal cost estimates for the selected design. In addition, design examples are presented for the alternative techniques of multiple access in order to compare with the selected technique.

  7. Access to health care

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Martin; Maltais, Danielle; Hudon, Catherine; Lapointe, Lise; Ntetu, Antoine Lutumba

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore access to health care for patients presenting with multiple chronic conditions and to identify barriers and factors conducive to access. DESIGN Qualitative study with focus groups. SETTING Family practice unit in Chicoutimi (Saguenay), Que. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-five male and female adult patients with at least four chronic conditions but no cognitive disorders or decompensating conditions. METHODS For this pilot study, only three focus group discussions were held. MAIN FINDINGS The main barriers to accessing follow-up appointments included long waits on the telephone, automated telephone-answering systems, and needing to attend at specific times to obtain appointments. The main barriers to specialized care were long waiting times and the need to get prescriptions and referrals from family physicians. Factors reported conducive to access included systematic callbacks and the personal involvement of family physicians. Good communication between family physicians and specialists was also perceived to be an important factor in access. CONCLUSION Systematic callbacks, family physicians’ personal efforts to obtain follow-up visits, and better physician-specialist communication were all suggested as ways to improve access to care for patients with multiple chronic conditions. PMID:16926944

  8. Vascular Access in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh Keller, Marc S.

    2011-02-15

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the 'expert procedural pyramid' is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  9. Development of W/C soft x-ray multilayer mirror by ion beam sputtering (IBS) system for below 50A wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, A.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2012-06-25

    A home-made Ion Beam Sputtering (IBS) system has been developed in our laboratory. Using the IBS system single layer W and single layer C film has been deposited at 1000eV Ar ion energy and 10mA ion current. The W-film has been characterized by grazing Incidence X-ray reflectrometry (GIXR) technique and Atomic Force Microscope technique. The single layer C-film has been characterized by Spectroscopic Ellipsometric technique. At the same deposition condition 25-layer W/C multilayer film has been deposited which has been designed for using as mirror at 30 Degree-Sign grazing incidence angle around 50A wavelength. The multilayer sample has been characterized by measuring reflectivity of CuK{alpha} radiation and soft x-ray radiation around 50A wavelength.

  10. The Comparison between Boron Carbide (B4C) with other Common Inhibitors on Physical and Mechanical Properties of WC/Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamizifar, H.; Hadian, A. M.; Tamizifar, M.

    The hardness, toughness and sum of cracks measurement of fine-grained WC-Co hard metals were studied. Thirty commercial and experimental hard metal grades with different additives such as boron carbide (B4C), vanadium carbide (VC), chromium carbide (Cr3C2) and silicon carbide (SiC) were prepared in a commercial sinter HIP furnace. Physical, mechanical and microstructure properties were investigated to build up a representative hardness/sum of cracks measurement band. This band was then used to estimate the most effective sintering temperature and the amount of each additives. Afterwards, influence of grain growth inhibitors in optimum condition were compared. The results showed that the grades, doped with B4C and VC as growth inhibitor exhibits more hardness than other comparable doped alloys. However, Cr3C2 is favorable in toughness improvement.

  11. Phenolic Polyketides from the Co-Cultivation of Marine-Derived Penicillium sp. WC-29-5 and Streptomyces fradiae 007

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Liping; Zhuang, Yibin; Kong, Fandong; Zhang, Cuixian; Zhu, Weiming

    2014-01-01

    Penicillium sp. WC-29-5 was co-cultured with Streptomyces fradiae 007 to produce five natural products (1–3, 4a and 4b) that were isolated and characterized by spectroscopic analysis. Interestingly, these compounds were found to be different from those produced in discrete fungal and bacterial controls. Among these compounds, the absolute configurations of compounds 4a and 4b were determined for the first time by X-ray single crystal diffraction experiments and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) calculations. An evaluation of the cytotoxic activities of these compounds revealed that 4b was moderately cytotoxic towards HL-60 and H1975 tumor cells with IC50 values of 3.73 and 5.73 µM, respectively, whereas compound 4a was only moderately cytotoxic towards H1975 cells with an IC50 value of 3.97 µM. PMID:24714124

  12. Compositional, morphological and mechanical investigations of monolayer type coatings obtained by standard and reactive magnetron sputtering from Ti, TiB2 and WC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinga, V.; Mateescu, A. O.; Cristea, D.; Mateescu, G.; Burducea, I.; Ionescu, C.; Crăciun, L. S.; Ghiuţă, I.; Samoilă, C.; Ursuţiu, D.; Munteanu, D.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to study new composite coatings that would have wear resistant properties. The coatings were obtained by standard and reactive simultaneous magnetron sputtering from three targets (Ti, TiB2, WC) with or without N2 as reactive gas. The chemical composition of the coatings was investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, while the morphological features were evaluated by atomic force microscopy. Some of the mechanical properties of the coatings, such as hardness and Young's modulus, were investigated by nanoindentation, while the adherence to the substrate was investigated by scratch tests. The wear resistance and friction coefficients were evaluated using a pin-on-disk tribometer. The films are hard (Hit between 20 and 22 GPa) and show promising results concerning their wear resistance, especially if the films would be paired with an appropriate substrate material.

  13. In Vitro Responsiveness of γδ T Cells from Mycobacterium bovis-Infected Cattle to Mycobacterial Antigens: Predominant Involvement of WC1+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Allister J.; Welsh, Michael D.; Girvin, R. Martyn; Pollock, John M.

