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Sample records for accessible wavelength range

  1. Two wavelength satellite laser ranging using SPAD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Hamal, Karel; Jelinkova, Helena; Kirchner, Georg; Koidl, F.

    1993-01-01

    When ranging to satellites with lasers, there are several principal contributions to the error budget: from the laser ranging system on the ground, from the satellite retroarray geometry, and from the atmosphere. Using a single wavelength, we have routinely achieved a ranging precision of 8 millimeters when ranging to the ERS-1 and Starlette satellites. The systematic error of the atmosphere, assuming the existing dispersion models, is expected to be of the order of 1 cm. Multiple wavelengths ranging might contribute to the refinement of the existing models. Taking into account the energy balance, the existing picosecond lasers and the existing receiver and detection technology, several pairs or multiple wavelengths may be considered. To be able to improve the atmospheric models to the subcentimeter accuracy level, the differential time interval (DTI) has to be determined within a few picoseconds depending on the selected wavelength pair. There exist several projects based on picosecond lasers as transmitters and on two types of detection techniques: one is based on photodetectors, like photomultipliers or photodiodes connected to the time interval meters. Another technique is based on the use of a streak camera as an echo signal detector, temporal analyzer, and time interval vernier. The temporal analysis at a single wavelength using the streak camera showed the complexity of the problem.

  2. Raman Amplifier Performance under New Wavelength Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, Ashraf A. M.; Mustafa, Fathy M.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the benefits of Raman amplifier (RA) for long-haul Ultra Wideband (UW)-WDM optical communications systems, we are studying and investigating how to widen the bandwidth and flatten the gain of RA by testing it in a new wider range of wavelengths (1.4 μm≤λsignal≤1.7 μm) instead of the benchmark range (1.45 μm≤λsignal≤1.65 μm). Four different ranges of signal wavelengths are used in this paper with the aim of testing the performance of RA model proposed in [13-15]: 1. 1.4 μm≤λsignal≤1.45 μm 2. 1.45 μm≤λsignal≤1.65 μm 3. 1.65 μm≤λsignal≤1.75 μm 4. 1.43 μm≤λsignal≤1.7 μm Different model sizes are used and analyzed to get wider bandwidth and more flat gain.

  3. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Tomohiro Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito

    2015-03-16

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  4. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Tomohiro; Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito

    2015-03-01

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  5. Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy in the Ultraviolet Wavelength Range.

    PubMed

    West, Brantley A; Moran, Andrew M

    2012-09-20

    Coherent two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopies conducted at visible and infrared wavelengths are having a transformative impact on the understanding of numerous processes in condensed phases. The extension of 2D spectroscopy to the ultraviolet spectral range (2DUV) must contend with several challenges, including the attainment of adequate laser bandwidth, interferometric phase stability, and the suppression of undesired nonlinearities in the sample medium. Solutions to these problems are motivated by the study of a wide range of biological systems whose lowest-frequency electronic resonances are found in the UV. The development of 2DUV spectroscopy also makes possible the attainment of new insights into elementary chemical reaction dynamics (e.g., electrocyclic ring opening in cycloalkenes). Substantial progress has been made in both the implementation and application of 2DUV spectroscopy in the past several years. In this Perspective, we discuss 2DUV methodology, review recent applications, and speculate on what the future will hold.

  6. Cascaded optical isolator configuration having high-isolation characteristics over a wide temperature and wavelength range.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, K; Kawakami, S

    1987-07-01

    A new configuration of a cascaded optical isolator with high isolation over a wide range of temperature and wavelength is proposed. The configuration consists of two unit isolators, each of which is optimized for a different temperature and wavelength.

  7. Comparative study of limited-range wavelength conversion policies for asynchronous optical packet switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Kaan; Gunalay, Yavuz; Akar, Nail

    2007-02-01

    We study an asynchronous optical packet (OP)-switching node equipped with a number of limited range (LR) wavelength converters shared per output link. We study both circular and noncircular LR-wavelength-conversion schemes. A wavelength conversion policy governs the selection of the outgoing wavelength for an OP if the incoming wavelength is in use. Through simulations, we show that the so-called far-conversion policy for which the OP is switched onto the farthest available wavelength in the tuning range, outperforms the other policies we studied. We point out the clustering effect in the use of wavelengths to explain this phenomenon. We also provide an approximate analytical method to find the packet-blocking probability in circular-type LR-wavelength-conversion systems. Based on the simulation results, the approximate method appears to lead to a lower bound for blocking probabilities for all the conversion policies we study.

  8. Experimental demonstration of wavelength domain rogue-free ONU based on wavelength-pairing for TDM/WDM optical access networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jie Hyun; Park, Heuk; Kang, Sae-Kyoung; Lee, Joon Ki; Chung, Hwan Seok

    2015-11-30

    In this study, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a wavelength domain rogue-free ONU based on wavelength-pairing of downstream and upstream signals for time/wavelength division-multiplexed optical access networks. The wavelength-pairing tunable filter is aligned to the upstream wavelength channel by aligning it to one of the downstream wavelength channels. Wavelength-pairing is implemented with a compact and cyclic Si-AWG integrated with a Ge-PD. The pairing filter covered four 100 GHz-spaced wavelength channels. The feasibility of the wavelength domain rogue-free operation is investigated by emulating malfunction of the misaligned laser. The wavelength-pairing tunable filter based on the Si-AWG blocks the upstream signal in the non-assigned wavelength channel before data collision with other ONUs.

  9. Extending the wavelength range in the Oclaro high-brightness broad area modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlik, Susanne; Guarino, Andrea; Sverdlov, Boris; Müller, Jürgen; Button, Christopher; Arlt, Sebastian; Jaeggi, Dominik; Lichtenstein, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    The demand for high power laser diode modules in the wavelength range between 793 nm and 1060 nm has been growing continuously over the last several years. Progress in eye-safe fiber lasers requires reliable pump power at 793 nm, modules at 808 nm are used for small size DPSSL applications and fiber-coupled laser sources at 830 nm are used in printing industry. However, power levels achieved in this wavelength range have remained lower than for the 9xx nm range. Here we report on approaches to increasing the reliable power in our latest generations of high power pump modules in the wavelength range between 793 nm and 1060 nm.

  10. Spectral fluorescent properties of tissues in vivo with excitation in the red wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Klimov, D. V.; Edinac, N. E.; Wolnukhin, V. A.; Strashkevich, I. A.

    1997-12-01

    The spectral fluorescence analysis is a promising method for differential tissue diagnostic. Usually the UV and visible light is used for fluorescence excitation with emission registration in the visible wavelength range. The light penetration length in this wavelength range is very small allowing one to analyze only the surface region of the tissue. Here we present the tissue fluorescent spectra in vivo excited in the red wavelength region. As excitation light source we used compact He-Ne laser (632.8 nm) and observed the fluorescence in 650 - 800 nm spectral range. The various tissues including normal skin, psoriasis, tumors, necrosis as well as photosensitized tissues have been measured.

  11. Wide-range adjustment technique of playback wavelength of MBDCG Lippmann hologram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhua; Dong, Guangxing; Li, Jiangfeng; Du, Jinglei

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, a new technique is presented for adjusting the playback wavelength of Lippmann holograms recorded in methylene-blue sensitized dichromated gelatin (MBDCG). The main feature of this technique is introducing a water-soluble organic reagent into MBDCG photosensitive layer as preswelling reagent and wavelength adjuster. This method has wide wavelength adjustment range and high signal-to-noise ratio, can be applied to adjust the playback wavelength of reflection hologram quantitatively by changing the concentration of preswelling reagent. Its possible applications include color image display, holographic optical elements, and optical anti-counterfeiting.

  12. Photon Counting Detectors for the 1.0 - 2.0 Micron Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe results on the development of greater than 200 micron diameter, single-element photon-counting detectors for the 1-2 micron wavelength range. The technical goals include quantum efficiency in the range 10-70%; detector diameter greater than 200 microns; dark count rate below 100 kilo counts-per-second (cps), and maximum count rate above 10 Mcps.

  13. Two-wavelength interferometry: extended range and accurate optical path difference analytical estimator.

    PubMed

    Houairi, Kamel; Cassaing, Frédéric

    2009-12-01

    Two-wavelength interferometry combines measurement at two wavelengths lambda(1) and lambda(2) in order to increase the unambiguous range (UR) for the measurement of an optical path difference. With the usual algorithm, the UR is equal to the synthetic wavelength Lambda=lambda(1)lambda(2)/|lambda(1)-lambda(2)|, and the accuracy is a fraction of Lambda. We propose here a new analytical algorithm based on arithmetic properties, allowing estimation of the absolute fringe order of interference in a noniterative way. This algorithm has nice properties compared with the usual algorithm: it is at least as accurate as the most accurate measurement at one wavelength, whereas the UR is extended to several times the synthetic wavelength. The analysis presented shows how the actual UR depends on the wavelengths and different sources of error. The simulations presented are confirmed by experimental results, showing that the new algorithm has enabled us to reach an UR of 17.3 microm, much larger than the synthetic wavelength, which is only Lambda=2.2 microm. Applications to metrology and fringe tracking are discussed.

  14. Detection range enhancement using circularly polarized light in scattering environments for infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, J D; Scrymgeour, D A; Kemme, S A; Dereniak, E L

    2015-03-20

    We find for infrared wavelengths that there are broad ranges of particle sizes and refractive indices that represent fog and rain, where circular polarization can persist to longer ranges than linear polarization. Using polarization tracking Monte Carlo simulations for varying particle size, wavelength, and refractive index, we show that, for specific scene parameters, circular polarization outperforms linear polarization in maintaining the illuminating polarization state for large optical depths. This enhancement with circular polarization can be exploited to improve range and target detection in obscurant environments that are important in many critical sensing applications. Initially, researchers employed polarization-discriminating schemes, often using linearly polarized active illumination, to further distinguish target signals from the background noise. More recently, researchers have investigated circular polarization as a means to separate signal from noise even more. Specifically, we quantify both linearly and circularly polarized active illumination and show here that circular polarization persists better than linear for radiation fog in the short-wave infrared, for advection fog in the short-wave and long-wave infrared, and large particle sizes of Sahara dust around the 4 μm wavelength. Conversely, we quantify where linear polarization persists better than circular polarization for some limited particle sizes of radiation fog in the long-wave infrared, small particle sizes of Sahara dust for wavelengths of 9-10.5 μm, and large particle sizes of Sahara dust through the 8-11 μm wavelength range in the long-wave infrared.

  15. Detection range enhancement using circularly polarized light in scattering environments for infrared wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    van der Laan, J. D.; Scrymgeour, D. A.; Kemme, S. A.; Dereniak, E. L.

    2015-03-13

    We find for infrared wavelengths there are broad ranges of particle sizes and refractive indices that represent fog and rain where the use of circular polarization can persist to longer ranges than linear polarization. Using polarization tracking Monte Carlo simulations for varying particle size, wavelength, and refractive index, we show that for specific scene parameters circular polarization outperforms linear polarization in maintaining the intended polarization state for large optical depths. This enhancement with circular polarization can be exploited to improve range and target detection in obscurant environments that are important in many critical sensing applications. Specifically, circular polarization persists better than linear for radiation fog in the short-wave infrared, for advection fog in the short-wave infrared and the long-wave infrared, and large particle sizes of Sahara dust around the 4 micron wavelength.

  16. Detection range enhancement using circularly polarized light in scattering environments for infrared wavelengths

    DOE PAGES

    van der Laan, J. D.; Sandia National Lab.; Scrymgeour, D. A.; ...

    2015-03-13

    We find for infrared wavelengths there are broad ranges of particle sizes and refractive indices that represent fog and rain where the use of circular polarization can persist to longer ranges than linear polarization. Using polarization tracking Monte Carlo simulations for varying particle size, wavelength, and refractive index, we show that for specific scene parameters circular polarization outperforms linear polarization in maintaining the intended polarization state for large optical depths. This enhancement with circular polarization can be exploited to improve range and target detection in obscurant environments that are important in many critical sensing applications. Specifically, circular polarization persists bettermore » than linear for radiation fog in the short-wave infrared, for advection fog in the short-wave infrared and the long-wave infrared, and large particle sizes of Sahara dust around the 4 micron wavelength.« less

  17. TCSPC FLIM in the wavelength range from 800 nm to 1700 nm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Shcheslavsky, Vladislav

    2016-03-01

    Excitation and detection in the wavelength range above 800nm is a convenient and relatively inexpensive way to increase the penetration depth in optical microscopy. Moreover, detection at long wavelength avoids the problem that tissue autofluorescence contaminates the signals from endogenous fluorescence probes. FLIM at NIR wavelength may therefore be complementary to multiphoton microscopy, especially if the lifetimes of NIR fluorophores report biological parameters of the tissue structures they are bound to. Unfortunately, neither the excitation sources nor the detectors of standard confocal and multiphoton laser scanning systems are directly suitable for excitation and detection of NIR fluorescence. Most of these problems can be solved, however, by using ps diode lasers or Ti:Sapphire lasers at their fundamental wavelength, and NIR-sensitive detectors. With NIR-sensitive PMTs the detection wavelength range can be extended up to 900 nm, with InGaAs SPAD detectors up to 1700 nm. Here, we demonstrate the use of a combination of laser scanning, multi-dimensional TCSPC, and advanced excitation sources and detectors for FLIM at up to 1700 nm. The performance was tested at tissue samples incubated with NIR dyes. The fluorescence lifetimes generally get shorter with increasing absorption and emission wavelengths of the dyes. For the cyanine dye IR1061, absorbing around 1060 nm, the lifetime was found to be as short as 70 ps. Nevertheless the fluorescence decay could still be clearly detected. Almost all dyes showed clear lifetime changes depending on the binding to different tissue constituents.

  18. Long-wavelength-range laser diode using GaInNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondow, Masahiko; Nakatsuka, Shin'ichi; Kitatani, Takeshi; Yazawa, Yoshiaki; Okai, Makoto O.

    1997-05-01

    We propose a novel material: GaInNAs. It can be formed on a GaAs substrate, and has a bandgap energy suitable for long- wavelength-range laser diodes. The band lineup is ideal for preventing electron overflow. Therefore, applying GaInNAs to long-wavelength-range laser diodes is expected to result in excellent high-temperature performance. We have succeeded in demonstrating continuous-wave operation of GaInNAs/GaAs single quantum well laser diodes at room temperature. The threshold current density was about 1.4 kA/cm2. The lasing wavelength was about 1.2 micrometers . We have measured some characteristic parameters of the GaInNAs laser diode under pulsed operation. A high characteristic temperature (T0) of 127 K and a small wavelength shift per ambient temperature change of 0.48 nm/ degree(s)C were obtained. The experimental results indicate the applicability of GaInNAs to long-wavelength-range laser diodes with excellent high- temperature performance.

  19. Near-field imaging of single walled carbon nanotubes emitting in the telecom wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La China, F.; Caselli, N.; Sarti, F.; Biccari, F.; Torrini, U.; Intonti, F.; Vinattieri, A.; Durán-Valdeiglesias, E.; Alonso Ramos, C.; Le Roux, X.; Balestrieri, M.; Filoramo, A.; Vivien, L.; Gurioli, M.

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid systems based on carbon nanotubes emitting in the telecom wavelength range and Si-photonic platforms are promising candidates for developing integrated photonic circuits. Here, we consider semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) emitting around 1300 nm or 1550 nm wavelength. The nanotubes are deposited on quartz substrate for mapping their photoluminescence in hyperspectral near-field microscopy. This method allows for a sub-wavelength resolution in detecting the spatial distribution of the emission of single s-SWNTs at room temperature. Optical signature delocalized over several micrometers is observed, thus denoting the high quality of the produced carbon nanotubes on a wide range of tube diameters. Noteworthy, the presence of both nanotube bundles and distinct s-SWNT chiralities is uncovered.

  20. Numerical calculation of the operation wavelength range of a polarization controller based on rotatable wave plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hee Su; Sharma, Aditya

    2016-12-01

    We calculate the operation wavelength range of polarization controllers based on rotating wave plates such as paddle-type optical fiber devices. The coverages over arbitrary polarization conversion or arbitrary birefringence compensation are numerically estimated. The results present the acceptable phase retardation range of polarization controllers composed of two quarter-wave plates or a quarter-half-quarter-wave plate combination, and thereby determines the operation wavelength range of a given design. We further prove that a quarter-quarter-half-wave-plate combination is also an arbitrary birefringence compensator as well as a conventional quarter-half-quarter-wave-plate combination, and show that the two configurations have the identical range of acceptable phase retardance within the uncertainty of our numerical method.

  1. Coherent direct sequence optical code multiple access encoding-decoding efficiency versus wavelength detuning.

    PubMed

    Pastor, D; Amaya, W; García-Olcina, R; Sales, S

    2007-07-01

    We present a simple theoretical model of and the experimental verification for vanishing of the autocorrelation peak due to wavelength detuning on the coding-decoding process of coherent direct sequence optical code multiple access systems based on a superstructured fiber Bragg grating. Moreover, the detuning vanishing effect has been explored to take advantage of this effect and to provide an additional degree of multiplexing and/or optical code tuning.

  2. Wide dynamic range wavefront sensor using sub-wavelength grating array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaobin; Li, Yanqiu; Liu, Ke

    2015-07-01

    We propose a new zonal wavefront sensor with a very wide dynamic range. The proposed sensor uses a sub-wavelength grating array to subdivide the input wavefront and produce transmitted light spots on CCD. The wavefront tilts are calculated from the transmissions of a sub-wavelength grating array. The dynamic range and resolution of the proposed sensor are respectively decided by the grating parameters and the sub-unit size of the array. So these two performances of the sensor are independent of one another, which enables the realization of wide dynamic range and high resolution simultaneously. We introduce the principle of the sensor by both Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis and Finite-Difference Time-Domain methods. A simulation is designed to validate our proposed method, and the measurement errors are analyzed. The sensor performs good sensitivity for wide incident angles, which is particularly suitable for spherical input wavefront.

  3. Extension of distance measurement range in a sinusoidal wavelength-scanning interferometer using a liquid-crystal wavelength filter with double feedback control.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Osami; Saito, Akihiro; Suzuki, Takamasa; Takeda, Mitsuo; Kurokawa, Takashi

    2007-08-10

    The optical path difference (OPD) and amplitude of a sinusoidal wavelength scanning (SWS) are controlled with a double feedback control system in an interferometer, so that a ruler marking every wavelength and a ruler with scales smaller than a wavelength are generated. These two rulers enable us to measure an OPD longer than a wavelength. A liquid-crystal Fabry-Perot interferometer (LC-FPI) is adopted as a wavelength-scanning device, and double sinusoidal phase modulation is incorporated in the SWS interferometer. Because of a high resolution of the LC-FPI, the upper limit of the measurement range can be extended to 280 microm by the use of the phase lock where the amplitude of the SWS is doubled in the feedback control. The ruler marking every wavelength is generated between 80 microm and 280 microm, and distances are measured with a high accuracy of the order of a nanometer in real time.

  4. Spectroscopic technique with wide range of wavelength information improves near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eda, Hideo; Aoki, Hiromichi; Eura, Shigeru; Ebe, Kazutoshi

    2009-02-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) calculates hemoglobin parameters, such as oxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHb) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (deoxyHb) using the near-infrared light around the wavelength of 800nm. This is based on the modified-Lambert-Beer's law that changes in absorbance are proportional to changes in hemoglobin parameters. Many conventional measurement methods uses only a few wavelengths, however, in this research, basic examination of NIRS measurement was approached by acquiring wide range of wavelength information. Venous occlusion test was performed by using the blood pressure cuff around the upper arm. Pressure of 100mmHg was then applied for about 3 minutes. During the venous occlusion, the spectrum of the lower arm muscles was measured every 15 seconds, within the range of 600 to 1100nm. It was found that other wavelength bands hold information correlating to this venous occlusion task. Technique of improving the performance of NIRS measurement using the Spectroscopic Method is very important for Brain science.

  5. Investigation of electrical parameters of the samples of optical materials in a decimeter wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseichik, L. V.; Butyrin, P. A.; Shakirzyanov, F. N.

    2012-12-01

    Semiconductors, being the intermediates between conductors and dielectrics, possess the properties of both conductors and dielectrics. There are few studies devoted to the consideration of dielectric properties of semiconductor materials. In this study, dielectric properties of zinc selenide and germanium in a decimeter wavelength range are investigated. The results of investigation indicate the possibility of using these materials in new promising directions of microwave electrical engineering.

  6. Increment of Access Points in Integrated System of Wavelength Division Multiplexed Passive Optical Network Radio over Fiber.

    PubMed

    Amiri, I S; Alavi, S E; Soltanian, M R K; Fisal, N; Supa'at, A S M; Ahmad, H

    2015-07-08

    This paper describes a novel technique to increase the numbers of access points (APs) in a wavelength division multiplexed-passive optical network (WDM-PON) integrated in a 100 GHz radio-over-fiber (RoF). Eight multi-carriers separated by 25 GHz intervals were generated in the range of 193.025 to 193.200 THz using a microring resonator (MRR) system incorporating an add-drop filter system. All optically generated multi-carriers were utilized in an integrated system of WDM-PON-RoF for transmission of four 43.6 Gb/sec orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signals. Results showed that an acceptable BER variation for different path lengths up to 25 km was achievable for all four access points and thus the transmission of four OFDM channels is feasible for a 25 km standard single mode fiber (SSMF) path length.

  7. Effects of Various Wavelength Ranges of Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation on Teflon FEP Film Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; McCracken, Cara A.

    2004-01-01

    Teflon Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FTP) films (DuPont) have been widely used for spacecraft thermal control and have been observed to become embrittled and cracked upon exposure to the space environment. This degradation has been attributed to a synergistic combination of radiation and thermal effects. A research study was undertaken at the NASA Glenn Research Center to examine the effects of different wavelength ranges of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation on the degradation of the mechanical properties of FEP. This will contribute to an overall understanding of space radiation effects on Teflon FEP, and will provide information necessary to determine appropriate techniques for using laboratory tests to estimate space VUV degradation. Research was conducted using inhouse facilities at Glenn and was carried out, in part, through a grant with the Cleveland State University. Samples of Teflon FEP film of 50.8 microns thickness were exposed to radiation from a VUV lamp from beneath different cover windows to provide different exposure wavelength ranges: MgF2 (115 to 400 nm), crystalline quartz (140 to 400 nm), and fused silica (FS, 155 to 400 nm). Following exposure, FEP film specimens were tensile tested to determine the ultimate tensile strength and elongation at failure as a function of the exposure duration for each wavelength range. The graphs show the effect of ultraviolet exposure on the mechanical properties of the FEP samples.

  8. Wavelength dependent near-range lidar profiling of smog aerosol over Athens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Marinou, Eleni; Engelmann, Ronny; Costa Surós, Montserrat; Kottas, Mickael; Baars, Holger; Janicka, Lucja; Solomos, Stavros; Heese, Birgit; Kumala, Wojciech; Tsekeri, Alexandra; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Amiridis, Vassilis; Balis, Dimitris; Althausen, Dietrich; Wandinger, Ulla; Ansmann, Albert

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the ACTRIS2 JRA1 field campaign focusing on joint remote and in-situ sensing of absorbing aerosols has been conducted in Athens (http://actris-athens.eu). In the frame of the ACTRIS2 BL-Smog TNA, co-located measurements of the near-range lidar receiver (NARLa) of the University of Warsaw with the multi-wavelength PollyXT lidar of the National Observatory of Athens were performed. The excellent capacities of the PollyXT-NOA lidar, equipped with eight far-range channels (355, 355s, 387, 407, 532, 532s, 607, and 1064nm) and two near-range channels (532 and 607 nm), were enhanced by integrating the NARLa for simultaneous observations. By using the NARLa, equipped with the elastic channels (355 and 532nm) and Raman channels (387 and 607nm), the wavelength dependence of the aerosol particles properties within boundary layer was captured. The dominant conditions observed during the JRA1 period were the fresh winter smog layers occurring in lowermost boundary layer over Athens. NARLa provided profiles as close to surface as 50m, thus the data obtained in the near-range were used for the incomplete overlap region of the far-field channels. With NARLa we assessed the overlap at 355 and 532nm wavelengths and concluded on the possibility of using the single near-range 532 nm channel for the overlap correction in both VIS and UV channels of the PollyXT-NOA. As a result, the obtained lidar profiles are expected to be more consistent with the sunphotometer measurements. In the future, the GARRLiC code can be applied on the synergy of combined near and far range lidar profiles with AERONET data sets in order to study improvement on the inversion results.

  9. Optical properties of circulating human blood in the wavelength range 400-2500 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggan, Andre; Friebel, Moritz; Doerschel, Klaus; Hahn, Andreas; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge about the optical properties (mu) a, (mu) s, and g of human blood plays an important role for many diagnostic and therapeutic applications in laser medicine and medical diagnostics. They strongly depend on physiological parameters such as oxygen saturation, osmolarity, flow conditions, haematocrit, etc. The integrating sphere technique and inverse Monte Carlo simulations were applied to measure (mu) a, (mu) s, and g of circulating human blood. At 633 nm the optical properties of human blood with a haematocrit of 10% and an oxygen saturation of 98% were found to be 0.210 +/- 0.002 mm-1 for (mu) a, 77.3 +/- 0.5 mm-1 for (mu) s, and 0.994 +/- 0.001 for the g factor. An increase of the haematocrit up to 50% lead to a linear increase of absorption and reduced scattering. Variations in osmolarity and wall shear rate led to changes of all three parameters while variations in the oxygen saturation only led to a significant change of the absorption coefficient. A spectrum of all three parameters was measured in the wavelength range 400 - 2500 nm for oxygenated and deoxygenated blood, showing that blood absorption followed the absorption behavior of haemoglobin and water. The scattering coefficient decreased for wavelengths above 500 nm with approximately (lambda) -1.7; the g factor was higher than 0.9 over the whole wavelength range.

  10. Photodegradation of malachite green and malachite green carbinol under irradiation with different wavelength ranges.

    PubMed

    Fischer, A R; Werner, P; Goss, K-U

    2011-01-01

    The dye malachite green (MG) is used worldwide as a fungicide in aquaculture. It is a toxic substance which in aqueous solutions is partly converted into its non-ionic colorless form (leucocarbinol). The equilibrium between these two forms is pH-dependent (pK=6.9). To assess the photodegradation of MG under sunlight conditions, both species were irradiated separately in aqueous solutions with different pH values (4.0 and 12.0) using various ultraviolet and visible wavelength ranges (UV/VIS). A 700 W high-pressure mercury lamp with special filters was used. No artificial photooxidizers such as H₂O₂ or TiO₂ were added. MG leucocarbinol proved to be much more sensitive to irradiation than the dye form. Quantum yields Φ were calculated for some wavelength ranges as follows: MG carbinol: Φ((280-312 nm)) is 4.3 × 10⁻³, Φ((313 - 410 nm)) is 5.8 × 10⁻³, and MG dye: Φ((280 - 312 nm)) is 4.8 × 10(-5), Φ((313-365nm)) is 1.1×10⁻⁵, and Φ((> 365nm)) is 0, respectively. Therefore, the solar photolysis of MG is an important sink and primarily depends on the photodegradation of the colorless leucocarbinol. During the irradiation of MG leucocarbinol with wavelengths > 365 nm, an intermediate was formed which has photocatalytical properties.

  11. Magnesium as Novel Material for Active Plasmonics in the Visible Wavelength Range.

    PubMed

    Sterl, Florian; Strohfeldt, Nikolai; Walter, Ramon; Griessen, Ronald; Tittl, Andreas; Giessen, Harald

    2015-12-09

    Investigating new materials plays an important role for advancing the field of nanoplasmonics. In this work, we fabricate nanodisks from magnesium and demonstrate tuning of their plasmon resonance throughout the whole visible wavelength range by changing the disk diameter. Furthermore, we employ a catalytic palladium cap layer to transform the metallic Mg particles into dielectric MgH2 particles when exposed to hydrogen gas. We prove that this transition can be reversed in the presence of oxygen. This yields plasmonic nanostructures with an extinction spectrum that can be repeatedly switched on or off or kept at any intermediate state, offering new perspectives for active plasmonic metamaterials.

  12. Observations of secondary spectrophotometric standards in the wavelength range between 5840 and 10800 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, B. J.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-three stars that are suitable for use as secondary spectrophotometric standards are compared with Alpha Lyrae in the wavelength range between 5840 A and 1.1 microns. The consistency of the present data with previously existing measurements is discussed, along with the reliability of the present data. It is found that there is good agreement with previous data in some cases, but moderate or substantial discrepancies are exhibited in others. It is suggested that extinction variation is the most probable cause of the discrepancies, and observational procedures that may improve the situation with regard to the discrepancies are proposed.

  13. Optical constants determination of neodymium and gadolinium in the 3-nm to 100-nm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjornrattanawanich, B.; Windt, D. L.; Uspenskii, Y. A.; Seely, J. F.

    2006-08-01

    The optical constants (n, k) of the wavelength-dependent index of refraction N = n+ik = 1-δ+ik of Nd (Neodymium) and Gd (Gadolinium) are determined in the wavelength range of 3 nm to 100 nm by the transmittance method using synchrotron radiation. Nd and Gd films with thicknesses ranging from 5 nm to 180 nm were fabricated on Si photodiodes (which served as the coating substrates as well as the detectors) and capped with Si layers to protect these reactive rare earth elements from oxidation. The imaginary part (k) obtained directly from the transmittance measurement is used in the derivation of the real part (δ) of the complex index of refraction N through the Kramers- Kronig integral. The measured optical constants are used in the design of currently developed Nd- and Gd-based multilayers for solar imaging applications. Our results on Nd and Gd optical constants and the reflectance of some Nd- and Gd-based multilayers are presented.

  14. Investigations of Saturn’s Main Rings over Broad Range of Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda J.; Deau, Estelle; Morishima, Ryuji; Filacchione, Gianrico; Hedman, Matt; Nicholson, Phil; Colwell, Josh; Bradley, Todd; Showalter, Mark; Pilorz, Stu; Brooks, Shawn; Ciarniello, Mauro

    2015-11-01

    An abundance of information about the characteristics of Saturn’s ring particles and their regolith can be obtained by comparing the changes in their brightness, color and temperature with changing viewing geometry over a wide range of wavelengths from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared. Data from Cassini’s Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) are jointly studied using data from the lit and unlit main rings at multiple geometries and solar elevations over 11 years of the Cassini mission. Using multi-wavelength data sets allows us to test different thermal models by combining the effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, particle spin rate and spin axis orientation.CIRS temperatures, ISS colors and UVIS brightness appear to vary noticeably with phase angle, but are not a strong function of spacecraft elevation angle. Color, temperature and brightness dependence on solar elevation angle are also observed. VIMS observations show that the infrared ice absorption band depths change with the solar phase angle, in particular between 0-20° and at high phase. This trend indicates that single scattering approximation is correct only at low phases (<20°) while at high phase multiple scattering must be taken into account.These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of scattering within the regolith, as well as scattering between individual particles or clumps in a many-particle-thick layer. Initial results from our joint studies will be presented.This research was carried out in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA

  15. All-optical SOA-based wavelength converter assisted by optical filters with wide operation wavelength and large dynamic input power range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Wang, J.; Marculescu, A.; Vorreau, P.; Zhang, Z.; Freude, W.; Leuthold, J.

    2008-11-01

    All-optical wavelength converters (AOWCs) based on nonlinear processes of semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) have attracted interest to overcome the wavelength blocking issues in future transparent networks. While many schemes work well, pattern effect impairments that are due to the finite lifetime of charge carriers are an issue most of the time. Recently, wavelength conversion and pattern effect mitigation techniques that work by properly shaping the passband of filters following the converter have been introduced. However, due to the necessity of selecting filter slope and position precisely, one would expect that the schemes are extremely sensitive to any drift of the center wavelength. In this work, we demonstrate a 40 Gbit/s SOA-based wavelength converter with more than 15 dB dynamic input power range. In addition, the center wavelength of the converted signal has a tolerance of ~0.2 nm towards the red spectral region and of ~0.1nm towards blue spectral region, respectively. This success is due to combining advantageously pattern effect mitigation techniques connected to the pulse reformatting optical filter, the red-shift and the blue-shift optical filter.

  16. Coherent radiation of relativistic electrons in dielectric fibers in the millimeter wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, G. A.; Potylitsyn, A. P.; Bleko, V. V.; Soboleva, V. V.

    2015-02-01

    The generation of visible light by a relativistic electron beam in dielectric fibers was considered in X. Artru and C. Ray, Nucl. Inst. Meth. B 309, 4 (2013), where the characteristics of radiation induced in a fiber by the electromagnetic field of a relativistic charged particle were studied and it was emphasized that they differ from those in the traditional mechanisms of radiation such as transition and diffraction. We have experimentally studied the characteristics of such a radiation in the millimeter wavelength range. It has been shown that radiation can be generated through different mechanisms depending on the geometry of the position of a fiber with respect to the trajectory of the charged particle. Fibers have been shown to be promising for nondestructive diagnostics of accelerator beams.

  17. Optical properties of apple skin and flesh in the wavelength range from 350 to 2200 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeys, Wouter; Velazco-Roa, Maria A.; Thennadil, Suresh N.; Ramon, Herman; Nicolaï, Bart M.

    2008-03-01

    Optical measurement of fruit quality is challenging due to the presence of a skin around the fruit flesh and the multiple scattering by the structured tissues. To gain insight in the light-tissue interaction, the optical properties of apple skin and flesh tissue are estimated in the 350-2200 nm range for three cultivars. For this purpose, single integrating sphere measurements are combined with inverse adding-doubling. The observed absorption coefficient spectra are dominated by water in the near infrared and by pigments and chlorophyll in the visible region, whose concentrations are much higher in skin tissue. The scattering coefficient spectra show the monotonic decrease with increasing wavelength typical for biological tissues with skin tissue being approximately three times more scattering than flesh tissue. Comparison to the values from time-resolved spectroscopy reported in literature showed comparable profiles for the optical properties, but overestimation of the absorption coefficient values, due to light losses.

  18. Optical properties of apple skin and flesh in the wavelength range from 350 to 2200 nm.

    PubMed

    Saeys, Wouter; Velazco-Roa, Maria A; Thennadil, Suresh N; Ramon, Herman; Nicolaï, Bart M

    2008-03-01

    Optical measurement of fruit quality is challenging due to the presence of a skin around the fruit flesh and the multiple scattering by the structured tissues. To gain insight in the light-tissue interaction, the optical properties of apple skin and flesh tissue are estimated in the 350-2200 nm range for three cultivars. For this purpose, single integrating sphere measurements are combined with inverse adding-doubling. The observed absorption coefficient spectra are dominated by water in the near infrared and by pigments and chlorophyll in the visible region, whose concentrations are much higher in skin tissue. The scattering coefficient spectra show the monotonic decrease with increasing wavelength typical for biological tissues with skin tissue being approximately three times more scattering than flesh tissue. Comparison to the values from time-resolved spectroscopy reported in literature showed comparable profiles for the optical properties, but overestimation of the absorption coefficient values, due to light losses.

  19. Method and apparatus for generating high power laser pulses in the two to six micron wavelength range

    DOEpatents

    MacPherson, David C.; Nelson, Loren D.; O'Brien, Martin J.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus performs a method of generating one or more output laser pulses in a range of 2 to 6 microns. When a plurality of the output laser pulses are generated, a first output pulse has any selected wavelength within the range and a second output pulse is temporally closely spaced relative to the first output pulse and has a chosen wavelength differing from the selected wavelength. An oscillator laser cavity is provided with a tunable oscillator rod capable of generating initial laser pulses within a range of from 750 to 1000 nm, and a tuning element is coupled to the rod. A flashlamp is operable to pump the rod. For two pulse operation, the flashlamp has a given duration. A Q-switch provides the initial laser pulses upon operation of the tuning element and the flashlamp. A Raman device coupled to the rod shifts the wavelength of such initial laser pulse into the range of from 2 to 6 microns to form the output laser pulse having a wavelength within the range. For multiple pulses, a controller causes the Q-switch to provide first and second ones of the initial laser pulses, spaced by a time interval less than the given duration. Also, a selector coupled to the tuning element is operable within such duration to successively select the wavelength of the first output pulse and the chosen wavelength of the second initial pulse. The Raman device is responsive to each of the initial light pulses to generate radiation at first and second Stokes wavelengths, each of said the output laser pulses being radiation at the second Stokes wavelength.

  20. Method and apparatus for generating high power laser pulses in the two to six micron wavelength range

    DOEpatents

    MacPherson, D.C.; Nelson, L.D.; O`Brien, M.J.

    1996-12-10

    Apparatus performs a method of generating one or more output laser pulses in a range of 2 to 6 microns. When a plurality of the output laser pulses are generated, a first output pulse has any selected wavelength within the range and a second output pulse is temporally closely spaced relative to the first output pulse and has a chosen wavelength differing from the selected wavelength. An oscillator laser cavity is provided with a tunable oscillator rod capable of generating initial laser pulses within a range of from 750 to 1000 nm, and a tuning element is coupled to the rod. A flashlamp is operable to pump the rod. For two pulse operation, the flashlamp has a given duration. A Q-switch provides the initial laser pulses upon operation of the tuning element and the flashlamp. A Raman device coupled to the rod shifts the wavelength of such initial laser pulse into the range of from 2 to 6 microns to form the output laser pulse having a wavelength within the range. For multiple pulses, a controller causes the Q-switch to provide first and second ones of the initial laser pulses, spaced by a time interval less than the given duration. Also, a selector coupled to the tuning element is operable within such duration to successively select the wavelength of the first output pulse and the chosen wavelength of the second initial pulse. The Raman device is responsive to each of the initial light pulses to generate radiation at first and second Stokes wavelengths, each of said the output laser pulses being radiation at the second Stokes wavelength. 30 figs.

  1. High power laser diodes at 14xx nm wavelength range for industrial and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telkkälä, Jarkko; Boucart, Julien; Krejci, Martin; Crum, Trevor; Lichtenstein, Norbert

    2014-03-01

    We report on the development of the latest generation of high power laser diodes at 14xx nm wavelength range suitable for industrial applications such as plastics welding and medical applications including acne treatment, skin rejuvenation and surgery. The paper presents the newest chip generation developed at II-VI Laser Enterprise, increasing the output power and the power conversion efficiency while retaining the reliability of the initial design. At an emission wavelength around 1440 nm we applied the improved design to a variety of assemblies exhibiting maximum power values as high as 7 W for broad-area single emitters. For 1 cm wide bars on conductive coolers and for bars on active micro channel coolers we have obtained 50 W and 72 W in continuous wave (cw) operation respectively. The maximum power measured for a 1 cm bar operated with 50 μs pulse width and 0.01% duty cycle was 184 W, demonstrating the potential of the chip design for optimized cooling. Power conversion efficiency values as high as 50% for a single emitter device and over 40% for mounted bars have been demonstrated, reducing the required power budget to operate the devices. Both active and conductive bar assembly configurations show polarization purity greater than 98%. Life testing has been conducted at 95 A, 50% duty cycle and 0.5 Hz hard pulsed operation for bars which were soldered to conductive copper CS mounts using our hard solder technology. The results after 5500 h, or 10 million "on-off" cycles show stable operation.

  2. The optical absorption of triatomic carbon C3 for the wavelength range 260 to 560 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The spectral absorption properties of C3 have been measured in a shock tube containing a test gas mixture of acetylene diluted with argon. The absorption of a pulsed xenon light source was measured by means of eight photomultiplier channels to a spectrograph and an accompanying drum camera. The postshock test gas temperature and pressure were varied over the range 3240 to 4300 K and 37 to 229 kPa, respectively. The results showed appreciable absorption by C3 for the wavelength range 300 to 540 nm. The various reported measurements of the heat of formation of C3 which are available in the open literature were reviewed, and a value of 198 kcal/mol is recommended. This value, along with best available values for other species, was used to calculate the number density of C3 for the conditions of the present experiments in order to compute absorption cross section or electronic oscillator strength. The computed electronic oscillator strength varied from a high of 0.062 at 3300 K to a low of 0.036 at 3900 K.

  3. Increment of Access Points in Integrated System of Wavelength Division Multiplexed Passive Optical Network Radio over Fiber

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, I. S.; Alavi, S. E.; Soltanian, M. R. K.; Fisal, N.; Supa’at, A. S. M.; Ahmad, H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a novel technique to increase the numbers of access points (APs) in a wavelength division multiplexed-passive optical network (WDM-PON) integrated in a 100 GHz radio-over-fiber (RoF). Eight multi-carriers separated by 25 GHz intervals were generated in the range of 193.025 to 193.200 THz using a microring resonator (MRR) system incorporating an add-drop filter system. All optically generated multi-carriers were utilized in an integrated system of WDM-PON-RoF for transmission of four 43.6 Gb/sec orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signals. Results showed that an acceptable BER variation for different path lengths up to 25 km was achievable for all four access points and thus the transmission of four OFDM channels is feasible for a 25 km standard single mode fiber (SSMF) path length. PMID:26153536

  4. Satellite laser ranging using superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors at 1064  nm wavelength.

    PubMed

    Xue, Li; Li, Zhulian; Zhang, Labao; Zhai, Dongsheng; Li, Yuqiang; Zhang, Sen; Li, Ming; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng; Xiong, Yaoheng

    2016-08-15

    Satellite laser ranging operating at 1064 nm wavelength using superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) is successfully demonstrated. A SNSPD with an intrinsic quantum efficiency of 80% and a dark count rate of 100 cps at 1064 nm wavelength is developed and introduced to Yunnan Observatory in China. With improved closed-loop telescope systems (field of view of about 26''), satellites including Cryosat, Ajisai, and Glonass with ranges of 1600 km, 3100 km, and 19,500 km, respectively, are experimentally ranged with mean echo rates of 1200/min, 4200/min, and 320/min, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of laser ranging for satellites using SNSPDs at 1064 nm wavelength. Theoretical analysis of the detection efficiency and the mean echo rate for typical satellites indicate that it is possible for a SNSPD to range satellites from low Earth orbit to geostationary Earth orbit.

  5. Electro-optical SLS devices for operating at new wavelength ranges

    DOEpatents

    Osbourn, Gordon C.

    1986-01-01

    An intrinsic semiconductor electro-optical device includes a p-n junction intrinsically responsive, when cooled, to electromagnetic radiation in the wavelength range of 8-12 um. The junction consists of a strained-layer superlattice of alternating layers of two different III-V semiconductors having mismatched lattice constants when in bulk form. A first set of layers is either InAs.sub.1-x Sb.sub.x (where x is aobut 0.5 to 0.7) or In.sub.1-x Ga.sub.x As.sub.1-y Sb.sub.y (where x and y are chosen such that the bulk bandgap of the resulting layer is about the same as the minimum bandgap in the In.sub.1-x Ga.sub.x As.sub.1-y Sb.sub.y family). The second set of layers has a lattice constant larger than the lattice constant of the layers in the first set.

  6. Detection of wavelengths in the visible range using fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Leonardo; Morales, Yailteh; Mattos, Lorenzo; Torres, Cesar O.

    2013-11-01

    This paper shows the design and implementation of a fiber optic sensor for detecting and identifying wavelengths in the visible range. The system consists of a diffuse optical fiber, a conventional laser diode 650nm, 2.5mW of power, an ambient light sensor LX1972, a PIC 18F2550 and LCD screen for viewing. The principle used in the detection of the lambda is based on specular reflection and absorption. The optoelectronic device designed and built used the absorption and reflection properties of the material under study, having as active optical medium a bifurcated optical fiber, which is optically coupled to an ambient light sensor, which makes the conversion of light signals to electricas, procedure performed by a microcontroller, which acquires and processes the signal. To verify correct operation of the assembly were utilized the color cards of sewing thread and nail polish as samples for analysis. This optoelectronic device can be used in many applications such as quality control of industrial processes, classification of corks or bottle caps, color quality of textiles, sugar solutions, polymers and food among others.

  7. Apparatus And Methods For Launching And Receiving A Broad Wavelength Range Source

    DOEpatents

    Von Drasek, William A.; Sonnenfroh, David; Allen, Mark G.; Stafford-Evans, Joy

    2006-02-28

    An apparatus and method for simultaneous detection of N gas species through laser radiation attenuation techniques is disclosed. Each of the N species has a spectral absorption band. N laser sources operate at a wavelength ?N in a spectral absorption band separated by the cutoff wavelength for single-mode transmission. Each laser source corresponds to a gas species and transmits radiation through an optical fiber constructed and arranged to provide single-mode transmission with minimal power loss.

  8. Aerosol single scattering albedo retrieval with various techniques in the UV and visible wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazantzidis, A.; Krotkov, N.; Blumthaler, M.; Bais, A.; Kazadzis, S.; Balis, D.; Schmidhauser, R.; Kouremeti, N.; Giannakaki, E.; Arola, A.

    2009-08-01

    The most important aerosol properties for determining aerosol effect in the solar radiation reaching the earth's surface are the aerosol extinction optical depth and the single scattering albedo (SSA). Most of the latest studies, dealing with aerosol direct or indirect effects, are based on the analysis of aerosol optical depth in a regional or global scale, while SSA is typically assumed based on theoretical assumptions and not direct measurements. Especially for the retrieval of SSA in the UV wavelengths only limited work has been available in the literature. In the frame of SCOUT-O3 project, the variability of the aerosol SSA in the UV and visible range was investigated during an experimental campaign. The campaign took place in July 2006 at Thessaloniki, Greece, an urban environment with high temporal aerosol variability. SSA values were calculated using measured aerosol optical depth, direct and diffuse irradiance as input to radiative transfer models. The measurements were performed by co-located UV-MFRSR and AERONET CIMEL filter radiometers, as well as by two spectroradiometers. In addition, vertical aerosol profile measurements with LIDAR and in-situ information about the aerosol optical properties at ground level with a nephelometer and an aethalometer were available. The ground-based measurements revealed a strong diurnal cycle in the SSA measured in-situ at ground level (from 0.75 to 0.87 at 450nm), which could be related to the variability of the wind speed, the boundary layer height and the local aerosol emissions. The reasons for SSA differences obtained by different techniques are analyzed for the first time to provide recommendations for more accurate column SSA measurements.

  9. Wide wavelength range tunable one-dimensional silicon nitride nano-grating guided mode resonance filter based on azimuthal rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukino, Ryoji; Sahoo, Pankaj K.; Sharma, Jaiyam; Takamura, Tsukasa; Joseph, Joby; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2017-01-01

    We describe wavelength tuning in a one dimensional (1D) silicon nitride nano-grating guided mode resonance (GMR) structure under conical mounting configuration of the device. When the GMR structure is rotated about the axis perpendicular to the surface of the device (azimuthal rotation) for light incident at oblique angles, the conditions for resonance are different than for conventional GMR structures under classical mounting. These resonance conditions enable tuning of the GMR peak position over a wide range of wavelengths. We experimental demonstrate tuning over a range of 375 nm between 500 nm˜875 nm. We present a theoretical model to explain the resonance conditions observed in our experiments and predict the peak positions with show excellent agreement with experiments. Our method for tuning wavelengths is simpler and more efficient than conventional procedures that employ variations in the design parameters of structures or conical mounting of two-dimensional (2D) GMR structures and enables a single 1D GMR device to function as a high efficiency wavelength filter over a wide range of wavelengths. We expect tunable filters based on this technique to be applicable in a wide range of fields including astronomy and biomedical imaging.

  10. Linear absorption coefficient of beryllium in the 50-300-A wavelength range. [bandpass filter materials for ultraviolet astronomy instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barstow, M. A.; Lewis, M.; Petre, R.

    1983-01-01

    Transmittances of thin-film filters fabricated for an extreme-UV astronomy sounding-rocket experiment yield values for the linear absorption coefficient of beryllium in the 50-300-A wavelength range, in which previous measurements are sparse. The inferred values are consistent with the lowest data previously published and may have important consequences for extreme-UV astronomers.

  11. 21-nm-range wavelength-tunable L-band Er-doped fiber linear-cavity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shiquan; Zhao, Chunliu; Li, Zhaohui; Ding, Lei; Yuan, Shuzhong; Dong, Xiaoyi

    2001-10-01

    A novel method, which utilizes amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) as a secondary pump source, is presented for implanting a linear cavity erbium-doped fiber laser operating in L-Band. The output wavelength tuned from 1566 nm to 1587 nm, about 21 nm tuning range, was obtained in the experiment and the stability of the laser is very good.

  12. Broadband carbon monoxide laser system operating in the wavelength range of 2.5 - 8.3 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Yu M; Ionin, Andrei A; Kinyaevsky, I O; Klimachev, Yu M; Kozlov, A Yu; Kotkov, A A; Lanskii, G V; Shaiduko, A V

    2013-02-28

    A two-cascade frequency conversion of CO-laser radiation is demonstrated in a single sample of a nonlinear ZnGeP{sub 2} crystal. The crystal is pumped by a repetitively pulsed cryogenic lowpressure CO laser operating on {approx}150 vibration - rotational transitions in the wavelength range 5.0 - 7.5 {mu}m, which corresponds to the frequency range of a half octave. In the first conversion cascade, generation of second harmonic and sum frequencies of various pairs of CO-laser radiation give {approx}350 emission lines in the wavelength range 2.5 - 3.7 {mu}m. In the second cascade, by mixing the radiation converted in the first cascade with the residual radiation of the CO laser we have obtained {approx}90 lines in the range 4.3 - 5.0 {mu}m and more than 80 lines in the range 7.5 - 8.3 {mu}m. Thus, using a single sample of the nonlinear ZnGeP{sub 2} crystal pumped by the radiation of a single CO laser we have produced a source of broadband (more than one and a half octaves) laser radiation, simultaneously operating at {approx}670 lines in the wavelength range 2.5 - 8.3 {mu}m. (lasers)

  13. Single & Multiprobe Apertureless Thermal Imaging of Electromagnetic Excitation Over A Wide Range of Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekhter, Rimma; Lewis, Aaron; Kokotov, Sophia; Hamra, Patricia; Fleischman, Boaz; Taha, Hesham

    2013-03-01

    Near-field optical effects have generally been detected using photodetectors. There are no reports on the use of the temperature changes caused by electromagnetic radiation using thermal sensing probes for scanned probe microscopy. In this paper we apply our development of such probes to monitor the effects of electromagnetic radiation at a number of different wavelengths using the heating caused in a sample by specific wavelengths and their propagation. The paper will catalogue effects over a wide spectrum of wavelengths from the near to mid infrared. The thermal sensing probes are based on glass nanopipettes that have metal wires that make a contact at the very tip of a tapered glass structure. These probes are cantilevered and use normal force tuning fork methodology to bring them either into contact or near-contact since this feedback method has no jump to contact instability associated with it. Data will be shown that defines the resolution of such thermal sensing to at least the 32 nm level. In addition the probes have the important attribute of having a highly exposed tip that allows for either optical sensing methodologies with a lens either from directly above or below or heat sensing with a single or additional probe in a multiprobe scanning probe system.

  14. Dual-wavelength technology used in anti-interference for long-range and short-distance detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haojun; Zhao, Jianlin; Ren, Ju; Sun, Limin

    2009-10-01

    Technology of interference becomes more advancing. Adopting fog and aerosols is the best way to interfere optical detection. Due to the fog and aerosols, target recognition becomes difficult under this environment. In the present paper a method is given to solve this problem in a simple way. A dual-wavelength technology used in anti-interfere for long range and short distance detection is introduced in this paper, which can discriminate the backscattering reflection of fog and aerosols. In the present work the scattering character of the special fog and aerosols environment is calculated using the Rayleigh scattering method and Mie scattering method. The scattering characters in different environment are analyses using two wavelengths, i.e. one wavelength lies in ultraviolet wave band, the other in near infrared wave band. The results indicated that the ratio of proportion-discrimination is usually greater than 2, and deeper the strength of the fog and aerosols, the greater the ratio. This method also validated by experiment. In the present study, three kinds of wavelength such as 405nm, 670nm and 808nm are adopted. The intensity data collected shows that the ratio is greater than 3. The performance and working principle of the system and its components are analyzed in details. Based on the full system, the dual-wavelength technology can be well applied. The result of the experiments also proves that the technology is efficient, especially in the heavy fog and aerosols environment. The dual wavelength method can be used for long range and short distance detection.

  15. Diffractive optical elements with an increased angular and wavelength range of operation for application in solar collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, H.; Naydenova, I.; Martin, S.

    2015-05-01

    A holographic device characterised by a large angular and wavelength range of operation is under development. It aims to improve the efficiency of solar energy concentration in solar cells. The aim of this study is to increase the angular and wavelength range of the gratings by stacking three layers of high efficiency gratings on top of each other so that light from a moving source, such as the sun, is collected from a broad range of angles. In order to increase the angle and the wavelength range of operation of the holographic device, low spatial frequency of holographic recording is preferable. Recording at low spatial frequency requires a photopolymer material with unique properties, such as fast monomer/monomers diffusion rate/rates. An acrylamide-based photopolymer developed at the Centre for Industrial and Engineering Optics has been used in this study. This material has fast diffusion rates and has previously demonstrated very good performance at low spatial frequency, where gratings of 90% diffraction efficiency at 300 lines/ mm spatial frequency were recorded in layers of 75 μm thickness. This paper will study the angular selectivity of a device consisting of stacked layer of Difftactive Optical Elements ( DOEs) recorded at range of angles at spatial frequency of 300 lines/mm with recording intensity of 1 mW/cm2. The optical recording process and the properties of the multilayer structure are described and discussed.

  16. A study of sea-wave spectra in a wide wavelength range from satellite and in-situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondur, V. G.; Dulov, V. A.; Murynin, A. B.; Yurovsky, Yu. Yu.

    2016-12-01

    The results of studying sea-wave spectra in a wide wavelength range using high resolution (0.5-1.0 m) satellite optical imagery spectra and the results of measurements carried out from an oceanographic platform using string-wave recorders, stereo system, and drifting wave buoys are presented in this paper. The wave spectra retrieved from satellite imagery and sea-truth data have been compared. A comparison has shown the adequacy of the purposely developed retrieval methods. Power approximation indices for spatial spectra in the 0.04-5.0-m wavelength range have been found. It has been shown that the wave spectra measured experimentally by satellite-based and in-situ methods best approximate the Toba spectrum.

  17. Study of the electron kinetic processes in laser-induced breakdown of electronegative gases over an extended wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamal, Yosr E. E.-D.; Omar, M. M.

    2001-12-01

    A theoretical investigation of laser-induced breakdown of electronegative gases is presented. The formulations are based on an electron cascade model previously developed by Evans and Gamal (J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 13 (1980) 1447-1458). This model solves numerically the time-dependent Boltzmann equation simultaneously with a set of rate equations describing the population density of the formed excited states. It includes the possible kinds of interactions between electrons, molecules and photons. Calculations are carried out under the experimental conditions of Davis et al. (Appl. Optics 30 (1991) 4358-4364) where molecular oxygen over a pressure range of 20-760 Torr is irradiated with the first four harmonics of a Nd : YAG laser source at wavelengths 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm of pulse duration 8.5, 7.5, 6.5 and 5.5 ns, respectively, and peak irradiance varies between 3.6×10 10 and 3.7×10 11 W/cm 2. Computations revealed that the dependence of threshold irradiance on gas pressure is in quite close agreement with those measured by Davis et al. (1991) for the four laser wavelengths considered in this analysis. It is also shown that at laser wavelengths 532 and 266 nm oxygen breakdown is mainly governed by the combined effect of two and three-body attachment loss processes, while for the wavelengths 335and 1064 nm, the three-body attachment process dominates. In addition, calculation of the electron energy distribution function and its parameters, viz, electron density, ionization rate and electron mean energy predicted the importance of the photoionization of excited states as the main electron generation process over the short wavelength range.

  18. Predictions and measurements of scattering and absorption over broad wavelength ranges in tissue phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Mourant, J.R.; Fuselier, T.; Boyer, J.; Johnson, T.M.; Bigio, I.J.

    1997-02-01

    Predictions from Mie theory regarding the wavelength dependence of scattering in tissue from the near UV to the near IR are discussed and compared with experiments on tissue phantoms. For large fiber separations it is shown that rapid, simultaneous measurements of the elastic scatter signal for several fiber separations can yield the absorption coefficient and reduced scattering coefficient. With this information, the size of the scattering particles can be estimated, and this is done for Intralipid. Measurements made at smaller source detector separations support Mie theory calculations, demonstrating that the sensitivity of elastic scatter measurements to morphological features, such as scatterer size, is enhanced when the distance between the source and detector fibers is small. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  19. Stellar science from a blue wavelength range. A possible design for the blue arm of 4MOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Seifert, W.; Koch, A.; Xu, W.; Caffau, E.; Christlieb, N.; Korn, A. J.; Lind, K.; Sbordone, L.; Ruchti, G.; Feltzing, S.; de Jong, R. S.; Barden, S.

    2015-09-01

    From stellar spectra, a variety of physical properties of stars can be derived. In particular, the chemical composition of stellar atmospheres can be inferred from absorption line analyses. These provide key information on large scales, such as the formation of our Galaxy, down to the small-scale nucleosynthesis processes that take place in stars and supernovae. By extending the observed wavelength range toward bluer wavelengths, we optimize such studies to also include critical absorption lines in metal-poor stars, and allow for studies of heavy elements (Z\\ensuremath{g}e 38) whose formation processes remain poorly constrained. In this context, spectrographs optimized for observing blue wavelength ranges are essential, since many absorption lines at redder wavelengths are too weak to be detected in metal-poor stars. This means that some elements cannot be studied in the visual-redder regions, and important scientific tracers and science cases are lost. The present era of large public surveys will target millions of stars. It is therefore important that the next generation of spectrographs are designed such that they cover a wide wavelength range and can observe a large number of stars simultaneously. Only then, we can gain the full information from stellar spectra, from both metal-poor to metal-rich ones, that will allow us to understand the aforementioned formation scenarios in greater detail. Here we describe the requirements driving the design of the forthcoming survey instrument 4MOST, a multi-object spectrograph commissioned for the ESO VISTA 4 m-telescope. While 4MOST is also intended for studies of active galactic nuclei, baryonic acoustic oscillations, weak lensing, cosmological constants, supernovae and other transients, we focus here on high-density, wide-area survey of stars and the science that can be achieved with high-resolution stellar spectroscopy. Scientific and technical requirements that governed the design are described along with a thorough

  20. Vertically integrated (Ga, In)N nanostructures for future single photon emitters operating in the telecommunication wavelength range.

    PubMed

    Winden, A; Mikulics, M; Grützmacher, D; Hardtdegen, H

    2013-10-11

    Important technological steps are discussed and realized for future room-temperature operation of III-nitride single photon emitters. First, the growth technology of positioned single pyramidal InN nanostructures capped by Mg-doped GaN is presented. The optimization of their optical characteristics towards narrowband emission in the telecommunication wavelength range is demonstrated. In addition, a device concept and technology was developed so that the nanostructures became singularly addressable. It was found that the nanopyramids emit in the telecommunication wavelength range if their size is chosen appropriately. A p-GaN contacting layer was successfully produced as a cap to the InN pyramids and the top p-contact was achievable using an intrinsically conductive polymer PEDOT:PSS, allowing a 25% increase in light transmittance compared to standard Ni/Au contact technology. Single nanopyramids were successfully integrated into a high-frequency device layout. These decisive technology steps provide a promising route to electrically driven and room-temperature operating InN based single photon emitters in the telecommunication wavelength range.

