Science.gov

Sample records for accessing just-in-time learning

  1. Just in time? Using QR codes for multi-professional learning in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Jamu, Joseph Tawanda; Lowi-Jones, Hannah; Mitchell, Colin

    2016-07-01

    Clinical guidelines and policies are widely available on the hospital intranet or from the internet, but can be difficult to access at the required time and place. Clinical staff with smartphones could use Quick Response (QR) codes for contemporaneous access to relevant information to support the Just in Time Learning (JIT-L) paradigm. There are several studies that advocate the use of smartphones to enhance learning amongst medical students and junior doctors in UK. However, these participants are already technologically orientated. There are limited studies that explore the use of smartphones in nursing practice. QR Codes were generated for each topic and positioned at relevant locations on a medical ward. Support and training were provided for staff. Website analytics and semi-structured interviews were performed to evaluate the efficacy, acceptability and feasibility of using QR codes to facilitate Just in Time learning. Use was intermittently high but not sustained. Thematic analysis of interviews revealed a positive assessment of the Just in Time learning paradigm and context-sensitive clinical information. However, there were notable barriers to acceptance, including usability of QR codes and appropriateness of smartphone use in a clinical environment. The use of Just in Time learning for education and reference may be beneficial to healthcare professionals. However, alternative methods of access for less technologically literate users and a change in culture of mobile device use in clinical areas may be needed.

  2. Active Learning and Just-in-Time Teaching in a Material and Energy Balances Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberatore, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of a material and energy balances course is enhanced through a series of in-class and out-of-class exercises. An active learning classroom is achieved, even at class sizes over 150 students, using multiple instructors in a single classroom, problem solving in teams, problems based on YouTube videos, and just-in-time teaching. To avoid…

  3. A presentation system for just-in-time learning in radiology.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Charles E; Santos, Amadeu; Thao, Cheng; Rock, Jayson J; Nagy, Paul G; Ehlers, Kevin C

    2007-03-01

    There is growing interest in bringing medical educational materials to the point of care. We sought to develop a system for just-in-time learning in radiology. A database of 34 learning modules was derived from previously published journal articles. Learning objectives were specified for each module, and multiple-choice test items were created. A web-based system-called TEMPO-was developed to allow radiologists to select and view the learning modules. Web services were used to exchange clinical context information between TEMPO and the simulated radiology work station. Preliminary evaluation was conducted using the System Usability Scale (SUS) questionnaire. TEMPO identified learning modules that were relevant to the age, sex, imaging modality, and body part or organ system of the patient being viewed by the radiologist on the simulated clinical work station. Users expressed a high degree of satisfaction with the system's design and user interface. TEMPO enables just-in-time learning in radiology, and can be extended to create a fully functional learning management system for point-of-care learning in radiology.

  4. A Just-in-Time Learning based Monitoring and Classification Method for Hyper/Hypocalcemia Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xin; Tang, Yang; He, Wangli; Du, Wenli; Qian, Feng

    2017-01-20

    This study focuses on the classification and pathological status monitoring of hyper/hypo-calcemia in the calcium regulatory system. By utilizing the Independent Component Analysis (ICA) mixture model, samples from healthy patients are collected, diagnosed, and subsequently classified according to their underlying behaviors, characteristics, and mechanisms. Then, a Just-in-Time Learning (JITL) has been employed in order to estimate the diseased status dynamically. In terms of JITL, for the purpose of the construction of an appropriate similarity index to identify relevant datasets, a novel similarity index based on the ICA mixture model is proposed in this paper to improve online model quality. The validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach have been demonstrated by applying it to the calcium regulatory system under various hypocalcemic and hypercalcemic diseased conditions.

  5. The Effect of Inquiry Training Learning Model Based on Just in Time Teaching for Problem Solving Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnip, Betty; Wahyuni, Ida; Tanjung, Yul Ifda

    2016-01-01

    One of the factors that can support successful learning activity is the use of learning models according to the objectives to be achieved. This study aimed to analyze the differences in problem-solving ability Physics student learning model Inquiry Training based on Just In Time Teaching [JITT] and conventional learning taught by cooperative model…

  6. Improving Student Learning of Calculus Topics via Modified Just-in-Time Teaching Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natarajan, Rekha; Bennett, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Although the use of traditional just-in-time teaching techniques has long been viewed positively by students and instructors in undergraduate calculus courses, past studies in this area have not addressed gains in student achievement with respect to specific calculus topics. This paper investigates the latter by administering modified just-in-time…

  7. Just-in-Time Teaching in undergraduate physics courses: Implementation, learning, and perceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Jessica Hewitt

    Regardless of discipline, a decades-long battle has ensued within nearly every classroom in higher education: instructors getting students to come to class prepared to learn. In response to this clash between teacher expectations and frequent student neglect, a group of four physics education researchers developed a reformed instructional strategy called Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT). This dissertation investigates the following three areas: 1) the fidelity with which undergraduate physics instructors implement JiTT, 2) whether student performance predicts student perception of their instructor's fidelity of JiTT implementation, and 3) whether student perception of their instructor's fidelity of JiTT implementation correlates with student views of their physics course. A blend of quantitative data (e.g., students grades, inventory scores, and questionnaire responses) are integrated with qualitative data (e.g., individual faculty interviews, student focus group discussions, and classroom observations). This study revealed no statistically significant relationship between instructors who spent time on a predefined JiTT critical component and their designation as a JiTT user or non-user. While JiTT users implemented the pedagogy in accordance with the creators' intended ideal vision, many also had trouble reconciling personal concerns about their role as a JiTT adopter and the anticipated demand of the innovation. I recommend that this population of faculty members can serve as a JiTT model for other courses, disciplines, and/or institutions. Student performance was not a predictor of student perception instructor fidelity of JiTT implementation. Additionally, the majority of students in this study reported they read their textbook prior to class and that JiTT assignments helped them prepare for in-class learning. I found evidence that exposure to the JiTT strategy may correlate with a more favorable student view of their physics course. Finally, according to students

  8. Enhancing Student Engagement and Active Learning through Just-in-Time Teaching and the Use of Powerpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This instructional article is about an innovative teaching approach for enhancing student engagement and active learning in higher education through a combination of just-in-time teaching and the use of PowerPoint technology. The central component of this approach was students' pre-lecture preparation of a short PowerPoint presentation in which…

  9. Public awareness and disaster risk reduction: just-in-time networks and learning.

    PubMed

    Ardalan, Ali; Linkov, Faina; Shubnikov, Eugene; LaPorte, Ronald E

    2008-01-01

    Improving public awareness through education has been recognized widely as a basis for reducing the risk of disasters. Some of the first disaster just-in-time (JIT) education modules were built within 3-6 days after the south Asia tsunami, Hurricane Katrina, and the Bam, Pakistan, and Indonesia earthquakes through a Supercourse. Web monitoring showed that visitors represented a wide spectrum of disciplines and educational levels from 120 developed and developing countries. Building disaster networks using an educational strategy seizes the opportunity of increased public interest to teach and find national and global expertise in hazard and risk information. To be effective, an expert network and a template for the delivery of JIT education must be prepared before an event occurs, focusing on developing core materials that could be customized rapidly, and then be based on the information received from a recent disaster. The recyclable process of the materials would help to improve the quality of the teaching, and decrease the time required for preparation. The core materials can be prepared for disasters resulting from events such as earthquakes, hurricanes, tsunamis, floods, and bioterrorism.

  10. The Role of Coaching in Student Teams: A "Just-in-Time" Approach to Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Michele Kremen

    1999-01-01

    Describes ways teachers can support student teams: (1) starting on the right foot by laying the groundwork of group process; (2) increasing effectiveness by helping teams manage diversity and conflict; and (3) helping students learn from the teamwork experience. Appropriate coaching behaviors for each step are presented. (SK)

  11. Just-in-Time Teaching, Just-in-Need Learning: Designing towards Optimized Pedagogical Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killi, Steinar; Morrison, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Teaching methods are constantly being changed, new ones are developed and old methods have undergone a renaissance. Two main approaches to teaching prevail: a) lecture-based and project-based and b) an argumentative approach to known knowledge or learning by exploration. Today, there is a balance between these two approaches, and they are more…

  12. Just in Time Assurance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Just in Time Assurance Ji Al F PhD U i it f Id hm ves- oss, , n vers y o a o Director Center for Secure and Dependable Computing W. Mark Vanfleet...COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Just in Time Assurance 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...discusses how practical and affordable recertification can become the norm instead of the rare exception 2 What Does Just in Time Mean? Manufacturing

  13. Fault Detection for Nonlinear Process With Deterministic Disturbances: A Just-In-Time Learning Based Data Driven Method.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shen; Gao, Huijun; Qiu, Jianbin; Kaynak, Okyay

    2016-07-12

    Data-driven fault detection plays an important role in industrial systems due to its applicability in case of unknown physical models. In fault detection, disturbances must be taken into account as an inherent characteristic of processes. Nevertheless, fault detection for nonlinear processes with deterministic disturbances still receive little attention, especially in data-driven field. To solve this problem, a just-in-time learning-based data-driven (JITL-DD) fault detection method for nonlinear processes with deterministic disturbances is proposed in this paper. JITL-DD employs JITL scheme for process description with local model structures to cope with processes dynamics and nonlinearity. The proposed method provides a data-driven fault detection solution for nonlinear processes with deterministic disturbances, and owns inherent online adaptation and high accuracy of fault detection. Two nonlinear systems, i.e., a numerical example and a sewage treatment process benchmark, are employed to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Just-in-Time Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gavrin, A.

    2006-01-01

    Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) is an innovative pedagogy that enables faculty to increase interactivity in the classroom and engage students in learning. By creating a feedback loop between students' work at home and the classroom setting, time on task is improved in both quality and quantity. This paper includes an introduction to JiTT and evidence…

  15. Adaptive online monitoring for ICU patients by combining just-in-time learning and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejian; Wang, Youqing

    2016-12-01

    Offline general-type models are widely used for patients' monitoring in intensive care units (ICUs), which are developed by using past collected datasets consisting of thousands of patients. However, these models may fail to adapt to the changing states of ICU patients. Thus, to be more robust and effective, the monitoring models should be adaptable to individual patients. A novel combination of just-in-time learning (JITL) and principal component analysis (PCA), referred to learning-type PCA (L-PCA), was proposed for adaptive online monitoring of patients in ICUs. JITL was used to gather the most relevant data samples for adaptive modeling of complex physiological processes. PCA was used to build an online individual-type model and calculate monitoring statistics, and then to judge whether the patient's status is normal or not. The adaptability of L-PCA lies in the usage of individual data and the continuous updating of the training dataset. Twelve subjects were selected from the Physiobank's Multi-parameter Intelligent Monitoring for Intensive Care II (MIMIC II) database, and five vital signs of each subject were chosen. The proposed method was compared with the traditional PCA and fast moving-window PCA (Fast MWPCA). The experimental results demonstrated that the fault detection rates respectively increased by 20 % and 47 % compared with PCA and Fast MWPCA. L-PCA is first introduced into ICU patients monitoring and achieves the best monitoring performance in terms of adaptability to changes in patient status and sensitivity for abnormality detection.

  16. The Just-in-Time Imperative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weintraub, Robert S.; Martineau, Jennifer W.

    2002-01-01

    Increasinginly in demand, just-in-time learning is associated with informal, learner-driven knowledge acquisition. Technologies being used include databases, intranets, portals, and content management systems. (JOW)

  17. Just-In-Time Logistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-07

    Logistics modernization, end-to-end logistics, logistics transformation, and just - in - time logistics -- whichever name it is being called today, it is...demonstrations as to what these systems will do for the end user, consumer confidence will increase and " just - in - time " logistics will lead to a lighter and leaner combat logistics support.

  18. Learning Just-in-Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chene, Adele

    A study explored training from the perspective of the trainees, what it meant for them when they were faced with a major reorganization of their work, and what its impact was. Data were collected from 10 women operators working in cellular manufacturing, 2 foremen, and 1 forewoman. The interviewees selected by the management had converted to…

  19. Just-in-Time Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Gregor M.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview and implementation guidelines of Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT), an interactive engagement pedagogy used across disciplines and across the academy, now in its fourteenth year. The heart of JiTT pedagogy is Web-based pre-instruction assignments called warm-ups, with some colorful local variations, such as GeoBytes in…

  20. A clinically integrated curriculum in Evidence-based Medicine for just-in-time learning through on-the-job training: The EU-EBM project

    PubMed Central

    Coppus, Sjors FPJ; Emparanza, Jose I; Hadley, Julie; Kulier, Regina; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Burls, Amanda; Cabello, Juan B; Decsi, Tamas; Horvath, Andrea R; Kaczor, Marcin; Zanrei, Gianni; Pierer, Karin; Stawiarz, Katarzyna; Kunz, Regina; Mol, Ben WJ; Khan, Khalid S

    2007-01-01

    Background Over the last years key stake holders in the healthcare sector have increasingly recognised evidence based medicine (EBM) as a means to improving the quality of healthcare. However, there is considerable uncertainty about the best way to disseminate basic knowledge of EBM. As a result, huge variation in EBM educational provision, setting, duration, intensity, content, and teaching methodology exists across Europe and worldwide. Most courses for health care professionals are delivered outside the work context ('stand alone') and lack adaptation to the specific needs for EBM at the learners' workplace. Courses with modern 'adaptive' EBM teaching that employ principles of effective continuing education might fill that gap. We aimed to develop a course for post-graduate education which is clinically integrated and allows maximum flexibility for teachers and learners. Methods A group of experienced EBM teachers, clinical epidemiologists, clinicians and educationalists from institutions from eight European countries participated. We used an established methodology of curriculum development to design a clinically integrated EBM course with substantial components of e-learning. An independent European steering committee provided input into the process. Results We defined explicit learning objectives about knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviour for the five steps of EBM. A handbook guides facilitator and learner through five modules with clinical and e-learning components. Focussed activities and targeted assignments round off the learning process, after which each module is formally assessed. Conclusion The course is learner-centred, problem-based, integrated with activities in the workplace and flexible. When successfully implemented, the course is designed to provide just-in-time learning through on-the-job-training, with the potential for teaching and learning to directly impact on practice. PMID:18042271

  1. Just-in-Time Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rollins, Suzy Pepper

    2016-01-01

    Most students have gaps in their background knowledge and basic skills-gaps that can stand in the way of learning new concepts. For example, a student may be excited about studying probability--until he realizes that today's lesson on probability will require him to use fractions. As his brain searches frantically for his dim recollection of the…

  2. Just-in-time in the infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Guarriello, M L

    1997-08-01

    We know that just-in-time (JIT) manufacturing is a set of philosophies, not a set of techniques. These same philosophies are embraced by the total quality management (TQM) school. The most important element of this philosophy is that of continuous improvement--the acceptance of constantly changing objectives as a departure from reliance on standard requirements. This fundamental concept drives other philosophical aspects such as improving utilization of resources (employee involvement, reduction of waste) and long-term success (customer focus, vendor partnerships). Clearly, these philosophies are applicable to all organizations and functions. Perhaps some of these philosophies are manifest by certain JIT principles that we might consider when we design organizational routines and practices. Why not apply what has been proven in the factory to the seemingly bureaucratic behaviors in the office.

  3. Just in Time to Flip Your Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasry, Nathaniel; Dugdale, Michael; Charles, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    With advocates like Sal Khan and Bill Gates, flipped classrooms are attracting an increasing amount of media and research attention.2 We had heard Khan's TED talk and were aware of the concept of inverted pedagogies in general. Yet it really hit home when we accidentally flipped our classroom. Our objective was to better prepare our students for class. We set out to effectively move some of our course content outside of class and decided to tweak the Just-in-Time Teaching approach (JiTT).3 To our surprise, this tweak—which we like to call the flip-JiTT—ended up completely flipping our classroom. What follows is narrative of our experience and a procedure that any teacher can use to extend JiTT to a flipped classroom.

  4. How to Implement JITT - Just In Time Teaching?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Carolina; Hay, Katrina

    2010-03-01

    Reforms in education and the desire to improve the quality of learning were the incentive to search for more efficient teaching strategies [1]. Here is presented Just In Time Teaching, JITT, which is an exciting methodology [2] intended to engage students by using feedback from pre-class web assignments. In this process the students are more in control of the learning process and they become more active and interested learners. Even though some examples from physics are presented, this method can be successfully implemented in almost all the fields. The implementation of this method at SUNY Oswego, and Pacific Lutheran University is discussed. [4pt] [1]John D. Bransford, Ann L. Brown, and Rodney R. Cocking - editors, How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School, Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning; National Research Council; National Academy Press 1999[0pt] [2] Gregor M. Novak, Evelyn T. Patterson, Andrew D. Gavrin and Wolfgang Christian, Just in Time Teaching -- Blending Active Learning with Web Technology, Prentice Hall Series in Educational Innovation, 1999.

  5. Applying Just-In-Time to Army Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    expeditious manner. The Just - in - Time management philosophy is one of the possible methods to accomplish this requirement. The foundation for analyzing the...application of Just - in - Time to Army operations includes a look at the history of Supply Chain Management and the history and development of Just - in - Time as...an element of Supply Chain Management. The examination of Just - in - Time and its critical elements includes an analysis of commercial applications

  6. Just in Time Manufacturing: A Migration from Materials Requirements Planning.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    JUST IN TIME MANUFACTURING : A...Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. AFIT/GCA/LAS/95S-5 JUST IN TIME MANUFACTURING : A MIGRATION FROM MATERIALS REQUIREMENTS PLANNING THESIS...Operations Management: Manufacturing and Services. Chicago: Irwin, 1995. Cheng, T. C. and S. Podolsky. Just - In - Time Manufacturing : An

  7. Just-in-Time Contracting in the Department of Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    Just - In - Time is a production process that has revolutionized the automobile, as well as many other industries over the past forty years. The major...issue in this thesis is: ’What is the potential impact of implementing Just - In - Time practices into the contracting process in the Department of Defense...is to determine the feasibility of implementing Just - In - Time contracting practices in the procurement of selected parts for the T56 engine. The intent

  8. Teaching undergraduate biomechanics with Just-in-Time Teaching.

    PubMed

    Riskowski, Jody L

    2015-06-01

    Biomechanics education is a vital component of kinesiology, sports medicine, and physical education, as well as for many biomedical engineering and bioengineering undergraduate programmes. Little research exists regarding effective teaching strategies for biomechanics. However, prior work suggests that student learning in undergraduate physics courses has been aided by using the Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT). As physics understanding plays a role in biomechanics understanding, the purpose of study was to evaluate the use of a JiTT framework in an undergraduate biomechanics course. This two-year action-based research study evaluated three JiTT frameworks: (1) no JiTT; (2) mathematics-based JiTT; and (3) concept-based JiTT. A pre- and post-course assessment of student learning used the biomechanics concept inventory and a biomechanics concept map. A general linear model assessed differences between the course assessments by JiTT framework in order to evaluate learning and teaching effectiveness. The results indicated significantly higher learning gains and better conceptual understanding in a concept-based JiTT course, relative to a mathematics-based JiTT or no JiTT course structure. These results suggest that a course structure involving concept-based questions using a JiTT strategy may be an effective method for engaging undergraduate students and promoting learning in biomechanics courses.

  9. A Tradeoff Analysis of Just-In-Time and Non Just-In-Time Inventory with Transportation Ramifications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    Defense Logistics Studies Information Exchange, September 1991. 11. Cheng, T. and S. Podolsky, Just - In - Time Manufacturing , 1st ed. Chapman & Hall...New Manufacturing Challenge, The Free Press, New York, NY, 1987. 14. Harrison, Alan, Just - In - Time Manufacturing in Perspective, Prentice-Hall

  10. Just-in-Time Teaching Techniques through Web Technologies for Vocational Students' Reading and Writing Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chantoem, Rewadee; Rattanavich, Saowalak

    2016-01-01

    This research compares the English language achievements of vocational students, their reading and writing abilities, and their attitudes towards learning English taught with just-in-time teaching techniques through web technologies and conventional methods. The experimental and control groups were formed, a randomized true control group…

  11. Just-in-Time Online Professional Development Activities for an Innovation in Small Rural Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamel, Christine; Allaire, Stephane; Turcotte, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the just-in-time online professional development offered to teachers in the Remote Networked Schools (RNS), a systemic initiative funded by the Quebec Ministry of Education (Canada), which aims at enriching the learning environment of small rural schools with the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs). The…

  12. Adopting Just-in-Time Teaching in the Context of an Elementary Science Education Methodology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osmond, Pamela; Goodnough, Karen

    2011-01-01

    In this self-study, Pamela, a new science teacher educator, adopted Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) in the context of an elementary science education methodology course. JiTT is a teaching and learning strategy involving interaction between web-based study assignments and face-to-face class sessions. Students respond electronically to web-based…

  13. Just in Time Research: Data Breaches in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grama, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    This "Just in Time" research is in response to recent discussions on the EDUCAUSE Higher Education Information Security Council (HEISC) discussion list about data breaches in higher education. Using data from the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, this research analyzes data breaches attributed to higher education. The results from this…

  14. Making Total Quality Management + Just-in-Time Manufacturing Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldrop, Phillip S.; Scott, Thomas E.

    2000-01-01

    In one case study, teamwork was implemented in mainstream production; in a second, teamwork was applied to an ad hoc project. The cases show that process technologies and management strategies such as just-in-time are not enough; selection of the appropriate mix of individuals with complementary traits is crucial. (SK)

  15. Just in Time Teaching: A Strategy to Encourage Students' Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    López Cupita, Lorena Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative research study was carried out with two groups of students at a beginner English level; the students were in the fourth semester of psychology at a Colombian university. The overall aim of this action research study was to analyze learners' perceptions of the strategy "Just in Time Teaching" in a web 2.0. The data were…

  16. Wireless just-in-time training of mobile skilled support personnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandera, Cesar; Marsico, Michael; Rosen, Mitchel; Schlegel, Barry

    2006-05-01

    Skilled Support Personnel (SSP) serve emergency response organizations during an emergency incident, and include laborers, operating engineers, carpenters, ironworkers, sanitation workers and utility workers. SSP called to an emergency incident rarely have recent detailed training on the chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and/or explosives (CBRNE) agents or the personal protection equipment (PPE) relevant to the incident. This increases personal risk to the SSP and mission risk at the incident site. Training for SSP has been identified as a critical need by the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, Worker Education and Training Program. We present a system being developed to address this SSP training shortfall by exploiting a new training paradigm called just-in-time training (JITT) made possible by advances in distance learning and cellular telephony. In addition to the current conventional training at regularly scheduled instructional events, SSP called to an emergency incident will have secure access to short (<5 minutes) training modules specific to the incident and derived from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Disaster Site Worker Course. To increase retention, each learning module incorporates audio, video, interactive simulations, graphics, animation, and assessment designed for the user interface of most current cell phones. Engineering challenges include compatibility with current cell phone technologies and wireless service providers, integration with the incident management system, and SCORM compliance.

  17. Just-in-time Database-Driven Web Applications

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    "Just-in-time" database-driven Web applications are inexpensive, quickly-developed software that can be put to many uses within a health care organization. Database-driven Web applications garnered 73873 hits on our system-wide intranet in 2002. They enabled collaboration and communication via user-friendly Web browser-based interfaces for both mission-critical and patient-care-critical functions. Nineteen database-driven Web applications were developed. The application categories that comprised 80% of the hits were results reporting (27%), graduate medical education (26%), research (20%), and bed availability (8%). The mean number of hits per application was 3888 (SD = 5598; range, 14-19879). A model is described for just-in-time database-driven Web application development and an example given with a popular HTML editor and database program. PMID:14517109

  18. Just-in-time automated counseling for physical activity promotion.

    PubMed

    Bickmore, Timothy; Gruber, Amanda; Intille, Stephen

    2008-11-06

    Preliminary results from a field study into the efficacy of automated health behavior counseling delivered at the moment of user decision-making compared to the same counseling delivered at the end of the day are reported. The study uses an animated PDA-based advisor with an integrated accelerometer that can engage users in dialogues about their physical activity throughout the day. Preliminary results indicate health counseling is more effective when delivered just-in-time than when delivered retrospectively.

  19. HOPE: Just-in-time Python compiler for astrophysical computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akeret, Joel; Gamper, Lukas; Amara, Adam; Refregier, Alexandre

    2014-11-01

    HOPE is a specialized Python just-in-time (JIT) compiler designed for numerical astrophysical applications. HOPE focuses on a subset of the language and is able to translate Python code into C++ while performing numerical optimization on mathematical expressions at runtime. To enable the JIT compilation, the user only needs to add a decorator to the function definition. By using HOPE, the user benefits from being able to write common numerical code in Python while getting the performance of compiled implementation.

  20. Just-in-Time Effects on Peacetime Efficiency and Wartime Readiness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    just - in - time (JIT) logistics in support of a major theater war. It defense just - in - time logistics and analyzes...the reasons the Army adopted just - in - time principles. The study also shows the peacetime efficiencies of just - in - time logistics and how they may be...Army in the last century and examines the reasons for the adoption of just - in - time logistics. In the examination it defense just - in - time

  1. [Just-in-time initiation of optimal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Tom; Kooman, Jeroen P; van der Sande, Frank M

    2010-01-01

    The IDEAL trial shows that the decision to start renal replacement treatment should not depend on GFR alone, but should be taken on the basis of clinical parameters. Quality of Life (QoL) questionnaires and bio-impedance analysis are potential tools for detecting subtle changes in the predialysis clinic. Too early an initiation of dialysis may be deleterious for the patient and the healthcare system. We are convinced that ESRD patients should be informed about intensive haemodialysis (HD), especially nocturnal (home) HD, as the best available dialysis modality. There is substantial evidence which shows that intensive HD improves clinical, biochemical and biological parameters, and may even prolong survival. We believe that 'just-in-time delivery of intensive haemodialysis' may result in optimised QoL and reduced economic burden.

  2. Just-in-time classifiers for recurrent concepts.

    PubMed

    Alippi, Cesare; Boracchi, Giacomo; Roveri, Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Just-in-time (JIT) classifiers operate in evolving environments by classifying instances and reacting to concept drift. In stationary conditions, a JIT classifier improves its accuracy over time by exploiting additional supervised information coming from the field. In nonstationary conditions, however, the classifier reacts as soon as concept drift is detected; the current classification setup is discarded and a suitable one activated to keep the accuracy high. We present a novel generation of JIT classifiers able to deal with recurrent concept drift by means of a practical formalization of the concept representation and the definition of a set of operators working on such representations. The concept-drift detection activity, which is crucial in promptly reacting to changes exactly when needed, is advanced by considering change-detection tests monitoring both inputs and classes distributions.

  3. Chinese disasters and just-in-time education.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingyun; Chen, Yanwen; Chotani, Rashid A; Laporte, Ronald E; Ardalan, Ali; Shubnikov, Eugene; Linkov, Fania; Huang, Jesse

    2010-01-01

    Just-in-time ( JIT) Educational Strategy has been applied successfully to share scientific knowledge about disasters in several countries. This strategy was introduced to China in 2008 with the hopes to quickly disseminate accurate scientific data to the population, and it was applied during the Sichuan Earthquake and Influenza A (H1N1) outbreak. Implementation of this strategy likely educated between 10,000 and 20,000,000 people. The efforts demonstrated that an effective JIT strategy impacted millions of people in China after a disaster occurs as a disaster mitigation education method. This paper describes the Chinese JIT approach, and discusses methodologies for implementing JIT lectures in the context of China's medical and public health system.

  4. Just in time connectivity for large spiking networks

    PubMed Central

    Lytton, William W.; Omurtag, Ahmet; Neymotin, Samuel A; Hines, Michael L

    2008-01-01

    The scale of large neuronal network simulations is memory-limited due to the need to store connectivity information: connectivity storage grows as the square of neuron number up to anatomically-relevant limits. Using the NEURON simulator as a discrete-event simulator (no integration), we explored the consequences of avoiding the space costs of connectivity through regenerating connectivity parameters when needed – just-in-time after a presynaptic cell fires. We explored various strategies for automated generation of one or more of the basic static connectivity parameters: delays, postsynaptic cell identities and weights, as well as run-time connectivity state: the event queue. Comparison of the JitCon implementation to NEURON’s standard NetCon connectivity method showed substantial space savings, with associated run-time penalty. Although JitCon saved space by eliminating connectivity parameters, larger simulations were still memory-limited due to growth of the synaptic event queue. We therefore designed a JitEvent algorithm that only added items to the queue when required: instead of alerting multiple postsynaptic cells, a spiking presynaptic cell posted a callback event at the shortest synaptic delay time. At the time of the callback, this same presynaptic cell directly notified the first postsynaptic cell and generated another self-callback for the next delay time. The JitEvent implementation yielded substantial additional time and space savings. We conclude that just-in-time strategies are necessary for very large network simulations but that a variety of alternative strategies should be considered whose optimality will depend on the characteristics of the simulation to be run. PMID:18533821

  5. Just-in-time connectivity for large spiking networks.

    PubMed

    Lytton, William W; Omurtag, Ahmet; Neymotin, Samuel A; Hines, Michael L

    2008-11-01

    The scale of large neuronal network simulations is memory limited due to the need to store connectivity information: connectivity storage grows as the square of neuron number up to anatomically relevant limits. Using the NEURON simulator as a discrete-event simulator (no integration), we explored the consequences of avoiding the space costs of connectivity through regenerating connectivity parameters when needed: just in time after a presynaptic cell fires. We explored various strategies for automated generation of one or more of the basic static connectivity parameters: delays, postsynaptic cell identities, and weights, as well as run-time connectivity state: the event queue. Comparison of the JitCon implementation to NEURON's standard NetCon connectivity method showed substantial space savings, with associated run-time penalty. Although JitCon saved space by eliminating connectivity parameters, larger simulations were still memory limited due to growth of the synaptic event queue. We therefore designed a JitEvent algorithm that added items to the queue only when required: instead of alerting multiple postsynaptic cells, a spiking presynaptic cell posted a callback event at the shortest synaptic delay time. At the time of the callback, this same presynaptic cell directly notified the first postsynaptic cell and generated another self-callback for the next delay time. The JitEvent implementation yielded substantial additional time and space savings. We conclude that just-in-time strategies are necessary for very large network simulations but that a variety of alternative strategies should be considered whose optimality will depend on the characteristics of the simulation to be run.

  6. Just-in-Time Video Laryngoscopy Versus Direct Laryngoscopy for Neonatal Intubation.

    PubMed

    Grgurich, Erin; Arnemann, Cynthia; Amon, Kim; Horton, Rose; Carlson, Jestin N

    As neonatal endotracheal intubation (ETI) is a low-frequency, high-consequence event, it is essential that providers have access to resources to aid in ETI. We sought to determine the impact of video laryngoscopy (VL) with just-in-time training on intubation outcomes over direct laryngoscopy (DL) when performed by neonatal nurses. We conducted a prospective, randomized, crossover study with neonatal nurses employed at a level 2 neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Nurses performed both DL and VL on a neonatal mannequin using a CMAC (Karl Storz Corp, Tuttlingen, Germany) either with the assistance of the screen (VL) or without (DL). Before performing the intubation, providers were given a just-in-time, brief education presentation and allowed to practice with the device. Each ETI attempt was reviewed to obtain the percentage of glottic opening (POGO) score, time to intubation (TTI, time from insertion of the blade into the mouth until the first breath was delivered), and time from blade insertion until the best POGO score. We enrolled 19 participants, with a median (interquartile range) of 20 (9-26) years of experience and having a median of 2 (1-3) intubations within the past year. None had used VL in the NICU previously. Median TTI did not differ between DL and VL: 19.9 (15.3-41.5) vs 20.3 (17.9-24.4) (P = 1). POGO scores and the number of attempts also did not differ between DL and VL. In our simulated setting, just-in-time VL training provided similar intubation outcomes compared with DL in ETI performed by neonatal nurses. Just-in-time VL education may be an alternative to traditional DL for neonatal intubations.

  7. A practical application of just-in-time.

    PubMed

    Wormsley, J M

    1986-10-01

    During the 1950s, the Japanese recognized that they would have to upgrade their manufacturing operations significantly if they were going to make inroads into world markets. One of the targets they set for themselves was to eliminate waste, particularly, excess inventory. The Toyota Company originated a concept called kanban hoshiki, which, when translated, means "card system". The name refers to the use of tags (cards) to track the flow of work-in-progress inventory. On this side of the Pacific, the kanban hoshiki inventory management system has been renamed Just-in-Time. The basic premise of JIT is that inventory is an evil presence that drains company cash flow, contributes to wast and misuse of company assets, takes up valuable space, and undermines company profitability. The principal goal of JIT, then, is to get as close to zero inventory as possible. JIT has been applied with success in large manufacturing industries and recently has found a home in small business as well. A growing number of hospitals are also experimenting with the JIT concept, sometimes under the name of stockless purchasing.

  8. Just In-Time Maintenance of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    DR. Alexander G. Parlos

    2002-01-22

    The goal of this project has been to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a new technology for maintenance engineering: a Just-In-Time Maintenance (JITM) system for rotating machines. The JITM system is based on several key developments at Texas A and M over the past ten years in emerging intelligent information technologies, which if integrated into a single system could provide a revolutionary approach in the way maintenance is performed. Rotating machines, such as induction motors, range from a few horse power (hp) to several thousand hp in size, and they are widely used in nuclear power plants and in other industries. Forced outages caused by induction motor failures are the reason for as much as 15% - 40% of production costs to be attributable to maintenance, whereas plant shutdowns caused by induction motor failures result in daily financial losses to the utility and process industries of $1 M or more. The basic components of the JITM system are the available machine sensors, that is electric current sensors and accelerometers, and the computational algorithms used in the analysis and interpretation of the occurring incipient failures. The JITM system can reduce the costs attributable to maintenance by about 40% and it can lower the maintenance budgets of power and process plants by about 35%, while requiring no additional sensor installation. As a result, the JITM system can improve the competitiveness of US nuclear utilities at minimal additional cost.

  9. Unique Access to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Don

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the many learning opportunities that broadcast technology students at Ladue Horton Watkins High School in St. Louis, Missouri, experience because of their unique access to technology and methods of learning. Through scaffolding, stepladder techniques, and trial by fire, students learn to produce multiple television programs,…

  10. Just in Time in Space or Space Based JIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanOrsdel, Kathleen G.

    1995-01-01

    Our satellite systems are mega-buck items. In today's cost conscious world, we need to reduce the overall costs of satellites if our space program is to survive. One way to accomplish this would be through on-orbit maintenance of parts on the orbiting craft. In order to accomplish maintenance at a low cost I advance the hypothesis of having parts and pieces (spares) waiting. Waiting in the sense of having something when you need it, or just-in-time. The JIT concept can actually be applied to space processes. Its definition has to be changed just enough to encompass the needs of space. Our space engineers tell us which parts and pieces the satellite systems might be needing once in orbit. These items are stored in space for the time of need and can be ready when they are needed -- or Space Based JIT. When a system has a problem, the repair facility is near by and through human or robotics intervention, it can be brought back into service. Through a JIT process, overall system costs could be reduced as standardization of parts is built into satellite systems to facilitate reduced numbers of parts being stored. Launch costs will be contained as fewer spare pieces need to be included in the launch vehicle and the space program will continue to thrive even in this era of reduced budgets. The concept of using an orbiting parts servicer and human or robotics maintenance/repair capabilities would extend satellite life-cycle and reduce system replacement launches. Reductions of this nature throughout the satellite program result in cost savings.

  11. ConfChem Conference on Flipped Classroom: Just-in-Time Teaching in Chemistry Courses with Moodle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muzyka, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    In the Just-in-Time Teaching approach, a faculty member assigns readings to students before every class. After the students have done the daily reading, they access a short reading quiz using a course management system (e.g., Moodle). The faculty member uses student responses to the quiz in the preparation of the day's class material and is able…

  12. Just-in-Time Teaching in Statistics Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Monnie; Stokes, Lynne; Nadolsky, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Much has been made of the flipped classroom as an approach to teaching, and its effect on student learning. The volume of material showing that the flipped classroom technique helps students better learn and better retain material is increasing at a rapid pace. Coupled with this technique is active learning in the classroom. There are many ways of…

  13. JiTTree: A Just-in-Time Compiled Sparse GPU Volume Data Structure.

    PubMed

    Labschütz, Matthias; Bruckner, Stefan; Gröller, M Eduard; Hadwiger, Markus; Rautek, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Sparse volume data structures enable the efficient representation of large but sparse volumes in GPU memory for computation and visualization. However, the choice of a specific data structure for a given data set depends on several factors, such as the memory budget, the sparsity of the data, and data access patterns. In general, there is no single optimal sparse data structure, but a set of several candidates with individual strengths and drawbacks. One solution to this problem are hybrid data structures which locally adapt themselves to the sparsity. However, they typically suffer from increased traversal overhead which limits their utility in many applications. This paper presents JiTTree, a novel sparse hybrid volume data structure that uses just-in-time compilation to overcome these problems. By combining multiple sparse data structures and reducing traversal overhead we leverage their individual advantages. We demonstrate that hybrid data structures adapt well to a large range of data sets. They are especially superior to other sparse data structures for data sets that locally vary in sparsity. Possible optimization criteria are memory, performance and a combination thereof. Through just-in-time (JIT) compilation, JiTTree reduces the traversal overhead of the resulting optimal data structure. As a result, our hybrid volume data structure enables efficient computations on the GPU, while being superior in terms of memory usage when compared to non-hybrid data structures.