    2001-01-01

    It is generally accepted that protective immunity against tuberculosis is generated through the cell-mediated immune (CMI) system, and a greater understanding of such responses is required if better vaccines and diagnostic tests are to be developed. γδ T cells form a major proportion of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the ruminant system and, considering data from other species, may have a significant role in CMI responses in bovine tuberculosis. This study compared the in vitro responses of αβ and γδ T cells from Mycobacterium bovis-infected and uninfected cattle. The results showed that, following 24 h of culture of PBMC with M. bovis-derived antigens, the majority of γδ T cells from infected animals became highly activated (upregulation of interleukin-2R), while a lower proportion of the αβ T-cell population showed activation. Similar responses were evident to a lesser degree in uninfected animals. Study of the kinetics of this response showed that γδ T cells remained significantly activated for at least 7 days in culture, while activation of αβ T cells declined during that period. Subsequent analysis revealed that the majority of activated γδ T cells expressed WC1, a 215-kDa surface molecule which is not expressed on human or murine γδ T cells. Furthermore, in comparison with what was found for CD4+ T cells, M. bovis antigen was found to induce strong cellular proliferation but relatively little gamma interferon release by purified WC1+ γδ T cells. Overall, while the role of these cells in protective immunity remains unclear, their highly activated status in response to M. bovis suggests an important role in antimycobacterial immunity, and the ability of γδ T cells to influence other immune cell functions remains to be elucidated, particularly in relation to CMI-based diagnostic tests. PMID:11119493

  14. Access to space studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James A.

    1993-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is currently considering possible directions in Earth-to-orbit vehicle development under a study called 'Access to Space.' This agency-wide study is considering commercial launch vehicles, human transportation, space station logistics, and other space transportation requirements over the next 40 years. Three options are being considered for human transportation: continued use of the Space Shuttle; development of a small personnel carrier (personnel logistics system (PLS)); or development of an advanced vehicle such as a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO). Several studies related to the overall Access to Space study are reported in this document.

  15. Managing Information Resources for Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Services Administration, Washington, DC. Clearinghouse on Computer Accommodation.

    This handbook presents guidance for federal managers and other personnel who are unfamiliar with the policy and practice of information accessibility to accommodate users with disabilities and to provide for their effective access to information resources. It addresses federal requirements for accessibility, adopting accessibility as a sound…

  16. Digital Scholarship and Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losoff, Barbara; Pence, Harry E.

    2010-01-01

    Open access publications provide scholars with unrestricted access to the "conversation" that is the basis for the advancement of knowledge. The large number of open access journals, archives, and depositories already in existence demonstrates the technical and economic viability of providing unrestricted access to the literature that is the…

  17. Steps Toward Campus Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Physical Plant Administrators of Universities and Colleges, Washington, DC.

    Photo-essays focus on the progress colleges and universities have made in achieving program accessibility for handicapped persons in compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Both common problems and innovative solutions to unique problems are included. "People We Never See" introduces the challenge higher education faces to…

  18. ACCESS Project: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, Heiko

    2015-04-01

    The ACCESS project addressed the development, testing, and demonstration of the proposed advanced technologies and the associated emission and fuel economy improvement at an engine dynamometer and on a full-scale vehicle. Improve fuel economy by 25% with minimum performance penalties Achieve SULEV level emissions with gasoline Demonstrate multi-mode combustion engine management system

  19. Managing access block.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Peter; Scown, Paul; Campbell, Donald

    2002-01-01

    There is pessimism regarding the ability of the Acute Health Sector to manage access block for emergency and elective patients. Melbourne Health suffered an acute bed crisis in 2001 resulting in record ambulance diversions and emergency department (ED) delays. We conducted an observational study to reduce access block for emergency patients whilst maintaining elective throughput at Melbourne Health. This involved a clinician-led taskforce using previously proven principles for organisational change to implement 51 actions to improve patient access over a three-month period. The primary outcome measures were ambulance diversion, emergency patients waiting more than 12 hours for an inpatient bed, elective throughput and theatre cancellations. Despite a reduction in multi-day bed numbers all primary objectives were met, ambulance diversion decreased to minimal levels, 12-hour waits decreased by 40% and elective throughput was maintained. Theatre cancellations were also minimised. We conclude that access block can be improved by clinician-led implementation of proven process improvements over a short time frame. The ability to sustain change over the longer term requires further study.

  20. Partners: Promoting Accessible Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sable, Janet; Gravink, Jill

    1995-01-01

    The Promoting Accessible Recreation through Networking, Education, Resources and Services (PARTNERS) Project, a partnership between Northeast Passage, the University of New Hampshire, and Granite State Independent Living Foundation, helps create barrier-free recreation for individuals with physical disabilities. The paper describes PARTNERS and…

  1. Internet 2 Access Grid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simco, Greg

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of the Internet 2 Initiative, which is based on collaboration among universities, businesses, and government, focuses on the Access Grid, a Computational Grid that includes interactive multimedia within high-speed networks to provide resources to enable remote collaboration among the research community. (Author/LRW)

  2. Accessibility Standards, Illustrated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Michael A.

    The book sets forth Illinois environmental accessibility standards for disabled persons based on observation and interview data. Photographs, drawings, and detailed floor plans are included in sections dealing with human data (including space requirements for maneuvering wheelchairs, color blindness, incontinence, and severe auditory or visual…

  3. College Access Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremblay, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    College Access Marketing (CAM) is a relatively new phenomenon that seeks to positively influence the college-going rate. This report defines CAM, describes CAM examples, and discusses how CAM seeks to counter barriers to college. It explores four main elements of CAM: information, marketing, advocacy, and social mobilization. Further, it…

  4. Serving up Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    When low-income students returned to Chicago public schools this fall, many had better access to technology, thanks to a public-private partnership. Chicago families with children enrolled in the National School Lunch Program are eligible for subsidized computers and Internet connections through an agreement between the city and telecom giant…

  5. Unique Access to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Don

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the many learning opportunities that broadcast technology students at Ladue Horton Watkins High School in St. Louis, Missouri, experience because of their unique access to technology and methods of learning. Through scaffolding, stepladder techniques, and trial by fire, students learn to produce multiple television programs,…

  6. CAS. Controlled Access Security

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, B.; Pomeroy, G.

