Science.gov

Sample records for accessible transportation facilities

  1. Americans with Disabilities Act: Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities, Transportation Facilities, Transportation Vehicles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, Washington, DC.

    Guidelines are presented regarding accessibility to buildings and facilities, transportation facilities, and transportation vehicles by individuals with disabilities, under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. These guidelines are to be applied during building design, construction, and alteration. Part 1 offers detailed facility…

  2. 62. RAILROAD FACILITIES, TRUCKING PASSAGE, MAIL TRANSPORT AREA, ACCESS TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. RAILROAD FACILITIES, TRUCKING PASSAGE, MAIL TRANSPORT AREA, ACCESS TO POST OFFICE BUILDING, VIEW TO WEST - Terminal Tower Building, Cleveland Union Terminal, 50 Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  3. 25 CFR 170.813 - When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When can access to IRR transportation facilities be... WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.813 When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted? IRR transportation facilities must be open and available for public...

  4. 25 CFR 170.813 - When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When can access to IRR transportation facilities be... WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.813 When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted? IRR transportation facilities must be open and available for public...

  5. 49 CFR 37.9 - Standards for accessible transportation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) or ANSI A117.1(1980) (American National Standards Specification for... covering those elements or spaces are contained in UFAS or ANSI A117.1, as applicable. (c) (1)...

  6. 49 CFR 37.9 - Standards for accessible transportation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) or ANSI A117.1(1980) (American National Standards Specification for... covering those elements or spaces are contained in UFAS or ANSI A117.1, as applicable. (c) (1)...

  7. 49 CFR 37.9 - Standards for accessible transportation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) or ANSI A117.1(1980) (American National Standards Specification for... covering those elements or spaces are contained in UFAS or ANSI A117.1, as applicable. (c) (1)...

  8. 49 CFR 37.9 - Standards for accessible transportation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) or ANSI A117.1(1980) (American National Standards Specification for... covering those elements or spaces are contained in UFAS or ANSI A117.1, as applicable. (c) (1)...

  9. 49 CFR 37.9 - Standards for accessible transportation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) or ANSI A117.1(1980) (American National Standards Specification for... covering those elements or spaces are contained in UFAS or ANSI A117.1, as applicable. (c) (1)...

  10. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 37 - Modifications to Standards for Accessible Transportation Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Transportation Facilities A Appendix A to Part 37 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Pt. 37, App. A Appendix A to Part 37... also be found via a hyperlink on the Internet at the following address:...

  11. 25 CFR 170.813 - When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... restricted? 170.813 Section 170.813 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND... protection; (4) To prevent traffic from causing damage to the facility; and (5) For reasons deemed to be in the public interest such as fire prevention or suppression as approved by the Secretary....

  12. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 37 - Modifications to Standards for Accessible Transportation Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... also be found via a hyperlink on the Internet at the following address: http://www.access-board.gov/ada... Department has modified the language of the ADAAG as it applies to entities subject to 49 CFR part 37. These entities must comply with the modified language in this Appendix rather than the language of Appendices...

  13. Space Transportation and Destination Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smitherman, David; McClure, Wallace

    1999-01-01

    The Space Transportation and Destination Facilities section focused on space transportation vehicles-from use of existing vehicles to development of specialized transports-and on space stations, space business parks, space hotels, and other facilities in space of the kind that eventually would provide services for general public space travel (PST) and tourism. For both transportation and destination facilities, the emphasis was on the identification of various strategies to enable a realistic incremental progression in the development and acquisition of such facilities, and the identification of issues that need resolution to enable formation of viable businesses. The approach was to determine the best: (1) Strategies for general PST and tourism development through the description and analysis of a wide range of possible future scenarios. With these scenarios in mind the section then identified. (2) Key issues to be explored. (3) opportunities to eliminate barriers. (4) Recommendations for future actions. (5) Top-level requirements and characteristics for general PST and tourism systems and services that would guide the development of transportation and destination facilities.

  14. Access to Public Educational Facilities under the Equal Access Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, R. Craig; Goldblatt, Steven M.

    1988-01-01

    Discussion centers on the legal bases by which school administrators permit access to public educational facilities by religiously and politically oriented student organizations. It concludes that access should be granted to students whose purposes do not disrupt teaching and learning. (JAM)

  15. Facility Accessibility: Opening the Doors to All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Jeffrey C.; Piletic, Cindy K.

    2006-01-01

    A facility developed for fitness, physical activity, recreation, or sport is a vital community resource that contributes to the overall health and wellness of that community's citizens. In order to maximize the benefits derived from these facilities, it is imperative that they be accessible to as wide a range of people as possible. The Americans…

  16. 78 FR 67303 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1191 RIN 3014-AA22 Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities; Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) Accessibility...

  17. Research facility access & science education

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, S.P.; Teplitz, V.L.

    1994-10-01

    As Congress voted to terminate the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory in October of 1993, the Department of Energy was encouraged to maximize the benefits to the nation of approximately $2 billion which had already been expended to date on its evolution. Having been recruited to Texas from other intellectually challenging enclaves around the world, many regional scientists, especially physicists, of course, also began to look for viable ways to preserve some of the potentially short-lived gains made by Texas higher education in anticipation of {open_quotes}the SSC era.{close_quotes} In fact, by November, 1993, approximately 150 physicists and engineers from thirteen Texas universities and the SSC itself, had gathered on the SMU campus to discuss possible re-uses of the SSC assets. Participants at that meeting drew up a petition addressed to the state and federal governments requesting the creation of a joint Texas Facility for Science Education and Research. The idea was to create a facility, open to universities and industry alike, which would preserve the research and development infrastructure and continue the educational mission of the SSC.

  18. 7 CFR 800.26 - Access to records and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to records and facilities. 800.26 Section 800... Recordkeeping and Access to Facilities § 800.26 Access to records and facilities. (a) Inspection of records and facilities. Prior to the examination of records or inspection of facilities by an authorized...

  19. 45 CFR 1706.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1706... Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity... facilities accessible to and usable by handicapped persons; or (2) Require the agency to take any action...

  20. 45 CFR 1214.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1214... ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY ACTION § 1214.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency... require the agency to make each of its existing facilities accessible to and usable by individuals...

  1. 45 CFR 2301.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 2301... THE UNITED STATES ARCTIC RESEARCH COMMISSION § 2301.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a... not— (1) Necessarily require the agency to make each of its existing facilities accessible to...

  2. 45 CFR 85.42 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 85.42... SERVICES § 85.42 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each... to make each of its existing facilities accessible to and usable by individuals with handicaps; or...

  3. 45 CFR 2104.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 2104... BY THE COMMISSION OF FINE ARTS § 2104.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General...) Necessarily require the agency to make each of its existing facilities accessible to and usable by...

  4. 45 CFR 1803.7 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1803.7... facilities. (a) The Foundation shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when... does not necessarily require the Foundation to make each of its existing facilities accessible to...

  5. In-facility transport code review

    SciTech Connect

    Spore, J.W.; Boyack, B.E.; Bohl, W.R.

    1996-07-01

    The following computer codes were reviewed by the In-Facility Transport Working Group for application to the in-facility transport of radioactive aerosols, flammable gases, and/or toxic gases: (1) CONTAIN, (2) FIRAC, (3) GASFLOW, (4) KBERT, and (5) MELCOR. Based on the review criteria as described in this report and the versions of each code available at the time of the review, MELCOR is the best code for the analysis of in-facility transport when multidimensional effects are not significant. When multi-dimensional effects are significant, GASFLOW should be used.

  6. Space transportation and support facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Robert C., III

    A definition of space transportation for the SSTO program is discussed. It is argued that reusable SSTO vehicles are essential to free enterprise participation in space exploitation. Free enterprise participation requires not only transportation provided by government but also the civil's sector right to buy, own, and operate its own transportation systems.

  7. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  8. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  9. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  10. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  11. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  12. 36 CFR 812.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Methods—(1) General. The agency may comply with the requirements of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to... facilities and construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods...

  13. 22 CFR 219.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... program or activity. (b) Methods. The agency may comply with the requirements of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to... facilities and construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods...

  14. 36 CFR 909.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Methods—(1) General. The agency may comply with the requirements of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to... facilities and construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods...

  15. 38 CFR 15.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... activity. (b) Methods—(1) General. The agency may comply with the requirements of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to... facilities and construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods...

  16. 45 CFR 1214.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... program or activity. (b) Methods. The agency may comply with the requirements of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to... facilities and construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods...

  17. 49 CFR 807.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... program or activity. (b) Methods. The agency may comply with the requirements of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to... facilities and construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods...

  18. Community variation in adolescent access to indoor tanning facilities.

    PubMed

    Olson, Ardis L; Carlos, Heather A; Sarnoff, Rachel A

    2013-04-01

    Melanoma rates among younger women in New Hampshire (NH) are rising. In urban studies, youth proximity to tanning facilities has been linked to indoor tanning, a proven cause of melanoma. Youth access has not been examined in rural settings. To determine on a statewide basis the influence of rurality and community income level on female students' ease of access to tanning facilities, all NH tanning facilities (N = 261) and high schools (N = 77) in 2011 were spatially and statistically analyzed to determine schools with more facilities within 2 miles of the school and greater capacity (fewer female students per facility), for indoor tanning. Schools above the state-wide average for both measures were classified as "Easy Access" to indoor tanning. Among NH high schools, 74 % have 1 or more tanning facility within two miles and 22 % have "Easy Access" to tanning facilities. Ease of access did not differ by rurality. Lower-income school status was an independent predictor of both greater capacity and "Easy Access". While urban and rural teens have similar access to indoor tanning, female students in lower-income communities have easier access. Variations in access by community size and income must be considered in planning interventions to address youth indoor tanning.

  19. Opportunities for Process Monitoring Techniques at Delayed Access Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Michael M.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Johnson, Shirley J.; Schanfein, Mark; Toomey, Christopher

    2013-09-20

    Except for specific cases where the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) maintains a continuous presence at a facility (such as the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant), there is always a period of time or delay between the moment a State is notified or aware of an upcoming inspection, and the time the inspector actually enters the material balance area or facility. Termed by the authors as “delayed access,” this period of time between inspection notice and inspector entrance to a facility poses a concern. Delayed access also has the potential to reduce the effectiveness of measures applied as part of the Safeguards Approach for a facility (such as short-notice inspections). This report investigates the feasibility of using process monitoring to address safeguards challenges posed by delayed access at a subset of facility types.

  20. 39 CFR 255.8 - Access to postal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 255.8 Access to postal facilities. (a) Legal requirements and policy—(1) ABA Standards. Where the design standards of the Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) of 1968, 42 U.S.C. 4151 et seq., do not apply... facilities not legally required to conform to ABA standards when it determines that doing so would...

  1. 10 CFR 4.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 4.550 Section 4.550 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR...) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve...

  2. 45 CFR 2490.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 2490...: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or.... This paragraph does not— (1) Necessarily require the agency to make each of its existing...

  3. 31. FLOOR PLANS OF WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY. SHOWS ACCESS CORRIDOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. FLOOR PLANS OF WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY. SHOWS ACCESS CORRIDOR AT MEZZANINE AND LOWER LEVELS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106352. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-A-2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. Manual for Accessibility: [Conference, Meeting, and Lodging Facilities]. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rehabilitation Association, Alexandria, VA.

    This illustrated manual and survey forms are designed to be used by organizations, hotel and restaurant associations, interested individuals and others as a guide for selecting accessible conference, meeting, and lodging facilities. The guidelines can also be used with existing facilities to identify specific modifications and accommodations. The…

  5. 29 CFR 4907.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION § 4907.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by...

  6. 12 CFR 268.707 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Board Programs and Activities Because of Physical or Mental Disability § 268.707 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The Board shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with a...

  7. 12 CFR 268.707 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Board Programs and Activities Because of Physical or Mental Disability § 268.707 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The Board shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with a...

  8. 29 CFR 4907.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION § 4907.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by...

  9. 12 CFR 268.707 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Board Programs and Activities Because of Physical or Mental Disability § 268.707 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The Board shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with a...

  10. 18 CFR 1313.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... handicapped persons receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—1) General. The..., reassignment of the services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits... new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making...

  11. 22 CFR 144.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... persons receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—(1) General. The agency..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making its programs...

  12. 17 CFR 200.650 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... individuals with handicaps receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—(1... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making...

  13. 18 CFR 1313.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... handicapped persons receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—1) General. The..., reassignment of the services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits... new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making...

  14. 45 CFR 2104.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... handicapped persons receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—(1) General. The..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making its programs...

  15. 36 CFR 406.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Methods. The agency may comply with the requirements of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making...

  16. 5 CFR 1850.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... individuals with handicaps receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—(1... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making...

  17. 7 CFR 15e.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S... plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve program accessibility, the agency shall develop, by May 26, 1994, a transition plan setting forth the steps necessary...

  18. 17 CFR 200.650 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S... plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve program accessibility, the agency shall develop, by March 6, 1989, a transition plan setting forth the steps...

  19. 29 CFR 2205.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural...) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve program accessibility, the agency shall develop, by February 23, 1987, a transition plan setting forth the...

  20. 29 CFR 2706.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural...) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve program accessibility, the agency shall develop, by February 23, 1987 a transition plan setting forth the...

  1. 38 CFR 15.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 15.150 Section 15.150 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides...

  2. The Sandia Transportable Triggered Lightning Instrumentation Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schnetzer, G.H.; Fisher, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Development of the Sandia Transportable Triggered Lightning Instrumentation Facility (SATTLIF) was motivated by a requirement for the in situ testing of munitions storage bunker. Transfer functions relating the incident flash currents to voltages, currents, and electromagnetic field values throughout the structure will be obtained for use in refining and validating a lightning response computer model of this type of structure. A preliminary shakedown trial of the facility under actual operational conditions was performed during the summer of 1990 at the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) rocket-triggered lightning test site in Florida. A description is given of the SATTLIF, which is readily transportable on a single flatbed truck or by aircraft, and its instrumentation for measuring incident lightning channel currents and the responses of systems under test. Measurements of return-stroke current peaks obtained with the SATLLIF are presented. Agreement with data acquired on the same flashes with existing KSC instrumentation is, on average, to within {approximately}7 percent. Continuing currents were measured with a resolution of {approximately}2.5 A. This field trial demonstrated the practicality of using a transportable triggered lightning facility for specialized test applications. 5 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The Sandia transportable triggered lightning instrumentation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnetzer, George H.; Fisher, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    Development of the Sandia Transportable Triggered Lightning Instrumentation Facility (SATTLIF) was motivated by a requirement for the in situ testing of a munitions storage bunker. Transfer functions relating the incident flash currents to voltages, currents, and electromagnetic field values throughout the structure will be obtained for use in refining and validating a lightning response computer model of this type of structure. A preliminary shakedown trial of the facility under actual operational conditions was performed during summer of 1990 at the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) rocket-triggered lightning test site. A description is given of the SATTLIF, which is readily transportable on a single flatbed truck of by aircraft, and its instrumentation for measuring incident lightning channel currents and the responses of the systems under test. Measurements of return-stroke current peaks obtained with the SATTLIF are presented. Agreement with data acquired on the same flashes with existing KSC instrumentation is, on average, to within approximately 7 percent. Continuing currents were measured with a resolution of approximately 2.5 A. This field trial demonstrated the practicality of using a transportable triggered lightning facility for specialized test applications.

  4. Mechanism for alternating access in neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lucy R; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Jacobs, Miriam T; Gesmonde, Joan; Xie, Li; Honig, Barry H; Rudnick, Gary

    2008-07-29

    Crystal structures of LeuT, a bacterial homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters, show a molecule of bound substrate that is essentially exposed to the extracellular space but occluded from the cytoplasm. Thus, there must exist an alternate conformation for LeuT in which the substrate is accessible to the cytoplasm and a corresponding mechanism that switches accessibility from one side of the membrane to the other. Here, we identify the cytoplasmic accessibility pathway of the alternate conformation in a mammalian serotonin transporter (SERT) (a member of the same transporter family as LeuT). We also propose a model for the cytoplasmic-facing state that exploits the internal pseudosymmetry observed in the crystal structure. LeuT contains two structurally similar repeats (TMs1-5 and TMs 6-10) that are inverted with respect to the plane of the membrane. The conformational differences between them result in the formation of the extracellular pathway. Our model for the cytoplasm-facing state exchanges the conformations of the two repeats and thus exposes the substrate and ion-binding sites to the cytoplasm. The conformational change that connects the two states primarily involves the tilting of a 4-helix bundle composed of transmembrane helices 1, 2, 6, and 7. Switching the tilt angle of this bundle is essentially equivalent to switching the conformation of the two repeats. Extensive mutagenesis of SERT and accessibility measurements, using cysteine reagents, are accommodated by our model. These observations may be of relevance to other transporter families, many of which contain internal inverted repeats.

  5. Issues in designing transport layer multicast facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Bert J.; Weaver, Alfred C.

    1990-01-01

    Multicasting denotes a facility in a communications system for providing efficient delivery from a message's source to some well-defined set of locations using a single logical address. While modem network hardware supports multidestination delivery, first generation Transport Layer protocols (e.g., the DoD Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) (15) and ISO TP-4 (41)) did not anticipate the changes over the past decade in underlying network hardware, transmission speeds, and communication patterns that have enabled and driven the interest in reliable multicast. Much recent research has focused on integrating the underlying hardware multicast capability with the reliable services of Transport Layer protocols. Here, we explore the communication issues surrounding the design of such a reliable multicast mechanism. Approaches and solutions from the literature are discussed, and four experimental Transport Layer protocols that incorporate reliable multicast are examined.

  6. Personnel Access Control System Evaluation for National Ignition Facility Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Altenbach, T; Brereton, S.; Hermes, G.; Singh, M.

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to analyze the baseline Access Control System for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and to assess its effectiveness at controlling access to hazardous locations during full NIF operations. It reviews the various hazards present during a NIF shot sequence, and evaluates the effectiveness of the applicable set of controls at preventing access while the hazards are present. It considers only those hazards that could potentially be lethal. In addition, various types of technologies that might be applicable at NIF are reviewed, as are systems currently in use at other facilities requiring access control for safety reasons. Recommendations on how this system might be modified to reduce risk are made.

  7. 7 CFR 15e.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 15e.150 Section 15e.150 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF...

  8. 12 CFR 268.707 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Programs and Activities Because of Physical or Mental Disability § 268.707 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The Board shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity... can demonstrate would result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or...

  9. 12 CFR 268.707 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Programs and Activities Because of Physical or Mental Disability § 268.707 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The Board shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity... can demonstrate would result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or...

  10. 50 CFR 550.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 550.150 Section 550.150 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION §...

  11. 34 CFR 105.32 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 105.32 Section 105.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR...

  12. 50 CFR 550.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 550.150 Section 550.150 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION §...

  13. 50 CFR 550.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 550.150 Section 550.150 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION §...

  14. 50 CFR 550.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 550.150 Section 550.150 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION §...

  15. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Access to facilities and residents. 51.42 Section 51.42 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS... persons, including the person thought to be the victim of such abuse, who might be reasonably believed...

  16. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Access to facilities and residents. 51.42 Section 51.42 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS... persons, including the person thought to be the victim of such abuse, who might be reasonably believed...

  17. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Access to facilities and residents. 51.42 Section 51.42 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS... persons, including the person thought to be the victim of such abuse, who might be reasonably believed...

  18. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Access to facilities and residents. 51.42 Section 51.42 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS... persons, including the person thought to be the victim of such abuse, who might be reasonably believed...

  19. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Access to facilities and residents. 51.42 Section 51.42 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS... persons, including the person thought to be the victim of such abuse, who might be reasonably believed...

  20. 19 CFR 201.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 201.150 Section 201.150 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION GENERAL RULES OF GENERAL APPLICATION Enforcement of Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Handicap in Programs or...

  1. 32 CFR 1807.150 - Program accessibility: existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Program accessibility: existing facilities. 1807.150 Section 1807.150 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN PROGRAMS OR...

  2. 32 CFR 1807.150 - Program accessibility: existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program accessibility: existing facilities. 1807.150 Section 1807.150 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN PROGRAMS OR...

  3. 32 CFR 1807.150 - Program accessibility: existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Program accessibility: existing facilities. 1807.150 Section 1807.150 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN PROGRAMS OR...

  4. 32 CFR 1807.150 - Program accessibility: existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program accessibility: existing facilities. 1807.150 Section 1807.150 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN PROGRAMS OR...

  5. 32 CFR 1807.150 - Program accessibility: existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Program accessibility: existing facilities. 1807.150 Section 1807.150 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense NATIONAL COUNTERINTELLIGENCE CENTER ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN PROGRAMS OR...

  6. 17 CFR 149.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 149.150 Section 149.150 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING... the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157),...

  7. 45 CFR 606.51 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Section 606.51 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION § 606.51 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The... result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial...

  8. 45 CFR 606.51 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Section 606.51 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION § 606.51 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The... result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial...

  9. 45 CFR 606.51 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Section 606.51 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION § 606.51 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The... result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial...

  10. 22 CFR 1600.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1600.150 Section 1600.150 Foreign Relations JAPAN-UNITED STATES FRIENDSHIP COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE JAPAN-UNITED STATES...

  11. 22 CFR 1600.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1600.150 Section 1600.150 Foreign Relations JAPAN-UNITED STATES FRIENDSHIP COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE JAPAN-UNITED STATES...

  12. 22 CFR 1600.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1600.150 Section 1600.150 Foreign Relations JAPAN-UNITED STATES FRIENDSHIP COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE JAPAN-UNITED STATES...

  13. 22 CFR 1600.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1600.150 Section 1600.150 Foreign Relations JAPAN-UNITED STATES FRIENDSHIP COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE JAPAN-UNITED STATES...

  14. 22 CFR 1600.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1600.150 Section 1600.150 Foreign Relations JAPAN-UNITED STATES FRIENDSHIP COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE JAPAN-UNITED STATES...

  15. 19 CFR 201.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 201.150 Section 201.150 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION GENERAL RULES OF... appropriate. (c) Time period for compliance. The agency shall comply with the obligations established...

  16. 22 CFR 530.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 530.150 Section 530.150 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE BROADCASTING BOARD OF...

  17. 10 CFR 1041.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1041.150 Section 1041.150 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY § 1041.150...

  18. 50 CFR 80.24 - Recreational boating access facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS § 80.24... the Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration Act for recreational boating access facilities. However,...

  19. 40 CFR 12.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 12.150 Section 12.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE ENVIRONMENTAL...

  20. 40 CFR 12.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 12.150 Section 12.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE ENVIRONMENTAL...

  1. 41 CFR 51-10.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural...) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve program... plan setting forth the steps necessary to complete such changes. The agency shall provide...

  2. 34 CFR 1200.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157), and any regulations implementing it. In... as possible. (d) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve program accessibility, the agency shall develop, by May 26, 1994, a transition...

  3. 29 CFR 4907.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157), and any regulations implementing it. In...) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve program accessibility, the agency shall develop, by February 23, 1987 a transition plan setting forth the...

  4. 40 CFR 12.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 12.150 Section 12.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE ENVIRONMENTAL...

  5. 45 CFR 606.51 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Section 606.51 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION § 606.51 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate...

  6. 45 CFR 606.51 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 606.51 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION § 606.51 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate...

  7. 50 CFR 550.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 550.150 Section 550.150 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION §...

  8. 36 CFR 1208.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1208.150 Section 1208.150 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND... OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION § 1208.150...

  9. 36 CFR 1208.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1208.150 Section 1208.150 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND... OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION § 1208.150...

  10. 36 CFR 1208.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1208.150 Section 1208.150 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND... OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION § 1208.150...

  11. 36 CFR 1208.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1208.150 Section 1208.150 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND... OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION § 1208.150...

  12. 36 CFR 1208.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1208.150 Section 1208.150 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND... OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION § 1208.150...

  13. High power transportable VLF transmitter facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dazey, M. H.; Koons, H. C.

    1982-05-01

    A 100-kW, transportable, very-low-frequency (TVLF) transmitter facility has been used for magnetospheric wave-injection experiments from sites in Alaska, New Zealand and Norway. A unique feature of the TVLF facility is the antenna which is a conducting cable lofted to an altitude of 1000 m by a 1000 cu m3 helium balloon. The antenna is driven at its base as a monopole above a ground plane. The antenna cable also serves as the balloon tether. The lowest operating frequency in this configuration is 6.6 kHz at which the radiated power is 100 W. At the highest operating frequency used in the experiments, 21 kHz, the radiated power is 10 kW. In Norway power lines were used as antennas. The minimum operating frequency was then 1 kHz and the radiated power is estimated to be about 0.5 W. In this report we describe the components and performance of the TVLF as used for these magnetospheric experiments.

  14. 36 CFR 1154.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Existing facilities. 1154.150 Section 1154.150 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND... ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD § 1154.150 Program... Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157), and any regulations implementing it....

  15. Air support facilities. [interface between air and surface transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airports are discussed in terms of the interface between the ground and air for transportation systems. The classification systems, design, facilities, administration, and operations of airports are described.

  16. Facility wide benefits of radiology vascular access teams, part 2.

    PubMed

    Burns, Tim; Lamberth, Becky

    2010-01-01

    A vascular access team (VAT) can provide a full scope of PICC services, including pre-placement evaluation, placement of the PICC, educational resources to bedside nursing staff, management and monitoring of the insertion sites, discontinuation of the line, and documentation for quality control purposes. Two hospitals that have developed VAT programs outline key factors in forming a successful team, which include identifying the resources and associated costs,developing policies and procedures, establishing quality assurance, and enabling employee satisfaction. Facilities will need to consider the cost associated with the implementation of the team; however, benefits the team provides to the facility far outweigh the financial commitment required.

  17. Facility wide benefits of radiology vascular access teams.

    PubMed

    Burns, Tim; Lamberth, Becky

    2010-01-01

    Many PICC lines are inserted in the radiology department and, at the rate they are inserted, can have serious financial implications for a facility. These costs combined with the increase in the number of line placements performed annually have imaging leadership evaluating alternatives for catheter placements in their departments. Several benefits to forming an in-house vascular access team include increased patient satisfaction, improved care, decreased length of stay, optimizing DRG reimbursement, and increased revenue. Considerations prior to initiating a vascular access team include: staff members involved, location of insertions, and up front funds available.

  18. Simulation of a Production Facility with an Automated Transport System

    SciTech Connect

    ABRAMCZYK, GLENN

    2004-04-07

    A model was needed to assess material throughput and validate the conceptual design of a production facility, including equipment lists and layout. The initial desire was to use a commercially available discrete event simulation package. However, the available software was found to be too limited in capability. Database interface software was used to develop autonomous intelligent manufacturing workstations and material transporters. The initial Extend model used to assess material throughput and develop equipment lists for the preconceptual design effort was upgraded with software add-ons from Simulation Dynamics, Inc. (SDI). Use of the SDI database interface allowed the upgraded model to include: 1. a material mass balance at any level of detail required by the user, and 2. a transport system model that includes all transport system movements, time delays, and transfers between systems. This model will assist in evaluating transport system capacity, sensitive time delays in the system, and optimal operating strategies. An additional benefit of using the SDI database interface is dramatically improved run time performance. This allows significantly more runs to be completed to provide better statistics for overall plant performance. The model has all system and process parameters entered into sub-component accessible tables. All information for the manufactured items and process data is automatically generated and written to the database. The standard software is used for the movement of manufactured items between workstations, and for sequence and timing functions. Use of the database permits almost unlimited process control and data collection with an insignificant effect on run time.

  19. BIOPACK: the ground controlled late access biological research facility.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Jack J W A

    2004-03-01

    Future Space Shuttle flights shall be characterized by activities necessary to further build the International Space Station, ISS. During these missions limited resources are available to conduct biological experiments in space. The Shuttles' Middeck is a very suitable place to conduct science during the ISS assembly missions or dedicated science missions. The BIOPACK, which flew its first mission during the STS-107, provides a versatile Middeck Locker based research tool for gravitational biology studies. The core facility occupies the space of only two Middeck Lockers. Experiment temperatures are controlled for bacteria, plant, invertebrate and mammalian cultures. Gravity levels and profiles can be set ranging from 0 to 2.0 x g on three independent centrifuges. This provides the experimenter with a 1.0 x g on-board reference and intermediate hypogravity and hypergravity data points to investigate e.g. threshold levels in biological responses. Temperature sensitive items can be stored in the facilities' -10 degrees C and +4 degrees C stowage areas. During STS-107 the facility also included a small glovebox (GBX) and passive temperature controlled units (PTCU). The GBX provides the experimenter with two extra levels of containment for safe sample handling. This biological research facility is a late access (L-10 hrs) laboratory, which, when reaching orbit, could automatically be starting up reducing important experiment lag-time and valuable crew time. The system is completely telecommanded when needed. During flight system parameters like temperatures, centrifuge speeds, experiment commanding or sensor readouts can be monitored and changed when needed. Although ISS provides a wide range of research facilities there is still need for an STS-based late access facility such as the BIOPACK providing experimenters with a very versatile research cabinet for biological experiments under microgravity and in-flight control conditions.

  20. 25 CFR 170.800 - Who owns IRR transportation facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who owns IRR transportation facilities? 170.800 Section... ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.800 Who owns IRR transportation facilities? Public authorities such as tribes, States, counties, local governments, and the Federal Government own IRR...

  1. 25 CFR 170.800 - Who owns IRR transportation facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Who owns IRR transportation facilities? 170.800 Section... ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.800 Who owns IRR transportation facilities? Public authorities such as tribes, States, counties, local governments, and the Federal Government own IRR...

  2. 9. Acircuit weather cover in foreground, personnel access hatch, transporter/erector ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. A-circuit weather cover in foreground, personnel access hatch, transporter/erector grounding points at right center - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility D-6, 4 miles north of Badlands National Park Headquarters, 4.5 miles east of Jackson County line on county road, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  3. Traveling towards disease: transportation barriers to health care access.

    PubMed

    Syed, Samina T; Gerber, Ben S; Sharp, Lisa K

    2013-10-01

    Transportation barriers are often cited as barriers to healthcare access. Transportation barriers lead to rescheduled or missed appointments, delayed care, and missed or delayed medication use. These consequences may lead to poorer management of chronic illness and thus poorer health outcomes. However, the significance of these barriers is uncertain based on existing literature due to wide variability in both study populations and transportation barrier measures. The authors sought to synthesize the literature on the prevalence of transportation barriers to health care access. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed studies on transportation barriers to healthcare access was performed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) study addressed access barriers for ongoing primary care or chronic disease care; (2) study included assessment of transportation barriers; and (3) study was completed in the United States. In total, 61 studies were reviewed. Overall, the evidence supports that transportation barriers are an important barrier to healthcare access, particularly for those with lower incomes or the under/uninsured. Additional research needs to (1) clarify which aspects of transportation limit health care access (2) measure the impact of transportation barriers on clinically meaningful outcomes and (3) measure the impact of transportation barrier interventions and transportation policy changes.

  4. Traveling Towards Disease: Transportation Barriers to Health Care Access

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Ben S.; Sharp, Lisa K.

    2014-01-01

    Transportation barriers are often cited as barriers to healthcare access. Transportation barriers lead to rescheduled or missed appointments, delayed care, and missed or delayed medication use. These consequences may lead to poorer management of chronic illness and thus poorer health outcomes. However, the significance of these barriers is uncertain based on existing literature due to wide variability in both study populations and transportation barrier measures. The authors sought to synthesize the literature on the prevalence of transportation barriers to health care access. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed studies on transportation barriers to healthcare access was performed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) study addressed access barriers for ongoing primary care or chronic disease care; (2) study included assessment of transportation barriers; and (3) study was completed in the United States. In total, 61 studies were reviewed. Overall, the evidence supports that transportation barriers are an important barrier to healthcare access, particularly for those with lower incomes or the under/uninsured. Additional research needs to (1) clarify which aspects of transportation limit health care access (2) measure the impact of transportation barriers on clinically meaningful outcomes and (3) measure the impact of transportation barrier interventions and transportation policy changes. PMID:23543372

  5. 48 CFR 3052.222-71 - Strikes or picketing affecting access to a DHS facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... affecting access to a DHS facility. 3052.222-71 Section 3052.222-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... affecting access to a DHS facility. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48 CFR 3022.101-71(b), insert the following clause: Strikes or Picketing Affecting Access to a DHS Facility (DEC 2003) If the Contracting...

  6. 45 CFR 1386.22 - Access to records, facilities and individuals with developmental disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Access to records, facilities and individuals with... Access to records, facilities and individuals with developmental disabilities. (a) Access to records—A... the staff of a facility that is providing care or treatment; (2) Reports prepared by an agency...

  7. 61. RAILROAD FACILITIES, TRUCKING PASSAGE, MAIL TRANSPORT AREA, UNDER HURON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. RAILROAD FACILITIES, TRUCKING PASSAGE, MAIL TRANSPORT AREA, UNDER HURON ROAD, BAGGAGE ELEVATOR, VIEW TO WEST - Terminal Tower Building, Cleveland Union Terminal, 50 Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  8. 55. RAILROAD FACILITIES, TRUCKING PASSAGE, MAIL TRANSPORT AREA UNDER HURON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. RAILROAD FACILITIES, TRUCKING PASSAGE, MAIL TRANSPORT AREA UNDER HURON ROAD, LEVEL 85, VIEW TO EAST - Terminal Tower Building, Cleveland Union Terminal, 50 Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  9. 50 CFR 85.45 - Public access to facilities and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public access to facilities and... GRANT PROGRAM Conditions on Use/Acceptance of Funds § 85.45 Public access to facilities and maintenance. All recreational vessels must have access to pumpout and dump stations funded under this grant...

  10. ADA Compliance and the Accessibility of Physical Activity Facilities in Western Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinal, Bradley J.; Spaziani, Marc D.

    2003-01-01

    Investigated how compliant physical activity facilities in western Oregon were with regard to the Americans with Disabilities Act's mandate regarding accessibility of public facilities for all people. Data from direct observations and physical measurements at 50 physical activity facilities indicated that no facility was 100-percent compliant. The…

  11. 77 FR 50068 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1192 RIN 3014-AA38 Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers... Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) is holding a public...

  12. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  13. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  14. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  15. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  16. 39 CFR 254.1 - Adoption of U.S. Access Board Standards as Postal Service Standards of Facility Accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Barriers Act (ABA) “Standards for Facility Accessibility,” the following sections of 36 CFR part 1191... Barriers Act, Scoping (which contains ABA Chapter 1, Application and Administration, and ABA Chapter...

