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Sample records for accessing medical information

  1. Medical education and information literacy in the era of open access.

    PubMed

    Brower, Stewart M

    2010-01-01

    The Open Access movement in scholarly communications poses new issues and concerns for medical education in general and information literacy education specifically. For medical educators, Open Access can affect the availability of new information, instructional materials, and scholarship in medical education. For students, Open Access materials continue to be available to them post-graduation, regardless of affiliation. Libraries and information literacy librarians are challenged in their responses to the Open Access publishing movement in how best to support Open Access endeavors within their own institutions, and how best to educate their user base about Open Access in general. PMID:20391168

  2. Access to Biomedical Information: The Unified Medical Language System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the development of a Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) by the National Library of Medicine that will retrieve and integrate information from a variety of information resources. Highlights include the metathesaurus; the UMLS semantic network; semantic locality; information sources map; evaluation of the metathesaurus; future…

  3. A Framework for Context Sensitive Risk-Based Access Control in Medical Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Choi, Donghee; Kim, Dohoon; Park, Seog

    2015-01-01

    Since the access control environment has changed and the threat of insider information leakage has come to the fore, studies on risk-based access control models that decide access permissions dynamically have been conducted vigorously. Medical information systems should protect sensitive data such as medical information from insider threat and enable dynamic access control depending on the context such as life-threatening emergencies. In this paper, we suggest an approach and framework for context sensitive risk-based access control suitable for medical information systems. This approach categorizes context information, estimating and applying risk through context- and treatment-based permission profiling and specifications by expanding the eXtensible Access Control Markup Language (XACML) to apply risk. The proposed framework supports quick responses to medical situations and prevents unnecessary insider data access through dynamic access authorization decisions in accordance with the severity of the context and treatment. PMID:26075013

  4. A Framework for Context Sensitive Risk-Based Access Control in Medical Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Donghee; Kim, Dohoon; Park, Seog

    2015-01-01

    Since the access control environment has changed and the threat of insider information leakage has come to the fore, studies on risk-based access control models that decide access permissions dynamically have been conducted vigorously. Medical information systems should protect sensitive data such as medical information from insider threat and enable dynamic access control depending on the context such as life-threatening emergencies. In this paper, we suggest an approach and framework for context sensitive risk-based access control suitable for medical information systems. This approach categorizes context information, estimating and applying risk through context- and treatment-based permission profiling and specifications by expanding the eXtensible Access Control Markup Language (XACML) to apply risk. The proposed framework supports quick responses to medical situations and prevents unnecessary insider data access through dynamic access authorization decisions in accordance with the severity of the context and treatment. PMID:26075013

  5. Access Scheme for Controlling Mobile Agents and its Application to Share Medical Information.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Ting; Chen, Tzer-Shyong; Chen, Tzer-Long; Chung, Yu-Fang; Chen, Yu- Xin; Hwang, Jen-Hung; Wang, Huihui; Wei, Wei

    2016-05-01

    This study is showing the advantage of mobile agents to conquer heterogeneous system environments and contribute to a virtual integrated sharing system. Mobile agents will collect medical information from each medical institution as a method to achieve the medical purpose of data sharing. Besides, this research also provides an access control and key management mechanism by adopting Public key cryptography and Lagrange interpolation. The safety analysis of the system is based on a network attacker's perspective. The achievement of this study tries to improve the medical quality, prevent wasting medical resources and make medical resources access to appropriate configuration. PMID:27010391

  6. Availability and accessibility of evidence-based information resources provided by medical libraries in Australia.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, A; Sowter, B

    2000-01-01

    This article reports on the results of an exploratory survey of the availability and accessibility of evidence-based information resources provided by medical libraries in Australia. Although barriers impede access to evidence-based information for hospital clinicians, the survey revealed that Medline and Cinahl are available in over 90% of facilities. In most cases they are widely accessible via internal networks and the Internet. The Cochrane Library is available in 69% of cases. The Internet is widely accessible and most libraries provide access to some full-text, electronic journals. Strategies for overcoming restrictions and integrating information resources with clinical workflow are being pursued. State, regional and national public and private consortia are developing agreements utilising on-line technology. These could produce cost savings and more equitable access to a greater range of evidence-based resources.

  7. Medical student's access to information and resources for the residency selection process.

    PubMed

    Taggart, M P; Wartman, S A; Wessen, A F

    1988-01-01

    In the study reported here, the authors analyzed senior medical students' attitudes regarding the availability of information and resources pertaining to the residency selection process. Results of a nationwide survey of students showed that when the students had access to information from medical professionals (that is, faculty members, deans, house staff physicians), they felt they had greater access to information than did students who made greater use of other sources (official directories, classmates and the "grapevine"). Furthermore, the findings suggest that greater availability of information from medical professionals was related to higher levels of overall satisfaction with the residency match. While no evidence is presented that demonstrates that medical school faculty members and administrators were unwilling to devote attention to any particular group of students, the data suggest that these professionals provided information regarding the residency selection process more often to medical students at high-prestige schools, students who chose high-prestige specialties, and students who perceived themselves as having high class rank than to other students. Also, students in publicly supported schools felt the cost of travel for interviews to be more burdensome than did the students in private schools.

  8. Measuring access to primary medical care: some examples of the use of geographical information systems.

    PubMed

    Parker, E B; Campbell, J L

    1998-06-01

    This paper explores the potential for geographical information system technology in defining some variables influencing the use of primary care medical services. Eighteen general practices in Scotland contributed to a study examining the accessibility of their services and their patients' use of the local Accident and Emergency Department. Geo-referencing of information was carried out through analysis of postcode data relating to practices and patients. This information was analyzed using ARC/INFO GIS software in conjunction with the ORACLE relational database and 1991 census information. The results demonstrate that GIS technology has an important role in defining and analyzing the use of health services by the population. PMID:10671022

  9. Terminology issues in user access to Web-based medical information.

    PubMed Central

    McCray, A. T.; Loane, R. F.; Browne, A. C.; Bangalore, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    We conducted a study of user queries to the National Library of Medicine Web site over a three month period. Our purpose was to study the nature and scope of these queries in order to understand how to improve users' access to the information they are seeking on our site. The results show that the queries are primarily medical in content (94%), with only a small percentage (5.5%) relating to library services, and with a very small percentage (.5%) not being medically relevant at all. We characterize the data set, and conclude with a discussion of our plans to develop a UMLS-based terminology server to assist NLM Web users. Images Figure 1 PMID:10566330

  10. Meeting clinician information needs by integrating access to the medical record and knowledge resources via the Web.

    PubMed

    Tarczy-Hornoch, P; Kwan-Gett, T S; Fouche, L; Hoath, J; Fuller, S; Ibrahim, K N; Ketchell, D S; LoGerfo, J P; Goldberg, H I

    1997-01-01

    MINDscape is a web based integrated interface to diverse sources of clinical information including both patient specific information (electronic medical record) as well as medical knowledge (the "digital library") to provide "just in time" information at the point of care. It was developed at the University of Washington to meet clinical information needs both as identified locally and by a review of the literature. Beta testing by over 600 clinicians is in progress and medical centers wide access scheduled for Fall 1997. We describe the information needs we sought to meet and the ongoing evaluation approach we are taking to ensure the information needs of a diverse group of clinicians are met. The iterative evolution of the interface from prototype, to alpha to large scale beta testing is reported. Integration of information occurs at three levels: integration of information by patient, integration of information by provider, and integration of patient specific information with medical reference material and decision support tools.

  11. Access to Medical Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Nancy

    Although confidentiality with regard to medical records is supposedly protected by the American Medical Associaton's principles of Ethics and the physician-patient privilege, there are a number of laws that require a physician to release patient information to public authorities without the patient's consent. These exceptions include birth and…

  12. Comparing the quality of accessing medical literature using content-based visual and textual information retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Henning; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Kahn, Charles E., Jr.; Hersh, William

    2009-02-01

    Content-based visual information (or image) retrieval (CBIR) has been an extremely active research domain within medical imaging over the past ten years, with the goal of improving the management of visual medical information. Many technical solutions have been proposed, and application scenarios for image retrieval as well as image classification have been set up. However, in contrast to medical information retrieval using textual methods, visual retrieval has only rarely been applied in clinical practice. This is despite the large amount and variety of visual information produced in hospitals every day. This information overload imposes a significant burden upon clinicians, and CBIR technologies have the potential to help the situation. However, in order for CBIR to become an accepted clinical tool, it must demonstrate a higher level of technical maturity than it has to date. Since 2004, the ImageCLEF benchmark has included a task for the comparison of visual information retrieval algorithms for medical applications. In 2005, a task for medical image classification was introduced and both tasks have been run successfully for the past four years. These benchmarks allow an annual comparison of visual retrieval techniques based on the same data sets and the same query tasks, enabling the meaningful comparison of various retrieval techniques. The datasets used from 2004-2007 contained images and annotations from medical teaching files. In 2008, however, the dataset used was made up of 67,000 images (along with their associated figure captions and the full text of their corresponding articles) from two Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) scientific journals. This article describes the results of the medical image retrieval task of the ImageCLEF 2008 evaluation campaign. We compare the retrieval results of both visual and textual information retrieval systems from 15 research groups on the aforementioned data set. The results show clearly that, currently

  13. Evaluation of generic medical information accessed via mobile phones at the point of care in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Goldbach, Hayley; Chang, Aileen Y; Kyer, Andrea; Ketshogileng, Dineo; Taylor, Lynne; Chandra, Amit; Dacso, Matthew; Kung, Shiang-Ju; Rijken, Taatske; Fontelo, Paul; Littman-Quinn, Ryan; Seymour, Anne K; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2014-01-01

    Objective Many mobile phone resources have been developed to increase access to health education in the developing world, yet few studies have compared these resources or quantified their performance in a resource-limited setting. This study aims to compare the performance of resident physicians in answering clinical scenarios using PubMed abstracts accessed via the PubMed for Handhelds (PubMed4Hh) website versus medical/drug reference applications (Medical Apps) accessed via software on the mobile phone. Methods A two-arm comparative study with crossover design was conducted. Subjects, who were resident physicians at the University of Botswana, completed eight scenarios, each with multi-part questions. The primary outcome was a grade for each question. The primary independent variable was the intervention arm and other independent variables included residency and question. Results Within each question type there were significant differences in ‘percentage correct’ between Medical Apps and PubMed4Hh for three of the six types of questions: drug-related, diagnosis/definitions, and treatment/management. Within each of these question types, Medical Apps had a higher percentage of fully correct responses than PubMed4Hh (63% vs 13%, 33% vs 12%, and 41% vs 13%, respectively). PubMed4Hh performed better for epidemiologic questions. Conclusions While mobile access to primary literature remains important and serves an information niche, mobile applications with condensed content may be more appropriate for point-of-care information needs. Further research is required to examine the specific information needs of clinicians in resource-limited settings and to evaluate the appropriateness of current resources in bridging location- and context-specific information gaps. PMID:23535665

  14. Perceived barriers to information access among medical residents in Iran: obstacles to answering clinical queries in settings with limited Internet accessibility.

    PubMed

    Mazloomdoost, Danesh; Mehregan, Shervineh; Mahmoudi, Hilda; Soltani, Akbar; Embi, Peter J

    2007-01-01

    Studies performed in the US and other Western countries have documented that physicians generate many clinical questions during a typical day and rely on various information sources for answers. Little is known about the information seeking behaviors of physicians practicing in other countries, particularly those with limited Internet connectivity. We conducted this study to document the perceived barriers to information resources used by medical residents in Iran. Our findings reveal that different perceived barriers exist for electronic versus paper-based resources. Notably, paper-based resources are perceived to be limited by resident time-constraints and availability of resources, whereas electronic resources are limited by cost decentralized resources (such as PDAs) and accessibility of centralized, Internet access. These findings add to the limited literature regarding health information-seeking activities in international healthcare settings, particularly those with limited Internet connectivity, and will supplement future studies of and interventions in such settings. PMID:18693891

  15. RF-Medisys: a radio frequency identification-based electronic medical record system for improving medical information accessibility and services at point of care.

    PubMed

    Ting, Jacky S L; Tsang, Albert H C; Ip, Andrew W H; Ho, George T S

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative electronic medical records (EMR) system, RF-MediSys, which can perform medical information sharing and retrieval effectively and which is accessible via a 'smart' medical card. With such a system, medical diagnoses and treatment decisions can be significantly improved when compared with the conventional practice of using paper medical records systems. Furthermore, the entire healthcare delivery process, from registration to the dispensing or administration of medicines, can be visualised holistically to facilitate performance review. To examine the feasibility of implementing RF-MediSys and to determine its usefulness to users of the system, a survey was conducted within a multi-disciplinary medical service organisation that operates a network of medical clinics and paramedical service centres throughout Hong Kong Island, the Kowloon Peninsula and the New Territories. Questionnaires were distributed to 300 system users, including nurses, physicians and patients, to collect feedback on the operation and performance of RF-MediSys in comparison with conventional paper-based medical record systems. The response rate to the survey was 67%. Results showed a medium to high level of user satisfaction with the radiofrequency identification (RFID)-based EMR system. In particular, respondents provided high ratings on both 'user-friendliness' and 'system performance'. Findings of the survey highlight the potential of RF-MediSys as a tool to enhance quality of medical services and patient safety. PMID:21430306

  16. 20 CFR 401.55 - Access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Access to medical records. 401.55 Section 401... INFORMATION The Privacy Act § 401.55 Access to medical records. (a) General. You have a right to access your medical records, including any psychological information that we maintain. (b) Medical records...

  17. Facilitating access to antiviral medications and information during an influenza pandemic: engaging with the public on possible new strategies.

    PubMed

    Fain, Barbara A; Koonin, Lisa M; Stoto, Michael A; Shah, Umair A; Cooper, Susan R; Piltch-Loeb, Rachael N; Kellermann, Arthur L

    2014-01-01

    Antiviral medications can decrease the severity and duration of influenza, but they are most effective if started within 48 hours of the onset of symptoms. In a severe influenza pandemic, normal channels of obtaining prescriptions and medications could become overwhelmed. To assess public perception of the acceptability and feasibility of alternative strategies for prescribing, distributing, and dispensing antivirals and disseminating information about influenza and its treatment, the Institute of Medicine, with technical assistance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), convened public engagement events in 3 demographically and geographically diverse communities: Fort Benton, MT; Chattanooga, TN; and Los Angeles, CA. Participants were introduced to the issues associated with pandemic influenza and the challenges of ensuring timely public access to information and medications. They then discussed the advantages and disadvantages of 5 alternative strategies currently being considered by the CDC and its partners. Participants at all 3 venues expressed high levels of acceptance for each of the proposed strategies and contributed useful ideas to support their implementation. This article discusses the key findings from these sessions. PMID:24552360

  18. Facilitating Access to Antiviral Medications and Information During an Influenza Pandemic: Engaging with the Public on Possible New Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, Lisa M.; Stoto, Michael A.; Shah, Umair A.; Cooper, Susan R.; Piltch-Loeb, Rachael N.; Kellermann, Arthur L.

    2014-01-01

    Antiviral medications can decrease the severity and duration of influenza, but they are most effective if started within 48 hours of the onset of symptoms. In a severe influenza pandemic, normal channels of obtaining prescriptions and medications could become overwhelmed. To assess public perception of the acceptability and feasibility of alternative strategies for prescribing, distributing, and dispensing antivirals and disseminating information about influenza and its treatment, the Institute of Medicine, with technical assistance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), convened public engagement events in 3 demographically and geographically diverse communities: Fort Benton, MT; Chattanooga, TN; and Los Angeles, CA. Participants were introduced to the issues associated with pandemic influenza and the challenges of ensuring timely public access to information and medications. They then discussed the advantages and disadvantages of 5 alternative strategies currently being considered by the CDC and its partners. Participants at all 3 venues expressed high levels of acceptance for each of the proposed strategies and contributed useful ideas to support their implementation. This article discusses the key findings from these sessions. PMID:24552360

  19. Early assessment of medical technologies to inform product development and market access: a review of methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Ijzerman, Maarten J; Steuten, Lotte M G

    2011-09-01

    Worldwide, billions of dollars are invested in medical product development and there is an increasing pressure to maximize the revenues of these investments. That is, governments need to be informed about the benefits of spending public resources, companies need more information to manage their product development portfolios and even universities may need to direct their research programmes in order to maximize societal benefits. Assuming that all medical products need to be adopted by the heavily regulated healthcare market at one point in time, it is worthwhile to look at the logic behind healthcare decision making, specifically, decisions on the coverage of medical products and decisions on the use of these products under competing and uncertain conditions. With the growing tension between leveraging economic growth through R&D spending on the one hand and stricter control of healthcare budgets on the other, several attempts have been made to apply the health technology assessment (HTA) methodology to earlier stages of technology development and implementation. For instance, horizon scanning was introduced to systematically assess emerging technologies in order to inform health policy. Others have introduced iterative economic evaluation, e.g. economic evaluations in earlier stages of clinical research. However, most of these methods are primarily intended to support governments in making decisions regarding potentially expensive new medical products. They do not really inform biomedical product developers on the probability of return on investment, nor do they inform about the market needs and specific requirements of technologies in development. It is precisely this aspect that increasingly receives attention, i.e. is it possible to use HTA tools and methods to inform biomedical product development and to anticipate further development and market access. Several methods have been used in previous decades, but have never been compiled in a comprehensive review

  20. [Patients' access to their medical records].

    PubMed

    Laranjo, Liliana; Neves, Ana Luisa; Villanueva, Tiago; Cruz, Jorge; Brito de Sá, Armando; Sakellarides, Constantitno

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, the medical record was seen exclusively as being the property of health institutions and doctors. Its great technical and scientific components, as well as the personal characteristics attributed by each doctor, have been the reasons appointed for that control. However, nowadays throughout the world that paradigm has been changing. In Portugal, since 2007 patients are allowed full and direct access to their medical records. Nevertheless, the Deontological Code of the Portuguese Medical Association (2009) explicitly states that patients' access to their medical records should have a doctor as intermediary and that the records are each physician's intellectual property. Furthermore, several doctors and health institutions, receiving requests from patients to access their medical records, end up requesting the legal opinion of the Commission for access to administrative documents. Each and every time, that opinion goes in line with the notion of full and direct patient access. Sharing medical records with patients seems crucial and inevitable in the current patient-centred care model, having the potential to improve patient empowerment, health literacy, autonomy, self-efficacy and satisfaction with care. With the recent technological developments and the fast dissemination of Personal Health Records, it is foreseeable that a growing number of patients will want to access their medical records. Therefore, promoting awareness on this topic is essential, in order to allow an informed debate between all the stakeholders.

  1. 28 CFR 513.42 - Inmate access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inmate access to medical records. 513.42... ADMINISTRATION ACCESS TO RECORDS Release of Information Inmate Requests to Institution for Information § 513.42 Inmate access to medical records. (a) Except for the limitations of paragraphs (c) and (d) of...

  2. 28 CFR 513.42 - Inmate access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inmate access to medical records. 513.42... ADMINISTRATION ACCESS TO RECORDS Release of Information Inmate Requests to Institution for Information § 513.42 Inmate access to medical records. (a) Except for the limitations of paragraphs (c) and (d) of...

  3. 28 CFR 513.42 - Inmate access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inmate access to medical records. 513.42... ADMINISTRATION ACCESS TO RECORDS Release of Information Inmate Requests to Institution for Information § 513.42 Inmate access to medical records. (a) Except for the limitations of paragraphs (c) and (d) of...

  4. 28 CFR 513.42 - Inmate access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inmate access to medical records. 513.42... ADMINISTRATION ACCESS TO RECORDS Release of Information Inmate Requests to Institution for Information § 513.42 Inmate access to medical records. (a) Except for the limitations of paragraphs (c) and (d) of...

  5. 28 CFR 513.42 - Inmate access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inmate access to medical records. 513.42... ADMINISTRATION ACCESS TO RECORDS Release of Information Inmate Requests to Institution for Information § 513.42 Inmate access to medical records. (a) Except for the limitations of paragraphs (c) and (d) of...

  6. [Medical journals and open access].

    PubMed

    Sember, Marijan

    2008-01-01

    The open access (OA) or the idea of a free access to scholarly literature published in electronic form has been already well established in the field of medicine. Medline has already been free for a decade, PubMed Central has been growing steadily. The global crisis of the scientific publishing, becoming increasingly dominated by multinational companies and constant increase of journal prices have moved to action not only individuals and institutions but governments and research charities too. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the main open access initiatives and resources in biomedicine (PubMed, PubMed Central, BioMed Central, PLoS). The OA pros and cons are briefly discussed emphasizing the benefits of OA to medical research and practice. PMID:18792564

  7. Medical Information on Optical Disc*

    PubMed Central

    Schipma, Peter B.; Cichocki, Edward M.; Ziemer, Susan M.

    1987-01-01

    Optical discs may permit a revolutionary change in the distribution and use of medical information. A single compact disc, similar in size to that used for digital audio recording, can contain over 500 million characters of information that is accessible by a Personal Computer. These discs can be manufactured at a cost lower than that of print on paper, at reasonable volumes. Software can provide the health care professional with nearly instantaneous access to the information. Thus, for the first time, the opportunity exists to have large local medical information collections. This paper describes an application of this technology in the field of Oncology.

  8. Mobile medical visual information retrieval.

    PubMed

    Depeursinge, Adrien; Duc, Samuel; Eggel, Ivan; Müller, Henning

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose mobile access to peer-reviewed medical information based on textual search and content-based visual image retrieval. Web-based interfaces designed for limited screen space were developed to query via web services a medical information retrieval engine optimizing the amount of data to be transferred in wireless form. Visual and textual retrieval engines with state-of-the-art performance were integrated. Results obtained show a good usability of the software. Future use in clinical environments has the potential of increasing quality of patient care through bedside access to the medical literature in context.

  9. An Intelligent Information Access System Assisting a Case Based Learning Methodology Evaluated in Higher Education with Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aparicio, Fernando; De Buenaga, Manuel; Rubio, Margarita; Hernando, Asuncion

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there has been a shift in educational methodologies toward a student-centered approach, one which increasingly emphasizes the integration of computer tools and intelligent systems adopting different roles. In this paper we describe in detail the development of an Intelligent Information Access system used as the basis for producing…

  10. Mission Medical Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Joe, John C.; Follansbee, Nicole M.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Mission Medical Information System (MMIS). The topics include: 1) What is MMIS?; 2) MMIS Goals; 3) Terrestrial Health Information Technology Vision; 4) NASA Health Information Technology Needs; 5) Mission Medical Information System Components; 6) Electronic Medical Record; 7) Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (LSAH); 8) Methods; and 9) Data Submission Agreement (example).

  11. [Information technology in medical education].

    PubMed

    Ramić, A

    1999-01-01

    The role of information technology in educational models of under-graduate and post-graduate medical education is growing in 1980's influenced by PC's break-in in medical practice and creating relevant data basis, and, particularly, in 1990's by integration of information technology on international level, development of international network, Internet, Telemedicin, etc. The development of new educational information technology is evident, proving that information in transfer of medical knowledge, medical informatics and communication systems represent the base of medical practice, medical education and research in medical sciences. In relation to the traditional approaches in concept, contents and techniques of medical education, new models of education in training of health professionals, using new information technology, offer a number of benefits, such as: decentralization and access to relevant data sources, collecting and updating of data, multidisciplinary approach in solving problems and effective decision-making, and affirmation of team work within medical and non-medical disciplines. Without regard to the dynamics of change and progressive reform orientation within health sector, the development of modern medical education is inevitable for all systems a in which information technology and available data basis, as a base of effective and scientifically based medical education of health care providers, give guarantees for efficient health care and improvement of health of population. PMID:10870617

  12. Access to Medications and Medical Care After Participation in HIV Clinical Trials: A Systematic Review of Trial Protocols and Informed Consent Documents

    PubMed Central

    Ciaranello, Andrea L.; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Sax, Paul E.; Chang, Yuchiao; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Weissman, Joel S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Expectations regarding receipt of medications and medical care after clinical trials conclude may inform decisions about trial participation. We describe the frequency with which these posttrial services are described in the protocols and informed consent forms (ICFs) of antiretroviral drug (ARV) trials. Method We systematically reviewed protocols and ICFs from Phase 3 and 4 antiretroviral trials in adults (≥12 years) from 1987 to 2006. Pharmaceutical industry-sponsored trials were selected from US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) documentation and Clinicaltrials.gov. Trials administered by the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) were selected from the ACTG online registry. ACTG- and industry-provided protocols and ICFs were reviewed in full. The primary outcome was any mention of posttrial services, defined as any text regarding posttrial medications or medical care. Results Complete trial documents were available for 31 (48%) of 65 trials meeting inclusion criteria. Documents from 14 trials (45%) mentioned any posttrial service: 12 (39%) mentioned medications, and 5 (16%) mentioned medical care. Payment for trial participation (74%) and for care for trial-related injury (94%) were mentioned more often than were posttrial services. Conclusions Posttrial medications or medical care was mentioned in the trial documents of <50% of reviewed antiretroviral trials. Improved efforts are needed to clearly describe posttrial services in clinical trial protocols and ICFs. and ICFs. PMID:19362992

  13. Managing Information Resources for Accessibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Services Administration, Washington, DC. Clearinghouse on Computer Accommodation.

    This handbook presents guidance for federal managers and other personnel who are unfamiliar with the policy and practice of information accessibility to accommodate users with disabilities and to provide for their effective access to information resources. It addresses federal requirements for accessibility, adopting accessibility as a sound…

  14. Medical Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kent A.

    1986-01-01

    Description of information services from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) highlights a new system for retrieving information from NLM's databases (GRATEFUL MED); a formal Regional Medical Library Network; DOCLINE; the Unified Medical Language System; and Integrated Academic Information Management Systems. Research and development and the…

  15. Wireless access to a pharmaceutical database: A demonstrator for data driven Wireless Application Protocol applications in medical information processing

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Michael Schacht

    2001-01-01

    Background The Wireless Application Protocol technology implemented in newer mobile phones has built-in facilities for handling much of the information processing needed in clinical work. Objectives To test a practical approach we ported a relational database of the Danish pharmaceutical catalogue to Wireless Application Protocol using open source freeware at all steps. Methods We used Apache 1.3 web software on a Linux server. Data containing the Danish pharmaceutical catalogue were imported from an ASCII file into a MySQL 3.22.32 database using a Practical Extraction and Report Language script for easy update of the database. Data were distributed in 35 interrelated tables. Each pharmaceutical brand name was given its own card with links to general information about the drug, active substances, contraindications etc. Access was available through 1) browsing therapeutic groups and 2) searching for a brand name. The database interface was programmed in the server-side scripting language PHP3. Results A free, open source Wireless Application Protocol gateway to a pharmaceutical catalogue was established to allow dial-in access independent of commercial Wireless Application Protocol service providers. The application was tested on the Nokia 7110 and Ericsson R320s cellular phones. Conclusions We have demonstrated that Wireless Application Protocol-based access to a dynamic clinical database can be established using open source freeware. The project opens perspectives for a further integration of Wireless Application Protocol phone functions in clinical information processing: Global System for Mobile communication telephony for bilateral communication, asynchronous unilateral communication via e-mail and Short Message Service, built-in calculator, calendar, personal organizer, phone number catalogue and Dictaphone function via answering machine technology. An independent Wireless Application Protocol gateway may be placed within hospital firewalls, which may be an

  16. Child Health and Access to Medical Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leininger, Lindsey; Levy, Helen

    2015-01-01

    It might seem strange to ask whether increasing access to medical care can improve children's health. Yet Lindsey Leininger and Helen Levy begin by pointing out that access to care plays a smaller role than we might think, and that many other factors, such as those discussed elsewhere in this issue, strongly influence children's health.…

  17. The linked medical data access control framework.

    PubMed

    Kamateri, Eleni; Kalampokis, Evangelos; Tambouris, Efthimios; Tarabanis, Konstantinos

    2014-08-01

    The integration of medical data coming from multiple sources is important in clinical research. Amongst others, it enables the discovery of appropriate subjects in patient-oriented research and the identification of innovative results in epidemiological studies. At the same time, the integration of medical data faces significant ethical and legal challenges that impose access constraints. Some of these issues can be addressed by making available aggregated instead of raw record-level data. In many cases however, there is still a need for controlling access even to the resulting aggregated data, e.g., due to data provider's policies. In this paper we present the Linked Medical Data Access Control (LiMDAC) framework that capitalizes on Linked Data technologies to enable controlling access to medical data across distributed sources with diverse access constraints. The LiMDAC framework consists of three Linked Data models, namely the LiMDAC metadata model, the LiMDAC user profile model, and the LiMDAC access policy model. It also includes an architecture that exploits these models. Based on the framework, a proof-of-concept platform is developed and its performance and functionality are evaluated by employing two usage scenarios.

  18. 75 FR 35439 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards AGENCY... equipment to ensure that such equipment is accessible to, and usable by, individuals with disabilities to... accessibility needs of individuals with disabilities with respect to medical diagnostic equipment and...

  19. MIMS - MEDICAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankowski, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    MIMS, Medical Information Management System is an interactive, general purpose information storage and retrieval system. It was first designed to be used in medical data management, and can be used to handle all aspects of data related to patient care. Other areas of application for MIMS include: managing occupational safety data in the public and private sectors; handling judicial information where speed and accuracy are high priorities; systemizing purchasing and procurement systems; and analyzing organizational cost structures. Because of its free format design, MIMS can offer immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. File structures, data categories, field lengths and formats, including alphabetic and/or numeric, are all user defined. The user can quickly and efficiently extract, display, and analyze the data. Three means of extracting data are provided: certain short items of information, such as social security numbers, can be used to uniquely identify each record for quick access; records can be selected which match conditions defined by the user; and specific categories of data can be selected. Data may be displayed and analyzed in several ways which include: generating tabular information assembled from comparison of all the records on the system; generating statistical information on numeric data such as means, standard deviations and standard errors; and displaying formatted listings of output data. The MIMS program is written in Microsoft FORTRAN-77. It was designed to operate on IBM Personal Computers and compatibles running under PC or MS DOS 2.00 or higher. MIMS was developed in 1987.

  20. Medical smart cards: health care access in your pocket.

    PubMed

    Krohn, R W

    2000-01-01

    The wallet-sized medical smart card, embedded with a programmable computer chip, stores and transmits a cardholder's clinical, insurance coverage and biographical information. When fully deployed, smart cards will conduct many functions at the point of care, from claims submission to medical records updates in real time. Ultimately, the smart card will make the individual patient record and all clinical and economic transactions within that patient log as portable, accessible and secure as an ATM account.

  1. Child Health and Access to Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Leininger, Lindsey; Levy, Helen

    2016-01-01

    It might seem strange to ask whether increasing access to medical care can improve children’s health. Yet Lindsey Leininger and Helen Levy begin by pointing out that access to care plays a smaller role than we might think, and that many other factors, such as those discussed elsewhere in this issue, strongly influence children’s health. Nonetheless, they find that, on the whole, policies to improve access indeed improve children’s health, with the caveat that context plays a big role—medical care “matters more at some times, or for some children, than others.” Focusing on studies that can plausibly show a causal effect between policies to increase access and better health for children, and starting from an economic framework, they consider both the demand for and the supply of health care. On the demand side, they examine what happens when the government expands public insurance programs (such as Medicaid), or when parents are offered financial incentives to take their children to preventive appointments. On the supply side, they look at what happens when public insurance programs increase the payments that they offer to health-care providers, or when health-care providers are placed directly in schools where children spend their days. They also examine how the Affordable Care Act is likely to affect children’s access to medical care. Leininger and Levy reach three main conclusions. First, despite tremendous progress in recent decades, not all children have insurance coverage, and immigrant children are especially vulnerable. Second, insurance coverage alone doesn’t guarantee access to care, and insured children may still face barriers to getting the care they need. Finally, as this issue of Future of Children demonstrates, access to care is only one of the factors that policy makers should consider as they seek to make the nation’s children healthier. PMID:27516723

  2. 5 CFR 297.205 - Access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Access to medical records. 297.205... PROCEDURES FOR PERSONNEL RECORDS Request for Access § 297.205 Access to medical records. When a request for access involves medical or psychological records that the system manager believes requires...

  3. 5 CFR 297.205 - Access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Access to medical records. 297.205... PROCEDURES FOR PERSONNEL RECORDS Request for Access § 297.205 Access to medical records. When a request for access involves medical or psychological records that the system manager believes requires...

  4. VINSIA: visual navigator for surgical information access.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lingyun; Rowbottom, James; Craker, John; Xu, Rong; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2013-07-01

    Information access at the point of care presents a different set of requirements than those for traditional search engines. Critical care in remote (e.g., battle field) and rural settings not only requires access to clinical guidelines and medical libraries with surgical precision but also with minimal user effort and time. Our development of a graphical, anatomy-driven navigator called Visual Navigator for Surgical Information Access (VINSIA) fulfills the goal for providing evidence-based clinical decision support, specifically in perioperative and critical care settings, to allow rapid and precise information access through a portable stand-alone system. It comes with a set of unique characteristics: (a) a high precision, interactive visual interface driven by human anatomy; (b) direct linkage of anatomical structures to associated content such as clinical guidelines, literature, and medical libraries; and (c) an administrative content management interface allowing only an accredited, expert-level curator to edit and update the clinical content to ensure accuracy and currency. We believe that the deployment of VINSIA will improve quality, safety, and evidence-based standardization of patient care.

  5. Memory for medical information.

    PubMed

    Ley, P

    1979-06-01

    The frequency with which patients fail to recall advice presented by their doctors is discribed. The amount forgotten is shown to be a linear function of the amount presented, to be correlated with the patient's medical knowledge, anxiety level and possibly age, but not with intelligence. It is probable that instructions and advice are more often forgotten than other information, and that this is the result of their low perceived importance, and their being presented late in the series of statements presented-there being (a) a primacy effect in recall of medical information, and (b) a tendency for statements perceived as more important to be better recalled. Experiments to control the content and amount of forgetting are described. Control of content can be obtained by use of the primacy and importance effects, while control of amount forgotten can be achieved by use of (a) simpler language, (b) explicit categorization, (c) repetition, and (d) concrete-specific rather than general-abstract advice statements.

  6. Medical library and information services

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, R. B.

    1970-01-01

    The medical libraries in the Postgraduate Medical Education Centres which are now being built in many regions are generally of a simple pattern based on traditional library practices. In view of the recent advances in information science it is suggested that a more radical approach should be made to the design of medical library and information centres. The basic requirements for medical information in relation to education and medical practice are discussed together with recommendations for a regional and national network for the co-ordination of information-handling in the field of the health sciences. PMID:5440737

  7. 78 FR 32612 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1195 RIN 3014-AA40 Medical Diagnostic Equipment.... ACTION: Notice of advisory committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility... previously published Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on Medical Diagnostic Equipment...

  8. Personal medical information system using laser card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seong H.; Kim, Keun Ho; Choi, Hyung-Sik; Park, Hyun Wook

    1996-04-01

    The well-known hospital information system (HIS) and the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) are typical applications of multimedia to medical area. This paper proposes a personal medical information save-and-carry system using a laser card. This laser card is very useful, especially in emergency situations, because the medical information in the laser card can be read at anytime and anywhere if there exists a laser card reader/writer. The contents of the laser card include the clinical histories of a patient such as clinical chart, exam result, diagnostic reports, images, and so on. The purpose of this system is not a primary diagnosis, but emergency reference of clinical history of the patient. This personal medical information system consists of a personal computer integrated with laser card reader/writer, color frame grabber, color CCD camera and a high resolution image scanner optionally. Window-based graphical user interface was designed for easy use. The laser card has relatively sufficient capacity to store the personal medical information, and has fast access speed to restore and load the data with a portable size as compact as a credit card. Database items of laser card provide the doctors with medical data such as laser card information, patient information, clinical information, and diagnostic result information.

  9. Auditing medical records accesses via healthcare interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, You; Nyemba, Steve; Malin, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare organizations are deploying increasingly complex clinical information systems to support patient care. Traditional information security practices (e.g., role-based access control) are embedded in enterprise-level systems, but are insufficient to ensure patient privacy. This is due, in part, to the dynamic nature of healthcare, which makes it difficult to predict which care providers need access to what and when. In this paper, we show that modeling operations at a higher level of granularity (e.g., the departmental level) are stable in the context of a relational network, which may enable more effective auditing strategies. We study three months of access logs from a large academic medical center to illustrate that departmental interaction networks exhibit certain invariants, such as the number, strength, and reciprocity of relationships. We further show that the relations extracted from the network can be leveraged to assess the extent to which a patient's care satisfies expected organizational behavior.

  10. Auditing Medical Records Accesses via Healthcare Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, You; Nyemba, Steve; Malin, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare organizations are deploying increasingly complex clinical information systems to support patient care. Traditional information security practices (e.g., role-based access control) are embedded in enterprise-level systems, but are insufficient to ensure patient privacy. This is due, in part, to the dynamic nature of healthcare, which makes it difficult to predict which care providers need access to what and when. In this paper, we show that modeling operations at a higher level of granularity (e.g., the departmental level) are stable in the context of a relational network, which may enable more effective auditing strategies. We study three months of access logs from a large academic medical center to illustrate that departmental interaction networks exhibit certain invariants, such as the number, strength, and reciprocity of relationships. We further show that the relations extracted from the network can be leveraged to assess the extent to which a patient’s care satisfies expected organizational behavior. PMID:23304277

  11. 77 FR 39656 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards. See 77 FR 14706 (March... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1195 RIN 3014-AA40 Medical Diagnostic Equipment... Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards. DATES: The...

  12. 78 FR 10582 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards. See 77 FR 6916 (February 9, 2012). The NPRM and... comfort of other participants (see www.access-board.gov/about/policies/fragrance.htm for more...

  13. Increasing information accessibility for patients in obstetrics-gynecology domain.

    PubMed

    Crişan-Vida, Mihaela; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara

    2014-01-01

    It is important for the patient to have access to personal medical information in order to manage information for increased quality of medical care and life. The paper presents a module added to an Obstetrics-Gynaecology Department information system (OGD IS) supporting patient empowerment. The patient is accessing the system easily using laptops or mobile devices. The application accessed by the patient is web-based, implemented in Visual Studio. NET, using ASP.NET pages and C# language, and the application is published in the Windows Azure cloud. The solution is user friendly using familiar devices and is ubiquitous using the cloud solution. A module for translating medical terms in colloquial ones is integrated in the system. For certain situations the patient will get information related to life style influencing health status as how and what to eat or what type of exercise it is recommended.

