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Sample records for accessing specialist care

  1. Building access to specialist care through e-consultation

    PubMed Central

    Liddy, Clare; Rowan, Margo S; Afkham, Amir; Maranger, Julie; Keely, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited access to specialist care remains a major barrier to health care in Canada, affecting patients and primary care providers alike, in terms of both long wait times and inequitable availability. We developed an electronic consultation system, based on a secure web-based tool, as an alternative to face-to-face consultations, and ran a pilot study to evaluate its effectiveness and acceptability to practitioners. Methods In a pilot program conducted over 15 months starting in January 2010, the e-consultation system was tested with primary care providers and specialists in a large health region in Eastern Ontario, Canada. We collected utilization data from the electronic system itself (including quantitative data from satisfaction surveys) and qualitative information from focus groups and interviews with providers. Results Of 18 primary care providers in the pilot program, 13 participated in focus groups and 9 were interviewed; in addition, 10 of the 11 specialists in the program were interviewed. Results of our evaluation showed good uptake, high levels of satisfaction, improvement in the integration of referrals and consultations, and avoidance of unnecessary specialist visits. A total of 77 e-consultation requests were processed from 1 Jan. 2010 to 1 Apr. 2011. Less than 10% of the referrals required face-to-face follow-up. The most frequently noted benefits for patients (as perceived by providers) included improved access to specialist care and reduced wait times. Primary care providers valued the ability to assist with patient assessment and management by having access to a rapid response to clinical questions, clarifying the need for diagnostic tests or treatments, and confirming the need for a formal consultation. Specialists enjoyed the improved interaction with primary care providers, as well as having some control in the decision on which patients should be referred. Interpretation This low-cost referral system has potential for broader

  2. Access to specialist care: Optimizing the geographic configuration of trauma systems

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Jan O.; Morrison, Jonathan J.; Wang, Handing; He, Shan; Lawrenson, Robin; Hutchison, James D.; Campbell, Marion K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The optimal geographic configuration of health care systems is key to maximizing accessibility while promoting the efficient use of resources. This article reports the use of a novel approach to inform the optimal configuration of a national trauma system. METHODS This is a prospective cohort study of all trauma patients, 15 years and older, attended to by the Scottish Ambulance Service, between July 1, 2013, and June 30, 2014. Patients underwent notional triage to one of three levels of care (major trauma center [MTC], trauma unit, or local emergency hospital). We used geographic information systems software to calculate access times, by road and air, from all incident locations to all candidate hospitals. We then modeled the performance of all mathematically possible network configurations and used multiobjective optimization to determine geospatially optimized configurations. RESULTS A total of 80,391 casualties were included. A network with only high- or moderate-volume MTCs (admitting at least 650 or 400 severely injured patients per year, respectively) would be optimally configured with a single MTC. A network accepting lower-volume MTCs (at least 240 severely injured patients per year) would be optimally configured with two MTCs. Both configurations would necessitate an increase in the number of helicopter retrievals. CONCLUSION This study has shown that a novel combination of notional triage, network analysis, and mathematical optimization can be used to inform the planning of a national clinical network. Scotland’s trauma system could be optimized with one or two MTCs. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Care management study, level IV. PMID:26335775

  3. Organizing uninsured safety-net access to specialist physician services.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mark A

    2013-05-01

    Arranging referrals for specialist services is often the greatest difficulty that safety-net access programs face in attempting to provide fairly comprehensive services for the uninsured. When office-based community specialists are asked to care for uninsured patients, they cite the following barriers: difficulty determining which patients merit charity care, having to arrange for services patients need from other providers, and concerns about liability for providing inadequate care. Solutions to these barriers to specialist access can be found in the same institutional arrangements that support primary care and hospital services for the uninsured. These safety-net organization structures can be extended to include specialist physician care by funding community health centers to contract for specialist referrals, using free-standing referral programs to subsidize community specialists who accept uninsured patients at discounted rates, and encouraging hospitals through tax exemption or disproportionate share funding to require specialists on their medical staffs to accept an allocation of uninsured office-based referrals.

  4. Remote access to medical specialists: home care interactive patient management system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter J.; Draghic, Nicole; Wiesmann, William P.

    1999-07-01

    Diabetes management involves constant care and rigorous compliance. Glucose control is often difficult to maintain and onset of complications further compound health care needs. Status can be further hampered by geographic isolation from immediate medical infrastructures. The Home Care Interactive Patient Management System is an experimental telemedicine program that could improve chronic illness management through Internet-based applications. The goal of the system is to provide a customized, integrated approach to diabetes management to supplement and coordinate physician protocol while supporting routine patient activity, by supplying a set of customized automated services including health data collection, transmission, analysis and decision support.

  5. What Is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... PICU. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Critical Care Specialists Have? Pediatric critical care specialists are medical ...

  6. Access to health care

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Martin; Maltais, Danielle; Hudon, Catherine; Lapointe, Lise; Ntetu, Antoine Lutumba

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore access to health care for patients presenting with multiple chronic conditions and to identify barriers and factors conducive to access. DESIGN Qualitative study with focus groups. SETTING Family practice unit in Chicoutimi (Saguenay), Que. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-five male and female adult patients with at least four chronic conditions but no cognitive disorders or decompensating conditions. METHODS For this pilot study, only three focus group discussions were held. MAIN FINDINGS The main barriers to accessing follow-up appointments included long waits on the telephone, automated telephone-answering systems, and needing to attend at specific times to obtain appointments. The main barriers to specialized care were long waiting times and the need to get prescriptions and referrals from family physicians. Factors reported conducive to access included systematic callbacks and the personal involvement of family physicians. Good communication between family physicians and specialists was also perceived to be an important factor in access. CONCLUSION Systematic callbacks, family physicians’ personal efforts to obtain follow-up visits, and better physician-specialist communication were all suggested as ways to improve access to care for patients with multiple chronic conditions. PMID:16926944

  7. HIV specialists call for managed care evaluation.

    PubMed

    1996-05-01

    A group of San Francisco HIV care specialists is developing a system to measure the performance of health maintenance organizations (HMO) and to provide an evaluation of how HIV-positive patients fare under managed care systems. Establishing criteria for reviewing quality of care is difficult since AIDS treatments are evolving, and providers differ in their definition of optimum care. There is a link between physicians' experience and patients' health. AIDS patients who are treated by health care specialists with significant AIDS treatment experience are healthier and live longer than patients treated by inexperienced physicians. PMID:11363251

  8. The Visiting Specialist Model of Rural Health Care Delivery: A Survey in Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, Jacob; Cashman, Suzanne B.; Savageau, Judith A.; Stenger, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Context: Hospitals in rural communities may seek to increase specialty care access by establishing clinics staffed by visiting specialists. Purpose: To examine the visiting specialist care delivery model in Massachusetts, including reasons specialists develop secondary rural practices and distances they travel, as well as their degree of…

  9. What are the cost savings associated with providing access to specialist care through the Champlain BASE eConsult service? A costing evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Liddy, Clare; Drosinis, Paul; Deri Armstrong, Catherine; McKellips, Fanny; Afkham, Amir; Keely, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study estimates the costs and potential savings associated with all eConsult cases completed between 1 April 2014 and 31 March 2015. Design Costing evaluation from the societal perspective estimating the costs and potential savings associated with all eConsults completed during the study period. Setting Champlain health region in Eastern Ontario, Canada. Population Primary care providers and specialists registered to use the eConsult service. Main outcome measures Costs included (1) delivery costs; (2) specialist remuneration; (3) costs associated with traditional (face-to-face) referrals initiated as a result of eConsult. Potential savings included (1) costs of traditional referrals avoided; (2) indirect patient savings through avoided travel and lost wages/productivity. Net potential societal cost savings were estimated by subtracting total costs from total potential savings. Results A total of 3487 eConsults were completed during the study period. In 40% of eConsults, a face-to-face specialist visit was originally contemplated but avoided as result of eConsult. In 3% of eConsults, a face-to-face specialist visit was not originally contemplated but was prompted as a result of the eConsult. From the societal perspective, total costs were estimated at $207 787 and total potential savings were $246 516. eConsult led to a net societal saving of $38 729 or $11 per eConsult. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate potential cost savings from the societal perspective, as patients avoided the travel costs and lost wages/productivity associated with face-to-face specialist visits. Greater savings are expected once we account for other costs such as avoided tests and visits and potential improved health outcomes associated with shorter wait times. Our findings are valuable for healthcare delivery decision-makers as they seek solutions to improve care in a patient-centred and efficient manner. PMID:27338880

  10. Role Expectations in Dementia Care Among Family Physicians and Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Hum, Susan; Cohen, Carole; Persaud, Malini; Lee, Joyce; Drummond, Neil; Dalziel, William; Pimlott, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Background The assessment and ongoing management of dementia falls largely on family physicians. This pilot study explored perceived roles and attitudes towards the provision of dementia care from the perspectives of family physicians and specialists. Methods Semi-structured, one-to-one interviews were conducted with six family physicians and six specialists (three geriatric psychiatrists, two geriatricians, and one neurologist) from University of Toronto-affiliated hospitals. Transcripts were subjected to thematic content analysis. Results Physicians’ clinical experience averaged 16 years. Both physician groups acknowledged that family physicians are more confident in diagnosing/treating uncomplicated dementia than a decade ago. They agreed on care management issues that warranted specialist involvement. Driving competency was contentious, and specialists willingly played the “bad cop” to resolve disputes and preserve long-standing therapeutic relationships. While patient/caregiver education and support were deemed essential, most physicians commented that community resources were fragmented and difficult to access. Improving collaboration and communication between physician groups, and clarifying the roles of other multi-disciplinary team members in dementia care were also discussed. Conclusions Future research could further explore physicians’ and other multi-disciplinary members’ perceived roles and responsibilities in dementia care, given that different health-care system-wide dementia care strategies and initiatives are being developed and implemented across Ontario. PMID:25232368

  11. Coordination of cancer care between family physicians and cancer specialists

    PubMed Central

    Easley, Julie; Miedema, Baukje; Carroll, June C.; Manca, Donna P.; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Webster, Fiona; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore health care provider (HCP) perspectives on the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Design Qualitative study using semistructured telephone interviews. Setting Canada. Participants A total of 58 HCPs, comprising 21 FPs, 15 surgeons, 12 medical oncologists, 6 radiation oncologists, and 4 GPs in oncology. Methods This qualitative study is nested within a larger mixed-methods program of research, CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum), focused on improving the coordination of cancer care between FPs and cancer specialists. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, telephone interviews were conducted with HCPs involved in cancer care. Invitations to participate were sent to a purposive sample of HCPs based on medical specialty, sex, province or territory, and geographic location (urban or rural). A coding schema was developed by 4 team members; subsequently, 1 team member coded the remaining transcripts. The resulting themes were reviewed by the entire team and a summary of results was mailed to participants for review. Main findings Communication challenges emerged as the most prominent theme. Five key related subthemes were identified around this core concept that occurred at both system and individual levels. System-level issues included delays in medical transcription, difficulties accessing patient information, and physicians not being copied on all reports. Individual-level issues included the lack of rapport between FPs and cancer specialists, and the lack of clearly defined and broadly communicated roles. Conclusion Effective and timely communication of medical information, as well as clearly defined roles for each provider, are essential to good coordination of care along the cancer care trajectory, particularly during transitions of care between cancer specialist and FP care. Despite advances in technology, substantial communication challenges still

  12. A national evaluation of specialists' clinics in primary care settings.

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, A; Bond, M

    2001-01-01

    clinics, NHS costs were more expensive per patient in outreach. The benefits of outreach clinics on patients' health status at six months' follow-up were relatively small. CONCLUSIONS: Outreach clinics are a means of improving access to specialist services for patients, in addition to improving the efficiency and quality of health care. Most results were similar across specialties and areas. The benefits of the outreach service need to be weighed against their substantially higher NHS costs, in comparison with outpatients clinics. Outreach clinics are unlikely to be financially justifiable for NHS funding given that the impact on patients' health status was small. PMID:11458477

  13. Exploring the leadership role of the clinical nurse specialist on an inpatient palliative care consulting team.

    PubMed

    Stilos, Kalli; Daines, Pat

    2013-03-01

    Demand for palliative care services in Canada will increase owing to an aging population and the evolving role of palliative care in non-malignant illness. Increasing healthcare demands continue to shape the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role, especially in the area of palliative care. Clinical nurse specialists bring specialized knowledge, skills and leadership to the clinical setting to enhance patient and family care. This paper highlights the clinical leadership role of the CNS as triage leader for a hospital-based palliative care consulting team. Changes to the team's referral and triage processes are emphasized as key improvements to team efficiency and timely access to care for patients and families.

  14. Patient Preferences for Care by General Internists and Specialists in the Ambulatory Setting

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Carmen L; Wickstrom, Glenda C; Kolar, Maria M; Keyserling, Thomas C; Bognar, Bryan A; DuPre, Connie T; Hayden, Juliana

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate patients' preferences for care by general internists and specialists for common medical conditions. DESIGN Telephone interview. SETTING A convenience sample of general internal medicine practices at 10 eastern academic medical centers. PATIENT/PARTICIPANTS A probability sample of 314 participants who had at least one visit with their primary care physician during the preceding 2 years. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Items addressed patients' attitudes concerning continuity of care, preferences for care by general internists or specialists for common medical problems, and perceptions about the competency of general internists and specialists to manage these problems. Continuity was important to participants, with 63% reporting they preferred having one doctor. Respondents were willing to wait 3 or 4 days to see their regular doctor (85%) and wanted their doctor to see them in the emergency department (77%) and monitor their care while in the hospital (94%). A majority (>60%) preferred care from their regular doctor for a variety of new conditions. Though respondents valued continuity, 84% felt it was important to be able to seek medical care from any type of physician without a referral, and 74% responded that if they needed to see a specialist, they were willing to pay out-of-pocket to do so. Although most participants (98%) thought their regular doctor was able to take care of usual medical problems, the majority thought that specialists were better able to care for allergies (79%) and better able to prescribe medications for depression (65%) and low-back pain (72%). CONCLUSIONS Participants preferred to see their general internist despite their perceptions that specialists were more competent in caring for the conditions we examined. However, they wanted unrestricted access to specialists to supplement care provided by general internists. PMID:10672109

  15. Care of spinal cord injury in non-specialist settings.

    PubMed

    Rodger, Sian

    Patient with spinal cord injuries have individualised care routines to help prevent complications. Disruption to these routines following admission to non-specialist settings can have long-term consequences. This article focuses on the key long-term problems of pressure ulcers, bladder and bowel dysfunction, and autonomic dysreflexia. Nurses working on general wards need to consider how to manage these problems when caring for patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:27544957

  16. Hemodialysis access - self care

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Renal failure - chronic-hemodialysis access; Chronic renal insufficiency - hemodialysis access; Chronic kidney failure - hemodialysis access; Chronic renal failure - hemodialysis access; dialysis - hemodialysis access

  17. Management of liver cirrhosis between primary care and specialists

    PubMed Central

    Grattagliano, Ignazio; Ubaldi, Enzo; Bonfrate, Leonilde; Portincasa, Piero

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses a practical, evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and management of liver cirrhosis by focusing on etiology, severity, presence of complications, and potential home-managed treatments. Relevant literature from 1985 to 2010 (PubMed) was reviewed. The search criteria were peer-reviewed full papers published in English using the following MESH headings alone or in combination: “ascites”, “liver fibrosis”, “cirrhosis”, “chronic hepatitis”, “chronic liver disease”, “decompensated cirrhosis”, “hepatic encephalopathy”, “hypertransaminasemia”, “liver transplantation” and “portal hypertension”. Forty-nine papers were selected based on the highest quality of evidence for each section and type (original, randomized controlled trial, guideline, and review article), with respect to specialist setting (Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Internal Medicine) and primary care. Liver cirrhosis from any cause represents an emerging health issue due to the increasing prevalence of the disease and its complications worldwide. Primary care physicians play a key role in early identification of risk factors, in the management of patients for improving quality and length of life, and for preventing complications. Specialists, by contrast, should guide specific treatments, especially in the case of complications and for selecting patient candidates for liver transplantation. An integrated approach between specialists and primary care physicians is essential for providing better outcomes and appropriate home care for patients with liver cirrhosis. PMID:21633593

  18. Volunteer activity in specialist paediatric palliative care: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Burbeck, Rachel; Low, Joe; Sampson, Elizabeth L; Scott, Rosalind; Bravery, Ruth; Candy, Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the involvement of volunteers with direct patient/family contact in UK palliative care services for children and young people. Method Cross-sectional survey using a web-based questionnaire. Setting UK specialist paediatric palliative care services. Participants Volunteer managers/coordinators from all UK hospice providers (n=37) and one National Health Service palliative care service involving volunteers (covering 53 services in total). Main outcomes Service characteristics, number of volunteers, extent of volunteer involvement in care services, use of volunteers’ professional skills and volunteer activities by setting. Results A total of 21 providers covering 31 hospices/palliative care services responded (30 evaluable responses). Referral age limit was 16–19 years in 23 services and 23–35 years in seven services; three services were Hospice at Home or home care only. Per service, there was a median of 25 volunteers with direct patient/family contact. Services providing only home care involved fewer volunteers than hospices with beds. Volunteers entirely ran some services, notably complementary therapy and pastoral/faith-based care. Complementary therapists, school teachers and spiritual care workers most commonly volunteered their professional skills. Volunteers undertook a wide range of activities including emotional support and recreational activities with children and siblings. Conclusions This is the most detailed national survey of volunteer activity in palliative care services for children and young people to date. It highlights the range and depth of volunteers’ contribution to specialist paediatric palliative care services and will help to provide a basis for future research, which could inform expansion of volunteers’ roles. PMID:24644170

  19. Overview of Accountable Care Organizations for Oncology Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Anish J.; Macklis, Roger M.

    2013-01-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) are poised to become major components of health care delivery in the United States. The practice of oncology, often laden with high charges, is likely to undergo major shifts as ACOs become widespread. In this article, we review the economic factors leading to the growth of ACOs and discuss some elements of the current ACO model proposed in the Affordable Care Act. Oncology specialists—in medicine, surgery, and radiation oncology—will have important roles in determining the place of specialty care in an ACO framework and will have to take the lead in educating patients, primary care physicians, and administrators on the value propositions related to their activities. We also describe how oncology specialists may participate in the model to ensure success for physicians and patients. PMID:23942925

  20. The HIV specialist improves quality of care and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Valenti, William M

    2002-05-01

    HAART has raised the bar for standards of care for HIV/AIDS. As patient outcomes improve, efforts are under way to address the infrastructure needed to continue to provide high-quality HIV care. Standards of care and treatment guidelines are updated regularly in an effort to keep up with our rapidly evolving understanding of HIV medicine. Two professional organizations have been formed in the past several years to address the needs of HIV care providers and patients. While there is slight variation between the 2 groups, both organizations define the HIV specialist in terms of clinical experience and continuing education and recognize that HIV care providers are a diverse group committed to managing this critical and constantly evolving epidemic. Several states have also developed initiatives that address the importance of health care quality and outcomes for people with HIV/AIDS. New York and California lead the way, and surely other states will follow. To ensure quality of care and continued good outcomes for our patients, managed care organizations and other providers of HIV care can now measure their own competence against these existing standards. PMID:12056114

  1. Equity of use of specialist palliative care by age: cross-sectional study of lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Burt, Jenni; Plant, Hilary; Omar, Rumana; Raine, Rosalind

    2010-09-01

    The equitable provision of care is a core principle of the National Health Service. Previous research has suggested that older cancer patients may be less likely to use specialist palliative care, but such research has been limited by retrospective design and the failure to measure clinical need. The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which the use of specialist palliative care in lung cancer patients varies by age, after accounting for need. A cross-sectional survey of patients and their carers attending four hospital lung cancer clinics in London was conducted between June 2006 and April 2007. Two hundred and fifty-two patients and 137 carers participated in the study. Thirty-nine percent of participants received specialist palliative care. Metastatic disease, global quality of life and the clinic where treatment was provided were associated with use of specialist palliative care. Age, gender, deprivation, living alone, current or most recent line of treatment, number of co-morbidities and carer stress were not associated with receipt of such services. This suggests that, for patients within the specialist cancer care system, access to specialist palliative care is offered on the basis of need. PMID:20395355

  2. Caring--the work of the clinical nurse specialist.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, K M; Lucke, K T

    1990-01-01

    Understanding the contribution of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) to quality patient care is important for educators and administrators as they plan for the care of patients in an increasingly complex health care system. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical practice of CNSs as reported by practicing CNSs. Grounded theory methodology was used in collecting and analyzing the data. The subjects consisted of a theoretical sample of 17 Master's prepared CNSs who had functioned in the role of the CNS for a minimum of 1 year, and three recorded case studies from the literature. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted by the principle investigator. Using the constant comparative method, the data were line-coded and clustered to form groups of data that could be labeled as constructs. When theoretical saturation was reached, no further interviews were conducted. The investigators proposed that caring was the basic social psychological process (BSP), which was validated in a literature review. Scientific caring included investigating and teaching. Humanistic caring included creating-the-new, showing-the-way, working-with-others, and taking-care-of-the-environment. CNSs took care of the caretakers as well as the patients and their families.

  3. Orthopaedic Trauma Care Specialist Program for Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    Slobogean, Gerard; Sprague, Sheila; Furey, Andrew; Pollak, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    The dire challenges faced in Haiti, both preearthquake and postearthquake, highlight the need for developing surgical infrastructure to care for traumatic musculoskeletal injuries. The proposed Orthopaedic Trauma Care Specialist (OTCS) residency program aims to close the critical human resource gap that limits the appropriate care of musculoskeletal trauma in Haiti. The OTCS program is a proposal for a 2-year residency program that will focus primarily on the management of orthopaedic trauma. The proposed program will be a comprehensive approach for implementing affordable and sustainable strategies to improve orthopaedic trauma care. Its curriculum will be tailored to the injuries seen in Haiti, and the treatments that can be delivered within their health care system. Its long-term sustainability will be based on a "train-the-trainers" approach for developing local faculty to continue the program. This proposal outlines the OTCS framework specifically for Haiti; however, this concept is likely applicable to other low- and middle-income environments in a similar need for improved trauma and fracture care. PMID:26356211

  4. Elder Specialists: Psychosocial Aspects of Medical Education in Geriatric Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann-Stone, Nancy; Robinson, Sherry B.; Rull, Gary; Rosher, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an Elder Specialist Program developed by one school of medicine to sensitize medical students to geriatric psychosocial issues. Elder Specialists participate in panel discussions as part of each geriatric session. As an alternative to traditional senior mentoring programs, the Elder Specialist Program provides all students a…

  5. Integration of Early Specialist Palliative Care in Cancer Care and Patient Related Outcomes: A Critical Review of Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Salins, Naveen; Ramanjulu, Raghavendra; Patra, Lipika; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: World Health Organization and American Society of Clinical Oncology recommend early integration of specialist palliative care in patients with cancer. This paper focuses on critical review of evidence on integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care and patient-related outcomes. Methods: The question for the literature search was – Does integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care influences patient-related outcomes? 31 articles related to literature search review question were included in this paper. Results: Ten patient-related outcomes of early specialist palliative care in adult cancer care was studied. Studies by Temel et al. (2012), Bakitas et al. (2009), Zimmermann et al. (2014), Rugno et al. (2014), Lowery et al. (2013) and Walker et al. (2014) showed early specialist palliative care improves health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Studies by Pirl et al. (2012), Lowery et al. (2013), and Walker et al. (2014) showed early specialist palliative care improved mood depression and anxiety. Studies by Zimmermann et al. and Rugno et al. (2014) showed symptom control benefit of early specialist palliative care. Studies by Temel (2010), Bakitas (2015) and Rugno et al. (2014) showed survival improvement with early specialist palliative care. All these studies were carried in ambulatory palliative care setting. No survival benefit of palliative care intervention was seen in inpatient palliative care setting. The studies by Geer et al. (2012), Rugno et al. (2014), and Lowery et al. (2013) showed that early palliative care intervention positively influences treatment decision making. All the studies showed that palliative care intervention group received less intravenous chemotherapy in last few weeks of life. Studies by Yoong et al. and Temel et al. (2011) shows early specialist palliative care improves advanced care planning. Studies by Temel et al. (2010), Greer et al. (2012), McNamara et al. (2013), Hui et al. (2014

  6. Documenting coordination of cancer care between primary care providers and oncology specialists in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Brouwers, Melissa C.; Vukmirovic, Marija; Tomasone, Jennifer R.; Grunfeld, Eva; Urquhart, Robin; O’Brien, Mary Ann; Walker, Melanie; Webster, Fiona; Fitch, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To report on the findings of the CanIMPACT (Canadian Team to Improve Community-Based Cancer Care along the Continuum) Casebook project, which systematically documented Canadian initiatives (ie, programs and projects) designed to improve or support coordination and continuity of cancer care between primary care providers (PCPs) and oncology specialists. Design Pan-Canadian environmental scan. Setting Canada. Participants Individuals representing the various initiatives provided data for the analysis. Methods Initiatives included in the Casebook met the following criteria: they supported coordination and collaboration between PCPs and oncology specialists; they were related to diagnosis, treatment, survivorship, or personalized medicine; and they included breast or colorectal cancer or both. Data were collected on forms that were compiled into summaries (ie, profiles) for each initiative. Casebook initiatives were organized based on the targeted stage of the cancer care continuum, jurisdiction, and strategy (ie, model of care or type of intervention) employed. Thematic analysis identified similarities and differences among employed strategies, the level of primary care engagement, implementation barriers and facilitators, and initiative evaluation. Main findings The CanIMPACT Casebook profiles 24 initiatives. Eleven initiatives targeted the survivorship stage of the cancer care continuum and 15 focused specifically on breast or colorectal cancer or both. Initiative teams implemented the following strategies: nurse patient navigation, multidisciplinary care teams, electronic communication or information systems, PCP education, and multicomponent initiatives. Initiatives engaged PCPs at various levels. Implementation barriers included lack of care standardization across jurisdictions and incompatibility among electronic communication systems. Implementation facilitators included having clinical and program leaders publicly support the initiative

  7. Rural health care: redefining access.

    PubMed

    Collins, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The population and demographics of rural America are shifting once again. As our nation's unprecedented health care reform unfolds, it is becoming clear that rural communities have unique strengths, and capitalizing on these strengths can position them well for this health care transformation. Equally important are the distinct challenges that--with careful planning, attention, and resources--can be transformed into opportunities to thrive in the new health care environment. The North Carolina Institute of Medicine's Task Force on Rural Health recently published a report that highlights the strengths and challenges of rural communities [1]. In order to fully leverage these opportunities, we must continue to acknowledge the fundamental importance of access to basic health care, while also broadening our discussion to collectively tackle the additional components necessary to create healthy, thriving rural communities. As we reexamine the needs of rural communities, we should broaden our discussions to include an expansion of the types of access that are necessary for strengthening rural health. Collaboration, successful recruitment and retention, availability of specialty services, quality care, and cost effectiveness are some of the issues that must come into discussions about access to services. With this in mind, this issue of the NCMJ explores opportunities to strengthen the health of North Carolina's rural communities. PMID:25621473

  8. Quality of Care for HIV/AIDS and for Primary Prevention by HIV Specialists and Nonspecialists.

    PubMed

    Landovitz, Raphael J; Desmond, Katherine A; Gildner, Jennifer L; Leibowitz, Arleen A

    2016-09-01

    The role of HIV specialists in providing primary care to persons living with HIV/AIDS is evolving, given their increased incidence of comorbidities. Multivariate logit analysis compared compliance with sentinel preventive screening tests and interventions among publicly insured Californians with and without access to HIV specialists in 2010. Quality-of-care indicators [visit frequency, CD4 and viral load (VL) assessments, influenza vaccine, tuberculosis (TB) testing, lipid profile, glucose blood test, and Pap smears for women] were related to patient characteristics and provider HIV caseload. There were 9377 adult Medicare enrollees (71% also had Medicaid coverage) and 2076 enrollees with only Medicaid coverage. Adjusted for patient characteristics, patients seeing providers with greater HIV caseloads (>50 HIV patients) were more likely to meet visit frequency guidelines in both Medicare [98%; confidence interval (CI 97.5-98.2) and Medicaid (97%; CI 96.2-98.0), compared to 60% (CI 57.1-62.3) and 45% (CI 38.3-50.4), respectively, seeing providers without large HIV caseloads (p < 0.001). Patients seeing providers with larger caseloads were significantly more likely to have CD4 (p < 0.001), VL (p < 0.001), and TB testing (p < 0.05). A larger percentage of patients seeing large-volume Medicare providers received influenza vaccinations. Provider caseload was unrelated to lipid or glucose assessments or Pap Smears for women. Patients with access to large-volume providers were more likely to meet clinical guidelines for visits, CD4, VL, tuberculosis testing, and influenza vaccinations, and were not less likely to receive primary preventive care. Substantial insufficiencies remain in both monitoring to assess viral suppression and in preventive care. PMID:27610461

  9. Can we close the income and wealth gap between specialists and primary care physicians?

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Bryan T; DeVrieze, Steven R; Reed, Shelby D; Schulman, Kevin A

    2010-05-01

    Over their lifetimes, primary care physicians earn lower incomes--and accumulate considerably less wealth--than their specialist counterparts. This gap influences medical students, who are choosing careers in primary care in declining numbers. We estimated career wealth accumulation across specialists, primary care physicians, physician assistants, business school graduates, and college graduates. We then compared specialists, represented by cardiologists, to primary care physicians in four scenarios. The wealth gap is substantial; narrowing it would require substantial reductions in specialists' practice income or increases in primary care physicians' practice income, or both, of more than $100,000 a year. Current proposals for increasing primary care physician supply would do little to lessen these differences.

  10. The role of the maternal-fetal medicine specialist in high-risk obstetric care.

    PubMed

    Sisson, Melissa C; Witcher, Patricia M; Stubsten, Cathy

    2004-06-01

    The maternal-fetal medicine (MFM) specialist is a member of the health care team who possesses expertise in the management of the high-risk pregnancy. The MFM specialist has advanced knowledge of obstetric, medical, genetic, and surgical complications of pregnancy and the effects of complications on the mother, fetus, and newborn. The MFMspecialist may function as consultant, comanager, or direct care provider and may be equally comfortable in antepartum ambulatory, inpatient obstetric, and critical care settings. As the female population increases, the number of MFM specialists also is expected to grow. PMID:15145361

  11. Waiting to see the specialist: patient and provider characteristics of wait times from primary to specialty care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Wait times are an important measure of access to various health care sectors and from a patient’s perspective include several stages in their care. While mechanisms to improve wait times from specialty care have been developed across Canada, little is known about wait times from primary to specialty care. Our objectives were to calculate the wait times from when a referral is made by a family physician (FP) to when a patient sees a specialist physician and examine patient and provider factors related to these wait times. Methods Our study used the Electronic Medical Record Administrative data Linked Database (EMRALD) which is a linkage of FP electronic medical record (EMR) data to the Ontario, Canada administrative data. The EMR referral date was linked to the administrative physician claims date to calculate the wait times. Patient age, sex, socioeconomic status, comorbidity and FP continuity of care and physician age, sex, practice location, practice size and participation in a primary care delivery model were examined with respect to wait times. Results The median waits from medical specialists ranged from 39 to 76 days and for surgical specialists from 33 days to 66 days. With a few exceptions, patient factors were not associated with wait times from primary care to specialty care. Similarly physician factors were not consistently associated with wait times, except for FP practice location and size. Conclusions Actual wait times for a referral from a FP to seeing a specialist physician are longer than those reported by physician surveys. Wait times from primary to specialty care need to be included in the calculation of surgical and diagnostic wait time benchmarks in Canada. PMID:24460619

  12. [Collaboration with specialists and regional primary care physicians in emergency care at acute hospitals provided by generalists].

    PubMed

    Imura, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    A role of acute hospitals providing emergency care is becoming important more and more in regional comprehensive care system led by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. Given few number of emergent care specialists in Japan, generalists specializing in both general internal medicine and family practice need to take part in the emergency care. In the way collaboration with specialists and regional primary care physicians is a key role in improving the quality of emergency care at acute hospitals. A pattern of collaborating function by generalists taking part in emergency care is categorized into four types. PMID:26915241

  13. Commentary: Sense and sensibility: the role of specialists in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Schwann, Nanette M; Nester, Brian A; McLoughlin, Thomas M

    2012-03-01

    How to redesign the incentives structure in the United States to reward effective coordinated care rather than production volume is a staggering public health policy challenge. In the mind of the public, there is a fine distinction between health care rationing and rational health care. Specialists have a vital but underappreciated role in reining in health care costs, but specific incentives to elicit behavior change with positive social outcomes remain ambiguous. It is imperative, therefore, that redesigning the incentives structure is thoughtfully considered, modeled, and tested prior to implementation, lest an inferior-quality model is inadvertently adopted and costs are only marginally contained. Quality metrics need to be universal and reflect real patient outcomes instead of the degree of investment by the institution in the reporting tools. Still, specialists should take immediate action to implement safe and efficient procedures and to assess their long-term impact on patients' quality of life. Scientific evaluations should guide both the assessment of the appropriateness and the safe delivery of care. Investment in high-quality data architecture and the science of health delivery implementation is an imperative if health care reform is to achieve its goals. Coordination and collaboration between specialists and primary care physicians is essential to this enterprise. Specialists can champion these efforts as they pertain to their areas of expertise by considering their care episodes in the context of the patient as a whole, working closely with generalists, and returning to the mindset of the specialist as a family doctor. PMID:22373614

  14. Access to care save lives.

    PubMed

    Blaney, C L

    1994-02-01

    Emergency treatment of such major complications of pregnancy as obstructed labor, hemorrhage, infection, hypertension disorders, and the effects of unsafe abortion, helps ameliorate morbidity and prevent mortality. Access to life-saving treatment (e.g., antibiotics, Cesarean sections, and blood transfusions) in developing countries is limited. Maternal mortality in one area of The Gambia, for example, is 2200 per 100,000 births. Improving access to care depends upon the availability of these services in communities, trained health personnel, service improvements, transportation provision, and community education. Detection of complications and early referral to an appropriate facility with a supportive and professional environment is key to saving lives. Political will and public pressure are needed before improvement in services can be successfully accomplished; politicians may ignore women with low status. Barriers to care are physical, cultural, technical, and economic. Cost or distance from home may prevent women from seeking care. Infection, hemorrhage, and uterine injury are frequently related to unsafe abortions, particularly among teenage women. Hospitals must be equipped with a reliable management system, surgical facilities, and clinical services. The WHO recommends upgrading community health centers with trained personnel, adequate supervision, and equipment. In Uganda, midwives are specially trained in advanced skills for use in remote areas: administration of oxytocin to evacuate the uterus and reduce bleeding, use of antibiotics for infections, and surgical repair of vaginal tears. Nurses in Zaire are trained to do Cesarean sections. In Sierra Leone and Nigeria, doctors are encouraged to receive training in obstetrics and to be posted in rural areas. In Sierra Leone, young men are trained to bring pregnant women in to care on stretchers. Maternity waiting homes near hospitals are another means to save lives. Lack of permission from a male relative may

  15. Does the use of specialist palliative care services modify the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Nicolson, Donald J; Macleod, Una; Allgar, Victoria; Dalgliesh, Christopher; Johnson, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cancer patients in lower socioeconomic groups are significantly less likely to die at home and experience more barriers to access to palliative care. It is unclear whether receiving palliative care may mediate the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death. Aim: This review examines whether and how use of specialist palliative care may modify the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death. Design: A systematic review was conducted. Eligible papers were selected and the quality appraised by two independent reviewers. Data were synthesised using a narrative approach. Data sources: MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Web of Knowledge were searched (1997–2013). Bibliographies were scanned and experts contacted. Papers were included if they reported the effect of both socioeconomic status and use of specialist palliative care on place of death for adult cancer patients. Results: Nine studies were included. All study subjects had received specialist palliative care. With regard to place of death, socioeconomic status was found to have (1) no effect in seven studies and (2) an effect in one study. Furthermore, one study found that the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death was only significant when patients received standard specialist palliative care. When patients received more intense care adapted to their needs, the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death was no longer seen. Conclusion: There is some evidence to suggest that use of specialist palliative care may modify the effect of socioeconomic status on place of death. PMID:26330454

  16. AquaUsers: Improving access to remotely sensed data for non-specialists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Oliver; Walker, Peter; Calton, Ben; Miller, Peter

    2015-04-01

    In recent years more and more complex remotely sensed data have been made available to the public by national and international agencies. These data are also reprocessed by different organisations to produce secondary products that are of specific need to a community. For instance the production of chlorophyll concentration maps from ocean colour data provided by NASA for the marine community. Providing access to such data has normally been focused on simply making the data available with appropriate metadata so that domain specialists can make use of it. One area that has seen significant investment, both of time and money, has been in the production of web based data portals. Primarily these have focused on spatial data. By providing a web map visualisation users are able to quickly assess both spatial coverage and data values. Data portal improvements have been possible thanks to advancements in back end data servers such as Thredds and ncWMS as well as improvements in front-end libraries for data visualisation including OpenLayers and D3. Data portals that make use of these technological advancements have aimed at improving the access and use of data by trained scientific domain specialists. There is now a push to improve access to these systems by non-scientific domain specialists through several European Commission funded projects, including OPEC and AquaUsers. These projects have improved upon an open source web GIS portal created by Plymouth Marine Laboratory [https://github.com/pmlrsg/GISportal]. We will present the latest version of our GIS portal, discuss the designs steps taken to achieve the latest build and share user stories as to how non-domain specialists are now able to utilise the system and get benefits from remotely sensed data. A first version was produced and disseminated to end users for feedback. At this stage the end users included government advisors, fish farmers and scientific groups with no specific GIS training or knowledge. This

  17. Care for post-stroke patients at Malaysian public health centres: self-reported practices of family medicine specialists

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Provision of post stroke care in developing countries is hampered by discoordination of services and limited access to specialised care. Albeit shortcomings, primary care continues to provide post-stroke services in less than favourable circumstances. This paper aimed to review provision of post-stroke care and related problems among Family Medicine Specialists managing public primary health care services. Methods A semi-structured questionnaire was distributed to 121 Family Physicians servicing public funded health centres in a pilot survey focused on improving post stroke care provision at community level. The questionnaire assessed respondents background and practice details i.e. estimated stroke care burden, current service provision and opinion on service improvement. Means and frequencies described quantitative data. For qualitative data, constant comparison method was used until saturation of themes was reached. Results Response rate of 48.8% was obtained. For every 100 patients seen at public healthcentres each month, 2 patients have stroke. Median number of stroke patients seen per month is 5 (IQR 2-10). 57.6% of respondents estimated total stroke patients treated per year at each centre was less than 40 patients. 72.4% lacked a standard care plan although 96.6% agreed one was needed. Patients seen were: discharged from tertiary care (88.1%), shared care plan with specialists (67.8%) and patients who developed stroke during follow up at primary care (64.4%). Follow-ups were done at 8-12 weekly intervals (60.3%) with 3.4% on ‘as needed’ basis. Referrals ranked in order of frequency were to physiotherapy services, dietitian and speech and language pathologists in public facilities. The FMS’ perceived 4 important ‘needs’ in managing stroke patients at primary care level; access to rehabilitation services, coordinated care between tertiary centres and primary care using multidisciplinary care approach, a standardized guideline and family

  18. Do specialist palliative care teams improve outcomes for cancer patients? A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Hearn, J; Higginson, I J

    1998-09-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether teams providing specialist palliative care improve the health outcomes of patients with advanced cancer and their families or carers when compared to conventional services. The study involved a systematic literature review of published research. The source of the data included studies identified from a systematic search of computerized databases (Medline, psychINFO, CINAHL and BIDS to the end of 1996), hand-searching specialist palliative care journals, and studying bibliographies and reference lists. The inclusion criteria for articles were that the study considered the use of specialist palliative care teams caring for patients with advanced cancer. Articles were assessed and data extracted and synthesized, with studies graded according to design. A variety of outcomes were considered by the authors. These addressed aspects of symptom control, patient and family or carer satisfaction, health care utilization and cost, place of death, psychosocial indices and quality of life. Overall, 18 relevant studies were identified, including five randomized controlled trials. Improved outcomes were seen in the amount of time spent at home by patients, satisfaction by both patients and their carers, symptom control, a reduction in the number of inpatient hospital days, a reduction in overall cost, and the patients' likelihood of dying where they wished to for those receiving specialist care from a multiprofessional palliative care team. It was concluded that all evaluations were of services considered to be leading the field, or were pioneering training and treatments. However, when compared to conventional care, there is evidence that specialist teams in palliative care improve satisfaction and identify and deal with more patient and family needs. Moreover, multiprofessional approaches to palliative care reduce the overall cost of care by reducing the amount of time patients spend in acute hospital settings.