  17. Assessing the population-level impact of vouchers on access to health facility delivery for women in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Obare, Francis; Warren, Charlotte; Abuya, Timothy; Askew, Ian; Bellows, Ben

    2014-02-01

    Although available evidence indicates that vouchers improve service utilization among the target populations, we do not know whether increased utilization results from improved access (new clients who would not have used services without the voucher) or from shifting clients from non-accredited to contracted service providers. This paper examines whether the safe motherhood voucher program in Kenya is associated with improved access to health facility delivery using information on births within two years preceding the survey in voucher and comparison sites. Data were collected in 2010-2011 and in 2012 among 2933 and 3094 women aged 15-49 years reporting 962 and 1494 births within two years before the respective surveys. Analysis entails cross-tabulations and estimation of multilevel random-intercept logit models. The results show that the proportion of births occurring at home declined by more than 10 percentage points while the proportion of births delivered in health facilities increased by a similar margin over time in voucher sites. The increase in facility-based births occurred in both public and private health facilities. There was also a significant increase in the likelihood of facility-based delivery (odds ratios [OR]: 2.04; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.40-2.98 in the 2006 voucher arm; OR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.22-2.43 in the 2010-2011 voucher arm) in voucher sites over time. In contrast, there were no significant changes in the likelihood of facility-based delivery in the comparison arm over time. These findings suggest that the voucher program contributed to improved access to institutional delivery by shifting births from home to health facilities. However, available evidence from qualitative data shows that some women who purchased the vouchers did not use them because of high transportation costs to accredited facilities. The implication is that substantial improvements in service uptake could be achieved if the program subsidized transportation costs as

  18. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Within Industry 3004.470 Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities,...

  19. 14 CFR 382.51 - What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities? 382.51 Section 382.51 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE... BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Accessibility of Airport Facilities § 382.51 What requirements...

  20. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Consolidated Transportation Facility. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0822, addressing environmental impacts that could result from siting, construction, and operation of a consolidated transportation facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho. The DOE proposes to construct and operate a new transportation facility at the Central Facilities Area (CFA) at the INEL. The proposed facility would replace outdated facilities and consolidate in one location operations that are conducted at six different locations at the CFA. The proposed facility would be used for vehicle and equipment maintenance and repair, administrative support, bus parking, and bus driver accommodation. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

  1. Feasibility study for a transportation operations system cask maintenance facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rennich, M.J.; Medley, L.G.; Attaway, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for the development of a waste management program for the disposition of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW). The program will include a transportation system for moving the nuclear waste from the sources to a geologic repository for permanent disposal. Specially designed casks will be used to safely transport the waste. The cask systems must be operated within limits imposed by DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Department of Transportation (DOT). A dedicated facility for inspecting, testing, and maintaining the cask systems was recommended by the General Accounting Office (in 1979) as the best means of assuring their operational effectiveness and safety, as well as regulatory compliance. In November of 1987, OCRWM requested a feasibility study be made of a Cask Maintenance Facility (CMF) that would perform the required functions. 46 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

  2. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities. 37.61 Section 37.61 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.61...

  3. 49 CFR 37.41 - Construction of transportation facilities by public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Construction of transportation facilities by public entities. 37.41 Section 37.41 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.41 Construction...

  4. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities. 37.61 Section 37.61 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.61...

  5. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities. 37.61 Section 37.61 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.61...

  6. 49 CFR 37.41 - Construction of transportation facilities by public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Construction of transportation facilities by public entities. 37.41 Section 37.41 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.41 Construction...

  7. 49 CFR 37.41 - Construction of transportation facilities by public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Construction of transportation facilities by public entities. 37.41 Section 37.41 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.41 Construction...

  8. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities. 37.61 Section 37.61 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.61...

  9. 49 CFR 37.41 - Construction of transportation facilities by public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Construction of transportation facilities by public entities. 37.41 Section 37.41 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.41 Construction...

  10. 49 CFR 37.41 - Construction of transportation facilities by public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Construction of transportation facilities by public entities. 37.41 Section 37.41 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.41 Construction...

  11. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities. 37.61 Section 37.61 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.61...

  12. 29 CFR 1615.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION AND IN ACCESSIBILITY OF COMMISSION ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural... among available methods for meeting the requirements of this section, the Commission shall give...

  13. 39 CFR 255.8 - Access to postal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES TO POSTAL SERVICE PROGRAMS, ACTIVITIES, FACILITIES, AND ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY... meet ABA design standards is not required, a discretionary alteration may be made on a...

  14. The transportation depot: An orbiting vehicle support facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaszubowski, Martin J.; Ayers, J. Kirk

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the details of an effort to produce conceptual designs for an orbiting platform, called a transportation depot, to handle assembly and processing of lunar, Martian, and related vehicles. High-level requirements for such a facility were established, and several concepts were developed to meet those requirements. By showing that the critical rigid-body momentum characteristics of each concept are similar to those of the dual-keel space station, some insight was gained about the controllability and utility of this type of facility. Finally, several general observations were made that highlight the advantages and disadvantages of particular design features.

  15. The accessibility of substance abuse treatment facilities in the United States for persons with disabilities.

    PubMed

    West, Steven L

    2007-07-01

    This study assessed the accessibility of a nationally representative sample of substance abuse treatment facilities in the United States for persons with disabilities (PWDs). A stratified random sample of 159 substance abuse treatment facilities in 40 states completed a survey regarding physical accessibility and the provision of services that could enhance the ability to serve individuals with disabilities. Most responding facilities self-reported a variety of barriers to physical accessibility, as well as the lack of services and physical accommodations for persons with sensory limitations. Such widespread inaccessibility may be a factor that promotes the low representation of PWDs in the treatment population.

  16. Capabilities of the Large-Scale Sediment Transport Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    instrument reliability and accuracy while reducing maintenance and to expand facility capabilities for cohesive sediment erosion and transport...crested wave. Twenty variable speed pumps are used to minimize the boundary effects of a finite-length beach by supplementing the wave-driven... pump flow meters, sediment trap weigh tanks, and beach profiling lidar. A detailed discussion of the original LSTF features and capabilities can be

  17. 28 CFR 39.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... persons receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods. The agency may comply... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services..., use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making its programs or...

  18. 45 CFR 2490.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—(1) General. The agency may comply with the... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making its programs or activities readily accessible...

  19. 45 CFR 2301.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... program or activity. (b) Methods—(1) General. The agency may comply with the requirements of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment... other methods that result in making its programs or activities readily accessible to and usable...

  20. 14 CFR 1251.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—(1) General. The agency may comply... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services..., use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making its programs or...

  1. 5 CFR 1636.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... program or activity. (b) Methods—(1) General. The agency may comply with the requirements of this section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment... other methods that result in making its programs or activities readily accessible to and usable...

  2. 6 CFR 15.50 - Program accessibility; existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... make them accessible to and usable by individuals with a disability where other methods are effective... with a disability receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods. The..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits,...

  3. 10 CFR 1041.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods. The agency may comply with the requirements... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible... stock, or any other methods that result in making its programs or activities readily accessible to...

  4. 16 CFR 6.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods. The Commission may comply with... to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at... accessible rolling stock, or any methods that result in making its programs or activities readily...

  5. 36 CFR 1154.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods. The agency may comply with the requirements... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible... stock, or any other methods that result in making its programs or activities readily accessible to...

  6. 22 CFR 219.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968... changes shall be made by April 7, 1989, but in any event as expeditiously as possible. (d) Transition plan... accessibility, the agency shall develop, by October 7, 1986, a transition plan setting forth the steps...

  7. 15 CFR 8c.50 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S... changes shall be made by July 26, 1991, but in any event as expeditiously as possible. (d) Transition plan... accessibility, the agency shall develop, by January 26, 1989, a transition plan setting forth the...

  8. Defining groundwater transport times near ASR facilities using geochemical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    Determining groundwater transport and travel times between recharge facilities and wells has become increasingly important in managing Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) projects. This is especially true in the State of California where water reuse rules that consider groundwater travel time in the permitting process are being discussed. Fundamental geochemical approaches for investigating transport include tritium/helium-3 dating and the addition of sulfur hexafluoride tracer in controlled experiments. When combined, groundwater flow can be imaged with time scales on the order of days to decades. The Orange County Water District recharges to their groundwater basin approximately 250,000 acre-ft of surface water annually from a series of spreading ponds and a 9-km section of the Santa Ana River. Sulfur hexafluoride gas was injected into the Santa Ana River over a period of 2 weeks, tagging approximately 3,000 acre-ft of recharged water. Groundwater flow and transport from the river has been determined for more than three years. Results of the gas tracer experiment demonstrate that linear groundwater flow velocities range from less than 1 km/yr to more than 5 km/yr and that the groundwater flow system is stratified. These results will be used to verify and refine numerical models of transport near the ASR facilities in Orange County and have been used to establish flowlines so that in situ water quality changes can be quantified.

  9. Access to Mammography Facilities and Detection of Breast Cancer by Screening Mammography: A GIS Approach.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Selina; Price, James H; Dignan, Mark; Rahman, Saleh; Lindquist, Peter S; Jordan, Timothy R

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to examine the association between access to mammography facilities and utilization of screening mammography in an urban population. METHODS: Data on female breast cancer cases were obtained from an extensive mammography surveillance project. Distance to mammography facilities was measured by using GIS, which was followed by measuring geographical access to mammography facilities using Floating Catchment Area (FCA) method (considering all available facilities within an arbitrary radius from the woman's residence by using Arc GIS 9.0 software). RESULTS: Of 2,024 women, 91.4% were Caucasian; age ranged from 25 to 98 years; most (95%) were non-Hispanic in origin. Logistic regression found age, family history, hormone replacement therapy, physician recommendation, and breast cancer stage at diagnosis to be significant predictors of having had a previous mammogram. Women having higher access to mammography facilities were less likely to have had a previous mammogram compared to women who had low access, considering all the facilities within 10 miles (OR=0.41, CI=0.22-0.76), 30 miles (OR=0.52, CI=0.29-0.91) and 40 miles (OR=0.51, CI=0.28-0.92) radiuses. CONCLUSIONS: Physical distance to mammography facilities does not necessarily predict utilization of mammogram and greater access does not assure greater utilizations, due to constraints imposed by socio economic and cultural barriers. Future studies should focus on measuring access to mammography facilities capturing a broader dimension of access considering qualitative aspect of facilities, as well as other travel impedances.

  10. Spatial accessibility to specific sport facilities and corresponding sport practice: the RECORD Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical activity is considered as a major component of a healthy lifestyle. However, few studies have examined the relationships between the spatial accessibility to sport facilities and sport practice with a sufficient degree of specificity. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between the spatial accessibility to specific types of sports facilities and the practice of the corresponding sports after carefully controlling for various individual socio-demographic characteristics and neighborhood socioeconomic variables. Methods Data from the RECORD Study involving 7290 participants recruited in 2007–2008, aged 30–79 years, and residing in the Paris metropolitan area were analyzed. Four categories of sports were studied: team sports, racket sports, swimming and related activities, and fitness. Spatial accessibility to sport facilities was measured with two complementary approaches that both take into account the street network (distance to the nearest facility and count of facilities around the dwelling). Associations between the spatial accessibility to sport facilities and the practice of the corresponding sports were assessed using multilevel logistic regression after adjusting for individual and contextual characteristics. Results High individual education and high household income were associated with the practice of racket sports, swimming or related activities, and fitness over the previous 7 days. The spatial accessibility to swimming pools was associated with swimming and related sports, even after adjustment for individual/contextual factors. The spatial accessibility to facilities was not related to the practice of other sports. High neighborhood income was associated with the practice of a racket sport and fitness. Conclusions Accessibility is a multi-dimensional concept that integrates educational, financial, and geographical aspects. Our work supports the evidence that strategies to increase participation in sport

  11. 25 CFR 170.810 - To what standards must an IRR transportation facility be maintained?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false To what standards must an IRR transportation facility be... WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.810 To what standards must an IRR transportation facility be maintained? IRR transportation facilities must be maintained, subject to...

  12. 25 CFR 170.806 - What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance... AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.806 What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? An IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance...

  13. 25 CFR 170.810 - To what standards must an IRR transportation facility be maintained?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false To what standards must an IRR transportation facility be... WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.810 To what standards must an IRR transportation facility be maintained? IRR transportation facilities must be maintained, subject to...

  14. 25 CFR 170.806 - What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance... AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.806 What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? An IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance...

  15. 25 CFR 170.806 - What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? An IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.806 Section 170.806 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  16. 25 CFR 170.806 - What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? An IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.806 Section 170.806 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  17. Is Accessibility to Dental Care Facilities in Rural Areas Associated with Number of Teeth in Elderly Residents?

    PubMed Central

    Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Takeda, Miwako; Tominaga, Kazumichi; Sundquist, Kristina; Nabika, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Given that public transportation networks are less developed in rural than in urban areas, a lack of accessibility to dental care facilities could be a barrier to routine dental checkups. Thus, we hypothesized that the distance to the dental care facilities is a risk factor for tooth loss. The aim of this study was to test whether there is an association between the distance to dental care facilities, estimated by geographic information systems, and number of teeth, assessed by an oral examination, among elderly residents of a rural area in Japan. Data were collected in 2016 from a cross-sectional study conducted in Shimane prefecture, Japan. After excluding participants with missing data (n = 21), we analyzed data from 710 participants. Of them, 40.6% were male and the mean (standard deviation) age was 67.4 (7.4) years. Further, 68.0% (n = 483) had at least 20 teeth. We found that the distance to dental care facilities was significantly associated with the number of teeth (less than 20) (odds ratio = 1.07, 95% confidence interval = 1.01–1.12) after adjustment for potential confounders. This result suggested that individuals without easy access to dental care facilities may be important targets for dental care. PMID:28335583

  18. Charter Schools: Limited Access to Facility Financing. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaul, Marnie S.

    This report determines the degree to which charter schools have access to traditional public school facility financing, and whether alternative sources of facility financing are available to charter schools. Further discussed are potential options generally available to the federal government if it were to assume a larger role in charter school…

  19. 10 CFR 1016.8 - Approval for processing access permittees for security facility approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 1016.8 Approval for processing access permittees for security facility... Restricted Data at any location in connection with its permit shall promptly request a DOE security facility... proposed security procedures and controls for the protection of Restricted Data, including a floor plan...

  20. Mitigation of chemical attacks in enclosed public transportation facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swansiger, William A.; Brockmann, John E.

    1998-12-01

    Public transportation facilities in the United States are vulnerable to attack by terrorists using chemical agents. This paper focuses on the problem of protecting the people in underground subway stations, which are among the most difficult facilities to protect. A nerve agent can produce symptoms in seconds to minutes, so immediate triggering of evacuation alarms and initiation of mitigation measures is necessary to minimize casualties in the station. The question of whether currently available chemical detectors are sufficiently capable and reliable to enable an automated response is addressed and augmentation possibilities are discussed. A number of concepts for mitigating chemical attacks are explored and their applicability to other transportation facilities is discussed. A possible near-term mitigation measure that is reviewed in some detail is the use of water sprays to scrub gasses and aerosols from the air. This technique may have applicability in the station at the point of agent release, as well as for detoxification of the air stream if selective venting is employed. Calculations show that with proper spray nozzle selection, the water pressure and flow rate available at some subway stations for fire suppression is sufficient for effective removal of Sarin from an air stream.

  1. Self-Access English Learning Facility: A Report of Student Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gromik, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a case study research conducted at a Self-Access Learning Center (SALC) from 2009 to 2012. Over these four years data was collected through a survey from over 6000 participants regarding their access and use of the self facility and resources. The article reports on various on-site learning environments and the influence this…

  2. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to...

  3. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to...

  4. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to...

  5. 29 CFR 2706.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY... facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity... fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative...

  6. 29 CFR 2706.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY... facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity... fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative...

  7. Building collaboration tools and access to on-line facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.; Sachs, S.

    1996-11-01

    Network-based facilities will allow researchers at different locations to collaborate on experiments as if they all were together in the same laboratory. The expected value of these geographically distributed environments includes substantially increased effectiveness in doing science, and an enabling capability for analytical and high-value production use by industry. The Distributed, Collaboratory Experiment Environments (DCEE) Program consists of four projects that were established to build prototype remote experiment and collaborative environments. The work undertaken in this project represents some of the research and development of the mechanisms and infrastructure required to make collaboratories a reality. Some of these mechanisms have already been developed. Several other mechanisms, such as data dissemination, resource management for the sharing of experiment control, safety and security, electronic notebooks, elements of telepresence, and integrated user interfaces need further research and development. The pilot application for these collaborative tools is the Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamline 7.0 at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The ALS is a particle accelerator and is a source of very high brilliance soft X-ray beams. One experimental facility is the Spectro-Microscopy Facility Beamline 7.0. Through this project, the Spectro-Microscopy Facility will be opened up to users from a wide range of organizations. The goal is to build software that will not only put the ALS Beamline 7.0 on-line, but will also serve as building blocks for future collaboratory development.

  8. 31 CFR 17.150 - Program accessibility; Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4151-4157), and any regulations implementing it. In... expeditiously as possible. (d) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be... of this part, a transition plan setting forth the steps necessary to complete such changes....

  9. 75 FR 18781 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Parts 1191, 1193, and 1194 RIN 3014-AA37 Americans With... and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of hearing. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) will hold a public hearing on its...

  10. 75 FR 43747 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ...The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) is proposing to revise and update its accessibility guidelines for buses, over-the-road buses, and vans. The guidelines ensure that transportation vehicles are readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities. The guidelines apply to the acquisition of new, used, and remanufactured transportation......

  11. 1 CFR 500.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL COMMISSION FOR EMPLOYMENT POLICY... or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to... activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In those circumstances where agency...

  12. 43 CFR 17.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... on the Basis of Handicap in Programs or Activities Conducted by the Department of the Interior § 17... activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable... the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In...

  13. 1 CFR 457.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL CAPITAL PLANNING COMMISSION § 457... activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable... can demonstrate would result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or...

  14. 12 CFR 1072.109 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... usable by individuals with disabilities where other methods are effective in achieving compliance with... individuals with disabilities receive the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods. The..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits,...

  15. 49 CFR 37.43 - Alteration of transportation facilities by public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... affects or could affect the usability of the facility or part of the facility, the entity shall make the... public entity undertakes an alteration that affects or could affect the usability of or access to an...

  16. 49 CFR 37.43 - Alteration of transportation facilities by public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... affects or could affect the usability of the facility or part of the facility, the entity shall make the... public entity undertakes an alteration that affects or could affect the usability of or access to an...

  17. 49 CFR 37.43 - Alteration of transportation facilities by public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... affects or could affect the usability of the facility or part of the facility, the entity shall make the... public entity undertakes an alteration that affects or could affect the usability of or access to an...

  18. Evolution of area access safety training required for gaining access to Space Shuttle launch and landing facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willams, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    Assuring personnel and equipment are fully protected during the Space Shuttle launch and landing operations has been a primary concern of NASA and its associated contractors since the inception of the program. A key factor in support of this policy has been the area access safety training requirements for badging of employees assigned to work on Space Shuttle Launch and Facilities. This requirement was targeted for possible cost savings and the transition of physical on-site walkdowns to the use of television tapes has realized program cost savings while continuing to fully satisfy the area access safety training requirements.

  19. Overcoming Access Barriers for Facility-based Delivery in Low-income Settings: Insights from Bangladesh and Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Syed Azizur; Ssengooba, Freddie

    2006-01-01

    Women in both Bangladesh and Uganda face a number of barriers to delivery in professional health facilities, including costs, transportation problems, and sociocultural norms to deliver at home. Some women in both the countries manage to overcome these barriers. This paper reports on a comparative qualitative study investigating how some women and their families were able to use professional delivery services. The study provides insights into the decision-making processes and overcoming access barriers. Husbands were found to be particularly important in Uganda, while, in Bangladesh, a number of individuals could influence care-seeking, including unqualified local healers or traditional birth attendants. In both the settings, cost and transport barriers were often overcome through social networks. Social prohibitions on birth in the health facility did not feature strongly in women's accounts, with several Ugandan women explaining that friends or peers also used facilities, while, in Bangladesh, perceived complications apparently justified the use of professional medical care. Investigating the ways in which some women can overcome common barriers can help inform policy and planning to increase the use of health facilities for child delivery. PMID:17591340

  20. Lunar Transportation Facilities and Operations Study, option 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    During the Option 2 period of the Lunar Transportation Facilities and Operations Study (LTFOS), a joint McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Company Kennedy Space Center (MDSSC-KSC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Kennedy Space Center (NASA-KSC) Study team conducted a comparison of the functional testing of the RL-10 and Space Shuttle Main Engine, a quick-look impact assessment of the Synthesis Group Report, and a detailed assessment of the Synthesis Group Report. The results of these KSC LTFOS team efforts are included. The most recent study task effort was a detailed assessment of the Synthesis Group Report. The assessment was conducted to determine the impact on planetary launch and landing facilities and operations. The result of that effort is a report entitled 'Analysis of the Synthesis Group Report, its Architectures and their Impacts on PSS Launch and Landing Operations' and is contained in Appendix A. The report is structured in a briefing format with facing pages as opposed to a narrative style. A quick-look assessment of the Synthesis Group Report was conducted to determine the impact of implementing the recommendations of the Synthesis Group on KSC launch facilities and operations. The data was documented in a presentation format as requested by Kennedy Space Center Technology and Advanced Projects Office and is included in Appendix B. Appendix C is a white paper on the comparison of the functional testing of the RL-10 and Space Shuttle Main Engine. The comparison was undertaken to provide insight regarding common test requirements that would be applicable to Lunar and Mars Excursion Vehicles (LEV and MEV).

  1. A field study on downwind odor transport from swine facilities.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Li, X

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents field data to illustrate the characteristics of downwind odor dispersion. A total of eight swine facilities were studied in this project and power functions were found to be an appropriate description of the pattern of downwind odor transport for both swine buildings and manure storage lagoons and tanks. The coefficients of correlation for the power regressions ranged from 0.75-0.87. It was found that swine buildings have the potential of generating more odor than manure storage facilities such as lagoons and tanks and thus could be the major odor sources causing downwind odor nuisance. Therefore, to maintain the building clean should be highly recommended as swine producers' best management practice. For earthen basins, the odor strength was reduced by 80% at about 250-meter distance from the source. While for the swine building, a 50% of reduction in odor strength was observed at the same distance. The study did not show any advantages of using lagoons over concrete (or steel) manure tanks in terms of reducing downwind odor concentrations. Land application of manure did not cause persistent downwind odor problems.

  2. Apollo 11 Occupied Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) Moved For Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named 'Eagle'', carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet recovery ship, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) which served as their home until they reached the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) Lunar Receiving Laboratory in Houston, Texas. The occupied MQF was unloaded from the U.S.S. Hornet in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. In this photo, the facility is moved from the Hornet's dock enroute to Hickam Field where it was loaded aboard an Air Force C-141 jet transport for the flight back to Ellington Air Force Base Texas, and then on to the MSC.

  3. 77 FR 56590 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ... 56590-56591] [FR Doc No: 2012-22554] ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR...) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers... Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) is holding an information meeting in Seattle, WA on October...

  4. Maryland Public Library Services for the Handicapped. A Survey for Handicapped Accessibility to Public Library Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore. Div. of Library Development and Services.

    Prepared as a part of an ongoing effort to make Maryland public libraries readily accessible to the handicapped, this directory identifies equipment, services, and facilities available to library users who are confined to wheel chairs and others who have difficulty with steps or stairs. Supplied by the administrators of Maryland's 24 public…

  5. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations §...

  6. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations §...

  7. 14 CFR 382.51 - What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities? 382.51 Section 382.51 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE..., including, but not limited to, moving sidewalks, shuttle vehicles and people movers, comply with...

  8. 14 CFR 382.51 - What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities? 382.51 Section 382.51 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE..., including, but not limited to, moving sidewalks, shuttle vehicles and people movers, comply with...

  9. 14 CFR 382.51 - What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities? 382.51 Section 382.51 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE..., including, but not limited to, moving sidewalks, shuttle vehicles and people movers, comply with...

  10. 14 CFR 382.51 - What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities? 382.51 Section 382.51 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE..., including, but not limited to, moving sidewalks, shuttle vehicles and people movers, comply with...

  11. An Enhanced Variable Two-Step Floating Catchment Area Method for Measuring Spatial Accessibility to Residential Care Facilities in Nanjing.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jianhua; Wang, Jinyin; Rui, Yikang; Qian, Tianlu; Wang, Jiechen

    2015-11-13

    Civil administration departments require reliable measures of accessibility so that residential care facility shortage areas can be accurately identified. Building on previous research, this paper proposes an enhanced variable two-step floating catchment area (EV2SFCA) method that determines facility catchment sizes by dynamically summing the population around the facility until the facility-to-population ratio (FPR) is less than the FPR threshold (FPRT). To minimize the errors from the supply and demand catchments being mismatched, this paper proposes that the facility and population catchment areas must both contain the other location in calculating accessibility. A case study evaluating spatial accessibility to residential care facilities in Nanjing demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in accurately determining catchment sizes and identifying details in the variation of spatial accessibility. The proposed method can be easily applied to assess other public healthcare facilities, and can provide guidance to government departments on issues of spatial planning and identification of shortage and excess areas.

  12. The CT Scanner Facility at Stellenbosch University: An open access X-ray computed tomography laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Plessis, Anton; le Roux, Stephan Gerhard; Guelpa, Anina

    2016-10-01

    The Stellenbosch University CT Scanner Facility is an open access laboratory providing non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and a high performance image analysis services as part of the Central Analytical Facilities (CAF) of the university. Based in Stellenbosch, South Africa, this facility offers open access to the general user community, including local researchers, companies and also remote users (both local and international, via sample shipment and data transfer). The laboratory hosts two CT instruments, i.e. a micro-CT system, as well as a nano-CT system. A workstation-based Image Analysis Centre is equipped with numerous computers with data analysis software packages, which are to the disposal of the facility users, along with expert supervision, if required. All research disciplines are accommodated at the X-ray CT laboratory, provided that non-destructive analysis will be beneficial. During its first four years, the facility has accommodated more than 400 unique users (33 in 2012; 86 in 2013; 154 in 2014; 140 in 2015; 75 in first half of 2016), with diverse industrial and research applications using X-ray CT as means. This paper summarises the existence of the laboratory's first four years by way of selected examples, both from published and unpublished projects. In the process a detailed description of the capabilities and facilities available to users is presented.

  13. 33 CFR 6.04-5 - Preventing access of persons, articles or things to vessels, or waterfront facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preventing access of persons..., AND WATERFRONT FACILITIES General Provisions § 6.04-5 Preventing access of persons, articles or things to vessels, or waterfront facilities. The Captain of the Port may prevent any person, article,...

  14. 33 CFR 6.04-5 - Preventing access of persons, articles or things to vessels, or waterfront facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Preventing access of persons..., AND WATERFRONT FACILITIES General Provisions § 6.04-5 Preventing access of persons, articles or things to vessels, or waterfront facilities. The Captain of the Port may prevent any person, article,...

  15. 33 CFR 6.04-5 - Preventing access of persons, articles or things to vessels, or waterfront facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Preventing access of persons..., AND WATERFRONT FACILITIES General Provisions § 6.04-5 Preventing access of persons, articles or things to vessels, or waterfront facilities. The Captain of the Port may prevent any person, article,...

  16. 23 CFR 810.106 - Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Highway Public Transportation... facility will remain in public ownershp as long as the facility is needed and that any change in ownership... (primary, secondary, or urban system) used for projects under this subpart may be either funds...

  17. 23 CFR 810.106 - Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Highway Public Transportation... facility will remain in public ownershp as long as the facility is needed and that any change in ownership... (primary, secondary, or urban system) used for projects under this subpart may be either funds...

  18. 23 CFR 810.106 - Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Highway Public Transportation... facility will remain in public ownershp as long as the facility is needed and that any change in ownership... (primary, secondary, or urban system) used for projects under this subpart may be either funds...

  19. 23 CFR 810.106 - Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Highway Public Transportation... facility will remain in public ownershp as long as the facility is needed and that any change in ownership... (primary, secondary, or urban system) used for projects under this subpart may be either funds...

  20. 23 CFR 810.106 - Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Highway Public Transportation... facility will remain in public ownershp as long as the facility is needed and that any change in ownership... (primary, secondary, or urban system) used for projects under this subpart may be either funds...

  1. Mass transport and electrode accessibility through periodic self-assembled nanoporous silica thin films.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ta-Chen; Hillhouse, Hugh W

    2007-05-08

    Ordered nanoporous silica films have attracted great interest for their potential use to template nanowires for photovoltaics and thermoelectrics. However, it is crucial to develop films such that an electrode under the nanoporous film is accessible to solution species via facile mass transport through well-defined pores. Here, we quantitatively measure the electrode accessibility and the effective species diffusivity for nearly all the known nanoporous silica film structures formed by evaporation-induced self-assembly upon dip-coating or spin-coating. Grazing-angle of incidence small-angle X-ray scattering was used to verify the nanoscale structure of the films and to ensure that all films were highly ordered and oriented. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was then used to assess the transport properties. A model has been developed that separates the electrode/film kinetics and the film transport properties from the film/solution interface and bulk solution effects. Accounting for this, the accessible area of the nanoporous film coated FTO electrode (1-theta) is obtained from the high-frequency data, while the effective diffusivity of the ferrocene dimethanol (D(FDM)) redox couple is obtained from intermediate frequencies. It was found that the degree of order and orientation in the film, in addition to the symmetry/topology, is a dominant factor that determines these two key parameters. The EIS data show that the (211) oriented double gyroid, (110) oriented distorted body center cubic, and (211) distorted primitive cubic silica films have significant accessibility (larger than 26% of geometric area). However, the double-gyroid films showed the highest diffusivity by over an order of magnitude. Both the (10) oriented 2D hexagonal and (111) oriented rhombohedral films were found to be highly blocking with only small accessibility due to microporosity. The impedance data were also collected to study the stability of the nanoporous silica films in aqueous

  2. Apollo 11 Quarantine Facility Prepared for Loading Onto Jet Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named 'Eagle'', carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) which served as their home until they reached the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) Lunar Receiving Laboratory in Houston, Texas. In this photo taken at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, the inhabited MQF is prepared for loading into an Air Force C-141 jet transport for the flight back to Ellington Air Force Base Texas and then on to the MSC.

  3. Beyond the Yellow Bus: Promising Practices for Maximizing Access to Opportunity through Innovations in Student Transportation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Jeffrey M.; Makarewicz, Carrie; Miller, Ruth; Ehrman, Julia; McKoy, Deborah L.

    2014-01-01

    Access to safe, affordable, and convenient transportation shapes the 'geography of opportunity' for many children and youth. This study looks at how ?localities acrossthe country are implementing new and innovative alternative approaches to student transportation that expand regionaltransportation access for K-12 students, improve…

  4. Managing commercial low-level radioactive waste beyond 1992: Transportation planning for a LLW disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    This technical bulletin presents information on the many activities and issues related to transportation of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) to allow interested States to investigate further those subjects for which proactive preparation will facilitate the development and operation of a LLW disposal facility. The activities related to transportation for a LLW disposal facility are discussed under the following headings: safety; legislation, regulations, and implementation guidance; operations-related transport (LLW and non-LLW traffic); construction traffic; economics; and public involvement.

  5. Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-12-14

    The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board or Board) is issuing a final rule that revises its existing accessibility guidelines for non-rail vehicles--namely, buses, over-the-road buses, and vans--acquired or remanufactured by entities covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act. The revised guidelines ensure that such vehicles are readily accessible to, and usable by, individuals with disabilities. The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) is required to revise its accessibility standards for transportation vehicles acquired or remanufactured by entities covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to be consistent with the final rule.

  6. RADIATION ACCESS ZONE AND VENTILATION CONFINEMENT ZONE CRITERIA FOR THE MGR SURFACE FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    D. A. Padula

    2000-09-13

    The objectives of this technical report are to: (1) Establish the criteria for Radiation Access Zone (RAZ) designation. (2) Establish the criteria for the Ventilation Confinement Zone (VCZ) designation. The scope will be to formulate the RAZ and VCZ zoning designation for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface facilities and to apply the zoning designations to the current Waste Handling Building (WHB), Waste Treatment Building (WTB), and Carrier Preparation Building (CPB) configurations.

  7. Individual Public Transportation Accessibility is Positively Associated with Self-Reported Active Commuting

    PubMed Central

    Djurhuus, Sune; Hansen, Henning Sten; Aadahl, Mette; Glümer, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Background: Active commuters have lower risk of chronic disease. Understanding which of the, to some extent, modifiable characteristics of public transportation that facilitate its use is thus important in a public health perspective. The aim of the study was to examine the association between individual public transportation accessibility and self-reported active commuting, and whether the associations varied with commute distance, age, and gender. Methods: Twenty-eight thousand nine hundred twenty-eight commuters in The Capital Region of Denmark reported self-reported time spent either walking or cycling to work or study each day and the distance to work or study. Data were obtained from the Danish National Health Survey collected in February to April 2010. Individual accessibility by public transportation was calculated using a multi-modal network in a GIS. Multilevel logistic regression was used to analyze the association between accessibility, expressed as access area, and being an active commuter. Results: Public transport accessibility area based on all stops within walking and cycling distance was positively associated with being an active commuter. Distance to work, age, and gender modified the associations. Residing within 10 km commute distance and in areas of high accessibility was associated with being an active commuter and meeting the recommendations of physical activity. For the respondents above 29 years, individual public transportation accessibility was positively associated with being an active commuter. Women having high accessibility had significantly higher odds of being an active commuter compared to having a low accessibility. For men, the associations were insignificant. Conclusion: This study extends the knowledge about the driving forces of using public transportation for commuting by examining the individual public transportation accessibility. Findings suggest that transportation accessibility supports active commuting and planning

  8. Limited electricity access in health facilities of sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of data on electricity access, sources, and reliability

    PubMed Central

    Adair-Rohani, Heather; Zukor, Karen; Bonjour, Sophie; Wilburn, Susan; Kuesel, Annette C; Hebert, Ryan; Fletcher, Elaine R

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Access to electricity is critical to health care delivery and to the overarching goal of universal health coverage. Data on electricity access in health care facilities are rarely collected and have never been reported systematically in a multi-country study. We conducted a systematic review of available national data on electricity access in health care facilities in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: We identified publicly-available data from nationally representative facility surveys through a systematic review of articles in PubMed, as well as through websites of development agencies, ministries of health, and national statistics bureaus. To be included in our analysis, data sets had to be collected in or after 2000, be nationally representative of a sub-Saharan African country, cover both public and private health facilities, and include a clear definition of electricity access. Results: We identified 13 health facility surveys from 11 sub-Saharan African countries that met our inclusion criteria. On average, 26% of health facilities in the surveyed countries reported no access to electricity. Only 28% of health care facilities, on average, had reliable electricity among the 8 countries reporting data. Among 9 countries, an average of 7% of facilities relied solely on a generator. Electricity access in health care facilities increased by 1.5% annually in Kenya between 2004 and 2010, and by 4% annually in Rwanda between 2001 and 2007. Conclusions: Energy access for health care facilities in sub-Saharan African countries varies considerably. An urgent need exists to improve the geographic coverage, quality, and frequency of data collection on energy access in health care facilities. Standardized tools should be used to collect data on all sources of power and supply reliability. The United Nations Secretary-General's “Sustainable Energy for All” initiative provides an opportunity to comprehensively monitor energy access in health care

  9. Design of a limited-access facility and safety program for a genetic toxicology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Inmon, J; Vaughan, T; Morris, J

    1985-06-01

    A limited-access facility has been designed as a result of the need for laboratories for testing hazardous materials found in the environment. The facility design features include room air flow and filtration, hood types, sink design and placement, design of countertops, type of flooring and wall sealant, and traffic flow within the laboratories. These laboratories required the diversity to handle weighing of stock hazardous materials, preparation and handling of aliquots, maintenance of dosed animals as well as sterile conditions required for tissue culture and continuous cell culture methods. A safety and health program was also developed which included specific dress (e.g., scrub suit, TYVEK jumpsuit, gloves, safety glasses and safety shoes), safety advisory group, safety response group, medical monitoring program and training of current and new staff members. The design and use of the facility are continuously reevaluated and changes are made as necessitated by either research needs or improved safety methods.

