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Sample records for accessible transportation facilities

  1. Americans with Disabilities Act: Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities, Transportation Facilities, Transportation Vehicles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, Washington, DC.

    Guidelines are presented regarding accessibility to buildings and facilities, transportation facilities, and transportation vehicles by individuals with disabilities, under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. These guidelines are to be applied during building design, construction, and alteration. Part 1 offers detailed facility…

  2. 25 CFR 170.813 - When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted? 170.813 Section 170.813 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.813 When can access to...

  3. 25 CFR 170.813 - When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted? 170.813 Section 170.813 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.813 When can access to...

  4. 25 CFR 170.813 - When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted? 170.813 Section 170.813 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.813 When can access to...

  5. 25 CFR 170.813 - When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted? 170.813 Section 170.813 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.813 When can access to...

  6. 25 CFR 170.813 - When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true When can access to IRR transportation facilities be restricted? 170.813 Section 170.813 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.813 When can access to...

  7. 49 CFR 37.9 - Standards for accessible transportation facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... in ADA Chapter 1, Section 103, of Appendix B to 36 CFR part 1191, the following parties may submit to... requirements set forth in Appendices B and D to 36 CFR part 1191, which apply to buildings and facilities... and D to 36 CFR part 1191 and Appendix A to this part, if the modifications complied with the...

  8. Sociospatial distribution of access to facilities for moderate and vigorous intensity physical activity in Scotland by different modes of transport

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background People living in neighbourhoods of lower socioeconomic status have been shown to have higher rates of obesity and a lower likelihood of meeting physical activity recommendations than their more affluent counterparts. This study examines the sociospatial distribution of access to facilities for moderate or vigorous intensity physical activity in Scotland and whether such access differs by the mode of transport available and by Urban Rural Classification. Methods A database of all fixed physical activity facilities was obtained from the national agency for sport in Scotland. Facilities were categorised into light, moderate and vigorous intensity activity groupings before being mapped. Transport networks were created to assess the number of each type of facility accessible from the population weighted centroid of each small area in Scotland on foot, by bicycle, by car and by bus. Multilevel modelling was used to investigate the distribution of the number of accessible facilities by small area deprivation within urban, small town and rural areas separately, adjusting for population size and local authority. Results Prior to adjustment for Urban Rural Classification and local authority, the median number of accessible facilities for moderate or vigorous intensity activity increased with increasing deprivation from the most affluent or second most affluent quintile to the most deprived for all modes of transport. However, after adjustment, the modelling results suggest that those in more affluent areas have significantly higher access to moderate and vigorous intensity facilities by car than those living in more deprived areas. Conclusions The sociospatial distributions of access to facilities for both moderate intensity and vigorous intensity physical activity were similar. However, the results suggest that those living in the most affluent neighbourhoods have poorer access to facilities of either type that can be reached on foot, by bicycle or by bus than

  9. Transport Reactor Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, D.A.; Shoemaker, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is currently evaluating hot gas desulfurization (HGD)in its on-site transport reactor facility (TRF). This facility was originally constructed in the early 1980s to explore advanced gasification processes with an entrained reactor, and has recently been modified to incorporate a transport riser reactor. The TRF supports Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power systems, one of METC`s advanced power generation systems. The HGD subsystem is a key developmental item in reducing the cost and increasing the efficiency of the IGCC concept. The TRF is a unique facility with high-temperature, high-pressure, and multiple reactant gas composition capability. The TRF can be configured for reacting a single flow pass of gas and solids using a variety of gases. The gas input system allows six different gas inputs to be mixed and heated before entering the reaction zones. Current configurations allow the use of air, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, methane, nitrogen, oxygen, steam, or any mixture of these gases. Construction plans include the addition of a coal gas input line. This line will bring hot coal gas from the existing Fluidized-Bed Gasifier (FBG) via the Modular Gas Cleanup Rig (MGCR) after filtering out particulates with ceramic candle filters. Solids can be fed either by a rotary pocket feeder or a screw feeder. Particle sizes may range from 70 to 150 micrometers. Both feeders have a hopper that can hold enough solid for fairly lengthy tests at the higher feed rates, thus eliminating the need for lockhopper transfers during operation.

  10. 36 CFR 1154.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD § 1154.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by...

  11. 36 CFR 1154.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD § 1154.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by...

  12. Space Transportation and Destination Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smitherman, David; McClure, Wallace

    1999-01-01

    The Space Transportation and Destination Facilities section focused on space transportation vehicles-from use of existing vehicles to development of specialized transports-and on space stations, space business parks, space hotels, and other facilities in space of the kind that eventually would provide services for general public space travel (PST) and tourism. For both transportation and destination facilities, the emphasis was on the identification of various strategies to enable a realistic incremental progression in the development and acquisition of such facilities, and the identification of issues that need resolution to enable formation of viable businesses. The approach was to determine the best: (1) Strategies for general PST and tourism development through the description and analysis of a wide range of possible future scenarios. With these scenarios in mind the section then identified. (2) Key issues to be explored. (3) opportunities to eliminate barriers. (4) Recommendations for future actions. (5) Top-level requirements and characteristics for general PST and tourism systems and services that would guide the development of transportation and destination facilities.

  13. Facility Accessibility: Opening the Doors to All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Jeffrey C.; Piletic, Cindy K.

    2006-01-01

    A facility developed for fitness, physical activity, recreation, or sport is a vital community resource that contributes to the overall health and wellness of that community's citizens. In order to maximize the benefits derived from these facilities, it is imperative that they be accessible to as wide a range of people as possible. The Americans…

  14. Research facility access & science education

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, S.P.; Teplitz, V.L.

    1994-10-01

    As Congress voted to terminate the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory in October of 1993, the Department of Energy was encouraged to maximize the benefits to the nation of approximately $2 billion which had already been expended to date on its evolution. Having been recruited to Texas from other intellectually challenging enclaves around the world, many regional scientists, especially physicists, of course, also began to look for viable ways to preserve some of the potentially short-lived gains made by Texas higher education in anticipation of {open_quotes}the SSC era.{close_quotes} In fact, by November, 1993, approximately 150 physicists and engineers from thirteen Texas universities and the SSC itself, had gathered on the SMU campus to discuss possible re-uses of the SSC assets. Participants at that meeting drew up a petition addressed to the state and federal governments requesting the creation of a joint Texas Facility for Science Education and Research. The idea was to create a facility, open to universities and industry alike, which would preserve the research and development infrastructure and continue the educational mission of the SSC.

  15. 49 CFR 37.41 - Construction of transportation facilities by public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... public entities. 37.41 Section 37.41 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation... transportation facilities by public entities. (a) A public entity shall construct any new facility to be used in providing designated public transportation services so that the facility is readily accessible to and...

  16. 45 CFR 85.42 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 85.42... SERVICES § 85.42 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each... to make each of its existing facilities accessible to and usable by individuals with handicaps; or...

  17. 45 CFR 2301.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 2301... THE UNITED STATES ARCTIC RESEARCH COMMISSION § 2301.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a... not— (1) Necessarily require the agency to make each of its existing facilities accessible to...

  18. 45 CFR 2104.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 2104... BY THE COMMISSION OF FINE ARTS § 2104.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General...) Necessarily require the agency to make each of its existing facilities accessible to and usable by...

  19. 45 CFR 1214.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1214... ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY ACTION § 1214.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency... require the agency to make each of its existing facilities accessible to and usable by individuals...

  20. 45 CFR 1803.7 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1803.7... facilities. (a) The Foundation shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when... does not necessarily require the Foundation to make each of its existing facilities accessible to...

  1. In-facility transport code review

    SciTech Connect

    Spore, J.W.; Boyack, B.E.; Bohl, W.R.

    1996-07-01

    The following computer codes were reviewed by the In-Facility Transport Working Group for application to the in-facility transport of radioactive aerosols, flammable gases, and/or toxic gases: (1) CONTAIN, (2) FIRAC, (3) GASFLOW, (4) KBERT, and (5) MELCOR. Based on the review criteria as described in this report and the versions of each code available at the time of the review, MELCOR is the best code for the analysis of in-facility transport when multidimensional effects are not significant. When multi-dimensional effects are significant, GASFLOW should be used.

  2. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  3. 36 CFR 406.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 406.150 Section 406.150 Parks, Forests, and Public Property AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS... AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION § 406.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General....

  4. 36 CFR 406.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 406.150 Section 406.150 Parks, Forests, and Public Property AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS... AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION § 406.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General....

  5. 36 CFR 406.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 406.150 Section 406.150 Parks, Forests, and Public Property AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS... AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION § 406.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General....

  6. 36 CFR 406.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 406.150 Section 406.150 Parks, Forests, and Public Property AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS... AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION § 406.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General....

  7. 36 CFR 406.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 406.150 Section 406.150 Parks, Forests, and Public Property AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS... AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION § 406.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General....

  8. 45 CFR 606.51 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 606.51 Section 606.51 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION § 606.51 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General....

  9. 39 CFR 255.8 - Access to postal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Access to postal facilities. 255.8 Section 255.8 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION ACCESS OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES TO POSTAL SERVICE PROGRAMS, ACTIVITIES, FACILITIES, AND ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION...

  10. 45 CFR 606.51 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 606.51 Section 606.51 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION § 606.51 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General....

  11. 45 CFR 606.51 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 606.51 Section 606.51 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE... THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION § 606.51 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General....

  12. Community variation in adolescent access to indoor tanning facilities.

    PubMed

    Olson, Ardis L; Carlos, Heather A; Sarnoff, Rachel A

    2013-04-01

    Melanoma rates among younger women in New Hampshire (NH) are rising. In urban studies, youth proximity to tanning facilities has been linked to indoor tanning, a proven cause of melanoma. Youth access has not been examined in rural settings. To determine on a statewide basis the influence of rurality and community income level on female students' ease of access to tanning facilities, all NH tanning facilities (N = 261) and high schools (N = 77) in 2011 were spatially and statistically analyzed to determine schools with more facilities within 2 miles of the school and greater capacity (fewer female students per facility), for indoor tanning. Schools above the state-wide average for both measures were classified as "Easy Access" to indoor tanning. Among NH high schools, 74 % have 1 or more tanning facility within two miles and 22 % have "Easy Access" to tanning facilities. Ease of access did not differ by rurality. Lower-income school status was an independent predictor of both greater capacity and "Easy Access". While urban and rural teens have similar access to indoor tanning, female students in lower-income communities have easier access. Variations in access by community size and income must be considered in planning interventions to address youth indoor tanning.

  13. Site and facility transportation services planning documents

    SciTech Connect

    Ratledge, J.E. ); Danese, L.; Schmid, S. )

    1990-01-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) will eventually ship Purchasers' (10 CFR 961.3) spent nuclear fuel from approximately 122 commercial nuclear facilities. The preparation and processing of Site and Facility Specific Transportation Services Planning Documents (SPDs) and Site Specific Servicing Plans (SSSPs) provides a focus for advanced planning and the actual shipping of waste, as well as the overall development of transportation requirements for the waste transportation system. SPDs will be prepared for each of the affected nuclear waste facilities over the next 2 years with initial emphasis on facilities likely to be served during the earliest years of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS) operations. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Perceived accessibility versus actual physical accessibility of healthcare facilities.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, J; Byfield, G; Brown, T T; LaFavor, K; Murphy, D; Laud, P

    2000-01-01

    This study addressed how healthcare clinics perceive themselves in regard to accessibility for persons with spinal cord injuries (SCI). All 40 of the clinics surveyed reported that they were wheelchair accessible; however, there was significant variability in the number of sites that actually met the guidelines of the Americans with Disability Act. In general, a person using a wheelchair could enter the building, the examination room, and the bathroom. The majority of sites did not have an examination table that could be lowered to wheelchair level. Most reported limited experience in working with persons with (SCI), yet they claimed to be able to assist with difficult transfers. Only one site knew about autonomic dysreflexia. Problems of accessibility appeared to be seriously compounded by the clinics' perception of how they met physical accessibility guidelines without consideration of the actual needs of persons with SCI. This study addressed the perception of accessibility as reported by clinic managers versus actual accessibility in healthcare clinics in a Midwestern metropolitan area for persons using wheelchairs. PMID:10754921

  15. 7 CFR 800.26 - Access to records and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... notify the elevator manager or manager's representative of their presence and furnish proof of identity... business hours and have access to the facilities and to inspect any books, documents, papers, and...

  16. Opportunities for Process Monitoring Techniques at Delayed Access Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Michael M.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Johnson, Shirley J.; Schanfein, Mark; Toomey, Christopher

    2013-09-20

    Except for specific cases where the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) maintains a continuous presence at a facility (such as the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant), there is always a period of time or delay between the moment a State is notified or aware of an upcoming inspection, and the time the inspector actually enters the material balance area or facility. Termed by the authors as “delayed access,” this period of time between inspection notice and inspector entrance to a facility poses a concern. Delayed access also has the potential to reduce the effectiveness of measures applied as part of the Safeguards Approach for a facility (such as short-notice inspections). This report investigates the feasibility of using process monitoring to address safeguards challenges posed by delayed access at a subset of facility types.

  17. Manual for Accessibility: [Conference, Meeting, and Lodging Facilities]. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rehabilitation Association, Alexandria, VA.

    This illustrated manual and survey forms are designed to be used by organizations, hotel and restaurant associations, interested individuals and others as a guide for selecting accessible conference, meeting, and lodging facilities. The guidelines can also be used with existing facilities to identify specific modifications and accommodations. The…

  18. 45 CFR 2490.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 2490...: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or.... This paragraph does not— (1) Necessarily require the agency to make each of its existing...

  19. 31. FLOOR PLANS OF WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY. SHOWS ACCESS CORRIDOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. FLOOR PLANS OF WASTE CALCINATION FACILITY. SHOWS ACCESS CORRIDOR AT MEZZANINE AND LOWER LEVELS. INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106352. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-A-2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. 29 CFR 2205.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 2205.150 Section 2205.150 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW... THE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION § 2205.150 Program accessibility:...

  1. 45 CFR 1803.7 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1803.7 Section 1803.7 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) HARRY S. TRUMAN SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP § 1803.7 Program accessibility:...

  2. 10 CFR 1041.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY § 1041.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by...

  3. 15 CFR 8c.50 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE § 8c.50 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable...

  4. 10 CFR 1041.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY § 1041.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by...

  5. 10 CFR 1041.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY § 1041.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by...

  6. 28 CFR 39.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE § 39.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable...

  7. 19 CFR 201.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 201.150 Section 201.150 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION GENERAL RULES OF... Conducted by the U.S. International Trade Commission § 201.150 Program accessibility: Existing...

  8. 29 CFR 2205.150 - Program accessibility: existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Section 2205.150 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW... THE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION AND IN ACCESSIBILITY OF COMMISSION ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 2205.150 Program accessibility: existing facilities. (a) General. The agency...

  9. 29 CFR 2205.150 - Program accessibility: existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Section 2205.150 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW... THE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION AND IN ACCESSIBILITY OF COMMISSION ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 2205.150 Program accessibility: existing facilities. (a) General. The agency...

  10. 29 CFR 2205.150 - Program accessibility: existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 2205.150 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW... THE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION AND IN ACCESSIBILITY OF COMMISSION ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 2205.150 Program accessibility: existing facilities. (a) General. The agency...

  11. 12 CFR 606.650 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... decision that compliance would result in such alteration or burdens must be made by the agency head or his..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... facilities, or any other methods that result in making its programs or activities readily accessible to...

  12. 43 CFR 17.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... proving that compliance with § 17.550(a) would result in such an alteration or burdens. The decision that..., reassignment of services to accessible locations, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making its programs...

  13. 14 CFR § 1251.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities... Activities Conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration § 1251.550 Program accessibility... the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—(1) General. The agency may...

  14. 14 CFR 1251.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities... Activities Conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration § 1251.550 Program accessibility... the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—(1) General. The agency may...

  15. 14 CFR 1251.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities... Activities Conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration § 1251.550 Program accessibility... the benefits and services of the program or activity. (b) Methods—(1) General. The agency may...

  16. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Access to... or treatment for individuals with mental illness, and to all areas of the facility which are used by... of an individual with mental illness. (c) In addition to access as prescribed in paragraph (b)...

  17. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Access to... or treatment for individuals with mental illness, and to all areas of the facility which are used by... of an individual with mental illness. (c) In addition to access as prescribed in paragraph (b)...

  18. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Access to... or treatment for individuals with mental illness, and to all areas of the facility which are used by... of an individual with mental illness. (c) In addition to access as prescribed in paragraph (b)...

  19. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Access to... or treatment for individuals with mental illness, and to all areas of the facility which are used by... of an individual with mental illness. (c) In addition to access as prescribed in paragraph (b)...

  20. 42 CFR 51.42 - Access to facilities and residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Access to... or treatment for individuals with mental illness, and to all areas of the facility which are used by... of an individual with mental illness. (c) In addition to access as prescribed in paragraph (b)...

  1. Accessing User Facilities and Making your Research Experience Successful

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder,R.; Lanzirotti, A.

    2006-01-01

    Access to many of the world's leading user facilities is easier than ever before, with web-based tutorials providing everything from instrumental overviews and example applications to online safety training. Submission of proposals for experiment time at large, heavily subscribed facilities, including synchrotron and neutron sources, has been streamlined with web-based submission. Support, which is commonly the key to successful experiments, is provided by facility staff and experienced users, allowing new users to begin experiments with minimal experience. Increasingly Earth scientists are taking advantage of the wide range of unique instrumentation at user facilities. Here, we explain how you can, too.

  2. The Sandia transportable triggered lightning instrumentation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnetzer, George H.; Fisher, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    Development of the Sandia Transportable Triggered Lightning Instrumentation Facility (SATTLIF) was motivated by a requirement for the in situ testing of a munitions storage bunker. Transfer functions relating the incident flash currents to voltages, currents, and electromagnetic field values throughout the structure will be obtained for use in refining and validating a lightning response computer model of this type of structure. A preliminary shakedown trial of the facility under actual operational conditions was performed during summer of 1990 at the Kennedy Space Center's (KSC) rocket-triggered lightning test site. A description is given of the SATTLIF, which is readily transportable on a single flatbed truck of by aircraft, and its instrumentation for measuring incident lightning channel currents and the responses of the systems under test. Measurements of return-stroke current peaks obtained with the SATTLIF are presented. Agreement with data acquired on the same flashes with existing KSC instrumentation is, on average, to within approximately 7 percent. Continuing currents were measured with a resolution of approximately 2.5 A. This field trial demonstrated the practicality of using a transportable triggered lightning facility for specialized test applications.

  3. Issues in designing transport layer multicast facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Bert J.; Weaver, Alfred C.

    1990-01-01

    Multicasting denotes a facility in a communications system for providing efficient delivery from a message's source to some well-defined set of locations using a single logical address. While modem network hardware supports multidestination delivery, first generation Transport Layer protocols (e.g., the DoD Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) (15) and ISO TP-4 (41)) did not anticipate the changes over the past decade in underlying network hardware, transmission speeds, and communication patterns that have enabled and driven the interest in reliable multicast. Much recent research has focused on integrating the underlying hardware multicast capability with the reliable services of Transport Layer protocols. Here, we explore the communication issues surrounding the design of such a reliable multicast mechanism. Approaches and solutions from the literature are discussed, and four experimental Transport Layer protocols that incorporate reliable multicast are examined.

  4. Personnel Access Control System Evaluation for National Ignition Facility Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Altenbach, T; Brereton, S.; Hermes, G.; Singh, M.

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to analyze the baseline Access Control System for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and to assess its effectiveness at controlling access to hazardous locations during full NIF operations. It reviews the various hazards present during a NIF shot sequence, and evaluates the effectiveness of the applicable set of controls at preventing access while the hazards are present. It considers only those hazards that could potentially be lethal. In addition, various types of technologies that might be applicable at NIF are reviewed, as are systems currently in use at other facilities requiring access control for safety reasons. Recommendations on how this system might be modified to reduce risk are made.

  5. 50 CFR 550.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 550.150 Section 550.150 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION §...

  6. 50 CFR 550.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 550.150 Section 550.150 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION §...

  7. 50 CFR 550.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 550.150 Section 550.150 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION §...

  8. 50 CFR 550.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 550.150 Section 550.150 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION §...

  9. 50 CFR 550.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 550.150 Section 550.150 Wildlife and Fisheries MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY MARINE MAMMAL COMMISSION §...

  10. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....150 Section 1906.150 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  11. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....150 Section 1906.150 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  12. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....150 Section 1906.150 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  13. 32 CFR 1906.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....150 Section 1906.150 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY § 1906.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities....

  14. 31 CFR 17.150 - Program accessibility; Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...'s facilities that limit the physical accessibility of its programs or activities to individuals with... ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE... operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is...

  15. 45 CFR 1214.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY ACTION § 1214.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is... fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative...

  16. 45 CFR 1214.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY ACTION § 1214.150 Program accessibility: Existing facilities. (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is... fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative...

  17. 22 CFR 1600.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1600.150 Section 1600.150 Foreign Relations JAPAN-UNITED STATES FRIENDSHIP COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE JAPAN-UNITED STATES...

  18. 22 CFR 530.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 530.150 Section 530.150 Foreign Relations BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE BROADCASTING BOARD OF...

  19. 29 CFR 1615.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1615.150 Section 1615.150 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION AND...

  20. 16 CFR 1034.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... 1034.150 Section 1034.150 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE CONSUMER... at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing facilities and construction of new...

  1. 50 CFR 80.24 - Recreational boating access facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS § 80.24... the Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration Act for recreational boating access facilities. However,...

  2. 45 CFR 85.42 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 85.42 Section 85.42 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  3. 22 CFR 1600.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1600.150 Section 1600.150 Foreign Relations JAPAN-UNITED STATES FRIENDSHIP COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE JAPAN-UNITED STATES...

  4. 17 CFR 200.650 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMISSION ORGANIZATION; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Enforcement of Nondiscrimination on... proving that compliance with § 200.650(a) would result in such alteration or burdens. The decision that... construction of new facilities, use of accessible rolling stock, or any other methods that result in making...

  5. 45 CFR 1175.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1175.150 Section 1175.150 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES ENFORCEMENT...

  6. 45 CFR 1153.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1153.150 Section 1153.150 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION...

  7. 45 CFR 1181.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1181.150 Section 1181.150 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES ENFORCEMENT...

  8. 22 CFR 1510.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1510.150 Section 1510.150 Foreign Relations AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT...

  9. 45 CFR 1181.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1181.150 Section 1181.150 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES ENFORCEMENT...

  10. 45 CFR 1175.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1175.150 Section 1175.150 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES ENFORCEMENT...

  11. 45 CFR 1175.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1175.150 Section 1175.150 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES ENFORCEMENT...

  12. 22 CFR 1005.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1005.150 Section 1005.150 Foreign Relations INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION §...

  13. 45 CFR 1153.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1153.150 Section 1153.150 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION...

  14. 40 CFR 12.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 12.150 Section 12.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE ENVIRONMENTAL...

  15. 7 CFR 800.26 - Access to records and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... regulations in effect at the elevator. Every elevator owner and operator and every merchandiser shall permit authorized representatives of the Secretary or Administrator to enter its place of business during normal business hours and have access to the facilities and to inspect any books, documents, papers, and...

  16. 40 CFR 12.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 12.150 Section 12.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE ENVIRONMENTAL...

  17. 22 CFR 1600.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1600.150 Section 1600.150 Foreign Relations JAPAN-UNITED STATES FRIENDSHIP COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE JAPAN-UNITED STATES...

  18. 22 CFR 1600.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1600.150 Section 1600.150 Foreign Relations JAPAN-UNITED STATES FRIENDSHIP COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE JAPAN-UNITED STATES...

  19. 22 CFR 1600.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 1600.150 Section 1600.150 Foreign Relations JAPAN-UNITED STATES FRIENDSHIP COMMISSION ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE JAPAN-UNITED STATES...

  20. 20 CFR 365.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 365.150 Section 365.150 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR...

  1. 20 CFR 365.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 365.150 Section 365.150 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR...

  2. 20 CFR 365.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Program accessibility: Existing facilities. 365.150 Section 365.150 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR...

  3. Traveling towards disease: transportation barriers to health care access.

    PubMed

    Syed, Samina T; Gerber, Ben S; Sharp, Lisa K

    2013-10-01

    Transportation barriers are often cited as barriers to healthcare access. Transportation barriers lead to rescheduled or missed appointments, delayed care, and missed or delayed medication use. These consequences may lead to poorer management of chronic illness and thus poorer health outcomes. However, the significance of these barriers is uncertain based on existing literature due to wide variability in both study populations and transportation barrier measures. The authors sought to synthesize the literature on the prevalence of transportation barriers to health care access. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed studies on transportation barriers to healthcare access was performed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) study addressed access barriers for ongoing primary care or chronic disease care; (2) study included assessment of transportation barriers; and (3) study was completed in the United States. In total, 61 studies were reviewed. Overall, the evidence supports that transportation barriers are an important barrier to healthcare access, particularly for those with lower incomes or the under/uninsured. Additional research needs to (1) clarify which aspects of transportation limit health care access (2) measure the impact of transportation barriers on clinically meaningful outcomes and (3) measure the impact of transportation barrier interventions and transportation policy changes.

  4. Traveling Towards Disease: Transportation Barriers to Health Care Access

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Ben S.; Sharp, Lisa K.