  1. Influence of the absorption behavior of sunscreens in the short-wavelength UV range (UVB) and the long-wavelength UV range (UVA) on the relation of the UVB absorption to sun protection factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigmann, Hans-Juergen; Schanzer, Sabine; Antoniou, Christina; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2010-09-01

    The absorption of filter substances in sunscreens, reducing the incident ultraviolet (UV) radiation, is the basis for the protecting ability of such formulations. The erythema-correlated sun protection factor (SPF), depending mainly on the intensity of the UVB radiation, is the common value to quantify the efficacy of the formulations avoiding sunburn. An ex vivo method combining tape stripping and optical spectroscopy is applied to measure the absorption of sunscreens in the entire UV spectral range. The obtained relations between the short-wavelength UV (UVB) absorption and the SPF confirm a clear influence of the long-wavelength UV (UVA) absorption on the SPF values. The data reflect the historical development of the relation of the concentration of UVB and UVA filters in sunscreens and points to the influence of additional ingredients, e.g., antioxidants and cell-protecting agents on the efficacy of the products.

  2. Influence of the absorption behavior of sunscreens in the short-wavelength UV range (UVB) and the long-wavelength UV range (UVA) on the relation of the UVB absorption to sun protection factor.

    PubMed

    Weigmann, Hans-Juergen; Schanzer, Sabine; Antoniou, Christina; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2010-01-01

    The absorption of filter substances in sunscreens, reducing the incident ultraviolet (UV) radiation, is the basis for the protecting ability of such formulations. The erythema-correlated sun protection factor (SPF), depending mainly on the intensity of the UVB radiation, is the common value to quantify the efficacy of the formulations avoiding sunburn. An ex vivo method combining tape stripping and optical spectroscopy is applied to measure the absorption of sunscreens in the entire UV spectral range. The obtained relations between the short-wavelength UV (UVB) absorption and the SPF confirm a clear influence of the long-wavelength UV (UVA) absorption on the SPF values. The data reflect the historical development of the relation of the concentration of UVB and UVA filters in sunscreens and points to the influence of additional ingredients, e.g., antioxidants and cell-protecting agents on the efficacy of the products.

  3. Performance of a polarizer using synthetic mica crystal in the 12-25 nm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ming-Qi; Chen, Kai; Zhao, Jia; Sun, Li-Juan; Xi, Shi-Bo; Yan, Fen

    2011-05-01

    To develop polarizer functioning in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray region, the polarization performance of synthetic mica has been investigated theoretically with a simulation code using Fresnel equations and optical constants from the Henke database. The reflectance of synthetic mica crystal for s and p polarization was measured to investigate its polarization performance in a home-made synchrotron radiation soft X-ray polarimeter at beamline 3W1B, Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF). The reflectivity of the synthetic mica crystal at an angle of grazing incidence of 48° was obtained from the experimental data, which is about 4.8×10-3 at 25 nm and 6.0×10-4 at 12 nm, and the linear polarizance of the X-ray reflected by the synthetic mica crystal that we measured using an analyzer-rotating method increases from 80% to 96.6% in this EUV region, while higher than 98.2% in the simulation. The result indicates that this synthetic mica crystal works as a practical polarizer in this EUV region of 12-25 nm, and also in an extensive wavelength region higher than 25 nm.

  4. Near-infrared spectroscopy with Spectroscopic technique with wide range of wavelength information detects tissue oxygenation level clearly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eda, Hideo; Aoki, Hiromichi; Eura, Shigeru; Ebe, Kazutoshi

    2010-02-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is based on the modified-Lambert-Beer's law that changes in absorbance are proportional to changes in hemoglobin parameters. Majority of the conventional measurement methods uses only two or three wavelengths. In this research, basic examination of NIRS measurement was approached by acquiring wide range of wavelength information. Arterial occlusion task was performed by using the blood pressure cuff around the upper arm. Pressure of 200mmHg was then applied for about 3 minutes. During the arterial occlusion, the spectrum of the lower arm muscles was measured every 15 seconds, within the range of 600 to 1100nm. The secondary derivative spectrum was calculated from the measured spectrum. Arterial occlusion is a task which changes the oxygenation level of the tissue. The change can be regarded as the change of the spectrum form, not as the change of the baseline. Furthermore, it was found that other wavelength bands hold information correlating to this arterial occlusion task.

  5. A HIGH-RESOLUTION, MULTI-EPOCH SPECTRAL ATLAS OF PECULIAR STARS INCLUDING RAVE, GAIA , AND HERMES WAVELENGTH RANGES

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasella, Lina; Munari, Ulisse; Zwitter, Tomaz

    2010-12-15

    We present an Echelle+CCD, high signal-to-noise ratio, high-resolution (R = 20,000) spectroscopic atlas of 108 well-known objects representative of the most common types of peculiar and variable stars. The wavelength interval extends from 4600 to 9400 A and includes the RAVE, Gaia, and HERMES wavelength ranges. Multi-epoch spectra are provided for the majority of the observed stars. A total of 425 spectra of peculiar stars, which were collected during 56 observing nights between 1998 November and 2002 August, are presented. The spectra are given in FITS format and heliocentric wavelengths, with accurate subtraction of both the sky background and the scattered light. Auxiliary material useful for custom applications (telluric dividers, spectrophotometric stars, flat-field tracings) is also provided. The atlas aims to provide a homogeneous database of the spectral appearance of stellar peculiarities, a tool useful both for classification purposes and inter-comparison studies. It could also serve in the planning and development of automated classification algorithms designed for RAVE, Gaia, HERMES, and other large-scale spectral surveys. The spectrum of XX Oph is discussed in some detail as an example of the content of the present atlas.

  6. High-power cw laser bars of the 750 - 790-nm wavelength range

    SciTech Connect

    Degtyareva, N S; Kondakov, S A; Mikayelyan, G T; Gorlachuk, P V; Ladugin, M A; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr A; Ryaboshtan, Yu L; Yarotskaya, I V

    2013-06-30

    We have developed the effective design of semiconductor heterostructures, which allow one to fabricate cw laser diodes emitting in the 750 - 790-nm spectral range. The optimal conditions for fabrication of GaAsP/AlGaInP/GaAs heterostructures by MOCVD have been determined. It is shown that the use of quantum wells with a precisely defined quantity mismatch reduces the threshold current density and increases the external differential efficiency. The results of studies of characteristics of diode laser bars fabricated from these heterostructures are presented. (lasers)

  7. Two-Channel Generator of the 8-mm Wavelength Range for Radiation with Subgigawatt Power Level Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostov, V. V.; Elchaninov, A. A.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ul'maskulov, M. R.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Rukin, S. N.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2014-01-01

    We review the studies of phase stabilization of a pulsed relativistic backward-wave oscillator (BWO) excited by the feed voltage with a steep front. Results of radiation phase stabilization are compared with the results of in-phase excitation of two independent nanosecond relativistic microwave backward-wave oscillators of the 8-mm wavelength range. Stable and controlled (by correcting the voltage front) synchronization of two channels with identical high-current electron beams is demonstrated for the case of generation power of up to 230 MW and a pulse duration of up to 100 oscillation periods in each beam.

  8. In orbit degradation of UV optical components for the wavelength range 10-140 microns. AO 138.3 (FRECOPA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delabouinere, J. P.; Carabetian, C.; Hochedez, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    Optical components (thin film filters and multilayered mirrors) for use in the wavelength range 10-140 micro-m were included in the vacuum tight container FRECOPA in preparation for the SOHO mission. They were exposed during 9 months at the beginning of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) flight. One batch of components was exposed to the sun, while another one was shielded from solar radiation. The results of the optical transmission measurements of the flight components and of a groundbase reference set, made at the ORSAY Synchotron radiation light source are presented.

  9. Array rotation aperture synthesis for short-range imaging at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucotte, B. M.; Grafulla-GonzáLez, B.; Harvey, A. R.

    2009-02-01

    Millimeter-wave interferometric synthetic aperture imagers are currently being developed for short-range applications such as concealed weapons detection. In contrast to the traditional snapshot imaging approach, we investigate the potential of mechanical scanning between the scene and the array in order to reduce the number of antennas and correlators. We assess the trade-off between this hardware reduction, the radiometric sensitivity and the imaging frame rate of the system. We show that rotational scanning achieves a more uniform coverage of the (u, v) plane than the more conventional linear scanning. We use a genetic algorithm to optimize two-dimensional arrays for maximum uniform (u, v) coverage after a rotational mechanical scan and demonstrates improvements in the array point spread function. Imaging performance is assessed with simulated millimeter-wave scenes. Results show an increased image quality is achieved with the optimized array compared with a conventional power law Y-shaped array. Finally we discuss the increased demands on system stability and calibration that the increased acquisition time of the proposed technique places.

  10. A Sounding Rocket Mission Concept to Acquire High-Resolution Radiometric Spectra Spanning the 9 nm - 31 nm Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. Habash; Cirtain, Jonathan; McGuirck, Michael; Pavelitz, Steven; Weber, Ed.; Winebarger, Amy

    2012-01-01

    When studying Solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) emissions, both single-wavelength, two- dimensional (2D) spectroheliograms and multi-wavelength, one-dimensional (1D) line spectra are important, especially for a thorough understanding of the complex processes in the solar magnetized plasma from the base of the chromosphere through the corona. 2D image data are required for a detailed study of spatial structures, whereas radiometric (i.e., spectral) data provide information on relevant atomic excitation/ionization state densities (and thus temperature). Using both imaging and radiometric techniques, several satellite missions presently study solar dynamics in the EUV, including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Hinode, and the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The EUV wavelengths of interest typically span 9 nm to 31 nm, with the shorter wavelengths being associated with the hottest features (e.g., intense flares and bright points) and the longer wavelengths associated with cooler features (e.g., coronal holes and filaments). Because the optical components of satellite instruments degrade over time, it is not uncommon to conduct sounding rocket underflights for calibration purposes. The authors have designed a radiometric sounding rocket payload that could serve as both a calibration underflight for and a complementary scientific mission to the upcoming Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) mission aboard the GOES-R satellite (scheduled for a 2015 launch). The challenge to provide quality radiometric line spectra over the 9-31 nm range covered by SUVI was driven by the multilayer coatings required to make the optical components, including mirrors and gratings, reflective over the entire range. Typically, these multilayers provide useful EUV reflectances over bandwidths of a few nm. Our solution to this problem was to employ a three-telescope system in which the optical components were coated with multilayers that spanned three wavelength ranges to cover

  11. Glacial modifications of short-wavelength topography and potential feedbacks on the denudation of a deglaciated mountain range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcher, Bernhard; Kober, Florian; Kissling, Eduard; Willett, Sean

    2014-05-01

    Distinct erosional landforms in the European Alps and other mid- to high-latitude mountain belts highlight the importance of glacial erosion in shaping mountain topography. Here we focus on the glacially induced modifications to the short-wavelength topography of the European Central Alps in an attempt to characterize the impact of glacial erosion on topography and to highlight potential feedback mechanisms on the denudation of the deglaciated mountain range. Glacial induced changes to the short-wavelength topography were analyzed by measuring the variations of drainage density and hillslope relief across the range. Variations of denudation rates were analyzed by compiling catchment-averaged concentrations of cosmogenic 10Be from existing studies covering Alpine and Foreland basins. Our results underline the importance of the LGM ELA elevation (i.e. the Equilibrium Line Altitude at the Late Glacial Maximum) as an important limit for the destruction of short-wavelength topography: The cumulative impact of glacial erosion above the LGM ELA has progressively decreased (i) drainage density, (ii) channel integration and (iii) commensurately increased hillslopes length (or hillslope relief). Exceptions from this trend are the highest and steepest peaks and ridges, nunataks even during the LGM. Alpine catchments in the orogen parts below this limit (i.e. Alpine foothills) lack strong modifications by glaciers. Here, glacial erosion is largely restricted to glacial troughs. There is also a statistically significant correlation between drainage density (or hillslope length) and catchment-wide denudation rates. The correlation does not define a single-valued function; rather there are two populations above and below the LGM ELA, one with a positive correlation for low-elevation, fluvially-dominated landscapes and a second for high-elevation, glacially-eroded basins in which this correlation is negative. We speculate that the commensurate lengthening of hillslopes increase

  12. Spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging of lipid-rich plaques in the human aorta in the 740 to 1400 nm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Thomas J.; Hall, Andrew; Dhillon, Amar P.; Owen, James S.; Beard, Paul C.

    2012-06-01

    Spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging has the potential to discriminate between normal and lipid-rich atheromatous areas of arterial tissue by exploiting the differences in the absorption spectra of lipids and normal arterial tissue in the 740 to 1400 nm wavelength range. Identification of regions of high lipid concentration would be useful to identify plaques that are likely to rupture (vulnerable plaques). To demonstrate the feasibility of visualizing lipid-rich plaques, samples of human aortas were imaged in forward mode, at wavelengths of 970 and 1210 nm. It was shown that the structure of the arterial wall and the boundaries of lipid-rich plaques obtained from the photoacoustic images were in good agreement with histology. The presence of lipids was also confirmed by comparing the photoacoustic spectra (740 to 1400 nm) obtained in a region within the plaque to the spectral signature of lipids. Furthermore, a lipid-rich plaque was successfully imaged while illuminating the sample through 2.8 mm of blood demonstrating the possibility of implementing the photoacoustic technique in vivo.

  13. Operation of a free electron laser in the wavelength range from the extreme ultraviolet to the water window

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, W.; Asova, G.; Ayvazyan, V.; Azima, A.; Baboi, N.; Bahr, J.; Balandin, V.; Beutner, B.; Brandt, A.; Bolzmann, A.; Brinkmann, R.; /DESY /Dubna, JINR

    2007-01-01

    We report results on the performance of a free-electron laser operating at a wavelength of 13.7 nm where unprecedented peak and average powers for a coherent extreme-ultraviolet radiation source have been measured. In the saturation regime, the peak energy approached 170 J for individual pulses, and the average energy per pulse reached 70 J. The pulse duration was in the region of 10 fs, and peak powers of 10 GW were achieved. At a pulse repetition frequency of 700 pulses per second, the average extreme-ultraviolet power reached 20 mW. The output beam also contained a significant contribution from odd harmonics of approximately 0.6% and 0.03% for the 3rd (4.6 nm) and the 5th (2.75 nm) harmonics, respectively. At 2.75 nm the 5th harmonic of the radiation reaches deep into the water window, a wavelength range that is crucially important for the investigation of biological samples.

  14. Prospects for high power Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) development in the 1000{angstrom} {minus} 1{angstrom} wavelength range

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, R.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.

    1994-03-01

    Electron bunch requirements for single-pass saturation of a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) operating at full transverse coherence in the Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) mode include: (1) a high peak current, (2) a sufficiently low relative energy spread, and (3) a transverse emittance {var_epsilon}[r-m] satisfying the condition {var_epsilon} {le} {lambda}A/4{pi}, where {lambda}[m] is the output wavelength of the FEL. In the insertion device that induces the coherent amplification, the prepared electron bunch must be kept on a trajectory sufficiently collinear with the amplified photons without significant dilution of its transverse density. In this paper we discuss a Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) based on a high energy accelerator such as, e.g., the 3km S-band structure at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), followed by a long high-precision undulator with superimposed quadrupole (FODO) focusing, to fulfill the given requirements for SASE operation in the 1000{Angstrom}--1{Angstrom} range. The electron source for the linac, an RF gun with a laser-excited photocathode featuring a normalized emittance in the 1--3 mm-mrad range, a longitudinal bunch duration of the order of 3 ps, and approximately 10{sup {minus}9} C/bunch, is a primary determinant of the required low transverse and longitudinal emittances. Acceleration of the injected bunch to energies in the 5--25 GeV range is used to reduce the relative longitudinal energy spread in the bunch, as well as to reduce the transverse emittance to values consistent with the cited wavelength regime. Two longitudinal compression stages are employed to increase the peak bunch current to the 2--5 kA levels required for sufficiently rapid saturation. The output radiation is delivered, via a grazing-incidence mirror bank, to optical instrumentation and a multi-user beam line system. Technological requirements for LCLS operation at 40{Angstrom}, 4.5{Angstrom}, and 1.5{Angstrom} are examined.

  15. Alleviating a form of electric vehicle range anxiety through on-demand vehicle access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Christopher; Griggs, Wynita; Wirth, Fabian; Quinn, Karl; Shorten, Robert

    2015-04-01

    On-demand vehicle access is a method that can be used to reduce types of range anxiety problems related to planned travel for electric vehicle owners. Using ideas from elementary queueing theory, basic quality of service (QoS) metrics are defined to dimension a shared fleet to ensure high levels of vehicle access. Using mobility data from Ireland, it is argued that the potential cost of such a system is very low.

  16. Characterization of long-range transported Saharan dust across the Atlantic Ocean; dual-wavelength lidar measurements during SALTRACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Silke; Freudenthaler, Volker; Schäfler, Andreas; Schepanski, Kerstin; Heinold, Bernd; Toledano, Carlos; Wiegner, Matthias; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dust is a major component of the atmospheric aerosol load which main source region is the Saharan desert. Dust layers can be transported over thousands of kilometers and thus they cannot be considered as regional phenomenon. During long-range transport the particles are influenced by aging and mixing processes altering the microphysical and thus the optical properties of Saharan dust. But the influence of long-range transport on the particle properties and their effect on the Earth's radiation budget is still not well understood. To study aging processes of transported Saharan dust as well as the microphysical, optical and radiative properties of long-range transported dust the Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE) took place at Barbados in June and July 2013. SALTRACE was designed as closure study combining ground-based and airborne lidar and in-situ measurements with Satellite observations, long-term measurements at Barbados, and model calculations. During SALTRACE four main dust events occurred with column integrated AOD of up to 0.6. The vertical aerosol distribution was characterized by a three layer structure consisting of a marine dominated boundary layer, a highly variable mixing layer often affected by clouds, and a Saharan dust layer in heights between 2 km and 3.5 km in some cases even up to 5 km. We will present first results of the ground-based measurements with the dual-wavelength lidar system POLIS of the Meteorological Institute of the Ludwig-Maximilians Universität, München. In particular we will investigate measurements of the particle linear depolarization ratio and the lidar ratio of the different aerosol layers. We compare our findings with results of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) studying Saharan dust close to the source region in Morocco and at the beginning of the long-range transport on the Cape Verde Islands. In addition, we assess the influence of long-range

  17. Different wavelength ranges' WGM lasing from a ZnO microrod/R6G:PMMA microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Gangyi; Li, Jitao; Li, Panlin; Tian, Zhengshan; Dai, Jun; Wang, Yueyue; Shi, Zengliang; Xu, Chunxiang

    2015-06-01

    Dual-wavelength or multi-wavelength laser sources have potential application in many areas. The ZnO material is an important candidate for ultraviolet (UV) micro/nanolasers for integrated photonic systems. In this paper, the dual-wavelength whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) laser is fabricated by symmetrically coating Rhodamine 6G (R6G):PMMA on a ZnO microrod, and realizes the UV WGM lasing and orange WGM lasing under optical pumping condition. The performance of the UV and orange WGM lasing, including the lasing threshold, emission intensity and quality factors (Q) are discussed. The resonance mechanism of the dual-wavelength WGM lasing is analyzed in detail. The two-dimensional FDTD simulation on optical-field distribution also confirms the resonance mechanism. This work is important to the design of optically and electrically pumped dual- or multi-wavelength WGM lasers.

  18. Optical properties of dental restorative materials in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm for the simulation of color perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friebel, Moritz; Povel, Kirsten; Cappius, Hans-Joachim; Helfmann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina

    2009-09-01

    Aesthetic restorations require dental restorative materials to have optical properties very similar to those of the teeth. A method is developed to this end to determine the optical parameters absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs, anisotropy factor g, and effective scattering coefficient μs' of dental restorative materials. The method includes sample preparation and measurements of transmittance and reflectance in an integrating sphere spectrometer followed by inverse Monte Carlo simulations. Using this method the intrinsic optical parameters are determined for shade B2 of the light-activated composites TPH® Spectrum®, Esthet-X®, and the Ormocer® Definite® in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm. By using the determined parameters μa, μs, and g together with an appropriate phase function, the reflectance of samples with 1-mm layer thickness and shade B2 could be predicted with a very high degree of accuracy using a forward Monte Carlo simulation. The color perception was calculated from the simulated reflectance according to the CIELAB system. We initiate the compilation of a data pool of optical parameters that in the future will enable calculation models to be used as a basis for optimization of the optical approximation of the natural tooth, and the composition of new materials and their production process.

  19. Optical properties of dental restorative materials in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm for the simulation of color perception.

    PubMed

    Friebel, Moritz; Povel, Kirsten; Cappius, Hans-Joachim; Helfmann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Aesthetic restorations require dental restorative materials to have optical properties very similar to those of the teeth. A method is developed to this end to determine the optical parameters absorption coefficient mu(a), scattering coefficient mu(s), anisotropy factor g, and effective scattering coefficient mu(s) (') of dental restorative materials. The method includes sample preparation and measurements of transmittance and reflectance in an integrating sphere spectrometer followed by inverse Monte Carlo simulations. Using this method the intrinsic optical parameters are determined for shade B2 of the light-activated composites TPH((R)) Spectrum, Esthet-X, and the Ormocer Definite in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm. By using the determined parameters mu(a), mu(s), and g together with an appropriate phase function, the reflectance of samples with 1-mm layer thickness and shade B2 could be predicted with a very high degree of accuracy using a forward Monte Carlo simulation. The color perception was calculated from the simulated reflectance according to the CIELAB system. We initiate the compilation of a data pool of optical parameters that in the future will enable calculation models to be used as a basis for optimization of the optical approximation of the natural tooth, and the composition of new materials and their production process.

  20. Reduction of patulin in apple juice products by UV light of different wavelengths in the UVC range.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Koutchma, Tatiana; Warriner, Keith; Zhou, Ting

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated three UVC wavelengths (222, 254, and 282 nm) to degrade patulin introduced into apple juice or apple cider. The average UV fluences of 19.6, 84.3, 55.0, and 36.6 mJ·cm(-2) achieved through exposure to UV lamps at 222-, 254-, and 282-nm wavelengths and the combination of these wavelengths, respectively, resulted in 90% reduction of patulin in apple juice. Therefore, the order of efficiency of the three wavelength lamps was as follows: far UVC (222 nm) > far UVC plus (282 nm) > UVC (254 nm). In terms of color, treatment of apple juice with 222 nm resulted in an increase in the L* (lightness) value but decreases in a* (redness) and b* (yellowness) values, although the changes were insignificantly different from the values for nontreated controls based on a sensory evaluation. The ascorbic acid loss in juice treated at 222 nm to support 90% reduction of patulin was 36.5%, compared with ascorbic acid losses of 45.3 and 36.1% in samples treated at 254 and 282 nm, respectively. The current work demonstrated that the 222-nm wavelength possesses the highest efficiency for patulin reduction in apple juice when compared with the reductions by 254 and 282 nm, with no benefit gained from using a combination of wavelengths.

  1. Non-stationary emission of the blazar S4 0954+658 over a wide range of wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volvach, A. E.; Bychkova, V. S.; Larionov, M. G.; Kardashev, N. S.; Volvach, L. N.; Vlasyuk, V. V.; Spiridonova, O. I.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Tornikoski, M.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Pooley, G.; Carrasco, L.; Porras, A.; Recillas, E.

    2016-12-01

    Data from long-term multi-frequency monitoring are used to analyze variations in the flux density of the active galactic nucleus S4 0954+658. These data were obtained at the CrimeanAstrophysical Observatory, the Metsähovi Radio Observatory of Aalto University, the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory, the Cavendish Laboratory of Cambridge University, the Special Astrophysical Observatory, and the National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics, and Electronics; 0.1-300-GeV data from the Fermi space gamma-ray observatory were also used. Radio data at 4.8, 8, 14.5, 15, 22.2, and 36.8 GHz are considered together with optical and near-infrared data in the R, J, H, and K filters. In the framework of a model in which binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are present in active galactic nuclei, harmonic and structural analyses are carried out to establish the orbital ( T orb ≈ 780 yrs) and precessional ( T pr ≈ 7800 yrs) periods in the rest frame of the source. The development of the most powerful flare ever observed in this object, which occurred in February 2015, is considered. The delay in the flare's development in different wavelength ranges from the gamma-ray to the radio is determined. both the magnitude of the delays and the durations of the flares themselves suggest that the physical characteristics of S4 0954+658 are similar to those of the blazar S5 0716+714, which displays evidence of a high γ factor for the jet motion and high superluminal speeds in the jet. The masses of the components of the binary SMBH ( M and m), the dimensions of their orbit, and the velocity of the lower-mass SMBH about the central SMBH are estimated. The derived physical characteristics are subject to a comparative analysis.

  2. [Corrective effects of electromagnetic radiation in a millimeter wavelength range on the parameters of oxidative stress after standard anti-helicobacterial therapy in patients with ulcer disease].

    PubMed

    Ivanishkina, E V; Podoprigorova, V G

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the possibilities of correction of oxidative stress parameters in the serum and gastroduodenal mucosa using electromagnetic radiation in a millimeter wavelength range in 127 patients with gastric and duodenal ulcer after eradication therapy. Control group included 230 healthy subjects. Parameter of lipid oxidation by free radicals were measured by direct methods (hemiluminescence and EPR-spectroscopy). The results show that standard eradication therapy does not influence parameters of oxidative stress. More pronounced effect of electromagnetic radiation in a millimeter wavelength range may be due to the correction of prooxidant-antioxidant and antioxidant disbalance. This observation provides pathogenetic substantiation for the inclusion of this physical method in modern therapeutic modalities.

  3. Wide range operation of regenerative optical parametric wavelength converter using ASE-degraded 43-Gb/s RZ-DPSK signals.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingyi; Kurumida, Junya; Namiki, Shu

    2011-11-07

    For sustainable growth of the Internet, wavelength-tunable optical regeneration is the key to scaling up high energy-efficiency dynamic optical path networks while keeping the flexibility of the network. Wavelength-tunable optical parametric regenerator (T-OPR) based on the gain saturation effect of parametric amplification in a highly nonlinear fiber is promising for noise reduction in phase-shift keying signals. In this paper, we experimentally evaluated the T-OPR performance for ASE-degraded 43-Gb/s RZ-DPSK signals over a 20-nm input wavelength range between 1527 nm and 1547 nm. As a result, we achieved improved power penalty performance for the regenerated idler with a proper pump power range.

  4. Influence of four-wave mixing in short- and medium-range 1310  nm dense wavelength division multiplexing systems.

    PubMed

    Markowski, Konrad; Chorchos, Łukasz; Turkiewicz, Jarosław Piotr

    2016-04-10

    In this paper, we demonstrate a comprehensive analysis of the impact of four-wave mixing (FWM) on the quality of transmission in short- and medium-range dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) systems in the 1310 nm wavelength domain. The presented analysis proves that, for the system with uniform power per channel assignment, setting proper input channel power can substantially reduce the influence of the FWM effect on bit error rate in low channel spaced short-range systems, despite the position of the DWDM grid around the zero-dispersion wavelength. Simulations and experimental analysis of the possibility of FWM suppression have been provided. The power penalty measurements show that the influence of FWM on system performance may be as low as 0.3 dB with reasonable input power (i.e., -11  dBm per channel), making possible the transmission of data by fiber over distances of 25 km. Finally, we demonstrate that, for channel spacing as low as 120 GHz, error-free transmission in the 1310 nm wavelength domain is possible, despite high efficiency of FWM generation. The results prove that utilization of the 1310 nm wavelength domain in a system with low channel spacing, i.e., with better bandwidth allocation, is an interesting solution for data storage and processing center applications.

  5. Wide tuning range wavelength-swept laser with a single SOA at 1020 nm for ultrahigh resolution Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Won; Song, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Moon-Youn; Kim, Seung-Hwan

    2011-10-24

    In this study, we demonstrated a wide tuning range wavelength-swept laser with a single semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) at 1020 nm for ultrahigh resolution, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (UHR, FD-OCT). The wavelength-swept laser was constructed with an external line-cavity based on a Littman configuration. An optical wavelength selection filter consisted of a grating, a telescope, and a polygon scanner. Before constructing the optical wavelength selection filter, we observed that the optical power, the spectrum bandwidth, and the center wavelength of the SOA were affected by the temperature of the thermoelectric (TE) cooler in the SOA mount as well as the applied current. Therefore, to obtain a wide wavelength tuning range, we adjusted the temperature of the TE cooler in the SOA mount. When the temperature in the TE cooler was 9 °C, our swept source had a tuning range of 142 nm and a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 121.5 nm at 18 kHz. The measured instantaneous spectral bandwidth (δλ) is 0.085 nm, which was measured by an optical spectrum analyzer with a resolution bandwidth of 0.06 nm. This value corresponds to an imaging depth of 3.1 mm in air. Additionally, the averaged optical power of our swept source was 8.2 mW. In UHR, FD/SS-OCT using our swept laser, the measured axial resolution was 4.0 μm in air corresponding to 2.9 μm in tissue (n = 1.35). The sensitivity was measured to be 93.1 dB at a depth of 100 μm. Finally, we obtained retinal images (macular and optic disk) and a corneal image.

  6. Method for the assessment of effects of a range of wavelengths and intensities of red/near-infrared light therapy on oxidative stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Giacci, Marcus K; Hart, Nathan S; Hartz, Richard V; Harvey, Alan R; Hodgetts, Stuart I; Fitzgerald, Melinda

    2015-03-21

    Red/near-infrared light therapy (R/NIR-LT), delivered by laser or light emitting diode (LED), improves functional and morphological outcomes in a range of central nervous system injuries in vivo, possibly by reducing oxidative stress. However, effects of R/NIR-LT on oxidative stress have been shown to vary depending on wavelength or intensity of irradiation. Studies comparing treatment parameters are lacking, due to absence of commercially available devices that deliver multiple wavelengths or intensities, suitable for high through-put in vitro optimization studies. This protocol describes a technique for delivery of light at a range of wavelengths and intensities to optimize therapeutic doses required for a given injury model. We hypothesized that a method of delivering light, in which wavelength and intensity parameters could easily be altered, could facilitate determination of an optimal dose of R/NIR-LT for reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vitro. Non-coherent Xenon light was filtered through narrow-band interference filters to deliver varying wavelengths (center wavelengths of 440, 550, 670 and 810 nm) and fluences (8.5x10(-3) to 3.8x10(-1) J/cm2) of light to cultured cells. Light output from the apparatus was calibrated to emit therapeutically relevant, equal quantal doses of light at each wavelength. Reactive species were detected in glutamate stressed cells treated with the light, using DCFH-DA and H2O2 sensitive fluorescent dyes. We successfully delivered light at a range of physiologically and therapeutically relevant wavelengths and intensities, to cultured cells exposed to glutamate as a model of CNS injury. While the fluences of R/NIR-LT used in the current study did not exert an effect on ROS generated by the cultured cells, the method of light delivery is applicable to other systems including isolated mitochondria or more physiologically relevant organotypic slice culture models, and could be used to assess effects on a range of outcome

  7. Method for the Assessment of Effects of a Range of Wavelengths and Intensities of Red/near-infrared Light Therapy on Oxidative Stress In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Giacci, Marcus K.; Hart, Nathan S.; Hartz, Richard V.; Harvey, Alan R.; Hodgetts, Stuart I.; Fitzgerald, Melinda

    2015-01-01

    Red/near-infrared light therapy (R/NIR-LT), delivered by laser or light emitting diode (LED), improves functional and morphological outcomes in a range of central nervous system injuries in vivo, possibly by reducing oxidative stress. However, effects of R/NIR-LT on oxidative stress have been shown to vary depending on wavelength or intensity of irradiation. Studies comparing treatment parameters are lacking, due to absence of commercially available devices that deliver multiple wavelengths or intensities, suitable for high through-put in vitro optimization studies. This protocol describes a technique for delivery of light at a range of wavelengths and intensities to optimize therapeutic doses required for a given injury model. We hypothesized that a method of delivering light, in which wavelength and intensity parameters could easily be altered, could facilitate determination of an optimal dose of R/NIR-LT for reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vitro. Non-coherent Xenon light was filtered through narrow-band interference filters to deliver varying wavelengths (center wavelengths of 440, 550, 670 and 810nm) and fluences (8.5 x 10-3 to 3.8 x 10-1 J/cm2) of light to cultured cells. Light output from the apparatus was calibrated to emit therapeutically relevant, equal quantal doses of light at each wavelength. Reactive species were detected in glutamate stressed cells treated with the light, using DCFH-DA and H2O2 sensitive fluorescent dyes.  We successfully delivered light at a range of physiologically and therapeutically relevant wavelengths and intensities, to cultured cells exposed to glutamate as a model of CNS injury. While the fluences of R/NIR-LT used in the current study did not exert an effect on ROS generated by the cultured cells, the method of light delivery is applicable to other systems including isolated mitochondria or more physiologically relevant organotypic slice culture models, and could be used to assess effects on a range of outcome

  8. Transillumination of subcutaneous adipose tissues using near-infrared hyperspectral imaging in the 1100-1800 nm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, K.; Kitayabu, A.; Kobayashi, Y.; Honda, N.; Awazu, K.

    2011-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a chemical imaging modality with spectroscopic information. This technique was often used in agricultural or pharmaceutical industries. But there have been a few reports for clinical medical applications. In near-infrared (NIR) wavelength region, the significant absorption peaks are often observed by the overtone of midinfrared molecular vibration. In addition, NIR light has a high penetration because of low scattering and less absorption by water or protein. In this study, we constructed the NIR-HSI system and the high-contrast subcutaneous adipose tissue imaging was conducted in-vitro. In the absorption spectra which are obtained by our NIR-HSI system, the characteristic absorption bands were observed around 1200 nm and 1700 nm. In the processed images using these wavelength bands, subcutaneous adipose tissue was observed through a skin. In a hyperspectral image by another processing using all wavelengths, a high-contrast image of subcutaneous adipose tissue is also obtained. NIR-HSI system is a powerful diagnostic technique for adipose tissues distribution and their morphological change on/inside a tissue.

  9. Exploration of the two-photon excitation spectrum of fluorescent dyes at wavelengths below the range of the Ti:Sapphire laser

    PubMed Central

    Trägårdh, J; Robb, G; Amor, R; Amos, WB; Dempster, J; McConnell, G

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the wavelength dependence of the two-photon excitation efficiency for a number of common UV excitable fluorescent dyes; the nuclear stains DAPI, Hoechst and SYTOX Green, chitin- and cellulose-staining dye Calcofluor White and Alexa Fluor 350, in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range (540–800 nm). For several of the dyes, we observe a substantial increase in the fluorescence emission intensity for shorter excitation wavelengths than the 680 nm which is the shortest wavelength usually available for two-photon microscopy. We also find that although the rate of photo-bleaching increases at shorter wavelengths, it is still possible to acquire many images with higher fluorescence intensity. This is particularly useful for applications where the aim is to image the structure, rather than monitoring changes in emission intensity over extended periods of time. We measure the excitation spectrum when the dyes are used to stain biological specimens to get a more accurate representation of the spectrum of the dye in a cell environment as compared to solution-based measurements. PMID:25946127

  10. Wavelength-Modulated Differential Photoacoustic (WM-DPA) imaging: a high dynamic range modality towards noninvasive diagnosis of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Choi, Sung soo Sean; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    This study explores wavelength-modulated differential photo-acoustic (WM-DPA) imaging for non-invasive early cancer detection via sensitive characterization of functional information such as hemoglobin oxygenation (sO2) levels. Well-known benchmarks of tumor formation such as angiogenesis and hypoxia can be addressed this way. While most conventional photo-acoustic imaging has almost entirely employed high-power pulsed lasers, frequency-domain photo-acoustic radar (FD-PAR) has seen significant development as an alternative technique. It employs a continuous wave laser source intensity-modulated and driven by frequency-swept waveforms. WM-DPA imaging utilizes chirp modulated laser beams at two distinct wavelengths for which absorption differences between oxy- and deoxygenated hemoglobin are minimum (isosbestic point, 805 nm) and maximum (680 nm) to simultaneously generate two signals detected using a standard commercial array transducer as well as a single-element transducer that scans the sample. Signal processing is performed using Lab View and Matlab software developed in-house. Minute changes in total hemoglobin concentration (tHb) and oxygenation levels are detectable using this method since background absorption is suppressed due to the out-of-phase modulation of the laser sources while the difference between the two signals is amplified, thus allowing pre-malignant tumors to become identifiable. By regulating the signal amplitude ratio and phase shift the system can be tuned to applications like cancer screening, sO2 quantification and hypoxia monitoring in stroke patients. Experimental results presented demonstrate WM-DPA imaging of sheep blood phantoms in comparison to single-wavelength FD-PAR imaging. Future work includes the functional PA imaging of small animals in vivo.

  11. Selective ablation of WHHLMI rabbit atherosclerotic plaque by quantum cascade laser in the 5.7 μm wavelength range for less-invasive laser angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimura, Keisuke; Ishii, Katsunori; Akikusa, Naota; Edamura, Tadataka; Yoshida, Harumasa; Awazu, Kunio

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the potential of a compact and high-power quantum cascade laser (QCL) in the 5.7 μm wavelength range for less-invasive laser angioplasty. Atherosclerotic plaques consist mainly of cholesteryl esters. Radiation at a wavelength of 5.75 μm is strongly absorbed in C=O stretching vibration mode of cholesteryl esters. Our previous study achieved to make cutting differences between a normal artery and an atherosclerotic lesions using nanosecond pulsed laser by difference-frequency generation (DFG laser) at the wavelength of 5.75 μm. For applying this technique to clinical treatment, a compact laser device is required. In this study, QCL irradiation effects to a porcine normal aorta were compared with DFG laser. Subsequently, QCL irradiation effects on an atherosclerotic aorta of myocardial infarction-prone Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbit (WHHLMI rabbit) and a normal rabbit aorta were observed. As a result, the QCL could make cutting differences between the rabbit atherosclerotic and normal aortas. On the other hand, the QCL induced more thermal damage to porcine normal aorta than the DFG laser at the irradiation condition of comparable ablation depths. In conclusion, the possibility of less-invasive and selective treatment of atherosclerotic plaques using the QCL in the 5.7 μm wavelength range was revealed, although improvement of QCL was required to prevent the thermal damage of a normal artery.

  12. Radiance Temperatures (in the Wavelength Range 530 to 1500 nm) of Nickel at Its Melting Point by a Pulse-Heating Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschnitz, E.; McClure, J. L.; Cezairliyan, A.

    1998-11-01

    The radiance temperatures (at seven wavelengths in the range 530 to 1500 nm) of nickel at its melting point were measured by a pulse-heating technique. The method is based on rapid resistive self-heating of the specimen from room temperature to its melting point in less than 1 s and on simultaneously measuring specimen radiance temperatures every 0.5 ms. Melting of the specimen was manifested by a plateau in the radiance temperature-versus-time function for each wavelength. The melting-point radiance temperatures for a given specimen were determined by averaging the measured temperatures along the plateau at each wavelength. The melting-point radiance temperatures for nickel, as determined by averaging the results at each wavelength for 25 specimens, are: 1641 K at 530 nm, 1615 K at 627 nm, 1606 K at 657 nm, 1589 K at 722 nm, 1564 K at 812 nm, 1538 K at 908 nm, and 1381 K at 1500 nm. Based on uncertainties arising from pyrometry and specimen conditions, the combined uncertainty (two standard-deviation level) is about ± 6 K for the reported values in the range 530 to 900 nm and is about ± 8 K for the reported value at 1500 nm.

  13. Anomalous angular dispersion in lithium niobate one-dimensional waveguide array in the near-infrared wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apetrei, Alin Marian; Rambu, Alicia Petronela; Minot, Christophe; Moison, Jean-Marie; Belabas, Nadia; Tascu, Sorin

    2017-02-01

    Knowing the dispersion properties of a device is important in many applications (e.g., wavelength separation). For an isolated waveguide, besides the material dispersion, one must consider the waveguide influence as well, through waveguide dispersion and mode dispersion. For a waveguide array, one must consider the influence of evanescent coupling between adjacent waveguides as well. We investigate by the Finite Element Method the angular dispersion of a LiNbO3 waveguide array using two techniques. The first one assumes the Coupled Mode Theory in a 2-waveguide system. The other one uses the actual diffraction curve determined in a 7-waveguide system. In both approaches, we find that by decreasing the array period, one passes from normal angular dispersion by an achromatic point to anomalous angular dispersion. We then illustrate the wavelength separation by the waveguide array by doing Runge-Kutta light propagation simulations. As all the values of parameters are technologically feasible, this opens new possibilities for optical data processing, such as WDM and dispersion compensation.

  14. Ultrasonic Multiple-Access Ranging System Using Spread Spectrum and MEMS Technology for Indoor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Segers, Laurent; Tiete, Jelmer; Braeken, An; Touhafi, Abdellah

    2014-01-01

    Indoor localization of persons and objects poses a great engineering challenge. Previously developed localization systems demonstrate the use of wideband techniques in ultrasound ranging systems. Direct sequence and frequency hopping spread spectrum ultrasound signals have been proven to achieve a high level of accuracy. A novel ranging method using the frequency hopping spread spectrum with finite impulse response filtering will be investigated and compared against the direct sequence spread spectrum. In the first setup, distances are estimated in a single-access environment, while in the second setup, two senders and one receiver are used. During the experiments, the micro-electromechanical systems are used as ultrasonic sensors, while the senders were implemented using field programmable gate arrays. Results show that in a single-access environment, the direct sequence spread spectrum method offers slightly better accuracy and precision performance compared to the frequency hopping spread spectrum. When two senders are used, measurements point out that the frequency hopping spread spectrum is more robust to near-far effects than the direct sequence spread spectrum. PMID:24553084

  15. An Ultrasonic Multiple-Access Ranging Core Based on Frequency Shift Keying Towards Indoor Localization.

    PubMed

    Segers, Laurent; Van Bavegem, David; De Winne, Sam; Braeken, An; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2015-07-30

    This paper describes a new approach and implementation methodology for indoor ranging based on the time difference of arrival using code division multiple access with ultrasound signals. A novel implementation based on a field programmable gate array using finite impulse response filters and an optimized correlation demodulator implementation for ultrasound orthogonal signals is developed. Orthogonal codes are modulated onto ultrasound signals using frequency shift keying with carrier frequencies of 24.5 kHz and 26 kHz. This implementation enhances the possibilities for real-time, embedded and low-power tracking of several simultaneous transmitters. Due to the high degree of parallelism offered by field programmable gate arrays, up to four transmitters can be tracked simultaneously. The implementation requires at most 30% of the available logic gates of a Spartan-6 XC6SLX45 device and is evaluated on accuracy and precision through several ranging topologies. In the first topology, the distance between one transmitter and one receiver is evaluated. Afterwards, ranging analyses are applied between two simultaneous transmitters and one receiver. Ultimately, the position of the receiver against four transmitters using trilateration is also demonstrated. Results show enhanced distance measurements with distances ranging from a few centimeters up to 17 m, while keeping a centimeter-level accuracy.

  16. An Ultrasonic Multiple-Access Ranging Core Based on Frequency Shift Keying Towards Indoor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Segers, Laurent; Van Bavegem, David; De Winne, Sam; Braeken, An; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach and implementation methodology for indoor ranging based on the time difference of arrival using code division multiple access with ultrasound signals. A novel implementation based on a field programmable gate array using finite impulse response filters and an optimized correlation demodulator implementation for ultrasound orthogonal signals is developed. Orthogonal codes are modulated onto ultrasound signals using frequency shift keying with carrier frequencies of 24.5 kHz and 26 kHz. This implementation enhances the possibilities for real-time, embedded and low-power tracking of several simultaneous transmitters. Due to the high degree of parallelism offered by field programmable gate arrays, up to four transmitters can be tracked simultaneously. The implementation requires at most 30% of the available logic gates of a Spartan-6 XC6SLX45 device and is evaluated on accuracy and precision through several ranging topologies. In the first topology, the distance between one transmitter and one receiver is evaluated. Afterwards, ranging analyses are applied between two simultaneous transmitters and one receiver. Ultimately, the position of the receiver against four transmitters using trilateration is also demonstrated. Results show enhanced distance measurements with distances ranging from a few centimeters up to 17 m, while keeping a centimeter-level accuracy. PMID:26263986

  17. Compact fixed wavelength femtosecond oscillators as an add-on for tunable Ti:sapphire lasers extend the range of applications towards multimodal imaging and optogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakulinen, T.; Klein, J.

    2016-03-01

    Two-photon (2P) microscopy based on tunable Ti:sapphire lasers has become a widespread tool for 3D imaging with sub-cellular resolution in living tissues. In recent years multi-photon microscopy with simpler fixed-wavelength femtosecond oscillators using Yb-doped tungstenates as gain material has raised increasing interest in life-sciences, because these lasers offer one order of magnitude more average power than Ti:sapphire lasers in the wavelength range around 1040 nm: Two-photon (2P) excitation of mainly red or yellow fluorescent dyes and proteins (e.g. YFP, mFruit series) simultaneously has been proven with a single IR laser wavelength. A new approach is to extend the usability of existing tunable Titanium sapphire lasers by adding a fixed IR wavelength with an Yb femtosecond oscillator. By that means a multitude of applications for multimodal imaging and optogenetics can be supported. Furthermore fs Yb-lasers are available with a repetition rate of typically 10 MHz and an average power of typically 5 W resulting in pulse energy of typically 500 nJ, which is comparably high for fs-oscillators. This makes them an ideal tool for two-photon spinning disk laser scanning microscopy and holographic patterning for simultaneous photoactivation of large cell populations. With this work we demonstrate that economical, small-footprint Yb fixed-wavelength lasers can present an interesting add-on to tunable lasers that are commonly used in multiphoton microscopy. The Yb fs-lasers hereby offer higher power for imaging of red fluorescent dyes and proteins, are ideally enhancing existing Ti:sapphire lasers with more power in the IR, and are supporting pulse energy and power hungry applications such as spinning disk microscopy and holographic patterning.

  18. Simultaneous Chemical and Refractive Index Sensing in the 1-2.5 μm Near-Infrared Wavelength Range on Nanoporous Gold Disks.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wei-Chuan; Santos, Greggy M; Zhao, Fusheng; Zenasni, Oussama; Arnob, Md Masud Parvez

    2016-07-13

    Near-infrared (NIR) absorption spectroscopy provides molecular and chemical information based on overtones and combination bands of the fundamental vibrational modes in the infrared wavelengths. However, the sensitivity of NIR absorption measurement is limited by the generally weak absorption and the relatively poor detector performance compared to other wavelength ranges. To overcome these barriers, we have developed a novel technique to simultaneously obtain chemical and refractive index sensing in 1-2.5 μm NIR wavelength range on nanoporous gold (NPG) disks, which feature high-density plasmonic hot-spots of localized electric field enhancement. For the first time, surface-enhanced near-infrared absorption (SENIRA) spectroscopy has been demonstrated for high sensitivity chemical detection. With a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of octadecanethiol (ODT), an enhancement factor (EF) of up to ∼10(4) has been demonstrated for the first C-H combination band at 2400 nm using NPG disk with 600 nm diameter. Together with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) extinction spectroscopy, simultaneous sensing of sample refractive index has been achieved for the first time. The performance of this technique has been evaluated using various hydrocarbon compounds and crude oil samples.

  19. Optical properties measurement of laser coagulated tissues with double integrating sphere and inverse Monte Carlo technique in the wavelength range from 350 to 2100 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Norihiro; Nanjo, Takuya; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2012-03-01

    In laser medicine, the accurate knowledge about the optical properties (absorption coefficient; μa, scattering coefficient; μs, anisotropy factor; g) of laser irradiated tissues is important for the prediction of light propagation in tissues, since the efficacy of laser treatment depends on the photon propagation within the irradiated tissues. Thus, it is likely that the optical properties of tissues at near-ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared wavelengths will be more important due to more biomedical applications of lasers will be developed. For improvement of the laser induced thermotherapy, the optical property change during laser treatment should be considered in the wide wavelength range. For estimation of the optical properties of the biological tissues, the optical properties measurement system with a double integrating sphere setup and an inverse Monte Carlo technique was developed. The optical properties of chicken muscle tissue were measured in the native state and after laser coagulation using the optical properties measurement system in the wavelength range from 350 to 2100 nm. A CO2 laser was used for laser coagulation. After laser coagulation, the reduced scattering coefficient of the tissue increased. And, the optical penetration depth decreased. For improvement of the treatment depth during laser coagulation, a quantitative procedure using the treated tissue optical properties for determination of the irradiation power density following light penetration decrease might be important in clinic.

  20. Exploring the accessible frequency range of phase-resolved ferromagnetic resonance detected with x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnicke, P.; Knut, R.; Wahlström, E.; Karis, O.; Bailey, W. E.; Arena, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    We present time- and element-resolved measurements of the magnetization dynamics in a ferromagnetic trilayer structure. A pump-probe scheme was utilized with a microwave magnetic excitation field phase-locked to the photon bunches and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism in transmission geometry. Using a relatively large photon bunch length with a full width at half maximum of 650 ps, the precessional motion of the magnetization was resolved up to frequencies of 2.5 GHz, thereby enabling sampling at frequencies significantly above the inverse bunch length. By simulating the experimental data with a numerical model based on a forced harmonic oscillator, we obtain good correlation between the two. The model, which includes timing jitter analysis, is used to predict the accessible frequency range of x-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance.

  1. Frequency-resolved optical gating system with a tellurium crystal for characterizing free-electron lasers in the wavelength range of 10-30 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Iijima, Hokuto; Nagai, Ryoji; Nishimori, Nobuyuki; Hajima, Ryoichi; Minehara, Eisuke J.

    2009-12-15

    A second-harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating (SHG-FROG) system has been developed for the complete characterization of laser pulses in the wavelength range of 10-30 {mu}m. A tellurium crystal is used so that spectrally resolved autocorrelation signals with a good signal-to-noise ratio are obtained. Pulses (wavelength {approx}22 {mu}m) generated from a free-electron laser are measured by the SHG-FROG system. The SHG intensity profile and the spectrum obtained by FROG measurements are well consistent with those of independent measurements of the pulse length and spectrum. The pulse duration and spectral width determined from the FROG trace are 0.6 ps and 5.2 THz at full width half maximum, respectively.

  2. Tunable C- and L-band erbium-doped fiber ring lasers for performance testing of a wavelength-division multiplexing access network with injection-locked Fabry-Pérot laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zih-Rong; Liu, Cheng-Kuang; Keiser, Gerd; Tseng, Chih-Lung; Chiu, Chia-Ming

    2010-10-01

    A widely wavelength-tunable erbium-doped-fiber laser (T-EDFL) located at a central office is proposed for the bidirectional high-speed performance testing of wavelength-division-multiplexing access networks in which injection-locked Fabry-Pérot laser diodes located at optical network units are used for upstream transmissions. The T-EDFL not only generates laser light for downstream transmission testing, but also serves as the injection source for upstream transmission testing. It has a wide tunable range of 64 nm (1540 to 1604 nm), a high output power of 2.2 dBm, and a good signal-to-noise ratio above 46 dB. For 10-Gb/s downstream and 1.25-Gb/s upstream transmissions over a 10-km single-mode fiber (SMF), power penalties at a bit error rate of 10-9 are less than 0.94 dB and 0.76 dB (1.26 dB and 1.68 dB) for downstream and upstream transmissions at C-band (at L-band) wavelengths, respectively. In the transmissions over a 25-km SMF, the penalties are 2.24 dB and 2.36 dB (3.66 dB and 4.18 dB) at C-band (at L-band) for downstream and upstream transmissions, respectively.

  3. Relationships between range access as monitored by radio frequency identification technology, fearfulness, and plumage damage in free-range laying hens.

    PubMed

    Hartcher, K M; Hickey, K A; Hemsworth, P H; Cronin, G M; Wilkinson, S J; Singh, M

    2016-05-01

    Severe feather-pecking (SFP), a particularly injurious behaviour in laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus), is thought to be negatively correlated with range use in free-range systems. In turn, range use is thought to be inversely associated with fearfulness, where fearful birds may be less likely to venture outside. However, very few experiments have investigated the proposed association between range use and fearfulness. This experiment investigated associations between range use (time spent outside), fearfulness, plumage damage, and BW. Two pens of 50 ISA Brown laying hens (n=100) were fitted with radio frequency identification (RFID) transponders (contained within silicone leg rings) at 26 weeks of age. Data were then collected over 13 days. A total of 95% of birds accessed the outdoor run more than once per day. Birds spent an average duration of 6.1 h outside each day over 11 visits per bird per day (51.5 min per visit). The top 15 and bottom 15 range users (n=30), as determined by the total time spent on the range over 13 days, were selected for study. These birds were tonic immobility (TI) tested at the end of the trial and were feather-scored and weighed after TI testing. Birds with longer TI durations spent less time outside (P=0.01). Plumage damage was not associated with range use (P=0.68). The small group sizes used in this experiment may have been conducive to the high numbers of birds utilising the outdoor range area. The RFID technology collected a large amount of data on range access in the tagged birds, and provides a potential means for quantitatively assessing range access in laying hens. The present findings indicate a negative association between fearfulness and range use. However, the proposed negative association between plumage damage and range use was not supported. The relationships between range use, fearfulness, and SFP warrant further research.

  4. Satellite range delay simulator for a matrix-switched time division multiple-access network simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Lawrence A.

    1989-01-01

    The Systems Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility at NASA Lewis Research Center is presently configured as a satellite-switched time division multiple access (SS-TDMA) network simulator. The purpose of SITE is to demonstrate and evaluate advanced communication satellite technologies, presently embodied by POC components developed under NASA contracts in addition to other hardware, such as ground terminals, designed and built in-house at NASA Lewis. Each ground terminal in a satellite communications system will experience a different aspect of the satellite's motion due mainly to daily tidal effects and station keeping, hence a different duration and rate of variation in the range delay. As a result of this and other effects such as local oscillator instability, each ground terminal must constantly adjust its transmit burst timing so that data bursts from separate ground terminals arrive at the satellite in their assigned time slots, preventing overlap and keeping the system in synchronism. On the receiving end, ground terminals must synchronize their local clocks using reference transmissions received through the satellite link. A feature of the SITE facility is its capability to simulate the varying propagation delays and associated Doppler frequency shifts that the ground terminals in the network have to cope with. Delay is achieved by means of two NASA Lewis designed and built range delay simulator (RDS) systems, each independently controlled locally with front panel switches or remotely by an experiment control and monitor (EC/M) computer.

  5. Spectral aerosol extinction (SpEx): a new instrument for in situ ambient aerosol extinction measurements across the UV/visible wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Corr, C. A.; Dibb, J. E.; Greenslade, M. E.; Martin, R. F.; Moore, R. H.; Scheuer, E.; Shook, M. A.; Thornhill, K. L.; Troop, D.; Winstead, E. L.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a new instrument for the measurement of in situ ambient aerosol extinction over the 300-700 nm wavelength range, the spectral aerosol extinction (SpEx) instrument. This measurement capability is envisioned to complement existing in situ instrumentation, allowing for simultaneous measurement of the evolution of aerosol optical, chemical, and physical characteristics in the ambient environment. In this work, a detailed description of the instrument is provided along with characterization tests performed in the laboratory. Measured spectra of NO2 and polystyrene latex spheres (PSLs) agreed well with theoretical calculations. Good agreement was also found with simultaneous aerosol extinction measurements at 450, 530, and 630 nm using CAPS PMex instruments in a series of 22 tests including nonabsorbing compounds, dusts, soot, and black and brown carbon analogs. SpEx measurements are expected to help identify the presence of ambient brown carbon due to its 300 nm lower wavelength limit compared to measurements limited to longer UV and visible wavelengths. Extinction spectra obtained with SpEx contain more information than can be conveyed by a simple power law fit (typically represented by Ångström exponents). Planned future improvements aim to lower detection limits and ruggedize the instrument for mobile operation.

  6. Spectral Aerosol Extinction (SpEx): a new instrument for in situ ambient aerosol extinction measurements across the UV/visible wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Corr, C. A.; Dibb, J. E.; Greenslade, M. E.; Martin, R. F.; Moore, R. H.; Scheuer, E.; Shook, M. A.; Thornhill, K. L.; Troop, D.; Winstead, E. L.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a new instrument for the measurement of in situ ambient aerosol extinction over the 300-700 nm wavelength range, the Spectral Aerosol Extinction (SpEx) instrument. This measurement capability is envisioned to complement existing in situ instrumentation, allowing for simultaneous measurement of the evolution of aerosol optical, chemical, and physical characteristics in the ambient environment. In this work, a detailed description of the instrument is provided along with characterization tests performed in the laboratory. Measured spectra of NO2 and polystyrene latex spheres (PSLs) agreed well with theoretical calculations. Good agreement was also found with simultaneous aerosol extinction measurements at 450, 530, and 630 nm using CAPS PMex instruments in a series of 22 tests including non-absorbing compounds, dusts, soot, and black and brown carbon analogs. SpEx can more accurately distinguish the presence of brown carbon from other absorbing aerosol due to its 300 nm lower wavelength limit compared to measurements limited to visible wavelengths. Extinction spectra obtained with SpEx contain more information than can be conveyed by a simple power law fit (typically represented by Ångström Exponents). Planned future improvements aim to lower detection limits and ruggedize the instrument for mobile operation.

  7. Selective ablation of atherosclerotic lesions with less thermal damage by controlling the pulse structure of a quantum cascade laser in the 5.7-µm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimura, Keisuke; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2016-04-01

    Cholesteryl esters are the main components of atherosclerotic plaques, and they have an absorption peak at the wavelength of 5.75 µm. To realize less-invasive ablation of the atherosclerotic plaques using a quasi-continuous wave (quasi-CW) quantum cascade laser (QCL), the thermal effects on normal vessels must be reduced. In this study, we attempted to reduce the thermal effects by controlling the pulse structure. The irradiation effects on rabbit atherosclerotic aortas using macro pulse irradiation (irradiation of pulses at intervals) and conventional quasi-CW irradiation were compared. The macro pulse width and the macro pulse interval were determined based on the thermal relaxation time of atherosclerotic and normal aortas in the oscillation wavelength of the QCL. The ablation depth increased and the coagulation width decreased using macro pulse irradiation. Moreover, difference in ablation depth between the atherosclerotic and normal rabbit aortas using macro pulse irradiation was confirmed. Therefore, the QCL in the 5.7-µm wavelength range with controlling the pulse structure was effective for less-invasive laser angioplasty.