  14. Implementation and evaluation of a simulation curriculum for paediatric residency programs including just-in-time in situ mock codes

    PubMed Central

    Sam, Jonathan; Pierse, Michael; Al-Qahtani, Abdullah; Cheng, Adam

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop, implement and evaluate a simulation-based acute care curriculum in a paediatric residency program using an integrated and longitudinal approach. DESIGN: Curriculum framework consisting of three modular, year-specific courses and longitudinal just-in-time, in situ mock codes. SETTING: Paediatric residency program at BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia. INTERVENTIONS: The three year-specific courses focused on the critical first 5 min, complex medical management and crisis resource management, respectively. The just-in-time in situ mock codes simulated the acute deterioration of an existing ward patient, prepared the actual multidisciplinary code team, and primed the surrounding crisis support systems. Each curriculum component was evaluated with surveys using a five-point Likert scale. RESULTS: A total of 40 resident surveys were completed after each of the modular courses, and an additional 28 surveys were completed for the overall simulation curriculum. The highest Likert scores were for hands-on skill stations, immersive simulation environment and crisis resource management teaching. Survey results also suggested that just-in-time mock codes were realistic, reinforced learning, and prepared ward teams for patient deterioration. CONCLUSIONS: A simulation-based acute care curriculum was successfully integrated into a paediatric residency program. It provides a model for integrating simulation-based learning into other training programs, as well as a model for any hospital that wishes to improve paediatric resuscitation outcomes using just-in-time in situ mock codes. PMID:23372405

  15. Improved Access to Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Sandra; Simkins, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Describes efforts by principal of the Willow Elementary School in the Charter Oak Unified School District (California) to provide students with technology-enhanced access to information and learning resources to improve reading and mathematics skills. Includes list of the Web addresses for the skills software used at the school. (PKP)

  16. Delivering "Just-In-Time" Smoking Cessation Support Via Mobile Phones: Current Knowledge and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Felix

    2016-05-28

    Smoking lapses early on during a quit attempt are highly predictive of failing to quit. A large proportion of these lapses are driven by cravings brought about by situational and environmental cues. Use of cognitive-behavioral lapse prevention strategies to combat cue-induced cravings is associated with a reduced risk of lapse, but evidence is lacking in how these strategies can be effectively promoted. Unlike most traditional methods of delivering behavioral support, mobile phones can in principle deliver automated support, including lapse prevention strategy recommendations, Just-In-Time (JIT) for when a smoker is most vulnerable, and prevent early lapse. JIT support can be activated by smokers themselves (user-triggered), by prespecified rules (server-triggered) or through sensors that dynamically monitor a smoker's context and trigger support when a high risk environment is sensed (context-triggered), also known as a Just-In-Time Adaptive Intervention (JITAI). However, research suggests that user-triggered JIT cessation support is seldom used and existing server-triggered JIT support is likely to lack sufficient accuracy to effectively target high-risk situations in real time. Evaluations of mobile phone cessation interventions that include user and/or server-triggered JIT support have yet to adequately assess whether this improves management of high risk situations. While context-triggered systems have the greatest potential to deliver JIT support, there are, as yet, no impact evaluations of such systems. Although it may soon be feasible to learn about and monitor a smoker's context unobtrusively using their smartphone without burdensome data entry, there are several potential advantages to involving the smoker in data collection.

  17. The ’Just-in-Time’ Force for the Army.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Administrations, lies in effective incorporation of the Army National Guard as a ’ Just - in - Time ’ force. This paper contends that the ARNO fills critical needs...today and will be able to fulfill needed roles on a ’ just - in - time ’ basis as the Army transitions into the 21st century. Different training approaches

  18. Transforming a Business Statistics Course with Just-in-Time Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bangs, Joann

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes changing the way a business statistics course is taught through the use of just-in-time teaching methods. Implementing this method allowed for more time in the class to be spent focused on problem solving, resulting in students being able to handle more difficult problems. Students' perceptions of the just-in-time assignments…

  19. The School Librarian as Program Administrator: Just-in-Time Librarianship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    By applying just-in-time philosophy to today's school libraries, librarians can fulfill the role of program administrator by continuing to provide the resources students and faculty deserve, exactly at their individual points of need. Just-in-time librarianship is a mindset that could prove unsettling for some school librarians. The main facets of…

  20. Surface contact stimulates the just-in-time deployment of bacterial adhesins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guanglai; Brown, Pamela J.B.; Tang, Jay X.; Xu, Jing; Quardokus, Ellen M.; Fuqua, Clay; Brun, Yves V.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The attachment of bacteria to surfaces provides advantages such as increasing nutrient access and resistance to environmental stress. Attachment begins with a reversible phase, often mediated by surface structures such as flagella and pili, followed by a transition to irreversible attachment, typically mediated by polysaccharides. Here we show that the interplay between pili and flagellum rotation stimulates the rapid transition between reversible and polysaccharide-mediated irreversible attachment. We found that reversible attachment of Caulobacter crescentus cells is mediated by motile cells bearing pili and that their contact with a surface results in the rapid pili-dependent arrest of flagellum rotation and concurrent stimulation of polar holdfast adhesive polysaccharide. Similar stimulation of polar adhesin production by surface contact occurs in Asticcacaulis biprosthecum and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Therefore, single bacterial cells respond to their initial contact with surfaces by triggering just-in-time adhesin production. This mechanism restricts stable attachment to intimate surface interactions, thereby maximizing surface attachment, discouraging non-productive self-adherence, and preventing curing of the adhesive. PMID:22053824

  1. Surface contact stimulates the just-in-time deployment of bacterial adhesins.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanglai; Brown, Pamela J B; Tang, Jay X; Xu, Jing; Quardokus, Ellen M; Fuqua, Clay; Brun, Yves V

    2012-01-01

    The attachment of bacteria to surfaces provides advantages such as increasing nutrient access and resistance to environmental stress. Attachment begins with a reversible phase, often mediated by surface structures such as flagella and pili, followed by a transition to irreversible attachment, typically mediated by polysaccharides. Here we show that the interplay between pili and flagellum rotation stimulates the rapid transition between reversible and polysaccharide-mediated irreversible attachment. We found that reversible attachment of Caulobacter crescentus cells is mediated by motile cells bearing pili and that their contact with a surface results in the rapid pili-dependent arrest of flagellum rotation and concurrent stimulation of polar holdfast adhesive polysaccharide. Similar stimulation of polar adhesin production by surface contact occurs in Asticcacaulis biprosthecum and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Therefore, single bacterial cells respond to their initial contact with surfaces by triggering just-in-time adhesin production. This mechanism restricts stable attachment to intimate surface interactions, thereby maximizing surface attachment, discouraging non-productive self-adherence, and preventing curing of the adhesive.

  2. The Combination of Just-in-Time Teaching and Wikispaces in Physics Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohottala, Hashini E.

    2013-01-01

    The general student population enrolled in today's physics classrooms is diverse. They come from a variety of different educational backgrounds. Some demonstrate a good knowledge of natural laws of physics with a better understanding of mathematical concepts, while others show a fair knowledge in fundamentals of physics with a minimum knowledge in mathematics. There are few who have not been exposed to physics or mathematics in their high schools (or at least they claim it to be the case). In addition, now we have "nontraditional" students: working part-time students, older students, commuting students, and, occasionally, military veterans. Regardless of the background, the majority of the students show little or no interest in physics and exhibit anxiety toward learning the subject. In order to address such a diverse and often unmotivated student population, and excite them about physics in a timely manner, we should deviate from conventional teaching techniques. Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) combined with wikis is an excellent way to accomplish this goal.

  3. Automatically Producing Accessible Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Iorio, Angelo; Feliziani, Antonio Angelo; Mirri, Silvia; Salomoni, Paola; Vitali, Fabio

    2006-01-01

    The "Anywhere, Anytime, Anyway" slogan is frequently associated to e-learning with the aim to emphasize the wide access offered by on-line education. Otherwise, learning materials are currently created to be used with a specific technology or configuration, leaving out from the virtual classroom students who have limited access capabilities and,…

  4. Computer Aided Process Planning -- A Path to Just-in-Time Manufacturing for Shipyards (The National Shipbuilding Research Program)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    Just - In - Time Manufacturing for Shipyards U.S. DEPARTMENT OF...Shipbuilding Research Program 1987 Ship Production Symposium Paper No.14: Computer Aided Process Planning -- A Path to Just - In - Time Manufacturing for...SECTION OF THE SOCIETY OF NAVAL ARCHITECTS AND MARINE ENGINEERS Computer Aided Process Planning—A Path to Just - in - Time Manufacturing for

  5. Transforming Common-Sense Beliefs into Newtonian Thinking through Just-in-Time Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Formica, Sarah P.; Easley, Jessica L.; Spraker, Mark C.

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether teaching an introductory physics course with a traditional lecture style or with Just-in-Time teaching (a student-centered, interactive-engagement style) will help students to better understand Newtonian concepts, such as Newton's Third Law, 222 students in introductory physics courses taught by traditional lecture styles and…

  6. Blogs and Wikis as Instructional Tools: A Social Software Adaptation of Just-in-Time Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higdon, Jude; Topaz, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) methodology uses Web-based tools to gather student responses to questions on preclass reading assignments. However, the technological requirements of JiTT and the content-specific nature of the questions may prevent some instructors from implementing it. Our own JiTT implementation uses publicly and freely available…

  7. Open Access Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentor, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Educational institutions are increasingly adopting "closed" learning environments that hide learning materials in password-protected areas. While this may be a logical solution to a range of problems, much is lost in this mode of course delivery. Although there are logical reasons for moving toward closed environments, we may be erring…

  8. Just-in-Time Information Improved Decision-Making in Primary Care: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Jessie; Hogg, William; Campbell, Craig; Rowan, Margo

    2008-01-01

    Background The “Just-in-time Information” (JIT) librarian consultation service was designed to provide rapid information to answer primary care clinical questions during patient hours. This study evaluated whether information provided by librarians to answer clinical questions positively impacted time, decision-making, cost savings and satisfaction. Methods and Finding A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted between October 2005 and April 2006. A total of 1,889 questions were sent to the service by 88 participants. The object of the randomization was a clinical question. Each participant had clinical questions randomly allocated to both intervention (librarian information) and control (no librarian information) groups. Participants were trained to send clinical questions via a hand-held device. The impact of the information provided by the service (or not provided by the service), additional resources and time required for both groups was assessed using a survey sent 24 hours after a question was submitted. The average time for JIT librarians to respond to all questions was 13.68 minutes/question (95% CI, 13.38 to 13.98). The average time for participants to respond their control questions was 20.29 minutes/question (95% CI, 18.72 to 21.86). Using an impact assessment scale rating cognitive impact, participants rated 62.9% of information provided to intervention group questions as having a highly positive cognitive impact. They rated 14.8% of their own answers to control question as having a highly positive cognitive impact, 44.9% has having a negative cognitive impact, and 24.8% with no cognitive impact at all. In an exit survey measuring satisfaction, 86% (62/72 responses) of participants scored the service as having a positive impact on care and 72% (52/72) indicated that they would use the service frequently if it were continued. Conclusions In this study, providing timely information to clinical questions had a highly positive impact on decision

  9. Just-in-Time Training: A Novel Approach to Quality Improvement Education.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Allison; Park, Nesha D; Smith, Denise; Tracy, Kelly; Reed, Danielle J W; Olsen, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    Just-in-time training (JITT) is accepted in medical education as a training method for newer concepts or seldom-performed procedures. Providing JITT to a large nursing staff may be an effective method to teach quality improvement (QI) initiatives. We sought to determine if JITT could increase knowledge of a specific nutrition QI initiative. Members of the nutrition QI team interviewed staff using the Frontline Contextual Inquiry to assess knowledge regarding the specific QI project. The inquiry was completed pre- and post-JITT. A JITT educational cart was created, which allowed trainers to bring the educational information to the bedside for a short, small group educational session. The results demonstrated a marked improvement in the knowledge of the frontline staff regarding our Vermont Oxford Network involvement and the specifics of the nutrition QI project. Just-in-time training can be a valuable and effective method to disseminate QI principles to a large audience of staff members.

  10. Just-in-Time Teaching for Food Science: Creating an Active Learner Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrs, Kathleen A.; Chism, Grady W., III

    2005-01-01

    Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) combines the best features of traditional in-class instruction with the communication potential available via the Web. We describe here how JiTT has been used in Biology Education and how it can be used in Food Science Education. JiTT uses Web-based "Warm Up" assignments due before class to stimulate critical thinking…

  11. Just-in-Time Technology to Encourage Incremental, Dietary Behavior Change

    PubMed Central

    Intille, Stephen S.; Kukla, Charles; Farzanfar, Ramesh; Bakr, Waseem

    2003-01-01

    Our multi-disciplinary team is developing mobile computing software that uses “just-in-time” presentation of information to motivate behavior change. Using a participatory design process, preliminary interviews have helped us to establish 10 design goals. We have employed some to create a prototype of a tool that encourages better dietary decision making through incremental, just-in-time motivation at the point of purchase. PMID:14728379

  12. Coping with SLE: just in case vs. just in time: nurse's perspective.

    PubMed

    Brown, S

    2013-10-01

    This paper considers the experiences of people with lupus in comparison with those with diabetes, and discusses the impact of lupus specialist nurses in information-giving and education under the guise of 'just in case' vs. 'just in time'. Now recognized as a difficult condition to diagnose, lupus can lead to significant worry and distress especially during delays to diagnosis and times of high disease activity. Providing appropriate, individualized information to people with lupus is embedded in specialist nursing practice and enables individuals to use the tools of self-management approaches in gaining control over everyday symptoms.

  13. Just-in-time coding of the problem list in a clinical environment.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, J. J.; Collins, J.; Sorrentino, C.; Campbell, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    Clinically useful problem lists are essential to the CPR. Providing a terminology that is standardized and understood by all clinicians is a major challenge. UNMC has developed a lexicon to support their problem list. Using a just-in-time coding strategy, the lexicon is maintained and extended prospectively in a dynamic clinical environment. The terms in the lexicon are mapped to ICD-9-CM, NANDA, and SNOMED International classification schemes. Currently, the lexicon contains 12,000 terms. This process of development and maintenance of the lexicon is described. PMID:9929226

  14. Uncertainty in Damage Detection, Dynamic Propagation and Just-in-Time Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-03

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0216 Uncertainty in Damage Detection, Dynamic Propagation and Just-in- Time Networks Harvey Banks North Carolina State University...ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 The public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for... Time Networks 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0188 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Harvey Banks 5d.  PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  15. Just-in-Time Logistics: Does It Fulfill the Surface Navy’s Requirements to Support the National Military Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    most prominent of the changes implemented from industry has been the Just - in - Time logistics model. This model requires reduced inventories and greater...repair parts distribution capabilities, and conditions of the battlefield with fleet requirements will provide a framework for determining if Just - in - Time logistics

  16. Just-in-time Design and Additive Manufacture of Patient-specific Medical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shidid, Darpan; Leary, Martin; Choong, Peter; Brandt, Milan

    Recent advances in medical imaging and manufacturing science have enabled the design and production of complex, patient-specific orthopaedic implants. Additive Manufacture (AM) generates three-dimensional structures layer by layer, and is not subject to the constraints associated with traditional manufacturing methods. AM provides significant opportunities for the design of novel geometries and complex lattice structures with enhanced functional performance. However, the design and manufacture of patient-specific AM implant structures requires unique expertise in handling various optimization platforms. Furthermore, the design process for complex structures is computationally intensive. The primary aim of this research is to enable the just-in-time customisation of AM prosthesis; whereby AM implant design and manufacture be completed within the time constraints of a single surgical procedure, while minimising prosthesis mass and optimising the lattice structure to match the stiffness of the surrounding bone tissue. In this research, a design approach using raw CT scan data is applied to the AM manufacture of femoral prosthesis. Using the proposed just-in-time concept, the mass of the prosthesis was rapidly designed and manufactured while satisfying the associated structural requirements. Compressive testing of lattice structures manufactured using proposed method shows that the load carrying capacity of the resected composite bone can be recovered by up to 85% and the compressive stiffness of the AM prosthesis is statistically indistinguishable from the stiffness of the initial bone.

  17. {open_quotes}Just-in-time inventory{close_quotes} proceed with caution!

    SciTech Connect

    Katterhenry, W.E.

    1995-08-01

    Just when the power generation industry was stabilizing along came mega government regulations and changing economic conditions that threw a monkey wrench into the works. Although improved inventory practices have helped solve some coal problems, other still remain. The Clean Air Act has resulted in fuel switching, blending, equipment changes, and other factors, all contributing to power plant personnel grey hair. Then along came Just-In-Time inventory practices. Not only is the plant required to make all these changes to meet regulatory requirements, but reduce the quantity of fuel in inventory to unheard of low levels. Why is it so difficult to precisely account for coal in inventory? After all, inventory is a simple matter of accurately measuring the coal coming in to the plant, measuring the coal used by the plant, and conducting an accurate physical inventory to measure the remaining coal. Add to this, a major coal inventory reduction policy, when base maps are not maintained or updated and are, therefore, not likely to be accurate. Some coal may have been stored below the prevailing water table, rendering the coal unusable. Weather conditions, such as major ice storms can render much of the coal unburnable. Unless accounted for, these things reduce the perceived amount of coal in inventory. This presentation will address these issues to assist in preventing potential unscheduled plant shut down and the need to purchase unscheduled blocks of emergency power. Just-In-Time Inventory isn`t as straightforward as first meets the eye.

  18. Just-in-Time Compound Pooling Increases Primary Screening Capacity without Compromising Screening Quality.

    PubMed

    Elkin, L L; Harden, D G; Saldanha, S; Ferguson, H; Cheney, D L; Pieniazek, S N; Maloney, D P; Zewinski, J; O'Connell, J; Banks, M

    2015-06-01

    Compound pooling, or multiplexing more than one compound per well during primary high-throughput screening (HTS), is a controversial approach with a long history of limited success. Many issues with this approach likely arise from long-term storage of library plates containing complex mixtures of compounds at high concentrations. Due to the historical difficulties with using multiplexed library plates, primary HTS often uses a one-compound-one-well approach. However, as compound collections grow, innovative strategies are required to increase the capacity of primary screening campaigns. Toward this goal, we have developed a novel compound pooling method that increases screening capacity without compromising data quality. This method circumvents issues related to the long-term storage of complex compound mixtures by using acoustic dispensing to enable "just-in-time" compound pooling directly in the assay well immediately prior to assay. Using this method, we can pool two compounds per well, effectively doubling the capacity of a primary screen. Here, we present data from pilot studies using just-in-time pooling, as well as data from a large >2-million-compound screen using this approach. These data suggest that, for many targets, this method can be used to vastly increase screening capacity without significant reduction in the ability to detect screening hits.

  19. Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Array: A Just-In-Time Multiplexed Protein Expression and Purification Platform

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Systematic study of proteins requires the availability of thousands of proteins in functional format. However, traditional recombinant protein expression and purification methods have many drawbacks for such study at the proteome level. We have developed an innovative in situ protein expression and capture system, namely NAPPA (nucleic acid programmable protein array), where C-terminal tagged proteins are expressed using an in vitro expression system and efficiently captured/purified by antitag antibodies coprinted at each spot. The NAPPA technology presented in this chapter enable researchers to produce and display fresh proteins just in time in a multiplexed high-throughput fashion and utilize them for various downstream biochemical researches of interest. This platform could revolutionize the field of functional proteomics with it ability to produce thousands of spatially separated proteins in high density with narrow dynamic rand of protein concentrations, reproducibly and functionally. PMID:21943897

  20. Nucleic acid programmable protein array a just-in-time multiplexed protein expression and purification platform.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Systematic study of proteins requires the availability of thousands of proteins in functional format. However, traditional recombinant protein expression and purification methods have many drawbacks for such study at the proteome level. We have developed an innovative in situ protein expression and capture system, namely NAPPA (nucleic acid programmable protein array), where C-terminal tagged proteins are expressed using an in vitro expression system and efficiently captured/purified by antitag antibodies coprinted at each spot. The NAPPA technology presented in this chapter enable researchers to produce and display fresh proteins just in time in a multiplexed high-throughput fashion and utilize them for various downstream biochemical researches of interest. This platform could revolutionize the field of functional proteomics with it ability to produce thousands of spatially separated proteins in high density with narrow dynamic rand of protein concentrations, reproducibly and functionally.

  1. Diagnostic instrumentation aboard ISS: just-in-time training for non-physician crewmembers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foale, C. Michael; Kaleri, Alexander Y.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Melton, Shannon; Martin, David; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The performance of complex tasks on the International Space Station (ISS) requires significant preflight crew training commitments and frequent skill and knowledge refreshment. This report documents a recently developed "just-in-time" training methodology, which integrates preflight hardware familiarization and procedure training with an on-orbit CD-ROM-based skill enhancement. This "just-in-time" concept was used to support real-time remote expert guidance to complete ultrasound examinations using the ISS Human Research Facility (HRF). METHODS: An American and Russian ISS crewmember received 2 h of "hands on" ultrasound training 8 mo prior to the on-orbit ultrasound exam. A CD-ROM-based Onboard Proficiency Enhancement (OPE) interactive multimedia program consisting of memory enhancing tutorials, and skill testing exercises, was completed by the crewmember 6 d prior to the on-orbit ultrasound exam. The crewmember was then remotely guided through a thoracic, vascular, and echocardiographic examination by ultrasound imaging experts. RESULTS: Results of the CD-ROM-based OPE session were used to modify the instructions during a complete 35-min real-time thoracic, cardiac, and carotid/jugular ultrasound study. Following commands from the ground-based expert, the crewmember acquired all target views and images without difficulty. The anatomical content and fidelity of ultrasound video were adequate for clinical decision making. CONCLUSIONS: Complex ultrasound experiments with expert guidance were performed with high accuracy following limited preflight training and multimedia based in-flight review, despite a 2-s communication latency. In-flight application of multimedia proficiency enhancement software, coupled with real-time remote expert guidance, facilitates the successful performance of ultrasound examinations on orbit and may have additional terrestrial and space applications.

  2. Just in Time DSA-The Hanford Nuclear Safety Basis Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, S. J.; Buhl, A. R.

    2002-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) is responsible for 30 hazard category 2 and 3 nuclear facilities that are operated by its prime contractors, Fluor Hanford Incorporated (FHI), Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated (BHI) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The publication of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 830, Subpart B, Safety Basis Requirements (the Rule) in January 2001 imposed the requirement that the Documented Safety Analyses (DSA) for these facilities be reviewed against the requirements of the Rule. Those DSA that do not meet the requirements must either be upgraded to satisfy the Rule, or an exemption must be obtained. RL and its prime contractors have developed a Nuclear Safety Strategy that provides a comprehensive approach for supporting RL's efforts to meet its long term objectives for hazard category 2 and 3 facilities while also meeting the requirements of the Rule. This approach will result in a reduction of the total number of safety basis documents that must be developed and maintained to support the remaining mission and closure of the Hanford Site and ensure that the documentation that must be developed will support: compliance with the Rule; a ''Just-In-Time'' approach to development of Rule-compliant safety bases supported by temporary exemptions; and consolidation of safety basis documents that support multiple facilities with a common mission (e.g. decontamination, decommissioning and demolition [DD&D], waste management, surveillance and maintenance). This strategy provides a clear path to transition the safety bases for the various Hanford facilities from support of operation and stabilization missions through DD&D to accelerate closure. This ''Just-In-Time'' Strategy can also be tailored for other DOE Sites, creating the potential for large cost savings and schedule reductions throughout the DOE complex.

  3. Just-in-Time Teaching: A Tool for Enhancing Student Engagement in Advanced Foreign Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abreu, Laurel; Knouse, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Scholars have indicated a need for further research on effective pedagogical strategies designed for advanced foreign language courses in the postsecondary setting, especially in light of decreased enrollments at this level and the elimination of foreign language programs altogether in some institutions (Paesani & Allen, 2012). This article…

  4. Just-in-Time Information Presentation: Improving Learning a Troubleshooting Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kester, Liesbeth; Kirschner, Paul A.; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2006-01-01

    Troubleshooting in a practice situation requires two types of information, namely for reasoning about the problem-cause and for finding an adequate solution ("declarative information") and for manipulating the environment ("procedural information"). It is hypothesized that presenting this information piece-by-piece during practice (i.e.,…

  5. Assessing the Availability of Users to Engage in Just-in-Time Intervention in the Natural Environment.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Hillol; Sharmin, Moushumi; Ali, Amin Ahsan; Rahman, Md Mahbubur; Bari, Rummana; Hossain, Syed Monowar; Kumar, Santosh

    Wearable wireless sensors for health monitoring are enabling the design and delivery of just-in-time interventions (JITI). Critical to the success of JITI is to time its delivery so that the user is available to be engaged. We take a first step in modeling users' availability by analyzing 2,064 hours of physiological sensor data and 2,717 self-reports collected from 30 participants in a week-long field study. We use delay in responding to a prompt to objectively measure availability. We compute 99 features and identify 30 as most discriminating to train a machine learning model for predicting availability. We find that location, affect, activity type, stress, time, and day of the week, play significant roles in predicting availability. We find that users are least available at work and during driving, and most available when walking outside. Our model finally achieves an accuracy of 74.7% in 10-fold cross-validation and 77.9% with leave-one-subject-out.

  6. A data-driven soft sensor for needle deflection in heterogeneous tissue using just-in-time modelling.

    PubMed

    Rossa, Carlos; Lehmann, Thomas; Sloboda, Ronald; Usmani, Nawaid; Tavakoli, Mahdi

    2016-12-10

    Global modelling has traditionally been the approach taken to estimate needle deflection in soft tissue. In this paper, we propose a new method based on local data-driven modelling of needle deflection. External measurement of needle-tissue interactions is collected from several insertions in ex vivo tissue to form a cloud of data. Inputs to the system are the needle insertion depth, axial rotations, and the forces and torques measured at the needle base by a force sensor. When a new insertion is performed, the just-in-time learning method estimates the model outputs given the current inputs to the needle-tissue system and the historical database. The query is compared to every observation in the database and is given weights according to some similarity criteria. Only a subset of historical data that is most relevant to the query is selected and a local linear model is fit to the selected points to estimate the query output. The model outputs the 3D deflection of the needle tip and the needle insertion force. The proposed approach is validated in ex vivo multilayered biological tissue in different needle insertion scenarios. Experimental results in five different case studies indicate an accuracy in predicting needle deflection of 0.81 and 1.24 mm in the horizontal and vertical lanes, respectively, and an accuracy of 0.5 N in predicting the needle insertion force over 216 needle insertions.

  7. Assessing the Availability of Users to Engage in Just-in-Time Intervention in the Natural Environment

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Hillol; Sharmin, Moushumi; Ali, Amin Ahsan; Rahman, Md. Mahbubur; Bari, Rummana; Hossain, Syed Monowar; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Wearable wireless sensors for health monitoring are enabling the design and delivery of just-in-time interventions (JITI). Critical to the success of JITI is to time its delivery so that the user is available to be engaged. We take a first step in modeling users’ availability by analyzing 2,064 hours of physiological sensor data and 2,717 self-reports collected from 30 participants in a week-long field study. We use delay in responding to a prompt to objectively measure availability. We compute 99 features and identify 30 as most discriminating to train a machine learning model for predicting availability. We find that location, affect, activity type, stress, time, and day of the week, play significant roles in predicting availability. We find that users are least available at work and during driving, and most available when walking outside. Our model finally achieves an accuracy of 74.7% in 10-fold cross-validation and 77.9% with leave-one-subject-out. PMID:25798455

  8. MEDLINE as a Source of Just-in-Time Answers to Clinical Questions

    PubMed Central

    Demner-Fushman, Dina; Hauser, Susan E.; Humphrey, Susanne M.; Ford, Glenn M.; Jacobs, Joshua L.; Thoma, George R.

    2006-01-01

    Clinicians increasingly use handheld devices to support evidence-based practice and for clinical decision support. However, support of clinical decisions through information retrieval from MEDLINE® and other databases lags behind popular daily activities such as patient information or drug formulary look-up. The objective of the current study is to determine whether relevant information can be retrieved from MEDLINE to answer clinical questions using a handheld device at the point of care. Analysis of search and retrieval results for 108 clinical questions asked by members of clinical teams during 28 daily rounds in a 12-bed intensive care unit confirm MEDLINE as a potentially valuable resource for just-in-time answers to clinical questions. Answers to 93 (86%) questions were found in MEDLINE by two resident physicians using handheld devices. The majority of answers, 88.9% and 97.7% respectively, were found during rounds. Strategies that facilitated timely retrieval of results include using PubMed® Clinical Queries and Related Articles, spell check, and organizing retrieval results into topical clusters. Further possible improvements in organization of retrieval results such as automatic semantic clustering and providing patient outcome information along with the titles of the retrieved articles are discussed. PMID:17238329

  9. Micro-Randomized Trials: An Experimental Design for Developing Just-in-Time Adaptive Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Klasnja, Predrag; Hekler, Eric B.; Shiffman, Saul; Boruvka, Audrey; Almirall, Daniel; Tewari, Ambuj; Murphy, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This paper presents an experimental design, the micro-randomized trial, developed to support optimization of just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs). JITAIs are mHealth technologies that aim to deliver the right intervention components at the right times and locations to optimally support individuals’ health behaviors. Micro-randomized trials offer a way to optimize such interventions by enabling modeling of causal effects and time-varying effect moderation for individual intervention components within a JITAI. Methods The paper describes the micro-randomized trial design, enumerates research questions that this experimental design can help answer, and provides an overview of the data analyses that can be used to assess the causal effects of studied intervention components and investigate time-varying moderation of those effects. Results Micro-randomized trials enable causal modeling of proximal effects of the randomized intervention components and assessment of time-varying moderation of those effects. Conclusions Micro-randomized trials can help researchers understand whether their interventions are having intended effects, when and for whom they are effective, and what factors moderate the interventions’ effects, enabling creation of more effective JITAIs. PMID:26651463

  10. MEDLINE as a source of just-in-time answers to clinical questions.

    PubMed

    Demner-Fushman, Dina; Hauser, Susan E; Humphrey, Susanne M; Ford, Glenn M; Jacobs, Joshua L; Thoma, George R

    2006-01-01

    Clinicians increasingly use handheld devices to support evidence-based practice and for clinical decision support. However, support of clinical decisions through information retrieval from MEDLINE(R) and other databases lags behind popular daily activities such as patient information or drug formulary look-up. The objective of the current study is to determine whether relevant information can be retrieved from MEDLINE to answer clinical questions using a handheld device at the point of care. Analysis of search and retrieval results for 108 clinical questions asked by members of clinical teams during 28 daily rounds in a 12-bed intensive care unit confirm MEDLINE as a potentially valuable resource for just-in-time answers to clinical questions. Answers to 93 (86%) questions were found in MEDLINE by two resident physicians using handheld devices. The majority of answers, 88.9% and 97.7% respectively, were found during rounds. Strategies that facilitated timely retrieval of results include using PubMed(R) Clinical Queries and Related Articles, spell check, and organizing retrieval results into topical clusters. Further possible improvements in organization of retrieval results such as automatic semantic clustering and providing patient outcome information along with the titles of the retrieved articles are discussed.

  11. Just-in-time adaptive classifiers-part II: designing the classifier.

    PubMed

    Alippi, Cesare; Roveri, Manuel

    2008-12-01

    Aging effects, environmental changes, thermal drifts, and soft and hard faults affect physical systems by changing their nature and behavior over time. To cope with a process evolution adaptive solutions must be envisaged to track its dynamics; in this direction, adaptive classifiers are generally designed by assuming the stationary hypothesis for the process generating the data with very few results addressing nonstationary environments. This paper proposes a methodology based on k-nearest neighbor (NN) classifiers for designing adaptive classification systems able to react to changing conditions just-in-time (JIT), i.e., exactly when it is needed. k-NN classifiers have been selected for their computational-free training phase, the possibility to easily estimate the model complexity k and keep under control the computational complexity of the classifier through suitable data reduction mechanisms. A JIT classifier requires a temporal detection of a (possible) process deviation (aspect tackled in a companion paper) followed by an adaptive management of the knowledge base (KB) of the classifier to cope with the process change. The novelty of the proposed approach resides in the general framework supporting the real-time update of the KB of the classification system in response to novel information coming from the process both in stationary conditions (accuracy improvement) and in nonstationary ones (process tracking) and in providing a suitable estimate of k. It is shown that the classification system grants consistency once the change targets the process generating the data in a new stationary state, as it is the case in many real applications.

  12. Using Just in Time Teaching in a Global Climate Change Course to Address Misconceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuenemann, K. C.

    2013-12-01

    Just in Time Teaching (JiTT) is employed in an introductory Global Climate Change college course with the intention of addressing common misconceptions and climate myths. Students enter the course with a variety of prior knowledge and opinions on global warming, and JiTT can be used as a constructivist pedagogical approach to make use of this prior knowledge. Students are asked to watch a short video or do a reading, sometimes screen capture videos created by the professor as review of material from the previous class, a video available on the web from NASA or NOAA, for example, or a reading from an online article or their textbook. After the video or reading, students answer a question carefully designed to pry at a common misconception, or simply are asked for the 'muddiest point' that remains on the concept. This assignment is done the night before class using a web program. The program aggregates the answers in an organized way so the professor can use the answers to design the day's lesson to address common misconceptions or concerns students displayed in their answers, as well as quickly assign participation credit to students who completed the assignment. On the other hand, if students display that they have already mastered the material, the professor can confidently move on to the next concept. The JiTT pedagogical method personalizes each lecture period to the students in that particular class for maximum efficiency while catching and fixing misconceptions in a timely manner. This technique requires students to spend time with the material outside of class, acts as review of important concepts, and increases engagement in class due to the personalization of the course. Evaluation results from use of this technique will be presented. Examples of successful JiTT videos, questions, student answers, and techniques for addressing misconceptions during lecture will also be presented with the intention that instructors can easily apply this technique to their

  13. Just-in-time Time Data Analytics and Visualization of Climate Simulations using the Bellerophon Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantharaj, V. G.; Venzke, J.; Lingerfelt, E.; Messer, B.

    2015-12-01

    Climate model simulations are used to understand the evolution and variability of earth's climate. Unfortunately, high-resolution multi-decadal climate simulations can take days to weeks to complete. Typically, the simulation results are not analyzed until the model runs have ended. During the course of the simulation, the output may be processed periodically to ensure that the model is preforming as expected. However, most of the data analytics and visualization are not performed until the simulation is finished. The lengthy time period needed for the completion of the simulation constrains the productivity of climate scientists. Our implementation of near real-time data visualization analytics capabilities allows scientists to monitor the progress of their simulations while the model is running. Our analytics software executes concurrently in a co-scheduling mode, monitoring data production. When new data are generated by the simulation, a co-scheduled data analytics job is submitted to render visualization artifacts of the latest results. These visualization output are automatically transferred to Bellerophon's data server located at ORNL's Compute and Data Environment for Science (CADES) where they are processed and archived into Bellerophon's database. During the course of the experiment, climate scientists can then use Bellerophon's graphical user interface to view animated plots and their associated metadata. The quick turnaround from the start of the simulation until the data are analyzed permits research decisions and projections to be made days or sometimes even weeks sooner than otherwise possible! The supercomputer resources used to run the simulation are unaffected by co-scheduling the data visualization jobs, so the model runs continuously while the data are visualized. Our just-in-time data visualization software looks to increase climate scientists' productivity as climate modeling moves into exascale era of computing.

  14. HOPE: A Python just-in-time compiler for astrophysical computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akeret, J.; Gamper, L.; Amara, A.; Refregier, A.

    2015-04-01

    The Python programming language is becoming increasingly popular for scientific applications due to its simplicity, versatility, and the broad range of its libraries. A drawback of this dynamic language, however, is its low runtime performance which limits its applicability for large simulations and for the analysis of large data sets, as is common in astrophysics and cosmology. While various frameworks have been developed to address this limitation, most focus on covering the complete language set, and either force the user to alter the code or are not able to reach the full speed of an optimised native compiled language. In order to combine the ease of Python and the speed of C++, we developed HOPE, a specialised Python just-in-time (JIT) compiler designed for numerical astrophysical applications. HOPE focuses on a subset of the language and is able to translate Python code into C++ while performing numerical optimisation on mathematical expressions at runtime. To enable the JIT compilation, the user only needs to add a decorator to the function definition. We assess the performance of HOPE by performing a series of benchmarks and compare its execution speed with that of plain Python, C++ and the other existing frameworks. We find that HOPE improves the performance compared to plain Python by a factor of 2 to 120, achieves speeds comparable to that of C++, and often exceeds the speed of the existing solutions. We discuss the differences between HOPE and the other frameworks, as well as future extensions of its capabilities. The fully documented HOPE package is available at http://hope.phys.ethz.ch and is published under the GPLv3 license on PyPI and GitHub.

  15. Mobile and Accessible Learning for MOOCs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharples, Mike; Kloos, Carlos Delgado; Dimitriadis, Yannis; Garlatti, Serge; Specht, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Many modern web-based systems provide a "responsive" design that allows material and services to be accessed on mobile and desktop devices, with the aim of providing "ubiquitous access." Besides offering access to learning materials such as podcasts and videos across multiple locations, mobile, wearable and ubiquitous…

  16. Case Study Evaluating Just-In-Time Teaching and Peer Instruction Using Clickers in a Quantum Mechanics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayer, Ryan; Marshman, Emily; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) is an instructional strategy involving feedback from students on prelecture activities in order to design in-class activities to build on the continuing feedback from students. We investigate the effectiveness of a JiTT approach, which included in-class concept tests using clickers in an upper-division quantum…

  17. An Empirical Study of Factors Driving the Adoption of Mobile Learning in Omani Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarrab, Mohamed; Al Shibli, Ibtisam; Badursha, Nabeela

    2016-01-01

    Mobile learning (M-learning) provides a new learning channel in which learners can access content and just in time information as required irrespective of the time and location. Even though M-learning is fast evolving in many regions of the world, research addressing the driving factors of M-learning adoption is in short supply. This article…

  18. Academic Skills Rovers: A Just in Time Peer Support Initiative for Academic Skills and Literacy Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeman, Peter; Keightley, Polly

    2014-01-01

    In 2013 the University of Canberra (UC) initiated a program of peer-assisted academic skills help, the Academic Skills Rovers program, with the goal of providing drop-in peer learning support to students at campus locations where they congregate to study. The Academic Skills Rovers were initially recruited from the teacher education discipline,…

  19. On the role of the chaperonin CCT in the just-in-time assembly process of APC/CCdc20.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Carien

    2010-02-05

    The just-in-time hypothesis relates to the assembly of large multi-protein complexes and their regulation of activation in the cell. Here I postulate that chaperonins may contribute to the timely assembly and activation of such complexes. For the case of anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome(Cdc20) assembly by the eukaryotic chaperonin chaperonin containing Tcp1 it is shown that just-in-time synthesis and chaperone-assisted folding can synergise to generate a highly regulated assembly process of a protein complex that is vital for cell cycle progression. Once dependency has been established transcriptional regulation and chaperonin-dependency may have co-evolved to safeguard the timely activation of important multi-protein complexes.