    2014-01-01

    Transportation barriers are often cited as barriers to healthcare access. Transportation barriers lead to rescheduled or missed appointments, delayed care, and missed or delayed medication use. These consequences may lead to poorer management of chronic illness and thus poorer health outcomes. However, the significance of these barriers is uncertain based on existing literature due to wide variability in both study populations and transportation barrier measures. The authors sought to synthesize the literature on the prevalence of transportation barriers to health care access. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed studies on transportation barriers to healthcare access was performed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) study addressed access barriers for ongoing primary care or chronic disease care; (2) study included assessment of transportation barriers; and (3) study was completed in the United States. In total, 61 studies were reviewed. Overall, the evidence supports that transportation barriers are an important barrier to healthcare access, particularly for those with lower incomes or the under/uninsured. Additional research needs to (1) clarify which aspects of transportation limit health care access (2) measure the impact of transportation barriers on clinically meaningful outcomes and (3) measure the impact of transportation barrier interventions and transportation policy changes. PMID:23543372

  5. 9. Acircuit weather cover in foreground, personnel access hatch, transporter/erector ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. A-circuit weather cover in foreground, personnel access hatch, transporter/erector grounding points at right center - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility D-6, 4 miles north of Badlands National Park Headquarters, 4.5 miles east of Jackson County line on county road, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  6. Safety systems and access control in the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Reed, Robert K; Bell, Jayce C

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest and most energetic laser system. The facility has the potential to generate ionizing radiation due to the interaction between the laser beams and target material, with neutrons and gamma rays being produced during deuterium-tritium fusion reactions. To perform these experiments, several types of hazards must be mitigated and controlled to ensure personnel safety. NIF uses a real-time safety system to monitor and mitigate the hazards presented by the facility. The NIF facility Safety Interlock System (SIS) monitors for oxygen deficiency and controls access to the facility preventing exposure to laser light and radiation from the Radiation Generating Devices. It also interfaces to radiation monitoring and other radiological monitoring and alarm systems. The SIS controls permissives to the hazard-generating equipment and annunciates hazard levels in the facility. To do this reliably and safely, the SIS has been designed as a fail-safe system with a proven performance record now spanning over 10 y. This paper discusses the SIS, its design, implementation, operator interfaces, validation/verification, and the hazard mitigation approaches employed in the NIF. A brief discussion of the Failure Modes and Effect Analysis supporting the SIS will also be presented. The paper ends with a general discussion of SIS do's and don'ts and common design flaws that should be avoided in SIS design. PMID:23629061

  7. BIOPACK: the ground controlled late access biological research facility.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Jack J W A

    2004-03-01

    Future Space Shuttle flights shall be characterized by activities necessary to further build the International Space Station, ISS. During these missions limited resources are available to conduct biological experiments in space. The Shuttles' Middeck is a very suitable place to conduct science during the ISS assembly missions or dedicated science missions. The BIOPACK, which flew its first mission during the STS-107, provides a versatile Middeck Locker based research tool for gravitational biology studies. The core facility occupies the space of only two Middeck Lockers. Experiment temperatures are controlled for bacteria, plant, invertebrate and mammalian cultures. Gravity levels and profiles can be set ranging from 0 to 2.0 x g on three independent centrifuges. This provides the experimenter with a 1.0 x g on-board reference and intermediate hypogravity and hypergravity data points to investigate e.g. threshold levels in biological responses. Temperature sensitive items can be stored in the facilities' -10 degrees C and +4 degrees C stowage areas. During STS-107 the facility also included a small glovebox (GBX) and passive temperature controlled units (PTCU). The GBX provides the experimenter with two extra levels of containment for safe sample handling. This biological research facility is a late access (L-10 hrs) laboratory, which, when reaching orbit, could automatically be starting up reducing important experiment lag-time and valuable crew time. The system is completely telecommanded when needed. During flight system parameters like temperatures, centrifuge speeds, experiment commanding or sensor readouts can be monitored and changed when needed. Although ISS provides a wide range of research facilities there is still need for an STS-based late access facility such as the BIOPACK providing experimenters with a very versatile research cabinet for biological experiments under microgravity and in-flight control conditions.

  8. Air support facilities. [interface between air and surface transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airports are discussed in terms of the interface between the ground and air for transportation systems. The classification systems, design, facilities, administration, and operations of airports are described.

  9. Simulation of a Production Facility with an Automated Transport System

    SciTech Connect

    ABRAMCZYK, GLENN

    2004-04-07

    A model was needed to assess material throughput and validate the conceptual design of a production facility, including equipment lists and layout. The initial desire was to use a commercially available discrete event simulation package. However, the available software was found to be too limited in capability. Database interface software was used to develop autonomous intelligent manufacturing workstations and material transporters. The initial Extend model used to assess material throughput and develop equipment lists for the preconceptual design effort was upgraded with software add-ons from Simulation Dynamics, Inc. (SDI). Use of the SDI database interface allowed the upgraded model to include: 1. a material mass balance at any level of detail required by the user, and 2. a transport system model that includes all transport system movements, time delays, and transfers between systems. This model will assist in evaluating transport system capacity, sensitive time delays in the system, and optimal operating strategies. An additional benefit of using the SDI database interface is dramatically improved run time performance. This allows significantly more runs to be completed to provide better statistics for overall plant performance. The model has all system and process parameters entered into sub-component accessible tables. All information for the manufactured items and process data is automatically generated and written to the database. The standard software is used for the movement of manufactured items between workstations, and for sequence and timing functions. Use of the database permits almost unlimited process control and data collection with an insignificant effect on run time.

  10. 48 CFR 3052.222-71 - Strikes or picketing affecting access to a DHS facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... affecting access to a DHS facility. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48 CFR 3022.101-71(b), insert the following clause: Strikes or Picketing Affecting Access to a DHS Facility (DEC 2003) If the Contracting Officer... affecting access to a DHS facility. 3052.222-71 Section 3052.222-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations...

  11. 45 CFR 1386.22 - Access to records, facilities and individuals with developmental disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Access to records, facilities and individuals with... Access to records, facilities and individuals with developmental disabilities. (a) Access to records—A... the staff of a facility that is providing care or treatment; (2) Reports prepared by an agency...

  12. 25 CFR 170.800 - Who owns IRR transportation facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who owns IRR transportation facilities? 170.800 Section 170.800 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.800 Who owns IRR transportation facilities? Public...

  13. 25 CFR 170.800 - Who owns IRR transportation facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Who owns IRR transportation facilities? 170.800 Section 170.800 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.800 Who owns IRR transportation facilities? Public...

  14. 25 CFR 170.800 - Who owns IRR transportation facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Who owns IRR transportation facilities? 170.800 Section 170.800 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.800 Who owns IRR transportation facilities? Public...

  15. 25 CFR 170.800 - Who owns IRR transportation facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Who owns IRR transportation facilities? 170.800 Section 170.800 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.800 Who owns IRR transportation facilities? Public...

  16. 25 CFR 170.800 - Who owns IRR transportation facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Who owns IRR transportation facilities? 170.800 Section 170.800 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.800 Who owns IRR transportation facilities? Public...

  17. 48 CFR 1252.222-71 - Strikes or picketing affecting access to a DOT facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Provisions and Clauses 1252.222-71 Strikes or picketing affecting access to a DOT facility. As prescribed in (TAR) 48 CFR 1222.101-71(b), insert the following clause: Strikes or Picketing Affecting Access to a... affecting access to a DOT facility. 1252.222-71 Section 1252.222-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations...

  18. Transport and handling of National Ignition Facility beamline optic modules

    SciTech Connect

    Yakuma, S.C.; Grasz, E.L.; Rowe, A.W.; Yourchenko, G.; Swan, D.A.; Robles, G.M.

    1997-12-23

    Installing the thousands of optics that make up the laser for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a complex operation. This paper introduces the Optical Transport and Material Handling designs that will be used to deliver the optics. The transport and handling hardware is being designed to allow autonomous, semiautonomous, and manual operations.

  19. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  20. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  1. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  2. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  3. 41 CFR 51-10.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of the services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the...

  4. 29 CFR 2706.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the...

  5. 43 CFR 17.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible locations, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to...) of this section, alternative, methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  6. 45 CFR 2301.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  7. 43 CFR 17.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible locations, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to...) of this section, alternative, methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  8. 29 CFR 2706.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the...

  9. 43 CFR 17.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible locations, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to...) of this section, alternative, methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  10. 5 CFR 1636.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  11. 22 CFR 711.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  12. 5 CFR 1636.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  13. 5 CFR 1636.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  14. 29 CFR 2706.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the...

  15. 22 CFR 711.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  16. 22 CFR 711.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  17. 5 CFR 1636.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  18. 29 CFR 2205.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the...

  19. 45 CFR 2301.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  20. 41 CFR 51-10.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of the services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the...

  1. 22 CFR 711.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... section through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  2. 41 CFR 51-10.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of the services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the...

  3. 34 CFR 1200.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... through such means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites... to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by...

  4. 39 CFR 254.1 - Adoption of U.S. Access Board Standards as Postal Service Standards of Facility Accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Barriers Act (ABA) “Standards for Facility Accessibility,” the following sections of 36 CFR part 1191... THE ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS ACT § 254.1 Adoption of U.S. Access Board Standards as Postal Service... Barriers Act, Scoping (which contains ABA Chapter 1, Application and Administration, and ABA Chapter...

  5. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities; Play Areas; Final Rule. Federal Register, Part IV: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, 36 CFR Part 1191.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Register, 2000

    2000-01-01

    The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board has issued guidelines to serve as the basis for enforceable standards to be adopted by the Department of Justice for new construction and alterations of play areas covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act. The guidelines include scoping and technical provisions for ground level…

  6. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED... Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. (a) MPI and DAC detectives/investigators will be...

  7. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW.... Army facilities and records. (a) MPI and DAC detectives/investigators will be granted access to all...

  8. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Within Industry 3004.470 Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities,...

  9. Assessing the population-level impact of vouchers on access to health facility delivery for women in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Obare, Francis; Warren, Charlotte; Abuya, Timothy; Askew, Ian; Bellows, Ben

    2014-02-01

    Although available evidence indicates that vouchers improve service utilization among the target populations, we do not know whether increased utilization results from improved access (new clients who would not have used services without the voucher) or from shifting clients from non-accredited to contracted service providers. This paper examines whether the safe motherhood voucher program in Kenya is associated with improved access to health facility delivery using information on births within two years preceding the survey in voucher and comparison sites. Data were collected in 2010-2011 and in 2012 among 2933 and 3094 women aged 15-49 years reporting 962 and 1494 births within two years before the respective surveys. Analysis entails cross-tabulations and estimation of multilevel random-intercept logit models. The results show that the proportion of births occurring at home declined by more than 10 percentage points while the proportion of births delivered in health facilities increased by a similar margin over time in voucher sites. The increase in facility-based births occurred in both public and private health facilities. There was also a significant increase in the likelihood of facility-based delivery (odds ratios [OR]: 2.04; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.40-2.98 in the 2006 voucher arm; OR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.22-2.43 in the 2010-2011 voucher arm) in voucher sites over time. In contrast, there were no significant changes in the likelihood of facility-based delivery in the comparison arm over time. These findings suggest that the voucher program contributed to improved access to institutional delivery by shifting births from home to health facilities. However, available evidence from qualitative data shows that some women who purchased the vouchers did not use them because of high transportation costs to accredited facilities. The implication is that substantial improvements in service uptake could be achieved if the program subsidized transportation costs as

  10. 49 CFR 655.73 - Access to facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 655.73 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL MISUSE AND PROHIBITED DRUG USE IN TRANSIT... State oversight agency authorized to oversee rail fixed guideway systems. (d) An employer shall...

  11. Conceptual design of an RTG Facility Transportation System

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.J.; Gentzlinger, R.C.; Lujan, R.E.

    1994-06-03

    The conceptual design of an Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Facility Transportation System which is part of the overall RTG Transportation System has been completed and is described in detail. The Facility Transportation System serves to provide locomotion, cooling, shock protection and data acquisition for the RTG package during loading and unloading sequences. The RTG Facility Transportation System consists of a Transporter Subsystem, a Package Cooling Subsystem, and a Shock Limiting Transit Device Subsystem. The Transporter Subsystem is a uniquely designed welded steel cart combined with a pneumatically-driven hand tug for locomotion. The Package Cooling Subsystem provides five kilowatts of active liquid cooling via an on-board refrigeration system. The Shock limiting Transit Device Subsystem consists of a consumable honeycomb transit frame which provides shock protection for the 3855 kg (8500 LB) RTG package. These subsystems have been combined into an integrated system which will facilitate the unloading and loading of the RTG , of the Transport Trailer as well as meet ALARA radiation Package into and out exposure guidelines.

  12. 47 CFR 69.709 - Dedicated transport and special access services other than channel terminations between LEC end...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Pricing Flexibility § 69.709 Dedicated transport and special access services other than channel... pricing flexibility with respect to the following services: (1) Entrance facilities, as described in § 69... flexibility, as specified in § 69.727(a) of this part, for the services described in paragraph (a) of...

  13. 47 CFR 69.709 - Dedicated transport and special access services other than channel terminations between LEC end...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Pricing Flexibility § 69.709 Dedicated transport and special access services other than channel... pricing flexibility with respect to the following services: (1) Entrance facilities, as described in § 69... flexibility, as specified in § 69.727(a) of this part, for the services described in paragraph (a) of...

  14. 47 CFR 69.709 - Dedicated transport and special access services other than channel terminations between LEC end...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Pricing Flexibility § 69.709 Dedicated transport and special access services other than channel... pricing flexibility with respect to the following services: (1) Entrance facilities, as described in § 69... flexibility, as specified in § 69.727(a) of this part, for the services described in paragraph (a) of...

  15. 47 CFR 69.709 - Dedicated transport and special access services other than channel terminations between LEC end...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Pricing Flexibility § 69.709 Dedicated transport and special access services other than channel... pricing flexibility with respect to the following services: (1) Entrance facilities, as described in § 69... flexibility, as specified in § 69.727(a) of this part, for the services described in paragraph (a) of...

  16. 36 CFR 909.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... effective in achieving compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing...

  17. 18 CFR 1313.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., reassignment of the services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet... (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  18. 18 CFR 1313.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., reassignment of the services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet... (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  19. 36 CFR 812.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... effective in achieving compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing...

  20. 36 CFR 909.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... effective in achieving compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing...

  1. 36 CFR 812.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... effective in achieving compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing...

  2. 18 CFR 1313.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., reassignment of the services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet... (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  3. 36 CFR 812.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... effective in achieving compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing...

  4. 36 CFR 909.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... effective in achieving compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing...

  5. 18 CFR 1313.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., reassignment of the services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet... (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  6. 36 CFR 909.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... effective in achieving compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing...

  7. 36 CFR 812.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... effective in achieving compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing...

  8. 44 CFR 16.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to...), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using audio-visual materials and...

  9. 38 CFR 15.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers...

  10. 38 CFR 15.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers...

  11. 38 CFR 15.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers...

  12. 10 CFR 4.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 4.550(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility...

  13. 10 CFR 4.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 4.550(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility...

  14. 44 CFR 16.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to...), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using audio-visual materials and...

  15. 38 CFR 15.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers...

  16. 45 CFR 1153.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to...), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using audio-visual materials and...

  17. 38 CFR 15.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... means as redesign of equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible sites, alteration of existing... buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the Architectural Barriers...

  18. 44 CFR 16.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to...), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using audio-visual materials and...

  19. 45 CFR 1153.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to...), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using audio-visual materials and...

  20. 45 CFR 1153.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to...), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using audio-visual materials and...

  1. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Consolidated Transportation Facility. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0822, addressing environmental impacts that could result from siting, construction, and operation of a consolidated transportation facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho. The DOE proposes to construct and operate a new transportation facility at the Central Facilities Area (CFA) at the INEL. The proposed facility would replace outdated facilities and consolidate in one location operations that are conducted at six different locations at the CFA. The proposed facility would be used for vehicle and equipment maintenance and repair, administrative support, bus parking, and bus driver accommodation. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and the Department is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

  2. Feasibility study for a transportation operations system cask maintenance facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rennich, M.J.; Medley, L.G.; Attaway, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for the development of a waste management program for the disposition of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW). The program will include a transportation system for moving the nuclear waste from the sources to a geologic repository for permanent disposal. Specially designed casks will be used to safely transport the waste. The cask systems must be operated within limits imposed by DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Department of Transportation (DOT). A dedicated facility for inspecting, testing, and maintaining the cask systems was recommended by the General Accounting Office (in 1979) as the best means of assuring their operational effectiveness and safety, as well as regulatory compliance. In November of 1987, OCRWM requested a feasibility study be made of a Cask Maintenance Facility (CMF) that would perform the required functions. 46 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

  3. 39 CFR 255.8 - Access to postal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... consistent with efficient postal operations. In determining whether modifications not legally required should... the ABA, may be made to the local postal manager of the facility involved. (2) The local postal manager's response to a request or complaint regarding an alteration to a facility will be made...

  4. 49 CFR 37.41 - Construction of transportation facilities by public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Construction of transportation facilities by public entities. 37.41 Section 37.41 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.41 Construction...

  5. 47 CFR 1.1850 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Activities Conducted By the Federal Communications Commission § 1.1850 Program accessibility: Existing... program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to... alteration in the nature of a program or activity, or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In...

  6. 5 CFR 2416.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 2416.150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  7. 49 CFR 1014.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 1014.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  8. 34 CFR 105.32 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignments of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... with this section. (iii) The Department, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet... because of § 105.32 (a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include—...

  9. 22 CFR 144.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 144.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  10. 22 CFR 1510.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  11. 5 CFR 1850.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  12. 22 CFR 1510.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  13. 22 CFR 530.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services.... The Board, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the... historic property is not required because of § 530.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of...

  14. 29 CFR 100.550 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet...(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  15. 45 CFR 2490.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... property is not required because of § 2490.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving...

  16. 12 CFR 794.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 794.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  17. 12 CFR 794.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 794.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  18. 3 CFR 102.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet...(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  19. 25 CFR 720.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 720.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  20. 3 CFR 102.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet...(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  1. 22 CFR 144.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 144.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  2. 5 CFR 1207.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 1207.150(a)(2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  3. 36 CFR 1208.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... physical alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 1208.150(a)(2) or (3),...

  4. 22 CFR 530.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services.... The Board, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the... historic property is not required because of § 530.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of...

  5. 5 CFR 1850.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  6. 34 CFR 105.32 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignments of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... with this section. (iii) The Department, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet... because of § 105.32 (a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include—...

  7. 45 CFR 2104.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 2104.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  8. 7 CFR 15e.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet...(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  9. 1 CFR 457.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 457.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  10. 5 CFR 2416.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 2416.150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  11. 5 CFR 1850.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  12. 46 CFR 507.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 507.150 (a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  13. 5 CFR 1207.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 1207.150(a)(2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  14. 22 CFR 530.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services.... The Board, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the... historic property is not required because of § 530.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of...

  15. 1 CFR 500.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 500.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  16. 29 CFR 4907.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 4907.150 (a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  17. 5 CFR 2416.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 2416.150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  18. 36 CFR 1208.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... physical alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 1208.150(a)(2) or (3),...

  19. 17 CFR 200.650 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet...(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  20. 22 CFR 1005.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 1005.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  1. 22 CFR 1005.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 1005.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  2. 17 CFR 149.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 149.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  3. 22 CFR 1701.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  4. 22 CFR 1701.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  5. 22 CFR 1510.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  6. 45 CFR 2490.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... property is not required because of § 2490.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving...

  7. 17 CFR 149.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 149.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  8. 49 CFR 1014.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 1014.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  9. 5 CFR 723.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... physical alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 723.150(a) (2) or (3),...

  10. 22 CFR 1701.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  11. 12 CFR 794.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 794.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  12. 34 CFR 105.32 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignments of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... with this section. (iii) The Department, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet... because of § 105.32 (a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include—...

  13. 5 CFR 1207.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 1207.150(a)(2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  14. 25 CFR 720.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 720.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  15. 36 CFR 1208.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... physical alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 1208.150(a)(2) or (3),...

  16. 25 CFR 720.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 720.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  17. 5 CFR 2416.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 2416.150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  18. 46 CFR 507.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 507.150 (a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  19. 29 CFR 4907.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 4907.150 (a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  20. 22 CFR 1005.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 1005.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  1. 34 CFR 1200.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  2. 7 CFR 15e.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet...(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  3. 29 CFR 4907.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 4907.150 (a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  4. 5 CFR 2416.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 2416.150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  5. 5 CFR 1207.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 1207.150(a)(2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  6. 5 CFR 1850.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  7. 22 CFR 144.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 144.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  8. 45 CFR 2104.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 2104.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  9. 22 CFR 1510.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a) (2) or (3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  10. 49 CFR 1014.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to... alteration to an historic property is not required because of § 1014.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative...

  11. 22 CFR 1701.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet....150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program accessibility include— (i) Using...

  12. 22 CFR 1005.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate... alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent compelled by the... required because of § 1005.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of achieving program...

  13. 5 CFR 1207.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at alternate accessible..., in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the extent... historic property is not required because of § 1207.150(a)(2) or (3), alternative methods of...

  14. 22 CFR 530.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services.... The Board, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall meet accessibility requirements to the... historic property is not required because of § 530.150(a)(2) or (a)(3), alternative methods of...

  15. 16 CFR 6.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... such alteration or burdens. The decision that compliance would result in such alteration or burdens... to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery of services at... accessible rolling stock, or any methods that result in making its programs or activities readily...

  16. Mammography facilities are accessible, so why is utilization so low?

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tzy-Mey (May); Clayton, Laurel J.; Evans, W. Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study examines new socio-ecological variables reflecting community context as predictors of mammography use. Methods The conceptual model is a hybrid of traditional health-behavioral and socio-ecological constructs with an emphasis on spatial interaction among women and their environments, differentiating between several levels of influence for community context. Multilevel probability models of mammography use are estimated. The study sample includes 70,129 women with traditional Medicare fee-for-service coverage for inpatient and outpatient services, drawn from the SEER–Medicare linked data. The study population lives in heterogeneous California, where mammography facilities are dense but utilization rates are low. Results Several contextual effects have large significant impacts on the probability of mammography use. Women living in areas with higher proportions of elderly in poverty are 33% less likely to use mammography. However, dually eligible women living in these poor areas are 2% more likely to use mammography than those without extra assistance living in these areas. Living in areas with higher commuter intensity, higher violent crime rates, greater land use mix (urbanicity), or more segregated Hispanic communities exhibit −14%, −1%, −6%, and −3% (lower) probability of use, respectively. Women living in segregated American Indian communities or in communities where more elderly women live alone exhibit 16% and 12% (higher) probability of use, respectively. Minority women living in more segregated communities by their minority are more likely to use mammography, suggesting social support, but this is significant for Native Americans only. Women with disability as their original reason for entitlement are found 40% more likely to use mammography when they reside in communities with high commuter intensity, suggesting greater ease of transportation for them in these environments. Conclusions Socio-ecological variables reflecting

  17. 39 CFR 255.8 - Access to postal facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES TO POSTAL SERVICE PROGRAMS, ACTIVITIES, FACILITIES, AND ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY... with the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, 16 U.S.C. 470 et seq.; (vii) The availability...

  18. 49 CFR 28.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... equipment, reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home... achieving compliance with this section. The Department, in making alterations to existing buildings, shall... made until the planned restructuring takes place. However, alternative means for participation...

  19. The transportation depot: An orbiting vehicle support facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaszubowski, Martin J.; Ayers, J. Kirk

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the details of an effort to produce conceptual designs for an orbiting platform, called a transportation depot, to handle assembly and processing of lunar, Martian, and related vehicles. High-level requirements for such a facility were established, and several concepts were developed to meet those requirements. By showing that the critical rigid-body momentum characteristics of each concept are similar to those of the dual-keel space station, some insight was gained about the controllability and utility of this type of facility. Finally, several general observations were made that highlight the advantages and disadvantages of particular design features.