  8. Spectral Aerosol Extinction (SpEx): A New Instrument for In situ Ambient Aerosol Extinction Measurements Across the UV/Visible Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Corr, C. A.; Dibb, J. E.; Greenslade, M. E.; Martin, R. F.; Moore, R. H.; Scheuer, E.; Shook, M. A.; Thornhill, K. L.; Troop, D.; Winstead, Edward L.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new instrument for the measurement of in situ ambient aerosol extinction over the 300-700 nm wavelength range, the Spectral Aerosol Extinction (SpEx) instrument. This measurement capability is envisioned to complement existing in situ instrumentation, allowing for simultaneous measurement of the evolution of aerosol optical, chemical, and physical characteristics in the ambient environment. In this work, a detailed description of the instrument is provided along with characterization tests performed in the laboratory. Measured spectra of NO2 and polystyrene latex spheres agreed well with theoretical calculations. Good agreement was also found with simultaneous aerosol extinction measurements at 450, 530, and 630 nm using CAPS PMex instruments in a series of 22 tests including non-absorbing compounds, dusts, soot, and black and brown carbon analogs. SpEx can more accurately distinguish the presence of brown carbon from other absorbing aerosol due to its 300 nm lower wavelength limit compared to measurements limited to visible wavelengths. In addition, the spectra obtained by SpEx carry more information than can be conveyed by a simple power law fit that is typically defined by the use of Angstrom Exponents. Future improvements aim at lowering detection limits and ruggedizing the instrument for mobile operation.

  9. Remote sensing of vegetation based on band-spectral and hyperspectral studies at canopy and pigment level within visible range of wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RayChaudhuri, Barun; Bhaumik, Subarnarekha

    2006-12-01

    The suitability of visible spectral response of vegetation for remote sensing has been investigated with field and laboratory studies on canopy and chloroplastidial pigments, respectively. To simulate band-spectral and hyperspectral sensing, measurements were taken both in wavebands and with fine resolution of wavelength. Vegetation species and maturity stages were distinguished with average reflectance and characteristic absorption features. The methodology was tried on both land vegetation, viz. jute canopy of West Bengal and marine plant, viz. green algae of the eastern coast of India. The absorbance variation within visible wavelength range was observed with both mixed chlorophyll solution and solutions of chromatographically separated pigments. The different characteristic absorption peaks were identified, which were quite different for higher plants and algae. The gradual changes in spectral response of leaf pigments with senescence in a common higher plant were systematically investigated with both original leaf extracts and artificial mixtures of fresh and decomposed chlorophyll solutions at different ratios. Mathematical models were put forward for both average and hyperspectral absorption features to track the experimental plots and estimate absorption at different wavelengths.

  10. The spectral opacity of triatomic carbon measured in a graphite tube furnace over the 280 to 600 nm wavelength range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, W. L.; Wells, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    The opacity of linear triatomic carbon (C3) was measured in a graphite tube furnace from 280 to 600 nm to supplement the earlier measurements of Brewer and Engelke. The spectral cross section was estimated from the opacities using temperature profiles determined pyrometrically and a revised heat of formation delta H = 198 kcal/mole). The cross section was found to be nonnegligible over the range 300 to 500 nm and the electronic oscillator strength based on the total cross section estimate was 0.02.

  11. Extended femtosecond laser wavelength range to 330 nm in a high power LBO based optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jintao; Gu, Chenglin; Wang, Chingyue; Hu, Minglie

    2016-06-13

    We experimentally demonstrate a compact tunable, high average power femtosecond laser source in the ultraviolet (UV) regime. The laser source is based on intra-cavity frequency doubling of a temperature-tuned lithium tribotate (LBO) optical parametric oscillator (OPO), synchronously pumped at 520 nm by a frequency-doubled, Yb-fiber femtosecond laser amplifier system. By adjusting crystal temperature, the OPO can provide tunable visible to near-infrared (NIR) signal pulse, which have a wide spectral tuning range from 660 to 884 nm. Using a β-barium borate (BBO) crystal for intra-cavity frequency doubling, tunable femtosecond UV pulse are generated across 330~442 nm with up to 364 mW at 402 nm.

  12. Space-resolved extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy free of high-energy neutral particle noise in wavelength range of 10-130 Å on the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xianli; Morita, Shigeru; Oishi, Tetsutarou; Goto, Motoshi; Dong, Chunfeng

    2014-04-01

    A flat-field space-resolved extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer system working in wavelength range of 10-130 Å has been constructed in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for profile measurements of bremsstrahlung continuum and line emissions of heavy impurities in the central column of plasmas, which are aimed at studies on Zeff and impurity transport, respectively. Until now, a large amount of spike noise caused by neutral particles with high energies (≤180 keV) originating in neutral beam injection has been observed in EUV spectroscopy on LHD. The new system has been developed with an aim to delete such a spike noise from the signal by installing a thin filter which can block the high-energy neutral particles entering the EUV spectrometer. Three filters of 11 μm thick beryllium (Be), 3.3 μm thick polypropylene (PP), and 0.5 μm thick polyethylene terephthalate (PET: polyester) have been examined to eliminate the spike noise. Although the 11 μm Be and 3.3 μm PP filters can fully delete the spike noise in wavelength range of λ ≤ 20 Å, the signal intensity is also reduced. The 0.5 μm PET filter, on the other hand, can maintain sufficient signal intensity for the measurement and the spike noise remained in the signal is acceptable. As a result, the bremsstrahlung profile is successfully measured without noise at 20 Å even in low-density discharges, e.g., 2.9 × 1013 cm-3, when the 0.5 μm PET filter is used. The iron n = 3-2 Lα transition array consisting of FeXVII to FeXXIV is also excellently observed with their radial profiles in wavelength range of 10-18 Å. Each transition in the Lα array can be accurately identified with its radial profile. As a typical example of the method a spectral line at 17.62 Å is identified as FeXVIII transition. Results on absolute intensity calibration of the spectrometer system, pulse height and noise count analyses of the spike noise between holographic and ruled gratings and wavelength response of the used filters

  13. Variability of the Extragalactic Radio Sources 3C 446 and BL Lac in the Centimeter Wavelength Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, A. L.

    2015-03-01

    This work presents the results of the analysis of long-term monitoring (over 40 years) changes in radio fluxes of the two extragalactic sources - 3C 446, and BL Lac. Observations at frequencies of 14.5, 8, 4.8 GHz were obtained in the Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO). With using Fourier filtering were selected O - C (short-periodic), and the trend components of flux variations that were analyzed separately with using the wavelet-analysis method. Each of these components is associated with certain physical processes in the "core-accretion disk-jet" system. Were constructed time-frequency waveletspectra showing the changes of the frequency composition of the investigated data over time. For the trend component values of the main periods of ~ 4-9 years (3C 446) and ~ 8 years (BL Lac), for O - C component - ~ 0.8-3 years (3C 446) and ~ 0.6-4 years (BL Lac) and they appear in the time and structural changes of the jet. On the basis of calculating the global wavelet-spectra in the frequency range identified main phases activity of radio sources. Obtained comparison between the dynamics of jets (Mojave VLBI images), and change the frequency spectral structure of the studied data. With bandpass wavelet filtering, flux components corresponding to the main periods in the spectra, were identified and also found the delay between the observation frequencies in spectral bands of these periods.

  14. Recent Development of Sb-based Phototransistors in the 0.9- to 2.2-microns Wavelength Range for Applications to Laser Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. Nurul; Refaat, Tamer F.; Sulima, Oleg V.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated commercially available photodiodes and also recent developed Sb-based phototransistors in order to compare their performances for applications to laser remote sensing. A custom-designed phototransistor in the 0.9- to 2.2-microns wavelength range has been developed at AstroPower and characterized at NASA Langley's Detector Characterization Laboratory. The phototransistor's performance greatly exceeds the previously reported results at this wavelength range in the literature. The detector testing included spectral response, dark current and noise measurements. Spectral response measurements were carried out to determine the responsivity at 2-microns wavelength at different bias voltages with fixed temperature; and different temperatures with fixed bias voltage. Current versus voltage characteristics were also recorded at different temperatures. Results show high responsivity of 2650 A/W corresponding to an internal gain of three orders of magnitude, and high detectivity (D*) of 3.9x10(exp 11) cm.Hz(exp 1/2)/W that is equivalent to a noise-equivalent-power of 4.6x10(exp -14) W/Hz(exp 1/2) (-4.0 V @ -20 C) with a light collecting area diameter of 200-microns. It appears that this recently developed 2-micron phototransistor's performances such as responsivity, detectivity, and gain are improved significantly as compared to the previously published APD and SAM APD using similar materials. These detectors are considered as phototransistors based-on their structures and performance characteristics and may have great potential for high sensitivity differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor at 2.05-microns and 1.9-microns, respectively.

  15. Influence of polymer packaging films on hyperspectral imaging data in the visible-near-infrared (450-950 nm) wavelength range.

    PubMed

    Gowen, A A; O'Donnell, C P; Esquerre, C; Downey, G

    2010-03-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) has recently emerged as a useful tool for quality analysis of consumer goods (e.g., food and pharmaceutical products). These products are typically packaged in polymeric film prior to distribution; however, HSI experiments are typically carried out on such samples ex-packaging (either prior to or after removal from packaging). This research examines the effects of polymer packaging films (polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET)) on spectral and spatial features of HSI data in order to investigate the potential of HSI for quality evaluation of packaged goods. The effects of packaging film were studied for hyperspectral images of samples obtained in the visible-near-infrared (Vis-NIR, i.e., 450-950 nm) wavelength range, which is relevant to many food, agricultural, and pharmaceutical products. The dominant influence of the films tested in this wavelength range could be attributed to light scattering. Relative position of the light source, film, and detector were shown to be highly influential on the scattering effects observed. Detection of features on samples imaged through film was shown to be possible after some data preprocessing. This suggests that quality analysis of products packaged in polymer film is feasible using HSI. These findings would be useful in the development of quality monitoring tools for consumer products post-packaging using HSI.

  16. Optical absorption of carbon and hydrocarbon species from shock heated acetylene and methane in the 135-220 nm wavelength range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Absorption spectroscopy of carbon and hydrocarbon species has been performed in a shock tube at an incident shock condition for a wavelength range of 135-220 nm, in order to obtain information needed for calculating radiation blockage ahead of a planetary probe. Instrumentation consisted of high frequency response pressure transducers, thin-film heat transfer gages, or photomultipliers coupled by light pipes. Two test-gas mixtures, one with acetylene and the other with methane, both diluted with argon, were used to provide a reliable variation of C3 and C2H concentration ratio. Comparison of tests results of the two mixtures, in the temperature range of 3750 + or - 100 K, showed the main absorbing species to be C3. The wavelength for maximum absorption agrees well with the theoretical values of 7.68 eV and 8.03 eV for the vertical excitation energy, and a value of 0.90 for the electronic oscillator strength, obtained from the measured absorption band, is also in good agreement with the predicted value of 0.92.

  17. Low threshold lasing of bubble-containing glass microspheres by non-whispering gallery mode excitation over a wide wavelength range

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, Tsutaru Kishi, Tetsuo; Yano, Tetsuji

    2015-03-21

    Bubble-containing Nd{sup 3+}-doped tellurite glass microspheres were fabricated by localized laser heating technique to investigate their optical properties for use as microresonators. Fluorescence and excitation spectra measurements were performed by pumping with a tunable CW-Ti:Sapphire laser. The excitation spectra manifested several sharp peaks due to the conventional whispering gallery mode (WGM) when the pumping laser was irradiated to the edge part of the microsphere. However, when the excitation light was irradiated on the bubble position inside the microsphere, “non-WGM excitation” was induced, giving rise to numerous peaks at a broad wavelength range in the excitation spectra. Thus, efficient excitation was achieved over a wide wavelength range. Lasing threshold excited at the bubble position was much lower than that for the excitation at the edges of the microsphere. The lowest value of the laser threshold was 34 μW for a 4 μm sphere containing a 0.5 μm bubble. Efficiency of the excitation at the bubble position with broadband light was calculated to be 5 times higher than that for the edge of the microsphere. The bubble-containing microsphere enables efficient utilization of broadband light excitation from light-emitting diodes and solar light.

  18. Four-frequency polarizing microscope for recording plasma images in the wavelength range 0.4-1.1 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Vasin, B. L.; Mal'kova, S. V.; Osipov, M. V.; Puzyrev, V. N.; Saakyan, A. T.; Starodub, A. N.; Fedotov, S. I.; Fronya, A. A.; Shutyak, V. G.

    2010-12-15

    The optical scheme and design of a four-frequency polarizing microscope intended for simultaneous recording of plasma images in the wavelength range 0.4-1.1 {mu}m with the spatial resolution 12 {mu}m in the entire spectral range are described. The effectiveness of such a microscope in studies of plasmas produced on interaction of laser radiation with a target is demonstrated. The plasma images are obtained at the frequencies {omega}{sub 0}, (3/2){omega}{sub 0}, 2{omega}{sub 0}, and (5/2){omega}{sub 0}, where {omega}{sub 0} corresponds to the frequency of heating radiation. The transformation coefficient that characterizes the efficiency of conversion of heating radiation into the 2{omega}{sub 0}, (3/2){omega}{sub 0}, and (5/2){omega}{sub 0} harmonics generated in the plasma is determined.

  19. Ultrahigh wavelength range (300nm-2μm) polarization-independent 500gs/s single-shot pulse, all-optical real time oscilloscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleyze, Jean-François; Hocquet, Steve; Monnier Bourdin, Dominique; Le Boudec, Patrice; Arnaud, Romain; Chassagne, Bruno; Jolly, Alain; Penninckx, Denis

    2014-03-01

    The development of ultra-broadband oscilloscopes is mainly governed by the needs of future telecom networks. But other applications are requesting the availability of true real-time acquisition oscilloscopes. Systems able to be used in single-shot operation are of prime interest for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and for the related R&D for plasma physics. We previously demonstrate a single-shot, 100GHz design of an all-optical sampling oscilloscope at 1μm (MULO). This laboratory system has been improved in stability and compactness to make an all-in-one box prototype. More, by the addition of an opto-electro-optics (OEO) sub-system at the input, we developed the ability to use this oscilloscope to analyze an electrical input signal up to 60GHz. This new integrated subset also increases the range of wavelength for optical input signal, from 300nm up to 2μm. Furthermore, it allows the use of inexpensive opto-electronic components at telecom wavelength for this system regardless of the signal to be analysed. In parallel with these improvements, by optimizing the heart of the system, we get a very high sampling rate, up to 500Gs/s and more; this allows considering much higher bandwidths in the future. In this talk, we will present latest developments and integration of this system. It will also allow us to give more details on the innovative OEO sub-system.

  20. Investigation of in-band transmission of both spectral amplitude coding/optical code division multiple-access and wavelength division multiplexing signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashour, Isaac A. M.; Shaari, Sahbudin; Shalaby, Hossam M. H.; Menon, P. Susthitha

    2011-06-01

    The transmission of both optical code division multiple-access (OCDMA) and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) users on the same band is investigated. Code pulses of spectral amplitude coding (SAC)/optical code division multiple-access (CDMA) are overlaid onto a multichannel WDM system. Notch filters are utilized in order to suppress the WDM interference signals for detection of optical broadband CDMA signals. Modified quadratic congruence (MQC) codes are used as the signature codes for the SAC/OCDMA system. The proposed system is simulated and its performance in terms of both the bit-error rate and Q-factor are determined. In addition, eavesdropper probability of error-free code detection is evaluated. Our results are compared to traditional nonhybrid systems. It is concluded that the proposed hybrid scheme still achieves acceptable performance. In addition, it provides enhanced data confidentiality as compared to the scheme with SAC/OCDMA only. It is also shown that the performance of the proposed system is limited by the interference of the WDM signals. Furthermore, the simulation illustrates the tradeoff between the performance and confidentiality for authorized users.

  1. Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Structures and Evolution analysis by Combination of Fractal Dimension of 3 Wavelength Lidar Signal and Range Correct Signal of 1064nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, L.; McCormick, M. P.; Su, J.

    2015-12-01

    Detection of the PBL heights and the PBL structure is very important for understanding the dynamic of the PBL since heat, water vapor and pollutions which come from the surface must transport through the PBL before they can affect the upper atmosphere. Fractal dimension (FD) retrieved from the three wavelengths lidar signals and the range- corrected signal (RCS) of 1064nm were used to analyses the PBL height and structure in Hampton University (HU, 37.02° N, 76.33° W). And the result shows that the new method has the potential to determine the top of different layer at same time. Combination of the FD and RCS signal also can be used to derive the structure of the PBL. Also the PBL evolution and the long time variety of the PBL in Hampton were analyzed. Wavelet covariance transform (WCT) was used to objectively determine the top and structure of the PBL from the FD signal and RCS signal.

  2. MEMS Fabry-Perot interferometer-based spectrometer demonstrator for 7.5 μm to 9.5 μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkynen, Jussi H.; Tuohiniemi, Mikko; Näsilä, Antti; Mannila, Rami; Antila, Jarkko E.

    2014-03-01

    VTT Technical research centre of Finland has developed a MEMS Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) for the wavelength range from 7.5 μm to 9.5 μm. The device consists of two Distributed Bragg Reflectors (DBR) manufactured with MEMS processing techniques. The full width half maximum of the transmission peak is 150nm. This transmission peak can be tuned from 7.5 μm to 9.5 μm by applying a control voltage from 0 V to 30 V. A laboratory demonstrator has been put together to show the use of this module as a part of a spectral measurement setup. Several gas samples have been measured with the setup and compared against measurement results found in literature.

  3. 5000 groove/mm multilayer-coated blazed grating with 33percent efficiency in the 3rd order in the EUV wavelength range

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced Light Source; Voronov, Dmitriy L.; Anderson, Erik; Cambie, Rossana; Salmassi, Farhad; Gullikson, Eric; Yashchuk, Valeriy; Padmore, Howard; Ahn, Minseung; Chang, Chih-Hao; Heilmann, Ralf; Schattenburg, Mark

    2009-07-07

    We report on recent progress in developing diffraction gratings which can potentially provide extremely high spectral resolution of 105-106 in the EUV and soft x-ray photon energy ranges. Such a grating was fabricated by deposition of a multilayer on a substrate which consists ofa 6-degree blazed grating with a high groove density. The fabrication of the substrate gratings was based on scanning interference lithography and anisotropic wet etch of silicon single crystals. The optimized fabrication process provided precise control of the grating periodicity, and the grating groove profile, together with very short anti-blazed facets, and near atomically smooth surface blazed facets. The blazed grating coated with 20 Mo/Si bilayers demonstrated a diffraction efficiency in the third order as high as 33percent at an incidence angle of 11? and wavelength of 14.18 nm.

  4. Absorption spectrum and absolute absorption cross sections of CH3O2 radicals and CH3I molecules in the wavelength range 7473-7497 cm(-1).

    PubMed

    Faragó, Eszter P; Viskolcz, Bela; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa

    2013-12-05

    The absorption spectrum of CH3O2 radicals and CH3I molecules has been measured in the range 7473-7497 cm(-1). CH3O2 radicals have been generated by 248 nm laser photolysis of CH3I in the presence of O2, and the relative absorption has been measured by time-resolved continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS). Calibration of the relative absorption spectrum has been carried out on three distinct wavelengths by carefully measuring CH3O2 decays under different experimental conditions and extracting the initial radical concentration (and with this the absolute absorption cross sections) by using the well-known rate constant for the CH3O2 self-reaction. The following, pressure-independent absorption cross sections were determined: 3.41 × 10(-20), 3.40 × 10(-20), and 2.11 × 10(-20) cm(2) at 7748.18, 7489.16, and 7493.33 cm(-1). These values are 2-3 times higher than previous determinations ( Pushkarsky, M. B.; Zalyubovsky, S. J.; Miller, T. A. J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 112 (24), 10695 - 10698 and Atkinson, D. B.; Spillman, J. L. J. Phys. Chem. A 2002, 106 (38), 8891 - 8902). The absorption spectrum of the stable precursor CH3I has also been determined and three characteristic sharp absorption lines with absorption cross sections up to 2 × 10(-21) cm(2) have been observed in this wavelength range.

  5. Determination of Seed Soundness in Conifers Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obtusa Using Narrow-Multiband Spectral Imaging in the Short-Wavelength Infrared Range

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Osamu; Hara, Masashi; Tobita, Hiroyuki; Yazaki, Kenichi; Nakagawa, Toshinori; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi; Uemura, Akira; Utsugi, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of planted forests of Cryptomeria japonica (sugi) and Chamaecyparis obtuse (hinoki) is the pressing importance to the forest administration in Japan. Low seed germination rate of these species, however, has hampered low-cost production of their seedlings for reforestation. The primary cause of the low germinability has been attributed to highly frequent formation of anatomically unsound seeds, which are indistinguishable from sound germinable seeds by visible observation and other common criteria such as size and weight. To establish a method for sound seed selection in these species, hyperspectral imaging technique was used to identify a wavelength range where reflectance spectra differ clearly between sound and unsound seeds. In sound seeds of both species, reflectance in a narrow waveband centered at 1,730 nm, corresponding to a lipid absorption band in the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) range, was greatly depressed relative to that in adjacent wavebands on either side. Such depression was absent or less prominent in unsound seeds. Based on these observations, a reflectance index SQI, abbreviated for seed quality index, was formulated using reflectance at three narrow SWIR wavebands so that it represents the extent of the depression. SQI calculated from seed area-averaged reflectance spectra and spatial distribution patterns of pixelwise SQI within each seed area were both proven as reliable criteria for sound seed selection. Enrichment of sound seeds was accompanied by an increase in germination rate of the seed lot. Thus, the methods described are readily applicable toward low-cost seedling production in combination with single seed sowing technology. PMID:26083366

  6. Determination of Seed Soundness in Conifers Cryptomeria japonica and Chamaecyparis obtusa Using Narrow-Multiband Spectral Imaging in the Short-Wavelength Infrared Range.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Osamu; Hara, Masashi; Tobita, Hiroyuki; Yazaki, Kenichi; Nakagawa, Toshinori; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi; Uemura, Akira; Utsugi, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of planted forests of Cryptomeria japonica (sugi) and Chamaecyparis obtuse (hinoki) is the pressing importance to the forest administration in Japan. Low seed germination rate of these species, however, has hampered low-cost production of their seedlings for reforestation. The primary cause of the low germinability has been attributed to highly frequent formation of anatomically unsound seeds, which are indistinguishable from sound germinable seeds by visible observation and other common criteria such as size and weight. To establish a method for sound seed selection in these species, hyperspectral imaging technique was used to identify a wavelength range where reflectance spectra differ clearly between sound and unsound seeds. In sound seeds of both species, reflectance in a narrow waveband centered at 1,730 nm, corresponding to a lipid absorption band in the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) range, was greatly depressed relative to that in adjacent wavebands on either side. Such depression was absent or less prominent in unsound seeds. Based on these observations, a reflectance index SQI, abbreviated for seed quality index, was formulated using reflectance at three narrow SWIR wavebands so that it represents the extent of the depression. SQI calculated from seed area-averaged reflectance spectra and spatial distribution patterns of pixelwise SQI within each seed area were both proven as reliable criteria for sound seed selection. Enrichment of sound seeds was accompanied by an increase in germination rate of the seed lot. Thus, the methods described are readily applicable toward low-cost seedling production in combination with single seed sowing technology.

  7. Combined optical parametric oscillator with continuous tuning of radiation wavelength in the spectral range 2.5–10.8 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolker, D. B.; Sherstov, I. V.; Kostyukova, N. Yu.; Boyko, A. A.; Zenov, K. G.; Pustovalova, R. V.

    2017-02-01

    A combined optical parametric oscillator (OPO) with continuous tuning of the radiation wavelength in the spectral range 2.5–10.8 μm, optically pumped with the radiation from a Q-switched Nd : YLF laser (1.053 μm), is developed and tested. The oscillation is provided by an OPO1 based on a MgO : PPLN ‘fan-out’ structure in the spectral region 2.5–4.5 μm and by an OPO2 based on HgGa2S4 nonlinear crystals in the spectral region 4.18–10.8 μm, respectively. The angles of phase matching are measured for the HgGa2S4 crystals in the spectral range 4.18–10.8 μm for the type II conversion (eo-e), which virtually coincide with the calculated ones. The experimental absorption spectra of a gas mixture in the range 2.5–10.8 μm obtained using a gas-filled sealed-off photoacoustic cell are presented.

  8. Accessibility

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Federal laws, including Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, mandate that people with disabilities have access to the same information that someone without a disability would have. 508 standards cover electronic and information technology (EIT) products.

  9. Effect of multiple scattering of light by titanium dioxide nanoparticles implanted into a superficial skin layer on radiation transmission in different wavelength ranges

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A P; Priezzhev, A V; Lademann, Juergen; Myllylae, Risto

    2007-01-31

    The propagation of radiation in different spectral ranges in a superficial skin layer partially filled with titanium dioxide nanoparticles at the volume concentration 0.67%-2.25% is simulated by the Monte-Carlo method. This volume concentration corresponds to the maximum admissible concentrations of particles that most efficiently attenuate radiation in the independent scattering regime. The transmission of radiation at 307, 400, and 500 nm in a 20-{mu}m thick skin layer is simulated and the effect of nanoparticles on the contributions from photons of different scattering orders to transmission is considered. It is shown that the administration of nanoparticles results in the broadening of the scattering-order distribution of photons propagated through the skin layer and the shift of the maximum of this distribution in the direction of a greater number of scattering events at wavelengths 400 and 500 nm, the effect being more pronounced at 400 nm. The increase in the scattering order elongates photon trajectories in the medium and enhances diffusely scattered radiation, thereby reducing transmission. (special issue devoted to multiple radiation scattering in random media)

  10. Highly transparent conductive AZO/Zr50Cu50/AZO films in wide range of visible and near infrared wavelength grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jingyun; Cao, Guohua; Zong, Haitao; Kang, Chaoyang; Jia, Erguang; Zhang, Baoqing; Li, Ming

    Novel AZO/Zr50Cu50/AZO tri-layer transparent conductive films with excellent transmittance in both visible and near infrared region were successfully prepared by pulsed laser deposition on glass substrates. The electrical and optical properties were investigated at various Zr50Cu50 thicknesses. As the AZO thickness was fixed at 50 nm and Zr50Cu50 thickness was varied between 1 and 18 nm, it was found that AZO (50 nm)/Zr50Cu50/AZO (50 nm) tri-layer films exhibited good conductivity and high transmittance in both visible and near infrared wavelength. Additionally, both the electrical and optical properties of AZO (50 nm)/Zr50Cu50 (2 nm)/AZO (50 nm) tri-layer films were found to be sensitive to the growth temperature. In this work, the lowest sheet resistance (43 Ω/□) and relatively high transmittance (∼80%) in the range of 400-2000 nm were achieved while the growth temperature was 350 °C. Furthermore, the AZO (50 nm)/Zr50Cu50 (2 nm)/AZO (50 nm) thin film deposited at 350 °C exhibits the highest figure of merit of 1.42 × 10-3 Ω-1, indicating that the multilayer is promising for coated glasses and thin film solar cells.

  11. The non-contact detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints using visible wavelength hyperspectral imaging: Part II effectiveness on a range of substrates.

    PubMed

    Cadd, Samuel; Li, Bo; Beveridge, Peter; O'Hare, William T; Campbell, Andrew; Islam, Meez

    2016-05-01

    Biological samples, such as blood, are regularly encountered at violent crime scenes and successful identification is critical for criminal investigations. Blood is one of the most commonly encountered fingerprint contaminants and current identification methods involve presumptive tests or wet chemical enhancement. These are destructive however; can affect subsequent DNA sampling; and do not confirm the presence of blood, meaning they are susceptible to false positives. A novel application of visible wavelength reflectance hyperspectral imaging (HSI) has been used for the non-contact, non-destructive detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints across a range of coloured substrates of varying porosities. The identification of blood was based on the Soret γ band absorption of haemoglobin between 400 nm and 500 nm. Ridge detail was successfully visualised to the third depletion across light coloured substrates and the stain detected to the tenth depletion on both porous and non-porous substrates. A higher resolution setup for blood stained fingerprints on black tiles, detected ridge detail to the third depletion and the stain to the tenth depletion, demonstrating considerable advancements from previous work. Diluted blood stains at 1500 and 1000 fold dilutions for wet and dry stains respectively were also detected on pig skin as a replica for human skin.

  12. Preserving Range and Airspace Access for the Air Force Mission: Striving for a Strategic Vantage Point

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    turbines on land now set aside for Air Force use, and the increasing demand for airspace to accom- modate the growth in civilian air traffic. • next...to ranges, energy development that seeks to place wind turbines on land now set aside for Air Force use, and increasing demand for sufficient... turbine towers may create a hazard to low-flying aircraft and thus preclude low-level training. Wind turbines tend to be located in gaps with higher

  13. Digital predistortion of 75-110 GHz W-band frequency multiplier for fiber wireless short range access systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Deng, Lei; Pang, Xiaodan; Yu, Xianbin; Zheng, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hanyi; Monroy, Idelfonso Tafur

    2011-12-12

    We present a W-band fiber-wireless transmission system based on a nonlinear frequency multiplier for high-speed wireless short range access applications. By implementing a baseband digital signal predistortion scheme, intensive nonlinear distortions induced in a sextuple frequency multiplier can be effectively pre-compensated. Without using costly W-band components, a transmission system with 26 km fiber and 4 m wireless transmission operating at 99.6 GHz is experimentally validated. Adjacent-channel power ratio (ACPR) improvements for IQ-modulated vector signals are guaranteed and transmission performances for fiber and wireless channels are studied. This W-band predistortion technique is a promising candidate for applications in high capacity wireless-fiber access systems.

  14. Dynamics of chromatin accessibility and long-range interactions in response to glucocorticoid pulsing.

    PubMed

    Stavreva, Diana A; Coulon, Antoine; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; John, Sam; Stixova, Lenka; Tesikova, Martina; Hakim, Ofir; Miranda, Tina; Hawkins, Mary; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Chow, Carson C; Hager, Gordon L

    2015-06-01

    Although physiological steroid levels are often pulsatile (ultradian), the genomic effects of this pulsatility are poorly understood. By utilizing glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling as a model system, we uncovered striking spatiotemporal relationships between receptor loading, lifetimes of the DNase I hypersensitivity sites (DHSs), long-range interactions, and gene regulation. We found that hormone-induced DHSs were enriched within ± 50 kb of GR-responsive genes and displayed a broad spectrum of lifetimes upon hormone withdrawal. These lifetimes dictate the strength of the DHS interactions with gene targets and contribute to gene regulation from a distance. Our results demonstrate that pulsatile and constant hormone stimulations induce unique, treatment-specific patterns of gene and regulatory element activation. These modes of activation have implications for corticosteroid function in vivo and for steroid therapies in various clinical settings.

  15. An objective approach to determining the weight ranges of prey preferred by and accessible to the five large African carnivores.

    PubMed

    Clements, Hayley S; Tambling, Craig J; Hayward, Matt W; Kerley, Graham I H

    2014-01-01

    Broad-scale models describing predator prey preferences serve as useful departure points for understanding predator-prey interactions at finer scales. Previous analyses used a subjective approach to identify prey weight preferences of the five large African carnivores, hence their accuracy is questionable. This study uses a segmented model of prey weight versus prey preference to objectively quantify the prey weight preferences of the five large African carnivores. Based on simulations of known predator prey preference, for prey species sample sizes above 32 the segmented model approach detects up to four known changes in prey weight preference (represented by model break-points) with high rates of detection (75% to 100% of simulations, depending on number of break-points) and accuracy (within 1.3±4.0 to 2.7±4.4 of known break-point). When applied to the five large African carnivores, using carnivore diet information from across Africa, the model detected weight ranges of prey that are preferred, killed relative to their abundance, and avoided by each carnivore. Prey in the weight ranges preferred and killed relative to their abundance are together termed "accessible prey". Accessible prey weight ranges were found to be 14-135 kg for cheetah Acinonyx jubatus, 1-45 kg for leopard Panthera pardus, 32-632 kg for lion Panthera leo, 15-1600 kg for spotted hyaena Crocuta crocuta and 10-289 kg for wild dog Lycaon pictus. An assessment of carnivore diets throughout Africa found these accessible prey weight ranges include 88±2% (cheetah), 82±3% (leopard), 81±2% (lion), 97±2% (spotted hyaena) and 96±2% (wild dog) of kills. These descriptions of prey weight preferences therefore contribute to our understanding of the diet spectrum of the five large African carnivores. Where datasets meet the minimum sample size requirements, the segmented model approach provides a means of determining, and comparing, the prey weight range preferences of any carnivore species.

  16. Line spectrum and ion temperature measurements from tungsten ions at low ionization stages in large helical device based on vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy in wavelength range of 500–2200 Å

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, T. Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Huang, X. L.; Zhang, H. M.

    2014-11-15

    Vacuum ultraviolet spectra of emissions released from tungsten ions at lower ionization stages were measured in the Large Helical Device (LHD) in the wavelength range of 500–2200 Å using a 3 m normal incidence spectrometer. Tungsten ions were distributed in the LHD plasma by injecting a pellet consisting of a small piece of tungsten metal and polyethylene tube. Many lines having different wavelengths from intrinsic impurity ions were observed just after the tungsten pellet injection. Doppler broadening of a tungsten candidate line was successfully measured and the ion temperature was obtained.

  17. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Feldman, M.

    1992-12-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10[sup 8]. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing. 7 figs.

  18. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Feldman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10.sup.8. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing.

  19. Spatially resolved in vivo measurement system for estimating the optical properties of tissue in the wavelength range 1000-1700 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjalmarsson, Pär; Thennadil, Suresh N.

    2007-07-01

    For non-invasive estimation of optical properties (i.e. determination of the absorption and the reduced scattering coefficients) of turbid media such as tissue, spatially resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is one of most used technique. So far this has only been done for wavelengths covered by CCD-detectors (about 350-1050nm). The NIR region beyond 1050nm i.e. the second and first overtone regions, has absorption peaks of interest e.g. for tissue the glucose peak at around 1250nm and 1600nm. Thus for non-invasive medical diagnostics applications, a spatially resolved measurement system capable of estimating optical properties in this region will be very useful. Until now optical properties of tissue in this region have only been estimated using in vitro methods e.g. using an integrating sphere set-up. In this paper we describe a spatially resolved system that will extend the region up to 1700nm by using a TE cooled 320×256 pixel InGaAS detector, a white light source and a probe that consists of 9×200micron fibres spanning 0.3 to 2.7mm from the source. Across the 320 pixels 680nm will be dispersed giving a resolution of 2.125nm/pixel and a resolving power of about 14nm. The system is validated using tissue-like phantoms. Since tissue has a high concentration of water which leads to high absorption after 950nm, the diffusion approximation cannot be used to extract the optical properties from the spatially resolved measurements. Instead, two techniques based around Monte Carlo simulations of diffuse reflectance profiles, to build a lookup table coupled with interpolation using splines or a third order polynomial, have been used to calculate the optical properties for different wavelengths. The performances of these techniques are compared. It was found that the spline fitting produced lower error for the wavelength region considered.

  20. Satellite range delay simulator for a matrix-switched time division multiple-access network simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Lawrence A.

    1990-01-01

    The Systems Integration, Test, and Evaluation (SITE) facility at NASA Lewis Research Center is presently configured as a satellite-switched time division multiple access (SS-TDMA) network simulator. The purpose of SITE is to demonstrate and evaluate advanced communication satellite technologies, presently embodied by POC components developed under NASA contracts in addition to other hardware, such as ground terminals, designed and built in-house at NASA Lewis. Each ground terminal in a satellite communications system will experience a different aspect of the satellite's motion due mainly to daily tidal effects and station keeping, hence a different duration and rate of variation in the range delay. As a result of this and other effects such as local oscillator instability, each ground terminal must constantly adjust its transmit burst timing so that data bursts from separate ground terminals arrive at the satellite in their assigned time slots, preventing overlap and keeping the system in synchronism. On the receiving end, ground terminals must synchronize their local clocks using reference transmissions received through the satellite link. A feature of the SITE facility is its capability to simulate the varying propagation delays and associated Doppler frequency shifts that the ground terminals in the network have to cope with. Delay is ahcieved by means of two NASA Lewis designed and built range delay simulator (RDS) systems, each independently controlled locally with front panel switches or remotely by an experiment control and monitor (EC/M) computer.

  1. Full-range ultrahigh-resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in 1.7 µm wavelength region for deep-penetration and high-resolution imaging of turbid tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawagoe, Hiroyuki; Yamanaka, Masahito; Makita, Shuichi; Yasuno, Yoshiaki; Nishizawa, Norihiko

    2016-12-01

    For the first time, we developed a full-range ultrahigh-resolution (UHR) spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) technique working in the 1.7 µm wavelength region. This technique allowed high-resolution, deep-tissue imaging. By using a supercontinuum source operating at a wavelength of 1.7 µm, an axial resolution of 3.6 µm in a tissue specimen was achieved. To enhance the imaging depth of UHR-SD-OCT, we performed full-range OCT imaging based on a phase modulation method. We demonstrated the three-dimensional (3D) imaging of a mouse brain with the developed system, and specific structures in the mouse brain were clearly visualized at depths up to 1.7 mm.

  2. Selective ablation of rabbit atherosclerotic plaque with less thermal effect by the control of pulse structure of a quantum cascade laser in the 5.7 μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimura, Keisuke; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2016-03-01

    Cholesteryl esters are main components of atherosclerotic plaques and have an absorption peak at the wavelength of 5.75 μm originated from C=O stretching vibration mode of ester bond. Our group achieved the selective ablation of atherosclerotic lesions using a quantum cascade laser (QCL) in the 5.7 μm wavelength range. QCLs are relatively new types of semiconductor lasers that can emit mid-infrared range. They are sufficiently compact and considered to be useful for clinical application. However, large thermal effects were observed because the QCL worked as quasicontinuous wave (CW) lasers due to its short pulse interval. Then we tried macro pulse irradiation (irradiation of pulses at intervals) of the QCL and achieved effective ablation with less-thermal effects than conventional quasi-CW irradiation. However, lesion selectivity might be changed by changing pulse structure. Therefore, in this study, irradiation effects of the macro pulse irradiation to rabbit atherosclerotic plaque and normal vessel were compared. The macro pulse width and the macro pulse interval were set to 0.5 and 12 ms, respectively, because the thermal relaxation time of rabbit normal and atherosclerotic aortas in the oscillation wavelength of the QCL was 0.5-12 ms. As a result, cutting difference was achieved between rabbit atherosclerotic and normal aortas by the macro pulse irradiation. Therefore, macro pulse irradiation of a QCL in the 5.7 μm wavelength range is effective for reducing thermal effects and selective ablation of the atherosclerotic plaque. QCLs have the potential of realizing less-invasive laser angioplasty.

  3. Porous silicon-VO{sub 2} based hybrids as possible optical temperature sensor: Wavelength-dependent optical switching from visible to near-infrared range

    SciTech Connect

    Antunez, E. E.; Salazar-Kuri, U.; Estevez, J. O.; Basurto, M. A.; Agarwal, V.; Campos, J.

    2015-10-07

    Morphological properties of thermochromic VO{sub 2}—porous silicon based hybrids reveal the growth of well-crystalized nanometer-scale features of VO{sub 2} as compared with typical submicron granular structure obtained in thin films deposited on flat substrates. Structural characterization performed as a function of temperature via grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman demonstrate reversible semiconductor-metal transition of the hybrid, changing from a low-temperature monoclinic VO{sub 2}(M) to a high-temperature tetragonal rutile VO{sub 2}(R) crystalline structure, coupled with a decrease in phase transition temperature. Effective optical response studied in terms of red/blue shift of the reflectance spectra results in a wavelength-dependent optical switching with temperature. As compared to VO{sub 2} film over crystalline silicon substrate, the hybrid structure is found to demonstrate up to 3-fold increase in the change of reflectivity with temperature, an enlarged hysteresis loop and a wider operational window for its potential application as an optical temperature sensor. Such silicon based hybrids represent an exciting class of functional materials to display thermally triggered optical switching culminated by the characteristics of each of the constituent blocks as well as device compatibility with standard integrated circuit technology.

  4. Porous silicon-VO2 based hybrids as possible optical temperature sensor: Wavelength-dependent optical switching from visible to near-infrared range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunez, E. E.; Salazar-Kuri, U.; Estevez, J. O.; Campos, J.; Basurto, M. A.; Jiménez Sandoval, S.; Agarwal, V.

    2015-10-01

    Morphological properties of thermochromic VO2—porous silicon based hybrids reveal the growth of well-crystalized nanometer-scale features of VO2 as compared with typical submicron granular structure obtained in thin films deposited on flat substrates. Structural characterization performed as a function of temperature via grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman demonstrate reversible semiconductor-metal transition of the hybrid, changing from a low-temperature monoclinic VO2(M) to a high-temperature tetragonal rutile VO2(R) crystalline structure, coupled with a decrease in phase transition temperature. Effective optical response studied in terms of red/blue shift of the reflectance spectra results in a wavelength-dependent optical switching with temperature. As compared to VO2 film over crystalline silicon substrate, the hybrid structure is found to demonstrate up to 3-fold increase in the change of reflectivity with temperature, an enlarged hysteresis loop and a wider operational window for its potential application as an optical temperature sensor. Such silicon based hybrids represent an exciting class of functional materials to display thermally triggered optical switching culminated by the characteristics of each of the constituent blocks as well as device compatibility with standard integrated circuit technology.

  5. High-performance GaSb laser diodes and diode arrays in the 2.1-3.3 micron wavelength range for sensing and defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvinelis, Edgaras; TrinkÅ«nas, Augustinas; Greibus, Mindaugas; Kaušylas, Mindaugas; Žukauskas, Tomas; Å imonytÄ--, Ieva; Songaila, RamÅ«nas; Vizbaras, Augustinas; Vizbaras, Kristijonas

    2015-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectral region (2-4 μm) is gaining significant attention recently due to the presence of numerous enabling applications in the field of gas sensing, medical, and defense applications. Gas sensing in this spectral region is attractive due to the presence of numerous absorption lines for such gases as methane, ethane, ozone, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, etc. Sensing of the mentioned gas species is of particular importance for applications such as atmospheric LIDAR, petrochemical industry, greenhouse gas monitoring, etc. Defense applications benefit from the presence of covert atmospheric transmission window in the 2.1-2.3 micron band which is more eye-safe and offers less Rayleigh scattering than the conventional atmospheric windows in the near-infrared. Major requirement to enable these application is the availability of high-performance, continuous-wave laser sources in this window. Type-I GaSb-based laser diodes are ideal candidates for these applications as they offer direct emission possibility, high-gain and continuous wave operation. Moreover, due to the nature of type-I transition, these devices have a characteristic low operation voltage, which results in very low input powers and high wall-plug efficiency. In this work, we present recent results of 2 μm - 3.0 μm wavelength room-temperature CW light sources based on type-I GaSb developed at Brolis Semiconductors. We discuss performance of defense oriented high-power multimode laser diodes with < 1 W CW power output with over 30 % WPE as well as ~ 100 mW single TE00 Fabry-Perot chips. In addition, recent development efforts on sensing oriented broad gain superluminescent gain chips will be presented.

  6. Simulations of transit spectra of Hot Jupiters in the wavelength range of the CARMENES infrared channel (0.96-1.7μm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Lopez, A.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Amado, P. J.; Lara, L. M.; Salz, M.

    2017-03-01

    Transmission spectroscopy in the primary transit of an exoplanet has proven to be very useful for obtaining information of exoplanet atmospheres from both ground-based facilities and space telescopes. The Calar Alto high-Resolution search for M dwarfs with Exoearths with Near-infrared and optical Echelle Spectrographs (CARMENES) instrument has started being operative in early 2016 and here, we explore its capabilities for extracting information about Hot Jupiter atmospheres taking advantage of its ultra-stability, wide spectral interval (0.52 ‑ 1.7 μm), and high spectral resolution (R = 82000). We present some preliminary results of our simulations of the primary transit transmission spectra of HD 189733b in the 1 ‑ 1.7 μm m spectral range where several molecules, such as water vapour, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and methane, have strong ro-vibrational bands. Sensitivity studies are presented for the range of expected concentrations of these species, as well as for the expected range of temperature profiles. Our simulations have been performed using the line-by-line Karlsruhe Optimized and Precise Radiative Transfer Algorithm (KOPRA) adapted for exo-atmospheres.

  7. Use of layer strains in strained-layer superlattices to make devices for operation in new wavelength ranges, E. G. , InAsSb at 8 to 12. mu. m. [InAs/sub 1-x/Sb/sub x/

    DOEpatents

    Osbourn, G.C.

    1983-10-06

    An intrinsic semiconductor electro-optical device comprises a p-n junction intrinsically responsive, when cooled, to electromagnetic radiation in the wavelength range of 8 to 12 ..mu..m. This radiation responsive p-n junction comprises a strained-layer superlattice (SLS) of alternating layers of two different III-V semiconductors. The lattice constants of the two semiconductors are mismatched, whereby a total strain is imposed on each pair of alternating semiconductor layers in the SLS structure, the proportion of the total strain which acts on each layer of the pair being proportional to the ratio of the layer thicknesses of each layer in the pair.

  8. Long-range Transport of Dust and Smoke towards Barbados during Summer and Winter Season Measured with Three-Wavelength Polarization Lidar during SALTRACE-1, 2 and 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarig, Moritz; Ansmann, Albert; Althausen, Dietrich; Klepel, André; Baars, Holger; Farrell, David; Toledano, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    The annual cycle of the north-south movement of the intertropical convergence zone has an impact on the sources and mixture of the dust transported to the Caribbean. In summer, pure Saharan dust from northern Africa dominates, while in winter the dust originates from southern West Africa and is mixed with biomass burning smoke. The island of Barbados (13°N, 59°W) is an ideal site to investigate the long-range transport of Saharan dust because it is advected more than 5000 km across the Atlantic Ocean without any disturbance by anthropogenic aerosol sources. To investigate these seasonal changes in dust transport we extended the Saharan Aerosol Long-Range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE) in June-July 2013 by further two campaigns in February-March 2014 (SALTRACE-2) and June-July 2014 (SALTRACE-3). Additionally a ship cruise with a Raman polarization lidar on board from the Caribbean to the Cape Verde islands was performed in April-May 2013. Dual-polar sun photometer observations were performed continuously from June 2013 to July 2014 (see AERONET Barbados_SALTRACE site). For SALTRACE, we used a complex lidar system equipped with two Raman channels and a 532 nm high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) channel to obtain daytime (HSRL) and nighttime (Raman) extinction profiles. For the first time the dust linear depolarization ratios at 355, 532 and 1064 nm were measured simultaneously. The linear depolarization ratio provides information about the presence and amount of dust. The spectrum yields information about the dust size distribution. Combined with the extinction-to-backscatter ratio (lidar ratio) a separation of mineral dust (fine-mode and coarse-mode fractions), biomass burning smoke and maritime aerosols is possible. The measurements are presently used for understanding of long-range transported dust and provide insight into the aerosol composition over the western Atlantic. The classification of different aerosol types will be

  9. Miniaturized optical wavelength sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Helen Ling-Ning

    Recently semiconductor processing technology has been applied to the miniaturization of optical wavelength sensors. Compact sensors enable new applications such as integrated diode-laser wavelength monitors and frequency lockers, portable chemical and biological detection, and portable and adaptive hyperspectral imaging arrays. Small sensing systems have trade-offs between resolution, operating range, throughput, multiplexing and complexity. We have developed a new wavelength sensing architecture that balances these parameters for applications involving hyperspectral imaging spectrometer arrays. In this thesis we discuss and demonstrate two new wavelength-sensing architectures whose single-pixel designs can easily be extended into spectrometer arrays. The first class of devices is based on sampling a standing wave. These devices are based on measuring the wavelength-dependent period of optical standing waves formed by the interference of forward and reflected waves at a mirror. We fabricated two different devices based on this principle. The first device is a wavelength monitor, which measures the wavelength and power of a monochromatic source. The second device is a spectrometer that can also act as a selective spectral coherence sensor. The spectrometer contains a large displacement piston-motion MEMS mirror and a thin GaAs photodiode flip-chip bonded to a quartz substrate. The performance of this spectrometer is similar to that of a Michelson in resolution, operating range, throughput and multiplexing but with the added advantages of fewer components and one-dimensional architecture. The second class of devices is based on the Talbot self-imaging effect. The Talbot effect occurs when a periodic object is illuminated with a spatially coherent wave. Periodically spaced self-images are formed behind the object. The spacing of the self-images is proportional to wavelength of the incident light. We discuss and demonstrate how this effect can be used for spectroscopy

  10. Internal to external wavelength calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash C.

    1999-01-01

    The spectra of Hen 1357 (the Stingray nebula) were used to check the internal to external wavelength calibration of the STIS first order CCD modes. The radial velocity of the Stingray nebula is known to high accuracy (< 1 km/sec) and the line with of the nebular line is very narrow (< 8 km/sec for the integrated nebula). Thus the observations of the Stingray nebula are ideal to check the internal to external wavelength calibration of the first order modes. The observations were taken in G430L and G750M modes using a 52 x 0.05 arcsec slit covering the wavelength range 2900 to 5700 A and 6295 to 6867 A, respectively. The observed wavelength range includes many nebular emission lines. The wavelengths of the nebular lines derived using the pipeline internal wavelength calibration were compared with the wavelengths derived from other ground based observations. In all cases, the wavelength match between the two is of the same order as the accuracy to which the line center can be measured. These results imply that there is no significant offset between the internal and external wavelength calibrations for these modes. The HDF-S QSO observations were also used for this test both for the first order and the Echelle modes. The results of the HDF-S QSO observations further confirm the above finding for the first order modes, and imply that there is no significant offset between the internal and external wavelength calibration for the Echelle modes.

  11. Medium-Range Predictability of Contrail-Cirrus Demonstrated during Experiments Ml-Cirrus and Access-Ii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, U.

    2015-12-01

    The Contrail Cirrus Prediction model CoCiP (doi:10.5194/gmd-5-543-2012) has been applied quasi operationally to predict contrails for flight planning of ML-CIRRUS (C. Voigt, DLR, et al.) in Europe and for ACCESS II in California (B. Anderson, NASA, et al.) in March-May 2014. The model uses NWP data from ECMWF and past airtraffic data (actual traffic data are used for analysis). The forecasts provided a sequence of hourly forecast maps of contrail cirrus optical depth for 3.5 days, every 12 h. CoCiP has been compared to observations before, e.g. within a global climate-aerosol-contrail model (Schumann, Penner et al., ACPD, 2015, doi:10.5194/acpd-15-19553-2015). Good predictions would allow for climate optimal routing (see, e.g., US patent by Mannstein and Schumann, US 2012/0173147 A1). The predictions are tested by: 1) Local eyewitness reports and photos, 2) satellite observed cloudiness, 3) autocorrelation analysis of predictions for various forecast periods, 4) comparisons of computed with observed optical depth from COCS (doi:10.5194/amt-7-3233-2014, 2014) by IR METEOSAT-SEVIRI observations over Europe. The results demonstrate medium-range predictability of contrail cirrus to a useful degree for given traffic, soot emissions, and high-quality NWP data. A growing set of satellite, Lidar, and in-situ data from ML-CIRRUS and ACCENT are becoming available and will be used to further test the forecast quality. The autocorrelation of optical depth predictions is near 70% for 3-d forecasts for Europe (outside times with high Sahara dust loads), and only slightly smaller for continental USA. Contrail cirrus is abundant over Europe and USA. More than 1/3 of all cirrus measured with the research aircraft HALO during ML-CIRRUS was impacted by contrails. The radiative forcing (RF) is strongly daytime and ambience dependent. The net annual mean RF, based on our global studies, may reach up to 0.08 W/m2 globally, and may well exceed 1 W/m2 regionally, with maximum over Europe

  12. Non-Destructive and Discriminating Identification of Illegal Drugs by Transient Absorption Spectroscopy in the Visible and Near-IR Wavelength Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Chie; Furube, Akihiro; Katoh, Ryuzi; Nonaka, Hidehiko; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2008-11-01

    We have tested the possibility of identifying illegal drugs by means of nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy with a 10-ns UV-laser pulse for the excitation light and visible-to-near-IR light for the probe light. We measured the transient absorption spectra of acetonitrile solutions of d-methamphetamine, dl-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine hydrochloride (MDMA), and dl-N-methyl-1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-butanamine hydrochloride (MBDB), which are illegal drugs widely consumed in Japan. Transient absorption signals of these drugs were observed between 400 and 950 nm, a range in which they are transparent in the ground state. By analyzing the spectra in terms of exponential and Gaussian functions, we could identify the drugs and discriminate them from chemical substances having similar structures. We propose that transient absorption spectroscopy will be a useful, non-destructive method of inspecting for illegal drugs, especially when they are dissolved in liquids. Such a method may even be used for drugs packed in opaque materials if it is further extended to utilize intense femtosecond laser pulses.

  13. Opacity of iron, nickel, and copper plasmas in the x-ray wavelength range: Theoretical interpretation of 2p-3d absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Blenski, T.; Loisel, G.; Poirier, M.; Thais, F.; Arnault, P.; Caillaud, T.; Fariaut, J.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J.-C.; Porcherot, Q.; Reverdin, C.; Silvert, V.; Villette, B.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Foelsner, W.; Gaufridy de Dortan, F. de

    2011-09-15

    This paper deals with theoretical studies on the 2p-3d absorption in iron, nickel, and copper plasmas related to LULI2000 (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, 2000J facility) measurements in which target temperatures were of the order of 20 eV and plasma densities were in the range 0.004-0.01 g/cm{sup 3}. The radiatively heated targets were close to local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The structure of 2p-3d transitions has been studied with the help of the statistical superconfiguration opacity code sco and with the fine-structure atomic physics codes hullac and fac. A new mixed version of the sco code allowing one to treat part of the configurations by detailed calculation based on the Cowan's code rcg has been also used in these comparisons. Special attention was paid to comparisons between theory and experiment concerning the term features which cannot be reproduced by sco. The differences in the spin-orbit splitting and the statistical (thermal) broadening of the 2p-3d transitions have been investigated as a function of the atomic number Z. It appears that at the conditions of the experiment the role of the term and configuration broadening was different in the three analyzed elements, this broadening being sensitive to the atomic number. Some effects of the temperature gradients and possible non-LTE effects have been studied with the help of the radiative-collisional code scric. The sensitivity of the 2p-3d structures with respect to temperature and density in medium-Z plasmas may be helpful for diagnostics of LTE plasmas especially in future experiments on the {Delta}n=0 absorption in medium-Z plasmas for astrophysical applications.

  14. Multiple wavelength light collimator and monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, Warren J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An optical system for receiving and collimating light and for transporting and processing light received in each of N wavelength ranges, including near-ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared and mid-infrared wavelengths, to determine a fraction of light received, and associated dark current, in each wavelength range in each of a sequence of time intervals.

  15. Analysis of weld seam uniformity through temperature distribution by spatially resolved detector elements in the wavelength range of 0.3μm to 5μm for the detection of structural changing heating and cooling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempe, B.; Maschke, R.; Rudek, F.; Baselt, T.; Hartmann, P.

    2016-03-01

    Online process control systems often only detecting temperatures at a local area of the machining point and determining an integrated value. In order to determine the proper welding quality and the absence of defects, such as temperature induced stress cracks, it is necessary to do time and space resolved measurements before, during and after the production process. The system under development consists of a beam splitting unit which divides the electromagnetic radiation of the heated component on two different sensor types. For high temperatures, a sensor is used which is sensitive in the visible spectrum and has a dynamic range of 120dB.1 Thus, very high intensity differences can be displayed and a direct analysis of the temperature profile of the weld spots is possible.2 A second sensor is operating in the wavelength range from 1 micron to 5 microns and allows the determination of temperatures from approximately 200°C.3 At the beginning of a welding process, the heat-up phase of the metal is critical to the resultant weld quality. If a defined temperature range exceeded too fast, the risk of cracking is significantly increased.4 During the welding process the thermal supervision of the central processing location is decisive for a high secure weld. In the border areas as well as in connection of the welding process especially cooling processes are crucial for the homogeneity of the results. In order to obtain sufficiently accurate resolution of the dynamic heating- and cooling-processes, the system can carry out up to 500 frames per second.

  16. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosz, Marek; KoŻuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ṡ 10-8. Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement.

  17. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement.

    PubMed

    Dobosz, Marek; Kożuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ⋅ 10(-8). Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement.

  18. Method of Controlling Lasing Wavelength(s)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Murray, Keith E. (Inventor); Hutcheson, Ralph L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided to control the lasing wavelength of a laser material without changing or adjusting the mechanical components of a laser device, The rate at which the laser material is pumped with the pumping energy is controlled so that lasing occurs at one or more lasing wavelengths based on the rate. The lasing wavelengths are determined by transition lifetimes and/or energy transfer rates.

  19. Fully automated dual-frequency three-pulse-echo 2DIR spectrometer accessing spectral range from 800 to 4000 wavenumbers.

    PubMed

    Leger, Joel D; Nyby, Clara M; Varner, Clyde; Tang, Jianan; Rubtsova, Natalia I; Yue, Yuankai; Kireev, Victor V; Burtsev, Viacheslav D; Qasim, Layla N; Rubtsov, Grigory I; Rubtsov, Igor V

    2014-08-01

    A novel dual-frequency two-dimensional infrared instrument is designed and built that permits three-pulse heterodyned echo measurements of any cross-peak within a spectral range from 800 to 4000 cm(-1) to be performed in a fully automated fashion. The superior sensitivity of the instrument is achieved by a combination of spectral interferometry, phase cycling, and closed-loop phase stabilization accurate to ~70 as. The anharmonicity of smaller than 10(-4) cm(-1) was recorded for strong carbonyl stretching modes using 800 laser shot accumulations. The novel design of the phase stabilization scheme permits tuning polarizations of the mid-infrared (m-IR) pulses, thus supporting measurements of the angles between vibrational transition dipoles. The automatic frequency tuning is achieved by implementing beam direction stabilization schemes for each m-IR beam, providing better than 50 μrad beam stability, and novel scheme for setting the phase-matching geometry for the m-IR beams at the sample. The errors in the cross-peak amplitudes associated with imperfect phase matching conditions and alignment are found to be at the level of 20%. The instrument can be used by non-specialists in ultrafast spectroscopy.

  20. Fully automated dual-frequency three-pulse-echo 2DIR spectrometer accessing spectral range from 800 to 4000 wavenumbers

    SciTech Connect

    Leger, Joel D.; Nyby, Clara M.; Varner, Clyde; Tang, Jianan; Rubtsova, Natalia I.; Yue, Yuankai; Kireev, Victor V.; Burtsev, Viacheslav D.; Qasim, Layla N.; Rubtsov, Igor V.; Rubtsov, Grigory I.

    2014-08-15

    A novel dual-frequency two-dimensional infrared instrument is designed and built that permits three-pulse heterodyned echo measurements of any cross-peak within a spectral range from 800 to 4000 cm{sup −1} to be performed in a fully automated fashion. The superior sensitivity of the instrument is achieved by a combination of spectral interferometry, phase cycling, and closed-loop phase stabilization accurate to ∼70 as. The anharmonicity of smaller than 10{sup −4} cm{sup −1} was recorded for strong carbonyl stretching modes using 800 laser shot accumulations. The novel design of the phase stabilization scheme permits tuning polarizations of the mid-infrared (m-IR) pulses, thus supporting measurements of the angles between vibrational transition dipoles. The automatic frequency tuning is achieved by implementing beam direction stabilization schemes for each m-IR beam, providing better than 50 μrad beam stability, and novel scheme for setting the phase-matching geometry for the m-IR beams at the sample. The errors in the cross-peak amplitudes associated with imperfect phase matching conditions and alignment are found to be at the level of 20%. The instrument can be used by non-specialists in ultrafast spectroscopy.