  10. Incremental Risks of Transporting NARM to the LLW Disposal Facility at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, R.F.

    1999-02-23

    This study models the incremental radiological risk of transporting NARM to the Hanford commercial LLW facility, both for incident-free transportation and for possible transportation accidents, compared with the radiological risk of transporting LLW to that facility. Transportation routes are modeled using HIGHWAY 3.1 and risks are modeled using RADTRAN 4. Both annual population doses and risks, and annual average individual doses and risks are reported. Three routes to the Hanford site were modeled from Albany, OR, from Coeur d'Alene, ID (called the Spokane route), and from Seattle, WA. Conservative estimates are used in the RADTRAN inputs, and RADTRAN itself is conservative.

  11. 25 CFR 170.443 - How can a tribe list a proposed transportation facility in the IRR Inventory?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... in the IRR Inventory? 170.443 Section 170.443 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Reservation Roads Program Facilities Irr Inventory § 170.443 How can a tribe list a proposed transportation facility in the IRR Inventory? A proposed IRR transportation facility is any transportation...

  12. 25 CFR 170.443 - How can a tribe list a proposed transportation facility in the IRR Inventory?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... in the IRR Inventory? 170.443 Section 170.443 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Reservation Roads Program Facilities Irr Inventory § 170.443 How can a tribe list a proposed transportation facility in the IRR Inventory? A proposed IRR transportation facility is any transportation...

  13. 25 CFR 170.808 - Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve IRR transportation facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... IRR transportation facilities? 170.808 Section 170.808 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF... Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve IRR transportation facilities? No. BIA Road Maintenance Program funds cannot be used to improve roads or other IRR transportation facilities to a...

  14. 25 CFR 170.808 - Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve IRR transportation facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... IRR transportation facilities? 170.808 Section 170.808 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF... Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve IRR transportation facilities? No. BIA Road Maintenance Program funds cannot be used to improve roads or other IRR transportation facilities to a...

  15. Lunar Transportation Facilities and Operations Study, option 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Throughout the Option I period of the Lunar Transportation Facilities and Operations Study (LTFOS), McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Company - Kennedy Space Center (MDSSC-KSC) provided support to both the Planetary Surface Systems (PSS) Office at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at the Johnson Space Center and to the Flight and Ground Systems Projects Office (Payload Projects Management) at the Kennedy Space Center. The primary objective of the Option I phase of the study was to assist the above NASA centers in developing Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) concepts. MDSSC-KSC conducted three analyses which provided launch and landing detail to the proposed exploration concepts. One analysis, the Lunar Ejecta Assessment, was conducted to determine the effects of launch and landing a vehicle in a dusty environment. A second analysis, the Thermal/Micrometeoroid Protection Trade Study, was refined to determine the impacts that Reference Architecture Option 5A would have on thermal/micrometeoroid protection approaches. The third analysis, the Centaur Prelaunch Procedure Analysis, used a Centaur prelaunch test and checkout flow to identify key considerations that would be important if a Lunar Excursion Vehicle (LEV) was to use an expander cycle liquid oxygen-liquid hydrogen engine. Several 'quick look' assessments were also conducted. One quick look assessment, the Storable Propellant Quick Look Assessment, was conducted to identify design considerations that should be made if storable propellants were to be used instead of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. The LEV Servicer Maintenance Analysis provided an early look at the effort required to maintain an LEV Servicer on the lunar surface. Also, support was provided to the PSS Logistics Manager to develop initial LEV Servicer cost inputs. Consideration was given to the advanced development that must be provided to accomplish a lunar and/or Mars mission. MDSS-KSC also provided support to both MASE

  16. 76 FR 75844 - Accessibility Guidelines for Pedestrian Facilities in the Public Right-of-Way; Reopening of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1190 RIN 3014-AA26 Accessibility Guidelines for Pedestrian... Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking; reopening of comment period. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) is reopening until February 2,...

  17. Review of the facile (F/sub N/) method in particle transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, R.D.M.

    1985-10-01

    The facile (F/sub N/) method for solving particle transport problems is reviewed. The fundamentals of the method are summarized, recent developments are discussed and several applications of the method are described in detail.

  18. Alternating access mechanisms of LeuT-fold transporters: trailblazing towards the promised energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Kazmier, Kelli; Claxton, Derek P; Mchaourab, Hassane S

    2016-12-29

    Secondary active transporters couple the uphill translocation of substrates to electrochemical ion gradients. Transporter conformational motion, generically referred to as alternating access, enables a central ligand binding site to change its orientation relative to the membrane. Here we review themes of alternating access and the transduction of ion gradient energy to power this process in the LeuT-fold class of transporters where crystallographic, computational and spectroscopic approaches have converged to yield detailed models of transport cycles. Specifically, we compare findings for the Na(+)-coupled amino acid transporter LeuT and the Na(+)-coupled hydantoin transporter Mhp1. Although these studies have illuminated multiple aspects of transporter structures and dynamics, a number of questions remain unresolved that so far hinder understanding transport mechanisms in an energy landscape perspective.

  19. 76 FR 43356 - Evaluations of Explosions Postulated To Occur at Nearby Facilities and on Transportation Routes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... COMMISSION Evaluations of Explosions Postulated To Occur at Nearby Facilities and on Transportation Routes... for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1270, ``Evaluations of Explosions Postulated to... assumptions the NRC's staff finds acceptable for evaluating postulated explosions at nearby facilities...

  20. 41 CFR 109-40.112 - Transportation factors in the location of Government facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in the location of Government facilities. 109-40.112 Section 109-40.112 Public Contracts and Property... 40.1-General Provision § 109-40.112 Transportation factors in the location of Government facilities... prior to the selection of new site locations and during the planning and construction phases in...

  1. Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    An expansion of medical data collection facilities was necessary to implement the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP). The primary objective of the EDOMP was to ensure the capability of crew members to reenter the Earth's atmosphere, land, and egress safely following a 16-day flight. Therefore, access to crew members as soon as possible after landing was crucial for most data collection activities. Also, with the advent of EDOMP, the quantity of investigations increased such that the landing day maximum data collection time increased accordingly from two hours to four hours. The preflight and postflight testing facilities at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) required only some additional testing equipment and minor modifications to the existing laboratories in order to fulfill EDOMP requirements. Necessary modifications at the landing sites were much more extensive.

  2. 9 CFR 320.4 - Access to and inspection of records, facilities and inventory; copying and sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to and inspection of records, facilities and inventory; copying and sampling. 320.4 Section 320.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY...) of this chapter) also must be afforded any necessary facilities (other than reproduction...

  3. 9 CFR 381.178 - Access to and inspection of records, facilities and inventory; copying and sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to and inspection of records, facilities and inventory; copying and sampling. 381.178 Section 381.178 Animals and Animal Products FOOD... necessary facilities (other than reproduction equipment) for the examination and copying of records and...

  4. Estimating spatial accessibility to facilities on the regional scale: an extended commuting-based interaction potential model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in the study of the relationships between individual health-related behaviours (e.g. food intake and physical activity) and measurements of spatial accessibility to the associated facilities (e.g. food outlets and sport facilities). The aim of this study is to propose measurements of spatial accessibility to facilities on the regional scale, using aggregated data. We first used a potential accessibility model that partly makes it possible to overcome the limitations of the most frequently used indices such as the count of opportunities within a given neighbourhood. We then propose an extended model in order to take into account both home and work-based accessibility for a commuting population. Results Potential accessibility estimation provides a very different picture of the accessibility levels experienced by the population than the more classical "number of opportunities per census tract" index. The extended model for commuters increases the overall accessibility levels but this increase differs according to the urbanisation level. Strongest increases are observed in some rural municipalities with initial low accessibility levels. Distance to major urban poles seems to play an essential role. Conclusions Accessibility is a multi-dimensional concept that should integrate some aspects of travel behaviour. Our work supports the evidence that the choice of appropriate accessibility indices including both residential and non-residential environmental features is necessary. Such models have potential implications for providing relevant information to policy-makers in the field of public health. PMID:21219597

  5. Distance, transportation cost, and mode of transport in the utilization of facility-based maternity services: evidence from rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Keya, Kaji Tamanna; Rob, Ubaidur; Rahman, Moshiur; Bajracharya, Ashish; Bellows, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Although the maternal mortality ratio in Bangladesh has decreased, significant underutilization of facilities continues to be a persistent challenge to policy makers. Women face long distances and significant transportation cost to deliver at health facilities. This study identifies the distance traveled to utilize facilities, associated transportation cost, and transport mode used for maternal healthcare services. A total of 3,300 mothers aged 18-49 years, who had given birth in the year before the survey, were interviewed from 22 sub-districts in 2010. Findings suggest that facility-based maternal healthcare service utilization was very poor. Only 53% of women received antenatal care, 20% used delivery care. and 10% used postnatal care from health centers. Median distance traveled for antenatal and postnatal check-ups was 2 kilometers but 4 kilometers for complication management care and delivery. Most women used non-motorized rickshaw or van to reach a health facility. On average, women spent Taka 100 (US$1.40) as transportation cost for antenatal care, Taka 432 (US$6.17) for delivery, and Taka 132 (US$1.89) for postnatal check-up. For each additional kilometer, the cost increased by Taka 9 (US$0.13) for antenatal, Taka 31 (US$0.44) for delivery, and Taka 8 (US$0.11) for postnatal care.

  6. 36 CFR 1250.8 - Does NARA provide access to all the executive branch records housed at NARA facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does NARA provide access to... AVAILABILITY AND USE OF FEDERAL RECORDS General Information About Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Requests § 1250.8 Does NARA provide access to all the executive branch records housed at NARA facilities? (a)...

  7. The Association between Access to Public Transportation and Self-Reported Active Commuting

    PubMed Central

    Djurhuus, Sune; Hansen, Henning S.; Aadahl, Mette; Glümer, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Active commuting provides routine-based regular physical activity which can reduce the risk of chronic diseases. Using public transportation involves some walking or cycling to a transit stop, transfers and a walk to the end location and users of public transportation have been found to accumulate more moderate physical activity than non-users. Understanding how public transportation characteristics are associated with active transportation is thus important from a public health perspective. This study examines the associations between objective measures of access to public transportation and self-reported active commuting. Self-reported time spent either walking or cycling commuting each day and the distance to workplace were obtained for adults aged 16 to 65 in the Danish National Health Survey 2010 (n = 28,928). Access to public transportation measures were computed by combining GIS-based road network distances from home address to public transit stops an integrating their service level. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the association between access to public transportation measures and active commuting. Distance to bus stop, density of bus stops, and number of transport modes were all positively associated with being an active commuter and with meeting recommendations of physical activity. No significant association was found between bus services at the nearest stop and active commuting. The results highlight the importance of including detailed measurements of access to public transit in order to identify the characteristics that facilitate the use of public transportation and active commuting. PMID:25489998

  8. The association between access to public transportation and self-reported active commuting.

    PubMed

    Djurhuus, Sune; Hansen, Henning S; Aadahl, Mette; Glümer, Charlotte

    2014-12-05

    Active commuting provides routine-based regular physical activity which can reduce the risk of chronic diseases. Using public transportation involves some walking or cycling to a transit stop, transfers and a walk to the end location and users of public transportation have been found to accumulate more moderate physical activity than non-users. Understanding how public transportation characteristics are associated with active transportation is thus important from a public health perspective. This study examines the associations between objective measures of access to public transportation and self-reported active commuting. Self-reported time spent either walking or cycling commuting each day and the distance to workplace were obtained for adults aged 16 to 65 in the Danish National Health Survey 2010 (n = 28,928). Access to public transportation measures were computed by combining GIS-based road network distances from home address to public transit stops an integrating their service level. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the association between access to public transportation measures and active commuting. Distance to bus stop, density of bus stops, and number of transport modes were all positively associated with being an active commuter and with meeting recommendations of physical activity. No significant association was found between bus services at the nearest stop and active commuting. The results highlight the importance of including detailed measurements of access to public transit in order to identify the characteristics that facilitate the use of public transportation and active commuting.

  9. Selected List of Low Energy Beam Transport Facilities for Light-Ion, High-Intensity Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L. R.

    2016-02-17

    This paper presents a list of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) facilities for light-ion, high-intensity accelerators. It was put together to facilitate comparisons with the PXIE LEBT design choices. A short discussion regarding the importance of the beam perveance in the choice of the transport scheme follows.

  10. Transportation Accessibility and Quality of Life for the Urban Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belnap, Judith A.

    The barriers to physical mobility of the elderly are explained in this study which concentrated on spatial-temporal accessibility, and the use of mass transit to urban services and resources. The first area of concern dealt with the amount and extent of free time available to the elderly who are perceived as having large blocks of descretionary…

  11. Multi terabits/s optical access transport technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binh, Le Nguyen; Wang Tao, Thomas; Livshits, Daniil; Gubenko, Alexey; Karinou, Fotini; Liu Ning, Gordon; Shkolnik, Alexey

    2016-02-01

    Tremendous efforts have been developed for multi-Tbps over ultra-long distance and metro and access optical networks. With the exponential increase demand on data transmission, storage and serving, especially the 5G wireless access scenarios, the optical Internet networking has evolved to data-center based optical networks pressuring on novel and economical access transmission systems. This paper reports (1) Experimental platforms and transmission techniques employing band-limited optical components operating at 10G for 100G based at 28G baud. Advanced modulation formats such as PAM-4, DMT, duo-binary etc are reported and their advantages and disadvantages are analyzed so as to achieve multi-Tbps optical transmission systems for access inter- and intra- data-centered-based networks; (2) Integrated multi-Tbps combining comb laser sources and micro-ring modulators meeting the required performance for access systems are reported. Ten-sub-carrier quantum dot com lasers are employed in association with wideband optical intensity modulators to demonstrate the feasibility of such sources and integrated micro-ring modulators acting as a combined function of demultiplexing/multiplexing and modulation, hence compactness and economy scale. Under the use of multi-level modulation and direct detection at 56 GBd an aggregate of higher than 2Tbps and even 3Tbps can be achieved by interleaved two comb lasers of 16 sub-carrier lines; (3) Finally the fundamental designs of ultra-compacts flexible filters and switching integrated components based on Si photonics for multi Tera-bps active interconnection are presented. Experimental results on multi-channels transmissions and performances of optical switching matrices and effects on that of data channels are proposed.

  12. Reconsidering access: park facilities and neighborhood disamenities in New York City.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Christopher C; Purciel, Marnie; Bader, Michael; Quinn, James W; Lovasi, Gina; Neckerman, Kathryn M; Rundle, Andrew G

    2011-04-01

    With increasing concern about rising rates of obesity, public health researchers have begun to examine the availability of parks and other spaces for physical activity, particularly in cities, to assess whether access to parks reduces the risk of obesity. Much of the research in this field has shown that proximity to parks may support increased physical activity in urban environments; however, as yet, there has been limited consideration of environmental impediments or disamenities that might influence individuals' perceptions or usage of public recreation opportunities. Prior research suggests that neighborhood disamenities, for instance crime, pedestrian safety, and noxious land uses, might dissuade people from using parks or recreational facilities and vary by neighborhood composition. Motivated by such research, this study estimates the relationship between neighborhood compositional characteristics and measures of park facilities, controlling for variation in neighborhood disamenities, using geographic information systems (GIS) data for New York City parks and employing both kernel density estimation and distance measures. The central finding is that attention to neighborhood disamenities can appreciably alter the relationship between neighborhood composition and spatial access to parks. Policy efforts to enhance the recreational opportunities in urban areas should expand beyond a focus on availability to consider also the hazards and disincentives that may influence park usage.

  13. An Enhanced Variable Two-Step Floating Catchment Area Method for Measuring Spatial Accessibility to Residential Care Facilities in Nanjing

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jianhua; Wang, Jinyin; Rui, Yikang; Qian, Tianlu; Wang, Jiechen

    2015-01-01

    Civil administration departments require reliable measures of accessibility so that residential care facility shortage areas can be accurately identified. Building on previous research, this paper proposes an enhanced variable two-step floating catchment area (EV2SFCA) method that determines facility catchment sizes by dynamically summing the population around the facility until the facility-to-population ratio (FPR) is less than the FPR threshold (FPRT). To minimize the errors from the supply and demand catchments being mismatched, this paper proposes that the facility and population catchment areas must both contain the other location in calculating accessibility. A case study evaluating spatial accessibility to residential care facilities in Nanjing demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in accurately determining catchment sizes and identifying details in the variation of spatial accessibility. The proposed method can be easily applied to assess other public healthcare facilities, and can provide guidance to government departments on issues of spatial planning and identification of shortage and excess areas. PMID:26580637

  14. 33 CFR 154.1325 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. 154.1325...) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Other Non-Petroleum..., store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that...

  15. 33 CFR 154.1325 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. 154.1325...) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Other Non-Petroleum..., store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that...

  16. 33 CFR 154.1325 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. 154.1325...) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Other Non-Petroleum..., store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that...

  17. 33 CFR 154.1325 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. 154.1325...) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Other Non-Petroleum..., store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that...

  18. 33 CFR 154.1325 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. 154.1325...) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Other Non-Petroleum..., store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that...

  19. Gender and Transportation Access among Community-Dwelling Seniors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupuis, Josette; Weiss, Deborah R.; Wolfson, Christina

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study estimates the prevalence of problems with transportation in a sample of community-dwelling seniors residing in an urban setting and investigates the role that gender plays in the ability of seniors to remain mobile in their communities. Design and Methods: Data collected as part of a study assessing the prevalence and…

  20. A Unique, Optically Accessible Flame Tube Facility for Lean Combustor Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Yolanda R.; Locke, Randy J.; Wey, Chowen C.; Bianco, Jean

    1995-01-01

    A facility that allows interrogation of combusting flows by advanced diagnostic methods and instrumentation has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. An optically accessible flame tube combustor is described which has high temperature, pressure, and air flow capabilities. The windows in the combustor measure 3.8 cm axially by 5.1 cm radially, providing 67% optical access to the 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm cross section flow chamber. Advanced gas analysis instrumentation is available through a gas chromatography/mass spectrometer system (GC/MS), which has on-line capability for heavy hydrocarbon measurement with resolution to the parts per billion level. The instrumentation allows one to study combusting flows and combustor subcomponents, such as fuel injectors and air swirlers. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) can measure unstable combustion species, which cannot be obtained with traditional gas sampling. This type of data is especially useful to combustion modellers. The optical access allows measurements to have high spatial and temporal resolution. GC/MS data and PLIF images of OH- are presented from experiments using a lean direct injection (LDI) combustor burning Jet-A fuel at inlet temperatures ranging from 810 K to 866 K, combustor pressures up to 1380 kPa, and equivalence ratios from 0.41 to 0.59.

  1. Role of public transport in accessibility to emergency dental care in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Carla M; Kruger, Estie; McGuire, Shane; Tennant, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method for the analysis of the influence of public transport supply in a large city (Melbourne) on the access to emergency dental treatment. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) tools were used to associate the geographical distribution of patients (and their socioeconomic status) with accessibility (through public transport supply, i.e. bus, tram and/or train) to emergency dental care. The methodology used allowed analysis of the socioeconomic status of patient residential areas and both spatial location and supply frequency of public transport by using existing data from patient records, census and transport departments. In metropolitan Melbourne, a total of 13 784 patients met the inclusion criteria for the study sample, of which 95% (n = 13 077) were living within a 50 km radius of the Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne. Low socioeconomic areas had a higher demand for dental emergency care in the Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne. Public transport supply was similar across the various socioeconomic strata in the population, with 80% of patients having good access to public transport. However, when considering only high-frequency bus stops, the percentage of patients living within 400 m from a bus stop dropped to 65%. Despite this, the number of patients (adjusted to the population) coming from areas not supplied by public transport, and from areas with good or poor public transport supply, was similar. The methodology applied in the present study highlights the importance of evaluating not only the spatial distribution but also the frequency of public transport supply when studying access to services. This methodology can be extrapolated to other settings to identity transport/access patterns for a variety of services.

  2. Site and facility waste transport planning documents (SPDs) status and findings

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, S P; Danese, F L; Wankerl, M W

    1993-05-01

    Site and Facility Waste Transportation Services Planning Documents (SPDS) are detailed desk-top reference documents that initiate planning for shipping commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the sites where it is currently generated and/or stored to another location. Because of the unique design features and individual variations in the spent fuel handling and cask loading operation requirements for each facility, one SPD will be written for each of the commercial facilities currently expected to deliver SNF into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) disposal system. One primary purpose of an SPD is to initiate the discussions that will lead to a determination of the type of spent fuel cask and transport mode that will be used to transport spent fuel from each facility. The initial assessment of which cask type and mode would best serve each facility is based on the principle that the largest possible capacity casks should be used at the greatest number of facilities to reduce the total number of spent fuel shipments. The final selection of cask and transportation mode will be arrived at following discussion with the facility licensed operator. Once agreed upon by OCRWM and the facility owner, the SPD wig be used as a primary input to the development of a Site Specific Servicing Plan (SSSP) that will detail chosen servicing options for the individual site. This paper will discuss the purpose and development of SPDs and the preliminary results of an evaluation of the ability of delivering facilities to handle and ship spent fuel casks within the confines of the local nation infrastructure.

  3. 33 CFR 154.1045 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport Group I through Group IV petroleum oils... transport Group I through Group IV petroleum oils. (a) The owner or operator of a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group I through Group IV petroleum oils shall use the criteria in this section...

  4. 33 CFR 154.1045 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport Group I through Group IV petroleum oils... transport Group I through Group IV petroleum oils. (a) The owner or operator of a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group I through Group IV petroleum oils shall use the criteria in this section...

  5. 33 CFR 154.1045 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport Group I through Group IV petroleum oils... transport Group I through Group IV petroleum oils. (a) The owner or operator of a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group I through Group IV petroleum oils shall use the criteria in this section...

  6. 33 CFR 154.1045 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport Group I through Group IV petroleum oils... transport Group I through Group IV petroleum oils. (a) The owner or operator of a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group I through Group IV petroleum oils shall use the criteria in this section...

  7. Assessing Sediment Transport at Navy Facilities (User’s Guide)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    investigations move into the Feasibility Study phase, a lack of accurate and defensible information regarding sediment transport and sediment deposition...environmentally sound remediation scenarios for the sites. A case study report for each of these demonstration sites is provided in the appendices...questions and study objectives. Tier 1 data needs and data analysis methods are also presented. In discussing Tier 2 Evaluation, this guide

  8. 49 CFR 37.59 - Differences in accessibility completion dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Differences in accessibility completion dates. 37.59 Section 37.59 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.59 Differences in accessibility...

  9. 49 CFR 37.59 - Differences in accessibility completion dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Differences in accessibility completion dates. 37.59 Section 37.59 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.59 Differences in accessibility...

  10. 49 CFR 37.59 - Differences in accessibility completion dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Differences in accessibility completion dates. 37.59 Section 37.59 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.59 Differences in accessibility...

  11. 49 CFR 37.59 - Differences in accessibility completion dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Differences in accessibility completion dates. 37.59 Section 37.59 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.59 Differences in accessibility...

  12. 49 CFR 37.59 - Differences in accessibility completion dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Differences in accessibility completion dates. 37.59 Section 37.59 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.59 Differences in accessibility...

  13. Technology benefits and ground test facilities for high-speed civil transport development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winston, Matthew M.; Shields, Elwood M.; Morris, Shelby J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The advanced technology base necessary for successful twenty-first century High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft will require extensive ground testing in aerodynamics, propulsion, acoustics, structures, materials, and other disciplines. This paper analyzes the benefits of advanced technology application to HSCT concepts, addresses the adequacy of existing groundbased test facilities, and explores the need for new facilities required to support HSCT development. A substantial amount of HSCT-related ground testing can be accomplished in existing facilities. The HSCT development effort could also benefit significantly from some new facilities initially conceived for testing in other aeronautical research areas. A new structures testing facility is identified as critically needed to insure timely technology maturation.

  14. Beyond the Yellow Bus: Promising Practices for Maximizing Access to Opportunity through Innovations in Student Transportation. Policy Brief 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Cities & Schools, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Access to safe, affordable, and convenient transportation shapes the "geography of opportunity" for many children and youth. This study looks at how ?localities across the country are implementing new and innovative alternative approaches to student transportation that expand regional transportation access for K-12 students, improve…

  15. Costs and benefits of employment transportation for low-wage workers: an assessment of job access public transportation services.

    PubMed

    Thakuriah Vonu, Piyushimita; Persky, Joseph; Soot, Siim; Sriraj, P S

    2013-04-01

    This paper focuses on an evaluation of public transportation-based employment transportation (ET) services to transport low-wage workers to jobs in the US. We make an attempt to capture a more comprehensive range of intended and unintended outcomes of ET services than those traditionally considered in the case of public transportation services. Using primary data from 23 locations across the country, we present a framework to evaluate how transportation improvements, in interaction with labor markets, can affect users' short-run economic welfare, users' long-run human capital accumulation and non-users' short-run economic welfare. These services were partially funded by a specialized program - the Job Access and Reverse Commute (JARC) program - which was consolidated into larger transit funding programs by recent legislation. In the sites examined, we found that low wage users benefited from self-reported increased access to jobs, improvements in earnings potential, as well as from savings in transport cost and time. Simulations show the potential of users to accrue long-term worklife benefits. At the same time, users may have accrued changes in leisure time as a result of transitioning from unemployment to employment, and generated a range of societal impacts on three classes of non-users: the general tax-paying public, the general commuting public in the service operating area and other low-wage workers in local labor markets.

  16. Reproductive rights denied: the Hyde Amendment and access to abortion for Native American women using Indian health service facilities.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Shaye Beverly

    2014-10-01

    Restrictions on the use of federal funds to provide abortions have limited the access to abortion services for Native American women receiving care at Indian Health Service facilities. Current data suggest that the vast majority of Indian Health Service facilities are unequipped to provide abortions under any circumstances. Native American women experience disproportionately high rates of sexual assault and unintended pregnancy. Hyde Amendment restrictions systematically infringe on the reproductive rights of Native American women and present a pressing public health policy concern.

  17. The alternating access mechanism of transport as observed in the sodium-hydantoin transporter Mhp1

    PubMed Central

    Weyand, Simone; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Beckstein, Oliver; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Iwata, So; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Cameron, Alexander D.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary active transporters move molecules across cell membranes by coupling this process to the energetically favourable downhill movement of ions or protons along an electrochemical gradient. They function by the alternating access model of transport in which, through conformational changes, the substrate binding site alternately faces either side of the membrane. Owing to the difficulties in obtaining the crystal structure of a single transporter in different conformational states, relatively little structural information is known to explain how this process occurs. Here, the structure of the sodium-benzylhydantoin transporter, Mhp1, from Microbacterium liquefaciens, has been determined in three conformational states; from this a mechanism is proposed for switching from the outward-facing open conformation through an occluded structure to the inward-facing open state. PMID:21169684

  18. Challenges and Successes in the Application of Universal Access Principles in the Development of Bus Rapid Transport Sytems in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    The National Department of Transport started a programme to upgrade public transport systems throughout South Africa in 2008, which included the upgrading of transport systems for host cities of the 2010 World Cup. This was the first time there was a clear commitment to produce universally accessible public transport systems in South Africa. The requirement to achieve universal access was reinforced by National Treasuries stipulation, that universal access was a precondition for the approval of all funding for these projects. In the absence of any specific legislation in the transport sector to address universal access and the South African National Building Regulations and the associated deemed to satisfy code, South African National Standard (SANS) 10400 Part S: "Facilities for Persons with Disabilities", providing the only associated standards, there has been a need to revisit traffic engineering codes. This has created an opportunity to look at the functionality and safety of commuters, especially those who have functional limitations, at traffic intersections and midblock pedestrian crossings, especially as the commuters have to access predominately median located Bus Rapid Transport (BRT) trunk stations. Included in the specific areas of focus that impact on the issues of pedestrian safety, has been the application and functionality of tactile wayfinding and warning surfaces and other support systems for commuters with functional sight limitations and the integration of the systems with other infrastructure and the safety of all commuter. In addition to the issues of functionality, this paper will address the influence of misdirected foreign expertise that set the initial BRT Systems on a high floor vehicle modality, which has created operational challenges that have seriously compromised functional universal access. This presentation will highlight these challenges, opportunities and solutions, the procedural complexities, as well as the inherent resistance

  19. Ultraviolet Light Generation and Transport in the Final Optics Assembly of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, P.; Hackel, L.; Feit, M.; Parham, T.; Kozlowski, M.; Whitman, P.

    2015-02-12

    The design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) includes a Final Optics Assembly (FOA) subsystem for ultraviolet (UV) light generation and transport for each of the 192 beamlines. Analytical and experimental work has been done to help understand and predict the performance of FOA.

  20. Alternating Access in Maltose Transporter Mediated by Rigid-Body Rotations

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, Dheeraj; Oldham, Michael L.; Orelle, Cedric; Davidson, Amy L.; Chen, Jue; Purdue

    2010-07-27

    ATP-binding cassette transporters couple ATP hydrolysis to substrate translocation through an alternating access mechanism, but the nature of the conformational changes in a transport cycle remains elusive. Previously we reported the structure of the maltose transporter MalFGK{sub 2} in an outward-facing conformation in which the transmembrane (TM) helices outline a substrate-binding pocket open toward the periplasmic surface and ATP is poised for hydrolysis along the closed nucleotide-binding dimer interface. Here we report the structure of the nucleotide-free maltose transporter in which the substrate binding pocket is only accessible from the cytoplasm and the nucleotide-binding interface is open. Comparison of the same transporter crystallized in two different conformations reveals that alternating access involves rigid-body rotations of the TM subdomains that are coupled to the closure and opening of the nucleotide-binding domain interface. The comparison also reveals that point mutations enabling binding protein-independent transport line dynamic interfaces in the TM region.

  1. A public aid clinic prototype: utilizing a dental hygiene educational facility to increase access to care.

    PubMed

    Maurizio, Sandra J; DeMattei, Ronda; Meyer, Jennifer; Cotner, Danna

    2003-01-01

    Few dentists in a rural Midwestern community participate in providing oral health care to public aid recipients. In response, faculty at a baccalaureate degree dental hygiene program located at Southern illinois University, Carbondale (SIUC) proposed, developed, and implemented the Heartland Dental Clinic to serve Medicaid participants. The unique program utilizes existing facilities, staff, and students to provide comprehensive oral health care to underserved populations. The state awarded a small grant to cover start-up costs. Two dental units were upgraded with fiber optics to allow restorative procedures. Dental hygiene students provide intake examinations and preventive care, while a staff dentist provides restorative care, dentures, and examinations. Dental technology students and faculty fabricate prostheses. A part-time clinic manager facilitates communication, patient scheduling, and billing. Two local Rotary Club members volunteer as receptionists for the clinic on the one evening per week that the clinic operates. The Rotary Club purchased educational pamphlets, a television/VCR, videotapes, and two signs for the clinic. By locating the clinic in the existing SIUC facility and utilizing dental hygiene students, a staff dentist, volunteer receptionists and dentists, student workers, and health care management interns, the clinic overhead costs have been kept to a minimum. The clinic provides a unique opportunity for dental hygiene students to experience firsthand scheduling, billing, and treating public aid patients while providing patients with an additional source for oral health care. The Heartland Dental Clinic model represents a cost effective method for increasing oral health access to underserved populations while also benefiting students in an educational program.

  2. Investigating disparities in spatial accessibility to and characteristics of sport facilities: direction, strength, and spatial scale of associations with area income.

    PubMed

    Billaudeau, Nathalie; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Simon, Chantal; Charreire, Hélène; Casey, Romain; Salze, Paul; Badariotti, Dominique; Banos, Arnaud; Weber, Christiane; Chaix, Basile

    2011-01-01

    We conducted an environmental justice study of the spatial distribution of sport facilities, a major resource for physical activity, in the Paris Region in France. Comprehensive data of the French Census of Sport Facilities allowed us to investigate disparities not only in the spatial accessibility to facilities, but also in the characteristics of these facilities. We found that the associations between area income and the presence of facilities or favorable characteristics of these facilities varied from positive to negative depending on the facilities and on the characteristics examined. Sensitivity analyses defining area income in circular areas of different radii permitted a refined identification of areas underserved in sport facilities.

  3. 77 FR 73455 - Transportation Workers Identification Card (TWIC) Removal for Commercial Users To Access...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... Access Electronic Transportation Acquisition (ETA) AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice.../IMA/ES, 1 Soldier Way, Scott AFB, IL 62225 ATTN: ETA Program Manager. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: ETA Program Manager at sddc.safb.etapmo@us.army.mil . Technical questions should be addressed to...