  20. Improving Open Access through Prior Learning Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Shuangxu; Kawachi, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores and presents new data on how to improve open access in distance education through using prior learning assessments. Broadly there are three types of prior learning assessment (PLAR): Type-1 for prospective students to be allowed to register for a course; Type-2 for current students to avoid duplicating work-load to gain…

  1. Improving residents' handovers through just-in-time training for structured communication.

    PubMed

    Rourke, Liam; Amin, Aditi; Boyington, Curtiss; Ao, Peter; Frolova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    In a recent quality assurance project we learned that nearly half of the handovers we examined were characterized as unsatisfactory by our residents, who provided examples in which their anxiety had been piqued and patient care had been affected. These reports substantiated a growing body of literature on the relationship between the quality of handover and the quality of patient care, so we sought to improve the quality and consistency of the in-hosptial handovers undertaken by our internal medicine residents. Senior residents attended morning report for three consecutive month long blocks and evaluated the quality of the handovers using an observational protocol comprised of 16 aspects of effective handover. During the first block, the resident observed a median of eight of the 16 practices occurring across the 46 handovers, and a large amount of variability. At the beginning of the subsequent block we presented a concise introduction to a structured handover procedure (SBARR). The median quality of the subsequent 33 handovers rose to 11, and the variability decreased considerably. In the next block we refined the SBARR orientation to focus on the errors observed in the previous blocks, and the improvement in the quality and variability was sustained. The minor change, which requires few resources to sustain, had a favourable impact on the quality of our residents' in-hospital handovers.

  2. Improving residents' handovers through just-in-time training for structured communication

    PubMed Central

    Rourke, Liam; Amin, Aditi; Boyington, Curtiss; Ao, Peter; Frolova, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    In a recent quality assurance project we learned that nearly half of the handovers we examined were characterized as unsatisfactory by our residents, who provided examples in which their anxiety had been piqued and patient care had been affected. These reports substantiated a growing body of literature on the relationship between the quality of handover and the quality of patient care, so we sought to improve the quality and consistency of the in-hosptial handovers undertaken by our internal medicine residents. Senior residents attended morning report for three consecutive month long blocks and evaluated the quality of the handovers using an observational protocol comprised of 16 aspects of effective handover. During the first block, the resident observed a median of eight of the 16 practices occurring across the 46 handovers, and a large amount of variability. At the beginning of the subsequent block we presented a concise introduction to a structured handover procedure (SBARR). The median quality of the subsequent 33 handovers rose to 11, and the variability decreased considerably. In the next block we refined the SBARR orientation to focus on the errors observed in the previous blocks, and the improvement in the quality and variability was sustained. The minor change, which requires few resources to sustain, had a favourable impact on the quality of our residents' in-hospital handovers. PMID:26893890

  3. Just-in-Time Training for High-Risk Low-Volume Therapies: An Approach to Ensure Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Helman, Stephanie; Lisanti, Amy Jo; Adams, Ann; Field, Cynthia; Davis, Katherine Finn

    2016-01-01

    High-risk low-volume therapies are those therapies that are practiced infrequently and yet carry an increased risk to patients because of their complexity. Staff nurses are required to competently manage these therapies to treat patients' unique needs and optimize outcomes; however, maintaining competence is challenging. This article describes implementation of Just-in-Time Training, which requires validation of minimum competency of bedside nurses managing high-risk low-volume therapies through direct observation of a return-demonstration competency checklist.

  4. Building health behavior models to guide the development of just-in-time adaptive interventions: A pragmatic framework.

    PubMed

    Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Hekler, Eric B; Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2015-12-01

    Advances in wireless devices and mobile technology offer many opportunities for delivering just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs)-suites of interventions that adapt over time to an individual's changing status and circumstances with the goal to address the individual's need for support, whenever this need arises. A major challenge confronting behavioral scientists aiming to develop a JITAI concerns the selection and integration of existing empirical, theoretical and practical evidence into a scientific model that can inform the construction of a JITAI and help identify scientific gaps. The purpose of this paper is to establish a pragmatic framework that can be used to organize existing evidence into a useful model for JITAI construction. This framework involves clarifying the conceptual purpose of a JITAI, namely, the provision of just-in-time support via adaptation, as well as describing the components of a JITAI and articulating a list of concrete questions to guide the establishment of a useful model for JITAI construction. The proposed framework includes an organizing scheme for translating the relatively static scientific models underlying many health behavior interventions into a more dynamic model that better incorporates the element of time. This framework will help to guide the next generation of empirical work to support the creation of effective JITAIs.

  5. Critical elements in implementations of just-in-time management: empirical study of cement industry in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Muhammad Imran; Iftikhar, Mehwish; Bhatti, Mansoor Nazir; Shams, Tauqeer; Zaman, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, inventory management is continuous challenge for all organizations not only due to heavy cost associated with inventory holding, but also it has a great deal to do with the organizations production process. Cement industry is a growing sector of Pakistan's economy which is now facing problems in capacity utilization of their plants. This study attempts to identify the key strategies for successful implementation of just-in-time (JIT) management philosophy on the cement industry of Pakistan. The study uses survey responses from four hundred operations' managers of cement industry in order to know about the advantages and benefits that cement industry have experienced by Just in time (JIT) adoption. The results show that implementing the quality, product design, inventory management, supply chain and production plans embodied through the JIT philosophy which infect enhances cement industry competitiveness in Pakistan. JIT implementation increases performance by lower level of inventory, reduced operations & inventory costs was reduced eliminates wastage from the processes and reduced unnecessary production which is a big challenge for the manufacturer who are trying to maintain the continuous flow processes. JIT implementation is a vital manufacturing strategy that reaches capacity utilization and minimizes the rate of defect in continuous flow processes. The study emphasize the need for top management commitment in order to incorporate the necessary changes that need to take place in cement industry so that JIT implementation can take place in an effective manner.

  6. Building health behavior models to guide the development of just-in-time adaptive interventions: A pragmatic framework

    PubMed Central

    Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Hekler, Eric B.; Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2016-01-01

    Advances in wireless devices and mobile technology offer many opportunities for delivering just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs)--suites of interventions that adapt over time to an individual’s changing status and circumstances with the goal to address the individual’s need for support, whenever this need arises. A major challenge confronting behavioral scientists aiming to develop a JITAI concerns the selection and integration of existing empirical, theoretical and practical evidence into a scientific model that can inform the construction of a JITAI and help identify scientific gaps. The purpose of this paper is to establish a pragmatic framework that can be used to organize existing evidence into a useful model for JITAI construction. This framework involves clarifying the conceptual purpose of a JITAI, namely the provision of just-in-time support via adaptation, as well as describing the components of a JITAI and articulating a list of concrete questions to guide the establishment of a useful model for JITAI construction. The proposed framework includes an organizing scheme for translating the relatively static scientific models underlying many health behavior interventions into a more dynamic model that better incorporates the element of time. This framework will help to guide the next generation of empirical work to support the creation of effective JITAIs. PMID:26651462

  7. Just in time

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Ian T; Meldau, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The optimal defense hypothesis (ODH) provides a functional explanation for the inhomogeneous distribution of defensive structures and defense metabolites throughout a plant’s body: tissues that are most valuable in terms of fitness and have the highest probability of attack are generally the best defended. In a previous review,1 we argue that ontogenically-controlled accumulations of defense metabolites are likely regulated through an integration of developmental and defense signaling pathways. In this addendum, we extend the discussion of ODH patterns by including the recent discoveries of circadian clock-controlled defenses in plants. PMID:23603968

  8. Just in Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderpool, Nancy M.; Risacher, Joanne

    2006-01-01

    At the end of the day, most of those in higher education feel gratified for having accomplished meaningful work but somewhat overwhelmed with the pile of work yet to be tackled. Still, they see the need to do more beyond that. Indeed, it is becoming clear that there is a growing need for more contact between educators and students and a need to…

  9. Stop the hunting: using a wound care-specific EMR for 'just-in-time" supply ordering.

    PubMed

    Turner, Toni; Walker, David

    2007-01-01

    Ensuring adequate stocks of wound care supplies at wound care to be tied up, and too little can cause problems for patients. Most facilities maintain a "par" level for each item, which requires that supplies be ordered even if the "par" is numerically short by one item. In addition, due to the current just-in-time environment, if attention is not paid to the par level, unexpected shortages of supplies can develop. By using Inventory Trak software developed by Intellicure, facility managers will always know how much stock is presentfor each item, as individual item barcodes are registered in the system each time an item is used through software-linking scanners. The result is increased efficiency, reduced cost to the facility, and an assurance that the facility will not run out of critical items.

  10. Visualization of Time-Series Sensor Data to Inform the Design of Just-In-Time Adaptive Stress Interventions.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Moushumi; Raij, Andrew; Epstien, David; Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Beck, J Gayle; Vhaduri, Sudip; Preston, Kenzie; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-09-01

    We investigate needs, challenges, and opportunities in visualizing time-series sensor data on stress to inform the design of just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs). We identify seven key challenges: massive volume and variety of data, complexity in identifying stressors, scalability of space, multifaceted relationship between stress and time, a need for representation at multiple granularities, interperson variability, and limited understanding of JITAI design requirements due to its novelty. We propose four new visualizations based on one million minutes of sensor data (n=70). We evaluate our visualizations with stress researchers (n=6) to gain first insights into its usability and usefulness in JITAI design. Our results indicate that spatio-temporal visualizations help identify and explain between- and within-person variability in stress patterns and contextual visualizations enable decisions regarding the timing, content, and modality of intervention. Interestingly, a granular representation is considered informative but noise-prone; an abstract representation is the preferred starting point for designing JITAIs.

  11. Professional Learning in Higher Education: Understanding How Academics Interpret Student Feedback and Access Resources to Improve Their Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curwood, Jen Scott; Tomitsch, Martin; Thomson, Kate; Hendry, Graham D.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on professional learning has identified that face-to-face consultation is an effective approach to support academics' learning from student feedback. However, this approach is labour and time intensive, and does not necessarily provide all academics with just-in-time support. In this article, we describe an alternative approach,…

  12. Case study evaluating Just-In-Time Teaching and Peer Instruction using clickers in a quantum mechanics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, Ryan; Marshman, Emily; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-12-01

    Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) is an instructional strategy involving feedback from students on prelecture activities in order to design in-class activities to build on the continuing feedback from students. We investigate the effectiveness of a JiTT approach, which included in-class concept tests using clickers in an upper-division quantum mechanics course. We analyze student performance on prelecture reading quizzes, in-class clicker questions answered individually, and clicker questions answered after group discussion, and compare those performances with open-ended retention quizzes administered after all instructional activities on the same concepts. In general, compared to the reading quizzes, student performance improved when individual clicker questions were posed after lectures that focused on student difficulties found via electronic feedback. The performance on the clicker questions after group discussion following individual clicker question responses also showed improvement. We discuss some possible reasons for the improved performance at various stages, e.g., from prelecture reading quizzes to postlecture clicker questions, and from individual to group clicker questions.

  13. Nash and integrated solutions in a just-in-time seller-buyer supply chain with buyer's ordering cost reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Kuo-Ren; Wang, Lu

    2016-05-01

    The seller frequently offers the buyer trade credit to settle the purchase amount. From the seller's prospective, granting trade credit increases not only the opportunity cost (i.e., the interest loss on the buyer's purchase amount during the credit period) but also the default risk (i.e., the rate that the buyer will be unable to pay off his/her debt obligations). On the other hand, granting trade credit increases sales volume and revenue. Consequently, trade credit is an important strategy to increase seller's profitability. In this paper, we assume that the seller uses trade credit and number of shipments in a production run as decision variables to maximise his/her profit, while the buyer determines his/her replenishment cycle time and capital investment as decision variables to reduce his/her ordering cost and achieve his/her maximum profit. We then derive non-cooperative Nash solution and cooperative integrated solution in a just-in-time inventory system, in which granting trade credit increases not only the demand but also the opportunity cost and default risk, and the relationship between the capital investment and the ordering cost reduction is logarithmic. Then, we use a software to solve and compare these two distinct solutions. Finally, we use sensitivity analysis to obtain some managerial insights.

  14. Visualization of Time-Series Sensor Data to Inform the Design of Just-In-Time Adaptive Stress Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sharmin, Moushumi; Raij, Andrew; Epstien, David; Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Beck, J. Gayle; Vhaduri, Sudip; Preston, Kenzie; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    We investigate needs, challenges, and opportunities in visualizing time-series sensor data on stress to inform the design of just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs). We identify seven key challenges: massive volume and variety of data, complexity in identifying stressors, scalability of space, multifaceted relationship between stress and time, a need for representation at multiple granularities, interperson variability, and limited understanding of JITAI design requirements due to its novelty. We propose four new visualizations based on one million minutes of sensor data (n=70). We evaluate our visualizations with stress researchers (n=6) to gain first insights into its usability and usefulness in JITAI design. Our results indicate that spatio-temporal visualizations help identify and explain between- and within-person variability in stress patterns and contextual visualizations enable decisions regarding the timing, content, and modality of intervention. Interestingly, a granular representation is considered informative but noise-prone; an abstract representation is the preferred starting point for designing JITAIs. PMID:26539566

  15. Managing Self-Access Language Learning: Principles and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David; Miller, Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on a research project looking at the management of self-access language learning (SALL) from the perspective of the managers of self-access centres. It looks at the factors which influence the practice of seven managers of self-access language learning in tertiary institutions in Hong Kong. The discussion centres around five…

  16. Self-Access Language Learning for Malaysian University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tse, Andrew Yau Hau

    2012-01-01

    Just a few Malaysian universities offer self-access language learning activities to students. The objective of this study is to investigate if self-access learning can promote self-directed or autonomous learning in a public Malaysian technical university. Data collection is by means of interviewing the Director, lecturers, and students in a…

  17. Just-in-Time Control of Spo0A Synthesis in Bacillus subtilis by Multiple Regulatory Mechanisms ▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Chastanet, Arnaud; Losick, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The response regulator Spo0A governs multiple developmental processes in Bacillus subtilis, including most conspicuously sporulation. Spo0A is activated by phosphorylation via a multicomponent phosphorelay. Previous work has shown that the Spo0A protein is not rate limiting for sporulation. Rather, Spo0A is present at high levels in growing cells, rapidly rising to yet higher levels under sporulation-inducing conditions, suggesting that synthesis of the response regulator is subject to a just-in-time control mechanism. Transcription of spo0A is governed by a promoter switching mechanism, involving a vegetative, σA-recognized promoter, Pv, and a sporulation σH-recognized promoter, Ps, that is under phosphorylated Spo0A (Spo0A∼P) control. The spo0A regulatory region also contains four (including one identified in the present work) conserved elements that conform to the consensus binding site for Spo0A∼P binding sites. These are herein designated O1, O2, O3, and O4 in reverse order of their proximity to the coding sequence. Here we report that O1 is responsible for repressing Pv during the transition to stationary phase, that O2 is responsible for repressing Ps during growth, that O3 is responsible for activating Ps at the start of sporulation, and that O4 is dispensable for promoter switching. We also report that Spo0A synthesis is subject to a posttranscriptional control mechanism such that translation of mRNAs originating from Pv is impeded due to RNA secondary structure whereas mRNAs originating from Ps are fully competent for protein synthesis. We propose that the opposing actions of O2 and O3 and the enhanced translatability of mRNAs originating from Ps create a highly sensitive, self-reinforcing switch that is responsible for producing a burst of Spo0A synthesis at the start of sporulation. PMID:21949067

  18. Critical Approaches to Accessibility for Technology-Enhanced Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewthwaite, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    The term "accessibility" is broadly used to describe the degree to which a service or product gives learners the "ability to access" functionality, services or materials. In recent years there has been a push towards accessibility in technology-enhanced learning (TEL) across all levels of education. However, accessibility represents a shifting…

  19. Just-in-time control of Spo0A synthesis in Bacillus subtilis by multiple regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chastanet, Arnaud; Losick, Richard

    2011-11-01

    The response regulator Spo0A governs multiple developmental processes in Bacillus subtilis, including most conspicuously sporulation. Spo0A is activated by phosphorylation via a multicomponent phosphorelay. Previous work has shown that the Spo0A protein is not rate limiting for sporulation. Rather, Spo0A is present at high levels in growing cells, rapidly rising to yet higher levels under sporulation-inducing conditions, suggesting that synthesis of the response regulator is subject to a just-in-time control mechanism. Transcription of spo0A is governed by a promoter switching mechanism, involving a vegetative, σ(A)-recognized promoter, P(v), and a sporulation σ(H)-recognized promoter, P(s), that is under phosphorylated Spo0A (Spo0A∼P) control. The spo0A regulatory region also contains four (including one identified in the present work) conserved elements that conform to the consensus binding site for Spo0A∼P binding sites. These are herein designated O(1), O(2), O(3), and O(4) in reverse order of their proximity to the coding sequence. Here we report that O(1) is responsible for repressing P(v) during the transition to stationary phase, that O(2) is responsible for repressing P(s) during growth, that O(3) is responsible for activating P(s) at the start of sporulation, and that O(4) is dispensable for promoter switching. We also report that Spo0A synthesis is subject to a posttranscriptional control mechanism such that translation of mRNAs originating from P(v) is impeded due to RNA secondary structure whereas mRNAs originating from P(s) are fully competent for protein synthesis. We propose that the opposing actions of O(2) and O(3) and the enhanced translatability of mRNAs originating from P(s) create a highly sensitive, self-reinforcing switch that is responsible for producing a burst of Spo0A synthesis at the start of sporulation.

  20. NASA Access Mechanism: Lessons learned document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdick, Lisa; Dunbar, Rick; Duncan, Denise; Generous, Curtis; Hunter, Judy; Lycas, John; Taber-Dudas, Ardeth

    1994-01-01

    The six-month beta test of the NASA Access Mechanism (NAM) prototype was completed on June 30, 1993. This report documents the lessons learned from the use of this Graphical User Interface to NASA databases such as the NASA STI Database, outside databases, Internet resources, and peers in the NASA R&D community. Design decisions, such as the use of XWindows software, a client-server distributed architecture, and use of the NASA Science Internet, are explained. Users' reactions to the interface and suggestions for design changes are reported, as are the changes made by the software developers based on new technology for information discovery and retrieval. The lessons learned section also reports reactions from the public, both at demonstrations and in response to articles in the trade press and journals. Recommendations are included for future versions, such as a World Wide Web (WWW) and Mosaic based interface to heterogeneous databases, and NAM-Lite, a version which allows customization to include utilities provided locally at NASA Centers.

  1. Evaluating Teachers' Support Requests When Just-in-Time Instructional Support is Provided to Introduce a Primary Level Web-Based Reading Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Eileen; Anderson, Alissa; Piquette-Tomei, Noella; Savage, Robert; Mueller, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Support requests were documented for 10 teachers (4 kindergarten, 4 grade one, and 2 grade one/two teachers) who received just-in-time instructional support over a 2 1/2 month period while implementing a novel reading software program as part of their literacy instruction. In-class observations were made of each instructional session. Analysis of…

  2. Learning at Work: Work-Based Access to Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loots, Catriona; Osborne, Michael; Seagraves, Liz

    1998-01-01

    Learning at Work is a Scottish program attempting to widen access to higher education across socioeconomic groups through work-based learning. Factors limiting participation include motivation, employer perceptions of the value of higher education, lack of a learning culture, and economic feasibility. (SK)

  3. Just-in-Time Research: A Call to Arms for Research into Mobile Technologies in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne-Davis, Lucie; Dexter, Hilary; Hart, Jo; Cappelli, Tim; Byrne, Ged; Sampson, Ian; Mooney, Jane; Lumsden, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technologies are becoming commonplace in society and in education. In higher education, it is crucial to understand the impact of constant access to information on the development of the knowledge and competence of the learner. This study reports on a series of four surveys completed by UK-based medical students (n = 443) who received…

  4. Just-in-Time or Plenty-of-Time Teaching? Different Electronic Feedback Devices and Their Effect on Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Jerry Chih-Yuan; Martinez, Brandon; Seli, Helena

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how incorporating different electronic feedback devices (i.e., clickers versus web-based polling) may affect specific types of student engagement (i.e., behavioral, emotional, and cognitive engagement), whether students' self-efficacy for learning and performance may differ between courses that have integrated clickers and…

  5. Access to cervical screening for women with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Watts, Sian

    Evidence shows that the uptake of cervical screening is much lower in women with learning disabilities compared to other women. A literature review was conducted, including published and unpublished international empirical research, discussion articles and reports written in English from 1990 to October 2007, to identify what factors are preventing women with learning disabilities from accessing cervical screening, and what can be done to encourage uptake. From the literature reviewed, factors that prevent women with learning disabilities from accessing cervical screening fell into the following categories: administration errors; access to a GP; assumptions made by healthcare professionals about women with learning disabilities; perceived difficulties obtaining consent; attitudes of carers; the beliefs and experiences of women themselves; lack of accessible information; and physical difficulties. Findings on how cervical screening uptake can be improved in women with learning disabilities were categorized into: preparation with the women; working in partnership; and encouraging good practice. The literature review showed that there are many factors that may be preventing women with learning disabilities from accessing cervical screening, many of which can be overcome by healthcare professionals adhering to good practice guidelines, thus ensuring that women with learning disabilities have their right to access cervical screening services acknowledged.

  6. Determined to Learn: Accessing Education despite Life-Threatening Disasters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SchWeber, Claudine

    2008-01-01

    The "right to education" proclaimed by the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights requires access to learning as well as the support systems. Since access can be interrupted by various circumstances, the possibility of providing continuity despite external dangers by using online distance education, offers an intriguing and valuable…

  7. Making Online Learning Accessible for Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashey, Andrew I.; Stahl, Skip

    2014-01-01

    The growing presence of K-12 online education programs is a trend that promises to increase flexibility, improve efficiency, and foster engagement in learning. Students with disabilities can benefit from dynamic online educational environments, but only to the extent that they can access and participate in the learning process. As students with…

  8. Distance Learning: Information Access and Services for Virtual Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iyer, Hemalata, Ed.

    This volume centers broadly on information support services for distance education. The articles in this book can be categorized into two areas: access to information resources for distance learners, and studies of distance learning programs. Contents include: "The Challenges and Benefits of Asynchronous Learning Networks" (Daphne…

  9. The Potential for Adaptable Accessible Learning Objects: A Case Study in Accessible Vodcasting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gkatzidou, Stavroula; Pearson, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    With the rapid development of wireless networks and mobile technologies and the increasing adoption of mobile learning, the need for "anywhere, anytime and any device" access to information becomes more evident. This has influenced the design of learning objects. The small but developing literature on vodcasting indicates its potential…

  10. Improving access to screening for people with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Anna; Turner, Sue; Giraud-Saunders, Alison

    2014-11-04

    People with learning disabilities have poorer health than their non-disabled peers, and are less likely to access screening services than the general population. The National Development Team for Inclusion and the Norah Fry Research Centre developed a toolkit and guidance to improve uptake of five national (English) screening programmes (one of which is delivered through local programmes), based on work to improve access by people with learning disabilities in the south west peninsula of the UK. This article describes the findings in relation to the five English screening programmes and suggests ways to improve uptake of cancer screening by people with learning disabilities.

  11. Accessing FMS Functionality: The Impact of Design on Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennell, Karl; Sherry, Lance; Roberts, Ralph, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In modern commercial and military aircraft, the Flight Management System (FMS) lies at the heart of the functionality of the airplane. The nature of the FMS has also caused great difficulties learning and accessing this functionality. This study examines actual Air Force pilots who were qualified on the newly introduced advanced FMS and shows that the design of the system itself is a primary source of difficulty learning the system. Twenty representative tasks were selected which the pilots could be expected to accomplish on an ' actual flight. These tasks were analyzed using the RAFIV stage model (Sherry, Polson, et al. 2002). This analysis demonstrates that a great burden is placed on remembering complex reformulation of the task to function mapping. 65% of the tasks required retaining one access steps in memory to accomplish the task, 20% required two memorized access steps, and 15% required zero memorized access steps. The probability that a participant would make an access error on the tasks was: two memorized access steps - 74%, one memorized access step - 13%, and zero memorized access steps - 6%. Other factors were analyzed as well, including experience with the system and frequency of use. This completed the picture of a system with many memorized steps causing difficulty with the new system, especially when trying to fine where to access the correct function.

  12. Just-in-time rescue plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Veronica R.; Popat, Uday; Ciurea, Stefan; Nieto, Yago; Anderlini, Paolo; Rondon, Gabriela; Alousi, Amin; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Kebriaei, Partow; Khouri, Issa; de Lima, Marcos; Champlin, Richard; Hosing, Chitra

    2014-01-01

    Plerixafor, a recently approved peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilizing agent, is often added to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells in patients with lymphoma or myeloma who cannot mobilize enough CD34+ cells with G-CSF alone to undergo autologous stem cell transplantation. However, data are lacking regarding the feasibility and efficacy of just-in-time plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and G-CSF. We reviewed the peripheral blood stem cell collection data of 38 consecutive patients with lymphoma (Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s) and multiple myeloma who underwent chemomobilization and high-dose G-CSF and just-in-time plerixafor to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment combination. All patients with multiple myeloma and all but 1 patient with lymphoma collected the minimum required number of CD34+ cells to proceed with autologous stem cell transplantation (>2 × 106/kilogram of body weight). The median CD34+ cell dose collected in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma was 4.93 × 106/kilogram of body weight. The median CD34+ cell dose collected for patients with multiple myeloma was 8.81 × 106/kilogram of body weight. Plerixafor was well tolerated; no grade 2 or higher non- hematologic toxic effects were observed. PMID:23749720

  13. Just-in-time rescue plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Smith, Veronica R; Popat, Uday; Ciurea, Stefan; Nieto, Yago; Anderlini, Paolo; Rondon, Gabriela; Alousi, Amin; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Kebriaei, Partow; Khouri, Issa; de Lima, Marcos; Champlin, Richard; Hosing, Chitra

    2013-09-01

    Plerixafor, a recently approved peripheral blood progenitor cell mobilizing agent, is often added to granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells in patients with lymphoma or myeloma who cannot mobilize enough CD34+ cells with G-CSF alone to undergo autologous stem cell transplantation. However, data are lacking regarding the feasibility and efficacy of just-in-time plerixafor in combination with chemotherapy and G-CSF. We reviewed the peripheral blood stem cell collection data of 38 consecutive patients with lymphoma (Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's) and multiple myeloma who underwent chemomobilization and high-dose G-CSF and just-in-time plerixafor to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment combination. All patients with multiple myeloma and all but one patient with lymphoma collected the minimum required number of CD34+ cells to proceed with autologous stem cell transplantation (>2 × 10(6) /kg of body weight). The median CD34+ cell dose collected in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma was 4.93 × 10(6) /kg of body weight. The median CD34+ cell dose collected for patients with multiple myeloma was 8.81 × 10(6) /kg of body weight. Plerixafor was well tolerated; no grade 2 or higher non-hematologic toxic effects were observed.

  14. Providing public standardized data access function: Lessons learned from accessing USGS Landsat archive

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, X.; Bai, Y.; Di, L.; Nebert, D.

    2009-01-01

    The geospatial community is experiencing a shift from having data locally to sharing them over the Web. However, not all the data accessing systems are built in compliance with open geospatial standards and thus are weak in terms of interoperability. The USGS Landsat data are now available through free electronic access though not yet through standard Web service interfaces. This paper intends to discuss the experience and lessons learned from integrating a public data access function to the USGS Landsat data archive into a geospatial workflow environment. Currently available systems and their problems, proposed solutions and application scenarios are discussed.

  15. Alcohol gains access to appetitive learning through adolescent heavy drinking.

    PubMed

    DiLeo, Alyssa; Wright, Kristina M; Mangone, Elizabeth; McDannald, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Adolescent heavy alcohol drinking increases the risk for alcohol use disorders in adulthood, yet mechanisms conferring increased risk are not well understood. We propose that adolescent alcohol drinking shapes alcohol's aversive or appetitive properties in adulthood. Alcohol normally drives aversive learning and alcohol-predictive cues are avoided. We hypothesize that through adolescent heavy drinking alcohol gains access to appetitive learning. A primary consequence is that alcohol-predictive cues become valued and sought out. To test this hypothesis, we gave genetically heterogeneous, male Long Evans rats voluntary, chronic intermittent access to water or alcohol throughout adolescence and then identified moderate and heavy alcohol drinkers. After a short abstinence period, we assessed the aversive or appetitive properties of alcohol using flavor learning procedures. We compared alcohol to the known appetitive properties of sugar. Flavor learning in adult rats who were alcohol-naïve or adolescent moderate alcohol drinkers revealed alcohol to be aversive and sugar to be appetitive. The same flavor learning procedures revealed both alcohol and sugar to be appetitive in adult rats who were adolescent heavy drinkers. The results demonstrate that alcohol gains access to neurobehavioral circuits for appetitive learning through adolescent heavy alcohol drinking.

  16. After Access: Divergent Learning Profiles in Vietnam and India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolleston, Caine; James, Zoe

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, both India and Vietnam have successfully expanded access to schooling to near-universal levels and have shifted their focus to quality-oriented policy reform. Yet, international and national evidence shows strongly contrasting learning profiles for children within the two systems. Simple indicators of numeracy suggest similar…

  17. Workplace Learning: The Roles of Knowledge Accessibility and Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jessica; Brake, Gary; Champion, Angeline; Fuller, Tony; Gabel, Sandy; Hatcher-Busch, Lori

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how knowledge management systems have been used by the studied organizations to improve knowledge accessibility and knowledge sharing in order to increase workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach: The study relies on a qualitative multisite case study method. Data were obtained from five…

  18. Current Approaches to Assessment in Self-Access Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinders, Hayo; Lázaro, Noemí

    2007-01-01

    Assessment is generally seen as one of the key challenges in the field of self-access learning (Gardner & Miller, 1999; Champagne et al., 2001; Lai, 2001; Kinoshita Thomson, 1996). Many researchers and practitioners point to difficulties with assessing language gains in an environment in which variables cannot comprehensively be controlled…

  19. Supporting Accessible Technology-Enhanced Training: The eAccess2Learn Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Demetrios G.; Zervas, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    During the last years, the design and development of technology-enhanced training systems for disabled groups of learners has attracted the attention of the technology-enhanced learning community. However, although a number of such systems have been designed to meet accessibility needs and preferences for those groups, most of them anticipate…

  20. Just-in-time vaccines: Biomineralized calcium phosphate core-immunogen shell nanoparticles induce long-lasting CD8+ T cell responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weibin; Moguche, Albanus; Chiu, David; Murali-Krishna, Kaja; Baneyx, François

    2014-01-01

    Distributed and on-demand vaccine production could be game-changing for infectious disease treatment in the developing world by providing new therapeutic opportunities and breaking the refrigeration “cold chain”. Here, we show that a fusion protein between a calcium phosphate binding domain and the model antigen ovalbumin can mineralize a biocompatible adjuvant in a single step. The resulting 50 nm calcium phosphate core-immunogen shell particles are comparable to soluble protein in inducing ovalbumin-specific antibody response and class switch recombination in mice. However, single dose vaccination with nanoparticles leads to higher expansion of ovalbumin-specific CD8+ T cells upon challenge with an influenza virus bearing the ovalbumin-derived SIINFEKL peptide, and these cells produce high levels of IFN-γ. Furthermore, mice exhibit a robust antigen-specific CD8+ T cell recall response when challenged with virus 8 months post-immunization. These results underscore the promise of immunogen-controlled adjuvant mineralization for just-in-time manufacturing of effective T cell vaccines. PMID:24275478

  1. Developing Guidelines for Evaluating the Adaptation of Accessible Web-Based Learning Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radovan, Marko; Perdih, Mojca

    2016-01-01

    E-learning is a rapidly developing form of education. One of the key characteristics of e-learning is flexibility, which enables easier access to knowledge for everyone. Information and communications technology (ICT), which is e-learning's main component, enables alternative means of accessing the web-based learning materials that comprise the…

  2. Behavioral Response to a Just-in-Time Adaptive Intervention (JITAI) to Reduce Sedentary Behavior in Obese Adults: Implications for JITAI Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J. Graham; Bond, Dale S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs) use mobile computers, sensors, and software analytics to automatically detect behavior and deliver tailored treatment. However, little is known about how JITAIs influence patterns of behavior or how best to design JITAIs for maximum effect. Methods This study examined prompts and behavioral response to the B-MOBILE JITAI for reducing sedentary behavior (SB) in overweight/obese individuals. Thirty participants (83% women; 67% White, mean ± SD body mass index = 36.2 kg/m2) tested three conditions presented in a randomized counterbalanced order involving smartphone-based prompts for walking breaks of (1) 3-min after 30 SB min; (2) 6-min after 60 SB min; and (3) 12-min after 120 SB min. Results Participants carried the smartphone an average of 6.90 days during each 7-day condition, for an average of 14.94 hours per day. The 3- and 6-min conditions resulted in the greatest number of prompts, walking breaks, the best adherence to prompts, the greatest amount of daily time spent in walking breaks, and fastest adherence to prompts (ps < .01). Small but statistically significant decreases in the number of daily walking breaks, adherence to prompts, and minutes per day spent in walking breaks were observed as a function of the number of days spent in a condition (ps < .05). Conclusions The B-MOBILE JITAI was effective in prompting breaks in sedentary behavior when it is most clinically relevant. Frequent prompts for small change may be an optimal strategy for shaping sedentary behavior, although more research is needed to determine how best to promote long-term adherence. PMID:26651467

  3. Just-in-Time Evidence-Based E-mail “Reminders” in Home Health Care: Impact on Nurse Practices

    PubMed Central

    Murtaugh, Christopher M; Pezzin, Liliana E; McDonald, Margaret V; Feldman, Penny H; Peng, Timothy R

    2005-01-01

    Objective To test the effectiveness of two interventions designed to improve the adoption of evidence-based practices by home health nurses caring for heart failure (HF) patients. Data Sources/Study Setting Information on nurse practices was abstracted from the clinical records of patients admitted between June 2000 and November 2001 to the care of 354 study nurses at a large, urban, nonprofit home care agency. Study Design The study employed a randomized design with nurses assigned to usual care or one of two intervention groups upon identification of an eligible patient. The basic intervention was a one-time e-mail reminder highlighting six HF-specific clinical recommendations. The augmented intervention consisted of the initial e-mail reminder supplemented by provider prompts, patient education material, and clinical nurse specialist outreach. Data Collection At each home health visit provided by a study nurse to an eligible HF patient during the 45-day follow-up period, a structured chart abstraction tool was used to collect information on whether the nurse provided the care practices highlighted in the e-mail reminder. Principal Findings Both the basic and the augmented interventions greatly increased the practice of evidence-based care, according to patient records, in the areas of patient assessment and instructions about HF disease management. While not all results were statistically significant at conventional levels, intervention effects were positive in virtually all cases and effect magnitudes frequently were large. Conclusions The results of this randomized trial strongly support the efficacy of just-in-time evidence-based reminders as a means of changing clinical practice among home health nurses who are geographically dispersed and spend much of their time in the field. PMID:15960694

  4. Multiple perspectives on the accessibility of e-learning in Canadian colleges and universities.

    PubMed

    Asuncion, Jennison V; Fichten, Catherine S; Ferraro, Vittoria; Chwojka, Caroline; Barile, Maria; Nguyen, Mai Nhu; Wolforth, Joan

    2010-01-01

    An exploratory study identified and compared the views of 77 campus disability service providers, 38 professors, and 45 e-learning professionals from Canadian colleges and universities regarding their experiences with e-learning and its accessibility to students with disabilities. Findings indicate that all groups saw benefit in having someone who makes e-learning accessible to students with disabilities on campus and that problems related to e-learning accessibility were most likely to go to campus disability service providers and least likely to e-learning professionals. Only half of the participants indicated that professors are taught about e-learning accessibility, that there is someone on campus who makes e-learning accessible, that accessibility is a criterion for selecting new types of e-learning, and that their school has e-learning accessibility guidelines or policies. These findings suggest that important e-learning accessibility problems remain. Recommendations for colleges and universities on how to increase e-learning accessibility are provided.

  5. Conscious knowledge of learning: accessing learning strategies in a final year high school biology class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conner, Lindsey; Gunstone, Richard

    2004-12-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative case study investigation of the knowledge and use of learning strategies by 16 students in a final year high school biology class to expand their conscious knowledge of learning. Students were provided with opportunities to engage in purposeful inquiry into the biological, social and ethical aspects of cancer. A constructivist approach was implemented to access prior content and procedural knowledge in various ways. Students were encouraged to develop evaluation of their learning skills independently through activities that promoted metacognition. Those students who planned and monitored their work produced essays of higher quality. The value and difficulties of promoting metacognitive approaches in this context are discussed, as well as the idea that metacognitive processes are difficult to research, because they have to be conscious in order to be identified by the learner, thereby making them accessible to the researcher.