  1. Chromosomal dynamics predicted by an elastic network model explains genome-wide accessibility and long-range couplings.

    PubMed

    Sauerwald, Natalie; Zhang, She; Kingsford, Carl; Bahar, Ivet

    2017-03-16

    Understanding the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of chromatin and its relation to gene expression and regulation is fundamental to understanding how the genome functions. Advances in Hi-C technology now permit us to study 3D genome organization, but we still lack an understanding of the structural dynamics of chromosomes. The dynamic couplings between regions separated by large genomic distances (>50 Mb) have yet to be characterized. We adapted a well-established protein-modeling framework, the Gaussian Network Model (GNM), to model chromatin dynamics using Hi-C data. We show that the GNM can identify spatial couplings at multiple scales: it can quantify the correlated fluctuations in the positions of gene loci, find large genomic compartments and smaller topologically-associating domains (TADs) that undergo en bloc movements, and identify dynamically coupled distal regions along the chromosomes. We show that the predictions of the GNM correlate well with genome-wide experimental measurements. We use the GNM to identify novel cross-correlated distal domains (CCDDs) representing pairs of regions distinguished by their long-range dynamic coupling and show that CCDDs are associated with increased gene co-expression. Together, these results show that GNM provides a mathematically well-founded unified framework for modeling chromatin dynamics and assessing the structural basis of genome-wide observations.

  2. Dual Wavelength Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Dual wavelength lasers are discussed, covering fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics of these systems. Results on Tm:Ho:Er:YAG dual wavelength laser action (Ho at 2.1 m and Er at 2.9 m) as well as Nd:YAG (1.06 and 1.3 m) are presented as examples of such dual wavelength systems. Dual wavelength lasers are not common, but there are criteria that govern their behavior. Based on experimental studies demonstrating simultaneous dual wavelength lasing, some general conclusions regarding the successful operation of multi-wavelength lasers can be made.

  3. Simple wavelength assignment protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryaputra, Stephen; Touch, Joseph D.; Bannister, Joseph A.

    2000-10-01

    IP routers can be coupled with wavelength-selective optical cross- connects to support existing Internet infrastructure in a wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) optical network. Because optical wavelength routing is transparent to IP, packets can bypass traditional forwarding and pass directly through the optical cross-connect, resulting in very high throughput and low delay routing. This approach shares features with label switching, but wavelengths are much more scarce resource than labels. Because optical switches have larger switching times than electronic switches, and wavelength conversions are expensive, wavelength label swapping is not easily done. Wavelength label assignments must consider these limitations to be practical in an optical environment. The performance of an instance of this approach, called Packet over Wavelengths (POW) has been simulated and studied. A new signaling protocol, Simple Wavelength Assignment Protocol (SWAP) is devised to be POW signaling protocol. SWAP takes into account the optical device limitations, and is designed to minimize wavelength conversion, utilize wavelengths with the merging of flows, and reduce the reconfiguration of optical switches. SWAP, to our knowledge, is the first approach to combine signaling and wavelength assignment in an on- line protocol. This paper describes high level SWAP design challenges, decision, and overhead.

  4. Aerial perches and free-range laying hens: the effect of access to aerial perches and of individual bird parameters on keel bone injuries in commercial free-range laying hens.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, C J; Ball, M E E; O'Connell, N E

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this trial was to determine the effect of aerial perches on keel bone injuries and tibia bone characteristics in free-range laying hens. The relationship between keel bone injuries and individual bird parameters, such as weight, girth, wing:girth ratio, feather coverage, and tibia bone characteristics, was also assessed. Five commercial free-range houses, each containing between 7,000 and 8,000 birds, were used. The houses and range areas were divided in half; in half of the house, birds had access to aerial perches (P) and in the other half, they did not (NP). On 13 occasions between 17 and 70 wk of age, 20 birds per treatment were randomly selected from the slatted area and palpated for keel bone injury. At 72 wk of age, 30 birds per treatment in each of 4 houses were selected at random, weighed, and then euthanized. Girth and wing area and feather coverage were measured. The keel and left tibia bones were removed and keel bones were scored for injury. Tibia bones were weighed and diameter, length, breaking strength, and ash content recorded. Results indicated that access to aerial perches did not affect tibia bone measures (P > 0.05). Average palpated keel bone score increased with age of the hens (P < 0.001) but was not significantly affected by perch treatment (P > 0.05). There was a significant interaction between treatment and farm on keel bone injuries measured at dissection (P < 0.05), with the probability of birds having high keel-damage scores increasing in the perched treatment in some farms but not others. In general, as the keel bone injury score measured at dissection increased, the breaking strength (P < 0.001) and ash content (P < 0.05) of the tibia bone decreased. It is suggested that individual variation in bone strength contributes to differences in susceptibility to keel injury. No relationship existed between keel-injury score measured at dissection and individual parameters, such as weight, girth, or wing:girth ratio (P > 0

  5. Short-wavelength MEMS-tunable VCSELs.

    PubMed

    Cole, Garrett D; Behymer, Elaine; Bond, Tiziana C; Goddard, Lynford L

    2008-09-29

    We present electrically-injected MEMS-tunable vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with emission wavelengths below 800 nm. Operation in this wavelength range, near the oxygen A-band from 760-780 nm, is attractive for absorption-based optical gas sensing. These fully-monolithic devices are based on an oxide-aperture AlGaAs epitaxial structure and incorporate a suspended dielectric Bragg mirror for wavelength tuning. By implementing electrostatic actuation, we demonstrate the potential for tuning rates up to 1 MHz, as well as a wide wavelength tuning range of 30 nm (767-737 nm).

  6. Jupiter before Juno: State of the atmosphere at cloud level in 2016 from PlanetCam observations in the 0.4-1.7 microns wavelength range and amateur observations in the visible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, Ricardo; Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Rojas, Jose Felix; Iñurrigarro, Peio; Mendikoa, Iñigo; Go, Christopher; PVOL-IOPW Team

    2016-10-01

    The arrival of Juno to Jupiter provides a unique opportunity to link findings of the inner structure of the planet with astronomical observations of its meteorology at cloud level. Long time base observations of Jupiter's atmosphere before and during the Juno mission are critical in providing context to Junocam observations and may benefit the interpretation of the MWR data on the lower atmosphere structure as well as Juno data on the depth of the zonal winds. We have performed a long campaign of observations in the visible with the PlanetCam lucky imaging instrument in the 2.2m telescope at Calar Alto Observatory in Spain with observations obtained in December 2015 and in March, May, June and July 2016. In observations under good atmospheric seeing, the instrument allows to obtain images with a spatial resolution of 0.05'' in the visible and 0.1'' from 1.0 to 1.7 microns. The later is an interesting range of wavelengths for observing Jupiter because of the existence of several strong and weak methane absorption bands not generally used in high-resolution ground-based observations of the planet. A combination of images using narrow filters centered in methane absorption bands and their adjacent continuum allows studying the vertical structure of the clouds at horizontal spatial scales of 350-1000 km over the planet depending on the atmospheric seeing and filter used. The best images can be further processed showing features at spatial resolutions of about 150 km. We have also monitored the state of the atmosphere with images obtained by amateur astronomers contributing to the Planetary Virtual Observatory Laboratory database (http://pvol.ehu.eus). Based on both datasets we present zonal winds from -70 to +75 deg with an accuracy of 10 m/s in the low latitudes and 25 m/s in subpolar latitudes. Relative altitude maps of features observed in bands J, H and others with different methane absorption will be presented.

  7. Wavelength independent interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochberg, Eric B. (Inventor); Page, Norman A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A polychromatic interferometer utilizing a plurality of parabolic reflective surfaces to properly preserve the fidelity of light wavefronts irrespective of their wavelengths as they pass through the instrument is disclosed. A preferred embodiment of the invention utilizes an optical train which comprises three off-axis parabolas arranged in conjunction with a beam-splitter and a reference mirror to form a Twyman-Green interferometer. An illumination subsystem is provided and comprises a pair of lasers at different preselected wavelengths in the visible spectrum. The output light of the two lasers is coaxially combined by means of a plurality of reflectors and a grating beam combiner to form a single light source at the focal point of the first parabolic reflection surface which acts as a beam collimator for the rest of the optical train. By using visible light having two distinct wavelengths, the present invention provides a long equivalent wavelength interferogram which operates at visible light wherein the effective wavelength is equal to the product of the wavelengths of the two laser sources divided by their difference in wavelength. As a result, the invention provides the advantages of what amounts to long wavelength interferometry but without incurring the disadvantage of the negligible reflection coefficient of the human eye to long wavelength frequencies which would otherwise defeat any attempt to form an interferogram at that low frequency using only one light source.

  8. Wavelength shifting of intra-cavity photons: Adiabatic wavelength tuning in rapidly wavelength-swept lasers

    PubMed Central

    Jirauschek, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the physics behind the newest generation of rapidly wavelength tunable sources for optical coherence tomography (OCT), retaining a single longitudinal cavity mode during operation without repeated build up of lasing. In this context, we theoretically investigate the currently existing concepts of rapidly wavelength-swept lasers based on tuning of the cavity length or refractive index, leading to an altered optical path length inside the resonator. Specifically, we consider vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirrors as well as Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) and Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector (VT-DBR) lasers. Based on heuristic arguments and exact analytical solutions of Maxwell’s equations for a fundamental laser resonator model, we show that adiabatic wavelength tuning is achieved, i.e., hopping between cavity modes associated with a repeated build up of lasing is avoided, and the photon number is conserved. As a consequence, no fundamental limit exists for the wavelength tuning speed, in principle enabling wide-range wavelength sweeps at arbitrary tuning speeds with narrow instantaneous linewidth. PMID:26203373

  9. Parametric wavelength conversion in photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sigang; Wu, Zhaohui; Yang, Yi; Chen, Minghua; Xie, Shizhong

    2016-11-01

    Nonlinear wavelength conversion provides flexible solutions for generating wideband tunable radiation in novel wavelength band. Parametric process in photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) has attracted comprehensive interests since it can act as broadband tunable light sources in non-conventional wavelength bands. The current state-of-the-art photonic crystal fibers can provide more freedom for customizing the dispersion and nonlinearity which is critical to the nonlinear process, such as four wave mixing (FWM), compared with the traditional fibers fabricated with doping techniques. Here we demonstrate broadband parametric wavelength conversion in our homemade photonic crystal fibers. The zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW) of PCFs is critical for the requirement of phase matching condition in the parametric four wave mixing process. Firstly a procedure of the theoretical design of PCF with the ZDW at 1060 nm is proposed through our homemade simulation software. A group of PCF samples with gradually variable parameters are fabricated according to the theoretical design. The broadband parametric gain around 1060 nm band is demonstrated pumped with our homemade mode locked fiber laser in the anomalous dispersion region. Also a narrow gain band with very large wavelength detune with the pump wavelength in the normal dispersion region is realized. Wavelength conversion with a span of 194 nm is realized. Furthermore a fiber optical parametric oscillator based on the fabricated PCF is built up. A wavelength tunable range as high as 340 nm is obtained. This report demonstrates a systematic procedure to realize wide band wavelength conversion based on PCFs.

  10. Wavelength Anomalies in UV-Vis Spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellinghuisen, J.

    2012-06-01

    Commercial spectrophotometers are great tools for recording absorption spectra of low-to-moderate resolution and high photometic quality. However, in the case of at least one such instrument, the Shimadzu UV-2101PC (and by assumption, similar Shimadzu models), the wavelength accuracy may not match the photometric accuracy. In fact the wavelength varies with slit width, spectral sampling interval, and even the specified range, with a smoothing algorithm invoked any time the spectrum includes more than 65 sampled wavelengths. This behavior appears not to be documented anywhere, but it has been present for at least 20 years and persists even in the latest software available to run the instrument. The wavelength shifts can be as large as 1 nm, so for applications where wavelength accuracy better than this is important, wavelength calibration must be done with care to ensure that the results are valid for the parameters used to record the target spectra.

  11. Gd(III)-Gd(III) EPR distance measurements--the range of accessible distances and the impact of zero field splitting.

    PubMed

    Dalaloyan, Arina; Qi, Mian; Ruthstein, Sharon; Vega, Shimon; Godt, Adelheid; Feintuch, Akiva; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2015-07-28

    Gd(III) complexes have emerged as spin labels for distance determination in biomolecules through double-electron-electron resonance (DEER) measurements at high fields. For data analysis, the standard approach developed for a pair of weakly coupled spins with S = 1/2 was applied, ignoring the actual properties of Gd(III) ions, i.e. S = 7/2 and ZFS (zero field splitting) ≠ 0. The present study reports on a careful investigation on the consequences of this approach, together with the range of distances accessible by DEER with Gd(III) complexes as spin labels. The experiments were performed on a series of specifically designed and synthesized Gd-rulers (Gd-PyMTA-spacer-Gd-PyMTA) covering Gd-Gd distances of 2-8 nm. These were dissolved in D2O-glycerol-d8 (0.03-0.10 mM solutions) which is the solvent used for the corresponding experiments on biomolecules. Q- and W-band DEER measurements, followed by data analysis using the standard data analysis approach, used for S = 1/2 pairs gave the distance-distribution curves, of which the absolute maxima agreed very well with the expected distances. However, in the case of the short distances of 2.1 and 2.9 nm, the distance distributions revealed additional peaks. These are a consequence of neglecting the pseudo-secular term in the dipolar Hamiltonian during the data analysis, as is outlined in a theoretical treatment. At distances of 3.4 nm and above, disregarding the pseudo-secular term leads to a broadening of a maximum of 0.4 nm of the distance-distribution curves at half height. Overall, the distances of up to 8.3 nm were determined, and the long evolution time of 16 μs at 10 K indicates that a distance of up to 9.4 nm can be accessed. A large distribution of the ZFS parameter, D, as is found for most Gd(III) complexes in a frozen solution, is crucial for the application of Gd(III) complexes as spin labels for distance determination via Gd(III)-Gd(III) DEER, especially for short distances. The larger ZFS of Gd-PyMTA, in

  12. Big Data, Small Data: Accessing and Manipulating Geoscience Data Ranging From Repositories to Student-Collected Data Sets Using GeoMapApp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    We often demand information and data to be accessible over the web at no cost, and no longer do we expect to spend time labouriously compiling data from myriad sources with frustratingly-different formats. Instead, we increasingly expect convenience and consolidation. Recent advances in web-enabled technologies and cyberinfrastructure are answering those calls by providing data tools and resources that can transform undergraduate education. By freeing up valuable classroom time, students can focus upon gaining deeper insights and understanding from real-world data. GeoMapApp (http://www.geomapapp.org) is a map-based data discovery and visualisation tool developed at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. GeoMapApp promotes U-Learning by working across all major computer platforms and functioning anywhere with internet connectivity, by lowering socio-economic barriers (it is free), by seamlessly integrating thousands of built-in research-grade data sets under intuitive menus, and by being adaptable to a range of learning environments - from lab sessions, group projects, and homework assignments to in-class pop-ups. GeoMapApp caters to casual and specialist users alike. Contours, artificial illumination, 3-D displays, data point manipulations, cross-sectional profiles, and other display techniques help students better grasp the content and geospatial context of data. Layering capabilities allow easy data set comparisons. The core functionality also applies to imported data sets: Student-collected data can thus be imported and analysed using the same techniques. A new Save Session function allows educators to preserve a pre-loaded state of GeoMapApp. When shared with a class, the saved file allows every student to open GeoMapApp at exactly the same starting point from which to begin their data explorations. Examples of built-in data sets include seafloor crustal age, earthquake locations and focal mechanisms, analytical geochemistry, ocean water physical properties, US and

  13. Short wavelength FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The generation of coherent ultraviolet and shorter wavelength light is presently limited to synchrotron sources. The recent progress in the development of brighter electron beams enables the use of much lower energy electron rf linacs to reach short-wavelengths than previously considered possible. This paper will summarize the present results obtained with synchrotron sources, review proposed short- wavelength FEL designs and then present a new design which is capable of over an order of magnitude higher power to the extreme ultraviolet. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Millimeter wavelength propagation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    The investigations conducted for the Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Studies during the period December, 1966, to June 1974 are reported. These efforts included the preparation for the ATS-5 Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Experiment and the subsequent data acquisition and data analysis. The emphasis of the OSU participation in this experiment was placed on the determination of reliability improvement resulting from the use of space diversity on a millimeter wavelength earth-space communication link. Related measurements included the determination of the correlation between radiometric temperature and attenuation along the earth-space propagation path. Along with this experimental effort a theoretical model was developed for the prediction of attenuation statistics on single and spatially separated earth space propagation paths. A High Resolution Radar/Radiometer System and Low Resolution Radar System were developed and implemented for the study of intense rain cells in preparation for the ATS-6 Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Experiment.

  15. Long-wavelength photonic integrated circuits and avalanche photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, Yi-Jen D.; Zaytsev, Sergey; Pauchard, Alexandre; Hummel, Steve; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2001-10-01

    Fast-growing internet traffic volume require high data communication bandwidth over longer distances. Access network bottlenecks put pressure on short-range (SR) telecommunication systems. To effectively address these datacom and telecom market needs, low-cost, high-speed laser modules at 1310 to 1550 nm wavelengths and avalanche photodetectors are required. The great success of GaAs 850nm VCSEls for Gb/s Ethernet has motivated efforts to extend VCSEL technology to longer wavelengths in the 1310 and 1550 nm regimes. However, the technological challenges associated with materials for long wavelength VCSELs are tremendous. Even with recent advances in this area, it is believed that significant additional development is necessary before long wavelength VCSELs that meet commercial specifications will be widely available. In addition, the more stringent OC192 and OC768 specifications for single-mode fiber (SMF) datacom may require more than just a long wavelength laser diode, VCSEL or not, to address numerous cost and performance issues. We believe that photonic integrated circuits (PICs), which compactly integrate surface-emitting lasers with additional active and passive optical components with extended functionality, will provide the best solutions to today's problems. Photonic integrated circuits have been investigated for more than a decade. However, they have produced limited commercial impact to date primarily because the highly complicated fabrication processes produce significant yield and device performance issues. In this presentation, we will discuss a new technology platform of InP-based PICs compatible with surface-emitting laser technology, as well as a high data rate externally modulated laser module. Avalanche photodetectors (APDs) are the key component in the receiver to achieve high data rate over long transmission distance because of their high sensitivity and large gain- bandwidth product. We have used wafer fusion technology to achieve In

  16. GHRS Cycle 5 Echelle Wavelength Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, David

    1995-07-01

    This proposal defines the spectral lamp test for Echelle A. It is an internal test which makes measurements of the wavelength lamp SC2. It calibrates the carrousel function, Y deflections, resolving power, sensitivity, and scattered light. The wavelength calibration dispersion constants will be updated in the PODPS calibration data base. This proposal defines the spectral lamp test for Echelle B. It is an internal test which makes measurements of the wavelength lamp SC2. It calibrates the carrousel function, Y deflections, resolving power, sensitivity, and scattered light. The wavelength calibration dispersion constants will be updated in the PODPS calibration data base. It will be run every 4 months. The wavelengths may be out of range according to PEPSI or TRANS. Please ignore the errors.

  17. Shear flow-induced optical inhomogeneity of blood assessed in vivo and in vitro by spectral domain optical coherence tomography in the 1.3 μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimalla, Peter; Walther, Julia; Mittasch, Matthaeus; Koch, Edmund

    2011-11-01

    The optical inhomogeneity of flowing blood, which appears as a waisted double fan-shaped intensity pattern inside vessels in cross-sectional optical coherence tomography (OCT) images, was investigated for the first time. High resolution spectral domain OCT in the 1.3 μm wavelength region is used to assess this inhomogeneous intravascular backscattering of light in an in vivo mouse model and flow phantom measurements. Based on a predicted alignment of the red blood cells toward laminar shear flow, an angular modulation of the corresponding backscattering cross-section inside the vessels is assumed. In combination with the signal attenuation in depth by absorption and scattering, a simple model of the intravascular intensity modulation is derived. The suitability of the model is successfully demonstrated in the in vivo experiments and confirmed by the in vitro measurements. The observed effect appears in flowing blood only and shows a strong dependency on the shear rate. In conclusion, the shear-induced red blood cell alignment in conjunction with the vessel geometry is responsible for the observed intensity distribution. This inherent effect of blood imaging has to be considered in attenuation measurements performed with OCT. Furthermore, the analysis of the intravascular intensity pattern might be useful to evaluate flow characteristics.

  18. High-power frequency comb in the range of 2-2.15  μm based on a holmium fiber amplifier seeded by wavelength-shifted Raman solitons from an erbium-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Coluccelli, Nicola; Cassinerio, Marco; Gambetta, Alessio; Laporta, Paolo; Galzerano, Gianluca

    2014-03-15

    We demonstrate a room-temperature high-power frequency comb source covering the spectral region from 2 to 2.15 μm. The source is based on a femtosecond erbium-fiber laser operating at 1.55 μm with a repetition rate of 250 MHz, wavelength-shifted up to 2.06 μm by the solitonic Raman effect, seeding a large-mode-area holmium (Ho) fiber amplifier pumped by a thulium (Tm) fiber laser emitting at 1.94 μm. The frequency comb has an integrated power of 2 W, with overall power fluctuations as low as 0.3%. The beatnote between the comb and a high-spectral-purity, single-frequency Tm-Ho laser has a linewidth of 32 kHz over 1 ms observation time, with a signal-to-noise ratio in excess of 30 dB.

  19. Monolithic single mode interband cascade lasers with wide wavelength tunability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Edlinger, M.; Weih, R.; Scheuermann, J.; Nähle, L.; Fischer, M.; Koeth, J.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2016-11-01

    Monolithic two-section interband cascade lasers offering a wide wavelength tunability in the wavelength range around 3.7 μm are presented. Stable single mode emission in several wavelength channels was realized using the concept of binary superimposed gratings and two-segment Vernier-tuning. The wavelength selective elements in the two segments were based on specially designed lateral metal grating structures defined by electron beam lithography. A dual-step dry etch process provided electrical separation between the segments. Individual current control of the segments allowed wavelength channel selection as well as continuous wavelength tuning within channels. A discontinuous tuning range extending over 158 nm in up to six discrete wavelength channels was achieved. Mode hop free wavelength tuning up to 14 nm was observed within one channel. The devices can be operated in continuous wave mode up to 30 °C with the output powers of 3.5 mW around room temperature.

  20. Long wavelength infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Long wavelength infrared detection is achieved by a detector made with layers of quantum well material bounded on each side by barrier material to form paired quantum wells, each quantum well having a single energy level. The width and depth of the paired quantum wells, and the spacing therebetween, are selected to split the single energy level with an upper energy level near the top of the energy wells. The spacing is selected for splitting the single energy level into two energy levels with a difference between levels sufficiently small for detection of infrared radiation of a desired wavelength.

  1. Wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Harter, D.J.; Bado, P.

    1988-11-01

    We describe a wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier which is used to amplify nanosecond slices from a single-frequency cw dye laser or 50-ps pulses emitted by a diode laser to energies in the 10-mJ range. The amplified 5-ns slices generated by the cw-pumped line narrowed dye laser are Fourier transform limited. The 50-ps pulses emitted by a gain-switched diode laser are amplified by more than 10 orders of magnitude in a single stage.

  2. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  3. Gaia-ESO Survey: Empirical classification of VLT/Giraffe stellar spectra in the wavelength range 6440-6810 Å in the γ Velorum cluster, and calibration of spectral indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, F.; Prisinzano, L.; Micela, G.; Randich, S.; Gilmore, G.; Drew, J. E.; Jeffries, R. D.; Frémat, Y.; Alfaro, E. J.; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Pancino, E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Sacco, G. G.; Smiljanic, R.; Jackson, R. J.; de Laverny, P.; Morbidelli, L.; Worley, C. C.; Hourihane, A.; Costado, M. T.; Jofré, P.; Lind, K.; Maiorca, E.

    2014-06-01

    We present a study of spectral diagnostics available from optical spectra with R = 17 000 obtained with the VLT/Giraffe HR15n setup, using observations from the Gaia-ESO Survey, on the γ Vel young cluster, with the purpose of classifying these stars and finding their fundamental parameters. We define several spectroscopic indices, sampling the amplitude of TiO bands, the Hα line core and wings, and temperature- and gravity-sensitive sets of lines, each useful as a Teff or log g indicator over a limited range of stellar spectral types. Hα line indices are also useful as chromospheric activity or accretion indicators. Furthermore, we use all indices to define additional global Teff- and log g-sensitive indices τ and γ, valid for the entire range of types in the observed sample. We find a clear difference between gravity indices of main-sequence and pre-main-sequence stars, as well as a much larger difference between these and giant stars. The potentially great usefulness of the (γ,τ) diagram as a distance-independent age measurement tool for young clusters is discussed. We discuss the effect on the defined indices of classical T Tauri star veiling, which is however detected in only a few stars in the present sample. Then, we present tests and calibrations of these indices, on the basis of both photometry and literature reference spectra, from the UVES Paranal Observatory Projectand the ELODIE 3.1 Library. The known properties of these stars, spanning a wide range of stellar parameters, enable us to obtain a good understanding of the performances of our new spectral indices. For non-peculiar stars with known temperature, gravity, and metallicity, we are able to calibrate quantitatively our indices, and derive stellar parameters for a wide range of stellar types. To this aim, a new composite index is defined, providing a good metallicity indicator. The ability of our indices to select peculiar, or otherwise rare classes of stars is also established. For pre

  4. Triple wavelength monitor PDIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Deukhee; Ha, Chang-woo; Shin, Sang-cheol; Kwon, Kyoung-soo; Ko, Joo-yul; Kang, Shin-jae

    2006-08-01

    Recently the demand for high-capacity optical storage systems compatible with CD, DVD, and Blue is growing. We designed the Vertical NIP photodiode with a diameter of 700um and the trans-impedance circuits by using 0.6um BiCMOS process. The measured sensitivity of the photodiode is 0.25, 0.42, and 0.48A/W for 405, 650, and 780nm wavelength lights, respectively. The capacitance of the PD is 4.5pF. Monitor PDIC for detecting triple wavelength lights is presented in this paper. The complete monitor PDIC with the NIP photodiode of 700um in diameter occupies 1900um*1200um. -3dB bandwidth is 110MHz and the temperature drift of output voltage is 3.2%.

  5. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, Peter L.

    1986-01-01

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  6. Medium-range objective predictions of thunderstorms on the McIDAS/CSIS interactive computer system. [Computer Interactive Data Access System/Centralized Storm Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    Until recently, all operational meteorological data has been made available to forecasters in a variety of different forms. Predictions based upon these different data formats have been complicated by the inability of forecasters to easily assimilate, in real-time, all data to provide an optimum decision regarding future weather occurrences. By March 1980, a joint NASA/NOAA effort had been initiated to develop the Centralized Storm Information System (CSIS). The primary objectives of this joint project are related to an improvement of the overall severe storm forecast and warning procedure and to a demonstration of the operational utility of techniques developed within the applied research community. CSIS is to utilize the Man Computer Interactive Data Access System (McIDAS). The present investigation is concerned with one of the first attempts to employ the CSIS system for the evaluation of a new research technique involving the prediction of thunderstorms over a forecast period of 12-48 hours.

  7. Millimeter wavelength thermographic scanner.

    PubMed

    Cacak, R K; Winans, D E; Edrich, J; Hendee, W R

    1981-01-01

    Two new types of thermographic instruments sensitive to millimeter-wave electromagnetic radiation have been designed, constructed, and tested. These instruments utilize wavelengths that are three orders of magnitude longer and much more penetrating than those used in conventional infrared thermography. The instruments are capable of detecting apparent thermal variations as small as a fraction of a degree existing at tissue depths of several millimeters below the skin. By comparison, conventional IR thermographic units are limited to sampling radiation emitted only from the surface. The millimeter wave thermographic units are designed to contribute to the clinical detection of breast abnormalities with the specific aim of accurately and noninvasively detecting breast cancer.

  8. Investigation of optimum wavelengths for oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huong, Audrey K. C.; Stockford, Ian M.; Crowe, John A.; Morgan, Stephen P.

    2009-07-01

    An evaluation of the optimum choice of wavelengths, when using the 'Modified Lambert-Beer law' to estimate blood oxygen saturation, that minimises the mean error across a range of oxygen saturation values is presented. The stability of this approach and its susceptibility to noise are also considered.

  9. Comets at radio wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovisier, Jacques; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Colom, Pierre; Biver, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Comets are considered as the most primitive objects in the Solar System. Their composition provides information on the composition of the primitive solar nebula, 4.6 Gyr ago. The radio domain is a privileged tool to study the composition of cometary ices. Observations of the OH radical at 18 cm wavelength allow us to measure the water production rate. A wealth of molecules (and some of their isotopologues) coming from the sublimation of ices in the nucleus have been identified by observations in the millimetre and submillimetre domains. We present an historical review on radio observations of comets, focusing on the results from our group, and including recent observations with the Nançay radio telescope, the IRAM antennas, the Odin satellite, the Herschel space observatory, ALMA, and the MIRO instrument aboard the Rosetta space probe.

  10. New design for a wavelength demultiplexing device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethmann, Konrad; Orghici, Rozalia; Pichler, Elke; Zywietz, Urs; Schimdt, Thomas; Gleissner, Uwe; Kelb, Christian; Roth, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Carsten; Willer, Ulrike; Schade, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    Arrayed waveguide gratings (AWG) originally designed as demultiplexing device and manufactured with well established silicon wafer technology are already used successfully as compact spectrometers with high resolution1. In this paper, the concept of a new design for a wavelength demultiplexing device based on tailor-made polymers is presented. The motivation for a new design is a smaller footprint of the device and the avoidance of bended waveguides and the associated losses. Extensive simulations were performed to optimize the design. Using microscope projection lithography and hot embossing a first polymer based device was realized. Its characterization and the achieved performance in terms of resolution and covered wavelength range will be discussed.

  11. GHRS Ech-B Wavelength Monitor -- Cycle 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, David

    1994-01-01

    This proposal defines the spectral lamp test for Echelle B. It is an internal test which makes measurements of the wavelength lamp SC2. It calibrates the carrousel function, Y deflections, resolving power, sensitivity, and scattered light. The wavelength calibration dispersion constants will be updated in the PODPS calibration data base. It will be run every 4 months. The wavelengths may be out of range according to PEPSI or TRANS. Please ignore the errors.

  12. The effect of a diet containing grasshoppers and access to free-range on carcase and meat physicochemical and sensory characteristics in broilers.

    PubMed

    Sun, T; Long, R J; Liu, Z Y

    2013-01-01

    1. Research was conducted to evaluate the impact of a diet containing grasshoppers on the carcase, physicochemical and sensory characteristics in a free-range, grassland-based broiler production system. 2. A total of 80, 28-d-old male broilers were reared on grassland containing a large population of grasshoppers (treatment PB). Control birds were reared intensively on a maize-soybean diet (treatment CB). At 91 d of age, 24 birds from each treatment were slaughtered to evaluate carcase, meat and sensory characteristics. 3. Treatment PB produced birds with significantly lower live weights, breast, wing, thigh and drum weights, and higher dressing percentage and breast percentage of carcase, compared with CB. Treatment PB produced breast meat with significantly higher redness values, shear force and protein content, and lower pH values, cooking loss, moisture and fat content compared with CB. Sensory panel results for breast and thigh meats showed no treatment effect on colour and juiciness, but significantly higher scores for chewiness, flavour, aroma and overall appreciation, and lower scores for tenderness from treatment PB compared with CB. 4. Rearing chickens on rangeland may provide an alternative way to produce poultry meat which is considered superior by modern consumers.

  13. Multi-wavelength Extragalactic Surveys and the Role of MeerKAT and SALT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, Matt J.

    2012-03-01

    In these proceedings I discuss a range of surveys that are currently underway at optical, near-infrared and far-infrared wavelengths that have large components accessible to both the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) and the Meer Karoo Array Telescope (MeerKAT). Particular attention is paid to the surveys currently underway with ESO's VISTA telescope, which will provide the ideal data from which to select targets for SALT spectroscopy whilst also providing the necessary depth and photometric redshift accuracy to trace the uJy radio population, found through the proposed MeerKAT surveys. Such surveys will lead to an accurate picture of evolution of star-formation and accretion activity traced at radio wavelengths. Furthermore, SALT spectroscopy could play a crucial role in following up Herschel surveys with its large collecting area and blue sensitivity which occupies a niche in instrumentation on 8- and 10-m class telescopes.

  14. Wavelength-conserving grating router for intermediate wavelength density

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Patel, Rajesh R.; Bond, Steven W.; Bennett, Cory V.

    2007-03-20

    A wavelength router to be used for fiber optical networking router is based on a diffraction grating which utilizes only N wavelengths to interconnect N inputs to N outputs. The basic approach is to augment the grating with additional couplers or wavelength selective elements so than N-1 of the 2N-1 outputs are combined with other N outputs (leaving only N outputs). One embodiment uses directional couplers as combiners. Another embodiment uses wavelength-selective couplers. Another embodiment uses a pair of diffraction gratings to maintain parallel propagation of all optical beams. Also, beam combining can be implemented either by using retroflection back through the grating pair or by using couplers.

  15. Smoke optical depths - Magnitude, variability, and wavelength dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Russell, P. B.; Colburn, D. A.; Ackerman, T. P.; Allen, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    An airborne autotracking sun-photometer has been used to measure magnitudes, temporal/spatial variabilities, and the wavelength dependence of optical depths in the near-ultraviolet to near-infrared spectrum of smoke from two forest fires and one jet fuel fire and of background air. Jet fuel smoke optical depths were found to be generally less wavelength dependent than background aerosol optical depths. Forest fire smoke optical depths, however, showed a wide range of wavelength depedences, such as incidents of wavelength-independent extinction.

  16. Broadband Wavelength Spanning Holographic Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Kashma; Shriyan, Sameet; Fontecchio, Adam

    2008-03-01

    Broadened interaction wavelength of holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystals (HPDLCs) have extensive applications in beam steering for instrument clusters, hyperspectral imaging, wavelength filtering and construction of lightweight optics. A novel simultaneous time and spatial multiplexing formation configuration is proposed here, to increase narrow wavelength reflecting notch to broad range wavelength spanning device. HPDLC films have electro-optic controllability by applying field. No moving parts, light weight, small footprint compared to prisms and lenses, high color purity make the broadband wavelength HPDLCs desirable for the above applications. Varying the incident laser beam exposure angles using motorized rotating stage, during formation is the key step here for their formation in a single medium. The fabricated broadband wavelength sensitive HPDLCs are characterized for the uniformity of the reflected peak and electro optic response. Their output wavefront is analyzed using wavefront analysis technique.

  17. Source of coherent short wavelength radiation

    DOEpatents

    Villa, Francesco

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for producing coherent radiation ranging from X-rays to the far ultraviolet (i.e., 1 Kev to 10 eV) utilizing the Compton scattering effect. A photon beam from a laser is scattered on a high energy electron bunch from a pulse power linac. The short wavelength radiation produced by such scattering has sufficient intensity and spatial coherence for use in high resolution applications such as microscopy.

  18. Robust Fixed-Wavelength Laser Eye Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    protection : ■ protection against a few known wavelengths, such as used by friendly forces, and ■ protection against lasers that are frequency-agile, or...for flashblindness protection but were too slow for use against lasers. Many goggle materials have been developed to protect against specific laser...hazard to the eyes offered by currently fielded range-finders and designators requires that eye protection against these devices be made available

  19. Passive infrared ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonpacher, N. K.

    1983-12-01

    The range of an infrared source was estimated by analyzing the atmospheric absorption by CO2 in several wavelength intervals of its spectrum. These bandpasses were located at the edge of the CO2 absorption band near 2300 1/cm (4.3 micron). A specific algorithm to predict range was determined based on numerous computer generated spectra. When tested with these spectra, range estimates within 0.8 km were obtained for ranges between 0 and 18 km. Accuracy decreased when actual source spectra were tested. Although actual spectra were available only for ranges to 5 km, 63% of these spectra resulted in range estimates that were within 1.6 km of the actual range. Specific spectral conditions that affected the range predictions were found. Methods to correct the deficiencies were discussed. Errors from atmospheric variations, and the effects of background noise, were also investigated. Limits on accuracy and range resolution were determined.

  20. Long wavelength gravity and topography anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, A. B.; Daly, S. F.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that gravity and topography anomalies on the earth's surface may provide new information about deep processes occurring in the earth, such as those associated with mantle convection. Two main reasons are cited for this. The first is the steady improvement that has occurred in the resolution of the long wavelength gravity field, particularly in the wavelength range of a few hundred to a few thousand km, mainly due to increased coverage of terrestrial gravity measurements and the development of radar altimeters in orbiting satellites. The second reason is the large number of numerical and laboratory experiments of convection in the earth, including some with deformable upper and lower boundaries and temperature-dependent viscosity. The oceans are thought to hold the most promise for determining long wavelength gravity and topography anomalies, since their evolution has been relatively simple in comparison with that of the continents. It is also shown that good correlation between long wavelength gravity and topography anomalies exists over some portions of the ocean floor

  1. Multiple-wavelength tunable laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Walsh, Brian M. (Inventor); Reichle, Donald J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A tunable laser includes dispersion optics for separating generated laser pulses into first and second wavelength pulses directed along first and second optical paths. First and second reflective mirrors are disposed in the first and second optical paths, respectively. The laser's output mirror is partially reflective and partially transmissive with respect to the first wavelength and the second wavelength in accordance with provided criteria. A first resonator length is defined between the output mirror and the first mirror, while a second resonator length is defined between the output mirror and the second mirror. The second resonator length is a function of the first resonator length.

  2. AWG Filter for Wavelength Interrogator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Richard J. (Inventor); Costa, Joannes M. (Inventor); Faridian, Fereydoun (Inventor); Moslehi, Behzad (Inventor); Sotoudeh, Vahid (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A wavelength interrogator is coupled to a circulator which couples optical energy from a broadband source to an optical fiber having a plurality of sensors, each sensor reflecting optical energy at a unique wavelength and directing the reflected optical energy to an AWG. The AWG has a detector coupled to each output, and the reflected optical energy from each grating is coupled to the skirt edge response of the AWG such that the adjacent channel responses form a complementary pair response. The complementary pair response is used to convert an AWG skirt response to a wavelength.

  3. Synchronous two-wavelength temporal interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoqiong; Gao, Zhan; Qin, Jie; Li, Guangyu; Feng, Ziang; Wang, Shengjia

    2016-09-01

    Interferometry is an optical measuring method with the character of non-destructive, high sensitivity and high accuracy. However, its measurement range is limited by the phase ambiguity. Hence the method with two separate different wavelengths light source is introduced to enlarge the measurement range. As for the two-wavelength interferometry case, phase shifting is the traditional way to acquire the phase map, it needs to repeat the measurement twice, which means the measurement cannot be accomplished in real time. Hence to solve the problem, a temporal sequence interferometry has been used. This method can obtain the desired phase information in real time by using the Fourier transform methods of the interferogram recorded in a sequence while the object is being deformed. But, it is difficult to retrieve the phase information directly due to the multi extreme points in one period of the cosine function. In this paper, an algorithm based on the wavelet ridge analysis is adopted to retrieve the two wavelength phase fluctuation caused by the displacement simultaneously. The preliminary experiment is conducted and the results are compared with theoretical simulations to validate the proposed approach. The laser emits light with two wavelengths 532 nm and 473 nm, two separated interference patterns in time sequence are detected by the CCD camera in the same time. The overlapped interferograms of two colors are analyzed by this algorithm and the corresponding phase information are obtained. The maximum error value between the simulation and theory is 0.03 um and the relative error is 0.33%.

  4. Arteriovenous Access

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, Jennifer M.; Dipchand, Christine; Oliver, Matthew; Moist, Louise; Yilmaz, Serdar; Lok, Charmaine; Leung, Kelvin; Clark, Edward; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Luscombe, Rick; Miller, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Complications of vascular access lead to morbidity and may reduce quality of life. In this module, we review both infectious and noninfectious arteriovenous access complications including neuropathy, aneurysm, and high-output access. For the challenging patients who have developed many complications and are now nearing their last vascular access, we highlight some potentially novel approaches. PMID:28270919

  5. Mach-Zehnder wavelength selective switch embedded with microring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Kengo; Shoji, Yuya; Mizumoto, Tetsuya

    2017-02-01

    A wavelength selective switch is proposed for optical wavelength division multiplexing network applications with very short range interconnections. The proposed device uses a Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration incorporating wavelength selective phase shifters composed of microring resonators between their two arms. Wavelength selectivity is provided by cascaded microring resonators, which are placed in proximity so that the increase in excess loss caused by the difference in resonant wavelengths can be minimized. An on/off switching ratio >20 dB is obtainable when the drop/through transmittance ratio of the cascaded microring resonators is >22 dB and the coupling efficiency deviation from 50% is <1% in the directional couplers constructing the Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

  6. Optimal wavelength band clustering for multispectral iris recognition.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yazhuo; Zhang, David; Shi, Pengfei; Yan, Jingqi

    2012-07-01

    This work explores the possibility of clustering spectral wavelengths based on the maximum dissimilarity of iris textures. The eventual goal is to determine how many bands of spectral wavelengths will be enough for iris multispectral fusion and to find these bands that will provide higher performance of iris multispectral recognition. A multispectral acquisition system was first designed for imaging the iris at narrow spectral bands in the range of 420 to 940 nm. Next, a set of 60 human iris images that correspond to the right and left eyes of 30 different subjects were acquired for an analysis. Finally, we determined that 3 clusters were enough to represent the 10 feature bands of spectral wavelengths using the agglomerative clustering based on two-dimensional principal component analysis. The experimental results suggest (1) the number, center, and composition of clusters of spectral wavelengths and (2) the higher performance of iris multispectral recognition based on a three wavelengths-bands fusion.

  7. Short-wavelength infrared laser activates the auditory neurons: comparing the effect of 980 vs. 810 nm wavelength.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lan; Wang, Jingxuan; Wei, Ying; Lu, Jianren; Xu, Anting; Xia, Ming

    2017-02-01

    Research on auditory neural triggering by optical stimulus has been developed as an emerging technique to elicit the auditory neural response, which may provide an alternative method to the cochlear implants. However, most previous studies have been focused on using longer-wavelength near-infrared (>1800 nm) laser. The effect comparison of different laser wavelengths in short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) range on the auditory neural stimulation has not been previously explored. In this study, the pulsed 980- and 810-nm SWIR lasers were applied as optical stimuli to irradiate the auditory neurons in the cochlea of five deafened guinea pigs and the neural response under the two laser wavelengths was compared by recording the evoked optical auditory brainstem responses (OABRs). In addition, the effect of radiant exposure, laser pulse width, and threshold with the two laser wavelengths was further investigated and compared. The one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze those data. Results showed that the OABR amplitude with the 980-nm laser is higher than the amplitude with the 810-nm laser under the same radiant exposure from 10 to 102 mJ/cm(2). And the laser stimulation of 980 nm wavelength has lower threshold radiant exposure than the 810 nm wavelength at varied pulse duration in 20-500 μs range. Moreover, the 810-nm laser has a wider optimized pulse duration range than the 980-nm laser for the auditory neural stimulation.

  8. Spatial phase stepping wavelength meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surrel, Yves; García-Márquez, Jorge; Fodor, Jozsua; Juncar, Patrick

    2005-03-01

    A new way of evaluating the ratio between a reference wavelength radiation and an unknown wavelength radiation in a two-beam interferometer is proposed here. The advantage of two-beam interferometry is the sinusoidal fringe signal for which precise phase detection algorithms exist. Modern algorithms can cope with different sources of errors, and correct them. We recall the principle of the Michelson-type lambdameter using temporal interference and we introduce the Young-type lambdameter using spatial interference. The Young-type lambdameter is based on the acquisition of the interference pattern from two point sources (e.g. two ends of monomode fibres projected onto a CCD camera). The measurement of an unknown wavelength can be achieved by comparing with a reference wavelength. Accurate interference phase maps can be calculated using spatial phase shifting. In this way, each small group of contiguous pixels acts as a single interferometer, and the whole set of pixels corresponds to many hundreds or thousands of interferometric measurement system units. The analysis of uncertainties shows that resolutions better than 10-7 can be achieved. An advantage of the fibre wavelength metre described here is the measurement velocity that takes only a few seconds.

  9. Systematic wavelength selection for improved multivariate spectral analysis

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Edward V.; Robinson, Mark R.; Haaland, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for determining in a biological material one or more unknown values of at least one known characteristic (e.g. the concentration of an analyte such as glucose in blood or the concentration of one or more blood gas parameters) with a model based on a set of samples with known values of the known characteristics and a multivariate algorithm using several wavelength subsets. The method includes selecting multiple wavelength subsets, from the electromagnetic spectral region appropriate for determining the known characteristic, for use by an algorithm wherein the selection of wavelength subsets improves the model's fitness of the determination for the unknown values of the known characteristic. The selection process utilizes multivariate search methods that select both predictive and synergistic wavelengths within the range of wavelengths utilized. The fitness of the wavelength subsets is determined by the fitness function F=.function.(cost, performance). The method includes the steps of: (1) using one or more applications of a genetic algorithm to produce one or more count spectra, with multiple count spectra then combined to produce a combined count spectrum; (2) smoothing the count spectrum; (3) selecting a threshold count from a count spectrum to select these wavelength subsets which optimize the fitness function; and (4) eliminating a portion of the selected wavelength subsets. The determination of the unknown values can be made: (1) noninvasively and in vivo; (2) invasively and in vivo; or (3) in vitro.

  10. Investigations of medium wavelength magnetic anomalies in the eastern Pacific using Magsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, C. G. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Three long total magnetic field profiles taken over ocean basins were analyzed. It is found that there is a significant signal in the wavelength range of 1500 to 150 km. This is too short a wavelength to be caused by the core field, which becomes insignificant at about a wavelength of 1500 km; this intermediate wavelength signal is not caused by a typical sea floor spreading process, which should give maximum power in the wavelength region about 50 km. It is shown that the external magnetic field contributes very little to this intermediate wavelength signal. Efforts to explain the cause of this signal have failed.

  11. The "+" for CRIRES: enabling better science at infrared wavelength and high spectral resolution at the ESO VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Reinhold J.; Follert, Roman; Bristow, Paul; Cumani, Claudio; Eschbaumer, Siegfried; Grunhut, Jason; Haimerl, Andreas; Hatzes, Artie; Heiter, Ulrike; Hinterschuster, Renate; Ives, Derek J.; Jung, Yves; Kerber, Florian; Klein, Barbara; Lavaila, Alexis; Lizon, Jean Louis; Löwinger, Tom; Molina-Conde, Ignacio; Nicholson, Belinda; Marquart, Thomas; Oliva, Ernesto; Origlia, Livia; Pasquini, Luca; Paufique, Jérôme; Piskunov, Nikolai; Reiners, Ansgar; Seemann, Ulf; Stegmeier, Jörg; Stempels, Eric; Tordo, Sebastien

    2016-08-01

    The adaptive optics (AO) assisted CRIRES instrument is an IR (0.92 - 5.2 μm) high-resolution spectrograph was in operation from 2006 to 2014 at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) observatory. CRIRES was a unique instrument, accessing a parameter space (wavelength range and spectral resolution) up to now largely uncharted. It consisted of a single-order spectrograph providing long-slit (40 arcsecond) spectroscopy with a resolving power up to R=100 000. However the setup was limited to a narrow, single-shot, spectral range of about 1/70 of the central wavelength, resulting in low observing efficiency for many scientific programmes requiring a broad spectral coverage. The CRIRES upgrade project, CRIRES+, transforms this VLT instrument into a cross-dispersed spectrograph to increase the simultaneously covered wavelength range by a factor of ten. A new and larger detector focal plane array of three Hawaii 2RG detectors with 5.3 μm cut-off wavelength will replace the existing detectors. For advanced wavelength calibration, custom-made absorption gas cells and an etalon system will be added. A spectro-polarimetric unit will allow the recording of circular and linear polarized spectra. This upgrade will be supported by dedicated data reduction software allowing the community to take full advantage of the new capabilities offered by CRIRES+. CRIRES+ has now entered its assembly and integration phase and will return with all new capabilities by the beginning of 2018 to the Very Large Telescope in Chile. This article will provide the reader with an update of the current status of the instrument as well as the remaining steps until final installation at the Paranal Observatory.

  12. Nonstoichiometric Laser Materials: Designer Wavelengths in Neodymium Doped Garnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.; Barnes, Norman P.

    2008-01-01

    The tunable nature of lasers provides for a wide range of applications. Most applications rely on finding available laser wavelengths to meet the needs of the research. This article presents the concept of compositional tuning, whereby the laser wavelength is designed by exploiting nonstoichiometry. For research where precise wavelengths are required, such as remote sensing, this is highly advantageous. A theoretical basis for the concept is presented and experimental results in spectroscopic measurements support the theoretical basis. Laser operation nicely demonstrates the validity of the concept of designer lasers.

  13. Free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Z; Rizvi, A A; Riza, N A

    2001-12-10

    A wavelength-multiplexed optical scanning scheme is proposed for deflecting a free-space optical beam by selection of the wavelength of the light incident on a wavelength-dispersive optical element. With fast tunable lasers or optical filters, this scanner features microsecond domain scan setting speeds and large- diameter apertures of several centimeters or more for subdegree angular scans. Analysis performed indicates an optimum scan range for a given diffraction order and grating period. Limitations include beam-spreading effects based on the varying scanner aperture sizes and the instantaneous information bandwidth of the data-carrying laser beam.

  14. Filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses of different wavelengths in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiexing; Lin, Wenbin

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the filaments formed by the ultrashort laser pulses with different wavelengths of 400 nm, 586 nm and 800 nm propagating in argon. Numerical results show that, when the input power or the ratio of the input power to the critical power is given, the pulse with 400 nm wavelength has the largest on-axis intensity, as well as the narrowest filament and the most stable beam radius. These results indicate that the pulse with shorter wavelength is more suitable for the long-range propagation in argon.

  15. Middle infrared (wavelength range: 8 μm-14 μm) 2-dimensional spectroscopy (total weight with electrical controller: 1.7 kg, total cost: less than 10,000 USD) so-called hyperspectral camera for unmanned air vehicles like drones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Saito, Tsubasa; Ogawa, Satoru; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    We developed the palm size (optical unit: 73[mm]×102[mm]×66[mm]) and light weight (total weight with electrical controller: 1.7[kg]) middle infrared (wavelength range: 8[μm]-14[μm]) 2-dimensional spectroscopy for UAV (Unmanned Air Vehicle) like drone. And we successfully demonstrated the flights with the developed hyperspectral camera mounted on the multi-copter so-called drone in 15/Sep./2015 at Kagawa prefecture in Japan. We had proposed 2 dimensional imaging type Fourier spectroscopy that was the near-common path temporal phase-shift interferometer. We install the variable phase shifter onto optical Fourier transform plane of infinity corrected imaging optical systems. The variable phase shifter was configured with a movable mirror and a fixed mirror. The movable mirror was actuated by the impact drive piezo-electric device (stroke: 4.5[mm], resolution: 0.01[μm], maker: Technohands Co.,Ltd., type:XDT50-45, price: around 1,000USD). We realized the wavefront division type and near common path interferometry that has strong robustness against mechanical vibrations. Without anti-mechanical vibration systems, the palm-size Fourier spectroscopy was realized. And we were able to utilize the small and low-cost middle infrared camera that was the micro borometer array (un-cooled VOxMicroborometer, pixel array: 336×256, pixel pitch: 17[μm], frame rate 60[Hz], maker: FLIR, type: Quark 336, price: around 5,000USD). And this apparatus was able to be operated by single board computer (Raspberry Pi.). Thus, total cost was less than 10,000 USD. We joined with KAMOME-PJ (Kanagawa Advanced MOdule for Material Evaluation Project) with DRONE FACTORY Corp., KUUSATSU Corp., Fuji Imvac Inc. And we successfully obtained the middle infrared spectroscopic imaging with multi-copter drone.

  16. Sub-wavelength plasmon laser

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.

    2016-04-19

    A plasmonic laser device has resonant nanocavities filled with a gain medium containing an organic dye. The resonant plasmon frequencies of the nanocavities are tuned to align with both the absorption and emission spectra of the dye. Variables in the system include the nature of the dye and the wavelength of its absorption and emission, the wavelength of the pumping radiation, and the resonance frequencies of the nanocavities. In addition the pumping frequency of the dye is selected to be close to the absorption maximum.

  17. Discrete Wavelength-Locked External Cavity Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2004-01-01

    A prototype improved external cavity laser (ECL) was demonstrated in the second phase of a continuing effort to develop wavelength-agile lasers for fiber-optic communications and trace-gas-sensing applications. This laser is designed to offer next-generation performance for incorporation into fiber-optic networks. By eliminating several optical components and simplifying others used in prior designs, the design of this laser reduces costs, making lasers of this type very competitive in a price-sensitive market. Diode lasers have become enabling devices for fiber optic networks because of their cost, compactness, and spectral properties. ECLs built around diode laser gain elements further enhance capabilities by virtue of their excellent spectral properties with significantly increased (relative to prior lasers) wavelength tuning ranges. It is essential to exploit the increased spectral coverage of ECLs while simultaneously insuring that they operate only at precisely defined communication channels (wavelengths). Heretofore, this requirement has typically been satisfied through incorporation of add-in optical components that lock the ECL output wavelengths to these specific channels. Such add-in components contribute substantially to the costs of ECL lasers to be used as sources for optical communication networks. Furthermore, the optical alignment of these components, needed to attain the required wavelength precision, is a non-trivial task and can contribute substantially to production costs. The design of the present improved ECL differs significantly from the designs of prior ECLs. The present design relies on inherent features of components already included within an ECL, with slight modifications so that these components perform their normal functions while simultaneously effecting locking to the required discrete wavelengths. Hence, add-in optical components and the associated cost of alignment can be eliminated. The figure shows the locking feedback signal

  18. Integration of both dense wavelength-division multiplexing and coarse wavelength-division multiplexing demultiplexer on one photonic crystal chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Huiping; Shen, Guansheng; Liu, Weijia; Ji, Yuefeng

    2013-07-01

    An integrated model of photonic crystal (PC) demultiplexer that can be used to combine dense wavelength-division multiplexing (DWDM) and coarse wavelength-division multiplexing (CWDM) systems is first proposed. By applying the PC demultiplexer, dense channel spacing 0.8 nm and coarse channel spacing 20 nm are obtained at the same time. The transmission can be improved to nearly 90%, and the crosstalk can be decreased to less than -18 dB by enlarging the width of the bus waveguide. The total size of the device is 21×42 μm2. Four channels on one side of the demultiplexer can achieve DWDM in the wavelength range between 1575 and 1578 nm, and the other four channels on the other side can achieve CWDM in the wavelength range between 1490 and 1565 nm, respectively. The demonstrated demultiplexer can be applied in the future CWDM and DWDM system, and the architecture costs can be significantly reduced.

  19. 115 kHz tuning repetition rate ultrahigh-speed wavelength-swept semiconductor laser.

    PubMed

    Oh, W Y; Yun, S H; Tearney, G J; Bouma, B E

    2005-12-01

    We demonstrate an ultrahigh-speed wavelength-swept semiconductor laser using a polygon-based wavelength scanning filter. With a polygon rotational speed of 900 revolutions per second, a continuous wavelength tuning rate of 9200 nm/ms and a tuning repetition rate of 115 kHz were achieved. The wavelength tuning range of the laser was 80 nm centered at 1325 nm, and the average polarized output power was 23 mW.

  20. Interferometric Sensor of Wavelength Detuning Using a Liquid Crystalline Polymer Waveplate

    PubMed Central

    Wierzba, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Operation of a polarization interferometer for measurement of the wavelength changes of a tunable semiconductor laser was investigated. A λ/8 waveplate made from liquid crystalline polymer is placed in one of interferometers’ arms in order to generate two output signals in quadrature. Wavelength was measured with resolution of 2 pm in the wavelength range 628–635 nm. Drift of the interferometer, measured in the period of 500 s, was 8 nm, which corresponded to the change in the wavelength of 1.3 pm. If needed, wavelength-dependent Heydemann correction can be used to expand the range of operation of such interferometer. PMID:27171082

  1. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    A solid colloidal optical wavelength filter includes a suspension of spheal particles dispersed in a coagulable medium such as a setting plastic. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium; agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  2. Wavelength-shifted Cherenkov radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, E. P.; Jacobson, V. L.; Pifer, A. E.; Polakos, P. A.; Kurz, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The scintillation and Cherenkov responses of plastic Cherenkov radiators containing different wavelength-shifting fluors in varying concentrations have been studied in beams of low energy protons and pions. For cosmic ray applications, where large Cherenkov to scintillation ratios are desired, the optimum fluor concentrations are 0.000025 by weight or less.

  3. Wavelength-modulated photocapacitance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamieniecki, E.; Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    Derivative deep-level spectroscopy was achieved with wavelength-modulated photocapacitance employing MOS structures and Schottky barriers. The energy position and photoionization characteristics of deep levels of melt-grown GaAs and the Cr level in high-resistivity GaAs were determined. The advantages of this method over existing methods for deep-level spectroscopy are discussed.

  4. Dynamic sensor interrogation using wavelength-swept laser with a polygon-scanner-based wavelength filter.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong Seok; Ko, Myeong Ock; Jung, Mi Sun; Park, Ik Gon; Kim, Namje; Han, Sang-Pil; Ryu, Han-Cheol; Park, Kyung Hyun; Jeon, Min Yong

    2013-07-29

    We report a high-speed (~2 kHz) dynamic multiplexed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor interrogation using a wavelength-swept laser (WSL) with a polygon-scanner-based wavelength filter. The scanning frequency of the WSL is 18 kHz, and the 10 dB scanning bandwidth is more than 90 nm around a center wavelength of 1,540 nm. The output from the WSL is coupled into the multiplexed FBG array, which consists of five FBGs. The reflected Bragg wavelengths of the FBGs are 1,532.02 nm, 1,537.84 nm, 1,543.48 nm, 1,547.98 nm, and 1,553.06 nm, respectively. A dynamic periodic strain ranging from 500 Hz to 2 kHz is applied to one of the multiplexed FBGs, which is fixed on the stage of the piezoelectric transducer stack. Good dynamic performance of the FBGs and recording of their fast Fourier transform spectra have been successfully achieved with a measuring speed of 18 kHz. The signal-to-noise ratio and the bandwidth over the whole frequency span are determined to be more than 30 dB and around 10 Hz, respectively. We successfully obtained a real-time measurement of the abrupt change of the periodic strain. The dynamic FBG sensor interrogation system can be read out with a WSL for high-speed and high-sensitivity real-time measurement.

  5. Three wavelength optical oxymetry including the measurement of carboxyhemoglobin concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieralli, Christian; Devillers, Robert; Tribillon, Gilbert M.; Barthelemy, Jean-Claude; Geyssant, Andre

    1995-02-01

    The measurement of blood component concentrations is of great interest for medical applications such as anaesthetizing monitoring, heart disease evolution, respiratory insufficiency, etc. The common system is the spectroscopic analysis of blood samples. Analyzing the absorption versus wavelengths permits the determination of blood component concentrations by comparison to the theoretical extinction coefficients of the investigated components. The functional saturation rate of oxyhemoglobin HbO2 called SfO2 is therefore accessible. A new system is presented in this paper utilizing three laser diodes at wavelengths 660, 830, and 1060 nm. We have, therefore, access to a supplementary parameter which is the concentration of carboxyhemoglobin HbCO. The set-up can be portable because it utilizes small light sources, optical fibers, and integrated electrical supply and signal processing device. The performances reach a SfO2 resolution of 2% and 1% on HbCO measurement.