  20. Spatial accessibility to specific sport facilities and corresponding sport practice: the RECORD Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical activity is considered as a major component of a healthy lifestyle. However, few studies have examined the relationships between the spatial accessibility to sport facilities and sport practice with a sufficient degree of specificity. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between the spatial accessibility to specific types of sports facilities and the practice of the corresponding sports after carefully controlling for various individual socio-demographic characteristics and neighborhood socioeconomic variables. Methods Data from the RECORD Study involving 7290 participants recruited in 2007–2008, aged 30–79 years, and residing in the Paris metropolitan area were analyzed. Four categories of sports were studied: team sports, racket sports, swimming and related activities, and fitness. Spatial accessibility to sport facilities was measured with two complementary approaches that both take into account the street network (distance to the nearest facility and count of facilities around the dwelling). Associations between the spatial accessibility to sport facilities and the practice of the corresponding sports were assessed using multilevel logistic regression after adjusting for individual and contextual characteristics. Results High individual education and high household income were associated with the practice of racket sports, swimming or related activities, and fitness over the previous 7 days. The spatial accessibility to swimming pools was associated with swimming and related sports, even after adjustment for individual/contextual factors. The spatial accessibility to facilities was not related to the practice of other sports. High neighborhood income was associated with the practice of a racket sport and fitness. Conclusions Accessibility is a multi-dimensional concept that integrates educational, financial, and geographical aspects. Our work supports the evidence that strategies to increase participation in sport

  1. Access to Mammography Facilities and Detection of Breast Cancer by Screening Mammography: A GIS Approach.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Selina; Price, James H; Dignan, Mark; Rahman, Saleh; Lindquist, Peter S; Jordan, Timothy R

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to examine the association between access to mammography facilities and utilization of screening mammography in an urban population. METHODS: Data on female breast cancer cases were obtained from an extensive mammography surveillance project. Distance to mammography facilities was measured by using GIS, which was followed by measuring geographical access to mammography facilities using Floating Catchment Area (FCA) method (considering all available facilities within an arbitrary radius from the woman's residence by using Arc GIS 9.0 software). RESULTS: Of 2,024 women, 91.4% were Caucasian; age ranged from 25 to 98 years; most (95%) were non-Hispanic in origin. Logistic regression found age, family history, hormone replacement therapy, physician recommendation, and breast cancer stage at diagnosis to be significant predictors of having had a previous mammogram. Women having higher access to mammography facilities were less likely to have had a previous mammogram compared to women who had low access, considering all the facilities within 10 miles (OR=0.41, CI=0.22-0.76), 30 miles (OR=0.52, CI=0.29-0.91) and 40 miles (OR=0.51, CI=0.28-0.92) radiuses. CONCLUSIONS: Physical distance to mammography facilities does not necessarily predict utilization of mammogram and greater access does not assure greater utilizations, due to constraints imposed by socio economic and cultural barriers. Future studies should focus on measuring access to mammography facilities capturing a broader dimension of access considering qualitative aspect of facilities, as well as other travel impedances. PMID:20628557

  2. Dialysis Facility Transplant Philosophy and Access to Kidney Transplantation in the Southeast

    PubMed Central

    Gander, Jennifer; Browne, Teri; Plantinga, Laura; Pastan, Stephen O; Sauls, Leighann; Krisher, Jenna; Patzer, Rachel E

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the impact of dialysis facility treatment philosophy on access to transplant. The aim of our study was to determine the relationship between dialysis facility transplant philosophy and facility-level access to kidney transplant waitlisting. Methods A 25-item questionnaire administered to Southeastern dialysis facilities (n=509) in 2012 captured facility transplant philosophy (categorized as “transplant is our first choice,” “transplant is a great option for some,” and “transplant is a good option, if the patient is interested”) .. Facility-level waitlisting and facility characteristics were obtained from the 2008-2011 Dialysis Facility Report. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examinethe association between dialysis facility transplant philosophy and facility waitlisting performance (dichotomized using the national median), where low performance was defined as less than 21.7% of dialysis patients waitlisted within a facility. Results Fewer than 25% (n=124) of dialysis facilities reported “transplant is our first option.” A total of 131 (31.4%) dialysis facilities in the Southeast were high-performing with respect to waitlisting. Adjusted analysis showed that facilities who reported “transplant is our first option” were twice (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.0, 3.9) as likely to have high waitlisting performance compared to facilities who reported “transplant is a good option, if the patient is interested.” Conclusions Facilities with staff who had a more positive transplant philosophy were more likely to have better facility waitlisting performance. Future prospective studies are needed to further transplantation. PMID:26278585

  3. Charter Schools: Limited Access to Facility Financing. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaul, Marnie S.

    This report determines the degree to which charter schools have access to traditional public school facility financing, and whether alternative sources of facility financing are available to charter schools. Further discussed are potential options generally available to the federal government if it were to assume a larger role in charter school…

  4. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to...

  5. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations § 637.9 Access to...

  6. Building collaboration tools and access to on-line facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.; Sachs, S.

    1996-11-01

    Network-based facilities will allow researchers at different locations to collaborate on experiments as if they all were together in the same laboratory. The expected value of these geographically distributed environments includes substantially increased effectiveness in doing science, and an enabling capability for analytical and high-value production use by industry. The Distributed, Collaboratory Experiment Environments (DCEE) Program consists of four projects that were established to build prototype remote experiment and collaborative environments. The work undertaken in this project represents some of the research and development of the mechanisms and infrastructure required to make collaboratories a reality. Some of these mechanisms have already been developed. Several other mechanisms, such as data dissemination, resource management for the sharing of experiment control, safety and security, electronic notebooks, elements of telepresence, and integrated user interfaces need further research and development. The pilot application for these collaborative tools is the Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamline 7.0 at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The ALS is a particle accelerator and is a source of very high brilliance soft X-ray beams. One experimental facility is the Spectro-Microscopy Facility Beamline 7.0. Through this project, the Spectro-Microscopy Facility will be opened up to users from a wide range of organizations. The goal is to build software that will not only put the ALS Beamline 7.0 on-line, but will also serve as building blocks for future collaboratory development.

  7. 1 CFR 457.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL CAPITAL PLANNING COMMISSION § 457... undertaken, such changes shall be made by August 22, 1989, but in any event as expeditiously as possible. (d) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve...

  8. 1 CFR 457.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL CAPITAL PLANNING COMMISSION § 457... undertaken, such changes shall be made by August 22, 1989, but in any event as expeditiously as possible. (d) Transition plan. In the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve...

  9. 12 CFR 410.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED... program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to... of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In those...

  10. 45 CFR 85.42 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to... the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In...

  11. 11 CFR 9420.5 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE U.S. ELECTION ASSISTANCE COMMISSION § 9420.5... activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable... of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. The Commission has...

  12. 40 CFR 12.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to... the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In...

  13. 22 CFR 1103.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO, UNITED STATES... program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to... of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In those...

  14. 11 CFR 6.150 - Program accessibility; Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION § 6.150... activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable... of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. The Commission has...

  15. 45 CFR 1175.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE... program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to... of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In those...

  16. 22 CFR 1103.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO, UNITED STATES... program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to... of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In those...

  17. 40 CFR 12.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to... the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In...

  18. 45 CFR 1175.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE... program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to... of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In those...

  19. 12 CFR 606.650 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE FARM CREDIT... program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to... the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In...

  20. 12 CFR 606.650 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE FARM CREDIT... program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to... the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In...

  1. 40 CFR 12.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... program or activity so that the program or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to... the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens. In...

  2. 24 CFR 9.150 - Program accessibility: existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., reassignment of services to accessible buildings, assignment of aides to beneficiaries, home visits, delivery... compliance with this section. The agency, in making alterations to existing buildings, also shall meet... alternative method to meet the needs of that current or prospective tenant. Nothing in this section shall...

  3. Defining groundwater transport times near ASR facilities using geochemical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    Determining groundwater transport and travel times between recharge facilities and wells has become increasingly important in managing Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) projects. This is especially true in the State of California where water reuse rules that consider groundwater travel time in the permitting process are being discussed. Fundamental geochemical approaches for investigating transport include tritium/helium-3 dating and the addition of sulfur hexafluoride tracer in controlled experiments. When combined, groundwater flow can be imaged with time scales on the order of days to decades. The Orange County Water District recharges to their groundwater basin approximately 250,000 acre-ft of surface water annually from a series of spreading ponds and a 9-km section of the Santa Ana River. Sulfur hexafluoride gas was injected into the Santa Ana River over a period of 2 weeks, tagging approximately 3,000 acre-ft of recharged water. Groundwater flow and transport from the river has been determined for more than three years. Results of the gas tracer experiment demonstrate that linear groundwater flow velocities range from less than 1 km/yr to more than 5 km/yr and that the groundwater flow system is stratified. These results will be used to verify and refine numerical models of transport near the ASR facilities in Orange County and have been used to establish flowlines so that in situ water quality changes can be quantified.

  4. 25 CFR 170.806 - What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.806 What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? An IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is an IRR Transportation Facilities...

  5. 25 CFR 170.806 - What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.806 What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? An IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is an IRR Transportation Facilities...

  6. 25 CFR 170.806 - What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.806 What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? An IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What is an IRR Transportation Facilities...

  7. 25 CFR 170.806 - What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.806 What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? An IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What is an IRR Transportation Facilities...

  8. 25 CFR 170.806 - What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.806 What is an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? An IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What is an IRR Transportation Facilities...

  9. 49 CFR 807.150 - Program accessibility: Existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES.... (a) General. The agency shall operate each program or activity so that the program or activity, when... result in a fundamental alteration in the nature of a program or activity or in undue financial...

  10. Access to Transportation and Health Care Utilization in a Rural Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Preisser, John S.; Gesler, Wilbert M.; Powers, James M.

    2005-01-01

    Access to transportation to transverse the large distances between residences and health services in rural settings is a necessity. However, little research has examined directly access to transportation in analyses of rural health care utilization. This analysis addresses the association of transportation and health care utilization in a rural…

  11. TRANSPORTATION CASK RECEIPT/RETURN FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Sanders

    2005-04-26

    The purpose of this design calculation is to demonstrate that the handling operations of transportation casks performed in the Transportation Cask Receipt and Return Facility (TCRRF) and Buffer Area meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''Transportation Cask Receipt/Return Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170217], Section 3.2.3). Specific scope of work contained in this activity consists of the following items: (1) Evaluate criticality effects for both dry and fully flooded conditions pertaining to TCRRF and Buffer Area operations for defense in depth. (2) Evaluate Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the TCRRF as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7). This evaluation includes credible fuel reconfiguration conditions. In addition to the scope of work listed above, an evaluation was also performed of modeling assumptions for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) regarding inclusion of plenum and end regions of the active fuel. This calculation is limited to CSNF and US Department of Energy (DOE) SNF. it should be mentioned that the latter waste form is evaluated more in depth in the ''Canister Handling Facility Criticality Safety Calculations (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167614]). Further, the design and safety analyses of the naval SNF canisters are the responsibility of the US Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design of the TCRRF and Buffer Area and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility. However, it is anticipated that design changes to the facility layout will have little or no impact on the criticality results and/or conclusions

  12. 75 FR 5609 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/ALL-024 Facility and Perimeter Access...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... DHS/ALL--024 Facility and Perimeter Access Control and Visitor Management System of Records (74 FR... Perimeter Access Control and Visitor Management System of Records AGENCY: Privacy Office; DHS. ACTION... Facility and Perimeter Access Control and Visitor Management System of Records to include record...

  13. Oral healthcare access and adequacy in alternative long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Smith, Barbara J; Ghezzi, Elisa M; Manz, Michael C; Markova, Christiana P

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine practices and perceived barriers to access related to oral health by surveying administrators in Michigan alternative long-term care facilities (ALTCF). A 24-item questionnaire was mailed to all 2,275 Michigan ALTCF serving residents aged 60+. Facility response rate was 22% (n = 508). Eleven percent of facilities had a written dental care plan; 18% stated a dentist examined new residents; and 19% of facilities had an agreement with a dentist to come to the facility, with 52% of those being for emergency care only. The greatest perceived barriers were willingness of general and specialty dentists to treat residents at the nursing facility and/or private offices as well as financial concerns. Substantial barriers to care were uniformly perceived. Oral health policies and practices within Michigan ALTCF vary, as measured by resources, attitudes, and the availability of professional care. There is limited involvement by dental professionals in creating policy and providing consultation and service.

  14. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... order to make the facilities accessible by individuals who use wheelchairs, unless and to the extent... required to be made accessible to individuals who use wheelchairs, are not required to provide to...

  15. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... order to make the facilities accessible by individuals who use wheelchairs, unless and to the extent... required to be made accessible to individuals who use wheelchairs, are not required to provide to...

  16. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... order to make the facilities accessible by individuals who use wheelchairs, unless and to the extent... required to be made accessible to individuals who use wheelchairs, are not required to provide to...

  17. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... order to make the facilities accessible by individuals who use wheelchairs, unless and to the extent... required to be made accessible to individuals who use wheelchairs, are not required to provide to...

  18. 49 CFR 37.61 - Public transportation programs and activities in existing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... order to make the facilities accessible by individuals who use wheelchairs, unless and to the extent... required to be made accessible to individuals who use wheelchairs, are not required to provide to...

  19. Beyond the Yellow Bus: Promising Practices for Maximizing Access to Opportunity through Innovations in Student Transportation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Jeffrey M.; Makarewicz, Carrie; Miller, Ruth; Ehrman, Julia; McKoy, Deborah L.

    2014-01-01

    Access to safe, affordable, and convenient transportation shapes the 'geography of opportunity' for many children and youth. This study looks at how ?localities acrossthe country are implementing new and innovative alternative approaches to student transportation that expand regionaltransportation access for K-12 students, improve…

  20. 14 CFR 382.51 - What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities? 382.51 Section 382.51 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE..., including, but not limited to, moving sidewalks, shuttle vehicles and people movers, comply with...

  1. 14 CFR 382.51 - What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities? 382.51 Section 382.51 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE..., including, but not limited to, moving sidewalks, shuttle vehicles and people movers, comply with...

  2. 14 CFR 382.51 - What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities? 382.51 Section 382.51 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE..., including, but not limited to, moving sidewalks, shuttle vehicles and people movers, comply with...

  3. 14 CFR 382.51 - What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What requirements must carriers meet concerning the accessibility of airport facilities? 382.51 Section 382.51 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE..., including, but not limited to, moving sidewalks, shuttle vehicles and people movers, comply with...

  4. 32 CFR 637.9 - Access to U.S. Army facilities and records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Access to U.S. Army facilities and records. 637.9 Section 637.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MILITARY POLICE INVESTIGATION Investigations §...

  5. 24 CFR 9.152 - Program accessibility: alterations of Property Disposition Program multifamily housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program accessibility: alterations of Property Disposition Program multifamily housing facilities. 9.152 Section 9.152 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development ENFORCEMENT...

  6. 24 CFR 9.152 - Program accessibility: alterations of Property Disposition Program multifamily housing facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Program accessibility: alterations of Property Disposition Program multifamily housing facilities. 9.152 Section 9.152 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development ENFORCEMENT...

  7. 49 CFR 37.43 - Alteration of transportation facilities by public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... this section apply to any alteration which begins (i.e., issuance of notice to proceed or work order... maximum physical accessibility feasible. Any altered features of the facility or portion of the facility... counted as expenditures required to provide an accessible path of travel include: (i) Costs...

  8. A field study on downwind odor transport from swine facilities.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Li, X

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents field data to illustrate the characteristics of downwind odor dispersion. A total of eight swine facilities were studied in this project and power functions were found to be an appropriate description of the pattern of downwind odor transport for both swine buildings and manure storage lagoons and tanks. The coefficients of correlation for the power regressions ranged from 0.75-0.87. It was found that swine buildings have the potential of generating more odor than manure storage facilities such as lagoons and tanks and thus could be the major odor sources causing downwind odor nuisance. Therefore, to maintain the building clean should be highly recommended as swine producers' best management practice. For earthen basins, the odor strength was reduced by 80% at about 250-meter distance from the source. While for the swine building, a 50% of reduction in odor strength was observed at the same distance. The study did not show any advantages of using lagoons over concrete (or steel) manure tanks in terms of reducing downwind odor concentrations. Land application of manure did not cause persistent downwind odor problems. PMID:10736772

  9. A field study on downwind odor transport from swine facilities.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Li, X

    2000-03-01

    This paper presents field data to illustrate the characteristics of downwind odor dispersion. A total of eight swine facilities were studied in this project and power functions were found to be an appropriate description of the pattern of downwind odor transport for both swine buildings and manure storage lagoons and tanks. The coefficients of correlation for the power regressions ranged from 0.75-0.87. It was found that swine buildings have the potential of generating more odor than manure storage facilities such as lagoons and tanks and thus could be the major odor sources causing downwind odor nuisance. Therefore, to maintain the building clean should be highly recommended as swine producers' best management practice. For earthen basins, the odor strength was reduced by 80% at about 250-meter distance from the source. While for the swine building, a 50% of reduction in odor strength was observed at the same distance. The study did not show any advantages of using lagoons over concrete (or steel) manure tanks in terms of reducing downwind odor concentrations. Land application of manure did not cause persistent downwind odor problems.

  10. An Enhanced Variable Two-Step Floating Catchment Area Method for Measuring Spatial Accessibility to Residential Care Facilities in Nanjing.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jianhua; Wang, Jinyin; Rui, Yikang; Qian, Tianlu; Wang, Jiechen

    2015-11-13

    Civil administration departments require reliable measures of accessibility so that residential care facility shortage areas can be accurately identified. Building on previous research, this paper proposes an enhanced variable two-step floating catchment area (EV2SFCA) method that determines facility catchment sizes by dynamically summing the population around the facility until the facility-to-population ratio (FPR) is less than the FPR threshold (FPRT). To minimize the errors from the supply and demand catchments being mismatched, this paper proposes that the facility and population catchment areas must both contain the other location in calculating accessibility. A case study evaluating spatial accessibility to residential care facilities in Nanjing demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in accurately determining catchment sizes and identifying details in the variation of spatial accessibility. The proposed method can be easily applied to assess other public healthcare facilities, and can provide guidance to government departments on issues of spatial planning and identification of shortage and excess areas.

  11. Lunar Transportation Facilities and Operations Study, option 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    During the Option 2 period of the Lunar Transportation Facilities and Operations Study (LTFOS), a joint McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Company Kennedy Space Center (MDSSC-KSC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Kennedy Space Center (NASA-KSC) Study team conducted a comparison of the functional testing of the RL-10 and Space Shuttle Main Engine, a quick-look impact assessment of the Synthesis Group Report, and a detailed assessment of the Synthesis Group Report. The results of these KSC LTFOS team efforts are included. The most recent study task effort was a detailed assessment of the Synthesis Group Report. The assessment was conducted to determine the impact on planetary launch and landing facilities and operations. The result of that effort is a report entitled 'Analysis of the Synthesis Group Report, its Architectures and their Impacts on PSS Launch and Landing Operations' and is contained in Appendix A. The report is structured in a briefing format with facing pages as opposed to a narrative style. A quick-look assessment of the Synthesis Group Report was conducted to determine the impact of implementing the recommendations of the Synthesis Group on KSC launch facilities and operations. The data was documented in a presentation format as requested by Kennedy Space Center Technology and Advanced Projects Office and is included in Appendix B. Appendix C is a white paper on the comparison of the functional testing of the RL-10 and Space Shuttle Main Engine. The comparison was undertaken to provide insight regarding common test requirements that would be applicable to Lunar and Mars Excursion Vehicles (LEV and MEV).

  12. Lunar Transportation Facilities and Operations Study, option 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-02-01

    During the Option 2 period of the Lunar Transportation Facilities and Operations Study (LTFOS), a joint McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Company Kennedy Space Center (MDSSC-KSC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Kennedy Space Center (NASA-KSC) Study team conducted a comparison of the functional testing of the RL-10 and Space Shuttle Main Engine, a quick-look impact assessment of the Synthesis Group Report, and a detailed assessment of the Synthesis Group Report. The results of these KSC LTFOS team efforts are included. The most recent study task effort was a detailed assessment of the Synthesis Group Report. The assessment was conducted to determine the impact on planetary launch and landing facilities and operations. The result of that effort is a report entitled 'Analysis of the Synthesis Group Report, its Architectures and their Impacts on PSS Launch and Landing Operations' and is contained in Appendix A. The report is structured in a briefing format with facing pages as opposed to a narrative style. A quick-look assessment of the Synthesis Group Report was conducted to determine the impact of implementing the recommendations of the Synthesis Group on KSC launch facilities and operations. The data was documented in a presentation format as requested by Kennedy Space Center Technology and Advanced Projects Office and is included in Appendix B. Appendix C is a white paper on the comparison of the functional testing of the RL-10 and Space Shuttle Main Engine. The comparison was undertaken to provide insight regarding common test requirements that would be applicable to Lunar and Mars Excursion Vehicles (LEV and MEV).

  13. The CT Scanner Facility at Stellenbosch University: An open access X-ray computed tomography laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Plessis, Anton; le Roux, Stephan Gerhard; Guelpa, Anina

    2016-10-01

    The Stellenbosch University CT Scanner Facility is an open access laboratory providing non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and a high performance image analysis services as part of the Central Analytical Facilities (CAF) of the university. Based in Stellenbosch, South Africa, this facility offers open access to the general user community, including local researchers, companies and also remote users (both local and international, via sample shipment and data transfer). The laboratory hosts two CT instruments, i.e. a micro-CT system, as well as a nano-CT system. A workstation-based Image Analysis Centre is equipped with numerous computers with data analysis software packages, which are to the disposal of the facility users, along with expert supervision, if required. All research disciplines are accommodated at the X-ray CT laboratory, provided that non-destructive analysis will be beneficial. During its first four years, the facility has accommodated more than 400 unique users (33 in 2012; 86 in 2013; 154 in 2014; 140 in 2015; 75 in first half of 2016), with diverse industrial and research applications using X-ray CT as means. This paper summarises the existence of the laboratory's first four years by way of selected examples, both from published and unpublished projects. In the process a detailed description of the capabilities and facilities available to users is presented.

  14. 76 FR 55886 - Selection Criteria-Transportation Infrastructure Improvements Associated With Medical Facilities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... of the Secretary Selection Criteria--Transportation Infrastructure Improvements Associated With... funding from the Office of Economic Adjustment (OEA) for construction of Transportation Infrastructure... Infrastructure Improvements associated with medical facilities related to recommendations of the 2005...

  15. 33 CFR 6.04-5 - Preventing access of persons, articles or things to vessels, or waterfront facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preventing access of persons..., AND WATERFRONT FACILITIES General Provisions § 6.04-5 Preventing access of persons, articles or things to vessels, or waterfront facilities. The Captain of the Port may prevent any person, article,...

  16. 78 FR 7334 - Port Authority Access to Facility Vulnerability Assessments and the Integration of Security Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public meeting..., prevent, mitigate, and respond to Transportation Security Incidents (TSIs) and other disasters. If the... disaster. Each Facility Security Assessment (FSA) must contain provisions for contingency...

  17. Uganda's New National Laboratory Sample Transport System: A Successful Model for Improving Access to Diagnostic Services for Early Infant HIV Diagnosis and Other Programs

    PubMed Central

    Kiyaga, Charles; Sendagire, Hakim; Joseph, Eleanor; McConnell, Ian; Grosz, Jeff; Narayan, Vijay; Esiru, Godfrey; Elyanu, Peter; Akol, Zainab; Kirungi, Wilford; Musinguzi, Joshua; Opio, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Uganda scaled-up Early HIV Infant Diagnosis (EID) when simplified methods for testing of infants using dried blood spots (DBS) were adopted in 2006 and sample transport and management was therefore made feasible in rural settings. Before this time only 35% of the facilities that were providing EID services were reached through the national postal courier system, Posta Uganda. The transportation of samples during this scale-up, therefore, quickly became a challenge and varied from facility to facility as different methods were used to transport the samples. This study evaluates a novel specimen transport network system for EID testing. Methods A retrospective study was done in mid-2012 on 19 pilot hubs serving 616 health facilities in Uganda. The effect on sample-result turnaround time (TAT) and the cost of DBS sample transport on 876 sample-results was analyzed. Results The HUB network system provided increased access to EID services ranging from 36% to 51%, drastically reduced transportation costs by 62%, reduced turn-around times by 46.9% and by a further 46.2% through introduction of SMS printers. Conclusions The HUB model provides a functional, reliable and efficient national referral network against which other health system strengthening initiatives can be built to increase access to critical diagnostic and treatment monitoring services, improve the quality of laboratory and diagnostic services, with reduced turn-around times and improved quality of prevention and treatment programs thereby reducing long-term costs. PMID:24236026

  18. RADIATION ACCESS ZONE AND VENTILATION CONFINEMENT ZONE CRITERIA FOR THE MGR SURFACE FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    D. A. Padula

    2000-09-13

    The objectives of this technical report are to: (1) Establish the criteria for Radiation Access Zone (RAZ) designation. (2) Establish the criteria for the Ventilation Confinement Zone (VCZ) designation. The scope will be to formulate the RAZ and VCZ zoning designation for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface facilities and to apply the zoning designations to the current Waste Handling Building (WHB), Waste Treatment Building (WTB), and Carrier Preparation Building (CPB) configurations.

  19. Limited electricity access in health facilities of sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of data on electricity access, sources, and reliability

    PubMed Central

    Adair-Rohani, Heather; Zukor, Karen; Bonjour, Sophie; Wilburn, Susan; Kuesel, Annette C; Hebert, Ryan; Fletcher, Elaine R

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Access to electricity is critical to health care delivery and to the overarching goal of universal health coverage. Data on electricity access in health care facilities are rarely collected and have never been reported systematically in a multi-country study. We conducted a systematic review of available national data on electricity access in health care facilities in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: We identified publicly-available data from nationally representative facility surveys through a systematic review of articles in PubMed, as well as through websites of development agencies, ministries of health, and national statistics bureaus. To be included in our analysis, data sets had to be collected in or after 2000, be nationally representative of a sub-Saharan African country, cover both public and private health facilities, and include a clear definition of electricity access. Results: We identified 13 health facility surveys from 11 sub-Saharan African countries that met our inclusion criteria. On average, 26% of health facilities in the surveyed countries reported no access to electricity. Only 28% of health care facilities, on average, had reliable electricity among the 8 countries reporting data. Among 9 countries, an average of 7% of facilities relied solely on a generator. Electricity access in health care facilities increased by 1.5% annually in Kenya between 2004 and 2010, and by 4% annually in Rwanda between 2001 and 2007. Conclusions: Energy access for health care facilities in sub-Saharan African countries varies considerably. An urgent need exists to improve the geographic coverage, quality, and frequency of data collection on energy access in health care facilities. Standardized tools should be used to collect data on all sources of power and supply reliability. The United Nations Secretary-General's “Sustainable Energy for All” initiative provides an opportunity to comprehensively monitor energy access in health care

  20. Recommendation for a second access for the Yucca Mountain exploratory shaft facility

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, G.K.

    1984-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a site for a repository for radioactive waste. An exploratory shaft facility (ESF) is planned to permit characterization of the tuff underlying Yucca Mountain. The ESF consists of a 12-foot-diameter, 1480-foot-deep exploratory shaft (ES) and associated surface facilities. This report responds to a request by DOE to study the inclusion of a second access in the ESF for the purposes of improving safety, providing flexibility in the scope and duration of geologic testing, and facilitating subsurface construction of the full repository. Eight options for a second access to the ESF are explored. These options include using the ES in combination with either a second shaft, a muck-handling ramp, or a waste-handling ramp. Some of these options also include enlarging the diameter of the ES to 16 feet. On the basis of the analysis performed for this study, a 16-foot-diameter ES and a muck-handling ramp are recommended as accesses to the ESF. Should budget or other considerations require a less expensive means of providing a second access, a 12-foot-diameter ES and a 6-foot-diameter second shaft would satisfy the requirement to improve safety.