  6. Access to Education with Online Learning and Open Educational Resources: Can They Close the Gap?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geith, Christine; Vignare, Karen

    2008-01-01

    One of the key concepts in the right to education is access: access to the means to fully develop as human beings as well as access to the means to gain skills, knowledge and credentials. This is an important perspective through which to examine the solutions to access enabled by Open Educational Resources (OER) and online learning. The authors…

  7. Self-Access English Learning Facility: A Report of Student Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gromik, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a case study research conducted at a Self-Access Learning Center (SALC) from 2009 to 2012. Over these four years data was collected through a survey from over 6000 participants regarding their access and use of the self facility and resources. The article reports on various on-site learning environments and the influence this…

  8. Essential, Desirable or Optional? Making Distance E-Learning Courses Available to Those without Internet Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Val

    2010-01-01

    The Open University, an open distance learning institution, is increasingly using a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) that requires internet access. This paper investigates how the move to a VLE has affected one group of students who do not have internet access--offender learners studying in prison. Members of the armed forces and secure hospital…

  9. Embedding Accessibility and Usability: Considerations for E-Learning Research and Development Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Martyn; Colwell, Chetz; Jelfs, Anne

    2007-01-01

    This paper makes the case that if e-learning research and development projects are to be successfully adopted in real-world teaching and learning contexts, then they must effectively address accessibility and usability issues; and that these need to be integrated throughout the project. As such, accessibility and usability issues need to be made…

  10. The Development of Accessibility Practices in E-Learning: An Exploration of Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seale, Jane

    2004-01-01

    The UK's 2001 Special Educational Needs and Disability Act has charged learning technologists with the responsibility of ensuring that electronic teaching materials can be accessed by disabled students. In an attempt to explore how learning technologists are developing practices to produce accessible electronic materials this paper will present a…

  11. Inequality in Preschool Quality? Community-Level Disparities in Access to High-Quality Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassok, Daphna; Galdo, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, unequal access to high-quality preschool has emerged as a growing public policy concern. Because of data limitations, it is notoriously difficult to measure disparities in access to early learning opportunities across communities and particularly challenging to quantify gaps in access to "high-quality" programs. Research…

  12. Security Concerns in Accessing Naval e-Learning with Personal Mobile Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    IN ACCESSING NAVAL e - LEARNING WITH PERSONAL MOBILE DEVICES by Keystella R. Mitchell December 2014 Thesis Co-Advisors: Man-Tak Shing...December 2014 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE SECURITY CONCERNS IN ACCESSING NAVAL e - LEARNING WITH PERSONAL...was to investigate the feasibility of using personal mobile devices for Naval e - Learning (NeL). Another objective was to find out which mobile device

  13. JUST in time health emergency interventions: an innovative approach to training the citizen for emergency situations using virtual reality techniques and advanced IT tools (the VR Tool).

    PubMed

    Manganas, A; Tsiknakis, M; Leisch, E; Ponder, M; Molet, T; Herbelin, B; Magnetat-Thalmann, N; Thalmann, D; Fato, M; Schenone, A

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the second of the two systems developed by JUST, a collaborative project supported by the European Union under the Information Society Technologies (IST) Programme. The most innovative content of the project has been the design and development of a complementary training course for non-professional health emergency operators, which supports the traditional learning phase, and which purports to improve the retention capability of the trainees. This was achieved with the use of advanced information technology techniques, which provide adequate support and can help to overcome the present weaknesses of the existing training mechanisms.

  14. JUST in time health emergency interventions: an innovative approach to training the citizen for emergency situations using virtual reality techniques and advanced IT tools (the Web-CD).

    PubMed

    Manganas, A; Tsiknakis, M; Leisch, E; Karefilaki, L; Monsieurs, K; Bossaert, L L; Giorgini, F

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the first of the two systems developed by JUST, a collaborative project supported by the European Union under the Information Society Technologies (IST) Programme. The most innovative content of the project has been the design and development of a complementary training course for non-professional health emergency operators, which supports the traditional learning phase, and which purports to improve the retention capability of the trainees. This was achieved with the use of advanced information technology techniques, which provide adequate support and can help to overcome the present weaknesses of the existing training mechanisms.

  15. E-Learning Applications for Urban Modelling and Ogc Standards Using HTML5 Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaden, R.; König, G.; Malchow, C.; Kolbe, T. H.

    2012-07-01

    This article reports on the development of HTML5 based web-content related to urban modelling with special focus on GML and CityGML, allowing participants to access it regardless of the device platform. An essential part of the learning modules are short video lectures, supplemented by exercises and tests during the lecture to improve students' individual progress and success. The evaluation of the tests is used to guide students through the course content, depending on individual knowledge. With this approach, we provide learning applications on a wide range of devices, either mobile or desktop, fulfil the needs of just-in-time knowledge, and increase the emphasis on lifelong learning.

  16. Accessible Article: Involving People with Learning Disabilities in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garbutt, Ruth; Tattersall, John; Dunn, Jo; Boycott-Garnett, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    This is an article that talks about our research about sex and relationships for people with learning disabilities. It talks about how people with learning disabilities have been fully involved in the research. (Contains 2 footnotes.)

  17. Impacts of Pedagogical Agent Gender in an Accessible Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Noah L.; Adesope, Olusola O.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in information technologies have resulted in the use of pedagogical agents to facilitate learning. Although several studies have been conducted to examine the effects of pedagogical agents on learning, little is known about gender stereotypes of agents and how those stereotypes influence student learning and attitudes. This study…

  18. Big Brother Is Helping You: Supporting Self-Access Language Learning with a Student Monitoring System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinders, Hayo

    2007-01-01

    Self-access and language advising are relatively recent and increasingly common types of language support offered in schools and tertiary institutions around the world. There is a great deal of anecdotal support for the positive contribution of such support to student learning. Self-access and language advising hold strong potential as…

  19. A Theory of the Measurement of Knowledge Content, Access, and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirolli, Peter; Wilson, Mark

    1998-01-01

    An approach to the measurement of knowledge content, knowledge access, and knowledge learning is developed. First a theoretical view of cognition is described, and then a class of measurement models, based on Rasch modeling, is presented. Knowledge access and content are viewed as determining the observable actions selected by an agent to achieve…

  20. Concepts of Access for People with Learning Difficulties: Towards a Shared Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nind, Melanie; Seale, Jane

    2009-01-01

    This article explores both the process and outcomes of a seminar series on the concept of access for people with learning difficulties. The seminar topics chosen to foster dialogue across professional and disciplinary boundaries included access to information, education, employment, the law, health, leisure, community, past histories and future…

  1. Creating a Public Domain Software Library To Increase Computer Access of Elementary Students with Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInturff, Johanna R.

    Information is provided on a practicum that addressed the lack of access to computer-aided instruction by elementary level students with learning disabilities, due to lack of diverse software, limited funding, and insufficient teacher training. The strategies to improve the amount of access time included: increasing the number of computer programs…

  2. Increasing Access to Higher Education through Open and Distance Learning: Empirical Findings from Mzuzu University, Malawi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chawinga, Winner Dominic; Zozie, Paxton Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Slowly but surely, open and distance learning (ODL) programmes are being regarded as one of the most practical ways that universities across the world are increasingly adopting in order to increase access to university education. Likewise, Mzuzu University (MZUNI) set up the Centre for Open and Distance Learning (CODL) to oversee the running of…

  3. Making Online Learning Accessible to Disabled Students: An Institutional Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Martyn

    2006-01-01

    Based on the authors' reflections on experience working at the Open University, approaches to making online learning accessible to disabled students are considered. The considerations are applicable to all concerned with online learning and indeed anyone seeking to trade, disseminate information and mediate services online. In reflecting on the…

  4. A Working Model for Complying with Accessibility Guidelines for Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cifuentes, Lauren; Janney, Alexandra; Guerra, Lauran; Weir, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    We describe our activities that emerged in the context of an Office of Distance Education and Learning Technologies' efforts to systematically and systemically address accessibility for online learning in order to comply with ethical principles, best practices, and laws. The activities include three overarching continuous tasks: strategically…

  5. E-Learning Access, Opportunities, and Challenges for Aboriginal Adult Learners Located in Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawalilak, Colleen; Wells, Noella; Connell, Lynn; Beamer, Kate

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study focused on 1) the learning needs of Aboriginal adult learners residing in selected First Nations communities in rural Alberta and 2) the potential for increasing access to e-learning education. Through open dialogue with First Nations community leaders, Aboriginal adult learners, and Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal…

  6. Making Online Learning Accessible: Using Technology to Declutter the Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunvand, Stein; Abadeh, Heidi

    2010-01-01

    The proliferation of Web 2.0 technologies has made it possible for teachers to create a variety of engaging online learning activities for students of all ages. However, for students with learning disabilities, the prospect of having to search, read, and analyze information online can be overwhelming. This article reviews a variety of tools and…

  7. Access to oral health care services among adults with learning disabilities: a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Naseem, Mustafa; Shah, Altaf H; Khiyani, Muhammad Faheem; Khurshid, Zohaib; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Gulzar, Shabnam; AlJameel, AlBandary H.; Khalil, Hesham S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The prevalence of oral diseases including dental caries and periodontal conditions is remarkably higher in people with disabilities. The provision of accessible oral health services for people with learning disabilities may be challenging. Objectives The objectives of the review were to identify barriers in accessing oral health care that persists within society, enabling or disabling people with learning disabilities. Methods Using the Arksey O’Malley framework, a scoping review was conducted on PubMed/Medline, OVIDSP, and EMBASE. Studies were evaluated and short-listed based on the inclusion criteria, which consisted of: (1) study participants or population with learning disabilities, (2) aged 16 years or over, (3) reporting on access to oral health services, (4) published in the English language. Those that justified the inclusion criteria were carefully chosen after a blind peer-reviewed process when relevance and quality were debated. Results Nine studies were eventually included from searches. Tabulation of data was done under the heading of study type, outcomes, the year of publication and patient selection. The majority of studies provided a biomedical overview of access for adults with learning disabilities. Conclusions The concept of access for people with disability is still ill-defined and obscure. Access to oral health care and needs of people with learning disabilities are complex and multi-facet. PMID:28149451

  8. Just in Time Research: Privacy Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grama, Joanna Lyn

    2014-01-01

    The January 2014 edition of the ECAR Update subscriber newsletter included an informal poll on information privacy practices. The poll was intended to collect a quick snapshot of the higher education community's thoughts on this important topic during Data Privacy Month. Results of the poll will be used to inform EDUCAUSE research, programs,…

  9. Just in time for late-LTP

    PubMed Central

    Vlachos, Andreas; Maggio, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    It is a fundamental question in neuroscience how long-term memory formation is regulated at the molecular level. Although widely considered a highly complex process requiring numerous molecular players, it also has been speculated that a single protein could play a pivotal role. This “astonishing hypothesis” has made a significant impact on memory research and has led to a reevaluation of concepts regarding memory formation.1,2 PMID:19513256

  10. Just in Time to Flip Your Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasry, Nathaniel; Dugdale, Michael; Charles, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    With advocates like Sal Khan and Bill Gates, flipped classrooms are attracting an increasing amount of media and research attention. We had heard Khan's TED talk and were aware of the concept of inverted pedagogies in general. Yet it really hit home when we accidentally flipped our classroom. Our objective was to better prepare our students…

  11. The Rainbow Bridge Metaphor as a Tool for Developing Accessible E-Learning Practices in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seale, Jane K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the extent to which existing accessibility metaphors can help to develop our conceptualizations of accessible e-­learning practice in higher education and outlines a proposal for a new rainbow bridge metaphor for accessible e­-learning practice. The need for a metaphor that reflects in more depth what we are beginning to…

  12. Making Marx Accessible: Understanding Alienated Labor through Experiential Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrotta, Kylie L.; Buck, Alison R.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce an exercise designed to make Marx's theory of alienated labor accessible to students in a Sociology of Work class. Through a role-playing activity where students create and sell goods under conditions of both alienated and nonalienated labor, students actually experience the different material and social consequences of these…

  13. Scalable Machine Learning Framework for Behavior-Based Access Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    rules. Dynamic events, such as subversion of credentials (e.g., theft of a Smart Card [3] such as the Common Access Card [4]) or changes in actor... Smart card handbook. Wiley, 2010. [4] DoD ID Card Reference Center, 2013, http://www.cac.mil/ [5] Hearst, Marti A., et al. "Support vector machines

  14. Universal Design for Learning: Curriculum, Technology, and Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlandson, Robert F.

    This paper examines how teachers, as educational designers, can utilize universal design for learning (UDL) concepts. UDL is a comprehensive approach to the design of educational systems that addresses elements necessary for the achievement of desired educational goals and objectives: elements such as equity among the participants, environmental…

  15. The Quick Response Center: An Interactive Business Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schorr, Aaron

    1995-01-01

    Describes the educational Quick Response (QR) Center developed at the Fashion Institute of Technology to enable students, faculty, and industry to bridge the technology learning gap between college and the workplace. QR is a working model of a Just-in-Time computer system that enables companies to produce and deliver finished goods just in time to…

  16. Are Accessible Distance Learning Systems Useful for All Students?: Our Experience with IMES, an Accessible Web-Based Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iglesias, Ana; Moreno, Lourdes; Castro, Elena; Cuadra, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays the use of distance learning systems is widely extended in engineering education. Moreover, most of them use multimedia resources that sometimes are the only educational material available to provide certain educational knowledge to the students. Unfortunately, most of the current educational systems and their educational content present…

  17. Are Accessible Distance Learning Systems Useful for All Students?: Our Experience with IMES, an Accessible Web-Based Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iglesias, Ana; Moreno, Lourdes; Cuadra, Dolores; Castro, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays the use of distance learning systems is widely extended in engineering education. Moreover, most of them use multimedia resources that sometimes are the only educational material available to provide certain educational knowledge to the students. Unfortunately, most of the current educational systems and their educational content present…

  18. Accessibility

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Federal laws, including Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, mandate that people with disabilities have access to the same information that someone without a disability would have. 508 standards cover electronic and information technology (EIT) products.

  19. Distance learning via interactive telecommunications: ACCESS Network's experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Junichi

    1989-05-01

    A variety of formal and informal telecourses, via interactive television (one-way audio, two-way video), for distant learners are presented. Three interactive formats (telephone, phone-in on radio, and audio teleconferencing) have been utilized in linking a studio instructor with students at home or in the classroom. More interactive segments have been allocated during the broadcast to improve the teaching-learning process. A field trial to test the usefulness of a computer conferencing facility for students studying at a distance and interacting with their teachers is described.

  20. Strategies for active learning in online continuing education.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Janet M

    2005-01-01

    Online continuing education and staff development is on the rise as the benefits of access, convenience, and quality learning are continuing to take shape. Strategies to enhance learning call for learner participation that is self-directed and independent, thus changing the educator's role from expert to coach and facilitator. Good planning of active learning strategies promotes optimal learning whether the learning content is presented in a course or a just-in-time short module. Active learning strategies can be used to enhance online learning during all phases of the teaching-learning process and can accommodate a variety of learning styles. Feedback from peers, educators, and technology greatly influences learner satisfaction and must be harnessed to provide effective learning experiences. Outcomes of active learning can be assessed online and implemented conveniently and successfully from the initiation of the course or module planning to the end of the evaluation process. Online learning has become accessible and convenient and allows the educator to track learner participation. The future of online education will continue to grow, and using active learning strategies will ensure that quality learning will occur, appealing to a wide variety of learning needs.

  1. Learning from practice: compulsory licensing cases and access to medicines.

    PubMed

    Stirner, Beatrice; Thangaraj, Harry

    2013-03-01

    Compulsory license is one of the safeguards that international IP law provides to address the undesired effects of pharmaceutical patents on access to important medicines. This article looks into three important case examples to analyze the mechanism's effectiveness and feasibility: the first uses of the newer compulsory license regime established in 2003 under the WTO legislative framework to export medicines to third countries, which lack pharmaceutical manufacturing capacities; and further, the first compulsory license grant in India in March 2012. The case analyses are based on the historical, factual and legal background. They reveal the main challenges of the 2003 WTO regime, including the lack of economic incentives for the generic pharmaceutical companies' participation. In the case of India's compulsory license grant, the article takes as in depth look into possible reasons for the reluctance to use the safeguard until recently, and the important aspects and implications of the Indian authorization to manufacture and sell a generic version of a patented cancer drug.

  2. Internet Access and Usage in Improving Students' Self-Directed Learning in Indonesia Open University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahardjo, Djoko; Sumardjo; Lubis, Djuara P.; Harijati, Sri Ir.

    2016-01-01

    Internet is well known nowadays, however higher distance education students who live in remote rural areas still have not been able to take advantages of this medium optimally for their learning process. For accessing the internet the students have to be available with the minimum prerequisites: the existence of adequate devices and the sufficient…

  3. Internet Access, Use and Sharing Levels among Students during the Teaching-Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutkun, Omer F.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the awareness among students and levels regarding student access, use, and knowledge sharing during the teaching-learning process. The triangulation method was utilized in this study. The population of the research universe was 21,747. The student sample population was 1,292. Two different data collection…

  4. Revealing Shifts and Diversity in Understandings of Self Access Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, John L.; Brown, Howard G.; Fujimoto-Adamson, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    This study has traced the growth of a new facility intended to promote independent language study in a Japanese university. The study traces this Self Access Learning Center (SALC) from its inception through the first two years of its development. It has revealed how key qualitative insights from an archive of semi-structured interviews,…

  5. Low-Income Low-Qualified Employees' Access to Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Rebecca; Wang, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to investigate the embedded process that enables or constrains low-income low-qualified employees' access to workplace learning in small organizations. Design/methodology/approach: Informed by the sociomaterial approach and cultural historical activity theory, this study adopted a qualitative cross-case study…

  6. Learners on the Superhighway? Access to Learning via Electronic Communications. Winston Churchill Fellowship Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeomans, Keith

    Policymakers and practitioners in electronic communication and education in the United States and Canada were interviewed to identify those policies, strategies, and models of good practice used to increase access to learning via electronic communications that are relevant to the United Kingdom and Europe. Information was gathered from 5 experts…

  7. Increasing Accessibility: Using Universal Design Principles to Address Disability Impairments in the Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Candice N.; Heiselt, April K.

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing number of students enrolling in distance education, there is a need to consider the accessibility of course materials in online learning environments. Four major groups of disabilities: mobility, auditory, visual, and cognitive are explored as they relate to their implementation into instructional design and their impact on…

  8. Easing Access for Lifelong Learners: A Comparison of European Models for University Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Müller, Romina; Remdisch, Sabine; Köhler, Katharina; Marr, Liz; Repo, Saara; Yndigegn, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Easing access to higher education (HE) for those engaging in lifelong learning has been a common policy objective across the European Union since the late 1990s. To reach this goal, the transition between vocational and academic routes must be simplified, but European countries are at different developmental stages. This article maps the…

  9. Using Habitus and Field to Explore Access to Higher Education Students' Learning Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Nalita; Busher, Hugh; Suttill, Beth

    2015-01-01

    Despite the diversification of the student population in higher education, there has been little empirical research on the impact of Access to Higher Education (AHE) courses, on mature students' learning identities, and of the changes in higher education policy on their chances to participate. Using data from a study examining AHE students'…

  10. Video Modeling and Observational Learning to Teach Gaming Access to Students with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spriggs, Amy D.; Gast, David L.; Knight, Victoria F.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate both video modeling and observational learning to teach age-appropriate recreation and leisure skills (i.e., accessing video games) to students with autism spectrum disorder. Effects of video modeling were evaluated via a multiple probe design across participants and criteria for mastery were based on…

  11. Access to Adult Learning Opportunities. Tierra de Oportunidad Module 6. LAES: Latino Adult Education Services Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissam, Ed; Dorsey, Holda

    This module, which may be used as the basis for a workshop or as a special topic unit in an adult basic education or English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) course, focuses on access to adult learning opportunities. The following items are included: module overview; list of basic, thinking, interpersonal, information utilization, and other skills…

  12. Beyond the Glow: Children's Broadband Access, Digital Learning Initiatives, and Academic Achievement in Rural Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mardis, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 26 million Americans have no access to broadband's social and economic benefits. A persistent level of non-adoption stems from adults' lack of perceived need or benefit. Florida's unique move to all digital instructional materials and required online learning by 2015 may make home broadband essential for maintaining a learning…

  13. Student Access to and Skills in Using Technology in an Open and Distance Learning Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebenberg, Hanlie; Chetty, Yuraisha; Prinsloo, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Amidst the different challenges facing higher education, and particularly distance education (DE) and open distance learning (ODL), access to information and communication technology (ICT) and students' abilities to use ICTs are highly contested issues in the South African higher education landscape. While there are various opinions about the…

  14. Accessibility Evaluation of Online Learning Management System for Persons with Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwannawut, Nantanoot

    2014-01-01

    Many academic institutions around the world are utilizing and investing in online learning management systems (LMS). While several research studies have examined the functionality of this type of technology, little attention has been paid to accessibility issues, in particular to the complex web-based interfaces for learners with disabilities,…

  15. Basset: learning the regulatory code of the accessible genome with deep convolutional neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, David R.; Snoek, Jasper; Rinn, John L.

    2016-01-01

    The complex language of eukaryotic gene expression remains incompletely understood. Despite the importance suggested by many noncoding variants statistically associated with human disease, nearly all such variants have unknown mechanisms. Here, we address this challenge using an approach based on a recent machine learning advance—deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs). We introduce the open source package Basset to apply CNNs to learn the functional activity of DNA sequences from genomics data. We trained Basset on a compendium of accessible genomic sites mapped in 164 cell types by DNase-seq, and demonstrate greater predictive accuracy than previous methods. Basset predictions for the change in accessibility between variant alleles were far greater for Genome-wide association study (GWAS) SNPs that are likely to be causal relative to nearby SNPs in linkage disequilibrium with them. With Basset, a researcher can perform a single sequencing assay in their cell type of interest and simultaneously learn that cell's chromatin accessibility code and annotate every mutation in the genome with its influence on present accessibility and latent potential for accessibility. Thus, Basset offers a powerful computational approach to annotate and interpret the noncoding genome. PMID:27197224

  16. Accessibility of e-Learning and Computer and Information Technologies for Students with Visual Impairments in Postsecondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fichten, Catherine S.; Asuncion, Jennison V.; Barile, Maria; Ferraro, Vittoria; Wolforth, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the results of two studies on the accessibility of e-learning materials and other information and computer and communication technologies for 143 Canadian college and university students with low vision and 29 who were blind. It offers recommendations for enhancing access, creating new learning opportunities, and eliminating…

  17. Screening for Diabetic Retinopathy in Adults with Learning Disability: Current Uptake and Adjustments to Facilitate Equality of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilling, Rachel F.

    2015-01-01

    Equality of access to health care for adults with learning disability has been in the spotlight in the UK in recent years due to publication of several reports. Adults with learning disability are thought to account for a significant proportion of the diabetic population in the UK. A list of adults known to the learning disability health…

  18. Student-Centered Learning: A Comparison of Two Different Methods of Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slunt, Kelli M.; Giancarlo, Leanna C.

    2004-01-01

    The two student centered learning methods, concept checks and just-in-time teaching were tested. While both the methods were found to be valuable for active participation of the student in his or her education, just-in-time was perhaps more effective from the point of view of getting the student to prepare ahead of the next lecture and in the…

  19. Designing Accessible Learning Materials for Learners with Disabilities and Learning Difficulties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, Ann

    1996-01-01

    Explains how the Open Training and Education Network in New South Wales (Australia) has addressed the issue of designing learning materials for learners in vocational and pre-vocational areas with physical, intellectual, vision, hearing, psychological, or neurological disabilities and learning difficulties, such as low literacy and numeracy…

  20. Semantic Web Technologies for Storing and Accessing Immediately Needed Training Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    just - in - time ” Job Aids. • Job Aids help them learn/recall how to perform their mission. • DRC developed tools which leverage Semantic Web technology...to: – Reduce development costs of authoring Job Aids by dynamically composing Job Aids from procedural knowledge bases on the fly. – Enable “ just - in - time ” training...in real-time – Content used for just - in - time warfighter training while in the field Page 12 of 44 Dynamic Job Aid System (DJAS) Demonstration Page

  1. Using statistical and machine learning to help institutions detect suspicious access to electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jihoon; Grillo, Janice M; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether statistical and machine-learning methods, when applied to electronic health record (EHR) access data, could help identify suspicious (ie, potentially inappropriate) access to EHRs. Methods From EHR access logs and other organizational data collected over a 2-month period, the authors extracted 26 features likely to be useful in detecting suspicious accesses. Selected events were marked as either suspicious or appropriate by privacy officers, and served as the gold standard set for model evaluation. The authors trained logistic regression (LR) and support vector machine (SVM) models on 10-fold cross-validation sets of 1291 labeled events. The authors evaluated the sensitivity of final models on an external set of 58 events that were identified as truly inappropriate and investigated independently from this study using standard operating procedures. Results The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the models on the whole data set of 1291 events was 0.91 for LR, and 0.95 for SVM. The sensitivity of the baseline model on this set was 0.8. When the final models were evaluated on the set of 58 investigated events, all of which were determined as truly inappropriate, the sensitivity was 0 for the baseline method, 0.76 for LR, and 0.79 for SVM. Limitations The LR and SVM models may not generalize because of interinstitutional differences in organizational structures, applications, and workflows. Nevertheless, our approach for constructing the models using statistical and machine-learning techniques can be generalized. An important limitation is the relatively small sample used for the training set due to the effort required for its construction. Conclusion The results suggest that statistical and machine-learning methods can play an important role in helping privacy officers detect suspicious accesses to EHRs. PMID:21672912

  2. Video Modeling and Observational Learning to Teach Gaming Access to Students with ASD.

    PubMed

    Spriggs, Amy D; Gast, David L; Knight, Victoria F

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate both video modeling and observational learning to teach age-appropriate recreation and leisure skills (i.e., accessing video games) to students with autism spectrum disorder. Effects of video modeling were evaluated via a multiple probe design across participants and criteria for mastery were based on these results. Secondary measures were collected on observational learning across participants and behaviors. Participants included 4 children with autism, ages 8-11, who were served in self-contained special education classrooms. Results indicated a functional relation between video modeling and increased independence in gaming; observational learning occurred for at least some steps across students. Results, implications for practitioners, limitations, and ideas for future research are discussed.

  3. A Novel Dynamic Spectrum Access Framework Based on Reinforcement Learning for Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yun; Wang, Chao; Wang, Jiaxing; Dou, Zheng

    2016-10-12

    Cognitive radio sensor networks are one of the kinds of application where cognitive techniques can be adopted and have many potential applications, challenges and future research trends. According to the research surveys, dynamic spectrum access is an important and necessary technology for future cognitive sensor networks. Traditional methods of dynamic spectrum access are based on spectrum holes and they have some drawbacks, such as low accessibility and high interruptibility, which negatively affect the transmission performance of the sensor networks. To address this problem, in this paper a new initialization mechanism is proposed to establish a communication link and set up a sensor network without adopting spectrum holes to convey control information. Specifically, firstly a transmission channel model for analyzing the maximum accessible capacity for three different polices in a fading environment is discussed. Secondly, a hybrid spectrum access algorithm based on a reinforcement learning model is proposed for the power allocation problem of both the transmission channel and the control channel. Finally, extensive simulations have been conducted and simulation results show that this new algorithm provides a significant improvement in terms of the tradeoff between the control channel reliability and the efficiency of the transmission channel.

  4. A Novel Dynamic Spectrum Access Framework Based on Reinforcement Learning for Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yun; Wang, Chao; Wang, Jiaxing; Dou, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive radio sensor networks are one of the kinds of application where cognitive techniques can be adopted and have many potential applications, challenges and future research trends. According to the research surveys, dynamic spectrum access is an important and necessary technology for future cognitive sensor networks. Traditional methods of dynamic spectrum access are based on spectrum holes and they have some drawbacks, such as low accessibility and high interruptibility, which negatively affect the transmission performance of the sensor networks. To address this problem, in this paper a new initialization mechanism is proposed to establish a communication link and set up a sensor network without adopting spectrum holes to convey control information. Specifically, firstly a transmission channel model for analyzing the maximum accessible capacity for three different polices in a fading environment is discussed. Secondly, a hybrid spectrum access algorithm based on a reinforcement learning model is proposed for the power allocation problem of both the transmission channel and the control channel. Finally, extensive simulations have been conducted and simulation results show that this new algorithm provides a significant improvement in terms of the tradeoff between the control channel reliability and the efficiency of the transmission channel. PMID:27754316

  5. Service users leading the way: focus group methodology in developing accessible information DVDs with people with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Boyden, Paul; Esscopri, Nazima; Ogi, Laura; Brennan, Andrew; Kalsy-Lillico, Sunny

    2009-09-01

    The English government sees it important to view service users as active partners in the delivery of accessible resources. The current article follows a brief report which described an innovative project on developing an accessible DVD explaining the Birmingham Clinical Psychology Service to people with learning disabilities. The article describes three focus groups involving adults with learning disabilities that met to reflect and evaluate the accessibility of the DVD. This process formed the evaluative phase of the DVD development project where people with learning disabilities evaluated the accessibility, level of understanding, and clarity of the DVD content. The DVD was rated positively by the focus groups, and minor changes were made to the final version of the DVD. The article also reflects upon the use of focus groups as a methodological approach in researching the views of people with learning disabilities.

  6. Scaffolding the design of accessible eLearning content: a user-centered approach and cognitive perspective.

    PubMed

    Catarci, Tiziana; De Giovanni, Loredana; Gabrielli, Silvia; Kimani, Stephen; Mirabella, Valeria

    2008-08-01

    There exist various guidelines for facilitating the design, preparation, and deployment of accessible eLearning applications and contents. However, such guidelines prevalently address accessibility in a rather technical sense, without giving sufficient consideration to the cognitive aspects and issues related to the use of eLearning materials by learners with disabilities. In this paper we describe how a user-centered design process was applied to develop a method and set of guidelines for didactical experts to scaffold their creation of accessible eLearning content, based on a more sound approach to accessibility. The paper also discusses possible design solutions for tools supporting eLearning content authors in the adoption and application of the proposed approach.

  7. Deaf Adolescents' Learning of Cardiovascular Health Information: Sources and Access Challenges.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott R; Kushalnagar, Poorna; Hauser, Peter C

    2015-10-01

    Deaf individuals have more cardiovascular risks than the general population that are believed to be related to their cardiovascular health knowledge disparities. This phenomenological study describes where 20 deaf sign language-using adolescents from Rochester, New York, many who possess many positive characteristics to support their health literacy, learn cardiovascular health information and their lived experiences accessing health information. The goal is to ultimately use this information to improve the delivery of cardiovascular health education to this population and other deaf adolescents at a higher risk for weak health literacy. Deaf bilingual researchers interviewed deaf adolescents, transcribed and coded the data, and described the findings. Five major sources of cardiovascular health information were identified including family, health education teachers, healthcare providers, printed materials, and informal sources. Despite possessing advantageous characteristics contributing to stronger health literacy, study participants described significant challenges with accessing health information from each source. They also demonstrated inconsistencies in their cardiovascular health knowledge, especially regarding heart attack, stroke, and cholesterol. These findings suggest a great need for additional public funding to research deaf adolescents' informal health-related learning, develop accessible and culturally appropriate health surveys and health education programming, improve interpreter education, and disseminate information through social media.

  8. Integrating E-Learning into the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harun, Mohd Hishamuddin

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of electronic learning and knowledge management in the workplace focuses on learning and training in the medical and health care setting in Malaysia. Highlights include learning and the knowledge economy; just-in-time continuing medical education; distance education; and modular distance learning. (Author/LRW)

  9. A Promising Practicum Pilot--Exploring Associate Teachers' Access and Interactions with a Web-Based Learning Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrarca, Diana

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores how a small group of associate teachers (i.e., the classroom teachers who host, supervise, and mentor teacher candidates during practicum placements) accessed and interacted with the Associate Teacher Learning Tool (ATLT), a web-based learning tool created specifically for this new group of users. The ATLT is grounded in…

  10. Optimal biliary access point and learning curve for endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy with transmural stenting

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dongwook; Park, Do Hyun; Song, Tae Jun; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although endoscopic ultrasound-guided hepaticogastrostomy (EUS-HGS) with transmural stenting has increased for biliary decompression in patients with an inaccessible papilla, the optimal biliary access point and the learning curve of EUS-HGS have not been studied. We evaluated the optimal biliary access point and learning curve for technically successful EUS-HGS. Methods: 129 consecutive patients (male n = 81, 62.3%; malignant n = 113, 87.6%) who underwent EUS-HGS due to an inaccessible papilla were enrolled. EUS finding and procedure times according to each needle puncture attempt in EUS-HGS were prospectively measured. Learning curves of EUS-HGS were calculated for two main outcome measurements (procedure time and adverse events) by using the moving average method and cumulative sum (CUSUM) analysis, respectively. Results: A total of 174 EUS-HGS attempts were performed in 129 patients. The mean number of needle punctures was 1.35 ± 0.57. Using the logistic regression model, bile duct diameter of the puncture site ⩽ 5 mm [odds ratio (OR) 3.7, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.71–8.1, p < 0.01] and hepatic portion length [linear distance from the mural wall to the punctured bile duct wall on EUS; mean hepatic portion length was 27 mm (range 10–47 mm)] > 3 cm (OR 5.7, 95% CI: 2.7–12, p < 0.01) were associated with low technical success. Procedure time and adverse events were shorter after 24 cases, and stabilized at 33 cases of EUS-HGS, respectively. Conclusions: Our data suggest that a bile duct diameter > 5 mm and hepatic portion length 1 cm to ⩽ 3 cm on EUS may be suitable for successful EUS-HGS. In our learning curve analysis, over 33 cases might be required to achieve the plateau phase for successful EUS-HGS. PMID:28286558

  11. E-Learning System Overview Based on Semantic Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsultanny, Yas A.

    2006-01-01

    The challenge of the semantic web is the provision of distributed information with well-defined meaning, understandable for different parties. e-Learning is efficient task relevant and just-in-time learning grown from the learning requirements of the new dynamically changing, distributed business world. In this paper we design an e-Learning system…

  12. Effects of lexical factors on lexical access among typical language-learning children and children with word-finding difficulties.

    PubMed

    Newman, Rochelle S; German, Diane J

    2002-09-01

    This investigation studied the influence of lexical factors, known to impact lexical access in adults, on the word retrieval of children. Participants included 320 typical and atypical (word-finding difficulties) language-learning children, ranging in age from 7 to 12 years. Lexical factors examined included word frequency, age-of-acquisition, neighborhood density, neighborhood frequency, and stress pattern. Findings indicated that these factors did influence lexical access in children. Words which were high in frequency and neighborhood frequency, low in neighborhood density and age-of-acquisition, and which contained the typical stress pattern for the language were easier to name. Further, the number of neighbors that were more frequent than the target word also had an effect on the word's ease of retrieval. Significant interactions indicated that age-of-acquisition effects decreased with maturation for typically-learning children whereas these effects continued to impact the lexical access of children with word-finding difficulties across the ages studied, suggesting that these children's difficulties in accessing words may have prevented them from developing strong access paths to these words. These findings support a view of lexical access in which access paths to words become strengthened with successful use.

  13. Regulation of BDNF chromatin status and promoter accessibility in a neural correlate of associative learning

    PubMed Central

    Ambigapathy, Ganesh; Zheng, Zhaoqing; Keifer, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression critically controls learning and its aberrant regulation is implicated in Alzheimer's disease and a host of neurodevelopmental disorders. The BDNF gene is target of known DNA regulatory mechanisms but details of its activity-dependent regulation are not fully characterized. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the epigenetic regulation of the turtle BDNF gene (tBDNF) during a neural correlate of associative learning using an in vitro model of eye blink classical conditioning. Shortly after conditioning onset, the results from ChIP-qPCR show conditioning-dependent increases in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and repressor basic helix-loop-helix binding protein 2 (BHLHB2) binding to tBDNF promoter II that corresponds with transcriptional repression. In contrast, enhanced binding of ten-eleven translocation protein 1 (Tet1), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) to promoter III corresponds with transcriptional activation. These actions are accompanied by rapid modifications in histone methylation and phosphorylation status of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). Significantly, these remarkably coordinated changes in epigenetic factors for two alternatively regulated tBDNF promoters during conditioning are controlled by Tet1 and ERK1/2. Our findings indicate that Tet1 and ERK1/2 are critical partners that, through complementary functions, control learning-dependent tBDNF promoter accessibility required for rapid transcription and acquisition of classical conditioning. PMID:26336984

  14. Responding to the Widening Participation Agenda through Improved Access to and within 3D Virtual Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Denise; Willems, Julie

    2012-01-01

    The Australian Government's widening participation agenda--also referred to as the social inclusion agenda--considers equity through the triple focus of access, participation and outcomes. These foci are catalysts for re-examining teaching and learning approaches in formal education. This article considers this national refocus and the…

  15. "I Always Wanted to Do Second Chance Learning": Identities and Experiences of Tutors on Access to Higher Education Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busher, Hugh; James, Nalita; Piela, Anna

    2015-01-01

    There is a dearth of literature on Access to Higher Education (AHE) tutors, which this paper addresses. Tutors play an important part in constructing emotional and academic support for students. Understanding their constructions of professional identity and their views of the students they teach helps to explain the learning environments they…

  16. Access, Use and Perceptions of Teachers and Students towards Mobile Phones as a Tool for Teaching and Learning in Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafyulilo, Ayoub

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the access, use and perceptions of teachers and students towards mobile phones as a tool for facilitating teaching and learning beyond the classroom walls. A total of 29 pre-service teachers and four college instructors from Dar es salaam University College of Education (DUCE) as well as 12 in-service teachers and 40 students…

  17. Redefining Accessibility on High-Stakes Tests for Postsecondary College Students with Learning Disabilities in an Era of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banerjee, Manju; Gregg, Noel

    2008-01-01

    Unprecedented increases in the use of technologies throughout postsecondary education and the workplace are redefining traditional concepts of accessibility during testing for college students with learning disabilities. High stakes testing practices are under pressure to change. The challenge for professionals is to ensure that tests are designed…

  18. Improving Access to Healthy Foods for Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders: Lessons Learned from the STRIVE Program.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Simona C; Rideout, Catlin; Patel, Shilpa; Arista, Pedro; Tepporn, Edward; Lipman, Jesse; Kunkel, Sarah; Le, Daniel Q; Chin, Kathy Ko; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2015-05-01

    Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AANHPIs) experience a large burden from certain chronic disease-related risk factors. The STRIVE Program funded four AANHPI community-based organizations (CBOs) to implement culturally adapted community gardens and farmers' markets to increase access to healthy foods. Key CBO informant interviews were conducted to understand processes and lessons learned.