  19. Marketing and the medical specialist in the managed care environment.

    PubMed

    Treister, N W

    1997-01-01

    Marketing means more than just communicating or advertising to potential patients; marketing means identifying your customers and working to meet or exceed their expectations. There are five key areas of a marketing plan: (1) Establish the foundation, beginning with your mission statement; (2) Assess your marketing environment by internal and external research; (3) Target your efforts, looking at image and perception; (4) Develop your particular mix of product, price, place of distribution, and promotion; and (5) implement and evaluate your marketing process. This article discusses the importance of a marketing plan for the medical specialist and highlights the features unique to a practice working in a system of capitated reimbursement. Applying these principles will help to demonstrate added value, protect the fundamental role of the patient-physician relationship, ensure that our efforts are aligned with professional missions and goals, and ultimately increase profitability and professional success. PMID:10169343

  20. Marketing and the medical specialist in the managed care environment.

    PubMed

    Treister, N W

    1997-01-01

    Marketing means more than just communicating or advertising to potential patients; marketing means identifying your customers and working to meet or exceed their expectations. There are five key areas of a marketing plan: (1) Establish the foundation, beginning with your mission statement; (2) Assess your marketing environment by internal and external research; (3) Target your efforts, looking at image and perception; (4) Develop your particular mix of product, price, place of distribution, and promotion; and (5) implement and evaluate your marketing process. This article discusses the importance of a marketing plan for the medical specialist and highlights the features unique to a practice working in a system of capitated reimbursement. Applying these principles will help to demonstrate added value, protect the fundamental role of the patient-physician relationship, ensure that our efforts are aligned with professional missions and goals, and ultimately increase profitability and professional success.

  1. Critical Care in Critical Access Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Seright, Teresa J; Winters, Charlene A

    2015-10-01

    What began as a grant-funded demonstration project, as a means of bridging the gap in rural health care, has developed into a critical access hospital system comprising 1328 facilities across 45 states. A critical access hospital is not just a safety net for health care in a rural community. Such hospitals may also provide specialized services such as same-day surgery, infusion therapy, and intensive care. For hospitals located near the required minimum of 35 miles from a tertiary care center, management of critically ill patients may be a matter of stabilization and transfer. Critical access hospitals in more rural areas are often much farther from tertiary care; some of these hospitals are situated within frontier areas of the United States. This article describes the development of critical access hospitals, provision of care and services, challenges to critical care in critical access hospitals, and suggestions to address gaps in research and collaborative care.

  2. Rural nurse specialists: clinical practice and the politics of care.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Ruth P

    2008-01-01

    Doctor flight from rural areas is an international phenomenon that places great pressure on primary health care delivery. In New Zealand, the response to these empty doctors' surgeries has been the introduction of nurse-led rural health clinics that have attracted controversy both in the media and from urban-based doctors over whether such nurse-led care is a direct substitution of medical care. This article analyzes the reflections of nurses working in some of these clinics who suggest that their situation is more complex than a direct substitution of labor. Although the nurses indicate some significant pressures moving them closer to the work of doctoring, they actively police this cross-boundary work and labor simultaneously to shore up their nursing identities. My own conclusions support their assertions. I argue that it is the maintenance of a holistic professional habitus that best secures their professional identity as nurses while they undertake the cross-boundary tasks of primary rural health care. There are clear professional benefits and disadvantages for the nurses in these situations, which make the positions highly politicized. These recurring divisions of labor within medical care giving and the elaboration of new types of care worker form an appropriate although neglected topic of study for anthropologists. The study of the social organization of clinical medicine is much enriched by paying closer attention to its interaction with allied health professions and their associated understandings of "good" care.

  3. [General practitioners as gatekeepers: Better health care than in countries with self-referral to specialists?].

    PubMed

    Groenewegen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In the Netherlands and a number of other European countries general practitioners are the gatekeepers for specialist and hospital care. European health care systems with gatekeeping general practitioners, i.e. those with comprehensive, strong primary care, perform better on a number of health indicators and on equity. However, it is less clear if gatekeeping health care systems have lower health expenditure. There is ongoing debate on whether gatekeeping plays a role in diagnostic delay of cancers. At health care system level research is being hampered by small numbers and should be combined with in-depth research into health care mechanisms.

  4. Excellence in cost-effective inpatient specialist palliative care in the NHS - a new model.

    PubMed

    Grogan, Eleanor; Paes, Paul; Peel, Tim

    2016-02-01

    There is little in the literature describing hospital specialist palliative care units (PCUs) within the NHS. This paper describes how specialist PCUs can be set up within and be entirely funded by the NHS, and outlines some of the challenges and successes of the units. Having PCUs within hospitals has offered patients increased choice over their place of care and death; perhaps not surprisingly leading to a reduced death rate in the acute hospital. However, since the opening of the PCUs there has also been an increased home death rate. The PCUs are well received by patients, families and other staff within the hospital. We believe they offer a model for excellence in cost-effective inpatient specialist palliative care within the NHS.

  5. Role of the specialist nurse in caring for patients with myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lobban, Lois; Perkins, Sue

    Myeloma is a rare, heterogeneous cancer of the bone marrow. It is characterised by a range of comorbidities and clinical complications, including bone fractures, anaemia and kidney damage. Myeloma is an individual cancer both in terms of the symptoms and complications patients can experience and in their response to treatment. This means that patients require individual management and care from specialist nurses who provide information, education, and social and psychological support, as well as direct patient care. The different combinations of treatment include complicated chemotherapy and anti-myeloma regimens. These treatments result in an accumulation of toxicities in patients, which specialist nurses play a vital role in monitoring and managing. The support and care given by specialist nurses have an effect both on the patient experience and patient outcomes. PMID:24093415

  6. Access to care - an unmet need in headache management?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Access to care for headache sufferers is not always simple. A survey conducted in a large number of members of lay associations point to the existence of multiple barriers to care for headache in several European countries. Patients usually discover the existence of specialized structures with a delay of several years after the onset of their headache. Furthermore, a relevant portion of them are not satisfied with the management of their disease, partly because of the poor efficacy of treatments and partly because of the difficulty to get in touch with the specialist. Headache disorders, and primary headaches in particular, represent an important issue in public health, because they are common, disabling and treatable. A joint effort is required from the relevant stakeholders (scientists, lay organizations, decision-makers, healthcare policymakers, and others) to improve the access to care for headache sufferers. PMID:24742114

  7. Dialogues on depression management: the primary care and specialist perspectives.

    PubMed

    Collins, Richard L; Escobar, Javier I

    2006-10-01

    Depression is a major public health problem in the United States and is responsible for an enormous economic burden and loss of productivity and quality of life. In many cases, PCPs are well situated to identify and treat unrecognized depression, but an optimal treatment program often comprises both medical and psychotherapeutic interventions. Many collaborative models that integrate the efforts of PCPs, psychiatrists, behavioral health organizations, and workplace assistance programs are being tested and may prove to be the best direction for improving care for patients with depression. Looking ahead, improvement in treatment of depression will depend on numerous factors, including educating health care practitioners to recognize silent depression, expanding current collaborative models to cover more of the population, involving MCOs and payers in the development of effective treatment systems, and improving workplace-support programs to encourage more patients to seek appropriate care.

  8. Intensive Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Victoria A.; Walsh, Joan; Rudolf, Matthew; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell

    2007-01-01

    Context: Although critical access hospitals (CAHs) have limitations on number of acute care beds and average length of stay, some of them provide intensive care unit (ICU) services. Purpose: To describe the facilities, equipment, and staffing used by CAHs for intensive care, the types of patients receiving ICU care, and the perceived impact of…

  9. Think Stoma Nurse: a tool to trigger referral to specialist care.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Judy; Adams, Jane

    This article describes the initial development and subsequent evolution of a simple referral assessment tool for stoma care. The first author's personal experience identified that there was widespread inconsistency in perceptions of local multidisciplinary teams as to when it was appropriate to refer to specific specialist nursing teams. This resulted in both inappropriate and delayed referrals. A 'Think Specialist Nurse' initiative was developed across the author's trust, building on the traffic light template from the 'ThinkGlucose' tool, to facilitate referrals to clinical nurse specialists. The stoma-care specific tool, 'Think Stoma Nurse', has subsequently evolved beyond its initial audience, and has been adapted into materials aimed at patients and carers. PMID:26419813

  10. Naturopathic physicians: holistic primary care and integrative medicine specialists.

    PubMed

    Litchy, Andrew P

    2011-12-01

    The use of Complimentary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is increasing in the United States; there is a need for physician level practitioners who possess extensive training in both CAM and conventional medicine. Naturopathic physicians possess training that allows integration of modern scientific knowledge and the age-old wisdom of natural healing techniques. Naturopathic philosophy provides a framework to implement CAM in concert with conventional therapies. The naturopathic physician's expertise in both conventional medicine and CAM allows a practice style that provides excellent care through employing conventional and CAM modalities while utilizing modern research and evidence-based medicine. PMID:22432775

  11. Naturopathic physicians: holistic primary care and integrative medicine specialists.

    PubMed

    Litchy, Andrew P

    2011-12-01

    The use of Complimentary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is increasing in the United States; there is a need for physician level practitioners who possess extensive training in both CAM and conventional medicine. Naturopathic physicians possess training that allows integration of modern scientific knowledge and the age-old wisdom of natural healing techniques. Naturopathic philosophy provides a framework to implement CAM in concert with conventional therapies. The naturopathic physician's expertise in both conventional medicine and CAM allows a practice style that provides excellent care through employing conventional and CAM modalities while utilizing modern research and evidence-based medicine.

  12. Health Care Access among Deaf People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in…

  13. Child Health and Access to Medical Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leininger, Lindsey; Levy, Helen

    2015-01-01

    It might seem strange to ask whether increasing access to medical care can improve children's health. Yet Lindsey Leininger and Helen Levy begin by pointing out that access to care plays a smaller role than we might think, and that many other factors, such as those discussed elsewhere in this issue, strongly influence children's health.…

  14. Reforming Long-Term Care in the United States: Findings from a National Survey of Specialists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Edward Alan; Mor, Vincent; Clark, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Theories of the policy process recognize that policy proposals are typically generated, debated, redrafted, and accepted for consideration through the gradual accumulation of knowledge within communities of specialists. Thus, to inform long-term care (LTC) reform efforts, we conducted a Web-based survey of 1,147 LTC specialists…

  15. Development of a standardised pro forma for specialist palliative care multidisciplinary team meetings.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Jennifer; Forman, Margaret Louise

    2012-05-01

    A pro forma of the caseload of the community palliative care clinical nurse specialists in the Central Lancashire Community Specialist Palliative Care Team was devised to provide a brief overview of each patient's plan of care for use in the multidisciplinary team meetings and as a consequence of preparing for the UK Department of Health's peer review process. The pro forma was also designed to be used in everyday clinical practice in Gold Standards Framework meetings in the community. It has been evaluated by the team and found to be helpful for highlighting key issues in clinical practice, such as symptoms, psychological and emotional needs, and Preferred Priorities of Care. Over the past 2 years, it has also complemented the organisation's drive to become 'paperless'. This article looks at how the pro forma was developed, how it has evolved over time, and how it works today. Consideration has also been given to its benefits and limitations.

  16. Integration of Early Specialist Palliative Care in Cancer Care: Survey of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salins, Naveen; Patra, Lipika; Usha Rani, MR; Lohitashva, SO; Rao, Raghavendra; Ramanjulu, Raghavendra; Vallath, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Palliative care is usually delivered late in the course of illness trajectory. This precludes patients on active disease modifying treatment from receiving the benefit of palliative care intervention. A survey was conducted to know the opinion of oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients about the role of early specialist palliative care in cancer. Methods: A nonrandomized descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at a tertiary cancer care center in India. Thirty oncologists, sixty oncology nurses, and sixty patients were surveyed. Results: Improvement in symptom control was appreciated by oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients with respect to pain (Z = −4.10, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.84, P = 0.001), (Z = −6.20, P = 0.001); nausea and vomiting (Z = −3.75, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.3, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.1, P = 0.001); constipation (Z = −3.29, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.96, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.49, P = 0.001); breathlessness (Z = −3.57, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.03, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.99, P = 0.001); and restlessness (Z = −3.68, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.23, P = 0.001), (Z = −3.22, P = 0.001). Improvement in end-of-life care management was appreciated by oncologists and oncology nurses with respect to communication of prognosis (Z = −4.04, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.20, P = 0.001); discussion on limitation of life-sustaining treatment (Z = −3.68, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.53, P = 0.001); end-of-life symptom management (Z = −4.17, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.59, P = 0.001); perimortem care (Z = −3.86, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.80, P = 0.001); and bereavement support (Z = −3-80, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.95, P = 0.001). Improvement in health-related communication was appreciated by oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients with respect to communicating health related information in a sensitive manner (Z = −3.74, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.47, P = 0.001), (Z = −6.12, P = 0.001); conducting family meeting (Z = −3.12, P = 0.002), (Z = −4.60, P = 0

  17. 48 CFR 801.602-73 - Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources. 801.602-73 Section 801.602... Responsibilities 801.602-73 Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources. For contracts to be awarded under the authority of either 38 U.S.C. 7409 or 38...

  18. 48 CFR 801.602-73 - Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources. 801.602-73 Section 801.602... Responsibilities 801.602-73 Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources. For contracts to be awarded under the authority of either 38 U.S.C. 7409 or 38...

  19. 48 CFR 801.602-73 - Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources. 801.602-73 Section 801.602... Responsibilities 801.602-73 Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources. For contracts to be awarded under the authority of either 38 U.S.C. 7409 or 38...

  20. 48 CFR 801.602-73 - Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources. 801.602-73 Section 801.602... Responsibilities 801.602-73 Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources. For contracts to be awarded under the authority of either 38 U.S.C. 7409 or 38...

  1. 48 CFR 801.602-73 - Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources. 801.602-73 Section 801.602... Responsibilities 801.602-73 Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources. For contracts to be awarded under the authority of either 38 U.S.C. 7409 or 38...

  2. Perceptions of Palliative Care Among Hematologic Malignancy Specialists: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Thomas W.; O'Donnell, Jonathan D.; Crowley-Matoka, Megan; Rabow, Michael W.; Smith, Cardinale B.; White, Douglas B.; Tiver, Greer A.; Arnold, Robert M.; Schenker, Yael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with hematologic malignancies are less likely to receive specialist palliative care services than patients with solid tumors. Reasons for this difference are poorly understood. Methods: This was a multisite, mixed-methods study to understand and contrast perceptions of palliative care among hematologic and solid tumor oncologists using surveys assessing referral practices and in-depth semistructured interviews exploring views of palliative care. We compared referral patterns using standard statistical methods. We analyzed qualitative interview data using constant comparative methods to explore reasons for observed differences. Results: Among 66 interviewees, 23 oncologists cared exclusively for patients with hematologic malignancies; 43 treated only patients with solid tumors. Seven (30%) of 23 hematologic oncologists reported never referring to palliative care; all solid tumor oncologists had previously referred. In qualitative analyses, most hematologic oncologists viewed palliative care as end-of-life care, whereas most solid tumor oncologists viewed palliative care as a subspecialty that could assist with complex patient cases. Solid tumor oncologists emphasized practical barriers to palliative care referral, such as appointment availability and reimbursement issues. Hematologic oncologists emphasized philosophic concerns about palliative care referrals, including different treatment goals, responsiveness to chemotherapy, and preference for controlling even palliative aspects of patient care. Conclusion: Most hematologic oncologists view palliative care as end-of-life care, whereas solid tumor oncologists more often view palliative care as a subspecialty for comanaging patients with complex cases. Efforts to integrate palliative care into hematologic malignancy practices will require solutions that address unique barriers to palliative care referral experienced by hematologic malignancy specialists. PMID:25784580

  3. Child Health and Access to Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Leininger, Lindsey; Levy, Helen

    2016-01-01

    It might seem strange to ask whether increasing access to medical care can improve children’s health. Yet Lindsey Leininger and Helen Levy begin by pointing out that access to care plays a smaller role than we might think, and that many other factors, such as those discussed elsewhere in this issue, strongly influence children’s health. Nonetheless, they find that, on the whole, policies to improve access indeed improve children’s health, with the caveat that context plays a big role—medical care “matters more at some times, or for some children, than others.” Focusing on studies that can plausibly show a causal effect between policies to increase access and better health for children, and starting from an economic framework, they consider both the demand for and the supply of health care. On the demand side, they examine what happens when the government expands public insurance programs (such as Medicaid), or when parents are offered financial incentives to take their children to preventive appointments. On the supply side, they look at what happens when public insurance programs increase the payments that they offer to health-care providers, or when health-care providers are placed directly in schools where children spend their days. They also examine how the Affordable Care Act is likely to affect children’s access to medical care. Leininger and Levy reach three main conclusions. First, despite tremendous progress in recent decades, not all children have insurance coverage, and immigrant children are especially vulnerable. Second, insurance coverage alone doesn’t guarantee access to care, and insured children may still face barriers to getting the care they need. Finally, as this issue of Future of Children demonstrates, access to care is only one of the factors that policy makers should consider as they seek to make the nation’s children healthier. PMID:27516723

  4. A transferable telepsychiatry model for improving access to emergency mental health care.

    PubMed

    Saurman, Emily; Johnston, Jarret; Hindman, James; Kirby, Sue; Lyle, David

    2014-10-01

    The Mental Health Emergency Care-Rural Access Programme (MHEC) aims to improve access to specialist emergency mental health care in rural and remote communities in New South Wales. It provides a range of services including emergency telephone triage and video assessment. The present report provides a detailed description of the structure and function of the MHEC model, and identifies matters concerning adaptation and transferability. Structure: the MHEC can be contacted 24 hours/day, every day of the year; no caller is refused assistance. Function: the MHEC provides information services, clinical services and other programme activities. Adaptation of the model and implementation elsewhere (transferability) should be informed by local needs, existing practices and the components of access. The programme has already attracted the attention of two other regions in Australia interested in implementing emergency telepsychiatry programmes. The MHEC model is a practical solution for improving access to specialist emergency mental health care in underserved areas.

  5. Referral interventions from primary to specialist care: a systematic review of international evidence

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Lindsay; Baxter, Susan; Woods, Helen Buckley; Goyder, Elizabeth; Lee, Andrew; Payne, Nick; Rimmer, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Background Demand management defines any method used to monitor, direct, or regulate patient referrals. Strategies have been developed to manage the referral of patients to secondary care, with interventions that target primary care, specialist services, or infrastructure. Aim To review the international evidence on interventions to manage referral from primary to specialist care. Design and setting Systematic review. Method Iterative, systematic searches of published and unpublished sources public health, health management, management, and grey literature databases from health care and other industries were undertaken to identify recent, relevant studies. A narrative synthesis of the data was completed to structure the evidence into groups of similar interventions. Results The searches generated 8327 unique results, of which 140 studies were included. Interventions were grouped into four intervention categories: GP education (n = 50); process change (n = 49); system change (n = 38); and patient-focused (n = 3). It is clear that there is no ‘magic bullet’ to managing demand for secondary care services: although some groups of interventions may have greater potential for development, given the existing evidence that they can be effective in specific contexts. Conclusions To tackle demand management of primary care services, the focus cannot be on primary care alone; a whole-systems approach is needed because the introduction of interventions in primary care is often just the starting point of the referral process. In addition, more research is needed to develop and evaluate interventions that acknowledge the role of the patient in the referral decision. PMID:25452541

  6. Health Care Access Among Deaf People.

    PubMed

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in global health knowledge for deaf people including those with even higher risk of marginalization. Examples of approaches to improve access to health care, such as providing powerful and visually accessible communication through the use of sign language, the implementation of important communication technologies, and cultural awareness trainings for health professionals are discussed. Programs that raise health knowledge in Deaf communities and models of primary health care centers for deaf people are also presented. Published documents can empower deaf people to realize their right to enjoy the highest attainable standard of health.

  7. The Surgical Nosology In Primary-care Settings (SNIPS): a simple bridging classification for the interface between primary and specialist care

    PubMed Central

    Gruen, Russell L; Knox, Stephanie; Britt, Helena; Bailie, Ross S

    2004-01-01

    Background The interface between primary care and specialist medical services is an important domain for health services research and policy. Of particular concern is optimising specialist services and the organisation of the specialist workforce to meet the needs and demands for specialist care, particularly those generated by referral from primary care. However, differences in the disease classification and reporting of the work of primary and specialist surgical sectors hamper such research. This paper describes the development of a bridging classification for use in the study of potential surgical problems in primary care settings, and for classifying referrals to surgical specialties. Methods A three stage process was undertaken, which involved: (1) defining the categories of surgical disorders from a specialist perspective that were relevant to the specialist-primary care interface; (2) classifying the 'terms' in the International Classification of Primary Care Version 2-Plus (ICPC-2 Plus) to the surgical categories; and (3) using referral data from 303,000 patient encounters in the BEACH study of general practice activity in Australia to define a core set of surgical conditions. Inclusion of terms was based on the probability of specialist referral of patients with such problems, and specialists' perception that they constitute part of normal surgical practice. Results A four-level hierarchy was developed, containing 8, 27 and 79 categories in the first, second and third levels, respectively. These categories classified 2050 ICPC-2 Plus terms that constituted the fourth level, and which covered the spectrum of problems that were managed in primary care and referred to surgical specialists. Conclusion Our method of classifying terms from a primary care classification system to categories delineated by specialists should be applicable to research addressing the interface between primary and specialist care. By describing the process and putting the bridging

  8. How and when to refer a child for specialist paediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Emily; Edwards, Clare

    2013-12-01

    Specialist paediatric palliative care is a relatively new area of paediatrics, and the interface with other disciplines can occasionally pose challenges for referrers due to lack of information about the diverse services available. Although services vary on a regional basis, there are common principles which may be used to guide and support referrals. Children may be referred to palliative care services via a number of routes from community-based primary care to regional tertiary centres. Identifying those most likely to benefit from the finite resources available can be a challenge, and healthcare professional's negative attitudes to palliative care have been further identified as a potentially modifiable barrier. This article aims to clarify the role of specialist paediatric palliative care, identify who should be eligible for such care, describe the services available (including those from children's hospices) and provide a tool for assessing some of the most challenging referrals. Many of the documents referenced can be downloaded from the Together for Short Lives website, and in many cases, there is no charge.

  9. Advanced nurse practitioner-led referral for specialist care and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Mashlan, Wendy; Hayes, Julie; Thomas, Ceri

    2016-02-01

    In response to the need for appropriate and timely care of frail older patients admitted to hospital, a dedicated advanced nurse practitioner (ANP)-led referral service was developed. The service has continued to evolve over the 13 years since its implementation in accordance with changing service demands. This article describes the role of the ANP in care of the elderly/rehabilitation medicine and focuses on one area of clinical practice developed by the team: an ANP-led referral service. The aim of developing the service was to ensure that patients who required specialist care and rehabilitation could be identified and assessed as soon as possible after admission, with the premise that they could be transferred to a bed in care of the elderly medical wards. This was perceived by the ANPs to be advantageous for patients, who would receive care from a specialist team, and for care of the elderly staff who could use their knowledge and skills appropriately and safely.

  10. Taking care of the caretakers: a partial explanation of clinical nurse specialist practice.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, K M

    1991-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical practice of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs). Data were collected from three recorded case studies and interviews from a theoretical sample of 17 masters-prepared CNSs who had functioned in the CNS role for a minimum of 1 year. Using the constant comparative method, transcribed interviews were line-coded and clustered to form groups of data that could be labelled as constructs. Caring was validated as the basic psychological process. Scientific caring included investigating and teaching; humanistic caring included creating the new, showing the way, working with others, and taking care of the environment. It was found that CNSs took care of the caretakers as well as the patients and their families.

  11. Specialist Pediatric Palliative Care Prescribing Practices: A Large 5-year Retrospective Audit

    PubMed Central

    Damani, Anuja; Salins, Naveen; Ghoshal, Arunangshu; Muckaden, MaryAnn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: There is a gradual increasing trend in childhood cancers in India and pediatric palliative care in India is an emerging specialty. Prescribing pain and symptom control drugs in children with cancer requires knowledge of palliative care formulary, dosing schedules, and prescription guidelines. This study is a retrospective audit of prescribing practices of a specialist palliative care service situated in a tertiary cancer center. Methods: A total of 1135 medication records of children receiving specialist pediatric palliative care services were audited for 5 years (2010–2014) to evaluate prescribing practices in children with advanced cancer. Results: A total of 51 types of drugs were prescribed with an average of 4.2 drugs per prescription. 66.9% of the prescriptions had paracetamol, and 33.9% of the prescriptions had morphine. Most common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs prescribed was ibuprofen (23.9%), and more than 50% of the prescriptions had aperients. The most commonly prescribed aperient was a combination of liquid paraffin and sodium-picosulfate. Dexamethasone was prescribed in 51.9% of patients and in most cases this was part of oral chemotherapy regimen. Generic names in prescription were used only in 33% of cases, and adverse effects of the drugs were documented in only 9% of cases. In 25% of cases, noncompliance to the WHO prescription guidelines was seen, and patient compliance to prescription was seen in 40% of cases. Conclusions: Audit of the prescribing practices in specialist pediatric palliative care service shows that knowledge of pediatric palliative care formulary, rational drug use, dosing, and prescribing guidelines is essential for symptom control in children with advanced life-limiting illness. Noncompliance to WHO prescribing guidelines in one fourth of cases and using nongeneric names in two-thirds of prescription indicates poor prescribing practices and warrants prescriber education. Prescription noncompliance by

  12. Primary health care use and health care accessibility among adolescents in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Barakat-Haddad, C; Siddiqua, A

    2015-05-19

    This study examined primary health care use and accessibility among adolescents living in the United Arab Emirates. In a cross-sectional study, we collected health care use, sociodemographic and residential data for a sample of 6363 adolescents. Logistic regression modelling was used to examine predictors of health care use. The most-consulted health professionals were dentists or orthodontists, family doctors and eye specialists. Local adolescents were more likely to attend public clinics/hospitals than private facilities, while the opposite was true for expatriates. In the previous 12 months 22.6% of the participants had not obtained the health care they needed and 19.5% had not had a routine health check-up. Common reasons for not obtaining care were busy schedules, dislike/fear of doctors and long waiting times. Predictors of not obtaining needed care included nationality and income, while those for having a routine check-up were mother's education and car ownership. Improvements to the health care sector may increase health care accessibility among adolescents.

  13. Latino Adults’ Access to Mental Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Zayas, Luis H.; Hansen, Marissa C.

    2008-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, epidemiological studies using state-of-the-art methodologies have documented the unmet mental health needs of Latinos adults in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. This paper reviews 16 articles based on seven epidemiological studies, examines studies methodologies, and summarizes findings about how Latino adults access mental health services. Studies consistently report that, compared to non-Latino Whites, Latinos underutilize mental health services, are less likely to receive guideline congruent care, and rely more often on primary care for services. Structural, economic, psychiatric, and cultural factors influence Latinos’ service access. In spite of the valuable information these studies provide, methodological limitations (e.g., reliance on cross-sectional designs, scarcity of mixed Latino group samples) constrict knowledge about Latinos access to mental health services. Areas for future research and development needed to improve Latinos’ access and quality of mental health care are discussed. PMID:16598658

  14. Referral to a specialist paediatric palliative care service in oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Lorna K; Miller, Michael; McKinney, Patricia A; Parslow, Roger C; Feltbower, Richard G

    2011-04-01

    Cancer is the second most common cause of death in children and young people (0-19 years) accounting for 16.2% of deaths in England and Wales in 2005. Only 37.6% children and young people who died from cancer in Yorkshire were referred to Martin House Children's Hospice (MH) during the period 1990-2005. A significantly higher proportion with central nervous system tumours and a significantly lower than expected proportion with leukaemia or lymphoma were referred for palliative care. There is potential to increase the proportion of children and young people with cancer who are referred to specialist palliative care services.

  15. Access to Care and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Alcalá, Héctor E.; Albert, Stephanie L.; Roby, Dylan H.; Beckerman, Jacob; Champagne, Philippe; Brookmeyer, Ron; Prelip, Michael L.; Glik, Deborah C.; Inkelas, Moira; Garcia, Rosa-Elenna; Ortega, Alexander N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading killer of Americans. CVD is understudied among Latinos, who have high levels of CVD risk factors. This study aimed to determine whether access to health care (ie, insurance status and having a usual source of care) is associated with 4 CVD prevention factors (ie, health care utilization, CVD screening, information received from health care providers, and lifestyle factors) among Latino adults and to evaluate whether the associations depended on CVD clinical risk/disease. Data were collected as part of a community-engaged food environment intervention study in East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights, CA. Logistic regressions were fitted with insurance status and usual source of care as predictors of the 4 CVD prevention factors while controlling for demographics. Analyses were repeated with interactions between self-reported CVD clinical risk/disease and access to care measures. Access to health care significantly increased the odds of CVD prevention. Having a usual source of care was associated with all factors of prevention, whereas being insured was only associated with some factors of prevention. CVD clinical risk/disease did not moderate any associations. Although efforts to reduce CVD risk among Latinos through the Affordable Care Act could be impactful, they might have limited impact in curbing CVD among Latinos, via the law's expansion of insurance coverage. CVD prevention efforts must expand beyond the provision of insurance to effectively lower CVD rates. PMID:26313803

  16. Improving access to depression care: descriptive report of a multidisciplinary primary care pilot service

    PubMed Central

    Symons, Lorrie; Tylee, André; Mann, Anthony; Jones, Roger; Plummer, Susan; Walker, Maria; Duff, Carole; Holt, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Background: Research has identified a need for improved depression care in primary care, while current United Kingdom (UK) health policy outlines standards for the management of the condition, including improved access to care. Innovative ways of working are needed to address these standards and provide better care. Aims: To pilot a multidisciplinary service for the management of depressed patients with a particular focus on facilitating access. Design of study: Uncontrolled descriptive pilot study. Setting: One general practice in inner London. Methods: The service was advertised by post to all 6689 adult patients registered with the practice. It provided open access and face-to-face assessment by a specially trained primary care nurse for patients who considered themselves to be depressed. Following assessment, depressed patients received systematic telephone support from nursing staff in addition to the usual care from the general practitioners (GPs). The service was evaluated for a 6-month period. Results: Sixty-six people, aged 19–77 years, 44 of them female, contacted the service, the majority in the first 2 months. Fifty-four patients were offered an assessment by the nurse. Thirty-five (80%) of the 44 attendees fulfilled criteria for major depression. Between them, the nurses and doctors achieved high levels of adherence to treatment and follow-up. This specialist service appears to have enabled a group of depressed patients, some of whom may not have sought or received help, to gain access to primary care. With appropriate supervision and training in depression care the nurses were able to assess and support depressed patients and this appeared to be acceptable to both patients and GPs. Conclusion: In its present form the service would not be cost-effective. However, we believe it could be adapted to suit the needs of individual or clusters of practices incorporating key elements of the service (open access and case management, in particular), and

  17. Bridging the gap between primary and specialist care--an integrative model for stroke.

    PubMed

    Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Ang, Yan Hoon; Chan, Bernard Pl; Chan, Parvathi; Heng, Bee Hoon; Kong, Keng He; Kumari, Nanda; Lim, Linda Lh; Phang, Jonathan Sk; Toh, Matthias Phs; Widjaja, Sutrisno; Wong, Loong Mun; Yin, Ann; Cheah, Jason

    2008-02-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability in Singapore and many parts of the world. Chronic disease management programmes allow seamless care provision across a spectrum of healthcare facilities and allow appropriate services to be brought to the stroke patient and the family. Randomised controlled trials have provided evidence for efficacious interventions. After the management of acute stroke in a stroke unit, most stable stroke patients can be sent to their family physician for continued treatment and rehabilitation supervision. Disabled stroke survivors may need added home-based services. Suitable community resources will need to be harnessed. Clinic-based stroke nurses may enhance service provision and coordination. Close collaboration between the specialist and family physician would be needed to right-site patients and also allow referrals in either direction where necessary. Barriers to integration can be surmounted by trust and improved communication. Audits would allow monitoring of care provision and quality care enhancement. The Wagner model of chronic care delivery involves self-management support, shared clinical information systems, delivery system redesign, decision support, healthcare organisation and community resources. The key and critical feature is the need for an informed, activated (or motivated) patient, working in collaboration with the specialist and family physician, and a team of nursing and allied healthcare professionals across the continuum of care. The 3-year Integrating Services and Interventions for Stroke (ISIS) project funded by the Ministry of Health will test such an integrative system. PMID:18327347

  18. Collaboration between municipal and specialist public health care in tuberculosis screening in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background About 90% of new tuberculosis (TB) cases in Norway appear among immigrants from high incidence countries. There is a compulsory governmental tuberculosis screening programme for immigrants; immigrants with positive screening results are to be referred from municipal health care to the specialist health care for follow-up. Recent studies of the screening programme have shown inadequate follow-up. One of the main problems has been that patients referred for follow-up have not attended their appointment at the specialist health care. TB screening in the municipality of Trondheim is done by two different teams: the Refugee Healthcare Centre (RHC) screens refugees and the Vaccination and Infection Control Office (VICO) screens all the other groups. Patients with positive findings on screening are referred to the hospital’s Pulmonary Out-patient Department (POPD). The municipal and referral level public health care initiated a project aiming to improve follow-up through closer collaboration. Methods An intervention group and a pre-intervention control group were established for each screening group. During meetings between staff from the municipality and the POPD, inadequacies in the screening process were identified, and changes in procedures for summoning patients, and time and place for tests were implemented. For both the intervention group and the control group, time from referral until consultation at the POPD and number of patients that attended their first appointment were registered and compared. Results In the VICO group, 97/134 (72%) of the controls and 109/123 (89%) of the intervention group attended their first appointment at the POPD after 30 weeks (median) and 10 weeks, respectively. In the RHC group 28/46 (61%) of the controls and 55/59 (93%) in the intervention group attended their first appointment after 15 and 8 weeks (median) respectively. Conclusion Increased collaboration between the municipal and specialist health care can

  19. Taking kangaroo mother care forward in South Africa: The role of district clinical specialist teams.

    PubMed

    Feucht, Ute Dagmar; van Rooyen, Elise; Skhosana, Rinah; Bergh, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The global agenda for improved neonatal care includes the scale-up of kangaroo mother care (KMC) services. The establishment of district clinical specialist teams (DCSTs) in South Africa (SA) provides an excellent opportunity to enhance neonatal care at district level and ensure translation of policies, including the requirement for KMC implementation, into everyday clinical practice. Tshwane District in Gauteng Province, SA, has been experiencing an increasing strain on obstetric and neonatal services at central, tertiary and regional hospitals in recent years as a result of growing population numbers and rapid up-referral of patients, with limited down-referral of low-risk patients to district-level services. We describe a successful multidisciplinary quality improvement initiative under the leadership of the Tshwane DCST, in conjunction with experienced local KMC implementers, aimed at expanding the district's KMC services. The project subsequently served as a platform for improvement of other areas of neonatal care by means of a systematic approach.