  6. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  7. Wavelength Tunability of Ion-Bombardment-Induced Ripples on Sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou,H.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, L.; Headrick, R.; Ozcan, A.; Wang, Y.; Ozaydin, G.; Ludwig, Jr., K.; Siddons, D.

    2007-01-01

    A study of ripple formation on sapphire surfaces by 300-2000 eV Ar{sup +} ion bombardment is presented. Surface characterization by in-situ synchrotron grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering and ex-situ atomic force microscopy is performed in order to study the wavelength of ripples formed on sapphire (0001) surfaces. We find that the wavelength can be varied over a remarkably wide range -- nearly two orders of magnitude -- by changing the ion incidence angle. Within the linear theory regime, the ion induced viscous flow smoothing mechanism explains the general trends of the ripple wavelength at low temperature and incidence angles larger than 30{sup o}. In this model, relaxation is confined to a few nm thick damaged surface layer. The behavior at high temperature suggests relaxation by surface diffusion. However, strong smoothing is inferred from the observed ripple wavelength near normal incidence, which is not consistent with either surface diffusion or viscous flow relaxation.

  8. Wavelength stabilized multi-kW diode laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Bernd; Unger, Andreas; Kindervater, Tobias; Drovs, Simon; Wolf, Paul; Hubrich, Ralf; Beczkowiak, Anna; Auch, Stefan; Müntz, Holger; Biesenbach, Jens

    2015-03-01

    We report on wavelength stabilized high-power diode laser systems with enhanced spectral brightness by means of Volume Holographic Gratings. High-power diode laser modules typically have a relatively broad spectral width of about 3 to 6 nm. In addition the center wavelength shifts by changing the temperature and the driving current, which is obstructive for pumping applications with small absorption bandwidths. Wavelength stabilization of high-power diode laser systems is an important method to increase the efficiency of diode pumped solid-state lasers. It also enables power scaling by dense wavelength multiplexing. To ensure a wide locking range and efficient wavelength stabilization the parameters of the Volume Holographic Grating and the parameters of the diode laser bar have to be adapted carefully. Important parameters are the reflectivity of the Volume Holographic Grating, the reflectivity of the diode laser bar as well as its angular and spectral emission characteristics. In this paper we present detailed data on wavelength stabilized diode laser systems with and without fiber coupling in the spectral range from 634 nm up to 1533 nm. The maximum output power of 2.7 kW was measured for a fiber coupled system (1000 μm, NA 0.22), which was stabilized at a wavelength of 969 nm with a spectral width of only 0.6 nm (90% value). Another example is a narrow line-width diode laser stack, which was stabilized at a wavelength of 1533 nm with a spectral bandwidth below 1 nm and an output power of 835 W.

  9. Dual-wavelength phase-shifting digital holography selectively extracting wavelength information from wavelength-multiplexed holograms.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tatsuki; Mori, Ryota; Kikunaga, Shuhei; Arai, Yasuhiko; Takaki, Yasuhiro

    2015-06-15

    Dual-wavelength phase-shifting digital holography that selectively extracts wavelength information from five wavelength-multiplexed holograms is presented. Specific phase shifts for respective wavelengths are introduced to remove the crosstalk components and extract only the object wave at the desired wavelength from the holograms. Object waves in multiple wavelengths are selectively extracted by utilizing 2π ambiguity and the subtraction procedures based on phase-shifting interferometry. Numerical results show the validity of the proposed technique. The proposed technique is also experimentally demonstrated.

  10. Effect of wavelength on cutaneous pigment using pulsed irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, K.A.; Murray, S.; Kurban, A.K.; Tan, O.T.

    1989-05-01

    Several reports have been published over the last two decades describing the successful removal of benign cutaneous pigmented lesions such as lentigines, cafe au lait macules' nevi, nevus of Ota, and lentigo maligna by a variety of lasers such as the excimer (351 nm), argon (488,514 nm), ruby (694 nm), Nd:YAG (1060 nm), and CO/sub 2/ (10,600 nm). Laser treatment has been applied to lesions with a range of pigment depths from superficial lentigines in the epidermis to the nevus of Ota in the reticular dermis. Widely divergent laser parameters of wavelength, pulse duration, energy density, and spotsizes have been used, but the laser parameters used to treat this range of lesions have been arbitrary, with little effort focused on defining optimal laser parameters for removal of each type. In this study, miniature black pig skin was exposed to five wavelengths (504, 590, 694, 720, and 750 nm) covering the absorption spectrum of melanin. At each wavelength, a range of energy densities was examined. Skin biopsies taken from laser-exposed sites were examined histologically in an attempt to establish whether optimal laser parameters exist for destroying pigment cells in skin. Of the five wavelengths examined, 504 nm produced the most pigment specific injury; this specificity being maintained even at the highest energy density of 7.0 J/cm2. Thus, for the destruction of melanin-containing cells in the epidermal compartment, 504 nm wavelength appears optimal.

  11. Linear FBG Temperature Sensor Interrogation with Fabry-Perot ITU Multi-wavelength Reference.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyoung-Jun; Song, Minho

    2008-10-29

    The equidistantly spaced multi-passbands of a Fabry-Perot ITU filter are used as an efficient multi-wavelength reference for fiber Bragg grating sensor demodulation. To compensate for the nonlinear wavelength tuning effect in the FBG sensor demodulator, a polynomial fitting algorithm was applied to the temporal peaks of the wavelength-scanned ITU filter. The fitted wavelength values are assigned to the peak locations of the FBG sensor reflections, obtaining constant accuracy, regardless of the wavelength scan range and frequency. A linearity error of about 0.18% against a reference thermocouple thermometer was obtained with the suggested method.

  12. Linear FBG Temperature Sensor Interrogation with Fabry-Perot ITU Multi-wavelength Reference

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyoung-Jun; Song, Minho

    2008-01-01

    The equidistantly spaced multi-passbands of a Fabry-Perot ITU filter are used as an efficient multi-wavelength reference for fiber Bragg grating sensor demodulation. To compensate for the nonlinear wavelength tuning effect in the FBG sensor demodulator, a polynomial fitting algorithm was applied to the temporal peaks of the wavelength-scanned ITU filter. The fitted wavelength values are assigned to the peak locations of the FBG sensor reflections, obtaining constant accuracy, regardless of the wavelength scan range and frequency. A linearity error of about 0.18% against a reference thermocouple thermometer was obtained with the suggested method. PMID:27873898

  13. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building access control (BAC)--a catchall phrase to describe the systems that control access to facilities across campus--has traditionally been handled with remarkably low-tech solutions: (1) manual locks; (2) electronic locks; and (3) ID cards with magnetic strips. Recent improvements have included smart cards and keyless solutions that make use…

  14. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  15. Note: Laser wavelength precision measurement based on a laser synthetic wavelength interferometer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liping; Chen, Benyong; Zhang, Shihua; Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Enzheng

    2016-08-01

    A laser wavelength precision measurement method is presented based on the laser synthetic wavelength interferometer (LSWI). According to the linear relation between the displacements of measurement and reference arms in the interferometer, the synthetic wavelength produced by an unknown wavelength and a reference wavelength can be measured by detecting the phase coincidences of two interference signals. The advantage of the method is that a larger synthetic wavelength resulting from an unknown wavelength very close to the reference wavelength can be easily determined according to the linear relation in the interferometer. Then the unknown wavelength is derived according to the one-to-one corresponding relationship between single wavelength and synthetic wavelength. Wavelengths of an external cavity diode laser and two He-Ne lasers were determined experimentally. The experimental results show that the proposed method is able to realize a relative uncertainty on the order of 10(-8).

  16. Dye mixtures for ultrafast wavelength shifters

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, S.; Liu, L.; Palsule, C.; Borst, W.; Wigmans, R.; Barashkov, N.

    1994-12-31

    Particle detectors based on scintillation processes have been used since the discovery of radium about 100 years ago. The fast signals that can be obtained with these detectors, although often considered a nice asset, were rarely essential for the success of experiments. However, the new generation of high energy particle accelerators require particle detectors with fast response time. The authors have produced fast wavelength shifters using mixtures of various Coumarin dyes with DCM in epoxy-polymers (DGEBA+HHPA) and measured the properties of these wavelength shifters. The particular mixtures were chosen because there is a substantial overlap between the emission spectrum of Coumarin and the absorption spectrum of DCM. The continuous wave and time-resolved fluorescence spectra have been studied as a function of component concentration to optimize the decay times, emission peaks and quantum yields. The mean decay times of these mixtures are in the range of 2.5--4.5 ns. The mean decay time increases with an increase in Coumarin concentration at a fixed DCM concentration or with a decrease in DCM concentration at a fixed Coumarin concentration. This indicates that the energy transfer is radiative at lower relative DCM concentrations and becomes non-radiative at higher DCM concentrations.

  17. Wavelengths for EVE coronal dimming signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Simoes, P. J. D. A.; Kukstas, E.

    2014-12-01

    The EVE instrument on SDO detects post-flare dimmings, mainly in the spectral regions of Fe IX-XII in its MEGS-A range. We have shown that dimmings occurred in most of the 31 X-class flares that occurred between SDO launch and the end of April 2014. Based upon earlier X-ray observations, we interpret these dimmings as the result of CME mass ejections from the low corona. We can estimate the masses involved in these dimmings by deriving a best pre-event temperature and emission measure in the dimmed region from EVE, and a source volume from AIA images. The dimming for SOL2011-02-15, the first of these events, "peaked" at -3.4% in Fe IX in terms of the pre-event emission from the whole Sun, with smaller relative depletions in higher ionization states of Fe. Because of its high photon throughput, EVE data determine line centroids with precisions of a few km/s equivalent. In the present study we analyze the wavelengths of the dimmed regions, characterizing their displacements from the mean wavelengths as functions of heliographic position, time, event magnitude, and excitation state of Fe.

  18. Coherence techniques at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chang

    2002-01-01

    The renaissance of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray (SXR) optics in recent years is mainly driven by the desire of printing and observing ever smaller features, as in lithography and microscopy. This attribute is complemented by the unique opportunity for element specific identification presented by the large number of atomic resonances, essentially for all materials in this range of photon energies. Together, these have driven the need for new short-wavelength radiation sources (e.g. third generation synchrotron radiation facilities), and novel optical components, that in turn permit new research in areas that have not yet been fully explored. This dissertation is directed towards advancing this new field by contributing to the characterization of spatial coherence properties of undulator radiation and, for the first time, introducing Fourier optical elements to this short-wavelength spectral region. The first experiment in this dissertation uses the Thompson-Wolf two-pinhole method to characterize the spatial coherence properties of the undulator radiation at Beamline 12 of the Advanced Light Source. High spatial coherence EUV radiation is demonstrated with appropriate spatial filtering. The effects of small vertical source size and beamline apertures are observed. The difference in the measured horizontal and vertical coherence profile evokes further theoretical studies on coherence propagation of an EUV undulator beamline. A numerical simulation based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle is performed.

  19. Active Antenna Development for the Long Wavelength Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, K. P.; Hicks, B. C.; Crane, P. C.; Ray, P. S.; Gross, C.; Polisensky, E. J.; Erickson, W. C.

    2005-12-01

    We are developing and testing active baluns and electrically short dipoles for possible use as the primary wideband receiving elements in the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) for HF-VHF radio astronomy. Several dipoles of various designs and dimensions have been built and tested. Their useful range occurs when the dipole arms are approximately 1/8 to one wavelength long and the feedpoint is less than 1/2 wavelength above ground. An eight-element NRL LWA Test Array (NLTA) interferometer has been built and fringes have been observed from the brightest celestial sources in the frequency range from 10 MHz to 50 MHz. The antenna temperatures vary from about 10% to 100% of the average brightness temperature of the galactic background. With these parameters it is easy to make the amplifier noise levels low enough that final system temperature is dominated by the galactic background.

  20. Far-field measurements of short-wavelength surface plasmons

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Yochai; Gjonaj, Bergin; David, Asaf; Dolev, Shimon; Shterman, Doron; Bartal, Guy

    2015-03-23

    We present direct far-field measurements of short-wavelength surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) by conventional optics means. Plasmonic wavelength as short as 231 nm was observed for 532 nm illumination on a Ag−Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} platform, demonstrating the capability to characterize SPPs well below the optical diffraction limit. This is done by scaling a sub-wavelength interferometric pattern to a far-field resolvable periodicity. These subwavelength patterns are obtained by coupling light into counter-propagating SPP waves to create a standing-wave pattern of half the SPP wavelength periodicity. Such patterns are mapped by a scattering slit, tilted at an angle so as to increase the periodicity of the intensity pattern along it to more than the free-space wavelength, making it resolvable by diffraction limited optics. The simplicity of the method as well as its large dynamic range of measurable wavelengths make it an optimal technique to characterize the properties of plasmonic devices and high-index dielectric waveguides, to improve their design accuracy and enhance their functionality.

  1. Multi-wavelength fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Tiffany C.; Lo, Pei-An; Cho, Jaedu; Nouizi, Farouk; Chiang, Huihua K.; Kim, Chang-Seok; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-03-01

    The strong scattering and absorption of light in biological tissue makes it challenging to model the propagation of light, especially in deep tissue. This is especially true in fluorescent tomography, which aims to recover the internal fluorescence source distribution from the measured light intensities on the surface of the tissue. The inherently ill-posed and underdetermined nature of the inverse problem along with strong tissue scattering makes Fluorescence Tomography (FT) extremely challenging. Previously, multispectral detection fluorescent tomography (FT) has been shown to improve the image quality of FT by incorporating the spectral filtering of biological tissue to provide depth information to overcome the inherent absorption and scattering limitations. We investigate whether multi-wavelength fluorescent tomography can be used to distinguish the signals from multiple fluorophores with overlapping fluorescence spectrums using a unique near-infrared (NIR) swept laser. In this work, a small feasibility study was performed to see whether multi-wavelength FT can be used to detect subtle shifts in the absorption spectrum due to differences in fluorophore microenvironment.

  2. Flare stars at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1990-01-01

    The radio emission from dMe flare stars is discussed using Very Large Array and Arecibo observations as examples. Active flare stars emit weak, unpolarized, quiescent radio radiation that may be always present. Although thermal bremsstrahlung and/or thermal gyroresonance radiation account for the slowly-varying, quiescent radio radiation of solar active regions, these processes cannot account for the long-wavelength quiescent radiation observed from nearby dMe flare stars. It has been attributed to nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation, but some as yet unexplained mechanism must be continually producing the energetic electrons. Long duration, narrow-band radiation is also emitted from some nearby dMe stars at 20 cm wavelength. Such radiation may be attributed to coherent plasma radiation or to coherent electron-cyclotron masers. Impulsive stellar flares exhibit rapid variations that require radio sources that are smaller than the star in size, and high brightness temperatures greater than 10(exp 15) K that are also explained by coherent radiation processes. Quasi-periodic temporal fluctuations suggest pulsations during some radio flares. Evidence for frequency structure and positive or negative frequency drifts during radio flares from dMe stars is also presented.

  3. Flare stars at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1989-01-01

    The radio emission from dMe flare stars is discussed using Very Large Array and Arecibo observations as examples. Active flare stars emit weak, unpolarized, quiescent radio radiation that may be always present. Although thermal bremsstrahlung and/or thermal gyroresonance radiation account for the slowly-varying, quiescent radio radiation of solar active regions, these processes cannot account for the long-wavelength quiescent radiation observed from nearby dMe flare stars. It has been attributed to nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation, but some as yet unexplained mechanism must be continually producing the energetic electrons. Long duration, narrow-band radiation is also emitted from some nearby dMe stars at 20 cm wavelength. Such radiation may be attributed to coherent plasma radiation or to coherent electron-cyclotron masers. Impulsive stellar flares exhibit rapid variations that require radio sources that are smaller than the star in size, and high brightness temperatures greater than 10(exp 15) K that are also explained by coherent radiation processes. Quasi-periodic temporal fluctuations suggest pulsations during some radio flares. Evidence for frequency structure and positive or negative frequency drifts during radio flares from dMe stars is also presented.

  4. Multi-wavelength multi-level optical storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wullert, John R., II

    Current digital information storage technologies offer rapid access and seemingly ever-increasing capacities. New storage techniques that improve the data rate of high-density storage technologies are attractive, particularly for cost-sensitive services such as video on demand. Wavelength multiplexing of optical information storage has the potential to increase storage capacity, density and data rate. This dissertation addresses the design, simulation and fabrication of a multi-wavelength, multi-level optical storage structure that has the potential to increase the capacity, density and data rate of optical storage. Multi-wavelength, multi-layer optical storage is a technique for storing data in many separate layers in a medium, where each layer responds to a unique optical wavelength. This approach builds on the strengths of current optical storage technologies and addresses some of their limitations. Multiple layers of storage increase the high storage density possible with optical techniques and the parallelism of wavelength multiplexing improves the relatively low data rate. Multi-wavelength, multi-level optical storage has been investigated theoretically and experimentally. The experimental results provide the first demonstration of optical storage using three wavelengths to read three separate layers of information. These read-only optical memories were based on dielectric mirrors of silicon dioxide, magnesium oxide and aluminum oxide. The layers were designed to be read with semiconductor lasers of 635, 780 and 980 nanometers. The prototype devices exhibited open margins between the on and off states for all eight combinations of the presence and absence of the three mirrors. Theoretical simulations were employed to assess the dynamic operation of multi-wavelength storage devices. Through systematic simulations, variations in the thickness and refractive index of the layers in the structure were identified as the primary noise mechanism and a critical

  5. Central venous access.

    PubMed

    Ganeshan, Arul; Warakaulle, Dinuke R; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-01-01

    Central venous access plays an important role in the management of an ever-increasing population of patients ranging from those that are critically ill to patients with difficult clinical access. Interventional radiologists are key in delivering this service and should be familiar with the wide range of techniques and catheters now available to them. A comprehensive description of these catheters with regard to indications, technical aspects of catheterization, success rates, and associated early and late complications, as well as a review of various published guidelines on central venous catheter insertion are given in this article.

  6. Sub-microsecond wavelength stabilization of tunable lasers with the internal wavelength locker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Ryoga; Tatsumoto, Yudai; Sakuma, Kazuki; Onji, Hirokazu; Shimokozono, Makoto; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazutoshi

    2016-08-01

    We proposed a method of accelerating the wavelength stabilization after wavelength switching of the tunable distributed amplification-distributed feedback (TDA-DFB) laser using the internal wavelength locker to reduce the size and the cost of the wavelength control system. The configuration of the wavelength stabilization system based on this locker was as follows. At the wavelength locker, the light intensity after an optical filter is detected as a current by the photodiodes (PDs). Then, for estimating the wavelength, the current is processed by the current/voltage-converting circuit (IVC), logarithm amplifier (Log Amp) and field programmable gate array (FPGA). Finally, the laser current is tuned to the desired wavelength with reference to the estimated wavelength. With this control system the wavelength is stabilized within 800 ns after wavelength switching, which is even faster than that with the conventional control system.

  7. Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Patta, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Stephen McCarthy, co-partner and president of Equal Access ADA Consulting Architects of San Diego, California, about designing schools to naturally integrate compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (EV)

  8. Bolometric Arrays for Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, E.; Serrano, A.; Torres-Jácome, A.

    2009-11-01

    During last years, semiconductor bolometers using thin films have been developed at INAOE, specifically boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films. The characteristics shown by these devices made them attractive to be used in astronomical instrumentation, mainly in two-dimentional arrays. These detector arrays used at the Large Millimeter Telescope will make possible to obtain astronomical images in millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. With this in mind, we are developing a method to produce, with enough reliability, bolometer arrays at INAOE. Until now, silicon nitride diaphragm arrays, useful as radiation absorbers, have succesfully been obtained. Sizes going from one to four millimeter by element in a consistent way; however we have not tested thermometers and metallic contact deposition yet. At the same time, we are working on two possible configurations for the readout electronics; one of them using commercial components while the other will be an integrated circuit specifically designed for this application. Both versions will work below 77K.

  9. Optical add/drop filter for wavelength division multiplexed systems

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Strand, Oliver T.; Garrett, Henry E.

    2002-01-01

    An optical add/drop filter for wavelength division multiplexed systems and construction methods are disclosed. The add/drop filter includes a first ferrule having a first pre-formed opening for receiving a first optical fiber; an interference filter oriented to pass a first set of wavelengths along the first optical fiber and reflect a second set of wavelengths; and, a second ferrule having a second pre-formed opening for receiving the second optical fiber, and the reflected second set of wavelengths. A method for constructing the optical add/drop filter consists of the steps of forming a first set of openings in a first ferrule; inserting a first set of optical fibers into the first set of openings; forming a first set of guide pin openings in the first ferrule; dividing the first ferrule into a first ferrule portion and a second ferrule portion; forming an interference filter on the first ferrule portion; inserting guide pins through the first set of guide pin openings in the first ferrule portion and second ferrule portion to passively align the first set of optical fibers; removing material such that light reflected from the interference filter from the first set of optical fibers is accessible; forming a second set of openings in a second ferrule; inserting a second set of optical fibers into the second set of openings; and positioning the second ferrule with respect to the first ferrule such that the second set of optical fibers receive the light reflected from the interference filter.

  10. Angled multimode interferometer for bidirectional wavelength division (de)multiplexing

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Y.; Thomson, D. J.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Stanković, S.; Mitchell, C. J.; Gardes, F. Y.; Penades, J. Soler; Mashanovich, G. Z.; Reed, G. T.

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated a bidirectional wavelength division (de)multiplexer (WDM) on the silicon-on-insulator platform using two 4-channel angled multimode interferometers (AMMIs) sharing the same multimode interference waveguide. An excellent match of the peak transmission wavelength of each channel between the two AMMIs was achieved. The input and output access waveguides were arranged in a configuration such that the propagation of light of one AMMI in the multimode interference waveguide suffered minimal perturbation by the input and output waveguides of the other AMMI. This type of device is ideal for the WDM system for datacom or telecom applications, e.g. an integrated optical transceiver, where the transmission wavelengths are required to match with the receiving wavelengths. The device also benefits from simple fabrication (as only a single lithography and etching step is required), improved convenience for the transceiver layout design, a reduction in tuning power and circuitry and efficient use of layout space. A low insertion loss of 3–4 dB, and low crosstalk of −15 to −20 dB, was achieved. PMID:26587242

  11. Accessibility and assistive products

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Porrero, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Accessibility and assistive products and technologies are needed to ensure the rights of persons with disabilities and older persons. Many developments have been implemented in laws, standards, markets and from the consumers perspective, at international, European and national levels. The real issue is that not all the potential users benefit from the use of assistive products or accessible measures. Discussion Innovative methods are needed to allow all potential users to have real advantage of assistive technologies and accessible and design for all facilities. Best practices will be presented and existing gaps and recommendations will be discussed. Cost-benefits aspects will also be presented. Conclusion In order to get advantages from opportunities of globalization, hard work and responsibilities of all stakeholders are needed, so that assistive products and accessibility reach a whole range of situations and environments and contribute to ensure quality of life in a society for all.

  12. Collecting EUV mask images through focus by wavelength tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Mochi, Iacopo; Huh, Sungmin

    2009-02-23

    Using an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) microscope to produce high-quality images of EUV reticles, we have developed a new wavelength tuning method to acquire through-focus data series with a higher level of stability and repeatability than was previously possible. We utilize the chromatic focal-length dependence of a diffractive Fresnel zoneplate objective lens, and while holding the mask sample mechanically still, we tune the wavelength through a narrow range, in small steps. In this paper, we demonstrate the method and discuss the relative advantages that this data collection technique affords.

  13. Monolithic Michelson Interferometer as ultra stable wavelength reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian

    2010-07-01

    Ultra-stable Monolithic Michelson interferometer can be an ideal reference for highprecision applications such as RV measurement in planet searching and orbit study. The advantages include wide wavelength range, simple sinusoidal spectral format, and high optical efficiency. In this paper, we report that a monolithic Michelson interferometers has been in-house developed with minimized thermal sensitivity with compensation tuning. With a scanning white light interferometer, the thermal sensitivity is measured ~ 6x10-7/°C at 550 nm and it decreases to zero near 1000 nm. We expect the wideband wavelength reference source to be stabilized better than 0.3 m/s for RV experiments

  14. Three Dimensional Imaging with Multiple Wavelength Speckle Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Cannon, Bret D.; Schiffern, John T.; Mendoza, Albert

    2014-05-28

    We present the design, modeling, construction, and results of a three-dimensional imager based upon multiple-wavelength speckle interferometry. A surface under test is illuminated with tunable laser light in a Michelson interferometer configuration while a speckled image is acquired at each laser frequency step. The resulting hypercube is Fourier transformed in the frequency dimension and the beat frequencies that result map the relative offsets of surface features. Synthetic wavelengths resulting from the laser tuning can probe features ranging from 18 microns to hundreds of millimeters. Three dimensional images will be presented along with modeling results.

  15. Giant Bragg Wavelength Tuning of Tunable Hollow Waveguide Bragg Reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yasuki; Matsutani, Akihiro; Sakaguchi, Takahiro; Koyama, Fumio

    2005-09-01

    We demonstrate a giant Bragg wavelength tuning with a grating loaded hollow waveguide Bragg reflector. An air-core thickness change of a hollow waveguide enables us to achieve a large propagation constant change over few tens percent, which would be useful for various tunable optical devices. Our observed Bragg-wavelength tuning range is over 160 nm at an air-core thickness change from 10.7 to 1.8 μm, which corresponds to a propagation constant change of over 10%. This is the record large tuning value ever reported in conventional tuning schemes such as thermo-optic or electro-optic effects.

  16. Submillimeter-wavelength space-based imaging radar. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Manheimer, W.M.

    1988-05-31

    This report considers the use of a submillimeter wavelength space-based imaging radar. The main application envisioned is midcourse decoy discrimination for strategic defense, for which it would have the capability of producing a series of images, in real time, at strategic ranges, with less than meter-scale resolution and with modest power requirements. Undoubtedly, there are other applications. The requirements for a SAR and ISAR imaging radar at submillimeter wavelength are determined, and the prospect for the development of rf sources to power the radar is examined.

  17. Influence of Space Plasma and Ionosphere on Interferometer Measurements at Decametre Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashkovskiy, S. L.; Shepelyev, V. A.

    2006-08-01

    Radio astronomical study at low frequencies and interferometer observations especially are exposed to the effect of different phenomena in the space plasma both in the source itself and along the path of radio wave propagation. The space plasma result in various effects, e.g. absorption, scattering, refraction, a delay of the radio sources radiation, and the Faraday rotation. The phenomena are frequency dependent and prove themselves particularly brightly at longer wavelengths. Some of them change apparent structure of the source. Other can restrict the obtainable sensitivity, resolution etc. The experimental data relating to the effect of a scattering on electron density inhomogeneities of the space plasma obtained with decameter range interferometers URAN are presented. The data were obtained both at the time of the study of the angular structure of radio sources and during the special investigations. The scattering on the interstellar plasma inhomogeneities enlarges the apparent angular diameters so the highest resolution obtainable at the decameter wavelengths are limited about 1". Annual interferometer observations of the Crab compact radio source were used to determine the effect of the interplanetary plasma at various elongations. It was found that accessible values of the coherent integration time drop down to value less 1 sec with the elongation decreasing from 180 to 90 degrees. At the lower elongations the scattering becomes strong with the considerable increasing of the diameter of the observed source. Single dish observations of the ionosphere scintillation were carrying out with URAN-1 array. Diurnal and seasonal variations of the scintillation parameters and their effects on the accuracy of the decameter observations have been defined. The space and ionosperic plasma influence is taking into account when studying the angular structure of the radio sources at the decameter wavelengths and can be required in a designing of new low frequency instruments.

  18. Using wavelength-tunable self-seeding Fabry-Perot laser for upstream transmission in hybrid WDM/TDM PON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Min; Xiao, Shilin; Guo, Wei; Bi, Meihua; Zhou, Zhao; Jin, Yaohui; Hu, Weisheng

    2010-12-01

    We propose a simple configuration of wavelength-tunable self-seeding Fabry-Perot fiber laser at ONUs for upstream transmission in hybrid WDM/TDM PON. The performances of the side-mode suppression ratio (SMSR), tuning range, wavelength and power stability for the proposed laser module are experimentally investigated. The performance benefits from the upstream wavelengths sharing are showed via simulations.

  19. The Effects of Space Weathering at UV Wavelengths: S-Class Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, Amanda R.; Vilas, Faith

    2006-01-01

    We present evidence that space weathering manifests itself at near-UV wavelengths as a bluing of the spectrum, in contrast with the spectral reddening that has been seen at visible-near-IR wavelengths. Furthermore, the effects of space weathering at UV wavelengths tend to appear with less weathering than do the longer wavelength effects, suggesting that the UV wavelength range is a more sensitive indicator of weathering, and thus age. We report results from analysis of existing near-UV (approx.220-350 nm) measurements of S-type asteroids from the International Ultraviolet Explorer and the Hubble Space Telescope and comparisons with laboratory measurements of meteorites to support this hypothesis. Composite spectra of S asteroids are produced by combining UV spacecraft data with ground-based longer wavelength data. At visible-near-IR wavelengths, S-type asteroids are generally spectrally redder (and darker) than ordinary chondrite meteorites, whereas the opposite is generally true at near-UV wavelengths. Similarly, laboratory measurements of lunar samples show that lunar soils (presumably more weathered) are spectrally redder at longer wavelengths, and spectrally bluer at near-UV wavelengths, than less weathered crushed lunar rocks. The UV spectral bluing may be a result of the addition of nanophase iron to the regolith through the weathering process. The UV bluing is most prominent in the 300-400 nm range, where the strong UV absorption edge is degraded with weathering.

  20. Two-wavelength laser-diode heterodyne interferometry with one phasemeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onodera, Ribun; Ishii, Yukihiro

    1995-12-01

    A two-wavelength laser-diode interferometer that is based on heterodyne detection with one phasemeter has been constructed. Two laser diodes are frequency modulated by mutually inverted sawtooth currents on an unbalanced interferometer. One can measure the tested phase at a synthetic wavelength from the sum of the interference beat signals by synchronizing them with the modulation frequency. The experimental result presented shows a phase-measurement range with a 4.7- mu m synthetic wavelength.

  1. Narrow-band radiation wavelength measurement by processing digital photographs in RAW format

    SciTech Connect

    Kraiskii, A V; Mironova, T V; Sultanov, T T

    2012-12-31

    The technique of measuring the mean wavelength of narrow-band radiation in the 455 - 625-nm range using the image of the emitting surface is presented. The data from the camera array unprocessed by the built-in processor (RAW format) are used. The method is applied for determining the parameters of response of holographic sensors. Depending on the wavelength and brightness of the image fragment, the mean square deviation of the wavelength amounts to 0.3 - 3 nm. (experimental techniques)

  2. Passive Ranging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    1981). 5. R. Courant and D. Hilbert, Methods of Mathematical Physics , Vol. I, English ed., * Interscience, New York, 1953. 32 32 APPENDIX A CALCULATION...K Courant and D. Hilbert, Methods of Mathematical Physics , Vol. I, English ed., * Interscience, New York, 1953. A-8 APPENDIX B * RANGING ACCURACY IN

  3. Displacement measurement using a wavelength-phase-shifting grating interferometer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Yi; Jiang, Geng-An

    2013-10-21

    A grating interferometer based on the wavelength-modulated phase-shifting method for displacement measurements is proposed. A laser beam with sequential phase shifting can be accomplished using a wavelength-modulated light passing through an unequal-path-length optical configuration. The optical phase of the moving grating is measured by the wavelength-modulated phase-shifting technique and the proposed time-domain quadrature detection method. The displacement of the grating is determined by the grating interferometry theorem with the measured phase variation. Experimental results reveal that the proposed method can detect a displacement up to a large distance of 1 mm and displacement variation down to the nanometer range.

  4. Intersubband transitions in nonpolar GaN/Al(Ga)N heterostructures in the short- and mid-wavelength infrared regions

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, C. B.; Beeler, M.; Ajay, A.; Lähnemann, J.; Bellet-Amalric, E.; Monroy, E.; Bougerol, C.

    2015-07-07

    This paper assesses nonpolar m- and a-plane GaN/Al(Ga)N multi-quantum-wells grown on bulk GaN for intersubband optoelectronics in the short- and mid-wavelength infrared ranges. The characterization results are compared to those for reference samples grown on the polar c-plane, and are verified by self-consistent Schrödinger-Poisson calculations. The best results in terms of mosaicity, surface roughness, photoluminescence linewidth and intensity, as well as intersubband absorption are obtained from m-plane structures, which display room-temperature intersubband absorption in the range from 1.5 to 2.9 μm. Based on these results, a series of m-plane GaN/AlGaN multi-quantum-wells were designed to determine the accessible spectral range in the mid-infrared. These samples exhibit tunable room-temperature intersubband absorption from 4.0 to 5.8 μm, the long-wavelength limit being set by the absorption associated with the second order of the Reststrahlen band in the GaN substrates.

  5. Laser Ranging Simulation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piazolla, Sabino; Hemmati, Hamid; Tratt, David

    2003-01-01

    Laser Ranging Simulation Program (LRSP) is a computer program that predicts selected aspects of the performances of a laser altimeter or other laser ranging or remote-sensing systems and is especially applicable to a laser-based system used to map terrain from a distance of several kilometers. Designed to run in a more recent version (5 or higher) of the MATLAB programming language, LRSP exploits the numerical and graphical capabilities of MATLAB. LRSP generates a graphical user interface that includes a pop-up menu that prompts the user for the input of data that determine the performance of a laser ranging system. Examples of input data include duration and energy of the laser pulse, the laser wavelength, the width of the laser beam, and several parameters that characterize the transmitting and receiving optics, the receiving electronic circuitry, and the optical properties of the atmosphere and the terrain. When the input data have been entered, LRSP computes the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of range, signal and noise currents, and ranging and pointing errors.

  6. Single-wavelength STED microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Stephen C.

    2011-03-01

    The zero-point STED microscope (US Pat. 5,866,911)1 was the first far-field microscope to overcome the diffraction limit, but optimally it requires two expensive synchronized short-pulsed lasers. Replacing the synchronized pulsed lasers with CW lasers had been proposed to reduce costs1, but this seriously reduced resolution compared to a similarly powered pulsed STED microscope. A recent theoretical and experimental study (Nat. Methods 4, 915 (2007))3 argued that CW STED has better resolution than previously believed, but there appear to be flaws in the theory sufficient to raise questions about its reported experimental confirmation. We describe an alternative approach to reducing cost of the STED microscope while preserving resolution. A portion of the beam from a femtosecond pulsed laser of a wavelength able to excite fluorescence by multiphoton absorption, is passed through a long optical fiber to stretch the pulses to reduce their peak power so they can no longer excite but can quench by stimulated emission. The stretched pulses are shaped into a doughnut profile and then recombined with the first beam for interaction with the specimen. With suitable fluorophores, this instrument should be able to match the resolution performance of the pulsed laser STED microscope using separate lasers. Particularly when added to an existing multiphoton microscope, such performance should be achievable at extremely low added cost.

  7. Enhanced UV light detection using wavelength-shifting properties of Silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magill, S.; Nayfeh, M.; Fizari, M.; Malloy, J.; Maximenko, Y.; Xie, J.; Yu, H.

    2015-05-01

    Detection of UV photons is becoming increasingly necessary with the use of noble gases and liquids in elementary particle experiments. Cerenkov light in crystals and glasses, scintillation light in neutrino, dark matter, and rare decay experiments all require sensitivity to UV photons. New sensor materials are needed that can directly detect UV photons and/or absorb UV photons and re-emit light in the visible range measurable by existing photosensors. It has been shown that silicon nanoparticles are sensitive to UV light in a wavelength range around ~ 200 nm. UV light is absorbed and re-emitted at wavelengths in the visible range depending on the size of the nanoparticles. Initial tests of the wavelength-shifting properties of silicon nanoparticles are presented here that indicate by placing a film of nanoparticles in front of a standard visible-wavelength detecting photosensor, the response of the sensor is significantly enhanced at wavelengths < 320 nm.

  8. Wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, Darrell J.; Smith, Arlee V.

    2007-07-24

    A wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator (OPO) comprising a type II nonlinear optical medium for generating a pair of degenerate waves at twice a pump wavelength and a plurality of mirrors for rotating the polarization of one wave by 90 degrees to produce a wavelength-doubled beam with an increased output energy by coupling both of the degenerate waves out of the OPO cavity through the same output coupler following polarization rotation of one of the degenerate waves.

  9. Expanding Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    There is no question that the United States lags behind most industrialized nations in consumer access to broadband Internet service. For many policy makers and activists, this shortfall marks the latest phase in the struggle to overcome the digital divide. To remedy this lack of broadband affordability and availability, one start-up firm--with…

  10. Easy Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    School and university restrooms, locker and shower rooms have specific ADA accessibility requirements that serve the needs of staff, students and campus visitors who are disabled as a result of injury, illness or age. Taking good care of them is good for the reputation of a sensitive community institution, and fosters positive public relations.…

  11. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    As faculty members add online and multimedia elements to their courses, colleges and universities across the country are realizing that there is a lot of work to be done to ensure that disabled students (and employees) have equal access to course material and university websites. Unfortunately, far too few schools consider the task a top priority.…

  12. Accessibility in E-Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Simon

    2009-01-01

    E-assessment offers many opportunities to broaden the range of tools at the assessor's disposal and thereby improve the overall accessibility of the assessment experience. In 2006, TechDis commissioned a report, produced by Edexcel, on the state of guidance on accessibility at the various stages of the assessment process--question design,…

  13. Sensitivity of laser-induced upconversion fluorescence dynamics to exciting wavelength in Er3+-doped YAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, S.; Jiang, L.; Zhang, W.; Gong, W.; Fu, Z.; Dai, Z.

    2011-06-01

    A novel sensitivity of laser-induced upconversion (UC) fluorescence dynamics to the exciting wavelength in Er3+:YAG crystal has been observed. The sensitivities to exciting wavelength variations are only 0.02 and 0.06 nm for 2 G 9/2 and 2 P 3/2 UC luminescence, respectively. The observation of this sensitivity reveals that when a certain level is populated by more than one UC mechanisms, a precise determination of suitable exciting wavelength is crucial because the competition between different UC mechanisms has a sensitive variation with exciting wavelength in near-resonant range.

  14. Laser System for Precise, Unambiguous Range Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubovitsky, Serge; Lay, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    The Modulation Sideband Technology for Absolute Range (MSTAR) architecture is the basis of design of a proposed laser-based heterodyne interferometer that could measure a range (distance) as great as 100 km with a precision and resolution of the order of 1 nm. Simple optical interferometers can measure changes in range with nanometer resolution, but cannot measure range itself because interference is subject to the well-known integer-multiple-of-2 -radians phase ambiguity, which amounts to a range ambiguity of the order of 1 m at typical laser wavelengths. Existing rangefinders have a resolution of the order of 10 m and are therefore unable to resolve the ambiguity. The proposed MSTAR architecture bridges the gap, enabling nanometer resolution with an ambiguity range that can be extended to arbitrarily large distances. The MSTAR architecture combines the principle of the heterodyne interferometer with the principle of extending the ambiguity range of an interferometer by using light of two wavelengths. The use of two wavelengths for this purpose is well established in optical metrology, radar, and sonar. However, unlike in traditional two-color laser interferometry, light of two wavelengths would not be generated by two lasers. Instead, multiple wavelengths would be generated as sidebands of phase modulation of the light from a single frequency- stabilized laser. The phase modulation would be effected by applying sinusoidal signals of suitable frequencies (typically tens of gigahertz) to high-speed electro-optical phase modulators. Intensity modulation can also be used

  15. Acousto-Optic-Based Wavelength-Comb-Swept Laser for Extended Displacement Measurements.

    PubMed

    Park, Nam Su; Chun, Soo Kyung; Han, Ga-Hee; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2017-03-31

    We demonstrate a novel wavelength-comb-swept laser based on two intra-cavity filters: an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) and a Fabry-Pérot etalon filter. The AOTF is used for the tunable selection of the output wavelength with time and the etalon filter for the narrowing of the spectral linewidth to extend the coherence length. Compared to the conventional wavelength-swept laser, the acousto-optic-based wavelength-comb-swept laser (WCSL) can extend the measureable range of displacement measurements by decreasing the sensitivity roll-off of the point spread function. Because the AOTF contains no mechanical moving parts to select the output wavelength acousto-optically, the WCSL source has a high wavenumber (k) linearity of R² = 0.9999 to ensure equally spaced wavelength combs in the wavenumber domain.

  16. High power pumped MID-IR wavelength devices using nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Laser diode pumped mid-IR wavelength sources include at least one high power, near-IR wavelength, injection and/or sources wherein one or both of such sources may be tunable providing a pump wave output beam to a quasi-phase matched (QPM) nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) device. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Wavelength tuning of at least one of the sources advantageously provides the ability for optimizing pump or injection wavelengths to match the QPM properties of the NFM device enabling a broad range of mid-IR wavelength selectivity. Also, pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  17. High power pumped mid-IR wavelength systems using nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Laser diode pumped mid-IR wavelength systems include at least one high power, near-IR wavelength, injection and/or sources wherein one or both of such sources may be tunable providing a pump wave output beam to a quasi-phase matched (QPM) nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) device. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Wavelength tuning of at least one of the sources advantageously provides the ability for optimizing pump or injection wavelengths to match the QPM properties of the NFM device enabling a broad range of mid-IR wavelength selectivity. Also, pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  18. Effect of light wavelength on polymerization of light-cured resins.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, R

    1997-06-01

    Experimental light-cured composite resins were exposed to a narrow-band light at a constant quantum number using a narrow-band interference filter. The IR spectra of the cured resin specimens were measured before and after extraction of residual monomers. Degree of conversion (DC) and polymerization conversion (PC) were calculated from these IR spectra. The light in 410-550 nm could be polymerized. With a brief exposure (5 s), DC and PC were affected by the wavelength. The effect of wavelength between 410 and 490 nm decreased with increasing duration of exposure. The most efficient wavelength was 470 nm and the most adequate wavelength was in the 450-490 nm wavelength range. The absorbance of camphorquinone strongly affected polymerization, especially during the initial stage. However, from the relationship between DC or PC and exposure energy, polymerization depended not only on the wavelength of the light, but also on the exposure energy.

  19. Touch the Invisible Sky: A Multi-Wavelength Braille Book Featuring Tactile NASA Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grice, N.; Steel, S.; Daou, D.

    2008-06-01

    According to the American Foundation for the Blind and the National Federation of the Blind, there are approximately 10 million blind and visually impaired people in the United States. Because astronomy is often visually based, many people assume that it cannot be made accessible. A new astronomy book, Touch the Invisible Sky, makes wavelengths not visible to human eyes, accessible to all audiences through text in print and Braille and with pictures that are touchable and in color.

  20. Semiconductor laser with multiple lasing wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-07-29

    A new class of multi-terminal vertical-cavity semiconductor laser components has been developed. These multi-terminal laser components can be switched, either electrically or optically, between distinct lasing wavelengths, or can be made to lase simultaneously at multiple wavelengths.

  1. Optical wavelength modulation in free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mabe, R.M.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    An attribute of the free electron laser (FEL) is the continuous tunability of the optical wavelength by modulation of the electron beam energy. The variation of the wavelength and power of the optical beam is studied as a function of FEL operating parameters. These results will be applied to the Stanford SCA FEL and Boeing FEL.

  2. Long-wavelength shift and enhanced room temperature photoluminescence efficiency in GaAsSb/InGaAs/GaAs-based heterostructures emitting in the spectral range of 1.0–1.2 μm due to increased charge carrier's localization

    SciTech Connect

    Kryzhkov, D. I. Yablonsky, A. N.; Morozov, S. V.; Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Krasilnik, Z. F.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Vikhrova, O. V.

    2014-11-28

    In this work, a study of the photoluminescence (PL) temperature dependence in quantum well GaAs/GaAsSb and double quantum well InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs heterostructures grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition with different parameters of GaAsSb and InGaAs layers has been performed. It has been demonstrated that in double quantum well InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs heterostructures, a significant shift of the PL peak to a longer-wavelength region (up to 1.2 μm) and a considerable reduction in the PL thermal quenching in comparison with GaAs/GaAsSb structures can be obtained due to better localization of charge carriers in the double quantum well. For InGaAs/GaAsSb/GaAs heterostructures, an additional channel of radiative recombination with participation of the excited energy states in the quantum well, competing with the main ground-state radiative transition, has been revealed.

  3. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - hemodialysis access; dialysis - hemodialysis ...

  4. ELTS, interferometers, and hypertelescopes at different wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labeyrie, Antoine

    2008-04-01

    In the way of major new instruments for ground-based optical astronomy, maximizing the science favors a large hypertelescope. If equipped with adaptive optics and a laser guide star, it can provide direct high-resolution images of faint extra-galactic and cosmological sources. The signal/(photon noise) ratio is theoretically higher than with interferometer schemes relying upon aperture synthesis, using a few large apertures to reconstruct images. The crowding limit on complex objects, the direct-imaging field, and the dynamic range are also improved with many small apertures. The adaptive phasing of hypertelescopes, achievable on bright stars with modified wave sensing techniques such as "dispersed speckle" analysis, is also achievable on very faint sources with a modified version of a laser guide star. This makes large hypertelescopes capable of observing cosmological deep fields of faint galaxies. Pending space versions, the size of which can in principle reach hundreds and thousands of kilometers, terrestrial hypertelescopes limited in size to one or two kilometers can be built at suitable sites and used efficiently from ultra-violet to millimeter wavelengths. Some sites can allow the coupling of a hypertelescope with an ELT, an alternate option which can also be efficient for imaging deep fields with a high-resolution.

  5. Widening Access to Higher Education: An Evaluative Case Study of a Foundation Year Alternative to Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Peter A.; Moores, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    Universities are encouraged to widen access to a broad range of applicants, including mature students taking Access qualifications. Admissions tutors can find it difficult to compare and choose between Access and A-level applications, and Access applicants for popular courses may be disadvantaged relative to students with good A-levels. In this…

  6. Switchable dual-wavelength CNT-based Q-switched using arrayed waveguide gratings (AWG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, H.; Hamdan, K. Z.; Muhammad, F. D.; Harun, S. W.; Zulkifli, M. Z.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a dual-wavelength synchronously pulsed fiber laser Q-switched by carbon nanotube-based saturable absorber with switchable wavelength spacing enabled using arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) is proposed and demonstrated. By just switching the channels of the AWG, discrete tuning in wavelength spacing of the dual-wavelength Q-switched laser operation can be attained over several nanometers, ranging from 1.6 to 4.0 nm in a stable dual-wavelength regime without employing any modulation technique or intracavity spectral filters. Our experimental results show that the fiber laser can generate Q-switched microsecond pulses with a wide repetition rate range, starting from 12.0 kHz to a maximum value of 54.9 kHz. This proposed system is also reasonably simple to realize at low cost.

  7. Optical properties of silicon germanium waveguides at telecommunication wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Hammani, Kamal; Ettabib, Mohamed A; Bogris, Adonis; Kapsalis, Alexandros; Syvridis, Dimitris; Brun, Mickael; Labeye, Pierre; Nicoletti, Sergio; Richardson, David J; Petropoulos, Periklis

    2013-07-15

    We present a systematic experimental study of the linear and nonlinear optical properties of silicon-germanium (SiGe) waveguides, conducted on samples of varying cross-sectional dimensions and Ge concentrations. The evolution of the various optical properties for waveguide widths in the range 0.3 to 2 µm and Ge concentrations varying between 10 and 30% is considered. Finally, we comment on the comparative performance of the waveguides, when they are considered for nonlinear applications at telecommunications wavelengths.

  8. Comparing galaxy morphology at ultraviolet and opical wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchinski, L.; Freedman, W.; Madore, B.; Trewhella, M.; Bohlin, R.; Cornett, R.; Fanelli, M.; Marcum, P.; Neff, S.; O'Connell, R.; Roberts, M.; Smith, A.; Stecher, T.; Waller, W.

    2000-01-01

    We have undertaken an imaging survey of 34 nearby galaxies in far-ultraviolet(FUV, [sim]1500 u and optical (UBVRI) passbands to characterize galaxy morphology as a function of wavelength. This sample, which includes a range of classical Hubble types from elliptical to irregular, with emphasis on spirals at low inclination angle, provides a valuable database for comparison with images of high-z galaxies whose FUV light is redshifted into the optical and near-infrared bands.

  9. High-speed wavelength tunable DPSK demodulation using a phase modulator based loop mirror filter.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jia; Feng, Hanlin; Fok, Mable P

    2014-06-15

    A high-speed wavelength tunable differential phase-shift-keying (DPSK) signal demodulator is presented using a phase modulator (PM) based fiber loop mirror filter. By controlling the birefringence of the PM inside the loop through electro-optic effect, wavelength tuning speed of tens of GHz and tuning range of over two free spectral ranges are achieved. Stable filter spectra with extinction ratio over 30 dB are obtained through the tuning process. By combining the birefringence of polarization maintaining fiber and PM, error-free demodulation performance is experimentally achieved throughout the wavelength tuning range for DPSK signals with flexible bit-rate range from 2.5 to 10  Gb/s. This design significantly improves the wavelength tuning speed and is potentially valuable for high-speed switching and tuning applications.

  10. An Update on the Long Wavelength Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Gregory B.; Tremblay, S. E.; Pihlstrom, Y.; Craig, J.; Rickard, L.; Dowell, J.; Kassim, N.; Clarke, T.; Hicks, B.; Polisensky, E.; Ray, P.; Schmitt, H.; Woods, D.; Hartman, J.; Ellingson, S.; Wolfe, C.; Navarro, R.; Sigman, E.; Soriano, M.; Owen, F.

    2011-01-01

    The Long Wavelength Array (LWA), a SKA Pathfinder, will be a new multi-purpose radio telescope operating in the frequency range 10-88 MHz. Scientific programs include pulsars, supernova remnants, general transient searches, radio recombination lines, solar and Jupiter bursts, investigations into the "dark ages" using redshifted hydrogen, and ionospheric phenomena. Upon completion, LWA will consist of 53 phased array "stations” distributed across a region over 400 km in diameter. Each station consists of 256 pairs of dipole-type antennas whose signals are formed into beams, with outputs transported to a central location for high-resolution aperture synthesis imaging. The resulting image sensitivity is estimated to be a few mJy (5sigma, 8 MHz, 2 polarizations, 1 h, zenith) from 20-80 MHz; with angular resolution of a few arcseconds. A technical overview of the LWA project is available (Ellingson etal. 2009, Proc. IEEE, 97, 1421), and additional information is online at http://lwa.unm.edu. Partners in the LWA project include LANL, JPL, NRAO, NRL, UNM, NMT, and Virginia Tech. The first station of the LWA, called "LWA-1", is located near the center of the EVLA and is expected to achieve initial operational capability in early 2011. As of September 2010, all antennas have been installed as well as a subset of the "production” versions of receivers, digital electronics, data recorders, and monitoring and control system. The "transient buffer - wideband” (TBW) capability is operational with 20 dipoles, and provides the ability to capture simultaneous raw 196 MSPS A/D output over the entire 10-88 MHz tuning range in 61 ms bursts. Other operating modes are in the final stages of implementation. Some early results obtained with LWA-1 will be presented. Funding for the LWA has been provided by the Office of Naval Research.

  11. Four-wavelength retinal vessel oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewes, Jonathan Jensen

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation documents the design and construction of a four-wavelength retinal vessel oximeter, the Eye Oximeter (EOX). The EOX scans low-powered laser beams (at 629, 678, 821 and 899 nm) into the eye and across a targeted retinal vessel to measure the transmittance of the blood within the vessel. From the transmittance measurements, the oxygen saturation of the blood within the vessel is computed. Retinal vessel oxygen saturation has been suggested as a useful parameter for monitoring a wide range of conditions including occult blood loss and a variety of ophthalmic diseases. An artificial eye that simulates the geometry of a human retinal vessel was constructed and used to calibrate the EOX saturation measurement. A number of different oximetry equations were developed and tested. From measurements made on whole human blood in the artificial eye, an oximetry equation that places a linear wavelength dependance on the scattering losses (3% decrease from 629 to 899 nm) is found to best calibrate the EOX oxygen saturation measurement. This calibration also requires that an adjustment be made to the absorption coefficient of hemoglobin at 629 nm that has been reported in the literature. More than 4,000 measurements were made in the eyes of three human subjects during the development of the EOX. Applying the oximetry equation developed through the in vitro experiments to human data, the average human retinal venous oxygen saturation is estimated to be 0.63 +/- 0.07 and the average human retinal arterial oxygen saturation is 0.99 +/- 0.03. Furthermore, measurements made away from the optic disk resulted in a larger variance in the calculated saturation when compared to measurements made on the optic disk. A series of EOX experiments using anesthetized swine helped to verify the sensitivity of the EOX measurement of oxygen saturation. It is found that the calibration in swine differed from the calibration in the artificial eye. An empirical calibration from the

  12. An enhanced dynamic wavelength and bandwidth allocation method in WDM-EPON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhiwei; Ran, Yang; Huang, Hongbin; Liu, Weiping

    2009-11-01

    A kind of dynamic wavelength and bandwidth allocation (DWBA) algorithm of WDM-EPON was studied and then improved to guarantee QoS of multiple-services access. MPCP extension with modified REQUEST message and GRANT message are also proposed.The simulation results based on OPNET indicates the improved algorithm performed well in successful QoS assurance.

  13. SOA gain recovery wavelength dependence: simulation and measurement using a single-color pump-probe technique.

    PubMed

    Mathlouthi, W; Vacondio, F; Lemieux, P; Rusch, Leslie A

    2008-12-08

    Measurements to date of the wavelength dependency of gain recovery time in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) have mostly used pump-probe techniques with a pump and probe operated on distinct wavelengths. Choice of pump wavelength, and its relative proximity to the probe wavelength, could influence measurements and impede unambiguous observation of wavelength dependence on recovery dynamics. We use a single-color pump-probe measurement technique to directly access the wavelength dependence of the gain recovery time in bulk InGaAsP SOAs. We used ultrashort pulses from a single mode locked laser to measure unambiguously the spectral dependency and temporal behavior of SOAs. Simulation results using a model that takes into account intra-band and inter-band contributions to SOA saturation, as well as experimental results for the SOA tested, show recovery rate dependency similar to gain spectrum.

  14. GOME wavelength calibration using solar and atmospheric spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspar, C.; Chance, K.

    1997-01-01

    Spectral information in the global ozone monitoring experiment (GOME) solar irradiance spectra and GOME earth radiance spectra are used in conjunction with the GOME solar reference spectrum to provide absolute vacuum internal wavelength calibration for GOME. Two methods for wavelength calibration of GOME data are investigated. The first employs chi-square minimization of a merit function involving wavelength and the GOME slit function. It is quite robust and requires little GOME data in the processing (calibration window regions from 15 to 40 pixels). The second employs cross correlation of GOME data and the solar reference spectrum in the Fourier transform domain, using a procedure in the image reduction and analysis facility (IRAF) software system developed for the determination of galaxy redshifts. It also requires small amounts of GOME data (calibration window regions with from 10 to 15 pixels). Both methods provide absolute wavelength calibration accurate to a small fraction of a GOME pixel across the entire GOME spectrum, and to 0.001 nm over much of the range.

  15. Analysis of PolSK based FSO system using wavelength and time diversity over strong atmospheric turbulence with pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabu, K.; Cheepalli, Shashidhar; Kumar, D. Sriram

    2014-08-01

    Free space optics (FSO) or wireless optical communication systems is an evolving alternative to the current radio frequency (RF) links due to its high and secure datarates, large license free bandwidth access, ease of installation, and lower cost for shorter range distances. These systems are largely influenced by atmospheric conditions due to wireless transmission; requirement of line of sight (LOS) propagation may lead to alignment problems in turn pointing errors. In this paper, we consider atmospheric turbulence and pointing errors are the major limitations. We tried to address these difficulties by considering polarization shift keying (PolSK) modulated FSO communication system with wavelength and time diversity. We derived the closed form expressions for estimation of the average bit error rate (BER) and outage probability, which are vital system performance metrics. Analytical results are shown considering different practical cases.

  16. Wavelengths effective in induction of malignant melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Setlow, R B; Grist, E; Thompson, K; Woodhead, A D

    1993-01-01

    It is generally agreed that sunlight exposure is one of the etiologic agents in malignant melanoma of fair-skinned individuals. However, the wavelengths responsible for tumorigenesis are not known, although DNA is assumed to be the target because individuals defective in the repair of UV damage to DNA are several thousandfold more prone to the disease than the average population. Heavily pigmented backcross hybrids of the genus Xiphophorus (platyfish and swordtails) are very sensitive to melanoma induction by single exposures to UV. We irradiated groups of five 6-day-old fish with narrow wavelength bands at 302, 313, 365, 405, and 436 nm and scored the irradiated animals for melanomas 4 months later. We used several exposures at each wavelength to obtain estimates of the sensitivity for melanoma induction as a function of exposure and wavelength. The action spectrum (sensitivity per incident photon as a function of wavelength) for melanoma induction shows appreciable sensitivity at 365, 405, and probably 436 nm, suggesting that wavelengths not absorbed directly in DNA are effective in induction. We interpret the results as indicating that light energy absorbed in melanin is effective in inducing melanomas in this animal model and that, in natural sunlight, 90-95% of melanoma induction may be attributed to wavelengths > 320 nm--the UV-A and visible spectral regions. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8341684

  17. Wavelengths effective in induction of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R.B.; Grist, E.; Thompson, K.; Woodhead, A.D. )

    1993-07-15

    It is generally agreed that sunlight exposure is one of the etiologic agents in malignant melanoma of fair-skinned individuals. However, the wavelengths responsible for tumorigenesis are not known, although DNA is assumed to be the target because individuals defective in the repair of UV damage to DNA are several thousandfold more prone to the disease than the average population. Heavily pigmented back-cross hybrids of the genus Xiphophorus (platyfish and swordtails) are very sensitive to melanoma induction by single exposures to UV. The authors irradiated groups of five 6-day-old fish with narrow wavelength bands at 302, 313, 365, 405, and 436 nm and score the irradiated animals for melanomas 4 months later. They used several exposures at each wavelength to obtain estimates of the sensitivity for melanoma induction as a function of exposure and wavelength. The action spectrum (sensitivity per incident photon as a function of wavelength) for melanoma induction shows appreciable sensitivity at 365, 405, and probably 436 nm, suggesting that wavelengths not absorbed directly in DNA are effective in induction. They interpret the results as indicating that light energy absorbed in melanin is effective in inducing melanomas in this animal model and that, in natural sunlight, 90-95% of melanoma induction may be attributed to wavelengths >320 nm-the UV-A and visible spectral regions. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Two-color temporal focusing multiphoton excitation imaging with tunable-wavelength excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Chi-Hsiang; Abrigo, Gerald; Chen, Pei-Hsuan; Chien, Fan-Ching

    2017-02-01

    Wavelength tunable temporal focusing multiphoton excitation microscopy (TFMPEM) is conducted to visualize optical sectioning images of multiple fluorophore-labeled specimens through the optimal two-photon excitation (TPE) of each type of fluorophore. The tunable range of excitation wavelength was determined by the groove density of the grating, the diffraction angle, the focal length of lenses, and the shifting distance of the first lens in the beam expander. Based on a consideration of the trade-off between the tunable-wavelength range and axial resolution of temporal focusing multiphoton excitation imaging, the presented system demonstrated a tunable-wavelength range from 770 to 920 nm using a diffraction grating with groove density of 830 lines/mm. TPE fluorescence imaging examination of a fluorescent thin film indicated that the width of the axial confined excitation was 3.0±0.7 μm and the shifting distance of the temporal focal plane was less than 0.95 μm within the presented wavelength tunable range. Fast different wavelength excitation and three-dimensionally rendered imaging of Hela cell mitochondria and cytoskeletons and mouse muscle fibers were demonstrated. Significantly, the proposed system can improve the quality of two-color TFMPEM images through different excitation wavelengths to obtain higher-quality fluorescent signals in multiple-fluorophore measurements.