  19. The Potential of Using a Mobile Phone to Access the Internet for Learning EFL Listening Skills within a Korean Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nah, Ki Chune; White, Peter; Sussex, Roland

    2008-01-01

    Interest in the use of a mobile phone to access the Internet for learning English in general, and listening skills in particular, has been increasing in Korea over the last few years. However, there has been only a small number of studies on this topic in Korea. The present paper investigates the potential of using a mobile phone to browse…

  20. Improving Access to Healthy Foods for Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders: Lessons Learned from the STRIVE Program

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Simona C.; Rideout, Catlin; Patel, Shilpa; Arista, Pedro; Tepporn, Edward; Lipman, Jesse; Kunkel, Sarah; Le, Daniel Q.; Chin, Kathy Ko; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2015-01-01

    Summary Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AANHPIs) experience a large burden from certain chronic disease-related risk factors. The STRIVE Program funded four AANHPI community-based organizations (CBOs) to implement culturally adapted community gardens and farmers' markets to increase access to healthy foods. CBO key informant interviews were conducted to understand processes and lessons learned. PMID:25981093

  1. Interaction Problems Accessing E-Learning Environments in Multi-Touch Mobile Devices: A Case Study in TelEduc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Silva, André Constantino; Freire, Fernanda Maria Pereira; de Arruda, Alan Victor Pereira; da Rocha, Heloísa Vieira

    2013-01-01

    e-Learning environments offer content, such text, audio, video, animations, using the Web infrastructure and they are designed to users interacting with keyboard, mouse and a medium-sized screen. Mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, have enough computation power to render Web pages, allowing browsing the Internet and access e-Learning…

  2. Web Site Usability Testing Involving People with Learning Disabilities Using Only Images and Audio to Access Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The need for social inclusion, informed choice and the facilitation of independent living for people with learning disabilities (LD) is being emphasised ever more by government, professionals, academics and, indeed, by people with LD themselves, particularly in self-advocacy groups. Achieving goals around inclusion and autonomy requires access to…

  3. Activity Based Learning as Self-Accessing Strategy to Promote Learners' Autonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravi, R.; Xavier, P.

    2007-01-01

    The Activity Based Learning (ABL) is unique and effective to attract out-of -school children to schools. It facilitates readiness for learning, instruction, reinforcement and evaluation. ABL has transformed the classrooms into hubs of activities and meaningful learning. Activity-based learning, naturally leads to cooperative learning. Since group…

  4. A Data Mining Approach to Improve Re-Accessibility and Delivery of Learning Knowledge Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabitha, Sai; Mehrotra, Deepti; Bansal, Abhay

    2014-01-01

    Today Learning Management Systems (LMS) have become an integral part of learning mechanism of both learning institutes and industry. A Learning Object (LO) can be one of the atomic components of LMS. A large amount of research is conducted into identifying benchmarks for creating Learning Objects. Some of the major concerns associated with LO are…

  5. Assessing the engagement, learning, and overall experience of students operating an atomic absorption spectrophotometer with remote access technology.

    PubMed

    Erasmus, Daniel J; Brewer, Sharon E; Cinel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The use of internet-based technologies in the teaching of laboratories has emerged as a promising education tool. This study evaluated the effectiveness of using remote access technology to operate an atomic absorption spectrophotometer in analyzing the iron content in a crude myoglobin extract. Sixty-two students were surveyed on their level of engagement, learning, and overall experience. Feedback from students suggests that the use of remote access technology is effective in teaching students the principles of chemical analysis by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

  6. Ecologia: The Assumptions, Expectations, and Strategies of Modern Language Students Working in a Self-Access Learning Environment for the First Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, Alison

    1994-01-01

    This study examined 29 second-year undergraduate students of Spanish using a self-access learning environment for the first time, focusing on their language attitudes and learning strategies. The results show that, even as modern languages majors, the students possessed a model of language and strategies for learning that were significantly…

  7. Navigating E-Learning and Blended Learning for Pre-Service Teachers: Redesigning for Engagement, Access and Efficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chigeza, Philemon; Halbert, Kelsey

    2014-01-01

    Nebulous combinations of face-to-face and online learning are increasingly common across Australian higher education contexts. This paper reports on part of a redesign project of an undergraduate education subject at a regional university. The aim of the redesign was to enhance e-learning and blended learning environments. An approach that maps…

  8. Through the Open Door--Today's Revolution in Open Access and Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Roger, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Consists of eight articles discussing the topic of open learning. Articles address (1) definitions, (2) corporate training, (3) further education programs, (4) university-based training, (5) distance learning, (6) learning to learn, (7) Britain's Open University, (8) the Business-Technical Education Council. (CH)

  9. Access to ICT for Teaching and Learning: From Single Artefact to Interrelated Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerniewicz, Laura; Brown, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    In the past few years, concepts of the digital divide and theories of access to ICT have evolved beyond a focus on the separation of the "haves" and the "have nots" to include more than just physical access to computers. Researchers have started considering the conditions or criteria for access and broadened the concept by…

  10. The VA Point-of-Care Precision Oncology Program: Balancing Access with Rapid Learning in Molecular Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Louis D.; Brophy, Mary T.; Turek, Sara; Kudesia, Valmeek; Ramnath, Nithya; Shannon, Colleen; Ferguson, Ryan; Pyarajan, Saiju; Fiore, Melissa A.; Hornberger, John; Lavori, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) recognized the need to balance patient-centered care with responsible creation of generalizable knowledge on the effectiveness of molecular medicine tools. Embracing the principles of the rapid learning health-care system, a new clinical program called the Precision Oncology Program (POP) was created in New England. The POP integrates generalized knowledge about molecular medicine in cancer with a database of observations from previously treated veterans. The program assures access to modern genomic oncology practice in the veterans affairs (VA), removes disparities of access across the VA network of clinical centers, disseminates the products of learning that are generalizable to non-VA settings, and systematically presents opportunities for patients to participate in clinical trials of targeted therapeutics. PMID:26949343

  11. Service-Learning in the Financial Planning Curriculum: Expanding Access to the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annis, Paul M.; Palmer, Lance; Goetz, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Service-learning projects are a cornerstone of student experiential learning. Such programs have proven to be mutually beneficial to communities and students within a variety of family and consumer sciences courses. However, there is a paucity of literature addressing service-learning efforts within the field of financial planning. There is an…

  12. E-Learning in Engineering Education: Design of a Collaborative Advanced Remote Access Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandra A. P., Jagadeesh; Samuel, R. D. Sudhaker

    2010-01-01

    Attaining excellence in technical education is a worthy challenge to any life goal. Distance learning opportunities make these goals easier to reach with added quality. Distance learning in engineering education is possible only through successful implementations of remote laboratories in a learning-by-doing environment. This paper presents one…

  13. Setting the Direction. Partnerships in Action: First Nations, Metis and Inuit Learning Access and Success. A Learning Alberta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Advanced Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Aboriginal Learning Subcommittee looked specifically at developing recommendations that address First Nations, Metis and Inuit learning needs and supports. The Subcommittee proposes policy actions and recommends that all stakeholders work together to implement these actions. The first recommendation for action is to build on partnerships to…

  14. Global Learning for Global Colleges: Creating Opportunities for Greater Access to International Learning for 16-25 Year Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentall, Clare; Bourn, Douglas; McGough, Hannah; Hodgson, Ann; Spours, Ken

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the extent to which it is possible to incorporate global learning within the further education (FE) curriculum, drawing on the findings from the "Global Learning for Global Colleges" (2009-2012) research and development project, funded by the Department for International Development (DfID). Against a background of…

  15. Just in time: an update on continuum neurogenetics.

    PubMed

    Rost, Natalia S

    2011-04-01

    The field of neurogenetics has been revolutionized by the advances in genome-wide association testing. Recent gene discoveries for disorders of neurodegeneration, CNS demyelination, and neurodevelopmental and cerebrovascular syndromes begin to shape our understanding of the complexity of their underlying genetic architecture. In the future, this knowledge should advance risk prediction, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment strategies for patients with neurologic disorders and their families.

  16. Just-in-Time Web Searches for Trainers & Adult Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, James J.

    Trainers and adult educators often need to quickly locate quality information on the World Wide Web (WWW) and need assistance in searching for such information. A "search engine" is an application used to query existing information on the WWW. The three types of search engines are computer-generated indexes, directories, and meta search…

  17. Just-in-time: maximizing its success potential.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S K

    1990-08-01

    The effective implementation and use of JIT manufacturing practices depends largely on the education, training, and commitment of all levels of management to a fundamental quality-first policy. Management must transfer and demonstrate that commitment to every level and extension of the manufacturing endeavor. As a company establishes and reaches toward that goal, the move to JIT manufacturing practices becomes rational and justifiable. Failing to establish and commit to a quality directive greatly diminishes the potential benefits of JIT. If all levels of manufacturing participate in the JIT planning, implementing, and maintenance procedure, the realization of positive change and improvement drives the process. Total participation makes the task of JIT implementation not only possible, but practical. Enhanced mutual respect for all concerned is a likely consequence, advancing the productive environment.

  18. Inventory management in the just-in-time age.

    PubMed

    Jordan, H H

    1990-08-01

    JIT will change our conventional thinking concerning the management of inventories and streamline our methods for inventory control. Proper selection and implementation of these methods will yield substantial benefits by improving customer service, shortening delivery lead times, and significantly reducing inventory investment. It does not, however, eliminate the need for sound inventory planning.

  19. Developing Inclusive Educators: Enhancing the Accessibility of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquis, Elizabeth; Jung, Bonny; Fudge Schormans, Ann; Lukmanji, Sara; Wilton, Robert; Baptiste, Susan

    2016-01-01

    In light of the growing population of students with disabilities at colleges and universities worldwide, faculty development connected to accessible teaching is of paramount importance. Drawing from the existing literature and from the results of a qualitative study of educational accessibility at one Canadian university, this article offers a…

  20. Lessons Learned from an Advanced Access Trial Within a Canadian Armed Forces Primary Care Clinic.

    PubMed

    Singh, P Tony

    2017-01-01

    Accessibility is a key element of an effective primary care system. Literature has outlined that primary care practices have successfully employed an advanced access scheduler to improve accessibility to booked appointments and consequently enhance patient experience and outcomes. In 2015, a Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) primary care facility in Ottawa trialed an advanced access scheduler. Based on the unique characteristics of a CAF medical clinic and the patient population, this trial produced six critical lessons, which include maintenance of a stable base of clinicians, correcting rostering mismatches, eliminating appointment backlogs, acquiring required information systems, improved understanding of patient demand and communicating changes effectively. These lessons may be utilized by similar organizations to successfully integrate an advanced access scheduler within their primary care facilities.

  1. What It Has or What It Does Not Have? Signposts from US Data for Rural Children's Digital Access to Informal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mardis, Marcia A.

    2013-01-01

    A fifth of US children live in rural areas with limited access to the informal learning opportunities available to their metropolitan counterparts. High-speed broadband internet access can be an important vehicle for delivering opportunities at home and outside of the classroom. In an attempt to explore what current data say about children's…

  2. Computer Acquisition: A Longitudinal Study of the Influence of High Computer Access on Students' Thinking, Learning, and Interactions. Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Robert J.; And Others

    In this study, six students were followed through 4 years of high school, documenting the impact of unlimited access to new learning tools--such as computers, scanners, and videodisc players--on their thinking, their approach to learning, and their interactions with others. The students were in two different classes and the years of case studies…

  3. Scholarly Learning as Vocation: A Study of Community and Broad Access Liberal Arts College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terosky, Aimee LaPointe; Gonzales, Leslie D.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we extended Neumann's scholarly learning theory (2009)?and Hansen's theory on vocation (1994, 1995) to explore the scholarly learning of faculty members employed at institutional types not typically recognized for faculty work beyond teaching. Through interviews with 22 participants, we studied the content of and reasons for…

  4. Healthcare for Men and Women with Learning Disabilities: Understanding Inequalities in Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redley, Marcus; Banks, Carys; Foody, Karen; Holland, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare for men and women with learning disabilities (known internationally as intellectual disabilities) has risen up the political agenda in the United Kingdom, propelled by a report from the charity Mencap. This report has resulted in renewed efforts, set out in "Valuing People Now", to ensure that people with learning disabilities…

  5. Learning Support Policy for Mathematics in Irish Primary Schools: Equal Access but Unequal Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travers, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    This paper critiques learning-support policy for mathematics in Irish primary schools. The key policy question addressed is how equitable the development of the learning-support service has been in addressing low achievement in mathematics in designated schools compared to non-designated schools. The core argument developed is that there is a link…

  6. School Ground as Environmental Learning Resources: Teachers' and Pupils' Perspectives on Its Potentials, Uses and Accessibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atmodiwirjo, Paramita

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the role of school ground as outdoor learning resources for environmental education. The opportunities to use school ground are particularly prominent in tropical climate, where the weather permits plenty of outdoor learning activities. A study in primary schools in Jakarta explored the relationship between the spatial aspects…

  7. Constructing an Inquiry Orientation from a Learning Theory Perspective: Democratizing Access through Task Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buell, Catherine A.; Greenstein, Steven; Wilstein, Zahava

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted in the mathematics education community that pedagogies oriented toward inquiry are aligned with a constructivist theory of learning, and that these pedagogies effectively support students' learning of mathematics. In order to promote such an orientation, we first separate the idea of inquiry from its conception as a…

  8. Random Access: The Latino Student Experience with Prior Learning Assessment. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein-Collins, Rebecca; Olson, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Many Latinos come to higher education as adults. One degree completion strategy that is particularly suited to adult students in higher education is prior learning assessment (PLA). PLA provides opportunities to evaluate a student's learning from work or life experience for the purpose of awarding college credit. For students whose…

  9. The Power of Technology to Transform Adult Learning: Expanding Access to Adult Education & Workforce Skills through Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCain, Mary L.

    2009-01-01

    There is a highly compelling case for using technology on a large scale to increase access to and improve America's adult education and workforce skills enterprise. By the reckoning of the National Commission on Adult Literacy and others, the nation must reach many more millions of adults with effective college- and job-readiness skills programs…

  10. Methods for Evaluating Online, Resource-Based Learning Environments for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhow, Christine; Dexter, Sara; Riedel, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Online delivery methods offer much promise for anytime, anywhere adult learning. As a method of outreach, and to provide support for just-in-time learning, teacher educators are increasingly deciding to design Web sites that are online, resource-based learning environments for teachers and preservice teachers. Automated evaluation tools and data…

  11. Using Mobile Peer Mentors for Student Engagement: Student Rovers in the Learning Commons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tout, Dan; Pancini, Geri; McCormack, Rob

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a 2010 evaluation of Victoria University's Student Rover program, an on-campus work-based learning program in which mobile student mentors are employed and deployed within the university's Learning Commons to provide "just-in-time" and "just-in-place" learning support to other students. Student…

  12. Learning Communities Faculty Scholars: An Online, Targeted Faculty Development Course to Promote Scholarly Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Hillary H.

    2016-01-01

    Many learning communities instructors seek professional development opportunities that foster their growth as teacher-scholars. Learning communities programs, therefore, have an opportunity to provide targeted, "just in time" training that allows for the immediate application of knowledge to a learning community setting, maximizing…

  13. Designing Collaborative E-Learning Environments Based upon Semantic Wiki: From Design Models to Application Scenarios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yanyan; Dong, Mingkai; Huang, Ronghuai

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge society requires life-long learning and flexible learning environment that enables fast, just-in-time and relevant learning, aiding the development of communities of knowledge, linking learners and practitioners with experts. Based upon semantic wiki, a combination of wiki and Semantic Web technology, this paper designs and develops…

  14. An Assessment for Learning System Called ACED: Designing for Learning Effectiveness and Accessibility. Research Report. ETS RR-07-26

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shute, Valerie J.; Hansen, Eric G.; Almond, Russell G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a 3-year, NSF-funded research and development project called ACED: Adaptive Content with Evidence-based Diagnosis. The purpose of the project was to design, develop, and evaluate an assessment for learning (AfL) system for diverse students, using Algebra I content related to geometric sequences (i.e., successive numbers…

  15. Housing Quality and Access to Material and Learning Resources within the Home Environment in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Robert H.; Putnick, Diane L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined home environment conditions (housing quality, material resources, formal and informal learning materials) and their relations with the Human Development Index (HDI) in 28 developing countries. Home environment conditions in these countries varied widely. The quality of housing and availability of material resources at home were consistently tied to HDI; the availability of formal and informal learning materials little less so. Gross domestic product (GDP) tended to show a stronger independent relation with housing quality and material resources than life expectancy and education. Formal learning resources were independently related to the GDP and education indices, and informal learning resources were not independently related to any constituent indices of the overall HDI. PMID:22277008

  16. 21st Century Senior Leader Education: Ubiquitous Open Access Learning Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-22

    Roughly 2 years ago—with the introduction of the iPhone and the 3G network—access to information all-the-time exploded. With it, expectations...breakthrough technologies General Dempsey‘s epilogue describes are game changing in form-factor and access. In an era of immediacy, iPhones , iPads and...elephant smells the smoke and sees the flames, the elephant overrides the conditioned response and moves.7 Finding a way to get people to smell the

  17. Transgressing the Traditional? Teaching and Learning Methods in a Medieval History Access Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Victoria A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a medieval history access course at the University of Glasgow (Scotland) in which non-traditional teaching methods were used, specifically collaborative group work and embedded rhetorical training for essay writing. Questions the idea of discipline-specific pedagogical practice. (Author/DB)

  18. Minority Access to Information Technology: Lessons Learned. Occasional Paper No. 67. Latino Studies Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pachon, Harry P.; Macias, Elsa E.; Bagasao, Paula Y.

    The Digital Steppingstones (DSS) project is a 3-year study exploring access to advanced information technologies and related training in low-income and minority communities. The project is also identifying exemplary information technology programs in schools, libraries, and community centers in disadvantaged areas of five large cities. Site…

  19. Smallholder Marketing Cooperatives and Smallholders' Market Access: Lessons Learned from the Actors Involved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gouet, Christian; Van Paassen, Annemarie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article explores the views of Smallholder Marketing Cooperatives' (SMCs) leaders and staff, to gain insight about the particular roles SMCs play in facilitating smallholders' market access. Design/methodology/approach: The authors conceptualized and executed two international workshops in which participants from 42 SMCs from 24…

  20. Adapting Online Learning Resources for All: Planning for Professionalism in Accessibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAndrew, Patrick; Farrow, Robert; Cooper, Martyn

    2012-01-01

    Online resources for education offer opportunities for those with disabilities but also raise challenges on how to best adjust resources to accommodate accessibility. Automated reconfiguration could in principle remove the need for expensive and time-consuming discussions about adaptation. On the other hand, human-based systems provide much needed…

  1. Lessons Learned from a Data-Driven College Access Program: The National College Advising Corps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horng, Eileen L.; Evans, Brent J.; antonio, anthony l.; Foster, Jesse D.; Kalamkarian, Hoori S.; Hurd, Nicole F.; Bettinger, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the collaboration between a national college access program, the National College Advising Corps (NCAC), and its research and evaluation team at Stanford University. NCAC is currently active in almost four hundred high schools and through the placement of a recent college graduate to serve as a college adviser provides…

  2. Enhancing Digital Access to Learning Materials for Canadians with Perceptual Disabilities: A Pilot Study. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockerby, Christina; Breau, Rachel; Zuvela, Biljana

    2006-01-01

    By exploring the experiences of participants with DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) Talking Books, the study reported in this article not only discovered how people who are blind, visually impaired, and/or print-disabled read DAISY books, but also identified participants' perceptions of DAISY as being particularly useful in their…

  3. Access to Knowledge: Removing School Barriers to Learning. Youth at Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keating, Pamela; Oakes, Jeannie

    School barriers to equal access need to be removed by fundamentally new policy initiatives at the state and district levels in order to assure educational opportunities for at-risk students. Gender, race, poverty and individual disabilities continue to generate barriers for at-risk students despite broad legal efforts at reform. The following…

  4. Learning as Accessing a Disciplinary Discourse: Integrating Academic Literacy into Introductory Physics through Collaborative Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Delia; Conana, Honjiswa; Maclon, Rohan; Herbert, Mark; Volkwyn, Trevor

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines a collaborative partnership between discipline lecturers and an academic literacy practitioner in the context of undergraduate physics. Gee's sociocultural construct of Discourse is used as a framework for the design of an introductory physics course, explicitly framed around helping students access the disciplinary discourse…

  5. Technology and Learning at Home: Findings from the Evaluation of the Home Access Programme Pilot

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewitt, C.; Parashar, U.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of a UK government initiative, introduced in late 2008 and closed in 2011, to provide a computer and 1 year of Internet connectivity to low-income households with children aged 5-19 years. This paper presents and discusses the findings from the evaluation of the initiative, the Home Access Programme (HAP) pilot study…

  6. Gaining Access to Economically Marginalized Rural Populations: Lessons Learned from Nonprobability Sampling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mammen, Sheila; Sano, Yoshie

    2012-01-01

    Poverty is a significant problem in rural America. Gaining access to economically marginalized rural populations in order to recruit individuals to participate in a research study, however, is often a challenge. This article compares three different nonprobability sampling techniques that have been used to recruit rural, low-income…

  7. The Role of Open Access and Open Educational Resources: A Distance Learning Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatzipanagos, Stylianos; Gregson, Jon

    2015-01-01

    The paper explores the role of Open Access (in licensing, publishing and sharing research data) and Open Educational Resources within Distance Education, with a focus on the context of the University of London International Programmes. We report on a case study where data were gathered from librarians and programme directors relating to existing…

  8. Self-Access Language Learning: Students' Perceptions of and Experiences within This New Mode of Learning (Aprendizaje de idiomas mediante la modalidad de autoacceso: percepciones y experiencias de los estudiantes)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera Díaz, Luz Edith

    2012-01-01

    With the aim of fostering autonomy in learning, both innovations, the self-access centre and the mode of learning derived from it, were adopted in the context of the study (Language Centre in the University of Veracruz, Mexico). Based on a case study, I have adopted a qualitative perspective to do this research, which aimed to know how the…

  9. Learning Disabilities and the Virtual College Campus: A Grounded Theory of Accessibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollins, Nancy L.

    2012-01-01

    Two trends currently impacting higher education intersect in this study: (1) students with learning disabilities are enrolling in colleges and universities in increasing numbers, and (2) colleges and universities are increasingly relying on the web to provide services to students. This reliance on the "virtual campus" comes without…

  10. Playing the Game of School Mathematics: Being Explicit for Indigenous Learners and Access to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on studies of successful remote schools in one region of Australia, it was found that two key strategies were common in the approaches at these schools. First, to make the strategies and expectations being adopted explicit to all those involved in the learning enterprise, and second, that consistency in approaches was crucial. Bourdieu's…

  11. Custom E-Learning Experiences: Working with Profiles for Multiple Content Sources Access and Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferretti, Stefano; Roccetti, Marco; Salomoni, Paola; Mirri, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    It is a common belief that the problem of extracting learners' profiles to be used for delivering custom learning experiences is a closed case. Yet, practical solutions do not completely cope with the complex issue of capturing all the features of users, especially those of heterogeneous learners, who may have special needs or characteristics…

  12. Housing Quality and Access to Material and Learning Resources within the Home Environment in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Robert H.; Putnick, Diane L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined home environment conditions (housing quality, material resources, formal and informal learning materials) and their relations with the Human Development Index (HDI) in 28 developing countries. Home environment conditions in these countries varied widely. The quality of housing and availability of material resources at home were…

  13. Accessing Mainstream: Examining the Struggle for Parents of Children Who Have Learning Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Mairin; Shevlin, Michael; Walsh, Patricia Noonan; McNeela, Eileen

    2005-01-01

    In the past decade Ireland has witnessed substantial changes in policy and provision for children with general learning difficulties as government policies and legislation increasingly underpin the move towards more inclusive provision. Despite this series of policy initiatives parents of children who experience Down syndrome and general learning…

  14. Environmental--Access to Safe Water Learning Module. Development Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Bank, Washington, DC.

    This learning module has two main goals: (1) to increase students' knowledge and understanding of the often complex relationship between sustainable development and the social, economic, and environmental conditions in a country; and (2) to strengthen students' ability to perform statistical calculations, make and interpret maps, charts, and…

  15. Urban Adolescent Students and Technology: Access, Use and Interest in Learning Language and Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jia; Snow, Catherine; White, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents today have vastly different opportunities to learn and process information via pervasive digital technologies and social media. However, there is scant literature on the impact of these technologies on urban adolescents with lower socioeconomic status. This study of 531 urban students in grades 6-8 used a self-reported survey to…

  16. Digital Access: "Using Blogs to Support Adolescent Writers with Learning Disabilities"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sarah R.

    2012-01-01

    Adolescents with learning disabilities need explicit supports to improve their written expression, but those structures and supports are best utilized in an environment that promotes authentic writing resembling the writing students will produce in adult life and work. Classroom blogs may offer special educators an authentic context for writing…

  17. Accessing Flexible Learning Opportunities: Children's and Young People's Use of Laptops in a Paediatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nisselle, Amy; Hanns, Shaun; Green, Julie; Jones, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Hospitalised children and young people not only face challenges to their health but also to their continued education and social connections. These challenges can impact on future life trajectories, so it is crucial to maintain learning and socialising. Educational technologies, such as laptops and iPads, are used in the multidisciplinary…

  18. Space environment data storage and access: lessons learned and recommendations for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Hugh; Heynderickx, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    With the ever increasing volume of space environment data available at present and planned for the near future, the demands on data storage and access methods are increasing as well. In addition, continued access to historical, archived data remains crucial. On the basis of many years of experience, the authors identify the following issues as important for continued and efficient handling of datasets now and in the future: The huge data volumes currently or very soon avaiable from a number of space missions will limi direct Internet download access to even relatively short epoch ranges of data. Therefore, data providers should establish or extend standardised data (post-) processing services so that only data query results should be downloaded. Although a single standardised data format will in all likelihood remain utopia, data providers should at least include extensive metadata with their data products, according to established standards and practices (e.g. ISTP, SPASE). Standardisation of (sets of) metadata greatly facilitates data mining and querying. The use of SQL database storage should be considered instead of, or in parallel with, classic storage of data files. The use of SQL does away with having to handle file parsing and processing, while at the same time standard access protocols can be used to (remotely) connect to such data repositories. Many data holdings are still lacking in extensive descriptions of data provenance (e.g. instrument description), content and format. Unfortunately, detailed data information is usually rejected by scientific and technical journals. Re-processing of historical archived datasets into modern formats, making them easily available and usable, is urgently required, as knowledge is being lost. A global data directory has still not been achieved; policy makers should enforce stricter rules for "broadcasting" dataset information.

  19. How Can Pricing and Reimbursement Policies Improve Affordable Access to Medicines? Lessons Learned from European Countries.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Sabine; Paris, Valérie; Ferrario, Alessandra; Wirtz, Veronika J; de Joncheere, Kees; Schneider, Peter; Pedersen, Hanne Bak; Dedet, Guillaume; Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din

    2017-01-06

    This article discusses pharmaceutical pricing and reimbursement policies in European countries with regard to their ability to ensure affordable access to medicines. A frequently applied pricing policy is external price referencing. While it provides some benchmark for policy-makers and has been shown to be able to generate savings, it may also contribute to delay in product launch in countries where medicine prices are low. Value-based pricing has been proposed as a policy that promotes access while rewarding useful innovation; however, implementing it has proven quite challenging. For high-priced medicines, managed-entry agreements are increasingly used. These agreements allow policy-makers to manage uncertainty and obtain lower prices. They can also facilitate earlier market access in case of limited evidence about added therapeutic value of the medicine. However, these agreements raise transparency concerns due to the confidentiality clause. Tendering as used in the hospital and offpatent outpatient sectors has been proven to reduce medicine prices but it requires a robust framework and appropriate design with clear strategic goals in order to prevent shortages. These pricing and reimbursement policies are supplemented by the widespread use of Health Technology Assessment to inform decision-making, and by strategies to improve the uptake of generics, and also biosimilars. While European countries have been implementing a set of policy options, there is a lack of thorough impact assessments of several pricing and reimbursement policies on affordable access. Increased cooperation between authorities, experience sharing and improving transparency on price information, including the disclosure of confidential discounts, are opportunities to address current challenges.

  20. Technology Closes the Distance: Global Solutions Show the Variety, Equity, and Accessibility of Distance Learning Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The number of U.S. teachers participating in some form of distance education is on the rise, yet compared to many nations, distance-based professional learning is fairly new in the U.S. What are common elements of effective global distance education for teachers, and what lessons do they hold for those who design similar programs in the U.S.? Over…

  1. Improving prediction of secondary structure, local backbone angles, and solvent accessible surface area of proteins by iterative deep learning

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Rhys; Paliwal, Kuldip; Lyons, James; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Sharma, Alok; Wang, Jihua; Sattar, Abdul; Yang, Yuedong; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2015-01-01

    Direct prediction of protein structure from sequence is a challenging problem. An effective approach is to break it up into independent sub-problems. These sub-problems such as prediction of protein secondary structure can then be solved independently. In a previous study, we found that an iterative use of predicted secondary structure and backbone torsion angles can further improve secondary structure and torsion angle prediction. In this study, we expand the iterative features to include solvent accessible surface area and backbone angles and dihedrals based on Cα atoms. By using a deep learning neural network in three iterations, we achieved 82% accuracy for secondary structure prediction, 0.76 for the correlation coefficient between predicted and actual solvent accessible surface area, 19° and 30° for mean absolute errors of backbone φ and ψ angles, respectively, and 8° and 32° for mean absolute errors of Cα-based θ and τ angles, respectively, for an independent test dataset of 1199 proteins. The accuracy of the method is slightly lower for 72 CASP 11 targets but much higher than those of model structures from current state-of-the-art techniques. This suggests the potentially beneficial use of these predicted properties for model assessment and ranking. PMID:26098304

  2. Lessons Learned From Small Store Programs to Increase Healthy Food Access

    PubMed Central

    Gittelsohn, Joel; Laska, Melissa N.; Karpyn, Allison; Klingler, Kristen; Ayala, Guadalupe X.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To document implementation challenges and opportunities associated with small store interventions. Methods Case study analysis of small store interventions conducted in 4 regions of the US. We systematically generated matrices to compare and contrast lessons learned to advance implementation science. Results Seven thematic areas were identified including: establishing relationships with stores, store owner and customer relationships, selection of intervention approaches, stocking healthier foods, evaluation, maintenance of changes, and dissemination. Conclusions This information provides guidance to researchers and practitioners wishing to design, implement, and evaluate small store interventions. PMID:24629559

  3. Unreasonable effectiveness of learning neural networks: From accessible states and robust ensembles to basic algorithmic schemes

    PubMed Central

    Borgs, Christian; Chayes, Jennifer T.; Ingrosso, Alessandro; Lucibello, Carlo; Saglietti, Luca; Zecchina, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    In artificial neural networks, learning from data is a computationally demanding task in which a large number of connection weights are iteratively tuned through stochastic-gradient-based heuristic processes over a cost function. It is not well understood how learning occurs in these systems, in particular how they avoid getting trapped in configurations with poor computational performance. Here, we study the difficult case of networks with discrete weights, where the optimization landscape is very rough even for simple architectures, and provide theoretical and numerical evidence of the existence of rare—but extremely dense and accessible—regions of configurations in the network weight space. We define a measure, the robust ensemble (RE), which suppresses trapping by isolated configurations and amplifies the role of these dense regions. We analytically compute the RE in some exactly solvable models and also provide a general algorithmic scheme that is straightforward to implement: define a cost function given by a sum of a finite number of replicas of the original cost function, with a constraint centering the replicas around a driving assignment. To illustrate this, we derive several powerful algorithms, ranging from Markov Chains to message passing to gradient descent processes, where the algorithms target the robust dense states, resulting in substantial improvements in performance. The weak dependence on the number of precision bits of the weights leads us to conjecture that very similar reasoning applies to more conventional neural networks. Analogous algorithmic schemes can also be applied to other optimization problems. PMID:27856745

  4. The path to learning: action acquisition is impaired when visual reinforcement signals must first access cortex.

    PubMed

    Thirkettle, Martin; Walton, Thomas; Shah, Ashvin; Gurney, Kevin; Redgrave, Peter; Stafford, Tom

    2013-04-15

    Animals, interacting with the environment, learn and exploit the consequences of their movements. Fundamental to this is the pairing of salient sensory input with recent motor output to form an action-outcome pair linking a performed movement with its outcome. Short-latency dopamine (DA) signalling in the basal ganglia has been proposed to support this crucial task. For visual stimuli, this DA signalling is triggered at short latency by input from the superior colliculus (SC). While some aspects of the visual signal (e.g. luminance), are relayed directly to the SC via the retinotectal projection, other information unavailable to this subcortical pathway must take a more circuitous route to the SC, first submitting to early visual processing in cortex. By comparing action-outcome pairing when the visual stimulus denoting success was immediately available to the SC, via the retinotectal pathway, against that when cortical processing of the signal was required, the impact this additional sensory processing has on action-outcome learning can be established. We found that action acquisition was significantly impaired when the action was reinforced by a stimulus ineligible for the retinotectal pathway. Furthermore, we found that when the stimulus was eligible for the retinotectal pathway but evoked an increased latency, action acquisition was not impaired. These results suggest that the afferent sensory pathway via the SC is certainly primary and possibly instrumental to the DA neurons' role in the discovery of novel actions and that the differences found are not due to simple sensory latency.

  5. Transforming Classrooms into Learning Studios: What Does It Take to Make Classrooms a Living Space?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aslan, Sinem; Reigeluth, Charles M.; Mete, Sinem Emine

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors start with a description of the learner-centered paradigm of education. The key tenets of the paradigm are outlined as: Competency-based student progress, competency-based student assessment and records, personal learning plans, project-based learning, just-in-time instructional support, student as self-directed…

  6. Institutional Change for Improving Accessibility in the Design and Delivery of Distance Learning--The Role of Faculty Accessibility Specialists at the Open University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Rachel; Pearson, Victoria K.; Warren, James P.; Forbes, Tina

    2015-01-01

    The Open University (OU) has an established infrastructure for supporting disabled students. Historically, the thrust of this has focused on providing accessible adjustments post-production. In 2012, the OU implemented securing greater accessibility (SeGA) to raise awareness and bring about an institutional change to curriculum design so that the…

  7. Cyberspace, Distance Learning, and Higher Education in Developing Countries: Old and Emergent Issues of Access, Pedagogy, and Knowledge Production. International Studies in Sociology and Social Anthropology, 94

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assie-Lumumba, N'Dri T., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Amidst the euphoria about the new frontiers of technology sometimes perceived as a panacea for expansion of higher education in developing countries, there is a need to analyze persistent and new grounds of unequal opportunity for access, learning, and the production of knowledge. This volume addresses fundamental questions about the educational…

  8. On the Accessibility of Phonological, Orthographic, and Semantic Aspects of Second Language Vocabulary Learning and Their Relationship with Spatial and Linguistic Intelligences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarei, Abbas Ali; Aleali, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    The present study was an attempt to investigate the differences in the accessibility of phonological, semantic, and orthographic aspects of words in L2 vocabulary learning. For this purpose, a sample of 119 Iranian intermediate level EFL students in a private language institute in Karaj was selected. All of the participants received the same…

  9. Libraries for Lifelong Literacy: Unrestricted Access to Information as a Basis for Lifelong Learning and Empowerment. IFLA/FAIFE Theme Report. World Report Series Volume IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidelin, Susanne, Ed.; Hamilton, Stuart, Ed.; Sturges, Paul, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The IFLA/FAIFE (International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions/Committee on Free Access to Information and Freedom of Expression) Theme Report 2004 presents visions of how libraries can promote literacy and lifelong learning. The literacy process has to be recognised as inclusive of all ranges of communication, and it occurs at…

  10. Asynchronous Online Access as an Accommodation on Students with Learning Disabilities and/or Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorders in Postsecondary STEM Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Laura; Asunda, Paul A.; Plant, Stacey J.; Goad, Chester

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether asynchronous online access of course recordings was beneficial to students with learning disabilities (LD) and/or Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) enrolled in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews…

  11. Positioning Extension Massive Open Online Courses (xMOOCs) within the Open Access and the Lifelong Learning Agendas in a Developing Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nkuyubwatsi, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports on xMOOCs indicate that underprivileged learners in need of higher education have minimally been reached by these courses. While the "open access" agenda is needed to reach such learners, most MOOCs have been developed in societies that have shifted toward the "lifelong learning" agenda. In this paper, xMOOCs are…

  12. What Are the Consequences of the Newly Implemented 24+Advanced Learning Loans on Retention of Adult Access to Higher Education Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Jane Marie; Slack, Kim

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the previous literature on student retention in the post-compulsory education sector and the "24+Advanced Learning Loan". Adult students participating in an Access to Higher Education course are at particularly high risk of non-completion. Literature indicates that whilst stakeholders may require factual statistics…

  13. Using Social Media Technologies to Enhance Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Linda Weiser; Friedman, Hershey H.