  20. Taking kangaroo mother care forward in South Africa: The role of district clinical specialist teams.

    PubMed

    Feucht, Ute Dagmar; van Rooyen, Elise; Skhosana, Rinah; Bergh, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The global agenda for improved neonatal care includes the scale-up of kangaroo mother care (KMC) services. The establishment of district clinical specialist teams (DCSTs) in South Africa (SA) provides an excellent opportunity to enhance neonatal care at district level and ensure translation of policies, including the requirement for KMC implementation, into everyday clinical practice. Tshwane District in Gauteng Province, SA, has been experiencing an increasing strain on obstetric and neonatal services at central, tertiary and regional hospitals in recent years as a result of growing population numbers and rapid up-referral of patients, with limited down-referral of low-risk patients to district-level services. We describe a successful multidisciplinary quality improvement initiative under the leadership of the Tshwane DCST, in conjunction with experienced local KMC implementers, aimed at expanding the district's KMC services. The project subsequently served as a platform for improvement of other areas of neonatal care by means of a systematic approach. PMID:26792305

  1. Emergency Obstetric Care in a Rural Hospital: On-call Specialists Can Manage C-sections

    PubMed Central

    Ashtekar, Shyam V; Kulkarni, Madhav B; Ashtekar, Ratna S; Sadavarte, Vaishali S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Institutional birth and Emergency Obstetric Care (EmOC) are important strategies of the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM). While the Community Health Center (CHC) is expected to serve EmOC needs in NRHM, the CHCs are hamstrung due to chronic shortage of specialist doctors. Alternative strategies are therefore needed for ensuring EmOC. Objectives: This study aims to estimate the EmOC needs in a private rural hospital from case records and find some useful predictors for caesarian section (C-section) and to assess C-section needs in the context of on-call specialist support. Materials and Methods: We analyzed a two-decade series of 2587 obstetric cases in a private rural hospital for normal deliveries and EmOC including C-section. Results: About 80% of the obstetric cases were normal deliveries. Of the remaining 20% cases that required EmOC, nearly one-third required C-section. In the series, two maternal deaths occurred due to hemorrhage. About 13% case records showed past abortion, which adds to EmOC workload. Primipararous mothers with higher age had a greater incidence (23%) of C-section. The C-section rate shows a steady rise from 3% to above 10% in the series. Conclusions: This rural hospital required C-section in 6.4% cases. This C-section workload was managed with the help of on-call specialists. The local hospital team could manage 93.6% of the cases and abortions with only two maternal deaths. This strategy of an on-call specialist team can be an option for CHCs till resident specialists are adequately available. PMID:23112445

  2. Health-care reform and its impact on African-American surgical specialists.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, E. B.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1960, numerous concepts of health-care reform have been submitted to the US Congress and the American public with different viewpoints and objectives. The priority for the US Congress to pass a bipartisan health-reform plan has been circumvented by the newly elected majority Republican Congress. Nevertheless, health-care cost containment, quality control, and health-care delivery concepts have been implemented gradually into the concept of competitive managerial health care. A few of the serious problems in the African-American community are the efficiency and quality of the health-care delivery system and the effects of managed care on African-American primary physicians and surgical specialists. The critical shortages of this group, especially the latter, may create a dilemma in the implementation of a quality surgical care delivery system. The Association of American Medical Colleges, the American College of Surgeons, and other affiliating organizations should become sensitized to the African-American community's health needs, deficiencies, and the rational institution of an equitable, efficient, comprehensive, and quality health-care plan coupled with a sustained and increasing supply of certified, diversified, and experienced African-American surgical manpower in company with family practice physicians and primary care physicians. PMID:8839031

  3. Nursing home organizational change: the "Culture Change" movement as viewed by long-term care specialists.

    PubMed

    Miller, Susan C; Miller, Edward Alan; Jung, Hye-Young; Sterns, Samantha; Clark, Melissa; Mor, Vincent

    2010-08-01

    A decade-long grassroots movement aims to deinstitutionalize nursing home (NH) environments and individualize care. Coined "NH Culture Change" the movement is often described by its resident-centered/directed care focus. While empirical data of "culture change's" costs and benefits are limited, it is broadly viewed as beneficial and widely promoted. Still, debate abounds regarding barriers to its adoption. We used data from a Web-based survey of 1,147 long-term care specialists (including NH and other providers, consumers/advocates, state and federal government officials, university/academic, researchers/consultants, and others) to better understand factors associated with perceived barriers. Long-term care specialists view the number-one barrier to adoption differently depending on their employment, familiarity with culture change, and their underlying policy views. To promote adoption, research and broad-based educational efforts are needed to influence views and perceptions. Fundamental changes in the regulatory process together with targeted regulatory changes and payment incentives may also be needed.

  4. New care measures and their impact on pain medicine: One pain specialist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V

    2015-08-01

    Value-based purchasing (VBP) goes into effect this year and it links the quality of care to payments for care. Starting in fiscal year 2013, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services reduces all inpatient prospective payment system reimbursements by 1%. This money then can be returned to hospitals in the form of a bonus through VBP. Value-based purchasing holds hospitals accountable for both cost and quality. With VBP, hospitals get a score that is based on the process of care, the outcomes, and patient-centeredness. This means that reimbursements in health care, which keep hospitals in business, are transitioning from "volume of services" to VBP. Although VBP sounds like a great idea, particularly to politicians in Washington tasked with managing out-of-control health care expenditures, there is very little high-quality evidence that VBP will actually improve care. Nevertheless, this is the way we are going to be moving forward. The perception of pain is a highly personalized phenomenon, and chronic pain affects every aspect of a patient's life. The biopsychosocial model and the concept of utilizing an interdisciplinary team approach in the management of chronic pain make sense, but there are concerns that it could result in higher overall costs and no measurable improvements in the patient's perception of care. Both results. could have a negative impact on pain specialists. PMID:26028362

  5. Specialist Pediatric Palliative Care Referral Practices in Pediatric Oncology: A Large 5-year Retrospective Audit

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Arunangshu; Salins, Naveen; Damani, Anuja; Deodhar, Jayita; Muckaden, MaryAnn

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To audit referral practices of pediatric oncologists referred to specialist pediatric palliative care services. Patients and Methods: Retrospective review of medical case records of pediatric palliative care patients over a period of 5 years from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2014. Descriptive summaries of demographic, clinical variables, and patient circumstances at the time of referral and during end-of-life care were examined. Results: A total of 1135 patients were referred from pediatric oncology with a gradual increasing trend over 5 years. About 84.6% consultations took place in the outpatient setting. In 97.9% of the cases, parents were the primary caregivers. Availability of specialist pediatric health-care services at local places was available in 21.2% cases and 48% families earned <5000 INR (approximately 73 USD) in a month. Around 28.3% of the referrals were from leukemia clinic and maximum references were late with 72.4% patients having advanced disease at presentation. 30.3% of the referrals were made for counseling and communication and 54.2% had high symptom burden during referral. After referral, 21.2% patients continued with oral metronomic chemotherapy and 10.5% were referred back to oncology services for palliative radiotherapy. Only 4.9% patients had more than 2 follow-ups. 90.8% of the patients were cared for at home in the last days of illness by local general practitioners. 70.6% of the deaths were anticipated. Conclusions: Oncologists referred patients late in the course of disease trajectory. Most of the referrals were made for counseling and communication, but many patients had high symptom burden during referral. PMID:27559254

  6. Finding the Primary Care Providers in the Specialist-Dominant Primary Care Setting of Korea: A Cluster Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Yong; Eun, Sang Jun; Kim, Hyun Joo; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to identify private clinics that have a potential to perform the role of primary care providers (PCPs) in a primary care setting in Korea where private specialists are dominant. Methods The 2013 National Patient Sample claim data of Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service in Korea was used. Two-step cluster analysis was performed using characteristics of private clinics, and patient and utilization characteristics of 27,797 private clinics. External validation of clusters was performed by assessing the association among clusters and outcomes of care provided by private clinics. Stability of clusters was cross-validated using discriminant analysis. Results The result classified more than a half of private clinics into a potential PCP cluster. These were private clinics with specialties considered to be those of primary care physicians and were more likely to be located in non-metropolitan areas than specialized PCPs were. Compared to specialized PCPs, they had a higher percentage of pediatric and geriatric patients, patients with greater disease severity, a higher percentage of patients with complex comorbidities or with simple or minor disease groups, a higher number of patients and visits, and the same or higher quality of primary care. The most important factor in explaining variations between PCP clusters was the number of simple or minor disease groups per patient. Conclusion This study identified potential PCPs and suggested the identifying criteria for PCPs. It will provide useful information for formulation of a primary care strengthening policy to policy makers in Korea as well as other countries with similar specialist-dominant primary care settings. PMID:27560181

  7. Judaism, justice, and access to health care.

    PubMed

    Mackler, A L

    1991-06-01

    This paper develops the traditional Jewish understanding of justice (tzedakah) and support for the needy, especially as related to the provision of medical care. After an examination of justice in the Hebrew Bible, the values and institutions of tzedakah in Rabbinic Judaism are explored, with a focus on legal codes and enforceable obligations. A standard of societal responsibility to provide for the basic needs of all, with a special obligation to save lives, emerges. A Jewish view of justice in access to health care is developed on the basis of this general standard, as well as explicit discussion in legal sources. Society is responsible for the securing of access to all health care needed by any individual. Elucidation of this standard of need and corresponding societal obligations, and the significance of the Jewish model for the contemporary United States, are considered.

  8. Strategic purchasing reform in Estonia: Reducing inequalities in access while improving care concentration and quality.

    PubMed

    Habicht, Triin; Habicht, Jarno; van Ginneken, Ewout

    2015-08-01

    As of 2014, the Estonian Health Insurance Fund has adopted new purchasing procedures and criteria, which it now has started to implement in specialist care. Main changes include (1) redefined access criteria based on population need rather than historical supply, which aim to achieve more equal access of providers and specialties; (2) stricter definition and use of optimal workload criteria to increase the concentration of specialist care (3) better consideration of patient movement; and (4) an increased emphasis on quality to foster quality improvement. The new criteria were first used in the contract cycle that started in 2014 and resulted in fewer contracted providers for a similar volume of care compared to the previous contract cycle. This implies that provision of specialized care has become concentrated at fewer providers. It is too early to draw firm conclusions on the impact on care quality or on actors, but the process has sparked debate on the role of selective contracting and the role of public and private providers in Estonian health care. Lastly, the Estonian experience may hold important lessons for other countries looking to overcome inequalities in access while concentrating care and improving care quality.

  9. Strategic purchasing reform in Estonia: Reducing inequalities in access while improving care concentration and quality.

    PubMed

    Habicht, Triin; Habicht, Jarno; van Ginneken, Ewout

    2015-08-01

    As of 2014, the Estonian Health Insurance Fund has adopted new purchasing procedures and criteria, which it now has started to implement in specialist care. Main changes include (1) redefined access criteria based on population need rather than historical supply, which aim to achieve more equal access of providers and specialties; (2) stricter definition and use of optimal workload criteria to increase the concentration of specialist care (3) better consideration of patient movement; and (4) an increased emphasis on quality to foster quality improvement. The new criteria were first used in the contract cycle that started in 2014 and resulted in fewer contracted providers for a similar volume of care compared to the previous contract cycle. This implies that provision of specialized care has become concentrated at fewer providers. It is too early to draw firm conclusions on the impact on care quality or on actors, but the process has sparked debate on the role of selective contracting and the role of public and private providers in Estonian health care. Lastly, the Estonian experience may hold important lessons for other countries looking to overcome inequalities in access while concentrating care and improving care quality. PMID:26149322

  10. [Access to dental care during prenatal assistance].

    PubMed

    dos Santos Neto, Edson Theodoro; Oliveira, Adauto Emmerich; Zandonade, Eliana; Leal, Maria do Carmo

    2012-11-01

    This study sought to evaluate the self-perceived response to dental care during prenatal assistance in the Unified Health System (SUS) in the Metropolitan Region of Vitória, Espírito Santo, Brazil. 1032 postpartum women were interviewed and 1006 prenatal records copied. Postpartum women's self-perceived response was measured by the Oral Health Index Profile-14. When an impact was identified, dental care rendered in educational, preventive and curative terms was considered adequate. When there was no impact, assistance was considered adequate in educational and preventive terms. The Chi-square test revealed an association between prenatal care and dental care. Oral health impact on quality of life was 14.7%. Dental care received by mothers in educational terms was rated at 41.3%, while in preventive terms it was 21% and in curative terms it was 16.6%. Six or more prenatal appointments coupled with educational activities was closely associated with adequate dental care (p < 0.05). Access to dental care is facilitated when pregnant women attend health services and become involved in educational activities during the prenatal period. Consequently, educational measures appear to indicate an improvement in prenatal care in the SUS.

  11. Web-Based Specialist Support for Spinal Cord Injury Person's Care: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Della Mea, Vincenzo; Marin, Dario; Rosin, Claudio; Zampa, Agostino

    2012-01-01

    Persons with disability from spinal cord injury (SCI) are subject to high risk of pathological events and need a regular followup even after discharge from the rehabilitation hospital. To help in followup, we developed a web portal for providing online specialist as well as GP support to SCI persons. After a feasibility study with 13 subjects, the portal has been introduced in the regional healthcare network in order to make it compliant with current legal regulations on data protection, including smartcard authentication. Although a number of training courses have been made to introduce SCI persons to portal use (up to 50 users), the number of accesses remained very low. Reasons for that have been investigated by means of a questionnaire submitted to the initial feasibility study subjects and included the still easier use of telephone versus our web-based smartcard-authenticated portal, in particular, because online communications are still perceived as an unusual way of interacting with the doctor. To summarize, the overall project has been appreciated by the users, but when it is time to ask for help to, the specialist, it is still much easier to make a phone call. PMID:22934107

  12. A primary care specialist genetics service: a cluster-randomised factorial trial

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, Greta; Pickering, Ruth; Latter, Sue; Little, Paul; Gerard, Karen; Lucassen, Anneke; Temple, I Karen

    2012-01-01

    Background GPs do not have the confidence to identify patients at increased genetic risk. A specialist primary care clinical genetics service could support GPs with referral and provide local clinics for their patients. Aim To test whether primary care genetic-led genetics education improves both non-cancer and cancer referral rates, and primary care-led genetics clinics improve the patient pathway. Design and setting Cluster-randomised factorial trial in 73 general practices in the south of England. Method Practices randomised to receive case scenario based seminar (intervention) or not (control), and referred patients a primary (intervention) or secondary (control) care genetic counsellor (GC)-led appointment. Outcome measures: GP referral and clinic attendance rates (primary), appropriate cancer and case scenario referral rates, patient satisfaction, clinic costs, and case management (secondary). Results Eighty-nine and 68 referrals made by 36 intervention and 37 control practices respectively. There was a trend towards an overall higher referral rate among educated GPs (referral rate ratio [RRR] 1.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.89 to 2.02; P = 0.161), and they made more appropriate cancer referrals (RRR 2.36, 95% CI = 1.07 to 5.24; P = 0.035). No indication of difference in clinic attendance rates (odds ratio 0.91, 95% CI = 0.43 to 1.95; P = 0.802) or patient satisfaction (P = 0.189). Patients spent 49% less travelling (£3.60 versus £6.62; P<0.001) and took 33% less time (39.7 versus 57.7 minutes; P<0.001) to attend a primary than secondary care appointment; 83% of GC-managed appointments met the 18-week referral to treatment, NHS target. Conclusion An integrated primary care genetics service both supports GPs in appropriate cancer referral and provides care in the right place by the right person. PMID:22429436

  13. Availability and accessibility of rural health care.

    PubMed

    Hicks, L L

    1990-10-01

    The 1980s saw a retrenchment of the ideology that government intervention could solve the problems of inadequate access to health services in rural areas. Increased emphasis was placed on an ideology that promoted deregulation and competitive market solutions. During the 1980s, the gap in the availability of physicians in metropolitan versus nonmetropolitan areas widened. Also during that time period, the gap between metropolitan and nonmetropolitan populations' utilization of physician services widened. In addition, many indicators of the health status of nonmetropolitan residents versus metropolitan residents worsened during the 1980s. As we enter the 1990s, concern about equitable access to needed health care services and for the vulnerability and fragility of rural health systems has resurfaced. A number of national policies and a research agenda to improve accessibility and availability of health services in rural areas are being considered.

  14. Opportunities for multidisciplinary ASH clinical hypertension specialists in an era of population health and accountable care: ASH leadership message.

    PubMed

    Egan, Brent M

    2014-07-01

    The ASH hypertension specialists and ASH clinical and comprehensive hypertension centers represent a continuum of expertise and capacity positioned to play a major role in advancing the Triple Aim, which includes improving the patient care experience, population health, and value in cardiovascular health promotion and disease prevention. The ASH hypertension specialists board is dedicated to testing and designating a broad range of qualified health care professionals as clinical hypertension specialists. A continuing partnership with ASH, recognizing the need for an appropriate firewall between education and testing, is essential in providing the education and training programs required to grow and sustain the specialized workforce required to translate current evidence and future advances in personalized medicine into better care for individuals, better health for populations, and better value for payers. Moreover, growth of the ASH hypertension registry has the potential to accelerate advances in education and patient care as noted previously. The ASH hypertension specialists board is excited about the opportunities available to a well-trained and collaborative multidisciplinary group of clinical hypertension specialists in an era of ACOs pursuing the Triple Aim. PMID:25064766

  15. Health Education Specialists' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Perceptions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Strong, Jessica; Hanson, Carl L; Magnusson, Brianna; Neiger, Brad

    2016-03-01

    The changing landscape of health care as a result of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) may provide new opportunities for health education specialists (HES). The purpose of this study was to survey HES in the United States on their knowledge and attitudes of the ACA and assess their perceptions of job growth under the law. A random sample of 220 (36% response rate) certified HES completed a 53-item cross sectional survey administered online through Qualtrics. Findings were compared to public opinion on health care reform. HES are highly favorable of the law (70%) compared to the general public (23%). A total of 85% of respondents were able to list a provision of the ACA, and most (81%) thought the ACA would be successful at increasing insured Americans. Over half (64.6%) believe job opportunities will increase. Those who viewed the law favorably were significantly more likely to score better on a knowledge scale related to the ACA. HES understand publicized provisions but are uncertain about common myths and specific provisions related to Title IV, "Prevention of Chronic Disease and Improving Public Health." Directed and continuing education to HES regarding the ACA is warranted. PMID:26272884

  16. Health Education Specialists' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Perceptions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Strong, Jessica; Hanson, Carl L; Magnusson, Brianna; Neiger, Brad

    2016-03-01

    The changing landscape of health care as a result of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) may provide new opportunities for health education specialists (HES). The purpose of this study was to survey HES in the United States on their knowledge and attitudes of the ACA and assess their perceptions of job growth under the law. A random sample of 220 (36% response rate) certified HES completed a 53-item cross sectional survey administered online through Qualtrics. Findings were compared to public opinion on health care reform. HES are highly favorable of the law (70%) compared to the general public (23%). A total of 85% of respondents were able to list a provision of the ACA, and most (81%) thought the ACA would be successful at increasing insured Americans. Over half (64.6%) believe job opportunities will increase. Those who viewed the law favorably were significantly more likely to score better on a knowledge scale related to the ACA. HES understand publicized provisions but are uncertain about common myths and specific provisions related to Title IV, "Prevention of Chronic Disease and Improving Public Health." Directed and continuing education to HES regarding the ACA is warranted.

  17. Geographic Access to Health Care for Rural Medicare Beneficiaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Leighton; Hart, L. Gary; Goodman, David C.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Patients in rural areas may use less medical care than those living in urban areas. This could be due to differences in travel distance and time and a utilization of a different mix of generalists and specialists for their care. Purpose: To compare the travel times, distances, and physician specialty mix of all Medicare patients living in…

  18. Project ECHO: linking university specialists with rural and prison-based clinicians to improve care for people with chronic hepatitis C in New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sanjeev; Thornton, Karla; Jenkusky, Steven M; Parish, Brooke; Scaletti, Joseph V

    2007-01-01

    Project Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (Project ECHO) is a telemedicine and distance-learning program designed to improve access to quality health care for New Mexicans with hepatitis C. Project ECHO links health-care providers from rural clinics, the Indian Health Service, and prisons with specialists at the University of New Mexico. At weekly clinics, partners present and discuss patients with hepatitis C with specialists. Partners can receive continuing education credits for participating. Since June 2003, 173 hepatitis C clinics have been conducted with 1,843 case presentations. Partners have received 390 hours of training and 2,997 hours of continuing education credits. And in 2006, the State Legislature approved $1.5 million in annual funding for the project. Project ECHO has increased access to state-of-the art hepatitis C virus care for patients living in rural areas or prisons. Because of its success with hepatitis C, this project is being expanded to other chronic medical conditions. PMID:17542458

  19. Health Literacy and Access to Care.

    PubMed

    Levy, Helen; Janke, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-documented links between low health literacy, low rates of health insurance coverage, and poor health outcomes, there has been almost no research on the relationship between low health literacy and self-reported access to care. This study analyzed a large, nationally representative sample of community-dwelling adults ages 50 and older to estimate the relationship between low health literacy and self-reported difficulty obtaining care. We found that individuals with low health literacy were significantly more likely than individuals with adequate health literacy to delay or forgo needed care or to report difficulty finding a provider, even after we controlled for other factors, including health insurance coverage, employment, race/ethnicity, poverty, and general cognitive function. They were also more likely to lack a usual source of care, although this result was only marginally significant after we controlled for other factors. The results show that in addition to any obstacles that low health literacy creates within the context of the clinical encounter, low health literacy also reduces the probability that people get in the door of the health care system in a timely way. PMID:27043757

  20. Health Literacy and Access to Care.

    PubMed

    Levy, Helen; Janke, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-documented links between low health literacy, low rates of health insurance coverage, and poor health outcomes, there has been almost no research on the relationship between low health literacy and self-reported access to care. This study analyzed a large, nationally representative sample of community-dwelling adults ages 50 and older to estimate the relationship between low health literacy and self-reported difficulty obtaining care. We found that individuals with low health literacy were significantly more likely than individuals with adequate health literacy to delay or forgo needed care or to report difficulty finding a provider, even after we controlled for other factors, including health insurance coverage, employment, race/ethnicity, poverty, and general cognitive function. They were also more likely to lack a usual source of care, although this result was only marginally significant after we controlled for other factors. The results show that in addition to any obstacles that low health literacy creates within the context of the clinical encounter, low health literacy also reduces the probability that people get in the door of the health care system in a timely way.

  1. Access to care: leveraging dental education.

    PubMed

    Bertolami, Charles N; Berne, Robert

    2014-11-01

    If it is not a naïve expectation for dentists who have been beneficiaries of public generosity to share their good fortune with the public that made it possible, there may be a rational basis for enhancing the role of dental education in improving access to oral health care by promoting-but not requiring-a voluntary service commitment after graduation commensurate with the magnitude of the subsidy received. Such an approach would be in accordance with the Institute of Medicine's report Improving Access to Oral Health Care for Vulnerable and Underserved Populations, but without the governmental coercion explicit in the report. A sustainable alternative proposal is made here, offering both greater options to students in the financing of their dental education and greater obligations for those students who accept state subsidies: providing tuition discounts for students of state-supported dental schools based not on past residency status but rather on a future commitment to public service. This arrangement could be good public policy that might also help to create a culture in which dental students are given authentic options as part of a profession-wide ideology of public service. The result could well contribute to improved oral health care for the underserved.

  2. Health Care Access among Latinos: Implications for Social and Health Care Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    According to the Institute of Medicine, health care access is defined as "the degree to which people are able to obtain appropriate care from the health care system in a timely manner." Two key components of health care access are medical insurance and having access to a usual source of health care. Recent national data show that 34% of Latino…

  3. The Motivation-Facilitation Theory of Prenatal Care Access.

    PubMed

    Phillippi, Julia C; Roman, Marian W

    2013-01-01

    Despite the availability of services, accessing health care remains a problem in the United States and other developed countries. Prenatal care has the potential to improve perinatal outcomes and decrease health disparities, yet many women struggle with access to care. Current theories addressing access to prenatal care focus on barriers, although such knowledge is minimally useful for clinicians. We propose a middle-range theory, the motivation-facilitation theory of prenatal care access, which condenses the prenatal care access process into 2 interacting components: motivation and facilitation. Maternal motivation is the mother's desire to begin and maintain care. Facilitation represents the goal of the clinic to create easy, open access to person-centered beneficial care. This simple model directs the focus of research and change to the interface of the woman and the clinic and encourages practice-level interventions that facilitate women entering and maintaining prenatal care.

  4. Self-Care Practices of Female Peer Support Specialists with Co-Occurring Mood and Substance Use Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wohlert, Beverly A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the self-care practices of female peer support specialists (PSS) with co-occurring mood and substance use disorders. The researcher took a qualitative grounded theory approach conducting in-depth semi-structured interviews with ten women employed at peer-run agencies in Maricopa County, Arizona.…

  5. The unfunded costs incurred by patients accessing plastic surgical care in Northern Saskatchewan

    PubMed Central

    Robb, Jessica L; Clapson, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    The Canadian health care system was designed to ensure that all Canadian citizens would receive equal access to health care. However, in rural areas of Canada, patients are required to travel long distances and pay significant out-of-pocket expenses to access health care. The present study attempted to quantify the added out-of-pocket costs that rural Saskatchewan residents must pay to receive plastic surgical specialist care compared with urban residents of Saskatoon. A cost analysis was performed to generate a numerical value that would represent a minimum cost for patients travelling from three different locations within the province. The cost analysis performed in the present study approximated that the unfunded costs for common plastic surgical procedures are, at a minimum, 30 times greater for rural patients in La Ronge compared with their urban counterparts in Saskatoon. The fundamental principle of the Canadian health care system is equal access to necessary health care for all Canadians. Despite this, inequalities persist. The present cost-analysis study demonstrated that the unfunded (out-of-pocket) expenses for rural Saskatchewan patients seeking plastic surgical treatment is significantly higher than for their urban counterparts. These unfunded costs represent a significant barrier to health care access in Canada and serve to propagate inequalities in the nation’s heath care system. PMID:25114619

  6. Access to care provided by better safety net systems for the uninsured: measuring and conceptualizing adequacy.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mark A

    2011-08-01

    This descriptive study assesses the access to care provided by five model and diverse safety net programs that enroll uninsured adults in a coordinated system offering primary care, hospital care, prescription drugs, and most specialist services. Physician use by safety net program members was similar to insured groups. However, there was less use of hospitals in the two programs that relied on uncompensated charity care. Considering access measures commonly used in population-based surveys, the uninsured in these five communities fared no better than uninsured elsewhere. However, respondents may consider enrollment in a well-structured safety net program to be equivalent to insurance. If so, population surveys may be least accurate in identifying uninsured people in the very communities that have the best safety net programs. On balance the five safety net systems profiled here meet the needs of low-income uninsured residents at a level that is roughly similar to that for people with insurance.

  7. Accessing wound-care information on the Internet: the implications for patients.

    PubMed

    Bovill, E S; Hormbrey, E; Gillespie, P H; Banwell, P E

    2001-02-01

    The Internet and the World Wide Web have revolutionised communication and provide a unique forum for the exchange of information. It has been proposed that the Internet has given the public more access to medical information resources and improved patient education. This study assessed the impact of the Internet on the availability of information on wound care management. The search phrases 'wound care', 'wound healing' and 'wounds' were analysed using a powerful Metacrawler search engine (www.go2net.com). Web site access was classified according to the target audience (wound-care specialists, other health professionals, patients) and the author (societies, institutions or commercial companies). The largest proportion of web sites were commercially based (32%). Of the total number, 23% specifically targeted patients, mostly by advertising. Only 20% were aimed at wound specialists. Extensive surfing was required to obtain wound-care information, and objective information sites were under-represented. Regulated, easily accessible, objective information sites on wound-healing topics are needed for improved patient education and to balance the existing commercial bias. PMID:12964224

  8. Developing new models of shared primary and specialist HIV care in the UK: a survey of current practice.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Jane; Sutcliffe, Loma J; Williams, Andy J; Estcourt, Claudia S

    2016-07-01

    HIV care in the UK is led by hospital-based specialists with limited general practitioner (GP) involvement. As GPs have expertise in some non-microbial HIV-associated co-morbidities (e.g. cardiovascular disease), and more people are disclosing their HIV status to their GPs, there could be benefits in sharing HIV care. We describe contemporary models of shared HIV care in relevant developed world settings to inform future shared HIV care in the UK. An interview survey of key informants was used to explore experiences and models of shared care, and identify promoting and inhibiting factors. We interviewed ten key informants from six shared care models. There were three broad categories of shared care, with varying degrees of GP involvement. Strong clinical leadership in primary care, good professional relationships and communication, and tailored GP training were facilitators. Barriers included stigma, confidentiality concerns, and low prevalence of HIV outside major conurbations. Contemporary shared HIV care models have emerged organically and seem to work when grounded in good collaboration between a small number of dedicated GPs and specialist units. We propose two models for further study which may only be feasible in high HIV caseload practices. User acceptability, clinical and cost effectiveness must be considered.

  9. The development of a 7-day community specialist palliative care service.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Jennifer

    2013-12-01

    The author worked as a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) in community palliative care in the Central Lancashire area of England when the CNS service was extended to a 9am-to-5pm 7-day service. A project group was set up to canvas some of the key stakeholders for their views on the extension of the service. The group undertook a literature search, a telephone survey of services in other areas that were providing this level of service, and interviews to ascertain the views of district nurses in the locality of the proposed service extension. The extension of service has long been advocated and was one of the key recommendations in the UK Department of Health's peer-review process. Such an extension was implemented following the research phase and was then evaluated by the project lead and the community services manager. The extension was found to be effective in the ongoing monitoring and support of patients. Anecdotally, the CNS team also felt it had been proactive in preventing unnecessary hospital admissions, although this specific aspect is difficult to quantify. This article looks at how the service was developed, how it has evolved over time, and how it works today. Consideration is also given to benefits and limitations. PMID:24356506

  10. Definition of Specific Functions and Procedural Skills Required by Cuban Specialists in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Véliz, Pedro L; Berra, Esperanza M; Jorna, Ana R

    2015-07-01

    INTRODUCTION Medical specialties' core curricula should take into account functions to be carried out, positions to be filled and populations to be served. The functions in the professional profile for specialty training of Cuban intensive care and emergency medicine specialists do not include all the activities that they actually perform in professional practice. OBJECTIVE Define the specific functions and procedural skills required of Cuban specialists in intensive care and emergency medicine. METHODS The study was conducted from April 2011 to September 2013. A three-stage methodological strategy was designed using qualitative techniques. By purposive maximum variation sampling, 82 professionals were selected. Documentary analysis and key informant criteria were used in the first stage. Two expert groups were formed in the second stage: one used various group techniques (focus group, oral and written brainstorming) and the second used a three-round Delphi method. In the final stage, a third group of experts was questioned in semistructured in-depth interviews, and a two-round Delphi method was employed to assess priorities. RESULTS Ultimately, 78 specific functions were defined: 47 (60.3%) patient care, 16 (20.5%) managerial, 6 (7.7%) teaching, and 9 (11.5%) research. Thirty-one procedural skills were identified. The specific functions and procedural skills defined relate to the profession's requirements in clinical care of the critically ill, management of patient services, teaching and research at the specialist's different occupational levels. CONCLUSIONS The specific functions and procedural skills required of intensive care and emergency medicine specialists were precisely identified by a scientific method. This product is key to improving the quality of teaching, research, administration and patient care in this specialty in Cuba. The specific functions and procedural skills identified are theoretical, practical, methodological and social contributions to

  11. 78 FR 22527 - TRICARE Access to Care Demonstration Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... of the Secretary TRICARE Access to Care Demonstration Project AGENCY: Department of Defense. ACTION: Notice of Extension of the TRICARE South Region United States Coast Guard Access to Care Demonstration... fiscal year to TRICARE authorized Urgent Care Centers without obtaining an authorization from...

  12. Referring cruise ship patients to specialists in Norway--a welfare state with a national health care system.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Eilif

    2015-01-01

    Northern Europe is a popular cruise destination, but many non-Scandinavian cruise ship's doctors who are used to enthusiastic service from specialists ashore, get frustrated when referring passengers or crew to out-patient medical evaluation. Norway's national health care system is described and used as an example of medical conditions in a welfare state with a relatively well-functioning national health care system: Emergency cases are usually promptly admitted. Out-patient specialist consultations are available in public polyclinics, but waiting time can be considerable, also for patients from ships. Private specialists are fully booked weeks in advance and do not work from Friday to Monday and during holidays. Public and private medical service capacity is significantly reduced during the summer months. Hence, most specialists ashore are not eager to see demanding ship patients. Ship's doctors should limit referral to conditions that require specific procedures that are not available on the vessel but are necessary for the patient to be able to continue cruising or working aboard. Crewmembers who are unfit for work aboard, should instead be signed off and repatriated for diagnostic work-up and follow-up at home. In cases of hospitalisation or necessary referral ashore, the ship's doctor should always confer in advance with the company's ship's port agents and make necessary shore-side arrangements through them. PMID:26119674

  13. Referring cruise ship patients to specialists in Norway--a welfare state with a national health care system.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Eilif

    2015-01-01

    Northern Europe is a popular cruise destination, but many non-Scandinavian cruise ship's doctors who are used to enthusiastic service from specialists ashore, get frustrated when referring passengers or crew to out-patient medical evaluation. Norway's national health care system is described and used as an example of medical conditions in a welfare state with a relatively well-functioning national health care system: Emergency cases are usually promptly admitted. Out-patient specialist consultations are available in public polyclinics, but waiting time can be considerable, also for patients from ships. Private specialists are fully booked weeks in advance and do not work from Friday to Monday and during holidays. Public and private medical service capacity is significantly reduced during the summer months. Hence, most specialists ashore are not eager to see demanding ship patients. Ship's doctors should limit referral to conditions that require specific procedures that are not available on the vessel but are necessary for the patient to be able to continue cruising or working aboard. Crewmembers who are unfit for work aboard, should instead be signed off and repatriated for diagnostic work-up and follow-up at home. In cases of hospitalisation or necessary referral ashore, the ship's doctor should always confer in advance with the company's ship's port agents and make necessary shore-side arrangements through them.

  14. Care in specialist medical and mental health unit compared with standard care for older people with cognitive impairment admitted to general hospital: randomised controlled trial (NIHR TEAM trial)

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Sarah E; Bradshaw, Lucy E; Kearney, Fiona C; Russell, Catherine; Whittamore, Kathy H; Foster, Pippa E R; Mamza, Jil; Gladman, John R F; Jones, Rob G; Lewis, Sarah A; Porock, Davina

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop and evaluate a best practice model of general hospital acute medical care for older people with cognitive impairment. Design Randomised controlled trial, adapted to take account of constraints imposed by a busy acute medical admission system. Setting Large acute general hospital in the United Kingdom. Participants 600 patients aged over 65 admitted for acute medical care, identified as “confused” on admission. Interventions Participants were randomised to a specialist medical and mental health unit, designed to deliver best practice care for people with delirium or dementia, or to standard care (acute geriatric or general medical wards). Features of the specialist unit included joint staffing by medical and mental health professionals; enhanced staff training in delirium, dementia, and person centred dementia care; provision of organised purposeful activity; environmental modification to meet the needs of those with cognitive impairment; delirium prevention; and a proactive and inclusive approach to family carers. Main outcome measures Primary outcome: number of days spent at home over the 90 days after randomisation. Secondary outcomes: structured non-participant observations to ascertain patients’ experiences; satisfaction of family carers with hospital care. When possible, outcome assessment was blind to allocation. Results There was no significant difference in days spent at home between the specialist unit and standard care groups (median 51 v 45 days, 95% confidence interval for difference −12 to 24; P=0.3). Median index hospital stay was 11 versus 11 days, mortality 22% versus 25% (−9% to 4%), readmission 32% versus 35% (−10% to 5%), and new admission to care home 20% versus 28% (−16% to 0) for the specialist unit and standard care groups, respectively. Patients returning home spent a median of 70.5 versus 71.0 days at home (−6.0 to 6.5). Patients on the specialist unit spent significantly more time with positive mood or

  15. Access Barriers to Prenatal Care in Emerging Adult Latinas.

    PubMed

    Torres, Rosamar

    2016-03-01

    Despite efforts to improve access to prenatal care, emerging adult Latinas in the United States continue to enter care late in their pregnancies and/or underutilize these services. Since little is known about emerging adult Latinas and their prenatal care experiences, the purpose of this study was to identify actual and perceived prenatal care barriers in a sample of 54 emerging adult Latinas between 18 and 21 years of age. More than 95% of the sample experienced personal and institutional barriers when attempting to access prenatal care. Results from this study lend support for policy changes for time away from school or work to attend prenatal care and for group prenatal care.

  16. The Intensive care unit specialist: Report from the Task Force of World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Amin, Pravin; Fox-Robichaud, Alison; Divatia, J V; Pelosi, Paolo; Altintas, Defne; Eryüksel, Emel; Mehta, Yatin; Suh, Gee Young; Blanch, Lluís; Weiler, Norbert; Zimmerman, Janice; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2016-10-01

    The role of the critical care specialist has been unequivocally established in the management of severely ill patients throughout the world. Data show that the presence of a critical care specialist in the intensive care unit (ICU) environment has reduced morbidity and mortality, improved patient safety, and reduced length of stay and costs. However, many ICUs across the world function as "open ICUs," in which patients may be admitted under a primary physician who has not been trained in critical care medicine. Although the concept of the ICU has gained widespread acceptance amongst medical professionals, hospital administrators and the general public; recognition and the need for doctors specializing in intensive care medicine has lagged behind. The curriculum to ensure appropriate training around the world is diverse but should ideally meet some minimum standards. The World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine has set up a task force to address issues concerning the training, functions, roles, and responsibilities of an ICU specialist.

  17. Assessment, authorization and access to medicaid managed mental health care.

    PubMed

    Masland, Mary C; Snowden, Lonnie R; Wallace, Neal T

    2007-11-01

    Examined were effects on access of managed care assessment and authorization processes in California's 57 county mental health plans. Primary data on managed care implementation were collected from surveys of county plan administrators; secondary data were from Medicaid claims and enrollment files. Using multivariate fixed effects regression, we found that following implementation of managed care, greater access occurred in county plans where assessments and treatment were performed by the same clinician, and where service authorizations were made more rapidly. Lower access occurred in county plans where treating clinicians authorized services themselves. Results confirm the significant effects of managed care processes on outcomes and highlight the importance of system capacity.