  1. The association between access to public transportation and self-reported active commuting.

    PubMed

    Djurhuus, Sune; Hansen, Henning S; Aadahl, Mette; Glümer, Charlotte

    2014-12-05

    Active commuting provides routine-based regular physical activity which can reduce the risk of chronic diseases. Using public transportation involves some walking or cycling to a transit stop, transfers and a walk to the end location and users of public transportation have been found to accumulate more moderate physical activity than non-users. Understanding how public transportation characteristics are associated with active transportation is thus important from a public health perspective. This study examines the associations between objective measures of access to public transportation and self-reported active commuting. Self-reported time spent either walking or cycling commuting each day and the distance to workplace were obtained for adults aged 16 to 65 in the Danish National Health Survey 2010 (n = 28,928). Access to public transportation measures were computed by combining GIS-based road network distances from home address to public transit stops an integrating their service level. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the association between access to public transportation measures and active commuting. Distance to bus stop, density of bus stops, and number of transport modes were all positively associated with being an active commuter and with meeting recommendations of physical activity. No significant association was found between bus services at the nearest stop and active commuting. The results highlight the importance of including detailed measurements of access to public transit in order to identify the characteristics that facilitate the use of public transportation and active commuting.

  2. Transportation Accessibility and Quality of Life for the Urban Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belnap, Judith A.

    The barriers to physical mobility of the elderly are explained in this study which concentrated on spatial-temporal accessibility, and the use of mass transit to urban services and resources. The first area of concern dealt with the amount and extent of free time available to the elderly who are perceived as having large blocks of descretionary…

  3. Managing commercial low-level radioactive waste beyond 1992: Transportation planning for a LLW disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    This technical bulletin presents information on the many activities and issues related to transportation of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) to allow interested States to investigate further those subjects for which proactive preparation will facilitate the development and operation of a LLW disposal facility. The activities related to transportation for a LLW disposal facility are discussed under the following headings: safety; legislation, regulations, and implementation guidance; operations-related transport (LLW and non-LLW traffic); construction traffic; economics; and public involvement.

  4. Multi terabits/s optical access transport technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binh, Le Nguyen; Wang Tao, Thomas; Livshits, Daniil; Gubenko, Alexey; Karinou, Fotini; Liu Ning, Gordon; Shkolnik, Alexey

    2016-02-01

    Tremendous efforts have been developed for multi-Tbps over ultra-long distance and metro and access optical networks. With the exponential increase demand on data transmission, storage and serving, especially the 5G wireless access scenarios, the optical Internet networking has evolved to data-center based optical networks pressuring on novel and economical access transmission systems. This paper reports (1) Experimental platforms and transmission techniques employing band-limited optical components operating at 10G for 100G based at 28G baud. Advanced modulation formats such as PAM-4, DMT, duo-binary etc are reported and their advantages and disadvantages are analyzed so as to achieve multi-Tbps optical transmission systems for access inter- and intra- data-centered-based networks; (2) Integrated multi-Tbps combining comb laser sources and micro-ring modulators meeting the required performance for access systems are reported. Ten-sub-carrier quantum dot com lasers are employed in association with wideband optical intensity modulators to demonstrate the feasibility of such sources and integrated micro-ring modulators acting as a combined function of demultiplexing/multiplexing and modulation, hence compactness and economy scale. Under the use of multi-level modulation and direct detection at 56 GBd an aggregate of higher than 2Tbps and even 3Tbps can be achieved by interleaved two comb lasers of 16 sub-carrier lines; (3) Finally the fundamental designs of ultra-compacts flexible filters and switching integrated components based on Si photonics for multi Tera-bps active interconnection are presented. Experimental results on multi-channels transmissions and performances of optical switching matrices and effects on that of data channels are proposed.

  5. Grout pump selection process for the Transportable Grout Facility

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, D.; Treat, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Selected low-level radioactive liquid wastes at Hanford will be disposed by grouting. Grout is formed by mixing the liquid wastes with solid materials, including Portland cement, fly ash, and clay. The mixed grouts will be pumped to disposal sites (e.g., trenches and buried structures) where the grout will be allowed to harden and, thereby, immobilize the wastes. A Transportable Grout Facility (TGF) will be constructed and operated by Rockwell Hanford Operations to perform the grouting function. A critical component of the TGF is the grout pump. A preliminary review of pumping requirements identified reciprocating pumps and progressive cavity pumps as the two classes of pumps best suited for the application. The advantages and disadvantages of specific types of pumps within these two classes were subsequently investigated. As a result of this study, the single-screw, rotary positive displacement pump was identified as the best choice for the TGF application. This pump has a simple design, is easy to operate, is rugged, and is suitable for a radioactive environment. It produces a steady, uniform flow that simplifies suction and discharge piping requirements. This pump will likely require less maintenance than reciprocating pumps and can be disassembled rapidly and decontaminated easily. If the TGF should eventually require discharge pressures in excess of 500 psi, a double-acting duplex piston pump is recommended because it can operate at low speed, with only moderate flow rate fluctuations. However, the check valves, stuffing box, piston, suction, and discharge piping must be designed carefully to allow trouble-free operations.

  6. 76 FR 75844 - Accessibility Guidelines for Pedestrian Facilities in the Public Right-of-Way; Reopening of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... (76 FR 44664). In that notice, the Access Board proposed guidelines for accessible public rights-of... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1190 RIN 3014-AA26 Accessibility Guidelines for Pedestrian... Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking; reopening of comment period. SUMMARY:...

  7. 23 CFR 810.106 - Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities. 810.106 Section 810.106 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Highway Public...

  8. 23 CFR 810.106 - Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities. 810.106 Section 810.106 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Highway Public...

  9. 23 CFR 810.106 - Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities. 810.106 Section 810.106 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Highway Public...

  10. 23 CFR 810.106 - Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities. 810.106 Section 810.106 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Highway Public...

  11. 23 CFR 810.106 - Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Approval of fringe and transportation corridor parking facilities. 810.106 Section 810.106 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Highway Public...

  12. 75 FR 43747 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ...., buses characterized by an elevated passenger deck located over a baggage compartment). 56 FR 45530, September 6, 1991; 63 FR 51694, September 28, 1998. The Access Board's transportation vehicle guidelines are... transportation provisions of the ADA in 1991. 56 FR 45621 and 45756, September 6, 1991. The Department...

  13. Gender and Transportation Access among Community-Dwelling Seniors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupuis, Josette; Weiss, Deborah R.; Wolfson, Christina

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study estimates the prevalence of problems with transportation in a sample of community-dwelling seniors residing in an urban setting and investigates the role that gender plays in the ability of seniors to remain mobile in their communities. Design and Methods: Data collected as part of a study assessing the prevalence and…

  14. Integrating School Transportation Resources into Coordinated Rural Public Transportation Programs: A Proposal To Increase Access to Community Services for Transportation-Disadvantaged Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Legislative Commission on Rural Resources, Albany.

    Inadequate public transportation in rural areas has long been a major impediment for rural residents' access to health care, jobs, and community activities and services. Particularly disadvantaged in transportation are the rural poor, elderly, and youth. This report highlights the benefits to be gained by passage of the Commission on Rural…

  15. Lunar Transportation Facilities and Operations Study, option 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Throughout the Option I period of the Lunar Transportation Facilities and Operations Study (LTFOS), McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Company - Kennedy Space Center (MDSSC-KSC) provided support to both the Planetary Surface Systems (PSS) Office at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at the Johnson Space Center and to the Flight and Ground Systems Projects Office (Payload Projects Management) at the Kennedy Space Center. The primary objective of the Option I phase of the study was to assist the above NASA centers in developing Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) concepts. MDSSC-KSC conducted three analyses which provided launch and landing detail to the proposed exploration concepts. One analysis, the Lunar Ejecta Assessment, was conducted to determine the effects of launch and landing a vehicle in a dusty environment. A second analysis, the Thermal/Micrometeoroid Protection Trade Study, was refined to determine the impacts that Reference Architecture Option 5A would have on thermal/micrometeoroid protection approaches. The third analysis, the Centaur Prelaunch Procedure Analysis, used a Centaur prelaunch test and checkout flow to identify key considerations that would be important if a Lunar Excursion Vehicle (LEV) was to use an expander cycle liquid oxygen-liquid hydrogen engine. Several 'quick look' assessments were also conducted. One quick look assessment, the Storable Propellant Quick Look Assessment, was conducted to identify design considerations that should be made if storable propellants were to be used instead of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. The LEV Servicer Maintenance Analysis provided an early look at the effort required to maintain an LEV Servicer on the lunar surface. Also, support was provided to the PSS Logistics Manager to develop initial LEV Servicer cost inputs. Consideration was given to the advanced development that must be provided to accomplish a lunar and/or Mars mission. MDSS-KSC also provided support to both MASE

  16. Lunar Transportation Facilities and Operations Study, option 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-05-01

    Throughout the Option I period of the Lunar Transportation Facilities and Operations Study (LTFOS), McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Company - Kennedy Space Center (MDSSC-KSC) provided support to both the Planetary Surface Systems (PSS) Office at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at the Johnson Space Center and to the Flight and Ground Systems Projects Office (Payload Projects Management) at the Kennedy Space Center. The primary objective of the Option I phase of the study was to assist the above NASA centers in developing Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) concepts. MDSSC-KSC conducted three analyses which provided launch and landing detail to the proposed exploration concepts. One analysis, the Lunar Ejecta Assessment, was conducted to determine the effects of launch and landing a vehicle in a dusty environment. A second analysis, the Thermal/Micrometeoroid Protection Trade Study, was refined to determine the impacts that Reference Architecture Option 5A would have on thermal/micrometeoroid protection approaches. The third analysis, the Centaur Prelaunch Procedure Analysis, used a Centaur prelaunch test and checkout flow to identify key considerations that would be important if a Lunar Excursion Vehicle (LEV) was to use an expander cycle liquid oxygen-liquid hydrogen engine. Several 'quick look' assessments were also conducted. One quick look assessment, the Storable Propellant Quick Look Assessment, was conducted to identify design considerations that should be made if storable propellants were to be used instead of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. The LEV Servicer Maintenance Analysis provided an early look at the effort required to maintain an LEV Servicer on the lunar surface. Also, support was provided to the PSS Logistics Manager to develop initial LEV Servicer cost inputs. Consideration was given to the advanced development that must be provided to accomplish a lunar and/or Mars mission. MDSS-KSC also provided support to both MASE

  17. 33 CFR 125.15 - Access to waterfront facilities, and port and harbor areas, including vessels and harbor craft...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., and port and harbor areas, including vessels and harbor craft therein. 125.15 Section 125.15....15 Access to waterfront facilities, and port and harbor areas, including vessels and harbor craft....09 to those waterfront facilities, and port and harbor areas, including vessels and harbor...

  18. 9 CFR 320.4 - Access to and inspection of records, facilities and inventory; copying and sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to and inspection of records, facilities and inventory; copying and sampling. 320.4 Section 320.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY...) of this chapter) also must be afforded any necessary facilities (other than reproduction...

  19. 9 CFR 320.4 - Access to and inspection of records, facilities and inventory; copying and sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Access to and inspection of records, facilities and inventory; copying and sampling. 320.4 Section 320.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY...) of this chapter) also must be afforded any necessary facilities (other than reproduction...

  20. 9 CFR 381.178 - Access to and inspection of records, facilities and inventory; copying and sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to and inspection of records, facilities and inventory; copying and sampling. 381.178 Section 381.178 Animals and Animal Products FOOD... necessary facilities (other than reproduction equipment) for the examination and copying of records and...

  1. 9 CFR 381.178 - Access to and inspection of records, facilities and inventory; copying and sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Access to and inspection of records, facilities and inventory; copying and sampling. 381.178 Section 381.178 Animals and Animal Products FOOD... necessary facilities (other than reproduction equipment) for the examination and copying of records and...

  2. Accessibility of sports facilities for persons with reduced mobility and assessment of their motivation for practice.

    PubMed

    Sá, Maria Manuel; Azevedo, Rui; Martins, Maria Cristina; Machado, Osvaldo; Tavares, João

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to create awareness, both within the scientific community and among providers of sports facilities, for individuals with impaired or reduced mobility, promoting the development of technical solutions that allow greater autonomy and social integration of people with disabilities. The purpose of this work is, on the one hand, to evaluate the accessibility of sports facilities for people with reduced mobility and, on the other hand, to investigate why this user group has such low rates of participation in sporting activities. Firstly, using the Portuguese norms and legislation transcribed from European Community directives, a check list was created comprising all the items that sports facilities should abide by in order to provide accessibility and safety to people with reduced mobility. Another questionnaire was designed aimed at this user group, with questions pertaining to their desire and ability to use sports facilities. This questionnaire was distributed in Portugal, in the greater metropolitan area of Porto, to users of Rehabilitation Centres and Physiotherapy Clinics. The results obtained from the check-list showed the compliances and non-compliances of the respective sports facilities, proving that many barriers preventing the participation of people with reduced mobility still exist. Twenty-four people with permanent impairment of the lower extremities (paraplegia) answered the questionnaire pertaining to the desire and ability to perform physical activity. Two individuals (8%) had sporting activities available to them in their area of residence and only five (21%) performed any physical activity. The main reason given for not taking part in any activity was the lack of adapted sports facilities. All the participants felt that taking part in sports is beneficial. The benefits stated were: general well-being and development of the psychomotor component (e.g. coordination, balance, body posture), of physical condition (e.g. strength, resistance

  3. Review of the facile (F/sub N/) method in particle transport theory

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, R.D.M.

    1985-10-01

    The facile (F/sub N/) method for solving particle transport problems is reviewed. The fundamentals of the method are summarized, recent developments are discussed and several applications of the method are described in detail.

  4. Beyond the Yellow Bus: Promising Practices for Maximizing Access to Opportunity through Innovations in Student Transportation. Policy Brief 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Cities & Schools, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Access to safe, affordable, and convenient transportation shapes the "geography of opportunity" for many children and youth. This study looks at how ?localities across the country are implementing new and innovative alternative approaches to student transportation that expand regional transportation access for K-12 students, improve…

  5. An Enhanced Variable Two-Step Floating Catchment Area Method for Measuring Spatial Accessibility to Residential Care Facilities in Nanjing

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jianhua; Wang, Jinyin; Rui, Yikang; Qian, Tianlu; Wang, Jiechen

    2015-01-01

    Civil administration departments require reliable measures of accessibility so that residential care facility shortage areas can be accurately identified. Building on previous research, this paper proposes an enhanced variable two-step floating catchment area (EV2SFCA) method that determines facility catchment sizes by dynamically summing the population around the facility until the facility-to-population ratio (FPR) is less than the FPR threshold (FPRT). To minimize the errors from the supply and demand catchments being mismatched, this paper proposes that the facility and population catchment areas must both contain the other location in calculating accessibility. A case study evaluating spatial accessibility to residential care facilities in Nanjing demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in accurately determining catchment sizes and identifying details in the variation of spatial accessibility. The proposed method can be easily applied to assess other public healthcare facilities, and can provide guidance to government departments on issues of spatial planning and identification of shortage and excess areas. PMID:26580637

  6. An Enhanced Variable Two-Step Floating Catchment Area Method for Measuring Spatial Accessibility to Residential Care Facilities in Nanjing.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jianhua; Wang, Jinyin; Rui, Yikang; Qian, Tianlu; Wang, Jiechen

    2015-11-01

    Civil administration departments require reliable measures of accessibility so that residential care facility shortage areas can be accurately identified. Building on previous research, this paper proposes an enhanced variable two-step floating catchment area (EV2SFCA) method that determines facility catchment sizes by dynamically summing the population around the facility until the facility-to-population ratio (FPR) is less than the FPR threshold (FPRT). To minimize the errors from the supply and demand catchments being mismatched, this paper proposes that the facility and population catchment areas must both contain the other location in calculating accessibility. A case study evaluating spatial accessibility to residential care facilities in Nanjing demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in accurately determining catchment sizes and identifying details in the variation of spatial accessibility. The proposed method can be easily applied to assess other public healthcare facilities, and can provide guidance to government departments on issues of spatial planning and identification of shortage and excess areas. PMID:26580637

  7. Distance, transportation cost, and mode of transport in the utilization of facility-based maternity services: evidence from rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Keya, Kaji Tamanna; Rob, Ubaidur; Rahman, Moshiur; Bajracharya, Ashish; Bellows, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Although the maternal mortality ratio in Bangladesh has decreased, significant underutilization of facilities continues to be a persistent challenge to policy makers. Women face long distances and significant transportation cost to deliver at health facilities. This study identifies the distance traveled to utilize facilities, associated transportation cost, and transport mode used for maternal healthcare services. A total of 3,300 mothers aged 18-49 years, who had given birth in the year before the survey, were interviewed from 22 sub-districts in 2010. Findings suggest that facility-based maternal healthcare service utilization was very poor. Only 53% of women received antenatal care, 20% used delivery care. and 10% used postnatal care from health centers. Median distance traveled for antenatal and postnatal check-ups was 2 kilometers but 4 kilometers for complication management care and delivery. Most women used non-motorized rickshaw or van to reach a health facility. On average, women spent Taka 100 (US$1.40) as transportation cost for antenatal care, Taka 432 (US$6.17) for delivery, and Taka 132 (US$1.89) for postnatal check-up. For each additional kilometer, the cost increased by Taka 9 (US$0.13) for antenatal, Taka 31 (US$0.44) for delivery, and Taka 8 (US$0.11) for postnatal care.

  8. A Unique, Optically Accessible Flame Tube Facility for Lean Combustor Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Yolanda R.; Locke, Randy J.; Wey, Chowen C.; Bianco, Jean

    1995-01-01

    A facility that allows interrogation of combusting flows by advanced diagnostic methods and instrumentation has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. An optically accessible flame tube combustor is described which has high temperature, pressure, and air flow capabilities. The windows in the combustor measure 3.8 cm axially by 5.1 cm radially, providing 67% optical access to the 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm cross section flow chamber. Advanced gas analysis instrumentation is available through a gas chromatography/mass spectrometer system (GC/MS), which has on-line capability for heavy hydrocarbon measurement with resolution to the parts per billion level. The instrumentation allows one to study combusting flows and combustor subcomponents, such as fuel injectors and air swirlers. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) can measure unstable combustion species, which cannot be obtained with traditional gas sampling. This type of data is especially useful to combustion modellers. The optical access allows measurements to have high spatial and temporal resolution. GC/MS data and PLIF images of OH- are presented from experiments using a lean direct injection (LDI) combustor burning Jet-A fuel at inlet temperatures ranging from 810 K to 866 K, combustor pressures up to 1380 kPa, and equivalence ratios from 0.41 to 0.59.

  9. Comparing perceived and objectively measured access to recreational facilities as predictors of physical activity in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Scott, Molly M; Evenson, Kelly R; Cohen, Deborah A; Cox, Christine E

    2007-05-01

    A number of studies in recent years have identified both self-report and objectively measured accessibility of recreational facilities as important predictors of physical activity in youth. Yet, few studies have: (1) examined the relationship between the number and proximity of objectively measured neighborhood physical activity facilities and respondents' perceptions and (2) compared objective and self-report measures as predictors of physical activity. This study uses data on 1,367 6th-grade girls who participated in the Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG) to explore these issues. Girls reported whether nine different types of recreational facilities were easily accessible. These facilities included basketball courts, golf courses, martial arts studios, playing fields, tracks, skating rinks, swimming pools, tennis courts, and dance/gymnastic clubs. Next, geographic information systems (GIS) were used to identify all the parks, schools, and commercial sites for physical activity located within a mile of each girl's home. These sites were then visited to inventory the types of facilities available. Girls wore accelerometers to measure their weekly minutes of non-school metabolic equivalent weighted moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MW-MVPA). The number of facilities within a half-mile of girls' homes strongly predicted the perception of easy access to seven out of nine facility types. Both individual facility perceptions and the total number of facilities perceived were associated with increased physical activity. For each additional facility perceived, girls clocked 3% more metabolic equivalent weighted moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (p < 0.001). Although girls tended to record 3% more of this kind of physical activity (p < 0.05) per basketball court within a mile of their homes, objective facility measures were otherwise unrelated to physical activity. The results from this study suggest that raising the profile of existing facilities may

  10. Comparing perceived and objectively measured access to recreational facilities as predictors of physical activity in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Scott, Molly M; Evenson, Kelly R; Cohen, Deborah A; Cox, Christine E

    2007-05-01

    A number of studies in recent years have identified both self-report and objectively measured accessibility of recreational facilities as important predictors of physical activity in youth. Yet, few studies have: (1) examined the relationship between the number and proximity of objectively measured neighborhood physical activity facilities and respondents' perceptions and (2) compared objective and self-report measures as predictors of physical activity. This study uses data on 1,367 6th-grade girls who participated in the Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG) to explore these issues. Girls reported whether nine different types of recreational facilities were easily accessible. These facilities included basketball courts, golf courses, martial arts studios, playing fields, tracks, skating rinks, swimming pools, tennis courts, and dance/gymnastic clubs. Next, geographic information systems (GIS) were used to identify all the parks, schools, and commercial sites for physical activity located within a mile of each girl's home. These sites were then visited to inventory the types of facilities available. Girls wore accelerometers to measure their weekly minutes of non-school metabolic equivalent weighted moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MW-MVPA). The number of facilities within a half-mile of girls' homes strongly predicted the perception of easy access to seven out of nine facility types. Both individual facility perceptions and the total number of facilities perceived were associated with increased physical activity. For each additional facility perceived, girls clocked 3% more metabolic equivalent weighted moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (p < 0.001). Although girls tended to record 3% more of this kind of physical activity (p < 0.05) per basketball court within a mile of their homes, objective facility measures were otherwise unrelated to physical activity. The results from this study suggest that raising the profile of existing facilities may

  11. Access to Vocational Education. A Planning System for Local Secondary and Post-Secondary Program and Facility Accessibility. Step 5: Removing Barriers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Eric; And Others

    This guidebook focuses on the final step included in a five-step planning system for improving local secondary and postsecondary programs and facilities accessibility: removing barriers. The guidebook is comprised of self-instructional discussions of three techniques that can be used in planning for implementation of barrier-removal strategies:…

  12. 49 CFR 37.59 - Differences in accessibility completion dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Differences in accessibility completion dates. 37.59 Section 37.59 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.59 Differences in accessibility...

  13. Challenges and Successes in the Application of Universal Access Principles in the Development of Bus Rapid Transport Sytems in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    The National Department of Transport started a programme to upgrade public transport systems throughout South Africa in 2008, which included the upgrading of transport systems for host cities of the 2010 World Cup. This was the first time there was a clear commitment to produce universally accessible public transport systems in South Africa. The requirement to achieve universal access was reinforced by National Treasuries stipulation, that universal access was a precondition for the approval of all funding for these projects. In the absence of any specific legislation in the transport sector to address universal access and the South African National Building Regulations and the associated deemed to satisfy code, South African National Standard (SANS) 10400 Part S: "Facilities for Persons with Disabilities", providing the only associated standards, there has been a need to revisit traffic engineering codes. This has created an opportunity to look at the functionality and safety of commuters, especially those who have functional limitations, at traffic intersections and midblock pedestrian crossings, especially as the commuters have to access predominately median located Bus Rapid Transport (BRT) trunk stations. Included in the specific areas of focus that impact on the issues of pedestrian safety, has been the application and functionality of tactile wayfinding and warning surfaces and other support systems for commuters with functional sight limitations and the integration of the systems with other infrastructure and the safety of all commuter. In addition to the issues of functionality, this paper will address the influence of misdirected foreign expertise that set the initial BRT Systems on a high floor vehicle modality, which has created operational challenges that have seriously compromised functional universal access. This presentation will highlight these challenges, opportunities and solutions, the procedural complexities, as well as the inherent resistance

  14. Challenges and Successes in the Application of Universal Access Principles in the Development of Bus Rapid Transport Sytems in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    The National Department of Transport started a programme to upgrade public transport systems throughout South Africa in 2008, which included the upgrading of transport systems for host cities of the 2010 World Cup. This was the first time there was a clear commitment to produce universally accessible public transport systems in South Africa. The requirement to achieve universal access was reinforced by National Treasuries stipulation, that universal access was a precondition for the approval of all funding for these projects. In the absence of any specific legislation in the transport sector to address universal access and the South African National Building Regulations and the associated deemed to satisfy code, South African National Standard (SANS) 10400 Part S: "Facilities for Persons with Disabilities", providing the only associated standards, there has been a need to revisit traffic engineering codes. This has created an opportunity to look at the functionality and safety of commuters, especially those who have functional limitations, at traffic intersections and midblock pedestrian crossings, especially as the commuters have to access predominately median located Bus Rapid Transport (BRT) trunk stations. Included in the specific areas of focus that impact on the issues of pedestrian safety, has been the application and functionality of tactile wayfinding and warning surfaces and other support systems for commuters with functional sight limitations and the integration of the systems with other infrastructure and the safety of all commuter. In addition to the issues of functionality, this paper will address the influence of misdirected foreign expertise that set the initial BRT Systems on a high floor vehicle modality, which has created operational challenges that have seriously compromised functional universal access. This presentation will highlight these challenges, opportunities and solutions, the procedural complexities, as well as the inherent resistance

  15. Versatile Design Principles for Facile Access to Unstrained Conjugated Organoborane Macrocycles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pangkuan; Yin, Xiaodong; Baser-Kirazli, Nurcan; Jäkle, Frieder

    2015-09-01

    A facile and versatile approach was developed to access ambipolar boron-containing macrocycles. Two examples of new conjugated cyclic motifs are presented with carbazole moieties as donors and borane moieties as acceptors embedded into the ring system. They were first predicted using computational methods. Possible targets with appropriately shaped π-conjugated bridges that minimize the overall ring strain were identified and their geometry was optimized by DFT methods. The synthetic demonstration was then accomplished using organometallic condensation reactions under high dilution conditions. The resulting monodisperse macrocycles provide important insights into the design principles necessary for the preparation of new unstrained macrocycles with interesting optical and electronic characteristics. The current research also offers a more general approach to conjugated ambipolar B/N macrocycles as a promising new family of (opto)electronic materials. PMID:26119860

  16. 77 FR 50068 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of public information meeting and reopening of comment period. SUMMARY: The Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) is holding a public information... issues related to the design and slope of bus ramps and the space needed at the top of ramps...