    2013-01-01

    Models of distance education have evolved over decades, just in time to collide with modern pedagogies in which communication, interaction, student engagement, and active learning are of critical importance. The number of college students taking online classes continues to grow. Today, nearly 30% of college students are taking at least one online…

  14. Learning to Thrive: Building Diverse Scientists’ Access to Community and Resources through the BRAINS Program

    PubMed Central

    Margherio, Cara; Horner-Devine, M. Claire; Mizumori, Sheri J. Y.; Yen, Joyce W.

    2016-01-01

    BRAINS: Broadening the Representation of Academic Investigators in NeuroScience is a National Institutes of Health–funded, national program that addresses challenges to the persistence of diverse early-career neuroscientists. In doing so, BRAINS aims to advance diversity in neuroscience by increasing career advancement and retention of post-PhD, early-career neuroscientists from underrepresented groups (URGs). The comprehensive professional development program is structured to catalyze conversations specific to URGs in neuroscience and explicitly addresses factors known to impact persistence such as a weak sense of belonging to the scientific community, isolation and solo status, inequitable access to resources that impact career success, and marginalization from informal networks and mentoring relationships. While we do not yet have data on the long-term impact of the BRAINS program on participants’ career trajectory and persistence, we introduce the BRAINS program theory and report early quantitative and qualitative data on shorter-term individual impacts within the realms of career-advancing behaviors and career experiences. These early results suggest promising, positive career productivity, increased self-efficacy, stronger sense of belonging, and new perspectives on navigating careers for BRAINS participants. We finish by discussing recommendations for future professional development programs and research designed to broaden participation in the biomedical and life sciences. PMID:27587858

  15. Data Management for Flexible Access - Implementation and Lessons Learned from work with Multiple User Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, K. K.; Scott, S.; Hudspeth, W. B.

    2012-12-01

    There is no shortage of community-specific and generic data discovery and download platforms and protocols (e.g. CUAHSI HIS, DataONE, GeoNetwork Open Source, GeoPortal, OGC CSW, OAI PMH), documentation standards (e.g. FGDC, ISO 19115, EML, Dublin Core), data access and visualization standards and models (e.g. OGC WxS, OpenDAP), and general-purpose web service models (i.e. REST & SOAP) upon which Geo-informatics cyberinfrastructure (CI) may be built. When attempting to develop a robust platform that may service a wide variety of users and use cases the challenge is one of identifying which existing platform (if any) may support those current needs while also allowing for future expansion for additional capabilities. In the case of the implementation of a data storage, discovery and delivery platform to support the multiple projects at the Earth Data Analysis Center at UNM, no single platform or protocol met the joint requirements of two initial applications (the New Mexico Resource Geographic Information System [http://rgis.unm.edu] and the New Mexico EPSCoR Data Portal [http://nmepscor.org/dataportal]) and furthermore none met anticipated additional requirements as new applications of the platform emerged. As a result of this assessment three years ago EDAC embarked on the development of the Geographic Storage, Transformation, and Retrieval Engine (GSToRE) platform as a general purpose platform upon which n-tiered geospatially enabled data intensive applications could be built. When initially released in 2010 the focus was on the publication of dynamically generated Open Geospatial Consortium services based upon a PostgreSQL/PostGIS backend database. The identification of additional service interface requirements (implementation of the DataONE API and CUAHSI WaterML services), use cases provided by the NM EPSCoR education working group, and expanded metadata publication needs have led to a significant update to the underlying data management tier for GSToRE - the

  16. AquaPedia: Building Intellectual Capacity Through Shared Learning and Open Access Platform to Resolve Water Conflicts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, S.; Akanda, A. S.; Jutla, A.; Lin, C.; Gao, Y.

    2009-04-01

    consider the impact of natural factors (E, P, and Q) and coupling among them. We recognize that uncertainties and incomplete information about interconnections, feedbacks, and complexities within and between societal and natural systems will continue to pose high barriers in finding an effective solution and reaching an agreement for a given water conflict. Sharing of knowledge across river basins can catalyze this learning process. Yet, each water problem or conflict is usually highly contextual and local with different patterns of interconnections and complexities within and between societal and natural system. A management intervention that works in one basin may not be applicable to another due to differences in social-economic context and natural settings. Consequently, we need a conceptual framework that can integrate knowledge as well as compare and contrast outcomes across different scales, boundaries, and river basins. Such a framework will allow us to share knowledge and speed up the learning process across scales and boundaries. Our proposed web-based, wiki-style, self-learning repository of interactive and searchable water case studies, AquaPedia, is a step in that direction. This repository of water information and collective wisdom will bring together various stakeholders across the globe on a common platform to discuss and craft possible solution(s) for a conflict through joint fact finding and interactive learning. An open access collaborative model is adopted in AquaPedia so that stakeholders can participate in the creation, collaboration, discussion, and modification of the content in a meaningful way. The goal is to encourage and combine multiple perspectives and explore negotiated solutions to water conflicts.

  17. "Learn by Doing": An Assessment of the Impact of Access Services in Fostering Skills Development of Access Services Student Staff at Kennedy Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeogun, Margaret Olufunke

    2016-01-01

    The academic library continues to formulate strategies for providing and sustaining a creative learning environment for knowledge creation. But little has been said about its role in skills building through micro employment that is enabling students to develop and integrate their academic, personal, and social skills sets. This study examines the…

  18. Learning Made Accessible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menard, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    During a speech to community college administrators in October, President Barack Obama recognized two-year colleges as the "unsung heroes" that provide opportunities to those who otherwise would be unable to enter higher education. Community colleges, he said, play an important role in reviving the economy and putting Americans back to…

  19. Visual Access in Interpreter-Mediated Learning Situations for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing High School Students Where an Artifact Is in Use.

    PubMed

    Berge, Sigrid Slettebakk; Thomassen, Gøril

    2016-04-01

    This article highlights interpreter-mediated learning situations for deaf high school students where such mediated artifacts as technical machines, models, and computer graphics are used by the teacher to illustrate his or her teaching. In these situations, the teacher's situated gestures and utterances, and the artifacts will contribute independent pieces of information. However, the deaf student can only have his or her visual attention focused on one source at a time. The problem to be addressed is how the interpreter coordinates the mediation when it comes to deaf students' visual orientation. The presented discourse analysis is based on authentic video recordings from inclusive learning situations in Norway. The theoretical framework consists of concepts of role, footing, and face-work (Goffman, E. (1959). The presentation of self in everyday life. London, UK: Penguin Books). The findings point out dialogical impediments to visual access in interpreter-mediated learning situations, and the article discusses the roles and responsibilities of teachers and educational interpreters.

  20. Learning to Work during Work Placement: Negotiating Access to Work and Participation through "Origination" and Establishing a "Legitimate Presence"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pang, Priscilla

    2015-01-01

    Research on work-based learning has produced much insight into how newcomers to work roles acquire the skills and knowledge required in their work. Overwhelmingly, studies have shown that learning takes place through participation in work activities which provides opportunities for learning. But participation can be problematic when workers and…

  1. The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Help for Academic Tour Guides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saathoff, Rachael

    2013-01-01

    The presence of scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL), or its absence, has greatly impacted my undergraduate studies. While professors are experts in their subject matter, they do not always know how to reach students. SoTL provides resources to address such disconnects. Just-in-time teaching (JiTT) is one example of a SoTL-informed teaching…

  2. Lessons Learned from Client Projects in an Undergraduate Project Management Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Carol E.

    2012-01-01

    This work proposes that a subtle combination of three learning methods offering "just in time" project management knowledge, coupled with hands-on project management experience can be particularly effective in producing project management students with employable skills. Students were required to apply formal project management knowledge to gain…

  3. Towards Effective Evaluation and Reform in Medical Education: A Cognitive and Learning Sciences Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Vimla L.; Yoskowitz, Nicole A.; Arocha, Jose F.

    2009-01-01

    Health professions education is dealing with major transformations in light of the changing nature of the health care delivery system, including the use of technology for "just in time" delivery of care, evidence-based practice, personalized medical care and learning, as health professionals strive to integrate biomedical advances and clinical…

  4. Learning Analytics Platform, towards an Open Scalable Streaming Solution for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewkow, Nicholas; Zimmerman, Neil; Riedesel, Mark; Essa, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Next generation digital learning environments require delivering "just-in-time feedback" to learners and those who support them. Unlike traditional business intelligence environments, streaming data requires resilient infrastructure that can move data at scale from heterogeneous data sources, process the data quickly for use across…

  5. Impact Assessment of Problem-Based Learning in an Engineering Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasr, Karim J.; Ramadan, Bassem H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the development and implementation of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) in an engineering thermodynamics course at Kettering University. In this project, the thermodynamics course was restructured as modules presenting practical applications first, whereas principles were introduced just-in-time and as encountered. Theoretical…

  6. Three Students with Developmental Disabilities Learn to Operate an iPod to Access Age-Appropriate Entertainment Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagohara, Debora M.

    2011-01-01

    Students with developmental disabilities may not have the necessary skills or the same opportunities to access multimedia-based leisure materials as their typical peers. Portable multimedia devices such as the iPod Touch[R] may provide them with a useful tool for accessing age-appropriate leisure material. The present study examined the…

  7. Benefits Access for College Completion: Lessons Learned from a Community College Initiative to Help Low-Income Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke-Benfield, Amy Ellen; Saunders, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    This report analyzes how students were served by Benefits Access for College Completion (BACC), a 2.5-year initiative designed to increase access to public benefits (such as SNAP or Medicaid) for eligible low-income students. These crucial supports reduce students' unmet financial needs and help them finish school. Launched in 2011, BACC funded…

  8. Using a Learning Collaborative Strategy With Office-based Practices to Increase Access and Improve Quality of Care for Patients With Opioid Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nordstrom, Benjamin R.; Saunders, Elizabeth C.; McLeman, Bethany; Meier, Andrea; Xie, Haiyi; Lambert-Harris, Chantal; Tanzman, Beth; Brooklyn, John; King, Gregory; Kloster, Nels; Lord, Clifton Frederick; Roberts, William; McGovern, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Rapidly escalating rates of heroin and prescription opioid use have been widely observed in rural areas across the United States. Although US Food and Drug Administration-approved medications for opioid use disorders exist, they are not routinely accessible to patients. One medication, buprenorphine, can be prescribed by waivered physicians in office-based practice settings, but practice patterns vary widely. This study explored the use of a learning collaborative method to improve the provision of buprenorphine in the state of Vermont. Methods We initiated a learning collaborative with 4 cohorts of physician practices (28 total practices). The learning collaborative consisted of a series of 4 face-to-face and 5 teleconference sessions over 9 months. Practices collected and reported on 8 quality-improvement data measures, which included the number of patients prescribed buprenorphine, and the percent of unstable patients seen weekly. Changes from baseline to 8 months were examined using a p-chart and logistic regression methodology. Results Physician engagement in the learning collaborative was favorable across all 4 cohorts (85.7%). On 6 of the 7 quality-improvement measures, there were improvements from baseline to 8 months. On 4 measures, these improvements were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Importantly, practice variation decreased over time on all measures. The number of patients receiving medication increased only slightly (3.4%). Conclusions Results support the effectiveness of a learning collaborative approach to engage physicians, modestly improve patient access, and significantly reduce practice variation. The strategy is potentially generalizable to other systems and regions struggling with this important public health problem. PMID:26900669

  9. Access to Mainstream Health Services: A Case Study of the Difficulties Faced by a Child with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Freddy Jackson; Cooper, Kate; Diebel, Tara

    2013-01-01

    People with learning disabilities have higher levels of health needs compared with the general population (Nocon, 2006, Background evidence for the DRC's formal investigation into health inequalities experienced by people with learning disabilities or mental health problems. London and Manchester, Disability Rights Commission). Research has shown…

  10. (Re)Framing Educational Possibility: Attending to Power and Equity in Shaping Access to and within Learning Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, V.; Penuel, W. R.; Gutierrez, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    Accounts of how culture constitutes the learning activities we accomplish with others are flourishing. These accounts illustrate how participants draw upon, adapt, and contest historically situated social practices, tools, and relations to accomplish their learning goals [Vygotsky: Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1978]. Yet, they often lack…

  11. e-Learning Programs Come in All Shapes and Sizes: From Alaska to Arkansas, Districts Are Experimenting with Online Learning to Solve Access Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, Shawn; Jones, Thea; Pickle, Shirley Kirk

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a sample of online learning programs serving very different populations: a small district spread over a vast area, a large inner school district, and a statewide program serving numerous districts. It describes how these districts successfully implemented e-learning programs in their schools and discusses the positive impact…

  12. Losing access to the native language while immersed in a second language: evidence for the role of inhibition in second-language learning.

    PubMed

    Linck, Jared A; Kroll, Judith F; Sunderman, Gretchen

    2009-12-01

    Adults are notoriously poor second-language (L2) learners. A context that enables successful L2 acquisition is language immersion. In this study, we investigated the effects of immersion learning for a group of university students studying abroad in Spain. Our interest was in the effect of immersion on the native language (L1), English. We tested the hypothesis that immersion benefits L2 learning as a result of attenuated influence of the L1. Participants were English-speaking learners of Spanish who were either immersed in Spanish while living in Spain or exposed to Spanish in the classroom only. Performance on both comprehension and production tasks showed that immersed learners outperformed their classroom counterparts with respect to L2 proficiency. However, the results also revealed that immersed learners had reduced L1 access. The pattern of data is most consistent with the interpretation that the L1 was inhibited while the learners were immersed.

  13. Connecting or Dividing? Examining Female Learners' Information and Communication Technology Access and Use in Open and Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhushan, Poonam

    2008-01-01

    The role of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in addressing global development agenda, including the key Millennium Development Goal of promoting gender equality and empowering women, is being increasingly recognised. ICTs, by themselves, however cannot be effective if they do not address the central issue of women's access and…

  14. Aboriginal-Enhanced Access to Native Learning: A Literacy Project of the Native Women's Resource Centre. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaikezheyongai, Sally

    Ways of increasing awareness of and access to literacy programs for Native people in Toronto, Ontario, were examined. Data were collected through the following activities: a literature review; meetings with stakeholders and the public; surveys of learners, Native literacy workers, executive directors, and steering committee members; and focus…

  15. An Intelligent Information Access System Assisting a Case Based Learning Methodology Evaluated in Higher Education with Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aparicio, Fernando; De Buenaga, Manuel; Rubio, Margarita; Hernando, Asuncion

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there has been a shift in educational methodologies toward a student-centered approach, one which increasingly emphasizes the integration of computer tools and intelligent systems adopting different roles. In this paper we describe in detail the development of an Intelligent Information Access system used as the basis for producing…

  16. Assessing the Engagement, Learning, and Overall Experience of Students Operating an Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer with Remote Access Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erasmus, Daniel J.; Brewer, Sharon E.; Cinel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The use of internet-based technologies in the teaching of laboratories has emerged as a promising education tool. This study evaluated the effectiveness of using remote access technology to operate an atomic absorption spectrophotometer in analyzing the iron content in a crude myoglobin extract. Sixty-two students were surveyed on their level of…

  17. Identifiability and Accessibility in Learning Definite Article Usages: A Quasi-Experimental Study with Japanese Learners of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinenoya, Kimiko; Lyster, Roy

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of instruction on the use of the definite article "the" by Japanese learners of English by implementing two instructional treatments that varied in the extent to which they emphasized identifiability and accessibility. One instructional treatment, referred to as the traditional (TR) treatment,…

  18. Should laptops be allowed in the classroom? Two viewpoints: viewpoint 1: laptops in classrooms facilitate curricular advancement and promote student learning and viewpoint 2: deconstructing and rethinking the use of laptops in the classroom.

    PubMed

    Spallek, Heiko; von Bergmann, HsingChi

    2014-12-01

    This Point/Counterpoint article discusses the pros and cons of deploying one aspect of instructional technology in dental education: the use of laptops in the classroom. Two opposing viewpoints, written by different authors, evaluate the arguments. Viewpoint 1 argues that laptops in classrooms can be a catalyst for rapid curricular advancement and prepare dental graduates for the digital age of dentistry. As dental education is not limited to textual information, but includes skill development in spatial relationships and hands-on training, technology can play a transformative role in students' learning. Carefully implemented instructional technology can enhance student motivation when it transforms students from being the objects of teaching to the subjects of learning. Ubiquitous access to educational material allows for just-in-time learning and can overcome organizational barriers when, for instance, introducing interprofessional education. Viewpoint 2 argues that, in spite of widespread agreement that instructional technology leads to curricular innovation, the notion of the use of laptops in classrooms needs to be deconstructed and rethought when effective learning outcomes are sought. Analyzing the purpose, pedagogy, and learning product while applying lessons learned from K-12 implementation leads to a more complex picture of laptop integration in dental classrooms and forms the basis for questioning the value of such usage. For laptop use to contribute to student learning, rather than simply providing opportunity for students to take notes and access the Internet during class, this viewpoint emphasizes that dental educators need to think carefully about the purpose of this technology and to develop appropriate pedagogical strategies to achieve their objectives. The two viewpoints agree that significant faculty development efforts should precede any introduction of technology into the educational process and that technology alone cannot change education

  19. CuboCube: Student creation of a cancer genetics e-textbook using open-access software for social learning

    PubMed Central

    Seid-Karbasi, Puya; Ye, Xin C.; Zhang, Allen W.; Gladish, Nicole; Cheng, Suzanne Y. S.; Rothe, Katharina; Pilsworth, Jessica A.; Kang, Min A.; Doolittle, Natalie; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Stirling, Peter C.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.

    2017-01-01

    Student creation of educational materials has the capacity both to enhance learning and to decrease costs. Three successive honors-style classes of undergraduate students in a cancer genetics class worked with a new software system, CuboCube, to create an e-textbook. CuboCube is an open-source learning materials creation system designed to facilitate e-textbook development, with an ultimate goal of improving the social learning experience for students. Equipped with crowdsourcing capabilities, CuboCube provides intuitive tools for nontechnical and technical authors alike to create content together in a structured manner. The process of e-textbook development revealed both strengths and challenges of the approach, which can inform future efforts. Both the CuboCube platform and the Cancer Genetics E-textbook are freely available to the community. PMID:28267757

  20. CuboCube: Student creation of a cancer genetics e-textbook using open-access software for social learning.

    PubMed

    Seid-Karbasi, Puya; Ye, Xin C; Zhang, Allen W; Gladish, Nicole; Cheng, Suzanne Y S; Rothe, Katharina; Pilsworth, Jessica A; Kang, Min A; Doolittle, Natalie; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Stirling, Peter C; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2017-03-01

    Student creation of educational materials has the capacity both to enhance learning and to decrease costs. Three successive honors-style classes of undergraduate students in a cancer genetics class worked with a new software system, CuboCube, to create an e-textbook. CuboCube is an open-source learning materials creation system designed to facilitate e-textbook development, with an ultimate goal of improving the social learning experience for students. Equipped with crowdsourcing capabilities, CuboCube provides intuitive tools for nontechnical and technical authors alike to create content together in a structured manner. The process of e-textbook development revealed both strengths and challenges of the approach, which can inform future efforts. Both the CuboCube platform and the Cancer Genetics E-textbook are freely available to the community.

  1. Visual Access in Interpreter-Mediated Learning Situations for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing High School Students Where an Artifact Is in Use

    PubMed Central

    Thomassen, Gøril

    2016-01-01

    This article highlights interpreter-mediated learning situations for deaf high school students where such mediated artifacts as technical machines, models, and computer graphics are used by the teacher to illustrate his or her teaching. In these situations, the teacher’s situated gestures and utterances, and the artifacts will contribute independent pieces of information. However, the deaf student can only have his or her visual attention focused on one source at a time. The problem to be addressed is how the interpreter coordinates the mediation when it comes to deaf students’ visual orientation. The presented discourse analysis is based on authentic video recordings from inclusive learning situations in Norway. The theoretical framework consists of concepts of role, footing, and face-work (Goffman, E. (1959). The presentation of self in everyday life. London, UK: Penguin Books). The findings point out dialogical impediments to visual access in interpreter-mediated learning situations, and the article discusses the roles and responsibilities of teachers and educational interpreters. PMID:26681267

  2. Oceans of Data: In what ways can learning research inform the development of electronic interfaces and tools for use by students accessing large scientific databases?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumhansl, R. A.; Foster, J.; Peach, C. L.; Busey, A.; Baker, I.

    2012-12-01

    The practice of science and engineering is being revolutionized by the development of cyberinfrastructure for accessing near real-time and archived observatory data. Large cyberinfrastructure projects have the potential to transform the way science is taught in high school classrooms, making enormous quantities of scientific data available, giving students opportunities to analyze and draw conclusions from many kinds of complex data, and providing students with experiences using state-of-the-art resources and techniques for scientific investigations. However, online interfaces to scientific data are built by scientists for scientists, and their design can significantly impede broad use by novices. Knowledge relevant to the design of student interfaces to complex scientific databases is broadly dispersed among disciplines ranging from cognitive science to computer science and cartography and is not easily accessible to designers of educational interfaces. To inform efforts at bridging scientific cyberinfrastructure to the high school classroom, Education Development Center, Inc. and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography conducted an NSF-funded 2-year interdisciplinary review of literature and expert opinion pertinent to making interfaces to large scientific databases accessible to and usable by precollege learners and their teachers. Project findings are grounded in the fundamentals of Cognitive Load Theory, Visual Perception, Schemata formation and Universal Design for Learning. The Knowledge Status Report (KSR) presents cross-cutting and visualization-specific guidelines that highlight how interface design features can address/ ameliorate challenges novice high school students face as they navigate complex databases to find data, and construct and look for patterns in maps, graphs, animations and other data visualizations. The guidelines present ways to make scientific databases more broadly accessible by: 1) adjusting the cognitive load imposed by the user

  3. Context-aware access control for pervasive access to process-based healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Koufi, Vassiliki; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2008-01-01

    Healthcare is an increasingly collaborative enterprise involving a broad range of healthcare services provided by many individuals and organizations. Grid technology has been widely recognized as a means for integrating disparate computing resources in the healthcare field. Moreover, Grid portal applications can be developed on a wireless and mobile infrastructure to execute healthcare processes which, in turn, can provide remote access to Grid database services. Such an environment provides ubiquitous and pervasive access to integrated healthcare services at the point of care, thus improving healthcare quality. In such environments, the ability to provide an effective access control mechanism that meets the requirement of the least privilege principle is essential. Adherence to the least privilege principle requires continuous adjustments of user permissions in order to adapt to the current situation. This paper presents a context-aware access control mechanism for HDGPortal, a Grid portal application which provides access to workflow-based healthcare processes using wireless Personal Digital Assistants. The proposed mechanism builds upon and enhances security mechanisms provided by the Grid Security Infrastructure. It provides tight, just-in-time permissions so that authorized users get access to specific objects according to the current context. These permissions are subject to continuous adjustments triggered by the changing context. Thus, the risk of compromising information integrity during task executions is reduced.

  4. Student's Plagiarisms in Higher Learning Institutions in the Era of Improved Internet Access: Case Study of Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anney, Vicent Naano; Mosha, Mary Atanas

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated students' plagiarism practices in Tanzania higher learning institutions by involving two universities-one public and one private university as a case study. The universities involved have honour code and policies for plagiarism detection however they do not employ software for checking students' plagiarism. The study…

  5. Universal Design in Elementary and Middle School: Designing Classrooms and Instructional Practices to Ensure Access to Learning for All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Margaret M.

    2008-01-01

    Universal Design for Instruction (UDI) is a set of principles helpful in guiding the process of designing classroom environments and instruction that are conducive to the learning of all students. UDI, designed by the Center for Applied Special Technology, is a framework that has been successful for all students, including those with disabilities…

  6. Universal Design for Learning: Preparing Secondary Education Teachers in Training to Increase Academic Accessibility of High School English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopes-Murphy, Solange

    2012-01-01

    Although the concept of universal design for learning (UDL) is well understood in the world of architecture and in the area of special education, its use to increase the academic performance of high school English learners (ELs) is not widely explored. To reduce this void, this article presents an overview of the UDL concept and its principles,…

  7. "Hospital": A Five-Year-Old Samoan Boy's Access to Learning Curriculum Content in His New Zealand Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vine, Elaine W.

    2006-01-01

    Previous research suggests that young ESOL learners in mainstream English-medium classrooms are afforded limited opportunities to engage with curriculum content. This paper reports on a study of a five-year-old boy from Samoa who was just beginning to learn English in a mainstream New Zealand classroom. Interactions between the boy and his …

  8. Effective Teaching in Case-Based Education: Patterns in Teacher Behavior and Their Impact on the Students' Clinical Problem Solving and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaekers, Stephan; van Keulen, Hanno; Kremer, Wim; Pilot, Albert; van Beukelen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Case-based learning formats, in which relevant case information is provided just in time, require teachers to combine their scaffolding role with an information-providing one. The objective of this study is to establish how this combination of roles affects teacher behavior and that, in turn, mediates students' reasoning and problem solving. Data…

  9. Scaling Informal Learning at the Workplace: A Model and Four Designs from a Large-Scale Design-Based Research Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ley, Tobias; Cook, John; Dennerlein, Sebastian; Kravcik, Milos; Kunzmann, Christine; Pata, Kai; Purma, Jukka; Sandars, John; Santos, Patricia; Schmidt, Andreas; Al-Smadi, Mohammad; Trattner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Workplace learning happens in the process and context of work, is multi-episodic, often informal, problem based and takes place on a just-in-time basis. While this is a very effective means of delivery, it also does not scale very well beyond the immediate context. We review three types of technologies that have been suggested to scale learning…

  10. Anatomy in a new curriculum: facilitating the learning of gross anatomy using web access streaming dissection videos.

    PubMed

    DiLullo, Camille; Coughlin, Patrick; D'Angelo, Marina; McGuinness, Michael; Bandle, Jesse; Slotkin, Eric M; Shainker, Scott A; Wenger, Christopher; Berray, Scott J

    2006-09-01

    As anatomy course hours have decreased, it has become increasingly important to provide tools that facilitate laboratory task efficiency. Digital video clips were created to present dissection guidance to medical students. The video clips communicate challenging aspects of the dissection process with succinct visual demonstrations easily accessed via an online course site. Students were asked to complete a survey designed to assess the quality and utility of the videos. Survey respondents indicated that the videos enhanced the quality of the anatomy course as well as their individual performances. This teaching tool enhances student competencies in human gross anatomy.

  11. Design and application of a tool for structuring, capitalizing and making more accessible information and lessons learned from accidents involving machinery.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Samira; Sadeghi, Leyla; Tricot, Nicolas; Mathieu, Luc

    2016-10-11

    Accident reports are published in order to communicate the information and lessons learned from accidents. An efficient accident recording and analysis system is a necessary step towards improvement of safety. However, currently there is a shortage of efficient tools to support such recording and analysis. In this study we introduce a flexible and customizable tool that allows structuring and analysis of this information. This tool has been implemented under TEEXMA®. We named our prototype TEEXMA®SAFETY. This tool provides an information management system to facilitate data collection, organization, query, analysis and reporting of accidents. A predefined information retrieval module provides ready access to data which allows the user to quickly identify the possible hazards for specific machines and provides information on the source of hazards. The main target audience for this tool includes safety personnel, accident reporters and designers. The proposed data model has been developed by analyzing different accident reports.

  12. Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Robert

    A report on learning psychology and its relationship to the study of school learning emphasizes the increasing interaction between theorists and educational practitioners, particularly in attempting to learn which variables influence the instructional process and to find an appropriate methodology to measure and evaluate learning. "Learning…

  13. Prediction Enhancement of Residue Real-Value Relative Accessible Surface Area in Transmembrane Helical Proteins by Solving the Output Preference Problem of Machine Learning-Based Predictors.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Feng; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2015-11-23

    The α-helical transmembrane proteins constitute 25% of the entire human proteome space and are difficult targets in high-resolution wet-lab structural studies, calling for accurate computational predictors. We present a novel sequence-based method called MemBrain-Rasa to predict relative solvent accessibility surface area (rASA) from primary sequences. MemBrain-Rasa features by an ensemble prediction protocol composed of a statistical machine-learning engine, which is trained in the sequential feature space, and a segment template similarity-based engine, which is constructed with solved structures and sequence alignment. We locally constructed a comprehensive database of residue relative solvent accessibility surface area from the solved protein 3D structures in the PDB database. It is searched against for segment templates that are expected to be structurally similar to the query sequence's segments. The segment template-based prediction is then fused with the support vector regression outputs using knowledge rules. Our experiments show that pure machine learning output cannot cover the entire rASA solution space and will have a serious prediction preference problem due to the relatively small size of membrane protein structures that can be used as the training samples. The template-based engine solves this problem very well, resulting in significant improvement of the prediction performance. MemBrain-Rasa achieves a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.733 and mean absolute error of 13.593 on the benchmark dataset, which are 26.4% and 26.1% better than existing predictors. MemBrain-Rasa represents a new progress in structure modeling of α-helical transmembrane proteins. MemBrain-Rasa is available at www.csbio.sjtu.edu.cn/bioinf/MemBrain/.

  14. Brokering access to massive climate and landscape data via web services: observations and lessons learned after five years of the Geo Data Portal project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, D. L.; Walker, J. I.; Read, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The USGS Geo Data Portal (GDP) project started in 2010 with the goal of providing climate and landscape model output data to hydrology and ecology modelers in model-ready form. The system takes a user-specified collection of polygons and a gridded time series dataset and returns a time series of spatial statistics for each polygon. The GDP is designed for scalability and is generalized such that any data, hosted anywhere on the Internet adhering to the NetCDF-CF conventions, can be processed. Five years into the project, over 600 unique users from more than 200 organizations have used the system's web user interface and some datasets have been accessed thousands of times. In addition to the web interface, python and R client libraries have seen steady usage growth and several third-party web applications have been developed to use the GDP for easy data access. Here, we will present lessons learned and improvements made after five years of operation of the system's user interfaces, processing server, and data holdings. A vision for the future availability and processing of massive climate and landscape data will be outlined.

  15. Universal Design for Learning: speech-language pathologists and their teams making the common core curriculum accessible.

    PubMed

    Staskowski, Maureen; Hardin, Susan; Klein, Mike; Wozniak, Carrie

    2012-05-01

    The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework was named in the supporting documents for the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) as a means of helping all students, especially those with disabilities, to meet and exceed the rigorous expectations. This article will describe the principles of UDL, show how educational teams use the framework to design instruction to teach the CCSS with examples from science and English language arts, and finally explore how the implementation of UDL provides an opportunity for speech-language pathologists to play a critical role in school improvement and instructional design and support.

  16. Arteriovenous Access

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, Jennifer M.; Dipchand, Christine; Oliver, Matthew; Moist, Louise; Yilmaz, Serdar; Lok, Charmaine; Leung, Kelvin; Clark, Edward; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Luscombe, Rick; Miller, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Complications of vascular access lead to morbidity and may reduce quality of life. In this module, we review both infectious and noninfectious arteriovenous access complications including neuropathy, aneurysm, and high-output access. For the challenging patients who have developed many complications and are now nearing their last vascular access, we highlight some potentially novel approaches. PMID:28270919

  17. Twenty years of experimental and direct numerical simulation access to the velocity gradient tensor: What have we learned about turbulence?a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, James M.

    2009-02-01

    secondary instabilities. Since then several experimentalists have used multisensor hot-wire probes of increasing complexity in turbulent boundary layers, wakes, jets, mixing layers, and grid flows. Numerous computationalists have employed DNS in a wide variety of turbulent flows at ever increasing Reynolds numbers. Particle image velocimetry and other optical methods have been rapidly developed and advanced during these two decades which have provided other means of access to these fundamental properties of turbulence. This paper reviews highlights of these remarkable developments and points out some of the most important things we have learned about turbulence as a result.

  18. Great Business Training Is Just Enough, Just in Time, and Just for Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Thomas; Doyle, Diana; Wisniewski, Jane; Kaiser, Sarah; Vosler, Lynn; Amoo, Judith

    2007-01-01

    How has a small midwestern rural community college contributed to the growth of the nation's largest direct marketer whose annual earnings exceed $1.5 billion? Discover how Western Nebraska Community College has developed a Corporate Academy and a Corporate Associate of Occupational Studies degree customized to meet the unique needs of employees…

  19. "Just" in time: gene theory and the biology of the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Sapp, Jan

    2009-10-01

    Ernest Everett Just's critique of gene theory, his emphasis on the importance of cell cytoplasm, especially of the cortex in development and heredity, is placed within the context of his times, when the views of embryologists, who emphasized heredity as process, and those of geneticists who held determinist conceptions of the gene, were irreconcilable. Just's emphasis on the cell cortex in heredity and morphogenesis was appreciated by few, but was vindicated by studies of cortical inheritance and the morphogenetic role of pre-existing cell structure in ciliated protists. His essential criticisms of mechanism remain potent today.

  20. The Combination of Just-in-Time Teaching and Wikispaces in Physics Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohottala, Hashini E.

    2013-01-01

    The general student population enrolled in today's physics classrooms is diverse. They come from a variety of different educational backgrounds. Some demonstrate a good knowledge of natural laws of physics with a better understanding of mathematical concepts, while others show a fair knowledge in fundamentals of physics with a minimum knowledge in…

  1. Multiple biomarkers biosensor with just-in-time functionalization: Application to prostate cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Parra-Cabrera, C; Samitier, J; Homs-Corbera, A

    2016-03-15

    We present a novel lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device for the simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers using simple voltage measurements. The biosensor functionalization is performed in-situ, immediately before its use, facilitating reagents storage and massive devices fabrication. Sensitivity, limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) are tunable depending on the in-chip flown sample volumes. As a proof-of-concept, the system has been tested and adjusted to quantify two proteins found in blood that are susceptible to be used combined, as a screening tool, to diagnose prostate cancer (PCa): prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and spondin-2 (SPON2). This combination of biomarkers has been reported to be more specific for PCa diagnostics than the currently accepted but rather controversial PSA indicator. The range of detection for PSA and SPON2 could be adjusted to the clinically relevant range of 1 to 10 ng/ml. The system was tested for specificity to the evaluated biomarkers. This multiplex system can be modified and adapted to detect a larger quantity of biomarkers, or different ones, of relevance to other specific diseases.

  2. The SHAPE guideline: ahead of its time or just in time?

    PubMed

    Falk, Erling; Shah, Prediman K

    2011-10-01

    In 2006, a grass roots movement called SHAPE (Screening for Heart Attack Prevention and Education) published a novel practice guideline for cardiovascular screening in the asymptomatic at-risk population. It suggested the use of noninvasive tests for subclinical atherosclerosis in cardiovascular risk assessment to target intensified preventive care to those at highest risk. The SHAPE guideline received much attention but not as much support from the "official" medical societies. However, subsequent studies published since 2006 have now provided strong supportive evidence for the strategy spearheaded by the SHAPE guideline. Indeed, the latest guidelines issued jointly by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology have elevated recommendation levels for noninvasive imaging of subclinical atherosclerosis. This change is widely viewed as a significant step toward the SHAPE guidelines. The background for SHAPE and the evidence behind the recommendation to use coronary artery calcium score measured by computed tomography, carotid intima-media thickness and plaque measured by ultrasound, and ankle-brachial index in cardiovascular risk assessment is reviewed in this article.

  3. Just in time: circadian defense patterns and the optimal defense hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Ian T; Meldau, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    The optimal defense hypothesis (ODH) provides a functional explanation for the inhomogeneous distribution of defensive structures and defense metabolites throughout a plant's body: tissues that are most valuable in terms of fitness and have the highest probability of attack are generally the best defended. In a previous review, we argue that ontogenically-controlled accumulations of defense metabolites are likely regulated through an integration of developmental and defense signaling pathways. In this addendum, we extend the discussion of ODH patterns by including the recent discoveries of circadian clock-controlled defenses in plants.

  4. A just-in-time adaptive classification system based on the intersection of confidence intervals rule.

    PubMed

    Alippi, Cesare; Boracchi, Giacomo; Roveri, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Classification systems meant to operate in nonstationary environments are requested to adapt when the process generating the observed data changes. A straightforward form of adaptation implementing the instance selection approach suggests releasing the obsolete data onto which the classifier is configured by replacing it with novel samples before retraining. In this direction, we propose an adaptive classifier based on the intersection of confidence intervals rule for detecting a possible change in the process generating the data as well as identifying the new data to be used to configure the classifier. A key point of the research is that no assumptions are made about the distribution of the process generating the data. Experimental results show that the proposed adaptive classification system is particularly effective in situations where the process is subject to abrupt changes.

  5. A simulation-based "just in time" and "just in place" central venous catheter education program.

    PubMed

    Lengetti, Evelyn; Monachino, Anne Marie; Scholtz, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe the Central Venous Catheter Dress Rehearsal simulation program. Teaching is conducted at the bedside, which is efficient and cost effective and allows nurses to practice in a safe environment with no harm to the patient. The educators' challenges and remediation strategies are shared. This simulation program has demonstrated improved consistency of practice and knowledge among pediatric nurses.