  18. Does providing more accessible primary care psychology services lower the clinical threshold for referrals?

    PubMed Central

    Tata, P; Eagle, A; Green, J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The growing number of specialist services being provided within primary care has lead to the argument that this will reduce the clinical threshold for referrals to these clinics. AIM: The possibility that increasing the accessibility of primary care psychology services will reduce the threshold for referral was examined by comparing levels of psychological disturbance among patients seen by practice-based clinical psychologists with those attending outpatient clinics. METHOD: Psychological symptoms, distress, disruption in daily life and satisfaction with life were assessed using a questionnaire-based methodology. A consecutive series of 177 patients, assessed in a local general practice or an outpatient department across a wide range of urban locations, was studied over a fixed period. RESULTS: The study revealed equivalent levels of psychopathology within both specialist and primary care clinics. Of the overall sample, 79% were likely to merit a formal psychiatric diagnosis, relating primarily to mood disorder. Levels of subjective distress and life satisfaction were also equivalent at both service locations. CONCLUSION: The lack of evidence for a reduction in clinical threshold for referral within the primary care sample suggests that general practitioners' referral rates are similar regardless of whether practice-based clinical psychology services are available. This has implications for primary-care-led commissioning of mental health services. PMID:8949326

  19. Use of a mental health emergency care-rural access programme in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Saurman, Emily; Lyle, David; Kirby, Sue; Roberts, Russell

    2014-09-01

    Hospital emergency departments (EDs) are common providers of emergency mental health care. Access to specialist expertise can affect and improve patient outcomes. The Mental Health Emergency Care-Rural Access Programme (MHEC) provides access to mental health specialists for rural and remote communities in western New South Wales. In 2011, 46 of the 48 EDs used the MHEC programme, which provided 1487 clinical services, an average of 29 services per week. This represented 60% of all MHEC activity. A video assessment was conducted during 571 (38%) of these MHEC contacts. Patients attending a non-base hospital (<50 beds) were twice as likely to receive a video assessment as those attending the larger base hospitals, and video was used more with increasing remoteness. Patients from non-base hospitals were also more likely to be admitted locally after a video assessment. When a decision to admit was made, patients from non-base hospital EDs assessed by video were less likely to be transferred out of their community to a mental health inpatient unit than those assessed by telephone triage only (46% vs 62%; P = 0.016). The MHEC programme is a practical, relevant and responsive solution that was designed for the Australian health system, but the same model could be adapted for implementation in other countries.

  20. Non-attendance and effective equity of access at four public specialist outpatient centers in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Janice M; Leung, Gabriel; Saing, Hnin; Kwok, Kin-On; Ho, Lai-Ming; Wong, Irene O L; Tin, Keith Y K

    2006-05-01

    This study tests whether socio-economic status (SES), at either the individual or ecologic levels, exerts a direct impact on non-attendance or an indirect impact on attendance through longer waiting time for appointments and/or doctor-shopping behavior at four public specialist outpatient centers in Hong Kong. We collected information through three main sources, namely patients' referral letters, telephone interviews with both open- and closed-ended questions (e.g. doctor-shopping data) and hospital administrative databases from a total of 6495 attenders and non-attenders enrolled from July 2000 through October 2001. Individual-level SES was measured by education, occupation and monthly household income. Tertiary planning unit (TPU)-level SES data consisted of proportion unemployed, proportion with tertiary education, median income and Gini coefficient. Direct effects of SES on non-attendance were examined by logistic regression. Indirect contributions mediated through waiting time and doctor-shopping were analyzed by structural equation modeling. We found that SES, at the individual or ecologic level, did not exert a direct effect on non-attendance. Instead, TPU-level SES contributed positively to waiting time (beta=0.06+/-0.03, p=0.048), i.e. worse-off neighborhoods (and those with greater income inequality) had a shorter waiting time. Individual-level SES was also directly associated with the likelihood of doctor-shopping (beta=0.16+/-0.02, p<0.001), i.e. the poor were less likely to doctor-shop. Both waiting time (beta=0.12+/-0.02, p<0.001) and doctor-shopping (beta=0.37+/-0.02, p<0.001) were significantly related to non-attendance. Our findings suggest a highly equitable specialist ambulatory care public system in Hong Kong. Health care resources are appropriately targeted at the socially indigent, and the poor are not discriminated against and pushed to seek alternative sources of care by the system. These results should be confirmed using a prospective

  1. Specialist clinics in remote Australian Aboriginal communities: where rock art meets rocket science.

    PubMed

    Gruen, Russell; Bailie, Ross

    2004-10-01

    People in remote Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory have greater morbidity and mortality than other Australians, but face considerable barriers when accessing hospital-based specialist services. The Specialist Outreach Service, which began in 1997, was a novel policy initiative to improve access by providing a regular multidisciplinary visiting specialist services to remote communities. It led to two interesting juxtapositions: that of 'state of the art' specialist services alongside under-resourced primary care in remote and relatively traditional Aboriginal communities; and that of attempts to develop an evidence base for the effectiveness of outreach, while meeting the short-term evaluative requirements of policy-makers. In this essay, first we describe the development of the service in the Northern Territory and its initial process evaluation. Through a Cochrane systematic review we then summarise the published research on the effectiveness of specialist outreach in improving access to tertiary and hospital-based care. Finally we describe the findings of an observational population-based study of the use of specialist services and the impact of outreach to three remote communities over 11 years. Specialist outreach improves access to specialist care and may lessen the demand for both outpatient and inpatient hospital care. Specialist outreach is, however, dependent on well-functioning primary care. According to the way in which outreach is conducted and the service is organised, it can either support primary care or it can hinder primary care and, as a result, reduce its own effectiveness.

  2. Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage and access to health care.

    PubMed

    Kirby, James B; Kaneda, Toshiko

    2005-03-01

    Most research on access to health care focuses on individual-level determinants such as income and insurance coverage. The role of community-level factors in helping or hindering individuals in obtaining needed care, however, has not received much attention. We address this gap in the literature by examining how neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with access to health care. We find that living in disadvantaged neighborhoods reduces the likelihood of having a usual source of care and of obtaining recommended preventive services, while it increases the likelihood of having unmet medical need. These associations are not explained by the supply of health care providers. Furthermore, though controlling for individual-level characteristics reduces the association between neighborhood disadvantage and access to health care, a significant association remains. This suggests that when individuals who are disadvantaged are concentrated into specific areas, disadvantage becomes an "emergent characteristic " of those areas that predicts the ability of residents to obtain health care. PMID:15869118

  3. Impact of Specialist Home-Based Palliative Care Services in a Tertiary Oncology Set Up: A Prospective Non-Randomized Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Dhiliwal, Sunil R; Muckaden, Maryann

    2015-01-01

    Background: Home-based specialist palliative care services are developed to meet the needs of the patients in advanced stage of cancer at home with physical symptoms and distress. Specialist home care services are intended to improve symptom control and quality of life, enable patients to stay at home, and avoid unnecessary hospital admission. Materials and Methods: Total 690 new cases registered under home-based palliative care service in the year 2012 were prospectively studied to assess the impact of specialist home-based services using Edmonton symptom assessment scale (ESAS) and other parameters. Results: Out of the 690 registered cases, 506 patients received home-based palliative care. 50.98% patients were cared for at home, 28.85% patients needed hospice referral and 20.15% patients needed brief period of hospitalization. All patients receiving specialist home care had good relief of physical symptoms (P < 0.005). 83.2% patients received out of hours care (OOH) through liaising with local general practitioners; 42.68% received home based bereavement care and 91.66% had good bereavement outcomes. Conclusion: Specialist home-based palliative care improved symptom control, health-related communication and psychosocial support. It promoted increased number of home-based death, appropriate and early hospice referral, and averted needless hospitalization. It improved bereavement outcomes, and caregiver satisfaction. PMID:25709182

  4. Telemedicine for Specialist Geriatric Care in Small Rural Hospitals: Preliminary Data.

    PubMed

    Gray, Leonard C; Fatehi, Farhad; Martin-Khan, Melinda; Peel, Nancye M; Smith, Anthony C

    2016-06-01

    Small rural hospitals admit and manage older adults who, in city hospitals, would usually be offered geriatrician-supported comprehensive geriatric assessment and coordinated subacute care if required. Distance and diseconomies of scale prohibit access to the conventional in-person approach. A telegeriatric service model involving a geriatrician consulting remotely using wireless, mobile, high-definition videoconferencing; a trained host nurse at the rural site; structured geriatric assessment configured on a web-based clinical decision support system; routine weekly virtual rounds; and support from a local multidisciplinary team was established to overcome these barriers. This was a prospective observational study to examine the feasibility and sustainability of the model. Patient characteristics were recorded using the interRAI Acute Care assessment system. Usage patterns were derived from health service data sets and a service statistics database. Patients had characteristics that are consistent with characteristics of individuals typically referred for geriatric assessment. Overall, 53% of patients had cognitive impairment, 75% had limitations with activities of daily living, and the average Frailty Index was 0.44 ± 0.12. Stable patterns of consultation occurred within 6 months of start-up and continued uninterrupted for the remainder of the 24-month observation period. The estimated overall rate of initial consultation was 1.83 cases per occupied bed per year and 2.66 review cases per occupied bed per year. The findings indicate that the model was feasible and was sustained throughout and beyond the study period. This telegeriatric service model appears suitable for use in small rural hospitals. PMID:27321617

  5. Comparing specialist medical care with specialist medical care plus the Lightning Process® for chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial (SMILE Trial)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a relatively common and potentially serious condition with a limited evidence base for treatment. Specialist treatment for paediatric CFS/ME uses interventions recommended by National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) including cognitive behavioural therapy, graded exercise therapy and activity management. The Lightning Process® (LP) is a trademarked intervention derived from osteopathy, life-coaching and neuro-linguistic programming, delivered over three consecutive days as group sessions. Although over 250 children with CFS/ME attend LP courses each year, there are no reported studies on the effectiveness or cost-effectiveness. Methods This pragmatic randomised controlled trial is set within a specialist paediatric CFS/ME service in the south west of England. Children and young people with CFS/ME (n = 80 to 112), aged 12 to 18 years old will be randomised to specialist medical care (SMC) or SMC plus the LP. The primary outcome will be physical function (SF-36 physical function short form) and fatigue (Chalder Fatigue Scale). Discussion This study will tell us whether adding the LP to SMC is effective and cost-effective compared to SMC alone. This study will also provide detailed information on the implementation of the LP and SMC. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN81456207 (31 July 2012). PMID:24370208

  6. Global access to surgical care: a modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Alkire, Blake C; Raykar, Nakul P; Shrime, Mark G; Weiser, Thomas G; Bickler, Stephen W; Rose, John A; Nutt, Cameron T; Greenberg, Sarah L M; Kotagal, Meera; Riesel, Johanna N; Esquivel, Micaela; Uribe-Leitz, Tarsicio; Molina, George; Roy, Nobhojit; Meara, John G; Farmer, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background More than 2 billion people are unable to receive surgical care based on operating theatre density alone. The vision of the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery is universal access to safe, affordable surgical and anaesthesia care when needed. We aimed to estimate the number of individuals worldwide without access to surgical services as defined by the Commission’s vision. Methods We modelled access to surgical services in 196 countries with respect to four dimensions: timeliness, surgical capacity, safety, and affordability. We built a chance tree for each country to model the probability of surgical access with respect to each dimension, and from this we constructed a statistical model to estimate the proportion of the population in each country that does not have access to surgical services. We accounted for uncertainty with one-way sensitivity analyses, multiple imputation for missing data, and probabilistic sensitivity analysis. Findings At least 4·8 billion people (95% posterior credible interval 4·6–5·0 [67%, 64–70]) of the world’s population do not have access to surgery. The proportion of the population without access varied widely when stratified by epidemiological region: greater than 95% of the population in south Asia and central, eastern, and western sub-Saharan Africa do not have access to care, whereas less than 5% of the population in Australasia, high-income North America, and western Europe lack access. Interpretation Most of the world’s population does not have access to surgical care, and access is inequitably distributed. The near absence of access in many low-income and middle-income countries represents a crisis, and as the global health community continues to support the advancement of universal health coverage, increasing access to surgical services will play a central role in ensuring health care for all. Funding None. PMID:25926087

  7. A Conceptual Framework of Mapping Access to Health Care across EU Countries: The Patient Access Initiative.

    PubMed

    Souliotis, Kyriakos; Hasardzhiev, Stanimir; Agapidaki, Eirini

    2016-01-01

    Research evidence suggests that access to health care is the key influential factor for improved population health outcomes and health care system sustainability. Although the importance of addressing barriers in access to health care across European countries is well documented, little has been done to improve the situation. This is due to different definitions, approaches and policies, and partly due to persisting disparities in access within and between European countries. To bridge this gap, the Patient Access Partnership (PACT) developed (a) the '5As' definition of access, which details the five critical elements (adequacy, accessibility, affordability, appropriateness, and availability) of access to health care, (b) a multi-stakeholders' approach for mapping access, and (c) a 13-item questionnaire based on the 5As definition in an effort to address these obstacles and to identify best practices. These tools are expected to contribute effectively to addressing access barriers in practice, by suggesting a common framework and facilitating the exchange of knowledge and expertise, in order to improve access to health care between and within European countries. PMID:27237814

  8. Increased access to evidence-based primary mental health care: will the implementation match the rhetoric?

    PubMed

    Hickie, Ian B; McGorry, Patrick D

    2007-07-16

    There is clear evidence that coordinated systems of medical and psychological care ("collaborative care") are superior to single-provider-based treatment regimens. Although other general practice-based mental health schemes promoted collaborative care, the new Medicare Benefits Schedule payments revert largely to individual-provider service systems and fee-for-service rebates. Such systems have previously resulted in high out-of-pocket expenses, poor geographical and socioeconomic distribution of specialist services, and proliferation of individual-provider-based treatments rather than collaborative care. The new arrangements for broad access to psychological therapies should provide the financial basis for major structural reform. Unless this reform is closely monitored for equity of access, degree of out-of-pocket expenses, extent of development of evidence-based collaborative care structures, and impact on young people in the early phases of mental illness, we may waste this opportunity. The responsibility for achieving the best outcome does not lie only with governments. To date, the professions have not placed enough emphasis on systematically adopting evidence-based forms of collaborative care. PMID:17635093

  9. Increased access to evidence-based primary mental health care: will the implementation match the rhetoric?

    PubMed

    Hickie, Ian B; McGorry, Patrick D

    2007-07-16

    There is clear evidence that coordinated systems of medical and psychological care ("collaborative care") are superior to single-provider-based treatment regimens. Although other general practice-based mental health schemes promoted collaborative care, the new Medicare Benefits Schedule payments revert largely to individual-provider service systems and fee-for-service rebates. Such systems have previously resulted in high out-of-pocket expenses, poor geographical and socioeconomic distribution of specialist services, and proliferation of individual-provider-based treatments rather than collaborative care. The new arrangements for broad access to psychological therapies should provide the financial basis for major structural reform. Unless this reform is closely monitored for equity of access, degree of out-of-pocket expenses, extent of development of evidence-based collaborative care structures, and impact on young people in the early phases of mental illness, we may waste this opportunity. The responsibility for achieving the best outcome does not lie only with governments. To date, the professions have not placed enough emphasis on systematically adopting evidence-based forms of collaborative care.

  10. An evaluation of access to health care services along the rural-urban continuum in Canada

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies comparing the access to health care of rural and urban populations have been contradictory and inconclusive. These studies are complicated by the influence of other factor which have been shown to be related to access and utilization. This study assesses the equity of access to health care services across the rural-urban continuum in Canada before and after taking other determinants of access into account. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of the population of the 10 provinces of Canada using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS 2.1). Five different measures of access and utilization are compared across the continuum of rural-urban. Known determinants of utilization are taken into account according to Andersen's Health Behaviour Model (HBM); location of residence at the levels of province, health region, and community is also controlled for. Results This study found that residents of small cities not adjacent to major centres, had the highest reported utilisation rates of influenza vaccines and family physician services, were most likely to have a regular medical doctor, and were most likely to report unmet need. Among the rural categories there was a gradient with the most rural being least likely to have had a flu shot, use specialist physicians services, or have a regular medical doctor. Residents of the most urban centres were more likely to report using specialist physician services. Many of these differences are diminished or eliminated once other factors are accounted for. After adjusting for other factors those living in the most urban areas were more likely to have seen a specialist physician. Those in rural communities had a lower odds of receiving a flu shot and having a regular medical doctor. People residing in the most urban and most rural communities were less likely to have a regular medical doctor. Those in any of the rural categories were less likely to report unmet need. Conclusion Inequities in access to

  11. Impact of the implementation of an online network support tool among clinicians of Primary Health Care and Specialists: ECOPIH Project

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There has been created an online communication tool with the objective to improve the communication among different levels of care, between Primary Care clinicians and Specialists. This tool is web 2.0 based technology (ECOPIH project). It allows to review clinical cases and to share knowledge. Our study will evaluate its impact in terms of reduction on the number of referrals to three specialties two years after the use of this tool. Methods/Design Open, multicenter, controlled, non random intervention study over 24 months. Study population includes 131 Primary Care Physicians assigned to nine health centers. The study will compare the clinicians that use the ECOPIH with the ones that do not use the tool. Also, professionals that start to use the tool during the period time of the study will be included. The number of annual referrals during the first and second year will be analyzed and retrospectively compared with the previous year to the implementation of the tool. Moreover, it will be assessed the level of satisfaction of the professionals with the tool and to what extend the tool responds to their needs. Discussion The implementation of ECOPIH in the field of Primary Health Care can decrease the number of referrals from primary care to specialist care. It is expected that the reduction will be more noticeable in the group of professionals that use more intensively the tool. Furthermore, we believe that it can be also observed with the professionals that read the contributions of the others. We anticipate high degree of customer satisfaction as it is a very helpful resource never used before in our environment. PMID:24088387

  12. Competition, gatekeeping, and health care access.

    PubMed

    Godager, Geir; Iversen, Tor; Ma, Ching-to Albert

    2015-01-01

    We study gatekeeping physicians' referrals of patients to specialty care. We derive theoretical results when competition in the physician market intensifies. First, due to competitive pressure, physicians refer patients to specialty care more often. Second, physicians earn more by treating patients themselves, so refer patients to specialty care less often. We assess empirically the overall effect of competition with data from a 2008-2009 Norwegian survey, National Health Insurance Administration, and Statistics Norway. From the data we construct three measures of competition: the number of open primary physician practices with and without population adjustment, and the Herfindahl-Hirschman index. The empirical results suggest that competition has negligible or small positive effects on referrals overall. Our results do not support the policy claim that increasing the number of primary care physicians reduces secondary care. PMID:25544400

  13. Racial Disparities In Geographic Access To Primary Care In Philadelphia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Elizabeth J; Polsky, Daniel; Barbu, Corentin M; Seymour, Jane W; Grande, David

    2016-08-01

    Primary care is often thought of as the gateway to improved health outcomes and can lead to more efficient use of health care resources. Because of primary care's cardinal importance, adequate access is an important health policy priority. In densely populated urban areas, spatial access to primary care providers across neighborhoods is poorly understood. We examined spatial variation in primary care access in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We calculated ratios of adults per primary care provider for each census tract and included buffer zones based on prespecified drive times around each tract. We found that the average ratio was 1,073; the supply of primary care providers varied widely across census tracts, ranging from 105 to 10,321. We identified six areas of Philadelphia that have much lower spatial accessibility to primary care relative to the rest of the city. After adjustment for sociodemographic and insurance characteristics, the odds of being in a low-access area were twenty-eight times greater for census tracts with a high proportion of African Americans than in tracts with a low proportion of African Americans. PMID:27503960

  14. Racism and health care access: a dialogue with childbearing women.

    PubMed

    Murrell, N L; Smith, R; Gill, G; Oxley, G

    1996-01-01

    The rates of low birth weight and preterm delivery are twice as high for African Americans as they are for Whites in the United States. Racism and health care access may be factors in this twofold disparity. To investigate this possibility, we conducted a qualitative study with African American prenatal and postpartum women (N = 14). In 1- to 2-hr interviews, we asked the participants to describe their ability to access health care and their experiences of racism. We then independently and collectively coded the data until consensus (95%) was obtained. Data categories included access to care, treatment, differences in care, stereotypes, and racism. Three themes emerged from the interviews: (a) the pervasiveness of the stereotype of pregnant African American women; (b) a care that is indifferent, inaccessible, and undignified; and (c) the totality of racism. These themes encompass social, political, and economic factors affecting the experiences of childbearing African American families and mandate the need for further investigation and intervention.

  15. Helmsley trust support for telehealth improves access to care in rural and frontier areas.

    PubMed

    Stingley, Shelley; Schultz, Heidi

    2014-02-01

    Rural residents in need of health care face many challenges. In 2009 the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust created the Rural Healthcare Program to improve access to and quality of care in areas of the upper Midwest challenged by health care workforce shortages and low population density. The program has focused its efforts on telehealth in seven upper Midwestern states. Since 2009 the Rural Healthcare Program has approved $22 million in grants to eighty-five rural hospitals to implement eEmergency services. The service's videoconferencing technology connects rural emergency department staff with emergency physicians and nurses located at the service's "hub." Initial analyses indicate that eEmergency has helped participating rural hospitals increase patients' access to specialists, increase the use of evidence-based treatment, decrease time to transfer a patient to a facility able to provide a higher level of care, and reduce unnecessary patient transfers. This article describes the health care challenges rural communities face and the telehealth projects supported by the Helmsley Trust's Rural Healthcare Program. PMID:24493777

  16. Helmsley trust support for telehealth improves access to care in rural and frontier areas.

    PubMed

    Stingley, Shelley; Schultz, Heidi

    2014-02-01

    Rural residents in need of health care face many challenges. In 2009 the Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust created the Rural Healthcare Program to improve access to and quality of care in areas of the upper Midwest challenged by health care workforce shortages and low population density. The program has focused its efforts on telehealth in seven upper Midwestern states. Since 2009 the Rural Healthcare Program has approved $22 million in grants to eighty-five rural hospitals to implement eEmergency services. The service's videoconferencing technology connects rural emergency department staff with emergency physicians and nurses located at the service's "hub." Initial analyses indicate that eEmergency has helped participating rural hospitals increase patients' access to specialists, increase the use of evidence-based treatment, decrease time to transfer a patient to a facility able to provide a higher level of care, and reduce unnecessary patient transfers. This article describes the health care challenges rural communities face and the telehealth projects supported by the Helmsley Trust's Rural Healthcare Program.

  17. [Actual problems of medical care of aviation specialists in the Arctic region].

    PubMed

    Blaginin, A A; Vislov, A V; Lizogub, I N

    2015-01-01

    The article considers the influence of geographic and climatic conditions of the Arctic on a functional condition of aviation professionals. Marked possible effects of aggressive environmental factors on the health of the personnel. Studied the dynamics of the recovery functions of the cardio-respiratory system and of the indicators of general clinical blood test in a period of adaptation to the conditions of the middle latitudes after the return of the personnel from the Arctic. Identified the main activities to preserve the health of aviation specialists, depending on the length of stay in the Arctic region and age. PMID:25916038

  18. Vascular access creation and care should be provided by nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Malovrh, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The long-term survival and quality of life of patients on hemodialysis is dependent on the adequacy of dialysis via an appropriately placed vascular access. Recent clinical practice guidelines recommend the creation of native arteriovenous fistula or synthetic graft before start of chronic hemodialysis therapy to prevent the need for complication-prone dialysis catheters. The direct involvement of nephrologists in the management of referral patterns, predialysis follow-up, policy of venous preservation, preoperative evaluation, vascular access surgery and vascular access care seems to be important and productive targets for the quality of care delivered to the patients with end-stage renal disease. Early referral to nephrologists is important for delay progression of both kidney disease and its complications by specific and adequate treatment, for education program which should include modification of lifestyle, medication management, selection of treatment modality and instruction for vein preservation and vascular access. Nephrologists are responsible for on-time placement and adequate maturation of vascular access. The number of nephrologists around the world who create their own fistulas and grafts is growing, driven by a need for better patient outcomes on hemodialysis. Nephrologists have also a key role for care of vascular access during hemodialysis treatment by following vascular access function using clinical data, physical examination and additional ultrasound evaluation. Timely detection of malfunctioning vascular access means timely surgical or radiological intervention and increases the survival of vascular access. PMID:25751545

  19. Neighborhood Socioeconomic Disadvantage and Access to Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, James B.; Kaneda, Toshiko

    2005-01-01

    Most research on access to health care focuses on individual-level determinants such as income and insurance coverage. The role of community-level factors in helping or hindering individuals in obtaining needed care, however, has not received much attention. We address this gap in the literature by examining how neighborhood socioeconomic…

  20. Android-based access to holistic emergency care record.

    PubMed

    Koufi, Vassiliki; Malamateniou, Flora; Prentza, Andriana; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of an Emergency Medical Services (EMS) system which interfaces with a Holistic Emergency Care Record (HECR) that aims at managing emergency care holistically by supporting EMS processes and is accessible by Android-enabled mobile devices. PMID:23823406

  1. The College Access, Retention and Employment (CARE) Program Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mara Cooper

    The College Access, Retention, and Employment (CARE) program was a 3-year initiative by Florida's Miami-Dade Community College. CARE was designed: to improve both the delivery and outcomes of postsecondary education for people with disabilities, with a special focus on minority groups, and to disseminate a model, describing the program, including…

  2. Improving Access to Hospice Care: Informing the Debate

    PubMed Central

    CARLSON, MELISSA D.A.; MORRISON, R. SEAN; BRADLEY, ELIZABETH H.

    2015-01-01

    The most frequently cited policy solution for improving access to hospice care for patients and families is to expand hospice eligibility criteria under the Medicare Hospice Benefit. However, the substantial implications of such a policy change have not been fully articulated or evaluated. This paper seeks to identify and describe the implications of expanding Medicare Hospice Benefit eligibility on the nature of hospice care, the cost of hospice care to the Medicare program, and the very structure of hospice and palliative care delivery in the United States. The growth in hospice has been dramatic and the central issue facing policymakers and the hospice industry is defining the appropriate target population for hospice care. As policymakers and the hospice industry discuss the future of hospice and potential changes to the Medicare Hospice Benefit, it is critical to clearly delineate the options—and the implications and challenges of each option—for improving access to hospice care for patients and families. PMID:18363486

  3. Improving access to a primary care medical clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Meditz, R. W.; Manberg, C. L.; Rosner, F.

    1992-01-01

    Patients presenting to an episodic care walk-in clinic often warrant prompt but not necessarily emergency attention. Legitimate reasons often prohibit these patients from attending regularly scheduled daytime weekday clinics. Most patients interviewed thought that having a single primary care provider was important to ensure continuity of care. Access to primary care can be improved by scheduling clinics and ancillary services on nontraditional times and days. Enhanced communication can help patients differentiate routine from urgent from emergency conditions. Printed and audiovisual materials can be used to increase awareness of the benefits of comprehensive care. PMID:1507251

  4. Care coordination impacts on access to care for children with special health care needs enrolled in Medicaid and CHIP.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kipyn

    2014-05-01

    Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) often require services from multiple health care providers. This study's objective is to evaluate whether CSHCN, enrolled in Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and receiving care coordination services, experience improved access to mental and specialty health care services. Using data from the 2009-2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, two separate outcomes are used to evaluate children's access to care: receipt of needed mental and specialty care and timely access to services. Using propensity score matching, CSHCN propensity for receiving care coordination services is derived and an assessment is made of care coordination's impact on the receipt of health care and whether care is delayed. Results demonstrate that care coordination is positively associated with whether a child receives the mental and specialty care that they need, regardless of whether or not that coordination is perceived to be adequate by parents. However, receiving care coordination services that parents perceive to be adequate has a larger impact on the timeliness in which care is received. This study indicates that care coordination is associated with an increased ability for CSHCN to access needed mental and specialty care. States should consider offering care coordination services that support provider communication and fulfill families' coordination needs to the CSHCN enrolled in their Medicaid and CHIP programs.

  5. Traveling towards disease: transportation barriers to health care access.

    PubMed

    Syed, Samina T; Gerber, Ben S; Sharp, Lisa K

    2013-10-01

    Transportation barriers are often cited as barriers to healthcare access. Transportation barriers lead to rescheduled or missed appointments, delayed care, and missed or delayed medication use. These consequences may lead to poorer management of chronic illness and thus poorer health outcomes. However, the significance of these barriers is uncertain based on existing literature due to wide variability in both study populations and transportation barrier measures. The authors sought to synthesize the literature on the prevalence of transportation barriers to health care access. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed studies on transportation barriers to healthcare access was performed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) study addressed access barriers for ongoing primary care or chronic disease care; (2) study included assessment of transportation barriers; and (3) study was completed in the United States. In total, 61 studies were reviewed. Overall, the evidence supports that transportation barriers are an important barrier to healthcare access, particularly for those with lower incomes or the under/uninsured. Additional research needs to (1) clarify which aspects of transportation limit health care access (2) measure the impact of transportation barriers on clinically meaningful outcomes and (3) measure the impact of transportation barrier interventions and transportation policy changes.

  6. Traveling Towards Disease: Transportation Barriers to Health Care Access

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Ben S.; Sharp, Lisa K.

    2014-01-01

    Transportation barriers are often cited as barriers to healthcare access. Transportation barriers lead to rescheduled or missed appointments, delayed care, and missed or delayed medication use. These consequences may lead to poorer management of chronic illness and thus poorer health outcomes. However, the significance of these barriers is uncertain based on existing literature due to wide variability in both study populations and transportation barrier measures. The authors sought to synthesize the literature on the prevalence of transportation barriers to health care access. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed studies on transportation barriers to healthcare access was performed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) study addressed access barriers for ongoing primary care or chronic disease care; (2) study included assessment of transportation barriers; and (3) study was completed in the United States. In total, 61 studies were reviewed. Overall, the evidence supports that transportation barriers are an important barrier to healthcare access, particularly for those with lower incomes or the under/uninsured. Additional research needs to (1) clarify which aspects of transportation limit health care access (2) measure the impact of transportation barriers on clinically meaningful outcomes and (3) measure the impact of transportation barrier interventions and transportation policy changes. PMID:23543372

  7. Determinants of access to pediatric hospice care: A conceptual model

    PubMed Central

    Lindley, Lisa C.

    2014-01-01

    One of the many difficult moments for families of children with life-limiting illnesses is to make the decision to access pediatric hospice care. Although determinants that influence families’ decisions to access pediatric hospice care have been recently identified, the relationship between these determinants and access to pediatric hospice care have not been explicated or grounded in accepted healthcare theories or models. Using the Andersen Behavioral Healthcare Utilization Model, this article presents a conceptual model describing the determinants of hospice access. Predisposing (demographic; social support; and knowledge, beliefs, and values), enabling (family and community resources) and need (perceived and evaluated needs) factors were identified through the use of hospice literature. The relationships among these factors are described and implications of the model for future study and practice are discussed. PMID:25983662

  8. Vascular Access Creation and Care--Perspective From India.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Krishnaswamy; Lobo, Valentine; Balasubramaniam, Jeyaraj; Mahaldar, Amol; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Kumbar, Lalathaksha

    2015-11-01

    India has one of the fastest growing economies in the world and is home to nearly one sixth of world's population. Chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension are common. Kidney disease is a known complication of these chronic diseases and is on the rise. Improving affordability with advanced care delivery has led to the increasing use of maintenance hemodialysis. Along with this hemodialysis comes the inevitable need for vascular access. Interventional nephrology in India is a fast-evolving discipline and promises to be a critical component of hemodialysis care in the future. This review provides a background on the current state of the CKD burden in India and the various vascular access options in use currently. In addition, we describe the experience of 2 centers in western and southern India in managing vascular access needs in hopes that they will serve as a model of the proliferation of vascular access care throughout India and in other developing countries. PMID:26524952

  9. Vascular Access Creation and Care--Perspective From India.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Krishnaswamy; Lobo, Valentine; Balasubramaniam, Jeyaraj; Mahaldar, Amol; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Kumbar, Lalathaksha

    2015-11-01

    India has one of the fastest growing economies in the world and is home to nearly one sixth of world's population. Chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension are common. Kidney disease is a known complication of these chronic diseases and is on the rise. Improving affordability with advanced care delivery has led to the increasing use of maintenance hemodialysis. Along with this hemodialysis comes the inevitable need for vascular access. Interventional nephrology in India is a fast-evolving discipline and promises to be a critical component of hemodialysis care in the future. This review provides a background on the current state of the CKD burden in India and the various vascular access options in use currently. In addition, we describe the experience of 2 centers in western and southern India in managing vascular access needs in hopes that they will serve as a model of the proliferation of vascular access care throughout India and in other developing countries.

  10. Equity in Access to Health Care Services in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Glorioso, Valeria; Subramanian, S V

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide new evidence on whether and how patterns of health care utilization deviate from horizontal equity in a country with a universal and egalitarian public health care system: Italy. Data Sources Secondary analysis of data from the Health Conditions and Health Care Utilization Survey 2005, conducted by the Italian National Institute of Statistics on a probability sample of the noninstitutionalized Italian population. Study Design Using multilevel logistic regression, we investigated how the probability of utilizing five health care services varies among individuals with equal health status but different SES. Data Collection/Extraction Respondents aged 18 or older at the interview time (n = 103,651). Principal Findings Overall, we found that use of primary care is inequitable in favor of the less well-off, hospitalization is equitable, and use of outpatient specialist care, basic medical tests, and diagnostic services is inequitable in favor of the well-off. Stratifying the analysis by health status, however, we found that the degree of inequity varies according to health status. Conclusions Despite its universal and egalitarian public health care system, Italy exhibits a significant degree of SES-related horizontal inequity in health services utilization. PMID:24949515

  11. Non-specialist health worker interventions for mental health care in low- and middle- income countries

    PubMed Central

    van Ginneken, Nadja; Tharyan, Prathap; Lewin, Simon; Rao, Girish N; Romeo, Renee; Patel, Vikram

    2012-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: Overall objective In order to assess the impact of delivery by non-specialist health workers (NSHWs) and other professionals with health roles (OPHRs) on the effectiveness of mental healthcare interventions in low- and middle- income countries (LMICs), we will specifically analyse the effectiveness of NSHWs and OPHRS in delivering acute mental health interventions; as well as the effectiveness of NSHWs and OPHRs in delivering long term follow-up and rehabilitation for people with mental disorders; and the effect of the detection of mental disorders by NSHWs and OPHRs on patient and health delivery outcomes. For each of these objectives we will examine the current evidence for the impact of delivery by NSHWs and OPHRs on the resource use and costs associated with mental healthcare provision in LMICs. PMID:24143128

  12. [A nurse, a historian, a writer, a teaching specialist, a care designer, and ... a woman].

    PubMed

    Vigil-Ripoche, Marie-André

    2011-12-01

    Marie-Françoise Collière (1930-2005) was a great lady of the nursing profession recognized worldwide for her expertise. As a historian, a pioneer and an activist of the cause of the female nurses and health care, she devoted her life to giving the profession the first meaning of care, ie: accompanying the patient through his life, from the birth to the death, through disease, accident and ageing. Thus, for Marie-Françoise Collière, "Caring means health-care through the satisfaction of a series of needs which are indispensable for life but which have diverse manifestations". Here is the story of her life and her trajectory.

  13. Human rights and immigrants' access to care.

    PubMed

    Parmet, Wendy; Fischer, Simon

    2013-12-01

    Although the human right to health is well established under international law, many states limit non-citizens' participation in public insurance programs. In the United States, immigrants face especially high barriers due to the lack of recognition of a broad right to health as well as federal statutes restricting many immigrants' eligibility to federally-funded insurance. High rates of uninsurance among immigrants have a detrimental effect on their health, as well as on the health of citizens who live in their communities. Finch vs. Commonwealth Health Insurance Connector, a recent case decided by the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, recognized the rights of legal immigrants in Massachusetts to state-supported health care, and demonstrates the importance of insuring immigrants in broadly-based, rather than immigrant-specific, programs.

  14. Human rights and immigrants' access to care.

    PubMed

    Parmet, Wendy; Fischer, Simon

    2013-12-01

    Although the human right to health is well established under international law, many states limit non-citizens' participation in public insurance programs. In the United States, immigrants face especially high barriers due to the lack of recognition of a broad right to health as well as federal statutes restricting many immigrants' eligibility to federally-funded insurance. High rates of uninsurance among immigrants have a detrimental effect on their health, as well as on the health of citizens who live in their communities. Finch vs. Commonwealth Health Insurance Connector, a recent case decided by the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts, recognized the rights of legal immigrants in Massachusetts to state-supported health care, and demonstrates the importance of insuring immigrants in broadly-based, rather than immigrant-specific, programs. PMID:24715016

  15. Effect of Organizational Culture on Patient Access, Care Continuity, and Experience of Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Hung, Dorothy; Chung, Sukyung; Martinez, Meghan; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined relationships between organizational culture and patient-centered outcomes in primary care. Generalized least squares regression was used to analyze patient access, care continuity, and reported experiences of care among 357 physicians in 41 primary care departments. Compared with a "Group-oriented" culture, a "Rational" culture type was associated with longer appointment wait times, and both "Hierarchical" and "Developmental" culture types were associated with less care continuity, but better patient experiences with care. Understanding the unique effects of organizational culture can enhance the delivery of more patient-centered care.

  16. Effect of Organizational Culture on Patient Access, Care Continuity, and Experience of Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Hung, Dorothy; Chung, Sukyung; Martinez, Meghan; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined relationships between organizational culture and patient-centered outcomes in primary care. Generalized least squares regression was used to analyze patient access, care continuity, and reported experiences of care among 357 physicians in 41 primary care departments. Compared with a "Group-oriented" culture, a "Rational" culture type was associated with longer appointment wait times, and both "Hierarchical" and "Developmental" culture types were associated with less care continuity, but better patient experiences with care. Understanding the unique effects of organizational culture can enhance the delivery of more patient-centered care. PMID:27232685

  17. Weighing public and private options for reforming long-term care financing: findings from a national survey of specialists.