  14. Medical Information Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, S.; Hipkins, K. R.; Friedman, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    On-line interactive information processing system easily and rapidly handles all aspects of data management related to patient care. General purpose system is flexible enough to be applied to other data management situations found in areas such as occupational safety data, judicial information, or personnel records.

  15. Managing Costs and Medical Information

    Cancer.gov

    People with cancer may face major financial challenges and need help dealing with the high costs of care. Cancer treatment can be very expensive, even when you have insurance. Learn ways to manage medical information, paperwork, bills, and other records.

  16. 77 FR 14706 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... the Federal Register, 77 FR 6916, on accessibility standards for medical diagnostic equipment and... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1195 RIN 3014-AA40 Medical Diagnostic Equipment... equipment, in consultation with the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration. The Access...

  17. Widening Access by Changing the Criteria for Selecting Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powis, David; Hamilton, John; McManus, I. C.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review the principles underlying medical student selection from the perspective of the imperatives of widening access policies. Setting: A recent government initiative has increased the number of medical school places in Great Britain. A priority is to widen access to sections of the community hitherto inadequately represented in…

  18. Medical-Information-Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, Sidney; Friedman, Carl A.; Frankowski, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Medical Information Management System (MIMS) computer program interactive, general-purpose software system for storage and retrieval of information. Offers immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases required. User quickly and efficiently extracts, displays, and analyzes data. Used in management of medical data and handling all aspects of data related to care of patients. Other applications include management of data on occupational safety in public and private sectors, handling judicial information, systemizing purchasing and procurement systems, and analyses of cost structures of organizations. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  19. Intraosseous access in trauma by air medical retrieval teams.

    PubMed

    Sheils, Mark; Ross, Mark; Eatough, Noel; Caputo, Nicholas D

    2014-01-01

    Trauma accounts for a significant portion of overall mortality globally. Hemorrhage is the second major cause of mortality in the prehospital environment. Air medical retrieval services throughout the world have been developed to help improve the outcomes of patients suffering from a broad range of medical conditions, including trauma. These services often utilize intraosseous (IO) devices as an alternative means for access of both medically ill and traumatically injured patients in austere environments. However, studies have suggested that IO access cannot reach acceptable rates for massive transfusion. We review the subject to find the answer of whether IO access should be performed by air medical teams in the prehospital setting, or would central venous (CVC) access be more appropriate? We decided to assess the literature for capacity of IO access to meet resuscitation requirements in the prehospital management of trauma. We also decided to compare the insertion and complication characteristics of IO and CVC access. PMID:25049187

  20. 78 FR 1166 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards. See 77 FR 6916 (February 9, 2012). The NPRM and... TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1195 RIN 3014-AA40 Medical Diagnostic Equipment.... ACTION: Notice of advisory committee meeting. SUMMARY: The Medical Diagnostic Equipment...

  1. Information Access through Conceptual Structures and GIS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priss, Uta; Old, John

    1998-01-01

    Presents a new technique for information access based on a combination of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and conceptual structures as modeled in relational concept analysis. Describes a graphical interface that allows access of spatial, hierarchical, and linear data in a common manner; discusses its features and limits. (Author/AEF)

  2. Locally accessible information and distillation of entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Sibasish; Joag, Pramod; Kar, Guruprasad; Kunkri, Samir; Roy, Anirban

    2005-01-01

    A different type of complementarity relation is found between locally accessible information and final average entanglement for a given ensemble. It is also shown that in some well-known distillation protocols, this complementary relation is optimally satisfied. We discuss the interesting trade-off between locally accessible information and distillable entanglement for some states.

  3. ONTERIS: Access to Education Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derksen, Diane; Goodman, Judy

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the information needs of English-as-a-second-language teachers and ways in which the ONTERIS (Ontario Education Resources Information System) system of education information databases can provide valuable assistance, covering database contents, sources, utilization, dissemination, and sample records. (Author/CB)

  4. Prisoner denied access to medical marijuana.

    PubMed

    Wells, Joanna

    2004-12-01

    In a case that has recently come to the attention of the editors, the Federal Court refused to order Health Canada to provide a federal prisoner with medical marijuana, even though he possessed legal authorization to possess marijuana. PMID:15810136

  5. Accelerating global access to plant diversity information.

    PubMed

    Lughadha, Eimear Nic; Miller, Chuck

    2009-11-01

    Botanic gardens play key roles in the development and dissemination of plant information resources. Drivers for change have included progress in information technology, growing public expectations of electronic access and international conservation policy. Great advances have been made in the quantity, quality and accessibility of plant information in digital form and the extent to which information from multiple providers can be accessed through a single portal. However, significant challenges remain to be addressed in making botanic gardens resources maximally accessible and impactful, not least the overwhelming volume of material which still awaits digitisation. The year 2010 represents an opportunity for botanic gardens to showcase their collaborative achievements in delivery of electronic plant information and reinforce their relevance to pressing environmental issues.

  6. 77 FR 62479 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards. See 77 FR 6916 (February 9, 2012). The NPRM and... refrain from using perfume, cologne, and other fragrances for the comfort of other participants (see...

  7. 78 FR 16448 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... previously published NPRM on Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards. See 77 FR 6916 (February 9... provided. Persons attending the meetings are requested to refrain from using perfume, cologne, and...

  8. 77 FR 53163 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ...) on Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards. See 77 FR 6916 (February 9, 2012). The NPRM... provided. Persons attending the meetings are requested to refrain from using perfume, cologne, and...

  9. Negotiating Access to Health Information to Promote Students' Health.

    PubMed

    Radis, Molly E; Updegrove, Stephen C; Somsel, Anne; Crowley, Angela A

    2016-04-01

    Access to student health information, such as immunizations, screenings, and care plans for chronic conditions, is essential for school nurses to fulfill their role in promoting students' health. School nurses typically encounter barriers to accessing health records and spend many hours attempting to retrieve health information. As a result, nurses' time is poorly utilized and students may suffer adverse outcomes including delayed school entry. In response to this pressing public health issue, a school medical advisor and director of school nurses in a local health department successfully negotiated access for school nurses to three health record systems: a state immunization tracking system, an electronic lead surveillance program, and an electronic health record system. This negotiation process is presented within a framework of the Theory of Diffusion of Innovation and provides a strategy for other school nurses seeking access to student health information. PMID:26547091

  10. Negotiating Access to Health Information to Promote Students' Health.

    PubMed

    Radis, Molly E; Updegrove, Stephen C; Somsel, Anne; Crowley, Angela A

    2016-04-01

    Access to student health information, such as immunizations, screenings, and care plans for chronic conditions, is essential for school nurses to fulfill their role in promoting students' health. School nurses typically encounter barriers to accessing health records and spend many hours attempting to retrieve health information. As a result, nurses' time is poorly utilized and students may suffer adverse outcomes including delayed school entry. In response to this pressing public health issue, a school medical advisor and director of school nurses in a local health department successfully negotiated access for school nurses to three health record systems: a state immunization tracking system, an electronic lead surveillance program, and an electronic health record system. This negotiation process is presented within a framework of the Theory of Diffusion of Innovation and provides a strategy for other school nurses seeking access to student health information.

  11. Medication Information Flow in Home Care.

    PubMed

    Norri-Sederholm, Teija; Saranto, Kaija; Paakkonen, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Critical success factors in medication care involve communication and information sharing. Knowing the information needs of each actor in medication process in home care, is the first step to ensure that the right type of information is available, when needed. The aim of the study was to describe the needed and delivered information in home care in order to perform medication care successfully. A total of 15 nurses from primary home care participated a workshop focusing on medication treatment. The qualitative data was collected by focus group technique. Data was analyzed according to content analysis. Three medication information themes were formulated: Client-related information, medication, and medication error. The critical medication information were generic drug information, validity of the list of medication and client's clinical status. As a conclusion findings, show the diversity of the medication information in home care. PMID:27332222

  12. Access to continued-use medication among older adults, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Karynna Pimentel; Brito, Alexandre dos Santos; Rodrigues, Claudia Soares; Luiz, Ronir Raggio

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence and associated access factors for all continued-use prescription drugs and the ways in which they can be obtained. METHODS Data was obtained from the 2008 Household National Survey. The sample comprised 27,333 individuals above 60 years who reported that they used continued-use prescription drugs. A descriptive analysis and binary and multiple multinomial logistic regressions were performed. RESULTS 86.0% of the older adults had access to all the medication they needed, and among them, 50.7% purchased said medication. Those who obtained medication from the public health system were younger (60-64 years), did not have health insurance plans, and belonged to the lower income groups. It is remarkable that 14.0% of the subjects still had no access to any continued-use medication, and for those with more than four chronic diseases, this amount reached 22.0%. Those with a greater number of chronic diseases ran a higher risk of not having access to all the medication they needed. CONCLUSIONS There are some groups of older adults with an increased risk of not obtaining all the medication they need and of purchasing it. The results of this study are expected to contribute to guide programs and plans for access to medication in Brazil. PMID:25741646

  13. Planetree health information services: public access to the health information people want.

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, T L

    1994-01-01

    In July 1981, the Planetree Health Resource Center opened on the San Francisco campus of California Pacific Medical Center (Pacific Presbyterian Medical Center). Planetree was founded on the belief that access to information can empower people and help them face health and medical challenges. The Health Resource Center was created to provide medical library and health information resources to the general public. Over the last twelve years, Planetree has tried to develop a consumer health library collection and information service that is responsive to the needs and interests of a diverse public. In an effort to increase accessibility to the medical literature, a consumer health library classification scheme was created for the organization of library materials. The scheme combines the specificity and sophistication of the National Library of Medicine classification scheme with the simplicity of common lay terminology. PMID:8136762

  14. Choice, access, information are among clients' rights.

    PubMed

    Finger, W R

    1993-08-01

    This general discussion of the importance of respecting client's rights and access to a choice of methods relies on the statements of researchers and family planners from a variety of international and private organizations which reiterate the features of successful programs. The emphasis on client's rights is a change for many programs. The example is given of a clinic in Niger that posts the list of client rights to accessibility, information, education, communication, and freedom of choice. Pressure from international groups focuses on promoting client's informed and voluntary choice of family planning (FP) method, because it assures continuation. Quality of care is directly related to continuation of care. The quality of care framework of Judith Bruce, from the Population Council, identifies the first and most fundamental element in assuring quality of service to be choice of method. The UN assures that contraceptive choice is a basic human right. The International Planned Parenthood (IPPF) Medical and Service Delivery Guidelines proposes 10 client rights; this list of rights has been widely distributed as a poster. IPPF's African director states that contraceptive prevalence is low because of a lack of quality care. Women's rights have been integrated into FP and promoted in the Safe Motherhood Initiative and in the focus of the International Decade for Women, 1975-85. The International Women's Health Coalition, which is an alliance of over 100 women's organizations from 50 countries, has released a "Women's Declaration on Population Policies" at UN headquarters, which calls for provision of reproductive health care, not just technology, for fertility management by women. Policy makers and planners are urged to provide access to wide contraceptive choices, pregnancy care, safe abortion, prevention of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), development of new technology for protection against STDs, and encouragement of men to take responsibility for sexual

  15. Medical Information and Patient Power

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Julian H.

    1985-01-01

    The patient's right to know about his health and his medical care may benefit from new developments in information management for clinical care. While computer applications in patient care have to date been limited, forces within and around medicine have created a critical need for better clinical data management. The potential for these systems to serve not only the care providers but also the patients has only begun to be explored.

  16. [Medical publications and information technologies].

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Larrañaga, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The development of the computer science during the last 30 years has had a very important influence in human life, changing paradigms on all daily activities like public policies, commerce, education and science development. The aim of this editorial is to communicate some considerations about the way the development of technology in information and communication had influenced on the spread of scientific knowledge in its using on medical publications.

  17. Accessing complexity from genome information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2012-06-01

    This paper studies the information content of the chromosomes of 24 species. In a first phase, a scheme inspired in dynamical system state space representation is developed. For each chromosome the state space dynamical evolution is shed into a two dimensional chart. The plots are then analyzed and characterized in the perspective of fractal dimension. This information is integrated in two measures of the species' complexity addressing its average and variability. The results are in close accordance with phylogenetics pointing quantitative aspects of the species' genomic complexity.

  18. Access and control of information and intellectual property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Gerald S.

    1996-03-01

    This paper introduces the technology of two pioneering patents for the secure distribution of information and intellectual property. The seminal technology has been used in the control of sensitive material such as medical records and imagery in distributed networks. It lends itself to the implementation of an open architecture access control system that provides local or remote user selective access to digital information stored on any computer system or storage medium, down to the data element, pixel, and sub-pixel levels. Use of this technology is especially suited for electronic publishing, health care records, MIS, and auditing.

  19. Tracking medication information across medical records

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Rocks, Krupa; Jahanshad, Neda; Frias-Martinez, Enrique; Andrada, Lewellyn P.; Bui, Alex A.T.

    2009-01-01

    A patient’s electronic medical record can consist of a large number of reports, especially for an elderly patient or for one affected by a chronic disease. It can thus be cumbersome for a physician to go through all of the reports to understand the patient’s complete medical history. This paper describes work in progress towards tracking medications and their dosages through the course of a patient’s medical history. 923 reports associated with 11 patients were obtained from a university hospital. Drug names were identified using a dictionary look-up approach. Dosages corresponding to these drugs were determined using regular expressions. The state of a drug (ON, OFF), which determines whether or not the drug was being taken, was identified using a support vector machine with features based on expert knowledge. Results were promising: prec. ≈ recall ≈ 87%. The output is a timeline display of the drugs which the patient has been taking. PMID:20351862

  20. Secure medical information sharing in cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhiyi; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Wenzheng; Zhao, Yi; Wu, Zhenqiang; Miao, Meixia

    2015-01-01

    Medical information sharing is one of the most attractive applications of cloud computing, where searchable encryption is a fascinating solution for securely and conveniently sharing medical data among different medical organizers. However, almost all previous works are designed in symmetric key encryption environment. The only works in public key encryption do not support keyword trapdoor security, have long ciphertext related to the number of receivers, do not support receiver revocation without re-encrypting, and do not preserve the membership of receivers. In this paper, we propose a searchable encryption supporting multiple receivers for medical information sharing based on bilinear maps in public key encryption environment. In the proposed protocol, data owner stores only one copy of his encrypted file and its corresponding encrypted keywords on cloud for multiple designated receivers. The keyword ciphertext is significantly shorter and its length is constant without relation to the number of designated receivers, i.e., for n receivers the ciphertext length is only twice the element length in the group. Only the owner knows that with whom his data is shared, and the access to his data is still under control after having been put on the cloud. We formally prove the security of keyword ciphertext based on the intractability of Bilinear Diffie-Hellman problem and the keyword trapdoor based on Decisional Diffie-Hellman problem. PMID:26410315

  1. Secure medical information sharing in cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhiyi; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Wenzheng; Zhao, Yi; Wu, Zhenqiang; Miao, Meixia

    2015-01-01

    Medical information sharing is one of the most attractive applications of cloud computing, where searchable encryption is a fascinating solution for securely and conveniently sharing medical data among different medical organizers. However, almost all previous works are designed in symmetric key encryption environment. The only works in public key encryption do not support keyword trapdoor security, have long ciphertext related to the number of receivers, do not support receiver revocation without re-encrypting, and do not preserve the membership of receivers. In this paper, we propose a searchable encryption supporting multiple receivers for medical information sharing based on bilinear maps in public key encryption environment. In the proposed protocol, data owner stores only one copy of his encrypted file and its corresponding encrypted keywords on cloud for multiple designated receivers. The keyword ciphertext is significantly shorter and its length is constant without relation to the number of designated receivers, i.e., for n receivers the ciphertext length is only twice the element length in the group. Only the owner knows that with whom his data is shared, and the access to his data is still under control after having been put on the cloud. We formally prove the security of keyword ciphertext based on the intractability of Bilinear Diffie-Hellman problem and the keyword trapdoor based on Decisional Diffie-Hellman problem.

  2. Clinical evidence continuous medical education: a randomised educational trial of an open access e-learning program for transferring evidence-based information – ICEKUBE (Italian Clinical Evidence Knowledge Utilization Behaviour Evaluation) – study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Moja, Lorenzo; Moschetti, Ivan; Cinquini, Michela; Sala, Valeria; Compagnoni, Anna; Duca, Piergiorgio; Deligant, Christian; Manfrini, Roberto; Clivio, Luca; Satolli, Roberto; Addis, Antonio; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Dri, Pietro; Liberati, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    Background In an effort to ensure that all physicians have access to valid and reliable evidence on drug effectiveness, the Italian Drug Agency sponsored a free-access e-learning system, based on Clinical Evidence, called ECCE. Doctors have access to an electronic version and related clinical vignettes. Correct answers to the interactive vignettes provide Continuing Medical Education credits. The aims of this trial are to establish whether the e-learning program (ECCE) increases physicians' basic knowledge about common clinical scenarios, and whether ECCE is superior to the passive diffusion of information through the printed version of Clinical Evidence. Design All Italian doctors naïve to ECCE will be randomised to three groups. Group one will have access to ECCE for Clinical Evidence chapters and vignettes lot A and will provide control data for Clinical Evidence chapters and vignettes lot B; group two vice versa; group three will receive the concise printed version of Clinical Evidence. There are in fact two designs: a before and after pragmatic trial utilising a two by two incomplete block design (group one versus group two) and a classical design (group one and two versus group three). The primary outcome will be the retention of Clinical Evidence contents assessed from the scores for clinical vignettes selected from ECCE at least six months after the intervention. To avoid test-retest effects, we will randomly select vignettes out of lot A and lot B, avoiding repetitions. In order to preserve the comparability of lots, we will select vignettes with similar, optimal psychometric characteristics. Trial registration ISRCTN27453314 PMID:18637189

  3. Adolescents’ Access to Their Own Prescription Medications in the Home

    PubMed Central

    Ross-Durow, Paula Lynn; McCabe, Sean Esteban; Boyd, Carol J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this descriptive study was to determine adolescents’ access to their own medications at home, specifically prescription pain, stimulant, anti-anxiety, and sedative medications. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a cohort of 501 adolescents from two southeastern Michigan school districts. Participants were asked what medications had been prescribed to them during the previous six months; if they had received prescription medications, they were asked in-depth questions about them, including how medications were stored and supervised at home. Results The sample was comprised of adolescents in the 8th and 9th grades, and 50.9% were male. Participants were primarily White (72.9%, n = 365) or African American (21.6%, n = 108). Slightly less than half of the adolescents (45.9%, n=230) reported having been prescribed medications in the previous six months. Of this group, 14.3% (n = 33) had been prescribed pain medications, 9.6% (n = 22) stimulants, 1.7% (n = 4) anti-anxiety medications, and 0.9% (n = 2) sedatives. In total, 57 adolescents were prescribed medications in the pain, stimulant, anti-anxiety, or sedative categories (including controlled medications), and the majority (73.7%, n=42) reported that they had unsupervised access to medications with abuse potential. Conclusions The majority of adolescents who were prescribed medications in the pain, stimulant, anti-anxiety or sedative categories during the previous six months had unsupervised access to them at home. It is critical that clinicians educate parents and patients about the importance of proper storage and disposal of medications, particularly those with abuse potential. PMID:23683499

  4. Using an iconic language to improve access to electronic medical records in general medicine.

    PubMed

    Simon, Christian; Hassler, Sylvain; Beuscart-Zephir, Marie-Catherine; Favre, Madeleine; Venot, Alain; Duclos, Catherine; Lamy, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-01-01

    Physicians have difficulties to access and analyse information in a medical record. In a previous work on drug databanks, we have shown that with an iconic language as VCM, an icon-based presentation can help physicians to access medical information. Our objective, herein, is to study whether VCM can be used in an electronic medical record for facilitating physician access in general practice. We identify the data and the functionalities of an electronic medical record that could benefit from VCM icons representing clinical findings, patient history, etc. We also present a preliminary evaluation of this new icon-focused interface. We conclude by discussing the results like the assessment of the user's satisfaction and pointing out the importance of coding data.

  5. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  6. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  7. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  8. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  9. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    "Access" is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  10. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  11. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  12. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  13. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    "Access" is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  14. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  15. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  16. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  17. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  18. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  19. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  20. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  1. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    "Access" is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  2. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service covering published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  3. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1,000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  4. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  5. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service covering published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  6. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  7. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  8. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  9. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 21 .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  10. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  11. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  12. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  13. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  14. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  15. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  16. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  17. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  18. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  19. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Number 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service covering published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  20. The Language of Information Technology: Accessibility in the Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warmkessel, Marjorie M.

    The language of information technology is discussed, with a focus on accessibility in the information society. The metaphors of information technology as an "information superhighway" or "infobahn" are analyzed; limitations of the "road system" and developments of Internet systems are considered. The concept of connectivity of the rhizome in "A…

  1. Giving patients secure < Google-like > access to their medical record.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Fassa, Maniane; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Breton, Vincent; Boire, Jean Yves; Allaert, François André

    2008-01-01

    The main problem for the patient who wants to have access to all of the information about his health is that this information is very often spread over many medical records. Therefore, it would be convenient for the patient, after being identified and authenticated, to use a kind of specific medical search engine as one part of the solution to this main problem. The principal objective is for the patient to have access to his or her medical information at anytime and wherever it has been stored. This proposal for secure "Google Like" access requires the addition of different conditions: very strict identity checks using cryptographic techniques such as those planned for the electronic signature, which will not only ensure authentication of the patient and integrity of the file, but also protection of the confidentiality and access follow-up. The electronic medical record must also be electronically signed by the practitioner in order to provide evidence that he has given his agreement and accepted responsibility for the content. This electronic signature also prevents any kind of post-transmission falsification. New advances in technology make it possible to envisage access to medical records anywhere and anytime, thanks to Grid and watermarking methodologies.

  2. Occupational Safety and Health Administration--Access to employee exposure and medical records. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1980-05-23

    This final occupational safety and health standard, promulgated today as a revised 29 CFR 1910.20, provides for employee, designated representative, and OSHA access to employer-maintained exposure and medical records relevant to employees exposed to toxic substances and harmful physical agents. Access is also assured to employer analyses using exposure and medical records. The final standard requires long term preservation of these records, contains provisions concerning informing employees of their rights under the standard, and includes provisions protective of trade secret information.

  3. Should a patient have access to his medical records.

    PubMed

    de Klerk, A

    1989-01-01

    An investigation is undertaken into the right of a patient to have access to medical records concerning himself, and the ownership of medical records and X-ray photographs is discussed. It is argued that record accessibility by patients is to favoured. The current situation in England and the United States of America is considered and proposals de lege ferenda are made with respect to South Africa. The author is of the opinion that the South African legislature should consider legislation in this regard.

  4. Withdrawing routine outpatient medical services: effects on access and health.

    PubMed

    Fihn, S D; Wicher, J B

    1988-01-01

    In 1983 a budget shortfall at the Seattle Veterans Administration Medical Center prompted termination of regular outpatient care for individuals of low legal priority deemed medically stable by administrative criteria. The authors examined the effects on health status and access to medical care of 157 discharged patients and 74 comparison subjects who met the discharge criteria but were retained. Seventeen months after termination, 41% of discharged patients reported their self-perceived health status was "much worse," compared with 8% of retained patients (p less than 0.001). Among discharged patients, 23% had seen no health care provider, 58% believed they lacked access to necessary care, and 47% had reduced prescribed medications. In contrast, all retained patients had seen a provider, 5% claimed to lack access, and 25% had reduced medications. Among discharged patients for whom complete follow-up data were available, the percentage whose blood pressures were out of control at their 13-month follow-up visits was 41%, compared with 5% at the time of discharge. This marked change contrasted with a rise from 9% to 17% among retained patients. A best-case/worse-case analysis indicated that the findings could not be fully explained by biased follow-up. Administrative criteria did not accurately identify medically stable patients. During the study interval 25% of discharged patients were hospitalized and at least 6% died. These findings suggest that federal health care programs are important to many indigent patients and that withdrawing services may have deleterious consequences. PMID:3404297

  5. Accessing Patient Information for Probabilistic Patient Models Using Existing Standards.

    PubMed

    Gaebel, Jan; Cypko, Mario A; Lemke, Heinz U

    2016-01-01

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are developed to facilitate physicians' decision making, particularly for complex, oncological diseases. Access to relevant patient specific information from electronic health records (EHR) is limited to the structure and transmission formats in the respective hospital information system. We propose a system-architecture for a standardized access to patient specific information for a CDSS for laryngeal cancer. Following the idea of a CDSS using Bayesian Networks, we developed an architecture concept applying clinical standards. We recommend the application of Arden Syntax for the definition and processing of needed medical knowledge and clinical information, as well as the use of HL7 FHIR to identify the relevant data elements in an EHR to increase the interoperability the CDSS. PMID:27139392

  6. Medical ghostwriting and informed consent.

    PubMed

    Almassi, Ben

    2014-11-01

    Ghostwriting in its various forms has received critical scrutiny from medical ethicists, journal editors, and science studies scholars trying to explain where ghostwriting goes wrong and ascertain how to counter it. Recent analyses have characterized ghostwriting as plagiarism or fraud, and have urged that it be deterred through stricter compliance with journal submission requirements, conflict of interest disclosures, author-institutional censure, legal remedies, and journals' refusal to publish commercially sponsored articles. As a supplement to such efforts, this paper offers a critical assessment of medical ghostwriting as contrary to good patient care, on the grounds that it contradicts established general principles guiding clinical ethics. Specifically, I argue that ghostwriting undermines trust relationships between authors and their readers, and between these readers and their trusting patients, and in so doing contradicts the duty of respect for patient autonomy by obstructing informed consent. For this reason, complicity in ghostwriting practices should be understood as a violation of the professional ethical duties of physicians and other healthcare workers.

  7. Online Access to Mental Health Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Barbara A.

    1982-01-01

    Presents overview of commercially available databases useful to field of mental health. The availability, costs, coverage, currency, update frequency, and access points are compared for four major files--PsychINFO, National Clearinghouse for Mental Health Information, Social SciSearch, and MEDLINE. Forty-nine references are provided. (EJS)

  8. Research Investigation of Information Access Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinrichs, John H.; Sharkey, Thomas W.; Lim, Jeen-Su

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the satisfaction of library users at Wayne State University who utilize alternative information access methods. The LibQUAL+[TM] desired and perceived that satisfaction ratings are used to determine the user's "superiority gap." By focusing limited library resources to address "superiority gap" issues identified by each…

  9. Continued Access to Syntactic Information in Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funke, Reinold; Sieger, Jasmin

    2012-01-01

    Reliable access to syntactic information beyond its use in first-pass reading was probed using a task labeled "syntactic reading task." This task draws on an orthographic marker for syntactic structure, the capitalization of nouns in German. Subjects read written text strings containing a unit that could be taken as a noun or as a verb. The…

  10. Telemedicine for access to quality care on medical practice and continuing medical education in a global arena.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Azhar; Merrell, Ronald C

    2005-01-01

    Health care practices continue to evolve with technological advances integrating computer applications and patient information management into telemedicine systems. Telemedicine can be broadly defined as the use of information technology to provide patient care and share clinical information from one geographic location to another. Telemedicine can lower costs and increase access to health care, especially for those who live in remote or underserved areas. The mechanism of telemedicine raises some difficult legal and regulatory issues as well since technology provides remote diagnosis and treatment across state lines resulting in unclear definitions for liability coverage. Physician licensing becomes an issue because telemedicine facilitates consultations without respect to state or national borders. With the increased access to current information and resources, continuing medical education becomes more feasible with synchronous or asynchronous access to educational content. The challenge in implementation of these unique educational tools is the inclusion for standards of practice and appropriate regulatory mechanisms to cover the audiences.

  11. 32 CFR 324.13 - Access to medical and psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Program’ (see 32 CFR part 310). ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Access to medical and psychological records. 324... to medical and psychological records. Individual access to medical and psychological records...

  12. 32 CFR 324.13 - Access to medical and psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Program’ (see 32 CFR part 310). ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Access to medical and psychological records. 324... to medical and psychological records. Individual access to medical and psychological records...

  13. How to manage secure direct access of European patients to their computerized medical record and personal medical record.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Allaert, François André; Fassa, Maniane; Riandey, Benoît; Avillach, Paul; Cohen, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    The multiplication of the requests of the patients for a direct access to their Medical Record (MR), the development of Personal Medical Record (PMR) supervised by the patients themselves, the increasing development of the patients' electronic medical records (EMRs) and the world wide internet utilization will lead to envisage an access by using technical automatic and scientific way. It will require the addition of different conditions: a unique patient identifier which could base on a familial component in order to get access to the right record anywhere in Europe, very strict identity checks using cryptographic techniques such as those for the electronic signature, which will ensure the authentication of the requests sender and the integrity of the file but also the protection of the confidentiality and the access follow up. The electronic medical record must also be electronically signed by the practitioner in order to get evidence that he has given his agreement and taken the liability for that. This electronic signature also avoids any kind of post-transmission falsification. This will become extremely important, especially in France where patients will have the possibility to mask information that, they do not want to appear in their personal medical record. Currently, the idea of every citizen having electronic signatures available appears positively Utopian. But this is yet the case in eGovernment, eHealth and eShopping, world-wide. The same was thought about smart cards before they became generally available and useful when banks issued them.

  14. 78 FR 23872 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... Accessibility Standards. See 77 FR 6916 (February 9, 2012). The NPRM and information related to the proposed... provided. Persons attending the meetings are requested to refrain from using perfume, cologne, and...

  15. Information Technology and Undergraduate Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masys, Daniel R.

    1989-01-01

    Hewlett-Packard Corporation grant enabled Harvard Medical School to begin using computer technology in medical educational applications. Hardware and software selection, integration into the curriculum, teaching the use of computers, cost, successful applications, knowledge base access, simulations, video and graphics teaching programs, and…

  16. [Accessible health information: a question of age?].

    PubMed

    Loos, E F

    2012-04-01

    Aging and digitalisation are important trends which have their impact on information accessibility. Accessible information about products and services is of crucial importance to ensure that all citizens can participate fully as active members of society. Senior citizens who have difficulties using new media run the risk of exclusion in today's information society. Not all senior citizens, however, encounter problems with new media. Not by a long shot. There is much to be said for 'aged heterogeneity', the concept that individual differences increase as people age. In two explorative qualitative case studies related to accessible health information--an important issue for senior citizens--that were conducted in the Netherlands, variables such as gender, education level and frequency of internet use were therefore included in the research design. In this paper, the most important results of these case studies will be discussed. Attention will be also paid to complementary theories (socialisation, life stages) which could explain differences in information search behaviour when using old or new media. PMID:22642049

  17. Sources of Information on Medical Geography

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, Lynn S.

    1966-01-01

    Adequate research in the peripheral field of medical geography requires familiarity with the literature of medicine, geography, and other environmentally oriented fields. The pertinent literature of the two primary disciplines, as well as that of anthropology, nutrition, and human bioclimatology, is surveyed from a bibliographical point of view. A brief review of historical sources is presented, followed by a discussion of the contemporary organizations, both international and national, active in the field. Emphasis is placed on the publishing programs and projects, maps, atlases, symposia, reports, and other literature sponsored or stimulated by these organizations. Regional bibliographical surveys for East Africa, India, and the Soviet Union are also noted. Pertinent aspects of bibliographies, indexes, abstracts, library card catalogs and accession lists, and other resources are listed, with emphasis on the various subject headings and other approaches to them. Throughout, the sources of information are approached from a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary viewpoint. PMID:5329543

  18. Bringing patient centricity to diabetes medication access in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Glennie, Judith L; Kovacs Burns, Katharina; Oh, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Canada must become proactive in addressing type 2 diabetes. With the second highest rate of diabetes prevalence in the developed world, the number of Canadians living with diabetes will soon reach epidemic levels. Against international comparisons, Canada also performs poorly with respect to diabetes-related hospitalizations, mortality rates, and access to medications. Diabetes and its comorbidities pose a significant burden on people with diabetes (PWD) and their families, through out-of-pocket expenses for medications, devices, supplies, and the support needed to manage their illness. Rising direct and indirect costs of diabetes will become a drain on Canada’s economy and undermine the financial stability of our health care system. Canada’s approach to diabetes medication assessment and funding has created a patchwork of medication access across provinces. Access to treatments for those who rely on public programs is highly restricted compared to Canadians with private drug plans, as well in contrast with public payers in other countries. Each person living with diabetes has different needs, so a “patient-centric” approach ensures treatment focused on individual circumstances. Such tailoring is difficult to achieve, with the linear approach required by public payers. We may be undermining optimal care for PWD because of access policies that are not aligned with individualized approaches – and increasing overall health care costs in the process. The scope of Canada’s diabetes challenge demands holistic and proactive solutions. Canada needs to get out from “behind the eight ball” and get “ahead of the curve” when it comes to diabetes care. Improving access to medications is one of the tools for getting there. Canada’s “call to action” for diabetes starts with effective implementation of existing best practices. A personalized approach to medication access, to meet individual needs and optimize outcomes, is also a key enabler. PWD and

  19. Improving information access for public health professionals.

    PubMed

    Telleen, Sharon; Martin, Elaine

    2002-12-01

    Fundamental to our protection against biological weapons and the detection of disease outbreaks is the need to strengthen our surveillance systems. Improved electronic communications between local, state, and federal public health agencies provide a way for health officials to share information on unusual disease outbreaks and provide important health alert information. This article describes a model of a partnership between a regional medical library of the National Library of Medicine, a school of public health, and federally qualified community health centers. This project upgraded technology and provided public health professional training on Internet information and resources for local public health agencies.

  20. [Palliative care at home, transferring information to emergency medical teams].

    PubMed

    Ribeaucoup, Luc; Roche, Blandine

    2015-11-01

    Many people wish to die at home. However, the end-of-life period can be marked by the occurrence of numerous symptoms causing situations of crisis. Emergency medical teams are therefore frequently called upon. In order to be able to make the right decisions in a short space of time, they must have quick access to all the relevant information. PMID:26567076

  1. Using personal digital assistants to access drug information.

    PubMed

    McCreadie, Scott R; Stevenson, James G; Sweet, Burgunda V; Kramer, Mike

    2002-07-15

    The use of personal digital assistants (PDAs) to access drug information in a health system is described. Given the widespread use of PDAs at an 872-bed university health system, an opportunity existed to provide current drug information to physicians via these devices. As part of the health system's intranet, extensive online content had been made available through a browser; extension to PDAs was a natural next step. There were two primary requirements: the ability to synchronize information with the database server when a PDA was used and the development of content and applications by using existing staff. Mobile enterprise software was chosen that supports multiple PDA platforms, is easy to use, and does not require programming skills. The software works through customized "channels," or collections of information from a content provider. The customized channel service works over the Internet. Two channels of content were created, an ambulatory care channel and an inpatient care channel. The ambulatory care channel contains a list of preferred ambulatory care agents, poison control information, the locations of outpatient pharmacies, drug information, and safety tips for prescribing. The inpatient channel contains the inpatient formulary, current news and events, information on currrent drug shortages and recalls, pharmacy contact information, and medication safety tips. When a user synchronizes his or her PDA, the software contacts the department's intranet servers and processes the request. The data are compressed and downloaded to the user's PDA. A university health system successfully used PDAs to access drug and other information. PMID:12132560

  2. Information Activities in Medical Library : Tokyo Women's Medical College Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishioka, Masayuki

    The library facilities, resource materials, training of librarians and so on are described at first. The library collection is that of middle sized medical library. However, since the facilities are not enough to handle it, it is necessary for the library to be supplemented by information services. Then primary information services such as reading of materials, interlibrary loan and journal acquisition system of the recent issues for each laboratory is outlined. Secondary information services centered around on-line information retrieval service, contents sheet service and preparation of index cards are also described. What a medical library should be is considered in terms of its relation to information services.

  3. Facilitating consumer access to health information.

    PubMed

    Snowdon, Anne; Schnarr, Karin; Alessi, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The lead paper from Zelmer and Hagens details the substantive evolution occurring in health information technologies that has the potential to transform the relationship between consumers, health practitioners and health systems. In this commentary, the authors suggest that Canada is experiencing a shift in consumer behaviour toward a desire to actively manage one's health and wellness that is being facilitated through the advent of health applications on mobile and online technologies platforms. The result is that Canadians are now able to create personalized health solutions based on their individual health values and goals. However, before Canadians are able to derive a personal health benefit from these rapid changes in information technology, they require and are increasingly demanding greater real-time access to their own health information to better inform decision-making, as well as interoperability between their personal health tracking systems and those of their health practitioner team.

  4. Medical information asymmetry in the cyberworld of manuel castells.

    PubMed

    Kasztelowicz, Piotr

    2004-01-01

    Before 1997, the Internet was strongly associated with universities and higher education, including medical research. There were only small virtual communities at that time, but all their members had equal access to the entire body of information placed on the net. Each networking participant was able not only to retrieve but also to create and distribute medical information. This state was a symmetry, of sorts, between passive and active Internet usage. Since that time, however, significant commercialization of the Internet (including the medical domain) has been increasing its asymmetry. We currently observe a division into providers, serving and distributing medical information on the net, and consumers, who receive pre-prepared "products". This brings new challenges for both academic and practicing e-health physicians. First, while all large-scale initiatives to certify medical portals have so far failed, the public must be educated to chose valuable, high quality medical information themselves. Secondly, this imbalance favors abusive commercial behavior, such as spam, spreading viruses and advertising without content-related information. Stimulating a restoration of the previous idea of the Internet for non-profit activities seems to be best way to avoid the continuation of Internet "degeneration". Manuel Castells has defined future industrial and postindustrial progress of humanity as activity in global virtual communities, interchanging ideas, knowledge and information. The role of medical professionals seems to be to educate patients and their families on how to search for quality medical information and to stimulate other medical professionals, researchers as well as patients' supportive groups to be active themselves. Reducing the medical information asymmetry will provide a positive influence on the progress of e-health in the future. Open source software may help reduce costs by creating adequate resources.