    1989-12-01

    The Security Alarm System is a data acquisition and control system which collects data from intrusion sensors and displays the information in a real-time environment for operators. The Access Control System monitors and controls the movement of personnel with the use of card readers and biometrics hand readers.

  7. Fixed Access Network Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornaglia, Bruno; Young, Gavin; Marchetta, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Fixed broadband network deployments are moving inexorably to the use of Next Generation Access (NGA) technologies and architectures. These NGA deployments involve building fiber infrastructure increasingly closer to the customer in order to increase the proportion of fiber on the customer's access connection (Fibre-To-The-Home/Building/Door/Cabinet… i.e. FTTx). This increases the speed of services that can be sold and will be increasingly required to meet the demands of new generations of video services as we evolve from HDTV to "Ultra-HD TV" with 4k and 8k lines of video resolution. However, building fiber access networks is a costly endeavor. It requires significant capital in order to cover any significant geographic coverage. Hence many companies are forming partnerships and joint-ventures in order to share the NGA network construction costs. One form of such a partnership involves two companies agreeing to each build to cover a certain geographic area and then "cross-selling" NGA products to each other in order to access customers within their partner's footprint (NGA coverage area). This is tantamount to a bi-lateral wholesale partnership. The concept of Fixed Access Network Sharing (FANS) is to address the possibility of sharing infrastructure with a high degree of flexibility for all network operators involved. By providing greater configuration control over the NGA network infrastructure, the service provider has a greater ability to define the network and hence to define their product capabilities at the active layer. This gives the service provider partners greater product development autonomy plus the ability to differentiate from each other at the active network layer.

  8. Molecular and biological characterization of the 5 human-bovine rotavirus (WC3)-based reassortant strains of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine, RotaTeq (registered)

    SciTech Connect

    Matthijnssens, Jelle; Joelsson, Daniel B.; Warakomski, Donald J.; Zhou, Tingyi; Mathis, Pamela K.; Maanen, Marc-Henri van; Ranheim, Todd S.; Ciarlet, Max

    2010-08-01

    RotaTeq (registered) is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine that contains five human-bovine reassortant strains (designated G1, G2, G3, G4, and P1) on the backbone of the naturally attenuated tissue culture-adapted parental bovine rotavirus (BRV) strain WC3. The viral genomes of each of the reassortant strains were completely sequenced and compared pairwise and phylogenetically among each other and to human rotavirus (HRV) and BRV reference strains. Reassortants G1, G2, G3, and G4 contained the VP7 gene from their corresponding HRV parent strains, while reassortants G1 and G2 also contained the VP3 gene (genotype M1) from the HRV parent strain. The P1 reassortant contained the VP4 gene from the HRV parent strain and all the other gene segments from the BRV WC3 strain. The human VP7s had a high level of overall amino acid identity (G1: 95-99%, G2: 94-99% G3: 96-100%, G4: 93-99%) when compared to those of representative rotavirus strains of their corresponding G serotypes. The VP4 of the P1 reassortant had a high identity (92-97%) with those of serotype P1A[8] HRV reference strains, while the BRV VP7 showed identities ranging from 91% to 94% to those of serotype G6 HRV strains. Sequence analyses of the BRV or HRV genes confirmed that the fundamental structure of the proteins in the vaccine was similar to those of the HRV and BRV references strains. Sequences analyses showed that RotaTeq (registered) exhibited a high degree of genetic stability as no mutations were identified in the material of each reassortant, which undergoes two rounds of replication cycles in cell culture during the manufacturing process, when compared to the final material used to fill the dosing tubes. The infectivity of each of the reassortant strains of RotaTeq (registered) , like HRV strains, did not require the presence of sialic acid residues on the cell surface. The molecular and biologic characterization of RotaTeq (registered) adds to the significant body of clinical data supporting the

  9. Effects of high temperature treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of laser-clad NiCrBSi/WC coatings on titanium alloy substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guang Jie; Li, Jun Luo, Xing

    2014-12-15

    Laser-clad composite coatings on the Ti6Al4V substrate were heat-treated at 700, 800, and 900 °C for 1 h. The effects of post-heat treatment on the microstructure, microhardness, and fracture toughness of the coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and optical microscopy. The wear resistance of the coatings was evaluated under dry reciprocating sliding friction at room temperature. The coatings mainly comprised some coarse gray blocky (W,Ti)C particles accompanied by the fine white WC particles, a large number of black TiC cellular/dendrites, and the matrix composed of NiTi and Ni{sub 3}Ti; some unknown rich Ni- and Ti-rich particles with sizes ranging from 10 nm to 50 nm were precipitated and uniformly distributed in the Ni{sub 3}Ti phase to form a thin granular layer after heat treatment at 700 °C. The granular layer spread from the edge toward the center of the Ni{sub 3}Ti phase with increasing temperature. A large number of fine equiaxed Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} particles with 0.2–0.5 μm sizes were observed around the edges of the NiTi supersaturated solid solution when the temperature was further increased to 900 °C. The microhardness and fracture toughness of the coatings were improved with increased temperature due to the dispersion-strengthening effect of the precipitates. Dominant wear mechanisms for all the coatings included abrasive and delamination wear. The post-heat treatment not only reduced wear volume and friction coefficient, but also decreased cracking susceptibility during sliding friction. Comparatively speaking, the heat-treated coating at 900 °C presented the most excellent wear resistance. - Highlights: • TiC + WC reinforced intermetallic compound matrix composite coatings were produced. • The formation mechanism of the reinforcements was analyzed. • Two precipitates were generated at elevated temperature. • Cracking susceptibility and microhardness of the

  10. Remote access thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Parisha; Mohamed, Hossam Eldin; Kadi, Abida; Walvekar, Rohan R.