  4. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.807 Section 170.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

  5. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.807 Section 170.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.807 What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

  6. 25 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G - List of Activities Eligible for Funding Under BIA Transportation Facility Maintenance Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Transportation Facility Maintenance Management System (TFMMS). 16. Performing pavement maintenance such as pot... Transportation Facility Maintenance Program A Appendix A to Subpart G Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance Pt....

  7. 33 CFR 154.1047 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport Group V petroleum oils. 154.1047 Section... Group V petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group V petroleum oils must provide information in his or her response plan that identifies—...

  8. 33 CFR 154.1047 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport Group V petroleum oils. 154.1047 Section... Group V petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group V petroleum oils must provide information in his or her response plan that identifies—...

  9. 33 CFR 154.1047 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport Group V petroleum oils. 154.1047 Section... Group V petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group V petroleum oils must provide information in his or her response plan that identifies—...

  10. 33 CFR 154.1047 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport Group V petroleum oils. 154.1047 Section... Group V petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group V petroleum oils must provide information in his or her response plan that identifies—...

  11. 33 CFR 154.1047 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport Group V petroleum oils. 154.1047 Section... Group V petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group V petroleum oils must provide information in his or her response plan that identifies—...

  12. Radiocesium Discharges and Subsequent Environmental Transport at the Major U.S. Weapons Production Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, Jr. C.T.; Hamby, D.M.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1999-11-14

    Radiocesium is one of the more prevalent radionuclides in the environment as a result of weapons production related atomic projects in the United States and the former Soviet Union. Radiocesium discharges during the 1950's account for a large fraction of the historical releases from U.S. weapons production facilities. Releases of radiocesium to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems during the early ,years of nuclear weapons production provided the opportunity to conduct multidisciplinary studies on the transport mechanisms of this potentially hazardous radionuclide. The major U.S. Department of Energy facilities (Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, and Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina) are located in regions of the country that have different geographical characteristics. The facility siting provided diverse backgrounds for the development of an understanding of environmental factors contributing to the fate and transport of radiocesium. In this paper, we summarize the significant environmental releases of radiocesium in the early -years of weapons production and then discuss the historically significant transport mechanisms for r37Cs at the three facilities that were part of the U.S. nuclear weapons complex.

  13. Facilities, breed and experience affect ease of sheep handling: the livestock transporter's perspective.

    PubMed

    Burnard, C L; Pitchford, W S; Hocking Edwards, J E; Hazel, S J

    2015-08-01

    An understanding of the perceived importance of a variety of factors affecting the ease of handling of sheep and the interactions between these factors is valuable in improving profitability and welfare of the livestock. Many factors may contribute to animal behaviour during handling, and traditionally these factors have been assessed in isolation under experimental conditions. A human social component to this phenomenon also exists. The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the importance of a variety of factors affecting ease of handling, and the interactions between these from the perspective of the livestock transporter. Qualitative interviews were used to investigate the factors affecting sheep behaviour during handling. Interview transcripts underwent thematic analysis. Livestock transporters discussed the effects of attitudes and behaviours towards sheep, helpers, facilities, distractions, environment, dogs and a variety of sheep factors including breed, preparation, experience and sex on sheep behaviour during handling. Transporters demonstrated care and empathy and stated that patience and experience were key factors determining how a person might deal with difficult sheep. Livestock transporters strongly believed facilities (ramps and yards) had the greatest impact, followed by sheep experience (naivety of the sheep to handling and transport) and breed. Transporters also discussed the effects of distractions, time of day, weather, dogs, other people, sheep preparation, body condition and sheep sex on ease of handling. The concept of individual sheep temperament was indirectly expressed.

  14. Atmospheric science facility pallet-only mode space transportation system payload (feasibility study), Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The economic and technical feasibility is assessed of employing a pallet-only mode for conducting Atmospheric Magnetospheric Plasmas-in-Space experiments. A baseline design incorporating the experiment and instrument descriptions is developed. The prime instruments are packaged into four pallets in a physical and functional manner compatible with the Space Transportation System capabilities and/or constraints and an orbiter seven-day mission timeline. Operational compatibility is verified between the orbiter/payload and supporting facilities. The development status and the schedule requirements applicable to the Atmospheric Science Facility mission are identified. Conclusions and recommendations are presented and discussed.

  15. 47 CFR 69.709 - Dedicated transport and special access services other than channel terminations between LEC end...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... transport and special access services other than channel terminations between LEC end offices and customer... services other than channel terminations between LEC end offices and customer premises, determined as... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dedicated transport and special access...

  16. 47 CFR 69.709 - Dedicated transport and special access services other than channel terminations between LEC end...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... transport and special access services other than channel terminations between LEC end offices and customer... services other than channel terminations between LEC end offices and customer premises, determined as... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dedicated transport and special access...

  17. 47 CFR 69.709 - Dedicated transport and special access services other than channel terminations between LEC end...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... transport and special access services other than channel terminations between LEC end offices and customer... services other than channel terminations between LEC end offices and customer premises, determined as... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dedicated transport and special access...

  18. 47 CFR 69.709 - Dedicated transport and special access services other than channel terminations between LEC end...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... transport and special access services other than channel terminations between LEC end offices and customer... services other than channel terminations between LEC end offices and customer premises, determined as... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dedicated transport and special access...

  19. 47 CFR 69.709 - Dedicated transport and special access services other than channel terminations between LEC end...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... transport and special access services other than channel terminations between LEC end offices and customer... services other than channel terminations between LEC end offices and customer premises, determined as... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dedicated transport and special access...

  20. Regulatory facility guides for the transportation of hazardous and other materials

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.S.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.

    1994-07-01

    Regulatory Facility Guides (RFGS) are being developed to provide the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractor facilities with the understanding of the exact applicability of specific transportation regulations to DOE shippers. These detailed state-specific compilations of federal, state, tribal, local, and international transportation regulations should lead to enhanced compliance, fewer efforts, and less confusion. To date, RFGs for three states have been developed. The RFGs for Tennessee and Ohio were finalized in February 1994 and have been distributed under a controlled distribution. The RFG for New Meidco is in final draft form and is undergoing DOE review. Two additional RFGs, for the states of Idaho and California, are expected to be completed by September 1994.

  1. Transporter Development for the Tritium Extraction Facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, J.

    1998-12-17

    The Commercial Light Water Reactor-Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) is planned for location at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of the US Department of Energy CLWR tritium production alternative. This new facility will rely on processes and equipment that are significantly different from those proven in the past or currently in use at SRS. For instance, the CLWR-TEF reference design employs remote modules to provide an inert processing atmosphere, secondary confinement for tritium and the primary confinement for particulate contamination. The primary component of this modular system is the Transporter. A Transporter mock-up was developed to demonstrate concept feasibility of the required processing functions (sealing, attachment/alignment and materials handling). The module design, the seal door selection, and the planned test program are discussed.

  2. Estimation of contaminant transport in groundwater beneath radioactive waste disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.C.; Tauxe, J.D.; Lee, D.W.

    1995-05-25

    Performance assessments are required for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities to demonstrate compliance with the performance objectives, consider human exposures from water, air, and inadvertent intruder pathways. Among these, the groundwater pathway analysis usually involves complex numerical simulations with results which are often difficult to verify and interpret. This paper presents a technique to identify and simplify the essential parts of the groundwater analysis. The transport process of radionuclides including infiltration of precipitation, leachate generation, and advection and dispersion in the groundwater is divided into several steps. For each step, a simple analytical model is constructed and refined to capture the dominant phenomena represented in the complex analysis included in a site-specific performance assessment. This step-wise approach provides a means for gaining insights into the transport process and obtaining reasonable estimates of relevant quantities for facility design and site evaluation.

  3. Reproductive Rights Denied: The Hyde Amendment and Access to Abortion for Native American Women Using Indian Health Service Facilities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Restrictions on the use of federal funds to provide abortions have limited the access to abortion services for Native American women receiving care at Indian Health Service facilities. Current data suggest that the vast majority of Indian Health Service facilities are unequipped to provide abortions under any circumstances. Native American women experience disproportionately high rates of sexual assault and unintended pregnancy. Hyde Amendment restrictions systematically infringe on the reproductive rights of Native American women and present a pressing public health policy concern. PMID:25122025

  4. Manned Mars System Study (MMSS): Mars transportation and facility study. Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to design and analyze systems for conducting human missions to Mars and the moon, with special emphasis on the transportation and facility infrastructure. This study was conducted by Martin Marietta Astronautics Group, with an important teaming role by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). This work included the studies and separate reports of the FY-1988 and 1989 case studies as well as special analyses and parametric studies.

  5. Experiment Definition Using the Space Laboratory, Long Duration Exposure Facility, and Space Transportation System Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheppard, Albert P.; Wood, Joan M.

    1976-01-01

    Candidate experiments designed for the space shuttle transportation system and the long duration exposure facility are summarized. The data format covers: experiment title, Experimenter, technical abstract, benefits/justification, technical discussion of experiment approach and objectives, related work and experience, experiment facts space properties used, environmental constraints, shielding requirements, if any, physical description, and sketch of major elements. Information was also included on experiment hardware, research required to develop experiment, special requirements, cost estimate, safety considerations, and interactions with spacecraft and other experiments.

  6. Manned Mars System Study (MMSS): Mars transportation and facility study. Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to design and analyze systems for conducting human missions to Mars and the moon, with special emphasis on the transportation and facility infrastructure. This study was conducted by Martin Marietta Astronautics Group, with an important teaming role by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). This work included the studies and separate reports of the FY-1988 and 1989 case studies as well as special analyses and parametric studies.

  7. Smartphone-based system to improve transportation access for the cognitively impaired.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Shane M; Riehle, Timothy H; Lichter, Patrick A; Brown, Allen W; Panescu, Dorin

    2015-01-01

    This project developed and evaluated a smartphone-based system to improve mobility and transportation access for the cognitively impaired. The proposed system is intended to allow the cognitively impaired to use public transportation systems, community transportation and dedicated transportation services for the disabled with greater ease and safety. Individuals with cognitive disabilities are often unable to operate an automobile, or may require a prolonged recovery period before resuming driving. Public transportation systems represent a significant means to allow these individuals to maintain independence. Yet public transportation systems can pose significant challenges to individuals with cognitive impairment. The goal of this project is to develop a system to reduce these barriers via a technological solution consisting of components developed both for the cognitively impaired user and their caregiver or family member. The first component consists of a cognitive prosthetic device featuring traditional memory cueing and reminders as well as custom location-based transportation specific functions. This cognitive mobility assistant will leverage the computing power and GPS location determination capabilities of inexpensive, powerful smart phones. The second component consists of a management application which offers caregivers the ability to configure and program the reminder and transit functions remotely via the Internet. Following completion of the prototype system a pilot human test was performed with cognitively disabled individuals and family members or caregivers to assess the usability and acceptability of both system components.

  8. 75 FR 13457 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... Accessibility Guidelines; Electronic and Information Technology Accessibility Standards AGENCY: Architectural... Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) to begin the process of updating its standards for electronic and... (voice); 202- 272-0082 (TTY). Electronic mail address: board.gov ">creagan@access-...

  9. Application of Fiber-Optical Techniques in the Access Transmission and Backbone Transport of Mobile Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilt, Attila; Pozsonyi, László

    2012-09-01

    Fixed access networks widely employ fiber-optical techniques due to the extremely wide bandwidth offered to subscribers. In the last decade, there has also been an enormous increase of user data visible in mobile systems. The importance of fiber-optical techniques within the fixed transmission/transport networks of mobile systems is therefore inevitably increasing. This article summarizes a few reasons and gives examples why and how fiber-optic techniques are employed efficiently in second-generation networks.

  10. Accessible Transportation, Geographic Elevation, and Masticatory Ability Among Elderly Residents of a Rural Area.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Tominaga, Kazumichi; Takeda, Miwako; Sundquist, Kristina; Nabika, Toru

    2015-06-26

    Given that public transportation networks are often worse in rural areas than in urban areas, rural residents who do not drive can find it difficult to access health-promoting goods, services, and resources related to masticatory ability. Moreover, geographical location, assessed by elevation, could modify this association. The aim of this study was to test whether the association between access to transportation and masticatory ability varied by elevation. Data were collected from a cross-sectional study conducted in Mizuho and Iwami counties, Japan. Objective masticatory ability was evaluated using a test gummy jelly and elevation was estimated by the geographic information systems according to the participant's address. After excluding subjects with missing data, 672 subjects (Mizuho = 401 and Iwami = 271) were analyzed. After adjustment for potential confounders, being a driver was not significantly associated with masticatory ability among elderly people living at low elevation (≤313 m) in Mizuho county. However, after the same adjustment, being a driver remained significantly associated with increased masticatory ability among elderly at high elevations. Similar findings were observed in Iwami county. Accessible transportation was significantly associated with increased mastication ability in elderly people living at high elevations, but not in those living at low elevations.

  11. Library Media Facilities Access: Do You Really Want Your Library Media Center Used?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Thomas L.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses and provides some examples on how students and teachers should use library media centers. He also discusses the common problems with facilities design as it changes along with other aspects of society. He states that flexibility in design ensures that the physical facility will meet future program needs.…

  12. Making Facilities Accessible for the Physically Handicapped. Act. No. 1 of the Public Acts of 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Legislature, Lansing.

    A physical handicap is defined as an impairment which affects an individual to the extent that special facilities are needed to provide for his safety. Facilities include--(1) the special design of parking lots, building approaches and entrances, (2) stairs, ramps, doors, and multilevel floors, (3) corridors, and (4) rooms with sloping floors,…

  13. Preliminary survey report: evaluation of brake-drum-service controls at Ohio Department of Transportation, Maintenance Facility, Lebanon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehy, J.W.

    1986-07-01

    The Ohio Department of Transportation, Maintenance Facility, Lebanon, Ohio, was visited as part of a study of asbestos control during the maintenance and repair of vehicular brakes. The effectiveness of various control technologies designed to reduce asbestos exposure were evaluated.

  14. Emissions, transport, and chemistry downwind of oil extraction facilities in the Alaskan Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryerson, T. B.; Peischl, J. W.; Nowak, J. B.; Holloway, J.; Brioude, J.; Cooper, O. R.; Neuman, J.; Trainer, M.; Brock, C. A.; Roberts, J. M.; Warneke, C.; Schwarz, J. P.; Tans, P. P.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Novelli, P. C.; Montzka, S. A.; Pierce, R.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Vay, S. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Blake, D. R.; Huey, L. G.; Wennberg, P. O.; Stohl, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Sodemann, H.; Spackman, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    Analysis of recent trace gas and aerosol data taken downwind of oil extraction facilities on the Alaskan North Slope, including Prudhoe Bay, provides new insights into the chemistry and fate of anthropogenic industrial emissions at high latitudes, and can better constrain the anticipated impact of new emissions on air quality and climate in the Arctic. Three different analyses have been carried out using airborne data from the NOAA WP-3D and the NASA DC-8 instrumented aircraft during April 2008, the long-term data set from the NOAA GMD observatory at Barrow, and the FLEXPART transport model. These analyses include: 1. a determination of NOx oxidation rates and OH sources downwind of the Prudhoe Bay, AK oil extraction facilities, and a comparison to observations in well-mixed continental plumes at lower latitudes. 2. a new signature of halogen atom chemistry in the alkane-rich Prudhoe Bay plume. Coupled with transport model age spectra, this analysis provides a new and unique constraint on the time scales of halogen-catalyzed ozone depletion in the Arctic. 3. a direct quantification of greenhouse gas source strengths from oil extraction facilities at Prudhoe Bay in the Alaskan Arctic, and a comparison to existing global inventories.

  15. Factors Of Environmental Safety And Environmentally Efficient Technologies Transportation Facilities Gas Transportation Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Bogdan U.

    2017-01-01

    The stable development of the European countries depends on a reliable and efficient operation of the gas transportation system (GTS). With high reliability of GTS it is necessary to ensure its industrial and environmental safety. In this article the major factors influencing on an industrial and ecological safety of GTS are analyzed, sources of GTS safety decreasing is revealed, measures for providing safety are proposed. The article shows that use of gas-turbine engines of gas-compressor units (GCU) results in the following phenomena: emissions of harmful substances in the atmosphere; pollution by toxic waste; harmful noise and vibration; thermal impact on environment; decrease in energy efficiency. It is shown that for the radical problem resolution of an industrial and ecological safety of gas-transmission system it is reasonable to use gas-compressor units driven by electric motors. Their advantages are shown. Perspective technologies of these units and experience of their use in Europe and the USA are given in this article.

  16. Facilities Planning Guide for Special Education Programs: Planning Accessibility for the Handicapped in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Kenneth W.

    The guide details characteristics to provide architecturally accessible special education programs for handicapped students. Impetus for the accessibility movement is traced to legislation, including the Architectural Barriers Act and Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Planning features considered are the development of a…

  17. Recovery, Transportation and Acceptance to the Curation Facility of the Hayabusa Re-Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, M.; Fujimura, A.; Yano, H.; Okamoto, C.; Okada, T.; Yada, T.; Ishibashi, Y.; Shirai, K.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Okazaki, R.; Zolensky, M.; Sandford, S.; Ireland, T.; Ueno, M.; Mukai, T.; Yoshikawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Kuninaka, H.; Kawaguchi, J.

    2011-01-01

    The "Hayabusa" re-entry capsule was safely carried into the clean room of Sagamihara Planetary Sample Curation Facility in JAXA on June 18, 2010. After executing computed tomographic (CT) scanning, removal of heat shield, and surface cleaning of sample container, the sample container was enclosed into the clean chamber. After opening the sample container and residual gas sampling in the clean chamber, optical observation, sample recovery, sample separation for initial analysis will be performed. This curation work is continuing for several manths with some selected member of Hayabusa Asteroidal Sample Preliminary Examination Team (HASPET). We report here on the 'Hayabusa' capsule recovery operation, and transportation and acceptance at the curation facility of the Hayabusa re-entry capsule.

  18. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; Fisher, J. H.; Seiler, S. W.; Hinshelwood, D.; Compton, S.; Holdener, F. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Newlander, C. D.; Gilliam, R. P.; Froula, N.; Lilly, M.; Davis, J. F.; Lerch, MAJ. A.; Blue, B. E.

    2016-11-01

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the National Ignition Facility's diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built-in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight. The measured accuracy of sample responses as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette is discussed.

  19. Federal Facilities Inspections: A Guide to EPA's Access and Inspection Authorities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This brochure outlines the legal authority for EPA, or one of its authorized representatives, to inspect a federal facility for compliance with environmental laws. It also identifies the federal, state, or tribal inspectors who may conduct inspections.

  20. How stressful is transportation?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is common for cattle to be transported multiple times during their production life cycle. Transportation events may include calves shipped to backgrounding facilities and feed yards, as well as pregnant cows that may be transported to sale barns or relocated due to drought to access a pasture or ...

  1. Using geographical information systems for defining the accessibility to health care facilities in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Murad, Abdulkader A

    2014-12-01

    Spatial data play an important role in the planning of health care facilities and their allocation. Today, geographical information systems (GIS) provide useful techniques for capturing, maintaining and analysing health care spatial data; indeed health geoinformatics is an emerging discipline that uses innovative geospatial technology to investigate health issues. The purpose of this paper is to define how GIS can be used for assessing the level of accessibility to health care. The paper identifies the advantages of using GIS in health care planning and covers GIS-based international accessibility with a focus on GIS applications for health care facilities in Jeddah city, Saudi Arabia. A geodatabase that includes location of health services, road networks, health care demand and population districts was created using ArcGIS software. The geodatabase produced is based on collected data and covers issues, such as defining the spatial distribution of health care facilities, evaluating health demand types and modelling health service areas based on analysis of driving-time and straight-line distances.

  2. Preliminary data on rheological limits for grouts in the Transportable Grout Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliam, T.M.; McDaniel, E.W.; Dole, L.R.; West, G.A.

    1987-04-01

    This report describes a method for establishing rheological limits for grouts that can be pumped in the Hanford Transportable Grout Facility (TGF). This method is based on two models that require determining two key parameters - gel strength and density. This work also presents rheological data on grouts prepared with simulated customer phosphate wastes (CPW) and double shell slurry (DSS) from the Hanford complex. These data can be used to make preliminary estimates of operating rheological limits of the TFG grouts. The suggested design limits will include safety factors that will increase these limits significantly. 4 refs.

  3. Structural basis of the alternating-access mechanism in a bile acid transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Levin, Elena J.; Pan, Yaping; McCoy, Jason G.; Sharma, Ruchika; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in hepatocytes and secreted through the biliary tract into the small intestine, where they aid in absorption of lipids and fat-soluble vitamins. Through a process known as enterohepatic recirculation, more than 90% of secreted bile acids are then retrieved from the intestine and returned to the liver for resecretion. In humans, there are two Na+-dependent bile acid transporters involved in enterohepatic recirculation, the Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP; also known as SLC10A1) expressed in hepatocytes, and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; also known as SLC10A2) expressed on enterocytes in the terminal ileum. In recent years, ASBT has attracted much interest as a potential drug target for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia, because inhibition of ASBT reduces reabsorption of bile acids, thus increasing bile acid synthesis and consequently cholesterol consumption. However, a lack of three-dimensional structures of bile acid transporters hampers our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms of substrate selectivity and transport, and to interpret the wealth of existing functional data. The crystal structure of an ASBT homologue from Neisseria meningitidis (ASBTNM) in detergent was reported recently, showing the protein in an inward-open conformation bound to two Na+ and a taurocholic acid. However, the structural changes that bring bile acid and Na+ across the membrane are difficult to infer from a single structure. To understand the structural changes associated with the coupled transport of Na+ and bile acids, here we solved two structures of an ASBT homologue from Yersinia frederiksenii (ASBTYf) in a lipid environment, which reveal that a large rigid-body rotation of a substrate-binding domain gives the conserved `crossover' region, where two discontinuous helices cross each other, alternating accessibility from either side of the cell membrane. This result has implications

  4. Accessibility

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Federal laws, including Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, mandate that people with disabilities have access to the same information that someone without a disability would have. 508 standards cover electronic and information technology (EIT) products.

  5. 49 CFR 37.55 - Intercity rail station accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Intercity rail station accessibility. 37.55 Section 37.55 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.55 Intercity rail station...

  6. 49 CFR 37.55 - Intercity rail station accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Intercity rail station accessibility. 37.55 Section 37.55 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.55 Intercity rail station...

  7. 49 CFR 37.55 - Intercity rail station accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Intercity rail station accessibility. 37.55 Section 37.55 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.55 Intercity rail station...

  8. 49 CFR 37.55 - Intercity rail station accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Intercity rail station accessibility. 37.55 Section 37.55 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.55 Intercity rail station...

  9. 49 CFR 37.55 - Intercity rail station accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intercity rail station accessibility. 37.55 Section 37.55 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.55 Intercity rail station...

  10. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A. S.; Cooper, A. B.R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Graham, P.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Comley, A. J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Back, C. A.; Hund, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Foster, J.; Young, B.; Young, P.

    2014-06-01

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in bench-marking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic di usive Marshak wave which propagates into a high atomic number Ta2O5 aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range

  11. A MATLAB-based interface for the beam-transport system of an AMS facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Guzmán, J. M.; Gómez-Morilla, I.; Enamorado-Báez, S. M.; Moreno-Suárez, A. I.; Pinto-Gómez, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we present a MATLAB code built to model the transport of a charged particle beam through the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) facility located at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA, Seville, Spain). We determine the beam transport through the optical system using the transfer matrix formalism in two different approaches (ray tracing and the beam-envelope approach) and describe it in terms of cross section size and emittance. The beam size results given by MATLAB are compared with the measured beam size in three of the four image points that the system has, obtaining a good agreement between them. This suggests that the first-order transfer matrix formalism is enough to simulate the optical behavior of the system.

  12. 76 FR 44663 - Accessibility Guidelines for Pedestrian Facilities in the Public Right-of-Way

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe Center) to gather data and prepare cost estimates..., including requirements for visible characters on signs and alternative requirements for audible sign...

  13. Intelligent Urban Public Transportation for Accessibility Dedicated to People with Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haiying; Hou, Kun-Mean; Zuo, Decheng; Li, Jian

    2012-01-01

    The traditional urban public transport system generally cannot provide an effective access service for people with disabilities, especially for disabled, wheelchair and blind (DWB) passengers. In this paper, based on advanced information & communication technologies (ICT) and green technologies (GT) concepts, a dedicated public urban transportation service access system named Mobi+ has been introduced, which facilitates the mobility of DWB passengers. The Mobi+ project consists of three subsystems: a wireless communication subsystem, which provides the data exchange and network connection services between buses and stations in the complex urban environments; the bus subsystem, which provides the DWB class detection & bus arrival notification services; and the station subsystem, which implements the urban environmental surveillance & bus auxiliary access services. The Mobi+ card that supports multi-microcontroller multi-transceiver adopts the fault-tolerant component-based hardware architecture, in which the dedicated embedded system software, i.e., operating system micro-kernel and wireless protocol, has been integrated. The dedicated Mobi+ embedded system provides the fault-tolerant resource awareness communication and scheduling mechanism to ensure the reliability in data exchange and service provision. At present, the Mobi+ system has been implemented on the buses and stations of line ‘2’ in the city of Clermont-Ferrand (France). The experiential results show that, on one hand the Mobi+ prototype system reaches the design expectations and provides an effective urban bus access service for people with disabilities; on the other hand the Mobi+ system is easily to deploy in the buses and at bus stations thanks to its low energy consumption and small form factor. PMID:23112622

  14. Intelligent urban public transportation for accessibility dedicated to people with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haiying; Hou, Kun-Mean; Zuo, Decheng; Li, Jian

    2012-01-01

    The traditional urban public transport system generally cannot provide an effective access service for people with disabilities, especially for disabled, wheelchair and blind (DWB) passengers. In this paper, based on advanced information & communication technologies (ICT) and green technologies (GT) concepts, a dedicated public urban transportation service access system named Mobi+ has been introduced, which facilitates the mobility of DWB passengers. The Mobi+ project consists of three subsystems: a wireless communication subsystem, which provides the data exchange and network connection services between buses and stations in the complex urban environments; the bus subsystem, which provides the DWB class detection & bus arrival notification services; and the station subsystem, which implements the urban environmental surveillance & bus auxiliary access services. The Mobi+ card that supports multi-microcontroller multi-transceiver adopts the fault-tolerant component-based hardware architecture, in which the dedicated embedded system software, i.e., operating system micro-kernel and wireless protocol, has been integrated. The dedicated Mobi+ embedded system provides the fault-tolerant resource awareness communication and scheduling mechanism to ensure the reliability in data exchange and service provision. At present, the Mobi+ system has been implemented on the buses and stations of line '2' in the city of Clermont-Ferrand (France). The experiential results show that, on one hand the Mobi+ prototype system reaches the design expectations and provides an effective urban bus access service for people with disabilities; on the other hand the Mobi+ system is easily to deploy in the buses and at bus stations thanks to its low energy consumption and small form factor.

  15. Physical access to health facilities and contraceptive use in Kenya: evidence from the 2008-2009 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Ettarh, Remare R; Kyobutungi, Catherine

    2012-09-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the spatial variation in modern contraceptive use and unmet need for family planning across the counties of Kenya and to examine whether the spatial patterns were associated with inequalities in physical access to health facilities. Data were obtained from the 2008-2009 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey and linked to the location of health facilities in the country. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the influence of distance to the nearest health facility and health facility density, in addition to other covariates, on modern contraceptive use and unmet need. Overall, the prevalence of modern contraceptive use and unmet need among women aged 15-49 in Kenya was 42.1% and 19.7% respectively. Among the respondents who lived more than 5 km from the nearest health facility modern contraceptive use was significantly less likely compared to women resident 5 km or less from the nearest health facility. Women from counties with higher health facility density were 53% more likely to use modern contraceptives compared to women in counties with low health facility density. Distance and health facility density in the county were not significantly associated with unmet need. Physical access to health facilities is an important determinant of modern contraceptive use and unmet need in Kenya. Strategies should be developed in underserved counties to mitigate the challenge of distance to health facilities, such as delivering services by outreach and mobile facilities.

  16. A spatial analysis to study access to emergency obstetric transport services under the public private “Janani Express Yojana” program in two districts of Madhya Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The government in Madhya Pradesh (MP), India in 2006, launched “Janani Express Yojana” (JE), a decentralized, 24X7, free emergency transport service for all pregnant women under a public-private partnership. JE supports India’s large conditional cash transfer program, the “Janani Suraksha Yojana” (JSY) in the province and transports on average 60,000 parturients to hospital every month. The model is a relatively low cost one that potentially could be adopted in other parts of India and South Asia. This paper describes the uptake, time taken and geographic equity in access to the service to transport women to a facility in two districts of MP. Methods This was a facility based cross sectional study. We interviewed parturients (n = 468) who delivered during a five day study period at facilities with >10 deliveries/month (n = 61) in two study districts. The women were asked details of transportation used to arrive at the facility, time taken and their residential addresses. These details were plotted onto a Geographic Information System (GIS) to estimate travelled distances and identify statistically significant clusters of mothers (hot spots) reporting delays >2 hours. Results JE vehicles were well dispersed across the districts and used by 236 (50.03%) mothers of which 111(47.03%) took >2 hours to reach a facility. Inability of JE vehicle to reach a mother in time was the main reason for delays. There was no correlation between the duration of delay and distance travelled. Maps of the travel paths and travel duration of the women are presented. The study identified hot spots of mothers with delays >2 hours and explored the possible reasons for longer delays. Conclusions The JE service was accessible in all parts of the districts. Relatively high utilization rates of JE indicate that it ably supported JSY program to draw more women for institutional deliveries. However, half of the JE users experienced long (>2 hour) delays. The delayed mothers

  17. Exploring Factors Affecting Emergency Medical Services Staffs' Decision about Transporting Medical Patients to Medical Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Seyedin, Hesam; Jamshidi-Orak, Roohangiz

    2014-01-01

    Transfer of patients in medical emergency situations is one of the most important missions of emergency medical service (EMS) staffs. So this study was performed to explore affecting factors in EMS staffs' decision during transporting of patients in medical situations to medical facilities. The participants in this qualitative study consisted of 18 EMS staffs working in prehospital care facilities in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews. The data were analyzed using a content analysis approach. The data analysis revealed the following theme: “degree of perceived risk in EMS staffs and their patients.” This theme consisted of two main categories: (1) patient's condition' and (2) the context of the EMS mission'. The patent's condition category emerged from “physical health statuses,” “socioeconomic statuses,” and “cultural background” subcategories. The context of the EMS mission also emerged from two subcategories of “characteristics of the mission” and EMS staffs characteristics'. EMS system managers can consider adequate technical, informational, financial, educational, and emotional supports to facilitate the decision making of their staffs. Also, development of an effective and user-friendly checklist and scoring system was recommended for quick and easy recognition of patients' needs for transportation in a prehospital situation. PMID:24891953

  18. Exploring Factors Affecting Emergency Medical Services Staffs' Decision about Transporting Medical Patients to Medical Facilities.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimian, Abbasali; Seyedin, Hesam; Jamshidi-Orak, Roohangiz; Masoumi, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Transfer of patients in medical emergency situations is one of the most important missions of emergency medical service (EMS) staffs. So this study was performed to explore affecting factors in EMS staffs' decision during transporting of patients in medical situations to medical facilities. The participants in this qualitative study consisted of 18 EMS staffs working in prehospital care facilities in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews. The data were analyzed using a content analysis approach. The data analysis revealed the following theme: "degree of perceived risk in EMS staffs and their patients." This theme consisted of two main categories: (1) patient's condition' and (2) the context of the EMS mission'. The patent's condition category emerged from "physical health statuses," "socioeconomic statuses," and "cultural background" subcategories. The context of the EMS mission also emerged from two subcategories of "characteristics of the mission" and EMS staffs characteristics'. EMS system managers can consider adequate technical, informational, financial, educational, and emotional supports to facilitate the decision making of their staffs. Also, development of an effective and user-friendly checklist and scoring system was recommended for quick and easy recognition of patients' needs for transportation in a prehospital situation.

  19. Public Transport for Everyone: A Summary of the Results of Research and Development Projects Concerning Disabled People and Transport Facilities Supported by the Swedish Transport Research Board. TFB-Report 1989:1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borjesson, Mats

    This report summarizes the results of research and development concerning disabled individuals in Sweden and their use of transport facilities. The first section, "People with Impaired Mobility and Their Travel Needs," outlines Sweden's transport policy goal to adapt transport to the needs of disabled people, addresses the difficulty in…

  20. Household trends in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities in Vietnam and associated factors: findings from the Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    Tuyet-Hanh, Tran Thi; Lee, Jong-Koo; Oh, Juhwan; Van Minh, Hoang; Ou Lee, Chul; Hoan, Le Thi; Nam, You-Seon; Long, Tran Khanh

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite progress made by the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) number 7.C, Vietnam still faces challenges with regard to the provision of access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation. Objective This paper describes household trends in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities separately, and analyses factors associated with access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities in combination. Design Secondary data from the Vietnam Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey in 2000, 2006, and 2011 were analyzed. Descriptive statistics and tests of significance describe trends over time in access to water and sanitation by location, demographic and socio-economic factors. Binary logistic regressions (2000, 2006, and 2011) describe associations between access to water and sanitation, and geographic, demographic, and socio-economic factors. Results There have been some outstanding developments in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities from 2000 to 2011. In 2011, the proportion of households with access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities reached 90% and 77%, respectively, meeting the 2015 MDG targets for safe drinking water and basic sanitation set at 88% and 75%, respectively. However, despite these achievements, in 2011, only 74% of households overall had access to combined improved drinking water and sanitation facilities. There were also stark differences between regions. In 2011, only 47% of households had access to both improved water and sanitation facilities in the Mekong River Delta compared with 94% in the Red River Delta. In 2011, households in urban compared to rural areas were more than twice as likely (odds ratio [OR]: 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9-2.5) to have access to improved water and sanitation facilities in combination, and households in the highest compared with the lowest wealth quintile were over 40 times more likely (OR: 42.3; 95% CI: 29.8-60.0). Conclusions More efforts

  1. The Microfluidics Flow and Transport Laboratory: A New User Facility at PNNL's Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oostrom, M.; Werth, C.; Wietsma, T.; Hess, N.