  5. Prescription for change: accessing medication in transitional Russia.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Francesca; Balabanova, Dina

    2011-11-01

    BACKGROUND Many Russians experienced difficulty in accessing prescription medication during the widespread health service disruption and rapid socio-economic transition of the 1990s. This paper examines trends and determinants of access in Russia during this period. METHODS Data were from nine rounds (1994-2004) of the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey, a 38-centre household panel survey. Trends were measured in failing to access prescribed medication for the following reasons: unobtainable from a pharmacy, unable to afford and 'other' reasons. Determinants of unaffordability were studied in 1994, 1998 and 2004, using cross-sectional, age-adjusted logistic regression, with further multivariate analyses of unaffordability and failure to access for 'other' reasons in 2004. RESULTS After 1994, reporting of unavailability in pharmacies fell sharply from 25% to 4%. Meanwhile, unaffordability increased to 20% in 1998 but declined to 9% by 2004. In 1994, significant determinants of unaffordability were unemployment and lacking health care insurance in men. By 2004, determinants included low income and material goods in both sexes; rented accommodation and low education in men; and chronic disease and disability-related retirement in women. Not obtaining medicines for 'other' reasons was more likely amongst frequent male drinkers, and low educated or cohabiting women. Regional and gender differences were widest in 1998, coinciding with the Russian financial crisis. CONCLUSIONS Rapid improvements in drug availability in the late 1990s in Russia are a probable consequence of a more liberalized pharmaceutical sector and an improved pharmacy network, whilst later improvements in affordability may relate to expanded health care insurance coverage and economic recovery after the 1998 crash. A significant minority still finds prescription costs problematic, notably poorer and sick individuals, with inequalities apparently widening. Non-monetary determinants of affordability

  6. Giving Patients Access to Their Medical Records via the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Masys, Daniel; Baker, Dixie; Butros, Amy; Cowles, Kevin E.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The Patient-Centered Access to Secure Systems Online (pcasso) project is designed to apply state-of-the-art-security to the communication of clinical information over the Internet. Design: The authors report the legal and regulatory issues associated with deploying the system, and results of its use by providers and patients. Human subject protection concerns raised by the Institutional Review Board focused on three areas—unauthorized access to information by persons other than the patient; the effect of startling or poorly understood information; and the effect of patient access to records on the record-keeping behavior of providers. Measurements: Objective and subjective measures of security and usability were obtained. Results: During its initial deployment phase, the project enrolled 216 physicians and 41 patients; of these, 68 physicians and 26 patients used the system one or more times. The system performed as designed, with no unauthorized information access or intrusions detected. Providers rated the usability of the system low because of the complexity of the secure login and other security features and restrictions limiting their access to those patients with whom they had a professional relationship. In contrast, patients rated the usability and functionality of the system favorably. Conclusion: High-assurance systems that serve both patients and providers will need to address differing expectations regarding security and ease of use. PMID:11861633

  7. New advanced technologies to provide decentralised and secure access to medical records: case studies in oncology.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Allaert, François André; Fassa, Maniane; Bourquard, Karima; Boire, Jean-Yves; de Vlieger, Paul; Maigne, Lydia; Breton, Vincent

    2009-08-07

    The main problem for health professionals and patients in accessing information is that this information is very often distributed over many medical records and locations. This problem is particularly acute in cancerology because patients may be treated for many years and undergo a variety of examinations. Recent advances in technology make it feasible to gain access to medical records anywhere and anytime, allowing the physician or the patient to gather information from an "ephemeral electronic patient record". However, this easy access to data is accompanied by the requirement for improved security (confidentiality, traceability, integrity, ...) and this issue needs to be addressed. In this paper we propose and discuss a decentralised approach based on recent advances in information sharing and protection: Grid technologies and watermarking methodologies. The potential impact of these technologies for oncology is illustrated by the examples of two experimental cases: a cancer surveillance network and a radiotherapy treatment plan. It is expected that the proposed approach will constitute the basis of a future secure "google-like" access to medical records.

  8. New Advanced Technologies to Provide Decentralised and Secure Access to Medical Records: Case Studies in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Quantin, Catherine; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Allaert, François André; Fassa, Maniane; Bourquard, Karima; Boire, Jean-Yves; de Vlieger, Paul; Maigne, Lydia; Breton, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    The main problem for health professionals and patients in accessing information is that this information is very often distributed over many medical records and locations. This problem is particularly acute in cancerology because patients may be treated for many years and undergo a variety of examinations. Recent advances in technology make it feasible to gain access to medical records anywhere and anytime, allowing the physician or the patient to gather information from an “ephemeral electronic patient record”. However, this easy access to data is accompanied by the requirement for improved security (confidentiality, traceability, integrity, ...) and this issue needs to be addressed. In this paper we propose and discuss a decentralised approach based on recent advances in information sharing and protection: Grid technologies and watermarking methodologies. The potential impact of these technologies for oncology is illustrated by the examples of two experimental cases: a cancer surveillance network and a radiotherapy treatment plan. It is expected that the proposed approach will constitute the basis of a future secure “google-like” access to medical records. PMID:19718446

  9. Consumers' Perceptions of Patient-Accessible Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Vaughon, Wendy L; Czaja, Sara J; Levy, Joslyn; Rockoff, Maxine L

    2013-01-01

    Background Electronic health information (eHealth) tools for patients, including patient-accessible electronic medical records (patient portals), are proliferating in health care delivery systems nationally. However, there has been very limited study of the perceived utility and functionality of portals, as well as limited assessment of these systems by vulnerable (low education level, racial/ethnic minority) consumers. Objective The objective of the study was to identify vulnerable consumers’ response to patient portals, their perceived utility and value, as well as their reactions to specific portal functions. Methods This qualitative study used 4 focus groups with 28 low education level, English-speaking consumers in June and July 2010, in New York City. Results Participants included 10 males and 18 females, ranging in age from 21-63 years; 19 non-Hispanic black, 7 Hispanic, 1 non-Hispanic White and 1 Other. None of the participants had higher than a high school level education, and 13 had less than a high school education. All participants had experience with computers and 26 used the Internet. Major themes were enhanced consumer engagement/patient empowerment, extending the doctor’s visit/enhancing communication with health care providers, literacy and health literacy factors, improved prevention and health maintenance, and privacy and security concerns. Consumers were also asked to comment on a number of key portal features. Consumers were most positive about features that increased convenience, such as making appointments and refilling prescriptions. Consumers raised concerns about a number of potential barriers to usage, such as complex language, complex visual layouts, and poor usability features. Conclusions Most consumers were enthusiastic about patient portals and perceived that they had great utility and value. Study findings suggest that for patient portals to be effective for all consumers, portals must be designed to be easy to read, visually

  10. [Automation of medical literature--and information services].

    PubMed

    Bakker, S

    1997-01-01

    It is important for clinical practice to be able to find (or retrieve) relevant literature and to keep informed of the state of medical science. The fact that the contents of articles in journals are now accessible via computers is the result of integration of bibliographic techniques, medical knowledge and computer technology. Articles published in some 5000 medical journals can nowadays be retrieved electronically via Medline and Embase together (but medical literature in Dutch is underrepresented). Computerised insertion of publications into Internet dose not make information traceable or accessible, let alone reliable and readable. It cannot be predicted if electronic versions of scientific periodicals will replace the printed editions completely. However, valuable, reliable information will always have its price, even on Internet. It is unlikely that electronic information published privately (internet) will replace scientific publishers soon, for readers will still want selection and monitoring of contents and language. Good layout, professional typography and suitable illustrations to enhance reading comfort and cognitive processes, will even become more important. The problems arising from the immensity of scientific knowledge are not (any longer) of a technological nature-what is needed is a cultural about-turn of the information infrastructure in medical-scientific associations, organizations and institutions. PMID:9162847

  11. Protecting Privacy in Computerized Medical Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report analyzes the implications of computerized medical information and the challenges it brings to individual privacy. The report examines the nature of the privacy interest in health care information and the current state of the law protecting that information; the nature of proposals to computerize health care information and the…

  12. Medication information management: capturing multiprofessional perspective.

    PubMed

    Luukkonen, Irmeli; Mykkänen, Juha; Kivekäs, Eija; Saranto, Kaija

    2014-01-01

    Medication information management (MIM) is a crucial activity for good quality of medication, but unfortunately not without problems. In order to improve medication information management the core activity of medication as a cooperative activity is to be studied as a whole, and the multiprofessional viewpoint for the improvement needs must be captured. In this paper we present our approach to gain such shared understanding, based on our regional development project experiences in Northern Savonia, Finland. The central features of the approach include thematic interviews supported by activity-driven models and a workshop with professionally mixed groups. Participants agreed strongly on the usefulness of the approach.

  13. Medical devices transition to information systems: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Charters, Kathleen G

    2012-01-01

    Medical devices designed to network can share data with a Clinical Information System (CIS), making that data available within clinician workflow. Some lessons learned by transitioning anesthesia reporting and monitoring devices (ARMDs) on a local area network (LAN) to integration of anesthesia documentation within a CIS include the following categories: access, contracting, deployment, implementation, planning, security, support, training and workflow integration. Areas identified for improvement include: Vendor requirements for access reconciled with the organizations' security policies and procedures. Include clauses supporting transition from stand-alone devices to information integrated into clinical workflow in the medical device procurement contract. Resolve deployment and implementation barriers that make the process less efficient and more costly. Include effective field communication and creative alternatives in planning. Build training on the baseline knowledge of trainees. Include effective help desk processes and metrics. Have a process for determining where problems originate when systems share information. PMID:24199054

  14. Structuring medication related activities for information management.

    PubMed

    Luukkonen, Irmeli; Mykkänen, Juha; Kivekäs, Eija; Saranto, Kaija

    2014-01-01

    Medication treatment and the related information management are central parts of a patient's health care. As a cross-organizational and cooperative process, medication information management is a complex domain for development activities. We studied medication activities and related information management in a regional project in order to produce a shared broad picture of its processes and to understand the main issues and the needs for improvement. In this paper we provide a summary of the findings in a structured form, based on a six-dimensioned framework for design and analysis of activities and processes.

  15. The urban underserved: Attitudes toward gaining full access to electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Walker, Jan; Reisch, Lisa; Oster, Natalia; Delbanco, Thomas; Elmore, Joann

    2012-01-01

    Background As the use of electronic medical records (EMRs) spreads, health care organizations are increasingly offering patients online access to their medical records. Studies evaluating patient attitudes toward viewing elements of their records through secure, electronic patient portals have generally not included medically underserved patients or those with HIV/AIDS. The goal of this study was to gain insight into such patients’ attitudes toward online access to their medical records, including their doctors’ visit notes. Methods Qualitative study of four focus groups with adult patients in general adult medicine and HIV clinics at a large county hospital. Transcripts were analyzed for themes using an immersion/crystallization approach. Results Patients’ baseline understanding of the health record was limited. Perceived benefits of online access were improved patient understanding of health and disease, convenience, empowerment, and a stronger relationship with their provider. Concerns included threats to privacy, worries about being unable to understand their record, fear that the computer would replace direct provider contact, and hesitancy about potential demands on a provider’s time. Patients also recommended providing online visit reminders, links to credible health information, and assistance for paying bills. Conclusion Despite their initial lack of knowledge of the health record, focus group participants were overwhelmingly positive about the prospect of online access to medical records. However, they worried about potential loss of privacy and interference with the patient-provider relationship. As EMRs increasingly offer patients open access to their medical records, vulnerable patient groups will likely join others in desiring and adopting such change, but may need targeted support during times of transition. PMID:22738155

  16. Structuring Broadcast Audio for Information Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauvain, Jean-Luc; Lamel, Lori

    2003-12-01

    One rapidly expanding application area for state-of-the-art speech recognition technology is the automatic processing of broadcast audiovisual data for information access. Since much of the linguistic information is found in the audio channel, speech recognition is a key enabling technology which, when combined with information retrieval techniques, can be used for searching large audiovisual document collections. Audio indexing must take into account the specificities of audio data such as needing to deal with the continuous data stream and an imperfect word transcription. Other important considerations are dealing with language specificities and facilitating language portability. At Laboratoire d'Informatique pour la Mécanique et les Sciences de l'Ingénieur (LIMSI), broadcast news transcription systems have been developed for seven languages: English, French, German, Mandarin, Portuguese, Spanish, and Arabic. The transcription systems have been integrated into prototype demonstrators for several application areas such as audio data mining, structuring audiovisual archives, selective dissemination of information, and topic tracking for media monitoring. As examples, this paper addresses the spoken document retrieval and topic tracking tasks.

  17. Trends in medical information retrieval on Internet.

    PubMed

    Baujard, O; Baujard, V; Aurel, S; Boyer, C; Appel, R D

    1998-09-01

    Information on the World Wide Web is unstructured, distributed, multimedia and multilingual. Many tools have been developed to help users search for useful information: subject hierarchies, general search engines, browsers and search assistants. Although helpful, they present serious limitations, mainly in terms of precision, multilingual indexing and distribution. In this paper, we cover some on-line solutions to medical information discovery and present our own approach, the MARVIN (multi-agent retrieval vagabond on information network) project, which tackles medical information research with specialized cooperative retrieval agents. We also draw some outlines for future extensions. PMID:9861514

  18. Prescription for change: accessing medication in transitional Russia

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Francesca; Balabanova, Dina

    2011-01-01

    Background Many Russians experienced difficulty in accessing prescription medication during the widespread health service disruption and rapid socio-economic transition of the 1990s. This paper examines trends and determinants of access in Russia during this period. Methods Data were from nine rounds (1994–2004) of the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey, a 38-centre household panel survey. Trends were measured in failing to access prescribed medication for the following reasons: unobtainable from a pharmacy, unable to afford and ‘other’ reasons. Determinants of unaffordability were studied in 1994, 1998 and 2004, using cross-sectional, age-adjusted logistic regression, with further multivariate analyses of unaffordability and failure to access for ‘other’ reasons in 2004. Results After 1994, reporting of unavailability in pharmacies fell sharply from 25% to 4%. Meanwhile, unaffordability increased to 20% in 1998 but declined to 9% by 2004. In 1994, significant determinants of unaffordability were unemployment and lacking health care insurance in men. By 2004, determinants included low income and material goods in both sexes; rented accommodation and low education in men; and chronic disease and disability-related retirement in women. Not obtaining medicines for ‘other’ reasons was more likely amongst frequent male drinkers, and low educated or cohabiting women. Regional and gender differences were widest in 1998, coinciding with the Russian financial crisis. Conclusions Rapid improvements in drug availability in the late 1990s in Russia are a probable consequence of a more liberalized pharmaceutical sector and an improved pharmacy network, whilst later improvements in affordability may relate to expanded health care insurance coverage and economic recovery after the 1998 crash. A significant minority still finds prescription costs problematic, notably poorer and sick individuals, with inequalities apparently widening. Non-monetary determinants of

  19. Accessing Genetic Information with Liquid Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xuyu; Janku, Filip; Zhan, Qimin; Fan, Jian-Bing

    2015-10-01

    Recent scientific advances in understanding circulating tumor cells, cell-free DNA/RNA, and exosomes in blood have laid a solid foundation for the development of routine molecular 'liquid biopsies'. This approach provides non-invasive access to genetic information--somatic mutations, epigenetic changes, and differential expression--about the physiological conditions of our body and diseases. It opens a valuable avenue for future genetic studies and human disease diagnosis, including prenatal and neurodegenerative disease diagnosis, as well as for cancer screening and monitoring. With the rapid development of highly sensitive and accurate technologies such as next-generation sequencing, molecular 'liquid biopsies' will quickly become a central piece in the future of precision medicine.

  20. Steganography-based access control to medical data hidden in electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Mai, Vu; Khalil, Ibrahim; Ibaida, Ayman

    2013-01-01

    Steganographic techniques allow secret data to be embedded inside another host data such as an image or a text file without significant changes to the quality of the host data. In this research, we demonstrate how steganography can be used as the main mechanism to build an access control model that gives data owners complete control to their sensitive cardiac health information hidden in their own Electrocardiograms. Our access control model is able to protect the privacy of users, the confidentiality of medical data, reduce storage space and make it more efficient to upload and download large amount of data.

  1. Steganography-based access control to medical data hidden in electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Mai, Vu; Khalil, Ibrahim; Ibaida, Ayman

    2013-01-01

    Steganographic techniques allow secret data to be embedded inside another host data such as an image or a text file without significant changes to the quality of the host data. In this research, we demonstrate how steganography can be used as the main mechanism to build an access control model that gives data owners complete control to their sensitive cardiac health information hidden in their own Electrocardiograms. Our access control model is able to protect the privacy of users, the confidentiality of medical data, reduce storage space and make it more efficient to upload and download large amount of data. PMID:24109934

  2. Medical Information & Technology: Rapidly Expanding Vast Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Anil K.

    2012-12-01

    During ÑMedical Council Of India?, Platinum Jubilee Year (1933-2008) Celebrations, In Year 2008, Several Scientific Meeting/Seminar/Symposium, On Various Topics Of Contemporary Importance And Relevance In The Field Of ÑMedical Education And Ethics?, Were Organized, By Different Medical Colleges At Various Local, State, National Levels. The Present Discussion, Is An Comprehensive Summary Of Various Different Aspects of ìMedical Information Communication Technologyî, Especially UseFul For The Audience Stratum Group Of Those Amateur Medical & Paramedical Staff, With No Previous Work Experience Knowledge Of Computronics Applications. Outlining The, i.Administration Applications: Medical Records Etc, ii. Clinical Applications: Pros pective Scope Of TeleMedicine Applicabilities Etc iii. Other Applications: Efforts To Augment Improvement Of Medical Education, Medical Presentations, Medical Education And Research Etc. ÑMedical Trancription? & Related Recent Study Fields e.g ÑModern Pharmaceuticals?,ÑBio-Engineering?, ÑBio-Mechanics?, ÑBio-Technology? Etc., Along With Important Aspects Of Computers-General Considerations, Computer Ergonomics Assembled To Summarize, The AwareNess Regarding Basic Fundamentals Of Medical Computronics & Its Practically SuccessFul Utilities.

  3. [A medical consumable material management information system].

    PubMed

    Tang, Guoping; Hu, Liang

    2014-05-01

    Medical consumables material is essential supplies to carry out medical work, which has a wide range of varieties and a large amount of usage. How to manage it feasibly and efficiently that has been a topic of concern to everyone. This article discussed about how to design a medical consumable material management information system that has a set of standardized processes, bring together medical supplies administrator, suppliers and clinical departments. Advanced management mode, enterprise resource planning (ERP) applied to the whole system design process. PMID:25241525

  4. A patient privacy protection scheme for medical information system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chenglang; Wu, Zongda; Liu, Mingyong; Chen, Wei; Guo, Junfang

    2013-12-01

    In medical information systems, there are a lot of confidential information about patient privacy. It is therefore an important problem how to prevent patient's personal privacy information from being disclosed. Although traditional security protection strategies (such as identity authentication and authorization access control) can well ensure data integrity, they cannot prevent system's internal staff (such as administrators) from accessing and disclosing patient privacy information. In this paper, we present an effective scheme to protect patients' personal privacy for a medical information system. In the scheme, privacy data before being stored in the database of the server of a medical information system would be encrypted using traditional encryption algorithms, so that the data even if being disclosed are also difficult to be decrypted and understood. However, to execute various kinds of query operations over the encrypted data efficiently, we would also augment the encrypted data with additional index, so as to process as much of the query as possible at the server side, without the need to decrypt the data. Thus, in this paper, we mainly explore how the index of privacy data is constructed, and how a query operation over privacy data is translated into a new query over the corresponding index so that it can be executed at the server side immediately. Finally, both theoretical analysis and experimental evaluation validate the practicality and effectiveness of our proposed scheme.

  5. A patient privacy protection scheme for medical information system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chenglang; Wu, Zongda; Liu, Mingyong; Chen, Wei; Guo, Junfang

    2013-12-01

    In medical information systems, there are a lot of confidential information about patient privacy. It is therefore an important problem how to prevent patient's personal privacy information from being disclosed. Although traditional security protection strategies (such as identity authentication and authorization access control) can well ensure data integrity, they cannot prevent system's internal staff (such as administrators) from accessing and disclosing patient privacy information. In this paper, we present an effective scheme to protect patients' personal privacy for a medical information system. In the scheme, privacy data before being stored in the database of the server of a medical information system would be encrypted using traditional encryption algorithms, so that the data even if being disclosed are also difficult to be decrypted and understood. However, to execute various kinds of query operations over the encrypted data efficiently, we would also augment the encrypted data with additional index, so as to process as much of the query as possible at the server side, without the need to decrypt the data. Thus, in this paper, we mainly explore how the index of privacy data is constructed, and how a query operation over privacy data is translated into a new query over the corresponding index so that it can be executed at the server side immediately. Finally, both theoretical analysis and experimental evaluation validate the practicality and effectiveness of our proposed scheme. PMID:24166018

  6. Access to medical care under Medicaid: differentials by race.

    PubMed

    Link, C R; Long, S H; Settle, R F

    1982-01-01

    The Medicaid program was designed to help correct for the unequal access to medical care by income and race in pre-1965 America. Previous evaluations of the program have claimed that on average the eligible poor have enjoyed considerable gains in access, but that the benefits of Medicaid have not been shared equally by blacks and whites. We reexamined the evidence on differential access by race early in the program (1969) and evaluate that claim for the mature program (1976). Our evaluation is conducted within the context of multivariate models of physician and hospital utilization designed to control for a variety of socioeconomic, health status, and resource supply characteristics. While earlier evaluations overstated the extent of racial differentials in 1969, blacks who were not chronically ill had significantly lower levels of ambulatory care--both within and outside of the South. Between 1969 and 1976 all race, region, and health status groups of nonelderly Medicaid recipients experienced increases in physician visits that far outpaced those of the entire nonelderly U.S. population. By 1976 blacks clearly achieved equality with whites in Medicaid ambulatory care use. The only statistically significant shortfall we find is in hospital utilization among Southern blacks in good health.

  7. [Information safety test of digital medical device].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiong

    2014-07-01

    According to the background of the age of big data, the medical devices are informatized, we analyze the safety and efficiency for the information and data of digital medical devices or medical systems, also discussed some test methods. Lack of a suitable standard system of digital medical devices is a big problem both for domain standard and international standard. GB25000.51 is too ambiguous and free for testing, also not very operational. So this paper suggested some test advices and some prospective method. These test methods are helpful for finding the problem and performing the standards. What's more, these methods are famous in the world and used widely in the 3C region but just start in the medical region, which can promote the development of the medical devices. PMID:25330611

  8. Data and Information Access Link (DIAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, R.; Di, L.; McDonald, K.

    2001-05-01

    The Data and Information Access Link (DIAL) is a web based package of software tools for geospatial data storage, visualization and distribution. The DIAL software provides a web based easy to use software solution to small data producers to organize and distribute remote sensing data and metadata. DIAL system can handle heterogeneous types of remote sensing and field campaign data for Earth science applications. DIAL works with image data, grid, swath, and tabular, multidimensional array and point data. The DIAL system supports NASA's Earth Observing System and Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data standards HDF- EOS, Hierarchical Data Format (HDF), and network Common Data Format (netCDF). Data format translators are also available between HDF-EOS and Arc-Info, Geo-tiff, and shape formats. DIAL software works with data from the EOS Terra, LANDSAT 7, TRMM, SeaWiFS missions and many other types of legacy data from NASA. DIAL software is freely available for users. DIAL features: Catalog services: Spatial, temporal, and parameter-based search; Catalog search at inventory and directory levels; Automatic creation of metadata catalog; Supports ODBC/JDBC compatible databases for storing metadata/catalog; User-friendly Java search interface with query preview. Data services: On-line access to data and metadata; Single- and multi-granule subsetting and sub sampling based on array coordinates or record numbers; Single- and multi-granule sub setting and sub sampling based on geographic/map coordinates and physical parameters; Browse and dynamic/interactive visualization of data; Animation of time series or multi dimensional data; Interactive color composites of multi-spectral data; Overlay of coastal and political boundaries; On-line downloading of data in multiple formats; X-Y plotting for non-image data. DIAL can work as a standalone application or in a distributed environment. DIAL is integrated with NASA's Earth Science Data Gateway (EDG) providing support for the

  9. Information and informatics literacies of first-year medical students

    PubMed Central

    Bouquin, Daina R.; Tmanova, Lyubov L.; Wright, Drew

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The study evaluated medical students' familiarity with information literacy and informatics during the health sciences library orientation. Methods A survey was fielded at the start of the 2013 school year. Results Seventy-two of 77 students (94%) completed the survey. Over one-half (57%) expected to use library research materials and services. About half (43%) expected to use library physical space. Students preferred accessing biomedical research on laptops and learning via online-asynchronous modes. Conclusions The library identified areas for service development and outreach to medical students and academic departments. PMID:26512221

  10. 21 CFR 1401.4 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Access to information. 1401.4 Section 1401.4 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION § 1401.4 Access to information. The Office of National Drug Control Policy makes available information pertaining to...

  11. System architecture and information model for integrated access to distributed biomedical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongkyu; Alaoui, Adil; Levine, Betty; Leondaridis, Leonidas; Shields, Peter; Byers, Steve; Cleary, Kevin

    2009-02-01

    The current trend towards systems medicine will rely heavily on computational and bioinformatics capabilities to collect, integrate, and analyze massive amounts of data from disparate sources. The objective is to use this information to make medical decisions that improve patient care. At Georgetown University Medical Center, we are developing an informatics capability to integrate several research and clinical databases. Our long term goal is to provide researchers at Georgetown's Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center better access to aggregated molecular and clinical information facilitating the investigation of new hypotheses that impact patient care. We also recognize the need for data mining tools and intelligent agents to help researchers in these efforts. This paper describes our initial work to create a flexible platform for researchers and physicians that provides access to information sources including clinical records, medical images, genomic, epigenomic, proteomic and metabolomic data. This paper describes the data sources selected for this pilot project and possible approaches to integrating these databases. We present the different database integration models that we considered. We conclude by outlining the proposed Information Model for the project.

  12. Physician Internet Medical Information Seeking and On-line Continuing Education Use Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casebeer, Linda; Bennett, Nancy; Kristofco, Robert; Carillo, Anna; Centor, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 2,200 physicians indicated that nearly all have Internet access and use it primarily for medical information and professional development, not for communicating with patients. Credibility of source, speed, accessibility, and searching ease were most important. Barriers included information overload and too little information…

  13. Indexing the medical open access literature for textual and content-based visual retrieval.

    PubMed

    Eggel, Ivan; Müller, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few years an increasing amount of scientific journals have been created in an open access format. Particularly in the medical field the number of openly accessible journals is enormous making a wide body of knowledge available for analysis and retrieval. Part of the trend towards open access publications can be linked to funding bodies such as the NIH1 (National Institutes of Health) and the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF2) requiring funded projects to make all articles of funded research available publicly. This article describes an approach to make part of the knowledge of open access journals available for retrieval including the textual information but also the images contained in the articles. For this goal all articles of 24 journals related to medical informatics and medical imaging were crawled from the web pages of BioMed Central. Text and images of the PDF (Portable Document Format) files were indexed separately and a web-based retrieval interface allows for searching via keyword queries or by visual similarity queries. Starting point for a visual similarity query can be an image on the local hard disk that is uploaded or any image found via the textual search. Search for similar documents is also possible.

  14. Medical information privacy and the conduct of biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Korn, D

    2000-10-01

    Profound changes in the health care delivery system, the increasing pervasiveness of information technology, and dramatic advancements in research in human genetics are intensifying public concerns about the privacy of medical information. The author argues that some of these concerns, such as the fear that medical data could be used to deny health insurance or employment, are "pragmatic" and can be dealt with through the political process. But other, "ideologic" concerns tend to generate strong emotions and political positions that impede rational discourse and confound attempts to seek workable compromises. He stresses that the progress of medicine has long depended on studies of collections of empirical data about individuals, and discusses the federal oversight of research involving human subjects, including provisions in place to protect their privacy and maintain the confidentiality of data while at the same time permitting necessary access to data for research. He suggests that since every individual benefits from the accumulated medical knowledge base, everyone should contribute to the ongoing expansion and renewal of that base. The author then states nine principles crafted at the Association of American Medical Colleges to guide its thinking and advocacy efforts regarding medical-information privacy issues. (For example, "the free flow of identifiable medical information within the boundaries of the health care system is essential to the optimum provision of patient care and its payment.") He acknowledges that the flows and uses of identifiable patient information within our complex health care and research systems are bewildering and hard to explain to the public, which is deeply concerned about privacy in general, and especially medical information privacy. How to address this concern and at the same time protect the completeness, accuracy, and integrity of the medical record? The author offers no specific answers beyond those embodied in the AAMC

  15. How to use information technology to improve medication safety.

    PubMed

    Winter, A; Hilgers, R-D; Hofestädt, R; Knaup-Gregori, P; Ose, C; Timmer, A

    2014-01-01

    The publication of a memorandum on improving medication safety by information technology in both the German journal GMS Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (MIBE) and the journal Methods of Information in Medicine (MIM) gives reason to strengthen cooperation of MIBE and MIM and to report on more publications of MIBE here. The publications in focus deal with simulation-based optimization of emergency processes, handling of research data in publications, open access to research metadata, reliability of digital patient records in medical research, assessment methods for physical activity, using of insurance databases for epidemiological studies, certificates for epidemiological professionals, regression models, computer based training, and performance management in Swiss hospitals. Finally determining factors for scientific careers are discussed. PMID:25308917

  16. The medical librarian as chief information officer.

    PubMed Central

    Greer, M C

    1998-01-01

    The position of chief information officer (CIO) is gaining popularity, especially in the health care field. The results of an informal electronic and telephone survey indicate that few medical librarians have made a career move to CIO even though this might seem like a logical step. This paper examines the qualities required of an effective information management executive, the role CIOs play within organizations, and the career advancement strategies for librarians interested in becoming CIOs. Questionnaire responses are reported from three medical librarians who have made the transition to CIO-type positions, and a case study illustrates the responsibilities of CIOs in health care organizations. PMID:9549017

  17. Development of digital dashboard system for medical practice: maximizing efficiency of medical information retrieval and communication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kee Hyuck; Yoo, Sooyoung; Shin, HoGyun; Baek, Rong-Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Hwang, Hee

    2013-01-01

    It is reported that digital dashboard systems in hospitals provide a user interface (UI) that can centrally manage and retrieve various information related to patients in a single screen, support the decision-making of medical professionals on a real time basis by integrating the scattered medical information systems and core work flows, enhance the competence and decision-making ability of medical professionals, and reduce the probability of misdiagnosis. However, the digital dashboard systems of hospitals reported to date have some limitations when medical professionals use them to generally treat inpatients, because those were limitedly used for the work process of certain departments or developed to improve specific disease-related indicators. Seoul National University Bundang Hospital developed a new concept of EMR system to overcome such limitations. The system allows medical professionals to easily access all information on inpatients and effectively retrieve important information from any part of the hospital by displaying inpatient information in the form of digital dashboard. In this study, we would like to introduce the structure, development methodology and the usage of our new concept.

  18. User-Centered Indexing for Adaptive Information Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, James R.; Mathe, Nathalie

    1996-01-01

    We are focusing on information access tasks characterized by large volume of hypermedia connected technical documents, a need for rapid and effective access to familiar information, and long-term interaction with evolving information. The problem for technical users is to build and maintain a personalized task-oriented model of the information to quickly access relevant information. We propose a solution which provides user-centered adaptive information retrieval and navigation. This solution supports users in customizing information access over time. It is complementary to information discovery methods which provide access to new information, since it lets users customize future access to previously found information. It relies on a technique, called Adaptive Relevance Network, which creates and maintains a complex indexing structure to represent personal user's information access maps organized by concepts. This technique is integrated within the Adaptive HyperMan system, which helps NASA Space Shuttle flight controllers organize and access large amount of information. It allows users to select and mark any part of a document as interesting, and to index that part with user-defined concepts. Users can then do subsequent retrieval of marked portions of documents. This functionality allows users to define and access personal collections of information, which are dynamically computed. The system also supports collaborative review by letting users share group access maps. The adaptive relevance network provides long-term adaptation based both on usage and on explicit user input. The indexing structure is dynamic and evolves over time. Leading and generalization support flexible retrieval of information under similar concepts. The network is geared towards more recent information access, and automatically manages its size in order to maintain rapid access when scaling up to large hypermedia space. We present results of simulated learning experiments.

  19. Use and perceptions of information among family physicians: sources considered accessible, relevant, and reliable

    PubMed Central

    Kosteniuk, Julie G.; Morgan, Debra G.; D'Arcy, Carl K.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The research determined (1) the information sources that family physicians (FPs) most commonly use to update their general medical knowledge and to make specific clinical decisions, and (2) the information sources FPs found to be most physically accessible, intellectually accessible (easy to understand), reliable (trustworthy), and relevant to their needs. Methods: A cross-sectional postal survey of 792 FPs and locum tenens, in full-time or part-time medical practice, currently practicing or on leave of absence in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan was conducted during the period of January to April 2008. Results: Of 666 eligible physicians, 331 completed and returned surveys, resulting in a response rate of 49.7% (331/666). Medical textbooks and colleagues in the main patient care setting were the top 2 sources for the purpose of making specific clinical decisions. Medical textbooks were most frequently considered by FPs to be reliable (trustworthy), and colleagues in the main patient care setting were most physically accessible (easy to access). Conclusions: When making specific clinical decisions, FPs were most likely to use information from sources that they considered to be reliable and generally physically accessible, suggesting that FPs can best be supported by facilitating easy and convenient access to high-quality information. PMID:23405045

  20. In emergency departments, radiologists' access to EHRs may influence interpretations and medical management.

    PubMed

    Franczak, Michael J; Klein, Madeline; Raslau, Flavius; Bergholte, Jo; Mark, Leighton P; Ulmer, John L

    2014-05-01

    The adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) that meet federal meaningful-use standards is a major US national policy priority. Policy makers recognize the potential of electronic communication in delivering high-quality health care, particularly in an environment of expanding remote access to medical care and the ever-increasing need to transmit health care records across institutions. To demonstrate this principle, we sought to estimate the significance of EHR access in emergent neuroradiologic interpretations. Three neuroradiologists conducted a prospective expert-rater analysis of 2,000 consecutive head computed tomography (CT) exams ordered by emergency department (ED) physicians. For each head CT exam, the neuroradiologists compared medical information generated by ED physicians to information generated by the interpreting radiologists who had access to additional EHR-derived patient data. In 6.1 percent of the head CT exams, the neuroradiologists reached consensus--meaning two out of three agreed--that the additional clinical data derived from the EHR was "very likely" to influence radiological interpretations and that the lack of that data would have adversely affected medical management in those patients. Health care providers must recognize the value of implementing EHRs and foster their widespread adoption.

  1. Accessible information for people with complex communication needs.

    PubMed

    Owens, Janet S

    2006-09-01

    Information can be empowering if it is accessible. While a number of known information access barriers have been reported for the broader group of people with disabilities, specific information issues for people with complex communication needs have not been previously reported. In this consumer-focused study, the accessibility of information design and dissemination practices were discussed by 17 people with complex communication needs; by eight parents, advocates, therapists, and agency representatives in focus groups; and by seven individuals in individual interviews. Participants explored issues and made recommendations for content, including language, visual and audio supports; print accessibility; physical access; and human support for information access. Consumer-generated accessibility guidelines were an outcome of this study.

  2. 75 FR 65013 - Access in Litigation to Confidential Business Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... AGENCY Access in Litigation to Confidential Business Information AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (``EPA''). ACTION: Notice of Transfer of Information Claimed as Confidential Business Information to the United States Department of Justice and Parties to Certain Litigation. SUMMARY: The EPA has...

  3. Internet access to a medical case repository for teaching and analysis.

    PubMed

    Kindler, H; Fliedner, T M; Densow, D

    1997-01-01

    The acute radiation syndrome is a rare disease. Teaching its treatment and the achievement of scientific progress require a sufficient number of accessible case histories. An information system for standardized recording of acute radiation syndrome case histories has been established in the framework of the World Health Organization Radiation Medical Emergency Preparedness and Assistance Network Centers. The information system has been realized in client/server architecture. The centers are able to access the database by easy to use graphical user interfaces via the Internet. Focusing on optimization of network traffic and flexible information retrieval the hypertext transfer protocol has not been applied. At the moment the system is tested on the campus of the University of Ulm before it will be installed at the other centers. PMID:9357685

  4. Management information system of medical equipment using mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, C.; Castro, D.

    2011-09-01

    The large numbers of technologies currently incorporated into mobile devices transform them into excellent tools for capture and to manage the information, because of the increasing computing power and storage that allow to add many miscellaneous applications. In order to obtain benefits of these technologies, in the biomedical engineering field, it was developed a mobile information system for medical equipment management. The central platform for the system it's a mobile phone, which by a connection with a web server, it's capable to send and receive information relative to any medical equipment. Decoding a type of barcodes, known as QR-Codes, the management process is simplified and improved. These barcodes identified the medical equipments in a database, when these codes are photographed and decoded with the mobile device, you can access to relevant information about the medical equipment in question. This Project in it's actual state is a basic support tool for the maintenance of medical equipment. It is also a modern alternative, competitive and economic in the actual market.

  5. Ethics and access to teaching materials in the medical library.

    PubMed

    Atlas, M C

    2000-01-01

    The American Library Association's Library Bill of Rights states that "Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation." Medical ethicists question the use of data derived from experimentation that may have involved inhuman and degrading treatment of subjects or disrespect of a human corpse. Thus conflict between the upholding of ethical standards of research and freedom of information occurs. This conflict was brought to attention of the medical and library communities when journal articles purported that the source of the subjects for the illustrations in the classic anatomy atlas, Eduard Pernkopf's Topographische Anatomie des Menschen, were victims of the Nazi holocaust. While there has never been any dispute about the accuracy or educational value of the work, efforts were made to remove the book from medical libraries. Were these efforts a violation of the Library Bill of Rights or is it the responsibility of the library to discard those items that do not meet current standards of medical ethics? Librarians made different choices about what to do with the controversial Pernkopf title.

  6. A Framework for Medical Information Science

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Bruce

    1983-01-01

    The Seventh Annual Symposium for Computer Applications in Medical Care has sponsored a one day, limited attendance workshop to discuss the topic: A Framework for Medical Information Science. Participation was limited to approximately fifty people. Each attendee prepared either a paper or a working statement before the workshop; these documents will be revised following the workshop for publication. This session will contain a review of the workshop by some of its participants. An extract from the call for participation follows.

  7. SIPP ACCESS: Information Tools Improve Access to National Longitudinal Panel Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbin, Alice; David, Martin

    1988-01-01

    A computer-based, integrated information system incorporating data and information about the data, SIPP ACCESS systematically links technologies of laser disk, mainframe computer, microcomputer, and electronic networks, and applies relational technology to provide access to information about complex statistical data collections. Examples are given…

  8. 5 CFR 293.504 - Composition of, and access to, the Employee Medical File System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Composition of, and access to, the Employee Medical File System. 293.504 Section 293.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Composition of, and access to, the Employee Medical File System. (a) All employee occupational medical...

  9. 5 CFR 293.504 - Composition of, and access to, the Employee Medical File System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Composition of, and access to, the Employee Medical File System. 293.504 Section 293.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Composition of, and access to, the Employee Medical File System. (a) All employee occupational medical...