    2015-01-01

    Robot assisted thyroid surgery has been the latest advance in the evolution of thyroid surgery after endoscopy assisted procedures. The advantage of a superior field vision and technical advancements of robotic technology have permitted novel remote access (trans-axillary and retro-auricular) surgical approaches. Interestingly, several remote access surgical ports using robot surgical system and endoscopic technique have been customized to avoid the social stigma of a visible scar. Current literature has displayed their various advantages in terms of post-operative outcomes; however, the associated financial burden and also additional training and expertise necessary hinder its widespread adoption into endocrine surgery practices. These approaches offer excellent cosmesis, with a shorter learning curve and reduce discomfort to surgeons operating ergonomically through a robotic console. This review aims to provide details of various remote access techniques that are being offered for thyroid resection. Though these have been reported to be safe and feasible approaches for thyroid surgery, further evaluation for their efficacy still remains. PMID:26425450

  11. Corrosion resistance appraisal of TiN, TiCN and TiAlN coatings deposited by CAE-PVD method on WC-Co cutting tools exposed to artificial sea water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matei, A. A.; Pencea, I.; Branzei, M.; Trancă, D. E.; Ţepeş, G.; Sfăt, C. E.; Ciovica (Coman), E.; Gherghilescu, A. I.; Stanciu, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    A new advanced sintered composite cutting tool has been developed based on tungsten carbide matrix ligated with cobalt (WC-Co) additivated with tantalum carbide (TaC), titanium carbide (TiC) and niobium carbide (NbC) as grain growth inhibitors. Titanium nitride (TiN), titanium carbonitride (TiCN) and titanium aluminium nitride (TiAlN) coatings were deposited on these tools by CAE-PVD technique to find out the best solution to improve the corrosion resistance of this tool in marine environment. The electrochemical behaviours of the specimens in 3.5% NaCl water solution were estimated by potentiodynamic polarization measurements i.e. the open circuit potential (Eoc), corrosion potential (Ecorr) and corrosion current density (icorr). Wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), optical microscopy (OM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations have been carried on tested and untested specimens to substantiate the corrosion resistance of the tested specimens. Based on the open circuit potential (Eoc) and corrosion potential (Ecorr) results, the tested specimens were ranked as TiN, TiAlN, TiCN and WC-Co while on corrosion current density (icorr) and protective efficiency (P) values they have been ranked as TiN, TiAlN, WC-Co and TiCN. The WAXD, MO and AFM results unambiguously show that the corrosion resistance depends on the nature and morphology of the coating.

  12. After Access: Underrepresented Students' Postmatriculation Perceptions of College Access Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Means, Darris R.; Pyne, Kimberly B.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the perceived impact of college-going capital gained during participation in a college access program. In three, semistructured interviews spanning the first-year college experience, 10 first-year college students who participated in a college access program articulate the value of access programming and also raise…

  13. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... is a single-toilet room, having a full-length privacy door, within which urination can occur. (1) No... include is a multistall restroom. (1) Such a site must provide substantial visual privacy (e.g., a toilet... agent in all toilets or secure the toilets to prevent access; or (ii) Conduct all collections in...

  14. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... is a single-toilet room, having a full-length privacy door, within which urination can occur. (1) No... include is a multistall restroom. (1) Such a site must provide substantial visual privacy (e.g., a toilet... agent in all toilets or secure the toilets to prevent access; or (ii) Conduct all collections in...

  15. Assessing the effects of different dielectrics on environmentally conscious powder-mixed EDM of difficult-to-machine material (WC-Co)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jagdeep; Sharma, Rajiv Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Electrical discharge machining (EDM) is a well-known nontraditional manufacturing process to machine the difficult-to-machine (DTM) materials which have unique hardness properties. Researchers have successfully performed hybridization to improve this process by incorporating powders into the EDM process known as powder-mixed EDM process. This process drastically improves process efficiency by increasing material removal rate, micro-hardness, as well as reducing the tool wear rate and surface roughness. EDM also has some input parameters, including pulse-on time, dielectric levels and its type, current setting, flushing pressure, and so on, which have a significant effect on EDM performance. However, despite their positive influence, investigating the effects of these parameters on environmental conditions is necessary. Most studies demonstrate the use of kerosene oil as dielectric fluid. Nevertheless, in this work, the authors highlight the findings with respect to three different dielectric fluids, including kerosene oil, EDM oil, and distilled water using one-variable-at-a-time approach for machining as well as environmental aspects. The hazard and operability analysis is employed to identify the inherent safety factors associated with powder-mixed EDM of WC-Co.

  16. Effect of microscale texture on cutting performance of WC/Co-based TiAlN coated tools under different lubrication conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kedong; Deng, Jianxin; Xing, Youqiang; Li, Shipeng; Gao, Huanhuan

    2015-01-01

    Commonly known the severe friction between the tool and chip affects the tool life and the quality of the machined surfaces. Introducing a lubricant into the tool-chip interface can be used to alleviate the friction, the effectiveness of which may be improved by surface texturing of the tools. Thus, surface textures were fabricated using laser on the rake of the cemented carbide (WC/Co) inserts, then TiAlN films were coated on the textured tools. The effect of the textures on the cutting performance was investigated using the textured coated tools and conventional coated tools in cutting AISI 1045 hardened steel tests. Two batches of cutting tests were carried out, in regimes of full and starved lubrication. The machining performance was assessed in terms of the cutting forces, friction coefficient at the tool-chip interface, surface roughness of machined workpiece and tool wear on the rake face. Results show that the cutting performance of textured tools was enhanced, especially under the full lubrication condition.