    2008-12-01

    The Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at PNNL, in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, has developed a microfluidics capability to investigate the effects of fluid flow and transport at the microscale. Currently the EMSL houses the Subsurface Flow and Transport Laboratory (SFTL) in which EMSL Users have the opportunity to conduct column- and intermediate-scale research. The new Microfluidics Flow and Transport Laboratory (MFTL) will address fundamental scaling issues associated with fluid flow and reactive transport from both a combined experimental and theoretical approach at the micron scale, bridge the gap in experimental capabilities from the molecular scale within EMSL to the laboratory scales currently available in the SFTL, and permit simultaneous spatially and time resolved spectroscopic examination of geochemical and/or biogeochemical processes. Micromodels are two- dimensional representations of porous media etched in into silicon wafers, glass or polymers. Better control of pore network geometry is generally obtained by etching silicon. Pore sizes are typically on the order of tens of microns, but can be configured to be both smaller and larger. Fluid injection occurs with low-pulsation, high-precision syringe pumps. Images are obtained with an inverted fluorescent microscope. In this presentation, the new laboratory will be described and the mechanisms of user access will be explained.

  2. Effects of improved access to transportation on emergency obstetric care outcomes in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mucunguzi, Stephen; Wamani, Henry; Lochoro, Peter; Tylleskar, Thorkild

    2014-09-01

    Reduction in maternal mortality has not been appreciable in most low-income countries. Improved access to transport for mothers is one way to improve maternal health. This study evaluated a free-of-charge 24-hour ambulance and communication services intervention in Oyam district using 'Caesarean section rate' (CSR) and compared with the neighbouring non-intervention district. Ecological data were collected retrospectively from maternity/theatre registers in October 2010 for 3 years pre and 3 years intervention period. The average CSR in the intervention district increased from 0.57% before the intervention to 1.21% (p = 0.022) during the intervention, while there was no change in the neighbouring district (0.51% to 0.58%, p = 0.512). Hospital deliveries increased by over 50% per year with a slight reduction in the average hospital stillbirths per 1000 hospital births in the intervention district (46.6 to 37.5, p = 0.253). Reliable communication and transport services increased access to and utilization of maternal health services, particularly caesarean delivery services.

  3. U.S. EPA High-Field NMR Facility with Remote Accessibility

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s High-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Research Facility housed in Athens, GA has two Varian 600 MHz NMR spectrometers used for conducting sophisticated experiments in environmental science. Off-site users can ship their samples and perform their NMR experiments remotely fr...

  4. 78 FR 7334 - Port Authority Access to Facility Vulnerability Assessments and the Integration of Security Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... ] systems operated or maintained by certain law enforcement agencies and the Coast Guard. DATES: Comments... the maximum extent practical,'' the facility's security systems ``with compatible systems operated or... systems operated or maintained by the appropriate State and local law enforcement agencies and the...

  5. Race Differences in Mental Health Service Access in a Secure Male Juvenile Justice Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Richard F.; Evans, Lisa J.; Cruise, Keith R.; Feinstein, Ronald A.; Kendrick, Rhonda F.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether African American and Caucasian male youths had similar rates of referral to mental health services in a juvenile justice secure facility when controlling for differences obtained in the initial screening and assessment process. Data from the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument-2 (MAYSI-2), Initial Health Care…

  6. Accessibility and Use of Recreational Sports Facilities at Florida's Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Michele, Douglas

    In an effort to determine the percent of use of sports facilities on Florida community college campuses, a survey was sent to community college presidents and campus recreation directors throughout the Florida Community College System (FCCS). The survey, distributed to all 25 branch campuses and 28 primary campuses in the system, was designed to…

  7. AMERICAN STANDARD SPECIFICATIONS FOR MAKING BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES ACCESSIBLE TO, AND USABLE BY, THE PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Easter Seal Society for Crippled Children and Adults, Chicago, IL.

    THIS STANDARD IS INTENDED TO PROVIDE MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS TO BE USED IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF ALL BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES AND FOR ADOPTION AND ENFORCEMENT BY ADMINISTRATIVE AUTHORITIES IN ORDER TO ALLOW INDIVIDUALS WITH PERMANENT PHYSICAL DISABILITIES TO PURSUE THEIR INTERESTS AND ASPIRATIONS, DEVELOP THEIR TALENTS, AND EXERCISE THEIR SKILLS.…

  8. Engine Installation Effects of Four Civil Transport Airplanes: Wallops Flight Facility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gregg G.; Senzig, David A.; McCurdy, David A.; Roof, Christopher J.; Rapoza, Amanda S.

    2003-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Langley Research Center (LaRC), the Environmental Measurement and Modeling Division of the United States Department of Transportation s John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe), and several other organizations (see Appendix A for a complete list of participating organizations and individuals) conducted a noise measurement study at NASA s Wallops Flight Facility (Wallops) near Chincoteague, Virginia during September 2000. This test was intended to determine engine installation effects on four civil transport airplanes: a Boeing 767-400, a McDonnell-Douglas DC9, a Dassault Falcon 2000, and a Beechcraft King Air. Wallops was chosen for this study because of the relatively low ambient noise of the site and the degree of control over airplane operating procedures enabled by operating over a runway closed to other uses during the test period. Measurements were conducted using a twenty microphone U-shaped array oriented perpendicular to the flight path; microphones were mounted such that ground effects were minimized and low elevation angles were observed.

  9. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, Jr., C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; ...

    2016-08-10

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the NIF’s diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight.more » We discuss the measured accuracy of sample responses, as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette.« less

  10. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, Jr., C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; Fisher, J. H.; Seiler, S. W.; Hinshelwood, D.; Compton, S.; Holdener, F. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Newlander, C. D.; Gilliam, R. P.; Froula, N.; Lilly, M.; Davis, J. F.; Lerch, MAJ. A.; Blue, B. E.

    2016-08-10

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the NIF’s diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight. We discuss the measured accuracy of sample responses, as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette.

  11. A Distributed Simulation Facility to Support Human Factors Research in Advanced Air Transportation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amonlirdviman, Keith; Farley, Todd C.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Ladik, John F.; Sherer, Dana Z.

    1998-01-01

    A distributed real-time simulation of the civil air traffic environment developed to support human factors research in advanced air transportation technology is presented. The distributed environment is based on a custom simulation architecture designed for simplicity and flexibility in human experiments. Standard Internet protocols are used to create the distributed environment, linking all advanced cockpit simulator, all Air Traffic Control simulator, and a pseudo-aircraft control and simulation management station. The pseudo-aircraft control station also functions as a scenario design tool for coordinating human factors experiments. This station incorporates a pseudo-pilot interface designed to reduce workload for human operators piloting multiple aircraft simultaneously in real time. The application of this distributed simulation facility to support a study of the effect of shared information (via air-ground datalink) on pilot/controller shared situation awareness and re-route negotiation is also presented.

  12. Experimental Investigation of the DLR-F6 Transport Configuration in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Gregory M.; Rivers, Melissa B.; Goodliff, Scott L.; Rudnik, Ralf; Sitzmann, Martin

    2008-01-01

    An experimental aerodynamic investigation of the DLR (German Aerospace Center) F6 generic transport configuration has been conducted in the NASA NTF (National Transonic Facility) for CFD validation within the framework of the AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop. Force and moment, surface pressure, model deformation, and surface flow visualization data have been obtained at Reynolds numbers of both 3 million and 5 million. Flow-through nacelles and a side-of-body fairing were also investigated on this wing-body configuration. Reynolds number effects on trailing edge separation have been assessed, and the effectiveness of the side-of-body fairing in eliminating a known region of separated flow has been determined. Data obtained at a Reynolds number of 3 million are presented together for comparison with data from a previous wind tunnel investigation in the ONERA S2MA facility. New surface flow visualization capabilities have also been successfully explored and demonstrated in the NTF for the high pressure and moderately low temperature conditions required in this investigation. Images detailing wing surface flow characteristics are presented.

  13. Atmospheric transport modelling of time resolved 133Xe emissions from the isotope production facility ANSTO, Australia.

    PubMed

    Schöppner, M; Plastino, W; Hermanspahn, N; Hoffmann, E; Kalinowski, M; Orr, B; Tinker, R

    2013-12-01

    The verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) relies amongst other things on the continuous and worldwide monitoring of radioxenon. The characterization of the existing and legitimate background, which is produced mainly by nuclear power plants and isotope production facilities, is of high interest to improve the capabilities of the monitoring network. However, the emissions from legitimate sources can usually only be estimated. For this paper historic source terms of (133)Xe emissions from the isotope production facility at ANSTO, Sydney, Australia, have been made available in a daily resolution. Based on these high resolution data, different source term sets with weekly, monthly and yearly time resolution have been compiled. These different sets are then applied together with atmospheric transport modelling (ATM) to predict the concentration time series at two radioxenon monitoring stations. The results are compared with each other in order to examine the improvement of the prediction capability depending on the used time resolution of the most dominant source term in the region.

  14. NUMERICAL FLOW AND TRANSPORT SIMULATIONS SUPPORTING THE SALTSTONE FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.

    2009-02-28

    The Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment (PA) is being revised to incorporate requirements of Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA), and updated data and understanding of vault performance since the 1992 PA (Cook and Fowler 1992) and related Special Analyses. A hybrid approach was chosen for modeling contaminant transport from vaults and future disposal cells to exposure points. A higher resolution, largely deterministic, analysis is performed on a best-estimate Base Case scenario using the PORFLOW numerical analysis code. a few additional sensitivity cases are simulated to examine alternative scenarios and parameter settings. Stochastic analysis is performed on a simpler representation of the SDF system using the GoldSim code to estimate uncertainty and sensitivity about the Base Case. This report describes development of PORFLOW models supporting the SDF PA, and presents sample results to illustrate model behaviors and define impacts relative to key facility performance objectives. The SDF PA document, when issued, should be consulted for a comprehensive presentation of results.

  15. Low energy beam transport for facility for rare isotope beams driver linear particle accelerator.

    PubMed

    Sun, L T; Leitner, D; Machicoane, G; Pozdeyev, E; Smirnov, V; Vorozhtsov, S B; Winklehner, D; Zhao, Q

    2012-02-01

    The driver linac for the facility for rare isotope beams (FRIB) will provide a wide range of primary ion beams for nuclear physics research. The linac will be capable of accelerating a uranium beam to an energy of up to 200 Mev∕u and delivering it to a fragmentation target with a maximum power of 400 kW. Stable ion beams will be produced by a high performance electron cyclotron resonance ion source operating at 28 GHz. The ion source will be located on a high voltage platform to reach an initial beam energy of 12 keV∕u. After extraction, the ion beam will be transported vertically down to the linac tunnel in a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system and injected into a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) operating at a frequency of 80.5 MHz. To meet the beam power requirements, simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states will be used for heavier ions (≥Xe). This paper presents the layout of the FRIB LEBT and the beam dynamics in the LEBT. In particular, simulation and design of the beam line section before charge state selection will be detailed. The need to use an achromatic design for the charge state selection system and the advantage of an ion beam collimation system to limit the emittance of the beam injected into the RFQ will be discussed in this paper.

  16. Biological restoration of major transportation facilities domestic demonstration and application project (DDAP): technology development at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, James L., Jr.; Melton, Brad; Finley, Patrick; Brockman, John; Peyton, Chad E.; Tucker, Mark David; Einfeld, Wayne; Griffith, Richard O.; Brown, Gary Stephen; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Knowlton, Robert G.; Ho, Pauline

    2006-06-01

    The Bio-Restoration of Major Transportation Facilities Domestic Demonstration and Application Program (DDAP) is a designed to accelerate the restoration of transportation nodes following an attack with a biological warfare agent. This report documents the technology development work done at SNL for this DDAP, which include development of the BROOM tool, an investigation of surface sample collection efficiency, and a flow cytometry study of chlorine dioxide effects on Bacillus anthracis spore viability.

  17. 78 FR 59475 - Architectural Barriers Act Accessibility Guidelines; Outdoor Developed Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ...We, the Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board), are issuing a final rule that amends the Architectural Barriers Act Accessibility Guidelines by adding scoping and technical requirements for camping facilities, picnic facilities, viewing areas, trails, and beach access routes constructed or altered by or on behalf of federal agencies. The final rule ensures......

  18. Estimates of radioxenon released from Southern Hemisphere medical isotope production facilities using measured air concentrations and atmospheric transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Eslinger, Paul W; Friese, Judah I; Lowrey, Justin D; McIntyre, Justin I; Miley, Harry S; Schrom, Brian T

    2014-09-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive-Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty monitors the atmosphere for radioactive xenon leaking from underground nuclear explosions. Emissions from medical isotope production represent a challenging background signal when determining whether measured radioxenon in the atmosphere is associated with a nuclear explosion prohibited by the treaty. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates a reactor and medical isotope production facility in Lucas Heights, Australia. This study uses two years of release data from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility and (133)Xe data from three IMS sampling locations to estimate the annual releases of (133)Xe from medical isotope production facilities in Argentina, South Africa, and Indonesia. Atmospheric dilution factors derived from a global atmospheric transport model were used in an optimization scheme to estimate annual release values by facility. The annual releases of about 6.8 × 10(14) Bq from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility are in good agreement with the sampled concentrations at these three IMS sampling locations. Annual release estimates for the facility in South Africa vary from 2.2 × 10(16) to 2.4 × 10(16) Bq, estimates for the facility in Indonesia vary from 9.2 × 10(13) to 3.7 × 10(14) Bq and estimates for the facility in Argentina range from 4.5 × 10(12) to 9.5 × 10(12) Bq.

  19. Estimates of Radioxenon Released from Southern Hemisphere Medical isotope Production Facilities Using Measured Air Concentrations and Atmospheric Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Friese, Judah I.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2014-09-01

    Abstract The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive-Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty monitors the atmosphere for radioactive xenon leaking from underground nuclear explosions. Emissions from medical isotope production represent a challenging background signal when determining whether measured radioxenon in the atmosphere is associated with a nuclear explosion prohibited by the treaty. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates a reactor and medical isotope production facility in Lucas Heights, Australia. This study uses two years of release data from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility and Xe-133 data from three IMS sampling locations to estimate the annual releases of Xe-133 from medical isotope production facilities in Argentina, South Africa, and Indonesia. Atmospheric dilution factors derived from a global atmospheric transport model were used in an optimization scheme to estimate annual release values by facility. The annual releases of about 6.8×1014 Bq from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility are in good agreement with the sampled concentrations at these three IMS sampling locations. Annual release estimates for the facility in South Africa vary from 1.2×1016 to 2.5×1016 Bq and estimates for the facility in Indonesia vary from 6.1×1013 to 3.6×1014 Bq. Although some releases from the facility in Argentina may reach these IMS sampling locations, the solution to the objective function is insensitive to the magnitude of those releases.

  20. Access and utilisation of healthcare services in rural Tanzania: A comparison of public and non-public facilities using quality, equity, and trust dimensions.

    PubMed

    Shayo, Elizabeth H; Senkoro, Kesheni P; Momburi, Romanus; Olsen, Øystein E; Byskov, Jens; Makundi, Emmanuel A; Kamuzora, Peter; Mboera, Leonard E G

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the access and utilisation of health services in public and non-public health facilities in terms of quality, equity and trust in the Mbarali district, Tanzania. Interviews, focus group discussions, and informal discussions were used to generate data. Of the 1836 respondents, 1157 and 679 respondents sought healthcare services on their last visit at public or non-public health facilities, respectively. While 45.5% rated the quality of services to be good in both types of facilities, reported medicine shortages were more pronounced among those who visited public rather than non-public health facilities (OR = 1.7, 95% CI 1.4, 2.1). Respondents who visited public facilities were 4.9 times less likely than those who visited non-public facilities to emphasise the influence of cost in accessing and utilising health care (OR = 4.9, CI 3.9-6.1). A significant difference was also found in the provider-client relationship satisfaction level between non-public (89.1%) and public facilities (74.7%) (OR = 2.8, CI: 1.5-5.0), indicating a level of lower trust in the later. Revised strategies are needed to ensure availability of medicines in public facilities, which are used by the majority of the population, while strengthening private-public partnerships to harmonise healthcare costs.

  1. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What must BIA include when it develops an IRR... What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? (a) At a minimum, an IRR TFMMS system must include components for: (1) Uniformly...

  2. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must BIA include when it develops an IRR... What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? (a) At a minimum, an IRR TFMMS system must include components for: (1) Uniformly...

  3. REPORT ON THE HOMELAND SECURITY WORKSHOP ON TRANSPORT AND DISPOSAL OF WASTES FROM FACILITIES CONTAMINATED WITH CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes discussions from the "Homeland Security Workshop on Transport and Disposal of Wastes From Facilities Contaminated With Chemical or Biological Agents." The workshop was held on May 28-30, 2003, in Cincinnati, Ohio, and its objectives were to:

    .Documen...

  4. Educational Facilities Study Manual and Design; Flint-Genesee County Comprehensive Land Use-Transportation Planning Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genesee County Metropolitan Planning Commission, Flint, MI.

    The Educational Facilities Study Item of the Flint-Genesee County (Michigan) Comprehensive Land Use-Transportation Planning Study is implementing a program to identify present and future educational problems and needs in Genesee County. This report is a technical document to guide the execution of the research and analysis of the study. The study…

  5. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Undergraduate Education and Research Programs, Facilities, and Information Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The titles in this section include: 1) GRIDVIEW: Recent Improvements in Research and Education Software for Exploring Mars Topography; 2) Software and Hardware Upgrades for the University of North Dakota Asteroid and Comet Internet Telescope (ACIT); 3) Web-based Program for Calculating Effects of an Earth Impact; 4) On-Line Education, Web- and Virtual-Classes in an Urban University: A Preliminary Overview; 5) Modelling Planetary Material's Structures: From Quasicrystalline Microstructure to Crystallographic Materials by Use of Mathematica; 6) How We Used NASA Lunar Set in Planetary and Material Science Studies: Textural and Cooling Sequences in Sections of Lava Column from a Thin and a Thick Lava-Flow, from the Moon and Mars with Terrestrial Analogue and Chondrule Textural Comparisons; 7) Classroom Teaching of Space Technology and Simulations by the Husar Rover Model; 8) New Experiments (In Meteorology, Aerosols, Soil Moisture and Ice) on the New Hunveyor Educational Planetary Landers of Universities and Colleges in Hungary; 9) Teaching Planetary GIS by Constructing Its Model for the Test Terrain of the Hunveyor and Husar; 10) Undergraduate Students: An Untapped Resource for Planetary Researchers; 11) Analog Sites in Field Work of Petrology: Rock Assembly Delivered to a Plain by Floods on Earth and Mars; 12) RELAB (Reflectance Experiment Laboratory): A NASA Multiuser Spectroscopy Facility; 13) Full Text Searching and Customization in the NASA ADS Abstract Service.

  6. A longitudinal aerodynamic data repeatability study for a commercial transport model test in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahls, R. A.; Adcock, J. B.; Witkowski, D. P.; Wright, F. L.

    1995-01-01

    A high Reynolds number investigation of a commercial transport model was conducted in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at Langley Research Center. This investigation was part of a cooperative effort to test a 0.03-scale model of a Boeing 767 airplane in the NTF over a Mach number range of 0.70 to 0.86 and a Reynolds number range of 2.38 to 40.0 x 10(exp 6) based on the mean aerodynamic chord. One of several specific objectives of the current investigation was to evaluate the level of data repeatability attainable in the NTF. Data repeatability studies were performed at a Mach number of 0.80 with Reynolds numbers of 2.38, 4.45, and 40.0 x 10(exp 6) and also at a Mach number of 0.70 with a Reynolds number of 40.0 x 10(exp 6). Many test procedures and data corrections are addressed in this report, but the data presented do not include corrections for wall interference, model support interference, or model aeroelastic effects. Application of corrections for these three effects would not affect the results of this study because the corrections are systematic in nature and are more appropriately classified as sources of bias error. The repeatability of the longitudinal stability-axis force and moment data has been accessed. Coefficients of lift, drag, and pitching moment are shown to repeat well within the pretest goals of plus or minus 0.005, plus or minus 0.0001, and plus or minus 0.001, respectively, at a 95-percent confidence level over both short- and near-term periods.

  7. Canyon Disposal Initiative - Numerical Modeling of Contaminant Transport from Grouted Residual Waste in the 221-U Facility (U Plant)

    SciTech Connect

    Rockhold, Mark L.; White, Mark D.; Freeman, Eugene J.

    2004-10-12

    This letter report documents initial numerical analyses conducted by PNNL to provide support for a feasibility study on decommissioning of the canyon buildings at Hanford. The 221-U facility is the first of the major canyon buildings to be decommissioned. The specific objective of this modeling effort was to provide estimates of potential rates of migration of residual contaminants out of the 221-U facility during the first 40 years after decommissioning. If minimal contaminant migration is predicted to occur from the facility during this time period, then the structure may be deemed to provide a level of groundwater protection that is essentially equivalent to the liner and leachate collection systems that are required at conventional landfills. The STOMP code was used to simulate transport of selected radionuclides out of a canyon building, representative of the 221-U facility after decommissioning, for a period of 40 years. Simulation results indicate that none of the selected radionuclides that were modeled migrated beyond the concrete structure of the facility during the 40-year period of interest. Jacques (2001) identified other potential contaminants in the 221-U facility that were not modeled, however, including kerosene, phenol, and various metals. Modeling of these contaminants was beyond the scope of this preliminary effort due to increased complexity. Simulation results indicate that contaminant release from the canyon buildings will be diffusion controlled at early times. Advection is expected to become much more important at later times, after contaminants have diffused out of the facility and into the surrounding soil environment. After contaminants have diffused out of the facility, surface infiltration covers will become very important for mitigating further transport of contaminants in the underlying vadose zone and groundwater.

  8. Experiments on the transportation of a magnetized plasma stream in the GOL-3 facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postupaev, V. V.; Batkin, V. I.; Burdakov, A. V.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kuklin, K. N.; Mekler, K. I.; Rovenskikh, A. F.

    2016-04-01

    The program of the deep upgrade of the GOL-3 multiple-mirror trap is presented. The upgrade is aimed at creating a new GOL-NB open trap located at the GOL-3 site and intended to directly demonstrate the efficiency of using multiple-mirror magnetic cells to improve longitudinal plasma confinement in a gasdynamic open trap. The GOL-NB device will consist of a new central trap, adjoint cells with a multiple-mirror magnetic field, and end tanks (magnetic flux expanders). Plasma in the central trap will be heated by neutral beam injection with a power of up to 1.5 MW and duration of 1 ms. At present, physical experiments directed at developing plasma technologies that are novel for this facility are being carried out using the 6-m-long autonomous part of the GOL-3 solenoid. The aim of this work was to develop a method for filling the central trap with a low-temperature start plasma. Transportation of a plasma stream from an arc source over a distance of 3 m in a uniform magnetic field with an induction of 0.5-4.5 T is demonstrated. In these experiments, the axial plasma density was (1-4) × 1020 m-3 and the mirror ratio varied from 5 to 60. In general, the experiments confirmed the correctness of the adopted decisions for the start plasma source of the GOL-NB device.

  9. Longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a subsonic, energy-efficient transport configuration in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Peter F.; Gloss, Blair B.

    1989-01-01

    The Reynolds number, aeroelasticity, boundary layer transition, and nonadiabatic wall temperature effects, and data repeatability was determined in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) for a subsonic, energy efficient transport model. The model was tested over a Mach number range of 0.50 to 0.86 and a Reynolds number range of 1.9 million to approximately 23.0 million (based on mean geometric chord). The majority of the data was taken using cryogenic nitrogen (data at 1.9 million Reynolds number was taken in air). Force and moment, wing pressure, and wing thermocouple data are presented. The data indicate that increasing Reynolds number resulted in greater effective camber of the supercritical wing and horizontal tail, resulting in greater lift and pitching moment coefficients at nearly all angles of attack for M = 0.82. As Reynolds number was increased, untrimmed L/D increased, the angle of attack for maximum L/D decreased, drag creep was reduced significantly, and drag divergence Mach number increased slightly. Data repeatability for both modes of operation of the NTF (air and cryogenic nitrogen) was generally very good, and nonadiabatic wall effects were estimated to be small. Transition-free and transition-fixed configurations had significantly different force and moment data at M = 0.82 for low Reynolds number, and very small differences were noted at high Reynolds numbers.

  10. The transport of antibiotic resistance genes and residues in groundwater near swine production facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. F.; Yannarell, A. C.; Mackie, R. I.; Krapac, I. G.; Chee-Sanford, J. S.; Koike, S.

    2008-12-01

    The use of antibiotics at concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) for disease prevention, disease treatment, and growth promotion can contribute to the spread of antibiotic compounds, their breakdown products, and antibiotic resistant bacteria and/or the genes that confer resistance. In addition, constitutive use of antibiotics at sub-therapeutic levels can select for antibiotic resistance among the bacteria that inhabit animal intestinal tracts, onsite manure treatment facilities, and any environments receiving significant inputs of manure (e.g. through waste lagoon leakage or fertilizer amendments to farm soils). If the antibiotic resistant organisms persist in these new environments, or if they participate in genetic exchanges with the native microflora, then CAFOs may constitute a significant reservoir for the spread of antibiotic resistance to the environment at large. Our results have demonstrated that leakage from waste treatment lagoons can influence the presence and persistence of tetracycline resistance genes in the shallow aquifer adjacent to swine CAFOs, and molecular phylogeny allowed us to distinguish "native" tetracycline resistance genes in control groundwater wells from manure-associated genes introduced from the lagoon. We have also been able to detect the presence of erythromycin resistance genes in CAFO surface and groundwater even though erythromycin is strictly reserved for use in humans and thus is not utilized at any of these sites. Ongoing research, including modeling of particle transport in groundwater, will help to determine the potential spatial and temporal extent of CAFO-derived antibiotic resistance.

  11. 36 CFR 1191.1 - Accessibility guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... 1191.1 Section 1191.1 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS...; ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS ACT (ABA) ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES § 1191.1 Accessibility guidelines. (a) The... facilities covered by the Architectural Barriers Act are set forth in Appendices C and D to this part....

  12. The Delivery of Distance Education and Other Community Services through Multi-Role Public Access Facilities in Rural Communities: Australian Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crellin, Ian; Graham, Jim

    Changes in Australia's rural economy have resulted in reductions in the availability of government services and education and training. One response to these reductions has been the emergence of community-managed multirole facilities that deliver a range of community services, including access to education and training. Although these centers are…

  13. Solid-State Laser, Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (Rilis) and Laser Beam Transport at Radioactive Ion Beam Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassen, J.; Bricault, P.; Dombsky, M.; Izdebski, F.; Lavoie, J. P.; Gillner, M.; Gottwald, T.; Hellbusch, F.; Teigelhöfer, A.; Voss, A.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    2009-03-01

    The inception of laser resonance ionization spectroscopy and its application as a resonant ionization laser ion source (RILIS) took place merely 20 years ago with pulsed dye lasers [1-5]. By now next generation radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities are being planned or built. Understanding and considering the unique RILIS requirements in the layout of next generation RIB facilities will allow for cost-effective implementation of this versatile ion source. This discussion touches on laser beam transport and RILIS requirements not necessarily obvious to experts in conventional ion sources.

  14. Advancing Long Tail Data Capture and Access Through Trusted, Community-Driven Data Services at the IEDA Data Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, K. A.; Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V.; Hsu, L.; Arko, R. A.; Walker, J. D.; O'hara, S. H.

    2012-12-01

    Substantial volumes of data in the Earth Sciences are collected in small- to medium-size projects by individual investigators or small research teams, known as the 'Long Tail' of science. Traditionally, these data have largely stayed 'in the dark', i.e. they have not been properly archived, and have therefore been inaccessible and underutilized. The primary reason has been the lack of appropriate infrastructure, from adequate repositories to resources and support for investigators to properly manage their data, to community standards and best practices. Lack of credit for data management and for the data themselves has contributed to the reluctance of investigators to share their data. IEDA (Integrated Earth Data Applications), a NSF-funded data facility for solid earth geoscience data, has developed a comprehensive suite of data services that are designed to address the concerns and needs of investigators. IEDA's data publication service registers datasets with DOI and ensures their proper citation and attribution. IEDA is working with publishers on advanced linkages between datasets in the IEDA repository and scientific online articles to facilitate access to the data, enhance their visibility, and augment their use and citation. IEDA's investigator support ranges from individual support for data management to tools, tutorials, and virtual or face-to-face workshops that guide and assist investigators with data management planning, data submission, and data documentation. A critical aspect of IEDA's concept has been the disciplinary expertise within the team and its strong liaison with the science community, as well as a community-based governance. These have been fundamental to gain the trust and support of the community that have lead to significantly improved data preservation and access in the communities served by IEDA.

  15. Spatially Modelling the Association Between Access to Recreational Facilities and Exercise: The ‘Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis’

    PubMed Central

    Berchuck, Samuel I.; Warren, Joshua L.; Herring, Amy H.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Moore, Kari A.B.; Ranchod, Yamini K.; Diez-Roux, Ana V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Numerous studies have investigated the relationship between the built environment and physical activity. However these studies assume that these relationships are invariant over space. In this study, we introduce a novel method to analyze the association between access to recreational facilities and exercise allowing for spatial heterogeneity. In addition, this association is studied before and after controlling for crime, a variable that could explain spatial heterogeneity of associations. We use data from the Chicago site of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis of 781 adults aged 46 years and over. A spatially varying coefficient Tobit regression model is implemented in the Bayesian setting to allow for the association of interest to vary over space. The relationship is shown to vary over Chicago, being positive in the south but negative or null in the north. Controlling for crime weakens the association in the south with little change observed in northern Chicago. The results of this study indicate that spatial heterogeneity in associations of environmental factors with health may vary over space and deserve further exploration. PMID:26877598

  16. Sensitized nucleus accumbens dopamine terminal responses to methylphenidate and dopamine transporter releasers after intermittent-access self-administration.

    PubMed

    Calipari, Erin S; Jones, Sara R

    2014-07-01

    Long-access methylphenidate (MPH) self-administration has been shown to produce enhanced amphetamine potency at the dopamine transporter and concomitant changes in reinforcing efficacy, suggesting that MPH abuse may change the dopamine system in a way that promotes future drug abuse. While long-access self-administration paradigms have translational validity for cocaine, it may not be as relevant a model of MPH abuse, as it has been suggested that people often take MPH intermittently. Although previous work outlined the neurochemical and behavioral consequences of long-access MPH self-administration, it was not clear whether intermittent access (6 h session; 5 min access/30 min) would result in similar changes. For cocaine, long-access self-administration resulted in tolerance to cocaine's effects on dopamine and behavior while intermittent-access resulted in sensitization. Here we assessed the neurochemical consequences of intermittent-access MPH self-administration on dopamine terminal function. We found increased maximal rates of uptake, increased stimulated release, and subsensitive D2-like autoreceptors. Consistent with previous work using extended-access MPH paradigms, the potencies of amphetamine and MPH, but not cocaine, were increased, demonstrating that unlike cocaine, MPH effects were not altered by the pattern of intake. Although the potency results suggest that MPH may share properties with releasers, dopamine release was increased following acute application of MPH, similar to cocaine, and in contrast to the release decreasing effects of amphetamine. Taken together, these data demonstrate that MPH exhibits properties of both blockers and releasers, and that the compensatory changes produced by MPH self-administration may increase the abuse liability of amphetamines, independent of the pattern of administration.

  17. Facile thiol-ene thermal crosslinking reaction facilitated hole-transporting layer for highly efficient and stable perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhong'an; Zhu, Zonglong; Chueh, Chu -Chen; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K. -Y.

    2016-08-08

    A crosslinked organic hole-transporting layer (HTL) is developed to realize highly efficient and stable perovskite solar cells via a facile thiol-ene thermal reaction. This crosslinked HTL not only facilitates hole extraction from perovskites, but also functions as an effective protective barrier. Lastly, a high-performance (power conversion efficiency: 18.3%) device is demonstrated to show respectable photo and thermal stability without encapsulation.

  18. Expanding Access to the Intrauterine Device in Public Health Facilities in Ethiopia: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Tilahun, Yewondwossen; Mehta, Sarah; Zerihun, Habtamu; Lew, Candace; Brooks, Mohamad I; Nigatu, Tariku; Hagos, Kidest Lulu; Asnake, Mengistu; Tasissa, Adeba; Ali, Seid; Desalegn, Ketsela; Adane, Girmay

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Ethiopia, modern contraceptive prevalence among currently married women nearly tripled over the last decade, but the method mix remains skewed toward short-acting methods. Since 2011, the Integrated Family Health Program (IFHP+), jointly implemented by Pathfinder International and John Snow Inc., has supported the Federal Ministry of Health to introduce intrauterine devices (IUDs) in more than 800 health centers across 4 regions to improve access to a wider range of methods. Between March and August 2014, Pathfinder conducted a mixed-methods study in 40 purposively selected health centers to assess shifts in the contraceptive method mix following introduction of IUDs using data from family planning registers; determine the characteristics of IUD users through a cross-sectional survey of 2,943 family planning clients who accepted the IUD; explore reasons for method discontinuation among 165 clients seeking IUD removal services; and identify facilitators and barriers to IUD use through focus group discussions (N = 115 clients) and key informant interviews (N = 36 providers, facility heads, and health office heads). Introduction of IUDs into the 40 health centers participating in the study was correlated with a statistically significant increase in the contribution of all long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs)—both IUDs and implants—to the method mix, from 6.9% in 2011 to 20.5% in 2014 (P<.001). Our study found that latent demand for the IUD was more prevalent than anticipated and that the method was acceptable to a broad cross-section of women. Of the 2,943 women who sought IUDs during the 6-month study period, 18.0% were new contraceptive users (i.e., those using a contraceptive method for the first time ever), 44.7% reported no educational attainment, 62.5% were from rural areas, and 59.3% were younger than 30 years old, with almost 3 in 10 (27.7%) under the age of 25. The most commonly cited reason for seeking IUD removal services

  19. Accessible triple-phase boundary length: A performance metric to account for transport pathways in heterogeneous electrochemical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajo, A.; Cocco, A. P.; DeGostin, M. B.; Peracchio, A. A.; Cassenti, B. N.; Cantoni, M.; Van herle, J.; Chiu, W. K. S.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of materials for electrochemical energy conversion and storage depends upon the number of electrocatalytic sites available for reaction and their accessibility by the transport of reactants and products. For solid oxide fuel/electrolysis cell materials, standard 3-D measurements such as connected triple-phase boundary (TPB) length and effective transport properties partially inform on how local geometry and network topology causes variability in TPB accessibility. A new measurement, the accessible TPB, is proposed to quantify these effects in detail and characterize material performance. The approach probes the reticulated pathways to each TPB using an analytical electrochemical fin model applied to a 3-D discrete representation of the heterogeneous structure provided by skeleton-based partitioning. The method is tested on artificial and real structures imaged by 3-D x-ray and electron microscopy. The accessible TPB is not uniform and the pattern varies depending upon the structure. Connected TPBs can be even passivated. The sensitivity to manipulations of the local 3-D geometry and topology that standard measurements cannot capture is demonstrated. The clear presence of preferential pathways showcases a non-uniform utilization of the 3-D structure that potentially affects the performance and the resilience to alterations due to degradation phenomena. The concepts presented also apply to electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices such as other types of fuel cells, electrolyzers, batteries and capacitors.