  10. 5 CFR 293.504 - Composition of, and access to, the Employee Medical File System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Composition of, and access to, the Employee Medical File System. 293.504 Section 293.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Composition of, and access to, the Employee Medical File System. (a) All employee occupational medical...

  11. The contextual nature of medical information.

    PubMed

    Berg, M; Goorman, E

    1999-12-01

    Successful design of information systems in health care starts with a thorough understanding of the practices in which the systems are to function. In this paper, we discuss the nature of 'medical information' from a sociological perspective. We focus on the (im)possibilities of the utilization of primary health care data for secondary purposes such as research and administration. In much of the literature on EPRs, this secondary utilization is only seen to depend on the question whether the IT connections are in place. It is then simply a matter of selecting which information to transport and to where. In this article, we argue that this view of medical information is mistaken. Information should be conceptualized as always entangled with the context of its production. The disentangling of information from its production context is possible, but that entails work. We propose the following 'law of medical information': the further information has to be able to circulate (i.e. the more diverse contexts it has to be usable in), the more work is required to disentangle the information from the context of its production. The question that then becomes pertinent is; who has to do this work, and who reaps the benefits?

  12. Medication information for patients with limited English proficiency: lessons from the European Union.

    PubMed

    Regenstein, Marsha; Andres, Ellie; Nelson, Dylan; David, Stephanie; Lopert, Ruth; Katz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Misuse or misunderstanding of medication information is a common and costly problem in the U.S. The risks of misunderstanding medication information are compounded for the large and growing population of individuals with limited English proficiency that often lacks access to this information in their own language. This paper examines practices related to translation of medication information in the European Union that may serve as a model for future U.S. policy efforts to improve the quality and availability of medication information for individuals with limited English proficiency.

  13. Patients, privacy and trust: patients' willingness to allow researchers to access their medical records.

    PubMed

    Damschroder, Laura J; Pritts, Joy L; Neblo, Michael A; Kalarickal, Rosemarie J; Creswell, John W; Hayward, Rodney A

    2007-01-01

    The federal Privacy Rule, implemented in the United States in 2003, as part of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), created new restrictions on the release of medical information for research. Many believe that its restrictions have fallen disproportionately on researchers prompting some to call for changes to the Rule. Here we ask what patients think about researchers' access to medical records, and what influences these opinions. A sample of 217 patients from 4 Veteran Affairs (VA) facilities deliberated in small groups at each location with the opportunity to question experts and inform themselves about privacy issues related to medical records research. After extensive deliberation, these patients were united in their inclination to share their medical records for research. Yet they were also united in their recommendations to institute procedures that would give them more control over whether and how their medical records are used for research. We integrated qualitative and quantitative results to derive a better understanding of this apparent paradox. Our findings can best be presented as answers to questions related to five dimensions of trust: Patients' trust in VA researchers was the most powerful determinant of the kind of control they want over their medical records. More specifically, those who had lower trust in VA researchers were more likely to recommend a more stringent process for obtaining individual consent. Insights on the critical role of trust suggest actions that researchers and others can take to more fully engage patients in research.

  14. Enhancing access to health information in Africa: a librarian's perspective.

    PubMed

    Gathoni, Nasra

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, tremendous progress has been made toward providing health information in Africa, in part because of technological advancements. Nevertheless, ensuring that information is accessible, comprehensible, and usable remains problematic, and there remain needs in many settings to address issues such as computer skills, literacy, and the infrastructure to access information. To determine how librarians might play a more strategic role in meeting information needs of health professionals in Africa, the author reviewed key components of information systems pertinent to knowledge management for the health sector, including access to global online resources, capacity to use computer technology for information retrieval, information literacy, and the potential for professional networks to play a role in improving access to and use of information. The author concluded that, in regions that lack adequate information systems, librarians could apply their knowledge and skills to facilitate access and use by information seekers. Ensuring access to and use of health information can also be achieved by engaging organizations and associations working to enhance access to health information, such as the Association for Health Information and Libraries in Africa. These groups can provide assistance through training, dissemination, information repackaging, and other approaches known to improve information literacy.

  15. Enhancing access to health information in Africa: a librarian's perspective.

    PubMed

    Gathoni, Nasra

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, tremendous progress has been made toward providing health information in Africa, in part because of technological advancements. Nevertheless, ensuring that information is accessible, comprehensible, and usable remains problematic, and there remain needs in many settings to address issues such as computer skills, literacy, and the infrastructure to access information. To determine how librarians might play a more strategic role in meeting information needs of health professionals in Africa, the author reviewed key components of information systems pertinent to knowledge management for the health sector, including access to global online resources, capacity to use computer technology for information retrieval, information literacy, and the potential for professional networks to play a role in improving access to and use of information. The author concluded that, in regions that lack adequate information systems, librarians could apply their knowledge and skills to facilitate access and use by information seekers. Ensuring access to and use of health information can also be achieved by engaging organizations and associations working to enhance access to health information, such as the Association for Health Information and Libraries in Africa. These groups can provide assistance through training, dissemination, information repackaging, and other approaches known to improve information literacy. PMID:22724668

  16. A Cloud Computing Based Patient Centric Medical Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ankur; Henehan, Nathan; Somashekarappa, Vivek; Pandya, A. S.; Kalva, Hari; Furht, Borko

    This chapter discusses an emerging concept of a cloud computing based Patient Centric Medical Information System framework that will allow various authorized users to securely access patient records from various Care Delivery Organizations (CDOs) such as hospitals, urgent care centers, doctors, laboratories, imaging centers among others, from any location. Such a system must seamlessly integrate all patient records including images such as CT-SCANS and MRI'S which can easily be accessed from any location and reviewed by any authorized user. In such a scenario the storage and transmission of medical records will have be conducted in a totally secure and safe environment with a very high standard of data integrity, protecting patient privacy and complying with all Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations.

  17. Government Information Access: A decisive Factor for E-Government

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yikun; Huang, Cui

    In recent years we are witnessing enormous development of e-government, which has brought about great changes in our society. This study examines the relationship between the levels of e-government and the quality of government information access, pointing out that e-government principles are based on the assumption that government information should be accessed among all kinds of organizations. In contrast to government webs' rapid growth, the low quality of government information access has been a dilemma which impacts the usability and efficiency of e-government. This paper also analyzes blocking factors about information access in China, draw a conclusion that on-line government information access should be the key factor of e-government which steps should be taken to enhance accessibility to government information.

  18. 7 CFR 3402.22 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3402.22 Section 3402.22 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD... GRANTS PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3402.22 Access to peer review information. After...

  19. 7 CFR 3406.23 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3406.23 Section... PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3406.23 Access to peer review information. After final decisions have... the peer reviewers, will be made available to the respective principal investigator/project...

  20. 7 CFR 3405.16 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3405.16 Section... Supplementary Information § 3405.16 Access to peer review information. After final decisions have been announced.... Verbatim copies of summary reviews, not including the identity of the peer reviewers, will be...

  1. 7 CFR 3402.22 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3402.22 Section 3402.22 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD... GRANTS PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3402.22 Access to peer review information. After...

  2. 7 CFR 3402.22 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3402.22 Section 3402.22 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD... GRANTS PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3402.22 Access to peer review information. After...

  3. 39 CFR 958.11 - Respondent's access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Respondent's access to information. 958.11 Section... § 958.11 Respondent's access to information. Except as provided in this section, after receiving the... Determining Official under 39 U.S.C. 3018, and all exculpatory information in the possession of...

  4. Open Access and Civic Scientific Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuccala, Alesia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: We examine how residents and citizens of The Netherlands perceive open access to acquire preliminary insight into the role it might play in cultivating civic scientific literacy. Open access refers to scientific or scholarly research literature available on the Web to scholars and the general public in free online journals and…

  5. Computers, health care, and medical information science.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, T L; Korpman, R A

    1980-10-17

    The clinical laboratory is examined as a microcosm of the entire health care delivery system. The introduction of computers into the clinical laboratory raises issues that are difficult to resolve by the methods of information science or medical science applied in isolation. The melding of these two disciplines, together with the contributions of other disciplines, has created a new field of study called medical information science. The emergence of this new discipline and some specific problem-solving approaches used in its application in the clinical laboratory are examined.

  6. Medical information retrieval and WWW browsers at Mayo.

    PubMed Central

    Chute, C. G.; Crowson, D. L.; Buntrock, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    Medical information retrieval from "Master Sheet" entries specially indexed for research retrieval has been part of the Mayo culture since 1909. Providing easy to use and universally available WWW access to these and other patient information databases at Mayo via browsers, shines a bright light on issues of privacy and confidentiality, user authentication, need to know, data transmission security, and technical details of interfacing disparate databases on a spectrum of platforms to many types of workstations using a variety of browsers. We review our recent experience, and generalize pertinent issues. PMID:8563423

  7. Medical information retrieval and WWW browsers at Mayo.

    PubMed

    Chute, C G; Crowson, D L; Buntrock, J D

    1995-01-01

    Medical information retrieval from "Master Sheet" entries specially indexed for research retrieval has been part of the Mayo culture since 1909. Providing easy to use and universally available WWW access to these and other patient information databases at Mayo via browsers, shines a bright light on issues of privacy and confidentiality, user authentication, need to know, data transmission security, and technical details of interfacing disparate databases on a spectrum of platforms to many types of workstations using a variety of browsers. We review our recent experience, and generalize pertinent issues.

  8. 32 CFR 310.17 - Individual access to personal information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (32 CFR part 286). If the system of records is exempt from the access provisions of this part, and if... for use by individuals who seek access to records about themselves that are maintained in a system of... personal information contained in the system of records except where access may be denied pursuant to...

  9. Making Online Information Accessible to Students with Disabilities, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Janna Siegel; Harris, James Wallace

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on the major HTML coding techniques used when making Web pages and online courses accessible to students with disabilities. Examples of accessibility features provided are not difficult for most Web authors to incorporate into their Web pages. With a few adaptations, Web page developers can make online information accessible to students…

  10. Ethics in medical information and advertising.

    PubMed

    Serour, G I; Dickens, B M

    2004-05-01

    This article presents findings and recommendations of an international conference held in Cairo, Egypt in 2003 concerning issues of ethical practice in how information is provided to and by medical practitioners. Professional advertising to practitioners and the public is necessary, but should exclude misrepresentation of qualifications, resources, and authorship of research papers. Medical institutions are responsible for how staff members present themselves, and their institutions. Medical associations, both governmental licensing authorities and voluntary societies, have powers and responsibilities to monitor professional advertisement to defend the public interest against deception. Medical journals bear duties to ensure authenticity of authorship and integrity in published papers, and the scientific basis of commercial advertisers' claims. A mounting concern is authors' conflict of interest. Mass newsmedia must ensure accuracy and proportionality in reporting scientific developments, and product manufacturers must observe truth in advertising, particularly in Direct-to-Consumer advertising. Consumer protection by government agencies is a continuing responsibility. PMID:15099793

  11. Promoting social responsibility amongst health care users: medical tourists’ perspectives on an information sheet regarding ethical concerns in medical tourism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical tourists, persons that travel across international borders with the intention to access non-emergency medical care, may not be adequately informed of safety and ethical concerns related to the practice of medical tourism. Researchers indicate that the sources of information frequently used by medical tourists during their decision-making process may be biased and/or lack comprehensive information regarding individual safety and treatment outcomes, as well as potential impacts of the medical tourism industry on third parties. This paper explores the feedback from former Canadian medical tourists regarding the use of an information sheet to address this knowledge gap and raise awareness of the safety and ethical concerns related to medical tourism. Results According to feedback provided in interviews with former Canadian medical tourists, the majority of participants responded positively to the information sheet and indicated that this document prompted them to engage in further consideration of these issues. Participants indicated some frustration after reading the information sheet regarding a lack of know-how in terms of learning more about the concerns discussed in the document and changing their decision-making. This frustration was due to participants’ desperation for medical care, a topic which participants frequently discussed regarding ethical concerns related to health care provision. Conclusions The overall perceptions of former medical tourists indicate that an information sheet may promote further consideration of ethical concerns of medical tourism. However, given that these interviews were performed with former medical tourists, it remains unknown whether such a document might impact upon the decision-making of prospective medical tourists. Furthermore, participants indicated a need for an additional tool such as a website for continued discussion about these concerns. As such, along with dissemination of the information sheet

  12. Data Mining in Health and Medical Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bath, Peter A.

    2004-01-01

    Presents a literature review that covers the following topics related to data mining (DM) in health and medical information: the potential of DM in health and medicine; statistical methods; evaluation of methods; DM tools for health and medicine; inductive learning of symbolic rules; application of DM tools in diagnosis and prognosis; and…

  13. Accessing Information in a Technological Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitson, Donna L.; Amstutz, Donna D.

    This book is designed to help adults overcome information anxiety by developing skills to deal with overload produced by the current information glut. The nine chapters segment the information in logical steps toward information literacy. Chapter 1 discusses information anxiety and technology development and their relationship to lifelong learning…

  14. How does national culture affect citizens' rights of access to personal health information and informed consent?

    PubMed

    Cockcroft, Sophie; Sandhu, Neelam; Norris, Anthony

    2009-09-01

    Two widely discussed and debated aspects of health law literature are 'informed' consent to medical treatment and the right of access to personal health information. Both are tied to the larger subject of patients' rights, including the right to privacy. This article looks at the issue of informed consent internationally, and goes further to explain some of the inequalities across the world with respect to informed consent and patients' rights legislation via an analysis of the take-up of key legislative attributes in patient consent. Specifically, the effect that national culture, as defined by the GLOBE variables, has on the rate and pattern of adoption of these consent elements is analysed using binary logistic regression to provide evidence of the existence or otherwise of a cultural predicate of the legislative approach. The article concludes by outlining the challenges presented by these differences.

  15. Deployment of secure mobile agents for medical information systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzer-Long; Chung, Yu-Fang; Lin, Frank Y S

    2012-08-01

    Changes in global population and demography, and advances in medicine have led to elderly population growth, creating aging societies from which elderly medical care has evolved. In addition, with the elderly susceptible to chronic diseases, this together with the changing lifestyles of young adults have not only pushed up patient numbers of chronic diseases, but also effected into younger patients. These problems have become the major focus for the health care industry. In response to patient demand and the huge shortage of medical resources, we propose remote healthcare medical information systems that combine patient physiological data acquisition equipment with real-time health care analyses. Since remote health care systems are structured around the Internet, in addition to considering the numerous public systems spread across insecure heterogeneous networks, compatibility among heterogeneous networks will also be another concern. To address the aforementioned issues, mobile agents are adopted. With a mobile agent's characteristics of easy adaptability to heterogeneity and autonomy, the problem of heterogeneous network environments can be tackled. To construct a hierarchical safe access control mechanism for monitoring and control of patient data in order to provide the most appropriate medical treatment, we also propose to use the Chinese Remainder Theorem and discrete logarithm to classify different levels of monitoring staff and hence, to grant permission and access according to their authorized levels. We expect the methods proposed can improve medical care quality and reduce medical resource wastage, while ensuring patient privacy. Finally, security analysis of the system is conducted by simulating a variety of typical attacks, from which it can be concluded that the constructed remote healthcare information system be secure. PMID:21526332

  16. Deployment of secure mobile agents for medical information systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzer-Long; Chung, Yu-Fang; Lin, Frank Y S

    2012-08-01

    Changes in global population and demography, and advances in medicine have led to elderly population growth, creating aging societies from which elderly medical care has evolved. In addition, with the elderly susceptible to chronic diseases, this together with the changing lifestyles of young adults have not only pushed up patient numbers of chronic diseases, but also effected into younger patients. These problems have become the major focus for the health care industry. In response to patient demand and the huge shortage of medical resources, we propose remote healthcare medical information systems that combine patient physiological data acquisition equipment with real-time health care analyses. Since remote health care systems are structured around the Internet, in addition to considering the numerous public systems spread across insecure heterogeneous networks, compatibility among heterogeneous networks will also be another concern. To address the aforementioned issues, mobile agents are adopted. With a mobile agent's characteristics of easy adaptability to heterogeneity and autonomy, the problem of heterogeneous network environments can be tackled. To construct a hierarchical safe access control mechanism for monitoring and control of patient data in order to provide the most appropriate medical treatment, we also propose to use the Chinese Remainder Theorem and discrete logarithm to classify different levels of monitoring staff and hence, to grant permission and access according to their authorized levels. We expect the methods proposed can improve medical care quality and reduce medical resource wastage, while ensuring patient privacy. Finally, security analysis of the system is conducted by simulating a variety of typical attacks, from which it can be concluded that the constructed remote healthcare information system be secure.

  17. 5 CFR 293.504 - Composition of, and access to, the Employee Medical File System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Employee Medical File System. 293.504 Section 293.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERSONNEL RECORDS Employee Medical File System Records § 293.504 Composition of, and access to, the Employee Medical File System. (a) All employee occupational medical...

  18. Roles of pharmacists in expanding access to safe and effective medical abortion in developing countries: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Sneeringer, Robyn K; Billings, Deborah L; Ganatra, Bela; Baird, Traci L

    2012-01-01

    Unsafe abortion continues to be a major contributor to maternal mortality and morbidity around the world. This article examines the role of pharmacists in expanding women's access to safe medical abortion in Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Available research shows that although pharmacists and pharmacy workers often sell abortion medications to women, accurate information about how to use the medications safely and effectively is rarely offered. No publication covered effective interventions by pharmacists to expand access to medical abortion, but lessons can be learned from successful interventions with other reproductive health services. To better serve women, increasing awareness and improving training for pharmacists and pharmacy workers about unsafe abortion – and medications that can safely induce abortion – are needed. PMID:22402571

  19. Medical information and the right to privacy

    SciTech Connect

    Drell, D.

    1994-06-01

    This report is a compilation of submitted abstracts of papers presented at the DOE-supported workshop on medical information and the right to privacy held at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, on June 9 and 10, 1994. The aim of this meeting is to provide a forum to discuss the legal, ethical and practical issues related to the computerization and use of medical data, as well as the potential impact the use of these data may have on an individual`s privacy. Topical areas include an overview of the Federal and legal requirements to collect medical data, historical experiences with worker screening programs, currently available medical surveillance technologies (both biomedical and computer technologies) and their limitations. In addition, an-depth assessment of the needs and interests of a wide spectrum of parties as they relate to the use of medical data from both a legal and privacy perspective is provided. The needs of the individual, the public (e.g., blood and tissue banks), private enterprises (e.g., industry and insurance carriers), and the government (e.g., FBI) are discussed. Finally, the practical and legal issues relating to the use of computers to carry, store and transmit this information are also examined. The abstracts are presented in the intended order of presentation as indicated in the agenda for the meeting.

  20. Open access: implications for scholarly publishing and medical libraries

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Karen M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The paper reviews and analyzes the evolution of the open access (OA) publishing movement and its impact on the traditional scholarly publishing model. Procedures: A literature survey and analysis of definitions of OA, problems with the current publishing model, historical developments, funding agency responses, stakeholder viewpoints, and implications for scientific libraries and publishing are performed. Findings: The Internet's transformation of information access has fueled interest in reshaping what many see as a dysfunctional, high-cost system of scholarly publishing. For years, librarians alone advocated for change, until relatively recently when interest in OA and related initiatives spread to the scientific community, governmental groups, funding agencies, publishers, and the general public. Conclusions: Most stakeholders acknowledge that change in the publishing landscape is inevitable, but heated debate continues over what form this transformation will take. The most frequently discussed remedies for the troubled current system are the “green” road (self-archiving articles published in non-OA journals) and the “gold” road (publishing in OA journals). Both movements will likely intensify, with a multiplicity of models and initiatives coexisting for some time. PMID:16888657

  1. 10 CFR 4.33 - Access to sources of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to sources of information. 4.33 Section 4.33 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING... of 1964 and Title IV of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 Compliance Information § 4.33 Access...

  2. 7 CFR 3406.23 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3406.23 Section... Access to peer review information. After final decisions have been announced, NIFA will, upon request.... Verbatim copies of summary reviews, not including the identity of the peer reviewers, will be...

  3. 7 CFR 3406.23 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3406.23 Section... Access to peer review information. After final decisions have been announced, NIFA will, upon request.... Verbatim copies of summary reviews, not including the identity of the peer reviewers, will be...

  4. 7 CFR 3406.23 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3406.23 Section... Access to peer review information. After final decisions have been announced, CSREES will, upon request.... Verbatim copies of summary reviews, not including the identity of the peer reviewers, will be...

  5. 7 CFR 2903.18 - Access to review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Access to review information. 2903.18 Section 2903.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF ENERGY POLICY AND NEW USES, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BIODIESEL FUEL EDUCATION PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 2903.18 Access...

  6. Negotiating Access to Health Information to Promote Students' Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radis, Molly E.; Updegrove, Stephen C.; Somsel, Anne; Crowley, Angela A.

    2016-01-01

    Access to student health information, such as immunizations, screenings, and care plans for chronic conditions, is essential for school nurses to fulfill their role in promoting students' health. School nurses typically encounter barriers to accessing health records and spend many hours attempting to retrieve health information. As a result,…

  7. Providing Access to Electronic Information Resources in Further Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banwell, Linda; Ray, Kathryn; Coulson, Graham; Urquhart, Christine; Lonsdale, Ray; Armstrong, Chris; Thomas, Rhian; Spink, Sin; Yeoman, Alison; Fenton, Roger; Rowley, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    This article aims to provide a baseline for future studies on the provision and support for the use of digital or electronic information services (EIS) in further education. The analysis presented is based on a multi-level model of access, which encompasses access to and availability of information and communication technology (ICT) resources,…

  8. 7 CFR 2903.18 - Access to review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to review information. 2903.18 Section 2903.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF ENERGY POLICY AND NEW USES, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BIODIESEL FUEL EDUCATION PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 2903.18 Access...

  9. Accessibility and Integrity of Networked Information Collections. Background Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Clifford A.

    This paper considers questions related to the integrity and accessibility of new electronic information resources. It begins with a review of recent developments in networked information resources and the tools to identify, navigate, and use such resources. An overview is then given of the issues involved in access and integrity questions. Links…

  10. High School Student Information Access and Engineering Design Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentzer, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Developing solutions to engineering design problems requires access to information. Research has shown that appropriately accessing and using information in the design process improves solution quality. This quasi-experimental study provides two groups of high school students with a design problem in a three hour design experience. One group has…

  11. 10 CFR 4.33 - Access to sources of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Access to sources of information. 4.33 Section 4.33 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING... of 1964 and Title IV of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 Compliance Information § 4.33 Access...

  12. Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information Access Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Technological Innovation and Cooperation for Foreign Information Access (TICFIA) Program supports projects focused on developing innovative technologies for accessing, collecting, organizing, preserving, and disseminating information from foreign sources to address the U.S.' teaching and research needs in international education and foreign…

  13. Robust anonymous authentication scheme for telecare medical information systems.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Zhang, Jun; Dong, Na

    2013-04-01

    Patient can obtain sorts of health-care delivery services via Telecare Medical Information Systems (TMIS). Authentication, security, patient's privacy protection and data confidentiality are important for patient or doctor accessing to Electronic Medical Records (EMR). In 2012, Chen et al. showed that Khan et al.'s dynamic ID-based authentication scheme has some weaknesses and proposed an improved scheme, and they claimed that their scheme is more suitable for TMIS. However, we show that Chen et al.'s scheme also has some weaknesses. In particular, Chen et al.'s scheme does not provide user's privacy protection and perfect forward secrecy, is vulnerable to off-line password guessing attack and impersonation attack once user's smart card is compromised. Further, we propose a secure anonymity authentication scheme to overcome their weaknesses even an adversary can know all information stored in smart card.

  14. Robust anonymous authentication scheme for telecare medical information systems.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Zhang, Jun; Dong, Na

    2013-04-01

    Patient can obtain sorts of health-care delivery services via Telecare Medical Information Systems (TMIS). Authentication, security, patient's privacy protection and data confidentiality are important for patient or doctor accessing to Electronic Medical Records (EMR). In 2012, Chen et al. showed that Khan et al.'s dynamic ID-based authentication scheme has some weaknesses and proposed an improved scheme, and they claimed that their scheme is more suitable for TMIS. However, we show that Chen et al.'s scheme also has some weaknesses. In particular, Chen et al.'s scheme does not provide user's privacy protection and perfect forward secrecy, is vulnerable to off-line password guessing attack and impersonation attack once user's smart card is compromised. Further, we propose a secure anonymity authentication scheme to overcome their weaknesses even an adversary can know all information stored in smart card. PMID:23321972

  15. [Italian physician's needs for medical information. Retrospective analysis of the medical information service provided by Novartis Pharma to clinicians].

    PubMed

    Speroni, Elisabetta; Poggi, Susanna; Vinaccia, Vincenza

    2013-10-01

    The physician's need for medical information updates has been studied extensively in recent years but the point of view of the pharmaceutical industry on this need has rarely been considered. This paper reports the results of a retrospective analysis of the medical information service provided to Italian physicians by an important pharmaceutical company, Novartis Pharma, from 2004 to 2012. The results confirm clinicians' appreciation of a service that gives them access to tailored scientific documentation and the number of requests made to the network of medical representatives has been rising steadily, peaking whenever new drugs become available to physicians. The analysis confirms what -other international studies have ascertained, that most queries are about how to use the drugs and what their properties are. The results highlight some differences between different medical specialties: for example, proportionally, neurologists seem to be the most curious. This, as well as other interesting snippets, is worth further exploration. Despite its limits in terms of representativeness, what comes out of the study is the existence of an real unmet need for information by healthcare institutions and that the support offered by the pharmaceutical industry could be invaluable; its role could go well beyond that of a mere supplier to National Healthcare Systems, to that of being recognised as an active partner the process of ensuring balanced and evidence-based information. At the same time, closer appraisal of clinicians' needs could help the pharma industries to improve their communication and educational strategies in presenting their latest clinical research and their own products.

  16. Information Technologies (ITs) in Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet; Pandza, Haris; Toromanovic, Selim; Masic, Fedja; Sivic, Suad; Zunic, Lejla; Masic, Zlatan

    2011-01-01

    Advances in medicine in recent decades are in significant correlation with the advances in the information technology. Modern information technologies (IT) have enabled faster, more reliable and comprehensive data collection. These technologies have started to create a large number of irrelevant information, which represents a limiting factor and a real growing gap, between the medical knowledge on one hand, and the ability of doctors to follow its growth on the other. Furthermore, in our environment, the term technology is generally reserved for its technical component. Education means, learning, teaching, or the process of acquiring skills or behavior modification through various exercises. Traditionally, medical education meant the oral, practical and more passive transferring of knowledge and skills from the educators to students and health professionals. For the clinical disciplines, of special importance are the principles, such as, “learning at bedside,” aided by the medical literature. In doing so, these techniques enable students to contact with their teachers, and to refer to the appropriate literature. The disadvantage of these educational methods is in the fact, that teachers often do not have enough time. Additionally they are not very convenient to the horizontal and vertical integration of teaching, create weak or almost no self education, as well as, low skill levels and poor integration of education with a real social environment. In this paper authors describe application of modern IT in medical education – their advantages and disadvantages comparing with traditional ways of education. PMID:23408471

  17. Information Technologies (ITs) in Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet; Pandza, Haris; Toromanovic, Selim; Masic, Fedja; Sivic, Suad; Zunic, Lejla; Masic, Zlatan

    2011-09-01

    Advances in medicine in recent decades are in significant correlation with the advances in the information technology. Modern information technologies (IT) have enabled faster, more reliable and comprehensive data collection. These technologies have started to create a large number of irrelevant information, which represents a limiting factor and a real growing gap, between the medical knowledge on one hand, and the ability of doctors to follow its growth on the other. Furthermore, in our environment, the term technology is generally reserved for its technical component. Education means, learning, teaching, or the process of acquiring skills or behavior modification through various exercises. Traditionally, medical education meant the oral, practical and more passive transferring of knowledge and skills from the educators to students and health professionals. For the clinical disciplines, of special importance are the principles, such as, "learning at bedside," aided by the medical literature. In doing so, these techniques enable students to contact with their teachers, and to refer to the appropriate literature. The disadvantage of these educational methods is in the fact, that teachers often do not have enough time. Additionally they are not very convenient to the horizontal and vertical integration of teaching, create weak or almost no self education, as well as, low skill levels and poor integration of education with a real social environment. In this paper authors describe application of modern IT in medical education - their advantages and disadvantages comparing with traditional ways of education.

  18. A guide for medical information searches of bibliographic databases - psychiatric research as an example.

    PubMed

    Löhönen, Johanna; Isohanni, Matti; Nieminen, Pentti; Miettunen, Jouko

    2009-09-01

    Information overload, demanding work with strict time limits, and the extensive number of medical bibliographic databases and other research sources all underline the importance of being able to search for up-to-date information effectively. Medical journals play a key role in providing access to the latest information in medicine and health and bibliographic databases play an important role in accessing them. This paper sheds light on the role of the information search process and discusses how to approach key medical bibliographic databases and information sources, using the field of psychiatry as an example. Because of an increasing amount of information, the constant renewal within the discipline and a variety of services available, those seeking information must precisely define what kind of information they are looking for and from which sources the information needed may be found.

  19. Health and medication information resources on the World Wide Web.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Sara; Zerilli, Tina

    2013-04-01

    Health care practitioners have increasingly used the Internet to obtain health and medication information. The vast number of Internet Web sites providing such information and concerns with their reliability makes it essential for users to carefully select and evaluate Web sites prior to use. To this end, this article reviews the general principles to consider in this process. Moreover, as cost may limit access to subscription-based health and medication information resources with established reputability, freely accessible online resources that may serve as an invaluable addition to one's reference collection are highlighted. These include government- and organization-sponsored resources (eg, US Food and Drug Administration Web site and the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists' Drug Shortage Resource Center Web site, respectively) as well as commercial Web sites (eg, Medscape, Google Scholar). Familiarity with such online resources can assist health care professionals in their ability to efficiently navigate the Web and may potentially expedite the information gathering and decision-making process, thereby improving patient care.

  20. Complementarity of quantum discord and classically accessible information

    SciTech Connect

    Zwolak, Michael P.; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2013-05-20

    The sum of the Holevo quantity (that bounds the capacity of quantum channels to transmit classical information about an observable) and the quantum discord (a measure of the quantumness of correlations of that observable) yields an observable-independent total given by the quantum mutual information. This split naturally delineates information about quantum systems accessible to observers – information that is redundantly transmitted by the environment – while showing that it is maximized for the quasi-classical pointer observable. Other observables are accessible only via correlations with the pointer observable. In addition, we prove an anti-symmetry property relating accessible information and discord. It shows that information becomes objective – accessible to many observers – only as quantum information is relegated to correlations with the global environment, and, therefore, locally inaccessible. Lastly, the resulting complementarity explains why, in a quantum Universe, we perceive objective classical reality while flagrantly quantum superpositions are out of reach.

  1. Complementarity of quantum discord and classically accessible information

    DOE PAGES

    Zwolak, Michael P.; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2013-05-20

    The sum of the Holevo quantity (that bounds the capacity of quantum channels to transmit classical information about an observable) and the quantum discord (a measure of the quantumness of correlations of that observable) yields an observable-independent total given by the quantum mutual information. This split naturally delineates information about quantum systems accessible to observers – information that is redundantly transmitted by the environment – while showing that it is maximized for the quasi-classical pointer observable. Other observables are accessible only via correlations with the pointer observable. In addition, we prove an anti-symmetry property relating accessible information and discord. Itmore » shows that information becomes objective – accessible to many observers – only as quantum information is relegated to correlations with the global environment, and, therefore, locally inaccessible. Lastly, the resulting complementarity explains why, in a quantum Universe, we perceive objective classical reality while flagrantly quantum superpositions are out of reach.« less

  2. Complementarity of quantum discord and classically accessible information

    PubMed Central

    Zwolak, Michael; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2013-01-01

    The sum of the Holevo quantity (that bounds the capacity of quantum channels to transmit classical information about an observable) and the quantum discord (a measure of the quantumness of correlations of that observable) yields an observable-independent total given by the quantum mutual information. This split naturally delineates information about quantum systems accessible to observers – information that is redundantly transmitted by the environment – while showing that it is maximized for the quasi-classical pointer observable. Other observables are accessible only via correlations with the pointer observable. We also prove an anti-symmetry property relating accessible information and discord. It shows that information becomes objective – accessible to many observers – only as quantum information is relegated to correlations with the global environment, and, therefore, locally inaccessible. The resulting complementarity explains why, in a quantum Universe, we perceive objective classical reality while flagrantly quantum superpositions are out of reach.

  3. Managing medical images and clinical information: InCor's experience.

    PubMed

    Furuie, Sergio S; Rebelo, Marina S; Moreno, Ramon A; Santos, Marcelo; Bertozzo, Nivaldo; Motta, Gustavo H M B; Pires, Fabio A; Gutierrez, Marco A

    2007-01-01

    Patients usually get medical assistance in several clinics and hospitals during their lifetime, archiving vital information in a dispersed way. Clearly, a proper patient care should take into account that information in order to check for incompatibilities, avoid unnecessary exams, and get relevant clinical history. The Heart Institute (InCor) of São Paulo, Brazil, has been committed to the goal of integrating all exams and clinical information within the institution and other hospitals. Since InCor is one of the six institutes of the University of São Paulo Medical School and each institute has its own information system, exchanging information among the institutes is also a very important aspect that has been considered. In the last few years, a system for transmission, archiving, retrieval, processing, and visualization of medical images integrated with a hospital information system has been successfully created and constitutes the InCor's electronic patient record (EPR). This work describes the experience in the effort to develop a functional and comprehensive EPR, which includes laboratory exams, images (static, dynamic, and three dimensional), clinical reports, documents, and even real-time vital signals. A security policy based on a contextual role-based access control model was implemented to regulate user's access to EPR. Currently, more than 10 TB of digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) images have been stored using the proposed architecture and the EPR stores daily more than 11 GB of integrated data. The proposed storage subsystem allows 6 months of visibility for rapid retrieval and more than two years for automatic retrieval using a jukebox. This paper addresses also a prototype for the integration of distributed and heterogeneous EPR.

  4. 75 FR 21662 - Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records; Extension of the Office of Management and Budget...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... section of this notice titled ``Supplementary Information.'' Docket: To read or download comments or other... read or download through the Web site. All submissions, including copyrighted material, are available... governing access to worker exposure monitoring data and medical records. This regulation does not...

  5. Future Possibilities in Information Technology and Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Milton, Ed.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes two articles that discuss science fiction and future possibilities in information technology: "'Jurassic Park' and Al Jolson: Thinking about the Information Revolution" (Connie Willis) and "The Good and the Bad: Outlines of Tomorrow" (David Brin). (LRW)

  6. Long-Term Information Preservation and Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    An unprecedented amount of information encompassing almost every facet of human activities across the world is generated daily in the form of zeros and ones, and that is often the only form in which such information is recorded. A good fraction of this information needs to be preserved for periods of time ranging from a few years to centuries.…

  7. Accessing Current Information on California Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Trina

    As California Indians confront contemporary issues, their need for timely information is vital. The library at California State University (CSU), Fresno, serves students enrolled in Native American studies courses as well as members of the San Joaquin valley community. Information sources include both recorded information and the "invisible…

  8. Overcoming inertia: increasing public health departments' access to evidence-based information and promoting usage to inform practice.

    PubMed

    LaPelle, Nancy R; Dahlen, Karen; Gabella, Barbara A; Juhl, Ashley L; Martin, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the New England Region-National Network of Libraries of Medicine at University of Massachusetts Medical School received funding to improve information access for public health departments in 6 New England states and Colorado. Public health departments were provided with desktop digital access to licensed e-resources available through special pricing. In January through mid-April 2012, we evaluated the effectiveness of providing access to and training for using e-resources to public health department staff to motivate usage in practice. We found that additional strategies are needed to accomplish this.

  9. Overcoming Inertia: Increasing Public Health Departments’ Access to Evidence-Based Information and Promoting Usage to Inform Practice

    PubMed Central

    Dahlen, Karen; Gabella, Barbara A.; Juhl, Ashley L.; Martin, DA, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the New England Region–National Network of Libraries of Medicine at University of Massachusetts Medical School received funding to improve information access for public health departments in 6 New England states and Colorado. Public health departments were provided with desktop digital access to licensed e-resources available through special pricing. In January through mid-April 2012, we evaluated the effectiveness of providing access to and training for using e-resources to public health department staff to motivate usage in practice. We found that additional strategies are needed to accomplish this. PMID:24228662

  10. Information Access Instruction (IAI to the Fourth Power): Design Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ercegovac, Zorana

    1995-01-01

    Proposes four design principles of an information access system that link information sources regardless of implementation medium, information structure, or interface style. Provides examples from an undergraduate course in information science at the University of California at Los Angeles. (Author/AEF)

  11. Broadening access to medical care during a severe influenza pandemic: the CDC nurse triage line project.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Lisa M; Hanfling, Dan

    2013-03-01

    The impact of a severe influenza pandemic could be overwhelming to hospital emergency departments, clinics, and medical offices if large numbers of ill people were to simultaneously seek care. While current planning guidance to reduce surge on hospitals and other medical facilities during a pandemic largely focuses on improving the "supply" of medical care services, attention on reducing "demand" for such services is needed by better matching patient needs with alternative types and sites of care. Based on lessons learned during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and its partners are currently exploring the acceptability and feasibility of using a coordinated network of nurse triage telephone lines during a pandemic to assess the health status of callers, help callers determine the most appropriate site for care (eg, hospital ED, outpatient center, home), disseminate information, provide clinical advice, and provide access to antiviral medications for ill people, if appropriate. As part of this effort, the integration and coordination of poison control centers, existing nurse advice lines, 2-1-1 information lines, and other hotlines are being investigated.

  12. Medical Information Management System (MIMS): A generalized interactive information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, S.; Friedman, C. A.; Hipkins, K. R.

    1975-01-01

    An interactive information system is described. It is a general purpose, free format system which offers immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. The medical area is a prime area of application. Examples of the system's operation, commentary on the examples, and a complete listing of the system program are included.

  13. Medical Information Management System (MIMS): An automated hospital information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, S.; Simmons, P. B.; Schwartz, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    An automated hospital information system that handles all data related to patient-care activities is described. The description is designed to serve as a manual for potential users, nontechnical medical personnel who may use the system. Examples of the system's operation, commentary on the examples, and a complete listing of the system program are included.