  17. 33 CFR 154.1325 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. 154.1325...) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Other Non-Petroleum..., store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that...

  18. 33 CFR 154.1325 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. 154.1325...) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Other Non-Petroleum..., store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that...

  19. 33 CFR 154.1325 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. 154.1325...) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Other Non-Petroleum..., store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that...

  20. 33 CFR 154.1325 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. 154.1325...) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Other Non-Petroleum..., store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that...

  1. 33 CFR 154.1325 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. 154.1325...) POLLUTION FACILITIES TRANSFERRING OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL IN BULK Response Plans for Other Non-Petroleum..., store, or transport other non-petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that...

  2. Site and facility waste transport planning documents (SPDs) status and findings

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, S P; Danese, F L; Wankerl, M W

    1993-05-01

    Site and Facility Waste Transportation Services Planning Documents (SPDS) are detailed desk-top reference documents that initiate planning for shipping commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the sites where it is currently generated and/or stored to another location. Because of the unique design features and individual variations in the spent fuel handling and cask loading operation requirements for each facility, one SPD will be written for each of the commercial facilities currently expected to deliver SNF into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) disposal system. One primary purpose of an SPD is to initiate the discussions that will lead to a determination of the type of spent fuel cask and transport mode that will be used to transport spent fuel from each facility. The initial assessment of which cask type and mode would best serve each facility is based on the principle that the largest possible capacity casks should be used at the greatest number of facilities to reduce the total number of spent fuel shipments. The final selection of cask and transportation mode will be arrived at following discussion with the facility licensed operator. Once agreed upon by OCRWM and the facility owner, the SPD wig be used as a primary input to the development of a Site Specific Servicing Plan (SSSP) that will detail chosen servicing options for the individual site. This paper will discuss the purpose and development of SPDs and the preliminary results of an evaluation of the ability of delivering facilities to handle and ship spent fuel casks within the confines of the local nation infrastructure.

  3. 25 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G - List of Activities Eligible for Funding Under BIA Transportation Facility Maintenance Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Transportation Facility Maintenance Program A Appendix A to Subpart G Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance Pt. 170... Transportation Facility Maintenance Program The following activities are eligible for BIA Transportation...

  4. 25 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G - List of Activities Eligible for Funding Under BIA Transportation Facility Maintenance Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Transportation Facility Maintenance Program A Appendix A to Subpart G Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance Pt. 170... Transportation Facility Maintenance Program The following activities are eligible for BIA Transportation...

  5. 25 CFR Appendix A to Subpart G - List of Activities Eligible for Funding Under BIA Transportation Facility Maintenance Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Transportation Facility Maintenance Program A Appendix A to Subpart G Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance Pt. 170... Transportation Facility Maintenance Program The following activities are eligible for BIA Transportation...

  6. Reproductive rights denied: the Hyde Amendment and access to abortion for Native American women using Indian health service facilities.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Shaye Beverly

    2014-10-01

    Restrictions on the use of federal funds to provide abortions have limited the access to abortion services for Native American women receiving care at Indian Health Service facilities. Current data suggest that the vast majority of Indian Health Service facilities are unequipped to provide abortions under any circumstances. Native American women experience disproportionately high rates of sexual assault and unintended pregnancy. Hyde Amendment restrictions systematically infringe on the reproductive rights of Native American women and present a pressing public health policy concern.

  7. Development of a transport system for the copper source of the Texas Intense Positron Source facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doron, O.; Biegalski, S. R.; O'Kelly, S.; Hurst, B. J.

    2006-01-01

    The transport system design and construction for The Texas Intense Positron Source (TIPS) facility has been completed. This facility is located on beam port 1 of The University of Texas at Austin TRIGA Mark II 1.1 MW research reactor. The TIPS will provide a high intensity, variable energy positron beam for use in material studies. The natural copper source is transported into beam port 1 of the reactor where it is irradiated at close proximity to the reactor core. The transport system is an L-shaped aluminum channel that utilizes pulleys to drive a source cart. The copper source is transported on the cart into and out of the beam port for irradiation. After removal from the beam port, the activated copper positron source will be placed into a vacuum chamber where the positrons are moderated with annealed tungsten foil and electrostatically extracted.

  8. Technology benefits and ground test facilities for high-speed civil transport development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winston, Matthew M.; Shields, Elwood M.; Morris, Shelby J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The advanced technology base necessary for successful twenty-first century High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft will require extensive ground testing in aerodynamics, propulsion, acoustics, structures, materials, and other disciplines. This paper analyzes the benefits of advanced technology application to HSCT concepts, addresses the adequacy of existing groundbased test facilities, and explores the need for new facilities required to support HSCT development. A substantial amount of HSCT-related ground testing can be accomplished in existing facilities. The HSCT development effort could also benefit significantly from some new facilities initially conceived for testing in other aeronautical research areas. A new structures testing facility is identified as critically needed to insure timely technology maturation.

  9. Conceptual design of an RTG shipping and receiving facility transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.J.; Gentzlinger, R.C.; Lujan, R.E.

    1995-01-20

    The conceptual design of an RTG Facility Transportation System which is part of the overall RTG Transportation System has been completed and is described in detail. The Facility Transportation System serves to provide locomotion, cooling, shock protection and data acquisition for the RTG package during onloading and offloading sequences. The RTG Shipping & Receiving Facility Transportation System consists of a Transporter Subsystem, a Package Cooling Subsystem, and a Shock Limiting Transit Device Subsystem. The Transporter Subsystem is a custom designed welded steel cart combined with a pneumatically-driven hand tug for locomotion. The Package Cooling Subsystem provides five kilowatts of active liquid cooling via an on-board refrigeration system. The Shock Limiting Transit Device Subsystem consists of a consumable honeycomb anti-shock frame which provides shock protection for the 3855 kg (8500 LB) RTG package. These subsystems have been combined into an integrated system which will facilitate the offloading and onloading of the RTG Package into and out of the semitrailer as well as meet ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) radiation exposure guidelines. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  10. Smartphone-based system to improve transportation access for the cognitively impaired.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Shane M; Riehle, Timothy H; Lichter, Patrick A; Brown, Allen W; Panescu, Dorin

    2015-08-01

    This project developed and evaluated a smartphone-based system to improve mobility and transportation access for the cognitively impaired. The proposed system is intended to allow the cognitively impaired to use public transportation systems, community transportation and dedicated transportation services for the disabled with greater ease and safety. Individuals with cognitive disabilities are often unable to operate an automobile, or may require a prolonged recovery period before resuming driving. Public transportation systems represent a significant means to allow these individuals to maintain independence. Yet public transportation systems can pose significant challenges to individuals with cognitive impairment. The goal of this project is to develop a system to reduce these barriers via a technological solution consisting of components developed both for the cognitively impaired user and their caregiver or family member. The first component consists of a cognitive prosthetic device featuring traditional memory cueing and reminders as well as custom location-based transportation specific functions. This cognitive mobility assistant will leverage the computing power and GPS location determination capabilities of inexpensive, powerful smart phones. The second component consists of a management application which offers caregivers the ability to configure and program the reminder and transit functions remotely via the Internet. Following completion of the prototype system a pilot human test was performed with cognitively disabled individuals and family members or caregivers to assess the usability and acceptability of both system components. PMID:26738091

  11. Smartphone-based system to improve transportation access for the cognitively impaired.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Shane M; Riehle, Timothy H; Lichter, Patrick A; Brown, Allen W; Panescu, Dorin

    2015-01-01

    This project developed and evaluated a smartphone-based system to improve mobility and transportation access for the cognitively impaired. The proposed system is intended to allow the cognitively impaired to use public transportation systems, community transportation and dedicated transportation services for the disabled with greater ease and safety. Individuals with cognitive disabilities are often unable to operate an automobile, or may require a prolonged recovery period before resuming driving. Public transportation systems represent a significant means to allow these individuals to maintain independence. Yet public transportation systems can pose significant challenges to individuals with cognitive impairment. The goal of this project is to develop a system to reduce these barriers via a technological solution consisting of components developed both for the cognitively impaired user and their caregiver or family member. The first component consists of a cognitive prosthetic device featuring traditional memory cueing and reminders as well as custom location-based transportation specific functions. This cognitive mobility assistant will leverage the computing power and GPS location determination capabilities of inexpensive, powerful smart phones. The second component consists of a management application which offers caregivers the ability to configure and program the reminder and transit functions remotely via the Internet. Following completion of the prototype system a pilot human test was performed with cognitively disabled individuals and family members or caregivers to assess the usability and acceptability of both system components.

  12. Accessible Transportation, Geographic Elevation, and Masticatory Ability Among Elderly Residents of a Rural Area.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Tominaga, Kazumichi; Takeda, Miwako; Sundquist, Kristina; Nabika, Toru

    2015-06-26

    Given that public transportation networks are often worse in rural areas than in urban areas, rural residents who do not drive can find it difficult to access health-promoting goods, services, and resources related to masticatory ability. Moreover, geographical location, assessed by elevation, could modify this association. The aim of this study was to test whether the association between access to transportation and masticatory ability varied by elevation. Data were collected from a cross-sectional study conducted in Mizuho and Iwami counties, Japan. Objective masticatory ability was evaluated using a test gummy jelly and elevation was estimated by the geographic information systems according to the participant's address. After excluding subjects with missing data, 672 subjects (Mizuho = 401 and Iwami = 271) were analyzed. After adjustment for potential confounders, being a driver was not significantly associated with masticatory ability among elderly people living at low elevation (≤313 m) in Mizuho county. However, after the same adjustment, being a driver remained significantly associated with increased masticatory ability among elderly at high elevations. Similar findings were observed in Iwami county. Accessible transportation was significantly associated with increased mastication ability in elderly people living at high elevations, but not in those living at low elevations.

  13. 33 CFR 154.1047 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport Group V petroleum oils. 154.1047 Section... Group V petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group V petroleum oils must provide information in his or her response plan that identifies—...

  14. 33 CFR 154.1047 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport Group V petroleum oils. 154.1047 Section... Group V petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group V petroleum oils must provide information in his or her response plan that identifies—...

  15. 33 CFR 154.1047 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport Group V petroleum oils. 154.1047 Section... Group V petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group V petroleum oils must provide information in his or her response plan that identifies—...

  16. 33 CFR 154.1047 - Response plan development and evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... evaluation criteria for facilities that handle, store, or transport Group V petroleum oils. 154.1047 Section... Group V petroleum oils. (a) An owner or operator of a facility that handles, stores, or transports Group V petroleum oils must provide information in his or her response plan that identifies—...

  17. 25 CFR 170.443 - How can a tribe list a proposed transportation facility in the IRR Inventory?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., including a highway bridge, that will serve public transportation needs, is eligible for construction under... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true How can a tribe list a proposed transportation facility in... Reservation Roads Program Facilities Irr Inventory § 170.443 How can a tribe list a proposed...

  18. 25 CFR 170.443 - How can a tribe list a proposed transportation facility in the IRR Inventory?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., including a highway bridge, that will serve public transportation needs, is eligible for construction under... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How can a tribe list a proposed transportation facility... Reservation Roads Program Facilities Irr Inventory § 170.443 How can a tribe list a proposed...

  19. 25 CFR 170.443 - How can a tribe list a proposed transportation facility in the IRR Inventory?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., including a highway bridge, that will serve public transportation needs, is eligible for construction under... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How can a tribe list a proposed transportation facility... Reservation Roads Program Facilities Irr Inventory § 170.443 How can a tribe list a proposed...

  20. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.807 Section 170.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.807 What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

  1. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.807 Section 170.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.807 What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

  2. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.807 Section 170.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.807 What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

  3. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.807 Section 170.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.807 What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

  4. 25 CFR 170.807 - What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management System? 170.807 Section 170.807 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.807 What must BIA include when it develops an IRR Transportation Facilities Maintenance Management...

  5. Facilities, breed and experience affect ease of sheep handling: the livestock transporter's perspective.

    PubMed

    Burnard, C L; Pitchford, W S; Hocking Edwards, J E; Hazel, S J

    2015-08-01

    An understanding of the perceived importance of a variety of factors affecting the ease of handling of sheep and the interactions between these factors is valuable in improving profitability and welfare of the livestock. Many factors may contribute to animal behaviour during handling, and traditionally these factors have been assessed in isolation under experimental conditions. A human social component to this phenomenon also exists. The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the importance of a variety of factors affecting ease of handling, and the interactions between these from the perspective of the livestock transporter. Qualitative interviews were used to investigate the factors affecting sheep behaviour during handling. Interview transcripts underwent thematic analysis. Livestock transporters discussed the effects of attitudes and behaviours towards sheep, helpers, facilities, distractions, environment, dogs and a variety of sheep factors including breed, preparation, experience and sex on sheep behaviour during handling. Transporters demonstrated care and empathy and stated that patience and experience were key factors determining how a person might deal with difficult sheep. Livestock transporters strongly believed facilities (ramps and yards) had the greatest impact, followed by sheep experience (naivety of the sheep to handling and transport) and breed. Transporters also discussed the effects of distractions, time of day, weather, dogs, other people, sheep preparation, body condition and sheep sex on ease of handling. The concept of individual sheep temperament was indirectly expressed.

  6. Facilities, breed and experience affect ease of sheep handling: the livestock transporter's perspective.

    PubMed

    Burnard, C L; Pitchford, W S; Hocking Edwards, J E; Hazel, S J

    2015-08-01

    An understanding of the perceived importance of a variety of factors affecting the ease of handling of sheep and the interactions between these factors is valuable in improving profitability and welfare of the livestock. Many factors may contribute to animal behaviour during handling, and traditionally these factors have been assessed in isolation under experimental conditions. A human social component to this phenomenon also exists. The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the importance of a variety of factors affecting ease of handling, and the interactions between these from the perspective of the livestock transporter. Qualitative interviews were used to investigate the factors affecting sheep behaviour during handling. Interview transcripts underwent thematic analysis. Livestock transporters discussed the effects of attitudes and behaviours towards sheep, helpers, facilities, distractions, environment, dogs and a variety of sheep factors including breed, preparation, experience and sex on sheep behaviour during handling. Transporters demonstrated care and empathy and stated that patience and experience were key factors determining how a person might deal with difficult sheep. Livestock transporters strongly believed facilities (ramps and yards) had the greatest impact, followed by sheep experience (naivety of the sheep to handling and transport) and breed. Transporters also discussed the effects of distractions, time of day, weather, dogs, other people, sheep preparation, body condition and sheep sex on ease of handling. The concept of individual sheep temperament was indirectly expressed. PMID:25874817

  7. Radiocesium Discharges and Subsequent Environmental Transport at the Major U.S. Weapons Production Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, Jr. C.T.; Hamby, D.M.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1999-11-14

    Radiocesium is one of the more prevalent radionuclides in the environment as a result of weapons production related atomic projects in the United States and the former Soviet Union. Radiocesium discharges during the 1950's account for a large fraction of the historical releases from U.S. weapons production facilities. Releases of radiocesium to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems during the early ,years of nuclear weapons production provided the opportunity to conduct multidisciplinary studies on the transport mechanisms of this potentially hazardous radionuclide. The major U.S. Department of Energy facilities (Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, and Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina) are located in regions of the country that have different geographical characteristics. The facility siting provided diverse backgrounds for the development of an understanding of environmental factors contributing to the fate and transport of radiocesium. In this paper, we summarize the significant environmental releases of radiocesium in the early -years of weapons production and then discuss the historically significant transport mechanisms for r37Cs at the three facilities that were part of the U.S. nuclear weapons complex.

  8. Reproductive rights denied: the Hyde Amendment and access to abortion for Native American women using Indian health service facilities.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Shaye Beverly

    2014-10-01

    Restrictions on the use of federal funds to provide abortions have limited the access to abortion services for Native American women receiving care at Indian Health Service facilities. Current data suggest that the vast majority of Indian Health Service facilities are unequipped to provide abortions under any circumstances. Native American women experience disproportionately high rates of sexual assault and unintended pregnancy. Hyde Amendment restrictions systematically infringe on the reproductive rights of Native American women and present a pressing public health policy concern. PMID:25122025

  9. Reproductive Rights Denied: The Hyde Amendment and Access to Abortion for Native American Women Using Indian Health Service Facilities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Restrictions on the use of federal funds to provide abortions have limited the access to abortion services for Native American women receiving care at Indian Health Service facilities. Current data suggest that the vast majority of Indian Health Service facilities are unequipped to provide abortions under any circumstances. Native American women experience disproportionately high rates of sexual assault and unintended pregnancy. Hyde Amendment restrictions systematically infringe on the reproductive rights of Native American women and present a pressing public health policy concern. PMID:25122025

  10. The National Geoelectromagnetic Facility - an open access resource for ultra wideband electromagnetic geophysics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, A.; Urquhart, S.; Slater, M.

    2010-12-01

    At present, the US academic community has access to two national electromagnetic (EM) instrument pools that support long-period magnetotelluric (MT) equipment suitable for crust-mantle scale studies. The requirements of near surface geophysics, hydrology, glaciology, as well as the full range of crust and mantle investigations require development of new capabilities in data acquisition with broader frequency bandwidth than these existing units, increased instrument numbers, and concomitant developments in 3D/4D data interpretation. NSF Major Research Instrumentation support has been obtained to meet these requirements by developing an initial set of next-generation instruments as a National Geoelectromagnetic Facility (NGF), available to all PIs on a cost recovery basis, and operated by Oregon State University (OSU). In contrast to existing instruments with data acquisition systems specialized to operate within specific frequency bands and for specific electromagnetic methods, the NGF model "Zen/5" instruments being co-developed by OSU and Zonge Research and Engineering Organization are based on modular receivers with a flexible number of digital and analog input channels, designed to acquire EM data at dc, and from frequencies ranging from micro-Hz to MHz. These systems can be deployed in a compact, low power configuration for extended deployments (e.g. for crust-mantle scale experiments), or in a high frequency sampling mode for near surface work. The NGF is also acquiring controlled source EM transmitters, so that investigators may carry out magnetotelluric, audio-MT, radiofrequency-MT, as well as time-domain/transient EM and DC resistivity studies. The instruments are designed to simultaneously accommodate multiple electric field dipole sensors, magnetic fluxgates and induction coil sensors. Sample rates as high as 2.5 MHz with resolution between 24 and 32 bits, depending on sample rate, are specified to allow for high fidelity recording of waveforms. The NGF

  11. Groundwater Flow and Transport Calculations Supporting the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, Marcel P.; Wurstner, Signe K.

    2000-12-04

    This report summarizes the Hanford Site-Wide Groundwater Model and its application to the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) Disposal Facility Performance Assessment (PA). The site-wide model and supporting local-scale models are used to evaluate impacts from the transport of contaminants at a hypothetical well 100 m downgradient of the disposal facilities and to evaluate regional flow conditions and transport from the ILAW disposal facilities to the Columbia River. These models were used to well-intercept factors (WIFs) or dilution factors from a given areal flux of a hypothetical contaminant released to the unconfined aquifer from the ILAW disposal facilities for two waste-disposal options: 1) a remote-handled trench concept and 2) a concrete-vault concept. The WIF is defined as the ratio of the concentration at a well location in the aquifer to the concentration of infiltrating water entering the aquifer. These WIFs are being used in conjunction with calculations of released contaminant fluxes through the vadose zone to estimate potential impacts from radiological and hazardous chemical contaminants within the ILAW disposal facility at compliance points.

  12. Atmospheric science facility pallet-only mode space transportation system payload (feasibility study), Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The economic and technical feasibility is assessed of employing a pallet-only mode for conducting Atmospheric Magnetospheric Plasmas-in-Space experiments. A baseline design incorporating the experiment and instrument descriptions is developed. The prime instruments are packaged into four pallets in a physical and functional manner compatible with the Space Transportation System capabilities and/or constraints and an orbiter seven-day mission timeline. Operational compatibility is verified between the orbiter/payload and supporting facilities. The development status and the schedule requirements applicable to the Atmospheric Science Facility mission are identified. Conclusions and recommendations are presented and discussed.

  13. New Oil Pollution Act of 1990 will impact facilities, terminals, and transports in the oil industry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude of the Exxon Valdez spill galvanized the opinion of both the public and Congress on the need for new oil spill legislation. Consequently, the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 - a comprehensive prevention, response, liability, and compensation system for dealing with oil production - was passed by the 101st Congress. This book describes in detail the new law and the liabilities it imposes; the new financial responsibility requirements placed on oil-related facilities and vessels; oil spill prevention and response obligations; and the oil industry's activities to prevent and mitigate oil spills. Also discussed are the compliance problems faced by both fixed facilities and the transportation industry.

  14. Structural basis of the alternating-access mechanism in a bile acid transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Levin, Elena J.; Pan, Yaping; McCoy, Jason G.; Sharma, Ruchika; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in hepatocytes and secreted through the biliary tract into the small intestine, where they aid in absorption of lipids and fat-soluble vitamins. Through a process known as enterohepatic recirculation, more than 90% of secreted bile acids are then retrieved from the intestine and returned to the liver for resecretion. In humans, there are two Na+-dependent bile acid transporters involved in enterohepatic recirculation, the Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP; also known as SLC10A1) expressed in hepatocytes, and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; also known as SLC10A2) expressed on enterocytes in the terminal ileum. In recent years, ASBT has attracted much interest as a potential drug target for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia, because inhibition of ASBT reduces reabsorption of bile acids, thus increasing bile acid synthesis and consequently cholesterol consumption. However, a lack of three-dimensional structures of bile acid transporters hampers our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms of substrate selectivity and transport, and to interpret the wealth of existing functional data. The crystal structure of an ASBT homologue from Neisseria meningitidis (ASBTNM) in detergent was reported recently, showing the protein in an inward-open conformation bound to two Na+ and a taurocholic acid. However, the structural changes that bring bile acid and Na+ across the membrane are difficult to infer from a single structure. To understand the structural changes associated with the coupled transport of Na+ and bile acids, here we solved two structures of an ASBT homologue from Yersinia frederiksenii (ASBTYf) in a lipid environment, which reveal that a large rigid-body rotation of a substrate-binding domain gives the conserved `crossover' region, where two discontinuous helices cross each other, alternating accessibility from either side of the cell membrane. This result has implications

  15. Novel transport-vehicle design for moving optic modules in the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Grasz, E.; Tiszauer, D.

    1998-05-07

    The National Ignition Facility, currently under design and construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, will be the world`s largest laser when complete. The NIF will use about 8,000 large optics of 26 different types to focus up to 192 laser beams on a dime-size target. Given the constraints of the NIF operating environment, the tasks associated with optics transport and handling require a novel, versatile transport system. The system will consist of a computer system containing guidance, traffic management and order entry functions, and four or more automated laser-guided vehicles. This transport system will transport optics enclosures that are essentially portable clean rooms and will lift, align, and position them as needed to contact and engage mating points on the laser support structure.

  16. Intelligent Urban Public Transportation for Accessibility Dedicated to People with Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haiying; Hou, Kun-Mean; Zuo, Decheng; Li, Jian

    2012-01-01

    The traditional urban public transport system generally cannot provide an effective access service for people with disabilities, especially for disabled, wheelchair and blind (DWB) passengers. In this paper, based on advanced information & communication technologies (ICT) and green technologies (GT) concepts, a dedicated public urban transportation service access system named Mobi+ has been introduced, which facilitates the mobility of DWB passengers. The Mobi+ project consists of three subsystems: a wireless communication subsystem, which provides the data exchange and network connection services between buses and stations in the complex urban environments; the bus subsystem, which provides the DWB class detection & bus arrival notification services; and the station subsystem, which implements the urban environmental surveillance & bus auxiliary access services. The Mobi+ card that supports multi-microcontroller multi-transceiver adopts the fault-tolerant component-based hardware architecture, in which the dedicated embedded system software, i.e., operating system micro-kernel and wireless protocol, has been integrated. The dedicated Mobi+ embedded system provides the fault-tolerant resource awareness communication and scheduling mechanism to ensure the reliability in data exchange and service provision. At present, the Mobi+ system has been implemented on the buses and stations of line ‘2’ in the city of Clermont-Ferrand (France). The experiential results show that, on one hand the Mobi+ prototype system reaches the design expectations and provides an effective urban bus access service for people with disabilities; on the other hand the Mobi+ system is easily to deploy in the buses and at bus stations thanks to its low energy consumption and small form factor. PMID:23112622

  17. Transport of ammonium perfluorooctanoate in environmental media near a fluoropolymer manufacturing facility.

    PubMed

    Davis, Katherine L; Aucoin, Michael D; Larsen, Barbara S; Kaiser, Mary A; Hartten, Andrew S

    2007-05-01

    In order to understand better the pathways for transport of ammonium perfluorooctanoate (APFO) from a point source, a focused investigation of environmental media (water and soil) near a fluoropolymer manufacturing facility (Site) was undertaken. Methods were developed and validated at 2 microg kg(-1) [the limit of quantitation (LOQ)] in soil, and at 50 ng l(-1) in water. Environmental media were sampled from a public water supply well field located north of the Site, across a river. The data suggest that APFO air emissions from the Site are transported to the well field, deposited onto the soil, and then migrate downward with precipitation into the underlying aquifer.