  20. 47 CFR 69.123 - Density pricing zones for special access and switched transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Density pricing zones for special access and...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Computation of Charges § 69.123 Density pricing zones... price cap regulation may establish any number of density zones within a study area that is used...

  1. 75 FR 54543 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... accessibility guidelines for buses, over-the-road buses, and vans. DATES: The first public hearing will be held...) in the Federal Register to revise and update its accessibility guidelines for buses, over-the-road buses, and vans. 75 FR 43748 (July 26, 2010). The comment period on the proposed rule ends on...

  2. 47 CFR 69.123 - Density pricing zones for special access and switched transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Density pricing zones for special access and...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Computation of Charges § 69.123 Density pricing zones... price cap regulation may establish any number of density zones within a study area that is used...

  3. 47 CFR 69.123 - Density pricing zones for special access and switched transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Density pricing zones for special access and...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Computation of Charges § 69.123 Density pricing zones... price cap regulation may establish any number of density zones within a study area that is used...

  4. 47 CFR 69.123 - Density pricing zones for special access and switched transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Density pricing zones for special access and...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Computation of Charges § 69.123 Density pricing zones... price cap regulation may establish any number of density zones within a study area that is used...

  5. 47 CFR 69.123 - Density pricing zones for special access and switched transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Density pricing zones for special access and...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Computation of Charges § 69.123 Density pricing zones... price cap regulation may establish any number of density zones within a study area that is used...

  6. Extended access to methamphetamine self-administration up-regulates dopamine transporter levels 72 hours after withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    D'Arcy, Christina; Luevano, Joe E; Miranda-Arango, Manuel; Pipkin, Joseph A; Jackson, Jonathan A; Castañeda, Eddie; Gosselink, Kristin L; O'Dell, Laura E

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that there are persistent changes in dopamine systems following withdrawal from methamphetamine (METH). This study examined changes in striatal dopamine transporter (DAT), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine receptor 2 (D2) 72 h after withdrawal from METH intravenous self- administration (IVSA). Rats were given limited (1h) or extended (6h) access to METH IVSA (0.05 mg/kg/0.1 ml infusion) for 22 days. Controls did not receive METH IVSA. The rats given extended access to IVSA displayed higher METH intake during the first hour of drug access compared to rats given limited access. Extended access to METH also produced a concomitant increase in striatal DAT levels relative to drug-naïve controls. There were no changes in TH or D2 levels across groups. Previous studies have reported a decrease in striatal DAT levels during protracted periods (>7 days) of withdrawal from METH IVSA. This study extends previous work by showing an increase in striatal DAT protein expression during an earlier time point of withdrawal from this drug. These results are an important step toward understanding the dynamic changes in dopamine systems that occur during different time points of withdrawal from METH IVSA.

  7. 25 CFR 170.806 - What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.806 What is an IRR... facility, ensure safety, and report future funding needs to the Secretary. BIA will develop the IRR TFMMS....

  8. Access from Space: A New Perspective on NASA's Space Transportation Technology Requirements and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    The need for robust and reliable access from space is clearly demonstrated by the recent loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia; as well as the NASA s goals to get the Shuttle re-flying and extend its life, build new vehicles for space access, produce successful robotic landers and s a q k retrr? llisrions, and maximize the science content of ambitious outer planets missions that contain nuclear reactors which must be safe for re-entry after possible launch aborts. The technology lynch pin of access from space is hypersonic entry systems such the thermal protection system, along with navigation, guidance and control (NG&C). But it also extends to descent and landing systems such as parachutes, airbags and their control systems. Current space access technology maturation programs such as NASA s Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program or the In-Space Propulsion (ISP) program focus on maturing laboratory demonstrated technologies for potential adoption by specific mission applications. A key requirement for these programs success is a suitable queue of innovative technologies and advanced concepts to mature, including mission concepts enabled by innovative, cross cutting technology advancements. When considering space access, propulsion often dominates the capability requirements, as well as the attention and resources. From the perspective of access from space some new cross cutting technology drivers come into view, along with some new capability opportunities. These include new miniature vehicles (micro, nano, and picosats), advanced automated systems (providing autonomous on-orbit inspection or landing site selection), and transformable aeroshells (to maximize capabilities and minimize weight). This paper provides an assessment of the technology drivers needed to meet future access from space mission requirements, along with the mission capabilities that can be envisioned from innovative, cross cutting access from space technology developments.

  9. Creating a Clinical Video-Conferencing Facility in a Security-Constrained Environment Using Open-Source AccessGrid Software and Consumer Hardware

    PubMed Central

    Terrazas, Enrique; Hamill, Timothy R.; Wang, Ye; Channing Rodgers, R. P.

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Laboratory Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) has been split into widely separated facilities, leading to much time being spent traveling between facilities for meetings. We installed an open-source AccessGrid multi-media-conferencing system using (largely) consumer-grade equipment, connecting 6 sites at 5 separate facilities. The system was accepted rapidly and enthusiastically, and was inexpensive compared to alternative approaches. Security was addressed by aspects of the AG software and by local network administrative practices. The chief obstacles to deployment arose from security restrictions imposed by multiple independent network administration regimes, requiring a drastically reduced list of network ports employed by AG components. PMID:18693930

  10. Creating a clinical video-conferencing facility in a security-constrained environment using open-source AccessGrid software and consumer hardware.

    PubMed

    Terrazas, Enrique; Hamill, Timothy R; Wang, Ye; Channing Rodgers, R P

    2007-10-11

    The Department of Laboratory Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) has been split into widely separated facilities, leading to much time being spent traveling between facilities for meetings. We installed an open-source AccessGrid multi-media-conferencing system using (largely) consumer-grade equipment, connecting 6 sites at 5 separate facilities. The system was accepted rapidly and enthusiastically, and was inexpensive compared to alternative approaches. Security was addressed by aspects of the AG software and by local network administrative practices. The chief obstacles to deployment arose from security restrictions imposed by multiple independent network administration regimes, requiring a drastically reduced list of network ports employed by AG components.

  11. Development of Parallel Computing Framework to Enhance Radiation Transport Code Capabilities for Rare Isotope Beam Facility Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kostin, Mikhail; Mokhov, Nikolai; Niita, Koji

    2013-09-25

    A parallel computing framework has been developed to use with general-purpose radiation transport codes. The framework was implemented as a C++ module that uses MPI for message passing. It is intended to be used with older radiation transport codes implemented in Fortran77, Fortran 90 or C. The module is significantly independent of radiation transport codes it can be used with, and is connected to the codes by means of a number of interface functions. The framework was developed and tested in conjunction with the MARS15 code. It is possible to use it with other codes such as PHITS, FLUKA and MCNP after certain adjustments. Besides the parallel computing functionality, the framework offers a checkpoint facility that allows restarting calculations with a saved checkpoint file. The checkpoint facility can be used in single process calculations as well as in the parallel regime. The framework corrects some of the known problems with the scheduling and load balancing found in the original implementations of the parallel computing functionality in MARS15 and PHITS. The framework can be used efficiently on homogeneous systems and networks of workstations, where the interference from the other users is possible.

  12. Access to transport for women with hypovolemic shock differs according to weeks of pregnancy☆

    PubMed Central

    Butrick, Elizabeth; Penn, Amy; Itakura, Kaoru; Mkumba, Gricelia; Winter, Kelly; Amafumba, Rhoda; Miller, Suellen

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine whether women with hypovolemic shock secondary to obstetric hemorrhage are transported to referral hospitals differently depending on weeks of pregnancy in Zambia. Methods In a retrospective study, transport type, wait time, and transit time were assessed for women with obstetric hemorrhage and hypovolemic shock transported from 26 primary health centers to three referral hospitals during 2007–2011. A mean arterial pressure of less than 60 mm Hg was used to indicate severe shock. Women were split into two categories on the basis of the number of weeks of pregnancy (<24 weeks vs ≥24 weeks). Results Overall, 616 women were included. Mode of transport differed significantly by group (P<0.001). 414 (93.0%) of 445 women at 24 weeks of pregnancy or more were transported by ambulance versus 114 (66.7%) of 171 women at less than 24 weeks. Among those in severe shock, 106 (93.0%) of 114 women at 24 weeks of pregnancy or more were transported in ambulances versus 26 (52.0%) of 50 women at less than 24 weeks (P<0.001). Conclusion Women at 24 weeks of pregnancy or more were given preference for ambulance transport even when signs of shock were equivalent. Policy-makers aiming to lower maternal mortality need to address transport issues regardless of the etiology of hemorrhage or week of pregnancy. PMID:25022343

  13. Mercury regulation, fate, transport, transformation, and abatement within cement manufacturing facilities: review.

    PubMed

    Sikkema, Joel K; Alleman, James E; Ong, Say Kee; Wheelock, Thomas D

    2011-09-15

    The USEPA's 2010 mercury rule, which would reduce emissions from non-hazardous waste burning cement manufacturing facilities by an estimated 94%, represents a substantial regulatory challenge for the industry. These regulations, based on the performance of facilities that benefit from low concentrations of mercury in their feedstock and fuel inputs (e.g., limestone concentration was less than 25 ppb at each facility), will require non-compliant facilities to develop innovative controls. Control development is difficult because each facility's emissions must be assessed and simple correlation to mercury concentrations in limestone or an assumption of 'typically observed' mercury concentrations in inputs are unsupported by available data. Furthermore, atmospheric emissions are highly variable due to an internal control mechanism that captures and loops mercury between the high-temperature kiln and low-temperature raw materials mill. Two models have been reported to predict emissions; however, they have not been benchmarked against data from the internal components that capture mercury and do not distinguish between mercury species, which have different sorption and desorption properties. Control strategies include technologies applied from other industries and technologies developed specifically for cement facilities. Reported technologies, listed from highest to lowest anticipated mercury removal, include purge of collected dust or raw meal, changes in feedstocks and fuels, wet scrubbing, cleaning of mercury enriched dust, dry sorbent injection, and dry and semi-dry scrubbing. The effectiveness of these technologies is limited by an inadequate understanding of sorption, desorption, and mercury species involved in internal loop mercury control. To comply with the mercury rule and to improve current mercury control technologies and practices, research is needed to advance fundamental knowledge regarding mercury species sorption and desorption dynamics on materials

  14. NASA Langley Research Center's Simulation-To-Flight Concept Accomplished through the Integration Laboratories of the Transport Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Debbie; Davidson, Paul C.; Kenney, P. Sean; Hutchinson, Brian K.

    2004-01-01

    The Flight Simulation and Software Branch (FSSB) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) maintains the unique national asset identified as the Transport Research Facility (TRF). The TRF is a group of facilities and integration laboratories utilized to support the LaRC's simulation-to-flight concept. This concept incorporates common software, hardware, and processes for both groundbased flight simulators and LaRC s B-757-200 flying laboratory identified as the Airborne Research Integrated Experiments System (ARIES). These assets provide Government, industry, and academia with an efficient way to develop and test new technology concepts to enhance the capacity, safety, and operational needs of the ever-changing national airspace system. The integration of the TRF enables a smooth continuous flow of the research from simulation to actual flight test.

  15. Acclimatization of rats after ground transportation to a new animal facility.

    PubMed

    Capdevila, S; Giral, M; Ruiz de la Torre, J L; Russell, R J; Kramer, K

    2007-04-01

    This study aimed to assess the time needed by rats, which had not been previously transported, to acclimate to a new environment after 5 h of van transport, using physiological parameters as measures of acclimatization. Animal shipping boxes and transport van conditions were standardized to minimize stress factors that could be associated with transport. Heart rate (HR), body temperature and activity levels were measured in the rats before and after transport using previously implanted radio-telemetry transmitters. Body weight was also recorded. All parameters were changed significantly except for body temperature. Results suggest that rats take three days to acclimate to a new environment, as measured by the physiological parameters of body weight, HR and activity.

  16. Integration and use of Microgravity Research Facility: Lessons learned by the crystals by vapor transport experiment and Space Experiments Facility programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heizer, Barbara L.

    1992-01-01

    The Crystals by Vapor Transport Experiment (CVTE) and Space Experiments Facility (SEF) are materials processing facilities designed and built for use on the Space Shuttle mid deck. The CVTE was built as a commercial facility owned by the Boeing Company. The SEF was built under contract to the UAH Center for Commercial Development of Space (CCDS). Both facilities include up to three furnaces capable of reaching 850 C minimum, stand-alone electronics and software, and independent cooling control. In addition, the CVTE includes a dedicated stowage locker for cameras, a laptop computer, and other ancillary equipment. Both systems are designed to fly in a Middeck Accommodations Rack (MAR), though the SEF is currently being integrated into a Spacehab rack. The CVTE hardware includes two transparent furnaces capable of achieving temperatures in the 850 to 870 C range. The transparent feature allows scientists/astronauts to directly observe and affect crystal growth both on the ground and in space. Cameras mounted to the rack provide photodocumentation of the crystal growth. The basic design of the furnace allows for modification to accommodate techniques other than vapor crystal growth. Early in the CVTE program, the decision was made to assign a principal scientist to develop the experiment plan, affect the hardware/software design, run the ground and flight research effort, and interface with the scientific community. The principal scientist is responsible to the program manager and is a critical member of the engineering development team. As a result of this decision, the hardware/experiment requirements were established in such a way as to balance the engineering and science demands on the equipment. Program schedules for hardware development, experiment definition and material selection, flight operations development and crew training, both ground support and astronauts, were all planned and carried out with the understanding that the success of the program science

  17. The Long Duration Exposure Facility - A shuttle transported low cost technology experiment carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibattista, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is a passive spacecraft capable of remaining in space for extended periods. Its primary role is to accommodate advanced spacecraft technology experiments. The LDEF is space-shuttle delivered and retrieved. With retrieval, it offers unique opportunities to study, in ground-based laboratories, results from a wide variety of experiments after exposure in space.

  18. 49 CFR 37.43 - Alteration of transportation facilities by public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... that, to the maximum extent feasible, the path of travel to the altered area and the bathrooms.... Provided, that alterations to the path of travel, drinking fountains, telephones and bathrooms are not... areas (except those involving non-occupiable spaces accessed only by ladders, catwalks, crawl...

  19. Information needs for siting new, and evaluating current, nuclear facilities: ecology, fate and transport, and human health.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Clarke, James; Gochfeld, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The USA is entering an era of energy diversity, and increasing nuclear capacity and concerns focus on accidents, security, waste, and pollution. Physical buffers that separate outsiders from nuclear facilities often support important natural ecosystems but may contain contaminants. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licenses nuclear reactors; the applicant provides environmental assessments that serve as the basis for Environmental Impact Statements developed by NRC. We provide a template for the types of information needed for safe siting of nuclear facilities with buffers in three categories: ecological, fate and transport, and human health information that can be used for risk evaluations. Each item on the lists is an indicator for evaluation, and individual indicators can be selected for specific region. Ecological information needs include biodiversity (species, populations, communities) and structure and functioning of ecosystems, habitats, and landscapes, in addition to common, abundant, and unique species and endangered and rare ones. The key variables of fate and transport are sources of release for radionuclides and other chemicals, nature of releases (atmospheric vapors, subsurface liquids), features, and properties of environmental media (wind speed, direction and atmospheric stability, hydraulic gradient, hydraulic conductivity, groundwater chemistry). Human health aspects include receptor populations (demography, density, dispersion, and distance), potential pathways (drinking water sources, gardening, fishing), and exposure opportunities (lifestyle activities). For each of the three types of information needs, we expect that only a few of the indicators will be applicable to a particular site and that stakeholders should agree on a site-specific suite.

  20. Waste management facilities cost information for transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Feizollahi, F.; Shropshire, D.; Burton, D.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains cost information on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex waste streams that will be addressed by DOE in the programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) project. It describes the results of the task commissioned by DOE to develop cost information for transportation of radioactive and hazardous waste. It contains transportation costs for most types of DOE waste streams: low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), alpha LLW and alpha MLLW, Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) LLW and DOE equivalent waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and hazardous waste. Unit rates for transportation of contact-handled (<200 mrem/hr contact dose) and remote-handled (>200 mrem/hr contact dose) radioactive waste are estimated. Land transportation of radioactive and hazardous waste is subject to regulations promulgated by DOE, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and state and local agencies. The cost estimates in this report assume compliance with applicable regulations.

  1. Housing and Transport: Access Issues for Disabled International Students in British Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soorenian, Armineh

    2013-01-01

    This article explores two disabled people's "Seven Needs" to independent living, those of "housing" and "transport" issues, in relation to disabled international students in British universities. Firstly, students' living arrangements, including issues related to the suitability of university accommodation to their…

  2. Springfield Processing Plant* (A Hypothetical Facility) SPP, Entry Control Point and Vehicle Gate Access Control Post Order

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Gregory A.

    2014-06-01

    This hypothetical order provides the requirements and instructions for the Springfield Processing Plant (SPP) Vehicle Gate and Entry Control Point (ECP) in the perimeter access building. The purpose of this post is to prevent the theft, sabotage or diversion of nuclear material (NM), control access and exit at the protected area, and to respond to emergencies according the SPP Guard Force (GF) Contingency Plan and as directed by a Guard Force Supervisor.

  3. The Prospect of China’s Access to Naval Facilities in Burma and the Ramifications for Regional Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    www.guardian.co.uk/china/story/0,,1939380,00.html (accessed 2 March 2007). 34 David Zweig and Bi Jianhai. “China’s Global Hunt for Energy.” Foreign Affairs 84...http://www.uscc.gov/annual_report/2006/06_annual_report.php (accessed November 30, 2006). Zweig , David, and Bi Jianhai. “China’s Global Hunt for

  4. Estimating Access to Drinking Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene Facilities in Wolaita Sodo Town, Southern Ethiopia, in Reference to National Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Debebe, Ashenafi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The coverage of sanitation and access to safe drinking water in Ethiopia especially in Wolaita Sodo town are not well studied. Therefore, the main objective of this study was estimating access to drinking water supply, sanitation, and hygiene facilities in Wolaita Sodo town, southern Ethiopia, in reference to national coverage. Methods. A community based cross-sectional study design method was employed in the study in 588 households of Wolaita Sodo town inhabitants. Face-to-face interview to household owners, in-depth interview to key informants, reviewing secondary data, and observational check lists were used to collect data. Districts were selected using simple random sampling techniques, while systematic random sampling technique was applied to select households. Data was analyzed using Epi Info version 3.5.4 and SPSS version 16 statistical software. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analysis were carried out. Results. The community has access to improved water supply which was estimated to be 67.9%. The main water sources of the town were tap water within the yard, which was estimated to be 44.7%, and tap water in the community was 40.0% followed by private protected well which was 14.5%. Ninety-one percent of the households had at least one type of latrine in their homes. The most common type of latrine available to households was pit latrine with superstructure which was estimated to be 75.9% followed by a pit without superstructure, 21.3%, and more than half of the respondents had hand washing facilities in their compound. Occupational status, educational status, and training on water, sanitation, and hygiene related topics were significantly associated with use of improved water source, improved sanitation, and hygiene facilities. Conclusion. In order to address the demand of the town, additional water, sanitation, and hygiene programs are required. PMID:28025598

  5. The technology development studio of the MPI-CBG: an open access cell-based screening facility.

    PubMed

    Bickle, Marc

    2014-05-01

    In the past decade, academic screening centers have been created in many universities worldwide. Most of these screening centers are organized as core facilities that accept projects from both within their organization and from external users in order to maximize staff and instrument usage. The Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden, Germany, also created such a screening facility named the Technology Development Studio (TDS). The mission of the facility is to provide cell based screening services focused on high resolution confocal imaging. The acquisition of high resolution images allows the mathematical description of cells with image analysis to a high degree of precision. This precision in turn allows classifying phenotypes accurately and compare different cellular treatments to discover underlying mechanisms.

  6. Scheduling of flow shop problems on 3 machines in fuzzy environment with double transport facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathish, Shakeela; Ganesan, K.

    2016-06-01

    Flow shop scheduling is a decision making problem in production and manufacturing field which has a significant impact on the performance of an organization. When the machines on which jobs are to be processed are placed at different places, the transportation time plays a significant role in production. Further two different transport agents where 1st takes the job from 1st machine to 2nd machine and then returns back to the first machine and the 2nd takes the job from 2nd machine to 3rd machine and then returns back to the 2nd machine are also considered. We propose a method to minimize the total make span; without converting the fuzzy processing time to classical numbers by using a new type of fuzzy arithmetic and a fuzzy ranking method. A numerical example is provided to explain the proposed method.

  7. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building access control (BAC)--a catchall phrase to describe the systems that control access to facilities across campus--has traditionally been handled with remarkably low-tech solutions: (1) manual locks; (2) electronic locks; and (3) ID cards with magnetic strips. Recent improvements have included smart cards and keyless solutions that make use…

  8. National Ignition Facility subsystem design requirements transportation {ampersand} handling, SSDR 1.1.1.3.2

    SciTech Connect

    Yakuma, S.; McNairy, R.

    1996-07-10

    This Subsystem Design Requirement document is a development specification that establishes the performance, design, development, and test requirements for the Transportation & Material Handling Systems (WBS 1.1.1.3.2) of the NIF Laser System (WBS 1.3 and 1.4). The NIF is a multi-pass, 192-beam, high-power, neodymium-glass laser that meets requirements set forth in the NIF SDR 002 (Laser System). 5 figs.

  9. Book of Renovations. A Compilation of Drawings Depicting the Most Common Problems and Solutions to Renovating Existing Buildings and Facilities to Make Them Accessible to and Usable by People with Physical Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Bruce H., Ed.

    This booklet presents a compilation of ideas and illustrations intended to solve many accessibility problems of physically handicapped persons using older buildings and facilities which were built before legislation and regulations mandating accessibility for disabled persons were passed. The solutions pictured in the booklet are intended to meet…

  10. Transport of spent fuel from reactors to DOE storage/disposal facilities - a parametric study

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.R.; Saverot, P.M.

    1997-09-01

    The amount of spent fuel from US commercial nuclear power plants that will be shipped to US DOE disposal facilities is expected to peak out at about 3000 MTU. A number of concerns including safety, emergency response, and traffic impacts, have been expressed regarding the large number of shipments that will be required to move this spent fuel. This article develops parametrically the numbers of shipments required to move 3000 MTU/year in the form of spent fuel under a variety of cask capacities and assumptions of fuel characteristics as well as the number of casks needed. In addition incremental traffic impact on roads and rail lines under a variety of conditions is also analyzed. 3 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Chemical fate and transport of atrazine in soil gravel materials at agrichemical distribution facilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, W.R.; Krapac, I.G.; Chou, S.-F.J.

    1999-01-01

    The gravel commonly used to cover parking lots and roadways at retail agrichemical facilities may contain relatively large concentrations of pesticides that resulted from past management problems. These pesticides may threaten groundwater quality. Previous studies, however, suggested that the pesticides had not moved from the gravel in several sample profiles. Excavations at a closed facility revealed tremendous variability in pesticide distribution within the site. Pesticides were present below the gravel in two profiles, but the mechanism(s) for their movement were not clear. The objectives of this study were to investigate how the physical and chemical properties of the gravel influence the environmental fate of atrazine. All of the gravel samples collected and characterized contained atrazine and sufficient organic C to adsorb significant amounts of atrazine, thus retarding its movement through the gravel. Laboratory column leaching experiments, however, suggested that much of the atrazine should leach from the gravel within a year or two. A field-scale test plot was constructed to study how atrazine moves through the gravel under controlled conditions. Atrazine was "spilled" in the test plot. Atrazine moved from the gravel both vertically and horizontally. It appears that formulated product spilled on gravel will leach. A single discrete spill can give rise to phantom spills whose occurrence and distribution is not related to any specific pesticide-management practice. The apparent lack of atrazine leaching from gravel appeared to be a transient phenomenon and/or the result of sampling limitations in previous studies. The contaminated gravel clearly poses a risk to groundwater quality.

  12. LUGH an experimental facility for preferential flow-colloidal transport in heterogeneous unsaturated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo-Jaramillo, R.; Bien, L.; Hehn, V.; Winiarski, T.

    2011-12-01

    Colloidal particles transport through vadose zone can contribute to fast transport of contaminants into groundwater. The objective is to study the preferential flow and transport of colloids in heterogeneous unsaturated soil subjected to high organic matter entry. A physically based model is developed based on a large laboratory lysimeter than usual laboratory column experiments. LUGH-Lysimeter for Unsaturated Groundwater Hydrodynamics- is used to embed a soil monolith (1.6 m3) made of different cross-bedded lithological types with contrasting hydraulic properties. The filling material is a carbonated graded sand and gravel from the fluvioglacial vadose zone of the east of Lyon (France). Materials are 3D arranged on contrasting textured lithofacies analogous to the sedimentary lithology of a fluvioglacial cross-bedded deposit. Tracer (Br 1E-2M) and colloid solutions were injected in a pulse mode using a rainfall simulator. Colloid solution is Chlamydomonas reinhardtii at 3.2E+6 units/mL concentration. These unicellular algae can be considered as spherical particles from 6 to 10 μm in diam. Their resistance and doubling time of cell growth are greater than the transfer time in the lysimeter. Algae moving into the porous medium do not immediately reproduce, and then the population size remains constant. During this period, called the lag phase (1 to 2 days), the cells are metabolically active and increase only in cell size. Tensiometers, TDR and electric resistivity enable measurements of the parameters related to flow, solute and colloid transfer. Eluted solutions are sampled by 15 separated fraction collectors, leading to independent breakthrough curves. Eluted colloid concentration is measured by spectrofluorometry. The model approach combines Richards equation, coupled to a convective-dispersive equation with a source/sink term for particle transport and mobilization. Macroscopic particle attachment/detachment from pores is assumed to follow first-order kinetics

  13. Studies of plasma performance and transport in the advanced toroidal facility (ATF)

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, G.H.; Bigelow, T.S.; Carreras, B.A.; Colchin, R.J.; Crume, E.C.; Dunlap, J.L.; Dyer, G.R.; England, A.C.; Glowienka, J.C.; Halliwell, J.W.; Harris, J.H.; Hedrick, C.L.; Hillis, D.L.; Hiroe, S.; Horton, L.D.; Howe, H.C.; Isler, R.C.; Jernigan, T.C.; Langley, R.A.; Lue, J.W.; Lyon, J.F.; Ma, C.H.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Murakami, M.; Rasmussen, D.A.; Schwenterly, S.W.; Shepard, T.D.; Simpkins, J.E.; Uckan, T.; Wilgen, J.B

    1989-01-01

    An overview of recent ATF experimental results and program plans is presented, with emphasis on the role of magnetic configuration controls in transport studies. The ATF operating space is bounded by a density limit that effectively sets a limit on the energy confinement time {tau}{sub E}. Although this limit is not solely due to impurities, it has recently been raised by improved cleanliness following titanium gettering. This has led to collapse-free neutral beam injection (NBI) discharges with global {tau}{sub E} {approx} 16 ms. Preliminary experiments show that stored energy and bootstrap current are sensitive to details of the magnetic configuration. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Characterization of stormwater at selected South Carolina Department of Transportation maintenance yards and section shed facilities in Ballentine, Conway, and North Charleston, South Carolina, 2010-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Journey, Celeste; Conlon, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Increased impervious surfaces (driveways, parking lots, and buildings) and human activities (residential, industrial, and commercial) have been linked to substantial changes in both the quality and quantity of stormwater on a watershed scale (Brabec and others, 2002; Pitt and Maestre, 2005). Small-scale storage and equipment repair facilities increase impervious surfaces that prevent infiltration of stormwater, and these facilities accommodate activities that can introduce trace metals, organic compounds, and other contaminants to the facility’s grounds. Thus, these small facilities may contribute pollutants to the environment during storm events (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1992). The South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT) operates section shed and maintenance yard facilities throughout the State. Prior to this investigation, the SCDOT had no data to define the quality of stormwater leaving these facilities. To provide these data, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the SCDOT, conducted an investigation to identify and quantify constituents that are transported in stormwater from two maintenance yards and a section shed in three different areas of South Carolina. The two maintenance yards, in North Charleston and Conway, S.C., were selected because they represent facilities where equipment and road maintenance materials are stored and complete equipment repair operations are conducted. The section shed, in Ballentine, S.C., was selected because it is a facility that stores equipment and road maintenance material. Characterization of the constituents that were transported in stormwater from these representative SCDOT maintenance facilities may be used by the SCDOT in the development of stormwater management plans for similar section shed and maintenance yard facilities throughout the State to improve stormwater quality.

  15. Transport calculation of neutrons leaked to the surroundings of the facilities by the JCO criticality accident in Tokai-mura.

    PubMed

    Imanaka, T

    2001-09-01

    A transport calculation of the neutrons leaked to the environment by the JCO criticality accident was carried out based on three-dimensional geometrical models of the buildings within the JCO territory. Our work started from an initial step to simulate the leakage process of neutrons from the precipitation tank, and proceeded to a step to calculate the neutron propagation throughout the JCO facilities. The total fission number during the accident in the precipitation tank was evaluated to be 2.5 x 10(18) by comparing the calculated neutron-induced activities per 235U fission with the measured values in a stainless-steel net sample taken 2 m from the precipitation tank. Shield effects by various structures within the JCO facilities were evaluated by comparing the present results with a previous calculation using two-dimensional models which suppose a point source of the fission spectrum in the air above the ground without any shield structures. The shield effect by the precipitation tank, itself, was obtained to be a factor of 3. The shield factor by the conversion building varied between 1.1 and 2, depending on the direction from the building. The shield effect by the surrounding buildings within the JCO territory was between I and 5, also depending on the direction.

  16. Fleet servicing facilities for servicing, maintaining, and testing rail and truck radioactive waste transport systems: functional requirements, technical design concepts and options cost estimates and comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, C.D.; Hudson, B.J.; Keith, D.A.; Preston, M.K. Jr.; McCreery, P.N.; Knox, W.; Easterling, E.M.; Lamprey, A.S.; Wiedemann, G.

    1980-05-01

    This is a resource document which examines feasibility design concepts and feasibility studies of a Fleet Servicing Facility (FSF). Such a facility is intended to be used for routine servicing, preventive maintenance, and for performing requalification license compliance tests and inspections, minor repairs, and decontamination of both the transportation casks and their associated rail cars or tractor-trailers. None of the United States' waste handling plants presently receiving radioactive wastes have an on-site FSF, nor is there an existing third party facility providing these services. This situation has caused the General Accounting Office to express concern regarding the quality of waste transport system maintenance once the system is placed into service. Thus, a need is indicated for FSF's, or their equivalent, at various radioactive materials receiving sites. In this report, three forms of FSF's solely for spent fuel transport systems were examined: independent, integrated, and colocated. The independent concept was already the subject of a detailed report and is extensively referenced in this document so that capital cost comparisons of the three concepts could be made. These facilities probably could service high-level, intermediate-level, low-level, or other waste transportation systems with minor modification, but this study did not include any system other than spent fuel. Both the Integrated and Colocated concepts were assumed to be associated with some radioactive materials handling facility such as an AFR repository.

  17. 78 FR 10110 - Accessibility Guidelines for Pedestrian Facilities in the Public Right-of-Way; Shared Use Paths

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    .... Regulatory Analyses In this preamble, ``we,'' ``us,'' and ``our'' refer to the Architectural and...-way or on an exclusive right-of-way with minimal cross flow by motor vehicles. The Washington State... surfaces of 5.2.9 Surface Structure pedestrian access routes and Hard, all-weather pavement...

  18. Time and distance barriers to mammography facilities in the Atlanta metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Peipins, Lucy A; Graham, Shannon; Young, Randall; Lewis, Brian; Foster, Stephanie; Flanagan, Barry; Dent, Andrew

    2011-08-01

    To a great extent, research on geographic accessibility to mammography facilities has focused on urban-rural differences. Spatial accessibility within urban areas can nonetheless pose a challenge, especially for minorities and low-income urban residents who are more likely to depend on public transportation. To examine spatial and temporal accessibility to mammography facilities in the Atlanta metropolitan area by public and private transportation, we built a multimodal transportation network model including bus and rail routes, bus and rail stops, transfers, walk times, and wait times. Our analysis of travel times from the population-weighted centroids of the 282 census tracts in the 2-county area to the nearest facility found that the median public transportation time was almost 51 minutes. We further examined public transportation travel times by levels of household access to a private vehicle. Residents in tracts with the lowest household access to a private vehicle had the shortest travel times, suggesting that facilities were favorably located for women who have to use public transportation. However, census tracts with majority non-Hispanic black populations had the longest travel times for all levels of vehicle availability. Time to the nearest mammography facility would not pose a barrier to women who had access to a private vehicle. This study adds to the literature demonstrating differences in spatial accessibility to health services by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic characteristics. Ameliorating spatial inaccessibility represents an opportunity for intervention that operates at the population level.

  19. United States Access Board

    MedlinePlus

    ... disabilities through leadership in accessible design and the development of accessibility guidelines and standards for the built environment, transportation, communication, medical diagnostic equipment, and information technology. ...

  20. Interface of the transport systems research vehicle monochrome display system to the digital autonomous terminal access communication data bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easley, W. C.; Tanguy, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    An upgrade of the transport systems research vehicle (TSRV) experimental flight system retained the original monochrome display system. The original host computer was replaced with a Norden 11/70, a new digital autonomous terminal access communication (DATAC) data bus was installed for data transfer between display system and host, while a new data interface method was required. The new display data interface uses four split phase bipolar (SPBP) serial busses. The DATAC bus uses a shared interface ram (SIR) for intermediate storage of its data transfer. A display interface unit (DIU) was designed and configured to read from and write to the SIR to properly convert the data from parallel to SPBP serial and vice versa. It is found that separation of data for use by each SPBP bus and synchronization of data tranfer throughout the entire experimental flight system are major problems which require solution in DIU design. The techniques used to accomplish these new data interface requirements are described.