  14. Medical Information Management System (MIMS): A Generalized Interactive Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alterescu,Sidney; And Others

    This report describes an interactive information system. It is a general purpose, free format system which can offer immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. The medical area is a prime area of application. The report is designed to serve as a manual for potential users--nontechnical personnel who will use the…

  15. MIAPS: a web-based system for remotely accessing and presenting medical images.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hualei; Ma, Dianfu; Zhao, Yongwang; Sun, Hailong; Sun, Sujun; Ye, Rongwei; Huang, Lei; Lang, Bo; Sun, Yan

    2014-01-01

    MIAPS (medical image access and presentation system) is a web-based system designed for remotely accessing and presenting DICOM image. MIAPS is accessed with web browser through the Internet. MIAPS provides four features: DICOM image retrieval, maintenance, presentation and output. MIAPS does not intent to replace sophisticated commercial and open source packages, but it provides a web-based solution for teleradiology and medical image sharing. The system has been evaluated by 39 hospitals in China for 10 months.

  16. [Access and usability to medications: a proposal for an operational definition].

    PubMed

    Oscanoa, Teodoro J

    2012-03-01

    Research about accessibility to medicines through household surveys is very important in order to verify the reality and effectiveness of interventions done to increase the access of the population to the medications. Unfortunately, such studies, on top of being very few, have methodological problems, which mostly result from a lack of uniformity in the operational definitions of access and the differentiation with the dimensions of accessibility. The aim of this paper is to propose setting a difference between both terms. We propose an operational definition of access to medications as the process of verification of the purchase of a drug by a patient, independently from many factors that can affect this process. The term "usability of drugs" is introduced, defining it operationally as aimed at measuring the dimensions of the accessibility to the medications: physical availability, affordability, geographical accessibility, acceptability (or satisfaction).

  17. Accessing and managing open medical resources in Africa over the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Rada; Khalifa, Aly; Jimenez-Castellanos, Ana; de la Calle, Guillermo; Ramirez-Robles, Maximo; Crespo, Jose; Perez-Rey, David; Garcia-Remesal, Miguel; Anguita, Alberto; Alonso-Calvo, Raul; de la Iglesia, Diana; Barreiro, Jose M.; Maojo, Victor

    2014-10-01

    Recent commentaries have proposed the advantages of using open exchange of data and informatics resources for improving health-related policies and patient care in Africa. Yet, in many African regions, both private medical and public health information systems are still unaffordable. Open exchange over the social Web 2.0 could encourage more altruistic support of medical initiatives. We have carried out some experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of using this approach to disseminate open data and informatics resources in Africa. After the experiments we developed the AFRICA BUILD Portal, the first Social Network for African biomedical researchers. Through the AFRICA BUILD Portal users can access in a transparent way to several resources. Currently, over 600 researchers are using distributed and open resources through this platform committed to low connections.

  18. Science information systems: Archive, access, and retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William J.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop technology for the automated characterization and interactive retrieval and visualization of very large, complex scientific data sets. Technologies will be developed for the following specific areas: (1) rapidly archiving data sets; (2) automatically characterizing and labeling data in near real-time; (3) providing users with the ability to browse contents of databases efficiently and effectively; (4) providing users with the ability to access and retrieve system independent data sets electronically; and (5) automatically alerting scientists to anomalies detected in data.

  19. Access to F.D.A. Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinovic, Dianna

    Prior to the enactment of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), little of the data collected by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was made public or could be obtained from the agency. Although the FDA files are now open, information is considered exempt from public disclosure when it involves regulatory procedures, program guidelines, work…

  20. Access to Information in Rural Nigeria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aboyade, B. Olabimpe

    1985-01-01

    This paper focuses on intensified information transfer activities in rural areas of Nigeria: community development work, agricultural extension service, mass media (newspapers, television, radio, problems of communication), and the role of the library (reinforcing messages, repackaging information, acquiring specialized materials, coordinating…

  1. Health information system access control redesign - rationale and method.

    PubMed

    Moselle, Kenneth A

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of why a health service system might find it necessary to re-engineer the access control model that mediates the interaction of clinicians with health information systems. Factors that lead to increasingly complexity of the access control models are delineated, and consequences of that complexity are identified. Strategies are presented to address these factors, and a stepwise procedure is suggested to structure the access control model re-engineering process.

  2. [Information flow between medical and social sciences].

    PubMed

    Schubert, András; Somogyi, Anikó

    2014-12-28

    In order to reveal impacts of natural and social sciences on each other, the authors examined connections between fields of medical and social sciences using a search for references and citations of scientific publication. 1. The largest affinity between the medical and social sciences was found between neurosciences and psychology, but there was a significant affinity between clinical sciences and general social sciences, as well. 2. The example of General & Internal Medicine papers in the topics of "diabetes" suggests that in the period 2001-2010 the share of references to social sciences was significantly increased. In the meantime, social science papers in the same topics contained references to Clinical Medicine papers in a constantly high percentage. 3. In the sample under study, the age distribution of social science papers in the references did not differ significantly from that of the other sources. 4. Share of references to social science papers was found to be extremely high among Hungarian General & Internal Medicine papers in the topics of "diabetes". This finding still requires clarification, nevertheless, since e.g. it was not supported by an institutional comparison including the largest Hungarian medical research university. 5. The intensity of the reference/citation mediated information flows between the Hungarian Medical Journal, Orvosi Hetilap and social sciences appears to be in accordance with the current international trends.

  3. [Design and application of implantable medical device information management system].

    PubMed

    Cao, Shaoping; Yin, Chunguang; Zhao, Zhenying

    2013-03-01

    Through the establishment of implantable medical device information management system, with the aid of the regional joint sharing of resources, we further enhance the implantable medical device traceability management level, strengthen quality management, control of medical risk. PMID:23777076

  4. [Design and application of implantable medical device information management system].

    PubMed

    Cao, Shaoping; Yin, Chunguang; Zhao, Zhenying

    2013-03-01

    Through the establishment of implantable medical device information management system, with the aid of the regional joint sharing of resources, we further enhance the implantable medical device traceability management level, strengthen quality management, control of medical risk.

  5. 28 CFR 115.82 - Access to emergency medical and mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... § 115.82 Access to emergency medical and mental health services. (a) Inmate victims of sexual abuse..., the nature and scope of which are determined by medical and mental health practitioners according to their professional judgment. (b) If no qualified medical or mental health practitioners are on duty...

  6. 28 CFR 115.82 - Access to emergency medical and mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 115.82 Access to emergency medical and mental health services. (a) Inmate victims of sexual abuse..., the nature and scope of which are determined by medical and mental health practitioners according to their professional judgment. (b) If no qualified medical or mental health practitioners are on duty...

  7. 28 CFR 115.282 - Access to emergency medical and mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Mental Care § 115.282 Access to emergency medical and mental health services. (a) Resident victims of... intervention services, the nature and scope of which are determined by medical and mental health practitioners according to their professional judgment. (b) If no qualified medical or mental health practitioners are...

  8. 28 CFR 115.82 - Access to emergency medical and mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 115.82 Access to emergency medical and mental health services. (a) Inmate victims of sexual abuse..., the nature and scope of which are determined by medical and mental health practitioners according to their professional judgment. (b) If no qualified medical or mental health practitioners are on duty...

  9. 28 CFR 115.282 - Access to emergency medical and mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Mental Care § 115.282 Access to emergency medical and mental health services. (a) Resident victims of... intervention services, the nature and scope of which are determined by medical and mental health practitioners according to their professional judgment. (b) If no qualified medical or mental health practitioners are...

  10. 28 CFR 115.282 - Access to emergency medical and mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Mental Care § 115.282 Access to emergency medical and mental health services. (a) Resident victims of... intervention services, the nature and scope of which are determined by medical and mental health practitioners according to their professional judgment. (b) If no qualified medical or mental health practitioners are...

  11. 28 CFR 115.382 - Access to emergency medical and mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....382 Access to emergency medical and mental health services. (a) Resident victims of sexual abuse shall... nature and scope of which are determined by medical and mental health practitioners according to their professional judgment. (b) If no qualified medical or mental health practitioners are on duty at the time...

  12. 28 CFR 115.382 - Access to emergency medical and mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....382 Access to emergency medical and mental health services. (a) Resident victims of sexual abuse shall... nature and scope of which are determined by medical and mental health practitioners according to their professional judgment. (b) If no qualified medical or mental health practitioners are on duty at the time...

  13. 28 CFR 115.382 - Access to emergency medical and mental health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....382 Access to emergency medical and mental health services. (a) Resident victims of sexual abuse shall... nature and scope of which are determined by medical and mental health practitioners according to their professional judgment. (b) If no qualified medical or mental health practitioners are on duty at the time...

  14. The Open Access Availability of Library and Information Science Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Way, Doug

    2010-01-01

    To examine the open access availability of Library and Information Science (LIS) research, a study was conducted using Google Scholar to search for articles from 20 top LIS journals. The study examined whether Google Scholar was able to find any links to full text, if open access versions of the articles were available and where these articles…

  15. Enhancing Access to NTIS Information through Libraries: A Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shill, Harold B.

    1993-01-01

    Considers current and potential uses of libraries as National Technical Information Service (NTIS) access points, describes the library community's strengths and weaknesses, and suggests future trends. A proposal for using libraries as vehicles for broader access for current and potential NTIS users is outlined. (Contains 32 references.) (EAM)

  16. 1 CFR 456.4 - Public access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Public access to information. 456.4 Section 456... hours are 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding legal holidays. (c) Information... reaches, or with the exercise of due diligence should have reached, the appropriate information source....

  17. 1 CFR 456.4 - Public access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Public access to information. 456.4 Section 456... hours are 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding legal holidays. (c) Information... reaches, or with the exercise of due diligence should have reached, the appropriate information source....

  18. 21 CFR 1401.4 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION § 1401.4 Access to information. The Office of National Drug Control Policy makes available information pertaining to matters issued, adopted, or promulgated by ONDCP, that are within the scope of 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2). A...

  19. 21 CFR 1401.4 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION § 1401.4 Access to information. The Office of National Drug Control Policy makes available information pertaining to matters issued, adopted, or promulgated by ONDCP, that are within the scope of 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2). A...

  20. 21 CFR 1401.4 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION § 1401.4 Access to information. The Office of National Drug Control Policy makes available information pertaining to matters issued, adopted, or promulgated by ONDCP, that are within the scope of 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2). A...

  1. 21 CFR 1401.4 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION § 1401.4 Access to information. The Office of National Drug Control Policy makes available information pertaining to matters issued, adopted, or promulgated by ONDCP, that are within the scope of 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2). A...

  2. 28 CFR 17.41 - Access to classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... raised solely on the basis of the sexual orientation of the employee or mental health counseling. (d) An... sexual orientation in granting access to classified information. However, the Department may...

  3. 28 CFR 17.41 - Access to classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... raised solely on the basis of the sexual orientation of the employee or mental health counseling. (d) An... sexual orientation in granting access to classified information. However, the Department may...

  4. 28 CFR 17.41 - Access to classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... raised solely on the basis of the sexual orientation of the employee or mental health counseling. (d) An... sexual orientation in granting access to classified information. However, the Department may...

  5. 49 CFR 633.15 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Oversight Services § 633.15 Access to information. A recipient of FTA funds for a major capital project shall provide...

  6. 49 CFR 633.15 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Oversight Services § 633.15 Access to information. A recipient of FTA funds for a major capital project shall provide...

  7. 49 CFR 633.15 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Oversight Services § 633.15 Access to information. A recipient of FTA funds for a major capital project shall provide...

  8. 49 CFR 633.15 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Oversight Services § 633.15 Access to information. A recipient of FTA funds for a major capital project shall provide...

  9. 49 CFR 633.15 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Oversight Services § 633.15 Access to information. A recipient of FTA funds for a major capital project shall provide...

  10. United States Access Board

    MedlinePlus

    ... Communications & IT Access to information and communication technology (ICT) is addressed by Board standards and guidelines issued ... Engineer (November 3) Access Board Approves Rules on ICT Refresh and Medical Diagnostic Equipment (September 14) Access ...

  11. Improving access to computer-based library and drug information services in patient-care areas.

    PubMed

    Tobia, R C; Bierschenk, N F; Knodel, L C; Bowden, V M

    1990-01-01

    A project to increase access to drug and biomedical information through electronic linkage of drug information and library services to three patient-care areas is described. In February 1987, microcomputer work stations were installed in the Bexar County Hospital District's hospital emergency department, medical residents' office, and ambulatory-care clinic, as well as in The University of Texas Health Science Center's library reference area and drug information service office. Drug information was available on compact disk through the Micromedex Computerized Clinical Information System (CCIS) database, which includes DRUGDEX, POISINDEX, EMERGINDEX, and IDENTIDEX. Each work station was also connected to the library's computer via modem, allowing access to the Library Information System, books, journals, audiovisual materials, miniMEDLINE, and an electronic mail system. During the six-month project, the system was used 5487 times by 702 people. The system was successful in providing drug and other information in clinical settings and in introducing clinical staff members to new information technology. To increase access to the system after the project ended, the CD-ROM version was discontinued, and the distributed tape version of CCIS for VAX computers was added to the library's online information system, making drug information more available throughout the campus and teaching hospitals. In 1988-89 an average of 200 people accessed the tape version of CCIS each month. Although it is difficult to replace the convenience of an onsite library, at least some drug and biomedical information needs in the clinical setting can be met through computer networking.

  12. 38 CFR 17.241 - Sharing medical information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sharing medical... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Sharing of Medical Facilities, Equipment, and Information § 17.241 Sharing medical... Under Secretary for Health shall prescribe, Directors of Department of Veterans Affairs medical...

  13. 38 CFR 17.241 - Sharing medical information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sharing medical... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Sharing of Medical Facilities, Equipment, and Information § 17.241 Sharing medical... Under Secretary for Health shall prescribe, Directors of Department of Veterans Affairs medical...

  14. 38 CFR 17.241 - Sharing medical information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sharing medical... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Sharing of Medical Facilities, Equipment, and Information § 17.241 Sharing medical... Under Secretary for Health shall prescribe, Directors of Department of Veterans Affairs medical...

  15. 38 CFR 14.602 - Requests for medical information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Requests for medical... medical information. (a) Where there is indication that a tort claim will be filed, medical records or... medical records, documents, reports, or other information shall be handled in accordance with...

  16. 38 CFR 14.602 - Requests for medical information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requests for medical... medical information. (a) Where there is indication that a tort claim will be filed, medical records or... medical records, documents, reports, or other information shall be handled in accordance with...

  17. 38 CFR 14.602 - Requests for medical information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requests for medical... medical information. (a) Where there is indication that a tort claim will be filed, medical records or... medical records, documents, reports, or other information shall be handled in accordance with...

  18. 38 CFR 14.602 - Requests for medical information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requests for medical... medical information. (a) Where there is indication that a tort claim will be filed, medical records or... medical records, documents, reports, or other information shall be handled in accordance with...

  19. WebMIRS: web-based medical information retrieval system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, L. Rodney; Pillemer, Stanley R.; Lawrence, Reva C.; Goh, Gin-Hua; Neve, Leif; Thoma, George R.

    1997-12-01

    At the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, a research and development division of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), we are developing a prototype multimedia database system to provide World Wide Web access to biomedical databases. WebMIRS (Web-based Medical Information Retrieval System) will allow access to databases containing text and images and will allow database query by standard SQL, by image content, or by a combination of the two. The system is being developed in the form of Java applets, which will communicate with the Informix DBMS on an NLM Sun workstation running the Solaris operating system. The system architecture will allow access from any hardware platform, which supports a Java-enabled Web browser, such as Netscape or Internet Explorer. Initial databases will include data from two national health surveys conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), and will include x-ray images from those surveys. In addition to describing in- house research in database access systems, this paper describes ongoing work toward querying by image content. Image content search capability will include capability to search for x-ray images similar to an input image with respect to vertebral morphometry used to characterize features such as fractures and disc space narrowing.

  20. Nurses' access to library and information services.

    PubMed

    Capel, S

    The author reports on the impact of recent changes in the funding and organisation of library and information services which support the education of nurses. In order that nurses might better contribute to evidence-based practice and clinical effectiveness initiatives, the author calls for greater communication and co-operation between library and health services.

  1. Access to Federal Information: Trends and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Suzanne; Jamison, Carolyn

    1983-01-01

    Discussion of growing trend toward contracting out government printing to private sector highlights Government Printing Office duties, commercial publications, competition from National Technical Information Service, Ronald Reagan's moratorium on publication, use of microfiche, and implications of changes in government printing and distribution…

  2. Training Older Adults to Access Health Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertera, Elizabeth M.; Bertera, Robert L.; Morgan, Russell; Wuertz, Ellen; Attey, Alfred M. O.

    2007-01-01

    Many older adults do not use health information available on the Internet. Older adults residing in affordable housing were taught to use the NIHSeniorHealth.gov Web site. Participants were predominantly African American women with limited education and income (N = 42). Outcomes included changes in computer and health Web site navigation skills.…

  3. Access to Research Information Using Integrated Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Susan M.

    1994-01-01

    Because of the schedules, preferences, and varied information needs of researchers at Baylor College of Medicine (Texas), a system of computer and telecommunications technologies was developed to facilitate research and project planning. The system integrates cellular phones, voice mail, facsimile publishing, distributed document delivery, and…

  4. Accessing Quality Online Health Information: What Is the Solution?

    PubMed

    Boyer, Célia

    2016-01-01

    The majority of the adult population in both Europe and North America have access to the internet. Over 70% state that they have used the internet to look for health information and the majority started their search at a search engine. Given that search engines list sites according to popularity and not quality, it is imperative that users have a means of discerning trustworthy and honest information from non-reliable health information. The HONcode, a set of eight quality guidelines, ensures access to standardized trustworthy health information which can be used as a tool to guide consumers. PMID:27332317

  5. Access to medical care for documented and undocumented Latinos in a southern California county.

    PubMed Central

    Hubbell, F. A.; Waitzkin, H.; Mishra, S. I.; Dombrink, J.; Chavez, L. R.

    1991-01-01

    To determine local access to medical care among Latinos, we conducted telephone interviews with residents of Orange County, California. The survey replicated on a local level the national access surveys sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. We compared access among Latino citizens of the United States (including permanent legal residents), undocumented Latinos, and Anglos, and analyzed predictors of access. Among the sample of 958 respondents were 137 Latino citizens, 54 undocumented Latinos, and 680 Anglos. Compared with Anglos, Latino citizens and undocumented immigrants had less access to medical care by all measures used in the survey. Although undocumented Latinos were less likely than Latino citizens to have health insurance, by most other measures their access did not differ significantly. By multivariate analysis, health insurance status and not ethnicity was the most important predictor of access. Because access to medical care is limited for both Latino citizens and undocumented immigrants, policy proposals to improve access for Latinos should consider current barriers faced by these groups and local differences in access to medical care. PMID:1877182

  6. Using technology to access regional environmental information.

    PubMed

    Minns, C K

    1992-03-01

    Distinctions between holistic and presciptive technologies, and holistic and reductionist science are a backdrop to examination of two widespread environmental problems: eutrophication in the Bay of Quinte, Lake Ontario, and acidification of lakes in eastern Canada. Evidence is presented on a shift from prescriptive toward holistic approaches. Holistic solutions to technological limitations are discussed with emphasis on the interactive procedures people use to solve problems, rather than on the physical tools which are often employed in a prescriptive manner. Local gathering and integration of environmental information is presented as the key to macro-environmental assessments. Recommendations stress (i) the need for ecologists in every ecosystem, (ii) training with emphasis on problem-solving techniques, (iii) wide-spread use of microcomputers, a potent holistic technology, to transfer information and concepts, and (iv) local selection of indicators with the advice that they be simple and biotic.

  7. Information sources for medical waste management.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, B; Battistella, M

    1993-02-01

    Although many hospital professionals now have personal access to online databases, popular communications services may not have the full range of electronic services needed for technical problem solving. Librarians are practiced at cross-disciplinary technical research and so health professionals may be best served by consulting an experienced database search analyst so that important information is not accidentally missed. Additionally, many commercially produced databases have repackaged and redistributed data developed by NIOSH and other federal agencies, data that are readily available in the public sector. The cost of accessing or purchasing commercial databases is usually higher than for federal databases, though commercial products use the federal databases to develop their products. Public agencies should always be consulted to obtain the most current information issued by those bodies and also because a variety of free and low-cost support materials may be available. Because of the expense of routinely consulting electronic databases when comparable printed materials may be available at a lower cost, a small reference collection of books, journals, and audiovisuals may be desirable. A selective print reference collection is found in Appendix A. PMID:10123401

  8. 32 CFR 310.17 - Individual access to personal information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... mental or physical health of the individual or may result in harm to a third party, the following special... medical information may be harmful to the mental or physical health of the individual or to a third party... provide information that is disclosable pursuant to the DoD Freedom of Information Act program (see 32...

  9. 32 CFR 310.17 - Individual access to personal information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... mental or physical health of the individual or may result in harm to a third party, the following special... medical information may be harmful to the mental or physical health of the individual or to a third party... provide information that is disclosable pursuant to the DoD Freedom of Information Act program (see 32...

  10. 32 CFR 310.17 - Individual access to personal information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... mental or physical health of the individual or may result in harm to a third party, the following special... medical information may be harmful to the mental or physical health of the individual or to a third party... provide information that is disclosable pursuant to the DoD Freedom of Information Act program (see 32...

  11. 32 CFR 310.17 - Individual access to personal information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... mental or physical health of the individual or may result in harm to a third party, the following special... medical information may be harmful to the mental or physical health of the individual or to a third party... provide information that is disclosable pursuant to the DoD Freedom of Information Act program (see 32...

  12. NASA Access Mechanism - Graphical user interface information retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Judy F.; Generous, Curtis; Duncan, Denise

    1993-01-01

    Access to online information sources of aerospace, scientific, and engineering data, a mission focus for NASA's Scientific and Technical Information Program, has always been limited by factors such as telecommunications, query language syntax, lack of standardization in the information, and the lack of adequate tools to assist in searching. Today, the NASA STI Program's NASA Access Mechanism (NAM) prototype offers a solution to these problems by providing the user with a set of tools that provide a graphical interface to remote, heterogeneous, and distributed information in a manner adaptable to both casual and expert users. Additionally, the NAM provides access to many Internet-based services such as Electronic Mail, the Wide Area Information Servers system, Peer Locating tools, and electronic bulletin boards.

  13. NASA access mechanism: Graphical user interface information retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Judy; Generous, Curtis; Duncan, Denise

    1993-01-01

    Access to online information sources of aerospace, scientific, and engineering data, a mission focus for NASA's Scientific and Technical Information Program, has always been limited to factors such as telecommunications, query language syntax, lack of standardization in the information, and the lack of adequate tools to assist in searching. Today, the NASA STI Program's NASA Access Mechanism (NAM) prototype offers a solution to these problems by providing the user with a set of tools that provide a graphical interface to remote, heterogeneous, and distributed information in a manner adaptable to both casual and expert users. Additionally, the NAM provides access to many Internet-based services such as Electronic Mail, the Wide Area Information Servers system, Peer Locating tools, and electronic bulletin boards.

  14. [Design and Implementation of a Mobile Operating Room Information Management System Based on Electronic Medical Record].

    PubMed

    Liu, Baozhen; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Xianwen

    2015-06-01

    A mobile operating room information management system with electronic medical record (EMR) is designed to improve work efficiency and to enhance the patient information sharing. In the operating room, this system acquires the information from various medical devices through the Client/Server (C/S) pattern, and automatically generates XML-based EMR. Outside the operating room, this system provides information access service by using the Browser/Server (B/S) pattern. Software test shows that this system can correctly collect medical information from equipment and clearly display the real-time waveform. By achieving surgery records with higher quality and sharing the information among mobile medical units, this system can effectively reduce doctors' workload and promote the information construction of the field hospital. PMID:26485982

  15. [Design and Implementation of a Mobile Operating Room Information Management System Based on Electronic Medical Record].

    PubMed

    Liu, Baozhen; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Xianwen

    2015-06-01

    A mobile operating room information management system with electronic medical record (EMR) is designed to improve work efficiency and to enhance the patient information sharing. In the operating room, this system acquires the information from various medical devices through the Client/Server (C/S) pattern, and automatically generates XML-based EMR. Outside the operating room, this system provides information access service by using the Browser/Server (B/S) pattern. Software test shows that this system can correctly collect medical information from equipment and clearly display the real-time waveform. By achieving surgery records with higher quality and sharing the information among mobile medical units, this system can effectively reduce doctors' workload and promote the information construction of the field hospital.

  16. The role of auxiliary nurse-midwives and community health volunteers in expanding access to medical abortion in rural Nepal.

    PubMed

    Puri, Mahesh; Tamang, Anand; Shrestha, Prabhakar; Joshi, Deepak

    2015-02-01

    Medical abortion was introduced in Nepal in 2009, but rural women's access to medical abortion services remained limited. We conducted a district-level operations research study to assess the effectiveness of training 13 auxiliary nurse-midwives as medical abortion providers, and 120 female community health volunteers as communicators and referral agents for expanding access to medical abortion for rural women. Interviews with service providers and women who received medical abortion were undertaken and service statistics were analysed. Compared to a neighbouring district with no intervention, there was a significant increase in the intervention area in community health volunteers' knowledge of the legal conditions for abortion, the advantages and disadvantages of medical abortion, safe places for an abortion, medical abortion drugs, correct gestational age for home use of medical abortion, and carrying out a urine pregnancy test. In a one-year period in 2011-12, the community health volunteers did pregnancy tests for 584 women and referred 114 women to the auxiliary nurse-midwives for abortion; 307 women in the intervention area received medical abortion services from auxiliary nurse-midwives. There were no complications that required referral to a higher-level facility except for one incomplete abortion. Almost all women who opted for medical abortion were happy with the services provided. The study demonstrated that auxiliary nurse-midwives can independently and confidently provide medical abortion safely and effectively at the sub-health post level, and community health volunteers are effective change agents in informing women about medical abortion. PMID:25702073

  17. ISAIA: Interoperable Systems for Archival Information Access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanisch, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    The ISAIA project was originally proposed in 1999 as a successor to the informal AstroBrowse project. AstroBrowse, which provided a data location service for astronomical archives and catalogs, was a first step toward data system integration and interoperability. The goals of ISAIA were ambitious: '...To develop an interdisciplinary data location and integration service for space science. Building upon existing data services and communications protocols, this service will allow users to transparently query hundreds or thousands of WWW-based resources (catalogs, data, computational resources, bibliographic references, etc.) from a single interface. The service will collect responses from various resources and integrate them in a seamless fashion for display and manipulation by the user.' Funding was approved only for a one-year pilot study, a decision that in retrospect was wise given the rapid changes in information technology in the past few years and the emergence of the Virtual Observatory initiatives in the US and worldwide. Indeed, the ISAIA pilot study was influential in shaping the science goals, system design, metadata standards, and technology choices for the virtual observatory. The ISAIA pilot project also helped to cement working relationships among the NASA data centers, US ground-based observatories, and international data centers. The ISAIA project was formed as a collaborative effort between thirteen institutions that provided data to astronomers, space physicists, and planetary scientists. Among the fruits we ultimately hoped would come from this project would be a central site on the Web that any space scientist could use to efficiently locate existing data relevant to a particular scientific question. Furthermore, we hoped that the needed technology would be general enough to allow smaller, more-focused community within space science could use the same technologies and standards to provide more specialized services. A major challenge to searching

  18. Multimodal medical information retrieval with unsupervised rank fusion.

    PubMed

    Mourão, André; Martins, Flávio; Magalhães, João

    2015-01-01

    Modern medical information retrieval systems are paramount to manage the insurmountable quantities of clinical data. These systems empower health care experts in the diagnosis of patients and play an important role in the clinical decision process. However, the ever-growing heterogeneous information generated in medical environments poses several challenges for retrieval systems. We propose a medical information retrieval system with support for multimodal medical case-based retrieval. The system supports medical information discovery by providing multimodal search, through a novel data fusion algorithm, and term suggestions from a medical thesaurus. Our search system compared favorably to other systems in 2013 ImageCLEFMedical. PMID:24909951

  19. Multimodal medical information retrieval with unsupervised rank fusion.

    PubMed

    Mourão, André; Martins, Flávio; Magalhães, João

    2015-01-01

    Modern medical information retrieval systems are paramount to manage the insurmountable quantities of clinical data. These systems empower health care experts in the diagnosis of patients and play an important role in the clinical decision process. However, the ever-growing heterogeneous information generated in medical environments poses several challenges for retrieval systems. We propose a medical information retrieval system with support for multimodal medical case-based retrieval. The system supports medical information discovery by providing multimodal search, through a novel data fusion algorithm, and term suggestions from a medical thesaurus. Our search system compared favorably to other systems in 2013 ImageCLEFMedical.

  20. Equal Access Initiative HIV/AIDS Information Resources from NLM

    SciTech Connect

    Templin-Branner W. and N. Dancy

    2010-09-11

    The Equal Access Initiative: HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine training is designed specifically for the National Minority AIDS Council 2010 Equal Access Initiative (EAI) Computer Grants Program awardees to provide valuable health information resources from the National Library of Medicine and other reliable sources to increase awareness of the wealth of treatment information and educational materials that are available on the Internet and to improve prevention and treatment education for their clients. These resources will also meet the needs of community-based

  1. 7 CFR 3405.16 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3405.16 Section... to peer review information. After final decisions have been announced, CSREES will, upon request... reviews, not including the identity of the peer reviewers, will be made available to respective...

  2. 7 CFR 3405.16 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3405.16 Section... to peer review information. After final decisions have been announced, NIFA will, upon request... reviews, not including the identity of the peer reviewers, will be made available to respective...

  3. 7 CFR 3405.16 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3405.16 Section... to peer review information. After final decisions have been announced, NIFA will, upon request... reviews, not including the identity of the peer reviewers, will be made available to respective...

  4. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Numbers 13 and 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    ACCESS is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  5. Open Access: A User Information System. Professional Paper Series, #6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Bernard W.

    Focusing on the need for information systems that provide faculty, staff, and students with open access to all necessary information resources, this paper begins by discussing the issues involved in developing such systems. A review of the traditional environment looks at the traditional centralized resources versus the current trend toward…

  6. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 2 Numbers 15 and 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    "Access" is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  7. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Numbers 11 and 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  8. Environment Information ACCESS, Volume 1 Numbers 13 and 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environment Information Center, New York, NY.

    Access is an indexing, abstracting, and information retrieval service that covers published and non-print information on environmental pollution, conservation, and related fields. It provides an overview of the environmental reporting of more than 1000 scholarly, scientific, industrial, technical, and general periodicals and major newspapers;…

  9. Distance Learning: Information Access and Services for Virtual Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iyer, Hemalata, Ed.

    This volume centers broadly on information support services for distance education. The articles in this book can be categorized into two areas: access to information resources for distance learners, and studies of distance learning programs. Contents include: "The Challenges and Benefits of Asynchronous Learning Networks" (Daphne Jorgensen);…

  10. The End of Access? The Government's New Information Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Thomas James

    2002-01-01

    Examines examples of "information lockdown" by the federal government, including Executive Order 13233 issued by President George W. Bush. Considers the underlying rationale for the lockdown, its policy implications for academics and others who seek regular access to public-sector information, and its threat to democratic society. Includes a…

  11. [Do public health practitioners have satisfactory access to important information sources?].

    PubMed

    Forsetlund, L; Bjørndal, A

    1999-06-30

    We asked Norwegian public health practitioners which information sources they used as support for their professional medical counselling, how they gathered their information, and how they evaluated the validity of the information. 348 (67%) questionnaires were returned. Legal sources, other types of reference books/textbooks, different types of expertise from other institutions, and colleagues were considered the most important information sources. The majority had difficulties accessing libraries. Bibliographic databases were used very little. 30% often had problems finding relevant information, while 56% had problems occasionally. Many respondents felt that it was too difficult to get hold of information, that it was difficult to know where to search and that it was difficult to find the time to do it. In judging the scientific validity of an article the majority compared the content with their own experience. Relevant scientifically based medical information was seldom obtained and utilized. Public health practitioners were surprisingly homogeneous in their description of their handling of information. We found for instance almost no differences between specialists and non-specialists. The survey shows that public health practitioners do not have satisfactory access to potentially important information sources. The type of barriers many of them meet when searching for information, indicates that public health physicians would benefit from tailored information services.

  12. 78 FR 12051 - Access by EPA Contractors to Information Claimed as Confidential Business Information (CBI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ...EPA's Office of Transportation and Air Quality (OTAQ) plans to authorize various contractors to access information which was submitted to EPA under Title II of the Clean Air Act that may be claimed as, or may be determined to be, confidential business information (CBI). Access to this information, which is related to the Nonroad Diesel Engine Program will begin on February 22,...

  13. The effect of conflicting medication information and physician support on medication adherence for chronically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Delesha M.; DeVellis, Robert F.; Fisher, Edwin B.; DeVellis, Brenda M.; Hogan, Susan L.; Jordan, Joanne M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This article explores the effect of conflicting information, defined as contradictory information about medication topics from different sources, on medication adherence in a sample of chronically ill patients. We specifically investigate whether conflicting information and physician support directly affect medication adherence or whether the effect is mediated by adherence self-efficacy and outcome expectations for medications. Methods Vasculitis patients (n=228) completed two on-line questionnaires which contained measures of conflicting information, adherence self-efficacy, outcome expectations, physician support, and medication adherence. We conducted a mediation analysis using a bootstrapping approach to generate point estimates and 95% confidence intervals to test the significance of each mediated effect. Results A majority of patients (51.3%) received conflicting medication information. Conflicting information had a direct negative effect on medication adherence, which was not mediated by self-efficacy or outcome expectations. Alternatively, self-efficacy mediated the positive effect of physician support on medication adherence. Conclusion Patients who encounter conflicting medication information are less adherent to their medications. The presence of a supportive physician may counteract the negative effect of conflicting medication information. Practice Implications Physicians should initiate conversations about conflicting medication information with their patients. Consensus-based guidelines that address medication discrepancies may also reduce the availability of conflicting information. PMID:20044230

  14. Electronic medical record systems in critical access hospitals: leadership perspectives on anticipated and realized benefits.

    PubMed

    Mills, Troy R; Vavroch, Jared; Bahensky, James A; Ward, Marcia M

    2010-04-01

    The growth of electronic medical records (EMRs) is driven by the belief that EMRs will significantly improve healthcare providers' performance and reduce healthcare costs. Evidence supporting these beliefs is limited, especially for small rural hospitals. A survey that focused on health information technology (HIT) capacity was administered to all hospitals in Iowa. Structured interviews were conducted with the leadership at 15 critical access hospitals (CAHs) that had implemented EMRs in order to assess the perceived benefits of operational EMRs. The results indicate that most of the hospitals implemented EMRs to improve efficiency, timely access, and quality. Many CAH leaders also viewed EMR implementation as a necessary business strategy to remain viable and improve financial performance. While some reasons reflect external influences, such as perceived future federal mandates, other reasons suggest that the decision was driven by internal forces, including the hospital's culture and the desires of key leaders to embrace HIT. Anticipated benefits were consistent with goals; however, realized benefits were rarely obvious in terms of quantifiable results. These findings expand the limited research on the rationale for implementing EMRs in critical access hospitals.

  15. [Project Shared Medical Record in Catalonia, Spain: legal framework and enforcement of rights of access, rectification, cancellation and opposition (ARCO)].

    PubMed

    Borrás-Pascual, Maria Josep; Busquets-Font, Josep Maria; García-Martínez, Anna; Manent-González, Martí

    2010-02-01

    The Constitution and especially the Constitutional Court's jurisprudence have recognized the so-called right of habeas data, providing legal protection at the highest level of personal data. Health information, falls within the scope of protection, but we see that there are peculiarities in the health and development legislation that compels us to treat such information with special characteristics. This article will review the citizen's rights to access to health information, taking into account both the protection of personal data such as regulating access to specific health information and tools that have been developed for the exercise of these rights under the "Shared Medical Record" project developed by the Department of Health of the Generalitat of Catalonia. In particular the rights that are discussed are: the right of access to information, the right of correction, the right of cancellation. The right of access to information enables anyone to know if their personal data are processed, the purpose of treatment and the available information on the origin of personal data. In addition the law also allows to know whether the data have been disclosed to a third party. The right of rectification gives -concerned in this case the patient- the right to correct any data that contain errors. The cancellation right is restricted to situations where it really is exercising a right of correction against information. Finally, the right to object is for patients to be able to oppose their health data is consulted by various health care facilities to generate them.

  16. Constructing a knowledge-based database for dermatological integrative medical information.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jeeyoung; Jo, Yunju; Bae, Hyunsu; Hong, Moochang; Shin, Minkyu; Kim, Yangseok

    2013-01-01

    Recently, overuse of steroids and immunosuppressive drugs has produced incurable dermatological health problems. Traditional medical approaches have been studied for alternative solutions. However, accessing relevant information is difficult given the differences in information for western medicine (WM) and traditional medicine (TM). Therefore, an integrated medical information infrastructure must be utilized to bridge western and traditional treatments. In this study, WM and TM information was collected based on literature searches and information from internet databases on dermatological issues. Additionally, definitions for unified terminology and disease categorization based on individual cases were generated. Also a searchable database system was established that may be a possible model system for integrating both WM and TM medical information on dermatological conditions. Such a system will yield benefits for researchers and facilitate the best possible medical solutions for patients. The DIMI is freely available online.

  17. Constructing a Knowledge-Based Database for Dermatological Integrative Medical Information

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yunju; Bae, Hyunsu; Hong, Moochang; Shin, Minkyu; Kim, Yangseok

    2013-01-01

    Recently, overuse of steroids and immunosuppressive drugs has produced incurable dermatological health problems. Traditional medical approaches have been studied for alternative solutions. However, accessing relevant information is difficult given the differences in information for western medicine (WM) and traditional medicine (TM). Therefore, an integrated medical information infrastructure must be utilized to bridge western and traditional treatments. In this study, WM and TM information was collected based on literature searches and information from internet databases on dermatological issues. Additionally, definitions for unified terminology and disease categorization based on individual cases were generated. Also a searchable database system was established that may be a possible model system for integrating both WM and TM medical information on dermatological conditions. Such a system will yield benefits for researchers and facilitate the best possible medical solutions for patients. The DIMI is freely available online. PMID:24386003

  18. The Latest Information on Fort Detrick Gate Access Procedures | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    As of Jan. 5, all visitors to Fort Detrick are required to undergo a National Crime Information Center background check prior to entering base. The background checks are conducted at Old Farm Gate. The new access procedures may cause delays at all Fort Detrick gates, but especially at Old Farm Gate. Access requirements have not changed for employees and personnel with a federal/NIH PIV card. Other types of identification badges are no longer acceptable.

  19. Open Access: How Is Scholarly Information Service System Going?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Nanqiang; Zhang, Yaokun

    Open access movement has resulted in a change of the entire scholarly communication environment. Scholarly information service system (SISS) had a significant change which is represented in the emergency of various open access publishing mode and diversification of integrated value-added service providers. This paper analyzed this change, and discussed how academic library should react to the change; also some possible impacts on scientific communication were discussed.