  18. Regulatory facility guides for the transportation of hazardous and other materials

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.S.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.

    1994-07-01

    Regulatory Facility Guides (RFGS) are being developed to provide the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractor facilities with the understanding of the exact applicability of specific transportation regulations to DOE shippers. These detailed state-specific compilations of federal, state, tribal, local, and international transportation regulations should lead to enhanced compliance, fewer efforts, and less confusion. To date, RFGs for three states have been developed. The RFGs for Tennessee and Ohio were finalized in February 1994 and have been distributed under a controlled distribution. The RFG for New Meidco is in final draft form and is undergoing DOE review. Two additional RFGs, for the states of Idaho and California, are expected to be completed by September 1994.

  19. Manned Mars System Study (MMSS): Mars transportation and facility study. Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to design and analyze systems for conducting human missions to Mars and the moon, with special emphasis on the transportation and facility infrastructure. This study was conducted by Martin Marietta Astronautics Group, with an important teaming role by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). This work included the studies and separate reports of the FY-1988 and 1989 case studies as well as special analyses and parametric studies.

  20. Experiment Definition Using the Space Laboratory, Long Duration Exposure Facility, and Space Transportation System Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheppard, Albert P.; Wood, Joan M.

    1976-01-01

    Candidate experiments designed for the space shuttle transportation system and the long duration exposure facility are summarized. The data format covers: experiment title, Experimenter, technical abstract, benefits/justification, technical discussion of experiment approach and objectives, related work and experience, experiment facts space properties used, environmental constraints, shielding requirements, if any, physical description, and sketch of major elements. Information was also included on experiment hardware, research required to develop experiment, special requirements, cost estimate, safety considerations, and interactions with spacecraft and other experiments.

  1. HOV facilities and transportation-systems management, 1991. Transportation Research Record

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The papers in the Record are related by their focus on either high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) systems or transportation systems management (TSM). The reports evaluate the effectiveness in reducing delay to through-moving vehicles of left-turn bypass lanes at two-lane, rural T-intersections; examines the viability of advanced technology traffic management systems to provide solutions to the future traffic needs of New York City; summarizes the results of an extensive parking demand study of neighborhood and community shopping centers in northern Virginia; and examines various aspects of HOV systems.

  2. Race/Ethnicity and Geographic Access to Medicaid Substance Use Disorder Treatment Facilities in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Janet R.; Wen, Hefei; Ko, Michelle; Druss, Benjamin G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although substance use disorders (SUD) are prevalent and associated with adverse consequences, treatment rates remain extremely low. Unlike physical and mental health problems, treatment for SUD is predominantly provided in a separate specialty sector and more heavily financed by public sources. The Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has the potential to increase access to treatment for SUD, but only if an infrastructure exists to serve new enrollees. Objective This study examines the availability of outpatient SUD treatment facilities that accept Medicaid across U.S. counties, and whether counties with a higher percentage of racial/ethnic minorities are more likely to have gaps in this infrastructure. Design We used data from the 2009 National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services and the 2011-2012 Area Resource file to examine sociodemographic factors associated with county-level access to SUD treatment facilities that serve Medicaid enrollees. We estimated a probit model with state indicators to adjust for state-level heterogeneity in demographics, politics, and policies. Independent variables assessed county racial/ethnic composition (i.e., percentage Black and percentage Hispanic), percentage living in poverty, percentage living in a rural area, percentage insured with Medicaid, percentage uninsured, and total population. Participants U.S. Counties in all 50 states. Main Outcome Measure Dichotomous indicator for counties with at least one outpatient SUD treatment facility that accepts Medicaid. Results About sixty percent of U.S. counties have at least one outpatient SUD facility that accepts Medicaid, although this rate is lower in many Southern and Midwestern states. Counties with a higher percentage of Black (Marginal Effect [M.E.]=−3.1; 95% CI= −5.2,−0.9%), rural (M.E.=−9.2%; 95% CI=−11.1%,−7.4%), and/or uninsured (M.E.= −9.5%, 95% CI=−13.0%,−5.9%) residents are less likely to have one of these

  3. Library Media Facilities Access: Do You Really Want Your Library Media Center Used?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Thomas L.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses and provides some examples on how students and teachers should use library media centers. He also discusses the common problems with facilities design as it changes along with other aspects of society. He states that flexibility in design ensures that the physical facility will meet future program needs.…

  4. Making Facilities Accessible for the Physically Handicapped. Act. No. 1 of the Public Acts of 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Legislature, Lansing.

    A physical handicap is defined as an impairment which affects an individual to the extent that special facilities are needed to provide for his safety. Facilities include--(1) the special design of parking lots, building approaches and entrances, (2) stairs, ramps, doors, and multilevel floors, (3) corridors, and (4) rooms with sloping floors,…

  5. Facilities Planning Guide for Special Education Programs: Planning Accessibility for the Handicapped in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Kenneth W.

    The guide details characteristics to provide architecturally accessible special education programs for handicapped students. Impetus for the accessibility movement is traced to legislation, including the Architectural Barriers Act and Sections 503 and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Planning features considered are the development of a…

  6. Effects of improved access to transportation on emergency obstetric care outcomes in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mucunguzi, Stephen; Wamani, Henry; Lochoro, Peter; Tylleskar, Thorkild

    2014-09-01

    Reduction in maternal mortality has not been appreciable in most low-income countries. Improved access to transport for mothers is one way to improve maternal health. This study evaluated a free-of-charge 24-hour ambulance and communication services intervention in Oyam district using 'Caesarean section rate' (CSR) and compared with the neighbouring non-intervention district. Ecological data were collected retrospectively from maternity/theatre registers in October 2010 for 3 years pre and 3 years intervention period. The average CSR in the intervention district increased from 0.57% before the intervention to 1.21% (p = 0.022) during the intervention, while there was no change in the neighbouring district (0.51% to 0.58%, p = 0.512). Hospital deliveries increased by over 50% per year with a slight reduction in the average hospital stillbirths per 1000 hospital births in the intervention district (46.6 to 37.5, p = 0.253). Reliable communication and transport services increased access to and utilization of maternal health services, particularly caesarean delivery services.

  7. 49 CFR 37.55 - Intercity rail station accessibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intercity rail station accessibility. 37.55 Section 37.55 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Transportation Facilities § 37.55 Intercity rail station...

  8. 76 FR 45481 - Accessibility Guidelines for Pedestrian Facilities in the Public Right-of-Way

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ..., Are They Detectable?'' (2010) available at: http://theihe.org/knowledge-network/uploads/Shared%20Space... site at: http://www.access-board.gov/prowac/nprm.htm . Correction In the proposed rule FR Doc....

  9. Using geographical information systems for defining the accessibility to health care facilities in Jeddah City, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Murad, Abdulkader A

    2014-01-01

    Spatial data play an important role in the planning of health care facilities and their allocation. Today, geographical information systems (GIS) provide useful techniques for capturing, maintaining and analysing health care spatial data; indeed health geoinformatics is an emerging discipline that uses innovative geospatial technology to investigate health issues. The purpose of this paper is to define how GIS can be used for assessing the level of accessibility to health care. The paper identifies the advantages of using GIS in health care planning and covers GIS-based international accessibility with a focus on GIS applications for health care facilities in Jeddah city, Saudi Arabia. A geodatabase that includes location of health services, road networks, health care demand and population districts was created using ArcGIS software. The geodatabase produced is based on collected data and covers issues, such as defining the spatial distribution of health care facilities, evaluating health demand types and modelling health service areas based on analysis of driving-time and straight-line distances. PMID:25599637

  10. Facility site check report transportation safeguards divsision (TSD) underground storage tanks 2334-U and 2335-U at Building 9714

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This document presents an overview of the underground storage tank (UST)-related events that have taken place at the Transportation Safeguards Division (TSD) Facility (Facility ID 0-730168). The TSD facility is managed by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and is used to maintain and fuel specialty fleet vehicles. The facility is located approximately one mile east of the K-25 site at the intersection of Blair Road and the Oak Ridge Turnpike (Hwy 58). The location of the USTs at the TSD facility are illustrated.

  11. DWPF (Defense Waste Processing Facility) canister impact testing and analyses for the Transportation Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Mishima, J.

    1988-12-01

    A legal weight truck cask design has been developed for the US Department of Energy by GA Technologies, Inc. The cask will be used to transport defense high-level waste canisters produced by the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Plant. The development of the cask required the collection of impact data for the DWPF canisters. The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) performed this work under the guidance of the Transportation Technology Center (TTC) at Sandia National Laboratories. Two full-scale DWPF canisters filled with nonradioactive borosilicate glass were impacted under ''normal'' and ''hypothetical'' accident conditions. Two canisters, supplied by the DWPF, were tested. Each canister was vertically dropped on the bottom end from a height of either 0.3 m or 9.1 m (for normal or hypothetical accident conditions, respectively). The structural integrity of each canister was then examined using helium leak and dye penetrant testing. The canisters' diameters and heights, which had been previously measured, were then remeasured to determine how the canister dimensions had changed. Following structural integrity testing, the canisters were flaw leak tested. For transportation flaw leak testing, four holes were fabricated into the shell of canister A-27 (0.3 m drop height). The canister was then transported a total distance of 2069 miles. During transport, the waste form material that fell from each flaw was collected to determine the amount of size distribution of each flaw release. 2 refs., 8 figs., 12 tabs.

  12. Recovery, Transportation and Acceptance to the Curation Facility of the Hayabusa Re-Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, M.; Fujimura, A.; Yano, H.; Okamoto, C.; Okada, T.; Yada, T.; Ishibashi, Y.; Shirai, K.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Okazaki, R.; Zolensky, M.; Sandford, S.; Ireland, T.; Ueno, M.; Mukai, T.; Yoshikawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Kuninaka, H.; Kawaguchi, J.

    2011-01-01

    The "Hayabusa" re-entry capsule was safely carried into the clean room of Sagamihara Planetary Sample Curation Facility in JAXA on June 18, 2010. After executing computed tomographic (CT) scanning, removal of heat shield, and surface cleaning of sample container, the sample container was enclosed into the clean chamber. After opening the sample container and residual gas sampling in the clean chamber, optical observation, sample recovery, sample separation for initial analysis will be performed. This curation work is continuing for several manths with some selected member of Hayabusa Asteroidal Sample Preliminary Examination Team (HASPET). We report here on the 'Hayabusa' capsule recovery operation, and transportation and acceptance at the curation facility of the Hayabusa re-entry capsule.

  13. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; Fisher, J. H.; Seiler, S. W.; Hinshelwood, D.; Compton, S.; Holdener, F. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Newlander, C. D.; Gilliam, R. P.; Froula, N.; Lilly, M.; Davis, J. F.; Lerch, MAJ. A.; Blue, B. E.

    2016-11-01

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the National Ignition Facility's diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built-in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight. The measured accuracy of sample responses as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette is discussed.

  14. Operation of an academic open access mass spectrometry facility with particular reference to the analysis of synthetic compounds.

    PubMed

    Greaves, John

    2002-08-01

    Open access mass spectrometry now provides the opportunity to move this spectroscopic method to the beginning of the analytical chain, a place formerly the exclusive province of NMR and TLC. To date this transition has been occurring in industrial settings but there has been less change in the academic environment. This paper provides one blueprint for setting up such a facility, primarily in support of organic synthesis but also for the use of biological scientists. The open access format used at UCI utilizes four instruments: an ESI-TOFMS system used in the flow injection mode, two GC/MS systems (one in EI and one in CI) and a MALDI-TOFMS system. The first three instruments have autosamplers and open access software whereas the MALDI system has a fully automated plate handling interface. This level of automation allows access to the instruments by a user community of more than 100 users, day or night. The decisions made in setting up these instruments were based on a 'keep it simple' philosophy, given the fact that the primary type of data of interest is the molecular mass of the analyte and that data are required for a very wide range of structures.

  15. [Youth and health: discourse analysis on supply and access to public facilities].

    PubMed

    Souza, Cinoélia Leal; Souzas, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    From the standpoint of sociodemographic, teens today represent an important portion of the Brazilian population. In 2005 the Brazilian government published the National Youth Policy. Despite of this, many teens still find difficulties in accessing public services, especially the ones involving health. This study aimed to analyze young students' speeches about the conditions of access to public services and health through qualitative research. The students inquired live in rural and urban areas of the city of Vitória da Conquista - Bahia. The method used was the content analysis proposed by Bardin (1979) and Minayo (2006), and the technique of discussion groups for youth proposed by Weller (2006).

  16. Restricted feeding with scheduled sucrose access results in an upregulation of the rat dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Bello, Nicholas T; Sweigart, Kristi L; Lakoski, Joan M; Norgren, Ralph; Hajnal, Andras

    2003-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that the mesoaccumbens dopamine system undergoes neurochemical alterations as a result of restricted feeding conditions with access to sugars. This effect appears to be similar to the neuroadaptation resulting from drugs of abuse and may underlay some pathological feeding behaviors. To further investigate the cellular mechanisms of these alterations, the present study used quantitative autoradiography and in situ hybridization to assess dopamine membrane transporter (DAT) protein density and mRNA expression in restricted-fed and free-fed adult male rats. The restricted feeding regimen consisted of daily limited access to either a normally preferred sucrose solution (0.3 M) or a less preferred chow in a scheduled (i.e., contingent) fashion for 7 days. Restricted-fed rats with the contingent sucrose access lost less body weight, ate more total food, and drank more fluid than free-fed, contingent food, or noncontingent controls. In addition, these animals had selectively higher DAT binding in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area. This increase in protein binding also was accompanied by an increase in DAT mRNA levels in the ventral tegmental area. In contrast to the restricted-fed groups, no differential effect in DAT regulation was observed across free-fed groups. The observed alteration in behavior and DAT regulation suggest that neuroadaptation in the mesoaccumbens dopamine system develops in response to repeated feeding on palatable foods under dietary constraints. This supports the notion that similar cellular changes may be involved in restrictive eating disorders and bingeing.

  17. Household trends in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities in Vietnam and associated factors: findings from the Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, 2000–2011

    PubMed Central

    Tuyet-Hanh, Tran Thi; Lee, Jong-Koo; Oh, Juhwan; Van Minh, Hoang; Ou Lee, Chul; Hoan, Le Thi; Nam, You-Seon; Long, Tran Khanh

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite progress made by the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) number 7.C, Vietnam still faces challenges with regard to the provision of access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation. Objective This paper describes household trends in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities separately, and analyses factors associated with access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities in combination. Design Secondary data from the Vietnam Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey in 2000, 2006, and 2011 were analyzed. Descriptive statistics and tests of significance describe trends over time in access to water and sanitation by location, demographic and socio-economic factors. Binary logistic regressions (2000, 2006, and 2011) describe associations between access to water and sanitation, and geographic, demographic, and socio-economic factors. Results There have been some outstanding developments in access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities from 2000 to 2011. In 2011, the proportion of households with access to improved water sources and sanitation facilities reached 90% and 77%, respectively, meeting the 2015 MDG targets for safe drinking water and basic sanitation set at 88% and 75%, respectively. However, despite these achievements, in 2011, only 74% of households overall had access to combined improved drinking water and sanitation facilities. There were also stark differences between regions. In 2011, only 47% of households had access to both improved water and sanitation facilities in the Mekong River Delta compared with 94% in the Red River Delta. In 2011, households in urban compared to rural areas were more than twice as likely (odds ratio [OR]: 2.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9–2.5) to have access to improved water and sanitation facilities in combination, and households in the highest compared with the lowest wealth quintile were over 40 times more likely (OR: 42.3; 95% CI: 29.8–60.0). Conclusions More

  18. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A. S.; Cooper, A. B.R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Graham, P.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Comley, A. J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Back, C. A.; Hund, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Foster, J.; Young, B.; Young, P.

    2014-06-01

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in bench-marking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic di usive Marshak wave which propagates into a high atomic number Ta2O5 aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range

  19. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A. S. Graham, P.; Comley, A. J.; Foster, J.; Cooper, A. B. R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Young, B.; and others

    2014-06-15

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in benchmarking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic diffusive Marshak wave, which propagates into a high atomic number Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range of x-ray measurements that absolutely quantify the energetics and radiation partition inside the target.

  20. AMERICAN STANDARD SPECIFICATIONS FOR MAKING BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES ACCESSIBLE TO, AND USABLE BY, THE PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Easter Seal Society for Crippled Children and Adults, Chicago, IL.

    THIS STANDARD IS INTENDED TO PROVIDE MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS TO BE USED IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF ALL BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES AND FOR ADOPTION AND ENFORCEMENT BY ADMINISTRATIVE AUTHORITIES IN ORDER TO ALLOW INDIVIDUALS WITH PERMANENT PHYSICAL DISABILITIES TO PURSUE THEIR INTERESTS AND ASPIRATIONS, DEVELOP THEIR TALENTS, AND EXERCISE THEIR SKILLS.…

  1. Accessibility and Use of Recreational Sports Facilities at Florida's Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Michele, Douglas

    In an effort to determine the percent of use of sports facilities on Florida community college campuses, a survey was sent to community college presidents and campus recreation directors throughout the Florida Community College System (FCCS). The survey, distributed to all 25 branch campuses and 28 primary campuses in the system, was designed to…

  2. Race Differences in Mental Health Service Access in a Secure Male Juvenile Justice Facility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Richard F.; Evans, Lisa J.; Cruise, Keith R.; Feinstein, Ronald A.; Kendrick, Rhonda F.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether African American and Caucasian male youths had similar rates of referral to mental health services in a juvenile justice secure facility when controlling for differences obtained in the initial screening and assessment process. Data from the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument-2 (MAYSI-2), Initial Health Care…

  3. U.S. EPA High-Field NMR Facility with Remote Accessibility

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s High-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Research Facility housed in Athens, GA has two Varian 600 MHz NMR spectrometers used for conducting sophisticated experiments in environmental science. Off-site users can ship their samples and perform their NMR experiments remotely fr...

  4. 45 CFR 1386.22 - Access to records, facilities and individuals with developmental disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for Protection and Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.22... protection and advocacy (P&A) system shall have access to the records of any of the following individuals... property of the Protection and Advocacy System which must protect it from loss, damage, tampering, or...

  5. 45 CFR 1386.22 - Access to records, facilities and individuals with developmental disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... mental or physical condition is unable to authorize the system to have access; (ii) The individual does... persons who were interviewed, physical and documentary evidence that was reviewed, and the related...) Information in reports prepared by individuals and entities performing certification or licensure reviews,...

  6. 76 FR 44663 - Accessibility Guidelines for Pedestrian Facilities in the Public Right-of-Way

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (DOJ 2010 Standards). See 75 FR 56164 (September 15... Guidelines'').\\11\\ 69 FR 44083 (July 23, 2004). The 2004 ADA and ABA Accessibility Guidelines revised and... Board in 1991 (hereinafter referred to as ``1991 ADAAG''). 56 FR 35408 (July 26, 1991). The...

  7. 78 FR 67303 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... document that appeared in the Federal Register of September 26, 2013 (78 FR 59476). The document issued a... (TTY). Email address: board.gov ">raggio@access- board.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In FR Doc. 2013-22876 appearing on page 59476 in the Federal Register of Thursday, September 26, 2013 (78 FR 59476),...

  8. TATRA: a versatile high-vacuum tape transportation system for decay studies at radioactive-ion beam facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoušek, V.; Sedlák, M.; Venhart, M.; Janičkovič, D.; Kliman, J.; Petrík, K.; Švec, P.; Švec, , P.; Veselský, M.

    2016-03-01

    A compact and versatile tape transport system for the collection and counting of radioactive samples from radioactive ion beam facilities has been developed. It uses an amorphous metallic tape for transportation of the activity. Because of this material, the system can hold very good vacuum, typically below 10-7 mbar.

  9. Travel time simulation for radionuclide transport at the Korean underground research facility, KURT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, N.; Hwang, Y.; Jeong, J.; Kim, K.

    2013-12-01

    For the research on the deep geological disposal of radioactive waste, it is necessary to understand the underground environment, including the geology and hydrogeology. In Korea, KURT (KAERI Underground Research Tunnel) was constructed in 2006 at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). Geological and hydrogeological field data have been obtained from the facility, and the groundwater flow system was simulated. Based on the data observed and analyzed on a groundwater flow system, the transport of potential radionuclides, which were assumed to be released at the supposed position, was then calculated in order to prepare the fundamental data for a safety assessment of a hypothetical underground repository. Several pathways with highly water-conductive features were selected to evaluate the elapsed times of radionuclide transport. The transport times were calculated using a TDRW (Time-Domain Random Walk) method. The matrix diffusion and sorption mechanisms in the host rock, as well as the advection-dispersion processes, were considered under the KURT field conditions. To reflect the radioactive decay, some decay chains were selected. The simulation results indicate that the main factors for the shapes of the mass discharge of the radionuclides were the half-life and distribution coefficient. This shows that the long-lived radionuclides must be treated accurately at the steps of determining radioactive waste source term as well as considering the transport process, and intensified research is required for the sorption between radionuclides and host rocks for making the safety assessment process more reliable and less uncertain.

  10. Public Transport for Everyone: A Summary of the Results of Research and Development Projects Concerning Disabled People and Transport Facilities Supported by the Swedish Transport Research Board. TFB-Report 1989:1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borjesson, Mats

    This report summarizes the results of research and development concerning disabled individuals in Sweden and their use of transport facilities. The first section, "People with Impaired Mobility and Their Travel Needs," outlines Sweden's transport policy goal to adapt transport to the needs of disabled people, addresses the difficulty in…

  11. Exploring Factors Affecting Emergency Medical Services Staffs' Decision about Transporting Medical Patients to Medical Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Seyedin, Hesam; Jamshidi-Orak, Roohangiz

    2014-01-01

    Transfer of patients in medical emergency situations is one of the most important missions of emergency medical service (EMS) staffs. So this study was performed to explore affecting factors in EMS staffs' decision during transporting of patients in medical situations to medical facilities. The participants in this qualitative study consisted of 18 EMS staffs working in prehospital care facilities in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews. The data were analyzed using a content analysis approach. The data analysis revealed the following theme: “degree of perceived risk in EMS staffs and their patients.” This theme consisted of two main categories: (1) patient's condition' and (2) the context of the EMS mission'. The patent's condition category emerged from “physical health statuses,” “socioeconomic statuses,” and “cultural background” subcategories. The context of the EMS mission also emerged from two subcategories of “characteristics of the mission” and EMS staffs characteristics'. EMS system managers can consider adequate technical, informational, financial, educational, and emotional supports to facilitate the decision making of their staffs. Also, development of an effective and user-friendly checklist and scoring system was recommended for quick and easy recognition of patients' needs for transportation in a prehospital situation. PMID:24891953

  12. Techniques for Updating Pedestrian Network Data Including Facilities and Obstructions Information for Transportation of Vulnerable People

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seula; Bang, Yoonsik; Yu, Kiyun

    2015-01-01

    Demand for a Pedestrian Navigation Service (PNS) is on the rise. To provide a PNS for the transportation of vulnerable people, more detailed information of pedestrian facilities and obstructions should be included in Pedestrian Network Data (PND) used for PNS. Such data can be constructed efficiently by collecting GPS trajectories and integrating them with the existing PND. However, these two kinds of data have geometric differences and topological inconsistencies that need to be addressed. In this paper, we provide a methodology for integrating pedestrian facilities and obstructions information with an existing PND. At first we extracted the significant points from user-collected GPS trajectory by identifying the geometric difference index and attributes of each point. Then the extracted points were used to make an initial solution of the matching between the trajectory and the PND. Two geometrical algorithms were proposed and applied to reduce two kinds of errors in the matching: on dual lines and on intersections. Using the final solution for the matching, we reconstructed the node/link structure of PND including the facilities and obstructions information. Finally, performance was assessed with a test site and 79.2% of the collected data were correctly integrated with the PND. PMID:26404307

  13. Techniques for Updating Pedestrian Network Data Including Facilities and Obstructions Information for Transportation of Vulnerable People.

    PubMed

    Park, Seula; Bang, Yoonsik; Yu, Kiyun

    2015-09-23

    Demand for a Pedestrian Navigation Service (PNS) is on the rise. To provide a PNS for the transportation of vulnerable people, more detailed information of pedestrian facilities and obstructions should be included in Pedestrian Network Data (PND) used for PNS. Such data can be constructed efficiently by collecting GPS trajectories and integrating them with the existing PND. However, these two kinds of data have geometric differences and topological inconsistencies that need to be addressed. In this paper, we provide a methodology for integrating pedestrian facilities and obstructions information with an existing PND. At first we extracted the significant points from user-collected GPS trajectory by identifying the geometric difference index and attributes of each point. Then the extracted points were used to make an initial solution of the matching between the trajectory and the PND. Two geometrical algorithms were proposed and applied to reduce two kinds of errors in the matching: on dual lines and on intersections. Using the final solution for the matching, we reconstructed the node/link structure of PND including the facilities and obstructions information. Finally, performance was assessed with a test site and 79.2% of the collected data were correctly integrated with the PND.

  14. Evaluation of Subsurface Radionuclide Transport at Commercial Nuclear Power Production Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, T. C.; Bollinger, J. S.