  17. Macroscopic characterisations of Web accessibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Rui; Carriço, Luis

    2010-12-01

    The Web Science framework poses fundamental questions on the analysis of the Web, by focusing on how microscopic properties (e.g. at the level of a Web page or Web site) emerge into macroscopic properties and phenomena. One research topic on the analysis of the Web is Web accessibility evaluation, which centres on understanding how accessible a Web page is for people with disabilities. However, when framing Web accessibility evaluation on Web Science, we have found that existing research stays at the microscopic level. This article presents an experimental study on framing Web accessibility evaluation into Web Science's goals. This study resulted in novel accessibility properties of the Web not found at microscopic levels, as well as of Web accessibility evaluation processes themselves. We observed at large scale some of the empirical knowledge on how accessibility is perceived by designers and developers, such as the disparity of interpretations of accessibility evaluation tools warnings. We also found a direct relation between accessibility quality and Web page complexity. We provide a set of guidelines for designing Web pages, education on Web accessibility, as well as on the computational limits of large-scale Web accessibility evaluations.

  18. Pesticide safety training and access to field sanitation among migrant farmworker mothers from Starr County, Texas.

    PubMed

    Shipp, E M; Cooper, S P; Burau, K D; Bolin, J N

    2005-02-01

    Very little published research describes employer compliance with EPA-mandated Worker Protection Standard (WPS) pesticide safety training and the OSHA Field Sanitation Standard among farmworker women in general and mothers specifically. A goal of both standards is limiting farmworkers' exposure to potentially hazardous agricultural pesticides. Data from a NIOSH-supported cohort study ("Injury and Illness Surveillance in Migrant Farmworker Families") allowed for examining these issues. The cohort included 267 migrant farmworker families who usually reside along the Texas-Mexico border (Starr County, Texas). Data were collected in Starr County during in-home interviews. Of 102 mothers who participated in migrant farm work during summer 2001, 57 (55.9%) reported having ever received training/instruction in the safe use of pesticides, while 47 (46.1%) reported having received training within the previous five years, as required by WPS. Of trained mothers, 91.5% to 93.6% reported that their training covered key WPS areas: (1) entry into a recently treated field, (2) pesticide related injuries/illnesses, and (3) where to go and who to contact for emergency care following exposure. Regarding access to field sanitation, 67.5% to 84.2% of 77 mothers who worked outside Texas reported employer-provided decontamination supplies (e.g., soap, wash water, towels, and toilet facilities). However, a strikingly smaller proportion (12% to 28%) of 25 mothers who worked within Texas reported access to the same resources, suggesting discrepancies in compliance across the U.S. Due to the low level of employer compliance with both WPS and OSHA mandated standards, increased enforcement and an alternate delivery of pesticide training is recommended. PMID:15782888

  19. Access to water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Robyn; Niklaas, Lindie

    This paper will examine the legal implications of the South African Constitutional judgement of Government of the Republic of South Africa and others vs Grootboom and others (2001(1) SA 46 (CC)) in view of the developing debate on socio-economic rights under the constitution on the constitutional right of access to sufficient water. It will look at the manner in which effect is being given to this right at municipal level through the provision of free water and the constitutional implications of an adequate basic minimum level set by the State and local authorities. The paper will also explore the implications of relevant legislation, which enables local authorities to cut off water supplies as well as the implications of the Grootboom decision for communities facing water cut-offs.

  20. Chemists, Access, Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    2000-06-01

    New JCE Internet Feature at JCE Online Biographical Snapshots of Famous Chemists is a new JCE Internet feature on JCE Online. Edited by Barbara Burke, this feature provides biographical information on leading chemists, especially women and minority chemists, fostering the attitude that the practitioners of chemistry are as human as those who endeavor to learn about it. Currently, the column features biographical "snapshots" of 30 chemists. Each snapshot includes keywords and bibliography and several contain links to additional online information about the chemist. More biographical snapshots will appear in future installments. In addition, a database listing over 140 women and minority chemists is being compiled and will be made available online with the snapshots in the near future. The database includes the years of birth and death, gender and ethnicity, major and minor discipline, keywords to facilitate searching, and references to additional biographical information. We welcome your input into what we think is a very worthwhile resource. If you would like to provide additional biographical snapshots, see additional chemists added to the database, or know of additional references for those that are already in the database, please contact JCE Online or the feature editor. Your feedback is welcome and appreciated. You can find Biographical Snapshots of Famous Chemists starting from the JCE Online home page-- click the Features item under JCE Internet and then the Chemist Bios item. Access JCE Online without Name and Password We have recently been swamped by libraries requesting IP-number access to JCE Online. With the great benefit IP-number authentication gives to librarians (no user names and passwords to administer) and to their patrons (no need to remember and enter valid names and passwords) this is not surprising. If you would like access to JCE Online without the need to remember and enter a user name and password, you should tell your librarian about our

  1. Public Access and Open Access: Is There a Difference? | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Robin Meckley, Contributing Writer, and Tracie Frederick, Guest Writer Open access and public access—are they different concepts or are they the same? What do they mean for the researchers at NCI at Frederick? “Open-access (OA) literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. What makes it possible is the Internet and the consent of the author or copyright-holder,” according to an open access website maintained by Peter Suber, director, Harvard Open Access Project.

  2. Remote Data Access with IDL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloy, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A tool based on IDL (Interactive Data Language) and DAP (Data Access Protocol) has been developed for user-friendly remote data access. A difficulty for many NASA researchers using IDL is that often the data to analyze are located remotely and are too large to transfer for local analysis. Researchers have developed a protocol for accessing remote data, DAP, which is used for both SOHO and STEREO data sets. Server-side side analysis via IDL routine is available through DAP.