    PubMed

    Miller, Edward Alan; Mor, Vincent; Clark, Melissa

    2010-08-01

    Deficiencies in current long-term care (LTC) financing models are substantial and must be addressed if the nation is going to meet the needs of the growing population of frail and disabled elders. Because debate over reforming LTC financing has traditionally focused on the relative roles of the public and private sectors, this article examines what characteristics predispose LTC specialists to weigh one approach--public or private--more than the other. Data are derived from a Web-based survey of 1,147 individuals with known or demonstrable experience with LTC, including consumer advocates, provider representatives, policy experts, and public officials. Results suggest that support for spurring private sector mechanisms, bolstering the government's role, and reforming Medicare and Medicaid vary with key characteristics of the respondents, including experiential, attitudinal, and background variables. Findings also suggest consensus that reform of LTC financing should improve on the current public-private partnership in this area.

  18. Racial/ethnic disparities in access to physician care and medications among US stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Neidecker, M.V.; Kiefe, C.I.; Karve, S.; Williams, L.S.; Allison, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic blacks have higher stroke recurrence rates and lower rates of secondary stroke prevention than non-Hispanic whites. As a potential explanation for this disparity, we assessed racial/ethnic differences in access to physician care and medications in a national sample of US stroke survivors. Methods: Among all 4,864 stroke survivors aged ≥45 years who responded to the National Health Interview Survey years 2000–2006, we compared access to care within the last 12 months by race/ethnicity before and after stratification by age (45–64 years vs ≥65 years). With logistic regression, we adjusted associations between access measures and race/ethnicity for sex, comorbidity, neurologic disability, health status, year, income, and health insurance. Results: Among stroke survivors aged 45–64 years, Mexican Americans, non-Hispanic blacks, and non-Hispanic whites reported similar rates of no generalist physician visit (approximately 15%) and inability to afford medications (approximately 20%). However, among stroke survivors aged ≥65 years, Mexican Americans and blacks, compared with whites, reported greater frequency of no generalist visit (15%, 12%, 8%; p = 0.02) and inability to afford medications (20%, 11%, 6%; p < 0.001). Mexican Americans and blacks more frequently reported no medical specialist visit (54%, 49%, 40%; p < 0.001) than did whites and rates did not differ by age. Full covariate adjustment did not fully explain these racial/ethnic differences. Conclusions: Among US stroke survivors at least 65 years old, Mexican Americans and blacks reported worse access to physician care and medications than whites. This reduced access may lead to inadequate risk factor modification and recurrent stroke in these high-risk minority groups. PMID:21084692

  19. Library Media Specialists: Premier Information Specialists for the Information Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Delia

    2011-01-01

    The information age has given library media specialists an unprecedented opportunity to play a leading role in helping teachers, administrators, and especially students access and use information intelligently. As the school's premier information specialist; the library media specialist has a unique role to play in helping everyone in the school…

  20. Specialist and generalist oviposition strategies in butterflies: maternal care or precocious young?

    PubMed

    Schäpers, Alexander; Nylin, Sören; Carlsson, Mikael A; Janz, Niklas

    2016-02-01

    Herbivorous insects specialized on a narrow set of plants are believed to be better adapted to their specific hosts. This hypothesis is supported by observations of herbivorous insect species with a broader diet breadth which seemingly pay a cost through decreased oviposition accuracy. Despite many studies investigating female oviposition behavior, there is a lack of knowledge on how larvae cope behaviorally with their mothers' egg-laying strategies. We have examined a unique system of five nymphalid butterfly species with different host plant ranges that all feed on the same host plant. The study of this system allowed us to compare at the species level how oviposition preference is related to neonate larval responses in several disadvantageous situations. We found a general co-adaptation between female and larval abilities, where species with more discriminating females had larvae that were less able to deal with a suboptimal initial feeding site. Conversely, relatively indiscriminate females had more precocious larvae with better abilities to cope with suboptimal sites. Despite similarities between the tested species with similar host ranges, there were also striking differences. Generalist and specialist species can be found side by side in many clades, with each clade having a specific evolutionary history. Such clade-specific, phylogenetically determined preconditions apparently have affected how precisely a broad or narrow diet breadth can be realized. PMID:26141793

  1. Specialist and generalist oviposition strategies in butterflies: maternal care or precocious young?

    PubMed

    Schäpers, Alexander; Nylin, Sören; Carlsson, Mikael A; Janz, Niklas

    2016-02-01

    Herbivorous insects specialized on a narrow set of plants are believed to be better adapted to their specific hosts. This hypothesis is supported by observations of herbivorous insect species with a broader diet breadth which seemingly pay a cost through decreased oviposition accuracy. Despite many studies investigating female oviposition behavior, there is a lack of knowledge on how larvae cope behaviorally with their mothers' egg-laying strategies. We have examined a unique system of five nymphalid butterfly species with different host plant ranges that all feed on the same host plant. The study of this system allowed us to compare at the species level how oviposition preference is related to neonate larval responses in several disadvantageous situations. We found a general co-adaptation between female and larval abilities, where species with more discriminating females had larvae that were less able to deal with a suboptimal initial feeding site. Conversely, relatively indiscriminate females had more precocious larvae with better abilities to cope with suboptimal sites. Despite similarities between the tested species with similar host ranges, there were also striking differences. Generalist and specialist species can be found side by side in many clades, with each clade having a specific evolutionary history. Such clade-specific, phylogenetically determined preconditions apparently have affected how precisely a broad or narrow diet breadth can be realized.

  2. Access to health care and social protection.

    PubMed

    Martin, Philippe

    2012-06-01

    In France, the access to healthcare has been conceived as a social right and is mainly managed through the coverage of the population by the National Health Insurance, which is a part of the whole French social security scheme. This system was based on the so-called Bismarckian model, which implies that it requires full employment and solid family links, as the insured persons are the workers and their dependents. This paper examines the typical problems that this system has to face as far as the right to healthcare is concerned. First, it addresses the need to introduce some universal coverage programs, in order to integrate the excluded population. Then, it addresses the issue of financial sustainability as the structural weakness of the French system--in which healthcare is still mainly provided by private practice physicians and governed by the principle of freedom--leads to conceive and implement complex forms of regulations between the State, the Social security institutions and the healthcare providers. PMID:22924190

  3. Does referral to specialist paediatric palliative care services reduce hospital admissions in oncology patients at the end of life?

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, L K; van Laar, M; Miller, M; Aldridge, J; McKinney, P A; Parslow, R C; Feltbower, R G

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite advances in the treatment of childhood cancer, some children continue to die from their disease. This study aimed to assess the impact of specialist paediatric palliative care services (SPPCSs) on the number of hospital admissions in children who subsequently died from cancer in Yorkshire, UK. Methods: An extract of patients aged 0–19 years from the Yorkshire Specialist Register of Cancer in Children and Young People (YSRCCYP) diagnosed from 1990 to 2009 were linked to inpatient hospital episodes data and a SPPCS database. Deaths were included if they occurred before 31 August 2011. Differences in hospital admission patterns were assessed using negative binomial regression and presented as incidence rate ratios (IRRs). Results: Of 2508 children on the YSRCCYP, 657 (26%) had died by the censoring date. A total of 211 children had been referred to the local SPPCS, of whom 182 (86%) had subsequently died. Referral to SPPCS was associated with a significant reduction in the rate of planned hospital admissions (IRR=0.60, 95% CI 0.43–0.85). Central nervous system tumours showed significant decreases for all planned and emergency admissions compared with all other diagnostic groups. Conclusion: Referral to SPPCS significantly reduced the number of planned hospital admissions for children and young people with cancer before their death, which are often integral to paediatric oncology treatment regimens. Overall, our findings show that SPPCS have a role in reducing hospital admissions during end of life care of paediatric cancer patients with potential personal, social and economic benefits. PMID:23449361

  4. Health care access and preventive care among Vietnamese immigrants: do traditional beliefs and practices pose barriers?

    PubMed

    Jenkins, C N; Le, T; McPhee, S J; Stewart, S; Ha, N T

    1996-10-01

    Some have speculated that underutilization of Western health services among non-Western populations can be explained by traditional health beliefs and practices rooted deep within cultures. These beliefs and practices may act as barriers to access to and utilization of services. Among Vietnamese, in particular, a number of traditional health beliefs and practices have been identified which are said to pose barriers to Western medical care. No studies to date, however, have examined this hypothesis empirically. To examine this hypothesis, we measured traditional health beliefs and practices among Vietnamese in the San Francisco Bay area and analyzed the relationships between these factors and access to health care and use of preventive health services. The results of this study show clearly that many Vietnamese possess traditional health beliefs and practices which differ from those of the general U.S. population. Yet, the data do not support the hypothesis that these traditional beliefs and practices act as barriers to access to Western medical care or to utilization of preventive services. Being married and poverty status were the most consistent predictors of health care access. Furthermore, the components of access to health care (having some form of health insurance or having a regular doctor, for example) were the strongest predictors of preventive health care services utilization. Importantly, the cultural attributes of individuals did not explain either lack of health care access or underutilization of preventive health care services.

  5. A conservative case for universal access to health care.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Paul; Light, Donald W

    2006-01-01

    Universal access to health care has historically faced strident opposition from political conservatives in the United States, although it has long been accepted by most conservatives in the rest of the industrialized world. Now, in a global economy where American business is crippled by the rising cost of market-based health care, the time may be ripe for change. The key to fostering a new mindset among American conservatives is to show why universal access fulfills many of the basic values that all conservatives hold.

  6. Promoting Access Through Integrated Mental Health Care Education.

    PubMed

    Kverno, Karan

    2016-01-01

    Mental disorders are the leading cause of non-communicable disability worldwide. Insufficient numbers of psychiatrically trained providers and geographic inequities impair access. To close this treatment gap, the World Health Organization (WHO) has called for the integration of mental health services with primary care. A new innovative online program is presented that increases access to mental health education for primary care nurse practitioners in designated mental health professional shortage areas. To create successful and sustainable change, an overlapping three-phase strategy is being implemented. Phase I is recruiting and educating primary care nurse practitioners to become competent and certified psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners. Phase II is developing partnerships with state and local agencies to identify and support the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner education and clinical training. Phase III is sustaining integrated mental health care services through the development of nurse leaders who will participate in interdisciplinary coalitions and educate future students. PMID:27347257

  7. Promoting Access Through Integrated Mental Health Care Education.

    PubMed

    Kverno, Karan

    2016-01-01

    Mental disorders are the leading cause of non-communicable disability worldwide. Insufficient numbers of psychiatrically trained providers and geographic inequities impair access. To close this treatment gap, the World Health Organization (WHO) has called for the integration of mental health services with primary care. A new innovative online program is presented that increases access to mental health education for primary care nurse practitioners in designated mental health professional shortage areas. To create successful and sustainable change, an overlapping three-phase strategy is being implemented. Phase I is recruiting and educating primary care nurse practitioners to become competent and certified psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners. Phase II is developing partnerships with state and local agencies to identify and support the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner education and clinical training. Phase III is sustaining integrated mental health care services through the development of nurse leaders who will participate in interdisciplinary coalitions and educate future students.

  8. Promoting Access Through Integrated Mental Health Care Education

    PubMed Central

    Kverno, Karan

    2016-01-01

    Mental disorders are the leading cause of non-communicable disability worldwide. Insufficient numbers of psychiatrically trained providers and geographic inequities impair access. To close this treatment gap, the World Health Organization (WHO) has called for the integration of mental health services with primary care. A new innovative online program is presented that increases access to mental health education for primary care nurse practitioners in designated mental health professional shortage areas. To create successful and sustainable change, an overlapping three-phase strategy is being implemented. Phase I is recruiting and educating primary care nurse practitioners to become competent and certified psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners. Phase II is developing partnerships with state and local agencies to identify and support the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner education and clinical training. Phase III is sustaining integrated mental health care services through the development of nurse leaders who will participate in interdisciplinary coalitions and educate future students. PMID:27347257

  9. Hypertensive patients in primary health care: access, connection and care involved in spontaneous demands.

    PubMed

    Girão, Ana Lívia Araújo; Freitas, Consuelo Helena Aires de

    2016-06-01

    Objective To assess the impacts of inclusion of care for spontaneous demands in the treatment of hypertensive patients in primary health care. Methods Third generation qualitative assessment survey conducted with 16 workers in a Primary Care Health Unit (PHCU) of the city of Fortaleza, state of Ceara, in the period between July and September of 2015. To collect data, systematic field observation and semi-structured interviews were used, and the stages of thematic content analysis were adopted for data analysis. Results Participants revealed that access, connection and care are fundamental to the treatment of hypertension. However, they said that the introduction of free access for spontaneous demands compromised the flow of care in the hypertension programs. Conclusion A dichotomy between the practice of care recommended by health policies and the one existing in the reality of PHCUs was shown, causing evident losses to the care of hypertensive patients in primary care. PMID:27253602

  10. Nonwhite ethnicity and the provision of specialist palliative care services: factors affecting doctors' referral patterns.

    PubMed

    Karim, K; Bailey, M; Tunna, K

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine the use of palliative care services by members of black/minority ethnic communities. Referral patterns of hospital consultants and general practitioners (GPs) to Birmingham St Mary's Hospice were examined. Semistructured interviews were carried out to explore doctors' perceptions of the benefits and limitations of hospice services for their black/minority ethnic patients and to identify potential barriers to referral. In total, 27 doctors were interviewed: 15 hospital consultants and 12 GP. The GPs were selected according to size of practice within areas of Birmingham with significant black/minority ethnic populations. Referrals received by the hospice for the period April 1996 to November 1997 were collected from the Hospice's computerized database. Results show that, compared to white Europeans, there was an underutilization of day care and inpatient hospice services by members of black/minority ethnic communities. Doctors did, however, refer their black/minority ethnic patients for hospice home-care services: 8.5% of referrals received by the hospice were for nonwhite patients. This referral rate increased to 19.3% in specific postcode areas known to have significant black/minority ethnic communities. Further research is needed to establish levels of awareness, explore attitudes towards palliative care services and assess the demand for specific services within various black/minority ethnic communities.

  11. Foot care and footwear practices among patients attending a specialist diabetes clinic in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Gayle, Krystal A T; Tulloch Reid, Marshall K; Younger, Novie O; Francis, Damian K; McFarlane, Shelly R; Wright-Pascoe, Rosemarie A; Boyne, Michael S; Wilks, Rainford J; Ferguson, Trevor S

    2012-10-12

    This study aimed to estimate the proportion of patients at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) Diabetes Clinic who engage in recommended foot care and footwear practices. Seventy-two participants from the UHWI Diabetes Clinic completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire on foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants were a subset of a sex-stratified random sample of clinic attendees and were interviewed in 2010. Data analysis included frequency estimates of the various foot care practices and types of footwear worn. Participants had a mean age of 57.0±14.3 years and mean duration of diabetes of 17.0±10.3 years. Fifty-three percent of participants reported being taught how to care for their feet, while daily foot inspection was performed by approximately 60% of participants. Most participants (90%) reported daily use of moisturizing lotion on the feet but almost 50% used lotion between the toes. Approximately 85% of participants reported wearing shoes or slippers both indoors and outdoors but over 40% reported walking barefoot at some time. Thirteen percent wore special shoes for diabetes while over 80% wore shoes without socks at some time. Although much larger proportions reported wearing broad round toe shoes (82%) or leather shoes (64%), fairly high proportions reported wearing pointed toe shoes (39%), and 43% of women wore high heel shoes. In conclusion, approximately 60% of patients at the UHWI diabetic clinic engage in daily foot inspection and other recommended practices, but fairly high proportions reported foot care or footwear choices that should be avoided.

  12. An innovative care model coordinated by a physical therapist and nurse practitioner for osteoarthritis of the hip and knee in specialist care: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Voorn, Veronique M A; Vermeulen, Henricus M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Huizinga, Tom W J; Leijerzapf, Nicolette A C; Kroon, Herman M; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van der Linden, Henrica M J

    2013-07-01

    The subject of the study is to investigate whether health-related quality of life (HRQoL), pain and function of patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis (OA) improves after a specialist care intervention coordinated by a physical therapist and a nurse practitioner (NP) and to assess satisfaction with this care at 12 weeks. This observational study included all consecutive patients with hip or knee OA referred to an outpatient orthopaedics clinic. The intervention consisted of a single, standardized visit (assessment and individually tailored management advice, to be executed in primary care) and a telephone follow-up, coordinated by a physical therapist and a NP, in cooperation with an orthopaedic surgeon. Assessments at baseline and 10 weeks thereafter included the short form-36 (SF-36), EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D), hip or knee disability and osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS or KOOS), the intermittent and constant osteoarthritis pain questionnaire (ICOAP) for hip or knee and a multidimensional satisfaction questionnaire (23 items; 4 point scale). Eighty-seven patients (57 female), mean age 68 years (SD 10.9) were included, with follow-up data available in 63 patients (72 %). Statistically significant improvements were seen regarding the SF-36 physical summary component score, the EQ-5D, the ICOAP scores for hip and knee, the HOOS subscale sports and the KOOS subscales pain, symptoms and activities of daily living. The proportions of patients reporting to be satisfied ranged from 79 to 98 % per item. In patients with hip and knee OA pain, function and HRQoL improved significantly after a single-visit multidisciplinary OA management intervention in specialist care, with high patient satisfaction.

  13. The Whole World at Our Door and in Their Hands: Library Media Specialists, Internet Access, and PDAs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Daniel D.

    2003-01-01

    Considers the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) report on Internet access and the rapidly growing importance of Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) in education. Highlights include school access to the Internet; classroom access; types of connections; home access; special hardware and software for students with disabilities; and…

  14. Racial/ethnic differences in children's access to care.

    PubMed Central

    Weinick, R M; Krauss, N A

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study explored reasons for racial and ethnic differences in children's usual sources of care. METHODS: Data from the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey were examined by means of logistic regression techniques. RESULTS: Black and Hispanic children were substantially less likely than White children to have a usual source of care. These differences persisted after control for health insurance and socioeconomic status. Control for language ability, however, eliminated differences between Hispanic and White children. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that the marked Hispanic disadvantage in children's access to care noted in earlier studies may be related to language ability. PMID:11076248

  15. 76 FR 12080 - TRICARE Access to Care Demonstration Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... intended to improve access to urgent care including minor illness or injury for Coast Guard beneficiaries... treatment for an illness or injury that would not result in further disability or death if not treated... chronic conditions that are not true life threatening emergencies and may have been better ] suited...

  16. Access to Care: Overcoming the Rural Physician Shortage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    1999-01-01

    Describes three state-initiated programs that address the challenge of providing access to health care for Appalachia's rural residents: a traveling pediatric diabetes clinic serving eastern Kentucky; a telemedicine program operated out of Knoxville, Tennessee; and a new medical school in Kentucky dedicated to training doctors from Appalachia for…

  17. America's Children: Health Insurance and Access to Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Margaret, Ed.; Coye, Molly Joel, Ed.

    The National Academy of Sciences Committee on Children, Health Insurance, and Access to Care was assembled to address questions about health insurance for children, evaluating the strengths and limitations of insurance as a means of improving children's health from a variety of approaches and policies. Meeting between March 1997 and January 1998,…

  18. Advanced access: reducing waiting and delays in primary care.

    PubMed

    Murray, Mark; Berwick, Donald M

    2003-02-26

    Delay of care is a persistent and undesirable feature of current health care systems. Although delay seems to be inevitable and linked to resource limitations, it often is neither. Rather, it is usually the result of unplanned, irrational scheduling and resource allocation. Application of queuing theory and principles of industrial engineering, adapted appropriately to clinical settings, can reduce delay substantially, even in small practices, without requiring additional resources. One model, sometimes referred to as advanced access, has increasingly been shown to reduce waiting times in primary care. The core principle of advanced access is that patients calling to schedule a physician visit are offered an appointment the same day. Advanced access is not sustainable if patient demand for appointments is permanently greater than physician capacity to offer appointments. Six elements of advanced access are important in its application balancing supply and demand, reducing backlog, reducing the variety of appointment types, developing contingency plans for unusual circumstances, working to adjust demand profiles, and increasing the availability of bottleneck resources. Although these principles are powerful, they are counter to deeply held beliefs and established practices in health care organizations. Adopting these principles requires strong leadership investment and support.

  19. Advanced access: reducing waiting and delays in primary care.

    PubMed

    Murray, Mark; Berwick, Donald M

    2003-02-26

    Delay of care is a persistent and undesirable feature of current health care systems. Although delay seems to be inevitable and linked to resource limitations, it often is neither. Rather, it is usually the result of unplanned, irrational scheduling and resource allocation. Application of queuing theory and principles of industrial engineering, adapted appropriately to clinical settings, can reduce delay substantially, even in small practices, without requiring additional resources. One model, sometimes referred to as advanced access, has increasingly been shown to reduce waiting times in primary care. The core principle of advanced access is that patients calling to schedule a physician visit are offered an appointment the same day. Advanced access is not sustainable if patient demand for appointments is permanently greater than physician capacity to offer appointments. Six elements of advanced access are important in its application balancing supply and demand, reducing backlog, reducing the variety of appointment types, developing contingency plans for unusual circumstances, working to adjust demand profiles, and increasing the availability of bottleneck resources. Although these principles are powerful, they are counter to deeply held beliefs and established practices in health care organizations. Adopting these principles requires strong leadership investment and support. PMID:12597760

  20. Allocation of labour to somatic and psychiatric specialist care--the effects of earmarked grants.

    PubMed

    Halsteinli, Vidar; Ose, Solveig Osborg; Torvik, Heidi; Hagen, Terje P

    2006-10-01

    Until 2002, counties were responsible for providing both somatic and psychiatric specialized health care services in Norway. The financing arrangement of the counties consisted of fixed local taxes, a general block grant and different types of earmarked grants from the national government. Since 1997, earmarked conditional grants related to DRG-activity have been used for somatic services, whereas earmarked unconditional grants have been used for mental health care services from approximately the same time. This paper analyse the price and revenue effects of grants on the allocation of labour, with special attention to the two types of earmarked grants: conditional and unconditional. Theoretically, labour (as an index of production output) is assumed to be allocated to somatic and psychiatric services dependent upon revenues (taxes, block grants and earmarked unconditional grants), price per labour-year (that among other things are affected by earmarked conditional grants) and the preferences of the local government (which relate to the age structure and population density of the county). We assume that a conditional grant reduces the net price of labour and thereby increases the (relative) demand, whereas an unconditional grant adds to the other revenues of the county and do not affect the relative allocation of labour. Data from a panel of 18 counties for the period 1992-2001 is analysed using OLS with fixed effects. The results show revenue effects and direct price effects as expected. However, the assumption that unconditional grants do not affect relative allocation of labours is not supported. We find a positive effect of the unconditional grant to psychiatric care on the demand for labour in this sector. We interpret this as an effect of hierarchical governance such as supervision and monitoring that were remedies that were used together with the unconditional grant.

  1. Improving outpatient access and patient experiences in academic ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Sarah; Calderon, Sherry; Casella, Joanne; Wood, Elizabeth; Carvelli-Sheehan, Jayne; Zeidel, Mark L

    2012-02-01

    Effective scheduling of and ready access to doctor appointments affect ambulatory patient care quality, but these are often sacrificed by patients seeking care from physicians at academic medical centers. At one center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, the authors developed interventions to improve the scheduling of appointments and to reduce the access time between telephone call and first offered appointment. Improvements to scheduling included no redirection to voicemail, prompt telephone pickup, courteous service, complete registration, and effective scheduling. Reduced access time meant being offered an appointment with a physician in the appropriate specialty within three working days of the telephone call. Scheduling and access were assessed using monthly "mystery shopper" calls. Mystery shoppers collected data using standardized forms, rated the quality of service, and transcribed their interactions with schedulers. Monthly results were tabulated and discussed with clinical leaders; leaders and frontline staff then developed solutions to detected problems. Eighteen months after the beginning of the intervention (in June 2007), which is ongoing, schedulers had gone from using 60% of their registration skills to over 90%, customer service scores had risen from 2.6 to 4.9 (on a 5-point scale), and average access time had fallen from 12 days to 6 days. The program costs $50,000 per year and has been associated with a 35% increase in ambulatory volume across three years. The authors conclude that academic medical centers can markedly improve the scheduling process and access to care and that these improvements may result in increased ambulatory care volume. PMID:22193182

  2. Recent Developments in Alcohol Services Research on Access to Care.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Laura A

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, only about 10 percent of people with an alcohol or drug use disorder receive care for the condition, pointing to a large treatment gap. Several personal characteristics influence whether a person will receive treatment; additionally, many people with an alcohol use disorder do not perceive the need for treatment. The extent of the treatment gap differs somewhat across different population subgroups, such as those based on gender, age, or race and ethnicity. Recent health care reforms, such as implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, likely will improve access to substance abuse treatment. In addition, new treatment approaches, service delivery systems, and payment innovations may facilitate access to substance abuse services. Nevertheless, efforts to bridge the treatment gap will continue to be needed to ensure that all people who need alcohol and drug abuse treatment can actually receive it. PMID:27159809

  3. Recent Developments in Alcohol Services Research on Access to Care

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, only about 10 percent of people with an alcohol or drug use disorder receive care for the condition, pointing to a large treatment gap. Several personal characteristics influence whether a person will receive treatment; additionally, many people with an alcohol use disorder do not perceive the need for treatment. The extent of the treatment gap differs somewhat across different population subgroups, such as those based on gender, age, or race and ethnicity. Recent health care reforms, such as implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, likely will improve access to substance abuse treatment. In addition, new treatment approaches, service delivery systems, and payment innovations may facilitate access to substance abuse services. Nevertheless, efforts to bridge the treatment gap will continue to be needed to ensure that all people who need alcohol and drug abuse treatment can actually receive it. PMID:27159809

  4. [Nursing ethics and the access to nursing care].

    PubMed

    Monteverde, Settimio

    2013-08-01

    The increasing number of ethical issues highlighted in everyday nursing care demonstrates the connectedness between nursing ethics and nursing practice. However, what is the role of ethical theories in this context? This question will be examined in this article by analysing the contribution made by the ethics of care, in particular in understandings of gender roles, asymmetries of power, professional knowledge and experience. The adoption and criticism of an emergent nursing ethics is discussed and stated from different viewpoints. The actuality of the caring approach is affirmed by a new reading of the given situation. This article first describes the traditional perception of nurses as marginalised actors in the health sector. By making reference to the current and growing global scarcity of nursing care, it contends that nursing will no longer be marginalised, but instead at the centre of public health attention and reputation. Nevertheless, marginalisation will persist by increasingly affecting the care receivers, especially those groups that are pushed to the fringes by the consequences of the healthcare market, such as persons of extreme old age, suffering from multiple morbidities, or with poor health literacy. Whereas the "classical" understanding of the ethics of care focuses on the nurse-patient relationship and on individual care and understanding of ethics, the new understanding confirms the classical, but adds an understanding of social ethics: caring for the access to care is seen as a main ethical goal of social justice within a nursing ethic.

  5. State Medicaid Coverage, ESRD Incidence, and Access to Care

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Benjamin A.; Hall, Yoshio N.; Mitani, Aya A.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of low-income nonelderly adults covered by Medicaid varies widely by state. We sought to determine whether broader state Medicaid coverage, defined as the proportion of each state’s low-income nonelderly adult population covered by Medicaid, associates with lower state-level incidence of ESRD and greater access to care. The main outcomes were incidence of ESRD and five indicators of access to care. We identified 408,535 adults aged 20–64 years, who developed ESRD between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2008. Medicaid coverage among low-income nonelderly adults ranged from 12.2% to 66.0% (median 32.5%). For each additional 10% of the low-income nonelderly population covered by Medicaid, there was a 1.8% (95% confidence interval, 1.0% to 2.6%) decrease in ESRD incidence. Among nonelderly adults with ESRD, gaps in access to care between those with private insurance and those with Medicaid were narrower in states with broader coverage. For a 50-year-old white woman, the access gap to the kidney transplant waiting list between Medicaid and private insurance decreased by 7.7 percentage points in high (>45%) versus low (<25%) Medicaid coverage states. Similarly, the access gap to transplantation decreased by 4.0 percentage points and the access gap to peritoneal dialysis decreased by 3.8 percentage points in high Medicaid coverage states. In conclusion, states with broader Medicaid coverage had a lower incidence of ESRD and smaller insurance-related access gaps. PMID:24652791

  6. [Practice guideline 'Influenza prevention in nursing homes and care homes', issued by the Dutch Society of Nursing Home Specialists; division of tasks between nursing home specialist, general practitioner and company doctor].

    PubMed

    Cools, H J M; van Essen, G A

    2005-01-15

    The Dutch Society of Nursing Home Specialists has formulated a guideline for the prevention of influenza in nursing homes and care homes in The Netherlands. The guideline recommends the realisation of the highest possible degree of vaccination of both patients and health care workers. At the start of the flu season, the manager of the chronic care institute should organize a scheme for vaccination against influenza and a plan in case of an outbreak of influenza. The division of tasks between the nursing home specialist, the general practitioner and the company doctor should be recorded in both the vaccination scheme and the outbreak plan. In order to decrease the incidence of non-response to the vaccine a double dose of influenza vaccine for nursing home patients should be considered. The outbreak plan should raise the state of alertness for influenza and ensure that virological confirmation of clinical influenza is obtained quickly. Immediately after virological confirmation of clinical influenza, patients with influenza should be treated with oseltamivir and both patients and health care workers in the unit should receive prophylaxis with oseltamivir. Non-vaccinated patients should also be offered vaccination to restrict re-introduction of the virus. During an influenza outbreak, only patients with influenza or those who have had prophylactic treatment may be admitted to the facility. In the case of an influenza pandemic, national guidelines should be followed. PMID:15693586

  7. Public finance policy strategies to increase access to preconception care.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kay A

    2006-09-01

    Policy and finance barriers reduce access to preconception care and, reportedly, limit professional practice changes that would improve the availability of needed services. Millions of women of childbearing age (15-44) lack adequate health coverage (i.e., uninsured or underinsured), and others live in medically underserved areas. Service delivery fragmentation and lack of professional guidelines are additional barriers. This paper reviews barriers and opportunities for financing preconception care, based on a review and analysis of state and federal policies. We describe states' experiences with and opportunities to improve health coverage, through public programs such as Medicaid, Medicaid waivers, and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). The potential role of Title V and of community health centers in providing primary and preventive care to women also is discussed. In these and other public health and health coverage programs, opportunities exist to finance preconception care for low-income women. Three major policy directions are discussed. To increase access to preconception care among women of childbearing age, the federal and state governments have opportunities to: (1) improve health care coverage, (2) increase the supply of publicly subsidized health clinics, and (3) direct delivery of preconception screening and interventions in the context of public health programs.

  8. Racial disparities in health care access among pediatric patients with craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Zackary D; Bey, Amita K; Bonfield, Christopher M; Westrick, Ashly C; Kelly, Katherine; Kelly, Kevin; Wellons, John C

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Disparities in surgical access and timing to care result from a combination of complex patient, social, and institutional factors. Due to the perception of delayed presentation for overall health care services and treatment in African American patients on the part of the senior author, this study was designed to identify and quantify these differences in access and care between African American and Caucasian children with craniosynostosis. In addition, hypotheses regarding reasons for this difference are discussed. METHODS A retrospective study was conducted of 132 children between the ages of 0 and 17 years old who previously underwent operations for craniosynostosis at a tertiary pediatric care facility between 2010 and 2013. Patient and family characteristics, age at surgical consultation and time to surgery, and distance to primary care providers and the tertiary center were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS Of the 132 patients in this cohort, 88% were Caucasian and 12% were African American. The median patient age was 5 months (interquartile range [IQR] 2-8 months). African Americans had a significantly greater age at consult compared with Caucasians (median 341 days [IQR 192-584 days] vs median 137 days [IQR 62-235 days], respectively; p = 0.0012). However, after being evaluated in consultation, there was no significant difference in time to surgery between African American and Caucasian patients (median 56 days [IQR 36-98 days] vs median 64 days [IQR 43-87 days], respectively). Using regression analysis, race and type of synostoses were found to be significantly associated with a longer wait time for surgical consultation (p = 0.01 and p = 0.04, respectively, using cutoff points of ≤ 180 days vs > 180 days). Distance traveled to primary care physicians and to the tertiary care facility did not significantly differ between groups. Other factors such as parental education, insurance type, household income, and referring physician type also showed no

  9. Evaluation and Treatment of Low Back Pain: A Clinically Focused Review for Primary Care Specialists.

    PubMed

    Hooten, W Michael; Cohen, Steven P

    2015-12-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a leading cause of disability worldwide. In the absence of a classification system for pain syndromes, classification of LBP on the basis of the distribution of pain as axial (pain generally localized to the low back) or radicular neuropathic (pain radiating to the lower extremities) is relevant to clinical practice because the distribution of pain is often a corollary of frequently occurring disease processes involving the lumbar spine. Common sources of axial LBP include the intervertebral disc, facet joint, sacroiliac joint, and paraspinal musculature, whereas common sources of radicular pain include a herniated intervertebral disc and spinal stenosis. The accuracy of historical and physical examination findings has been established for sacroiliac joint pain, radiculopathy, and lumbar spinal stenosis. However, the accuracy of similar data, so-called red flags, for identifying the underlying medical sources of LBP has been overstated. Diagnostic imaging studies can be useful, and adherence to established guidelines can protect against overuse. Multiple pharmacological trials exist for the management of LBP; however, the long-term outcomes of commonly used drugs are mixed. For carefully selected patients with axial LBP, radiofrequency denervation techniques can provide sustained pain relief. In patients with radicular pain, transforaminal epidural steroid injections may provide short-term pain relief, but neurostimulation may confer more enduring benefits of refractory symptoms. Pain-related indications for commonly performed operations include spinal decompression for radicular symptoms as well as spinal fusion or disc prosthesis for discogenic LBP. Physical modalities and psychological treatments can improve pain and functioning, but patient preferences may influence treatment adherence. PMID:26653300

  10. The Breast Cancer Distance Education Program: development and evaluation of a course for specialist breast care nurses.

    PubMed

    Dixon, H; Hordern, A; Borland, R

    2001-02-01

    The Breast Cancer Distance Education Program is the first tertiary-based education program for specialist breast care nurses in Australia. The program covers current treatment options, psychosocial issues, and professional development issues relating to breast cancer nursing. For the first two student intakes (n = 53), precourse, postcourse, and 3-month follow-up surveys were conducted to assess the perceived value of the course, identify any limitations, and note changes in practice that arose. Before taking the course, most of the students had experience in breast cancer nursing, but lacked confidence and hoped to learn more about responding effectively to psychosocial issues through communication, counseling, and provision of support to patients and their carers. After taking the course, the students were very positive about the course content, resources, and teaching support. They reported learning new skills for addressing psychosocial issues and symptom management arising from a diagnosis of breast cancer, stating a desire to implement these new skills. Comparison between results from the three surveys indicated that students' confidence in providing breast cancer support increased significantly in most areas of practice, and was maintained at 3-month follow-up survey. Results suggest that students met the course objectives successfully, and in most cases subsequently translated their knowledge into improved practice.

  11. The House of Lords Select Committee on the Assisted Dying for the Terminally III Bill: implications for specialist palliative care.

    PubMed

    Finlay, I G; Wheatley, V J; Izdebski, C

    2005-09-01

    The Assisted Dying for the Terminally III Bill proposed to legalise both euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide for those with a terminal illness in the UK. A House of Lords Select Committee was convened to scrutinise this Bill and has recently published its report, which will be debated in Parliament on October 10th 2005. The written and oral evidence submitted to the Select Committee represented a wide range of views on 'assisted dying'. Much of the evidence from those countries which have legalised euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide (The Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland and Oregon, USA) dealt with the practicalities of ending life, and the legal procedures and safeguards instigated in these countries. All the written and oral evidence in the public domain was scrutinised by the authors whilst the Select Committee was sitting. We have extracted those themes relevant to specialist palliative care practice and present them in this paper. We hope that this will provide a useful resource to inform the forthcoming public debate on assisted dying. The evidence of harms inherent in making such a change in the law, as presented to the Select Committee, has moved all three authors to oppose a change in the law.

  12. Psychological needs, service utilization and provision of care in a specialist mental health clinic for young refugees: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Michelson, Daniel; Sclare, Irene

    2009-04-01

    This study addressed psychological needs, patterns of service utilization and provision of care in a specialist mental health service for young refugees and asylum seekers in London. Comparisons were made between two groups with different levels of postulated mental health need: unaccompanied minors (UAMs; n = 49) and children accompanied to the UK by one or more primary caregivers (n = 29). Significant differences were observed in referral pathways, with UAMs more likely to be referred by social services and less likely to be referred from medical agencies. UAMs also attended fewer sessions during treatment, and missed a greater proportion of scheduled appointments. Contrary to prediction, group comparisons revealed similar levels of post-migration stress and overall psychological morbidity. However, UAMs experienced significantly more traumatic events prior to resettlement, and were more likely to exhibit symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than their accompanied peers. Despite their elevated risk of PTSD, UAMs were less likely than accompanied children to have received trauma-focused interventions. UAMs were also significantly less likely to have been treated using cognitive therapy, anxiety management and parent/carer training, as well as receiving fewer types of practical assistance with basic social needs. The clinical and service implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:19293323

  13. A tele-oncology model replacing face-to-face specialist cancer care: perspectives of patients in North Queensland.

    PubMed

    Sabesan, Sabe; Kelly, Jenny; Evans, Rebecca; Larkins, Sarah

    2014-03-18

    We explored the experiences of patients using the Townsville Tele-oncology clinic, where most patients are no longer seen face-to-face. All medical oncology patients who received services via telehealth at the Townsville Cancer Centre in 2012 were invited to participate in an interview. None refused. Thirty two patients were interviewed by telephone and three via videoconference at their local health service facility. Data analysis identified five major themes (quality of the consultation; communication and relationships; familiarity with technology and initial fears; local services and support; and lack of coordination of services between the local rural hospital and the major regional hospital) and each major theme included a number of sub-themes. Most patients interviewed (69%) had not seen their oncology specialist face-to-face, but 86% of them found the video-consultation to be of high quality and were extremely satisfied with the interaction. The acceptance of teleconsultation appeared to be linked to the patients' trust with their local health system and staff. Overall, the tele-oncology model that replaced face-to-face care in North Queensland was accepted and welcomed by patients. PMID:24643950

  14. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... appropriateness of care provided under the plan, including how the State will assure: (a) Access to well-baby care... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care. 457.495 Section 457.495 Public Health CENTERS FOR...