  19. Mapping chemical concentration in binary thin organic films via multi-wavelength scanning absorption microscopy (MWSAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berriman, Garth; Routley, Ben; Holdsworth, John; Zhou, Xiaojing; Belcher, Warwick; Dastoor, Paul

    2014-09-01

    The composition and thickness of binary thin organic films is determined by measuring the optical absorption at multiple wavelengths across the film surface and performing a component analysis fit to absorption standards for the materials. The multiple laser wavelengths are focused onto the surface using microscope objectives and raster scanned across the film surface using a piezo-electric actuator X-Y stage. All of the wavelengths are scanned simultaneously with a frequency division multiplexing system used to separate the individual wavelength response. The composition values are in good quantitative agreement with measurements obtained by scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This new characterization technique extends quantitative compositional mapping of thin films to thickness regimes beyond that accessible by STXM.

  20. Touch the Invisible Sky: A multi-wavelength Braille book featuring NASA images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steel, S.; Grice, N.; Daou, D.

    2008-06-01

    Multi-wavelength astronomy - the study of the Universe at wavelengths beyond the visible, has revolutionised our understanding and appreciation of the cosmos. Hubble, Chandra and Spitzer are examples of powerful, space-based telescopes that complement each other in their observations spanning the electromagnetic spectrum. While several Braille books on astronomical topics have been published, to this point, no printed material accessible to the sight disabled or Braille reading public has been available on the topic of multi-wavelength astronomy. Touch the Invisible Sky presents the first printed introduction to modern, multi-wavelength astronomy studies to the disabled sight community. On a more fundamental level, tactile images of a Universe that had, until recently, been invisible to all, sighted or non-sighted, is an important learning message on how science and technology broadens our senses and our understanding of the natural world.

  1. FWM behavior in 2-D time-spreading wavelength-hopping OCDMA systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazan, Taher M.

    2017-03-01

    A new formula for the signal-to-four-wave mixing (FWM) crosstalk in 2-D time-spreading wavelength-hopping (TW) optical code division multiple access (OCDMA) systems is derived. The influence of several system parameters on the signal-to-FWM crosstalk ratio (SXR) is analyzed, including transmitted power per chip, code length, the number of active users, code weight, wavelength spacing, and transmission distance. Furthermore, for the first time, a closed-form expression for the total number of possible FWM products employing symmetric TW codes with equal wavelength spacing is investigated. The results show that SXR is sensitive to minor variations in system parameters, especially the launched power level and the code length while the wavelength spacing has a less impact on the level of the generated FWM power.

  2. Sub-wavelength focusing meta-lens.

    PubMed

    Roy, Tapashree; Rogers, Edward T F; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2013-03-25

    We show that a planar plasmonic metamaterial with spatially variable meta-atom parameters can focus transmitted light into sub-wavelength hot-spots located beyond the near-field of the metamaterial. By nano-structuring a gold film we created an array of meta-lenses generating foci of 160 nm (0.2λ) in diameter when illuminated by a wavelength of 800 nm. We attribute the occurrence of sub-wavelength hotspots beyond the near field to the phenomenon of superoscillation.

  3. High Power Short Wavelength Laser Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-01

    Unlimited güä^äsjäsiiiüüü X NRTC-77-43R P I High Power Short Wavelength Laser Development November 1977 D. B. Cohn and W. B. Lacina...NO NRTC-77-43R, «. TITLE fana »uetjjitj BEFORE COMPLETING FORM CIPIENT’S CATALOO NUMBER KIGH.POWER SHORT WAVELENGTH LASER DEVELOPMENT , 7...fWhtn Data Enterte NRTC-77-43R HIGH POWER SHORT WAVELENGTH LASER DEVELOPMENT ARPA Order Number: Program Code Number: Contract Number: Principal

  4. Multimode fiber optic wavelength division multiplexing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) systems, with signals transmitted on different wavelengths through a single optical fiber, can have increased bandwidth and fault isolation properties over single wavelength optical systems. Two WDM system designs that might be used with multimode fibers are considered and a general description of the components which could be used to implement the system are given. The components described are sources, multiplexers, demultiplexers, and detectors. Emphasis is given to the demultiplexer technique which is the major developmental component in the WDM system.

  5. Wavelength multicasting in silicon photonic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Biberman, Aleksandr; Lee, Benjamin G; Turner-Foster, Amy C; Foster, Mark A; Lipson, Michal; Gaeta, Alexander L; Bergman, Keren

    2010-08-16

    We demonstrate a scalable, energy-efficient, and pragmatic method for high-bandwidth wavelength multicasting using FWM in silicon photonic nanowires. We experimentally validate up to a sixteen-way multicast of 40-Gb/s NRZ data using spectral and temporal responses, and evaluate the resulting data integrity degradation using BER measurements and power penalty performance metrics. We further examine the impact of this wavelength multicasting scalability on conversion efficiency. Finally, we experimentally evaluate up to a three-way multicast of 160-Gb/s pulsed-RZ data using spectral and temporal responses, representing the first on-chip wavelength multicasting of pulsed-RZ data.

  6. Magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiaoji; Xu Xia; Chen Xuzong; Chen Jingbiao

    2010-01-15

    Magic wavelengths for laser trapping of boson isotopes of alkaline-earth metal atoms Sr, Ca, and Mg are investigated while considering terahertz clock transitions between the {sup 3}P{sub 0}, {sup 3}P{sub 1}, and {sup 3}P{sub 2} metastable triplet states. Our calculation shows that magic wavelengths for laser trapping do exist. This result is important because those metastable states have already been used to make accurate clocks in the terahertz frequency domain. Detailed discussions for magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions are given in this article.

  7. Optical amplification at the 1. 31 wavelength

    DOEpatents

    Cockroft, N.J.

    1994-02-15

    An optical amplifier operating at the 1.31 [mu]m wavelength for use in such applications as telecommunications, cable television, and computer systems is described. An optical fiber or other waveguide device is doped with both Tm[sup 3+] and Pr[sup 3+] ions. When pumped by a diode laser operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, energy is transferred from the Tm[sup 3+] ions to the Pr[sup 3+] ions, causing the Pr[sup 3+] ions to amplify at a wavelength of 1.31. 1 figure.

  8. Magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoji; Xu, Xia; Chen, Xuzong; Chen, Jingbiao

    2010-01-01

    Magic wavelengths for laser trapping of boson isotopes of alkaline-earth metal atoms Sr, Ca, and Mg are investigated while considering terahertz clock transitions between the 3P0, 3P1, and 3P2 metastable triplet states. Our calculation shows that magic wavelengths for laser trapping do exist. This result is important because those metastable states have already been used to make accurate clocks in the terahertz frequency domain. Detailed discussions for magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions are given in this article.

  9. On-Line Wavelength Calibration of Pulsed Laser for CO2 Differential Absorption LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Chengzhi; Ma, Xin; Han, Ge; Liang, Ailin; Gong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) remote sensing is a promising technology for atmospheric CO2 detection. However, stringent wavelength accuracy and stability are required in DIAL system. Accurate on-line wavelength calibration is a crucial procedure for retrieving atmospheric CO2 concentration using the DIAL, particularly when pulsed lasers are adopted in the system. Large fluctuations in the intensities of a pulsed laser pose a great challenge for accurate on-line wavelength calibration. In this paper, a wavelength calibration strategy based on multi-wavelength scanning (MWS) was proposed for accurate on-line wavelength calibration of a pulsed laser for CO2 detection. The MWS conducted segmented sampling across the CO2 absorption line with appropriate number of points and range of widths by using a tunable laser. Complete absorption line of CO2 can be obtained through a curve fitting. Then, the on-line wavelength can be easily found at the peak of the absorption line. Furthermore, another algorithm called the energy matching was introduced in the MWS to eliminate the backlash error of tunable lasers during the process of on-line wavelength calibration. Finally, a series of tests was conducted to elevate the calibration precision of MWS. Analysis of tests demonstrated that the MWS proposed in this paper could calibrate the on-line wavelength of pulsed laser accurately and steadily.

  10. TiO2 thin film based transparent flexible resistive switching random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Kim Ngoc; Dung Hoang, Van; Tran, Cao Vinh; Thang Phan, Bach

    2016-03-01

    In our work we have fabricated TiO2 based resistive switching devices both on transparent substrates (ITO, IGZO/glass) and transparent flexible substrate (ITO/PET). All devices demonstrate the reproducibility of forming free bipolar resistive switching with high transparency in the visible light range (∼80% at the wavelength of 550 nm). Particularly, transparent and flexible device exhibits stable resistive switching performance at the initial state (flat) and even after bending state up to 500 times with curvature radius of 10% compared to flat state. The achieved characteristics of resistive switching of TiO2 thin films seem to be promising for transparent flexible random access memory.

  11. Superconductor Semiconductor Research for NASA's Submillimeter Wavelength Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, Thomas W.

    1997-01-01

    Wideband, coherent submillimeter wavelength detectors of the highest sensitivity are essential for the success of NASA's future radio astronomical and atmospheric space missions. The critical receiver components which need to be developed are ultra- wideband mixers and suitable local oscillator sources. This research is focused on two topics, (1) the development of reliable varactor diodes that will generate the required output power for NASA missions in the frequency range from 300 GHZ through 2.5 THz, and (2) the development of wideband superconductive mixer elements for the same frequency range.

  12. Spectrally efficient next-generation optical access network incorporating a novel CWDM uplink combiner.

    PubMed

    Ha, J Y; Wonfor, A; Ghiggino, P; Penty, R V; White, I H

    2009-01-19

    A novel wavelength division multiplexed subcarrier multiplexed (WDM/SCM) broadband (1-Gb/s per user) optical access network (OAN) architecture incorporating a coarse WDM (CWDM) uplink combiner is proposed. The concept is demonstrated through theoretical and experimental validation of a 10 x1-Gb/s quadurature-phase-shift keying (QPSK) SCM optical network. Low penalty transmission is demonstrated for a proof-of-principle dual channel system with a range of 25 km. In agreement with simulation, experiments show that channel spacings of only 1 GHz are viable for Q factors of more than 18 dB. Simulations indicate that the system will operate with 40 wavelengths, each carrying 10 SCM channels at 1 Gb/s.

  13. All-fiber wavelength swept ring laser based on Fabry-Perot filter for optical frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Jun, Changsu; Villiger, Martin; Oh, Wang-Yuhl; Bouma, Brett E

    2014-10-20

    Innovations in laser engineering have yielded several novel configurations for high repetition rate, broad sweep range, and long coherence length wavelength swept lasers. Although these lasers have enabled high performance frequency-domain optical coherence tomography, they are typically complicated and costly and many require access to proprietary materials or devices. Here, we demonstrate a simplified ring resonator configuration that is straightforward to construct from readily available materials at a low total cost. It was enabled by an insight regarding the significance of isolation against bidirectional operation and by configuring the sweep range of the intracavity filter to exceed its free spectral range. The design can easily be optimized to meet a range of operating specifications while yielding robust and stable performance. As an example, we demonstrate 240 kHz operation with 125 nm sweep range and >70 mW of average output power and demonstrate high quality frequency domain OCT imaging. The complete component list and directions for assembly of the laser are posted on-line at www.octresearch.org.

  14. Apparatus for shifting the wavelength of light

    DOEpatents

    McCulla, William H.; Allen, Jr., John D.

    1983-01-01

    A light beam is reflected back and forth between a rotating body having a retroreflection corner at opposite ends thereof and a fixed mirror to change the wavelength of the light beam by the Doppler effect.

  15. A Solar Minimum Irradiance Spectrum for Wavelengths below 1200 Å

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2005-03-01

    NRLEUV represents an independent approach to modeling the Sun's EUV irradiance and its variability. Our model utilizes differential emission measure distributions derived from spatially and spectrally resolved solar observations, full-disk solar images, and a database of atomic physics parameters to calculate the solar EUV irradiance. In this paper we present a new solar minimum irradiance spectrum for wavelengths below 1200 Å. This spectrum is based on extensive observations of the quiet Sun taken with the CDS and SUMER spectrometers on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the most recent version of the CHIANTI atomic physics database. In general, we find excellent agreement between this new irradiance spectrum and our previous quiet-Sun reference spectrum derived primarily from Harvard Skylab observations. Our analysis does show that the quiet-Sun emission measure above about 1 MK declines more rapidly than in our earlier emission measure distribution and that the intensities of the EUV free-bound continua at some wavelengths are somewhat smaller than indicated by the Harvard observations. Our new reference spectrum is also generally consistent with recent irradiance observations taken near solar minimum. There are, however, two areas of persistent disagreement. Our solar spectrum indicates that the irradiance measurements overestimate the contribution of the EUV free-bound continua at some wavelengths by as much as a factor of 10. Our model also cannot reproduce the observed irradiances at wavelengths below about 150 Å. Comparisons with spectrally resolved solar and stellar observations indicate that only a small fraction of the emission lines in the 60-120 Å wavelength range are accounted for in CHIANTI.

  16. Angular Structure of the Radio Sources at Decameter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhenko, A. I.; Inyutin, G. A.; Koshovyy, V. V.; Lozins'kyy, A. B.; Lytvinenko, O. A.; Megn, A. V.; Rashkovskiy, S. L.; Shepelyev, V. A.; Vaschishin, R. V.

    2006-08-01

    The world biggest decameter radio telescope UTR-2 and four smaller arrays forms the Ukrainian VLBI network URAN with an angular resolution up to 1" operated at decameter wavelengths. A number of galactic and extragalactic radio sources were studed with the URAN interferometers. At decimeter and centimeter wavelengths the studied extragalactic radio sources usually possess compact components and a total size of the sources is of about or less than a resolving power of the shortest baseline of the network. The obtained results allow us to affirm that the structure of the studied extragalactic radio sources changes at the decameter wavelengths. The reason of the changes usually is a combination of various phenomena of radio wave generation and propagation. The peculiarities of the brightness distribution in the range are: - The compact details (hot spots and sources associated with AGN) in the radio galaxies and quasars are usually less prominent at the decameter wavelengths because of synchrotron self-absorption. Their angular diameters are equal to those at higher frequencies or enlarged by the interstellar scattering. - Dimensions of lobes are enlarged as a rule. - A characteristic feature of the quasars structure at lower frequencies is extended components with steep spectra producing the main part of a flux of the sources at the decameter wavelengths. Their angular diameters exceed the total size of the source measured at higher frequencies. Such halos have been revealed in some radio galaxies too. The galactic supernova remnants studied with the URAN mainly possess the same features of their structure as at higher frequencies. Some modificatios of their structure at lower frequencies are caused by interstellar scattering, which increases a size of their compact details and difference of spectral indexes that changes relative fluxes of source parts at the decameters.

  17. Low Noise Mid-Wavelength IR Photodetectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-19

    Several ICIP structures were grown by MBE and fabricated into devices with a cut -off wavelength near 4-5 µm. Experimental results obtained from these... cut -off wavelength near 4-5 µm. Experimental results obtained from these devices have indicated improved device performance at high temperatures...zone (3), consisting of several GaSb/AlSb QWs. Zone (2) is composed of a series of digitally-graded InAs/AlSb QWs that form an energy ladder with

  18. SALSA - A lunar submillimeter-wavelength array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, M. J.; Marsh, K. A.

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual design for a Synthesis Array for Lunar Submillimeter Astronomy (SALSA) is described with emphasis on information relevant to its implementation. SALSA is optimized to synthesize images of astronomical sources at wavelengths between 60 and 300 microns with an angular resolution of 10 milliarcseconds at the shortest wavelength. The discussion covers engineering considerations and descriptions of subsystems, including the environmental shield, antenna, and beam transport.

  19. Room-temperature short-wavelength infrared Si photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Berencén, Yonder; Prucnal, Slawomir; Liu, Fang; Skorupa, Ilona; Hübner, René; Rebohle, Lars; Zhou, Shengqiang; Schneider, Harald; Helm, Manfred; Skorupa, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    The optoelectronic applications of Si are restricted to the visible and near-infrared spectral range due to its 1.12 eV-indirect band gap. Sub-band gap light detection in Si, for instance, has been a long-standing scientific challenge for many decades since most photons with sub-band gap energies pass through Si unabsorbed. This fundamental shortcoming, however, can be overcome by introducing non-equilibrium deep-level dopant concentrations into Si, which results in the formation of an impurity band allowing for strong sub-band gap absorption. Here, we present steady-state room-temperature short-wavelength infrared p-n photodiodes from single-crystalline Si hyperdoped with Se concentrations as high as 9 × 1020 cm−3, which are introduced by a robust and reliable non-equilibrium processing consisting of ion implantation followed by millisecond-range flash lamp annealing. We provide a detailed description of the material properties, working principle and performance of the photodiodes as well as the main features in the studied wavelength region. This work fundamentally contributes to establish the short-wavelength infrared detection by hyperdoped Si in the forefront of the state-of-the-art of short-IR Si photonics. PMID:28262746

  20. Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Bryan J; Wang, Yue; Krauss, Thomas F

    2015-08-21

    Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission.

  1. Swift Multi-wavelength Observing Campaigns: Strategies and Outcomes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimm, Hans A.

    2007-01-01

    The Swift gamma-ray burst explorer has been operating since December 2004 as both a gamma-ray burst (GRB) monitor and telescope and a multi-wavelength observatory, covering the energy range from V band and near UV to hard X rays above 150 keV. It is designed to rapidly repoint to observe newly discovered GRBs, and this maneuverability, combined with an easily changed observing program, allows Swift to also be an effective multiwavelength observatory for non-GRB targets, both as targets of opportunity and pre-planned multi-wavelength observing campaigns. Blazars are particularly attractive targets for coordinated campaigns with TeV experiments since many blazars are bright in both the hard X-ray and TeV energy ranges. Successful coordinated campaigns have included observations of 3C454.3 during its 2005 outburst. The latest Swift funding cycles allow for non- GRB related observations to be proposed. The Burst Alert Telescope on Swift also serves as a hard X-ray monitor with a public web page that includes light curves for over 400 X-ray sources and is used to alert the astronomical community about increased activity from both known and newly discovered sources. This presentation mill include Swift capabilities, strategies and policies for coordinated multi-wavelength observations as well as discussion of the potential outcomes of such campaigns.

  2. Room-temperature short-wavelength infrared Si photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berencén, Yonder; Prucnal, Slawomir; Liu, Fang; Skorupa, Ilona; Hübner, René; Rebohle, Lars; Zhou, Shengqiang; Schneider, Harald; Helm, Manfred; Skorupa, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    The optoelectronic applications of Si are restricted to the visible and near-infrared spectral range due to its 1.12 eV-indirect band gap. Sub-band gap light detection in Si, for instance, has been a long-standing scientific challenge for many decades since most photons with sub-band gap energies pass through Si unabsorbed. This fundamental shortcoming, however, can be overcome by introducing non-equilibrium deep-level dopant concentrations into Si, which results in the formation of an impurity band allowing for strong sub-band gap absorption. Here, we present steady-state room-temperature short-wavelength infrared p-n photodiodes from single-crystalline Si hyperdoped with Se concentrations as high as 9 × 1020 cm‑3, which are introduced by a robust and reliable non-equilibrium processing consisting of ion implantation followed by millisecond-range flash lamp annealing. We provide a detailed description of the material properties, working principle and performance of the photodiodes as well as the main features in the studied wavelength region. This work fundamentally contributes to establish the short-wavelength infrared detection by hyperdoped Si in the forefront of the state-of-the-art of short-IR Si photonics.

  3. Dual-Wavelength Terahertz Metasurfaces with Independent Phase and Amplitude Control at Each Wavelength

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jun; Xu, Ningning; Ren, Han; Lin, Yuankun; Zhang, Weili; Zhang, Hualiang

    2016-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized dual-wavelength metasurfaces that function at two assigned terahertz wavelengths with independent phase and amplitude control at each wavelength. Specifically, we have designed a dual-wavelength achromatic metasurface-based deflector deflecting the incident wave to the same direction at two selected wavelengths, which has circumvented the critical limitation of strong wavelength dependence in the planar metasurface-based devices caused by the resonant nature of the plasmonic structures. As a proof of concept demonstration, the designed dual-wavelength achromatic deflector has been fabricated, and characterized experimentally. The numerical simulations, theoretical predictions, and experimental results agree very well with each other, demonstrating the property of independently manipulating the phase profiles at two wavelengths. Furthermore, another unique feature of the designed metasurface is that it can independently tailor both the phase and amplitude profiles at two wavelengths. This property has been numerically validated by engineering a metasurface-based device to simultaneously generate two diffraction orders at two desired wavelengths. PMID:27659800

  4. Dual-Wavelength Terahertz Metasurfaces with Independent Phase and Amplitude Control at Each Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jun; Xu, Ningning; Ren, Han; Lin, Yuankun; Zhang, Weili; Zhang, Hualiang

    2016-09-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized dual-wavelength metasurfaces that function at two assigned terahertz wavelengths with independent phase and amplitude control at each wavelength. Specifically, we have designed a dual-wavelength achromatic metasurface-based deflector deflecting the incident wave to the same direction at two selected wavelengths, which has circumvented the critical limitation of strong wavelength dependence in the planar metasurface-based devices caused by the resonant nature of the plasmonic structures. As a proof of concept demonstration, the designed dual-wavelength achromatic deflector has been fabricated, and characterized experimentally. The numerical simulations, theoretical predictions, and experimental results agree very well with each other, demonstrating the property of independently manipulating the phase profiles at two wavelengths. Furthermore, another unique feature of the designed metasurface is that it can independently tailor both the phase and amplitude profiles at two wavelengths. This property has been numerically validated by engineering a metasurface-based device to simultaneously generate two diffraction orders at two desired wavelengths.

  5. Short-range Fundamental forces

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniadis, I; Baessler, Stefan; Buechner, M; Fedorov, General Victor; Hoedl, S.; Lambrecht, A; Nesvizhevsky, V.; Pignol, G; Reynaud, S.; Sobolev, Yu.

    2011-01-01

    We consider theoretical motivations to search for extra short-range fundamental forces as well as experiments constraining their parameters. The forces could be of two types: (1) spin-independent forces; and (2) spin-dependent axion-like forces. Different experimental techniques are sensitive in respective ranges of characteristic distances. The techniques include measurements of gravity at short distances, searches for extra interactions on top of the Casimir force, precision atomic and neutron experiments. We focus on neutron constraints, thus the range of characteristic distances considered here corresponds to the range accessible for neutron experiments.

  6. The effects of wavelength on coherent Doppler lidar performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, T. R.

    1985-01-01

    Hitherto, long-range wind-sensing coherent (heterodyne) lidars have utilized CO2 lasers (operating at a 10-micrometer wavelength) since these were the only high-power single-mode (spatial and axial) pulsed sources available. This property ensures temporal coherence over the required spatial resolution, e.g., the pulse length. Recent developments in Nd:YAG lasers makes possible the consideration of a 1.06-micrometer source (Kane et al., 1984). The relative merit of operation at various wavelengths is a function of system parameter, backscattering cross section, signal processing, beam propagation, and practical and eye safety considerations. These factors are discussed in the context of a global wind-sensing coherent lidar.

  7. Short wavelength limits of current shot noise suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Nause, Ariel; Dyunin, Egor; Gover, Avraham

    2014-08-15

    Shot noise in electron beam was assumed to be one of the features beyond control of accelerator physics. Current results attained in experiments at Accelerator Test Facility in Brookhaven and Linac Coherent Light Source in Stanford suggest that the control of the shot noise in electron beam (and therefore of spontaneous radiation and Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission of Free Electron Lasers) is feasible at least in the visible range of the spectrum. Here, we present a general linear formulation for collective micro-dynamics of e-beam noise and its control. Specifically, we compare two schemes for current noise suppression: a quarter plasma wavelength drift section and a combined drift/dispersive (transverse magnetic field) section. We examine and compare their limits of applicability at short wavelengths via considerations of electron phase-spread and the related Landau damping effect.

  8. Displacement interferometry with stabilization of wavelength in air.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Josef; Holá, Miroslava; Cíp, Ondřej; Cížek, Martin; Hrabina, Jan; Buchta, Zdeněk

    2012-12-03

    We present a concept of suppression of the influence of variations of the refractive index of air in displacement measuring interferometry. The principle is based on referencing of wavelength of the coherent laser source in atmospheric conditions instead of traditional stabilization of the optical frequency and indirect evaluation of the refractive index of air. The key advantage is in identical beam paths of the position measuring interferometers and the interferometer used for the wavelength stabilization. Design of the optical arrangement presented here to verify the concept is suitable for real interferometric position sensing in technical practice especially where a high resolution measurement within some limited range in atmospheric conditions is needed, e.g. in nanometrology.

  9. MULTI-WAVELENGTH AFTERGLOWS OF FAST RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Gao, He; Zhang, Bing

    2014-09-01

    The physical origin of fast radio bursts (FRBs) is unknown. Detecting electromagnetic counterparts to FRBs in other wavelengths is essential to measure their distances and to determine their physical origin. Assuming that at least some of them are of cosmological origin, we calculate their afterglow light curves in multiple wavelengths (X-rays, optical, and radio) by assuming a range of total kinetic energies and redshifts. We focus on forward shock emission, but also consider the possibility that some of the FRBs might have bright reverse shock emission. In general, FRB afterglows are too faint to be detected by current detectors. Only if an FRB has a very low radiative efficiency in radio (hence, a very large kinetic energy), and when it is close enough to observe can its afterglow be detected in the optical and radio bands. We discuss observational strategies for detecting these faint afterglows using future telescopes such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and Expanded Very Large Array.

  10. The albedos of Pluto and Charon - Wavelength dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcialis, Robert L.; Lebofsky, Larry A.; Disanti, Michael A.; Fink, Uwe; Tedesco, Edward F.; Africano, John

    1992-01-01

    The March 3, 1987 occultation of Charon by Pluto was monitored simultaneously with three telescopes. Each site covered a distinct wavelength interval with the total range spanning 0.44-2.4 microns. Observing the same event ensures an identical sun-Pluto-earth geometry for all three sites, and minimizes the assumptions which must be made to combine results. This spectrophotometry is used to derive the individual geometric albedos of Pluto and Charon over a factor of at least 5 in wavelength. Combining the results with those of Binzel (1988) improved (B - V) color estimates (on the 'Johnson Pluto' system) are obtained for the components of the system at rotational phase 0.75: (Pluto + Charon) = 0.843 +/- 0.006; Pluto alone = 0.866 +/- 0.007; and Charon alone = 0.702 +/- 0.010.

  11. Bichromophoric Dyes for Wavelength Shifting of Dye-Protein Fluoromodules

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Ha H.; Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Brotherton, Wendy L.; Schmidt, Brigitte F.; Zanotti, Kimberly J.; Waggoner, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    Dye-protein fluoromodules consist of fluorogenic dyes and single chain antibody fragments that form brightly fluorescent noncovalent complexes. This report describes two new bichromophoric dyes that extend the range of wavelengths of excitation or emission of existing fluoromodules. In one case, a fluorogenic thiazole orange (TO) was attached to an energy acceptor dye, Cy5. Upon binding to a protein that recognizes TO, red emission due to efficient energy transfer from TO to Cy5 replaces the green emission observed for monochromophoric TO bound to the same protein. Separately, TO was attached to a coumarin that serves as an energy donor. The same green emission is observed for coumarin-TO and TO bound to a protein, but efficient energy transfer allows violet excitation of coumarin-TO, versus longer wavelength, blue excitation of monochromophoric TO. Both bichromophores exhibit low nanomolar KD values for their respective proteins, >95% energy transfer efficiency and high fluorescence quantum yields. PMID:25679477

  12. The dynamics of interacting nonlinearities governing long wavelength driftwave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, David E.

    1993-09-01

    Because of the ubiquitous nature of turbulence and the vast array of different systems which have turbulent solutions, the study of turbulence is an area of active research. Much present day understanding of turbulence is rooted in the well established properties of homogeneous Navier-Stokes turbulence, which, due to its relative simplicity, allows for approximate analytic solutions. This work examines a group of turbulent systems with marked differences from Navier-Stokes turbulence, and attempts to quantify some of their properties. This group of systems represents a variety of drift wave fluctuations believed to be of fundamental importance in laboratory fusion devices. From extensive simulation of simple local fluid models of long wavelength drift wave turbulence in tokamaks, a reasonably complete picture of the basic properties of spectral transfer and saturation has emerged. These studies indicate that many conventional notions concerning directions of cascades, locality and isotropy of transfer, frequencies of fluctuations, and stationarity of saturation are not valid for moderate to long wavelengths. In particular, spectral energy transfer at long wavelengths is dominated by the E x B nonlinearity, which carries energy to short scale in a manner that is highly nonlocal and anisotropic. In marked contrast to the canonical self-similar cascade dynamics of Kolmogorov, energy is efficiently passed between modes separated by the entire spectrum range in a correlation time. At short wavelengths, transfer is dominated by the polarization drift nonlinearity. While the standard dual cascade applies in this subrange, it is found that finite spectrum size can produce cascades that are reverse directed and are nonconservative in enstrophy and energy similarity ranges. In regions where both nonlinearities are important, cross-coupling between the nolinearities gives rise to large no frequency shifts as well as changes in the spectral dynamics.

  13. Evaluation of wavelength groups for discrimination of agricultural cover types. [remote sensing of environment in INDIANA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.

    1978-01-01

    Multispectral scanner data in twelve spectral channels, in the wavelength range 0.46 to 11.7 mm, acquired in July 1971 for three flightlines, were analyzed by applying automatic pattern recognition techniques. These twelve spectral channels were divided into four wavelength groups (W1, W2, W3 and W4), each consisting of three wavelength channels -- with respect to their estimated probability of correct classification (P sub c) in discriminating agricultural cover types. The same analysis was also done for the data acquired in August, to investigate the effect of time on these results. The effect of deletion of each of the wavelength groups on P sub C in the subsets of one to nine channels, is given. Values of P sub C for all possible combinations of wavelength groups, in the subsets of one to eleven channels are also given.

  14. Stable and wavelength-tunable silicon-micro-ring-resonator based erbium-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yang, L G; Yeh, C H; Wong, C Y; Chow, C W; Tseng, F G; Tsang, H K

    2013-02-11

    In this work, we propose and demonstrate a stable and wavelength-tunable erbium-doped fiber (EDF) ring laser. Here, a silicon-on-insulator (SOI)-based silicon-micro-ring-resonator (SMRR) is used as the wavelength selective element inside the fiber ring cavity. A uniform period grating coupler (GC) is used to couple between the SMRR and single mode fiber (SMF) and serves also as a polarization dependent element in the cavity. The output lasing wavelength of the proposed fiber laser can be tuned at a tuning step of 2 nm (defined by the free spectral range (FSR) of the SMRR) in a bandwidth of 35.2 nm (1532.00 to 1567.20 nm), which is defined by the gain of the EDF. The optical-signal-to-noise-ratio (OSNR) of each lasing wavelength is larger than 42.0 dB. In addition, the output stabilities of power and wavelength are also discussed.

  15. Dual-wavelength tunable fibre laser with a 15-dBm peak power

    SciTech Connect

    Latif, A A; Awang, N A; Zulkifli, M Z; Harun, S W; Ghani, Z A; Ahmad, H

    2011-08-31

    A high-power dual-wavelength tunable fibre laser (HP-DWTFL) operating in the C-band at wavelengths from 1536.7 nm to 1548.6 nm is proposed and demonstrated. The HP-DWTFL utilises an arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) (1 x 16 channels) and is capable of generating eight different dual-wavelength pairs with eight possible wavelength spacings ranging from 0.8 nm (the narrowest spacing) to 12.0 nm (the widest spacing). The average output power and side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) of the HP-DWTFL are measured to be 15 dBm and 52.55 dB, respectively. The proposed HP-DWTFL is highly stable with no variations in the chosen output wavelengths and has minimal changes in the output power. Such a laser has good potential for use in measurements, communications, spectroscopy and terahertz applications. (control of radiation parameters)

  16. Simultaneous dual-wavelength reflection digital holography applied to the study of the porous coal samples.

    PubMed

    Khmaladze, Alexander; Restrepo-Martínez, Alejandro; Kim, Myung; Castañeda, Roman; Blandón, Astrid

    2008-06-10

    We present a simultaneous dual-wavelength phase-imaging digital holographic technique demonstrated on porous coal samples. The use of two wavelengths enables us to increase the axial range at which the unambiguous phase imaging can be performed, but also increases the noise. We employ a noise reduction "fine map" algorithm, which uses the two-wavelength phase map as a guide to correct a single-wavelength phase image. Then, the resulting noise of a fine map is reduced to the level of single-wavelength noise. A comparison to software unwrapping is also presented. A simple way of correcting a curvature mismatch between the reference and the object beams is offered.

  17. Parallel online multi-wavelength (2D) fluorescence spectroscopy in each well of a continuously shaken microtiter plate.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Tobias; Beckers, Mario; Hitzmann, Bernd; Büchs, Jochen

    2016-12-01

    Small-scale high-throughput screening devices are becoming increasingly important in bioprocess development. Conventional dipping probes for process monitoring are often too large to be used in these devices. Thus, optical measurements are often the method of choice. Even some parameters that cannot directly be measured by fluorescence become accessible via sensitive fluorescence dyes. However, not all compounds of interest are measurable by this technique. Recent studies applying multi-wavelength (2D) fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with chemometrics have shown that information on numerous analytes is obscured by the fluorescence data. Hitherto, this measurement technique has only been available on the scale of stirred tank fermenters. This work introduces a new device for multi-wavelength (2D) fluorescence spectroscopy in each well of a continuously shaken microtiter plate. Using a combination of spectrograph and CCD detector, the required time per measurement cycle in a 48-well microtiter plate was 0.5 h. Cultures of Hansenula polymorpha and Escherichia coli are monitored. The concentrations of glycerol, glucose and acetate as well as pH are determined using partial least square (PLS) models. Because a pH-sensitive fluorescence dye was not required, no dependency of the pKa of a fluorescence dye exists, and measurements in the low pH range can be obtained.

  18. Effect of wavelength change in microholographic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Ryuichi

    2016-09-01

    In microholographic recording, expensive laser diodes having no spectrum broadening (single mode) and no wavelength variation are used. On the other hand, in conventional optical disk systems, cheap laser diodes having spectrum broadening (multimode) and wavelength variation are used. It is a great advantage if the laser diodes for conventional optical disk systems can be used for microholographic recording. Therefore, the effect of wavelength change in microholographic recording was investigated through a numerical simulation. The laser diodes were modeled so that the full width at 1/e2 maximum of the spectrum was 0.8 nm and the center wavelength was 405 nm. The numerical aperture of the objective lenses was 0.85 and the thickness of the recording medium was 300 μm. The diffraction efficiency of the diffracted beam from a microhologram was calculated using the coupled wave theory and the following results were obtained. The diffraction efficiency decreased by three orders of magnitude by replacing single-mode laser diodes with multimode laser diodes, which makes it necessary to enhance the readout signal. The tolerance of the optical path length difference between the signal and reference beams was -50 110 μm, which makes it necessary to adjust the optical path length difference. The tolerance of the wavelength variation was 405 +/- 0.5 nm, which makes it necessary to select the laser diodes. The conclusion was that it is not practical to use the laser diodes for conventional optical disk systems for microholographic recording.

  19. Calibration-Free Pulse Oximetry Based on Two Wavelengths in the Infrared — A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Nitzan, Meir; Noach, Salman; Tobal, Elias; Adar, Yair; Miller, Yaacov; Shalom, Eran; Engelberg, Shlomo

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of oxygen saturation in arterial blood by pulse oximetry (SpO2) is based on the different light absorption spectra for oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and the analysis of photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals acquired at two wavelengths. Commercial pulse oximeters use two wavelengths in the red and infrared regions which have different pathlengths and the relationship between the PPG-derived parameters and oxygen saturation in arterial blood is determined by means of an empirical calibration. This calibration results in an inherent error, and pulse oximetry thus has an error of about 4%, which is too high for some clinical problems. We present calibration-free pulse oximetry for measurement of SpO2, based on PPG pulses of two nearby wavelengths in the infrared. By neglecting the difference between the path-lengths of the two nearby wavelengths, SpO2 can be derived from the PPG parameters with no need for calibration. In the current study we used three laser diodes of wavelengths 780, 785 and 808 nm, with narrow spectral line-width. SaO2 was calculated by using each pair of PPG signals selected from the three wavelengths. In measurements on healthy subjects, SpO2 values, obtained by the 780–808 nm wavelength pair were found to be in the normal range. The measurement of SpO2 by two nearby wavelengths in the infrared with narrow line-width enables the assessment of SpO2 without calibration. PMID:24763216

  20. A novel dynamic wavelength bandwidth allocation scheme over OFDMA PONs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bo; Guo, Wei; Jin, Yaohui; Hu, Weisheng

    2011-12-01

    With rapid growth of Internet applications, supporting differentiated service and enlarging system capacity have been new tasks for next generation access system. In recent years, research in OFDMA Passive Optical Networks (PON) has experienced extraordinary development as for its large capacity and flexibility in scheduling. Although much work has been done to solve hardware layer obstacles for OFDMA PON, scheduling algorithm on OFDMA PON system is still under primary discussion. In order to support QoS service on OFDMA PON system, a novel dynamic wavelength bandwidth allocation (DWBA) algorithm is proposed in this paper. Per-stream QoS service is supported in this algorithm. Through simulation, we proved our bandwidth allocation algorithm performs better in bandwidth utilization and differentiate service support.

  1. Wavelength-codified fiber laser hydrogen detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortigosa-Blanch, A.; Díez, A.; González-Segura, A.; Cruz, J. L.; Andrés, M. V.

    2005-11-01

    We report a scheme for an optical hydrogen detector that codifies the information in wavelength. The system is based on an erbium-doped fiber laser with two coupled cavities and a Palladium-coated tapered fiber within one of the laser cavities. The tapered fiber acts as the hydrogen-sensing element. When the sensing element is exposed to a hydrogen atmosphere, its attenuation decreases changing the cavity losses. This change leads the system to switch lasing from the wavelength of the auxiliary cavity to the characteristic wavelength of the cavity which contains the sensing element. The detection level can be shifted by adjusting the reflective elements of the cavity containing the sensing element.

  2. Dynamic polarizabilities and magic wavelengths for dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2011-03-15

    We theoretically study dynamic scalar polarizabilities of the ground and select long-lived excited states of dysprosium, a highly magnetic atom recently laser cooled and trapped. We demonstrate that there is a set of magic wavelengths of the unpolarized lattice laser field for each pair of states, which includes the ground state and one of these excited states. At these wavelengths, the energy shift due to laser field is the same for both states, which can be useful for resolved sideband cooling on narrow transitions and precision spectroscopy. We present an analytical formula that, near resonances, allows for the determination of approximate values of the magic wavelengths without calculating the dynamic polarizabilities of the excited states.

  3. Cryogenic Amplifier Based Receivers at Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Reck, Theodore and; Schlecht, Erich; Lin, Robert; Deal, William

    2012-01-01

    The operating frequency of InP high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) based amplifiers has moved well in the submillimeter-wave frequencies over the last couple of years. Working amplifiers with usable gain in waveguide packages has been reported beyond 700 GHz. When cooled cryogenically, they have shown substantial improvement in their noise temperature. This has opened up the real possibility of cryogenic amplifier based heterodyne receivers at submillimeter wavelengths for ground-based, air-borne, and space-based instruments for astrophysics, planetary, and Earth science applications. This paper provides an overview of the science applications at submillimeter wavelengths that will benefit from this technology. It also describes the current state of the InP HEMT based cryogenic amplifier receivers at submillimeter wavelengths.

  4. Device for wavelength-selective imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Frangioni, John V.

    2010-09-14

    An imaging device captures both a visible light image and a diagnostic image, the diagnostic image corresponding to emissions from an imaging medium within the object. The visible light image (which may be color or grayscale) and the diagnostic image may be superimposed to display regions of diagnostic significance within a visible light image. A number of imaging media may be used according to an intended application for the imaging device, and an imaging medium may have wavelengths above, below, or within the visible light spectrum. The devices described herein may be advantageously packaged within a single integrated device or other solid state device, and/or employed in an integrated, single-camera medical imaging system, as well as many non-medical imaging systems that would benefit from simultaneous capture of visible-light wavelength images along with images at other wavelengths.

  5. Wavelength Dependence on the Space Charge Collection

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, A.; Teague, L.; Duff, M.; Burger, A.; Groza, M.; Buliga, V.

    2012-05-31

    The distribution of the internal electric field in Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te (CZT) materials has significant effects on the charge collection ability. Light exposure at various wavelengths is a relatively unexplored process that alters charge collection at the anode contact. The use of multiple wavelengths can target charge carriers at various trap energies and positions throughout the crystal. The controlled illumination increases charge collection by releasing trapped electron and hole carriers in the crystal despite differences in light energy. Our study presents the results from our investigation of the effect of external illumination of CZT on the internal electric field via the Pockels effect. The space charge collection is further analyzed based on location and intensity relative to the specific wavelength of illumination.

  6. Wavelength-diversity transmission for fading mitigation in the atmospheric optical communication channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giggenbach, Dirk; Wilkerson, Brandon L.; Henniger, Hennes; Perlot, Nicolas

    2006-08-01

    Mitigation of index of refraction turbulence (IRT) effects is crucial in long-range atmospheric communication links. Diversity-transmission is one favorable way for fading compensation. One of several different diversity concepts is the exploitation of the wavelength-dependent index of refraction of the atmosphere, which leads to ideal stochastically independent fading at different wavelengths, depending on the scenario. This concept is here named wavelength-diversity (WLD). Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation for the strength of this effect are given and verified by experimental tests.

  7. Stable dual-wavelength microlaser controlled by the output mirror tilt angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallas, Florent; Herault, Emilie; Zhou, Jie; Roux, Jean-Francois; Vitrant, Guy

    2011-12-01

    A continuous-wave dual-wavelength solid-state microlaser is presented and a technique for regulating the gain competition between the two wavelengths is proposed, based on the angular tilt of the laser cavity output mirror. Laser behavior is studied and balanced dual-wavelength emission is obtained with output power levels as high as 200 mW for 2 W pump power. Sum frequency mixing is demonstrated making the source promising for Terahertz generation in the 0.5-0.7 THz range through difference frequency generation.

  8. Effect of laser wavelength and intensity on the divergence of hot electrons in fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Boyuan; Tian, Chao; Zhang, Zhimeng; Zhang, Feng; Shan, Lianqiang; Zhang, Bo; Zhou, Weimin; Zhang, Baohan; Gu, Yuqiu

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the short wavelength laser is believed to have a promising prospect in fast ignition for reducing the conflict between laser energy requirement and electron stopping range. Here we investigate the influence of laser wavelength and intensity in the angular dispersion of hot electrons. Both our theoretical model and numerical simulations show that the angular dispersion would increase rapidly with the shortening of laser wavelength due to the Weibel instability, while the laser intensity has little effect on it. These results have important implications for fast ignition.

  9. Debunking the recurring myth of a magic wavelength for free-space optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korevaar, Eric J.; Kim, Isaac I.; McArthur, Bruce

    2002-12-01

    Free-Space Optics (FSO) is a proven, reliable technology for last mile telecommunications applications, used worldwide for both enterprise network building-to-building connections and for wireless access to more traditional land line communications networks. In most mid-latitude coastal cities, link availability at distances above a few hundred meters is primarily affected by fog and low clouds. At longer distances, heavy rain and snow can also affect the link. The most mature technology used in FSO equipment relies on low cost semiconductor lasers or LED"s operating in the near infrared at wavelengths of 785 nm or 850 nm. In the past few years, systems operating at 1550 nm have also been developed. At first the vendors of these systems claimed that the 1550 nm wavelength had better propagation characteristics in severe weather than the 785 nm wavelength. With further analysis and research, those claims were withdrawn. Now there are claims that even longer wavelengths near 10 microns will solve the FSO link availability issues associated with severe weather. Hype about such magic wavelengths for FSO is both a disservice to the investors who will lose the money they are investing based on exaggerated claims, and to the rest of the FSO industry which should be creating realistic expectations for the capability of its equipment. In the weather conditions which normally cause the highest attenuation for FSO systems, namely coastal fog and low clouds, 10 microns offers no propagation advantage over shorter wavelengths.

  10. Aerosol Absorption Retrieval at Ultraviolet Wavelengths in a Complex Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazadzis, Stelios; Raptis, Panagiotis; Kouremeti, Natalia; Amirdis, Vassilis; Arola, Antti; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Schuster, Gregory L.

    2016-01-01

    We have used total and diffuse UV irradiance measurements from a multi-filter rotating shadow-band radiometer (UVMFR) in order to investigate aerosol absorption in the UV range for a 5-year period in Athens, Greece. This dataset was used as input to a radiative transfer model and the single scattering albedo (SSA) at 368 and 332 nm was calculated. Retrievals from a collocated CIMEL sun photometer were used to evaluate the products and study the absorption spectral behavior of retrieved SSA values. The UVMFR SSA, together with synchronous, CIMEL-derived retrievals of SSA at 440 nm, had a mean of 0.90, 0.87 and 0.83, with lowest values (higher absorption) encountered at the shorter wavelengths. In addition, noticeable diurnal variation of the SSA in all wavelengths is shown, with amplitudes up to 0.05. Strong SSA wavelength dependence is revealed for cases of low Angstrom exponents, accompanied by a SSA decrease with decreasing extinction optical depth, suggesting varying influence under different aerosol composition. However, part of this dependence for low aerosol optical depths is masked by the enhanced SSA retrieval uncertainty. Dust and brown carbon UV absorbing properties were also investigated to explain seasonal patterns.

  11. Aerosol absorption retrieval at ultraviolet wavelengths in a complex environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazadzis, Stelios; Raptis, Panagiotis; Kouremeti, Natalia; Amiridis, Vassilis; Arola, Antti; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Schuster, Gregory L.

    2016-12-01

    We have used total and diffuse UV irradiance measurements from a multi-filter rotating shadow-band radiometer (UVMFR) in order to investigate aerosol absorption in the UV range for a 5-year period in Athens, Greece. This dataset was used as input to a radiative transfer model and the single scattering albedo (SSA) at 368 and 332 nm was calculated. Retrievals from a collocated CIMEL sun photometer were used to evaluate the products and study the absorption spectral behavior of retrieved SSA values. The UVMFR SSA, together with synchronous, CIMEL-derived retrievals of SSA at 440 nm, had a mean of 0.90, 0.87 and 0.83, with lowest values (higher absorption) encountered at the shorter wavelengths. In addition, noticeable diurnal variation of the SSA in all wavelengths is shown, with amplitudes up to 0.05. Strong SSA wavelength dependence is revealed for cases of low Ångström exponents, accompanied by a SSA decrease with decreasing extinction optical depth, suggesting varying influence under different aerosol composition. However, part of this dependence for low aerosol optical depths is masked by the enhanced SSA retrieval uncertainty. Dust and brown carbon UV absorbing properties were also investigated to explain seasonal patterns.

  12. Raman Shifting a Tunable ArF Excimer Laser to Wavelengths of 190 to 240 nm With a Forced Convection Raman Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balla, R. Jeffrey; Herring, G. C.

    2000-01-01

    Tunable radiation, at ultraviolet wavelengths, is produced by Raman shifting a modified 285-mJ ArF excimer laser. Multiple Stokes outputs are observed in H2, CH4, D2, N2, SF6, and CF4 (20, 22, 53, 21, 2.1, and 0.35 percent, respectively). Numbers in parentheses are the first Stokes energy conversion efficiencies. We can access 70 percent of the frequency range 42000-52000 cm (exp -1) (190-240 nm) with Stokes energies that vary from 0.2 microJoule to 58 mJ inside the Raman cell. By using 110 mJ of pump energy and D 2 , the tunable first Stokes energy varies over the 29-58 mJ range as the wavelength is tuned over the 204-206 nm range. Dependence on input energy, gas pressure, He mixture fraction, and circulation of the gas in the forced convection Raman cell is discussed; Stokes conversion is also discussed for laser repetition rates from 1 to 100 Hz. An empirical equation is given to determine whether forced convection can improve outputs for a given repetition rate.

  13. Multi-wavelength Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. P.; Miller, N. A.

    2002-01-01

    Multivariate or multi-wavelength luminosity functions will reveal the interplay between star formation, chemical evolution, and absorption and re-emission of dust within evolving galaxy populations. By using principal component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the problem, we optimally extract the relevant photometric information from large galaxy catalogs. As a demonstration of the technique, we derive the multi-wavelength luminosity function for the galaxies in the released SDSS catalog, and compare the results with those obtained by traditional methods. This technique will be applicable to catalogs of galaxies from datasets obtained by 2MASS, and the SIRTF and GALEX missions.

  14. Multi-Wavelength Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2002-01-01

    Multivariate or multi-wavelength luminosity functions will reveal the interplay between star formation, chemical evolution, and ab- sorption and re-emission of dust within evolving galaxy populations. By using principal component analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the problem, I optimally extract the relevant photometric information from large galaxy catalogs. As a demonstration of the technique, I derive the multi-wavelength luminosity function for the galaxies in the released SDSS catalog, and compare the results with those obtained by traditional methods. This technique will be applicable to catalogs of galaxies from datasets obtained by 2MASS, and the SIRTF and GALEX missions.

  15. Modulation compression for short wavelength harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, J.

    2010-01-11

    Laser modulator is used to seed free electron lasers. In this paper, we propose a scheme to compress the initial laser modulation in the longitudinal phase space by using two opposite sign bunch compressors and two opposite sign energy chirpers. This scheme could potentially reduce the initial modulation wavelength by a factor of C and increase the energy modulation amplitude by a factor of C, where C is the compression factor of the first bunch compressor. Such a compressed energy modulation can be directly used to generate short wavelength current modulation with a large bunching factor.

  16. Effects of Laser Wavelength on Ablator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Wavelength-dependent or spectral radiation effects are potentially significant for thermal protection materials. NASA atmospheric entry simulations include trajectories with significant levels of shock layer radiation which is concentrated in narrow spectral lines. Tests using two different high powered lasers, the 10.6 micron LHMEL I CO2 laser and the near-infrared 1.07 micron fiber laser, on low density ablative thermal protection materials offer a unique opportunity to evaluate spectral effects. Test results indicated that the laser wavelength can impact the thermal response of an ablative material, in terms of bond-line temperatures, penetration times, mass losses, and char layer thicknesses.

  17. Variable wavelength selection devices: Physics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xianyu, Haiqing

    Variable wavelength selection (VWS) achieved by implementing tunability to wavelength discriminating devices has generated great interest in basic science, applied physics, and technology. This thesis focuses on the underlying physics and application of several novel wavelength discriminating devices. Holographical polymer dispersed liquid crystals (HPDLCs) are switchable volume gratings formed by exposing a photopolymerizable monomer and liquid crystal mixture to interfering monochromatic light beams. An HPDLCs wavelength discriminating ability along with its switchability, allow it to be utilized in VWS devices. A novel mode HPDLC, total internal reflection (TIR) HPDLC, has been developed as a wavelength selective filter. The grating planes in this device are tilted so that the diffracted light experiences total internal reflection at the glass-air interface and is trapped in the cell until it eventually escapes from an edge. A VWS device is demonstrated by stacking TIR HPDLCs operating at different wavelengths. Converging or diverging recording beams are employed to fabricate chirped reflection HPDLCs with a pitch gradient along the designated direction, creating chirped switchable reflection gratings (CSRGs). A pixelated version of the CSRG is developed herein, and a dynamic spectral equalizer is presented by combining the pixelated CSRG with a prism (for wavelength discrimination). A switchable circular to point converter (SCPC), which enables the random selection of the wavelength bands divided by the Fabry-Perot interferometer utilizing the controllable beam steering capability of transmission HPDLCs, is demonstrated. A random optical cross-switch (TIROL) can be created by integrating a Fabry-Perot interferometer with a stack of SCPC units. The in-plane electric field generated by the interdigitated electrodes is utilized to elongate the helical pitch of a cholesteric liquid crystal and thereby induces a red shift of the transmission reflection peak

  18. Suggested isosbestic wavelength calibration in clinical analyses.

    PubMed

    Hoxter, G

    1979-01-01

    I recommend the use of isosbestic points for conveniently checking the wavelength scale of spectrophotometers in the ultraviolet and visible regions. Colorimetric pH indicators, hemoglobin derivatives, and other radiation-absorbing substances that are convertible into stable isomers of different absorption spectra provide a means for calibrating many different wavelengths by comparing the absorptivities of these isomers in equimolar solutions. The method requires no special precautions and results are independent of substance concentration and temperature between 4 and 45 degrees C. Isosbestic calibration may be important for (e.g.) coenzyme-dependent dehydrogenase activity determinations and in quality assurance programs.

  19. New method for spectrofluorometer monochromator wavelength calibration.

    PubMed

    Paladini, A A; Erijman, L

    1988-09-01

    A method is presented for wavelength calibration of spectrofluorometer monochromators. It is based on the distortion that the characteristic absorption bands of glass filters (holmium or didymium oxide), commonly used for calibration of spectrophotometers, introduce in the emitted fluorescence of fluorophores like indole, diphenyl hexatriene, xylene or rhodamine 6G. Those filters or a well characterized absorber with sharp bands like benzene vapor can be used for the same purpose. The wavelength calibration accuracy obtained with this method is better than 0.1 nm, and requires no modification in the geometry of the spectrofluorometer sample compartment.

  20. An economic Fabry-Perot wavelength reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fżrész, Gábor; Glenday, Alex; Latham, Christian

    2014-07-01

    Precision radial velocity (PRV) measurements are key in studying exoplanets, and so are wavelength calibrators in PRV instruments. ThAr lamps offer an affordable but somewhat limited solution for the visible passband. Laser frequency combs are ideal calibrators, except the (still) narrow wavelength coverage and large price tag. White light Fabry-Perot (FP) calibrators offer frequency-comb like properties in a more affordable and less complicated package1. Using a commercial solid FP etalon and off-the shelf components we have constructed an economic FP calibrator suitable for observatories on a smaller budget.

  1. Optimal wavelength selection for noncontact reflection photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corral Martinez, Luis F.; Paez, Gonzalo; Strojnik, Marija

    2011-08-01

    In this work, we obtain backscattered signals from human forehead for wavelengths from 380 to 980 nm. The results reveal bands with strong pulsatile signals that carry useful information. We describe those bands as the most suitable wavelengths in the visible and NIR regions from which heart and respiratory rate parameters can be derived using long distance non-contact reflection photoplethysmography analysis. The latter results show the feasibility of a novel technique for remotely detection of vital signs in humans. This technique, which may include morphological analysis or maps of tissue oxygenation, is a further step to real non-invasive remote monitoring of patients.

  2. A Novel Portable Multi-Wavelength Laser System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, Andy; Dickinson, B.

    There is an established need for a portable and affordable Q-switched laser system for use in studio conservation and small scale field use. The ideal system would be capable of producing a variety of wavelengths ranging from the ultraviolet to the infrared with sufficient energy per pulse to treat a wide range of materials including stone, marble, terracotta, wood, organic materials, bone, parchment, textiles, and metals. In this paper we report on such a system which is capable of delivering Q-switched output at 1,064nm in excess of 300mJ per pulse and at repetition rates of up to 25 Hz. Additional outputs are also reported at 266 nm, 355 nm, 532 nm, and 2.94 μm. Preliminary cleaning results on a small range of objects using the Q-switched 1,064nm output are presented.

  3. High-temperature long-wavelength vertical-cavity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalit, Near Moses

    Vertical cavity lasers(VCLs) have recently been the subject of much research effort around the world. These lasers hold the promise of inexpensive, low threshold, high speed sources for optical communication. Short wavelength lasers have many applications, including free space optical interconnects and short distance datacom, but have limited potential for longer distances due to the absorption and dispersion spectrum of standard optical fiber. The longer wavelength sources near 1.3 or 1.5 /mu m are ideally suited for medium and long distance applications. Interoperability as well as compatibility with existing fiber optic infrastructure also call for longer wavelength sources. However, large volume commercialization of such devices, for applications such as FTTH(fiber to the home), requires a wide temperature range of operation ([-]40o C to 85o C). Historically, the realization of such high performance long-wavelength vertical cavity- lasers has been difficult. Nonetheless, advances in fabrication techniques, such as wafer fusion, have allowed for ever increasing device performance. In this thesis, we present recent results that include devices with multigigahetz frequency responses, hundred of microwatts of cw output powers, as well as 65o C continuous-wave operating temperatures. In addition, these devices have now been demonstrated as sources in link transmission experiment at 2.5 Gb/s over 200 km of optical fiber, far surpassing the record distance-bandwidth products of any other VCL experiment. We analyze here the design and fabrication of these record performance devices. Further advancements may soon lead to commercial level performance.

  4. Wavelength control of random polymer fiber laser based on adaptive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhijia; Gao, Pengfei; Xie, Kang; Liang, Yunyun; Jiang, Haiming

    2014-12-15

    We demonstrate the realization of two different kinds of random polymer optical fiber lasers to control the random lasing wavelength by changing the disorder of polymer optical fibers (POFs). One is a long-range disorder POF based on copolymer refractive-index inhomogeneity, and the other is a short-range disorder POF based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes scattering. By end pumped both disorder POFs, the coherent random lasing for both is observed. Meanwhile, the random lasing wavelength of the short-range disorder POF because of a small scattering mean-free path has been found to be blue shifted with respect to the long-range disorder POF, which will give a way to control the random lasing wavelength.

  5. Flexible circular waveguides at millimeter wavelengths from metallized Teflon tubing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obrzut, J.; Goldsmith, P. F.

    1990-03-01

    Flexible waveguides for use at millimeter wavelengths have been fabricated by deposition of metallic film onto the composite-modified inside surface of Teflon tubing. The attenuation characteristics in the range 80 to 115 GHz show losses on the order of 0.1 dB/cm. Bending, twisting, and rotating to the limit of plastic mechanical stability (curvature radius typically greater than 8 cm) have a negligible effect on the attenuation, and bend angles less than 45 deg produce relatively small changes in the insertion phase.