  20. Rights to information access under the Data Protection Act.

    PubMed

    Dimond, Bridgit

    A patient has a legal right to access personal information held by health professionals on the basis of statutory provisions, such as the Data Protection Act 1998 and the regulations made under that Act, the Access to Health Reports Act 1988 (which is considered in a later article), and also on the basis of the common law, i.e. judge made or case law. Neither legal rights, however, give the patient an absolute right, but are qualified.

  1. [A survey of medical information education in radiological technology schools].

    PubMed

    Ohba, Hisateru; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Shuhei; Hosoba, Minoru; Okuda, Yasuo; Konishi, Yasuhiko; Ikeda, Ryuji

    2010-08-20

    The purpose of this study was to clarify actual conditions and problems in medical information education and to propose the educational concept to be adopted in medical information. A questionnaire survey was carried out by the anonymous method in June 2008. The survey was intended for 40 radiological technology schools. The questionnaire items were as follows: (1) educational environment in medical information education, (2) content of a lecture in medical information, (3) problems in medical information education. The response rate was 55.0% (22 schools). Half of the responding schools had a laboratory on medical information. Seventeen schools had a medical information education facility, and out of them, approximately 50% had an educational medical information system. The main problems of the medical information education were as follows: (a) motivation of the students is low, (b) the educational coverage and level for medical information are uncertain, (c) there are not an appropriate textbook and educational guidance. In conclusion, these findings suggest that it is necessary to have a vision of medical information education in the education of radiological technologists.

  2. 77 FR 6915 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... accommodations are accessible to individuals with disabilities.\\7\\ See 75 FR 43452 (July 26, 2010). Among other.... Survey respondents reported difficulties with getting on and off the equipment, positioning their bodies... for transferring onto and off of equipment and positioning their bodies on the equipment...

  3. IT Challenges for Space Medicine or How do We Protect Medical Information and Still Get Useful Work Done?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

    2010-01-01

    Space Medicine provides healthcare services of various types for astronauts throughout their lifetime starting from the time they are selected as astronauts. IT challenges include: protection of private medical information, access from locations both inside and outside NASA, nearly 24x7 access, access during disasters, international partner access, data archiving, off-region backup, secure communication of medical data to people outside the NASA system (e.g. expert consultants), efficient movement of medical record information between locations, search and retrieval of relevant information, and providing all of these services/capabilities within a limited budget. In Space Medicine, we have provided for these in various ways: limit the amount of private medical information stored locally, utilize encryption mechanisms that the international partners can also use, utilize 2-factor authentication, virtualize servers, employ concept-based search, and use of standardized terminologies (SNOMED) and messaging (HL7).

  4. Digital Atlas of Mexico Provides Accessible Climate Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala-Hidalgo, Jorge; Fernández-Eguiarte, Agustin; Romero-Centeno, Rosario; Zavala-Romero, Olmo

    2010-04-01

    Modern geomatic technologies—and particularly geoscientific, digital, and online multimedia cartography—represent one response to the growing demand for climatic information by the scientific community and general users. The Digital Climatic Atlas of Mexico (DCAM) fills the need to have readily accessible climate information about Mexico, Central America, and adjacent areas in preconfigured or user-configured georeferenced maps. The atlas provides information about the continental and oceanic climate, bioclimatic variables, and socioeconomic indicators (Figure 1).

  5. Medi-Cal selective contracting creates inequities, limits access.

    PubMed

    Parks, M C

    1991-01-01

    SPCP rate reductions, intended to encourage cost-effectiveness and efficiency, simply slash desperately needed funds. The reduced rates paid to Los Angeles county hospitals caused an estimated $130 million loss of Medi-Cal funds in the first four years of the contracting program alone.

  6. Enabling Access to Medical and Health Education in Rwanda Using Mobile Technology: Needs Assessment for the Development of Mobile Medical Educator Apps

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewski, Brian; Dusabejambo, Vincent; Ndayiragije, Vincent; Gonsalves, Snedden; Sawant, Aishwarya; Mumararungu, Angeline; Gasana, George; Amendezo, Etienne; Haake, Anne; Mutesa, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Background Lack of access to health and medical education resources for doctors in the developing world is a serious global health problem. In Rwanda, with a population of 11 million, there is only one medical school, hence a shortage in well-trained medical staff. The growth of interactive health technologies has played a role in the improvement of health care in developed countries and has offered alternative ways to offer continuous medical education while improving patient's care. However, low and middle-income countries (LMIC) like Rwanda have struggled to implement medical education technologies adapted to local settings in medical practice and continuing education. Developing a user-centered mobile computing approach for medical and health education programs has potential to bring continuous medical education to doctors in rural and urban areas of Rwanda and influence patient care outcomes. Objective The aim of this study is to determine user requirements, currently available resources, and perspectives for potential medical education technologies in Rwanda. Methods Information baseline and needs assessments data collection were conducted in all 44 district hospitals (DHs) throughout Rwanda. The research team collected qualitative data through interviews with 16 general practitioners working across Rwanda and 97 self-administered online questionnaires for rural areas. Data were collected and analyzed to address two key questions: (1) what are the currently available tools for the use of mobile-based technology for medical education in Rwanda, and (2) what are user's requirements for the creation of a mobile medical education technology in Rwanda? Results General practitioners from different hospitals highlighted that none of the available technologies avail local resources such as the Ministry of Health (MOH) clinical treatment guidelines. Considering the number of patients that doctors see in Rwanda, an average of 32 patients per day, there is need for a

  7. Particle data management--turning data into accessible information.

    PubMed

    Bonniface, J; Coppins, G J

    2007-09-01

    The UKAEA has assigned significant resources to the monitoring and retrieval of particles from the vicinity of its site at Dounreay in the north of Scotland. The monitoring, retrieval and analytical processes each generate information that is required for interpretative and record purposes. As significant resources are made available for studying and retrieving particles, the information collected must be managed in a logical, stable and accessible manner to protect the investment in information. If suitable data management procedures are not in place there is a high risk of data loss and duplication, and stakeholders may be unable to discover what information is already available or be unable to access the existing information. UKAEA Dounreay operates a geographic information system (GIS) that interfaces with a data management system known as IMAGES. These systems are used to securely store and access a wide range of environmental data including those relating to particles. A case study is presented illustrating the processes and systems involved with the collection, storage, analysis and distribution of particle data. The advantages gained through use of the GIS system are considered in relation to alternative types of record management system such as paper, and electronic non-spatial systems. It is considered that the GIS system offers very significant benefits in terms of standardisation of data capture, security of storage and increased accessibility of data compared with other systems. PMID:17768321

  8. Access to Medications for Cardiovascular Diseases in Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Veronika J; Kaplan, Warren A; Kwan, Gene F; Laing, Richard O

    2016-05-24

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) represent the highest burden of disease globally. Medicines are a critical intervention used to prevent and treat CVD. This review describes access to medication for CVD from a health system perspective and strategies that have been used to promote access, including providing medicines at lower cost, improving medication supply, ensuring medicine quality, promoting appropriate use, and managing intellectual property issues. Using key evidence in published and gray literature and systematic reviews, we summarize advances in access to cardiovascular medicines using the 5 health system dimensions of access: availability, affordability, accessibility, acceptability, and quality of medicines. There are multiple barriers to access of CVD medicines, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Low availability of CVD medicines has been reported in public and private healthcare facilities. When patients lack insurance and pay out of pocket to purchase medicines, medicines can be unaffordable. Accessibility and acceptability are low for medicines used in secondary prevention; increasing use is positively related to country income. Fixed-dose combinations have shown a positive effect on adherence and intermediate outcome measures such as blood pressure and cholesterol. We have a new opportunity to improve access to CVD medicines by using strategies such as efficient procurement of low-cost, quality-assured generic medicines, development of fixed-dose combination medicines, and promotion of adherence through insurance schemes that waive copayment for long-term medications. Monitoring progress at all levels, institutional, regional, national, and international, is vital to identifying gaps in access and implementing adequate policies.

  9. Patient access to medical records--from issue to law. Part I: An historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Morgan, C

    1984-05-01

    The growing interest of the individual in gaining control of his destiny, reflected over the past two decades in the consumer movement, has run a course parallel to the establishment of patient rights in consumption of health services. The desire to know the particulars of his health care is one such area of consumer interest, and across the nation, this desire to know is fast becoming an absolute right to know. Although in some states this right has become established through the courts, it would appear to be more satisfactorily ensured by means of specific legislation. The state of Maryland has enacted a statute which guarantees the patient access to his own medical record information: this process is surveyed as a means of expanding the evolutionary process from issue to law. Part II of this article, which will appear in the next issue of JAMRA provides an action model for states in which similar change is sought.

  10. Access to regulatory information in Malaysia - a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Razak, D A

    1996-01-01

    In 1984 Malaysia introduced legislation pertaining to drug regulatory control under The Control of Drugs and Cosmetics Regulations, 1984. A decade after its implementation, the general drug situation in the country has improved considerably and this is reflected in the number of drugs registered using the criteria of quality, safety and efficacy. However, not much attention has been paid to the question of access to regulatory information. This paper reports a preliminary survey on access to regulatory information in Malaysia, and examines the process of drug registration since the implementation of the 1984 regulations.

  11. Expanded access to naloxone among firefighters, police officers, and emergency medical technicians in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Davis, Corey S; Ruiz, Sarah; Glynn, Patrick; Picariello, Gerald; Walley, Alexander Y

    2014-08-01

    Naloxone is a medication that reverses respiratory depression from opioid overdose if given in time. Paramedics routinely administer naloxone to opioid overdose victims in the prehospital setting, and many states are moving to increase access to the medication. Several jurisdictions have expanded naloxone administration authority to nonparamedic first responders, and others are considering that step. We report here on policy change in Massachusetts, where several communities have equipped emergency medical technicians, law enforcement officers, and firefighters with naloxone.

  12. Teleradiology network system using the web medical image conference system with a new information security solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Hitoshi; Niki, Noboru; Eguchi, Kenji; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Kusumoto, Masahiro; Kaneko, Masahiro; Kakinuma, Ryutaru; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2012-02-01

    We have developed the teleradiology network system with a new information security solution that provided with web medical image conference system. In the teleradiology network system, the security of information network is very important subjects. We are studying the secret sharing scheme and the tokenization as a method safely to store or to transmit the confidential medical information used with the teleradiology network system. The confidential medical information is exposed to the risk of the damage and intercept. Secret sharing scheme is a method of dividing the confidential medical information into two or more tallies. Individual medical information cannot be decoded by using one tally at all. Our method has the function of automatic backup. With automatic backup technology, if there is a failure in a single tally, there is redundant data already copied to other tally. Confidential information is preserved at an individual Data Center connected through internet because individual medical information cannot be decoded by using one tally at all. Therefore, even if one of the Data Centers is struck and information is damaged due to the large area disaster like the great earthquake of Japan, the confidential medical information can be decoded by using the tallies preserved at the data center to which it escapes damage. Moreover, by using tokenization, the history information of dividing the confidential medical information into two or more tallies is prevented from lying scattered by replacing the history information with another character string (Make it to powerlessness). As a result, information is available only to those who have rightful access it and the sender of a message and the message itself are verified at the receiving point. We propose a new information transmission method and a new information storage method with a new information security solution.

  13. Users' information-seeking behavior on a medical library Website

    PubMed Central

    Rozic-Hristovski, Anamarija; Hristovski, Dimitar; Todorovski, Ljupco

    2002-01-01

    The Central Medical Library (CMK) at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia, started to build a library Website that included a guide to library services and resources in 1997. The evaluation of Website usage plays an important role in its maintenance and development. Analyzing and exploring regularities in the visitors' behavior can be used to enhance the quality and facilitate delivery of information services, identify visitors' interests, and improve the server's performance. The analysis of the CMK Website users' navigational behavior was carried out by analyzing the Web server log files. These files contained information on all user accesses to the Website and provided a great opportunity to learn more about the behavior of visitors to the Website. The majority of the available tools for Web log file analysis provide a predefined set of reports showing the access count and the transferred bytes grouped along several dimensions. In addition to the reports mentioned above, the authors wanted to be able to perform interactive exploration and ad hoc analysis and discover trends in a user-friendly way. Because of that, we developed our own solution for exploring and analyzing the Web logs based on data warehousing and online analytical processing technologies. The analytical solution we developed proved successful, so it may find further application in the field of Web log file analysis. We will apply the findings of the analysis to restructuring the CMK Website. PMID:11999179

  14. 'Pharmacy deserts' are prevalent in Chicago's predominantly minority communities, raising medication access concerns.

    PubMed

    Qato, Dima M; Daviglus, Martha L; Wilder, Jocelyn; Lee, Todd; Qato, Danya; Lambert, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    Attempts to explain and address disparities in the use of prescription medications have focused almost exclusively on their affordability. However, the segregation of residential neighborhoods by race or ethnicity also may influence access to the pharmacies that, in turn, provide access to prescription medications within a community. We examined whether trends in the availability of pharmacies varied across communities in Chicago with different racial or ethnic compositions. We also examined the geographic accessibility of pharmacies to determine whether "pharmacy deserts," or low-access neighborhoods, were more common in segregated black and Hispanic communities than elsewhere. We found that throughout the period 2000-2012 the number of pharmacies was lower in segregated minority communities than in segregated white communities and integrated communities. In 2012 there were disproportionately more pharmacy deserts in segregated black communities, as well as in low-income communities and federally designated Medically Underserved Areas. Our findings suggest that public policies aimed at improving access to prescription medications may need to address factors beyond insurance coverage and medication affordability. Such policies could include financial incentives to locate pharmacies in pharmacy deserts or the incorporation of pharmacies into community health centers in Medically Underserved Areas.

  15. Future of security and privacy in medical information.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Gio

    2002-01-01

    Today, issues of privacy and confidentiality in healthcare are dealt largely informally. Little legislation exists, and the awkwardness of accessing paper records makes violations of patients' privacy sporadic. As healthcare institutions move towards a future where all information is kept in an Electronic Medical Record (EMR), the casual attitudes that are prevalent will be in conflict with the desires and expectations of the patients. Legislation has been passed to make the holders of medical data responsible for securely protecting the patients privacy. Specific implementation guidelines are still lacking. There is much institutional resistance to the adoption of rigorous rules, but we expect that in the near future reliable procedures will have to be implemented to comply both with legal guidelines and patient's expectations. After introducing the issue more precisely we provide an overview over the concepts needed to understand the roles of technology of privacy and security and the people that must manage the technology. We then discuss the components of secure EMR systems and will point out where adequate technology exists and where future improvements are essential. We conclude with some advice to healthcare management facing the demands for security and privacy that the future will bring.

  16. Effective management of medical information through ROI-lossless fragile image watermarking technique.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudeb; Kundu, Malay Kumar

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we have proposed a blind, fragile and Region of Interest (ROI) lossless medical image watermarking (MIW) technique, providing an all-in-one solution tool to various medical data distribution and management issues like security, content authentication, safe archiving, controlled access retrieval, and captioning. The proposed scheme combines lossless data compression and encryption technique to embed electronic health record (EHR)/DICOM metadata, image hash, indexing keyword, doctor identification code and tamper localization information in the medical images. Extensive experiments (both subjective and objective) were carried out to evaluate performance of the proposed MIW technique. The findings offer suggestive evidence that the proposed MIW scheme is an effective all-in-one solution tool to various issues of medical information management domain. Moreover, given its relative simplicity, the proposed scheme can be applied to the medical images to serve in many medical applications concerned with privacy protection, safety, and management.

  17. Effective management of medical information through ROI-lossless fragile image watermarking technique.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudeb; Kundu, Malay Kumar

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we have proposed a blind, fragile and Region of Interest (ROI) lossless medical image watermarking (MIW) technique, providing an all-in-one solution tool to various medical data distribution and management issues like security, content authentication, safe archiving, controlled access retrieval, and captioning. The proposed scheme combines lossless data compression and encryption technique to embed electronic health record (EHR)/DICOM metadata, image hash, indexing keyword, doctor identification code and tamper localization information in the medical images. Extensive experiments (both subjective and objective) were carried out to evaluate performance of the proposed MIW technique. The findings offer suggestive evidence that the proposed MIW scheme is an effective all-in-one solution tool to various issues of medical information management domain. Moreover, given its relative simplicity, the proposed scheme can be applied to the medical images to serve in many medical applications concerned with privacy protection, safety, and management. PMID:23816251

  18. Improving access to a primary care medical clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Meditz, R. W.; Manberg, C. L.; Rosner, F.

    1992-01-01

    Patients presenting to an episodic care walk-in clinic often warrant prompt but not necessarily emergency attention. Legitimate reasons often prohibit these patients from attending regularly scheduled daytime weekday clinics. Most patients interviewed thought that having a single primary care provider was important to ensure continuity of care. Access to primary care can be improved by scheduling clinics and ancillary services on nontraditional times and days. Enhanced communication can help patients differentiate routine from urgent from emergency conditions. Printed and audiovisual materials can be used to increase awareness of the benefits of comprehensive care. PMID:1507251

  19. Automated medical information system of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Eagan, G.D.; Grier, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    The Medical Information System (MIS) at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory automates the acquisition, storage, and retrieval of medical information concerning the nine thousand project-connected personnel. The MIS incorporates an on-line, interactive medical history questionnaire, mark sense form processing, and automated coronary risk assesment in the medical evaluation process. Also, MIS has created the ability for long-term study and comparison of employee health as well as made the physician's time more effective.

  20. Accessing and Sharing Data Using the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarboton, D. G.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Whiteaker, T. L.; Maidment, D. R.; Zaslavsky, I.

    2008-12-01

    The Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc (CUAHSI) has a Hydrologic Information System (HIS) project, which is developing infrastructure to support the sharing of hydrologic data through web services and tools for data discovery, access and publication. Centralized data services support access to National Datasets such as the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) and SNOTEL, in a standard way. Distributed data services allow users to establish their own server and publish their data through CUAHSI HIS web services. Once such a data service is registered within HIS Central, it becomes searchable and accessible through the centralized discovery and data access tools. The HIS is founded upon an information model for observations at stationary points that supports its data services. This is implemented as both XML and relational database schema for transmission and storage of data respectively. WaterML is the XML based data transmission model that underlies the machine to machine communications, while the Observations Data Model (ODM) is a relational database model for persistent data storage. Web services support access to hydrologic data stored in ODM and transmitted using WaterML directly from applications software such as Excel, MATLAB and ArcGIS that have Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) capability. A significant value of web services derives from the capability to use them from within a user's preferred analysis environment, rather than requiring a user to learn new software. This allows a user to work with data from national and academic sources, almost as though it was on their local disk. This poster will be computer-based with internet access for demonstration of HIS tools and functionality.

  1. A novel user authentication and key agreement protocol for accessing multi-medical server usable in TMIS.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ruhul; Biswas, G P

    2015-03-01

    Telecare Medical Information System (TMIS) makes an efficient and convenient connection between patient(s)/user(s) at home and doctor(s) at a clinical center. To ensure secure connection between the two entities (patient(s)/user(s), doctor(s)), user authentication is enormously important for the medical server. In this regard, many authentication protocols have been proposed in the literature only for accessing single medical server. In order to fix the drawbacks of the single medical server, we have primarily developed a novel architecture for accessing several medical services of the multi-medical server, where a user can directly communicate with the doctor of the medical server securely. Thereafter, we have developed a smart card based user authentication and key agreement security protocol usable for TMIS system using cryptographic one-way hash function. We have analyzed the security of our proposed authentication scheme through both formal and informal security analysis. Furthermore, we have simulated the proposed scheme for the formal security verification using the widely-accepted AVISPA (Automated Validation of Internet Security Protocols and Applications) tool and showed that the scheme is secure against the replay and man-in-the-middle attacks. The informal security analysis is also presented which confirms that the protocol has well security protection on the relevant security attacks. The security and performance comparison analysis confirm that the proposed protocol not only provides security protection on the above mentioned attacks, but it also achieves better complexities along with efficient login and password change phase. PMID:25681100

  2. Information needs research in the era of the digital medical library.

    PubMed Central

    Lomax, E. C.; Lowe, H. J.

    1998-01-01

    The rapid adoption of Internet-accessible information resources by the clinical community, has resulted in an exponential growth in the variety and type of clinical information resources along with an increasing diversity of information technologies to deliver clinical information. To date, little formal work has been done to investigate the significance of new information technologies such as Internet-based digital libraries and multimedia record systems on clinical information need or information seeking behavior. In the work described in this paper, we highlight some results from our recent multimethod research design and investigation of the information-seeking behavior of Pittsburgh area medical oncologists to argue for the use of a multimethod research design as an essential component of any investigation of clinical information need and information-seeking behavior in the era of the digital medical library. PMID:9929301

  3. Information needs research in the era of the digital medical library.

    PubMed

    Lomax, E C; Lowe, H J

    1998-01-01

    The rapid adoption of Internet-accessible information resources by the clinical community, has resulted in an exponential growth in the variety and type of clinical information resources along with an increasing diversity of information technologies to deliver clinical information. To date, little formal work has been done to investigate the significance of new information technologies such as Internet-based digital libraries and multimedia record systems on clinical information need or information seeking behavior. In the work described in this paper, we highlight some results from our recent multimethod research design and investigation of the information-seeking behavior of Pittsburgh area medical oncologists to argue for the use of a multimethod research design as an essential component of any investigation of clinical information need and information-seeking behavior in the era of the digital medical library.

  4. Online Information Retrieval. Teaching Electronic Access in the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Elaine; And Others

    The electronic information access skills outlined in this guide for teachers and library media specialists expand the online searching skills discussed in the previous Wisconsin Educational Media Association handbook, and further delineate skill development in this crucial area. This publication is designed to serve as a broad planning and…

  5. 45 CFR 1326.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO INDIAN TRIBES FOR SUPPORT AND NUTRITION SERVICES § 1326.17 Access to information. A tribal...

  6. 45 CFR 1326.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO INDIAN TRIBES FOR SUPPORT AND NUTRITION SERVICES § 1326.17 Access to information. A tribal...

  7. 45 CFR 1326.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO INDIAN TRIBES FOR SUPPORT AND NUTRITION SERVICES § 1326.17 Access to information. A tribal...

  8. 45 CFR 1326.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO INDIAN TRIBES FOR SUPPORT AND NUTRITION SERVICES § 1326.17 Access to information. A tribal...

  9. 45 CFR 1326.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO INDIAN TRIBES FOR SUPPORT AND NUTRITION SERVICES § 1326.17 Access to information. A tribal...

  10. 45 CFR 1328.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Access to information. 1328.17 Section 1328.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS...

  11. 45 CFR 1328.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Access to information. 1328.17 Section 1328.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS...

  12. 45 CFR 1328.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Access to information. 1328.17 Section 1328.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS...

  13. 45 CFR 1328.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Access to information. 1328.17 Section 1328.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS...

  14. 45 CFR 1328.17 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Access to information. 1328.17 Section 1328.17 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS...

  15. 7 CFR 3402.22 - Access to peer review information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Access to peer review information. 3402.22 Section 3402.22 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL...

  16. 18 CFR 388.113 - Accessing critical energy infrastructure information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 CFR 388.112(b). The Commission reserves the right to restrict access to previously filed documents... in accordance with 18 CFR 388.109. ... energy infrastructure information. 388.113 Section 388.113 Conservation of Power and Water...

  17. 18 CFR 388.113 - Accessing critical energy infrastructure information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 CFR 388.112(b). The Commission reserves the right to restrict access to previously filed documents... in accordance with 18 CFR 388.109. ... energy infrastructure information. 388.113 Section 388.113 Conservation of Power and Water...

  18. 18 CFR 388.113 - Accessing critical energy infrastructure information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 CFR 388.112(b). The Commission reserves the right to restrict access to previously filed documents... in accordance with 18 CFR 388.109. ... energy infrastructure information. 388.113 Section 388.113 Conservation of Power and Water...

  19. 18 CFR 388.113 - Accessing critical energy infrastructure information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 CFR 388.112(b). The Commission reserves the right to restrict access to previously filed documents... in accordance with 18 CFR 388.109. ... energy infrastructure information. 388.113 Section 388.113 Conservation of Power and Water...

  20. 5 CFR 1303.10 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Access to information. 1303.10 Section..., or promulgated by OMB, that are within the scope of 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2). A public reading area is... with all practicable speed, with another agency having a substantial interest in the determination...

  1. 5 CFR 1303.10 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Access to information. 1303.10 Section..., or promulgated by OMB, that are within the scope of 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2). A public reading area is... with all practicable speed, with another agency having a substantial interest in the determination...

  2. 24 CFR 401.503 - Access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Access to information. 401.503 Section 401.503 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MULTIFAMILY HOUSING MORTGAGE AND HOUSING ASSISTANCE RESTRUCTURING...

  3. 77 FR 67595 - Medical Diagnostic Equipment Accessibility Standards Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    .... See 77 FR 6916 (February 9, 2012). The NPRM and information related to the proposed standards are... requested to refrain from using perfume, cologne, and other fragrances for the ] comfort of...

  4. [Current problems of information technologies application for forces medical service].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V V; Korneenkov, A A; Bogomolov, V D; Borisov, D N; Rezvantsev, M V

    2013-06-01

    The modern information technologies are the key factors for the upgrading of forces medical service. The aim of this article is the analysis of prospective information technologies application for the upgrading of forces medical service. The authors suggested 3 concepts of information support of Russian military health care on the basis of data about information technologies application in the foreign armed forces, analysis of the regulatory background, prospects of military-medical service and gathered experience of specialists. These three concepts are: development of united telecommunication network of the medical service of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation medical service, working out and implementation of standard medical information systems for medical units and establishments, monitoring the military personnel health state and military medical service resources. It is noted that on the assumption of sufficient centralized financing and industrial implementation of the military medical service prospective information technologies, by the year 2020 the united information space of the military medical service will be created and the target information support effectiveness will be achieved.

  5. Lifestyle-related factors and access to medically assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Dondorp, W; de Wert, G; Pennings, G; Shenfield, F; Devroey, P; Tarlatzis, B; Barri, P

    2010-03-01

    Lifestyle is increasingly recognized as an outcome-determining factor in assisted reproduction, not only with regard to the cost-effectiveness but also in view of the balance of benefits and risks, including risks related to the welfare of the future child. This document briefly summarizes the evidence concerning the impact of three lifestyle-related factors (obesity, tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption) on both natural and assisted reproduction (IVF) and discusses the implications of this for the practice of medically assisted reproduction in the light of relevant ethical principles. The central question is whether and to what extent fertility treatment of obese, smoking or drinking patients should be made conditional on prior lifestyle changes.

  6. Development of a clinical information tool for the electronic medical record: a case study*

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Barbara A; Wessel, Charles B; Yarger, Frances; LaDue, John; Fiorillo, Anthony B

    2010-01-01

    Question: What is the process of developing a clinical information tool to be embedded in the electronic health record of a very large and diverse academic medical center? Setting: The development took place at the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System. Method: The clinical information tool developed is a search box with subject tabs to provide quick access to designated full-text information resources. Each subject tab offers a federated search of a different pool of resources. Search results are organized “on the fly” into meaningful categories using clustering technology and are directly accessible from the results page. Results: After more than a year of discussion and planning, a clinical information tool was embedded in the academic medical center's electronic health record. Conclusion: The library successfully developed a clinical information tool, called Clinical-e, for use at the point of care. Future development will refine the tool and evaluate its impact and effectiveness. PMID:20648256

  7. Patient decision making in the face of conflicting medication information

    PubMed Central

    Elstad, Emily; Carpenter, Delesha M.; Devellis, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    When patients consult more than one source of information about their medications, they may encounter conflicting information. Although conflicting information has been associated with negative outcomes, including worse medication adherence, little is known about how patients make health decisions when they receive conflicting information. The objective of this study was to explore the decision making strategies that individuals with arthritis use when they receive conflicting medication information. Qualitative telephone interviews were conducted with 20 men and women with arthritis. Interview vignettes posed scenarios involving conflicting information from different sources (e.g., doctor, pharmacist, and relative), and respondents were asked how they would respond to the situation. Data analysis involved inductive coding to identify emergent themes and deductive contextualization to make meaning from the emergent themes. In response to conflicting medication information, patients used rules of thumb, trial and error, weighed benefits and risks, and sought more information, especially from a doctor. Patients relied heavily on trial and error when there was no conflicting information involved in the vignette. In contrast, patients used rules of thumb as a unique response to conflicting information. These findings increase our understanding of what patients do when they receive conflicting medication information. Given that patient exposure to conflicting information is likely to increase alongside the proliferation of medication information on the Internet, patients may benefit from assistance in identifying the most appropriate decision strategies for dealing with conflicting information, including information about best information sources. PMID:22943889

  8. A semantic medical multimedia retrieval approach using ontology information hiding.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kehua; Zhang, Shigeng

    2013-01-01

    Searching useful information from unstructured medical multimedia data has been a difficult problem in information retrieval. This paper reports an effective semantic medical multimedia retrieval approach which can reflect the users' query intent. Firstly, semantic annotations will be given to the multimedia documents in the medical multimedia database. Secondly, the ontology that represented semantic information will be hidden in the head of the multimedia documents. The main innovations of this approach are cross-type retrieval support and semantic information preservation. Experimental results indicate a good precision and efficiency of our approach for medical multimedia retrieval in comparison with some traditional approaches.

  9. [From library to clinical decision support systems: access of general practitioner to quality information].

    PubMed

    Fauquert, B

    2012-09-01

    Since 2003, the following tools have been implemented in Belgium for improving the access of general practioners to the EBM literature: the Digital Library for Health and the evidence-linker of the CEBAM, the portal EBMPracticeNet.be and the multidimensional electronic clinical decision support EBMeDS. The aim of this article is to show the progress achieved in the information dissemination toward the belgian general practioners, particularly the access from the electronic health record. From the literature published these last years, the opportunities cited by the users are for using EBM and the strong willingness for using these literature access in the future; the limits are the medical data coding, the irrelevance of the search results, the alerts fatigue induced by EBMeDS. The achievements done and planned for the new EBMPracticeNet guidelines portal and the EBMeDS system are explained in the aim of informing belgian healthcare professionals. These projects are claiming for lauching a participatory process in the production and dissemination of EBM information. The discussion is focused on the belgian healthcare system advantages, the solutions for a reasonable implementation of these projects and for increasing the place of an evidence-based information in the healthcare decision process. Finally the input of these projects to the continuing medical education and to the healthcare quality are discussed, in a context of multifactorial interaction healthcare design (complexity design).

  10. Improving access to computer-based library and drug information services in patient-care areas.

    PubMed

    Tobia, R C; Bierschenk, N F; Knodel, L C; Bowden, V M

    1990-01-01

    A project to increase access to drug and biomedical information through electronic linkage of drug information and library services to three patient-care areas is described. In February 1987, microcomputer work stations were installed in the Bexar County Hospital District's hospital emergency department, medical residents' office, and ambulatory-care clinic, as well as in The University of Texas Health Science Center's library reference area and drug information service office. Drug information was available on compact disk through the Micromedex Computerized Clinical Information System (CCIS) database, which includes DRUGDEX, POISINDEX, EMERGINDEX, and IDENTIDEX. Each work station was also connected to the library's computer via modem, allowing access to the Library Information System, books, journals, audiovisual materials, miniMEDLINE, and an electronic mail system. During the six-month project, the system was used 5487 times by 702 people. The system was successful in providing drug and other information in clinical settings and in introducing clinical staff members to new information technology. To increase access to the system after the project ended, the CD-ROM version was discontinued, and the distributed tape version of CCIS for VAX computers was added to the library's online information system, making drug information more available throughout the campus and teaching hospitals. In 1988-89 an average of 200 people accessed the tape version of CCIS each month. Although it is difficult to replace the convenience of an onsite library, at least some drug and biomedical information needs in the clinical setting can be met through computer networking. PMID:2405657

  11. [Application of information management system about medical equipment].

    PubMed

    Hang, Jianjin; Zhang, Chaoqun; Wu, Xiang-Yang

    2011-05-01

    Based on the practice of workflow, information management system about medical equipment was developed and its functions such as gathering, browsing, inquiring and counting were introduced. With dynamic and complete case management of medical equipment, the system improved the management of medical equipment. PMID:21954586

  12. [Application of information management system about medical equipment].

    PubMed

    Hang, Jianjin; Zhang, Chaoqun; Wu, Xiang-Yang

    2011-05-01

    Based on the practice of workflow, information management system about medical equipment was developed and its functions such as gathering, browsing, inquiring and counting were introduced. With dynamic and complete case management of medical equipment, the system improved the management of medical equipment.

  13. Educating medical students in the era of ubiquitous information.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Charles P; Donaldson, Katherine M; Vantsevich, Anna V

    2016-05-01

    Health care around the world is going digital. This inexorable trend will result in: (1) routine documentation of care in digital form and emerging national infrastructures for sharing data that allow progress toward a learning health system; and (2) a biomedical "knowledge cloud" that is fully integrated into practice environments and accessible to both providers and consumers of healthcare. Concurrently, medical students will be complete digital natives who have literally grown up with the Internet and will enter practice early in the next decade when the projected changes in practice approach maturity. This essay describes three competencies linked to this evolving information environment-(1) knowing what you do and don't know, (2) ability to ask a good question, and (3) skills in evaluating and weighing evidence-and suggests educational approaches to promote student mastery of each competency. Shifting medical education to address these competencies will call into question many current methods but may be essential to fully prepare trainees for optimal practice in the future. PMID:27027546

  14. Educating medical students in the era of ubiquitous information

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Charles P.; Donaldson, Katherine M.; Vantsevich, Anna V.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Health care around the world is going digital. This inexorable trend will result in: (1) routine documentation of care in digital form and emerging national infrastructures for sharing data that allow progress toward a learning health system; and (2) a biomedical “knowledge cloud” that is fully integrated into practice environments and accessible to both providers and consumers of healthcare. Concurrently, medical students will be complete digital natives who have literally grown up with the Internet and will enter practice early in the next decade when the projected changes in practice approach maturity. This essay describes three competencies linked to this evolving information environment—(1) knowing what you do and don’t know, (2) ability to ask a good question, and (3) skills in evaluating and weighing evidence—and suggests educational approaches to promote student mastery of each competency. Shifting medical education to address these competencies will call into question many current methods but may be essential to fully prepare trainees for optimal practice in the future. PMID:27027546

  15. Educating medical students in the era of ubiquitous information.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Charles P; Donaldson, Katherine M; Vantsevich, Anna V

    2016-05-01

    Health care around the world is going digital. This inexorable trend will result in: (1) routine documentation of care in digital form and emerging national infrastructures for sharing data that allow progress toward a learning health system; and (2) a biomedical "knowledge cloud" that is fully integrated into practice environments and accessible to both providers and consumers of healthcare. Concurrently, medical students will be complete digital natives who have literally grown up with the Internet and will enter practice early in the next decade when the projected changes in practice approach maturity. This essay describes three competencies linked to this evolving information environment-(1) knowing what you do and don't know, (2) ability to ask a good question, and (3) skills in evaluating and weighing evidence-and suggests educational approaches to promote student mastery of each competency. Shifting medical education to address these competencies will call into question many current methods but may be essential to fully prepare trainees for optimal practice in the future.

  16. Accessing Wind Tunnels From NASA's Information Power Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Jeff; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Ames wind tunnel customers are one of the first users of the Information Power Grid (IPG) storage system at the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division. We wanted to be able to store their data on the IPG so that it could be accessed remotely in a secure but timely fashion. In addition, incorporation into the IPG allows future use of grid computational resources, e.g., for post-processing of data, or to do side-by-side CFD validation. In this paper, we describe the integration of grid data access mechanisms with the existing DARWIN web-based system that is used to access wind tunnel test data. We also show that the combined system has reasonable performance: wind tunnel data may be retrieved at 50Mbits/s over a 100 base T network connected to the IPG storage server.

  17. Information-Seeking Behaviors of Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Web-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    Westby, Erin Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical students face an information-rich environment in which retrieval and appraisal strategies are increasingly important. Objective To describe medical students’ current pattern of health information resource use and characterize their experience of instruction on information search and appraisal. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional web-based survey of students registered in the four-year MD Program at Dalhousie University (Halifax, Nova Scotia, and Saint John, New Brunswick, sites), Canada. We collected self-reported data on information-seeking behavior, instruction, and evaluation of resources in the context of their medical education. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results Surveys were returned by 213 of 462 eligible students (46.1%). Most respondents (165/204, 80.9%) recalled receiving formal instruction regarding information searches, but this seldom included nontraditional tools such as Google (23/107, 11.1%), Wikipedia, or social media. In their daily practice, however, they reported heavy use of these tools, as well as EBM summaries. Accessibility, understandability, and overall usefulness were common features of highly used resources. Students identified challenges managing information and/or resource overload and source accessibility. Conclusions Medical students receive instruction primarily on searching and assessing primary medical literature. In their daily practice, however, they rely heavily on nontraditional tools as well as EBM summaries. Attention to appropriate use and appraisal of nontraditional sources might enhance the current EBM curriculum. PMID:27731842

  18. Using Web 2.0 technologies to enhance evidence-based medical information.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Miriam J; Flanagin, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    This article invokes research on information seeking and evaluation to address how providers of evidence-based medical information can use Web 2.0 technologies to increase access to, enliven users' experiences with, and enrich the quality of the information available. In an ideal scenario, evidence-based medical information can take appropriate advantage of community intelligence spawned by Web 2.0 technologies, resulting in the ideal combination of scientifically sound, high-quality information that is imbued with experiential insights from a multitude of individuals. To achieve this goal, the authors argue that people will engage with information that they can access easily, and that they perceive as (a) relevant to their information-seeking goals and (b) credible. The authors suggest the utility of Web 2.0 technologies for engaging stakeholders with evidence-based medical information through these mechanisms, and the degree to which the information provided can and should be trusted. Last, the authors discuss potential problems with Web 2.0 information in relation to decision making in health contexts, and they conclude with specific and practical recommendations for the dissemination of evidence-based health information via Web 2.0 technologies.