  15. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... appropriateness of care provided under the plan, including how the State will assure: (a) Access to well-baby care... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care. 457.495 Section 457.495 Public Health CENTERS FOR...

  16. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... appropriateness of care provided under the plan, including how the State will assure: (a) Access to well-baby care... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care. 457.495 Section 457.495 Public Health CENTERS FOR...

  17. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... appropriateness of care provided under the plan, including how the State will assure: (a) Access to well-baby care... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care. 457.495 Section 457.495 Public Health CENTERS FOR...

  18. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... appropriateness of care provided under the plan, including how the State will assure: (a) Access to well-baby care... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care. 457.495 Section 457.495 Public Health CENTERS FOR...

  19. Medical smart cards: health care access in your pocket.

    PubMed

    Krohn, R W

    2000-01-01

    The wallet-sized medical smart card, embedded with a programmable computer chip, stores and transmits a cardholder's clinical, insurance coverage and biographical information. When fully deployed, smart cards will conduct many functions at the point of care, from claims submission to medical records updates in real time. Ultimately, the smart card will make the individual patient record and all clinical and economic transactions within that patient log as portable, accessible and secure as an ATM account.

  20. Deported Mexican migrants: health status and access to care

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Niño, Julián Alfredo; Ramírez-Valdés, Carlos Jacobo; Cerecero-Garcia, Diego; Bojorquez-Chapela, Ietza

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the health status and access to care of forced-return Mexican migrants deported through the Mexico-United States border and to compare it with the situation of voluntary-return migrants. METHODS Secondary data analysis from the Survey on Migration in Mexico’s Northern Border from 2012. This is a continuous survey, designed to describe migration flows between Mexico and the United States, with a mobile-population sampling design. We analyzed indicators of health and access to care among deported migrants, and compare them with voluntary-return migrants. Our analysis sample included 2,680 voluntary-return migrants, and 6,862 deportees. We employ an ordinal multiple logistic regression model, to compare the adjusted odds of having worst self-reported health between the studied groups. RESULTS As compared to voluntary-return migrants, deportees were less likely to have medical insurance in the United States (OR = 0.05; 95%CI 0.04;0.06). In the regression model a poorer self-perceived health was found to be associated with having been deported (OR = 1.71, 95%CI 1.52;1.92), as well as age (OR = 1.03, 95%CI 1.02;1.03) and years of education (OR = 0.94 95%CI 0.93;0.95). CONCLUSIONS According to our results, deportees had less access to care while in the United States, as compared with voluntary-return migrants. Our results also showed an independent and statistically significant association between deportation and having poorer self-perceived health. To promote the health and access to care of deported Mexican migrants coming back from the United States, new health and social policies are required. PMID:25119943

  1. Understanding delayed access to antenatal care: a qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Delayed access to antenatal care ('late booking’) has been linked to increased maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. The aim of this qualitative study was to understand why some women are late to access antenatal care. Methods 27 women presenting after 19 completed weeks gestation for their first hospital booking appointment were interviewed, using a semi-structured format, in community and maternity hospital settings in South Yorkshire, United Kingdom. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and entered onto NVivo 8 software. An interdisciplinary, iterative, thematic analysis was undertaken. Results The late booking women were diverse in terms of: age (15–37 years); parity (0–4); socioeconomic status; educational attainment and ethnicity. Three key themes relating to late booking were identified from our data: 1) 'not knowing’: realisation (absence of classic symptoms, misinterpretation); belief (age, subfertility, using contraception, lay hindrance); 2) 'knowing’: avoidance (ambivalence, fear, self-care); postponement (fear, location, not valuing care, self-care); and 3) 'delayed’ (professional and system failures, knowledge/empowerment issues). Conclusions Whilst vulnerable groups are strongly represented in this study, women do not always fit a socio-cultural stereotype of a 'late booker’. We report a new taxonomy of more complex reasons for late antenatal booking than the prevalent concepts of denial, concealment and disadvantage. Explanatory sub-themes are also discussed, which relate to psychological, empowerment and socio-cultural factors. These include poor reproductive health knowledge and delayed recognition of pregnancy, the influence of a pregnancy 'mindset’ and previous pregnancy experience, and the perceived value of antenatal care. The study also highlights deficiencies in early pregnancy diagnosis and service organisation. These issues should be considered by practitioners and service commissioners in order to promote

  2. A WOUND CARE AND INTRAVENOUS ACCESS SUMMIT FOR ON-ORBIT CARE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, R.; Paul, B.; Gillis, D.; Bacal, K.; McCulley, P.; Polk, J.; Johnson-Throop, K.

    2005-01-01

    Wound care issues and the ability to establish intravenous (IV) access among injured or ill crew members are a source of concern for NASA flight surgeons. Indeed, the microgravity environment and the remote nature of the International Space Station (ISS) pose unique challenges in diagnosing and treating an injured astronaut. Therefore, it is necessary to identify and adapt the best evidence based terrestrial practices regarding wound care, hemostasis, and IV access for use on the ISS. Methods: A panel of consultants was convened to evaluate the adequacy of the current ISS in-flight medical system for diagnosis and treatment of wounds and establishing IV access by a nonclinician crew medical officer. Participants were acknowledged experts in terrestrial wound care and/or operational medicine. Prior to the meeting, each panelist was encouraged to participate in a pre-summit online forum. Results: Eight external experts participated in a face-to-face meeting held at NASA-Johnson Space Center. Recommendations were made to augment the space station pharmacopoeia, as well as current wound care diagnostic, therapeutic, and deorbit criteria protocols. Additionally, suggestions were offered regarding IV access techniques and devices for use in the microgravity environment. Discussion: The results of the expert panel provide an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and care of wounds in an injured astronaut on aboard the ISS. The results of the panel underscored the need for further research in wound therapy and IV access devices.

  3. Access to medical care under Medicaid: differentials by race.

    PubMed

    Link, C R; Long, S H; Settle, R F

    1982-01-01

    The Medicaid program was designed to help correct for the unequal access to medical care by income and race in pre-1965 America. Previous evaluations of the program have claimed that on average the eligible poor have enjoyed considerable gains in access, but that the benefits of Medicaid have not been shared equally by blacks and whites. We reexamined the evidence on differential access by race early in the program (1969) and evaluate that claim for the mature program (1976). Our evaluation is conducted within the context of multivariate models of physician and hospital utilization designed to control for a variety of socioeconomic, health status, and resource supply characteristics. While earlier evaluations overstated the extent of racial differentials in 1969, blacks who were not chronically ill had significantly lower levels of ambulatory care--both within and outside of the South. Between 1969 and 1976 all race, region, and health status groups of nonelderly Medicaid recipients experienced increases in physician visits that far outpaced those of the entire nonelderly U.S. population. By 1976 blacks clearly achieved equality with whites in Medicaid ambulatory care use. The only statistically significant shortfall we find is in hospital utilization among Southern blacks in good health.

  4. Role of Primary Health Care in Ensuring Access to Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Sambala, Evanson Z; Sapsed, Susan; Mkandawire, Mercy L

    2010-01-01

    To examine ways of ensuring access to health services within the framework of primary health care (PHC), since the goal of PHC to make universal health care available to all people has become increasingly neglected amid emerging themes of globalization, trade, and foreign policy. From a public health point of view, we argue that the premise of PHC can unlock barriers to health care services and contribute greatly to determining collective health through the promotion of universal basic health services. PHC has the most sophisticated and organized infrastructure, theories, and political principles, with which it can deal adequately with the issues of inequity, inequality, and social injustice which emerge from negative economic externalities and neo-liberal economic policies. Addressing these issues, especially the complex social and political influences that restrict access to medicines, may require the integration of different health initiatives into PHC. Based on current systems, PHC remains the only conventional health delivery service that can deal with resilient public health problems adequately. However, to strengthen its ability to do so, we propose the revitalization of PHC to incorporate scholarship that promotes human rights, partnerships, research and development, advocacy, and national drug policies. The concept of PHC can improve access; however, this will require the urgent interplay among theoretical, practical, political, and sociological influences arising from the economic, social, and political determinants of ill health in an era of globalization. PMID:20564760

  5. Role of primary health care in ensuring access to medicines.

    PubMed

    Sambala, Evanson Z; Sapsed, Susan; Mkandawire, Mercy L

    2010-06-01

    To examine ways of ensuring access to health services within the framework of primary health care (PHC), since the goal of PHC to make universal health care available to all people has become increasingly neglected amid emerging themes of globalization, trade, and foreign policy. From a public health point of view, we argue that the premise of PHC can unlock barriers to health care services and contribute greatly to determining collective health through the promotion of universal basic health services. PHC has the most sophisticated and organized infrastructure, theories, and political principles, with which it can deal adequately with the issues of inequity, inequality, and social injustice which emerge from negative economic externalities and neo-liberal economic policies. Addressing these issues, especially the complex social and political influences that restrict access to medicines, may require the integration of different health initiatives into PHC. Based on current systems, PHC remains the only conventional health delivery service that can deal with resilient public health problems adequately. However, to strengthen its ability to do so, we propose the revitalization of PHC to incorporate scholarship that promotes human rights, partnerships, research and development, advocacy, and national drug policies. The concept of PHC can improve access; however, this will require the urgent interplay among theoretical, practical, political, and sociological influences arising from the economic, social, and political determinants of ill health in an era of globalization.

  6. Integrality in cervical cancer care: evaluation of access

    PubMed Central

    Brito-Silva, Keila; Bezerra, Adriana Falangola Benjamin; Chaves, Lucieli Dias Pedreschi; Tanaka, Oswaldo Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate integrity of access to uterine cervical cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment services. METHODS The tracer condition was analyzed using a mixed quantitative and qualitative approach. The quantitative approach was based on secondary data from the analysis of cytology and biopsy exams performed between 2008 and 2010 on 25 to 59 year-old women in a municipality with a large population and with the necessary technological resources. Data were obtained from the Health Information System and the Regional Cervical Cancer Information System. Statistical analysis was performed using PASW statistic 17.0 software. The qualitative approach involved semi-structured interviews with service managers, health care professionals and users. NVivo 9.0 software was used for the content analysis of the primary data. RESULTS Pap smear coverage was low, possible due to insufficient screening and the difficulty of making appointments in primary care. The numbers of biopsies conducted are similar to those of abnormal cytologies, reflecting easy access to the specialized services. There was higher coverage among younger women. More serious diagnoses, for both cytologies and biopsies, were more prevalent in older women. CONCLUSIONS Insufficient coverage of cytologies, reported by the interviewees allows us to understand access difficulties in primary care, as well as the fragility of screening strategies. PMID:24897045

  7. Decisions about access to health care and accountability for reasonableness.

    PubMed

    Daniels, N

    1999-06-01

    Insurers make decisions that directly limit access to care (e.g., when deciding about coverage for new technologies or formulary design) and that indirectly limit access (e.g., by adopting incentives to induce physicians to provide fewer or different services). These decisions raise questions about legitimacy and fairness. By holding health plans accountable for the reasonableness of their decisions, it is possible to address these questions. Accountability for reasonableness involves providing publicly accessible rationales for decisions and limiting rationales to those that all "fair-minded" persons can agree are relevant to meeting patient needs fairly under resource constraints. This form of accountability is illustrated by examining its implications for the three examples of direct and indirect limit setting noted here. PMID:10924028

  8. Delivering dementia care differently—evaluating the differences and similarities between a specialist medical and mental health unit and standard acute care wards: a qualitative study of family carers’ perceptions of quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Karen; Foster, Pippa; Whittamore, Kathy H; Goldberg, Sarah E; Harwood, Rowan H

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine in depth carers’ views and experiences of the delivery of patient care for people with dementia or delirium in an acute general hospital, in order to evaluate a specialist Medical and Mental Health Unit (MMHU) compared with standard hospital wards. This qualitative study complemented the quantitative findings of a randomised controlled trial. Design Qualitative semistructured interviews were conducted with carers of patients with cognitive impairment admitted to hospital over a 4-month period. Setting A specialist MMHU was developed in an English National Health Service acute hospital aiming to deliver the best-practice care. Specialist mental health staff were integrated with the ward team. All staff received enhanced training in dementia, delirium and person-centred care. A programme of purposeful therapeutic and leisure activities was introduced. The ward environment was optimised to improve patient orientation and independence. A proactive and inclusive approach to family carers was encouraged. Participants 40 carers who had been recruited to a randomised controlled trial comparing the MMHU with standard wards. Results The main themes identified related closely to family carers’ met or unmet expectations and included activities and boredom, staff knowledge, dignity and fundamental care, the ward environment and communication between staff and carers. Carers from MMHU were aware of, and appreciated, improvements relating to activities, the ward environment and staff knowledge and skill in the appropriate management of dementia and delirium. However, communication and engagement of family carers were still perceived as insufficient. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the extent to which the MMHU succeeded in its goal of providing the best-practice care and improving carer experience, and where deficiencies remained. Neither setting was perceived as neither wholly good nor wholly bad; however, greater satisfaction (and less dissatisfaction

  9. Transitional care issues influencing access to health care: employability and insurability.

    PubMed

    Hellstedt, Linda F

    2004-12-01

    Addressing the issues of employability and insurability remains a challenge for young adults with CHD, their parents, and health care professionals who care for this patient group. Because of their chronic condition, these young persons require ongoing access to health care, throughout their adult lives. Because most individuals obtain insurance through their place of employment (unless it is obtained under a spouse's policy), adolescents with CHD should begin to look carefully at career options that are compatible with their interests and their physical abilities. If it is more appropriate, assistance with referral to vocational rehabilitation programs may be given. Finally, guidance should include how to avoid issues of discrimination during a job interview and when working at one's place of employment. Legislation now supports many workers as long as they can carry out the job for which they were hired. With the continuing rise in cost of health care and health insurance coverage, young persons with CHD must understand the high importance of maintaining health care coverage for their chronic health condition, usually through a group plan in their place of employment. Current legislation supports supplemental coverage and portability of coverage when changing jobs, which minimizes or eliminates waiting periods for pre-existing conditions. Suggestions for ongoing health care are included not only for care by a cardiologist but noncardiac care, including a primary care practitioner, dental care, and obstetric-gynecologic care. With the size and life expectancy of this patient group growing each year, the issues of employability and insurability must continually be addressed by health care professionals in conjunction with government policy makers and insurance representatives. As additional long-term survival data become available on the natural history of CHD, it is hoped that insurance requirements will be modified to afford this group the insurance coverage

  10. Transitional care issues influencing access to health care: employability and insurability.

    PubMed

    Hellstedt, Linda F

    2004-12-01

    Addressing the issues of employability and insurability remains a challenge for young adults with CHD, their parents, and health care professionals who care for this patient group. Because of their chronic condition, these young persons require ongoing access to health care, throughout their adult lives. Because most individuals obtain insurance through their place of employment (unless it is obtained under a spouse's policy), adolescents with CHD should begin to look carefully at career options that are compatible with their interests and their physical abilities. If it is more appropriate, assistance with referral to vocational rehabilitation programs may be given. Finally, guidance should include how to avoid issues of discrimination during a job interview and when working at one's place of employment. Legislation now supports many workers as long as they can carry out the job for which they were hired. With the continuing rise in cost of health care and health insurance coverage, young persons with CHD must understand the high importance of maintaining health care coverage for their chronic health condition, usually through a group plan in their place of employment. Current legislation supports supplemental coverage and portability of coverage when changing jobs, which minimizes or eliminates waiting periods for pre-existing conditions. Suggestions for ongoing health care are included not only for care by a cardiologist but noncardiac care, including a primary care practitioner, dental care, and obstetric-gynecologic care. With the size and life expectancy of this patient group growing each year, the issues of employability and insurability must continually be addressed by health care professionals in conjunction with government policy makers and insurance representatives. As additional long-term survival data become available on the natural history of CHD, it is hoped that insurance requirements will be modified to afford this group the insurance coverage

  11. Physician-assisted death with limited access to palliative care.

    PubMed

    Barutta, Joaquín; Vollmann, Jochen

    2015-08-01

    Even among advocates of legalising physician-assisted death, many argue that this should be done only once palliative care has become widely available. Meanwhile, according to them, physician-assisted death should be banned. Four arguments are often presented to support this claim, which we call the argument of lack of autonomy, the argument of existing alternatives, the argument of unfair inequalities and the argument of the antagonism between physician-assisted death and palliative care. We argue that although these arguments provide strong reasons to take appropriate measures to guarantee access to good quality palliative care to everyone who needs it, they do not justify a ban on physician-assisted death until we have achieved this goal. PMID:25614156

  12. Physician-assisted death with limited access to palliative care.

    PubMed

    Barutta, Joaquín; Vollmann, Jochen

    2015-08-01

    Even among advocates of legalising physician-assisted death, many argue that this should be done only once palliative care has become widely available. Meanwhile, according to them, physician-assisted death should be banned. Four arguments are often presented to support this claim, which we call the argument of lack of autonomy, the argument of existing alternatives, the argument of unfair inequalities and the argument of the antagonism between physician-assisted death and palliative care. We argue that although these arguments provide strong reasons to take appropriate measures to guarantee access to good quality palliative care to everyone who needs it, they do not justify a ban on physician-assisted death until we have achieved this goal.

  13. The Nijmegen Decision Tool for Chronic Low Back Pain. Development of a Clinical Decision Tool for Secondary or Tertiary Spine Care Specialists

    PubMed Central

    van Hooff, Miranda L.; van Loon, Jan; van Limbeek, Jacques; de Kleuver, Marinus

    2014-01-01

    Background In Western Europe, low back pain has the greatest burden of all diseases. When back pain persists, different medical specialists are involved and a lack of consensus exists among these specialists for medical decision-making in Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP). Objective To develop a decision tool for secondary or tertiary spine care specialists to decide which patients with CLBP should be seen by a spine surgeon or by other non-surgical medical specialists. Methods A Delphi study was performed to identify indicators predicting the outcome of interventions. In the preparatory stage evidence from international guidelines and literature were summarized. Eligible studies were reviews and longitudinal studies. Inclusion criteria: surgical or non-surgical interventions and persistence of complaints, CLBP-patients aged 18–65 years, reported baseline measures of predictive indicators, and one or more reported outcomes had to assess functional status, quality of life, pain intensity, employment status or a composite score. Subsequently, a three-round Delphi procedure, to reach consensus on candidate indicators, was performed among a multidisciplinary panel of 29 CLBP-professionals (>five years CLBP-experience). The pre-set threshold for general agreement was ≥70%. The final indicator set was used to develop a clinical decision tool. Results A draft list with 53 candidate indicators (38 with conclusive evidence and 15 with inconclusive evidence) was included for the Delphi study. Consensus was reached to include 47 indicators. A first version of the decision tool was developed, consisting of a web-based screening questionnaire and a provisional decision algorithm. Conclusions This is the first clinical decision tool based on current scientific evidence and formal multidisciplinary consensus that helps referring the patient for consultation to a spine surgeon or a non-surgical spine care specialist. We expect that this tool considerably helps in clinical decision

  14. Understanding the role of the volunteer in specialist palliative care: a systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Volunteers make a major contribution to palliative patient care, and qualitative studies have been undertaken to explore their involvement. With the aim of making connections between existing studies to derive enhanced meanings, we undertook a systematic review of these qualitative studies including synthesising the findings. We sought to uncover how the role of volunteers with direct contact with patients in specialist palliative care is understood by volunteers, patients, their families, and staff. Methods We searched for relevant literature that explored the role of the volunteer including electronic citation databases and reference lists of included studies, and also undertook handsearches of selected journals to find studies which met inclusion criteria. We quality appraised included studies, and synthesised study findings using a novel synthesis method, thematic synthesis. Results We found 12 relevant studies undertaken in both inpatient and home-care settings, with volunteers, volunteer coordinators, patients and families. Studies explored the role of general volunteers as opposed to those offering any professional skills. Three theme clusters were found: the distinctness of the volunteer role, the characteristics of the role, and the volunteer experience of the role. The first answers the question, is there a separate volunteer role? We found that to some extent the role was distinctive. The volunteer may act as a mediator between the patient and the staff. However, we also found some contradictions. Volunteers may take on temporary surrogate family-type relationship roles. They may also take on some of the characteristics of a paid professional. The second cluster helps to describe the essence of the role. Here, we found that the dominant feature was that the role is social in nature. The third helps to explain aspects of the role from the point of view of volunteers themselves. It highlighted that the role is seen by volunteers as flexible

  15. The role and organisation of community palliative specialist nursing teams in rural England.

    PubMed

    Leadbeater, Maria; Staton, Wendy

    2014-11-01

    This article describes a study that used a qualitative approach, purposive sampling and semi-structured telephone interviews conducted with specialist palliative care nurses from six rural community teams in England. The study investigated how services were organised and the issues of delivering specialist palliative nursing care in a rural area. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. The findings showed many similarities in that the majority of patients in rural areas were not accessing hospice services and there was a greater reliance on care at home. However, the challenges in delivering care ranged from managing patient expectations, geographical distance, lack of technology to support remote working and education for the specialist palliative care teams. The study makes specific recommendations for rural community specialist palliative care teams.

  16. Access to health care and religion among young American men.

    PubMed

    Gillum, R Frank; Jarrett, Nicole; Obisesan, Thomas O

    2009-12-01

    In order to elucidate cultural correlates of utilization of primary health services by young adult men, we investigated religion in which one was raised and service utilization. Using data from a national survey we tested the hypothesis that religion raised predicts access to and utilization of a regular medical care provider, examinations, HIV and other STD testing and counseling at ages 18-44 years in men born between 1958 and 1984. We also hypothesized that religion raised would be more predictive of utilization for Hispanic Americans and non-Hispanic Black Americans than for non-Hispanic White Americans. The study included a national sample of 4276 men aged 18-44 years. Descriptive and multivariate statistics were used to assess the hypotheses using data on religion raised and responses to 14 items assessing health care access and utilization. Compared to those raised in no religion, those raised mainline Protestant were more likely (p < 0.01) to report a usual source of care (67% vs. 79%), health insurance coverage (66% vs. 80%) and physical examination (43% vs. 48%). Religion raised was not associated with testicular exams, STD counseling or HIV testing. In multivariate analyses controlling for confounders, significant associations of religion raised with insurance coverage, a physician as usual source of care and physical examination remained which varied by race/ethnicity. In conclusion, although religion is a core aspect of culture that deserves further study as a possible determinant of health care utilization, we were not able to document any consistent pattern of significant association even in a population with high rates of religious participation.

  17. Access to Health Care for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities from Minority Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichard, Amanda; Sacco,Therese Marie; Turnbull, H. Rutherford, III

    2004-01-01

    In this project we examined access to health care by individuals with developmental disabilities in Kansas from low income populations and from minority backgrounds. Four criteria for determining access were employed: availability, accessibility, affordability, and appropriateness of care. Factors that pose barriers and that facilitate access are…

  18. Institutional Change for Improving Accessibility in the Design and Delivery of Distance Learning--The Role of Faculty Accessibility Specialists at the Open University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Rachel; Pearson, Victoria K.; Warren, James P.; Forbes, Tina

    2015-01-01

    The Open University (OU) has an established infrastructure for supporting disabled students. Historically, the thrust of this has focused on providing accessible adjustments post-production. In 2012, the OU implemented securing greater accessibility (SeGA) to raise awareness and bring about an institutional change to curriculum design so that the…

  19. Pediatric Specialists

    MedlinePlus

    ... Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... Life Medical Home Health Insurance Pediatric Specialists Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ...

  20. Nurses' opinions about a web-based distance course in a specialist education programme for the care of older people: a questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Häggström, Elisabeth; Hofsten, Anna; Wadensten, Barbro

    2009-09-01

    Aim.  The aim of the present study was to investigate students' opinions about a web-based distance learning course that was part of a specialist education programme. Background.  Most registered nurses (RNs) who work with older people in Sweden do not have a specialist education in caring for older people. Design.  Survey. Method.  The study was a descriptive survey with both qualitative and quantitative questions. Results.  The students found the web-based course very useful for their theoretical and professional development. New perspectives on ageing, increased knowledge about analysing and describing theories as well as practising interviews and qualitative analysis as methods were appreciated by the students. Conclusions.  One way for RNs in Sweden to get a university specialist education in the care of older people is to have a distance web-based course, as it allows flexibility and improves the students' theoretical and professional knowledge and communication skills. Relevance for clinical practice.  Managers working in care for older people settings and educators will be interested in this study's finding that distance learning is a useful strategy for providing education for RNs who work with older people.

  1. Canadian experiences in telehealth: equalizing access to quality care.

    PubMed

    Jennett, P A; Person, V L; Watson, M; Watanabe, M

    2000-01-01

    The Canadian Conference "TExpo'98: Interactive Health" focused on four telehealth themes: community needs, Canadian experiences, industry perspectives, and access/security/interoperability issues. Health and socioeconomic needs have been the driving force behind telehealth initiatives; telelearning is one of the major Canadian initiatives. To encourage Canadian telehealth initiatives, the federal government is building a national health infrastructure. One element in this framework is concerned with empowering the public, strengthening health care services, and ensuring accountability. Technological advancements and innovative partnerships among health communities, government, users, professional bodies, and industry are critical to continued growth. Key issues including access, evaluation, implementation, privacy, confidentiality, security, and interoperability are of universal concern to participants. Research that examines the benefits and costs of telehealth is needed.

  2. [Ethics in pediatric emergencies: Care access, communication, and confidentiality].

    PubMed

    Benoit, J; Berdah, L; Carlier-Gonod, A; Guillou, T; Kouche, C; Patte, M; Schneider, M; Talcone, S; Chappuy, H

    2015-05-01

    Children suffer most from today's increasing precariousness. In France, access to care is available for all children through various structures and existing measures. The support for foreign children is overseen by specific legislation often unfamiliar to caregivers. Pediatric emergencies, their location, organization, actors, and patient flow are a particular environment that is not always suitable to communication and may lead to situations of abuse. Communication should not be forgotten because of the urgency of the situation. The place of the child in the dialogue is often forgotten. Considering the triangular relationship, listening to the child and involving the parents in care are the basis for a good therapeutic alliance. Privacy and medical confidentiality in pediatric emergencies are governed by law. However, changes in treatments and medical practices along with the variety of actors involved imply both individual and collective limitations, to the detriment of medical confidentiality.

  3. Global access to antenatal care: a qualitative perspective.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, Kenneth

    2015-02-01

    Global strategies to reduce maternal mortality include the ambitious goal of achieving universal access to antenatal care by 2015. This target is unlikely to be achieved, especially in developing countries where antenatal coverage is often less than 50 per cent. Although much is known about the types of women who do not engage with antenatal services, there is limited information about their reasons for non-attendance. By summarising a variety of findings from qualitative studies, this article seeks to identify relevant issues. It highlights some of the problems of applying a standardised model of antenatal care in countries where resources are limited and belief systems are at odds with westernised understandings of pregnancy and childbirth. PMID:26333245

  4. Primary care access improvement: an empowerment-interaction model.

    PubMed

    Ledlow, G R; Bradshaw, D M; Shockley, C

    2000-05-01

    Improving community primary care access is a difficult and dynamic undertaking. Realizing a need to improve appointment availability, a systematic approach based on measurement, empowerment, and interaction was developed. The model fostered exchange of information and problem solving between interdependent staff sections within a managed care system. Measuring appointments demanded but not available proved to be a credible customer-focused approach to benchmark against set goals. Changing the organizational culture to become more sensitive to changing beneficiary needs was a paramount consideration. Dependent-group t tests were performed to compare the pretreatment and posttreatment effect. The empowerment-interaction model significantly improved the availability of routine and wellness-type appointments. The availability of urgent appointments improved but not significantly; a better prospective model needs to be developed. In aggregate, appointments demanded but not available (empowerment-interaction model) were more than 10% before the treatment and less than 3% with the treatment. PMID:10826388

  5. Perceptions of people living with HIV/AIDS regarding access to health care.

    PubMed

    Vaswani, Vina; Vaswani, Ravi

    2014-04-01

    Although the health care is replete with technology in the present day, it is not freely accessible in a developing country. The situation could be even more compromised in the case of people living with HIV/AIDS, with the added dimension of stigma and discrimination. What are the factors that act as barriers to health care? This study was conducted to look into perceptions of people living with HIV/AIDS with regard to access to health care. The study looked into accessibility of general health vis-à-vis access to antiretroviral therapy. Demographic variables like age, gender, income were studied in relation to factors such as counseling, confidentiality, stigma and discrimination, which are known to influence access to health care. People living with HIV/AIDS perceive general health care as more accessible than care for HIV treatment. Discrimination by health care workers causes a barrier to accessibility.

  6. Improving Access to Eye Care: Teleophthalmology in Alberta, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Ng, ManCho; Nathoo, Nawaaz; Rudnisky, Chris J.; Tennant, Matthew T. S.

    2009-01-01

    Backround Diabetic retinopathy in Alberta and throughout Canada is common, with a prevalence up to 40% in people with diabetes. Unfortunately, due to travel distance, time, and expense, a third of patients with diabetes do not receive annual dilated eye examinations by ophthalmologists, despite universal health care access. In an effort to improve access, a teleophthalmology program was developed to overcome barriers to eye care. Prior to clinical implementation, teleophthalmology technology was clinically validated for the identification of treatable levels of diabetic retinopathy. Method Patients undergoing a teleophthalmology assessment underwent stereoscopic digital retinal photographs following pupillary dilation. Digital images were then packaged into an encrypted password-protected compressed file for uploading onto a secure server. Images were digitally unpackaged for review as a stereoscopic digital slide show and graded with a modified Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study algorithm. Reports were then generated automatically as a PDF file and sent back to the referring physician. Results Teleophthalmology programs in Alberta have assessed more than 5500 patients (9016 visits) to date. Nine hundred thirty patients have been referred for additional testing or treatment. Approximately 2% of teleophthalmology assessments have required referral for in-person examination due to ungradable image sets, most commonly due to cataract, corneal drying, or asteroid hyalosis. Conclusions In Alberta and throughout Canada, many patients with diabetes do not receive an annual dilated eye examination. Teleophthalmology is beneficial because patients can be assessed within their own communities. This decreases the time to treatment, allows treated patients to be followed remotely, and prevents unnecessary referrals. Health care costs may be reduced by the introduction of comprehensive teleophthalmology examinations by enabling testing and treatment to be planned prior

  7. Optometry Specialist (AFSC 91255).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kille, Michael O.

    This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for optometry specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are optometry clinic administration (optometry career and field training, ethical relationships and professionalism, eligibility for optometric care and appointment…

  8. Patient-centred access to health care: conceptualising access at the interface of health systems and populations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Access is central to the performance of health care systems around the world. However, access to health care remains a complex notion as exemplified in the variety of interpretations of the concept across authors. The aim of this paper is to suggest a conceptualisation of access to health care describing broad dimensions and determinants that integrate demand and supply-side-factors and enabling the operationalisation of access to health care all along the process of obtaining care and benefiting from the services. Methods A synthesis of the published literature on the conceptualisation of access has been performed. The most cited frameworks served as a basis to develop a revised conceptual framework. Results Here, we view access as the opportunity to identify healthcare needs, to seek healthcare services, to reach, to obtain or use health care services, and to actually have a need for services fulfilled. We conceptualise five dimensions of accessibility: 1) Approachability; 2) Acceptability; 3) Availability and accommodation; 4) Affordability; 5) Appropriateness. In this framework, five corresponding abilities of populations interact with the dimensions of accessibility to generate access. Five corollary dimensions of abilities include: 1) Ability to perceive; 2) Ability to seek; 3) Ability to reach; 4) Ability to pay; and 5) Ability to engage. Conclusions This paper explains the comprehensiveness and dynamic nature of this conceptualisation of access to care and identifies relevant determinants that can have an impact on access from a multilevel perspective where factors related to health systems, institutions, organisations and providers are considered with factors at the individual, household, community, and population levels. PMID:23496984

  9. DOD Health Care. Issues Involving Military Nurse Specialists. Report to the Honorable Daniel K. Inouye, U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    Selected Department of Defense (DOD) policies were examined concerning nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners, particularly in regard to the extent to which these nurse specialists are allowed an independent scope of practice in military hospitals and the degree of physician supervision they require. Discussions were held with…

  10. Adolescent health care: improving access by school-based service.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, C; Mulligan, D; Kaufman, A; Davis, S; Hunt, K; Kalishman, N; Wallerstein, N

    1985-10-01

    Participants in this discussion of the potential of school-based health care services for adolescents included family medicine physicians, school health coordinators, a school nurse, and a community worker. It was noted that health care for adolescents tends to be either inaccessible or underutilized, largely because of a lack of sensitivity to adolescent culture and values. An ideal service for adolescents would offer immediate services for crises, strict confidentiality, ready access to prescribed medications, a sliding-scale scheme, and a staff that is tolerant of divergent values and life-styles. School-based pilot adolescent clinics have been established by the University of New Mexico's Department of Family, Community, and Emergency Medicine to test the community-oriented health care model. On-site clinics provide urgent medical care, family planning, pregnancy testing, psychological counseling, alcohol and drug counseling, and classroom health education. Experience with these programs has demonstrated the necessity for an alliance among the health team and the school administration, parents, and students. Financial, ethical, and political factors can serve as constraints to school-based programs. In some cases, school administrators have been resistant to the provision of contraception to students on school grounds and parents have been unwilling to accept the adolescent's right to confidentiality. These problems in part stem from having 2 separate systems, each with its own values, orientation, and responsibilities, housed in 1 facility. In addition, there have been problems generating awareness of the school-based clinic among students. Health education theater groups, peer counseling, and student-run community services have been effective, however, in increasing student participation. It has been helpful to mold clinic services to meet the needs identified by teenagers themselves. There is an interest not only in curative services, but in services focused

  11. Geographic access to cancer care: a disparity and a solution.

    PubMed

    Ahamad, Anesa

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND The rising cancer incidence in developing countries outpaces easy access to care. Time and effort spent on travel for care is a burden to patients and detracts from patient centredness, efficiency, and equitability. In Trinidad and Tobago, significant distress was observed among patients who made long journeys to the single public cancer clinic. The journey time among non-radiotherapy patients was measured. METHODS Over 19 weekdays in June 2007, the study assessed estimated travel time per visit (ETT), reason for visit for care, and number of visits per patient during their treatment course up to the time of study, and compared the findings with ETT to nearest centres for the US population. RESULTS 1447 episodes of care utilised 5296 h of patient travel time. Median ETT was 3.75 h (IQR 2-5 h, range 0.5-9 h). 74.1% of patients spent 2.25-9 h ETT. 44% of patients spent >4 h ETT. Median number of visits per patient was 34 (IQR 23-43; range 13-62). Median total ETT per patient was 127.5 h. Median ETT to the centre (1.75 h) was eight times greater than in the USA (13 min). More than 70% of patients attended for reasons other than chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS Cancer patients endured a burden of long travel times in 2007. The prevailing policy of the Ministry of Health to build a single centralised modern centre would not have alleviated this burden. Based on these findings, three outlying cancer clinics were created which now provide non-radiotherapy oncology management of patients nearer their homes.

  12. Accessing maternity care in rural Canada: there's more to the story than distance to a doctor.

    PubMed

    Sutherns, Rebecca; Bourgeault, Ivy Lynn

    2008-09-01

    Drawing upon a comparative, qualitative study of the experiences of rural women accessing maternity care in two Canadian provinces, we demonstrate that availability of services, having economic and informational resources to access the services offered, and the appropriateness of those services in terms of gender, continuity of care, confidentiality, quality of care, and cultural fit are key to an accurate understanding of health care access. We explore the implications of living rurally on each of these dimensions, thereby revealing both gaps in and solutions to rural maternity care access that narrower, proximity-based definitions miss. PMID:18726796

  13. Perceived Barriers to Health Care Access among Rural Older Adults: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, R. Turner; Williams, Kimberly A.; Carter, Mary W.; Spencer, S. Melinda; Solovieva, Tatiana

    2005-01-01

    Context: Many rural elders experience limited access to health care. The majority of what we know about this issue has been based upon quantitative studies, yet qualitative studies might offer additional insight into individual perceptions of health care access. Purpose: To examine what barriers rural elders report when accessing needed health…

  14. Perceived Barriers to Health Care Access Among Rural Older Adults: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goins, R. Turner; Williams, Kimberly A.; Carter, Mary W.; Spencer, S. Melinda; Solovieva, Tatiana

    2005-01-01

    Context: Many rural elders experience limited access to health care. The majority of what we know about this issue has been based upon quantitative studies, yet qualitative studies might offer additional insight into individual perceptions of health care access. Purpose: To examine what barriers rural elders report when accessing needed health…

  15. Telecommunications Specialist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This publication contains 17 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of telecommunications specialist, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 17 units are as…

  16. Accounting Specialist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This publication identifies 20 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of accounting specialist, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 20 units are as follows:…

  17. Universal access to health care: a practical perspective.

    PubMed

    Battistella, R M; Kuder, J M

    1993-01-01

    Policy disconnected from economic reality is bad policy. Neither government financed health insurance nor an employer mandated health insurance approach are in the national interest. Higher national priorities compel a reallocation of resources from consumption to investment. This need not, however, cause an abandonment of efforts to deal with the problems of the uninsured and other health reforms. Successful health care reform is achievable provided it is responsive to higher priorities for economic growth. A strong economy and the production of wealth are indispensable to economic justice. Toward this end, a program of universal access is proposed whereby families and individuals are required to pay for their own health insurance up to a fixed percentage of disposable personal income before public payments kick in. Government's chief role is to establish a standard package of cost-effective benefits to be offered by all insurance carriers, the cost of which is approximately 40 percent less than conventional insurance coverage because of the elimination of reimbursement for clinically non-efficacious and cost-ineffective services. Public financing is relegated to a residual role in which subsidies are targeted on the needy. Much of the momentum for cost control is transferred to consumers and private insurers, both of whom acquire a vested interest in obtaining value for money. Uniform rules for underwriting, eligibility, and enrollment practices guard against socially harmful practices such as experience rating and exclusion of preexisting conditions. The household responsibility and equity plan described herein could free up as much as $90 billion or more for public investment in economic growth and national debt reduction while assuring access to health care regardless of ability to pay. Economic revitalization will be assisted by changes in household savings. With health care no longer a free good and government social programs concentrated on the truly needy

  18. Improved Maternal and Child Health Care Access in a Rural Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carcillo, Joseph A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an underserved rural community in which health care initiatives increased access to comprehensive care. Over a 3-year period, increased accessibility to maternal and child health care also increased use of preventive services, thus decreasing emergency room visits and hospitalizations as well as low birth weight, risk of congenital…

  19. Childhood Immunization and Access to Health Care: Evidence From Nepal.

    PubMed

    Devkota, Satis; Panda, Bibhudutta

    2016-03-01

    This article examines the effect of access to health care center, in terms of travel time, on childhood immunization in Nepal using the 2004 and 2011 waves of the Nepal Living Standards Measurement Surveys. We employ probit and instrumental variable probit estimation methods to estimate the causal effect of travel time on the probability of immunization. Results indicate that travel time to the nearest health center displays a significant negative association with the probability of immunization (coefficient = -0.015,P< .05). Furthermore, the effect of travel time tends to be stronger in rural and distant areas of Nepal's mountain and hill regions. The results suggest that policy interventions should increase the number of mobile clinics in rural villages and provide conditional cash transfer to incentivize immunization coverage at the household level. In addition, household income, parental education, ethnicity, and household location emerge as important determinants of immunization in Nepal. PMID:26809971

  20. Access to dental care: a call for innovation.

    PubMed

    Manski, R J

    2001-01-01

    For many Americans dentistry not only works but works very well. Most Americans receive the care that they need and want. However, dentistry's success has not been whole or uniform and it has not reached every corner of America. In a society as prosperous as our, it is incumbent upon us, as a profession to help make sure that dentistry's success is accessible to each and every American. While recent efforts to address dental services use disparities may result in some improvements, most likely no single national effort will be globally effective. New ideas, including innovations that are local in design and market sensitive, will be needed to make the kinds of improvements that are desired. PMID:11764632

  1. Childhood Immunization and Access to Health Care: Evidence From Nepal.

    PubMed

    Devkota, Satis; Panda, Bibhudutta

    2016-03-01

    This article examines the effect of access to health care center, in terms of travel time, on childhood immunization in Nepal using the 2004 and 2011 waves of the Nepal Living Standards Measurement Surveys. We employ probit and instrumental variable probit estimation methods to estimate the causal effect of travel time on the probability of immunization. Results indicate that travel time to the nearest health center displays a significant negative association with the probability of immunization (coefficient = -0.015,P< .05). Furthermore, the effect of travel time tends to be stronger in rural and distant areas of Nepal's mountain and hill regions. The results suggest that policy interventions should increase the number of mobile clinics in rural villages and provide conditional cash transfer to incentivize immunization coverage at the household level. In addition, household income, parental education, ethnicity, and household location emerge as important determinants of immunization in Nepal.