  3. Atomic memory access hardware implementations

    DOEpatents

    Ahn, Jung Ho; Erez, Mattan; Dally, William J

    2015-02-17

    Atomic memory access requests are handled using a variety of systems and methods. According to one example method, a data-processing circuit having an address-request generator that issues requests to a common memory implements a method of processing the requests using a memory-access intervention circuit coupled between the generator and the common memory. The method identifies a current atomic-memory access request from a plurality of memory access requests. A data set is stored that corresponds to the current atomic-memory access request in a data storage circuit within the intervention circuit. It is determined whether the current atomic-memory access request corresponds to at least one previously-stored atomic-memory access request. In response to determining correspondence, the current request is implemented by retrieving data from the common memory. The data is modified in response to the current request and at least one other access request in the memory-access intervention circuit.

  4. Vehicle barrier with access delay

    DOEpatents

    Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

    2013-09-03

    An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

  5. Nonvolatile random access memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiin-Chuan (Inventor); Stadler, Henry L. (Inventor); Katti, Romney R. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A nonvolatile magnetic random access memory can be achieved by an array of magnet-Hall effect (M-H) elements. The storage function is realized with a rectangular thin-film ferromagnetic material having an in-plane, uniaxial anisotropy and inplane bipolar remanent magnetization states. The thin-film magnetic element is magnetized by a local applied field, whose direction is used to form either a 0 or 1 state. The element remains in the 0 or 1 state until a switching field is applied to change its state. The stored information is detcted by a Hall-effect sensor which senses the fringing field from the magnetic storage element. The circuit design for addressing each cell includes transistor switches for providing a current of selected polarity to store a binary digit through a separate conductor overlying the magnetic element of the cell. To read out a stored binary digit, transistor switches are employed to provide a current through a row of Hall-effect sensors connected in series and enabling a differential voltage amplifier connected to all Hall-effect sensors of a column in series. To avoid read-out voltage errors due to shunt currents through resistive loads of the Hall-effect sensors of other cells in the same column, at least one transistor switch is provided between every pair of adjacent cells in every row which are not turned on except in the row of the selected cell.

  6. A quantum access network.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Bernd; Dynes, James F; Lucamarini, Marco; Sharpe, Andrew W; Yuan, Zhiliang; Shields, Andrew J

    2013-09-01

    The theoretically proven security of quantum key distribution (QKD) could revolutionize the way in which information exchange is protected in the future. Several field tests of QKD have proven it to be a reliable technology for cryptographic key exchange and have demonstrated nodal networks of point-to-point links. However, until now no convincing answer has been given to the question of how to extend the scope of QKD beyond niche applications in dedicated high security networks. Here we introduce and experimentally demonstrate the concept of a 'quantum access network': based on simple and cost-effective telecommunication technologies, the scheme can greatly expand the number of users in quantum networks and therefore vastly broaden their appeal. We show that a high-speed single-photon detector positioned at a network node can be shared between up to 64 users for exchanging secret keys with the node, thereby significantly reducing the hardware requirements for each user added to the network. This point-to-multipoint architecture removes one of the main obstacles restricting the widespread application of QKD. It presents a viable method for realizing multi-user QKD networks with efficient use of resources, and brings QKD closer to becoming a widespread technology. PMID:24005413

  7. ACCESS: Detector Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Matthew J.; Kaiser, M.; Rauscher, B. J.; Kimble, R. A.; Kruk, J. W.; Mott, D. B.; Wen, Y.; Foltz, R.; McCandliss, S. R.; Pelton, R. S.; Wright, E. L.; Feldman, P. D.; Moos, H. W.; Riess, A. G.; Benford, D. J.; Gardner, J. P.; Woodgate, B. E.; Bohlin, R.; Deustua, S. E.; Dixon, W. V.; Sahnow, D. J.; Kurucz, R. L.; Lampton, M.; Perlmutter, S.

    2013-01-01

    ACCESS, Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars, is a series of rocket-borne sub-orbital missions and ground-based experiments that will enable improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale through the transfer of absolute laboratory detector standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of 500 across the 0.35 to 1.7 micron bandpass (overview Kaiser et al.). The flight detector and detector spare have been integrated with their electronics and flight mount. The controller electronics have been flight qualified. Vibration testing to launch loads and thermal vacuum testing of the detector, mount, and housing have been performed. The flight detector controller boards have been installed into a ruggedized flight housing. They have been successfully vacuum tested for periods significantly longer than the flight length, and components have been heat-sunk and reinforced as necessary. Thermal stability tests have been performed, and results will be presented. Goddard Space Flight Center’s Detector Characterization Lab (DCL) executed initial characterization tests for the flight detector in 2007. These were repeated in 2012, to ensure and establish baseline performance. Current lab characterization tests at Johns Hopkins are ongoing, and results will be presented. NASA sounding rocket grant NNX08AI65G supports this work.

  8. Remote direct memory access

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.

    2012-12-11

    Methods, parallel computers, and computer program products are disclosed for remote direct memory access. Embodiments include transmitting, from an origin DMA engine on an origin compute node to a plurality target DMA engines on target compute nodes, a request to send message, the request to send message specifying a data to be transferred from the origin DMA engine to data storage on each target compute node; receiving, by each target DMA engine on each target compute node, the request to send message; preparing, by each target DMA engine, to store data according to the data storage reference and the data length, including assigning a base storage address for the data storage reference; sending, by one or more of the target DMA engines, an acknowledgment message acknowledging that all the target DMA engines are prepared to receive a data transmission from the origin DMA engine; receiving, by the origin DMA engine, the acknowledgement message from the one or more of the target DMA engines; and transferring, by the origin DMA engine, data to data storage on each of the target compute nodes according to the data storage reference using a single direct put operation.