  6. Automatic Generation of Just-in-Time Online Assessments from Software Design Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zualkernan, Imran A.; El-Naaj, Salim Abou; Papadopoulos, Maria; Al-Amoudi, Budoor K.; Matthews, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    Computer software is pervasive in today's society. The rate at which new versions of computer software products are released is phenomenal when compared to the release rate of new products in traditional industries such as aircraft building. This rapid rate of change can partially explain why most certifications in the software industry are…

  7. The Just-in-Time Operating Philosophy: Implications for Workers and Work Teams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    block effect (teams) e - random error component DATA : COLLABORATION INDEX 2 TREATMENTS BLOCKS TI T2 T3 B 0.681 0.596 0.638 D 0.595 0.558 0.620 Q 0.814...6i where: y - collaboration index 1 A - overall mean r - treatment effect (survey time) - block effect (teams) e - random error component DATA ... COLLABORATION INDEX 1 TREATMENTS BLOCKS T1 T2 T3 B 0.774 0.699 0.769 D 0.953 0.779 0.753 Q 1.030 1.025 1.153 R 0.558 1.123 1.009 S 1.230 1.616 1.486 RESULTS

  8. Potential Applicability of Just-In-Time Inventory Management Within the Navy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA, 1992. 7. Heizer & Render, PRODUCTION AND OPERATION MANAGEMENT (3rd ED), Massachusetts, Simon & Schuster, Inc...Navy inventory management system to the elements of a JIT resupply system. An assessment is made to determine eligibility of Navy operations for a JIT...determine eligibility of Navy operations for a JIT inventory management system. Finally, a case study of Naval Aviation Depot North Island, an

  9. Just-in-Time Pedagogy: Teachers' Perspectives on the Response to Intervention Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Kathleen A.; Murakami-Ramalho, Elizabeth; Urick, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods research is to examine teachers' perspectives on the response to intervention (RTI) framework and its implementation in Michigan and Texas schools. Both states have been leaders in literacy, increasing preservice and in-service teacher certification standards and developing similar batteries for assessing literacy…

  10. NDU Knowledge Net: A Web-Enabled Just-In-Time Information Service for Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alden, Jay

    This paper describes the development of a web-enabled information service for constituents of the Information Resources Management College (National Defense University, Washington, DC). The constituents of the College, who include graduates, current students, and prospective students, typically work in the Chief Information Officer (CIO) office of…

  11. Digital Reference as an Instructional Tool: Just in Time and Just Enough.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Patricia E.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the amount of instruction that is part of reference service, based on experiences with the University of New Brunswick's LIVE (Library Information in a Virtual Environment) digital reference service. Concludes that digital reference instruction is not a substitute for more formal library instruction programs that include information…

  12. An effective implementation scheme of just-in-time protocol for optical burst switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guiling; Li, Xinwan; Chen, Jian-Ping; Wang, Hui

    2005-02-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) has been emerging as a promising technology that can effectively support the next generation IP-oriented transportation networks. JIT signaling protocol for OBS is relatively simple and easy to be implemented by hardware. This paper presented an effective scheme to implement the JIT protocol, which not only can effectively implement reservation and release of optical channels based on JIT, but also can process the failure of channel reservation and release due to loss of burst control packets. The scheme includes: (1) a BHP (burst head packet) path table is designed and built at each OBS node. It is used to guarantee the corresponding burst control packet, i.e. BHP, BEP (burst end packet) and BEP_ACK (BEP acknowledgement), to be transmitted in the same path. (2) The timed retransmission of BEP and the reversed deletion of the item in BHP path tables triggered by the corresponding BEP_ACK are combined to solve the problems caused by the loss of the signaling messages in channel reservation and release process. (3) Burst head packets and BEP_ACK are transmitted using "best-effort" method. Related signaling messages and their formats for the proposed scheme are also given.

  13. Embedded Librarians: Just-in-Time or Just-in-Case? A Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heathcock, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Embedded librarians in online courses provide a wealth of service and information to students. Though students indicate that these services are valuable, the librarians providing embedded services frequently note that these projects are very time consuming. This study examines the provision of a less time-intensive model of embedded librarianship…

  14. Just-in-Time Training: The Lessons of Hurricane Katrina, 10 Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boerner, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina reshaped college workforce development programs as thoroughly as it did the coastline--but in this case, the changes were for the good of students, employers and the community. This article discusses the effects and changes made by 4 community colleges who were effected by Hurricane Katrina: (1) Louisiana Community and Technical…

  15. Access to Public Educational Facilities under the Equal Access Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, R. Craig; Goldblatt, Steven M.

    1988-01-01

    Discussion centers on the legal bases by which school administrators permit access to public educational facilities by religiously and politically oriented student organizations. It concludes that access should be granted to students whose purposes do not disrupt teaching and learning. (JAM)

  16. A Learning City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynne, Andy

    1999-01-01

    CITINET is a network of learning centers in Sheffield, England, where adults can access information about educational opportunities and use information and communications technology. Both job-related learning and nonvocational learning are supported. (SK)

  17. Enabling the Use of Authentic Scientific Data in the Classroom--Lessons Learned from the AccessData and Data Services Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynds, S. E.; Buhr, S. M.; Ledley, T. S.

    2007-12-01

    Enabling the Use of Authentic Scientific Data in the Classroom--Lessons Learned from the AccessData and Data Services Workshops Since 2004, the annual AccessData and DLESE Data Services workshops have gathered scientists, data managers, technology specialists, teachers, and curriculum developers to work together creating classroom- ready scientific data modules. Teams of five (one participant from each of the five professions) develop topic- specific online educational units of the Earth Exploration Toolbook (serc.carleton.edu/eet/). Educators from middle schools through undergraduate colleges have been represented, as have scientific data professionals from many organizations across the United States. Extensive evaluation has been included in the design of each workshop. The evaluation results have been used each year to improve subsequent workshops. In addition to refining the format and process of the workshop itself, evaluation data collected reveal attendees' experiences using scientific data for educational purposes. Workshop attendees greatly value the opportunity to network with those of other professional roles in developing a real-world education project using scientific data. Educators appreciate the opportunity to work directly with scientists and technology specialists, while researchers and those in technical fields value the classroom expertise of the educators. Attendees' data use experiences are explored every year. Although bandwidth and connectivity were problems for data use in 2004, that has become much less common over time. The most common barriers to data use cited now are discoverability, data format problems, incomplete data sets, and poor documentation. Most attendees agree that the most useful types of online documentation and user support for scientific data are step-by-step instructions, examples, tutorials, and reference manuals. Satellite imagery and weather data were the most commonly used types of data, and these were often

  18. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  19. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-05-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  20. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan; Jersey Inst Ansari, New; Jersey Inst, New

    2005-04-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  1. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-06-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  2. Using Satellite Classes to Optimise Access to and Participation in First-Year Business Management: A Case at an Open and Distance-Learning University in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanepoel, Elana; De Beer, Andreas; Muller, Helene

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effect of satellite classes as a component of blended learning, to enhance student performance of the Business Management I and Management I students at an open and distance-learning university. We discuss the evolution of distance education, the interactivities promoted by open and distance learning and the concept of blended…

  3. Easy Access: Auditing the System Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiech, Dean

    2013-01-01

    In today's electronic learning environment, access to appropriate systems and data is of the utmost importance to students, faculty, and staff. Without proper access to the school's internal systems, teachers could be prevented from logging on to an online learning system and students might be unable to submit course work to an online…

  4. Accessibility of MOOCs: Understanding the Provider Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iniesto, Francisco; McAndrew, Patrick; Minocha, Shailey; Coughlan, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) have become an accepted way to make learning opportunities available at large scale and with low cost to the learner. However, only if these are made accessible will they be able to offer flexibility of learning and benefits to all, irrespective of disability. Experience in providing accessible online learning…

  5. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Building access control (BAC)--a catchall phrase to describe the systems that control access to facilities across campus--has traditionally been handled with remarkably low-tech solutions: (1) manual locks; (2) electronic locks; and (3) ID cards with magnetic strips. Recent improvements have included smart cards and keyless solutions that make use…

  6. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  7. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-03-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  8. The Interactive Learning Toolkit: supporting interactive classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, S.; McCauley, V.; Mazur, E.

    2004-05-01

    Research-based interactive learning techniques have dramatically improved student understanding. We have created the 'Interactive Learning Toolkit' (ILT), a web-based learning management system, to help implement two such pedagogies: Just in Time Teaching and Peer Instruction. Our main goal in developing this toolkit is to save the instructor time and effort and to use technology to facilitate the interaction between the students and the instructor (and between students themselves). After a brief review of both pedagogies, we will demonstrate the many exciting new features of the ILT. We will show how technology can not only implement, but also supplement and improve these pedagogies. We would like acknowdge grants from NSF and DEAS, Harvard University

  9. Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Patta, Joe

    2003-01-01

    Presents an interview with Stephen McCarthy, co-partner and president of Equal Access ADA Consulting Architects of San Diego, California, about designing schools to naturally integrate compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). (EV)

  10. Learning Diaries in the English as a Foreign Language Classroom: A Tool for Accessing Learners' Perceptions of Lessons and Developing Learner Autonomy and Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porto, Melina

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to learn from students' frame of reference how they experience foreign language classes. Data include learning diaries written during 2005 for more than 35 weeks (March to November). Subjects were 95 Argentine, Caucasian, mostly female, middle-class, Spanish-speaking College students between 19 and 21 years of age who…

  11. Internet-Based Public Health E-Learning Student Perceptions: An Evaluation from the People's Open Access Education Initiative (Peoples-uni)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awofeso, Niyi; Philip, Keir; Heller, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    Current public health training infrastructure and facilitators in most developing nations are insufficient relative to public health service delivery needs. We examined five areas of student perceptions of a web-based public health learning initiative, the Peoples-uni, which focused on: reasons for enrolling, learning expectations; technical…

  12. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-02-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the economic viability of many potential high-bandwidth applications. In recent years, optical access networks have been receiving tremendous attention from both academia and industry. A large number of research activities have been carried out or

  13. Optical Access Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Ansari, Nirwan

    2005-01-01

    Call for Papers: Optical Access Networks

    Guest Editors Jun Zheng, University of Ottawa Nirwan Ansari, New Jersey Institute of Technology

    Submission Deadline: 1 June 2005

    Background

    With the wide deployment of fiber-optic technology over the past two decades, we have witnessed a tremendous growth of bandwidth capacity in the backbone networks of today's telecommunications infrastructure. However, access networks, which cover the "last-mile" areas and serve numerous residential and small business users, have not been scaled up commensurately. The local subscriber lines for telephone and cable television are still using twisted pairs and coaxial cables. Most residential connections to the Internet are still through dial-up modems operating at a low speed on twisted pairs. As the demand for access bandwidth increases with emerging high-bandwidth applications, such as distance learning, high-definition television (HDTV), and video on demand (VoD), the last-mile access networks have become a bandwidth bottleneck in today's telecommunications infrastructure. To ease this bottleneck, it is imperative to provide sufficient bandwidth capacity in the access networks to open the bottleneck and thus present more opportunities for the provisioning of multiservices. Optical access solutions promise huge bandwidth to service providers and low-cost high-bandwidth services to end users and are therefore widely considered the technology of choice for next-generation access networks. To realize the vision of optical access networks, however, many key issues still need to be addressed, such as network architectures, signaling protocols, and implementation standards. The major challenges lie in the fact that an optical solution must be not only robust, scalable, and flexible, but also implemented at a low cost comparable to that of existing access solutions in order to increase the

  14. Distributed interactive virtual environments for collaborative experiential learning and training independent of distance over Internet2.

    PubMed

    Alverson, Dale C; Saiki, Stanley M; Jacobs, Joshua; Saland, Linda; Keep, Marcus F; Norenberg, Jeffrey; Baker, Rex; Nakatsu, Curtis; Kalishman, Summers; Lindberg, Marlene; Wax, Diane; Mowafi, Moad; Summers, Kenneth L; Holten, James R; Greenfield, John A; Aalseth, Edward; Nickles, David; Sherstyuk, Andrei; Haines, Karen; Caudell, Thomas P

    2004-01-01

    between Western Australia and UNM. We successfully demonstrated the ability to fully immerse participants in a distributed virtual environment independent of distance for collaborative team interaction in medical simulation designed for education and training. The ability to make mistakes in a safe environment is well received by students and has a positive impact on their understanding, as well as memory of the principles involved in correcting those mistakes. Bringing people together as virtual teams for interactive experiential learning and collaborative training, independent of distance, provides a platform for distributed "just-in-time" training, performance assessment and credentialing. Further validation is necessary to determine the potential value of the distributed VRE in knowledge transfer, improved future performance and should entail training participants to competence in using these tools.

  15. Symbolic Play and Novel Noun Learning in Deaf and Hearing Children: Longitudinal Effects of Access to Sound on Early Precursors of Language

    PubMed Central

    Quittner, Alexandra L.; Cejas, Ivette; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Niparko, John K.; Barker, David H.

    2016-01-01

    In the largest, longitudinal study of young, deaf children before and three years after cochlear implantation, we compared symbolic play and novel noun learning to age-matched hearing peers. Participants were 180 children from six cochlear implant centers and 96 hearing children. Symbolic play was measured during five minutes of videotaped, structured solitary play. Play was coded as "symbolic" if the child used substitution (e.g., a wooden block as a bed). Novel noun learning was measured in 10 trials using a novel object and a distractor. Cochlear implant vs. normal hearing children were delayed in their use of symbolic play, however, those implanted before vs. after age two performed significantly better. Children with cochlear implants were also delayed in novel noun learning (median delay 1.54 years), with minimal evidence of catch-up growth. Quality of parent-child interactions was positively related to performance on the novel noun learning, but not symbolic play task. Early implantation was beneficial for both achievement of symbolic play and novel noun learning. Further, maternal sensitivity and linguistic stimulation by parents positively affected noun learning skills, although children with cochlear implants still lagged in comparison to hearing peers. PMID:27228032

  16. Expanding Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    There is no question that the United States lags behind most industrialized nations in consumer access to broadband Internet service. For many policy makers and activists, this shortfall marks the latest phase in the struggle to overcome the digital divide. To remedy this lack of broadband affordability and availability, one start-up firm--with…

  17. Easy Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettelman, Alan

    2009-01-01

    School and university restrooms, locker and shower rooms have specific ADA accessibility requirements that serve the needs of staff, students and campus visitors who are disabled as a result of injury, illness or age. Taking good care of them is good for the reputation of a sensitive community institution, and fosters positive public relations.…

  18. Access Denied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    As faculty members add online and multimedia elements to their courses, colleges and universities across the country are realizing that there is a lot of work to be done to ensure that disabled students (and employees) have equal access to course material and university websites. Unfortunately, far too few schools consider the task a top priority.…

  19. PBL and beyond: trends in collaborative learning.

    PubMed

    Pluta, William J; Richards, Boyd F; Mutnick, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Building upon the disruption to lecture-based methods triggered by the introduction of problem-based learning, approaches to promote collaborative learning are becoming increasingly diverse, widespread and generally well accepted within medical education. Examples of relatively new, structured collaborative learning methods include team-based learning and just-in-time teaching. Examples of less structured approaches include think-pair share, case discussions, and the flipped classroom. It is now common practice in medical education to employ a range of instructional approaches to support collaborative learning. We believe that the adoption of such approaches is entering a new and challenging era. We define collaborate learning by drawing on the broader literature, including Chi's ICAP framework that emphasizes the importance of sustained, interactive explanation and elaboration by learners. We distinguish collaborate learning from constructive, active, and passive learning and provide preliminary evidence documenting the growth of methods that support collaborative learning. We argue that the rate of adoption of collaborative learning methods will accelerate due to a growing emphasis on the development of team competencies and the increasing availability of digital media. At the same time, the adoption collaborative learning strategies face persistent challenges, stemming from an overdependence on comparative-effectiveness research and a lack of useful guidelines about how best to adapt collaborative learning methods to given learning contexts. The medical education community has struggled to consistently demonstrate superior outcomes when using collaborative learning methods and strategies. Despite this, support for their use will continue to expand. To select approaches with the greatest utility, instructors must carefully align conditions of the learning context with the learning approaches under consideration. Further, it is critical that modifications are made

  20. Lifelong Learning among Canadians Aged 18 to 64 Years: First Results from the 2008 Access and Support to Education and Training Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knighton, Tamara; Hujaleh, Filsan; Iacampo, Joe; Werkneh, Gugsa

    2009-01-01

    This report is based on the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), which was undertaken by Statistics Canada in partnership with Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The ASETS brings together three previous education surveys that covered specific population groups: (1) the Survey of Approaches to Educational…

  1. Answering the Call for Equitable Access to Effective Teachers: Lessons Learned from State-Based Teacher Preparation Efforts in Georgia, Indiana, Michigan, New Jersey, and Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The nation's teacher education programs are not producing the quantity or quality of teachers needed, particularly in needed subjects. The only way to ensure a strong enough pipeline of effective teachers to ensure equitable access is to dramatically increase how states are preparing prospective educators. The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship…

  2. The Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program: Learning To Succeed. Volume I: Reducing Barriers for Homeless Children and Youth for Access and Achievement. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Clarenda M.; Wodatch, Jessica K.; Kelliher, Catherine T.

    A 1984 amendment to the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act instructs states to ensure that homeless students have equal access to the same free and appropriate public education as nonhomeless students. It provides local educational authorities increased flexibility to use funds, specify the rights of homeless preschoolers, give parents of…

  3. Say Yes to Education: Leading a Movement to Improve Access to Postsecondary Learning Opportunities in Cities Nationwide. Principles for Effective Education Grantmaking. Case Study No. 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maeroff, Gene I.

    2014-01-01

    What incentive could be stronger in a community than full-tuition college scholarships for all graduates of a public school system? Could this be an answer to the question of how the nation can support children growing up in poverty so that they may access middle-class opportunities? When George Weiss, a successful young money manager, pledged to…

  4. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - hemodialysis access; dialysis - hemodialysis ...

  5. The Accessibility of Learning Content for All Students, Including Students with Disabilities, Must Be Addressed in the Shift to Digital Instructional Materials. SETDA Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Geoff; Levin, Doug; Lipper, Katherine; Leichty, Reg

    2014-01-01

    This is a time of rapid technological advancement, with innovations in education holding great promise for improving teaching and learning, particularly for students with unique needs. High-quality digital educational materials, tools, and resources offer students relevant, up-to-date, and innovative ways to acquire knowledge and skills. Created…

  6. An Examination of Interprofessional Team Functioning in a BScN Blended Learning Program: Implications for Accessible Distance-Based Nursing Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Lorraine Mary; Beattie, Bev; Caswell, Wenda; Fitzgerald, Scott; Nowrouzi, Behdin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the perceptions and experiences of an interprofessional team responsible for the development and delivery of the Registered Practical Nurse (RPN) to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BScN) Blended Learning Program at Nipissing University were examined. In this program, RPNs can acquire a BScN through distance-based part-time study,…

  7. Visual Access in Interpreter-Mediated Learning Situations for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing High School Students Where an Artifact Is in Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berge, Sigrid Slettebakk; Thomassen, Gøril

    2016-01-01

    This article highlights interpreter-mediated learning situations for deaf high school students where such mediated artifacts as technical machines, models, and computer graphics are used by the teacher to illustrate his or her teaching. In these situations, the teacher's situated gestures and utterances, and the artifacts will contribute…

  8. Instructors and Students Competences, Perceptions, and Access to E-Learning Technologies: Implications for Implementation at the Open University of Tanzania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nihuka, Kassimu A.; Voogt, Joke

    2011-01-01

    In most sub-Sahara African countries, distance education is delivered using print materials complemented by a few face-to-face sessions. The approach is associated with a myriad of challenges some of which can be addressed by appropriately selected e-learning technologies based on the context in which they need to be used. This study was designed…

  9. Direct and Indirect Access to Corpora: An Exploratory Case Study Comparing Students' Error Correction and Learning Strategy Use in L2 Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Hyunsook; Jo, Jung Won

    2014-01-01

    Studies on students' use of corpora in L2 writing have demonstrated the benefits of corpora not only as a linguistic resource to improve their writing abilities but also as a cognitive tool to develop their learning skills and strategies. Most of the corpus studies, however, adopted either direct use or indirect use of corpora by students, without…

  10. Few Preschool Slots for Latino Children: Scarce Access in Illinois Drives Learning Gaps, Even before Starting School. New Journalism on Latino Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Bruce; Kim, Yoonjeon; Bridges, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Many children experience lasting benefits from attending quality preschools, evident in stronger pre-literacy and social skills at school entry. These gains are larger for children raised in low-income homes, as well as for Latino youngsters from middle-class homes. This is likely due to exposure to rich language and engaging learning tasks in…

  11. Computer Access Centers for the Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawk, Doug

    1995-01-01

    Describes Computer Access Centers (CACs), created by the Colorado Community College and Occupational Education System to help students with disabilities learn job skills and improve their lives. Indicates that, despite fears about program costs, CACs are in place at 11 sites and have expanded access for people with disabilities. (MAB)

  12. Access to Mathematics, Science, and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Michael; Woodrow, Maggie

    Research was conducted to investigate the curriculum implications of the development of Access courses in mathematics, science, and technology in Great Britain; to identify problem areas; to provide examples of appropriate teaching/learning strategies; and to indicate effective staff development approaches. (Access courses are an alternative form…

  13. Promoting higher order thinking skills using inquiry-based learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhuri, G. V.; S. S. N Kantamreddi, V.; Goteti, L. N. S. Prakash

    2012-05-01

    Active learning pedagogies play an important role in enhancing higher order cognitive skills among the student community. In this work, a laboratory course for first year engineering chemistry is designed and executed using an inquiry-based learning pedagogical approach. The goal of this module is to promote higher order thinking skills in chemistry. Laboratory exercises are designed based on Bloom's taxonomy and a just-in-time facilitation approach is used. A pre-laboratory discussion outlining the theory of the experiment and its relevance is carried out to enable the students to analyse real-life problems. The performance of the students is assessed based on their ability to perform the experiment, design new experiments and correlate practical utility of the course module with real life. The novelty of the present approach lies in the fact that the learning outcomes of the existing experiments are achieved through establishing a relationship with real-world problems.

  14. A Comparison between National and Transnational Students' Access of Online Learning Support Materials and Experience of Technical Difficulties on a Fully Online Distance Learning Master of Public Health Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gemmell, Isla; Harrison, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Online distance learning (ODL) is now recognised as a mainstream teaching method for undergraduate and postgraduate students around the world. However, differences in learner characteristics such as help-seeking behaviour between transnational students and home students may impact on student attainment. 64 students undertaking an online master of…

  15. Anytime, Anyplace Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Bruce O.

    2000-01-01

    Describes trends and innovations involving use of the World Wide Web in distance learning. Discusses Choice 2000, the first totally online public (charter) high school; Web information resources for more conventional schools; student access to the Internet; virtual learning communities; Web-based learning strategies; and skills involved in…

  16. Mobile learning in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkan Güllüoüǧlu, Sabri

    2013-03-01

    This paper outlines the main infrastructure for implicating mobile learning in medicine and present a sample mobile learning application for medical learning within the framework of mobile learning systems. Mobile technology is developing nowadays. In this case it will be useful to develop different learning environments using these innovations in internet based distance education. M-learning makes the most of being on location, providing immediate access, being connected, and acknowledges learning that occurs beyond formal learning settings, in places such as the workplace, home, and outdoors. Central to m-learning is the principle that it is the learner who is mobile rather than the device used to deliver m learning. The integration of mobile technologies into training has made learning more accessible and portable. Mobile technologies make it possible for a learner to have access to a computer and subsequently learning material and activities; at any time and in any place. Mobile devices can include: mobile phone, personal digital assistants (PDAs), personal digital media players (eg iPods, MP3 players), portable digital media players, portable digital multimedia players. Mobile learning (m-learning) is particularly important in medical education, and the major users of mobile devices are in the field of medicine. The contexts and environment in which learning occurs necessitates m-learning. Medical students are placed in hospital/clinical settings very early in training and require access to course information and to record and reflect on their experiences while on the move. As a result of this paper, this paper strives to compare and contrast mobile learning with normal learning in medicine from various perspectives and give insights and advises into the essential characteristics of both for sustaining medical education.

  17. Learning from the public: citizens describe the need to improve end-of-life care access, provision and recognition across Europe

    PubMed Central

    Daveson, Barbara A.; Alonso, Juan P.; Calanzani, Natalia; Ramsenthaler, Christina; Gysels, Marjolein; Antunes, Barbara; Moens, Katrien; Groeneveld, Esther I.; Albers, Gwenda; Finetti, Silvia; Pettenati, Francesca; Bausewein, Claudia; Higginson, Irene J.; Harding, Richard; Deliens, Luc; Toscani, Franco; Ferreira, Pedro L.; Ceulemans, Lucas; Gomes, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite ageing populations and increasing cancer deaths, many European countries lack national policies regarding palliative and end-of-life care. The aim of our research was to determine public views regarding end-of-life care in the face of serious illness. Methods: Implementation of a pan-European population-based survey with adults in England, Belgium (Flanders), Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal and Spain. Three stages of analysis were completed on open-ended question data: (i) inductive analysis to determine a category-code framework; (ii) country-level manifest deductive content analysis; and (iii) thematic analysis to identify cross-country prominent themes. Results: Of the 9344 respondents, 1543 (17%) answered the open-ended question. Two prominent themes were revealed: (i) a need for improved quality of end-of-life and palliative care, and access to this care for patients and families and (ii) the recognition of the importance of death and dying, the cessation of treatments to extend life unnecessarily and the need for holistic care to include comfort and support. Conclusions: Within Europe, the public recognizes the importance of death and dying; they are concerned about the prioritization of quantity of life over quality of life; and they call for improved quality of end-of-life and palliative care for patients, especially for elderly patients, and families. To fulfil the urgent need for a policy response and to advance research and care, we suggest four solutions for European palliative and end-of-life care: institute government-led national strategies; protect regional research funding; consider within- and between-country variance; establish standards for training, education and service delivery. PMID:23487548

  18. Clean access platform for orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, H.; Harris, J.

    1990-01-01

    The design of the Clean Access Platform at the Kennedy Space Center, beginning with the design requirements and tracing the effort throughout development and manufacturing is described. Also examined are: (1) A system description; (2) Testing requirements and conclusions; (3) Safety and reliability features; (4) Major problems experienced during the project; and (5) Lessons learned, including features necessary for the effective design of mechanisms used in clean systems.

  19. Just in time for late-LTP: A mechanism for the role of PKMzeta in long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Andreas; Maggio, Nicola; Jedlicka, Peter

    2008-01-01

    It is a fundamental question in neuroscience how long-term memory formation is regulated at the molecular level. Although widely considered a highly complex process requiring numerous molecular players, it also has been speculated that a single protein could play a pivotal role. This "astonishing hypothesis" has made a significant impact on memory research and has led to a reevaluation of concepts regarding memory formation.1,2.

  20. Autonomous Diagnostic Imaging Performed by Untrained Operators using Augmented Reality as a Form of "Just-in-Time" Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, D. S.; Wang, L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; Fleischer, A. C.; Gibson, C. R.; Stenger, M. B.

    2017-01-01

    We will address the Human Factors and Performance Team, "Risk of performance errors due to training deficiencies" by improving the JIT training materials for ultrasound and OCT imaging by providing advanced guidance in a detailed, timely, and user-friendly manner. Specifically, we will (1) develop an audio-visual tutorial using AR that guides non-experts through an abdominal trauma ultrasound protocol; (2) develop an audio-visual tutorial using AR to guide an untrained operator through the acquisition of OCT images; (3) evaluate the quality of abdominal ultrasound and OCT images acquired by untrained operators using AR guidance compared to images acquired using traditional JIT techniques (laptop-based training conducted before image acquisition); and (4) compare the time required to complete imaging studies using AR tutorials with images acquired using current JIT practices to identify areas for time efficiency improvements. Two groups of subjects will be recruited to participate in this study. Operator-subjects, without previous experience in ultrasound or OCT, will be asked to perform both procedures using either the JIT training with AR technology or the traditional JIT training via laptop. Images acquired by inexperienced operator-subjects will be scored by experts in that imaging modality for diagnostic and research quality; experts will be blinded to the form of JIT used to acquire the images. Operator-subjects also will be asked to submit feedback to improve the training modules used during the scans to improve future training modules. Scanned-subjects will be a small group individuals from whom all images will be acquired.

  1. Just in Time - Expecting Failure: Do JIT Principles Run Counter to DoD’s Business Nature?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    moving items through a production system only when needed. Equating inventory to an avoidable waste instead of adding value to a company directly...is a management philosophy that ties inventory to man- agement by combining many disciplines—including statistics, industrial engineering, production ...resources. Credit for developing JIT as a management strategy goes to Taiichi Ohno of the post-World War II Toyota Manufacturing Company. Ohno

  2. Selective, Embedded, Just-In-Time Specialization (SEJITS): Portable Parallel Performance from Sequential, Productive, Embedded Domain-Specific Languages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    outline only a single application due to space constraints. For many of these domains, there is no universally acknowledged “ gold standard” for...generator to output explicit cache-aware code that reduces memory traffic to the theoretical minimum; this work is currently being prepared for...it particularly amenable to specialization for multicore hardware with wide SIMD vector support. Why a Specializer: Current parallel implementations

  3. Just in time-selection: A rapid semiautomated SELEX of DNA aptamers using magnetic separation and BEAMing.

    PubMed

    Hünniger, Tim; Wessels, Hauke; Fischer, Christin; Paschke-Kratzin, Angelika; Fischer, Markus

    2014-11-04

    A semiautomated two-step method for in vitro selection of DNA aptamers using magnetic separation and solid-phase emulsion polymerase chain reaction has been developed. The application of a magnetic separator allows the simultaneous processing of up to 12 SELEXs (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) with different targets or buffer conditions. Using a magnetic separator and covalent target immobilization on magnetic beads, the selection process was simplified and the substeps of aptamer/target incubation, washing, and elution of the aptamers were merged into one automated procedure called "FISHing". Without further processing the resulting FISHing eluates are suitable for BEAMing (beads, emulsion, amplification, and magnetics), which includes the amplification by emPCR (emulsion polymerase chain reaction) and strand separation by the implementation of covalently immobilized reverse primers on magnetic beads. The novel selection process has been proved and validated by selecting and characterization of aptamers to the wine fining agent lysozyme.

  4. Just in Time: How Evidence-on-Demand Services Support Decision Making in Ontario's Child and Youth Mental Health Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notarianni, Maryann; Sundar, Purnima; Carter, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Using the best available evidence to inform decision making is important for the design or delivery of effective health-related services and broader public policy. Several studies identify barriers and facilitators to evidence-informed decision making in Canadian health settings. This paper describes how the Ontario Centre of Excellence for Child…

  5. Just in Time and Future-Proofing? Policy, Challenges and Opportunities in the Professional Development of Part-Time Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaton, Fran

    2017-01-01

    Part-time teachers form a growing proportion of the global Higher Education (HE) workforce. Their backgrounds can vary from Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) teaching for the first time, to practitioners bringing workplace experience into HE and sessional teachers, all with differing professional development needs. This paper builds on previous…

  6. Implementation and evaluation of a simulation curriculum for paediatric residency programs including just-in-time in situ mock codes.

    PubMed

    Sam, Jonathan; Pierse, Michael; Al-Qahtani, Abdullah; Cheng, Adam

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIF : Élaborer, mettre en œuvre et évaluer un cursus de soins aigus fondé sur la simulation dans un programme de résidence en pédiatrie au moyen d’une démarche intégrée et longitudinale. MÉTHODOLOGIE : Le cadre du cursus contient trois cours modulaires enseignés lors d’une année donnée et des scénarios longitudinaux juste-à-temps et in situ. LIEU : Programme de résidence en pédiatrie du BC Children’s Hospital de Vancouver, au Canada. INTERVENTIONS : Les trois cours enseignés lors d’une année donnée traitent des cinq premières minutes, essentielles, de la prise en charge médicale complexe et de la gestion des ressources en cas d’urgence, respectivement. Dans le cadre des scénarios juste-à-temps et in situ, on simulait la détérioration aiguë d’un patient déjà hospitalisé dans un service, on préparait une véritable équipe multidisciplinaire d’urgence et on organisait des systèmes de soutien connexes en cas d’urgence. Les chercheurs ont évalué chaque élément du cursus au moyen de sondages construits selon l’échelle de cinq points de Likert. RÉSULTATS : Au total, 40 sondages auprès des résidents ont été remplis après les cours modulaires, et 28 autres à l’égard de l’ensemble du cursus sur la simulation. Les indices de Likert les plus élevés portaient sur les ateliers pratiques, les milieux de simulation immersifs et l’enseignement de la gestion des ressources en cas d’urgence. Les résultats du sondage indiquaient également que les scénarios juste-à-temps étaient réalistes, qu’ils renforçaient l’apprentissage et préparaient les équipes des services à la détérioration de l’état des patients. CONCLUSIONS : L’hôpital a réussi à intégrer un cursus de soins aigus fondé sur la simulation à son programme de résidence en pédiatrie. Il fournit un modèle d’intégration de l’apprentissage par la simulation à d’autres programmes de formation et un modèle pour tout hôpital qui désire améliorer les issues de réanimation en pédiatrie au moyen des scénarios d’urgence juste-à-temps et in situ.

  7. Comparison of the Operational Characteristics of the Theory of Constraints and Just-In-Time Scheduling Methodologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    in the study of work -in-process inventory in a production system (Bowen, 1970). The past usage of GPSS combined with the inherent speed and...that were studied using the model systems are: 1. Type of scheduling system utilized. 2. Maximum work -in-process inventory present in the system during...New Outer Limit," Iron Age, 228: 81-82 (August 2, 1985). Bowen, H. L. "GPSS Study of Work -in-Process Inventory" Proceedings of the 4th Conferanc- on

  8. Predicted Shifts in Small Mammal Distributions and Biodiversity in the Altered Future Environment of Alaska: An Open Access Data and Machine Learning Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Baltensperger, A. P.; Huettmann, F.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is acting to reallocate biomes, shift the distribution of species, and alter community assemblages in Alaska. Predictions regarding how these changes will affect the biodiversity and interspecific relationships of small mammals are necessary to pro-actively inform conservation planning. We used a set of online occurrence records and machine learning methods to create bioclimatic envelope models for 17 species of small mammals (rodents and shrews) across Alaska. Models formed the basis for sets of species-specific distribution maps for 2010 and were projected forward using the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) A2 scenario to predict distributions of the same species for 2100. We found that distributions of cold-climate, northern, and interior small mammal species experienced large decreases in area while shifting northward, upward in elevation, and inland across the state. In contrast, many southern and continental species expanded throughout Alaska, and also moved down-slope and toward the coast. Statewide community assemblages remained constant for 15 of the 17 species, but distributional shifts resulted in novel species assemblages in several regions. Overall biodiversity patterns were similar for both time frames, but followed general species distribution movement trends. Biodiversity losses occurred in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta and Seward Peninsula while the Beaufort Coastal Plain and western Brooks Range experienced modest gains in species richness as distributions shifted to form novel assemblages. Quantitative species distribution and biodiversity change projections should help land managers to develop adaptive strategies for conserving dispersal corridors, small mammal biodiversity, and ecosystem functionality into the future. PMID:26207828

  9. Predicted Shifts in Small Mammal Distributions and Biodiversity in the Altered Future Environment of Alaska: An Open Access Data and Machine Learning Perspective.

    PubMed

    Baltensperger, A P; Huettmann, F

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is acting to reallocate biomes, shift the distribution of species, and alter community assemblages in Alaska. Predictions regarding how these changes will affect the biodiversity and interspecific relationships of small mammals are necessary to pro-actively inform conservation planning. We used a set of online occurrence records and machine learning methods to create bioclimatic envelope models for 17 species of small mammals (rodents and shrews) across Alaska. Models formed the basis for sets of species-specific distribution maps for 2010 and were projected forward using the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) A2 scenario to predict distributions of the same species for 2100. We found that distributions of cold-climate, northern, and interior small mammal species experienced large decreases in area while shifting northward, upward in elevation, and inland across the state. In contrast, many southern and continental species expanded throughout Alaska, and also moved down-slope and toward the coast. Statewide community assemblages remained constant for 15 of the 17 species, but distributional shifts resulted in novel species assemblages in several regions. Overall biodiversity patterns were similar for both time frames, but followed general species distribution movement trends. Biodiversity losses occurred in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta and Seward Peninsula while the Beaufort Coastal Plain and western Brooks Range experienced modest gains in species richness as distributions shifted to form novel assemblages. Quantitative species distribution and biodiversity change projections should help land managers to develop adaptive strategies for conserving dispersal corridors, small mammal biodiversity, and ecosystem functionality into the future.

  10. LANSCE personnel access control system

    SciTech Connect

    Sturrock, J.C.; Gallegos, F.R.; Hall, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. The Personnel Access Control System (PACS) is a component of the RSS that is designed to prevent personnel access to areas where prompt radiation is a hazard. PACS was designed to replace several older personnel safety systems (PSS) with a single modem unified design. Lessons learned from the operation over the last 20 years were incorporated into a redundant sensor, single-point failure safe, fault tolerant, and tamper-resistant system that prevents access to the beam areas by controlling the access keys and beam stoppers. PACS uses a layered philosophy to the physical and electronic design. The most critical assemblies are battery backed up, relay logic circuits; less critical devices use Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) for timing functions and communications. Outside reviewers have reviewed the operational safety of the design. The design philosophy, lessons learned, hardware design, software design, operation, and limitations of the device are described.

  11. Investigation of the Relationship between Learning Process and Learning Outcomes in E-Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurdugül, Halil; Menzi Çetin, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: Learners can access and participate in online learning environments regardless of time and geographical barriers. This brings up the umbrella concept of learner autonomy that contains self-directed learning, self-regulated learning and the studying process. Motivation and learning strategies are also part of this umbrella…

  12. Hemodialysis access procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... returned to your body. Usually the access is put in your arm but it can also go ... A surgeon will put the access in. There are 3 types of access. Fistula: The surgeon joins an artery and vein under the ...

  13. United States Access Board

    MedlinePlus

    ... disabilities through leadership in accessible design and the development of accessibility guidelines and standards for the built environment, transportation, communication, medical diagnostic equipment, and information technology. ...

  14. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... use requirements for Critical Access Hospitals related to Electronic Health Records (EHRs)? Critical Access Hospital (CAH) are eligible for Electronic Health Record (EHR) incentive payments and can receive ...

  15. Learn About Section 508

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find out about EPA's commitment to making its websites and other electronic and information technology (EIT) products accessible, learn what Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act covers and why, and how to make your EIT 508 compliant.