  1. Manned Mars System Study (MMSS): Mars transportation and facility infrastructure study. Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Manned Mars System Study (MMSS) was conducted for the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) over the 35 month period between May 15, 1987 and April 30, 1990. During the course of the study, the NASA Office of Exploration (OEXP; Code Z) was created and MSFC was subsequently designated the Transportation Integration Agent (TIA) for support of the OEXP Mission Analysis and Systems Engineering (MASE) team. As a result of this action, modifications to the contract redirected the efforts to be consistent with NASA's overall objectives, including lunar transportation system design. A large number of written submittals were required in order to provide TIA support to MASE. A list summarizing the documents which have been prepared and delivered by Martin Marietta under this contract during the course of this work is presented. In nearly all cases, full sets of view-graphs were also provided to the MSFC COTR, and in several cases magnetic media were provided as well. To incorporate all of these materials (more than 2,000 pages) into the present report would obviously produce an extremely unwieldy and confusing document. Therefore, a summary of key findings are presented in this final report, supplemented by other material produced under this contract but not already available in the widespread literature.

  2. Facile synthesis of mesostructured ZSM-5 zeolite with enhanced mass transport and catalytic performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Ren, Yanqun; Gou, Jinsheng; Liu, Baoyu; Xi, Hongxia

    2017-01-01

    A mesostructured ZSM-5 zeolite with multilamellar structure was successfully synthesized by employing a tetra-headgroup rigid bolaform quaternary ammonium surfactant. It was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, amines temperature programmed desorption (amines-TPD), and computer simulation. These results indicated that the dual-functional amphiphilic surfactants play a critical role for directing the multilamellar structure with high mesoporosity. The mass transport and catalytic performances of the zeolite were investigated by zero length column (ZLC) technique and aldol condensation reactions to evaluate the structure-property relationship. These results clearly indicated that the mass transport of selected molecules in hierarchical zeolite can be accelerated by introducing mesoporous structure with mesostructure with reduced diffusion length and an overall enhanced resistance against deactivation in reactions involving large molecules. Furthermore, the dual-functional surfactant approach of making hierarchical zeolite with MFI nanosheets framework would open up new opportunities for design and synthesis of hierarchical zeolites with controllable mesoporous structures.

  3. Support System Effects on the DLR-F6 Transport Configuration in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Melissa B.; Hunter, Craig A.; Gatlin, Gregory M.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the DLR-F6 generic transport configuration was conducted in the NASA NTF for use in the Drag Prediction Workshop. As data from this experimental investigation was collected, a large difference in drag values was seen between the NTF test and an ONERA test that was conducted several years ago. After much investigation, it was determined that this difference was likely due to a sting effect correction applied to the ONERA data which NTF does not use. This insight led to the present work. In this study, a computational assessment has been undertaken to investigate model support system interference effects on the DLR-F6 transport configuration. The configurations computed during this investigation were the isolated wing-body, the wing-body with the full support system (blade and sting), the wing-body with just the blade, and the wing-body with just the sting. The results from this investigation show the same trends that ONERA saw when they conducted a similar experimental investigation in the S2MA tunnel. Computational results suggest that the blade contributed an interference type of effect, the sting contributed a general blockage effect, and the full support system combined these effects.

  4. Solvent-driven electron trapping and mass transport in reduced graphites to access perfect graphene

    PubMed Central

    Vecera, Philipp; Holzwarth, Johannes; Edelthalhammer, Konstantin F.; Mundloch, Udo; Peterlik, Herwig; Hauke, Frank; Hirsch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report on a significant discovery, namely, the quantitative discharging of reduced graphite forms, such as graphite intercalation compounds, graphenide dispersions and graphenides deposited on surfaces with the simple solvent benzonitrile. Because of its comparatively low reduction potential, benzonitrile is reduced during this process to the radical anion, which exhibits a red colour and serves as a reporter molecule for the quantitative determination of negative charges on the carbon sheets. Moreover, this discovery reveals a very fundamental physical–chemical phenomenon, namely a quantitative solvent reduction induced and electrostatically driven mass transport of K+ ions from the graphite intercalation compounds into the liquid. The simple treatment of dispersed graphenides suspended on silica substrates with benzonitrile leads to the clean conversion to graphene. This unprecedented procedure represents a rather mild, scalable and inexpensive method for graphene production surpassing previous wet-chemical approaches. PMID:27506380

  5. Accessing exciton transport in light-harvesting structures with plasmonic nanotip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikin, Semion K.; Feist, Johannes; Homer Reid, M. T.; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2012-02-01

    Natural light-harvesting complexes, such as that of plant cells or photosynthetic bacteria, are considered as possible prototypes for artificially designed solar cell materials. In these structures the energy of light absorbed by a peripheral antenna is transmitted very efficiently in a form of excitons to a reaction center. Usually, information about the exciton transport is obtained from time-resolved nonlinear optical experiments where the frequencies of a pump and a probe fields select particular electronic transitions in the light-harvesting complex. We explore a complimentary setup utilizing a plasmonic nanotip as a local sub-wavelength probe of excitation dynamics. As specific examples we consider an LHII complex involved in the light-harvesting process of purple bacteria and a Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex of green-sulphur bacteria.

  6. Towards scalable parellelism in Monte Carlo particle transport codes using remote memory access

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Paul K; Brown, Forrest B; Forget, Benoit

    2010-01-01

    One forthcoming challenge in the area of high-performance computing is having the ability to run large-scale problems while coping with less memory per compute node. In this work, they investigate a novel data decomposition method that would allow Monte Carlo transport calculations to be performed on systems with limited memory per compute node. In this method, each compute node remotely retrieves a small set of geometry and cross-section data as needed and remotely accumulates local tallies when crossing the boundary of the local spatial domain. initial results demonstrate that while the method does allow large problems to be run in a memory-limited environment, achieving scalability may be difficult due to inefficiencies in the current implementation of RMA operations.

  7. Solvent-driven electron trapping and mass transport in reduced graphites to access perfect graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecera, Philipp; Holzwarth, Johannes; Edelthalhammer, Konstantin F.; Mundloch, Udo; Peterlik, Herwig; Hauke, Frank; Hirsch, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Herein, we report on a significant discovery, namely, the quantitative discharging of reduced graphite forms, such as graphite intercalation compounds, graphenide dispersions and graphenides deposited on surfaces with the simple solvent benzonitrile. Because of its comparatively low reduction potential, benzonitrile is reduced during this process to the radical anion, which exhibits a red colour and serves as a reporter molecule for the quantitative determination of negative charges on the carbon sheets. Moreover, this discovery reveals a very fundamental physical-chemical phenomenon, namely a quantitative solvent reduction induced and electrostatically driven mass transport of K+ ions from the graphite intercalation compounds into the liquid. The simple treatment of dispersed graphenides suspended on silica substrates with benzonitrile leads to the clean conversion to graphene. This unprecedented procedure represents a rather mild, scalable and inexpensive method for graphene production surpassing previous wet-chemical approaches.

  8. Investigation of wheelchair instability during transport in large accessible transit vehicles.

    PubMed

    Salipur, Zdravko; Frost, Karen; Bertocci, Gina

    2012-01-01

    Large accessible transit vehicles (LATVs, fixed-route intracity buses), generally considered safe, may not be as safe for wheelchair-seated passengers. Transit provider practices vary regarding use of wheelchair tiedown and occupant restraint systems (WTORSs), while recent research suggests high levels of WTORS disuse and misuse. We sought to better understand wheelchair and wheelchair passenger instabilities related to WTORS disuse and misuse on LATVs. This article presents a retrospective review of 295 video surveillance records of wheelchair passenger trips on LATVs. Wheelchair trips involving disuse and misuse of WTORS were quantified and categorized based on WTORS configurations. Cases of wheelchair and wheelchair passenger instability were categorized based on severity, type, and direction. Three adverse events involving severe wheelchair and/or passenger instability were examined in greater detail. Results showed 20.3% of records involved wheelchair-related adverse events (95% minor instabilities, 5% severe instabilities). Scooters were most likely to be unstable, followed by manual and power wheelchairs. In most instability cases, no tiedowns were used to secure the wheelchair and no lap belt was used to restrain the wheelchair passenger properly. In many instances, the lap belt was misused in an attempt to secure the wheelchair, whereas the shoulder belt was never used.

  9. Transport and fate of radionuclides in aquatic environments--the use of ecosystem modelling for exposure assessments of nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Kumblad, L; Kautsky, U; Naeslund, B

    2006-01-01

    In safety assessments of nuclear facilities, a wide range of radioactive isotopes and their potential hazard to a large assortment of organisms and ecosystem types over long time scales need to be considered. Models used for these purposes have typically employed approaches based on generic reference organisms, stylised environments and transfer functions for biological uptake exclusively based on bioconcentration factors (BCFs). These models are of non-mechanistic nature and involve no understanding of uptake and transport processes in the environment, which is a severe limitation when assessing real ecosystems. In this paper, ecosystem models are suggested as a method to include site-specific data and to facilitate the modelling of dynamic systems. An aquatic ecosystem model for the environmental transport of radionuclides is presented and discussed. With this model, driven and constrained by site-specific carbon dynamics and three radionuclide specific mechanisms: (i) radionuclide uptake by plants, (ii) excretion by animals, and (iii) adsorption to organic surfaces, it was possible to estimate the radionuclide concentrations in all components of the modelled ecosystem with only two radionuclide specific input parameters (BCF for plants and Kd). The importance of radionuclide specific mechanisms for the exposure to organisms was examined, and probabilistic and sensitivity analyses to assess the uncertainties related to ecosystem input parameters were performed. Verification of the model suggests that this model produces analogous results to empirically derived data for more than 20 different radionuclides.

  10. A study of facilities and fixtures for testing of a high speed civil transport wing component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerro, J. A.; Vause, R. F.; Bowman, L. M.; Jensen, J. K.; Martin, C. J., Jr.; Stockwell, A. E.; Waters, W. A., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A study was performed to determine the feasibility of testing a large-scale High Speed Civil Transport wing component in the Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory in Building 1148 at NASA Langley Research Center. The report includes a survey of the electrical and hydraulic resources and identifies the backing structure and floor hard points which would be available for reacting the test loads. The backing structure analysis uses a new finite element model of the floor and backstop support system in the Structures Laboratory. Information on the data acquisition system and the thermal power requirements is also presented. The study identified the hardware that would be required to test a typical component, including the number and arrangement of hydraulic actuators required to simulate expected flight loads. Load introduction and reaction structure concepts were analyzed to investigate the effects of experimentally induced boundary conditions.

  11. Radiological transportation risk assessment of the shipment of sodium-bonded fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.R.

    1995-01-31

    This document was written in support of Environmental Assessment: Shutdown of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. It analyzes the potential radiological risks associated with the transportation of sodium-bonded metal alloy and mixed carbide fuel from the FFTF on the Hanford Site in Washington State to the Idaho Engineering Laboratory in Idaho in the T-3 Cask. RADTRAN 4 is used for the analysis which addresses potential risk from normal transportation and hypothetical accident scenarios.

  12. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit (631-24G) - March 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, E.

    1996-03-01

    Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit is located in the northeast corner of SRS. In the mid 1980`s, sparse vegetation, dead trees, and small mounds of soil were discovered on a portion of the road leading to Gunsite 113. This area became the Gunsite 113 Access Road Unit (Gunsite 113). The unit appears to have been used as a spoil dirt and / or road construction debris disposal area. There is no documentation or record of any hazardous substance management, disposal, or any type of waste disposal at this unit. Based upon the available evidence, there are no potential contaminants of concern available for evaluation by a CERCLA baseline risk assessment. Therefore, there is no determinable health risk associated with Gunsite 113. In addition, it is also reasonable to conclude that, since contamination is below risk-based levels, the unit presents no significant ecological risk. It is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit.

  13. CFD and Gaussian atmospheric dispersion models: A comparison for leak from carbon dioxide transportation and storage facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoldi, Alberto; Hill, Tim; Colls, Jeremy J.

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is of interest to the scientific community as a way of achieving significant global reduction of atmospheric CO 2 emission in the medium term. CO 2 would be transported from large emission points (e.g. coal fired power plants) to storage sites by surface/shallow high pressure pipelines. Modelling of CO 2 atmospheric dispersion after leakages from transportation facilities will be required before starting large scale CCS projects. This paper deals with the evaluation of the atmospheric dispersion CFD tool Fluidyn-PANACHE against Prairie Grass and Kit Fox field experiments. A description of the models for turbulence generation and dissipation used ( k- ɛ and k- l) and a comparison with the Gaussian model ALOHA for both field experiments are also outlined. The main outcome of this work puts PANACHE among the "fit-for-purpose" models, respecting all the prerequisites stated by Hanna et al. [Hanna, S.R., Chang, J.C. and Strimaitis, D.G., 1993. Hazardous gas model evaluation with field observations. Atmospheric Environment, 27, 2265-2285] for the evaluation of atmospheric dispersion model performance. The average under-prediction has been ascribed to the usage of mean wind speed and direction, which is characteristic of all CFD models. The authors suggest a modification of performance ranges for model acceptability measures, within the field of high pressure CO 2 transportation risk assessment, with the aim of accounting for the overall simplification induced by the usage of constant wind speed and direction within CFD atmospheric dispersion models.

  14. Welfare Reform: DOT Has Made Progress in Implementing the Job Access Program but Has Not Evaluated the Impact. Testimony before the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, Subcommittee on Highways and Transit, U.S. House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecker, JayEtta Z.

    A series of reviews of the Department of Transportation's (DOT's) Job Access and Reverse Commute (Job Access) Program explored DOT's and grantees' challenges in implementing the Job Access program and the status of DOT's program evaluation efforts. DOT and grantees faced significant challenges in implementing the Job Access program. DOT's process…

  15. Proceedings of a workshop on uses of depleted uranium in storage, transportation and repository facilities

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    A workshop on the potential uses of depleted uranium (DU) in the repository was organized to coordinate the planning of future activities. The attendees, the original workshop objective and the agenda are provided in Appendices A, B and C. After some opening remarks and discussions, the objectives of the workshop were revised to: (1) exchange information and views on the status of the Department of Energy (DOE) activities related to repository design and planning; (2) exchange information on DU management and planning; (3) identify potential uses of DU in the storage, transportation, and disposal of high-level waste and spent fuel; and (4) define the future activities that would be needed if potential uses were to be further evaluated and developed. This summary of the workshop is intended to be an integrated resource for planning of any future work related to DU use in the repository. The synopsis of the first day`s presentations is provided in Appendix D. Copies of slides from each presenter are presented in Appendix E.

  16. Mesoscopic Framework Enables Facile Ionic Transport in Solid Electrolytes for Li Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Cheng; Cheng, Yongqiang; Chen, Kai; Li, Juchuan; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Nan, Ce-Wen; More, Karren L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Chi, Miaofang

    2016-03-29

    In Li-ion-conducting solid electrolytes can simultaneously overcome two grand challenges for Li-ion batteries: the severe safety concerns that limit the large-scale application and the poor electrolyte stability that forbids the use of high-voltage cathodes. Nevertheless, the ionic conductivity of solid electrolytes is typically low, compromising the battery performances. Precisely determining the ionic transport mechanism(s) is a prerequisite for the rational design of highly conductive solid electrolytes. For decades, the research on this subject has primarily focused on the atomic and microscopic scales, where the main features of interest are unit cells and microstructures, respectively. We show that the largely overlooked mesoscopic scale lying between these extremes could be the key to fast ionic conduction. In a prototype system, (Li0.33La0.56)TiO3, a mesoscopic framework is revealed for the first time by state-of-the-art scanning transmission electron microscopy. Corroborated by theoretical calculations and impedance measurements, it is demonstrated that such a unique configuration maximizes the number of percolation directions and thus most effectively improves the ionic conductivity. Finally, this discovery reconciles the long-standing structure–property inconsistency in (Li0.33La0.56)TiO3 and also identifies mesoscopic ordering as a promising general strategy for optimizing Li+ conduction.

  17. Mesoscopic Framework Enables Facile Ionic Transport in Solid Electrolytes for Li Batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Cheng; Cheng, Yongqiang; Chen, Kai; ...

    2016-03-29

    In Li-ion-conducting solid electrolytes can simultaneously overcome two grand challenges for Li-ion batteries: the severe safety concerns that limit the large-scale application and the poor electrolyte stability that forbids the use of high-voltage cathodes. Nevertheless, the ionic conductivity of solid electrolytes is typically low, compromising the battery performances. Precisely determining the ionic transport mechanism(s) is a prerequisite for the rational design of highly conductive solid electrolytes. For decades, the research on this subject has primarily focused on the atomic and microscopic scales, where the main features of interest are unit cells and microstructures, respectively. We show that the largely overlookedmore » mesoscopic scale lying between these extremes could be the key to fast ionic conduction. In a prototype system, (Li0.33La0.56)TiO3, a mesoscopic framework is revealed for the first time by state-of-the-art scanning transmission electron microscopy. Corroborated by theoretical calculations and impedance measurements, it is demonstrated that such a unique configuration maximizes the number of percolation directions and thus most effectively improves the ionic conductivity. Finally, this discovery reconciles the long-standing structure–property inconsistency in (Li0.33La0.56)TiO3 and also identifies mesoscopic ordering as a promising general strategy for optimizing Li+ conduction.« less

  18. Indoor Athletic Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, E. Scott

    2000-01-01

    Examines the concept of shared-use facilities to help financially support and meet the demand for athletic facilities. Shared-use considerations are explored including cost sharing of ongoing operations, aesthetics, locker rooms, support facilities, parking and site access, and building access and security. (GR)

  19. Factors Associated with the Use of Helicopter Inter-facility Transport of Trauma Patients to Tertiary Trauma Centers within an Organized Rural Trauma System

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Kenneth; Garwe, Tabitha; Bhandari, Naresh; Danford, Brandon; Albrecht, Roxie

    2016-01-01

    Objective A review of the literature yielded little information regarding factors associated with the decision to use ground (GEMS) or helicopter (HEMS) emergency medical services for trauma patients transferred inter-facility. Furthermore, studies evaluating the impact of inter-facility transport mode on mortality have reported mixed findings. Since HEMS transport is generally reserved for more severely injured patients, this introduces indication bias, which may explain the mixed findings. Our objective was to identify factors at referring non-tertiary trauma centers (NTC) influencing transport mode decision. Methods This was a case-control study of trauma patients transferred from a Level III or IV NTC to a tertiary trauma center (TTC) within 24-hours reported to the Oklahoma State Trauma Registry between 2005 and 2012. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine clinical and non-clinical factors associated with the decision to use HEMS. Results A total of 7380 patients met the study eligibility. Of these, 2803(38%) were transported inter-facility by HEMS. Penetrating injury, prehospital EMS transport, severe torso injury, hypovolemic shock, and TBI were significant predictors (p<0.05) of HEMS use regardless of distance to a TTC. Association between HEMS use and male gender, Level IV NTC, and local ground EMS resources varied by distance from the TTC. Many HEMS transported patients had minor injuries and normal vital signs. Conclusions Our results suggest that while distance remains the most influential factor associated with HEMS use, significant differences exist in clinical and non-clinical factors between patients transported by HEMS versus GEMS. To ensure comparability of study groups, studies evaluating outcome differences between HEMS and GEMS should take factors determining transport mode into account. The findings will be used to develop propensity scores to balance baseline risk between GEMS and HEMS patients for use in subsequent studies

  20. Monte Carlo simulations for the design of the treatment rooms and synchrotron access mazes in the CNAO Hadrontherapy facility.

    PubMed

    Porta, Alessandro; Agosteo, Stefano; Campi, Fabrizio

    2005-01-01

    The Italian National Centre for Hadrontherapy is based on a synchrotron capable of accelerating protons and carbon ions up to 250 MeV and 400 MeV u(-1), respectively. The present work describes some Monte Carlo simulations performed to verify the design of the treatment rooms and synchrotron access mazes. The different shielding efficiency and induced activations of the common concrete and the baryte concrete were analysed. In such a radiation field, i.e. with high-energy neutrons, the baryte concrete gains twice the activation than the common concrete without any relevant dose reduction. Moreover, the simulations have stressed, again, the discrepancies between H*(10) and E in such cases where the neutron radiation field is the dominant component and, particularly, in the medium-high energy range.

  1. PAH contamination in soils adjacent to a coal-transporting facility in Tapin district, south Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Mizwar, Andy; Trihadiningrum, Yulinah

    2015-07-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the level of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), listed as priority pollutants by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), in surface soils around a coal-transporting facility in the western part of South Kalimantan, Indonesia. Three composite soil samples were collected from a coal stockpile, coal-hauling road, and coal port. Identification and quantification of PAH was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The total content of 16 USEPA-PAH ranged from 11.79 to 55.30 mg/kg with arithmetic mean value of 33.14 mg/kg and median of 32.33 mg/kg. The 16 USEPA-PAH measured levels were found to be greater compared with most of the literature values. The levels of high molecular-weight PAH (5- and 6-ring) were dominant and formed 67.77-80.69 % of the total 16 USEPA-PAH The most abundant of individual PAH are indeno[1,2,3-cd] pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene with concentration ranges of 2.11-20.56 and 1.59-17.84 mg/kg, respectively. The degree of PAH contamination and subsequent toxicity assessment suggest that the soils of the study area are highly contaminated and pose a potential health risk to humans.

  2. Ground-water flow and transport modeling of the NRC-licensed waste disposal facility, West Valley, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Kool, J.B.; Wu, Y.S. )

    1991-10-01

    This report describes a simulation study of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport from disposal at the NRC licensed waste disposal facility in West Valley, New York. A transient, precipitation driven, flow model of the near-surface fractured till layer and underlying unweathered till was developed and calibrated against observed inflow data into a recently constructed interceptor trench for the period March--May 1990. The results suggest that lateral flow through the upper, fractured till layer may be more significant than indicated by previous, steady state flow modeling studies. A conclusive assessment of the actual magnitude of lateral flow through the fractured till could however not be made. A primary factor contributing to this uncertainty is the unknown contribution of vertical infiltration through the interceptor trench cap to the total trench inflow. The second part of the investigation involved simulation of the migration of Sr-90, Cs-137 and Pu-239 from the one of the fuel hull disposal pits. A first-order radionuclide leach rate with rate coefficient of 10{sup {minus}6}/day was assumed to describe radionuclide release into the disposal pit. The simulations indicated that for wastes buried below the fractured till zone, no significant migration would occur. However, under the assumed conditions, significant lateral migration could occur for radionuclides present in the upper, fractured till zone. 23 refs., 68 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Open Access Centre at the Nature Research Centre: a facility for enhancement of scientific research, education and public outreach in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šerpenskienė, Silvija; Skridlaitė, Gražina

    2014-05-01

    Open Access Centre (OAC) was established in Vilnius, Lithuania in 2013 as a subdivision of the Nature Research Centre (NRC) operating on the principle of open access for both internal and external users. The OAC consists of 15 units, i.e. 15 NRC laboratories or their branches. Forty four sets of research equipment were purchased. The OAC cooperates with Lithuanian science and studies institutions, business sector and other governmental and public institutions. Investigations can be carried in the Geosciences, Biotaxonomy, Ecology and Molecular Research, and Ecotoxicology fields. Environmental radioactivity, radioecology, nuclear geophysics, microscopic and chemical composition of natural compounds (minerals, rocks etc.), paleomagnetic, magnetic and environmental investigations, as well as ground and water contamination by oil products and other organic environment polluting compounds, identification of fossils, rocks and minerals can be studied in the Georesearch field. Ecosystems and identification of plants, animals and microorganisms are main subjects of the Biotaxonomy, Ecology and Molecular Research field. The Ecotoxicologal Research deals with toxic and genotoxic effects of toxic substances and other sources of pollution on macro- and microorganisms and cell cultures. Open access is guaranteed by: (1) providing scientific research and experimental development services; (2) implementing joint business and science projects; (3) using facilities for the training of specialists of the highest qualifications; (4) providing properly qualified and technically trained users with opportunities to carry out their scientific research and/or experiments in the OAC laboratories by themselves. Services provided in the Open Access Centre can be received by both internal and external users: persons undertaking innovative economic activities, students of other educational institutions, interns, external teams of researchers engaged in scientific research activities, teachers

  4. Design and simulation of a neutron facility.

    PubMed

    Studenski, Matthew T; Kearfott, Kimberlee J

    2007-02-01

    State and other regulatory entities require that for any facility housing a particle accelerator the surrounding areas must be restricted to public access unless the dose equivalent rate is less than 0.02 mSv h at 5 cm from any accessible wall surrounding the facility under conditions of maximum radiation output. A Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation code, MCNP5, was used to design a proposed facility to shield two D-T neutron generators and one D-D neutron generator. A number of different designs were simulated, but due to cost and space issues a small concrete cave proved to be the best solution for the shielding problem. With this design, all of the neutron generators could be used and all of the rooms surrounding the neutron facility could be considered unrestricted to public access. To prevent unauthorized access into the restricted area of the neutron facility, light curtains, warning lights, door interlocks, and rope barriers will be built into the facility.

  5. TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation outline: transport principles, effective solubility; gasoline composition; and field examples (plume diving).
    Presentation conclusions: MTBE transport follows from - phyiscal and chemical properties and hydrology. Field examples show: MTBE plumes > benzene plu...

  6. Research at a European Planetary Simulation Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrison, Jonathan; Alois, Stefano; Iversen, Jens Jacob

    2016-04-01

    A unique environmental simulation facility will be presented which is capable of re-creating extreme terrestrial or other planetary environments. It is supported by EU activities including a volcanology network VERTIGO and a planetology network Europlanet 2020 RI. It is also used as a test facility by ESA for the forthcoming ExoMars 2018 mission. Specifically it is capable of recreating the key physical parameters such as temperature, pressure (gas composition), wind flow and importantly the suspension/transport of dust or sand particulates. This facility is available both to the scientific and industrial community. Details of this laboratory facility will be presented and some of the most recent activities will be summarized. For information on access to this facility please contact the author.

  7. The EarthScope Array Network Facility: application-driven low-latency web-based tools for accessing high-resolution multi-channel waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, R. L.; Lindquist, K. G.; Clemesha, A.; Vernon, F. L.

    2008-12-01

    Since April 2004 the EarthScope USArray seismic network has grown to over 400 broadband stations that stream multi-channel data in near real-time to the Array Network Facility in San Diego. Providing secure, yet open, access to real-time and archived data for a broad range of audiences is best served by a series of platform agnostic low-latency web-based applications. We present a framework of tools that interface between the world wide web and Boulder Real Time Technologies Antelope Environmental Monitoring System data acquisition and archival software. These tools provide audiences ranging from network operators and geoscience researchers, to funding agencies and the general public, with comprehensive information about the experiment. This ranges from network-wide to station-specific metadata, state-of-health metrics, event detection rates, archival data and dynamic report generation over a stations two year life span. Leveraging open source web-site development frameworks for both the server side (Perl, Python and PHP) and client-side (Flickr, Google Maps/Earth and jQuery) facilitates the development of a robust extensible architecture that can be tailored on a per-user basis, with rapid prototyping and development that adheres to web-standards.

  8. Making a semi-convex Focus area in a Focus+Glue+Context map, considering map visibility and transport access points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirako, Y.; Yamamoto, D.; Takahashi, N.

    2016-04-01

    We previously implemented the Focus+Glue+Context map system EMMA that provides local detailed data in Focus, global context data in Context, and connection data between both in the same view. Introducing the Glue area between Focus and Context makes it possible to provide uniform scaling for the two latter areas. This paper enhances EMMA through the implementation of a Focus creation function that considers transportation access points, such as stations and bus stops. The enhanced EMMA searches a route from the current location to the transportation access point, and allows users to identify the spatial relationship between the various locations in a small-scale Context, and view the route from the current location to the transportation access points in a large-scale Focus. However, if Focus is too large because of unnecessary areas used to identify the route, some parts of Context might be hidden by Focus. The proposed system solves this problem by implementing the following functions: (1) it searches stations that are adjacent to the current location and makes a semiconvex Focus that includes the current location and those stations in order for Focus to include really necessary areas. (2) It reduces Focus distortion by setting a fixed point as the center of the Focus area. (3) It smoothens the Focus shape in order to improve visibility in the Glue area. We developed a prototype of the proposed system that implements these functions.

  9. Barrier-Free Design: Access to and Use of Buildings by Physically Disabled People = Amenagement pour Acces Facile: Acces Facile aux Immeubles et Leur Utilisation par les Personnes Handicapees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Works Canada, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The manual describes, for people with physical disabilities, a building standard of accessibility and the policy for its application. Policies address both new construction and renovation work based on principles of building accessibility to a broad range of users, public service accessibility, and equality of access to employment opportunities.…

  10. Characterization of stormwater at selected South Carolina Department of Transportation maintenance yard and section shed facilities in Ballentine, Conway, and North Charleston, South Carolina, 2010-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Journey, Celeste; Conlon, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    The South Carolina Department of Transportation operates section shed and maintenance yard facilities throughout the State. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a cooperative investigation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation to characterize water-quality constituents that are transported in stormwater from representative maintenance yard and section shed facilities in South Carolina. At a section shed in Ballentine, S.C., stormwater discharges to a retention pond outfall (Ballentine). At the Conway maintenance yard, stormwater in the southernmost section discharges to a pipe outfall (Conway1), and stormwater in the remaining area discharges to a grass-lined ditch (Conway2). At the North Charleston maintenance yard, stormwater discharges from the yard to Turkey Creek through a combination of pipes, ditches, and overland flow; therefore, samples were collected from the main channel of Turkey Creek at the upstream (North Charleston1) and downstream (North Charleston2) limits of the North Charleston maintenance yard facility. The storms sampled during this study had a wide range of rainfall amounts, durations, and intensities at each of the facilities and, therefore, were considered to be reasonably representative of the potential for contaminant transport. At all facilities, stormwater discharge was significantly correlated to rainfall amount and intensity. Event-mean unit-area stormwater discharge increased with increasing impervious surface at the Conway and North Charleston maintenance yards. The Ballentine facility with 79 percent impervious surface had a mean unit-area discharge similar to that of the North Charleston maintenance yard (62 percent impervious surface). That similarity may be attributed, in part, to the effects of the retention pond on the stormwater runoff at the Ballentine facility and to the greater rainfall intensities and amounts at the North Charleston facility. Stormwater samples from the facilities were analyzed for multiple

  11. 45 CFR 1170.32 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing facilities. 1170.32 Section 1170.32... ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES Accessibility § 1170.32 Existing facilities. (a) Accessibility. A recipient... require a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to...

  12. Racial disparities in travel time to radiotherapy facilities in the Atlanta metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Peipins, Lucy A; Graham, Shannon; Young, Randall; Lewis, Brian; Flanagan, Barry

    2013-07-01

    Low-income women with breast cancer who rely on public transportation may have difficulty in completing recommended radiation therapy due to inadequate access to radiation facilities. Using a geographic information system (GIS) and network analysis we quantified spatial accessibility to radiation treatment facilities in the Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area. We built a transportation network model that included all bus and rail routes and stops, system transfers and walk and wait times experienced by public transportation system travelers. We also built a private transportation network to model travel times by automobile. We calculated travel times to radiation therapy facilities via public and private transportation from a population-weighted center of each census tract located within the study area. We broadly grouped the tracts by low, medium and high household access to a private vehicle and by race. Facility service areas were created using the network model to map the extent of areal coverage at specified travel times (30, 45 and 60 min) for both public and private modes of transportation. The median public transportation travel time to the nearest radiotherapy facility was 56 min vs. approximately 8 min by private vehicle. We found that majority black census tracts had longer public transportation travel times than white tracts across all categories of vehicle access and that 39% of women in the study area had longer than 1 h of public transportation travel time to the nearest facility. In addition, service area analyses identified locations where the travel time barriers are the greatest. Spatial inaccessibility, especially for women who must use public transportation, is one of the barriers they face in receiving optimal treatment.

  13. Validation of Islet Transport From a Geographically Distant Isolation Center Enabling Equitable Access and National Health Service Funding of a Clinical Islet Transplant Program for England

    PubMed Central

    Aldibbiat, Ali; Huang, Guo Cai; Zhao, Min; Holliman, Graham N.; Ferguson, Linda; Hughes, Stephen; Brigham, Ken; Wardle, Julie; Williams, Rob; Dickinson, Anne; White, Steven A.; Johnson, Paul R. V.; Manas, Derek; Amiel, Stephanie A.; Shaw, James A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Islet transplantation has become established as a successful treatment for type 1 diabetes complicated by recurrent severe hypoglycemia. In the UK access has been limited to a few centrally located units. Our goal was to validate a quality-assured system for safe/effective transport of human islets in the UK and to successfully undertake the first transplants with transported islets. Pancreases were retrieved from deceased donors in the north of England and transported to King’s College London using two-layer method (TLM) or University of Wisconsin solution alone. Islets were isolated and transported back to Newcastle in standard blood transfusion or gas-permeable bags with detailed evaluation pre- and posttransport. In the preclinical phase, islets were isolated from 10 pancreases with mean yield of 258,000 islet equivalents. No significant differences were seen between TLM and University of Wisconsin solution organ preservation. A significant loss of integrity was demonstrated in islets shipped in gas-permeable bags, whereas sterility, number, purity, and viability were maintained in blood transfusion bags. Maintenance of secretory granules and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was confirmed following transport. A Standard Operating Procedure enabling final pretransplant quality control from a simple side-arm sample was validated. Moreover, levels of insulin and cytokines in transport medium were low, enabling transplant without centrifugation/resuspension at the recipient site. Six clinical transplants of transported islets were undertaken in five recipients with 100% primary graft function and resolution of severe hypoglycemia. Safe and clinically effective islet transport has been established facilitating sustainable NHS funding of a clinical islet transplant program for the UK. PMID:27004135

  14. Occurrence and transport of 17 perfluoroalkyl acids in 12 coastal rivers in south Bohai coastal region of China with concentrated fluoropolymer facilities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Lu, Yonglong; Wang, Tieyu; Fu, Yaning; Zhu, Zhaoyun; Liu, Shijie; Xie, Shuangwei; Xiao, Yang; Giesy, John P

    2014-07-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are emerging contaminants that have raised great concern in recent years. While PFAAs manufacturing becomes regulated in developed countries, production has been partly shifted to China. Eight fluoropolymer manufacturing facilities located in the South Bohai coastal region, one of the most populated areas of China, have been used to manufacture PFAA-related substances since 2001. The environmental consequence of the intensive production of PFAAs in this region remains largely unknown. We analyzed 17 PFAAs in twelve coastal rivers of this region, and found staggeringly high concentrations of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) ranging from 0.96 to 4534.41 ng/L. The highest concentration was observed in the Xiaoqing River which received effluents from certain fluoropolymer facilities. Principal component analysis indicated similar sources of several perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) in all rivers, which indicated that atmospheric transport, wastewater treatment and surface runoff also acted as important supplements to direct discharge to surface water.

  15. 14 CFR 1251.301 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...; assignment of aides to beneficiaries; home visits; delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites; alteration of existing facilities and construction of new facilities...