    2006-05-01

    An American Nuclear Society (ANS) working group was recently established to revise ANSI/ANS-2.17, a standard for evaluating radionuclide transport in ground water at commercial nuclear power production (NPP) facilities. The working group consists of technical experts from the nuclear industry, Federal and State regulatory agencies, universities, DOE National Laboratories, and hydrogeologic consulting firms. ANS 2.17 was originally adopted in 1980, reaffirmed in 1990, but subsequently withdrawn in 2000 due to a lapse in the decadal concurrence process. The working group charge is to re-visit the lapsed standard, review the state-of-the-science and -practice, and develop a performance-based standard that provides guidelines for demonstrating the ability to detect, characterize, diagnose, quantify, and effectively mitigate accidental and routine subsurface releases of radionuclides from NPP facilities. The resulting consensus standard focuses on subsurface site characterization, monitoring, and modeling issues at NPP sites that will guide the siting and evaluation of radionuclide transport at both existing and proposed new NPP facilities. This presentation provides the technical background for developing the standard along with a description of its current status. Performance Assessment is the proposed framework for designing characterization, monitoring, and modeling programs that quantitatively evaluate release scenarios. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are proposed for the archival and retrieval of spatially-explicit data, and will include real-time designators. New monitoring technologies are identified that may aid in the detection and characterization of releases. Remediation activities in response to detected releases should reflect, in part, the expected risk as defined using response thresholds. The presenters are actively soliciting technical documents and field application experiences which may contribute to the standard's technical bases and

  15. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 37 - Modifications to Standards for Accessible Transportation Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... codified in the Code of Federal Regulations in Appendices B and D of 36 CFR part 1191. Note the ADAAG may..., but is adopting them by cross-reference as permitted under 1 CFR 21.21(c)(4). In a few instances, the Department has modified the language of the ADAAG as it applies to entities subject to 49 CFR part 37....

  16. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 37 - Modifications to Standards for Accessible Transportation Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....3Platform and Vehicle Floor Coordination—Modification to 810.5.3 of Appendix D to 36 CFR Part 1191 Station... deployed devices, meeting the requirements of 49 CFR part 38, shall suffice. EXCEPTION: Where vehicles are... codified in the Code of Federal Regulations in Appendices B and D of 36 CFR part 1191. Note the ADAAG...

  17. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 37 - Modifications to Standards for Accessible Transportation Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CFR Part 1191 A curb ramp shall have a detectable warning complying with 705. The detectable warning... the ramp surface. 810.2.2Dimensions—Modification to 810.2.2 of Appendix D to 36 CFR Part 1191 Bus... codified in the Code of Federal Regulations in Appendices B and D of 36 CFR part 1191. Note the ADAAG...

  18. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 37 - Modifications to Standards for Accessible Transportation Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR Part 1191 A curb ramp shall have a detectable warning complying with 705. The detectable warning... the ramp surface. 810.2.2Dimensions—Modification to 810.2.2 of Appendix D to 36 CFR Part 1191 Bus... codified in the Code of Federal Regulations in Appendices B and D of 36 CFR part 1191. Note the ADAAG...

  19. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 37 - Modifications to Standards for Accessible Transportation Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CFR Part 1191 A curb ramp shall have a detectable warning complying with 705. The detectable warning... the ramp surface. 810.2.2Dimensions—Modification to 810.2.2 of Appendix D to 36 CFR Part 1191 Bus... codified in the Code of Federal Regulations in Appendices B and D of 36 CFR part 1191. Note the ADAAG...

  20. Facile access to new C-glycosides and C-glycoside scaffolds incorporating functionalised aromatic moieties.

    PubMed

    Redpath, Philip; Ness, Kerry A; Rousseau, Joanne; Macdonald, Simon J F; Migaud, Marie E

    2015-01-30

    The tandem ene/intramolecular Sakurai cyclisation (IMSC) reaction has been successfully applied to the synthesis of a range of C-glycosides, with key intermediates offering opportunities for functionalisation of the glycon moiety. To demonstrate the versatility of the approach to access the 2-deoxy-C-glycoside series, we synthesised diastereomerically pure C-glucoside and galactoside derivatives incorporating functionalised aromatic, heteroaromatic and bicyclic aromatic moieties, in addition to the C-homologue of (±)-β-2-deoxy-glucose 6-phosphate. PMID:25486220

  1. Engine Installation Effects of Four Civil Transport Airplanes: Wallops Flight Facility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gregg G.; Senzig, David A.; McCurdy, David A.; Roof, Christopher J.; Rapoza, Amanda S.

    2003-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Langley Research Center (LaRC), the Environmental Measurement and Modeling Division of the United States Department of Transportation s John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe), and several other organizations (see Appendix A for a complete list of participating organizations and individuals) conducted a noise measurement study at NASA s Wallops Flight Facility (Wallops) near Chincoteague, Virginia during September 2000. This test was intended to determine engine installation effects on four civil transport airplanes: a Boeing 767-400, a McDonnell-Douglas DC9, a Dassault Falcon 2000, and a Beechcraft King Air. Wallops was chosen for this study because of the relatively low ambient noise of the site and the degree of control over airplane operating procedures enabled by operating over a runway closed to other uses during the test period. Measurements were conducted using a twenty microphone U-shaped array oriented perpendicular to the flight path; microphones were mounted such that ground effects were minimized and low elevation angles were observed.

  2. Standard procedures of endovascular treatment for vascular access stenosis in our facility - clinical usefulness of ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takashi; Tsuboi, Masato; Onogi, Takeshi; Miwa, Naofumi; Sakurai, Hiroshi; Ookubo, Kentarou; Matsubara, Chieko; Kasuga, Hirotake

    2015-11-01

    In Japan, the number of patients receiving dialysis is 314,180 at the end of 2013 and 97% are treated with hemodialysis. And the mean age of patients and the percentage of diabetes have been increasing. For this reason, preparations of a new vascular access (VA) and its long-term maintenance have become difficult. In the guidelines by the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy (JSDT), endovascular treatment (ET) is positioned as the first line for VA stenosis. The procedure of ET itself is very simple. The revision of Japanese health insurance set an expensive technical fee for ET in 2012. It also added a restriction by which the claims for both technical and material fees would be denied, if the treatment was performed within 3 months after a previous treatment. This makes determination of best treatment timing more important. The functional evaluation using ultrasonography (US) is a useful monitoring index for determination of the ET timing for patients with stenosis. We investigated the cumulative relative frequency of flow volume (FV) and resistant index (RI) of brachial artery in arteriovenous graft (AVG) and arteriovenous fistula (AVF) cases with access failures. As a result, the cut-off values of FV and RI in AVG were 480 mL/min and 0.57, and in AVF were 354 mL/min and 0.61, respectively. Therefore we determine the treatment timing based on these results. Since 2012, active monitoring using US could have decreased the number of treatment patients by 100 per year. This meant that objective evaluation by US enabled treatments at a more suitable time to promote the proper use of medical expenses for EV treatment.

  3. A Distributed Simulation Facility to Support Human Factors Research in Advanced Air Transportation Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amonlirdviman, Keith; Farley, Todd C.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Ladik, John F.; Sherer, Dana Z.

    1998-01-01

    A distributed real-time simulation of the civil air traffic environment developed to support human factors research in advanced air transportation technology is presented. The distributed environment is based on a custom simulation architecture designed for simplicity and flexibility in human experiments. Standard Internet protocols are used to create the distributed environment, linking all advanced cockpit simulator, all Air Traffic Control simulator, and a pseudo-aircraft control and simulation management station. The pseudo-aircraft control station also functions as a scenario design tool for coordinating human factors experiments. This station incorporates a pseudo-pilot interface designed to reduce workload for human operators piloting multiple aircraft simultaneously in real time. The application of this distributed simulation facility to support a study of the effect of shared information (via air-ground datalink) on pilot/controller shared situation awareness and re-route negotiation is also presented.

  4. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, Jr., C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; Fisher, J. H.; Seiler, S. W.; Hinshelwood, D.; Compton, S.; Holdener, F. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Newlander, C. D.; et al

    2016-08-10

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the NIF’s diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight.more » We discuss the measured accuracy of sample responses, as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette.« less

  5. Experimental Investigation of the DLR-F6 Transport Configuration in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Gregory M.; Rivers, Melissa B.; Goodliff, Scott L.; Rudnik, Ralf; Sitzmann, Martin

    2008-01-01

    An experimental aerodynamic investigation of the DLR (German Aerospace Center) F6 generic transport configuration has been conducted in the NASA NTF (National Transonic Facility) for CFD validation within the framework of the AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop. Force and moment, surface pressure, model deformation, and surface flow visualization data have been obtained at Reynolds numbers of both 3 million and 5 million. Flow-through nacelles and a side-of-body fairing were also investigated on this wing-body configuration. Reynolds number effects on trailing edge separation have been assessed, and the effectiveness of the side-of-body fairing in eliminating a known region of separated flow has been determined. Data obtained at a Reynolds number of 3 million are presented together for comparison with data from a previous wind tunnel investigation in the ONERA S2MA facility. New surface flow visualization capabilities have also been successfully explored and demonstrated in the NTF for the high pressure and moderately low temperature conditions required in this investigation. Images detailing wing surface flow characteristics are presented.

  6. Atmospheric transport modelling of time resolved 133Xe emissions from the isotope production facility ANSTO, Australia.

    PubMed

    Schöppner, M; Plastino, W; Hermanspahn, N; Hoffmann, E; Kalinowski, M; Orr, B; Tinker, R

    2013-12-01

    The verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) relies amongst other things on the continuous and worldwide monitoring of radioxenon. The characterization of the existing and legitimate background, which is produced mainly by nuclear power plants and isotope production facilities, is of high interest to improve the capabilities of the monitoring network. However, the emissions from legitimate sources can usually only be estimated. For this paper historic source terms of (133)Xe emissions from the isotope production facility at ANSTO, Sydney, Australia, have been made available in a daily resolution. Based on these high resolution data, different source term sets with weekly, monthly and yearly time resolution have been compiled. These different sets are then applied together with atmospheric transport modelling (ATM) to predict the concentration time series at two radioxenon monitoring stations. The results are compared with each other in order to examine the improvement of the prediction capability depending on the used time resolution of the most dominant source term in the region.

  7. NUMERICAL FLOW AND TRANSPORT SIMULATIONS SUPPORTING THE SALTSTONE FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.

    2009-02-28

    The Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment (PA) is being revised to incorporate requirements of Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA), and updated data and understanding of vault performance since the 1992 PA (Cook and Fowler 1992) and related Special Analyses. A hybrid approach was chosen for modeling contaminant transport from vaults and future disposal cells to exposure points. A higher resolution, largely deterministic, analysis is performed on a best-estimate Base Case scenario using the PORFLOW numerical analysis code. a few additional sensitivity cases are simulated to examine alternative scenarios and parameter settings. Stochastic analysis is performed on a simpler representation of the SDF system using the GoldSim code to estimate uncertainty and sensitivity about the Base Case. This report describes development of PORFLOW models supporting the SDF PA, and presents sample results to illustrate model behaviors and define impacts relative to key facility performance objectives. The SDF PA document, when issued, should be consulted for a comprehensive presentation of results.

  8. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Undergraduate Education and Research Programs, Facilities, and Information Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The titles in this section include: 1) GRIDVIEW: Recent Improvements in Research and Education Software for Exploring Mars Topography; 2) Software and Hardware Upgrades for the University of North Dakota Asteroid and Comet Internet Telescope (ACIT); 3) Web-based Program for Calculating Effects of an Earth Impact; 4) On-Line Education, Web- and Virtual-Classes in an Urban University: A Preliminary Overview; 5) Modelling Planetary Material's Structures: From Quasicrystalline Microstructure to Crystallographic Materials by Use of Mathematica; 6) How We Used NASA Lunar Set in Planetary and Material Science Studies: Textural and Cooling Sequences in Sections of Lava Column from a Thin and a Thick Lava-Flow, from the Moon and Mars with Terrestrial Analogue and Chondrule Textural Comparisons; 7) Classroom Teaching of Space Technology and Simulations by the Husar Rover Model; 8) New Experiments (In Meteorology, Aerosols, Soil Moisture and Ice) on the New Hunveyor Educational Planetary Landers of Universities and Colleges in Hungary; 9) Teaching Planetary GIS by Constructing Its Model for the Test Terrain of the Hunveyor and Husar; 10) Undergraduate Students: An Untapped Resource for Planetary Researchers; 11) Analog Sites in Field Work of Petrology: Rock Assembly Delivered to a Plain by Floods on Earth and Mars; 12) RELAB (Reflectance Experiment Laboratory): A NASA Multiuser Spectroscopy Facility; 13) Full Text Searching and Customization in the NASA ADS Abstract Service.

  9. Reproductive health and access to healthcare facilities: risk factors for depression and anxiety in women with an earthquake experience

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The reproductive and mental health of women contributes significantly to their overall well-being. Three of the eight Millennium Development Goals are directly related to reproductive and sexual health while mental disorders make up three of the ten leading causes of disease burden in low and middle-income countries. Among mental disorders, depression and anxiety are two of the most prevalent. In the context of slower progress in achieving Millennium Development Goals in developing countries and the ever-increasing man-made and natural disasters in these areas, it is important to understand the association between reproductive health and mental health among women with post-disaster experiences. Methods This was a cross-sectional study with a sample of 387 women of reproductive age (15-49 years) randomly selected from the October 2005 earthquake affected areas of Pakistan. Data on reproductive health was collected using the Centers for Disease Control reproductive health assessment toolkit. Depression and anxiety were measured using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25, while earthquake experiences were captured using the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire. The association of either depression or anxiety with socio-demographic variables, earthquake experiences, reproductive health and access to health facilities was estimated using multivariate logistic regression. Results Post-earthquake reproductive health events together with economic deprivation, lower family support and poorer access to health care facilities explained a significant proportion of differences in the experiencing of clinical levels of depression and anxiety. For instance, women losing resources for subsistence, separation from family and experiencing reproductive health events such as having a stillbirth, having had an abortion, having had abnormal vaginal discharge or having had genital ulcers, were at significant risk of depression and anxiety. Conclusion The relationship between women's post

  10. Access and utilisation of healthcare services in rural Tanzania: A comparison of public and non-public facilities using quality, equity, and trust dimensions.

    PubMed

    Shayo, Elizabeth H; Senkoro, Kesheni P; Momburi, Romanus; Olsen, Øystein E; Byskov, Jens; Makundi, Emmanuel A; Kamuzora, Peter; Mboera, Leonard E G

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the access and utilisation of health services in public and non-public health facilities in terms of quality, equity and trust in the Mbarali district, Tanzania. Interviews, focus group discussions, and informal discussions were used to generate data. Of the 1836 respondents, 1157 and 679 respondents sought healthcare services on their last visit at public or non-public health facilities, respectively. While 45.5% rated the quality of services to be good in both types of facilities, reported medicine shortages were more pronounced among those who visited public rather than non-public health facilities (OR = 1.7, 95% CI 1.4, 2.1). Respondents who visited public facilities were 4.9 times less likely than those who visited non-public facilities to emphasise the influence of cost in accessing and utilising health care (OR = 4.9, CI 3.9-6.1). A significant difference was also found in the provider-client relationship satisfaction level between non-public (89.1%) and public facilities (74.7%) (OR = 2.8, CI: 1.5-5.0), indicating a level of lower trust in the later. Revised strategies are needed to ensure availability of medicines in public facilities, which are used by the majority of the population, while strengthening private-public partnerships to harmonise healthcare costs.

  11. Optical design of the National Ignition Facility main laser and switchyard/target area beam transport system

    SciTech Connect

    English, R E; Korniski, R J; Miller, J L; Rodgers, J M

    1998-06-26

    The optical design of the main laser and transport mirror sections of the National Ignition Facility are described. For the main laser the configuration, layout constraints, multiple beam arrangement, pinhole layout and beam paths, clear aperture budget, ray trace models, alignment constraints, lens designs, wavefront performance, and pupil aberrations are discussed. For the transport mirror system the layout, alignment controls and clear aperture budget are describe

  12. Biological restoration of major transportation facilities domestic demonstration and application project (DDAP): technology development at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, James L., Jr.; Melton, Brad; Finley, Patrick; Brockman, John; Peyton, Chad E.; Tucker, Mark David; Einfeld, Wayne; Griffith, Richard O.; Brown, Gary Stephen; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Knowlton, Robert G.; Ho, Pauline

    2006-06-01

    The Bio-Restoration of Major Transportation Facilities Domestic Demonstration and Application Program (DDAP) is a designed to accelerate the restoration of transportation nodes following an attack with a biological warfare agent. This report documents the technology development work done at SNL for this DDAP, which include development of the BROOM tool, an investigation of surface sample collection efficiency, and a flow cytometry study of chlorine dioxide effects on Bacillus anthracis spore viability.

  13. 9 CFR 88.5 - Requirements at a slaughtering facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... COMMERCIAL TRANSPORTATION OF EQUINES FOR SLAUGHTER § 88.5 Requirements at a slaughtering facility. (a) Upon arrival at a slaughtering facility, the owner/shipper must: (1) Ensure that each equine has access to... representative; (3) Allow a USDA representative access to the equines for the purpose of examination; and...

  14. 9 CFR 88.5 - Requirements at a slaughtering facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... COMMERCIAL TRANSPORTATION OF EQUINES FOR SLAUGHTER § 88.5 Requirements at a slaughtering facility. (a) Upon arrival at a slaughtering facility, the owner/shipper must: (1) Ensure that each equine has access to... representative; (3) Allow a USDA representative access to the equines for the purpose of examination; and...

  15. A longitudinal aerodynamic data repeatability study for a commercial transport model test in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahls, R. A.; Adcock, J. B.; Witkowski, D. P.; Wright, F. L.

    1995-01-01

    A high Reynolds number investigation of a commercial transport model was conducted in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at Langley Research Center. This investigation was part of a cooperative effort to test a 0.03-scale model of a Boeing 767 airplane in the NTF over a Mach number range of 0.70 to 0.86 and a Reynolds number range of 2.38 to 40.0 x 10(exp 6) based on the mean aerodynamic chord. One of several specific objectives of the current investigation was to evaluate the level of data repeatability attainable in the NTF. Data repeatability studies were performed at a Mach number of 0.80 with Reynolds numbers of 2.38, 4.45, and 40.0 x 10(exp 6) and also at a Mach number of 0.70 with a Reynolds number of 40.0 x 10(exp 6). Many test procedures and data corrections are addressed in this report, but the data presented do not include corrections for wall interference, model support interference, or model aeroelastic effects. Application of corrections for these three effects would not affect the results of this study because the corrections are systematic in nature and are more appropriately classified as sources of bias error. The repeatability of the longitudinal stability-axis force and moment data has been accessed. Coefficients of lift, drag, and pitching moment are shown to repeat well within the pretest goals of plus or minus 0.005, plus or minus 0.0001, and plus or minus 0.001, respectively, at a 95-percent confidence level over both short- and near-term periods.

  16. 25 CFR 170.808 - Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve IRR transportation facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve... THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.808 Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve IRR transportation facilities? No. BIA...

  17. 25 CFR 170.443 - How can a tribe list a proposed transportation facility in the IRR Inventory?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How can a tribe list a proposed transportation facility in the IRR Inventory? 170.443 Section 170.443 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Planning, Design, and Construction of...

  18. 25 CFR 170.805 - What are the local, tribal, and BIA roles in transportation facility maintenance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What are the local, tribal, and BIA roles in... INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.805 What are the local, tribal, and BIA roles in transportation facility maintenance? (a) State, county, and local...

  19. 25 CFR 170.805 - What are the local, tribal, and BIA roles in transportation facility maintenance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the local, tribal, and BIA roles in... INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.805 What are the local, tribal, and BIA roles in transportation facility maintenance? (a) State, county, and local...

  20. 25 CFR 170.805 - What are the local, tribal, and BIA roles in transportation facility maintenance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What are the local, tribal, and BIA roles in... INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.805 What are the local, tribal, and BIA roles in transportation facility maintenance? (a) State, county, and local...

  1. 25 CFR 170.805 - What are the local, tribal, and BIA roles in transportation facility maintenance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are the local, tribal, and BIA roles in... INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.805 What are the local, tribal, and BIA roles in transportation facility maintenance? (a) State, county, and local...

  2. 25 CFR 170.805 - What are the local, tribal, and BIA roles in transportation facility maintenance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What are the local, tribal, and BIA roles in... INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.805 What are the local, tribal, and BIA roles in transportation facility maintenance? (a) State, county, and local...

  3. REPORT ON THE HOMELAND SECURITY WORKSHOP ON TRANSPORT AND DISPOSAL OF WASTES FROM FACILITIES CONTAMINATED WITH CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes discussions from the "Homeland Security Workshop on Transport and Disposal of Wastes From Facilities Contaminated With Chemical or Biological Agents." The workshop was held on May 28-30, 2003, in Cincinnati, Ohio, and its objectives were to:

    .Documen...

  4. Educational Facilities Study Manual and Design; Flint-Genesee County Comprehensive Land Use-Transportation Planning Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genesee County Metropolitan Planning Commission, Flint, MI.

    The Educational Facilities Study Item of the Flint-Genesee County (Michigan) Comprehensive Land Use-Transportation Planning Study is implementing a program to identify present and future educational problems and needs in Genesee County. This report is a technical document to guide the execution of the research and analysis of the study. The study…

  5. 25 CFR 170.808 - Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve IRR transportation facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve... THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.808 Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve IRR transportation facilities? No. BIA...

  6. 25 CFR 170.808 - Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve IRR transportation facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve... THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.808 Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve IRR transportation facilities? No. BIA...

  7. 25 CFR 170.808 - Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve IRR transportation facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve... THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.808 Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve IRR transportation facilities? No. BIA...

  8. 25 CFR 170.808 - Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve IRR transportation facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve... THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM BIA Road Maintenance § 170.808 Can BIA Road Maintenance Program funds be used to improve IRR transportation facilities? No. BIA...

  9. Estimates of radioxenon released from Southern Hemisphere medical isotope production facilities using measured air concentrations and atmospheric transport modeling.

    PubMed

    Eslinger, Paul W; Friese, Judah I; Lowrey, Justin D; McIntyre, Justin I; Miley, Harry S; Schrom, Brian T

    2014-09-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive-Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty monitors the atmosphere for radioactive xenon leaking from underground nuclear explosions. Emissions from medical isotope production represent a challenging background signal when determining whether measured radioxenon in the atmosphere is associated with a nuclear explosion prohibited by the treaty. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates a reactor and medical isotope production facility in Lucas Heights, Australia. This study uses two years of release data from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility and (133)Xe data from three IMS sampling locations to estimate the annual releases of (133)Xe from medical isotope production facilities in Argentina, South Africa, and Indonesia. Atmospheric dilution factors derived from a global atmospheric transport model were used in an optimization scheme to estimate annual release values by facility. The annual releases of about 6.8 × 10(14) Bq from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility are in good agreement with the sampled concentrations at these three IMS sampling locations. Annual release estimates for the facility in South Africa vary from 2.2 × 10(16) to 2.4 × 10(16) Bq, estimates for the facility in Indonesia vary from 9.2 × 10(13) to 3.7 × 10(14) Bq and estimates for the facility in Argentina range from 4.5 × 10(12) to 9.5 × 10(12) Bq. PMID:24811887

  10. Estimates of Radioxenon Released from Southern Hemisphere Medical isotope Production Facilities Using Measured Air Concentrations and Atmospheric Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Friese, Judah I.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2014-09-01

    Abstract The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive-Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty monitors the atmosphere for radioactive xenon leaking from underground nuclear explosions. Emissions from medical isotope production represent a challenging background signal when determining whether measured radioxenon in the atmosphere is associated with a nuclear explosion prohibited by the treaty. The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates a reactor and medical isotope production facility in Lucas Heights, Australia. This study uses two years of release data from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility and Xe-133 data from three IMS sampling locations to estimate the annual releases of Xe-133 from medical isotope production facilities in Argentina, South Africa, and Indonesia. Atmospheric dilution factors derived from a global atmospheric transport model were used in an optimization scheme to estimate annual release values by facility. The annual releases of about 6.8×1014 Bq from the ANSTO medical isotope production facility are in good agreement with the sampled concentrations at these three IMS sampling locations. Annual release estimates for the facility in South Africa vary from 1.2×1016 to 2.5×1016 Bq and estimates for the facility in Indonesia vary from 6.1×1013 to 3.6×1014 Bq. Although some releases from the facility in Argentina may reach these IMS sampling locations, the solution to the objective function is insensitive to the magnitude of those releases.

  11. Accessible triple-phase boundary length: A performance metric to account for transport pathways in heterogeneous electrochemical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajo, A.; Cocco, A. P.; DeGostin, M. B.; Peracchio, A. A.; Cassenti, B. N.; Cantoni, M.; Van herle, J.; Chiu, W. K. S.

    2016-09-01

    The performance of materials for electrochemical energy conversion and storage depends upon the number of electrocatalytic sites available for reaction and their accessibility by the transport of reactants and products. For solid oxide fuel/electrolysis cell materials, standard 3-D measurements such as connected triple-phase boundary (TPB) length and effective transport properties partially inform on how local geometry and network topology causes variability in TPB accessibility. A new measurement, the accessible TPB, is proposed to quantify these effects in detail and characterize material performance. The approach probes the reticulated pathways to each TPB using an analytical electrochemical fin model applied to a 3-D discrete representation of the heterogeneous structure provided by skeleton-based partitioning. The method is tested on artificial and real structures imaged by 3-D x-ray and electron microscopy. The accessible TPB is not uniform and the pattern varies depending upon the structure. Connected TPBs can be even passivated. The sensitivity to manipulations of the local 3-D geometry and topology that standard measurements cannot capture is demonstrated. The clear presence of preferential pathways showcases a non-uniform utilization of the 3-D structure that potentially affects the performance and the resilience to alterations due to degradation phenomena. The concepts presented also apply to electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices such as other types of fuel cells, electrolyzers, batteries and capacitors.

  12. 47 CFR 69.123 - Density pricing zones for special access and switched transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Density pricing zones for special access and...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Computation of Charges § 69.123 Density pricing zones... price cap regulation may establish any number of density zones within a study area that is used...