  6. Imaging of sub-wavelength structures radiating coherently near microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, Alexey V.; Astratov, Vasily N.

    2016-02-01

    Using a two-dimensional model, we show that the optical images of a sub-wavelength object depend strongly on the excitation of its electromagnetic modes. There exist modes that enable the resolution of the object features smaller than the classical diffraction limit, in particular, due to the destructive interference. We propose to use such modes for super-resolution of resonant structures such as coupled cavities, metal dimers, or bowties. A dielectric microsphere in contact with the object forms its magnified image in a wide range of the virtual image plane positions. It is also suggested that the resonances may significantly affect the resolution quantification in recent experimental studies.

  7. Resonant tunneling diodes as sources for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanbesien, O.; Bouregba, R.; Mounaix, P.; Lippens, D.; Palmateer, L.; Pernot, J. C.; Beaudin, G.; Encrenaz, P.; Bockenhoff, E.; Nagle, J.

    1992-01-01

    High-quality Resonant Tunneling Diodes have been fabricated and tested as sources for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. The devices have shown excellent I-V characteristics with peak-to-valley current ratios as high as 6:1 and current densities in the range of 50-150 kA/cm(exp 2) at 300 K. Used as local oscillators, the diodes are capable of state of the art output power delivered by AlGaAs-based tunneling devices. As harmonic multipliers, a frequency of 320 GHz has been achieved by quintupling the fundamental oscillation of a klystron source.

  8. Volcano monitoring by short wavelength infrared satellite remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothery, D. A.; Francis, P. W.; Wood, C. A.

    1988-01-01

    The use of short wavelength IR Landsat TM data for volcano monitoring is examined. By determining the pixel-integrated from the TM data, it is possible to estimate the temperature and size of hot areas which occupy less than one complete pixel. Examples of volcano monitoring with remote sensing data are discussed. It is suggested that the entire volcanic temperature range (100-1200 C) could be accomplished by decreasing the band 6 gain by just one order of magnitude so that it was sensitive to radiance from 1 to 100 mW/sq cm/sr/micron.

  9. Synthesized femtosecond laser pulse source for two-wavelength contouring with simultaneously recorded digital holograms.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Thomas; Steinmeyer, Günter; Grunwald, Ruediger; Falldorf, Claas; Bonitz, Jens; Kaufmann, Christian; Kebbel, Volker; Griebner, Uwe

    2009-02-16

    A dual-wavelength femtosecond laser pulse source and its application for digital holographic single-shot contouring are presented. The synthesized laser source combines sub-picosecond time scales with a wide reconstruction range. A center wavelength distance of the two separated pulses of only 15 nm with a high contrast was demonstrated by spectral shaping of the 50 nm broad seed spectrum centered at 800 nm. Owing to the resulting synthetic wavelength, the scan depth range without phase ambiguity is extended to the 100-microm-range. Single-shot dual-wavelength imaging is achieved by using two CMOS cameras in a Twyman-Green interferometer, which is extended by a polarization encoding sequence to separate the holograms. The principle of the method is revealed, and experimental results concerning a single axis scanner mirror operating at a resonance frequency of 0.5 kHz are presented. Within the synthetic wavelength, the phase difference information of the object was unambiguously retrieved and the 3D-shape calculated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that single-shot two-wavelength contouring on a sub-ps time scale is reported.

  10. Concepts for a short wavelength rf gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzikov, S. V.; Shchelkunov, S.; Vikharev, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    Three concepts of an rf gun to be operated at 0.1-10 mm wavelengths are considered. In all the concepts, the rf system exploits an accelerating traveling wave. In comparison with a classical decimeter standing-wave rf gun, we analyze the advantages of new concepts, available rf sources, and achievable beam parameters.

  11. Short wavelength radio observations of Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janssen, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    Passive radio observations are discussed from 1 mm to 2 cm wavelengths. The interferometric technique was used to observe the brightness of the rings. The reflectivity and disk temperature are also considered. The differences between radio and radar observations are examined and discussed.

  12. The wavelength dependence of Triton's light curve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Mcewen, A.

    1991-01-01

    Using Voyager observations, it is demonstrated that Triton's orbital light curve is strongly wavelength-dependent, a characteristic which readily explains some of the apparent discrepancies among pre-Voyager telescopic measurements. Specifically, a light curve amplitude (peak to peak) is found that decreases systematically with increasing wavelength from about 0.08 magnitude (peak to peak) near 200 nm to less than 0.02 magnitude near 1000 nm. Peak brightness occurs near 90 deg orbital longitude (leading hemisphere). The brightness variation across this hemisphere is close to sinusoidal; the variation across the darker hemisphere is more complex. The decrease in light curve amplitude with increasing wavelength appears to be due to a decrease in contrast among surface markings, rather than to atmospheric obscuration. The model also explains the observed decrease in the amplitude of Triton's light curve at visible wavelengths over the past decade, a decrease related to the current migration of the subsolar latitude toward the south pole; it is predicted that this trend will continue into the 1990s.

  13. Two-wavelength spatial-heterodyne holography

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Gregory R.; Bingham, Philip R.; Simpson, John T.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Voelkl, Edgar

    2007-12-25

    Systems and methods are described for obtaining two-wavelength differential-phase holograms. A method includes determining a difference between a filtered analyzed recorded first spatially heterodyne hologram phase and a filtered analyzed recorded second spatially-heterodyned hologram phase.

  14. Age-related changes in wavelength discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Shinomori, Keizo; Schefrin, Brooke E.; Werner, John S.

    2008-01-01

    Wavelength discrimination functions (420 to 620–650 nm) were measured for four younger (mean 30.9 years) and four older (mean 72.5 years) observers. Stimuli consisted of individually determined isoluminant monochromatic lights (10 Td) presented in each half of a 2° circular bipartite field with use of a Maxwellian-view optical system. A spatial two-alternative forced-choice method was used in combination with a staircase procedure to determine discrimination thresholds across the spectrum. Small but consistent elevations in discrimination thresholds were found for older compared with younger observers. Because the retinal illuminance of the stimuli was equated across all observers, these age-related losses in discrimination are attributable to neural changes. Analyses of these data reveal a significant change in Weber fraction across adulthood for a chromatically opponent pathway receiving primarily antagonistic signals from middle-wavelength-sensitive and long-wavelength-sensitive cones but not for a short-wavelength-sensitive cone pathway. PMID:11205976

  15. Pump noise cancellation in parametric wavelength converters.

    PubMed

    Ataie, Vahid; Myslivets, Evgeny; Wiberg, Andereas O J; Alic, Nikola; Radic, Stojan

    2012-12-10

    A novel technique for pump noise effect mitigation in parametric wavelength converters is introduced. The method relies on digital signal processing and effectively takes advantage of the correlation property between the pump and idler, imposed by the parametric interaction. A 4 dB improvement in receiver performance is demonstrated experimentally for the conventional 10 Gbps OOK signal converted over 20 nm.

  16. Aero-Optics at Shorter Wavelengths.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    heliostat 1.93 1788 60 coelostat 2.40 2161 60 Changing from a CO2 laser to an iodine laser gives a wavelength ratio of 1/8. Assuming S is fixed, the...thickness and velocity profile. When the wall is concave to the external flow, Gortler vortices may occur. Cooling or heating can alter boundary layer

  17. Discrete wavelength-locked external cavity laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Silver, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An external cavity laser (and method of generating laser light) comprising: a laser light source; means for collimating light output by the laser light source; a diffraction grating receiving collimated light; a cavity feedback mirror reflecting light received from the diffraction grating back to the diffraction grating; and means for reliably tuning the external cavity laser to discrete wavelengths.

  18. Electricity and short wavelength radiation generator

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.

    1985-08-26

    Methods and associated apparati for use of collisions of high energy atoms and ions of He, Ne, or Ar with themselves or with high energy neutrons to produce short wavelength radiation (lambda approx. = 840-1300 A) that may be utilized to produce cathode-anode currents or photovoltaic currents.

  19. Fiber optics wavelength division multiplexing(components)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Herbert D.

    1985-01-01

    The long term objectives are to develop optical multiplexers/demultiplexers, different wavelength and modulation stable semiconductor lasers and high data rate transceivers, as well as to test and evaluate fiber optic networks applicable to the Space Station. Progress in each of the above areas is briefly discussed.

  20. RESOLVING THE MOTH AT MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Ricarte, Angelo; Moldvai, Noel; Hughes, A. Meredith; Duchene, Gaspard; Williams, Jonathan P.; Andrews, Sean M.; Wilner, David J.

    2013-09-01

    HD 61005, also known as ''The Moth'', is one of only a handful of debris disks that exhibit swept-back ''wings'' thought to be caused by interaction with the ambient interstellar medium (ISM). We present 1.3 mm Submillimeter Array observations of the debris disk around HD 61005 at a spatial resolution of 1.''9 that resolve the emission from large grains for the first time. The disk exhibits a double-peaked morphology at millimeter wavelengths, consistent with an optically thin ring viewed close to edge-on. To investigate the disk structure and the properties of the dust grains we simultaneously model the spatially resolved 1.3 mm visibilities and the unresolved spectral energy distribution (SED). The temperatures indicated by the SED are consistent with expected temperatures for grains close to the blowout size located at radii commensurate with the millimeter and scattered light data. We also perform a visibility-domain analysis of the spatial distribution of millimeter-wavelength flux, incorporating constraints on the disk geometry from scattered light imaging, and find suggestive evidence of wavelength-dependent structure. The millimeter-wavelength emission apparently originates predominantly from the thin ring component rather than tracing the ''wings'' observed in scattered light. The implied segregation of large dust grains in the ring is consistent with an ISM-driven origin for the scattered light wings.

  1. Imaging Uranus at Submillimeter to Centimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstadter, Mark D.; Butler, B. J.; Gurwell, M. A.

    2007-10-01

    We have been making regular observations of Uranus for the past several years, in part to search for variability associated with the 2007 equinox. We will present an analysis of our current data set, spanning wavelengths from 1 mm to 20 cm (using the SMA and VLA radio observatories), including our latest data collected in August of 2007. These wavelengths probe the atmosphere from pressures of 1 to 50 bars, which extends from the lower tropopause far into convectively dominated regions, and includes several altitudes of cloud formation. We have found that, at all our wavelengths, the planet appears symmetric, with both the north (spring) and south (fall) polar regions being radio bright. At pressures greater than a few bars, this is almost certainly due to the poles being depleted in atmospheric absorbers by convective processes (Hofstadter and Butler 2003, Icarus 165, 168-180). Near 1 bar, the bright poles could be due to the physical temperature being 5 K higher there than at the equator, or due to a strong depletion of CH4 vapor over the poles. A combination of the two seems likely, as compositional variations are consistent with the circulation inferred from several data sets, and 2 K temperature variations are found both in theoretical models (Friedson and Ingersoll 1987, Icarus 69, 135-156) and in Voyager infrared measurements made in 1986 during southern summer solstice (Hanel et al. 1986, Science 233, 70-74). We will discuss these results in the context of observations of Uranus made at other wavelengths, and recent images we have acquired of Neptune at radio wavelengths. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. We acknowledge the support of NASA's Planetary Astronomy program, and of the VLA and SMA observatories.

  2. The IAG solar flux atlas: Accurate wavelengths and absolute convective blueshift in standard solar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiners, A.; Mrotzek, N.; Lemke, U.; Hinrichs, J.; Reinsch, K.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new solar flux atlas with the aim of understanding wavelength precision and accuracy in solar benchmark data. The atlas covers the wavelength range 405-2300 nm and was observed at the Institut für Astrophysik, Göttingen (IAG), with a Fourier transform spectrograph (FTS). In contrast to other FTS atlases, the entire visible wavelength range was observed simultaneously using only one spectrograph setting. We compare the wavelength solution of the new atlas to the Kitt Peak solar flux atlases and to the HARPS frequency-comb calibrated solar atlas. Comparison reveals systematics in the two Kitt Peak FTS atlases resulting from their wavelength scale construction, and shows consistency between the IAG and the HARPS atlas. We conclude that the IAG atlas is precise and accurate on the order of ± 10 m s-1 in the wavelength range 405-1065 nm, while the Kitt Peak atlases show deviations as large as several ten to 100 m s-1. We determine absolute convective blueshift across the spectrum from the IAG atlas and report slight differences relative to results from the Kitt Peak atlas that we attribute to the differences between wavelength scales. We conclude that benchmark solar data with accurate wavelength solution are crucial to better understand the effect of convection on stellar radial velocity measurements, which is one of the main limitations of Doppler spectroscopy at m s -1 precision. Data (FITS files of the spectra) and Table A.1 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A65

  3. Tunable and switchable dual-wavelength Tm-doped mode-locked fiber laser by nonlinear polarization evolution.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhiyu; Li, Xiaohui; Tang, Yulong; Shum, Perry Ping; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Qi Jie

    2015-02-23

    We propose and demonstrate a tunable and switchable dual-wavelength ultra-fast Tm-doped fiber laser. The tunability is based on nonlinear polarization evolution (NPE) technique in a passively mode-locked laser cavity. The NPE effect induces wavelength-dependent loss in the cavity to effectively alleviate mode competition and enables the multiwavelength mode locking. The laser exhibits tunable dual-wavelength mode locking over a wide range from 1852 to 1886 nm. The system has compact structure and both the wavelength tuning and switching capabilities can be realized by controlling the polarization in the fiber ring cavity.

  4. Switchable single-longitudinal-mode dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber ring laser incorporating a semiconductor optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shilong; Zhao, Xiaofan; Lou, Caiyun

    2008-04-15

    We propose and demonstrate a novel single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) dual-wavelength erbium-doped fiber ring laser incorporating a semiconductor optical amplifier. The SOA biased in its low-gain regime greatly reduces the gain competition of the two wavelengths. The stable SLM operation is guaranteed by a passive triple-ring cavity and a fiber Fabry-Perot filter. The dual-wavelength output with a 40 GHz wavelength spacing is switchable in the range of 1533-1565.4 nm.

  5. Studies of Saturn's Main Rings at Multiple Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, L. J.; Deau, E.; Filacchione, G.; Morishima, R.; Hedman, M. M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Colwell, J. E.; Bradley, E. T.; Showalter, M.; Pilorz, S.; Brooks, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    A wealth of information about the characteristics of Saturn's ring particles and their regolith can be obtained by modeling the changes in their brightness, color and temperature with changing viewing geometry over a wide range of wavelengths, from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared. Data from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) are jointly studied using data from the lit and unlit main rings at multiple geometries and solar elevations over 11 years of the Cassini mission. Using multi-wavelength data sets allow us to test different thermal models by combining the effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, particle spin rate and spin axis orientation. The CIRS temperature and ISS color variations are confined primarily to phase angle over a range of solar elevations with only small differences from changing spacecraft elevation. Color and temperature dependence with varying solar elevation angle are also observed. Brightness dependence with changing solar elevation angle and phase angle is observed with UVIS. VIMS observations show that the IR ice absorption band depths are a very weak function of phase angle, out to ~140 deg phase, suggesting that interparticle light scattering is relatively unimportant except at very high phase angles. These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of scattering within the regolith and on possibly rough surfaces of the clumps, as well as a contribution from scattering between individual particles in a many-particle-thick layer. Preliminary results from our joint studies will be presented. This research was carried out in part at

  6. Hemodialysis access procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... returned to your body. Usually the access is put in your arm but it can also go ... A surgeon will put the access in. There are 3 types of access. Fistula: The surgeon joins an artery and vein under the ...

  7. Theoretical investigation of all-metal-based mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers at infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    High-performance wavelength-selective infrared (IR) sensors require small pixel structures, a low-thermal mass, and operation in the middle-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) regions for multicolor IR imaging. All-metal-based mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) were investigated theoretically and were designed to enhance the performance of wavelength-selective uncooled IR sensors. All components of the MPMAs are based on thin layers of metals such as Au without oxide insulators for increased absorption. The absorption properties of the MPMAs were investigated by rigorous coupled-wave analysis. Strong wavelength-selective absorption is realized over a wide range of MWIR and LWIR wavelengths by the plasmonic resonance of the micropatch and the narrow-gap resonance, without disturbance from the intrinsic absorption of oxide insulators. The absorption wavelength is defined mainly by the micropatch size and is longer than its period. The metal post width has less impact on the absorption properties and can maintain single-mode operation. Through-holes can be formed on the plate area to reduce the thermal mass. A small pixel size with reduced thermal mass and wideband single-mode operation can be realized using all-metal-based MPMAs.

  8. A nano/micro `meso' scale self-calibrating integrated optical wavelength and intensity meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, H. J.; Zavalin, A.

    2006-07-01

    Wavelength-division multiplexing has become the dominant approach to utilizing the massive bandwidth of optical fibers and integrated optics, including those based on a photonic crystal approach and recent nanotechnology achievements. For tunable sources and tunable receivers, it is desirable to measure the wavelength accurately and quickly. Unfortunately, current wavelength-measurement devices are not integrated and not fast enough to support 1 Gbit/s and higher requirements of the modern communication lines. We show here how to make an integrated optical system that results in an intensity-independent wavelength determination and a wavelength-independent intensity determination at ultra-short pulse duration or higher than ˜1-GHz bandwidth. The two output beams from a Mach-Zehnder interferometer, tuned to 3 dB at each output at the beginning of the wavelength-measurement range, provide all of the needed information. We show how a simple fast wavelength meter can be built into a silicon - or other - optical chip. It employs fuzzy metrology using both outputs of an integrated interferometer.

  9. Detection Wavelength Control of Uncooled Infrared Sensors Using Two-Dimensional Lattice Plasmonic Absorbers.

    PubMed

    Takagawa, Yousuke; Ogawa, Shinpei; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-06-10

    Wavelength-selective uncooled infrared (IR) sensors are highly promising for a wide range of applications, such as fire detection, gas analysis and biomedical analysis. We have recently developed wavelength-selective uncooled IR sensors using square lattice two-dimensional plasmonic absorbers (2-D PLAs). The PLAs consist of a periodic 2-D lattice of Au-based dimples, which allow photons to be manipulated using surface plasmon modes. In the present study, a detailed investigation into control of the detection wavelength was conducted by varying the PLA lattice structure. A comparison was made between wavelength-selective uncooled IR sensors with triangular and square PLA lattices that were fabricated using complementary metal oxide semiconductor and micromachining techniques. Selective enhancement of the responsivity could be achieved, and the detection wavelength for the triangular lattice was shorter than that for the square lattice. The results indicate that the detection wavelength is determined by the reciprocal-lattice vector for the PLAs. The ability to control the detection wavelength in this manner enables the application of such PLAs to many types of thermal IR sensors. The results obtained here represent an important step towards multi-color imaging in the IR region.

  10. Tunable dual-wavelength fiber laser with ultra-narrow linewidth based on Rayleigh backscattering.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Zhang, Baomei; Shi, Leilei; Huang, Shihong; Deng, Ming; Liu, Jianguo; Li, Xiong

    2016-01-25

    Dual-wavelength fiber lasers with ultra-narrow linewidth find wide applications in high-speed optical communications, fiber optic sensors, high resolution measurements and medical instruments and microwave or terahertz generation systems. Based on the linewidth compression mechanism due to Rayleigh backscattering, this paper adopts a simple ring structure cooperated with two fiber Bragg gratings centered at 1550 nm and 1530 nm respectively, achieving a dual-wavelength fiber laser with ultra-narrow linewidth, with a 3dB linewidth of ~700 Hz for each wavelength, and the SNR of 60dB. Tuning the center wavelength of one of the two FBGs while the other one keeps unchanged, the fiber laser keeps stable dual-wavelength lasing and the linewidth is still ~700 Hz. It can be seen that the compression for the linewidth based on the Rayleigh backscattering can be used in multi-wavelength laser systems, and because of the characteristic of the Rayleigh backscattering, the method has great potential in the application of wide wavelength range linewidth compression from the ultraviolet to the far infrared.

  11. Choice of the proper wavelength for photochemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moan, Johan; Iani, Vladimir; Ma, LiWei

    1996-01-01

    All photosensitizers applied in experimental- and clinical-photochemotherapy (PCT) have broad absorption spectra stretching from the ultraviolet up to 6 - 700 nm. Light of wavelengths in the red part of the spectrum is chosen for PCT even though the extinction coefficients of the sensitizers are usually smaller in this wavelength region than at shorter wavelengths. Thus, if one wants to treat superficial tumors or skin disorders, this may be a wrong choice. Two pieces of information are needed in order to make a proper choice of wavelength to treat a lesion of a given depth: the wavelength dependence of the optical penetration depth into tissue, and the action spectrum for tumor destruction. Additionally, the skin photosensitivity induced by the drug should be considered. We have non-invasively measured the optical penetration spectra of human tissues in vivo and the fluorescence excitation spectra for several sensitizers, including protoporphyrin (PpIX), in cells. Assuming that the action spectrum for cell inactivation can be approximated by the fluorescence excitation spectrum of the sensitizer -- which is indeed the case for a number of sensitizers in cells in vitro -- we have considered the situation for 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced PpIX in human tissue. All the way down to about 2 mm below the surface light in the Soret band (-410 nm) would give the largest cell inactivation, while at depth exceeding 2 mm, the conventional 635 nm light would be optimal. Light at the argon laser wavelength 514.5 nm is more efficient than light at 635 nm down to 1 mm. From the surface and down to 6 mm, the 635 nm peak of the excitation spectrum of PpIX, as evaluated per photon incident on the skin surface, is redshifted by less than 2 nm. In some cases photosensitizing photoproducts are formed during PCT, such as photoprotoporphyrin during PCT with PpIX. In such cases it may be advantageous to apply a broad-band light source with a spectrum that covers also part of the action

  12. Constraining the wavelength dependence of polarization for various asteroid taxonomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleszewski, Chester; Smith, Paul S.; McMillan, Robert S.

    2016-10-01

    The polarization of sunlight reflected from asteroids is known to be inversely proportional to geometric albedo (Umov 1905). However, that was mainly derived from observations in the V-filter. Preliminary observations of the wavelength dependence were conducted by Belskaya et al. (2009) in the major asteroid taxonomic classes. The limited UBVRI data revealed trends of spectral slope vs. phase angle. To study the wavelength dependence of asteroid polarization more robustly, we have used the SPOL spectropolarimeter at the 2.3-m Bok and 1.6-m Kuiper telescopes. The finer spectral resolution of spectropolarimetry is needed to confirm the linearity of the wavelength dependence of polarization.We present polarization spectra from four asteroid taxonomic groups: B-, C-, S-, and X-types. Across the observed wavelength range (0.45 to 0.7 microns), the linear trend described by Belskaya et al. is confirmed and we determined the best-fit linear slope of each spectrum. For the S-type asteroids, the slope of the polarization spectra becomes more negative as the phase angle increases. The rate at which the polarization slope changes increases at phase angles greater than the inversion angle. C-type asteroids behave differently from the S-types in two ways. First, the polarization spectra for the C-types are positively sloped as opposed to negative (also noted in Belskaya et al.). Also, as you observe the C-types closer to the inversion angle (~20 degrees phase angle), the polarization slopes tend to flatten as opposed to steepen. The polarization spectra of B-type asteroids are positively sloped, but the tendency to flatten near the inversion angle like the C-type spectra is not evident. Our observations of low albedo X-types exhibit positive polarization slopes, while the high albedo observations exhibit negative slopes. Differences in the wavelength dependencies of polarization between various asteroid types appear to be driven by differences in their geometric albedos. Better

  13. Initial Field Measurements of Atmospheric Absorption at 9 Micrometers to 11 Micrometers Wavelengths.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    likely to be responsible for this discrepancy. Accession For NTIS GRA&I DTIC TAB Unannounced El Justification By. Distr"ibtion/ AvailcbiJity Codes Diet...1978, " Photoacoustic Spectroscopy of NH, at the %m and 1Om 12C 01 Laser Wavelengths," J Appi Opt, 17:3746-3749 9K. 0. White et al, 1978, "Water...contrasts for the absorbing constituents. This may permit identification of absorbing gaseous concentrations by deconvolution of the spectra using

  14. Multi-Wavelength Optical Code-Division-Multiplexing Based on Passive, Linear, Unitary Filters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    EG) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 238.18 Designed using Perform Pro, WHS/DIOR, Oct 94 Multi-Wavelength Optical Code-Division-Multiplexing Based on... FTTH ) and fiber to the desk (FTTD) a reality. Every hertz of bandwidth available in optical fiber is now valuable for carrying data traffic in...contemporary communication systems. A different paradigm is required in designing multiple access optical communication systems to meet the challenges in

  15. Multi-Wavelength Spectroscopy of Super-Earth Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragomir, Diana; Benneke, Björn; Crossfield, Ian; Lothringer, Joshua; Knutson, Heather

    2017-01-01

    The Kepler mission has revealed that super-Earths (planets with radii between 1 and 4 R_Earth) are the most common class of planets in the Galaxy, though none are known in our own Solar System. These planets can theoretically have a wide range of compositions which we are just beginning to explore observationally. While studies based on Kepler data have revolutionized many areas of exoplanet research, the relative faintness of most of the host stars in the Kepler field means that atmospheric characterization of these super-Earths with currently available instruments is extremely challenging. However, a handful of transiting super-Earths are within reach of existing facilities. We have pointed both the HST and Spitzer toward these systems in an effort to paint a thorough picture of their atmospheres. Our transmission spectroscopy observations explore the transition region between terrestrial planets and miniature gas giants, and contribute to distinguishing between low-density hydrogen-dominated atmospheres and compact high-metallicity atmospheres. Transmission spectroscopy over a wide wavelength range is also essential to understanding the properties and effects of clouds in these atmospheres. The results of this program will inform the direction to be taken by future multi-wavelength studies of these worlds, in particular those enabled when the HST joins forces with the upcoming JWST.

  16. Biophysical mechanisms of modification of skin optical properties in the UV wavelength range with nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A. P.; Priezzhev, A. V.; Lademann, J.; Myllylae, R.

    2009-05-15

    In this paper, by means of the Mie theory and Monte Carlo simulations we investigate modification of optical properties of the superficial layer of human skin (stratum corneum) for 310- and 400-nm ultraviolet (UV) radiation by embedding of 35-200-nm-sized particles of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and silicon (Si). Problem of skin protection against UV light is of major importance due to increased frequency of skin cancer provoked by excessive doses of accepted UV radiation. For 310-nm light, the optimal sizes of the TiO{sub 2} and Si particles are found to be 62 and 55 nm, respectively, and for 400-nm radiation, 122 and 70 nm, respectively.

  17. Imaging diffraction VLS spectrometer for a wavelength range λ > 120 Å

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnyakov, E. A.; Kolesnikov, A. O.; Kuzin, A. A.; Negrov, D. V.; Ragozin, E. N.; Sasorov, P. V.; Shatokhin, A. N.

    2017-02-01

    A broadband stigmatic (imaging) soft X-ray (λ > 120 Å) spectrometer is experimentally realised. The optical configuration of the spectrometer comprises a plane grazing-incidence reflection grating with a spacing varying across its aperture according to a preassigned law [a so-called varied line-space (VLS) grating] and a broadband spherical normal-incidence mirror with an aperiodic Mo/Si multilayer structure. The average plate scale amounts to ∼5.5 Å mm‑1. The radiation is recorded with a matrix CCD detector (2048 × 1024 pixels of size 13 μm). The line spectra of the multiply charged ions LiIII and FV–FVII excited in laser-produced plasma are recorded with a spatial resolution of ∼26 μm and a spectral resolving power R ≈ 500 is experimentally demonstrated.

  18. Dielectric properties of doped titanates of transition metals in the millimeter-wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinkevich, A. B.; Perov, D. V.; Kuznetsov, E. A.; Pakhomov, Ya. A.; Ryabkov, Yu. I.

    2016-06-01

    Dielectric properties of ceramic titanates of nickel, cobalt, and manganese and their isomorphically substituted solid solutions are studied. Iron and magnesium are used as dopants. Original methods for solid-state synthesis of titanates allow variations in the dispersity of products. The structure and phase composition of products are analyzed. Microwave measurements of permittivity are performed in a frequency interval of 12-38 GHz. Real and imaginary parts of the permittivities of titanates are determined.

  19. High quality planar silicon nitride microdisk resonators for integrated photonics in the visible wavelength range.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Ehsan Shah; Yegnanarayanan, Siva; Atabaki, Amir Hossein; Soltani, Mohammad; Adibi, Ali

    2009-08-17

    High quality factor (Q approximately 3.4 x 10(6)) microdisk resonators are demonstrated in a Si(3)N(4) on SiO(2) platform at 652-660 nm with integrated in-plane coupling waveguides. Critical coupling to several radial modes is demonstrated using a rib-like structure with a thin Si(3)N(4) layer at the air-substrate interface to improve the coupling.

  20. Wideband protection filter: single filter for laser damage preventing at wide wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donval, A.; Nemet, B.; Oron, M.; Oron, R.; Shvartzer, R.; Singer, Lea; Reshef, Clara; Eberle, B.; Bürsing, H.; Ebert, R.

    2007-10-01

    We present a passive, solid-state threshold-triggered Wideband Protection Filter (WPF) that blocks the transmission only if the power exceeds a certain threshold. We demonstrate the protection ability of the WPF against laser threats including protection behavior for single and series of pulses. The WPF can be readily used for protection of detectors, cameras, or eye safety.

  1. Optical characteristics of aerosol trioxide dialuminum at the IR wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovskaya, O. K.; Shefer, O. V.; Kashirskii, D. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a numerical study of the transmission function, extinction coefficient, scattering coefficient, and absorption coefficient of the aerosol generated by the jet engine emissions was performed. Analyzing the calculation results of the IR optical characteristics of anthropogenic emissions containing the dialuminum trioxide was carried out. The spectral features of the optical characteristics of the medium caused by the average size, concentration and complex refractive index of the particles were illustrated.

  2. Investigation of the lithium 670.7 nm wavelength range in the solar spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffau, Elisabetta; Mott, Alessandro; Harutyunyan, Gohar; Malherbe, Jean-Marie; Steffen, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Lithium is a key chemical element, with a chemical evolution that is different from that of most other elements. It is also very fragile, as it is destroyed by nuclear reactions with protons at temperatures higher than about 2.5 million K. According to standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis, only the isotope 7Li is produced in significant amounts, while the primordial abundance of the lighter isotope 6Li is negligible. Lithium is not produced by nucleosynthesis in normal stars, except in peculiar phases of stellar evolution (e.g. in AGB stars and Novae). Lithium may also be formed as a result of flares in the atmospheres of young, active stars. To investigate the history of Li production and depletion in the Galaxy, it is necessary to analyse stars of all ages, including those at solar metallicity. In this case, the spectroscopic determination of the Li abundance is complicated by the presence of other spectral lines overlapping with the Li doublet at 670.7 nm. The correct identification and knowledge of the atomic parameters of these blend lines is critical, especially if the 6LI/7Li isotopic ratio is to be derived. In this investigation, we consider several line lists of the blending components available in the literature and use them to compute synthetic spectra, performing the line formation computations both for the classical 1D Holweger-Mueller model and a CO5BOLD 3D hydrodynamical simulation of the solar atmosphere. The synthetic spectra are then compared to the solar spectrum observed at different limb angles. This allows us to check the quality of existing line lists, to find potentially misidentified blend lines, and to construct an optimized line list for solar-type stars.

  3. United States Access Board

    MedlinePlus

    ... disabilities through leadership in accessible design and the development of accessibility guidelines and standards for the built environment, transportation, communication, medical diagnostic equipment, and information technology. ...

  4. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... use requirements for Critical Access Hospitals related to Electronic Health Records (EHRs)? Critical Access Hospital (CAH) are eligible for Electronic Health Record (EHR) incentive payments and can receive ...

  5. Feasibility Demonstration of a Massively Parallelizable Near-Field Sensor for Sub-Wavelength Defect Detection and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafavi, Mahkamehossadat

    To detect and resolve sub-wavelength features at optical frequencies, beyond the diffraction limit, requires sensors that interact with the electromagnetic near-field of those features. Most instruments operating in this modality scan a single detector element across the surface under inspection because the scattered signals from a multiplicity of such elements would end up interfering with each other. However, an alternative massively parallelized configuration, consisting of a remotely interrogating array of dipoles, capable of interrogating multiple adjacent areas of the surface at the same time, was proposed in 2002. In the present work a remotely interrogating slot antenna inside a 60nm silver slab is designed which increases the signal to noise ratio of the original system. The antenna is tuned to resonance at 600nm range by taking advantage of the plasmon resonance properties of the metal's negative permittivity and judicious shaping of the slot element. Full-physics simulations show the capability of detecting an 8nm particle using red light illumination. The sensitivity to the lambda/78 particle is attained by detecting the change induced on the antenna's far field signature by the proximate particle, a change that is 15dB greater than the scattering signature of the particle by itself. To verify the capabilities of this technology in a readily accessible experimental environment, a radiofrequency scale model is designed using a meta-material to mimic the optical properties of silver in the 2GHz to 5GHz range. Various approaches to the replication of the metal's behavior are explored in a trade-off between fidelity to the metal's natural plasmon response, desired bandwidth of the demonstration, and ii manufacturability of the meta-material. The simulation and experimental results successfully verify the capability of the proposed near-field sensor in sub-wavelength detection and imaging not only as a proof of concept for optical frequencies but also as a

  6. Fiber-coupled diode laser modules with wavelengths around 2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkamp, Mark; Wieching, Kristin; Traub, Martin; Boucke, Konstantin

    2007-02-01

    The common wavelength regime for high-power diode laser modules is the range between 800 nm and 1000 nm. However, there are also many applications that demand for a wavelength of around 2 μm. This wavelength range is extremely interesting for applications such as the processing of plastics, medical applications as well as environmental analytics. The interest in lasers with this wavelength is based on the special absorption characteristics of different types of material: Numerous plastics possess an intrinsic absorption around 2 μm, so that the use of additives is no longer necessary. This is of great value especially for medical-technical products, where additives require a separate approval. Furthermore the longer wavelength allows the processing of plastics which are clear and transparent at the visible. In addition, water, which is an essential element of biologic soft tissue, absorbs radiation at the wavelength about 2 μm very efficiently. As radiation of this wavelength can be guided by glass fibers, this wavelength may be very helpful for laser surgery. Currently available lasers at the spectral range about 2 μm are solid-state lasers based on Ho- and Tmdoped crystals. These systems suffer from high purchase costs as well as size and weight. In contrast to this, diode lasers can be built more compact, are much cheaper and more efficient. For this background, GaSb based high-power laser diodes for the wavelength regime of 1.9 - 2.3 μm are developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Solid State Physics (IAF). At the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology (ILT), fiber-coupled laser diode modules based on these laser bars are designed and realized. A first module prototype uses two laser bars with a wavelength of 1.9 μm to provide an output power of approx. 15 W from a 600 μm, NA 0.22 fiber. The module setup as well as the characteristics of the laser bars at 1.9 μm wavelength are described in this paper.

  7. Experimental investigation on supercontinuum generation by single, dual, and triple wavelength pumping in a silica photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weiqing; Xu, Qiang; Li, Xue; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Jigang; Li, Yuan; Chen, Xiangdong; Yuan, Zijun; Liao, Meisong; Cheng, Tonglei; Xue, Xiaojie; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2016-11-20

    We investigate the supercontinuum (SC) generation in an 1 cm long silica photonic crystal fiber (PCF) pumped by the pulse sources with single, dual, and triple wavelengths, respectively. The silica PCF has two zero-dispersion wavelengths at 900 and 2620 nm, respectively. When pumped by a single wavelength, the SC spectral range covers about 1000 nm. When pumped by dual and triple wavelengths, the SC spectral range covers wider than 2000 nm. Both the SC spectral range and the flatness are improved obviously when pumped by triple wavelengths. The maximum SC spectral range is obtained when the silica PCF is pumped by the triple wavelengths at 800, 1450, and 1785 nm. The SC spectral range covers 2810 nm from 350 to 3160 nm wider than three octaves. The 10 dB bandwidth covers 2280 nm from 450 to 2730 nm wider than two octaves. This is the first investigation on comparison of the SCs generated by different pump wavelengths up to three experimentally. The generated SC spectra have covered the full transmission window of silica fiber.

  8. Dual-wavelength laser with topological charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haohai; Xu, Miaomiao; Zhao, Yongguang; Wang, Yicheng; Han, Shuo; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Zhengping; Wang, Jiyang

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrate the simultaneous oscillation of different photons with equal orbital angular momentum in solid-state lasers for the first time to our knowledge. Single tunable Hermite-Gaussian (HG0,n) (0 ≤ n ≤ 7) laser modes with dual wavelength were generated using an isotropic cavity. With a mode-converter, the corresponding Laguerre-Gaussian (LG0,n) laser modes were obtained. The oscillating laser modes have two types of photons at the wavelengths of 1077 and 1081 nm and equal orbital angular momentum of nħ per photon. These results identify the possibility of simultaneous oscillation of different photons with equal and controllable orbital angular momentum. It can be proposed that this laser should have promising applications in many fields based on its compact structure, tunable orbital angular momentum, and simultaneous oscillation of different photons with equal orbital angular momentum.

  9. Multi-Wavelength Observations of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) provide a laboratory for studying various astrophysical processes, including particle acceleration, thermal and non thermal emission processes across the spectrum, distribution of heavy elements, the physics of strong shock waves, and the progenitor systems and environments of supernovae. Long studied in radio and X-rays, the past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the detection and subsequent study of SNRs in the infrared and gamma-ray regimes. Understanding the evolution of SNRs and their interaction with the interstellar medium requires a multi-wavelength approach. I will review the various physical processes observed in SNRs and how these processes are intertwined. In particular, I will focus on X-ray and infrared observations, which probe two very different but intrinsically connected phases of the ISM: gas and dust. I will discuss results from multi-wavelength studies of several SNRs at various stages of evolution, including Kepler, RCW 86, and the Cygnus Loop.

  10. Coordinated observations of PHEMU at radio wavelengths.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluchino, S.; Schillirò, F.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.; Kraus, A.; Mack, K.-H.

    We present preliminary results for our study of mutual phenomena of the Galilean satellites performed at radio wavelengths with the Medicina and Noto antennas of the Istituto di Radioastronomia \\textendash{} INAF, and with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope of the Max-Planck-Institute for Radioastronomy. Measurements of the radio flux density variation occurred during the mutual occultations of Io by Europa and Ganymede were carried out during the PHEMU09 campaign at K- and Q-band. Flux density variations observed for the first time at radio wavelengths are consistent with the typical optical patterns measured when partial occultations occurred. The flux density drops indicate a non-linear dependence with the percentage of overlapped area.

  11. Sinusoidal nonlinearity in wavelength-sweeping interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, Luc; Pfeiffer, Pierre

    2007-11-20

    We report the influence of the nonlinearities in the wavelength-sweeping speed on the resulting interferometric signals in an absolute distance interferometer. The sweeping signal is launched in the reference and target interferometers from an external cavity laser source. The experimental results demonstrate a good resolution in spite of the presence of nonlinearities in the wavelength sweep. These nonlinearities can be modeled by a sum of sinusoids. A simulation is then implemented to analyze the influence of their parameters. It shows that a sinusoidal nonlinearity is robust enough to give a good final measurement uncertainty through a Fourier transform technique. It can be concluded that an optimal value of frequency and amplitude exists in the case of a sinusoidal nonlinearity.

  12. Separability of agricultural cover types in spectral channels and wavelength regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R.

    1977-01-01

    Spectral channels and wavelength regions (visible, near infrared, middle infrared and thermal infrared) were evaluated with respect to their estimated probability of correct classification (Pc) in discriminating agricultural cover types. Multispectral scanner data in twelve spectral channels in the wavelength range of 0.4 to 11.7 microns acquired in the middle of July for three flightlines, were analyzed by applying automatic pattern recognition techniques. The same analysis was performed for the data acquired in the middle of August, 1971, over the same three flightlines, to investigate the effect of time on the results. The effect of deletion of each spectral channel as well as each wavelength region on Pc is given. Values of Pc for all possible combinations of wavelength regions in the subsets of one to twelve spectral channels are also given. The overall values of Pc were found to be greater for the data of the middle of August than the data of the middle of July.

  13. Development and operation of a high-throughput accurate-wavelength lens-based spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Ronald E.

    2014-11-15

    A high-throughput spectrometer for the 400–820 nm wavelength range has been developed for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy or general spectroscopy. A large 2160 mm{sup −1} grating is matched with fast f/1.8 200 mm lenses, which provide stigmatic imaging. A precision optical encoder measures the grating angle with an accuracy ≤0.075 arc sec. A high quantum efficiency low-etaloning CCD detector allows operation at longer wavelengths. A patch panel allows input fibers to interface with interchangeable fiber holders that attach to a kinematic mount at the entrance slit. Computer-controlled hardware allows automated control of wavelength, timing, f-number, automated data collection, and wavelength calibration.

  14. Development and operation of a high-throughput accurate-wavelength lens-based spectrometera)

    DOE PAGES

    Bell, Ronald E.

    2014-07-11

    A high-throughput spectrometer for the 400-820 nm wavelength range has been developed for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy or general spectroscopy. A large 2160 mm-1 grating is matched with fast f /1.8 200 mm lenses, which provide stigmatic imaging. A precision optical encoder measures the grating angle with an accuracy ≤ 0.075 arc seconds. A high quantum efficiency low-etaloning CCD detector allows operation at longer wavelengths. A patch panel allows input fibers to interface with interchangeable fiber holders that attach to a kinematic mount behind the entrance slit. The computer-controlled hardware allows automated control of wavelength, timing, f-number, automated data collection,more » and wavelength calibration.« less

  15. Wavelength-tunable colloidal quantum dot laser on ultra-thin flexible glass

    SciTech Connect

    Foucher, C.; Guilhabert, B.; Laurand, N.; Dawson, M. D.

    2014-04-07

    A mechanically flexible and wavelength-tunable laser with an ultra-thin glass membrane as substrate is demonstrated. The optically pumped hybrid device has a distributed feedback cavity that combines a colloidal quantum dot gain film with a grating-patterned polymeric underlayer, all on a 30-μm thick glass sheet. The total thickness of the structure is only 75 μm. The hybrid laser has an average threshold fluence of 450 ± 80 μJ/cm{sup 2} (for 5-ns excitation pulses) at an emitting wavelength of 607 nm. Mechanically bending the thin-glass substrate enables continuous tuning of the laser emission wavelength over an 18-nm range, from 600 nm to 618 nm. The correlation between the wavelength tunability and the mechanical properties of the thin laser structure is verified theoretically and experimentally.

  16. Reference Ultraviolet Wavelengths of Cr III Measured by Fourier Transform Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smillie, D.G.; Pickering, J.C.; Smith, P.L.

    2008-01-01

    We report Cr III ultraviolet (UV) transition wavelengths measured using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), for the first time, available for use as wavelength standards. The doubly ionized iron group element spectra dominate the observed opacity of hot B stars in the UV, and improved, accurate, wavelengths are required for the analysis of astronomical spectra. The spectrum was excited using a chromium-neon Penning discharge lamp and measured with the Imperial College vacuum ultraviolet FTS. 140 classified 3d(exp 3)4s- 3d(exp 3)4p Cr III transition lines, in the spectral range 38,000 to 49,000 cm(exp -1) (2632 to 2041 A), the strongest having wavelength uncertainties less than one part in 10(exp 7), are presented.

  17. Analysis of wavelength error in spectral phase shifting of digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jie; Zhang, Xiangchao; Zhang, Xiaolei; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Min

    2016-10-01

    Digital holographic microscopy is an attractive technology of precision measurement. Phase shifting is required to correctly reconstruct the measured surfaces from interferograms. Spectral phase shifting scheme, as an alternative approach of phase shifting, has drawn intensive attention in recent years. However, the wavelength modulated by the acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) is not sufficiently precise. As a consequence, severe measurement errors will be caused. In this paper, an iterative calibration algorithm is proposed. It estimates the unknown wavelength errors in the 3-step spectral phase shifting interferometry and then reconstructs the complex object wave. The actual wavelength is obtained by minimizing the difference between the measured and calculated intensities. Numerical examples have demonstrated that this algorithm can achieve very high accuracy over a wide range of wavelengths.

  18. Development and Operation of High-throughput Accurate-wavelength Lens-based Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Ronald E

    2014-07-01

    A high-throughput spectrometer for the 400-820 nm wavelength range has been developed for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy or general spectroscopy. A large 2160 mm-1 grating is matched with fast f /1.8 200 mm lenses, which provide stigmatic imaging. A precision optical encoder measures the grating angle with an accuracy < 0.075 arc seconds. A high quantum efficiency low-etaloning CCD detector allows operation at longer wavelengths. A patch panel allows input fibers to interface with interchangeable fiber holders that attach to a kinematic mount behind the entrance slit. Computer-controlled hardware allows automated control of wavelength, timing, f-number, automated data collection, and wavelength calibration.

  19. Narrow band wavelength selective filter using grating assisted single ring resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhathan, P. Murukeshan, V. M.

    2014-09-15

    This paper illustrates a filter configuration which uses a single ring resonator of larger radius connected to a grating resonator at its drop port to achieve single wavelength selectivity and switching property with spectral features suitable for on-chip wavelength selection applications. The proposed configuration is expected to find applications in silicon photonics devices such as, on-chip external cavity lasers and multi analytic label-free biosensors. The grating resonator has been designed for a high Q-factor, high transmittivity, and minimum loss so that the wavelength selectivity of the device is improved. The proof-of-concept device has been demonstrated on a Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) platform through electron beam lithography and Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) process. The transmission spectrum shows narrow band single wavelength selection and switching property with a high Free Spectral Range (FSR) ∼60 nm and side band rejection ratio >15 dB.

  20. Human wavelength discrimination of monochromatic light explained by optimal wavelength decoding of light of unknown intensity.

    PubMed

    Zhaoping, Li; Geisler, Wilson S; May, Keith A

    2011-01-01

    We show that human ability to discriminate the wavelength of monochromatic light can be understood as maximum likelihood decoding of the cone absorptions, with a signal processing efficiency that is independent of the wavelength. This work is built on the framework of ideal observer analysis of visual discrimination used in many previous works. A distinctive aspect of our work is that we highlight a perceptual confound that observers should confuse a change in input light wavelength with a change in input intensity. Hence a simple ideal observer model which assumes that an observer has a full knowledge of input intensity should over-estimate human ability in discriminating wavelengths of two inputs of unequal intensity. This confound also makes it difficult to consistently measure human ability in wavelength discrimination by asking observers to distinguish two input colors while matching their brightness. We argue that the best experimental method for reliable measurement of discrimination thresholds is the one of Pokorny and Smith, in which observers only need to distinguish two inputs, regardless of whether they differ in hue or brightness. We mathematically formulate wavelength discrimination under this wavelength-intensity confound and show a good agreement between our theoretical prediction and the behavioral data. Our analysis explains why the discrimination threshold varies with the input wavelength, and shows how sensitively the threshold depends on the relative densities of the three types of cones in the retina (and in particular predict discriminations in dichromats). Our mathematical formulation and solution can be applied to general problems of sensory discrimination when there is a perceptual confound from other sensory feature dimensions.

  1. Tuning the Activation Wavelength of Photochromic Oxazines.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Subramani; Garcia-Amorós, Jaume; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; Nonell, Santi; Captain, Burjor; Raymo, Françisco M

    2016-06-17

    The activation wavelength of a photochromic oxazine can be shifted bathochromically with the introduction of a methoxy substituent on the chromophore responsible for initiating the photochemical transformation. This structural modification permits switching under mild illumination conditions, enhances the photoisomerization quantum yield and ensures outstanding fatigue resistance. Thus, these results can guide the design of new members of this family of photoresponsive molecular switches with improved photochemical and photophysical properties.

  2. Intrinsic Wavelength Shifts in Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravins, D.; Lindegren, L.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Madsen, S.

    2004-12-01

    Wavelengths of stellar spectral lines do not have the precise values `naively' expected from laboratory wavelengths merely Doppler-shifted by stellar radial motion. Slight displacements may originate as convective shifts (correlated velocity and brightness patterns in the photosphere), as gravitational redshifts, or perhaps be induced by wave motions. Intrinsic lineshifts thus reveal stellar surface structure, while possible periodic changes (during a stellar activity cycle, say) need to be segregated from variability induced by orbiting exoplanets. Absolute lineshifts can now be studied also in some stars other than the Sun, thanks to astrometric determinations of stellar radial motion. Comparisons between spectroscopic apparent radial velocities and astrometrically determined radial motions reveal greater spectral blueshifts in F-type stars than in the Sun (as theoretically expected from their more vigorous convection), further increasing in A-type stars (possibly due to atmospheric shockwaves). Solar spectral atlases, and high-resolution spectra (from UVES on ESO VLT) of a dozen solar-type stars are being surveyed for `unblended' photospheric lines of most atomic species with accurate laboratory wavelengths available. One aim is to understand the ultimate information content of stellar spectra, and in what detail it will be feasible to verify models of stellar atmospheric hydrodynamics. These may predict line asymmetries (bisectors) and shifts for widely different classes of lines, but there will not result any comparison with observations if such lines do not exist in real spectra. An expected near-future development in stellar physics is spatially resolved spectroscopy across stellar disks, enabled by optical interferometry and adaptive optics on very large telescopes. Stellar surface structure manifests itself in the center-to-limb wavelength changes along a stellar diameter, and their spatially resolved time variability, diagnostics which already now can be

  3. Deformable mirror for short wavelength applications

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    1999-01-01

    A deformable mirror compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation that can be precisely controlled to nanometer and subnanometer accuracy is described. Actuators are coupled between a reaction plate and a face plate which has a reflective coating. A control system adjusts the voltage supplied to the actuators; by coordinating the voltages supplied to the actuators, the reflective surface of the mirror can be deformed to correct for dimensional errors in the mirror or to produce a desired contour.

  4. Varactor diodes for millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Brian J.; Hesler, Jeffrey L.; Dossal, Hasan; Crowe, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    Whisker-contacted GaAs Schottky barrier varactor diodes are the most common high-frequency multiplier element in use today. They are inherently simple devices that have very high frequency response and have been used to supply local oscillator power for Schottky heterodyne receivers to frequencies approaching 700 GHz. This paper discusses the development of improved varactor diode technology for space based applications at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths.

  5. Short wavelength striations on expanding plasma clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Gary, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    The growth and evolution of short wavelength (

  6. Gas sensing using wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viveiros, D.; Ribeiro, J.; Flores, D.; Ferreira, J.; Frazao, O.; Santos, J. L.; Baptista, J. M.

    2014-08-01

    An experimental setup has been developed for different gas species sensing based on the Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy (WMS) principle. The target is the measurement of ammonia, carbon dioxide and methane concentrations. The WMS is a rather sensitive technique for detecting atomic/molecular species presenting the advantage that it can be used in the near-infrared region using optical telecommunications technology. In this technique, the laser wavelength and intensity are modulated applying a sine wave signal through the injection current, which allows the shift of the detection bandwidth to higher frequencies where laser intensity noise is reduced. The wavelength modulated laser light is tuned to the absorption line of the target gas and the absorption information can be retrieved by means of synchronous detection using a lock-in amplifier, where the amplitude of the second harmonic of the laser modulation frequency is proportional to the gas concentration. The amplitude of the second harmonic is normalised by the average laser intensity and detector gain through a LabVIEW® application, where the main advantage of normalising is that the effects of laser output power fluctuations and any variations in laser transmission, or optical-electrical detector gain are eliminated. Two types of sensing heads based on free space light propagation with different optical path length were used, permitting redundancy operation and technology validation.

  7. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focusing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points. 3 figs.

  8. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, Peter A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focussing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points.

  9. Wavelength switching in an optical klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, K.W.; Smith, T.I.

    1995-12-31

    A symmetric optical klystron consists of two identical undulator sections separated a dispersive section. For a device of a given length, an optical klystron is capable of producing much more bunching, and therefore more gain, than a traditional undulator. Another consequence of introducing dispersion between two undulator sections is that the overall spontaneous radiation pattern results from the interference between the two undulator sections, and as such resembles a standard undulator radiation pattern modulated by a sinusoidal interference term. The presence of several wavelength peaks in the spontaneous lineshape implies an equal number of peaks in the gain spectrum. If the strength of the dispersion section is adjusted to provide nearly equal gain on the two largest of these peaks, then they will compete, and the FEL may switch wavelengths based on noise, cavity length, or other perturbations. We provide the first observations of this behavior, using the FIREFLY system at the Stanford Picosecond FEL Center. In FIREFLY, relative wavelength switching by more than 3%--more than twice the laser linewidth-has been observed by varying dispersion section strength, while at intermediate points stable switching has also been observed as a function of cavity length.

  10. Physical design of a wavelength tunable fully coherent VUV source using a self-seeding free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He-Ting; Jia, Qi-Ka

    2014-05-01

    In order to meet the requirements of the synchrotron radiation users, a fully coherent VUV free electron laser (FEL) has been preliminarily designed. One important goal of this design is that the radiation wavelength can be easily tuned in a broad range (70-170 nm). In the light of the users' demand and our actual conditions, the self-seeding scheme is adopted for this proposal. Firstly, we attempted to fix the electron energy and only changed the undulator gap to vary the radiation wavelength; however, our analysis implies that this is difficult because of the great difference of the power gain length and FEL efficiency at different wavelengths. Therefore, we have considered dividing the wavelength range into three subareas. In each subarea, a constant electron energy is used and the wavelength tuning is realized only by adjusting the undulator gap. The simulation results show that this scheme has an acceptable performance.

  11. Broadly tunable dual-wavelength erbium-doped ring fiber laser based on a high-birefringence fiber loop mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H. B.; Liu, X. M.; Gong, Y. K.; Li, X. H.; Wang, L. R.

    2010-02-01

    A broadly tunable dual-wavelength erbium-doped ring fiber laser based on a high-birefringence fiber loop mirror (HiBi-FLM) and a polarization controller is demonstrated experimentally. The measured transmission spectrum of HiBi-FLM covers a wide range from 1525 to 1575 nm. The wavelength of proposed laser can be flexibly tunable during this range of ˜50 nm by adjusting the polarization controller. In addition, the spacing of two wavelengths is adjustable by changing the length of HiBi fiber. The dual-wavelength lasers with the HiBi fiber length of 1 and 2 m are experimentally demonstrated and compared. The experimental results show that the proposed laser can stably operate on two wavelengths simultaneously at room temperature, and the output peak power variation is about 0.5 dB during 40 min.

  12. Small Satellite Access of the Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horan, Stephen; Minnix, Timothy O.; Vigil, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    Small satellites have been perceived as having limited access to NASA's Space Network (SN). The potential for satellite access of the space network when the design utilizes a fixed antenna configuration and low-power, coded transmission is analyzed. From the analysis, satellites using this configuration in high-inclination orbits are shown to have a daily data throughput in the 100 to 1000 Mbit range using the multiple access communications service.

  13. A Theory of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribot, Jesse C.; Peluso, Nancy Lee

    2003-01-01

    The term "access" is frequently used by property and natural resource analysts without adequate definition. In this paper we develop a concept of access and examine a broad set of factors that differentiate access from property. We define access as "the "ability" to derive benefits from things," broadening from property's classical definition as…

  14. Wavelength Calibration of the VLT-UVES Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Jonathan B.; Murphy, Michael T.; Griest, Kim

    2010-11-01

    We attempt to measure possible miscalibration of the wavelength scale of the VLT-UVES spectrograph. We take spectra of QSO HE0515-4414 through the UVES iodine cell which contains thousands of well-calibrated iodine lines and compare these lines to the wavelength scale from the standard thorium-argon pipeline calibration. Analyzing three exposures of this z = 1.71 QSO, we find two distinct types of calibration shifts needed to correct the Th/Ar wavelength scale. First, there is an overall average velocity shift of between 100 m s-1 and 500 m s-1 depending upon the exposure. Second, within a given exposure, we find intra-order velocity distortions of 100 m s-1 up to more than 200 m s-1. These calibration errors are similar to, but smaller than, those found earlier in the Keck HIRES spectrometer. We discuss the possible origins of these two types of miscalibration. We also explore the implications of these calibration errors on the systematic error in measurements of Δ α \\over α, the change in the fine-structure constant derived from measurement of the relative redshifts of absorption lines in QSO absorption systems. The overall average, exposure-dependent shifts should be less relevant for fine-structure work, but the intra-order shifts have the potential to affect these results. Using either our measured calibration offsets or a Gaussian model with sigma of around 90 m s-1, Monte Carlo mock experiments find errors in Δ α \\over α of between 1 × 10-6 N -1/2 sys and 3 × 10-6 N -1/2 sys, where N sys is the number of systems used and the range is due to dependence on how many metallic absorption lines in each system are compared.

  15. Objective identification of informative wavelength regions in galaxy spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Ching-Wa; Szalay, Alexander S.; Budavári, Tamás; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Mahoney, Michael W.; Csabai, István; Dobos, Laszlo E-mail: szalay@jhu.edu

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the diversity in spectra is the key to determining the physical parameters of galaxies. The optical spectra of galaxies are highly convoluted with continuum and lines that are potentially sensitive to different physical parameters. Defining the wavelength regions of interest is therefore an important question. In this work, we identify informative wavelength regions in a single-burst stellar population model using the CUR Matrix Decomposition. Simulating the Lick/IDS spectrograph configuration, we recover the widely used D {sub n}(4000), Hβ, and Hδ {sub A} to be most informative. Simulating the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrograph configuration with a wavelength range 3450-8350 Å and a model-limited spectral resolution of 3 Å, the most informative regions are: first region—the 4000 Å break and the Hδ line; second region—the Fe-like indices; third region—the Hβ line; and fourth region—the G band and the Hγ line. A principal component analysis on the first region shows that the first eigenspectrum tells primarily the stellar age, the second eigenspectrum is related to the age-metallicity degeneracy, and the third eigenspectrum shows an anti-correlation between the strengths of the Balmer and the Ca K and H absorptions. The regions can be used to determine the stellar age and metallicity in early-type galaxies that have solar abundance ratios, no dust, and a single-burst star formation history. The region identification method can be applied to any set of spectra of the user's interest, so that we eliminate the need for a common, fixed-resolution index system. We discuss future directions in extending the current analysis to late-type galaxies. ASCII formatted tables of the regional eigenspectra are available.

  16. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Paris, Robert D.; Feldman, Mark

    1993-01-01

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  17. Wavelength meter having single mode fiber optics multiplexed inputs

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Paris, R.D.; Feldman, M.

    1993-02-23

    A wavelength meter having a single mode fiber optics input is disclosed. The single mode fiber enables a plurality of laser beams to be multiplexed to form a multiplexed input to the wavelength meter. The wavelength meter can provide a determination of the wavelength of any one or all of the plurality of laser beams by suitable processing. Another aspect of the present invention is that one of the laser beams could be a known reference laser having a predetermined wavelength. Hence, the improved wavelength meter can provide an on-line calibration capability with the reference laser input as one of the plurality of laser beams.

  18. CBET Experiments with Wavelength Shifting at the Nike Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, James; McKenty, P.; Bates, J.; Myatt, J.; Shaw, J.; Obenschain, K.; Oh, J.; Kehne, D.; Obenschain, S.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Tsung, F.; Schmitt, A. J.; Serlin, V.