  9. Access to space study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a comprehensive NASA in-house study to identify and assess alternate approaches to access to space through the year 2030, and to select and recommend a preferred cause of action. The goals of the study were to identify the best vehicles and transportation architectures to make major reductions in the cost of space transportation (at least 50%), while at the same time increasing safety for flight crews by at least an order of magnitude. In addition, vehicle reliability was to exceed 0.98 percent, and, as important, the robustness, pad time, turnaround time, and other aspects of operability were to be vastly improved. This study examined three major optional architectures: (1) retain and upgrade the Space Shuttle and expendable launch vehicles; (2) develop new expendable vehicles using conventional technologies and transition from current vehicles beginning in 2005; and (3) develop new reusable vehicles using advanced technology, and transition from current vehicles beginning in 2008. The launch-needs, mission model utilized for for the study was based upon today's projection of civil, defense, and commercial mission payload requirements.

  10. Making Astronomy Accessible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grice, Noreen A.

    2011-05-01

    A new semester begins, and your students enter the classroom for the first time. You notice a student sitting in a wheelchair or walking with assistance from a cane. Maybe you see a student with a guide dog or carrying a Braille computer. Another student gestures "hello” but then continues hand motions, and you realize the person is actually signing. You wonder why another student is using an electronic device to speak. Think this can't happen in your class? According to the U.S. Census, one out of every five Americans has a disability. And some disabilities, such as autism, dyslexia and arthritis, are considered "invisible” disabilities. This means you have a high probability that one of your students will have a disability. As an astronomy instructor, you have the opportunity to reach a wide variety of learners by using creative teaching strategies. I will share some suggestions on how to make astronomy and your part of the universe more accessible for everyone.

  11. Access to postacute rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Buntin, Melinda Beeuwkes

    2007-11-01

    Each year, more than 10 million Medicare beneficiaries are discharged from acute care hospitals into postacute care (PAC) settings, including inpatient rehabilitation facilities, skilled nursing facilities, and homes with services from home health agencies. These beneficiaries include very frail and vulnerable elders, many of whom have suffered from an acute event such as a stroke or a fall resulting in hip fracture, all of whom are judged unable to return to their homes without further care. Whether beneficiaries receive PAC and the type and intensity of care they receive is influenced not only by clinical factors, but by nonclinical factors including provider supply and financing, especially Medicare's methods of payment. This article provides a definition of PAC and discusses the wide cross-sectional variation in the use of postacute rehabilitation. It then discusses recent changes to PAC provider payment that have raised concerns about access to postacute rehabilitation, trends in the use of PAC, and what these trends imply about the appropriateness of PAC as it is now delivered. It concludes by identifying issues about the policy and research implications of recent developments and the PAC literature reviewed.

  12. Mobile access control vestibule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePoy, Jennifer M.

    1998-12-01

    The mobile access control vestibule (MACV) is an adaptation of techniques developed for mobile military command centers. The overall configuration of modules acts as an entry control/screening facility or transportable command center. The system would provide the following capabilities: (1) A key element for force protection, rapid deployment units sent to areas having no prepositioned equipment or where there has been a degradation of that equipment as a result of natural disasters or civil unrest. (2) A rapidly deployable security control center to upgrade the security at nonmilitary sites (e.g., diplomatic or humanitarian organizations). (3) Personnel screening, package screening, badge/identification card production for authorized personnel, centralized monitoring of deployed perimeter sensors, and centralized communications for law enforcement personnel. (4) Self-contained screening and threat detection systems, including explosives detection using the system developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the FAA. When coupled with transportable electric generators, the system is self-sufficient. The communication system for the MACV would be a combination of physically wired and wireless communication units that supports by ad hoc networking.

  13. Is Your Church Accessible? Houses of Worship: Physical Accessibility Checklist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensign, Arselia, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This checklist is intended to help churches evaluate the accessibility of their facilities to those with physical disabilities. Categories covered are: basic accessibility, parking lots, walks, ramps, entrances/exits, doors and doorways, stairs and steps, floors, worship space, rest rooms, controls, water fountains, identification, warning…

  14. Internet Access to Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James; Parise, Ron; Hogie, Keith; Criscuolo, Ed; Langston, Jim; Jackson, Chris; Price, Harold; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Operating Missions as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) project at NASA's Goddard Space flight Center (GSFC), is demonstrating the use of standard Internet protocols for spacecraft communication systems. This year, demonstrations of Internet access to a flying spacecraft have been performed with the UoSAT-12 spacecraft owned and operated by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL). Previously, demonstrations were performed using a ground satellite simulator and NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). These activities are part of NASA's Space Operations Management Office (SOMO) Technology Program, The work is focused on defining the communication architecture for future NASA missions to support both NASA's "faster, better, cheaper" concept and to enable new types of collaborative science. The use of standard Internet communication technology for spacecraft simplifies design, supports initial integration and test across an IP based network, and enables direct communication between scientists and instruments as well as between different spacecraft, The most recent demonstrations consisted of uploading an Internet Protocol (IP) software stack to the UoSAT- 12 spacecraft, simple modifications to the SSTL ground station, and a series of tests to measure performance of various Internet applications. The spacecraft was reconfigured on orbit at very low cost. The total period between concept and the first tests was only 3 months. The tests included basic network connectivity (PING), automated clock synchronization (NTP), and reliable file transfers (FTP). Future tests are planned to include additional protocols such as Mobile IP, e-mail, and virtual private networks (VPN) to enable automated, operational spacecraft communication networks. The work performed and results of the initial phase of tests are summarized in this paper. This work is funded and directed by NASA/GSFC with technical leadership by CSC in arrangement with SSTL, and Vytek Wireless.