  16. A Theory of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribot, Jesse C.; Peluso, Nancy Lee

    2003-01-01

    The term "access" is frequently used by property and natural resource analysts without adequate definition. In this paper we develop a concept of access and examine a broad set of factors that differentiate access from property. We define access as "the "ability" to derive benefits from things," broadening from property's classical definition as…

  17. Authoring of Learning Objects in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Specht, Marcus; Kravcik, Milos

    2006-01-01

    Learning objects and content interchange standards provide new possibilities for e-learning. Nevertheless the content often lacks context data to find appropriate use for adaptive learning on demand and personalized learning experiences. In the Remotely Accessible Field Trips (RAFT) project mobile authoring of learning content in context has shown…

  18. Mobile Learning and Achievement Goal Orientation Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asplund, Minna

    2014-01-01

    Students with different achievement goal orientations have different approaches towards learning and studying. There is a widespread interest to find an easy access into learning spaces for those students who have low motivation with fear of failure and academic withdrawal. Mobile learning offers an easily accessible chance with low threshold to…

  19. Providing Access to Justice through Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubichek, Mary

    2010-01-01

    In the Casper College Legal Service (CCLS) program, Casper College paralegal students, under supervision of pro bono attorneys, use paralegal skills to provide legal services and work product. CCLS is different from other legal clinics; it is not law school based, bar based, or court based. CCLS is paralegal based.

  20. Assessing the Accessibility of Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badge, Joanne L.; Dawson, Emma; Cann, Alan J.; Scott, Jon

    2008-01-01

    A wide range of tools is now available to enable teaching practitioners to create web-based educational materials from PowerPoint presentations, adding a variety of different digital media, such as audio and animation. The pilot study described in this paper compared three different systems for producing multimedia presentations from existing…

  1. World Wide Access: Accessible Web Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper considers the application of "universal design" principles to Web page design in order to increase accessibility for people with disabilities. Suggestions are based on the World Wide Web Consortium's accessibility initiative, which has proposed guidelines for all Web authors and federal government standards. Seven guidelines for…

  2. Access Nets: Modeling Access to Physical Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohardt, Robert; Chang, Bor-Yuh Evan; Sankaranarayanan, Sriram

    Electronic, software-managed mechanisms using, for example, radio-frequency identification (RFID) cards, enable great flexibility in specifying access control policies to physical spaces. For example, access rights may vary based on time of day or could differ in normal versus emergency situations. With such fine-grained control, understanding and reasoning about what a policy permits becomes surprisingly difficult requiring knowledge of permission levels, spatial layout, and time. In this paper, we present a formal modeling framework, called AccessNets, suitable for describing a combination of access permissions, physical spaces, and temporal constraints. Furthermore, we provide evidence that model checking techniques are effective in reasoning about physical access control policies. We describe our results from a tool that uses reachability analysis to validate security policies.

  3. Chemists, Access, Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    2000-06-01

    New JCE Internet Feature at JCE Online Biographical Snapshots of Famous Chemists is a new JCE Internet feature on JCE Online. Edited by Barbara Burke, this feature provides biographical information on leading chemists, especially women and minority chemists, fostering the attitude that the practitioners of chemistry are as human as those who endeavor to learn about it. Currently, the column features biographical "snapshots" of 30 chemists. Each snapshot includes keywords and bibliography and several contain links to additional online information about the chemist. More biographical snapshots will appear in future installments. In addition, a database listing over 140 women and minority chemists is being compiled and will be made available online with the snapshots in the near future. The database includes the years of birth and death, gender and ethnicity, major and minor discipline, keywords to facilitate searching, and references to additional biographical information. We welcome your input into what we think is a very worthwhile resource. If you would like to provide additional biographical snapshots, see additional chemists added to the database, or know of additional references for those that are already in the database, please contact JCE Online or the feature editor. Your feedback is welcome and appreciated. You can find Biographical Snapshots of Famous Chemists starting from the JCE Online home page-- click the Features item under JCE Internet and then the Chemist Bios item. Access JCE Online without Name and Password We have recently been swamped by libraries requesting IP-number access to JCE Online. With the great benefit IP-number authentication gives to librarians (no user names and passwords to administer) and to their patrons (no need to remember and enter valid names and passwords) this is not surprising. If you would like access to JCE Online without the need to remember and enter a user name and password, you should tell your librarian about our

  4. Assessment and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, John R., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of assessment used to support learning, and it makes this area accessible and understandable for a wise range of users. This unique text is a major source of practice-based theory on assessment for learning, a formative assessment to support individual development and motivate learners. Key areas covered…

  5. Linked Up for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Bill

    1996-01-01

    The Chief Executive Office of Microsoft Corporation urges more complete integration of technology into higher education. He offers specific examples of how such integration can provide a new way to learn (such as accessing information on the Internet and using individually paced instruction) and efficient distance learning. Colleges and…

  6. The Fragmentation of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Information and communication technologies, especially the Internet, have vastly increased access to information and educational opportunities. Steadily increasing consumer demand is driving the development of online educational materials. The end result may be a "fragmentation" of learning involving multiple learning providers and delivery modes,…

  7. Distance Education: Access, Quality, Cautions, and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelson, Paul Jay

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the impact of widely distributed learning opportunities now accessible through distance education must take into account the re-imposition of values and motives long associated with traditional education. The expectations of new higher education consumers should be tempered by institutional acknowledgement of pre-existing value…

  8. Making Archival and Special Collections More Accessible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renspie, Melissa, Comp.; Shepard, Linda, Comp.; Childress, Eric, Comp.

    2015-01-01

    Revealing hidden assets stewarded by research institutions so they can be made available for research and learning locally and globally is a prime opportunity for libraries to create and deliver new value. "Making Archival and Special Collections More Accessible" collects important work OCLC Research has done to help achieve the…

  9. The interactive learning toolkit: technology and the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukoff, Brian; Tucker, Laura

    2011-04-01

    Peer Instruction (PI) and Just-in-Time-Teaching (JiTT) have been shown to increase both students' conceptual understanding and problem-solving skills. However, the time investment for the instructor to prepare appropriate conceptual questions and manage student JiTT responses is one of the main implementation hurdles. To overcome this we have developed the Interactive Learning Toolkit (ILT), a course management system specifically designed to support PI and JiTT. We are working to integrate the ILT with a fully interactive classroom system where students can use their laptops and smartphones to respond to ConcepTests in class. The goal is to use technology to engage students in conceptual thinking both in and out of the classroom.

  10. Technology for Learning...Not Learning about Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prickett, Elaine Montoya; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Educational technology should be a tool used for learning but should not become more important than the learning itself. Six criteria for the effective classroom use of technology include determining whether the technology offers an invitation to learn, decentralization of authority, flexibility, access to knowledge, time to explore and use…

  11. Refactoring of Learning Objects for Mobile Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damaševičius, Robertas

    We analyze the problem of refactoring of learning object (LO) for m-Learning. We apply methods adopted from software engineering domain for redesigning the structure and user interface of a LO and aim both at increasing usability and accessibility of the learning material. We evaluate usability of a LO from the user interface point of view, following the user interface development principles that are common both for human-computer interaction (HCI) and e-Learning domains. We propose the LO refactoring framework based on user interface usability principles. In a case study, we demonstrate the refactoring of an array-sorting LO for a mobile device.

  12. Video 2 of 4: Navigating the Live Access Server

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn how to navigate the MY NASA DATA website and server using the NASA Explorer Schools lesson, Analyzing Solar Energy Graphs. The video also shows you how to access, filter and manipulate the da...

  13. Primary vascular access.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, C P

    2006-05-01

    Primary vascular access is usually achievable by a distal autogenous arterio-venous fistula (AVF). This article describes the approach to vascular access planning, the usual surgical options and the factors affecting patency.

  14. The Online Learning Definitions Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Association for K-12 Online Learning, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The mission of the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL) is to ensure all students have access to a world-class education and quality online learning opportunities that prepare them for a lifetime of success. "The Online Learning Definitions Project" is designed to provide states, districts, online programs, and…

  15. An Investigation on the Correlation of Learner Styles and Learning Objects Characteristics in a Proposed Learning Objects Management Model (LOMM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanapu, Supachanun; Fung, Chun Che; Kerdprasop, Nittaya; Chamnongsri, Nisachol; Niwattanakul, Suphakit

    2016-01-01

    The issues of accessibility, management, storage and organization of Learning Objects (LOs) in education systems are a high priority of the Thai Government. Incorporating personalized learning or learning styles in a learning object management system to improve the accessibility of LOs has been addressed continuously in the Thai education system.…

  16. [Accessible Rural Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Nick, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This issue of the quarterly newsletter "Rural Exchange" provides information and resources on accessible rural housing for the disabled. "Accessible Manufactured Housing Could Increase Rural Home Supply" (Nick Baker) suggests that incorporation of access features such as lever door handles and no-step entries into manufactured housing could help…

  17. Reflective Database Access Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lars E.

    2009-01-01

    "Reflective Database Access Control" (RDBAC) is a model in which a database privilege is expressed as a database query itself, rather than as a static privilege contained in an access control list. RDBAC aids the management of database access controls by improving the expressiveness of policies. However, such policies introduce new interactions…

  18. Open Access Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Open access publishing is a hot topic today. But open access publishing can have many different definitions, and pros and cons vary with the definitions. Open access publishing is especially attractive to companies and small colleges or universities that are likely to have many more readers than authors. A downside is that a membership fee sounds…

  19. Demystifying Remote Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Grant

    2009-01-01

    With money tight, more and more districts are considering remote access as a way to reduce expenses and budget information technology costs more effectively. Remote access allows staff members to work with a hosted software application from any school campus without being tied to a specific physical location. Each school can access critical…

  20. Technology Resources: Mathematics Accessibility for All Not Accommodation for Some

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duranczyk, Irene M.

    2009-01-01

    When faculty and learning assistance staff create teaching documents and web pages envisioning the widest range of users they can save time while achieving access for all. There are tools and techniques available to make mathematics visual, orally, and dynamically more accessible through multimodal presentation forms. Resources from Design…

  1. Process-Oriented Design: Conversational Interfaces for Global Accessibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    The ability of the Internet to serve as a bridge to cultural understanding relies in great part on issues related to accessibility. My focus in this article is on accessibility as it relates to providing individuals with the full capabilities of the Internet to facilitate a process of association and learning, which can alleviate many issues that…

  2. Modeling Personalized Learning Styles in a Web-Based Learning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia-Cheng; Wang, Kun-Te; Huang, Yueh-Min

    An innovative learning mechanism for identifying learners' learning styles to improve adaptive learning is proposed. Hypermedia-learning tools are highly interactive to learners in web-based environments that have become increasingly popular in the field of education. However, these learning tools are frequently inadequate for individualize learning because accessing adaptive learning content is required for learners to achieve objectives. For predicating adaptive learning, a neuron-fuzzy inference approach is used to model the diagnosis of learning styles. Then, according to the diagnosis results, a recommendation model is constructed to help learners obtain adaptive digital content. The proposed approach has the capability of tracking learning activities on-line to correspond with learning styles. The results show that the identified model successfully classified 102 learners into groups based on learning style. The implemented learning mechanism produced a clear learning guide for learning activities, which can help an advanced learning system retrieve a well-structure learning unit.

  3. Analysis of Dynamic Resource Access Patterns in Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecking, Tobias; Ziebarth, Sabrina; Hoppe, H. Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of resource access patterns in two recently conducted online courses. One of these has been a master level university lecture taught as a blended learning course with a wide range of online learning activities and materials, including collaborative wikis, self-tests, and thematic videos. The other course has been…

  4. The Impact of Language on Educational Access in South Africa. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 24

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafon, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The role of Medium of Instruction or Language of Learning and Teaching has not received sufficient attention as a factor denying meaningful access to education in South Africa. Yet the majority of under-performing learners are also children who learn in a language that is not their mother-tongue. This research aims to assess how recent language…

  5. Towards effective evaluation and reform in medical education: a cognitive and learning sciences perspective.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vimla L; Yoskowitz, Nicole A; Arocha, Jose F

    2009-12-01

    Health professions education is dealing with major transformations in light of the changing nature of the health care delivery system, including the use of technology for "just in time" delivery of care, evidence-based practice, personalized medical care and learning, as health professionals strive to integrate biomedical advances and clinical practice. This has forced the medical education community to reassess the current teaching and learning practices and more importantly, the evaluation of the medical education process. There have been recent advances in cognitive and learning sciences theories, some of which can inform medical educators about best teaching and learning practices and their impact on the evaluation process. An understanding of these theories provides a sound rationale for choosing specific instructional strategies and choosing evaluation measures that assess the curricular objectives. The review begins with an overview of evaluation and assessment in education, followed by an overview of major theories from the cognitive and learning sciences. Next, the role of cognitive and learning sciences theories in informing the process of medical education evaluation is discussed, including its impact on student learning, performance and professional competence, as well as recommendations for reform of medical curricula based on such theories. The paper continues with the elaboration of current trends in health sciences education, particularly medical education, and available evidence for the impact on student learning and performance as well as areas where more research is needed.

  6. Channel Access in Erlang

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklaus, Dennis J.

    2013-10-13

    We have developed an Erlang language implementation of the Channel Access protocol. Included are low-level functions for encoding and decoding Channel Access protocol network packets as well as higher level functions for monitoring or setting EPICS process variables. This provides access to EPICS process variables for the Fermilab Acnet control system via our Erlang-based front-end architecture without having to interface to C/C++ programs and libraries. Erlang is a functional programming language originally developed for real-time telecommunications applications. Its network programming features and list management functions make it particularly well-suited for the task of managing multiple Channel Access circuits and PV monitors.

  7. Web Accessibility and Guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Simon; Yesilada, Yeliz

    Access to, and movement around, complex online environments, of which the World Wide Web (Web) is the most popular example, has long been considered an important and major issue in the Web design and usability field. The commonly used slang phrase ‘surfing the Web’ implies rapid and free access, pointing to its importance among designers and users alike. It has also been long established that this potentially complex and difficult access is further complicated, and becomes neither rapid nor free, if the user is disabled. There are millions of people who have disabilities that affect their use of the Web. Web accessibility aims to help these people to perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with, as well as contribute to, the Web, and thereby the society in general. This accessibility is, in part, facilitated by the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) currently moving from version one to two. These guidelines are intended to encourage designers to make sure their sites conform to specifications, and in that conformance enable the assistive technologies of disabled users to better interact with the page content. In this way, it was hoped that accessibility could be supported. While this is in part true, guidelines do not solve all problems and the new WCAG version two guidelines are surrounded by controversy and intrigue. This chapter aims to establish the published literature related to Web accessibility and Web accessibility guidelines, and discuss limitations of the current guidelines and future directions.

  8. AccessAbility @ Cleveland Public Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mates, Barbara T.

    2003-01-01

    Describes several programs that were developed by staff at the Cleveland (Ohio) Public Library to be accessible to users with disabilities. Highlights include a Braille reading program; sensory garden; poetry club; book club based on talking books; wheelchair athletics; touching museum artifacts; and a mobile library for users who could not visit…

  9. Standards and Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Tom

    1993-01-01

    Argues that easy claims about the relationship between language mastery and academic or economic access (made by both conservative commentators on education and mainstream writing teachers) are false and obscure real social and political boundaries, such as racism, sexism, elitism, and homophobia, that really do prevent access. (SR)

  10. ACCESS Pointing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Alexander, James; Trauger, John; Moody, Dwight; Egerman, Robert; Vallone, Phillip; Elias, Jason; Hejal, Reem; Camelo, Vanessa; Bronowicki, Allen; O'Connor, David; Partrick, Richard; Orzechowski, Pawel; Spitter, Connie; Lillie, Chuck

    2010-01-01

    ACCESS (Actively-Corrected Coronograph for Exoplanet System Studies) was one of four medium-class exoplanet concepts selected for the NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study (ASMCS) program in 2008/2009. The ACCESS study evaluated four major coronograph concepts under a common space observatory. This paper describes the high precision pointing control system (PCS) baselined for this observatory.

  11. The Equal Access Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catron, J. Gregory

    1987-01-01

    Reviews past history of access of religious activities in public schools in relation to the establishment clause of the First Amendment and sets forth the prerequisites in the Equal Access Act of 1984 for creating a well-defined forum for student-initiated free speech including religious groups in public high schools. (MD)

  12. Access to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briscoe, Felecia; De Oliver, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    This case study researches the degree to which the location and services offered by a multicampus university, geographically situated consistent with the commercial principles of a large mass-market enterprise, facilitate access for educationally underserved groups. First, the necessity of democratizing educational access to an underprivileged…

  13. Granting Each Equal Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Linda Lucas

    1992-01-01

    Summarizes federal legislation regarding equal access for students with disabilities and discusses environmental barriers to accessibility in the library media center. Solutions to these design problems are suggested in the following areas: material formats and space requirements; the physical setting, including furniture, floor coverings,…

  14. MedlinePlus: Accessibility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tools Español You Are Here: Home → MedlinePlus Accessibility URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/accessibility.html ... or (301) 594-5983 and provide the address (URL) of the page on which you need assistance, ...

  15. Design for Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conn, David R.; McCallum, Barry

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the facets of building design which affect the accessibility of libraries for the physically disabled and presents some basic guidelines for designing accessible libraries. Types of disabilities, questions relating to site design, and specific architectural and physical features of libraries (entranceways, lighting, stairways, and…

  16. Nurses' barriers to learning: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marion C

    2012-07-01

    This integrative review of the literature describes nurses' barriers to learning. Five major themes emerged: time constraints, financial constraints, workplace culture, access/relevance, and competency in accessing electronic evidence-based practice literature. The nurse educator must address these barriers for the staff to achieve learning and competency.

  17. Problem-Based Learning the Distance Learning Way: A Bridge Too Far?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Bob

    2000-01-01

    Evaluation of a distance learning nursing program that used problem-based learning tutorials shows it resulted in both student achievement and enjoyment. Results demonstrated the importance of well-written and accessible learning materials, realistic goals, and allowance for the learning curve of tutors. (SK)

  18. An Exposition of Current Mobile Learning Design Guidelines and Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teall, Ed; Wang, Minjuan; Callaghan, Vic; Ng, Jason W. P.

    2014-01-01

    As mobile devices with wireless access become more readily available, learning delivered via mobile devices of all types must be designed to ensure successful learning. This paper first examines three questions related to the design of mobile learning: 1) what mobile learning (m-learning) guidelines can be identified in the current literature, 2)…

  19. Mobile Technology: Implications of Its Application on Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeyemo, Samuel Adesola; Adedoja, Gloria Olusola; Adelore, Omobola

    2013-01-01

    Learning in Nigeria is considered to have taken a new dimension as the Distance Learning Centre (DLC) of the University of Ibadan has created wider access to learning through the application of mobile technology to learning with particular reference to mobile phones use for the teaching and learning process. By this, the Centre seeks to achieve…

  20. Intelligent Discovery for Learning Objects Using Semantic Web Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, I-Ching

    2012-01-01

    The concept of learning objects has been applied in the e-learning field to promote the accessibility, reusability, and interoperability of learning content. Learning Object Metadata (LOM) was developed to achieve these goals by describing learning objects in order to provide meaningful metadata. Unfortunately, the conventional LOM lacks the…

  1. The Growing Impact of Open Access Distance Education Journals: A Bibliometric Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawacki-Richter, Olaf; Anderson, Terry; Tuncay, Nazime

    2010-01-01

    Open access dissemination resonates with many distance education researchers and practitioners because it aligns with their fundamental mission of extending access to learning opportunity. However, there remains lingering doubt whether this increase in access comes at a cost of reducing prestige, value (often determined in promotion and tenure…

  2. NASA Access Mechanism (NAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Judy

    1993-01-01

    A 1991 user survey indicated that NASA users want (1) access to diverse sources of information; (2) an intuitive approach to system use; (3) avoidance of system query languages; (4) access to peers and other informal sources of information; and (5) simplified and enhanced presentation of search results. Based on these requirements and the use of an intelligent gateway processor, the NASA Access Mechanism (NAM) is being developed to provide the users with the semblance of a one stop shopping environment for information management.

  3. Is Open Access Right for Astronomy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, T. J.

    2010-10-01

    The underlying ethos of Open Access is that the public should have the right to free access to the published results of all publicly funded academic and scientific research. Such has been the political success of OA campaigners that some funding agencies (e.g. Wellcome) now make OA publication of funded research a necessary condition for the award of grants. Learned societies and publishers in astronomy are now looking at ways of best implementing OA in varying degrees of rigour. However, OA does not mean costless access: somewhere down the line, somebody has to pay for the added value (professional copyediting and typesetting, presentation, anonymous peer review, etc.) supplied to author manuscripts by learned-society and commercial publishers in the better journals. I take a critical look at the methods of finance employed within astronomical publishing and review the different flavours of OA. I also raise the question of whether it might make more sense to ensure free access to authors rather than to readers.

  4. HRP Data Accessibility 2009

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. Clarence Sams spoke at the 2009 Human Research Program's Investigators Workshop on the current status of Data Accessibility. In this presentation he discusses the content of the Human Life Scie...

  5. Accessibility and assistive products

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Porrero, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Accessibility and assistive products and technologies are needed to ensure the rights of persons with disabilities and older persons. Many developments have been implemented in laws, standards, markets and from the consumers perspective, at international, European and national levels. The real issue is that not all the potential users benefit from the use of assistive products or accessible measures. Discussion Innovative methods are needed to allow all potential users to have real advantage of assistive technologies and accessible and design for all facilities. Best practices will be presented and existing gaps and recommendations will be discussed. Cost-benefits aspects will also be presented. Conclusion In order to get advantages from opportunities of globalization, hard work and responsibilities of all stakeholders are needed, so that assistive products and accessibility reach a whole range of situations and environments and contribute to ensure quality of life in a society for all.

  6. Access denied; invalid password.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2006-11-01

    Progress addressing access to oral health is difficult to evaluate because it is unclear what access means. Ozar's proposal that access should be defined by dentists as true dental need is criticized. It is proposed that four different types of treatment are currently identifiable in dentistry: 1) traditional oral health care, 2) oral care that has minimal or no health component, 3) episodic care, and 4) oral health outcomes not resulting from dentist interventions such as fluoridation. Each of these models has a different definition of care and of access. The profession is becoming segmented--including growing disparities among dentists in earning potential--to the point where a single model may no longer be able to cover all needs for oral health.

  7. EPA Accessibility Statement

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is committed to making its websites and other electronic and information technology (EIT) accessible to the widest possible audience, including people with disabilities, in accordance with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act.

  8. Equal Access to All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schettler, Joel

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the Section 508 amendment to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 that directs the use of technology. Describes guidelines for online training accessibility with which vendors hoping for government business must fully comply. (JOW)

  9. Access to Investigational Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... access to investigational drugs being developed by pharmaceutical companies? Are there specific criteria used to determine whether ... laboratory. If the results are promising, the drug company or sponsor must apply for FDA approval to ...

  10. Problems of Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servedio, William; McLeod, William

    1980-01-01

    Increased participation in recreational programing by persons with handicapping conditions is a right that calls for significant changes in accessibility of facilities. Both interior and exterior building modifications must be made. (CJ)

  11. First Accessible Boat Launch

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a story about how the Northwest Indiana urban waters partnership location supported the process to create and open the first handicap accessible canoe and kayak launch in the state of Indiana.

  12. Mobile multiple access study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Multiple access techniques (FDMA, CDMA, TDMA) for the mobile user and attempts to identify the current best technique are discussed. Traffic loading is considered as well as voice and data modulation and spacecraft and system design. Emphasis is placed on developing mobile terminal cost estimates for the selected design. In addition, design examples are presented for the alternative techniques of multiple access in order to compare with the selected technique.

  13. Introducing ISTE Learning: What Do You Want to Learn Today?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, April

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces ISTE Learning, a new online professional development (PD) program designed specifically to make PD both fun and more easily accessible for busy educators. One thing that makes ISTE Learning different from everything else out there is that the NETS for students, teachers, and administrators are the cornerstone of everything…

  14. Vascular Access in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh Keller, Marc S.

    2011-02-15

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the 'expert procedural pyramid' is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  15. Transformative Learning, Enactivism, and Affectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiese, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Education theorists have emphasized that transformative learning is not simply a matter of students gaining access to new knowledge and information, but instead centers upon personal transformation: it alters students' perspectives, interpretations, and responses. How should learning that brings about this sort of self-transformation be understood…

  16. Sustainable Development of E-Learning Material for Opengis Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaden, R.; Konig, G.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we discuss our experiences in creating lectures-on-demand using Flash streams based on MS PowerPoint slides that are enriched by author's comments (audio as well as video streams). We depict the drawbacks concerning up-to-dateness of lecture content and compatibility with different desktop and mobile devices. According to this, we focus on our workflow to create lectures using podcasts including slides, animations and movies that is independent from the lecturers' presence. In contrast to podcasts recording classroom lectures, we propose to store authors' explanations as text and to add his comments to the learning material in synthetic voice. Out-dated material can be exchanged without creating new video sequences in lecture time and extent and avoids time consuming re-taping and editing of existing course content. Moreover, splitting learning modules into small pieces facilitates and accelerates work during the regular update process. With this approach we are able to improve sustainability, since it saves cost and allows just in time production of rapidly changing learning content.

  17. Equal access for all? Access to medical information for European psychiatric trainees.

    PubMed

    Marques, João Gama; Stefanovic, Maja Pantovic; Mitkovic-Voncina, Marija; Riese, Florian; Guloksuz, Sinan; Holmes, Kevin; Kilic, Ozge; Banjac, Visnja; Palumbo, Claudia; Nawka, Alexander; Jauhar, Sameer; Andlauer, Olivier; Krupchanka, Dzmitry; da Costa, Mariana Pinto

    2016-04-30

    Access to medical information is important as lifelong scientific learning is in close relation with a better career satisfaction in psychiatry. This survey aimed to investigate how medical information sources are being used among members of the European Federation of Psychiatric Trainees. Eighty-three psychiatric trainees completed our questionnaire. A significant variation was found, and information availability levels were associated with training duration and average income. The most available sources were books and websites, but the most preferred ones were scientific journals. Our findings suggest that further steps should be taken to provide an equal access to medical information across Europe.

  18. Public Computer Assisted Learning Facilities for Children with Visual Impairment: Universal Design for Inclusive Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siu, Kin Wai Michael; Lam, Mei Seung

    2012-01-01

    Although computer assisted learning (CAL) is becoming increasingly popular, people with visual impairment face greater difficulty in accessing computer-assisted learning facilities. This is primarily because most of the current CAL facilities are not visually impaired friendly. People with visual impairment also do not normally have access to…

  19. The Effects of Locus of Control on University Students' Mobile Learning Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsia, Jung-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Since mobile devices have become cheaper, easily accessible, powerful, and popular and the cost of wireless access has declined gradually, mobile learning (m-learning) has begun to spread rapidly. To further improve the effectiveness and efficiency of m-learning for university students, it is critical to understand whether they use m-learning.…

  20. How GPs learn.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Sheona

    2009-07-01

    As the requirements for the revalidation of general practitioners (GPs) unfold, there is an increasing emphasis on demonstrating effective continued medical education (CME) based on identified learning needs. This qualitative study aimed to promote understanding of how GPs currently approach their learning. The behaviour of one group of GPs was studied to explore how they assessed and met individual learning needs. The GPs studied showed a pragmatic approach, valuing learning that gave them practical advice and instant access to information for patient-specific problems. The main driver for the GPs' learning was discomfort during their daily work if a possible lack of knowledge or skills was perceived. However, some learning benchmarked current good practice or ensured continued expertise. Learning purely for interest was also described. The GPs in this study all demonstrated a commitment to personal learning, although they were not yet thinking about demonstrating the effectiveness of this for revalidation. The GPs prioritised their learning needs and were beginning to use some objective assessment methods to do this and the GP appraisal process was found to have a mainly positive effect on learning.

  1. Radial access for cerebrovascular procedures: Case report and technical note

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Ansar Z; Sivapatham, Thinesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Advantages of radial access over brachial/axillary or femoral access have been well described for several decades and include decreased cost, patient preference, and decreased major access site complications. Despite these advantages, radial access is rarely employed or even considered for neurointerventional procedures. This attitude should be reconsidered given several recent large, randomized, controlled trials from the cardiovascular literature proving that radial access is associated with statistically lower costs, decreased incidence of myocardial infarctions, strokes, and even decreased mortality. Radial access is now considered the standard of care for percutaneous coronary interventions in most US centers. Although radial access has been described for neurovascular procedures in the past, overall experience is limited. The two major challenges are the unique anatomy required to access the cerebral vasculature given very acute angles between the arm and craniocervical vessels and limitations in available technology. Methods We present a simplified approach to radial access for cerebrovascular procedures and provide a concise step-by-step approach for patient selection, ultrasound-guided single-wall access, recommended catheters/wires, and review of patent hemostasis. Additionally, we present a complex cerebrovascular intervention in which standard femoral access was unsuccessful, while radial access was quickly achieved to highlight the importance of familiarity with the radial approach for all neurointerventionalists. Results We have found that the learning curve is not too steep and that the radial access approach can be adopted smoothly for a large percentage of diagnostic and interventional neuroradiologic procedures. Conclusions Radial access should be considered in all patients undergoing a cerebrovascular procedure. PMID:26659807

  2. Bound Rationality and Organizational Learning.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-23

    8217 . 90 0 8 0.. O 4 BOUNDED RATIONALITY AND ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING Technical Report AlP - 107 Herbert A. Simon Department of Psychology Carnegie Mellon...ACCESSION No N/A N/A N/A N/A 1 1 TITLE (include Security Classificarnon) Bounded rationality and organizational learning 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) HretA io 13a...organizations organizational psychology organizational learning bounded rationality cognitive psychology 𔄃 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary

  3. E-Learning Divides in North Cyprus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzunboylu, Huseyin; Tuncay, Nazime

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out the differences in e-learning competences of teachers. The independent variables used were geographic location, teaching experience, Internet access, e-learning training needs, ICT teacher/non-ICT teachers, and status. A questionnaire was developed to examine the e-learning competencies of vocational…

  4. Users' Behavior towards Ubiquitous M-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suki, Norazah Mohd; Suki, Norbayah Mohd

    2011-01-01

    Mobile technologies have enabled a new way of communicating, for whom mobile communications are part of normal daily interaction. This paper explores the proposed and verified Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) that can be employed to explain the acceptance of Mobile Learning (M-learning), an activity in which users access learning material with…

  5. Psychology for the Classroom: E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woollard, John

    2011-01-01

    "Psychology for the Classroom: E-Learning" is a lively and accessible introduction to the field of technology-supported teaching and learning and the educational psychology associated with those developments. Offering a substantial and useful analysis of e-learning, this practical book includes current research, offers a grounding in both theory…

  6. Collaborative Language Learning for Professional Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesh, Linda Joy

    2010-01-01

    Institutions of higher education realise the importance of the role of learning organisations in terms of providing personnel training and updating. Yet further consideration should be given to flexible and accessible means for meeting the growing request for continuous learning. Jason Hughes describes an organization's capability to "learn how to…

  7. Mobile Learning: A Framework and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motiwalla, Luvai F.

    2007-01-01

    Wireless data communications in form of Short Message Service (SMS) and Wireless Access Protocols (WAP) browsers have gained global popularity, yet, not much has been done to extend the usage of these devices in electronic learning (e-learning). This project explores the extension of e-learning into wireless/handheld (W/H) computing devices with…

  8. Social Software for Life-Long Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klamma, Ralf; Chatti, Mohamed Amine; Duval, Erik; Hummel, Hans; Hvannberg, Ebba Thora; Kravcik, Milos; Law, Effie; Naeve, Ambjorn; Scott, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Life-long learning is a key issue for our knowledge society. With social software systems new heterogeneous kinds of technology enhanced informal learning are now available to the life-long learner. Learners outside of learning institutions now have access to powerful social communities of experts and peers who are together forging a new web 2.0.…

  9. Implementing Infrastructures for Managing Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemke, Roland; Ternier, Stefaan; Kalz, Marco; Specht, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Making learning objects available is critical to reuse learning resources. Making content transparently available and providing added value to different stakeholders is among the goals of the European Commission's eContentplus programme. This paper analyses standards and protocols relevant for making learning objects accessible in distributed data…

  10. Efficient Learning Algorithms with Limited Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De, Anindya

    2013-01-01

    The thesis explores efficient learning algorithms in settings which are more restrictive than the PAC model of learning (Valiant) in one of the following two senses: (i) The learning algorithm has a very weak access to the unknown function, as in, it does not get labeled samples for the unknown function (ii) The error guarantee required from the…

  11. Preparing Students to Learn without Us

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Will

    2012-01-01

    In this era of access, personalizing learning means allowing students to choose their own paths through the curriculum. However, the ability to learn what we want, when we want it, and with whomever we want creates a huge push against a system of education steeped in time-and-place learning. Fundamental changes need to happen in schools to provide…

  12. Learning to Integrate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osman, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Allan Ridley has many interesting qualities, not least his determination. Though he is totally blind, he doesn't let that stop him pursuing his interests, whether he is water skiing or learning database design. When asked to tutor blind learner Allan Ridley, the author had to give a lot of thought to making the curriculum accessible. This article…

  13. E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buzzi, Marina, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    E-Learning is a vast and complex research topic that poses many challenges in every aspect: educational and pedagogical strategies and techniques and the tools for achieving them; usability, accessibility and user interface design; knowledge sharing and collaborative environments; technologies, architectures, and protocols; user activity…

  14. Wired for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    1993-01-01

    Telephone cables connecting virtually every U.S. home, school, and work place will soon comprise national integrated services digital network allowing two-way video communication and fast data transfer on mass scale at affordable prices. Families, educators, and at-home workers will have routine access to video conferencing, distance learning, and…

  15. Learning Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Coll. of Education.

    Information is provided regarding major learning styles and other factors important to student learning. Several typically asked questions are presented regarding different learning styles (visual, auditory, tactile and kinesthetic, and multisensory learning), associated considerations, determining individuals' learning styles, and appropriate…

  16. ISDC Data Access Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, D.; Borkowski, J.; Contessi, T.; Lock, T.; Rohlfs, R.; Walter, R.

    The ISDC Data Access Layer (DAL) is an ANSI C and \\fortran 90 compatible library under development in support of the ESA INTEGRAL mission data analysis software. DALs primary purpose is to isolate the analysis software from the specifics of the data formats while at the same time providing new data abstraction and access capabilities. DAL supports the creation and manipulation of hierarchical data sets which may span multiple files and, in theory, multiple computer systems. A number of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) are supported by DAL that allow software to view and access data at different levels of complexity. DAL also allows data sets to reside on disk, in conventional memory or in shared memory in a way that is transparent to the user/application.

  17. Vascular access for hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Vanholder, R; Ringoir, S

    1994-04-01

    Indwelling central venous catheters were consecutively used as access for acute and chronic hemodialysis, emergency treatment of pulmonary fluid overload, intoxication and electrolyte disturbances, plasmapheresis, and semiacute continuous dialysis strategies, such as continuous arteriovenous hemofiltration (CAVH). Modification in catheter structure also made it possible to use this access for long-term treatment (e.g., surgically insertable catheters [Hickman], soft large-bore catheters for blind insertion). We discuss the remaining open questions in this field: Which is the insertion site of preference (i.e., subclavian, femoral, or deep jugular)? Should we prefer stiff or soft catheters? Should soft catheters be positioned surgically or is blind insertion by nonsurgeons as adequate? Is it necessary to couple catheter insertion to adjuvant techniques, such as echographic guidance, to reduce complications? Is the currently used polymer structure of the catheters acceptable? Should catheter dialysis be used with single or double vascular access?

  18. Restaurant wheelchair accessibility.

    PubMed

    McClain, L; Beringer, D; Kuhnert, H; Priest, J; Wilkes, E; Wilkinson, S; Wyrick, L

    1993-07-01

    This study was designed to determine the compliance of restaurants to the wheelchair accessibility standards set forth in the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards. The standards that were operationalized in this study are also found in Title III of the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990. The data were collected at 120 sites in three midwestern states. For one who uses a wheelchair, parking the car is often an obstacle to eating out. Only 53% of the restaurants surveyed provide handicapped parking. Entering the building may also be a problem. Of the restaurants that required a ramp, only 66% provided them. Inside the restaurant, the key problems were accessible rest-rooms and the height of tables. The study provided comparisons between restaurants in rural and urban settings, as well as comparisons between conventional restaurants and fast food restaurants. No notable differences emerged for these comparisons.

  19. Unveiling the Mobile Learning Paradox.

    PubMed

    Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    A mobile learning paradox exists in Australian healthcare settings. Although it is increasingly acknowledged that timely, easy, and convenient access to health information using mobile learning technologies can enhance care and improve patient outcomes, currently there is an inability for nurses to access information at the point of care. Rapid growth in the use of mobile technology has created challenges for learning and teaching in the workplace. Easy access to educational resources via mobile devices challenges traditional strategies of knowledge and skill acquisition. Redesign of learning and teaching in the undergraduate curriculum and the development of policies to support the use of mobile learning at point of care is overdue. This study explored mobile learning opportunities used by clinical supervisors in tertiary and community-based facilities in two Australian States. Individual, organisation and systems level governance were sub-themes of professionalism that emerged as the main theme and impacts on learning and teaching in situ in healthcare environments. It is imperative healthcare work redesign includes learning and teaching that supports professional identity formation of students during work integrated learning.

  20. Central venous access.

    PubMed

    Ganeshan, Arul; Warakaulle, Dinuke R; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-01-01

    Central venous access plays an important role in the management of an ever-increasing population of patients ranging from those that are critically ill to patients with difficult clinical access. Interventional radiologists are key in delivering this service and should be familiar with the wide range of techniques and catheters now available to them. A comprehensive description of these catheters with regard to indications, technical aspects of catheterization, success rates, and associated early and late complications, as well as a review of various published guidelines on central venous catheter insertion are given in this article.