  19. The Prevalence of Internet and Social Media Based Medication Information Seeking Behavior in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Bahkali, Salwa; Alfurih, Suha; Aldremly, Maha; Alzayyat, Ma'an; Alsurimi, Khaled; Househ, Mowafa

    2016-01-01

    The internet has become an important resource to help people search for online medication information. This study aims to report the prevalence and profile of Saudi online medication seeking behavior. Conducted via a web-based survey with Twitter participants between January-February, 2015, the primary outcome measures were the self-reported rates of using the internet to search for medication related information. A valid sample of 4847 participants was collected over the period of the study. Out of the total participants, 68.3% (n=3311) were found to seek online medication related information frequently. Most of the social media users were female 83.5% (n=2766). The majority of respondents 63.6% (n= 3081) used Google, followed by Twitter 28.7% (n= 1392), Snapchat 21%, (n=1019), WhatsApp 13.8% (n= 670), Instagram 11.4%, (n= 553), and Facebook 5.5 % (n= 267), with few searching YouTube 1.3% (n=65) to access online medication information. Findings indicate that the Saudi population actively uses the internet and social media to obtain medication information. Further studies are needed to explore the influence of the internet and social media on user perception, attitude, and behavior with the use of online medication information. PMID:27350524

  20. The Prevalence of Internet and Social Media Based Medication Information Seeking Behavior in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Bahkali, Salwa; Alfurih, Suha; Aldremly, Maha; Alzayyat, Ma'an; Alsurimi, Khaled; Househ, Mowafa

    2016-01-01

    The internet has become an important resource to help people search for online medication information. This study aims to report the prevalence and profile of Saudi online medication seeking behavior. Conducted via a web-based survey with Twitter participants between January-February, 2015, the primary outcome measures were the self-reported rates of using the internet to search for medication related information. A valid sample of 4847 participants was collected over the period of the study. Out of the total participants, 68.3% (n=3311) were found to seek online medication related information frequently. Most of the social media users were female 83.5% (n=2766). The majority of respondents 63.6% (n= 3081) used Google, followed by Twitter 28.7% (n= 1392), Snapchat 21%, (n=1019), WhatsApp 13.8% (n= 670), Instagram 11.4%, (n= 553), and Facebook 5.5 % (n= 267), with few searching YouTube 1.3% (n=65) to access online medication information. Findings indicate that the Saudi population actively uses the internet and social media to obtain medication information. Further studies are needed to explore the influence of the internet and social media on user perception, attitude, and behavior with the use of online medication information.

  1. Access to Medications for Cardiovascular Diseases in Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Veronika J; Kaplan, Warren A; Kwan, Gene F; Laing, Richard O

    2016-05-24

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) represent the highest burden of disease globally. Medicines are a critical intervention used to prevent and treat CVD. This review describes access to medication for CVD from a health system perspective and strategies that have been used to promote access, including providing medicines at lower cost, improving medication supply, ensuring medicine quality, promoting appropriate use, and managing intellectual property issues. Using key evidence in published and gray literature and systematic reviews, we summarize advances in access to cardiovascular medicines using the 5 health system dimensions of access: availability, affordability, accessibility, acceptability, and quality of medicines. There are multiple barriers to access of CVD medicines, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Low availability of CVD medicines has been reported in public and private healthcare facilities. When patients lack insurance and pay out of pocket to purchase medicines, medicines can be unaffordable. Accessibility and acceptability are low for medicines used in secondary prevention; increasing use is positively related to country income. Fixed-dose combinations have shown a positive effect on adherence and intermediate outcome measures such as blood pressure and cholesterol. We have a new opportunity to improve access to CVD medicines by using strategies such as efficient procurement of low-cost, quality-assured generic medicines, development of fixed-dose combination medicines, and promotion of adherence through insurance schemes that waive copayment for long-term medications. Monitoring progress at all levels, institutional, regional, national, and international, is vital to identifying gaps in access and implementing adequate policies. PMID:27217433

  2. [Inequities in access to information and inequities in health].

    PubMed

    Filho, Alberto Pellegrini

    2002-01-01

    This piece presents evidence that inequities in information are an important determinant of health inequities and that eliminating these inequities in access to information, especially by using new information and communication technologies (ICTs), could represent a significant advance in terms of guaranteeing the right to health for all. The piece reviews the most important international scientific research findings on the determinants of the health of populations, emphasizing the role of socioeconomic inequities and of deteriorating social capital as factors that worsen health conditions. It is noteworthy that Latin America has both socioeconomic inequities and major sectors of the population living in poverty. Among the fundamental strategies for overcoming the inequalities and the poverty are greater participation by the poor in civic life and the strengthening of social capital. The contribution that the new ICTs could make to these strategies is analyzed, and the Virtual Health Library (VHL) is discussed. Coordinated by the Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information (BIREME), the VHL is a contribution by the Pan American Health Organization that takes advantage of the potential of ICTs to democratize information and knowledge and consequently promote equity in health. The "digital gap" is discussed as something that can produce inequity itself and also increase other inequities, including ones in health. Prospects are discussed for overcoming this gap, emphasizing the role that governments and international organizations should play in order to expand access to the global public good that information for social development is.

  3. [Inequities in access to information and inequities in health].

    PubMed

    Filho, Alberto Pellegrini

    2002-01-01

    This piece presents evidence that inequities in information are an important determinant of health inequities and that eliminating these inequities in access to information, especially by using new information and communication technologies (ICTs), could represent a significant advance in terms of guaranteeing the right to health for all. The piece reviews the most important international scientific research findings on the determinants of the health of populations, emphasizing the role of socioeconomic inequities and of deteriorating social capital as factors that worsen health conditions. It is noteworthy that Latin America has both socioeconomic inequities and major sectors of the population living in poverty. Among the fundamental strategies for overcoming the inequalities and the poverty are greater participation by the poor in civic life and the strengthening of social capital. The contribution that the new ICTs could make to these strategies is analyzed, and the Virtual Health Library (VHL) is discussed. Coordinated by the Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information (BIREME), the VHL is a contribution by the Pan American Health Organization that takes advantage of the potential of ICTs to democratize information and knowledge and consequently promote equity in health. The "digital gap" is discussed as something that can produce inequity itself and also increase other inequities, including ones in health. Prospects are discussed for overcoming this gap, emphasizing the role that governments and international organizations should play in order to expand access to the global public good that information for social development is. PMID:12162837

  4. 78 FR 31800 - Accessible Emergency Information, and Apparatus Requirements for Emergency Information and Video...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010, Report and Order, 76 FR 55585 (2011) (``2011 Video..., 77 FR 70970, sought comment on this issue, the record is not yet sufficiently detailed for us to... subscribers to access linear video programming that contains emergency information via tablets,...

  5. Section 508 Electronic Information Accessibility Requirements for Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Section 508 Subpart B 1194.21 outlines requirements for operating system and software development in order to create a product that is accessible to users with various disabilities. This portion of Section 508 contains a variety of standards to enable those using assistive technology and with visual, hearing, cognitive and motor difficulties to access all information provided in software. The focus on requirements was limited to the Microsoft Windows® operating system as it is the predominant operating system used at this center. Compliance with this portion of the requirements can be obtained by integrating the requirements into the software development cycle early and by remediating issues in legacy software if possible. There are certain circumstances with software that may arise necessitating an exemption from these requirements, such as design or engineering software using dynamically changing graphics or numbers to convey information. These exceptions can be discussed with the Section 508 Coordinator and another method of accommodation used.

  6. A multi-agent softbot to retrieve medical information on Internet.

    PubMed

    Baujard, O; Baujard, V; Aurel, S; Boyer, C; Appel, R D

    1998-01-01

    World-Wide Web is a media where information is unstructured, distributed, multimedia and multilingual. Many tools have been developed to help users search for information: subject hierarchies, general search engines, browsers and search assistants. Although helpful, they show serious limitations, mainly in terms of precision, multilingual indexing and distribution. The M.A.R.V.I.N. project (Multi Agent Retrieval Vagabond on Information Networks) proposes solutions with a distribution of the indexing task in agents specialized in a given domain. M.A.R.V.I.N. has been successfully applied to the medical domain. The medical index and its associated search engine MedHunt (Medical Hunter) demonstrate the interest of such an approach with currently 50,000 indexed medical sites and more than 100,000 accesses each month. PMID:10384437

  7. Position of information science in the medical and health studies curricula.

    PubMed

    Kralova, E; Kukurova, E; Bergendi, L; Traubner, P

    2006-01-01

    Innovation of both the content and forms of informatics teaching directed on exploitation of technical facilities and methods of information and communication technologies (ICT) in non-informatics universities study programmes and in life-long education is still actual today. Expanding knowledge base of the life and health sciences requires to form new skills to educate the end-users and facilitate an immediate information access. Theoretical and practical teaching in pregradual medical and health studies includes the basic contacts of students with the modern technique and special medical devices supported or completed by computers. The teaching of information science and corresponding subjects represents small but important part of medical and health studies curricula at all medical faculties in Slovakia (Fig. 2, Ref. 8).

  8. Accessing wound-care information on the Internet: the implications for patients.

    PubMed

    Bovill, E S; Hormbrey, E; Gillespie, P H; Banwell, P E

    2001-02-01

    The Internet and the World Wide Web have revolutionised communication and provide a unique forum for the exchange of information. It has been proposed that the Internet has given the public more access to medical information resources and improved patient education. This study assessed the impact of the Internet on the availability of information on wound care management. The search phrases 'wound care', 'wound healing' and 'wounds' were analysed using a powerful Metacrawler search engine (www.go2net.com). Web site access was classified according to the target audience (wound-care specialists, other health professionals, patients) and the author (societies, institutions or commercial companies). The largest proportion of web sites were commercially based (32%). Of the total number, 23% specifically targeted patients, mostly by advertising. Only 20% were aimed at wound specialists. Extensive surfing was required to obtain wound-care information, and objective information sites were under-represented. Regulated, easily accessible, objective information sites on wound-healing topics are needed for improved patient education and to balance the existing commercial bias. PMID:12964224

  9. Our Commitment to Reliable Health and Medical Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... below: The commitment to reliable health and medical information on the internet HON was founded to encourage the dissemination of ... and trustworthy code for medical and health related information available on Internet.The HONcode is designed for three target audiences: ...

  10. Student Design and Evaluation of Written Patient Medication Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolinsky, Donna; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A project is described that aims: (1) to give undergraduate pharmacy students an understanding of the complexities of communicating medication information to patients, and (2) to teach skills in the design, analysis, and evaluation of written patient medication information. Materials students developed were evaluated by fellow students (MSE)

  11. An approach for integrating heterogeneous information sources in a medical data warehouse.

    PubMed

    Kerkri, E M; Quantin, C; Allaert, F A; Cottin, Y; Charve, P; Jouanot, F; Yétongnon, K

    2001-06-01

    In recent years, medical professionals are witnessing an explosive growth in data collected by various organizations and institutions. At the same time, the ongoing developments of networking technologies provide doctor with the capability to access these data across the boundaries of interconnected computers. In this paper we present a medical data warehousing methodology that aims to use data semantics to regroup and merge patients' medical data from different health information systems, which may be autonomous and heterogeneous. The proposed solution takes into account European laws concerning the security and anonymity of personal data.

  12. 29 CFR 1635.12 - Medical information that is not genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...)), and regulations at 29 CFR 1630.13, 1630.14, and 1630.16. (b) Genetic information related to a... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Medical information that is not genetic information. 1635... COMMISSION GENETIC INFORMATION NONDISCRIMINATION ACT OF 2008 § 1635.12 Medical information that is...

  13. 29 CFR 1635.12 - Medical information that is not genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)), and regulations at 29 CFR 1630.13, 1630.14, and 1630.16. (b) Genetic information related to a... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Medical information that is not genetic information. 1635... COMMISSION GENETIC INFORMATION NONDISCRIMINATION ACT OF 2008 § 1635.12 Medical information that is...

  14. 29 CFR 1635.12 - Medical information that is not genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...)), and regulations at 29 CFR 1630.13, 1630.14, and 1630.16. (b) Genetic information related to a... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Medical information that is not genetic information. 1635... COMMISSION GENETIC INFORMATION NONDISCRIMINATION ACT OF 2008 § 1635.12 Medical information that is...

  15. 29 CFR 1635.12 - Medical information that is not genetic information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...)), and regulations at 29 CFR 1630.13, 1630.14, and 1630.16. (b) Genetic information related to a... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Medical information that is not genetic information. 1635... COMMISSION GENETIC INFORMATION NONDISCRIMINATION ACT OF 2008 § 1635.12 Medical information that is...

  16. Medical Image Analysis by Cognitive Information Systems - a Review.

    PubMed

    Ogiela, Lidia; Takizawa, Makoto

    2016-10-01

    This publication presents a review of medical image analysis systems. The paradigms of cognitive information systems will be presented by examples of medical image analysis systems. The semantic processes present as it is applied to different types of medical images. Cognitive information systems were defined on the basis of methods for the semantic analysis and interpretation of information - medical images - applied to cognitive meaning of medical images contained in analyzed data sets. Semantic analysis was proposed to analyzed the meaning of data. Meaning is included in information, for example in medical images. Medical image analysis will be presented and discussed as they are applied to various types of medical images, presented selected human organs, with different pathologies. Those images were analyzed using different classes of cognitive information systems. Cognitive information systems dedicated to medical image analysis was also defined for the decision supporting tasks. This process is very important for example in diagnostic and therapy processes, in the selection of semantic aspects/features, from analyzed data sets. Those features allow to create a new way of analysis. PMID:27526188

  17. Medical Image Analysis by Cognitive Information Systems - a Review.

    PubMed

    Ogiela, Lidia; Takizawa, Makoto

    2016-10-01

    This publication presents a review of medical image analysis systems. The paradigms of cognitive information systems will be presented by examples of medical image analysis systems. The semantic processes present as it is applied to different types of medical images. Cognitive information systems were defined on the basis of methods for the semantic analysis and interpretation of information - medical images - applied to cognitive meaning of medical images contained in analyzed data sets. Semantic analysis was proposed to analyzed the meaning of data. Meaning is included in information, for example in medical images. Medical image analysis will be presented and discussed as they are applied to various types of medical images, presented selected human organs, with different pathologies. Those images were analyzed using different classes of cognitive information systems. Cognitive information systems dedicated to medical image analysis was also defined for the decision supporting tasks. This process is very important for example in diagnostic and therapy processes, in the selection of semantic aspects/features, from analyzed data sets. Those features allow to create a new way of analysis.

  18. Access to the Information Superhighway and Emerging Information Technologies by People with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, Washington, DC.

    This report discusses the growth of the National Information Infrastructure (NII), or the information superhighway, and its implications for people with disabilities. Advantages for people with disabilities include: increasing the ability of individuals with some types of disabilities to access and use information; decreasing personal isolation…

  19. Access to Corporate Information Systems: Datafiles, Classified Documents, and Information Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgartner, Kurt O.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Three articles discuss aspects of corporate information systems: (1) "Packet Switching Networks: Worldwide Access to Corporate Datafiles" (Kurt O. Baumgartner); "Classified Documents in the Corporate Library" (Patricia M. Shores); and "From Library to Information Center: Case Studies in the Evolution of Corporate Information Resources" (Eva M.…

  20. Accessing Queensland's soil information - an open data revolution!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Kelly; O'Brien, Lauren; Brough, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The Queensland government is the custodian of soil and land resource information with an estimated value of 75 million. The Soil and Land Information (SALI) system houses this data from over 600 distinct studies with some 96,000 soil observations dating back to the 1940s. This data is now not only used by government but by universities, councils, landowners, consultants and schools. Providing this information to the public in an easy and accessible way, with a focus towards online delivery is crucial. Previous issues with distribution of online soils information in Queensland have stemmed not only from limits to technology but also, changing departmental structures and multiple websites. The department which manages soils information in Queensland has undergone nine name changes in the last 12 years due to Machinery of Government (MoG) restructures. This constantly changing web presence and branding is as confusing for people sourcing soils information as it is for those providing it. The Queensland government has now moved to a whole of government online environment. This is a single website with no reference to the convoluted structures within government or department names. The aim is to prevent impacts from future MoG changes on the provision of data and information to the public. Queensland government soils now has a single dedicated website (qld.gov.au/environment/land/soil) which has allowed us to start to build a repository for soils information and is a single portal for people to access soils data. It has been demonstrated that this consistent approach to websites improves trust and confidence of users [1] and from this, confidence in using Queensland soils information and data and ultimately better land management decisions.

  1. Nip, tuck and click: medical tourism and the emergence of web-based health information.

    PubMed

    Lunt, Neil; Hardey, Mariann; Mannion, Russell

    2010-01-01

    An emerging trend is what has become commonly known as 'Medical Tourism' where patients travel to overseas destinations for specialised surgical treatments and other forms of medical care. With the rise of more affordable cross-border travel and rapid technological developments these movements are becoming more commonplace. A key driver is the platform provided by the internet for gaining access to healthcare information and advertising. There has been relatively little attention given to the role and impact of web-based information to inform Medical Tourism decisions.This article provides a brief overview of the most recent development in Medical Tourism and examines how this is linked to the emergence of specialized internet web sites. It produces a summary of the functionality of medical tourist sites, and situates Medical Tourism informatics within the broader literatures relating to information search, information quality and decision-making.This paper is both a call to strengthen the empirical evidence in this area, and also to advocate integrating Medical Tourism research within a broader conceptual framework. PMID:20517465

  2. Nip, Tuck and Click: Medical Tourism and the Emergence of Web-Based Health Information

    PubMed Central

    Lunt, Neil; Hardey, Mariann; Mannion, Russell

    2010-01-01

    An emerging trend is what has become commonly known as ‘Medical Tourism’ where patients travel to overseas destinations for specialised surgical treatments and other forms of medical care. With the rise of more affordable cross-border travel and rapid technological developments these movements are becoming more commonplace. A key driver is the platform provided by the internet for gaining access to healthcare information and advertising. There has been relatively little attention given to the role and impact of web-based information to inform Medical Tourism decisions. This article provides a brief overview of the most recent development in Medical Tourism and examines how this is linked to the emergence of specialized internet web sites. It produces a summary of the functionality of medical tourist sites, and situates Medical Tourism informatics within the broader literatures relating to information search, information quality and decision-making. This paper is both a call to strengthen the empirical evidence in this area, and also to advocate integrating Medical Tourism research within a broader conceptual framework. PMID:20517465

  3. Nip, tuck and click: medical tourism and the emergence of web-based health information.

    PubMed

    Lunt, Neil; Hardey, Mariann; Mannion, Russell

    2010-02-12

    An emerging trend is what has become commonly known as 'Medical Tourism' where patients travel to overseas destinations for specialised surgical treatments and other forms of medical care. With the rise of more affordable cross-border travel and rapid technological developments these movements are becoming more commonplace. A key driver is the platform provided by the internet for gaining access to healthcare information and advertising. There has been relatively little attention given to the role and impact of web-based information to inform Medical Tourism decisions.This article provides a brief overview of the most recent development in Medical Tourism and examines how this is linked to the emergence of specialized internet web sites. It produces a summary of the functionality of medical tourist sites, and situates Medical Tourism informatics within the broader literatures relating to information search, information quality and decision-making.This paper is both a call to strengthen the empirical evidence in this area, and also to advocate integrating Medical Tourism research within a broader conceptual framework.

  4. Health Information Security: A Case Study of Three Selected Medical Centers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hajrahimi, Nafiseh; Dehaghani, Sayed Mehdi Hejazi; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Health Information System (HIS) is considered a unique factor in improving the quality of health care activities and cost reduction, but today with the development of information technology and use of internet and computer networks, patients’ electronic records and health information systems have become a source for hackers. Methods This study aims at checking health information security of three selected medical centers in Iran using AHP fuzzy and TOPSIS compound model. To achieve that security measures were identified, based on the research literature and decision making matrix using experts’ points of view. Results and discussion Among the 27 indicators, seven indicators were selected as effective indicators and Fuzzy AHP technique was used to determine the importance of security indicators. Based on the comparisons made between the three selected medical centers to assess the security of health information, it is concluded that Chamran hospital has the most acceptable level of security and attention in three indicators of “verification and system design, user access management, access control system”, Al Zahra Hospital in two indicators of “access management and network access control” and Amin Hospital in “equipment safety and system design”. In terms of information security, Chamran Hospital ranked first, Al-Zahra Hospital ranked second and Al- Zahra hospital has the third place. PMID:23572861

  5. Exploring University Students' Online Information Seeking about Prescription Medications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkhalaf, Ahmad Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    This study explored university students' information seeking behaviors related to prescription medication (PM) information. Specifically, it examined the different sources students use for PM information, their use and perceptions of online sources, the types of PM information they seek, their concerns about, and methods they apply to verify the…

  6. 29 CFR 1915.1020 - Access to employee exposure and medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Access to employee exposure and medical records. 1915.1020 Section 1915.1020 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD...

  7. 29 CFR 1915.1020 - Access to employee exposure and medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Access to employee exposure and medical records. 1915.1020 Section 1915.1020 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD...

  8. The Impact of the Medical Home on Access to Care for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheak-Zamora, Nancy C.; Farmer, Janet E.

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) experience difficulty accessing health care services. Using parent-reported data from the 2009-2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, we examined whether having a medical home reduces unmet need for specialty care services for children with ASD (n = 3,055). Descriptive…

  9. The Role of International Medical Graduates in America?s Small Rural Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagopian, Amy; Thompson, Matthew J.; Kaltenbach, Emily; Hart, L. Gary

    2004-01-01

    Critical access hospitals (CAHs) are a federal Medicare category for isolated rural facilities with 15 or fewer acute care beds that receive cost-based reimbursement from Medicare. Purpose: This study examines the role of foreign-born international medical graduates (IMGs) in the staffing of CAHs. Methods: Chief executive officers (CEOs) of CAH…

  10. "Medical Education Online": A Case Study of an Open Access Journal in Health Professional Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The development of the World Wide Web (WWW) has made it possible of small groups of colleagues or even single individuals to create peer-reviewed scholarly journals. This paper discusses the development of Medical Education Online (MEO) an open access peer-reviewed journal in health professional education. Description: MEO was first…

  11. Disappearing Act: Persistence and Attrition of Uniform Resource Locators (URLs) in an Open Access Medical Journal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagaraja, Aragudige; Joseph, Shine A.; Polen, Hyla H.; Clauson, Kevin A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to assess and catalogue the magnitude of URL attrition in a high-impact, open access (OA) general medical journal. Design/methodology/approach: All "Public Library of Science Medicine (PLoS Medicine)" articles for 2005-2007 were evaluated and the following items were assessed: number of entries per issue; type of…

  12. Access to and value of information to support good practice for staff in Kenyan hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Muinga, Naomi; Sen, Barbara; Ayieko, Philip; Todd, Jim; English, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies have sought to define information needs of health workers within very specific settings or projects. Lacking in the literature is how hospitals in low-income settings are able to meet the information needs of their staff and the use of information communication technologies (ICT) in day-to-day information searching. Objective The study aimed to explore where professionals in Kenyan hospitals turn to for work-related information in their day-to-day work. Additionally, it examined what existing solutions are provided by hospitals with regard to provision of best practice care. Lastly, the study explored the use of ICT in information searching. Design Data for this study were collected in July 2012. Self-administered questionnaires (SAQs) were distributed across 22 study hospitals with an aim to get a response from 34 health workers per hospital. Results SAQs were collected from 657 health workers. The most popular sources of information to guide work were fellow health workers and printed guidelines while the least popular were scientific journals. Of value to health workers were: national treatment policies, new research findings, regular reports from surveillance data, information on costs of services and information on their performance of routine clinical tasks; however, hospitals only partially met these needs. Barriers to accessing information sources included: ‘not available/difficult to get’ and ‘difficult to understand’. ICT use for information seeking was reported and with demographic specific differences noted from the multivariate logistic regression model; nurses compared to medical doctors and older workers were less likely to use ICT for health information searching. Barriers to accessing Internet were identified as: high costs and the lack of the service at home or at work. Conclusions Hospitals need to provide appropriate information by improving information dissemination efforts and providing an enabling environment that

  13. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  14. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  15. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  16. 48 CFR 3004.470 - Security requirements for access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... access to unclassified facilities, Information Technology resources, and sensitive information. 3004.470... Technology resources, and sensitive information. ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Safeguarding Classified and Sensitive...

  17. Informed consent: corner stone in ethical medical and dental practice.

    PubMed

    Kakar, Heena; Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh; Singh, Simarpreet; Kaur, Amarinder; Nanda, Tarun

    2014-01-01

    Progress in health care technologies has enabled patients to be better informed about all aspects of health care. Patients' informed consent is a legal regulation and a moral principle which represents patients' rights to take part in the clinical decisions concerning their treatment. With increasing awareness among the patients, the concept of informed consent is also evolving in developing countries like India. It is important for the medical and dental practitioners to have a written and signed informed consent from their patients before performing any invasive or irreversible procedures. Informed consent is also needed when providing medical care to children, foreign patients, and incorporating images of the patients while conducting medical and dental research. The present review addresses some of the vital issues regarding informed consent when providing medical and dental care with current review of the literature. PMID:24791241

  18. Development of an integrated medical supply information system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Eric; Wermus, Marek; Blythe Bauman, Deborah

    2011-08-01

    The integrated medical supply inventory control system introduced in this study is a hybrid system that is shaped by the nature of medical supply, usage and storage capacity limitations of health care facilities. The system links demand, service provided at the clinic, health care service provider's information, inventory storage data and decision support tools into an integrated information system. ABC analysis method, economic order quantity model, two-bin method and safety stock concept are applied as decision support models to tackle inventory management issues at health care facilities. In the decision support module, each medical item and storage location has been scrutinised to determine the best-fit inventory control policy. The pilot case study demonstrates that the integrated medical supply information system holds several advantages for inventory managers, since it entails benefits of deploying enterprise information systems to manage medical supply and better patient services.

  19. Computers in medical education: information and knowledge management, understanding, and learning.

    PubMed

    Henry, J B

    1990-10-01

    Desktop computers have evolved to permit physicians in practice and/or training to access and manage information to enhance knowledge, understanding, and learning. There are compelling reasons why the personal computer is key to learning and important in medical education. Above all, the computer enhances and amplifies the learning process. Using the desktop computer effectively is relatively easy. We teach our students to research information in books and journals and hope that, as practicing physicians, they do it even more to be current and maintain their competency. Why not a desktop computer to access and manage information, analyze it, and present findings? Computer technology is available to do virtually all of these tasks. Some tools are critical for medical students. For some time, all medical students have needed a black bag and microscope. Now every medical student needs a computer. Ample courseware is available and expanding rapidly for basic sciences and clinical disciplines. The explosion in biomedical information will continue. Finding information is key to understanding and learning rather than depending solely on memory, recall, or library trips for information. The desktop computer will benefit students, faculty, and future physicians and other health professionals as life-long learners. PMID:2210737

  20. Spatial Analysis of the Distribution, Risk Factors and Access to Medical Resources of Patients with Hepatitis B in Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Yuliang; Ren, Fu; Liang, Shi; Zhang, Jinghua; Lin, De-Nan

    2014-01-01

    Considering the high morbidity of hepatitis B in China, many epidemiological studies based on classic medical statistical analysis have been started but lack spatial information. However, spatial information such as the spatial distribution, autocorrelation and risk factors of the disease is of great help in studying patients with hepatitis B. This study examined 2851 cases of hepatitis B that were hospitalized in Shenzhen in 2010 and studied the spatial distribution, risk factors and spatial access to health services using spatial interpolation, Pearson correlation analysis and the improved two-step floating catchment area method. The results showed that the spatial distribution of hepatitis B, along with risk factors as well as spatial access to the regional medical resources, was uneven and mainly concentrated in the south and southwest of Shenzhen in 2010. In addition, the distribution characteristics of hepatitis B revealed a positive correlation between four types of service establishments and risk factors for the disease. The Pearson correlation coefficients are 0.566, 0.515, 0.626, 0.538 corresponding to bath centres, beauty salons, massage parlours and pedicure parlours (p < 0.05). Additionally, the allocation of medical resources for hepatitis B is adequate, as most patients could be treated at nearby hospitals. PMID:25386954

  1. Pennsylvania Spatial Data Access and Online Advanced Spatial Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.; Petersen, G.; Kelly, M.; Day, R.

    2002-05-01

    The Pennsylvania Spatial Data Access system (PASDA) is Pennsylvania's official geospatial information clearinghouse and the Commonwealth's node on the National Spatial Data Infrastructure. The PASDA clearinghouse provides for the widespread sharing of geospatial data, eliminates the creation of redundant data sets, and serves as a resource for locating data throughout the Commonwealth through its comprehensive standardized data storage, online free download, interactive mapping tools, and metadata/documentation efforts. PASDA also serves as a primary member of the Geography Network, a node of the National Biological Information Infrastructure for fisheries and aquatic resources, and provides several WebGIS applications such as Pennsylvania Explorer and Pennsylvania Interactive Watershed Atlas. With PASDA data delivery and access mechanisms in place, we are further building Online Advanced Spatial Information Systems (OASIS) for 1) geospatial data mining and knowledge discovery and 2) intelligent spatial decision support. The OASIS intends to integrate artificial intelligence, spatial modeling, data mining tools, and expert systems into PASDA so that a mechanism for transforming geospatial data into information, synthesizing geospatial knowledge, and supporting spatial decision-making may be developed.

  2. 150 Years of Medical Information Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Elliot R.

    1987-01-01

    Traces the history of the National Library of Medicine with emphasis on research and development activities in biomedical communications and information science. Highlights include the areas of bibliographic control, library automation, information retrieval, knowledge management systems, and educational technologies. (CLB)

  3. Using Google Maps to Access USGS Volcano Hazards Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venezky, D. Y.; Snedigar, S.; Guffanti, M.; Bailey, J. E.; Wall, B. G.

    2006-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Volcano Hazard Program (VHP) is revising the information architecture of our website to provide data within a geospatial context for emergency managers, educators, landowners in volcanic areas, researchers, and the general public. Using a map-based interface for displaying hazard information provides a synoptic view of volcanic activity along with the ability to quickly ascertain where hazards are in relation to major population and infrastructure centers. At the same time, the map interface provides a gateway for educators and the public to find information about volcanoes in their geographic context. A plethora of data visualization solutions are available that are flexible, customizable, and can be run on individual websites. We are currently using a Google map interface because it can be accessed immediately from a website (a downloadable viewer is not required), and it provides simple features for moving around and zooming within the large map area that encompasses U.S. volcanism. A text interface will also be available. The new VHP website will serve as a portal to information for each volcano the USGS monitors with icons for alert levels and aviation color codes. When a volcano is clicked, a window will provide additional information including links to maps, images, and real-time data, thereby connecting information from individual observatories, the Smithsonian Institution, and our partner universities. In addition to the VHP home page, many observatories and partners have detailed graphical interfaces to data and images that include the activity pages for the Alaska Volcano Observatory, the Smithsonian Google Earth files, and Yellowstone Volcano Observatory pictures and data. Users with varied requests such as raw data, scientific papers, images, or brief overviews expect to be able to quickly access information for their specialized needs. Over the next few years we will be gathering, cleansing, reorganizing, and posting

  4. Racial/ethnic disparities in access to physician care and medications among US stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Neidecker, M.V.; Kiefe, C.I.; Karve, S.; Williams, L.S.; Allison, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic blacks have higher stroke recurrence rates and lower rates of secondary stroke prevention than non-Hispanic whites. As a potential explanation for this disparity, we assessed racial/ethnic differences in access to physician care and medications in a national sample of US stroke survivors. Methods: Among all 4,864 stroke survivors aged ≥45 years who responded to the National Health Interview Survey years 2000–2006, we compared access to care within the last 12 months by race/ethnicity before and after stratification by age (45–64 years vs ≥65 years). With logistic regression, we adjusted associations between access measures and race/ethnicity for sex, comorbidity, neurologic disability, health status, year, income, and health insurance. Results: Among stroke survivors aged 45–64 years, Mexican Americans, non-Hispanic blacks, and non-Hispanic whites reported similar rates of no generalist physician visit (approximately 15%) and inability to afford medications (approximately 20%). However, among stroke survivors aged ≥65 years, Mexican Americans and blacks, compared with whites, reported greater frequency of no generalist visit (15%, 12%, 8%; p = 0.02) and inability to afford medications (20%, 11%, 6%; p < 0.001). Mexican Americans and blacks more frequently reported no medical specialist visit (54%, 49%, 40%; p < 0.001) than did whites and rates did not differ by age. Full covariate adjustment did not fully explain these racial/ethnic differences. Conclusions: Among US stroke survivors at least 65 years old, Mexican Americans and blacks reported worse access to physician care and medications than whites. This reduced access may lead to inadequate risk factor modification and recurrent stroke in these high-risk minority groups. PMID:21084692

  5. [The experience of medical information system implementation into multi-field outpatient facility].

    PubMed

    Eloev, M S; Klipak, V M; Zherebko, O A; Belyshev, D V; Borisov, D N

    2014-09-01

    The main prospective line of development of information technologies implemented into medical facilities is working out and approbation of complex solutions for work automatiozation. It is necessary to mention the experience of implementation of industrial integrated medical information system into the 9h diagnostic and treatment centre of the Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation. In 2008 implementation of the information systems was funded by extra budgetary accounts of the facility. The basis of medical information system for the diagnostic and treatment centre was "Interin PROMIS". The article presents the main tasks, stages and difficulties that emerged in the process of implementation. One of the main tasks was to create the database of attached contingents. Conducted work allowed to increase access to healthcare, to develop transparent technologies for providing the healthcare to patients in different subunits. Implemented system is a very prospective for other military-medical facilities and has a unique functional capacity, system customizability, provides access to all activities of the medical facility.

  6. Estimating Client Out-of-Pocket Costs for Accessing Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Tchuenche, Michel; Haté, Vibhuti; McPherson, Dacia; Palmer, Eurica; Thambinayagam, Ananthy; Loykissoonlal, Dayanund; Forsythe, Steven

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, South Africa launched a countrywide effort to scale up its voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) program on the basis of compelling evidence that circumcision reduces men’s risk of acquiring HIV through heterosexual intercourse. Even though VMMC is free there, clients can incur indirect out-of-pocket costs (for example transportation cost or foregone income). Because these costs can be barriers to increasing the uptake of VMMC services, we assessed them from a client perspective, to inform VMMC demand creation policies. Costs (calculated using a bottom-up approach) and demographic data were systematically collected through 190 interviews conducted in 2015 with VMMC clients or (for minors) their caregivers at 25 VMMC facilities supported by the government and the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief in eight of South Africa’s nine provinces. The average age of VMMC clients was 22 years and nearly 92% were under 35 years of age. The largest reported out-of-pocket expenditure was transportation, at an average of US$9.20 (R 100). Only eight clients (4%) reported lost days of work. Indirect expenditures were childcare costs (one client) and miscellaneous items such as food or medicine (20 clients). Given competing household expense priorities, spending US$9.20 (R100) per person on transportation to access VMMC services could be a significant burden on clients and households, and a barrier to South Africa’s efforts to create demand for VMMC. Thus, we recommend a more focused analysis of clients’ transportation costs to access VMMC services. PMID:27783635

  7. Capturing Accurate and Useful Information on Medication-Related Telenursing Triage Calls.

    PubMed

    Lake, R; Li, L; Baysari, M; Byrne, M; Robinson, M; Westbrook, J I

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses providing telenursing triage and advice services record information on the medication related calls they handle. However the quality and consistency of these data were rarely examined. Our aim was to examine medication related calls made to the healthdirect advice service in November 2014, to assess their basic characteristics and how the data entry format influenced information collected and data consistency. Registered nurses selected the patient question type from a range of categories, and entered the medications involved in a free text field. Medication names were manually extracted from the free text fields. We also compared the selected patient question type with the free text description of the call, in order to gauge data consistency. Results showed that nurses provided patients with advice on medication-related queries in a timely matter (the median call duration of 9 minutes). From 1835 calls, we were able to identify and classify 2156 medications into 384 generic names. However, in 204 cases (11.2% of calls) no medication name was entered. A further 308 (15.0%) of the medication names entered were not identifiable. When we compared the selected patient question with the free text description of calls, we found that these were consistent in 63.27% of cases. Telenursing and triage advice services provide a valuable resource to the public with quick and easily accessible advice. To support nurses provide quality services and record accurate information about the queries, appropriate data entry format and design would be beneficial. PMID:27440292

  8. Attacking the information access problem with expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragusa, James M.; Orwig, Gary W.

    1991-01-01

    The results of applications research directed at finding an improved method of storing and accessing information are presented. Twelve microcomputer-based expert systems shells and five laser-optical formats have been studied, and the general and specific methods of interfacing these technologies are being tested in prototype systems. Shell features and interfacing capabilities are discussed, and results from the study of five laser-optical formats are recounted including the video laser, compact, and WORM disks, and laser cards and film. Interfacing, including laser disk device driver interfacing, is discussed and it is pointed out that in order to control the laser device from within the expert systems application, the expert systems shell must be able to access the device driver software. Potential integrated applications are investigated and an initial list is provided including consumer services, travel, law enforcement, human resources, marketing, and education and training.

  9. Security of electronic medical information and patient privacy: what you need to know.

    PubMed

    Andriole, Katherine P

    2014-12-01

    The responsibility that physicians have to protect their patients from harm extends to protecting the privacy and confidentiality of patient health information including that contained within radiological images. The intent of HIPAA and subsequent HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules is to keep patients' private information confidential while allowing providers access to and maintaining the integrity of relevant information needed to provide care. Failure to comply with electronic protected health information (ePHI) regulations could result in financial or criminal penalties or both. Protected health information refers to anything that can reasonably be used to identify a patient (eg, name, age, date of birth, social security number, radiology examination accession number). The basic tools and techniques used to maintain medical information security and patient privacy described in this article include physical safeguards such as computer device isolation and data backup, technical safeguards such as firewalls and secure transmission modes, and administrative safeguards including documentation of security policies, training of staff, and audit tracking through system logs. Other important concepts related to privacy and security are explained, including user authentication, authorization, availability, confidentiality, data integrity, and nonrepudiation. Patient privacy and security of medical information are critical elements in today's electronic health care environment. Radiology has led the way in adopting digital systems to make possible the availability of medical information anywhere anytime, and in identifying and working to eliminate any risks to patients. PMID:25467897

  10. Security of electronic medical information and patient privacy: what you need to know.

    PubMed

    Andriole, Katherine P

    2014-12-01

    The responsibility that physicians have to protect their patients from harm extends to protecting the privacy and confidentiality of patient health information including that contained within radiological images. The intent of HIPAA and subsequent HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules is to keep patients' private information confidential while allowing providers access to and maintaining the integrity of relevant information needed to provide care. Failure to comply with electronic protected health information (ePHI) regulations could result in financial or criminal penalties or both. Protected health information refers to anything that can reasonably be used to identify a patient (eg, name, age, date of birth, social security number, radiology examination accession number). The basic tools and techniques used to maintain medical information security and patient privacy described in this article include physical safeguards such as computer device isolation and data backup, technical safeguards such as firewalls and secure transmission modes, and administrative safeguards including documentation of security policies, training of staff, and audit tracking through system logs. Other important concepts related to privacy and security are explained, including user authentication, authorization, availability, confidentiality, data integrity, and nonrepudiation. Patient privacy and security of medical information are critical elements in today's electronic health care environment. Radiology has led the way in adopting digital systems to make possible the availability of medical information anywhere anytime, and in identifying and working to eliminate any risks to patients.