  2. Access to care for autism-related services.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kathleen C; Ellis, Alan R; McLaurin, Carolyn; Daniels, Julie; Morrissey, Joseph P

    2007-11-01

    This paper identifies family characteristics associated with use of autism-related services. A telephone or in-person survey was completed during 2003-2005 by 383 North Carolina families with a child 11 years old or younger with ASD. Access to care is limited for racial and ethnic minority families, with low parental education, living in nonmetropolitan areas, and not following a major treatment approach. Service use is more likely when parents have higher stress. Families use a broad array of services; the mix varies with child ASD diagnosis and age group. Disparities in service use associated with race, residence and education point to the need to develop policy, practice and family-level interventions that can address barriers to services for children with ASD.

  3. Regionalization of services improves access to emergency vascular surgical care.

    PubMed

    Roche-Nagle, G; Bachynski, K; Nathens, A B; Angoulvant, D; Rubin, B B

    2013-04-01

    Management of vascular surgical emergencies requires rapid access to a vascular surgeon and hospital with the infrastructure necessary to manage vascular emergencies. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of regionalization of vascular surgery services in Toronto to University Health Network (UHN) and St Michael's Hospital (SMH) on the ability of CritiCall Ontario to transfer patients with life- and limb-threatening vascular emergencies for definitive care. A retrospective review of the CritiCall Ontario database was used to assess the outcome of all calls to CritiCall regarding patients with vascular disease from April 2003 to March 2010. The number of patients with vascular emergencies referred via CritiCall and accepted in transfer by the vascular centers at UHN or SMH increased 500% between 1 April 2003-31 December 2005 and 1 January 2006-31 March 2010. Together, the vascular centers at UHN and SMH accepted 94.8% of the 1002 vascular surgery patients referred via CritiCall from other hospitals between 1 January 2006 and 31 March 2010, and 72% of these patients originated in hospitals outside of the Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network. Across Ontario, the number of physicians contacted before a patient was accepted in transfer fell from 2.9 ± 0.4 before to 1.7 ± 0.3 after the vascular centers opened. In conclusion, the vascular surgery centers at UHN and SMH have become provincial resources that enable the efficient transfer of patients with vascular surgical emergencies from across Ontario. Regionalization of services is a viable model to increase access to emergent care. PMID:23508395

  4. Specialist Bibliographic Databases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Specialist bibliographic databases offer essential online tools for researchers and authors who work on specific subjects and perform comprehensive and systematic syntheses of evidence. This article presents examples of the established specialist databases, which may be of interest to those engaged in multidisciplinary science communication. Access to most specialist databases is through subscription schemes and membership in professional associations. Several aggregators of information and database vendors, such as EBSCOhost and ProQuest, facilitate advanced searches supported by specialist keyword thesauri. Searches of items through specialist databases are complementary to those through multidisciplinary research platforms, such as PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Familiarizing with the functional characteristics of biomedical and nonbiomedical bibliographic search tools is mandatory for researchers, authors, editors, and publishers. The database users are offered updates of the indexed journal lists, abstracts, author profiles, and links to other metadata. Editors and publishers may find particularly useful source selection criteria and apply for coverage of their peer-reviewed journals and grey literature sources. These criteria are aimed at accepting relevant sources with established editorial policies and quality controls. PMID:27134485

  5. Specialist Bibliographic Databases.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A; Trukhachev, Vladimir I; Kostyukova, Elena I; Gerasimov, Alexey N; Kitas, George D

    2016-05-01

    Specialist bibliographic databases offer essential online tools for researchers and authors who work on specific subjects and perform comprehensive and systematic syntheses of evidence. This article presents examples of the established specialist databases, which may be of interest to those engaged in multidisciplinary science communication. Access to most specialist databases is through subscription schemes and membership in professional associations. Several aggregators of information and database vendors, such as EBSCOhost and ProQuest, facilitate advanced searches supported by specialist keyword thesauri. Searches of items through specialist databases are complementary to those through multidisciplinary research platforms, such as PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Familiarizing with the functional characteristics of biomedical and nonbiomedical bibliographic search tools is mandatory for researchers, authors, editors, and publishers. The database users are offered updates of the indexed journal lists, abstracts, author profiles, and links to other metadata. Editors and publishers may find particularly useful source selection criteria and apply for coverage of their peer-reviewed journals and grey literature sources. These criteria are aimed at accepting relevant sources with established editorial policies and quality controls. PMID:27134485

  6. Specialist Bibliographic Databases.

    PubMed

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A; Trukhachev, Vladimir I; Kostyukova, Elena I; Gerasimov, Alexey N; Kitas, George D

    2016-05-01

    Specialist bibliographic databases offer essential online tools for researchers and authors who work on specific subjects and perform comprehensive and systematic syntheses of evidence. This article presents examples of the established specialist databases, which may be of interest to those engaged in multidisciplinary science communication. Access to most specialist databases is through subscription schemes and membership in professional associations. Several aggregators of information and database vendors, such as EBSCOhost and ProQuest, facilitate advanced searches supported by specialist keyword thesauri. Searches of items through specialist databases are complementary to those through multidisciplinary research platforms, such as PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Familiarizing with the functional characteristics of biomedical and nonbiomedical bibliographic search tools is mandatory for researchers, authors, editors, and publishers. The database users are offered updates of the indexed journal lists, abstracts, author profiles, and links to other metadata. Editors and publishers may find particularly useful source selection criteria and apply for coverage of their peer-reviewed journals and grey literature sources. These criteria are aimed at accepting relevant sources with established editorial policies and quality controls.

  7. An audit to assess the perspectives of U.S. wound care specialists regarding the importance of proteases in wound healing and wound assessment.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Robert J; Cullen, Breda; Nisbet, Lorraine T

    2013-12-01

    Chronic wounds represent an aberrant biochemistry that creates a toxic proteolytic milieu which can be detrimental to the healing process. Rebalancing the wound microenvironment and addressing elevated protease activity (EPA) could therefore help facilitate healing. To understand how clinicians currently diagnose and manage excessive proteolytic activity, 183 survey responses from US wound specialists were collated and analysed to find out their perceptions on the role of proteases. The majority of respondents (>98%) believed proteases were important in wound healing and that a point-of-care (POC) protease test could be useful. This study yielded a low response rate (7.1%, n = 183); however, there were adequate data to draw significant conclusions. Specialists perceived that fibrin, slough, granulation tissue and rolled wound edges could indicate EPA. About 43% of respondents, however, failed to give a correct response when asked to review photographs to determine if excessive protease activity was present, and the perceived visual signs for EPA did not correlate with the wounds that had EPA; no statistical differences between professions were observed. Respondents chose debridement, wound cleansing and advanced therapies as important in reducing excessive protease activity. It was concluded that specialists have a need for POC diagnostic tests. On the basis of the responses to wound photos, it was determined that there were no visual cues clinicians could use in determining excessive protease activity. Additional research is recommended to evaluate the efficacy of a POC diagnostic test for protease activity and the treatments and therapies applied when EPA is found.

  8. Unregulated access to health-care services is associated with overutilization--lessons from Austria.

    PubMed

    Pichlhöfer, Otto; Maier, Manfred

    2015-06-01

    The Austrian health-care system is characterized by free provider choice and uncontrolled access to all levels of care. Using primary data, the ECOHCARE study shows that hospitalization rates for the secondary and tertiary care levels in Austria are both 4.4 times higher than those reported from the USA using a similar methodology. At the same time, essential functions of the primary care sector are weak. We propose that regulating access to secondary and tertiary care and restricting free provider choice to the primary care level would both reverse over utilization and strengthen the primary care sector.

  9. The feasibility and acceptability of conducting a trial of specialist medical care and the Lightning Process in children with chronic fatigue syndrome: feasibility randomized controlled trial (SMILE study)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) or myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) is relatively common in children with limited evidence for treatment. The Phil Parker Lightning Process (LP) is a trademarked intervention, which >250 children use annually. There are no reported studies investigating the effectiveness or possible side effects of LP. Methods The trial population was drawn from the Bath and Bristol NHS specialist paediatric CFS or ME service. The study was designed as a pilot randomized trial with children (aged 12 to 18 years) comparing specialist medical care with specialist medical care plus the Lightning Process. Integrated qualitative methodology was used to explore the feasibility and acceptability of the recruitment, randomization and interventions. Results A total of 56 children were recruited from 156 eligible children (1 October 2010 to 16 June 2012). Recruitment, randomization and both interventions were feasible and acceptable. Participants suggested changes to improve feasibility and acceptability and we incorporated the following in the trial protocol: stopped collecting 6-week outcomes; introduced a second reminder letter; used phone calls to collect primary outcomes from nonresponders; informed participants about different approaches of each intervention and changed our recommendation for the primary outcome for the full study from school attendance to disability (SF-36 physical function subscale) and fatigue (Chalder Fatigue Scale). Conclusions Conducting randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to investigate an alternative treatment such as LP is feasible and acceptable for children with CFS or ME. Feasibility studies that incorporate qualitative methodology enable changes to be made to trial protocols to improve acceptability to participants. This is likely to improve recruitment rate and trial retention. Trial registration Feasibility study first randomization: 29 September 2010. Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN81456207

  10. Translating social justice into clinical nurse specialist practice.

    PubMed

    Bell, Sue Ellen; Hulbert, James R

    2008-01-01

    Translating social justice into clinical nurse specialist (CNS) practice involves not only facilitating equitable access to healthcare resources but also changing the definition of health from individual centric to population based. Clinical nurse specialists working within hospitals or healthcare systems generally have not explored the ethical conflicts between demand and available healthcare resources. Application of social justice to CNS practice requires microallocation decisions in direct patient care and macroallocation decisions in the distribution of all societal goods that alleviate health disparities. This article reviews the meaning, history, and current basis for the application of the principle of social justice to CNS practice.

  11. Acceptable Care? Illness Constructions, Healthworlds, and Accessible Chronic Treatment in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Bronwyn; Eyles, John; Moshabela, Mosa

    2015-01-01

    Achieving equitable access to health care is an important policy goal, with access influenced by affordability, availability, and acceptability of specific services. We explore patient narratives from a 5-year program of research on health care access to examine relationships between social constructions of illness and the acceptability of health services in the context of tuberculosis treatment and antiretroviral therapy in South Africa. Acceptability of services seems particularly important to the meanings patients attach to illness and care, whereas—conversely—these constructions appear to influence what constitutes acceptability and hence affect access to care. We highlight the underestimated role of individually, socially, and politically constructed healthworlds; traditional and biomedical beliefs; and social support networks. Suggested policy implications for improving acceptability and hence overall health care access include abandoning patronizing approaches to care and refocusing from treating “disease” to responding to “illness” by acknowledging and incorporating patients’ healthworlds in patient–provider interactions. PMID:25829509

  12. AccessMod 3.0: computing geographic coverage and accessibility to health care services using anisotropic movement of patients

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Nicolas; Ebener, Steeve

    2008-01-01

    Background Access to health care can be described along four dimensions: geographic accessibility, availability, financial accessibility and acceptability. Geographic accessibility measures how physically accessible resources are for the population, while availability reflects what resources are available and in what amount. Combining these two types of measure into a single index provides a measure of geographic (or spatial) coverage, which is an important measure for assessing the degree of accessibility of a health care network. Results This paper describes the latest version of AccessMod, an extension to the Geographical Information System ArcView 3.×, and provides an example of application of this tool. AccessMod 3 allows one to compute geographic coverage to health care using terrain information and population distribution. Four major types of analysis are available in AccessMod: (1) modeling the coverage of catchment areas linked to an existing health facility network based on travel time, to provide a measure of physical accessibility to health care; (2) modeling geographic coverage according to the availability of services; (3) projecting the coverage of a scaling-up of an existing network; (4) providing information for cost effectiveness analysis when little information about the existing network is available. In addition to integrating travelling time, population distribution and the population coverage capacity specific to each health facility in the network, AccessMod can incorporate the influence of landscape components (e.g. topography, river and road networks, vegetation) that impact travelling time to and from facilities. Topographical constraints can be taken into account through an anisotropic analysis that considers the direction of movement. We provide an example of the application of AccessMod in the southern part of Malawi that shows the influences of the landscape constraints and of the modes of transportation on geographic coverage

  13. Do gerontology nurse specialists make a difference in hospitalization of long-term care residents? Results of a randomized comparison trial.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Michal; Armstrong, Delwyn; Parker, Janet; Pilcher, Carole; Zhou, Lifeng; McKenzie-Green, Barbara; Connolly, Martin J

    2014-10-01

    Residents of long-term care facilities have highly complex care needs and quality of care is of international concern. Maintaining resident wellness through proactive assessment and early intervention is key to decreasing the need for acute hospitalization. The Residential Aged Care Integration Program (RACIP) is a quality improvement intervention to support residential aged care staff and includes on-site support, education, clinical coaching, and care coordination provided by gerontology nurse specialists (GNSs) employed by a large district health board. The effect of the outreach program was evaluated through a randomized comparison of hospitalization 1 year before and after program implementation. The sample included 29 intervention facilities (1,425 residents) and 25 comparison facilities (1,128 residents) receiving usual care. Acute hospitalization rate unexpectedly increased for both groups after program implementation, although the rate of increase was significantly less for the intervention facilities. The hospitalization rate after the intervention increased 59% for the comparison group and 16% for the intervention group (rate ratio (RR) = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.61-0.86, P < .001). Subgroup analysis showed a significantly lower rate change for those admitted for medical reasons for the intervention group (13% increase) than the comparison group (69% increase) (RR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.56-0.82, P < .001). Conversely, there was no significant difference in the RR for surgical admissions between the intervention and comparison groups (RR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.68-1.46, P = .99). The integration of GNS expertise through the RACIP intervention may be one approach to support staff to provide optimal care and potentially improve resident health. PMID:25283552

  14. A Program to Improve Access to Health Care Among Mexican Immigrants in Rural Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz-Perez, Maria de Jesus; Farley, Tillman; Cabanis, Clara Martin

    2004-01-01

    Migration to the United States from Mexico is increasing every year. Mexican immigrants tend to be poor, uninsured, monolingual Spanish speakers without adequate access to appropriate medical care. As a further barrier, many are also undocumented. This article describes a program developed to improve access to health care among Mexican immigrants…

  15. Access to Transportation and Health Care Utilization in a Rural Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Preisser, John S.; Gesler, Wilbert M.; Powers, James M.

    2005-01-01

    Access to transportation to transverse the large distances between residences and health services in rural settings is a necessity. However, little research has examined directly access to transportation in analyses of rural health care utilization. This analysis addresses the association of transportation and health care utilization in a rural…

  16. Access to and Use of Eye Care Services in Rural Arkansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilmer, Greta; Bynum, LaTonya; Balamurugan, Appathurai

    2010-01-01

    Context: Rural residents are more likely to be uninsured and have low income. Purpose: To determine if rural residents in Arkansas have decreased access to eye care services and use them less frequently than urban residents. Methods: Data from the 2006 Visual Impairment and Access to Eye Care Module from the Arkansas Behavioral Risk Factor…

  17. Evaluation of Access, a Primary Care Program for Indigent Patients: Inpatient and Emergency Room Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Richard A.; Giancola, Angela; Gast, Andrea; Ho, Janice; Waddell, Rhondda

    2003-01-01

    Evaluated the impact of Accessing Community Care through Eastside Social Services (ACCESS), a program that provided indigent patients with free primary care, on inpatient admissions, emergency room (ER) visits, and subsequent charges. Data on 19 people before and after program enrollment showed significant decreases in ER visits following…

  18. Differences in Access to Care among Students Using School-Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parasuraman, Sarika Rane; Shi, Leiyu

    2015-01-01

    Health care reform has changed the landscape for the nation's health safety net, and school-based health centers (SBHCs) remain an important part of this system. However, few large-scale studies have been conducted to assess their impact on access to care. This study investigated differences in access among a nationally representative sample of…

  19. Influence of Place of Residence in Access to Specialized Cancer Care for African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onega, Tracy; Duell, Eric J.; Shi, Xun; Demidenko, Eugene; Goodman, David

    2010-01-01

    Context: Disparities in cancer care for rural residents and for African Americans have been documented, but the interaction of these factors is not well understood. Purpose: The authors examined the simultaneous influence of race and place of residence on access to and utilization of specialized cancer care in the United States. Methods: Access to…

  20. The Promise Clinic: a service learning approach to increasing access to health care.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Manuel; Tan-Billet, Jennifer; Babineau, John; Jimenez, Jennifer Endres; Billet, Todd; Flash, Charlene; Levin, Steven; West, Bernadette; Tallia, Alfred

    2008-08-01

    The goal of the Promise Clinic (a project of an academic medical center and a local social services group) is to increase access to primary care for an underserved population while addressing deficiencies in medical education. Students manage common primary care problems, creating access for this mostly uninsured population.

  1. A fast track path improves access to palliative care for people with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Whitington, Jane; Ma, Peng

    People with learning disabilities often experience inequalities in accessing general health services. This group, their families and carers need access to effective palliative care when facing a life limiting illness. This article describes the development and implementation of a fast track referral pathway for people with learning disabilities at St Francis Hospice in Essex. Our aim is to share this pathway so others can replicate the collaborative working to improve access to palliative care services for this group. PMID:20514883

  2. Equity in specialist waiting times by socioeconomic groups: evidence from Spain.

    PubMed

    Abásolo, Ignacio; Negrín-Hernández, Miguel A; Pinilla, Jaime

    2014-04-01

    In countries with publicly financed health care systems, waiting time--rather than price--is the rationing mechanism for access to health care services. The normative statement underlying such a rationing device is that patients should wait according to need and irrespective of socioeconomic status or other non-need characteristics. The aim of this paper is to test empirically that waiting times for publicly funded specialist care do not depend on patients' socioeconomic status. Waiting times for specialist care can vary according to the type of medical specialty, type of consultation (review or diagnosis) and the region where patients' reside. In order to take into account such variability, we use Bayesian random parameter models to explain waiting times for specialist care in terms of need and non-need variables. We find that individuals with lower education and income levels wait significantly more time than their counterparts.

  3. Healthcare organizational change: implications for access to care and its measurement.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R. H.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To summarize evidence from peer-reviewed literature on access to care for vulnerable HMO enrollee populations; to discuss the potential effect of recent HMO and physician organization changes on access to care and its measurement. STUDY DESIGN: Review and summary of peer-reviewed literature for two HMO populations: those with chronic conditions and diseases, and those subject to discrimination due to income, color, or ethnic background. I also reviewed and summarized literature on three major changes in capitated organizations (HMOs and capitated physician organizations) that could affect access to care for vulnerable populations, and summarized findings from healthcare manager interviews conducted for several recent research projects on health system change. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Although mixed, there are enough negative results to raise some concerns about access to care for HMO enrollees with chronic conditions and diseases. Several emerging organizational changes have the potential to change access to care for the vulnerable HMO enrollees. The shift in cost-cutting from fragmented clinical management of specific services at a point in time toward more integrated clinical management of all services for specific types of patients across time may improve access to care, as may increased efforts to attract and retain HMO enrollees. The increased importance of capitated provider organizations within the health system may restrict access in some ways, and expand access in others. CONCLUSIONS: Organizational changes can affect both access to care and its measurement. More research is needed on the effects of these changes on access to care and quality of care. For researchers examining access to care for vulnerable HMO enrollee populations, these changes create challenges to determine the most appropriate measures of access to care, and the most appropriate organizations and organizational characteristics to measure. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE

  4. Protocol for the PACE trial: A randomised controlled trial of adaptive pacing, cognitive behaviour therapy, and graded exercise as supplements to standardised specialist medical care versus standardised specialist medical care alone for patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis or encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    White, Peter D; Sharpe, Michael C; Chalder, Trudie; DeCesare, Julia C; Walwyn, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS, also called myalgic encephalomyelitis/encephalopathy or ME) is a debilitating condition with no known cause or cure. Improvement may occur with medical care and additional therapies of pacing, cognitive behavioural therapy and graded exercise therapy. The latter two therapies have been found to be efficacious in small trials, but patient organisations' surveys have reported adverse effects. Although pacing has been advocated by patient organisations, it lacks empirical support. Specialist medical care is commonly provided but its efficacy when given alone is not established. This trial compares the efficacy of the additional therapies when added to specialist medical care against specialist medical care alone. Methods/Design 600 patients, who meet operationalised diagnostic criteria for CFS, will be recruited from secondary care into a randomised trial of four treatments, stratified by current comorbid depressive episode and different CFS/ME criteria. The four treatments are standardised specialist medical care either given alone, or with adaptive pacing therapy or cognitive behaviour therapy or graded exercise therapy. Supplementary therapies will involve fourteen sessions over 23 weeks and a 'booster session' at 36 weeks. Outcome will be assessed at 12, 24, and 52 weeks after randomisation. Two primary outcomes of self-rated fatigue and physical function will assess differential effects of each treatment on these measures. Secondary outcomes include adverse events and reactions, subjective measures of symptoms, mood, sleep and function and objective measures of physical activity, fitness, cost-effectiveness and cost-utility. The primary analysis will be based on intention to treat and will use logistic regression models to compare treatments. Secondary outcomes will be analysed by repeated measures analysis of variance with a linear mixed model. All analyses will allow for stratification factors. Mediators and moderators

  5. HEALTH CARE ACCESS AMONG HISPANIC IMMIGRANTS: ¿ALGUIEN ESTÁ ESCUCHANDO? [IS ANYBODY LISTENING?].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Garcia, Jonathan; Song, David

    2010-11-01

    This systematic review identified 77 studies to examine patterns and determinants of health care access among Hispanic immigrants (HI) living in the U.S. In spite of major mental and physical care needs, HI and their families are at very high risk of not having access to health care compared with non-immigrant Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites. Noncitizenship status is a major barrier for accessing health care due to program ineligibility and fear of stigma and deportation. Low English proficiency is also an important barrier to health care. Culturally appropriate community outreach programs relying heavily on community health workers, also known as promotoras, have improved health care access and quality. Mexico shares the health care cost for HIs living in bordering states, calling for a binational dialogue. Mixed-methods research is needed to better understand: a) the net influence of acculturation on migrant health; b) the role of informal (e.g., family) vs. formal (e.g. promotoras) social support at facilitating health care access; c) issues related to 'single' male migrant farm workers; d) the "Hispanic mortality paradox"; e) traditional healing and medicine among HI. Comprehensive health and immigration reforms are needed to respect the human right that HIs have to gain access to health care. PMID:21116464

  6. HEALTH CARE ACCESS AMONG HISPANIC IMMIGRANTS: ¿ALGUIEN ESTÁ ESCUCHANDO? [IS ANYBODY LISTENING?

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Garcia, Jonathan; Song, David

    2010-01-01

    This systematic review identified 77 studies to examine patterns and determinants of health care access among Hispanic immigrants (HI) living in the U.S. In spite of major mental and physical care needs, HI and their families are at very high risk of not having access to health care compared with non-immigrant Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites. Noncitizenship status is a major barrier for accessing health care due to program ineligibility and fear of stigma and deportation. Low English proficiency is also an important barrier to health care. Culturally appropriate community outreach programs relying heavily on community health workers, also known as promotoras, have improved health care access and quality. Mexico shares the health care cost for HIs living in bordering states, calling for a binational dialogue. Mixed-methods research is needed to better understand: a) the net influence of acculturation on migrant health; b) the role of informal (e.g., family) vs. formal (e.g. promotoras) social support at facilitating health care access; c) issues related to ‘single’ male migrant farm workers; d) the “Hispanic mortality paradox”; e) traditional healing and medicine among HI. Comprehensive health and immigration reforms are needed to respect the human right that HIs have to gain access to health care. PMID:21116464

  7. MIMIC-III, a freely accessible critical care database.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Alistair E W; Pollard, Tom J; Shen, Lu; Lehman, Li-Wei H; Feng, Mengling; Ghassemi, Mohammad; Moody, Benjamin; Szolovits, Peter; Celi, Leo Anthony; Mark, Roger G

    2016-01-01

    MIMIC-III ('Medical Information Mart for Intensive Care') is a large, single-center database comprising information relating to patients admitted to critical care units at a large tertiary care hospital. Data includes vital signs, medications, laboratory measurements, observations and notes charted by care providers, fluid balance, procedure codes, diagnostic codes, imaging reports, hospital length of stay, survival data, and more. The database supports applications including academic and industrial research, quality improvement initiatives, and higher education coursework.

  8. Improving Access to Health Care: School-Based Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowden, Shauna L.; Calvert, Richard D.; Davis, Lisa; Gullotta, Thomas P.

    This article explores an approach for better serving the complete health care needs of children, specifically, the efficacy of school-based health centers (SBHCs) to provide a service delivery mechanism capable of functioning as a medical home for children, providing primary care for both their physical and behavioral health care needs. The…

  9. The Impact of the Medical Home on Access to Care for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheak-Zamora, Nancy C.; Farmer, Janet E.

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) experience difficulty accessing health care services. Using parent-reported data from the 2009-2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, we examined whether having a medical home reduces unmet need for specialty care services for children with ASD (n = 3,055). Descriptive…

  10. Integrated care model with self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: from family physicians to specialists.

    PubMed

    Bourbeau, Jean; Saad, Nathalie

    2013-05-01

    Patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has to become a partner and an active participant in his own care, that is, disease self-management. The goal of this article is to present successful and unsuccessful interventions using patient self-management and to propose a model of integrated care more suitable to the needs of COPD patients. This is a narrative review and an opinion article. Many systematic reviews have shown positive outcomes for patients with COPD. These studies have in common a self-management intervention including an action plan in the event of an exacerbation embedded in an integrated health-care system coordinated by a case manager for educational sessions and regular communication. Recently published trials have brought controversy with respect to the effectiveness of self-management programmes, especially in patients with high burden of disease and co-morbidities. It may be more challenging to make the patient with high burden of disease a partner and not without risk of serious adverse events. Finally, our health-care delivery has to be well integrated and more coherent, that is, strategic alliance between primary and secondary care, and supported by interdisciplinary teams for patients with high-risk and complex COPD. Clinical practice has to be structured to address COPD throughout the disease spectrum, that is, secondary versus primary, team work, partnership, self-management and continuity of care. PMID:23382555

  11. Integrated care model with self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: from family physicians to specialists.

    PubMed

    Bourbeau, Jean; Saad, Nathalie

    2013-05-01

    Patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has to become a partner and an active participant in his own care, that is, disease self-management. The goal of this article is to present successful and unsuccessful interventions using patient self-management and to propose a model of integrated care more suitable to the needs of COPD patients. This is a narrative review and an opinion article. Many systematic reviews have shown positive outcomes for patients with COPD. These studies have in common a self-management intervention including an action plan in the event of an exacerbation embedded in an integrated health-care system coordinated by a case manager for educational sessions and regular communication. Recently published trials have brought controversy with respect to the effectiveness of self-management programmes, especially in patients with high burden of disease and co-morbidities. It may be more challenging to make the patient with high burden of disease a partner and not without risk of serious adverse events. Finally, our health-care delivery has to be well integrated and more coherent, that is, strategic alliance between primary and secondary care, and supported by interdisciplinary teams for patients with high-risk and complex COPD. Clinical practice has to be structured to address COPD throughout the disease spectrum, that is, secondary versus primary, team work, partnership, self-management and continuity of care.

  12. Potential access to primary health care: what does the National Program for Access and Quality Improvement data show?

    PubMed Central

    Uchôa, Severina Alice da Costa; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre; Fronteira, Inês Santos Estevinho; Coêlho, Ardigleusa Alves; Martiniano, Claudia Santos; Brandão, Isabel Cristina Araújo; Yamamura, Mellina; Maroto, Renata Melo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the influence of contextual indicators on the performance of municipalities regarding potential access to primary health care in Brazil and to discuss the contribution from nurses working on this access. Method: a multicenter descriptive study based on secondary data from External Evaluation of the National Program for Access and Quality Improvement in Primary Care, with the participation of 17,202 primary care teams. The chi-square test of proportions was used to verify differences between the municipalities stratified based on size of the coverage area, supply, coordination, and integration; when necessary, the chi-square test with Yates correction or Fisher's exact test were employed. For the population variable, the Kruskal-Wallis test was used. Results: the majority of participants were nurses (n=15.876; 92,3%). Statistically significant differences were observed between the municipalities in terms of territory (p=0.0000), availability (p=0.0000), coordination of care (p=0.0000), integration (p=0.0000) and supply (p=0.0000), verifying that the municipalities that make up area 6 tend to have better performance in these dimensions. Conclusion: areas 4,5 and 6 performed better in every analyzed dimension, and the nurse had a leading role in the potential to access primary health care in Brazil. PMID:26959332

  13. Socioeconomic inequalities in the access to and quality of health care services

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Bruno Pereira; Thumé, Elaine; Tomasi, Elaine; Duro, Suele Manjourany Silva; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the inequalities in access, utilization, and quality of health care services according to the socioeconomic status. METHODS This population-based cross-sectional study evaluated 2,927 individuals aged ≥ 20 years living in Pelotas, RS, Southern Brazil, in 2012. The associations between socioeconomic indicators and the following outcomes were evaluated: lack of access to health services, utilization of services, waiting period (in days) for assistance, and waiting time (in hours) in lines. We used Poisson regression for the crude and adjusted analyses. RESULTS The lack of access to health services was reported by 6.5% of the individuals who sought health care. The prevalence of use of health care services in the 30 days prior to the interview was 29.3%. Of these, 26.4% waited five days or more to receive care and 32.1% waited at least an hour in lines. Approximately 50.0% of the health care services were funded through the Unified Health System. The use of health care services was similar across socioeconomic groups. The lack of access to health care services and waiting time in lines were higher among individuals of lower economic status, even after adjusting for health care needs. The waiting period to receive care was higher among those with higher socioeconomic status. CONCLUSIONS Although no differences were observed in the use of health care services across socioeconomic groups, inequalities were evident in the access to and quality of these services. PMID:26039400

  14. The effects of mandatory health insurance on equity in access to outpatient care in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Hidayat, Budi; Thabrany, Hasbullah; Dong, Hengjin; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2004-09-01

    This paper examines the effects of mandatory health insurance on access and equity in access to public and private outpatient care in Indonesia. Data from the second round of the 1997 Indonesian Family Life Survey were used. We adopted the concentration index as a measure of equity, and this was calculated from actual data and from predicted probability of outpatient-care use saved from a multinomial logit regression. The study found that a mandatory insurance scheme for civil servants (Askes) had a strongly positive impact on access to public outpatient care, while a mandatory insurance scheme for private employees (Jamsostek) had a positive impact on access to both public and private outpatient care. The greatest effects of Jamsostek were observed amongst poor beneficiaries. A substantial increase in access will be gained by expanding insurance to the whole population. However, neither Askes nor Jamsostek had a positive impact on equity. Policy implications are discussed.

  15. Access and utilisation of maternity care for disabled women who experience domestic abuse: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although disabled women are significantly more likely to experience domestic abuse during pregnancy than non-disabled women, very little is known about how maternity care access and utilisation is affected by the co-existence of disability and domestic abuse. This systematic review of the literature explored how domestic abuse impacts upon disabled women’s access to maternity services. Methods Eleven articles were identified through a search of six electronic databases and data were analysed to identify: the factors that facilitate or compromise access to care; the consequences of inadequate care for pregnant women’s health and wellbeing; and the effectiveness of existing strategies for improvement. Results Findings indicate that a mental health diagnosis, poor relationships with health professionals and environmental barriers can compromise women’s utilisation of maternity services. Domestic abuse can both compromise, and catalyse, access to services and social support is a positive factor when accessing care. Delayed and inadequate care has adverse effects on women’s physical and psychological health, however further research is required to fully explore the nature and extent of these consequences. Only one study identified strategies currently being used to improve access to services for disabled women experiencing abuse. Conclusions Based upon the barriers and facilitators identified within the review, we suggest that future strategies for improvement should focus on: understanding women’s reasons for accessing care; fostering positive relationships; being women-centred; promoting environmental accessibility; and improving the strength of the evidence base. PMID:25029907

  16. Interventions to Improve Access to Primary Care for People Who Are Homeless: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background People who are homeless encounter barriers to primary care despite having greater needs for health care, on average, than people who are not homeless. We evaluated the effectiveness of interventions to improve access to primary care for people who are homeless. Methods We performed a systematic review to identify studies in English published between January 1, 1995, and July 8, 2015, comparing interventions to improve access to a primary care provider with usual care among people who are homeless. The outcome of interest was access to a primary care provider. The risk of bias in the studies was evaluated, and the quality of the evidence was assessed according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group criteria. Results From a total of 4,047 citations, we identified five eligible studies (one randomized controlled trial and four observational studies). With the exception of the randomized trial, the risk of bias was considered high in the remaining studies. In the randomized trial, people who were homeless, without serious mental illness, and who received either an outreach intervention plus clinic orientation or clinic orientation alone, had improved access to a primary care provider compared with those receiving usual care. An observational study that compared integration of primary care and other services for people who are homeless with usual care did not observe any difference in access to a primary care provider between the two groups. A small observational study showed improvement among participants with a primary care provider after receiving an intervention consisting of housing and supportive services compared with the period before the intervention. The quality of the evidence was considered moderate for both the outreach plus clinic orientation and clinic orientation alone, and low to very low for the other interventions. Despite limitations, the literature identified reports of

  17. Who is my neighbor? A communitarian analysis of access to health care for immigrants.

    PubMed

    Kuczewski, Mark G

    2011-10-01

    Immigrants lacking health insurance access the health care system through the emergency departments of non-profit hospitals. Because these persons lack health insurance, continued care can pose challenges to those institutions. I analyze the values of our health care institutions, utilizing a Walzerian approach that describes its appropriate sphere of justice. This particular sphere is dominated by a caring response to need. I suggest that the logic of this sphere would be best preserved by providing increased access to health insurance to this population. This access would marry the rights of these members of our community to access care to our responsibility to contribute to financing of the system. I close with some considerations on what it means to be a member of the community.