    2016-10-01

    Studies conducted at NRL during 2015 searched for cross-beam energy transport (CBET) in small-scale plastic targets with strong gradients in planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries. The targets were irradiated by two widely separated beam arrays in a geometry similar to polar direct drive. Data from these shots will be presented that show a lack of a clear CBET signature even with wavelength shifting of one set of beams. This poster will discuss the next campaign being planned, in part, with modelling codes developed at LLE. The next experiments will use a target configuration optimized to create stronger SBS growth. The primary path under consideration is to increase scale lengths 5-10x over the previous study by using exploding foils or low density foams. In addition to simulations, the presentation will also discuss improvements to the diagnostic suite and laser operations; for example, a new set of etalons will be available for the next campaign that should double the range of wavelength shifting between the two beam arrays. Work supported by DoE/NNSA.

  19. Wavelength and energy dependent absorption of unconventional fuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, N.; Saleem, Z.; Mirza, A. A.

    2005-11-01

    Economic considerations of laser induced ignition over the normal electrical ignition of direct injected Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) engines has motivated automobile industry to go for extensive research on basic characteristics of leaner unconventional fuel mixtures to evaluate practical possibility of switching over to the emerging technologies. This paper briefly reviews the ongoing research activities on minimum ignition energy and power requirements of natural gas fuels and reports results of present laser air/CNG mixture absorption coefficient study. This study was arranged to determine the thermo-optical characteristics of high air/fuel ratio mixtures using laser techniques. We measured the absorption coefficient using four lasers of multiple wavelengths over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. The absorption coefficient of mixture was found to vary significantly over change of mixture temperature and probe laser wavelengths. The absorption coefficients of air/CNG mixtures were measured using 20 watts CW/pulsed CO2 laser at 10.6μm, Pulsed Nd:Yag laser at 1.06μm, 532 nm (2nd harmonic) and 4 mW CW HeNe laser at 645 nm and 580 nm for temperatures varying from 290 to 1000K using optical transmission loss technique.

  20. Magnetism Matters: Coronal Magnetometry Using Multi-Wavelength Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Sarah E.

    2015-08-01

    The solar coronal magnetic field is key both to solving fundamental problems in solar physics such as coronal heating and solar wind acceleration, and to predicting the internal magnetic structure and thus space-weather impact of coronal mass ejections. I will describe the current state of the art in coronal magnetometry, and present results from the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) at Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO), which since 2011 has taken polarimetric observations of the solar corona in the near-infrared on a near-daily basis. I will discuss work in progress that utilizes forward modeling to synthesize polarimetric data at multiple heights and vantage points, and at wavelengths from radio to infrared to visible to ultraviolet. The goal is to use such synthetic testbeds to determine the ideal set of observations for constraining the coronal magnetic field, and to establish a Data-Optimized Coronal Field Model (DOC-FM) that efficiently incorporates these data into global magnetic models. This work will provide essential tools and motivation for the planning and implementation of future coronal polarimetric projects and missions spanning a broad range of wavelengths.

  1. Complex refractive index of Martian dust - Wavelength dependence and composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, K.; Ajello, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    The size distribution and complex refractive index of Martian dust-cloud particles observed in 1971 with the Mariner 9 UV spectrometer are determined by matching the observed single-scattering albedo and phase function with Mie-scattering calculations for size distributions of spheres. Values of phase function times single-scattering albedo are presented for 12 wavelength intervals in the range from 190 to 350 nm, and best-fit values are obtained for the absorption index. It is found that the absorption index of the dust particles increases with decreasing wavelength from 350 to about 210 nm and then drops off shortward of 210 nm, with a structural shoulder occurring in the absorption spectrum between 240 and 250 nm. A search for a candidate material that can explain the strong UV absorption yields TiO2, whose anatase polymorph has an absorption spectrum matching that of the Martian dust. The TiO2 content of the dust particles is estimated to be a few percent or less.

  2. Two-dimensional wavelength demultiplexing employing multilevel arrayed waveguides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianyi; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Minghua; Wang, Yuelin

    2004-03-22

    Two-dimensional (2D) optical wavelength demultiplexing is demonstrated by employing multilevel arrayed waveguides as a 2D diffraction grating, named the 2D arrayed waveguide grating (2D-AWG). Since the monochromatic lightwave is diffracted by the 2D-AWG to a series of periodic spots with 2D diffraction orders in both x and y directions while the dispersion direction is never parallel to the x or y direction, we can obtain 2D wavelength demultiplexing exploiting diffraction orders of either the x or y direction. One of the two dispersion components is designed much larger than the other, and the correspondent spatial free spectral range component is set properly to ensure high diffraction efficiency. The input and output ports can also be designed based on the multilevel lightwave circuit (MLC), and their level planes can be tuned parallel to that of the MLC-based 2D-AWG, which makes it feasible to integrate the 2D-AWG with the input port and/or the output port. It provides a promising way to realize large-scale and high-density optical multiplexers/demultiplexers.

  3. Dark matter indirect searches: Multi-wavelength and anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Shin'ichiro

    2016-05-01

    If dark matter is made of particles governed by weak-scale physics, they may annihilate or decay to leave observable signatures in high-energy gamma-ray sky. In addition, any charged particles produced by the same process will also give low-frequency photons through successive electromagnetic interactions. Plenty of data from modern astrophysical measurements of various wavelengths, especially gamma rays, enabled new analysis techniques to search for these dark matter signatures with an unprecedented sensitivities. Since it is very likely that signatures of dark matter annihilation or decay is hidden in the gamma-ray data, one should fully utilize all available data including: (1) energy spectrum of all wavelengths ranging from radio to very-high-energy gamma rays; (2) spatial clustering probed with the angular power spectrum of the gamma-ray background; (3) cross correlation between the gamma-ray distribution with nearby galaxy catalogs; and (4) gamma-ray-flux distribution. I will review recent theoretical and observational developments in all these aspects, and discuss prospects for the future towards discovery of dark matter as an elementary particle in physics beyond the standard model.

  4. Two wavelength division multiplexing WAN trials

    SciTech Connect

    Lennon, W.J.; Thombley, R.L.

    1995-01-20

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as a super-user, supercomputer, and super-application site, is anticipating the future bandwidth and protocol requirements necessary to connect to other such sites as well as to connect to remote-sited control centers and experiments. In this paper the authors discuss their vision of the future of Wide Area Networking, describe the plans for a wavelength division multiplexed link connecting Livermore with the University of California at Berkeley and describe plans for a transparent, {approx} 10 Gb/s ring around San Francisco Bay.

  5. Bibliography of Short Wavelength Chemical Laser Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    shock tube dissociation of fluorine azide, (2) identify and characterize alternatives to BiF as the lasant in an excited NF driven laser , (3) develop...L.F. Phillips KINETICS OF 12 FOLLOWING ArF LASER EXCITATION: THERMAL DISSOCIATION OF THE A’(2u) STATE J. Phys. Chem., 88, 6084 (1984) 267. Tellinghuisen...VISIBLE WAVELENGTH CHEMICAL LASER SCHEMES BASED ON THERMAL DISSOCIATION OF CHLORINE AZIDE Proc. Int. Conf on.LASERS 󈨟, Eds. F.J. Duarte and D.G. Harris

  6. Wavelength de-multiplexing metasurface hologram

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Quan, Baogang; He, Jingwen; Xie, Zhenwei; Wang, Xinke; Li, Junjie; Kan, Qiang; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    A wavelength de-multiplexing metasurface hologram composed of subwavelength metallic antennas is designed and demonstrated experimentally in the terahertz (THz) regime. Different character patterns are generated at the separated working frequencies 0.50 THz and 0.63 THz which determine a narrow frequency bandwidth of 130 GHz. The two working frequencies are around the central resonance frequency of the antennas where antennas behave strong wavefront modulation. Each antenna is fully utilized to control the wavefront of the metasurface at different frequencies by an optimization algorithm. The results demonstrate a candidate way to design multi-colors optical display elements. PMID:27752118

  7. Multi-wavelength applications of gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadely, Ross

    2010-12-01

    Using an array of multi-wavelength data, we examine a variety of astrophysical problems with gravitational lensing. First, we seek to understand the mass distribution of an early-type galaxy with an analysis of the lens Q0957+561. We dissect the lens galaxy into luminous and dark components, and model the environment using results from weak lensing. Combining constraints from newly-discovered lensed images and stellar population models, we find the lens has a density profile which is shallower than isothermal, unlike those of typical early-type galaxies. Finally, using the measured time delay between the quasar images we find the Hubble constant to be H 0 = 79.3+6.7-8.5 km s-1 Mpc-1 . One intriguing application of lensing is to exploit the lens magnification boost to study high-redshift objects in greater detail than otherwise possible. Here, we analyze the mid-infrared properties of two lensed z ˜ 2 star-forming galaxies, SDSS J120602.09+514229.5 and SDSS J090122.37+181432.3, using Spitzer /IRS spectra to study their rest-frame ˜ 5-12 μm emission. Both systems exhibit strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features in the spectra, indicating strong star formation and the absence of significant AGN activity. For SDSS J090122.37+181432.3, this detection belies that inferred from optical measurements, indicating mid-IR spectroscopy provides key information needed to understand the properties of high-redshift star-forming galaxies. While lensing provides measurements of the macroscopic properties of lens systems, it can also shed light on small-scale structure of galaxies. To identify and understand lens substructure, we examine the multi-wavelength properties of flux ratios for six lenses. Variations of the flux ratios with wavelength can be used to study the lensed quasars and the small-scale mass distribution of lens galaxies. We detect strong multi-wavelength variations in the lenses HE 0435-1223 and SDSS 0806+2006. For HE 0435-1223, we study its

  8. Imaging Antenna Structure For Submillimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebeiz, G.; Rutledge, D.

    1990-01-01

    Integrated-circuit antenna structure contains two-dimensional array of antennas and antenna reflectors. In receiving mode, each antenna acts as part of detector for one picture element in millimeter- or submillimeter-wavelength imaging radar system. Millimeter-wave imaging system used to view objects through fog, smoke, or smog with resolution intermediate between microwave and visible-light imaging systems. Antenna elements, supports, and reflectors made by integrated-circuit techniques. Structures fabricated on front and back substrates separately. Substrates then joined. Inexpensive way to provide large number of small antenna elements required for imaging, all mounted rigidly in way that does not degrade operation.

  9. A low-temperature external cavity diode laser for broad wavelength tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, William G.; Rosenberg, Jason S.; Hutzler, Nicholas R.; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2016-11-01

    We report on the design and characterization of a low-temperature external cavity diode laser (ECDL) system for broad wavelength tuning. The performance achieved with multiple diode models addresses the scarcity of commercial red laser diodes below 633 nm, which is a wavelength range relevant to the spectroscopy of many molecules and ions. Using a combination of multiple-stage thermoelectric cooling and water cooling, the operating temperature of a laser diode is lowered to -64 °C, more than 85 °C below the ambient temperature. The laser system integrates temperature and diffraction grating feedback tunability for coarse and fine wavelength adjustments, respectively. For two different diode models, single-mode operation is achieved with 38 mW output power at 616.8 nm and 69 mW at 622.6 nm, more than 15 nm below their ambient temperature free-running wavelengths. The ECDL design can be used for diodes of any available wavelength, allowing individual diodes to be tuned continuously over tens of nanometers and extending the wavelength coverage of commercial laser diodes.

  10. Sensitivity of blackbody effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature: By genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Ejigu, E. K.; Liedberg, H. G.

    2013-09-11

    A variable-temperature blackbody (VTBB) is used to calibrate an infrared radiation thermometer (pyrometer). The effective emissivity (ε{sub eff}) of a VTBB is dependent on temperature and wavelength other than the geometry of the VTBB. In the calibration process the effective emissivity is often assumed to be constant within the wavelength and temperature range. There are practical situations where the sensitivity of the effective emissivity needs to be known and correction has to be applied. We present a method using a genetic algorithm to investigate the sensitivity of the effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature variation. Two matlab® programs are generated: the first to model the radiance temperature calculation and the second to connect the model to the genetic algorithm optimization toolbox. The effective emissivity parameter is taken as a chromosome and optimized at each wavelength and temperature point. The difference between the contact temperature (reading from a platinum resistance thermometer or liquid in glass thermometer) and radiance temperature (calculated from the ε{sub eff} values) is used as an objective function where merit values are calculated and best fit ε{sub eff} values selected. The best fit ε{sub eff} values obtained as a solution show how sensitive they are to temperature and wavelength parameter variation. Uncertainty components that arise from wavelength and temperature variation are determined based on the sensitivity analysis. Numerical examples are considered for illustration.

  11. World Wide Access: Accessible Web Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper considers the application of "universal design" principles to Web page design in order to increase accessibility for people with disabilities. Suggestions are based on the World Wide Web Consortium's accessibility initiative, which has proposed guidelines for all Web authors and federal government standards. Seven guidelines for…

  12. Browsing a wealth of millimeter-wavelength doppler spectra data

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson,K.; Luke,E.; Kollias, P.; Remillard, J.; Widener, K.; Jensen, M.

    2010-03-15

    The ARM Climate Research Facility has collected an extensive archive of vertically pointing millimeter wavelength Doppler radar spectra at both 35 and 95 GHz. These data are a rich potential source of detailed microphysical and dynamical cloud and precipitation information. The recording of spectra, which is ongoing, began at the Southern Great Plains site in September of 2003, at the North Slope of Alaska site in April 2004, and at Tropical Western Pacific sites in 2006. Spectra are also being collected during ARM Mobile Facility deployments. The data’s temporal resolution is as high as two seconds, at height intervals of 45 to 90 m. However, the sheer volume of available data can be somewhat daunting to access and search for specific features of interest. Here we present a user interface for spectra browsing, which allows the user to view time-height images of radar moments, select a time or height of interest, and then “drill down” through images of spectrograms to individual Doppler spectra or time- and height-sequences of spectra. Also available are images summarizing spectral characteristics, such as number of spectral peaks, spectral shape information (skewness and kurtosis), moment uncertainty estimates, and hydrometeor vs. clutter identification as produced by the ARM MicroARSCL (Microphysical Active Remote Sensing of Clouds) value-added product. In addition to the access and visualization tools, we are developing a Doppler spectra simulator capable of generating Doppler spectra from liquid, mixed-phase, and solid cloud constituents and precipitation. The Doppler spectra simulator can be used as an interface between explicit microphysics models and Doppler spectra observations from the ARM radars. The plan is to ultimately make the spectra simulator available from within the spectra browser, allowing a user to associate observed spectra with the microphysical conditions capable of producing them.

  13. Access Nets: Modeling Access to Physical Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohardt, Robert; Chang, Bor-Yuh Evan; Sankaranarayanan, Sriram

    Electronic, software-managed mechanisms using, for example, radio-frequency identification (RFID) cards, enable great flexibility in specifying access control policies to physical spaces. For example, access rights may vary based on time of day or could differ in normal versus emergency situations. With such fine-grained control, understanding and reasoning about what a policy permits becomes surprisingly difficult requiring knowledge of permission levels, spatial layout, and time. In this paper, we present a formal modeling framework, called AccessNets, suitable for describing a combination of access permissions, physical spaces, and temporal constraints. Furthermore, we provide evidence that model checking techniques are effective in reasoning about physical access control policies. We describe our results from a tool that uses reachability analysis to validate security policies.

  14. Laser-to-electricity energy converter for short wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.; Yeh, Y. C. M.

    1975-01-01

    Short-wavelength energy converter can be made using Schottky barrier structure. It has wider band gap than p-n junction silicon semiconductors, and thus it has improved response at wavelengths down to and including ultraviolet region.

  15. Dual-wavelength InP quantum dot lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Shutts, S.; Smowton, P. M.; Krysa, A. B.

    2014-06-16

    We have demonstrated a two-section dual-wavelength diode laser incorporating distributed Bragg reflectors, with a peak-wavelength separation of 62.5 nm at 300 K. Each lasing wavelength has a different temperature dependence, providing a difference-tuning of 0.11 nm/K. We discuss the mechanisms governing the light output of the two competing modes and explain how the short wavelength can be relatively insensitive to output changes at the longer wavelength. Starting from an initial condition when the output at both wavelengths are equal, a 500% increase in the long wavelength output causes the short wavelength output to fall by only 6%.

  16. Highly coherent red-shifted dispersive wave generation around 1.3 μm for efficient wavelength conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xia; Bi, Wanjun; Chen, Wei; Xue, Tianfeng; Hu, Lili; Liao, Meisong; Gao, Weiqing

    2015-03-14

    This research investigates the mechanism of the optical dispersive wave (DW) and proposes a scheme that can realize an efficient wavelength conversion. In an elaborately designed photonic crystal fiber, a readily available ytterbium laser operating at ∼1 μm can be transferred to the valuable 1.3 μm wavelength range. A low-order soliton is produced to concentrate the energy of the DW into the target wavelength range and improve the degree of coherence. The input chirp is demonstrated to be a factor that enhances the wavelength conversion efficiency. With a positive initial chirp, 76.6% of the pump energy in the fiber can be transferred into a spectral range between 1.24 and 1.4 μm. With the use of a grating compressor, it is possible to compress the generated coherent DW of several picoseconds into less than 90 fs.

  17. Revised wavelength and spectral response calibrations for AKARI near-infrared grism spectroscopy: Cryogenic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Shunsuke; Nakagawa, Takao; Shirahata, Mai; Isobe, Naoki; Usui, Fumihiko; Ohyama, Youichi; Onaka, Takashi; Yano, Kenichi; Kochi, Chihiro

    2016-04-01

    We perform revised spectral calibrations for the AKARI near-infrared grism to correct quantitatively for the effect of the wavelength-dependent refractive index. The near-infrared grism covering the wavelength range of 2.5-5.0 μm, with a spectral resolving power of 120 at 3.6 μm, is found to be contaminated by second-order light at wavelengths longer than 4.9 μm, which is especially serious for red objects. First, we present the wavelength calibration considering the refractive index of the grism as a function of the wavelength for the first time. We find that the previous solution is positively shifted by up to 0.01 μm compared with the revised wavelengths at 2.5-5.0 μm. In addition, we demonstrate that second-order contamination occurs even with a perfect order-sorting filter owing to the wavelength dependence of the refractive index. Secondly, the spectral responses of the system from the first- and second-order light are simultaneously obtained from two types of standard objects with different colors. The response from the second-order light suggests leakage of the order-sorting filter below 2.5 μm. The relations between the output of the detector and the intensities of the first- and second-order light are formalized by a matrix equation that combines the two orders. The removal of the contaminating second-order light can be achieved by solving the matrix equation. The new calibration extends the available spectral coverage of the grism mode from 4.9 μm up to 5.0 μm. The revision can be used to study spectral features falling in these extended wavelengths, e.g., the carbon monoxide fundamental ro-vibrational absorption within nearby active galactic nuclei.

  18. Retinal injury thresholds for blue wavelength lasers.

    PubMed

    Lund, David J; Stuck, Bruce E; Edsall, Peter

    2006-05-01

    The interaction mechanism leading to laser-induced retinal alteration can be thermal or non-thermal, depending upon the wavelength of the laser radiation and the duration of the exposure. To investigate the effect of exposure duration on the interaction mechanism, retinal injury thresholds in the rhesus monkey were experimentally measured for exposure to laser radiation at wavelengths of 441.6, 457.9, 476.5, and 496.5 nm. Exposure durations were 0.1, 1, 5, 16, and 100 s; and 1/e retinal irradiance diameters were 50, 125, and 327 microm. Tissue response was observed via ophthalmoscope 1 h and 48 h post exposure. Thermal and non-thermal damage thresholds were obtained depending upon the exposure duration. These threshold data are in agreement with data previously reported in the literature for 100-s duration exposures, but differences were noted for shorter exposures. The current study yielded an estimated injury threshold for 1-s duration, 327-microm retinal irradiance diameter exposures at 441.6 nm, which is an order of magnitude higher than that previously reported. This study provides evidence that laser-induced retinal damage is primarily induced via thermal mechanisms for exposures shorter than 5 s in duration. Arguments are presented that support an amendment of the thermal hazard function, R(lambda).

  19. Long-Wavelength Instability in Marangoni Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanHook, Stephen J.; Schatz, Michael F.; Swift, Jack B.; McCormick, W. D.; Swinney, Harry L.

    1996-01-01

    Our experiments in thin liquid layers (approximately 0.1 mm thick) heated from below reveal a well-defined long-wavelength instability: at a critical temperature difference across the layer, the depth of the layer in the center of the cell spontaneously decreases until the liquid-air interface ruptures and a dry spot forms. The onset of this critical instability occurs at a temperature difference across the liquid layer that is 35% smaller than that predicted in earlier theoretical studies of a single layer model. Our analysis of a two-layer model yields predictions in accord with the observations for liquid layer depths greater than or equal to 0.15 mm, but for smaller depths there is an increasing difference between our predictions and observations (the difference is 25% for a layer 0.06 mm thick). In microgravity environments the long-wavelength instability observed in our terrestrial experiments is expected to replace cellular convection as the primary instability in thick as well as thin liquid layers heated quasistatically from below.

  20. SHORT-WAVELENGTH MAGNETIC BUOYANCY INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Mizerski, K. A.; Davies, C. R.; Hughes, D. W. E-mail: tina@maths.leeds.ac.uk

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic buoyancy instability plays an important role in the evolution of astrophysical magnetic fields. Here we revisit the problem introduced by Gilman of the short-wavelength linear stability of a plane layer of compressible isothermal fluid permeated by a horizontal magnetic field of strength decreasing with height. Dissipation of momentum and magnetic field is neglected. By the use of a Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation analysis, we explain in detail the limit in which the transverse horizontal wavenumber of the perturbation, denoted by k, is large (i.e., short horizontal wavelength) and show that the fastest growing perturbations become localized in the vertical direction as k is increased. The growth rates are determined by a function of the vertical coordinate z since, in the large k limit, the eigenmodes are strongly localized in the vertical direction. We consider in detail the case of two-dimensional perturbations varying in the directions perpendicular to the magnetic field, which, for sufficiently strong field gradients, are the most unstable. The results of our analysis are backed up by comparison with a series of initial value problems. Finally, we extend the analysis to three-dimensional perturbations.

  1. Multistage WDM access architecture employing cascaded AWGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nahal, F. I.; Mears, R. J.

    2009-03-01

    Here we propose passive/active arrayed waveguide gratings (AWGs) with enhanced performance for system applications mainly in novel access architectures employing cascaded AWG technology. Two technologies were considered to achieve space wavelength switching in these networks. Firstly, a passive AWG with semiconductor optical amplifiers array, and secondly, an active AWG. Active AWG is an AWG with an array of phase modulators on its arrayed-waveguides section, where a programmable linear phase-profile or a phase hologram is applied across the arrayed-waveguide section. This results in a wavelength shift at the output section of the AWG. These architectures can address up to 6912 customers employing only 24 wavelengths, coarsely separated by 1.6 nm. Simulation results obtained here demonstrate that cascaded AWGs access architectures have a great potential in future local area networks. Furthermore, they indicate for the first time that active AWGs architectures are more efficient in routing signals to the destination optical network units than passive AWG architectures.

  2. Additive-Subtractive Two-Wavelength ESPI Contouring by Using a Synthetic Wavelength Phase Shift.

    PubMed

    Hack, E; Frei, B; Kästle, R; Sennhauser, U

    1998-05-01

    The addition correlation of two speckle fields by simultaneousillumination at different wavelengths is used for object contouring ina Twyman-Green-type interferometer. Fringe visibility is enhancedwhen the stochastic speckle background intensity obtained from areference plane modulation is subtracted. We calculate the contourphase map by using a phase-shift algorithm in the syntheticwavelength. A comparison with a sequential illumination, phasedifference method based on a laser wavelength phase shift isgiven. The test setup does not need to be stable on aninterferometric scale, and therefore a method is provided that lendsitself to applications in noisy environments.

  3. Light scattering by irregular particles much larger than the wavelength with wavelength-scale surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Grynko, Yevgen; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Förstner, Jens

    2016-08-01

    We simulate light scattering by random irregular particles that have dimensions much larger than the wavelength of incident light at the size parameter of X=200 using the discontinuous Galerkin time domain method. A comparison of the DGTD solution for smoothly faceted particles with that obtained with a geometric optics model shows good agreement for the scattering angle curves of intensity and polarization. If a wavelength-scale surface roughness is introduced, diffuse scattering at rough interface results in smooth and featureless curves for all scattering matrix elements which is consistent with the laboratory measurements of real samples.

  4. Novel fiber optic subscriber access network and optical amplifier placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Yatindra N.; Kumar, Arvind; Sakthivel, A.; Singh, Vandana

    2001-09-01

    In this work, a new subscriber access network architecture has been proposed. It uses optical add-drop multiplexer and wavelength division multiplexing. In order to alleviate the limitation on supportable number of users use of OAS has been investigated. It is found that with all the degradation in OAs, the number o users for a typical network is limited to 384.

  5. The use of semiconductors in nonreciprocal devices for submillimeter wavelengths.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, R. E.; May, W. G.

    1971-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of anisotropic effects in a passive semiconductor magnetoplasma for the development of submillimeter isolators and circulators. The emphasis is on two schemes that are applicable over the far infrared portion of the spectrum. The theory of transmission devices depending on Faraday rotation is described, and experiments are discussed. At far infrared wavelengths it is not necessary to cool the semiconductor in order to achieve low forward loss. Some experimental results are available in this frequency range, and a theoretical evaluation of device performance is given. Reflection devices in which the desired signal does not propagate through the semiconductor, but is reflected off of its surface, are also discussed. Experimental results show that these devices can have a low forward loss; a variety of novel geometrical arrangements are able to improve isolator performance. Theoretical results indicating satisfactory performance for a far infrared isolator using InSb at room temperature are presented.

  6. A Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering spectrometer for ultraviolet wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ziyu; Vieitez, M Ofelia; van Duijn, Eric-Jan; Ubachs, Wim

    2012-05-01

    A spectrometer for the measurement of spontaneous Rayleigh-Brillouin (RB) scattering line profiles at ultraviolet wavelengths from gas phase molecules has been developed, employing a high-power frequency-stabilized UV-laser with narrow bandwidth (2 MHz). The UV-light from a frequency-doubled titanium:sapphire laser is further amplified in an enhancement cavity, delivering a 5 W UV-beam propagating through the interaction region inside a scattering cell. The design of the RB-scattering cell allows for measurements at gas pressures in the range 0-4 bars and at stably controlled temperatures from -30 °C to 70 °C. A scannable Fabry-Perot analyzer with instrument resolution of 232 MHz probes the RB profiles. Measurements on N(2) and SF(6) gases demonstrate that the high signal-to-noise ratio is achievable with the instrument at the 1% level at the peak amplitude of the scattering profile.

  7. Acoustic dynamics of network-forming glasses at mesoscopic wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, C.; Pontecorvo, E.; Cerullo, G.; Chiasera, A.; Ruocco, G.; Schirmacher, W.; Scopigno, T.

    2013-01-01

    The lack of long-range structural order in amorphous solids induces well known thermodynamic anomalies, which are the manifestation of distinct peculiarities in the vibrational spectrum. Although the impact of such anomalies vanishes in the long wavelength, elastic continuum limit, it dominates at length scales comparable to interatomic distances, implying an intermediate transition regime still poorly understood. Here we report a study of such mesoscopic domains by means of a broadband version of picosecond photo-acoustics, developed to coherently generate and detect hypersonic sound waves in the sub-THz region with unprecedented sampling efficiency. We identify a temperature-dependent fractal v3/2 frequency behaviour of the sound attenuation, pointing to the presence of marginally stable regions and a transition between the two above mentioned limits. The essential features of this behaviour are captured by a theoretical approach based on random spatial variation of the shear modulus, including anharmonic interactions. PMID:23653205

  8. Long wavelength infrared dual field-of-view optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Tao; Yang, Chang-cheng

    2007-12-01

    For cooled 320×240 staring focal plane array (FPA), a novel long wavelength infrared dual field-of-view optical system is presented in the paper. The optical system is composed of re-imaging part and zooming part. The parameters of the system are 1.96 f/number, 100% cold shield efficiency, 180mm/60mm effective focal length (EFL) and 8-10 μm spectrum region. The optical system is analyzed from two modes of narrow field of view (NFOV) and wide field of view (WFOV). The system can be used in the temperature range from-30°Cand 60°C without significant degradation of optical performance. The final test results prove the designed performance is good..

  9. Gyrokinetic Theory for Arbitrary Wavelength Electromagnetic Modes in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, H.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-10-01

    A linear gyrokinetic system for arbitrary wavelength electromagnetic modes is developed. A wide range of modes in inhomogeneous plasmas, such as the internal kink modes, the toroidal Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) modes, and the drift modes, can be recovered from this system. The inclusion of most of the interesting physical factors into a single framework enables us to look at many familiar modes simultaneously and thus to study the modifications of and the interactions between them in a systematic way. Especially, we are able to investigate self-consistently the kinetic MHD phenomena entirely from the kinetic side. Phase space Lagrangian Lie perturbation methods and a newly developed computer algebra package for vector analysis in general coordinate system are utilized in the analytical derivation. In tokamak geometries, a 2D finite element code has been developed and tested. In this paper, we present the basic theoretical formalism and some of the preliminary results.

  10. Inexpensive mount for a large millimeter-wavelength telescope.

    PubMed

    Padin, S

    2014-07-10

    A telescope mount with a single-point force support at the center of gravity of the primary mirror is proposed in order to eliminate much of the structure and cost of a large, millimeter-wavelength telescope. The single-point support gives repeatable thermal and gravitational deformation, so the surface of the primary can be controlled based on lookup tables for elevation and temperature. The new design is most appropriate for a survey telescope because locating the support above the vertex of the primary limits the range of motion of the mount to about 1 rad. A 30 m diameter, λ=850  μm telescope with the proposed mount is a factor of 4 lighter than a design with a conventional elevation-over-azimuth mount, and roughly half the cost.

  11. Phase and fringe order determination in wavelength scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Moschetti, Giuseppe; Forbes, Alistair; Leach, Richard K; Jiang, Xiang; O'Connor, Daniel

    2016-04-18

    A method to obtain unambiguous surface height measurements using wavelength scanning interferometry with an improved repeatability, comparable to that obtainable using phase shifting interferometry, is reported. Rather than determining the conventional fringe frequency-derived z height directly, the method uses the frequency to resolve the fringe order ambiguity, and combine this information with the more accurate and repeatable fringe phase derived z height. A theoretical model to evaluate the method's performance in the presence of additive noise is derived and shown to be in good agreement with experiments. The measurement repeatability is improved by a factor of ten over that achieved when using frequency information alone, reaching the sub-nanometre range. Moreover, the z-axis non-linearity (bleed-through or ripple error) is reduced by a factor of ten. These order of magnitude improvements in measurement performance are demonstrated through a number of practical measurement examples.

  12. Advances from Recent Multi-wavelength Campaigns on Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggard, Daryl

    2017-01-01

    Sagittarius A* is the closest example of a supermassive black hole and our proximity allows us to detect emission from its accretion flow in the radio, submillimeter, near IR, and X-ray regimes. Ambitious monitoring campaigns have yielded rich multi-wavelength, time-resolved data that have the power to probe the physical processes underlying Sgr A*'s quiescent and flare emission. Here, I review the status of Sgr A* X-ray monitoring campaigns from the Chandra X-ray Observatory (also XMM Newton, and Swift), and efforts to coordinate these with observations across the electromagnetic spectrum. I also discuss how these observations constrain models for Sgr A*'s variability, which range from tidal disruption of asteroids to gravitational lensing to collimated outflows to magnetic reconnection.

  13. Multi-wavelengths studies of fossil galaxy groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosroshahi, H. G.

    2016-09-01

    Fossil systems are understood to be the end product of galaxy mergers within groups and clusters. Their halo morphology points to their relaxed/virialised nature, thus allowing them to employed as observational probes for the evolution of cosmic structures, their thermodynamics and dark matter distribution. Cosmological simulations, and their underlying models, are broadly consistent with the early formation epoch for fossils. In a series of studies we have looked into the dark matter, IGM and galaxy properties, across a wide range of wavelengths, from X-ray through optical and IR to the Radio, to achieve a better understating of fossil systems, the attributed halo age, IGM heating and their AGNs and use them as laboratories to probe galaxy formation models. We combine luminosity gap with luminosity segregation to identify the most dynamically relaxed systems which allows us to reveal brand new connections between galaxies and their environments.

  14. Quantum photonics at telecom wavelengths based on lithium niobate waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibart, Olivier; D'Auria, Virginia; De Micheli, Marc; Doutre, Florent; Kaiser, Florian; Labonté, Laurent; Lunghi, Tommaso; Picholle, Éric; Tanzilli, Sébastien

    2016-10-01

    Integrated optical components on lithium niobate play a major role in standard high-speed communication systems. Over the last two decades, after the birth and positioning of quantum information science, lithium niobate waveguide architectures have emerged as one of the key platforms for enabling photonics quantum technologies. Due to mature technological processes for waveguide structure integration, as well as inherent and efficient properties for nonlinear optical effects, lithium niobate devices are nowadays at the heart of many photon-pair or triplet sources, single-photon detectors, coherent wavelength-conversion interfaces, and quantum memories. Consequently, they find applications in advanced and complex quantum communication systems, where compactness, stability, efficiency, and interconnectability with other guided-wave technologies are required. In this review paper, we first introduce the material aspects of lithium niobate, and subsequently discuss all of the above mentioned quantum components, ranging from standard photon-pair sources to more complex and advanced circuits.

  15. Burg algorithm for enhancing measurement performance in wavelength scanning interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, Rebecca; Muhamedsalih, Hussam; Martin, Haydn; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2016-06-01

    Wavelength scanning interferometry (WSI) is a technique for measuring surface topography that is capable of resolving step discontinuities and does not require any mechanical movement of the apparatus or measurand, allowing measurement times to be reduced substantially in comparison to related techniques. The axial (height) resolution and measurement range in WSI depends in part on the algorithm used to evaluate the spectral interferograms. Previously reported Fourier transform based methods have a number of limitations which is in part due to the short data lengths obtained. This paper compares the performance auto-regressive model based techniques for frequency estimation in WSI. Specifically, the Burg method is compared with established Fourier transform based approaches using both simulation and experimental data taken from a WSI measurement of a step-height sample.

  16. Wavelength conversion through soliton self-frequency shift in tellurite microstructured fiber with picosecond pump pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Wanjun; Li, Xia; Xing, Zhaojun; Zhou, Qinling; Fang, Yongzheng; Gao, Weiqing; Xiong, Liangming; Hu, Lili; Liao, Meisong

    2016-01-01

    Wavelength conversion to the wavelength range that is not covered by commercially available lasers could be accomplished through the soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) effect. In this study, the phenomenon of SSFS pumped by a picosecond-order pulse in a tellurite microstructured fiber is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The balance between the dispersion and the nonlinearity achieved by a 1958 nm pump laser induces a distinct SSFS effect. Attributed to the large spectral distance between the pump pulse and the fiber zero-dispersion wavelength, the SSFS is not cancelled due to energy shedding from the soliton to the dispersive wave. Details about the physical mechanisms behind this phenomenon and the variations of the wavelength shift, the conversion efficiency are revealed based on numerical simulations. Owing to the large soliton number N, the pulse width of the first split fundamental soliton is approximately 40 fs, producing a pulse compression factor of ˜38, much higher than that pumped by a femtosecond pulse. Experiments were also conducted to confirm the validity of the simulation results. By varying the pump power, a continuous soliton shift from 1990 nm to 2264 nm was generated. The generation of SSFS in tellurite microstructured fibers with picosecond pump pulse can provide a new approach for wavelength conversion in the mid-infrared range and could be useful in medical and some other areas.

  17. Investigation of the pump wavelength influence on pulsed laser pumped Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvy, H.; Withford, M. J.; Mildren, R. P.; Piper, J. A.

    2005-09-01

    Recent theoretical modelling and experimental results have shown that excess lattice phonon energy created dur ing the non-radiative energy transfer from the 4T2 pump manifold to the 2E storage level in Alexandrite when pumped with wavelengths shorter than ˜645 nm causes chaotic lasing output. Shorter pump wavelengths have also been associated with increased non-radiative energy decay and reduced laser efficiency. We report studies of fluorescence emission spectra of Alexandrite illuminated at a range of wavelengths from green to red, which demonstrate reduced fluorescence yield for shorter pump wavelengths at elevated crystal temperatures. Investigations of pulsed laser pumping of Alexandrite over the same spectral range demonstrated reduced pump threshold energy for longer pump wavelengths. High repetition rate pulsed pumping of Alexandrite at 532, 578 and 671 nm showed stable and efficient laser performance was only achieved for red pumping at 671 nm. These results support the theoretical model and demonstrate the potential for scalable, red laser pumped, all-solid-state Alexandrite lasers.

  18. Wavelength-Division Multiplexing Of Bipolar Digital Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, Ronnie D.; Ubele, John L., II

    1994-01-01

    In system, bipolar digital data transmitted by use of wavelength-division multiplexing on single optical fiber. Two different wavelengths used to transmit pulses signifying "positive" or "negative" bipolar digital data. Simultaneous absence of pulses at both wavelengths signifies digital "zero."

  19. Individual Ranging Behaviour Patterns in Commercial Free-Range Layers as Observed through RFID Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Hannah; Cronin, Greg M.; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G.; Smith, Carolynn L.; Hemsworth, Paul H.; Rault, Jean-Loup

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary Understanding of how free-range laying hens on commercial farms utilize the outdoor space provided is limited. In order to optimise use of the range, it is important to understand whether hens vary in their ranging behaviour, both between and within individual hens. In our study, we used individual tracking technology to assess how hens in two commercial free-range flocks used the range and whether they varied in their use of the range. We assessed use of three areas at increasing distance from the shed; the veranda [0–2.4 m], close range [2.4–11.4 m], and far range [>11.4 m]. Most hens accessed the range every day (68.6% in Flock A, and 82.2% in Flock B), and most hens that ranged accessed all three areas (73.7% in Flock A, and 84.5% in Flock B). Hens spent half of their time outside in the veranda adjacent to the shed. We found that some hens within the flocks would range consistently (similar duration and frequency) daily, whereas others would range inconsistently. Hens that were more consistent in their ranging behaviour spent more time on the range overall than those that were inconsistent. These different patterns of range use should be taken into account to assess the implications of ranging for laying hens. Abstract In this exploratory study, we tracked free-range laying hens on two commercial flocks with Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology with the aim to examine individual hen variation in range use. Three distinct outdoor zones were identified at increasing distances from the shed; the veranda [0–2.4 m], close range [2.4–11.4 m], and far range [>11.4 m]. Hens’ movements between these areas were tracked using radio frequency identification technology. Most of the hens in both flocks (68.6% in Flock A, and 82.2% in Flock B) accessed the range every day during the study. Of the hens that accessed the range, most hens accessed all three zones (73.7% in Flock A, and 84.5% in Flock B). Hens spent half of their time

  20. Risk of Eye Damage from the Wavelength-Dependent Biologically Effective UVB Spectrum Irradiances

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Gao, Qian; Hu, Liwen; Gao, Na; Ge, Tiantian; Yu, Jiaming; Liu, Yang

    2012-01-01

    A number of previous studies have discussed the risk of eye damage from broadband ultraviolet (UV) radiation. As the biologically damaging effectiveness of UV irradiation on the human body is known to be wavelength-dependent, it is necessary to study the distribution of the UV spectral irradiance. In order to quantify the ocular biologically effective UV (UVBE) irradiance exposure of different wavelengths and assess the risk of eye damage, UV exposure values were measured at Sanya, China (18.4° N, 109.7°E, altitude 18 m), using a manikin and a dual-detector spectrometer to measure simultaneously the ocular exposure and ambient UV spectral irradiance data and solar elevation angle (SEA) range (approximately 7°–85°). The present study uses the ocular UV spectral irradiance exposure weighted with the action spectra for photokeratitis, photoconjunctivitis and cataracts to calculate the ocular UVBE irradiance exposure for photokeratitis (UVBEpker), photoconjunctivitis (UVBEpcon) and cataracts (UVBEcat). We found that the ocular exposure to UV irradiance is strongest in the 30°–60° SEA range when ∼50% of ocular exposure to UV irradiance on a summer’s day is received. In the 7°–30° SEA range, all the biologically highly effective wavelengths of UVBEpker, UVBEpcon and UVBEcat irradiances are at 300 nm. However, in other SEA ranges the biologically highly effective wavelengths of UVBEpker, UVBEpcon and UVBEcat irradiances are different, corresponding to 311 nm, 300 nm and 307 nm, respectively. PMID:23284960

  1. Micro-Laser-Based Devices Allowing Optical Wavelength-Packing Densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Jones, Darryl K.; Fork, Richard L.

    1998-01-01

    We examine theoretically and experimentally the space-time domain properties of high-speed electro-optically switched microlaser devices susceptible of construction at optical wavelength-packing densities. We address adjustable phase and group delays with wide dynamic range, coherent logic, temporal storage and reconfiguration of pulse arrays and applications to optical phased arrays.

  2. Centimeter- and millimeter-wavelength matched loads based on microwave photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usanov, D. A.; Meshchanov, V. P.; Skripal', A. V.; Popova, N. F.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Merdanov, M. K.

    2017-02-01

    Novel, small-sized broadband matched loads in the form of disordered photonic crystals containing nanometer metallic and insulating layers have been developed. It has been proposed to form insulating layers with different permittivities and low dissipation factors in both centimeter and millimeter wavelength ranges from the composites that consist of insulating matrices filled with air inclusions.

  3. Light-controllable reflection wavelength of blue phase liquid crystals doped with azobenzene-dimers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xingwu; Wang, Ling; Li, Chenyue; Xiao, Jiumei; Ding, Hangjun; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoguang; He, Wanli; Yang, Huai

    2013-10-03

    A new series of azobenzene-dimers were synthesized and doped into the blue phase liquid crystals to broaden the temperature range of BPs. It is found that not only can the reflection wavelength of BPI be reversibly controlled but BPI can also be transformed into the cholesteric phase owing to isomerization of azobenzene induced by light.

  4. Coherent ultra dense wavelength division multiplexing passive optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahpari, Ali; Ferreira, Ricardo; Ribeiro, Vitor; Sousa, Artur; Ziaie, Somayeh; Tavares, Ana; Vujicic, Zoran; Guiomar, Fernando P.; Reis, Jacklyn D.; Pinto, Armando N.; Teixeira, António

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we firstly review the progress in ultra-dense wavelength division multiplexing passive optical network (UDWDM-PON), by making use of the key attributes of this technology in the context of optical access and metro networks. Besides the inherit properties of coherent technology, we explore different modulation formats and pulse shaping. The performance is experimentally demonstrated through a 12 × 10 Gb/s bidirectional UDWDM-PON over hybrid 80 km standard single mode fiber (SSMF) and optical wireless link. High density, 6.25 GHz grid, Nyquist shaped 16-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (16QAM) and digital frequency shifting are some of the properties exploited together in the tests. Also, bidirectional transmission in fiber, relevant in the context, is analyzed in terms of nonlinear and back-reflection effects on receiver sensitivity. In addition, as a basis for the discussion on market readiness, we experimentally demonstrate real-time detection of a Nyquist-shaped quaternary phase-shift keying (QPSK) signal using simple 8-bit digital signal processing (DSP) on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA).

  5. Range indices of geomagnetic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuart, W.F.; Green, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    The simplest index of geomagnetic activity is the range in nT from maximum to minimum value of the field in a given time interval. The hourly range R was recommended by IAGA for use at observatories at latitudes greater than 65??, but was superceded by AE. The most used geomagnetic index K is based on the range of activity in a 3 h interval corrected for the regular daily variation. In order to take advantage of real time data processing, now available at many observatories, it is proposed to introduce a 1 h range index and also a 3 h range index. Both will be computed hourly, i.e. each will have a series of 24 per day, the 3 h values overlapping. The new data will be available as the range (R) of activity in nT and also as a logarithmic index (I) of the range. The exponent relating index to range in nT is based closely on the scale used for computing K values. The new ranges and range indices are available, from June 1987, to users in real time and can be accessed by telephone connection or computer network. Their first year of production is regarded as a trial period during which their value to the scientific and commercial communities will be assessed, together with their potential as indicators of regional and global disturbances' and in which trials will be conducted into ways of eliminating excessive bias at quiet times due to the rate of change of the daily variation field. ?? 1988.

  6. Saturn B and C ring studies at multiple wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda; Deau, Estelle; Morishima, Ryuji; Filacchione, Gianrico; Hedman, Matt; Nicholson, Phil; Colwell, Josh; Bradley, Todd; Pilorz, Stu

    2015-04-01

    We can learn a great deal about the characteristics of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths by modeling the changes in their brightness, color and temperature with changing viewing geometry over a wide range of wavelengths, from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared. Data from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) are jointly studied using data from the lit and unlit main rings at multiple geometries and solar elevations. Using multi-wavelength data sets allow us to test different thermal models by combining the effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, particle spin rate and spin axis orientation. With the high spatial resolution of the Cassini data it is now possible to analyze these effects at smaller spatial scales and characterize higher optical depth regions in faint rings such as the outer C ring, where albedo differences may be present. The CIRS temperature and ISS color variations are confined primarily to phase angle over a range of solar elevations with only small differences from changing spacecraft elevation. Color and temperature dependence with varying solar elevation angle are also observed. Brightness dependence with changing solar elevation angle and phase angle is observed with UVIS. VIMS observations show that the IR ice absorption band depths are a very weak function of phase angle, out to ~140 deg phase, suggesting that interparticle light scattering is relatively unimportant except at very high phase angles. These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of scattering within the regolith and on possibly rough surfaces of the clumps, as

  7. Radio recombination lines at decametre wavelengths. Prospects for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, W. M.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Clarke, T. E.; Erickson, W. C.; Kassim, N. E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the suitability of a number of emerging and future instruments for the study of radio recombination lines (RRLs) at frequencies below 200 MHz. These lines are of interest because they arise only in low-density regions of the ionized interstellar medium and because they may represent a frequency-dependent foreground for next-generation experiments trying to detect H I signals from the Universe's Epoch of Reionization and Dark Ages (so-called “21-cm cosmology” observations). We summarize existing decametre-wavelength observations of RRLs, which have detected only carbon RRLs. We then show that, with reference to an interferometric array, the primary instrumental factor limiting detection and study of the RRLs is the areal filling factor of the array. We consider the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA-1), the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR), the low-frequency component of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA-lo), and a future Lunar Radio Array (LRA), all of which are likely to operate at decametre wavelengths. Key advantages that many of these arrays offer include digital signal processing, which should produce more stable and better defined spectral bandpasses; larger frequency tuning ranges; and better angular resolution than that of the previous generation of instruments that have been used in the past for RRL observations. Detecting Galactic carbon RRLs, with optical depths at the level of 10-3, appears feasible for all of these arrays, with integration times ranging from a few hours to as much as 100 h; at optimal frequencies this would permit a Galactic survey. The SKA-lo and LRA, and the LWA-1 and LOFAR at the lowest frequencies, should have a high enough filling factor to detect lines with much lower optical depths, of order 10-4 in a few hundred hours. The amount of RRL-hosting gas present in the Galaxy at the high Galactic latitudes likely to be targeted in Epoch of Reionization and Dark Ages H I studies is currently unknown. If

  8. Security risk assessment of the primary layer of wavelength division multiplexing passive optical network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudelka, Petr; Siska, Petr; Latal, Jan; Poboril, Radek; Hajek, Lukas; Kepak, Stanislav; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation passive optical access networks come to the fore nowadays. These optical next-generation networks are the response to the increasing qualitative requirements from end users. Technologies using Time Division Multiplexing include NG-PON (XG-PON 1 and XG-PON 2) and 10GEPON. Their advantage is the applicability to older topologies, which are operated by the original technology of passive optical access networks. Wavelength Division Multiplexing Passive Optical Network (WDM-PON) is an alternative also belonging to next-generation networks. Time Division Multiplexing is in this case replaced by Wavelength Division Multiplexing. Certain variants of WDM-PON use a combination of broadband light source, optical circulator, optical phased array and tunable FP laser. Construction of the terminal units (ONU) is advantageous because it can always tune in to the appropriate wavelength in the given optical DWDM channel (100 GHz). The disadvantage is the increased security risk on the primary layer due to channel crosstalk in an optical phased array (AWG). The aim of this paper is to assess the degree of security risk in real conditions. The article includes both simulation and real measurements in C + L bands with 100 GHz DWDM spacing.

  9. Surface plasmon resonator using high sensitive resonance telecommunication wavelengths for DNA sensors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with thiol-modified probes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shih-Hsiang; Hung, Shao-Chiang; Chen, Yu-Kun; Jian, Zhi-Hao

    2014-12-25

    Various analytes can be verified by surface plasmon resonance, thus continuous improvement of this sensing technology is crucial for better sensing selection and higher sensitivity. The SPR sensitivity on the wavelength modulation is enhanced with increasing wavelengths. The telecommunication wavelength range was then utilized to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) under two situations, without immobilization and with 5'-thiol end labeled IS6100 DNA probes, for SPR sensitivity comparison. The experimental data demonstrated that the SPR sensitivity increased more than 13 times with the wavelength modulation after immobilization. Since the operating wavelength accuracy of a tunable laser source can be controlled within 0.001 nm, the sensitivity and resolution on immobilized MTB DNA were determined as 1.04 nm/(μg/mL) and 0.9 ng/mL, respectively.

  10. Mathematical model of optimized design of multi-point sensoric measurement with Bragg gratings using wavelength divison multiplex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajkus, Marcel; Nedoma, Jan; Kepak, Stanislav; Rapant, Lukas; Martinek, Radek; Bednarek, Lukas; Novak, Martin; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) belongs to the single-point optical sensors used in many fields and applications where they often replace a standard sensors. They are easy to multiplex and the wavelength division multiplex is the most widely used method. FBGs in sensory branch are designed for a different Bragg wavelength which gives different measure and sensitivity coefficients. Existing algorithm is based on the determination of left and right boundaries of the measuring channel and the central Bragg wavelength. In this paper is presented the new mathematical model for calculation of Bragg wavelength, sensitivity coefficient and channel width of any FBG in the single step. The model takes into account the following input parameters: wavelength of the optical source, source bandwidth, the type of measured quantity, measuring ranges, width of the FBG reflected spectrum and the guard band between adjacent channels. The mathematical model is verified by using a simulation in software OptiSystem.

  11. Tunable triple-wavelength mode-locked fiber laser with topological insulator Bi2Se3 solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bo; Yao, Yong

    2016-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a tunable triple-wavelength mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser with few-layer topological insulator: Bi2Se3/polyvinyl alcohol solution. By properly adjusting the pump power and the polarization state, the single-, dual-, and triple-wavelength mode-locking operation could be stably initiated with a wavelength-tunable range (˜1 nm) and a variable wavelength spacing (1.7 or 2 nm). Meanwhile, it exhibits the maximum output power of 10 mW and pulse energy of 1.12 nJ at the pump power of 175 mW. The simple, low-cost triple-wavelength mode-locked fiber laser might be applied in various potential fields, such as optical communication, biomedical research, and sensing system.

  12. TUNABLE RING LASER BASED ON A SEMICONDUCTOR OPTICAL AMPLIFIER AT 1300 NM USING A SIMPLE WAVELENGTH SELECTION FILTER

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun; Song, Jae-Won; Lee, Ho; Choi, Sanghoon; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2009-01-01

    A simple, compact, and low cost tunable ring laser with a commercial semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) was demonstrated. The tunable ring laser is based on an external wavelength filter cavity that is analogous with the Littman configuration with a diffraction grating, a mirror, and a simple slit. The unique structural advantage of this new system is that the slit is displaced to select a desired wavelength instead of tilting the mirror as in the Littman configuration. This allows easy control over the selected wavelength by the translating action of the slit. The full width half maximum (FWHM) wavelength turning range is 45 nm, and the wavelength resolution is about 2 pm. The demonstrated tunable ring laser has 2 mW output power. The side mode suppression ratios is 70–73 dB. PMID:20539831

  13. Tunable Terahertz-wave generation from DAST crystal pumped by a monolithic dual-wavelength fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming; Minamide, Hiroaki; Wang, Yuye; Notake, Takashi; Ohno, Seigo; Ito, Hiromasa

    2011-01-17

    For developing a continuous-wave (CW) tunable Terahertz-wave (THz-wave) source using difference-frequency generation (DFG) in highly nonlinear optical crystals, we proposed and demonstrated a dual-wavelength fiber ring laser system operating around 1060 nm based on wideband chirped fiber Bragg gratings (CFBGs) and semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). Thermo-induced phase shift along the CFBG produces a very sharp transmission spike therefore two lasing wavelengths with single longitudinal mode operation are oscillating simultaneously within the fiber ring cavity. Due to the inhomogeneous gain broadening property of SOA, the wavelength spacing of our dual-wavelength fiber laser can be continuously adjusted from 0.3 to 9.5 nm. By using this single emitter dual-wavelength fiber laser to pump an organic nonlinear DAST crystal, type-0 collinear phase matching of DFG process can be fulfilled and monochromatic THz wave ranging from 0.5 to 2 THz has been successfully generated.

  14. Multi-Wavelength Views of Messier 81

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on individual images below for larger view

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The magnificent spiral arms of the nearby galaxy Messier 81 are highlighted in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Located in the northern constellation of Ursa Major (which also includes the Big Dipper), this galaxy is easily visible through binoculars or a small telescope. M81 is located at a distance of 12 million light-years.

    The main image is a composite mosaic obtained with the multiband imaging photometer for Spitzer and the infrared array camera. Thermal infrared emission at 24 microns detected by the photometer (red, bottom left inset) is combined with camera data at 8.0 microns (green, bottom center inset) and 3.6 microns (blue, bottom right inset).

    A visible-light image of Messier 81, obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory, a ground-based telescope, is shown in the upper right inset. Both the visible-light picture and the 3.6-micron near-infrared image trace the distribution of stars, although the Spitzer image is virtually unaffected by obscuring dust. Both images reveal a very smooth stellar mass distribution, with the spiral arms relatively subdued.

    As one moves to longer wavelengths, the spiral arms become the dominant feature of the galaxy. The 8-micron emission is dominated by infrared light radiated by hot dust that has been heated by nearby luminous stars. Dust in the galaxy is bathed by ultraviolet and visible light from nearby stars. Upon absorbing an ultraviolet or visible-light photon, a dust grain is heated and re-emits the energy at longer infrared wavelengths. The dust particles are composed of silicates (chemically similar to beach sand), carbonaceous grains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and

  15. Primary vascular access.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, C P

    2006-05-01

    Primary vascular access is usually achievable by a distal autogenous arterio-venous fistula (AVF). This article describes the approach to vascular access planning, the usual surgical options and the factors affecting patency.

  16. Long range coherence in free electron lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    The simple free electron laser (FEL) design uses a static, periodic, transverse magnetic field to undulate relativistic electrons traveling along its axis. This allows coupling to a co-propagating optical wave and results in bunching to produce coherent radiation. The advantages of the FEL are continuous tunability, operation at wavelengths ranging from centimeters to angstroms, and high efficiency resulting from the fact that the interaction region only contains light, relativistic electrons, and a magnetic field. Theoretical concepts and operational principles are discussed.

  17. Ultra sub-wavelength surface plasmon confinement using air-gap, sub-wavelength ring resonator arrays

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaehak; Sung, Sangkeun; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Eom, Seok Chan; Mortensen, N. Asger; Shin, Jung H.

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of sub-wavelength, sub-10 nm air-gap plasmonic ring resonators are fabricated using nanoimprinting. In near infra-red (NIR) range, the resonator supports a single dipole mode which is excited and identified via simple normal illumination and explored through transmission measurements. By controlling both lateral and vertical confinement via a metal edge, the mode volume is successfully reduced down to 1.3 × 10−5 λ03. The advantage of such mode confinement is demonstrated by applying the resonators biosensing. Using bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules, a dramatic enhancement of surface sensitivity up to 69 nm/nm is achieved as the modal height approaches the thickness of the adsorbed molecule layers. PMID:26923610

  18. Ultra sub-wavelength surface plasmon confinement using air-gap, sub-wavelength ring resonator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehak; Sung, Sangkeun; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Eom, Seok Chan; Mortensen, N. Asger; Shin, Jung H.

    2016-02-01

    Arrays of sub-wavelength, sub-10 nm air-gap plasmonic ring resonators are fabricated using nanoimprinting. In near infra-red (NIR) range, the resonator supports a single dipole mode which is excited and identified via simple normal illumination and explored through transmission measurements. By controlling both lateral and vertical confinement via a metal edge, the mode volume is successfully reduced down to 1.3 × 10-5 λ03. The advantage of such mode confinement is demonstrated by applying the resonators biosensing. Using bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules, a dramatic enhancement of surface sensitivity up to 69 nm/nm is achieved as the modal height approaches the thickness of the adsorbed molecule layers.

  19. Magnetic compass orientation in European robins is dependent on both wavelength and intensity of light.

    PubMed

    Muheim, Rachel; Bäckman, Johan; Akesson, Susanne

    2002-12-01

    Magnetic compass orientation in birds has been shown to be light dependent. Results from behavioural studies indicate that magnetoreception capabilities are disrupted under light of peak wavelengths longer than 565 nm, and shifts in orientation have been observed at higher light intensities (43-44x10(15) quanta s(-1) m(-2)). To investigate further the function of the avian magnetic compass with respect to wavelength and intensity of light, we carried out orientation cage experiments with juvenile European robins, caught during their first autumn migration, exposed to light of 560.5 nm (green), 567.5 nm (green-yellow) and 617 nm (red) wavelengths at three different intensities (1 mW m(-2), 5 mW m(-2) and 10 mW m(-2)). We used monochromatic light of a narrow wavelength range (half bandwidth of 9-11 nm, compared with half bandwidths ranging between 30 nm and 70 nm used in other studies) and were thereby able to examine the magnetoreception mechanism in the expected transition zone between oriented and disoriented behaviour around 565 nm in more detail. We show (1) that European robins show seasonally appropriate migratory directions under 560.5 nm light, (2) that they are completely disoriented under 567.5 nm light under a broad range of intensities, (3) that they are able to orient under 617 nm light of lower intensities, although into a direction shifted relative to the expected migratory one, and (4) that magnetoreception is intensity dependent, leading to disorientation under higher intensities. Our results support the hypothesis that birds possess a light-dependent magnetoreception system based on magnetically sensitive, antagonistically interacting spectral mechanisms, with at least one high-sensitive short-wavelength mechanism and one low-sensitive long-wavelength mechanism.

  20. Monitoring the stability of wavelength calibration of spectrophotometers.

    PubMed

    Korzun, W J; Miller, W G

    1986-01-01

    The difference in absorbance (delta A) between equimolar acid and alkaline solutions of methyl red, at a wavelength near the isosbestic point of the indicator, is reproducible. Furthermore, this delta A is sensitive to changes in the wavelength calibration of the instrument used to make the measurement. The delta A of methyl red can be used to monitor wavelength accuracy in both manual and automated spectrophotometric instruments. Although this measurement does not establish wavelength calibration, it is useful for monitoring the wavelength accuracy of previously calibrated, automated spectrophotometers that do not easily lend themselves to calibration checks by conventional techniques.