  16. 10 CFR 1040.72 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and construction of new facilities in conformance...

  17. 10 CFR 1040.72 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and construction of new facilities in conformance...

  18. 14 CFR 1251.301 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...; assignment of aides to beneficiaries; home visits; delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites; alteration of existing facilities and construction of new facilities...

  19. 10 CFR 1040.72 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and construction of new facilities in conformance...

  20. 10 CFR 1040.72 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of health, welfare, or other social services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and construction of new facilities in conformance...

  1. A Substrate Access Tunnel in the Cytosolic Domain Is Not an Essential Feature of the Solute Carrier 4 (SLC4) Family of Bicarbonate Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Shnitsar, Volodymyr; Li, Jing; Li, Xuyao; Calmettes, Charles; Basu, Arghya; Casey, Joseph R.; Moraes, Trevor F.; Reithmeier, Reinhart A. F.

    2013-01-01

    Anion exchanger 1 (AE1; Band 3; SLC4A1) is the founding member of the solute carrier 4 (SLC4) family of bicarbonate transporters that includes chloride/bicarbonate AEs and Na+-bicarbonate co-transporters (NBCs). These membrane proteins consist of an amino-terminal cytosolic domain involved in protein interactions and a carboxyl-terminal membrane domain that carries out the transport function. Mutation of a conserved arginine residue (R298S) in the cytosolic domain of NBCe1 (SLC4A4) is linked to proximal renal tubular acidosis and results in impaired transport function, suggesting that the cytosolic domain plays a role in substrate permeation. Introduction of single and double mutations at the equivalent arginine (Arg283) and at an interacting glutamate (Glu85) in the cytosolic domain of human AE1 (cdAE1) had no effect on the cell surface expression or the transport activity of AE1 expressed in HEK-293 cells. In addition, the membrane domain of AE1 (mdAE1) efficiently mediated anion transport. A 2.1-Å resolution crystal structure of cdΔ54AE1 (residues 55–356 of cdAE1) lacking the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal disordered regions, produced at physiological pH, revealed an extensive hydrogen-bonded network involving Arg283 and Glu85. Mutations at these residues affected the pH-dependent conformational changes and stability of cdΔ54AE1. As these structural alterations did not impair functional expression of AE1, the cytosolic and membrane domains operate independently. A substrate access tunnel within the cytosolic domain is not present in AE1 and therefore is not an essential feature of the SLC4 family of bicarbonate transporters. PMID:24121512

  2. Accessibility of sulfhydryl residues induced by cytochalasin B binding and conformational dynamics in the human erythrocyte glucose transporter.

    PubMed

    Pinkofsky, H B; Jung, C Y

    1985-07-01

    Studies with intact cells have implicated essential sulfhydryl groups in the carrier-mediated glucose transport of human erythrocytes. In an attempt to identify and characterize such essential sulfhydryl residues we have studied the interaction of p-chloromercuribenzoate (PCMB) with a purified glucose transporter preparation (band 4.5) from human erythrocytes, in the presence and absence of its ligands, and the effects of this interaction on the binding of cytochalasin B (CB) to the transporter. At least 3 mol of PCMB reacted per mol of this preparation. A portion of the reaction was significantly enhanced in the presence of cytochalasin B. This enhancement was a saturable function of CB concentration, and was half-maximal at a CB concentration equal to the dissociation constant for the CB binding to the preparation. This CB-sensitive, PCMB reaction product comigrated with the band 4.5 on lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. An excess of D-glucose did not affect the PCMB reaction by itself in the absence of CB, but totally abolished the CB-induced enhancement of the PCMB reaction. PCMB inhibited the CB binding activity of the transporter preparation, and this inhibition was also enhanced in the presence of CB. These results suggest that CB binding perturbs the conformational dynamics of the glucose transporter resulting in an exposure of at least two sulfhydryl residues to PCMB reaction, and that some of these CB-sensitive sulfhydryl groups are essential for CB binding to the transporter.

  3. The Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility, located in eastern New Orleans, Louisiana, is an 832 acre site that is a government-owned, contractor-operated component of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The facility was acquired by NASA in 1961 at the recommendation of Dr. Wernher von Braun and his rocket team in Huntsville Alabama. The cavernous plant served as the assembly facility for the Saturn launch vehicles and most recently the external tank (ET) used for the Space Shuttle Program. The facility features one of the world's biggest manufacturing plants with 43 acres under one roof and a port with deep-water access for the transportation of large space structures. When completed, space hardware is towed on a barge across the Gulf of Mexico, around Florida and up to Kennedy Space Center. The original tract of land was part of a 34,500 acre French Royal land grant to local merchant, Gilbert Antoine de St. Maxent in 1763. Later, the land was acquired by French transplant Antoine Michoud, the son of Napoleon's Administrator of Domains, who moved to the city in 1827. Michoud operated a sugar cane plantation and refinery on the site until his death in 1863. His heirs continued operating the refinery and kept the original St. Maxent estate intact into the 20th century. Two brick smokestacks from the original refinery still stand before the Michoud facility today.

  4. The Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility, located in eastern New Orleans, Louisiana, is an 832 acre site that is a government-owned, contractor-operated component of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The facility was acquired by NASA in 1961 at the recommendation of Dr. Wernher von Braun and his rocket team in Huntsville Alabama. The cavernous plant served as the assembly facility for the Saturn launch vehicles and most recently the external tank (ET) used for the Space Shuttle Program. The facility features one of the world's biggest manufacturing plants with 43 acres under one roof and a port with deep-water access for the transportation of large space structures. When completed, space hardware is towed on a barge across the Gulf of Mexico, around Florida and up to Kennedy Space Center. The original tract of land was part of a 34,500 acre French Royal land grant to local merchant, Gilbert Antoine de St. Maxent in 1763. Later, the land was acquired by French transplant Antoine Michoud, the son of Napoleon's Administrator of Domains, who moved to the city in 1827. Michoud operated a sugar cane plantation and refinery on the site until his death in 1863. His heirs continued operating the refinery and kept the original St. Maxent estate intact into the 20th century. Visible on the right, is one of two brick smokestacks from the original refinery that still stand before the Michoud facility today.

  5. Addendum report to atmospheric science facility pallet-only mode space transportation system payload feasibility study, volume 3, revision A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of accomplishing selected atmospheric science mission using a pallet-only mode was studied. Certain unresolved issues were identified. The first issue was that of assuring that the on-board computer facility was adequate to process scientific data, control subsystems such as instrument pointing, provide mission operational program capability, and accomplish display and control. The second issue evolved from an investigation of the availability of existing substitute instruments that could be used instead of the prime instrumentation where the development tests and schedules are incompatible with the realistic budgets and shuttle vehicle schedules. Some effort was expended on identifying candidate substitute instruments, and the performance, cost, and development schedule trade-offs found during that effort were significant enough to warrant a follow-on investigation. This addendum documents the results of that follow-on effort, as it applies to the Atmospheric Sciences Facility.

  6. An x-ray tomography facility for quantitative prediction of mechanical and transport properties in geological, biological, and synthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakellariou, Arthur; Senden, Tim J.; Sawkins, Tim J.; Knackstedt, Mark A.; Turner, Michael L.; Jones, Anthony C.; Saadatfar, Mohammad; Roberts, Ray J.; Limaye, Ajay; Arns, Christoph H.; Sheppard, Adrian P.; Sok, Rob M.

    2004-10-01

    A fully integrated X-ray tomography facility with the ability to generate tomograms with 20483 voxels at 2 micron spatial resolution was built to satisfy the requirements of a virtual materials testing laboratory. The instrument comprises of a continuously pumped micro-focus X-ray gun, a milli-degree rotation stage and a high resolution and large field X-ray camera, configured in a cone beam geometry with a circular trajectory. The purpose of this facility is to routinely analyse and investigate real world biological, geological and synthetic materials at a scale in which the traditional domains of physics, chemistry, biology and geology merge. During the first 2 years of operation, approximately 4 Terabytes of data have been collected, processed and analysed, both as static and in some cases as composite dynamic data sets. This incorporates over 300 tomograms with 10243 voxels and 50 tomograms with 20483 voxels for a wide range of research fields. Specimens analysed include sedimentary rocks, soils, bone, soft tissue, ceramics, fibre-reinforced composites, foams, wood, paper, fossils, sphere packs, bio-morphs and small animals. In this paper, the exibility of the facility is highlighted with some prime examples.

  7. Engineering and design of holding yards, loading ramps and handling facilities for land and sea transport of livestock.

    PubMed

    Grandin, Temple

    2008-01-01

    Facilities designed for intensively raised animals trained to lead are not appropriate for handling extensively raised animals unaccustomed to close contact with people. The author provides information on facility design for both intensively and extensively raised livestock. Non-slip flooring in handling facilities is essential for all livestock. Cleats must be spaced on loading ramps for trucks or ships so that the hooves of the animals fit easily between them. Cleats spaced too far apart cause slipping and falling. In developing countries, building stationary ramps for vehicles of differing heights using concrete, wood or steel is recommended. Highly mechanised systems, such as hydraulic tailgate lifts, are not recommended in developing countries due to maintenance difficulties. The holding capacity for livestock shipping and receiving terminals should be designed to hold the largest number of animals handled on the busiest days. To maintain high standards of animal welfare, it is important to train employees to handle animals using methods to reduce stress and to conduct weekly audits of handling using an objective, numerical scoring system to maintain high welfare standards.

  8. National Cryo-Electron Microscopy Facility

    Cancer.gov

    Information about the National Cryo-EM Facility at NCI, created to provide researchers access to the latest cryo-EM technology for high resolution imaging. Includes timeline for installation and how to access the facility.

  9. 33 CFR 154.1216 - Facility classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Vegetable Oils Facilities § 154.1216 Facility classification. (a) The Coast Guard classifies facilities that handle, store, or transport animal fats or vegetable oils as “substantial harm” facilities because they... classification of a facility that handles, stores, or transports animal fats or vegetable oils. The COTP...

  10. 33 CFR 154.1216 - Facility classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Vegetable Oils Facilities § 154.1216 Facility classification. (a) The Coast Guard classifies facilities that handle, store, or transport animal fats or vegetable oils as “substantial harm” facilities because they... classification of a facility that handles, stores, or transports animal fats or vegetable oils. The COTP...

  11. 33 CFR 154.1216 - Facility classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Vegetable Oils Facilities § 154.1216 Facility classification. (a) The Coast Guard classifies facilities that handle, store, or transport animal fats or vegetable oils as “substantial harm” facilities because they... classification of a facility that handles, stores, or transports animal fats or vegetable oils. The COTP...

  12. 33 CFR 154.1216 - Facility classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Vegetable Oils Facilities § 154.1216 Facility classification. (a) The Coast Guard classifies facilities that handle, store, or transport animal fats or vegetable oils as “substantial harm” facilities because they... classification of a facility that handles, stores, or transports animal fats or vegetable oils. The COTP...

  13. 33 CFR 154.1216 - Facility classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Vegetable Oils Facilities § 154.1216 Facility classification. (a) The Coast Guard classifies facilities that handle, store, or transport animal fats or vegetable oils as “substantial harm” facilities because they... classification of a facility that handles, stores, or transports animal fats or vegetable oils. The COTP...

  14. In Situ Formation of ZnO in Graphene: A Facile Way To Produce a Smooth and Highly Conductive Electron Transport Layer for Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Aifeng; Wang, Qingxia; Chen, Lie; Hu, Xiaotian; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Yinfu; Chen, Yiwang

    2015-07-29

    A novel electron transport layer (ETL) based on zinc oxide@graphene:ethyl cellulose (ZnO@G:EC) nanocomposite is prepared by in situ formation of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals in a graphene matrix to improve the performance of polymer solar cells. Liquid ultrasound exfoliation by ethyl cellulose as stabilizer not only allows for uniform dispersion of graphene solution but also maintains an original structure of graphene gaining a high conductivity. The ZnO@G:EC ETL displays a quite smooth morphology and develops the energy-level alignment for the electron extraction and transportation. Subsequently, the device based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):(6,6)-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) with the ZnO@G:EC as ETL obtains a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.9%, exhibiting a ∼20% improvement compared to the familiar device with bare ZnO nanocrystals as ETL. Replacing the active layer with polythieno[3,4-b]thiophene/benzodithiophene (PTB7): (6,6)-phenyl-C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM), the PCE can be dramatically improved to 8.4%. This facile and fascinating method to produce a smooth and highly conductive electron transport layer provides an anticipated approach to obtain high performance polymer solar cells.

  15. Effect of Selected Modeling Assumptions on Subsurface Radionuclide Transport Projections for the Potential Environmental Management Disposal Facility at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, Scott L.

    2016-06-28

    The Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management recently revised a Remedial Investigation/ Feasibility Study (RI/FS) that included an analysis of subsurface radionuclide transport at a potential new Environmental Management Disposal Facility (EMDF) in East Bear Creek Valley near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The effect of three simplifying assumptions used in the RI/FS analyses are investigated using the same subsurface pathway conceptualization but with more flexible modeling tools. Neglect of vadose zone dispersion was found to be conservative or non-conservative, depending on the retarded travel time and the half-life. For a given equilibrium distribution coefficient, a relatively narrow range of half-life was identified for which neglect of vadose zone transport is non-conservative and radionuclide discharge into surface water is non-negligible. However, there are two additional conservative simplifications in the reference case that compensate for the non-conservative effect of neglecting vadose zone dispersion: the use of a steady infiltration rate and vadose zone velocity, and the way equilibrium sorption is used to represent transport in the fractured material of the saturated aquifer. With more realistic representations of all three processes, the RI/FS reference case was found to either provide a reasonably good approximation to the peak concentration or was significantly conservative (pessimistic) for all parameter combinations considered.

  16. Non-Specific Root Transport of Nutrient Gives Access to an Early Nutritional Indicator: The Case of Sulfate and Molybdate.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Anne; Sorin, Elise; Etienne, Philippe; Diquélou, Sylvain; Koprivova, Anna; Kopriva, Stanislav; Arkoun, Mustapha; Gallardo, Karine; Turner, Marie; Cruz, Florence; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Ourry, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Under sulfur (S) deficiency, crosstalk between nutrients induced accumulation of other nutrients, particularly molybdenum (Mo). This disturbed balanced between S and Mo could provide a way to detect S deficiency and therefore avoid losses in yield and seed quality in cultivated species. Under hydroponic conditions, S deprivation was applied to Brassica napus to determine the precise kinetics of S and Mo uptake and whether sulfate transporters were involved in Mo uptake. Leaf contents of S and Mo were also quantified in a field-grown S deficient oilseed rape crop with different S and N fertilization applications to evaluate the [Mo]:[S] ratio, as an indicator of S nutrition. To test genericity of this indicator, the [Mo]:[S] ratio was also assessed with other cultivated species under different controlled conditions. During S deprivation, Mo uptake was strongly increased in B. napus. This accumulation was not a result of the induction of the molybdate transporters, Mot1 and Asy, but could be a direct consequence of Sultr1.1 and Sultr1.2 inductions. However, analysis of single mutants of these transporters in Arabidopsis thaliana suggested that other sulfate deficiency responsive transporters may be involved. Under field conditions, Mo content was also increased in leaves by a reduction in S fertilization. The [Mo]:[S] ratio significantly discriminated between the plots with different rates of S fertilization. Threshold values were estimated for the hierarchical clustering of commercial crops according to S status. The use of the [Mo]:[S] ratio was also reliable to detect S deficiency for other cultivated species under controlled conditions. The analysis of the leaf [Mo]:[S] ratio seems to be a practical indicator to detect early S deficiency under field conditions and thus improve S fertilization management.

  17. Non-Specific Root Transport of Nutrient Gives Access to an Early Nutritional Indicator: The Case of Sulfate and Molybdate

    PubMed Central

    Etienne, Philippe; Diquélou, Sylvain; Koprivova, Anna; Kopriva, Stanislav; Arkoun, Mustapha; Gallardo, Karine; Turner, Marie; Cruz, Florence; Yvin, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Under sulfur (S) deficiency, crosstalk between nutrients induced accumulation of other nutrients, particularly molybdenum (Mo). This disturbed balanced between S and Mo could provide a way to detect S deficiency and therefore avoid losses in yield and seed quality in cultivated species. Under hydroponic conditions, S deprivation was applied to Brassica napus to determine the precise kinetics of S and Mo uptake and whether sulfate transporters were involved in Mo uptake. Leaf contents of S and Mo were also quantified in a field-grown S deficient oilseed rape crop with different S and N fertilization applications to evaluate the [Mo]:[S] ratio, as an indicator of S nutrition. To test genericity of this indicator, the [Mo]:[S] ratio was also assessed with other cultivated species under different controlled conditions. During S deprivation, Mo uptake was strongly increased in B. napus. This accumulation was not a result of the induction of the molybdate transporters, Mot1 and Asy, but could be a direct consequence of Sultr1.1 and Sultr1.2 inductions. However, analysis of single mutants of these transporters in Arabidopsis thaliana suggested that other sulfate deficiency responsive transporters may be involved. Under field conditions, Mo content was also increased in leaves by a reduction in S fertilization. The [Mo]:[S] ratio significantly discriminated between the plots with different rates of S fertilization. Threshold values were estimated for the hierarchical clustering of commercial crops according to S status. The use of the [Mo]:[S] ratio was also reliable to detect S deficiency for other cultivated species under controlled conditions. The analysis of the leaf [Mo]:[S] ratio seems to be a practical indicator to detect early S deficiency under field conditions and thus improve S fertilization management. PMID:27870884

  18. Siting and Transportation for Consolidated Used Nuclear Fuel Management Facilities: A Proposed Approach for a Regional Initiative to Begin the Dialogue - 13562

    SciTech Connect

    Thrower, Alex W.; Janairo, Lisa

    2013-07-01

    related to the selection of a consolidated storage site. The approach would be characterized by informed discussion and deliberation, bringing together stakeholders from government, the non-governmental (NGO) community, industry, and other sectors. Because site selection would result in regional transportation impacts, the development of the transportation system (e.g., route identification, infrastructure improvements) would be integrated into the issue-resolution process. In addition to laying out the necessary steps and associated timeline, the authors address the challenges of building public trust and confidence in the new waste management program, as well as the difficulty of reaching and sustaining broad-based consensus on a decision to host a consolidated storage facility. (authors)

  19. Problems of Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servedio, William; McLeod, William

    1980-01-01

    Increased participation in recreational programing by persons with handicapping conditions is a right that calls for significant changes in accessibility of facilities. Both interior and exterior building modifications must be made. (CJ)

  20. 45 CFR 707.8 - Physical access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... facilities, directing users to a location at which they can obtain information about accessible facilities... § 707.8 Physical access. (a) Discrimination prohibited. Except as otherwise provided in this section, no... facilities-program access—(1) Existing facilities defined. For the purpose of this section,...

  1. Impact of supervised drug consumption services on access to and engagement with care at a palliative and supportive care facility for people living with HIV/AIDS: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Ryan; Dilley, Laura B; Guirguis-Younger, Manal; Hwang, Stephen W; Small, Will

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Improvements in the availability and effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have prolonged the lives of people living with HIV/AIDS. However, mortality rates have remained high among populations that encounter barriers to accessing and adhering to HAART, notably people who use drugs. This population consequently has a high burden of illness and complex palliative and supportive care needs, but is often unable to access these services due to anti-drug policies and discrimination. In Vancouver, Canada, the Dr. Peter Centre (DPC), which operates a 24-bed residential HIV/AIDS care facility, has sought to improve access to palliative and supportive care services by adopting a comprehensive harm reduction strategy, including supervised injection services. We undertook this study to explore how the integration of comprehensive harm reduction services into this setting shapes access to and engagement with care. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 13 DPC residents between November 2010 and August 2011. Interviews made use of a semistructured interview guide which facilitated discussion regarding how the DPC Residence's model of care (a) shaped healthcare access, (b) influenced healthcare interactions and (c) impacted drug use practices and overall health. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically. Results Participant accounts highlight how the harm reduction policy altered the structural-environmental context of healthcare services and thus mediated access to palliative and supportive care services. Furthermore, this approach fostered an atmosphere in which drug use could be discussed without the risk of punitive action, and thus increased openness between residents and staff. Finally, participants reported that the environmental supports provided by the DPC Residence decreased drug-related risks and improved health outcomes, including HAART adherence and survival. Conclusions This study highlights how adopting

  2. 36 CFR Appendix F to Part 1191 - Modifications Adopted by the Department of Transportation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Department of Transportation F Appendix F to Part 1191 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND... BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES; ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS ACT (ABA) ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES Pt. 1191, App. F Appendix F to Part 1191—Modifications Adopted by the Department of Transportation The Department...

  3. 36 CFR Appendix F to Part 1191 - Modifications Adopted by the Department of Transportation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Department of Transportation F Appendix F to Part 1191 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND... BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES; ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS ACT (ABA) ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES Pt. 1191, App. F Appendix F to Part 1191—Modifications Adopted by the Department of Transportation The Department...

  4. Oil Pollution Act (OPA) and Federal Facilities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Oil Pollution Prevention regulation sets forth requirements for prevention of, preparedness for, and response to oil discharges at specific non-transportation-related facilities, including federal facilities.

  5. Development of the relaxation-assisted 2DIR method for accessing structures of molecules and its application for studying the energy transport on a molecular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasyanenko, Valeriy Mitrofanovich

    Measuring the three-dimensional structure of molecules, dynamics of structural changes, and energy transport on a molecular scale is important for many areas of natural science. Supplementing the widely used methods of x-ray diffraction, NMR, and optical spectroscopies, a two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2DIR) method was introduced about a decade ago. The 2DIR method measures pair-wise interactions between vibrational modes in molecules, thus acquiring molecular structural constraints such as distances between vibrating groups and the angles between their transition dipoles. The 2DIR method has been applied to a variety of molecular systems but in studying larger molecules such as proteins and peptides the method is facing challenges associated with the congestion of their vibrational spectra and delocalized character of their vibrational modes. To help extract structural information from such spectra and make efficient use of vibrational modes separated by large distances, a novel relaxation-assisted 2DIR method (RA 2DIR) has recently been proposed, which exploits the transport of excess vibrational energy from the initially excited mode. With the goal of further development of RA 2DIR, we applied it to a variety of molecular systems, including model compounds, transition-metal complexes, and isomers. The experiments revealed several novel effects which both enhance the power of RA 2DIR and bring a deeper understanding to the fundamental process of energy transport on a molecular level. We demonstrated that RA 2DIR can enhance greatly (27-fold) the cross-peak amplitude among spatially remote modes, which leads to an increase of the range of distances accessible for structural measurements by several fold. We demonstrated that the energy transport time correlates with the intermode distance. This correlation offers a new way for identifying connectivity patterns in molecules. We developed two models of energy transport in molecules. In one, a spatial overlap

  6. 45 CFR 1232.14 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing facilities. 1232.14 Section 1232.14... ASSISTANCE Accessibility § 1232.14 Existing facilities. (a) A recipient shall operate each program or... existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and usable by handicapped persons. (b)...

  7. 28 CFR 41.57 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Existing facilities. 41.57 Section 41.57... Practices Program Accessibility § 41.57 Existing facilities. (a) A recipient shall operate each program or... existing facilities or every part of an existing facility accessible to and usable by handicapped...

  8. 45 CFR 1151.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing facilities. 1151.22 Section 1151.22... Prohibited Accessibility § 1151.22 Existing facilities. (a) A recipient shall operate each program or... make each of its existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and usable...

  9. 45 CFR 1232.14 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Existing facilities. 1232.14 Section 1232.14... ASSISTANCE Accessibility § 1232.14 Existing facilities. (a) A recipient shall operate each program or... existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to and usable by handicapped persons. (b)...

  10. 45 CFR 84.22 - Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Existing facilities. 84.22 Section 84.22 Public... facilities. (a) Accessibility. A recipient shall operate its program or activity so that when each part is... a recipient to make each of its existing facilities or every part of a facility accessible to...

  11. Access to sustained high-beta with internal transport barrier and negative central magnetic shear in DIII-Da)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalo, A. M.; Doyle, E. J.; Ferron, J. R.; Greenfield, C. M.; Groebner, R. J.; Hyatt, A. W.; Jackson, G. L.; Jayakumar, R. J.; Kinsey, J. E.; La Haye, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Murakami, M.; Okabayashi, M.; Osborne, T. H.; Petty, C. C.; Politzer, P. A.; Reimerdes, H.; Scoville, J. T.; Solomon, W. M.; St. John, H. E.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; Wade, M. R.; VanZeeland, M. A.

    2006-05-01

    High values of normalized β (βN˜4) and safety factor (qmin˜2) have been sustained simultaneously for ˜2s in DIII-D [J.L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 64 (2002)], suggesting a possible path to high fusion performance, steady-state tokamak scenarios with a large fraction of bootstrap current. The combination of internal transport barrier and negative central magnetic shear at high β results in high confinement (H89P>2.5) and large bootstrap current fraction (fBS>60%) with good alignment. Previously, stability limits in plasmas with core transport barriers have been observed at moderate values of βN (<3) because of the pressure peaking which normally develops from improved core confinement. In recent DIII-D experiments, the internal transport barrier is clearly observed in the electron density and in the ion temperature and rotation profiles at ρ ˜0.5 but not in the electron temperature profile, which is very broad. The misalignment of Ti and Te gradients may help to avoid a large local pressure gradient. Furthermore, at low internal inductance ˜0.6, the current density gradients are close to the vessel and the ideal kink modes are strongly wall-coupled. Simultaneous feedback control of both external and internal sets of n =1 magnetic coils was used to maintain optimal error field correction and resistive wall mode stabilization, allowing operation above the free-boundary β limit. Large particle orbits at high safety factor in the core help to broaden both the pressure and the beam-driven current profiles, favorable for steady-state operation. At plasma current flat top and β ˜5%, a noninductive current fraction of ˜100% has been observed. Stability modeling shows the possibility for operation up to the ideal-wall limit at β ˜6%.

  12. ULI/UMTA (Urban Land Institute/Urban Mass Transportation Administration) Policy Forum of Joint Development of Rail-Transit Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dunphy, R.

    1987-01-01

    The ULI/UMTA Policy Forum on Joint Development of Rail Transit Facilities convened June 11-12, 1986. The participants included a representative group of developers, transit operators, local government officials, lenders, and public-interest groups concerned with transportation and urban development. Workshops at the forum elicited a consensus that UMTA should establish policies to advance, support, and reinforce joint development. They also recommended development of a set of guidelines that would address zoning and planning for density and traffic problems. It was also recommended that land-use changes at, near, or on development sites need to be made before construction begins, in part to preclude parties involved from changing their minds. The report includes general session presentations on the Hong Kong and Dulles DART projects, workshop summaries, and resource papers presented.

  13. Analysis of Residual Acceleration Effects on Transport and Segregation During Directional Solidification of Tin-Bismuth in the MEPHISTO Furnace Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Lizee, Arnaud

    1996-01-01

    The object of this work, started in March of 1995, is to approach the problem of determining the transport conditions (and effects of residual acceleration) during the plane-front directional solidification of a tin-bismuth alloy under low gravity conditions. The work involves using a combination of 2- and 3-D numerical models, scaling analyses, 1-D models and the results of ground-based and low-gravity experiments. The experiments conducted in the MEPHISTO furnace facility during the USMP-3 spaceflight which took place earlier this year (22 Feb. - 6 Mar. 1996). This experiment represents an unprecedented opportunity to make a quantitative correlation between residual accelerations and the response of an actual experimental solidification system

  14. Transportation and general aviation in Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The diversity of Virginia is examined with respect to its transportation facilities and services, the Virginia Air Transportation System Plan, regionalism, and selected case studies of individual facilities.

  15. Research and test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A description is given of each of the following Langley research and test facilities: 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel, 7-by 10-Foot High Speed Tunnel, 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel, 13-Inch Magnetic Suspension & Balance System, 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel, 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel, 16-by 24-Inch Water Tunnel, 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel, 30-by 60-Foot Wind Tunnel, Advanced Civil Transport Simulator (ACTS), Advanced Technology Research Laboratory, Aerospace Controls Research Laboratory (ACRL), Aerothermal Loads Complex, Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF), Avionics Integration Research Laboratory, Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART), Compact Range Test Facility, Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS), Enhanced/Synthetic Vision & Spatial Displays Laboratory, Experimental Test Range (ETR) Flight Research Facility, General Aviation Simulator (GAS), High Intensity Radiated Fields Facility, Human Engineering Methods Laboratory, Hypersonic Facilities Complex, Impact Dynamics Research Facility, Jet Noise Laboratory & Anechoic Jet Facility, Light Alloy Laboratory, Low Frequency Antenna Test Facility, Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel, Mechanics of Metals Laboratory, National Transonic Facility (NTF), NDE Research Laboratory, Polymers & Composites Laboratory, Pyrotechnic Test Facility, Quiet Flow Facility, Robotics Facilities, Scientific Visualization System, Scramjet Test Complex, Space Materials Research Laboratory, Space Simulation & Environmental Test Complex, Structural Dynamics Research Laboratory, Structural Dynamics Test Beds, Structures & Materials Research Laboratory, Supersonic Low Disturbance Pilot Tunnel, Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA), Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT), Transport Systems Research Vehicle, Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, and the Visual Motion Simulator (VMS).

  16. Spinel-structured surface layers for facile Li ion transport and improved chemical stability of lithium manganese oxide spinel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae Ri; Seo, Hyo Ree; Lee, Boeun; Cho, Byung Won; Lee, Kwan-Young; Oh, Si Hyoung

    2017-01-01

    Li-ion conducting spinel-structured oxide layer with a manganese oxidation state close to being tetravalent was prepared on aluminum-doped lithium manganese oxide spinel for improving the electrochemical performances at the elevated temperatures. This nanoscale surface layer provides a good ionic conduction path for lithium ion transport to the core and also serves as an excellent chemical barrier for protecting the high-capacity core material from manganese dissolution into the electrolyte. In this work, a simple wet process was employed to prepare thin LiAlMnO4 and LiMg0.5Mn1.5O4 layers on the surface of LiAl0.1Mn1.9O4. X-ray absorption studies revealed an oxidation state close to tetravalent manganese on the surface layer of coated materials. Materials with these surface coating layers exhibited excellent capacity retentions superior to the bare material, without undermining the lithium ion transport characteristics and the high rate performances.

  17. A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    SciTech Connect

    Spangler, Lee H.; Dobeck, Laura M.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Humphries, Seth D.; Barr, Jamie L.; Keith, Charlie J.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Rouse, Joshua H.; Cunningham, Alfred B.; Benson, Sally M.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Wells, Arthur W.; Diehl, J. R.; Strazisar, Brian; Fessenden, Julianna; Rahn, Thom A.; Amonette, James E.; Barr, Jonathan L.; Pickles, William L.; Jacobson, James D.; Silver, Eli A.; Male, Erin J.; Rauch, Henry W.; Gullickson, Kadie; Trautz, Robert; Kharaka, Yousif; Birkholzer, Jens; Wielopolski, Lucien

    2010-03-01

    A facility has been constructed to perform controlled shallow releases of CO2 at flow rates that challenge near surface detection techniques and can be scalable to desired retention rates of large scale CO2 storage projects. Preinjection measurements were made to determine background conditions and characterize natural variability at the site. Modeling of CO2 transport and concentration in saturated soil and the vadose zone was also performed to inform decisions about CO2 release rates and sampling strategies. Four releases of CO2 were carried out over the summer field seasons of 2007 and 2008. Transport of CO2 through soil, water, plants, and air was studied using near surface detection techniques. Soil CO2 flux, soil gas concentration, total carbon in soil, water chemistry, plant health, net CO2 flux, atmospheric CO2 concentration, movement of tracers, and stable isotope ratios were among the quantities measured. Even at relatively low fluxes, most techniques were able to detect elevated levels of CO2 in the soil, atmosphere, or water. Plant stress induced by CO2 was detectable above natural seasonal variations.

  18. Transportation Statistics Annual Report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Fenn, M.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the fourth Transportation Statistics Annual Report (TSAR) prepared by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) for the President and Congress. As in previous years, it reports on the state of U.S. transportation system at two levels. First, in Part I, it provides a statistical and interpretive survey of the system—its physical characteristics, its economic attributes, aspects of its use and performance, and the scale and severity of unintended consequences of transportation, such as fatalities and injuries, oil import dependency, and environment impacts. Part I also explores the state of transportation statistics, and new needs of the rapidly changing world of transportation. Second, Part II of the report, as in prior years, explores in detail the performance of the U.S. transportation system from the perspective of desired social outcomes or strategic goals. This year, the performance aspect of transportation chosen for thematic treatment is “Mobility and Access,” which complements past TSAR theme sections on “The Economic Performance of Transportation” (1995) and “Transportation and the Environment” (1996). Mobility and access are at the heart of the transportation system’s performance from the user’s perspective. In what ways and to what extent does the geographic freedom provided by transportation enhance personal fulfillment of the nation’s residents and contribute to economic advancement of people and businesses? This broad question underlies many of the topics examined in Part II: What is the current level of personal mobility in the United States, and how does it vary by sex, age, income level, urban or rural location, and over time? What factors explain variations? Has transportation helped improve people’s access to work, shopping, recreational facilities, and medical services, and in what ways and in what locations? How have barriers, such as age, disabilities, or lack of an automobile, affected these

  19. Lack of access to treatment as a barrier to HCV screening: a facility-based assessment in the Indian health service.

    PubMed

    Reilley, Brigg; Leston, Jessica; Redd, John T; Geiger, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently issued new recommendations to screen persons born between 1945 and 1965 for hepatitis C virus. Federal facilities in the US Indian Health Service were surveyed on knowledge and support for the hepatitis C virus recommendations, as well as barriers and concerns.

  20. Mobile access control vestibule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePoy, Jennifer M.

    1998-12-01

    The mobile access control vestibule (MACV) is an adaptation of techniques developed for mobile military command centers. The overall configuration of modules acts as an entry control/screening facility or transportable command center. The system would provide the following capabilities: (1) A key element for force protection, rapid deployment units sent to areas having no prepositioned equipment or where there has been a degradation of that equipment as a result of natural disasters or civil unrest. (2) A rapidly deployable security control center to upgrade the security at nonmilitary sites (e.g., diplomatic or humanitarian organizations). (3) Personnel screening, package screening, badge/identification card production for authorized personnel, centralized monitoring of deployed perimeter sensors, and centralized communications for law enforcement personnel. (4) Self-contained screening and threat detection systems, including explosives detection using the system developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the FAA. When coupled with transportable electric generators, the system is self-sufficient. The communication system for the MACV would be a combination of physically wired and wireless communication units that supports by ad hoc networking.