  15. Access to Safe Water and Personal Hygiene Practices in the Kulandia Refugee Camp (Jerusalem).

    PubMed

    Issa, Mohamad; McHenry, Michael; Issa, Abdul Aziz; Blackwood, R Alexander

    2015-12-22

    Diarrheal illness, frequently associated with fecal-oral transmission, is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. It is commonly preventable through the implementation of safe water practices. This experiment concerns how to best implement safe water practices in a quasi-permanent refugee camp setting with limited ability for structural changes. Specifically, we explore how health promotion activities that help identify target groups for hygiene interventions can play a role in disease prevention. An anonymous survey was conducted at the United Nations Relief and Works Agency Health Clinic in the Kulandia refugee camp to assess the safe water and personal hygiene practices. Demographic and social characteristics, accessible water and personal hygiene characteristics, and gastrointestinal (GI) burden for individuals and their households were assessed. A total of 96 individuals were enrolled; 62 females and 34 males. Approximately 58% of the sample had soap available and washed hands before and after eating and when preparing food. Piped water was the main source of drinking water (62%), while 31% of our sample utilized tanker-trucks. 93% of participants had access to toilet facilities, with 86% of these facilities being private households. 55% practice extra water hygiene measures on their household drinking water source. 51.3% considered vendor cleanliness when they were buying food. 51% had received formal health education. 68.8% had been taught by their parents, but only 55.2% were teaching their children and 15.6% had consistent access to a health professional for hygiene inquiries. Individual variables and hygiene practices associated with lower rates of diarrheal illnesses included having water piped into the home, proper hand washing, adequate soap availability, proper consideration of vendor cleanliness, higher income, levels of education, health hygiene education, and having access to healthcare professions to discuss hygiene related matters. This is

  16. Access to Safe Water and Personal Hygiene Practices in the Kulandia Refugee Camp (Jerusalem)

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Mohamad; McHenry, Michael; Issa, Abdul Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Diarrheal illness, frequently associated with fecal-oral transmission, is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. It is commonly preventable through the implementation of safe water practices. This experiment concerns how to best implement safe water practices in a quasi-permanent refugee camp setting with limited ability for structural changes. Specifically, we explore how health promotion activities that help identify target groups for hygiene interventions can play a role in disease prevention. An anonymous survey was conducted at the United Nations Relief and Works Agency Health Clinic in the Kulandia refugee camp to assess the safe water and personal hygiene practices. Demographic and social characteristics, accessible water and personal hygiene characteristics, and gastrointestinal (GI) burden for individuals and their households were assessed. A total of 96 individuals were enrolled; 62 females and 34 males. Approximately 58% of the sample had soap available and washed hands before and after eating and when preparing food. Piped water was the main source of drinking water (62%), while 31% of our sample utilized tanker-trucks. 93% of participants had access to toilet facilities, with 86% of these facilities being private households. 55% practice extra water hygiene measures on their household drinking water source. 51.3% considered vendor cleanliness when they were buying food. 51% had received formal health education. 68.8% had been taught by their parents, but only 55.2% were teaching their children and 15.6% had consistent access to a health professional for hygiene inquiries. Individual variables and hygiene practices associated with lower rates of diarrheal illnesses included having water piped into the home, proper hand washing, adequate soap availability, proper consideration of vendor cleanliness, higher income, levels of education, health hygiene education, and having access to healthcare professions to discuss hygiene related matters. This is

  17. Access to Safe Water and Personal Hygiene Practices in the Kulandia Refugee Camp (Jerusalem).

    PubMed

    Issa, Mohamad; McHenry, Michael; Issa, Abdul Aziz; Blackwood, R Alexander

    2015-12-22

    Diarrheal illness, frequently associated with fecal-oral transmission, is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. It is commonly preventable through the implementation of safe water practices. This experiment concerns how to best implement safe water practices in a quasi-permanent refugee camp setting with limited ability for structural changes. Specifically, we explore how health promotion activities that help identify target groups for hygiene interventions can play a role in disease prevention. An anonymous survey was conducted at the United Nations Relief and Works Agency Health Clinic in the Kulandia refugee camp to assess the safe water and personal hygiene practices. Demographic and social characteristics, accessible water and personal hygiene characteristics, and gastrointestinal (GI) burden for individuals and their households were assessed. A total of 96 individuals were enrolled; 62 females and 34 males. Approximately 58% of the sample had soap available and washed hands before and after eating and when preparing food. Piped water was the main source of drinking water (62%), while 31% of our sample utilized tanker-trucks. 93% of participants had access to toilet facilities, with 86% of these facilities being private households. 55% practice extra water hygiene measures on their household drinking water source. 51.3% considered vendor cleanliness when they were buying food. 51% had received formal health education. 68.8% had been taught by their parents, but only 55.2% were teaching their children and 15.6% had consistent access to a health professional for hygiene inquiries. Individual variables and hygiene practices associated with lower rates of diarrheal illnesses included having water piped into the home, proper hand washing, adequate soap availability, proper consideration of vendor cleanliness, higher income, levels of education, health hygiene education, and having access to healthcare professions to discuss hygiene related matters. This is

  18. Communication Access to Conversational Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Annalu

    2006-01-01

    This article describes methods that have been developed to provide augmentative and alternative communication communicators with better access to narrative conversation. It begins by highlighting the need to provide access to conversational narrative for people with complex communication needs, arguing that this type of conversation plays an…

  19. Accessibility in E-Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Simon

    2009-01-01

    E-assessment offers many opportunities to broaden the range of tools at the assessor's disposal and thereby improve the overall accessibility of the assessment experience. In 2006, TechDis commissioned a report, produced by Edexcel, on the state of guidance on accessibility at the various stages of the assessment process--question design,…

  20. Distributed Access to Administrative Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Eugene

    1987-01-01

    Administrators, faculty, and staff should have electronic access to records needed to perform their jobs, and students should have access to their own records--course registration and addresses. User-directed analysis and reporting are discussed and the security and audit issues are examined. (Author/MLW)