  13. 47 CFR 69.123 - Density pricing zones for special access and switched transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Density pricing zones for special access and...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Computation of Charges § 69.123 Density pricing zones... price cap regulation may establish any number of density zones within a study area that is used...

  14. 47 CFR 69.123 - Density pricing zones for special access and switched transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Density pricing zones for special access and...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Computation of Charges § 69.123 Density pricing zones... price cap regulation may establish any number of density zones within a study area that is used...

  15. 47 CFR 69.123 - Density pricing zones for special access and switched transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Density pricing zones for special access and...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) ACCESS CHARGES Computation of Charges § 69.123 Density pricing zones... price cap regulation may establish any number of density zones within a study area that is used...

  16. Advancing Long Tail Data Capture and Access Through Trusted, Community-Driven Data Services at the IEDA Data Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, K. A.; Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V.; Hsu, L.; Arko, R. A.; Walker, J. D.; O'hara, S. H.

    2012-12-01

    Substantial volumes of data in the Earth Sciences are collected in small- to medium-size projects by individual investigators or small research teams, known as the 'Long Tail' of science. Traditionally, these data have largely stayed 'in the dark', i.e. they have not been properly archived, and have therefore been inaccessible and underutilized. The primary reason has been the lack of appropriate infrastructure, from adequate repositories to resources and support for investigators to properly manage their data, to community standards and best practices. Lack of credit for data management and for the data themselves has contributed to the reluctance of investigators to share their data. IEDA (Integrated Earth Data Applications), a NSF-funded data facility for solid earth geoscience data, has developed a comprehensive suite of data services that are designed to address the concerns and needs of investigators. IEDA's data publication service registers datasets with DOI and ensures their proper citation and attribution. IEDA is working with publishers on advanced linkages between datasets in the IEDA repository and scientific online articles to facilitate access to the data, enhance their visibility, and augment their use and citation. IEDA's investigator support ranges from individual support for data management to tools, tutorials, and virtual or face-to-face workshops that guide and assist investigators with data management planning, data submission, and data documentation. A critical aspect of IEDA's concept has been the disciplinary expertise within the team and its strong liaison with the science community, as well as a community-based governance. These have been fundamental to gain the trust and support of the community that have lead to significantly improved data preservation and access in the communities served by IEDA.

  17. Access to Educational Opportunity in Rural Communities: Alternative Patterns of Delivering Vocational Education in Sparsely Populated Areas. Volume 3: The Northwest Multi-District: A Mobile Facilities Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Roland L.; And Others

    Representing the mobile facilities pattern of inter-district cooperation, the Northwest Multi-District case is one of four studies addressing access of rural students to vocational education through inter-school district cooperation. The report identifies essential features of this form of cooperation, details factors facilitating/impeding the…

  18. Extended access to methamphetamine self-administration up-regulates dopamine transporter levels 72 hours after withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    D'Arcy, Christina; Luevano, Joe E; Miranda-Arango, Manuel; Pipkin, Joseph A; Jackson, Jonathan A; Castañeda, Eddie; Gosselink, Kristin L; O'Dell, Laura E

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that there are persistent changes in dopamine systems following withdrawal from methamphetamine (METH). This study examined changes in striatal dopamine transporter (DAT), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine receptor 2 (D2) 72 h after withdrawal from METH intravenous self- administration (IVSA). Rats were given limited (1h) or extended (6h) access to METH IVSA (0.05 mg/kg/0.1 ml infusion) for 22 days. Controls did not receive METH IVSA. The rats given extended access to IVSA displayed higher METH intake during the first hour of drug access compared to rats given limited access. Extended access to METH also produced a concomitant increase in striatal DAT levels relative to drug-naïve controls. There were no changes in TH or D2 levels across groups. Previous studies have reported a decrease in striatal DAT levels during protracted periods (>7 days) of withdrawal from METH IVSA. This study extends previous work by showing an increase in striatal DAT protein expression during an earlier time point of withdrawal from this drug. These results are an important step toward understanding the dynamic changes in dopamine systems that occur during different time points of withdrawal from METH IVSA.

  19. Design description of the Large Coil Test Facility pulse-coil support and transport system

    SciTech Connect

    Queen, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    In order to simulate the transient fields which would be imposed on superconducting toroidal field coils in an operating tokamak reactor, the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF) test stand includes a set of pulse coils. This set of pulse coils is designed to be moved from one test location to another within the LCTF vacuum vessel while the vessel is operating under vacuum and the test stand and test coils are at an operating temperature of 4.2K. This operating environment and the extremely high magnetic loads have necessitated some unique design features for the pulse coil support and transport system. The support structure for the pulse coil must react high overturning moments and axial loads induced on the pulse coil by the interaction of the pulse field with the field generated by the large test coils. These loads are reacted into the test stand support structure or spider frame by an arrangement of six pedestals and a support beam. In order to move the pulse coil set from one test location to another, the support beam containing the pulse coils must be driven across rollers mounted on the pedestals, then clamped securely to react the loads. Because these operations must be performed in a vacuum environment at cryogenic tmperature, special consideration was given to component design.

  20. The transport of antibiotic resistance genes and residues in groundwater near swine production facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. F.; Yannarell, A. C.; Mackie, R. I.; Krapac, I. G.; Chee-Sanford, J. S.; Koike, S.

    2008-12-01

    The use of antibiotics at concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) for disease prevention, disease treatment, and growth promotion can contribute to the spread of antibiotic compounds, their breakdown products, and antibiotic resistant bacteria and/or the genes that confer resistance. In addition, constitutive use of antibiotics at sub-therapeutic levels can select for antibiotic resistance among the bacteria that inhabit animal intestinal tracts, onsite manure treatment facilities, and any environments receiving significant inputs of manure (e.g. through waste lagoon leakage or fertilizer amendments to farm soils). If the antibiotic resistant organisms persist in these new environments, or if they participate in genetic exchanges with the native microflora, then CAFOs may constitute a significant reservoir for the spread of antibiotic resistance to the environment at large. Our results have demonstrated that leakage from waste treatment lagoons can influence the presence and persistence of tetracycline resistance genes in the shallow aquifer adjacent to swine CAFOs, and molecular phylogeny allowed us to distinguish "native" tetracycline resistance genes in control groundwater wells from manure-associated genes introduced from the lagoon. We have also been able to detect the presence of erythromycin resistance genes in CAFO surface and groundwater even though erythromycin is strictly reserved for use in humans and thus is not utilized at any of these sites. Ongoing research, including modeling of particle transport in groundwater, will help to determine the potential spatial and temporal extent of CAFO-derived antibiotic resistance.

  1. Canyon Disposal Initiative - Numerical Modeling of Contaminant Transport from Grouted Residual Waste in the 221-U Facility (U Plant)

    SciTech Connect

    Rockhold, Mark L.; White, Mark D.; Freeman, Eugene J.

    2004-10-12

    This letter report documents initial numerical analyses conducted by PNNL to provide support for a feasibility study on decommissioning of the canyon buildings at Hanford. The 221-U facility is the first of the major canyon buildings to be decommissioned. The specific objective of this modeling effort was to provide estimates of potential rates of migration of residual contaminants out of the 221-U facility during the first 40 years after decommissioning. If minimal contaminant migration is predicted to occur from the facility during this time period, then the structure may be deemed to provide a level of groundwater protection that is essentially equivalent to the liner and leachate collection systems that are required at conventional landfills. The STOMP code was used to simulate transport of selected radionuclides out of a canyon building, representative of the 221-U facility after decommissioning, for a period of 40 years. Simulation results indicate that none of the selected radionuclides that were modeled migrated beyond the concrete structure of the facility during the 40-year period of interest. Jacques (2001) identified other potential contaminants in the 221-U facility that were not modeled, however, including kerosene, phenol, and various metals. Modeling of these contaminants was beyond the scope of this preliminary effort due to increased complexity. Simulation results indicate that contaminant release from the canyon buildings will be diffusion controlled at early times. Advection is expected to become much more important at later times, after contaminants have diffused out of the facility and into the surrounding soil environment. After contaminants have diffused out of the facility, surface infiltration covers will become very important for mitigating further transport of contaminants in the underlying vadose zone and groundwater.

  2. Access from Space: A New Perspective on NASA's Space Transportation Technology Requirements and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    The need for robust and reliable access from space is clearly demonstrated by the recent loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia; as well as the NASA s goals to get the Shuttle re-flying and extend its life, build new vehicles for space access, produce successful robotic landers and s a q k retrr? llisrions, and maximize the science content of ambitious outer planets missions that contain nuclear reactors which must be safe for re-entry after possible launch aborts. The technology lynch pin of access from space is hypersonic entry systems such the thermal protection system, along with navigation, guidance and control (NG&C). But it also extends to descent and landing systems such as parachutes, airbags and their control systems. Current space access technology maturation programs such as NASA s Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program or the In-Space Propulsion (ISP) program focus on maturing laboratory demonstrated technologies for potential adoption by specific mission applications. A key requirement for these programs success is a suitable queue of innovative technologies and advanced concepts to mature, including mission concepts enabled by innovative, cross cutting technology advancements. When considering space access, propulsion often dominates the capability requirements, as well as the attention and resources. From the perspective of access from space some new cross cutting technology drivers come into view, along with some new capability opportunities. These include new miniature vehicles (micro, nano, and picosats), advanced automated systems (providing autonomous on-orbit inspection or landing site selection), and transformable aeroshells (to maximize capabilities and minimize weight). This paper provides an assessment of the technology drivers needed to meet future access from space mission requirements, along with the mission capabilities that can be envisioned from innovative, cross cutting access from space technology developments.

  3. 49 CFR 27.71 - Airport facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Access Act rules (49 CFR part 382) for carriers. (g) If an airport operator who receives Federal... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airport facilities. 27.71 Section 27.71... Administration Programs: Airports, Railroads, and Highways § 27.71 Airport facilities. (a) This section...

  4. Access to transport for women with hypovolemic shock differs according to weeks of pregnancy☆

    PubMed Central

    Butrick, Elizabeth; Penn, Amy; Itakura, Kaoru; Mkumba, Gricelia; Winter, Kelly; Amafumba, Rhoda; Miller, Suellen

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine whether women with hypovolemic shock secondary to obstetric hemorrhage are transported to referral hospitals differently depending on weeks of pregnancy in Zambia. Methods In a retrospective study, transport type, wait time, and transit time were assessed for women with obstetric hemorrhage and hypovolemic shock transported from 26 primary health centers to three referral hospitals during 2007–2011. A mean arterial pressure of less than 60 mm Hg was used to indicate severe shock. Women were split into two categories on the basis of the number of weeks of pregnancy (<24 weeks vs ≥24 weeks). Results Overall, 616 women were included. Mode of transport differed significantly by group (P<0.001). 414 (93.0%) of 445 women at 24 weeks of pregnancy or more were transported by ambulance versus 114 (66.7%) of 171 women at less than 24 weeks. Among those in severe shock, 106 (93.0%) of 114 women at 24 weeks of pregnancy or more were transported in ambulances versus 26 (52.0%) of 50 women at less than 24 weeks (P<0.001). Conclusion Women at 24 weeks of pregnancy or more were given preference for ambulance transport even when signs of shock were equivalent. Policy-makers aiming to lower maternal mortality need to address transport issues regardless of the etiology of hemorrhage or week of pregnancy. PMID:25022343

  5. 77 FR 73455 - Transportation Workers Identification Card (TWIC) Removal for Commercial Users To Access...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Transportation Workers Identification Card (TWIC) Removal for Commercial Users To... Transportation Workers Identification Card (TWIC) PKI certificate cannot be used to authenticate users for...

  6. Identification of molecular hinge points mediating alternating access in the vesicular monoamine transporter VMAT2

    PubMed Central

    Yaffe, Dana; Radestock, Sebastian; Shuster, Yonatan; Forrest, Lucy R.; Schuldiner, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) catalyzes transport of monoamines into storage vesicles in a process that involves exchange of the charged monoamine with two protons. VMAT2 is a member of the DHA12 family of multidrug transporters that belongs to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of secondary transporters. Here we present a homology model of VMAT2, which has the standard MFS fold, that is, with two domains of six transmembrane helices each which are related by twofold pseudosymmetry and whose axis runs normal to the membrane and between the two halves. Demonstration of the essential role of a membrane-embedded glutamate and confirmation of the existence of a hydrogen bond probably involved in proton transport provide experimental evidence that validates some of the predictions inherent to the model. Moreover, we show the essential role of residues at two anchor points between the two bundles. These residues appear to function as molecular hinge points about which the two six transmembrane-helix bundles flex and straighten to open and close the pathways on either side of the membrane as required for transport. Polar residues that create a hydrogen bond cluster form one of the anchor points of VMAT2. The other results from hydrophobic interactions. Residues at the anchor points are strongly conserved in other MFS transporters in one way or another, suggesting that interactions at these locations will be critical in most, if not all, MFS transporters. PMID:23530208

  7. 1-Methylpyridinium-4-(4-phenylmethanethiosulfonate) iodide, MTS-MPP+, a novel scanning cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) reagent for monoamine transporter studies.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Godoy, Alejandra; Torres-Altoro, Melissa I; White, Kellie J; Barker, Eric L; Nichols, David E

    2007-01-01

    A novel substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) reagent was developed for monoamine uptake transporters. The new reagent, MTS-MPP(+), was a derivative of the neurotoxin and transporter substrate MPP(+). MTS-MPP(+) labeled cysteine residues introduced into the serotonin transporter protein. Although it did not prove to be a substrate, as is MPP(+), it appears to label cysteine residues lining the permeation pore of the transporter more readily than currently available nonspecific SCAM reagents.

  8. CSER 94-013: Classification and access to PFP 232-Z Incinerator Facility and limits on characterization and disassembly activities in 232-Z burning hood

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.M.

    1995-01-12

    This CSER justifies the Limited Control Facility designation for the closed Burning Hood in the PFP 232-Z Incinerator Facility. If the Burning Hood is opened to characterize the plutonium distribution and geometric integrity of the internals or for disassembly of the internals, then the more rigorous Fissionable Material Facility classification is required. Two sets of requirements apply for personnel access, criticality firefighting category for water use, and fissile material movement for the two states of the Burning Hood. The parameters used in the criticality analysis are listed to establish the limits under which this CSER is valid. Determination that the Burning Hood fissile material, moderation, or internal arrangements are outside these limits requires reevaluation of these parameter values and activities at the 232-Z Incinerator Facility. When the Burning Hood is open, water entry is to be prevented by two physical barriers for each water source.

  9. Expanding Access to the Intrauterine Device in Public Health Facilities in Ethiopia: A Mixed-Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Tilahun, Yewondwossen; Mehta, Sarah; Zerihun, Habtamu; Lew, Candace; Brooks, Mohamad I; Nigatu, Tariku; Hagos, Kidest Lulu; Asnake, Mengistu; Tasissa, Adeba; Ali, Seid; Desalegn, Ketsela; Adane, Girmay

    2016-03-01

    In Ethiopia, modern contraceptive prevalence among currently married women nearly tripled over the last decade, but the method mix remains skewed toward short-acting methods. Since 2011, the Integrated Family Health Program (IFHP+), jointly implemented by Pathfinder International and John Snow Inc., has supported the Federal Ministry of Health to introduce intrauterine devices (IUDs) in more than 800 health centers across 4 regions to improve access to a wider range of methods. Between March and August 2014, Pathfinder conducted a mixed-methods study in 40 purposively selected health centers to assess shifts in the contraceptive method mix following introduction of IUDs using data from family planning registers; determine the characteristics of IUD users through a cross-sectional survey of 2,943 family planning clients who accepted the IUD; explore reasons for method discontinuation among 165 clients seeking IUD removal services; and identify facilitators and barriers to IUD use through focus group discussions (N = 115 clients) and key informant interviews (N = 36 providers, facility heads, and health office heads). Introduction of IUDs into the 40 health centers participating in the study was correlated with a statistically significant increase in the contribution of all long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs)-both IUDs and implants-to the method mix, from 6.9% in 2011 to 20.5% in 2014 (P<.001). Our study found that latent demand for the IUD was more prevalent than anticipated and that the method was acceptable to a broad cross-section of women. Of the 2,943 women who sought IUDs during the 6-month study period, 18.0% were new contraceptive users (i.e., those using a contraceptive method for the first time ever), 44.7% reported no educational attainment, 62.5% were from rural areas, and 59.3% were younger than 30 years old, with almost 3 in 10 (27.7%) under the age of 25. The most commonly cited reason for seeking IUD removal services was a desire to

  10. Expanding Access to the Intrauterine Device in Public Health Facilities in Ethiopia: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Tilahun, Yewondwossen; Mehta, Sarah; Zerihun, Habtamu; Lew, Candace; Brooks, Mohamad I; Nigatu, Tariku; Hagos, Kidest Lulu; Asnake, Mengistu; Tasissa, Adeba; Ali, Seid; Desalegn, Ketsela; Adane, Girmay

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Ethiopia, modern contraceptive prevalence among currently married women nearly tripled over the last decade, but the method mix remains skewed toward short-acting methods. Since 2011, the Integrated Family Health Program (IFHP+), jointly implemented by Pathfinder International and John Snow Inc., has supported the Federal Ministry of Health to introduce intrauterine devices (IUDs) in more than 800 health centers across 4 regions to improve access to a wider range of methods. Between March and August 2014, Pathfinder conducted a mixed-methods study in 40 purposively selected health centers to assess shifts in the contraceptive method mix following introduction of IUDs using data from family planning registers; determine the characteristics of IUD users through a cross-sectional survey of 2,943 family planning clients who accepted the IUD; explore reasons for method discontinuation among 165 clients seeking IUD removal services; and identify facilitators and barriers to IUD use through focus group discussions (N = 115 clients) and key informant interviews (N = 36 providers, facility heads, and health office heads). Introduction of IUDs into the 40 health centers participating in the study was correlated with a statistically significant increase in the contribution of all long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs)—both IUDs and implants—to the method mix, from 6.9% in 2011 to 20.5% in 2014 (P<.001). Our study found that latent demand for the IUD was more prevalent than anticipated and that the method was acceptable to a broad cross-section of women. Of the 2,943 women who sought IUDs during the 6-month study period, 18.0% were new contraceptive users (i.e., those using a contraceptive method for the first time ever), 44.7% reported no educational attainment, 62.5% were from rural areas, and 59.3% were younger than 30 years old, with almost 3 in 10 (27.7%) under the age of 25. The most commonly cited reason for seeking IUD removal services

  11. Effect of Geographical Access to Health Facilities on Child Mortality in Rural Ethiopia: A Community Based Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Okwaraji, Yemisrach B.; Cousens, Simon; Berhane, Yemane; Mulholland, Kim; Edmond, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Background There have been few studies that have examined associations between access to health care and child health outcomes in remote populations most in need of health services. This study assessed the effect of travel time and distance to health facilities on mortality in children under five years in a remote area of rural north-western Ethiopia. Methods and Findings This study involved a randomly selected cross sectional survey of 2,058 households. Data were collected during home visits to all resident women of reproductive age (15–49 years). A geographic information system (GIS) was used to map all households and the only health centre in the district. The analysis was restricted to 2,206 rural children who were under the age of five years during the five years before the survey. Data were analysed using random effects Poisson regression. 90.4% (1,996/2,206) of children lived more than 1.5 hours walk from the health centre. Children who lived ≥1.5 hrs from the health centre had a two to three fold greater risk of death than children who lived <1.5 hours from the health centre (children with travel time 1.5–<2.5 hrs adjusted relative risk [adjRR] 2.3[0.95–5.6], travel time 2.5–<3.5 hrs adjRR 3.1[1.3–7.4] and travel time 3.5–<6.5 hrs adjRR 2.5[1.1–6.2]). Conclusion Distance to a health centre had a marked influence on under five mortality in a poor, rural, remote area of Ethiopia. This study provides important information for policy makers on the likely impact of new health centres and their most effective location in remote areas. PMID:22428070

  12. Neutron transport study of a beam port based dynamic neutron radiography facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaial, Anas M.

    Neutron radiography has the ability to differentiate between gas and liquid in two-phase flow due both to the density difference and the high neutron scattering probability of hydrogen. Previous studies have used dynamic neutron radiography -- in both real-time and high-speed -- for air-water, steam-water and gas-liquid metal two-phase flow measurements. Radiography with thermal neutrons is straightforward and efficient as thermal neutrons are easier to detect with relatively higher efficiency and can be easily extracted from nuclear reactor beam ports. The quality of images obtained using neutron radiography and the imaging speed depend on the neutron beam intensity at the imaging plane. A high quality neutron beam, with thermal neutron intensity greater than 3.0x 10 6 n/cm2-s and a collimation ratio greater than 100 at the imaging plane, is required for effective dynamic neutron radiography up to 2000 frames per second. The primary objectives of this work are: (1) to optimize a neutron radiography facility for dynamic neutron radiography applications and (2) to investigate a new technique for three-dimensional neutron radiography using information obtained from neutron scattering. In this work, neutron transport analysis and experimental validation of a dynamic neutron radiography facility is studied with consideration of real-time and high-speed neutron radiography requirements. A beam port based dynamic neutron radiography facility, for a target thermal neutron flux of 1.0x107 n/cm2-s, has been analyzed, constructed and experimentally verified at the McMaster Nuclear Reactor. The neutron source strength at the beam tube entrance is evaluated experimentally by measuring the thermal and fast neutron fluxes using copper activation flux-mapping technique. The development of different facility components, such as beam tube liner, gamma ray filter, beam shutter and biological shield, is achieved analytically using neutron attenuation and divergence theories. Monte

  13. 49 CFR 37.41 - Construction of transportation facilities by public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... by individuals with disabilities, including individuals who use wheelchairs. This requirement also... wheelchairs) would be structurally impracticable, accessibility shall nonetheless be ensured to persons...

  14. 49 CFR 37.41 - Construction of transportation facilities by public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... by individuals with disabilities, including individuals who use wheelchairs. This requirement also... wheelchairs) would be structurally impracticable, accessibility shall nonetheless be ensured to persons...

  15. 49 CFR 37.41 - Construction of transportation facilities by public entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... by individuals with disabilities, including individuals who use wheelchairs. This requirement also... wheelchairs) would be structurally impracticable, accessibility shall nonetheless be ensured to persons...

  16. The Pratt Pouch Provides a Three-Fold Access Increase to Antiretroviral Medication for Births outside Health Facilities in Southern Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Dahinten, Alexander P.; Malkin, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Modern day antiretroviral therapy allows HIV+ pregnant women to lower the likelihood of viral transmission to their infants before, during, and after birth from 20-45% to less than 5%. In developing countries, where non-facility births may outnumber facility births, infant access to safe antiretroviral medication during the critical first three days after birth is often limited. A single-dose, polyethylene pouch (“Pratt Pouch”) addresses this challenge by allowing the medication to be distributed to mothers during antenatal care. Methods: The Pratt Pouch was introduced as part of a one year clinical feasibility study in two districts in Southern Province, Zambia. Participating nurses, community health workers, and pharmacists were trained before implementation. Success in achieving improved antiretroviral medication access was assessed via pre intervention and post intervention survey responses by HIV+ mothers. Results: Access to medication for HIV-exposed infants born outside of a health facility increased from 35% (17/51) before the introduction of the pouch to 94% (15/16) after (p<0.05). A non-significant increase in homebirth rates from 33% (pre intervention cohort) to 50% (post intervention cohort) was observed (p>0.05). Results remained below the national average homebirth rate of 52%. Users reported minimal spillage and a high level of satisfaction with the Pratt Pouch. Conclusion: The Pratt Pouch enhances access to infant antiretroviral medication in a rural, non-facility birth setting. Wide scale implementation could have a substantial global impact on HIV transmission rates from mother to child. PMID:27073584

  17. Housing and Transport: Access Issues for Disabled International Students in British Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soorenian, Armineh

    2013-01-01

    This article explores two disabled people's "Seven Needs" to independent living, those of "housing" and "transport" issues, in relation to disabled international students in British universities. Firstly, students' living arrangements, including issues related to the suitability of university accommodation…

  18. Gaining Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Discusses issues schools and universities have encountered in complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and making their facilities more accessible to the disabled. The ADA's vagueness and the architect's need for understanding the regulations is highlighted. (GR)

  19. Creating a clinical video-conferencing facility in a security-constrained environment using open-source AccessGrid software and consumer hardware.

    PubMed

    Terrazas, Enrique; Hamill, Timothy R; Wang, Ye; Channing Rodgers, R P

    2007-10-11

    The Department of Laboratory Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) has been split into widely separated facilities, leading to much time being spent traveling between facilities for meetings. We installed an open-source AccessGrid multi-media-conferencing system using (largely) consumer-grade equipment, connecting 6 sites at 5 separate facilities. The system was accepted rapidly and enthusiastically, and was inexpensive compared to alternative approaches. Security was addressed by aspects of the AG software and by local network administrative practices. The chief obstacles to deployment arose from security restrictions imposed by multiple independent network administration regimes, requiring a drastically reduced list of network ports employed by AG components.

  20. Creating a Clinical Video-Conferencing Facility in a Security-Constrained Environment Using Open-Source AccessGrid Software and Consumer Hardware

    PubMed Central

    Terrazas, Enrique; Hamill, Timothy R.; Wang, Ye; Channing Rodgers, R. P.

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Laboratory Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) has been split into widely separated facilities, leading to much time being spent traveling between facilities for meetings. We installed an open-source AccessGrid multi-media-conferencing system using (largely) consumer-grade equipment, connecting 6 sites at 5 separate facilities. The system was accepted rapidly and enthusiastically, and was inexpensive compared to alternative approaches. Security was addressed by aspects of the AG software and by local network administrative practices. The chief obstacles to deployment arose from security restrictions imposed by multiple independent network administration regimes, requiring a drastically reduced list of network ports employed by AG components. PMID:18693930