  11. Library and Information Science Education for the New Medical Environment and the Age of Integrated Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Detlefsen, Ellen Gay

    1993-01-01

    Reviews factors that are changing ways in which medical librarians and health information specialists are educated. Employment sites for medical librarians are listed; current faculty and coursework at library and information science programs in the United States and Canada are discussed; doctoral research is described; and medical informatics is…

  12. 42 CFR 480.113 - QIO access to information collected for QIO purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false QIO access to information collected for QIO... DISCLOSURE OF QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATION REVIEW INFORMATION Utilization and Quality Control Quality Improvement Organizations (QIOs) Qio Access to Information § 480.113 QIO access to information collected...

  13. One and done? Equality of opportunity and repeated access to scarce, indivisible medical resources

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Existing ethical guidelines recommend that, all else equal, past receipt of a medical resource (e.g. a scarce organ) should not be considered in current allocation decisions (e.g. a repeat transplantation). Discussion One stated reason for this ethical consensus is that formal theories of ethics and justice do not persuasively accept or reject repeated access to the same medical resources. Another is that restricting attention to past receipt of a particular medical resource seems arbitrary: why couldn’t one just as well, it is argued, consider receipt of other goods such as income or education? In consequence, simple allocation by lottery or first-come-first-served without consideration of any past receipt is thought to best afford equal opportunity, conditional on equal medical need. There are three issues with this view that need to be addressed. First, public views and patient preferences are less ambiguous than formal theories of ethics. Empirical work shows strong preferences for fairness in health care that have not been taken into account: repeated access to resources has been perceived as unfair. Second, while difficult to consider receipt of many other prior resources including non-medical resources, this should not be used a motive for ignoring the receipt of any and all goods including the focal resource in question. Third, when all claimants to a scarce resource are equally deserving, then use of random allocation seems warranted. However, the converse is not true: mere use of a randomizer does not by itself make the merits of all claimants equal. Summary My conclusion is that not ignoring prior receipt of the same medical resource, and prioritizing those who have not previously had access to the medical resource in question, may be perceived as fairer and more equitable by society. PMID:22624597

  14. Computer network access to scientific information systems for minority universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Valerie L.; Wakim, Nagi T.

    1993-08-01

    The evolution of computer networking technology has lead to the establishment of a massive networking infrastructure which interconnects various types of computing resources at many government, academic, and corporate institutions. A large segment of this infrastructure has been developed to facilitate information exchange and resource sharing within the scientific community. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) supports both the development and the application of computer networks which provide its community with access to many valuable multi-disciplinary scientific information systems and on-line databases. Recognizing the need to extend the benefits of this advanced networking technology to the under-represented community, the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) in the Space Data and Computing Division at the Goddard Space Flight Center has developed the Minority University-Space Interdisciplinary Network (MU-SPIN) Program: a major networking and education initiative for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Minority Universities (MUs). In this paper, we will briefly explain the various components of the MU-SPIN Program while highlighting how, by providing access to scientific information systems and on-line data, it promotes a higher level of collaboration among faculty and students and NASA scientists.

  15. Health Sciences Information Tools 2000: a cooperative health sciences library/public school information literacy program for medical assistant students.

    PubMed Central

    Spang, L; Marks, E; Adams, N

    1998-01-01

    Educating diverse groups in how to access, use, and evaluate information available through information technologies is emerging as an essential responsibility for health sciences librarians in today's complex health care system. One group requiring immediate attention is medical assistants. Projections indicate that medical assistant careers will be among the fastest growing occupations in the twenty-first century. The expanding use and importance of information in all health care settings requires that this workforce be well versed in information literacy skills. But, for public school vocational education staff charged with educating entry level workers to meet this specialized demand, the expense of hiring qualified professionals and acquiring the sophisticated technology necessary to teach such skills poses a dilemma. Health Sciences Information Tools 2000, a cooperative work-study information literacy program jointly formulated by the Wayne State University's Shiffman Medical Library and the Detroit Public Schools' Crockett Career and Technical Center, demonstrates that cooperation between the health sciences library and the public school is a mutually beneficial and constructive solution. This article describes the background, goals, curriculum, personnel, costs, and evaluation methods of Tools 2000. The Shiffman-Crockett information literacy program, adaptable to a variety of library settings, is an innovative means of preparing well-trained high school vocational education students for beginning level medical assistant positions as well as further education in the health care field. PMID:9803297

  16. Obtaining good quality medical information from the World Wide Web.

    PubMed

    Thom, Deone H; Polosa, Riccardo

    2002-01-01

    Despite the complexity of the Internet, it is surprisingly easy to search the World Wide Web for medical information. With the right skills you can save yourself a lot of time and effort making the Internet a highly effective tool for supporting your work in health and medicine. Internet offers great opportunities for interactive learning and can help you to plan lectures and create teaching materials. Moreover, physicians can find many Web resources that can assist with articles and assignments and support academic research. Evidence-based indications about medical treatments are also available. However, Internet users need to be aware of the dangers of misleading and inaccurate medical information. In this article, we intend to illustrate to physicians the pros and cons of the World Wide Web, how to apply basic critical appraisal techniques to gather good quality medical information, and a number of useful medical Web sites. PMID:11975112

  17. Creating Electronic Access to Newspaper Information in Nigeria: The Information Aid Network (IFAnet) Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ola, Christopher O.; Ojo, Reuben A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper highlights the value of newspaper information and the methods adopted in organizing, preserving and disseminating it. The paper dwells on the traditional ways of managing newspaper resources and the need to device a new medium of accessing the information contents of the resource. It enumerates the steps taken in conserving newspaper…

  18. Access to Max '91 information via computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiplinger, Alan L.

    1989-01-01

    Various types of flare information, activity, active region reports, x ray plots and daily Campaign Action notices are now available on SPAN, and INTERNET. Although this system was developed for use by Max '91 participants during campaigns, it is updated daily and maintained at times outside of campaigns. Thus it is available for general use outside of campaigns. The Space Environment Laboratory maintains VAX and Apollo systems, both of which are on INTERNET. The VAX is also on the SPAN network as node SELVAX or 9555. Details of access to files on the VAX are given.

  19. Access to medication and pharmacy services for resettled refugees: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, Kim; Ostini, Remo; Martini, Nataly; Kairuz, Therese

    2015-01-01

    The difficulties that resettled refugees experience in accessing primary health-care services have been widely documented. In most developed countries, pharmacists are often the first health-care professional contacted by consumers; however, the ability of refugees to access community pharmacies and medication may be limited. This review systematically reviewed the literature and synthesised findings of research that explored barriers and/or facilitators of access to medication and pharmacy services for resettled refugees. This review adhered to guidelines for systematic reviews by PRISMA (preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses). Databases were searched during March 2014 and included Scopus, ProQuest Sociological Abstracts, PubMed, Embase and APAIS Health. The Australian and International grey literature was also explored. Nine studies met the quality and inclusion criteria. The research reported in seven of the nine studies was conducted in the US, one was conducted in Australia and the other in the UK. The majority of studies focussed on South-east Asian refugees. Themes identified across the studies included language and the use of interpreters; navigating the Western health-care system; culture and illness beliefs; medication non-adherence; use of traditional medicine; and family, peer and community support. There is a significant paucity of published research exploring barriers to medication and pharmacy services among resettled refugees. This systematic review highlights the need for appropriate interpreting and translation services, as well as pharmacy staff demonstrating effective cross-cultural communication skills.

  20. Sea-change or change challenge? Health information access in developing countries: The U.S. National Library of Medicine experience.

    PubMed

    Royall, J; Lyon, B

    2011-09-01

    Health professionals in developing countries want access to information to help them make changes in health care and contribute to medical research. However, they face challenges of technology limitations, lack of training, and, on the village level, culture and language. This report focuses on the U.S. National Library of Medicine experience with access: for the international medical/scientific community to health information which has been published by researchers in developing countries; for scientists and clinicians in developing countries to their own literature and to that of their colleagues around the world; for medical librarians who are a critical conduit for students, faculty, researchers, and, increasingly, the general public; and for the front line workers at the health center in the village at the end of the line. The fundamental question of whether or not information communication technology can make a difference in access and subsequently in health is illustrated by an anecdote regarding an early intervention in Africa in 1992. From that point, we examine programs to improve access involving malaria researchers, medical journal editors, librarians, and medical students working with local health center staff in the village. Although access is a reality, the positive change in health that the information technology intervention might produce often remains a mirage. Information and technology are not static elements in the equation for better access. They must function together, creating a dialectic in which they transform and inform one another and those whom their combination touches. PMID:22275940

  1. Sea-change or change challenge? Health information access in developing countries: The U.S. National Library of Medicine experience.

    PubMed

    Royall, J; Lyon, B

    2011-09-01

    Health professionals in developing countries want access to information to help them make changes in health care and contribute to medical research. However, they face challenges of technology limitations, lack of training, and, on the village level, culture and language. This report focuses on the U.S. National Library of Medicine experience with access: for the international medical/scientific community to health information which has been published by researchers in developing countries; for scientists and clinicians in developing countries to their own literature and to that of their colleagues around the world; for medical librarians who are a critical conduit for students, faculty, researchers, and, increasingly, the general public; and for the front line workers at the health center in the village at the end of the line. The fundamental question of whether or not information communication technology can make a difference in access and subsequently in health is illustrated by an anecdote regarding an early intervention in Africa in 1992. From that point, we examine programs to improve access involving malaria researchers, medical journal editors, librarians, and medical students working with local health center staff in the village. Although access is a reality, the positive change in health that the information technology intervention might produce often remains a mirage. Information and technology are not static elements in the equation for better access. They must function together, creating a dialectic in which they transform and inform one another and those whom their combination touches.

  2. 77 FR 20637 - Request for Information on Prescription Medication Adherence

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Request for Information on Prescription Medication Adherence AGENCY: Department of Health... the Surgeon General of the United States Public Health Service. ACTION: Request for information. SUMMARY: The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health is seeking information about causes, impact...

  3. Proceedings of a Conference on Medical Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    The purposes of this conference are: to define the current state of technology; to identify the problems, needs and emerging technology; and to consider alternative computer applications to multiple-facility medical information systems for the delivery of medical care and for health services research. The papers presented include: (1) General…

  4. An Analysis of Medication Adherence of Sooner Health Access Network SoonerCare Choice Patients.

    PubMed

    Davis, Nicholas A; Kendrick, David C

    2014-01-01

    Medication adherence is a desirable but rarely available metric in patient care, providing key insights into patient behavior that has a direct effect on a patient's health. In this research, we determine the medication adherence characteristics of over 46,000 patients enrolled in the Sooner Health Access Network (HAN), based on Medicaid claims data from the Oklahoma Health Care Authority. We introduce a new measure called Specific Medication PDC (smPDC), based on the popular Proportion of Days Covered (PDC) method, using the last fill date for the end date of the measurement duration. The smPDC method is demonstrated by calculating medication adherence across the eligible patient population, for relevant subpopulations over a two-year period spanning 2012 - 2013. We leverage a clinical analytics platform to disseminate adherence measurements to providers. Aggregate results demonstrate that the smPDC method is relevant and indicates potential opportunities for health improvement for certain population segments. PMID:25954350

  5. An Analysis of Medication Adherence of Sooner Health Access Network SoonerCare Choice Patients.

    PubMed

    Davis, Nicholas A; Kendrick, David C

    2014-01-01

    Medication adherence is a desirable but rarely available metric in patient care, providing key insights into patient behavior that has a direct effect on a patient's health. In this research, we determine the medication adherence characteristics of over 46,000 patients enrolled in the Sooner Health Access Network (HAN), based on Medicaid claims data from the Oklahoma Health Care Authority. We introduce a new measure called Specific Medication PDC (smPDC), based on the popular Proportion of Days Covered (PDC) method, using the last fill date for the end date of the measurement duration. The smPDC method is demonstrated by calculating medication adherence across the eligible patient population, for relevant subpopulations over a two-year period spanning 2012 - 2013. We leverage a clinical analytics platform to disseminate adherence measurements to providers. Aggregate results demonstrate that the smPDC method is relevant and indicates potential opportunities for health improvement for certain population segments.

  6. Implementing the Medical Desktop: tools for the integration of independent information resources.

    PubMed

    Loonsk, J W; Lively, R; TinHan, E; Litt, H

    1991-01-01

    The increasing availability of medical information resources has moved the "Medical Desktop" from a theoretical construct to a practical necessity. Many micro-computers are becoming available in clinical and academic settings that can access several medical information applications. These computers are usually not powerful workstations that are part of a clinically oriented information support system, but are personal computers with varied capabilities. The applications on these computers come from different sources, are accessed through different user interfaces and do not share data well. The de facto "Medical Desktop" this situation presents will discourage most end-users because the combination of applications is complex, the applications are poorly integrated, and individual applications are inconsistent. At the State University of New York at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences we have developed several Microsoft Windows-based tools that accept a systems level diversity of resources, but work toward the construction of a coherent "Medical Desktop." These tools include a lexical term linker, a resource database, and a context sensitive help system that is tailored to locally available resources.

  7. Information extraction from sound for medical telemonitoring.

    PubMed

    Istrate, Dan; Castelli, Eric; Vacher, Michel; Besacier, Laurent; Serignat, Jean-François

    2006-04-01

    Today, the growth of the aging population in Europe needs an increasing number of health care professionals and facilities for aged persons. Medical telemonitoring at home (and, more generally, telemedicine) improves the patient's comfort and reduces hospitalization costs. Using sound surveillance as an alternative solution to video telemonitoring, this paper deals with the detection and classification of alarming sounds in a noisy environment. The proposed sound analysis system can detect distress or everyday sounds everywhere in the monitored apartment, and is connected to classical medical telemonitoring sensors through a data fusion process. The sound analysis system is divided in two stages: sound detection and classification. The first analysis stage (sound detection) must extract significant sounds from a continuous signal flow. A new detection algorithm based on discrete wavelet transform is proposed in this paper, which leads to accurate results when applied to nonstationary signals (such as impulsive sounds). The algorithm presented in this paper was evaluated in a noisy environment and is favorably compared to the state of the art algorithms in the field. The second stage of the system is sound classification, which uses a statistical approach to identify unknown sounds. A statistical study was done to find out the most discriminant acoustical parameters in the input of the classification module. New wavelet based parameters, better adapted to noise, are proposed in this paper. The telemonitoring system validation is presented through various real and simulated test sets. The global sound based system leads to a 3% missed alarm rate and could be fused with other medical sensors to improve performance. PMID:16617615

  8. On the security of a dynamic ID-based authentication scheme for telecare medical information systems.

    PubMed

    Lin, Han-Yu

    2013-04-01

    Telecare medical information systems (TMISs) are increasingly popular technologies for healthcare applications. Using TMISs, physicians and caregivers can monitor the vital signs of patients remotely. Since the database of TMISs stores patients' electronic medical records (EMRs), only authorized users should be granted the access to this information for the privacy concern. To keep the user anonymity, recently, Chen et al. proposed a dynamic ID-based authentication scheme for telecare medical information system. They claimed that their scheme is more secure and robust for use in a TMIS. However, we will demonstrate that their scheme fails to satisfy the user anonymity due to the dictionary attacks. It is also possible to derive a user password in case of smart card loss attacks. Additionally, an improved scheme eliminating these weaknesses is also presented.

  9. On the security of a dynamic ID-based authentication scheme for telecare medical information systems.

    PubMed

    Lin, Han-Yu

    2013-04-01

    Telecare medical information systems (TMISs) are increasingly popular technologies for healthcare applications. Using TMISs, physicians and caregivers can monitor the vital signs of patients remotely. Since the database of TMISs stores patients' electronic medical records (EMRs), only authorized users should be granted the access to this information for the privacy concern. To keep the user anonymity, recently, Chen et al. proposed a dynamic ID-based authentication scheme for telecare medical information system. They claimed that their scheme is more secure and robust for use in a TMIS. However, we will demonstrate that their scheme fails to satisfy the user anonymity due to the dictionary attacks. It is also possible to derive a user password in case of smart card loss attacks. Additionally, an improved scheme eliminating these weaknesses is also presented. PMID:23345092

  10. Fair credit reporting medical information regulations. Final rules.

    PubMed

    2005-11-22

    The OCC, Board, FDIC, OTS, and NCUA (Agencies) are publishing final rules to implement section 411 of the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act of 2003 (FACT Act). The final rules create exceptions to the statute's general prohibition on creditors obtaining or using medical information pertaining to a consumer in connection with any determination of the consumer's eligibility, or continued eligibility, for credit for all creditors. The exceptions permit creditors to obtain or use medical information in connection with credit eligibility determinations where necessary and appropriate for legitimate purposes, consistent with the Congressional intent to restrict the use of medical information for inappropriate purposes. The final rules also create limited exceptions to permit affiliates to share medical information with each other without becoming consumer reporting agencies. The final rules are substantially similar to the rules adopted by the Agencies on an interim final basis in June 2005.

  11. 38 CFR 17.241 - Sharing medical information services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... techniques will be freely exchanged and the medical information services of all parties to the agreement will... other periodic basis, at rates determined, after appropriate study, to be fair and equitable....

  12. Free open access medical education can help rural clinicians deliver 'quality care, out there'.

    PubMed

    Leeuwenburg, Tim J; Parker, Casey

    2015-01-01

    Rural clinicians require expertise across a broad range of specialties, presenting difficulty in maintaining currency of knowledge and application of best practice. Free open access medical education is a new paradigm in continuing professional education. Use of the internet and social media allows a globally accessible crowd-sourced adjunct, providing inline (contextual) and offline (asynchronous) content to augment traditional educational principles and the availability of relevant resources for life-long learning. This markedly reduces knowledge translation (the delay from inception of a new idea to bedside implementation) and allows rural clinicians to further expertise by engaging in discussion of cutting edge concepts with peers worldwide. PMID:26278340

  13. An information gathering system for medical image inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Jin; Bajcsy, Peter

    2005-04-01

    We present an information gathering system for medical image inspection that consists of software tools for capturing computer-centric and human-centric information. Computer-centric information includes (1) static annotations, such as (a) image drawings enclosing any selected area, a set of areas with similar colors, a set of salient points, and (b) textual descriptions associated with either image drawings or links between pairs of image drawings, and (2) dynamic (or temporal) information, such as mouse movements, zoom level changes, image panning and frame selections from an image stack. Human-centric information is represented by video and audio signals that are acquired by computer-mounted cameras and microphones. The short-term goal of the presented system is to facilitate learning of medical novices from medical experts, while the long-term goal is to data mine all information about image inspection for assisting in making diagnoses. In this work, we built basic software functionality for gathering computer-centric and human-centric information of the aforementioned variables. Next, we developed the information playback capabilities of all gathered information for educational purposes. Finally, we prototyped text-based and image template-based search engines to retrieve information from recorded annotations, for example, (a) find all annotations containing the word "blood vessels", or (b) search for similar areas to a selected image area. The information gathering system for medical image inspection reported here has been tested with images from the Histology Atlas database.

  14. UNEP Chemicals' work: breaking the barriers to information access.

    PubMed

    Keita-Ouane, Fatoumata

    2003-08-21

    The global production and trade in chemicals was measured at 1.55 trillion US dollars in 1996, four times the amount of 1966. Chemicals represent 14% of imports and exports of OECD countries and the present decade has been characterised by the expansion of the production and use of chemicals in countries with economies in transition and developing countries. While some of these chemicals are benign at the levels we are usually exposed to them, others present risks to human health or the environment often across national boundaries. Failure to safely manage these risks could lead to serious and long-term consequences. The sound management of chemicals requires adequate information about their nature and use as well as their effects and control options. Much of this information can be culled from a variety of sources but that does not guarantee equal access to it by all those who are in need. To achieve equitable information distribution, the chemical unit of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) operates many activities aimed at removing the geographical and technical barriers that prevent the free flow of chemical management information. These activities include the use of assorted media and activities to enhance countries' internal capacity to search and use the information available on the Internet. PMID:12909405

  15. 76 FR 77816 - Access to Confidential Business Information by Guident Technologies, Inc. and Subcontractor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... Innovations Systems, Inc. of Manassas, VA to access information which has been submitted to EPA under all... AGENCY Access to Confidential Business Information by Guident Technologies, Inc. and Subcontractor, Impact Innovations Systems, Inc. AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice....

  16. 77 FR 44224 - Access to Confidential Business Information by Eastern Research Group, Incorporated

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... AGENCY Access to Confidential Business Information by Eastern Research Group, Incorporated AGENCY... will authorize its contractor Eastern Research Group, Incorporated (ERG) to access Confidential Business Information (CBI) which has been submitted to EPA under the authority of all sections of...

  17. 76 FR 23586 - Access to Confidential Business Information by Syracuse Research Corporation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... AGENCY Access to Confidential Business Information by Syracuse Research Corporation AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA has authorized its contractor, Syracuse Research... or determined to be Confidential Business Information (CBI). DATES: Access to the confidential...

  18. 77 FR 68769 - Access to Confidential Business Information by Eastern Research Group

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... AGENCY Access to Confidential Business Information by Eastern Research Group AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA has authorized its contractor, Eastern Research Group... Confidential Business Information (CBI). DATES: Access to the confidential data occurred on or about...

  19. 77 FR 12284 - Access to Confidential Business Information; Protection Strategies Incorporated

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Access to Confidential Business Information; Protection Strategies Incorporated AGENCY... Strategies Incorporated (PSI) of Arlington, VA, to access information which has been submitted to EPA...

  20. Web Content Accessibility of Consumer Health Information Web Sites for People with Disabilities: A Cross Sectional Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Parmanto, Bambang

    2004-01-01

    Background The World Wide Web (WWW) has become an increasingly essential resource for health information consumers. The ability to obtain accurate medical information online quickly, conveniently and privately provides health consumers with the opportunity to make informed decisions and participate actively in their personal care. Little is known, however, about whether the content of this online health information is equally accessible to people with disabilities who must rely on special devices or technologies to process online information due to their visual, hearing, mobility, or cognitive limitations. Objective To construct a framework for an automated Web accessibility evaluation; to evaluate the state of accessibility of consumer health information Web sites; and to investigate the possible relationships between accessibility and other features of the Web sites, including function, popularity and importance. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional study of the state of accessibility of health information Web sites to people with disabilities. We selected 108 consumer health information Web sites from the directory service of a Web search engine. A measurement framework was constructed to automatically measure the level of Web Accessibility Barriers (WAB) of Web sites following Web accessibility specifications. We investigated whether there was a difference between WAB scores across various functional categories of the Web sites, and also evaluated the correlation between the WAB and Alexa traffic rank and Google Page Rank of the Web sites. Results We found that none of the Web sites we looked at are completely accessible to people with disabilities, i.e., there were no sites that had no violation of Web accessibility rules. However, governmental and educational health information Web sites do exhibit better Web accessibility than the other categories of Web sites (P < 0.001). We also found that the correlation between the WAB score and the popularity of a

  1. Groundwater Information Network: enabling online access and analysis of Canadian groundwater information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodaric, B.; Sharpe, D.; Boisvert, E.

    2009-05-01

    A cornerstone of effective groundwater resource management is access to available groundwater information and tools for analysis, modeling, and eventually decision-making. In Canada, information access is inhibited by the heterogeneous nature of groundwater information, which is collected and maintained by many agencies using different digital structures and contents, and by varying online availability. To overcome these issues, a collaboration of federal and provincial agencies has developed the Groundwater Information Network (GIN, http://gw-info.net). In its first phase, GIN provides a single online data pipeline to the water-well databases hosted by six provincial agencies (British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia) and to some key aquifer information hosted by Natural Resources Canada. GIN also provides two online portals that can be used to view, download and analyse the information. At the core of GIN is an online mediator that distributes requests for information to the host databases, and translates the replies into a common format (Groundwater MarkUp Language). This allows the portals to treat the distributed information as a single virtual online repository, one with consistent links back to the original databases. Discussed will be the GIN system, including its architecture, functionality, and portals, as well as its overall role as a point of access to some Canadian groundwater information as well as to related web-mapping and analysis tools.

  2. MedIEQ-Quality labelling of medical web content using multilingual information extraction.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Miquel Angel; Karkaletsis, Vangelis; Stamatakis, Kostas; Leis, Angela; Villarroel, Dagmar; Thomeczek, Christian; Labský, Martin; López-Ostenero, Fernando; Honkela, Timo

    2006-01-01

    Quality of Internet health information is essential because it has the potential to benefit or harm a large number of people and it is therefore essential to provide consumers with some tools to aid them in assessing the nature of the information they are accessing and how they should use it without jeopardizing their relationship with their doctor. Organizations around the world are working on establishing standards of quality in the accreditation of health-related web content. For the full success of these initiatives, they must be equipped with technologies that enable the automation of the rating process and allow the continuous monitoring of labelled web sites alerting the labelling agency. In this paper we describe the European project MedIEQ (Quality Labelling of Medical Web Content Using Multilingual Information Extraction) that integrates the efforts of relevant organizations on medical quality labelling, multilingual information retrieval and extraction and semantic resources, from six different European countries (Spain, Germany, Greece, Finland, Czech Republic and Switzerland). The main objectives of MedIEQ are: first, to develop a scheme for the quality labelling of medical web content and provide the tools supporting the creation, maintenance and access of labelling data according to this scheme and second, to specify a methodology for the content analysis of medical web sites according to the MedIEQ scheme and develop the tools that will implement it.

  3. The Past and Present of Information Retrieval in Medical Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Torao

    This is a lecture at the 15th anniversary of JICST Kyushu Branch. In Medical Science there are many fields of study classified by the difference of approach. Each field is related closely, and to make a study of a field the knowledges of other fields are also needed. Such characteristic of medical study has been the problem on research of medical literature. Online information retrieval such as JOIS has changed the retrieval much easier, however some difficulties by the characteristic still remain. Importance of training specialist in information retrieval, construction of specialized databases, making databases easier to use and so on are suggested.

  4. Wireless Internet Information System for Medical Response in Disasters (WIISARD)

    PubMed Central

    Lenert, Leslie; Chan, Theodore C.; Griswold, William; Killeen, James; Palmer, Douglas; Kirsh, David; Mishra, Rajesh; Rao, Ramesh

    2006-01-01

    The Wireless Internet Information System for Medical Response in Disasters (WIISARD) explores the use of scalable wireless networks to facilitate medical care at the site of a disaster. The focus of the project is care of victims of industrial accidents or terrorist attacks with traumatic injuries complicated by chemical, biological or radiological contamination. We report on developments of new architectures for mesh networks, RFID tracking and telemetry, mobile collaborative work, and command and control informed by deployments in large-scale exercises with the San Diego Regional Metropolitan Medical Strike Team.

  5. Confidentiality of medical information: a study of Albertan family physicians.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Gerald L

    1988-06-01

    The author of this paper examines physicians' regard for the confidentiality of medical information in the light of their perception of their own role. Five case studies of increasing complexity of medical management and ethical issues, derived from practice and accompanied by questions relating to confidentiality and medical management, were submitted to randomly selected family physicians in Alberta. Analysis of the replies to determine attitudes to confidentiality and how the respondents perceived patients' best interests, and statements of how they would act in certain situations, disclosed that a substantial minority of the physicians were still prepared to breach confidentiality and exercise Hippocratic professional judgement in certain situations. The bases of confidentiality of medical information are reviewed, together with changing modes of medical ethics and the increasing trend to rights derived from patients, autonomy, and the ways in which these factors may affect the physician-patient relationship.

  6. Facilitating medical information search using Google Glass connected to a content-based medical image retrieval system.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Antoine; Schaer, Roger; Markonis, Dimitrios; Muller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Wearable computing devices are starting to change the way users interact with computers and the Internet. Among them, Google Glass includes a small screen located in front of the right eye, a camera filming in front of the user and a small computing unit. Google Glass has the advantage to provide online services while allowing the user to perform tasks with his/her hands. These augmented glasses uncover many useful applications, also in the medical domain. For example, Google Glass can easily provide video conference between medical doctors to discuss a live case. Using these glasses can also facilitate medical information search by allowing the access of a large amount of annotated medical cases during a consultation in a non-disruptive fashion for medical staff. In this paper, we developed a Google Glass application able to take a photo and send it to a medical image retrieval system along with keywords in order to retrieve similar cases. As a preliminary assessment of the usability of the application, we tested the application under three conditions (images of the skin; printed CT scans and MRI images; and CT and MRI images acquired directly from an LCD screen) to explore whether using Google Glass affects the accuracy of the results returned by the medical image retrieval system. The preliminary results show that despite minor problems due to the relative stability of the Google Glass, images can be sent to and processed by the medical image retrieval system and similar images are returned to the user, potentially helping in the decision making process.

  7. Facilitating medical information search using Google Glass connected to a content-based medical image retrieval system.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Antoine; Schaer, Roger; Markonis, Dimitrios; Muller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Wearable computing devices are starting to change the way users interact with computers and the Internet. Among them, Google Glass includes a small screen located in front of the right eye, a camera filming in front of the user and a small computing unit. Google Glass has the advantage to provide online services while allowing the user to perform tasks with his/her hands. These augmented glasses uncover many useful applications, also in the medical domain. For example, Google Glass can easily provide video conference between medical doctors to discuss a live case. Using these glasses can also facilitate medical information search by allowing the access of a large amount of annotated medical cases during a consultation in a non-disruptive fashion for medical staff. In this paper, we developed a Google Glass application able to take a photo and send it to a medical image retrieval system along with keywords in order to retrieve similar cases. As a preliminary assessment of the usability of the application, we tested the application under three conditions (images of the skin; printed CT scans and MRI images; and CT and MRI images acquired directly from an LCD screen) to explore whether using Google Glass affects the accuracy of the results returned by the medical image retrieval system. The preliminary results show that despite minor problems due to the relative stability of the Google Glass, images can be sent to and processed by the medical image retrieval system and similar images are returned to the user, potentially helping in the decision making process. PMID:25570993

  8. [Problematic issues and prospects of development of information and telecommunication technologies in the medical service of the Armed Forces].

    PubMed

    Kalachev, O V; Pershin, I V; Borisov, D N; Korneenkov, A A

    2014-12-01

    Medical information systems composed of many specialized modules help in synchronous solving of diagnostic, therapeutic, administrative, financial, statistical, and other tasks. According to the authors, the creation of a single information space of the medical service, integrating it into a single information space of the Defense Ministry of the Russian Fedaration, development and widespread use of telemedicine technology will significantly accelerate the integration in the daily activities of military hospitals of the latest achievements in medical science and practices consistent with the objectives of improving the military health care and improvement of the quality and accessibility of health care.

  9. Exploring the Further Integration of Machine Translation in English-Chinese Cross Language Information Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Dan; He, Daqing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to examine the further integration of machine translation technologies with cross language information access in providing web users the capabilities of accessing information beyond language barriers. Machine translation and cross language information access are related technologies, and yet they have their own unique…

  10. Adult Age Differences in Accessing and Retrieving Information from Long-Term Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petros, Thomas V.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Investigated adult age differences in accessing and retrieving information from long-term memory. Results showed that older adults (N=26) were slower than younger adults (N=35) at feature extraction, lexical access, and accessing category information. The age deficit was proportionally greater when retrieval of category information was required.…

  11. Unified Information Access for the 21st Century: A Project of The California State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Doug; Pollard, Marvin; Smith, Gordon

    This paper presents the results of a three-year project of the 22 libraries of the California State University (CSU) system to create an entirely new approach to information access. The Unified Information Access System (UIAS) is designed to provide integrated, single-search access to the full range of library information resources. In addition to…

  12. 42 CFR 480.111 - QIO access to records and information of institutions and practitioners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false QIO access to records and information of..., AND DISCLOSURE OF QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATION REVIEW INFORMATION Utilization and Quality Control Quality Improvement Organizations (QIOs) Qio Access to Information § 480.111 QIO access to records...

  13. 42 CFR 480.112 - QIO access to records and information of intermediaries and carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false QIO access to records and information of..., AND DISCLOSURE OF QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATION REVIEW INFORMATION Utilization and Quality Control Quality Improvement Organizations (QIOs) Qio Access to Information § 480.112 QIO access to records...

  14. [Intraosseous access for in-hospital emergencies. Intensive medical care case study].

    PubMed

    Werner, M; Daniel, H-P; Hoitz, J

    2010-07-01

    Since the release of the 2005 resuscitation guidelines intraosseous infusion has been recognized as the favorite alternative vascular access in emergency patients. It is no longer restricted to paediatric emergencies but is also considered the vascular access of choice for adult patients with difficult venous access. Intraosseous access has been used in an increasing proportion of patients especially in an out-of-hospital emergency care setting while only limited experience exists for in-hospital usage of this technique. This article reports on a case of intraosseous access performed in a critically ill patient directly after admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) due to difficult peripheral venous access. Despite the extensive medical resources available in the ICU (i.e. central venous catheterization) less invasive means were used to render appropriate care. Based on this case different strategies of critical care and possible improvements will be discussed. Intraosseous infusion should be regarded as an infrequently needed but potentially life-saving procedure that is still too often considered as an option at later stages during in-hospital emergency care. PMID:20628712

  15. Information Acquisition in Children Undergoing Medical Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melamed, Barbara G.; And Others

    In order to evaluate how individual characteristics of hospitalized children influence their acquisition of information presented in a film depicting preparation for surgery, 42 children between the ages of 4 to 17 were assigned to experimental and control groups that were matched for age, sex, race, type of surgery and previous hospital…

  16. Physician's interviewing styles and medical information obtained from patients.

    PubMed

    Roter, D L; Hall, J A

    1987-01-01

    This paper investigates the association between physicians' interviewing styles and medical information obtained during simulated patient encounters. The sources of data are audiotapes and transcripts of two standardized patient cases presented by trained patient simulators to 43 primary care practitioners. Transcripts were scored for physician proficiency using expert-generated criteria and were content-analyzed to assess the process of communication and information content. Relevant patient disclosure was also scored from the transcripts based on expert-generated criteria. Findings were: 1) On the whole, physicians elicited only slightly more than 50% of the medical information considered important according to expert consensus, with a range from 9% to 85%. 2) Both open and closed questions were substantially related to patient disclosure of medical information to the physician, but open questions were substantially more so (Pearson correlations of 0.37 and 0.72, respectively). 3) Patient education, particularly information regarding prognosis, cause, and prevention, was substantially related to patient disclosure of medical information to the physician (Pearson correlations of 0.44, 0.36, and 0.34, respectively). 5) Finally, clinical expertise was only weakly associated with patient disclosure of medical information to the physician (Pearson correlation of 0.16).

  17. 78 FR 951 - Accessible Medical Device Labeling in a Standard Content and Format Public Workshop; Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Accessible Medical Device Labeling in a Standard Content and... content and format for medical device labeling and the use of a repository containing medical device... session. Standard content and format of full labeling and a shortened version of labeling will...

  18. The impact of the college environment on Black students' access to a medical school education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Barbara Marie

    2009-12-01

    The focus of this study was to explore factors influencing the disparity in the acceptance rate for African American students into medical school as compared to their white counterparts. This study compared the college environment of Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Principally White Institutions, with respect to African American students' perceptions regarding their college experiences and the extent to which they perceived that their experiences enhanced or diminished their success in gaining access to medical school. The community cultural wealth framework was used to explore whether the HBCU or the PWI is the better environment for undergraduate science majors. By use of the CCW framework the study explored which college environment nurtured students to be successful as a biology major, obtain a competitive MCAT score and ultimately secure acceptance into medical school. A qualitative research design served as the best approach to explore the object of inquiry in this study: the students' perception of their college environment, and their perceptions of their college experiences. The findings suggest that both the HBCU and the PWI reveal characteristics that enhanced and diminished the potential for success in the biology pre-med program. The results of this study specifically addressed barriers to access as factors which may be contributing to the disparities in the number of African American students admitted to medical school. These barriers are related to differences in the social dynamics of the university. In this study both groups of students perceived that there were the negative faculty attitudes, but these seemed to have little impact on access to medical school. Student motivation and identification with a supportive community seemed to have more impact on the potential for career success.

  19. Disparities in provision of transplant information affect access to kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kucirka, L M; Grams, M E; Balhara, K S; Jaar, B G; Segev, D L

    2012-02-01

    Recently Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) began asking providers on Form-2728 whether they informed patients about transplantation, and if not, to select a reason. The goals of this study were to describe national transplant education practices and analyze associations between practices and access to transplantation (ATT), based on United States Renal Data System (USRDS) data from 2005 to 2007. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine factors associated with not being informed about transplantation, and modified Poisson regression to examine associations between not being informed and ATT (all models adjusted for demographics/comorbidities). Of 236,079 incident end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, 30.1% were not informed at time of 2728 filing, for reasons reported by providers as follows: 42.1% unassessed, 30.4% medically unfit, 16.9% unsuitable due to age, 3.1% psychologically unfit and 1.5% declined counsel. Older, obese, uninsured, Medicaid-insured and patients at for-profit centers were more likely to be unassessed. Women were more likely to be reported as unsuitable due to age, medically unfit and declined, and African Americans as psychologically unfit. Uninformed patients had a 53% lower rate of ATT, a disparity persisting in the subgroup of uninformed patients who were unassessed. Disparities in ATT may be partially explained by disparities in provision of transplant information; dialysis centers should ensure this critical intervention is offered equitably.

  20. Australian health policy on access to medical care for refugees and asylum seekers

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Velez, Ignacio; Gifford, Sandra M; Bice, Sara J

    2005-01-01

    Since the tightening of Australian policy for protection visa applicants began in the 1990s, access to health care has been increasingly restricted to asylum seekers on a range of different visa types. This paper summarises those legislative changes and discusses their implications for health policy relating to refugees and asylum seekers in Australia. Of particular concern are asylum seekers on Bridging Visas with no work rights and no access to Medicare. The paper examines several key questions: What is the current state of play, in terms of health screening and medical care policies, for asylum seekers and refugees? Relatedly, how has current policy changed from that of the past? How does Australia compare with other countries in relation to health policy for asylum seekers and refugees? These questions are addressed with the aim of providing a clear description of the current situation concerning Australian health policy on access to medical care for asylum seekers and refugees. Issues concerning lack of access to appropriate health care and related services are raised, ethical and practical issues are explored, and current policy gaps are investigated. PMID:16212674