  18. Enhancing primary care for persons with spinal cord injury: More than improving physical accessibility.

    PubMed

    Milligan, James; Lee, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    In Ontario, Canada, legislation exists that mandates that all medical practices be fully accessible by 2025, in an effort to improve access to primary care for persons with physical disabilities. The simple removal of physical barriers may not guarantee improved access to appropriate care. In this clinical note, members of an interprofessional primary care-based Mobility Clinic reflect on opportunities to improve primary care beyond just better physical accessibility for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). The importance of collaborations between funders, researchers, and clinicians are examined. Using a participatory action research model, the unique perspective of consumers and consumer networks are incorporated into the Mobility Clinic's clinical and research efforts to improve primary care for persons with SCI. PMID:26111044

  19. Do new and traditional models of primary care differ with regard to access?

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; Easley, Julie; Thompson, Ashley E.; Boivin, Antoine; Aubrey-Bassler, Kris; Katz, Alan; Hogg, William E.; Breton, Mylaine; Francoeur, Danièle; Wong, Sabrina T.; Wodchis, Walter P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine access to primary care in new and traditional models using 2 dimensions of the concept of patient-centred access. Design An international survey examining the quality and costs of primary health care (the QUALICOPC study) was conducted in 2013 in Canada. This study adopted a descriptive cross-sectional survey method using data from practices across Canada. Each participating practice filled out the Family Physician Survey and the Practice Survey, and patients in each participating practice were asked to complete the Patient Experiences Survey. Setting All 10 Canadian provinces. Participants A total of 759 practices and 7172 patients. Main outcome measures Independent t tests were conducted to examine differences between new and traditional models of care in terms of availability and accommodation, and affordability of care. Results Of the 759 practices, 407 were identified as having new models of care and 352 were identified as traditional. New models of care were distinct with respect to payment structure, opening hours, and having an interdisciplinary work force. Most participating practices were from large cities or suburban areas. There were few differences between new and traditional models of care regarding accessibility and accommodation in primary care. Patients under new models of care reported easier access to other physicians in the same practice, while patients from traditional models reported seeing their regular family physicians more frequently. There was no difference between the new and traditional models of care with regard to affordability of primary care. Patients attending clinics with new models of care reported that their physicians were more involved with them as a whole person than patients attending clinics based on traditional models did. Conclusion Primary care access issues do not differ strongly between traditional and new models of care; however, patients in the new models of care believed that their

  20. Lack of access and continuity of adult health care: a national population-based survey

    PubMed Central

    Dilélio, Alitéia Santiago; Tomasi, Elaine; Thumé, Elaine; da Silveira, Denise Silva; Siqueira, Fernando Carlos Vinholes; Piccini, Roberto Xavier; Silva, Suele Manjourany; Nunes, Bruno Pereira; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the lack of access and continuity of health care in adults. METHODS A cross-sectional population-based study was performed on a sample of 12,402 adults aged 20 to 59 years in urban areas of 100 municipalities of 23 states in the five Brazilian geopolitical regions. Barriers to the access and continuity of health care and were investigated based on receiving, needing and seeking health care (hospitalization and accident/emergency care in the last 12 months; care provided by a doctor, by other health professional or home care in the last three months). Based on the results obtained by the description of the sample, a projection is provided for adults living in Brazilian urban areas. RESULTS The highest prevalence of lack of access to health services and to provision of care by health professionals was for hospitalization (3.0%), whilst the lowest prevalence was for care provided by a doctor (1.1%). The lack of access to care provided by other health professionals was 2.0%; to accident and emergency services, 2.1%; and to home care, 2.9%. As for prevalences, the greatest absolute lack of access occurred in emergency care (more than 360,000 adults). The main reasons were structural and organizational problems, such as unavailability of hospital beds, of health professionals, of appointments for the type of care needed and charges made for care. CONCLUSIONS The universal right to health care in Brazil has not yet been achieved. These projections can help health care management in scaling the efforts needed to overcome this problem, such as expanding the infrastructure of health services and the workforce. PMID:26061454

  1. Access to care issues for African American communities: implications for STD disparities.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Deidra D; Kent, Charlotte K

    2008-12-01

    Reduced access to care is a major contributor to health disparities in black communities. This review discusses factors that serve to diminish access to care among blacks in the context of STD disparities and highlights strategies to improve access to STD care. At the individual level, structural factors such as poverty, lack of insurance, and lack of a regular source of care are known to decrease health service utilization and have been identified as barriers to STD care as well. Other individual level factors that influence access to care, particularly for STDs, include concerns about confidentiality and privacy, perceptions of discrimination, and perceptions of risk. At the health system level, availability of services, organizational inefficiencies, and staff perceptions affect access. Strategies to improve access to STD care include expanding services in high-risk nontraditional venues, developing multilevel partnerships, incorporating STD services into routine healthcare, integrating services with HIV, improving the quality of public STD clinic care, and ultimately addressing the broader underlying factors that contribute to health disparities.

  2. Relationships, Expertise, Incentives, and Governance: Supporting Care Home Residents' Access to Health Care. An Interview Study From England

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Claire; Davies, Sue L.; Gordon, Adam L.; Meyer, Julienne; Dening, Tom; Gladman, John R.F.; Iliffe, Steve; Zubair, Maria; Bowman, Clive; Victor, Christina; Martin, Finbarr C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore what commissioners of care, regulators, providers, and care home residents in England identify as the key mechanisms or components of different service delivery models that support the provision of National Health Service (NHS) provision to independent care homes. Methods Qualitative, semistructured interviews with a purposive sample of people with direct experience of commissioning, providing, and regulating health care provision in care homes and care home residents. Data from interviews were augmented by a secondary analysis of previous interviews with care home residents on their personal experience of and priorities for access to health care. Analysis was framed by the assumptions of realist evaluation and drew on the constant comparative method to identify key themes about what is required to achieve quality health care provision to care homes and resident health. Results Participants identified 3 overlapping approaches to the provision of NHS that they believed supported access to health care for older people in care homes: (1) Investment in relational working that fostered continuity and shared learning between visiting NHS staff and care home staff, (2) the provision of age-appropriate clinical services, and (3) governance arrangements that used contractual and financial incentives to specify a minimum service that care homes should receive. Conclusion The 3 approaches, and how they were typified as working, provide a rich picture of the stakeholder perspectives and the underlying assumptions about how service delivery models should work with care homes. The findings inform how evidence on effective working in care homes will be interrogated to identify how different approaches, or specifically key elements of those approaches, achieve different health-related outcomes in different situations for residents and associated health and social care organizations. PMID:25687930

  3. Access to medical care for documented and undocumented Latinos in a southern California county.

    PubMed Central

    Hubbell, F. A.; Waitzkin, H.; Mishra, S. I.; Dombrink, J.; Chavez, L. R.

    1991-01-01

    To determine local access to medical care among Latinos, we conducted telephone interviews with residents of Orange County, California. The survey replicated on a local level the national access surveys sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. We compared access among Latino citizens of the United States (including permanent legal residents), undocumented Latinos, and Anglos, and analyzed predictors of access. Among the sample of 958 respondents were 137 Latino citizens, 54 undocumented Latinos, and 680 Anglos. Compared with Anglos, Latino citizens and undocumented immigrants had less access to medical care by all measures used in the survey. Although undocumented Latinos were less likely than Latino citizens to have health insurance, by most other measures their access did not differ significantly. By multivariate analysis, health insurance status and not ethnicity was the most important predictor of access. Because access to medical care is limited for both Latino citizens and undocumented immigrants, policy proposals to improve access for Latinos should consider current barriers faced by these groups and local differences in access to medical care. PMID:1877182

  4. Increasing access to quality health care for the poor: Community perceptions on quality care in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kiguli, Julie; Ekirapa-Kiracho, Elizabeth; Okui, Olico; Mutebi, Aloysius; Macgregor, Hayley; Pariyo, George William

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the community's perspectives and perceptions on quality of health care delivery in two Uganda districts. The paper addresses community concerns on service quality. It focuses on the poor because they are a vulnerable group and often bear a huge burden of disease. Community views were solicited and obtained using eight focus group discussions, six in-depth and 12 key informant interviews. User perceptions and definitions of the quality of health services depended on a number of variables related to technical competence, accessibility to services, interpersonal relations and presence of adequate drugs, supplies, staff, and facility amenities. Results indicate that service delivery to the poor in the general population is perceived to be of low quality. The factors that were mentioned as affecting the quality of services delivered were inadequate trained health workers, shortage of essential drugs, poor attitude of the health workers, and long distances to health facilities. This paper argues that there should be an improvement in the quality of health services with particular attention being paid to the poor. Despite wide focus on improvement of the existing infrastructure and donor funding, there is still low satisfaction with health services and poor perceived accessibility. PMID:19936148

  5. MIMIC-III, a freely accessible critical care database

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alistair E.W.; Pollard, Tom J.; Shen, Lu; Lehman, Li-wei H.; Feng, Mengling; Ghassemi, Mohammad; Moody, Benjamin; Szolovits, Peter; Anthony Celi, Leo; Mark, Roger G.

    2016-01-01

    MIMIC-III (‘Medical Information Mart for Intensive Care’) is a large, single-center database comprising information relating to patients admitted to critical care units at a large tertiary care hospital. Data includes vital signs, medications, laboratory measurements, observations and notes charted by care providers, fluid balance, procedure codes, diagnostic codes, imaging reports, hospital length of stay, survival data, and more. The database supports applications including academic and industrial research, quality improvement initiatives, and higher education coursework. PMID:27219127

  6. Step 1: Offers All Birthing Mothers Unrestricted Access to Birth Companions, Labor Support, Professional Midwifery Care

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Mayri Sagady; Storton, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    The first step of the Ten Steps of Mother-Friendly Care insures that women have access to a wide variety of support in labor and during the pregnancy and postpartum periods: unrestricted access to birth companions of their choice, including family and friends; unrestricted access to continuous emotional and physical support from a skilled woman such as a doula; and access to midwifery care. The rationales for the importance of each factor and the evidence to support those rationales are presented. PMID:18523678

  7. Spatial access disparities to primary health care in rural and remote Australia.

    PubMed

    McGrail, Matthew Richard; Humphreys, John Stirling

    2015-01-01

    Poor spatial access to health care remains a key issue for rural populations worldwide. Whilst geographic information systems (GIS) have enabled the development of more sophisticated access measures, they are yet to be adopted into health policy and workforce planning. This paper provides and tests a new national-level approach to measuring primary health care (PHC) access for rural Australia, suitable for use in macro-level health policy. The new index was constructed using a modified two-step floating catchment area method framework and the smallest available geographic unit. Primary health care spatial access was operationalised using three broad components: availability of PHC (general practitioner) services; proximity of populations to PHC services; and PHC needs of the population. Data used in its measurement were specifically chosen for accuracy, reliability and ongoing availability for small areas. The resultant index reveals spatial disparities of access to PHC across rural Australia. While generally more remote areas experienced poorer access than more populated rural areas, there were numerous exceptions to this generalisation, with some rural areas close to metropolitan areas having very poor access and some increasingly remote areas having relatively good access. This new index provides a geographically-sensitive measure of access, which is readily updateable and enables a fine granulation of access disparities. Such an index can underpin national rural health programmes and policies designed to improve rural workforce recruitment and retention, and, importantly, health service planning and resource allocation decisions designed to improve equity of PHC access.

  8. Access to health and health care: how race and ethnicity matter.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Lynne D; Norris, Marlaina

    2010-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities in health are multifactorial; they reflect differences in biological vulnerability to disease as well as differences in social resources, environmental factors, and health care interventions. Understanding and intervening in health inequity require an understanding of the disparate access to all of the personal resources and environmental conditions that are needed to generate and sustain health, a set of circumstances that constitute access to health. These include access to health information, participation in health promotion and disease prevention activities, safe housing, nutritious foods, convenient exercise spaces, freedom from ambient violence, adequate social support, communities with social capital, and access to quality health care. Access to health care is facilitated by health insurance, a regular source of care, and a usual primary care provider. Various mechanisms through which access to health and access to health care are mediated by race and ethnicity are discussed; these include the built environment, social environment, residential segregation, stress, racism, and discrimination. Empirical evidence supporting the association between these factors and health inequities is also reviewed.

  9. Experiences among undocumented migrants accessing primary care in the United Kingdom: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Poduval, Shoba; Howard, Natasha; Jones, Lucy; Murwill, Phil; McKee, Martin; Legido-Quigley, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Immigration is a key political issue in the United Kingdom. The 2014 Immigration Act includes a number of measures intended to reduce net immigration, including removing the right of non-European Economic Area migrants to access free health care. This change risks widening existing health and social inequalities. This study explored the experiences of undocumented migrants trying to access primary care in the United Kingdom, their perspectives on proposed access restrictions, and suggestions for policymakers. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 undocumented migrants and four volunteer staff at a charity clinic in London. Inductive thematic analysis drew out major themes. Many undocumented migrants already faced challenges accessing primary care. None of the migrants interviewed said that they would be able to afford charges to access primary care and most said they would have to wait until they were much more unwell and access care through Accident & Emergency (A&E) services. The consequences of limiting access to primary care, including threats to individual and public health consequences and the additional burden on the National Health Service, need to be fully considered by policymakers. The authors argue that an evidence-based approach would avoid legislation that targets vulnerable groups and provides no obvious economic or societal benefit.

  10. Does Rural Residence Affect Access to Prenatal Care in Oregon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Beth; Grant, Therese; Schiff, Melissa; Kasehagen, Laurin

    2009-01-01

    Context: Identifying how maternal residential location affects late initiation of prenatal care is important for policy planning and allocation of resources for intervention. Purpose: To determine how rural residence and other social and demographic characteristics affect late initiation of prenatal care, and how residence status is associated…

  11. Integrated Behavioral Health Services: Improving Access to Mental Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturm, Lynne A.; Perry, Deborah F.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes innovative service delivery models and clinical strategies that support the social-emotional development of young children and their families in the pediatric primary care setting. By understanding the trends affecting well-child care, early childhood providers will be better equipped to partner with their pediatric…

  12. Equity of access to health care services: theory and evidence from the UK.

    PubMed

    Goddard, M; Smith, P

    2001-11-01

    The pursuit of equity of access to health care is a central objective of many health care systems. This paper first sets out a general theoretical framework within which equity of access can be examined. It then applies the framework by examining the extent to which research evidence has been able to detect systematic inequities of access in UK, where equity of access has been a central focus in the National Health Service since its inception in 1948. Inequity between socio-economic groups is used as an illustrative example, and the extent of inequity of access experienced is explored in each of five service areas: general practitioner consultations; acute hospital care; mental health services; preventative medicine and health promotion; and long-term health care. The paper concludes that there appear to be important inequities in access to some types of health care in the UK, but that the evidence is often methodologically inadequate, making it difficult to draw firm conclusions. In particular, it is difficult to establish the causes of inequities which in turn limits the scope for recommending appropriate policy to reduce inequities of access. The theoretical framework and the lessons learned from the UK are of direct relevance to researchers from other countries seeking to examine equity of access in a wide variety of institutional settings.

  13. Health Care Access and Health Behaviors Among Men Who Have Sex With Men: The Cost of Health Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKirnan, David J.; Du Bois, Steve N.; Alvy, Lisa M.; Jones, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) appear to experience barriers to health care compared with general population men. This report examines individual differences in health care access within a diverse sample of urban MSM ("N" = 871). The authors examined demographic differences in health care access and the relation between access and health-related…

  14. Optimising the detection and management of familial hypercholesterolaemia: central role of primary care and its integration with specialist services.

    PubMed

    Vickery, Alistair W; Bell, Damon; Garton-Smith, Jacquie; Kirke, Andrew B; Pang, Jing; Watts, Gerald F

    2014-12-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is the most common monogenic lipid disorder associated with premature coronary heart disease (CHD). However, the majority of people with FH are undiagnosed or undertreated. Early cholesterol lowering therapy reduces cardiovascular disease mortality in FH. Low awareness and knowledge of FH in specialty and general practice highlights the need for strategies to improve the detection and management of FH. We present an algorithm describing a multidisciplinary approach to FH detection and management. We highlight the role of primary care, and where GPs can work with preventive cardiologists to improve care of FH. Novel strategies to detect index cases with FH are presented including the community laboratory, highlighting patients at high risk of FH, and targeted FH detection through searching the general practice database. General practitioners request over 90% of LDL cholesterol measurements in the community. Once an individual with FH is detected only a small proportion of patients require specialty management with the majority of patients suitably managed in primary care. However, it is crucial to screen family members, as 50% of first-degree family members are expected to have FH due to the autosomal dominant inheritance. PMID:25130889

  15. Equity of access to health care: outlining the foundations for action

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, A.; Mossialos, E.

    2004-01-01

    The Ministers of Health from Chile, Germany, Greece, New Zealand, Slovenia, Sweden, and the United Kingdom recently established The International Forum on Common Access to Health Care Services, based on a common belief that their citizens should enjoy universal and equitable access to good quality health care. The ministers intend to form a network to share thinking and evidence on healthcare improvements, with the specific aim of sustaining and promoting equitable access to health care. Despite a vast literature on the notion of equity of access, little agreement has been reached in the literature on exactly what this notion ought to mean. This article provides a brief description of the relevance of the access principle of equity, and summarises the research programme that is necessary for turning the principle into a useful, operational policy objective. PMID:15252067

  16. Are there long-term benefits of experiential, interprofessional education for non-specialists on clinical behaviours and outcomes in diabetes care? A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Daniel; Forte, Denise; Aitchison, Elizabeth; Earle, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to assess the impact of an educational initiative for non-specialist, healthcare professionals in the community on the process and quality measures of diabetes care delivered, and changes in their learning experiences and clinical management behaviour in the short and long term. Setting Single locality of 26 primary care practices associated with one secondary centre. Participants General practitioners and practice nurses managing 4167 patients with diabetes. Intervention A rolling 10-week, experiential, interprofessional education programme delivered to 57 practitioners and observations in practice. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcomes were changes in the proportion of patients receiving foot care, urine albumin:creatinine ratio assessments and achieving National Quality Outcome Framework targets for blood pressure (<145/80 mm Hg), glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c; >86 mmol/mol (10%) and <57.4 mmol/mol (7.4%)) and total cholesterol (<5 mmol/L) thresholds. Secondary outcomes were evidence of sustained learning and changes in the number of patients referred to secondary care. Results Evaluation of care processes and quality outcomes took place 15 months after the programme was initiated. The proportion of patients with a HbA1c of <57.4 mmol/mol (7.4%) and >85 mmol/mol (10%) was significantly higher (44% vs 53% p=0.0001) and lower (12.5% vs 10%; p=0.002) respectively. There was an increase in the proportion (95% CI) of patients receiving foot care reviews (+26.0% (24.0% to 28.1%)), microalbuminuria screening (+29.8% (27.7% to 31.9%)) and who achieved targets for blood pressure (+9.6% (7.5% to 11.6%)) and total cholesterol (+14.4% (12.3% to 16.5%); p<0.001). 241 fewer patients were referred to secondary care. Increases in the healthcare professional's confidence and collaborative clinical behaviour were evident 3 years after completing the programme. Conclusions An experiential, interprofessional intervention can

  17. Developing a composite index of spatial accessibility across different health care sectors: A German example.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Martin; Koller, Daniela; Vogt, Verena; Sundmacher, Leonie

    2016-02-01

    The evolving lack of ambulatory care providers especially in rural areas increasingly challenges the strict separation between ambulatory and inpatient care in Germany. Some consider allowing hospitals to treat ambulatory patients to tackle potential shortages of ambulatory care in underserved areas. In this paper, we develop an integrated index of spatial accessibility covering multiple dimensions of health care. This index may contribute to the empirical evidence concerning potential risks and benefits of integrating the currently separated health care sectors. Accessibility is measured separately for each type of care based on official data at the district level. Applying an Improved Gravity Model allows us to factor in potential cross-border utilization. We combine the accessibilities for each type of care into a univariate index by adapting the concept of regional multiple deprivation measurement to allow for a limited substitutability between health care sectors. The results suggest that better health care accessibility in urban areas persists when taking a holistic view. We believe that this new index may provide an empirical basis for an inter-sectoral capacity planning.

  18. Equity in health care access to: assessing the urban health insurance reform in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gordon G; Zhao, Zhongyun; Cai, Renhua; Yamada, Tetsuji; Yamada, Tadashi

    2002-11-01

    This study evaluates changes in access to health care in response to the pilot experiment of urban health insurance reform in China. The pilot reform began in Zhenjiang and Jiujiang cities in 1994, followed by an expansion to 57 other cities in 1996, and finally to a nationwide campaign in the end of 1998. Specifically, this study examines the pre- and post-reform changes in the likelihood of obtaining various health care services across sub-population groups with different socioeconomic status and health conditions, in an attempt to shed light on the impact of reform on both vertical and horizontal equity measures in health care utilization. Empirical estimates were obtained in an econometric model using data from the annual surveys conducted in Zhenjiang City from 1994 through 1996. The main findings are as follows. Before the insurance reform, the likelihood of obtaining basic care at outpatient setting was much higher for those with higher income, education, and job status at work, indicating a significant measure of horizontal inequity against the lower socioeconomic groups. On the other hand, there was no evidence suggesting vertical inequity against people of chronic disease conditions in access to care at various settings. After the reform, the new insurance plan led to a significant increase in outpatient care utilization by the lower socioeconomic groups, making a great contribution to achieving horizontal equity in access to basic care. The new plan also has maintained the measure of vertical equity in the use of all types of care. Despite reform, people with poor socioeconomic status continue to be disadvantaged in accessing expensive and advanced diagnostic technologies. In conclusion, the reform model has demonstrated promising advantages over pre-reform insurance programs in many aspects, especially in the improvement of equity in access to basic care provided at outpatient settings. It also appears to be more efficient overall in allocating health

  19. Dental care access and use among HIV-infected women.

    PubMed Central

    Shiboski, C H; Palacio, H; Neuhaus, J M; Greenblatt, R M

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to identify predictors of dental care use in HIV-infected women. METHODS: In a cross-sectional survey of HIV-infected women enrolled in the northern California site of the Women's Interagency HIV Study, dental care use and unmet need were assessed in relation to selected variables. RESULTS: Among 213 respondents, who were predominantly Black and younger than 45 years, 43% had not seen a dentist and 53% (among dentate women) reported no dental cleaning in more than a year (although 67% had dental insurance coverage, mainly state Medicaid). Nine percent were edentulous. Among nonusers of dental care, 78% reported that they wanted care but failed to get it. Barriers included fear of and discomfort with dentists, not getting around to making an appointment, and not knowing which dentist to visit. Multivariate analysis showed that lack of past-year dental care was associated mainly with unemployment, a perception of poor oral health, and edentulism. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-positive women appear to be underusing dental care services. Fear and lack of information regarding available resources, in addition to unemployment and perception of poor oral health, may be important barriers. PMID:10358671

  20. Assessing program efficiency: a time and motion study of the Mental Health Emergency Care - Rural Access Program in NSW Australia.

    PubMed

    Saurman, Emily; Lyle, David; Kirby, Sue; Roberts, Russell

    2014-08-01

    The Mental Health Emergency Care-Rural Access Program (MHEC-RAP) is a telehealth solution providing specialist emergency mental health care to rural and remote communities across western NSW, Australia. This is the first time and motion (T&M) study to examine program efficiency and capacity for a telepsychiatry program. Clinical services are an integral aspect of the program accounting for 6% of all activities and 50% of the time spent conducting program activities, but half of this time is spent completing clinical paperwork. This finding emphasizes the importance of these services to program efficiency and the need to address variability of service provision to impact capacity. Currently, there is no efficiency benchmark for emergency telepsychiatry programs. Findings suggest that MHEC-RAP could increase its activity without affecting program responsiveness. T&M studies not only determine activity and time expenditure, but have a wider application assessing program efficiency by understanding, defining, and calculating capacity. T&M studies can inform future program development of MHEC-RAP and similar telehealth programs, both in Australia and overseas. PMID:25089774

  1. Assessing program efficiency: a time and motion study of the Mental Health Emergency Care - Rural Access Program in NSW Australia.

    PubMed

    Saurman, Emily; Lyle, David; Kirby, Sue; Roberts, Russell

    2014-08-01

    The Mental Health Emergency Care-Rural Access Program (MHEC-RAP) is a telehealth solution providing specialist emergency mental health care to rural and remote communities across western NSW, Australia. This is the first time and motion (T&M) study to examine program efficiency and capacity for a telepsychiatry program. Clinical services are an integral aspect of the program accounting for 6% of all activities and 50% of the time spent conducting program activities, but half of this time is spent completing clinical paperwork. This finding emphasizes the importance of these services to program efficiency and the need to address variability of service provision to impact capacity. Currently, there is no efficiency benchmark for emergency telepsychiatry programs. Findings suggest that MHEC-RAP could increase its activity without affecting program responsiveness. T&M studies not only determine activity and time expenditure, but have a wider application assessing program efficiency by understanding, defining, and calculating capacity. T&M studies can inform future program development of MHEC-RAP and similar telehealth programs, both in Australia and overseas.

  2. Implications for informatics given expanding access to care for Veterans and other populations.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Brian E; Haggstrom, David A; Weiner, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Recent investigations into appointment scheduling within facilities operated by the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) illuminate systemic challenges in meeting its goal of providing timely access to care for all Veterans. In the wake of these investigations, new policies have been enacted to expand access to care at VA facilities as well as non-VA facilities if the VA is unable to provide access within a reasonable timeframe or a Veteran lives more than 40 miles from a VA medical facility. These policies are similar to broader health reform efforts that seek to expand access to care for other vulnerable populations. In this perspective, we discuss the informatics implications of expanded access within the VA and its wider applicability across the US health system. Health systems will require robust health information exchange, to maintain coordination while access to care is expanded. Existing informatics research can guide short-term implementation; furthermore, new research is needed to generate evidence about how best to achieve the long-term aim of expanded access to care.

  3. Women's access to health care in Ghana: effects of education, residence, lineage and self-determination.

    PubMed

    Boateng, John; Flanagan, Constance

    2008-01-01

    Women's physical and psychological access to health care was analyzed using the 2003 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey (GDHS), a nationally representative study for monitoring population and health in Ghana. Female respondents from the 2133 cases in the couple's data set were used in this study. Women's level of education was positively related to physical but not to psychological access to health care. Residing in an urban area was positively related to both types of access. Matriliny consistently showed positive effects on physical access. In addition to these demographic factors, both physical and psychological access were positively related to women's self-determination, i.e., women's right and ability to make real choices about their lives including their health, fertility, sexuality, childcare and all areas where women are denied autonomy and dignity in their identities as women. Self-determination factors both mediated the effects of background factors on access and added explanatory power to the models.

  4. Physicians Who Treat the Elderly in Rural Florida: Trends Indicating Concerns regarding Access to Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderson, Anne; Menachemi, Nir; Brummel-Smith, Ken; Brooks, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Context: Rural elderly patients are faced with numerous challenges in accessing care. Additional strains to access may be occurring given recent market pressures, which would have significant impact on this vulnerable population. Purpose: This study focused on the practice patterns and future plans of rural Florida physicians who routinely see…

  5. Uncompensated hospital care payment and access for the uninsured: evidence from New Jersey.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, D L; Chen, M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We assess the impacts of New Jersey's payment for hospital uncompensated care on access for the uninsured. DATA SOURCES. Uncompensated care charges and other data were obtained from audited reports maintained by the New Jersey State Department of Health. Other data sources include the AHA Annual Survey and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The sample includes 80 of 88 acute care hospitals in the state for 1979 to 1987. STUDY DESIGN. This study used a pre- and postdesign to assess the impacts of the introduction of uncompensated care payment. Both descriptive and multivariate analyses were used. Key variables include hospital ownership and teaching characteristics; the labor force composition; and the level of government funding for public health insurance. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. The overall level of uncompensated hospital care increased markedly in New Jersey during the period 1979 through 1987. However, this trend can be attributed to variables other than the new payment system, including increased demand for uncompensated care. The program did result in a more even distribution of uncompensated care across hospitals. The financial condition of hospitals providing the largest share of this care also improved, ensuring continued access. CONCLUSIONS. Funding of uncompensated care via hospital payment regulation did not increase its overall provision. However, improved access was achieved as opportunities for the uninsured to receive care were made more widely available. PMID:8163377

  6. Strategic alliance between the infectious diseases specialist and intensive care unit physician for change in antibiotic use.

    PubMed

    Curcio, D; Belloni, R

    2005-02-01

    There is a general consensus that antimicrobial use in intensive care units (ICU) is greater than that in general wards. By implementing a strategy of systematic infectious disease consultations in agreement with the ICU chief, we have modified the antibiotic prescription habits of the ICU physician. A reduction was observed in the use of selected antibiotics (third-generation cephalosporins, vancomycin, carbapenems and piperacillin-tazobactam), with a significant reduction in the length of hospital stay for ICU patients and lower antibiotic costs without negative impact on patient mortality. Leadership by the infectious diseases consultant in combination with commitment by ICU physicians is a simple and effective method to change antibiotic prescription habits in the ICU. PMID:15828447

  7. Taking care of your vascular access for hemodialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... are 3 main types of vascular accesses for hemodialysis. These are described as follows. Fistula: An artery in your forearm is sewn to a vein nearby. This allows needles to be inserted into the vein for dialysis treatment. A fistula takes from 1 to 4 ...

  8. Spatial access to health care in Costa Rica and its equity: a GIS-based study.

    PubMed

    Rosero-Bixby, Luis

    2004-04-01

    This study assembles a geographic information system (GIS) to relate the 2000 census population (demand) with an inventory of health facilities (supply). It assesses the equity in access to health care by Costa Ricans and the impact on it by the ongoing reform of the health sector. It uses traditional measurements of access based on the distance to the closest facility and proposes a more comprehensive index of accessibility that results from the aggregation of all facilities weighted by their size, proximity, and characteristics of both the population and the facility. The weighting factors of this index were determined with an econometric analysis of clinic choice in a national household sample. Half Costa Ricans reside less than 1 km away from an outpatient care outlet and 5 km away from a hospital. In equity terms, 12-14% of population are underserved according to three indicators: having an outpatient outlet within 4 km, a hospital within 25 km, and less than 0.2 MD yearly hours per person. The data show substantial improvements in access (and equity) to outpatient care between 1994 and 2000. These improvements are linked to the health sector reform implemented since 1995. The share of the population whose access to outpatient health care (density indicator) was inequitable declined from 30% to 22% in pioneering areas where reform began in 1995-96. By contrast, in areas where reform has not occurred by 2001, the proportion underserved has slightly increased from 7% to 9%. Similar results come from a simpler index based on the distance to the nearest facility. Access to hospital care has held steady in this period. The reform achieved this result by targeting the least privileged population first, and by including such measures as new community medical offices and Basic Teams for Integrated Health Care (EBAIS) to work with these populations. The GIS platform developed for this study allows pinpointing communities with inadequate access to health care, where

  9. Corruption in the health care sector: A barrier to access of orthopaedic care and medical devices in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Globally, injuries cause approximately as many deaths per year as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined, and 90% of injury deaths occur in low- and middle- income countries. Given not all injuries kill, the disability burden, particularly from orthopaedic injuries, is much higher but is poorly measured at present. The orthopaedic services and orthopaedic medical devices needed to manage the injury burden are frequently unavailable in these countries. Corruption is known to be a major barrier to access of health care, but its effects on access to orthopaedic services is still unknown. Methods A qualitative case study of 45 open-ended interviews was conducted to investigate the access to orthopaedic health services and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. Participants included orthopaedic surgeons, related healthcare professionals, industry and government representatives, and patients. Participants’ experiences in accessing orthopaedic medical devices were explored. Thematic analysis was used to analyze and code the transcripts. Results Analysis of the interview data identified poor leadership in government and corruption as major barriers to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices. Corruption was perceived to occur at the worker, hospital and government levels in the forms of misappropriation of funds, theft of equipment, resale of drugs and medical devices, fraud and absenteeism. Other barriers elicited included insufficient health infrastructure and human resources, and high costs of orthopaedic equipment and poverty. Conclusions This study identified perceived corruption as a significant barrier to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. As the burden of injury continues to grow, the need to combat corruption and ensure access to orthopaedic services is imperative. Anti-corruption strategies such as transparency and accountability measures, codes of conduct, whistleblower protection, and higher

  10. Changing roles for psychiatric clinical nurse specialists: prescriptive privileges.

    PubMed

    Rufli, G M

    1996-01-01

    Interest was expressed at the mental health center in expanding the role of psychiatric clinical nurse specialists to include prescribing medications. There is a definite need for this expanded prescriptive role. The goals of improving patient access to care, offering quality service and cost effectiveness can be met by the psychiatric clinical nurse specialist certified by ANA. The functions of a CNS in a collaborative role with psychiatrists would involve promotion and health maintenance, evaluation, intake screening, health teaching, community action, and advanced psychobiological interventions including the prescribing of pharmacological agents. The ARNP, CS could alleviate the case load for pharmacological evaluation for the psychiatrists and enhance access to pharmacological management. The change in the Kentucky law giving prescriptive privileges to ARNPs makes this role feasible. PMID:9416059

  11. Health System Performance for the High-Need Patient: A Look at Access to Care and Patient Care Experiences.

    PubMed

    Salzberg, Claudia A; Hayes, Susan L; McCarthy, Douglas; Radley, David C; Abrams, Melina K; Shah, Tanya; Anderson, Gerard F

    2016-08-01

    Issue: Achieving a high-performing health system will require improving outcomes and reducing costs for high-need, high-cost patients--those who use the most health care services and account for a disproportionately large share of health care spending. Goal: To compare the health care experiences of adults with high needs--those with three or more chronic diseases and a functional limitation in the ability to care for themselves or perform routine daily tasks--to all adults and to those with multiple chronic diseases but no functional limitations. Methods: Analysis of data from the 2009--2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Key findings: High-need adults were more likely to report having an unmet medical need and less likely to report having good patient-provider communication. High-need adults reported roughly similar ease of obtaining specialist referrals as other adults and greater likelihood of having a medical home. While adults with private health insurance reported the fewest unmet needs overall, privately insured high-need adults reported the greatest difficulties having their needs met. Conclusion: The health care system needs to work better for the highest-need, most-complex patients. This study's findings highlight the importance of tailoring interventions to address their needs. PMID:27571600

  12. Between the Cracks: Access to Physical Health Care in Children of the Working Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinsley, Barbara J.; Wang, Shirley J.; Kwasman, Alan; Green, Delores

    This study examined the demographic and psychological characteristics of the parents of a group of children with no access to health care, due to their status as "working poor" and thus denied either public or private health insurance whose children were referred for treatment for an acute health problem by a volunteer health care program for…

  13. Prevention and Control of Dental Disease through Improved Access to Comprehensive Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Dental Association, Chicago, IL.

    Prevention of dental disease is the key to improving the nation's oral health. The American Dental Association (ADA) program of prevention and control of dental disease through improved access to comprehensive care concentrates on those who have special difficulties in receiving care: the poor, the elderly, the handicapped, the institutionalized…

  14. Access Barriers to Dental Health Care in Children with Disability. A Questionnaire Study of Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerreth, Karolina; Borysewicz-Lewicka, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background: A patient's with disability everyday life is rife with many limitations such as architectural, transport, information as well as medical, psychological, legal, economic and social barriers. The aim of this study was to evaluate access to dental health care of special-care schoolchildren with intellectual disability on the basis of…

  15. Information-Seeking in Family Day Care: Access, Quality and Personal Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corr, L.; Davis, E.; Cook, K.; Mackinnon, A.; Sims, M.; Herrman, H.

    2014-01-01

    Family day-care (FDC) educators work autonomously to provide care and education for children of mixed ages, backgrounds and abilities. To meet the demands and opportunities of their work and regulatory requirements, educators need access to context-relevant and high quality information. No previous research has examined how and where these workers…

  16. The Supply of Dentists and Access to Care in Rural Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, R. Andrew; Manski, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Rural deficits in dental care and oral health are well documented and are typically attributed to the low number of dentists practicing in rural areas, but the relationships between rural residence, dental supply, and access to care have not been firmly established, impeding the development of effective public policy. Purpose: The purpose…

  17. Investing in Our Children: A Plan to Expand Access to Preschool and Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cynthia G.; Cooper, Donna; Herman, Juliana; Lazarín, Melissa; Linden, Michael; Post, Sasha; Tanden, Neera

    2013-01-01

    This issue brief presents a plan to expand educational opportunities and care for children ages 0-5 years old by investing significant federal dollars to: (1) Make high-quality preschool universally accessible to all 3- and 4-year-old children; and (2) Enable more lower-income families to afford child care for children ages 0-3 years old. These…

  18. Predicting Early Center Care Utilization in a Context of Universal Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachrisson, Henrik Daae; Janson, Harald; Naerde, Ane

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports predictors for center care utilization prior to 18 months of age in Norway, a country with a welfare system providing up to one-year paid parental leave and universal access to subsidized and publicly regulated center care. A community sample of 1103 families was interviewed about demographics, family, and child characteristics…

  19. An Assessment of How Nurse Practitioners Create Access to Primary Care in Canadian Residential Long-Term Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Carter, Nancy; Sangster-Gormley, Esther; Ploeg, Jenny; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Donald, Faith; Wickson-Griffiths, Abigail; Kaasalainen, Sharon; McAiney, Carrie; Brazil, Kevin; Taniguchi, Alan; Martin, Lori Schindel

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore the role and activities of nurse practitioners (NPs) working in long-term care (LTC) to understand concepts of access to primary care for residents. Utilizing the "FIT" framework developed by Penchanksy and Thomas, we used a directed content analysis method to analyze data from a pan-Canadian study of NPs in LTC. Individual and focus group interviews were conducted at four sites in western, central and eastern regions of Canada with 143 participants, including NPs, RNs, regulated and unregulated nursing staff, allied health professionals, physicians, administrators and directors and residents and family members. Participants emphasized how the availability and accessibility of the NP had an impact on access to primary and urgent care for residents. Understanding more about how NPs affect access in Canadian LTC will be valuable for nursing practice and healthcare planning and policy and may assist other countries in planning for the introduction of NPs in LTC settings to increase access to primary care. PMID:27673401

  20. Expanding access to rheumatology care: the rheumatology general practice toolbox.

    PubMed

    Conway, R; Kavanagh, R; Coughlan, R J; Carey, J J

    2015-02-01

    Management guidelines for many rheumatic diseases are published in specialty rheumatology literature but rarely in general medical journals. Musculoskeletal disorders comprise 14% of all consultations in primary care. Formal post-graduate training in rheumatology is limited or absent for many primary care practitioners. Primary care practitioners can be trained to effectively treat complex diseases and have expressed a preference for interactive educational courses. The Rheumatology General Practice (GP) Toolbox is an intensive one day course designed to offer up to date information to primary care practitioners on the latest diagnostic and treatment guidelines for seven common rheumatic diseases. The course structure involves a short lecture on each topic and workshops on arthrocentesis, joint injection and DXA interpretation. Participants evaluated their knowledge and educational experience before, during and after the course. Thirty-two primary care practitioners attended, who had a median of 13 (IQR 6.5, 20) years experience in their specialty. The median number of educational symposia attended in the previous 5 years was 10 (IQR-5, 22.5), with a median of 0 (IQR 0, 1) in rheumatology. All respondents agreed that the course format was appropriate. Numerical improvements were demonstrated in participant's confidence in diagnosing and managing all seven common rheumatologic conditions, with statistically significant improvements (p < 0.05) in 11 of the 14 aspects assessed. The Rheumatology Toolbox is an effective educational method for disseminating current knowledge in rheumatology to primary care physicians and improved participant's self-assessed competence in diagnosis and management of common rheumatic diseases. PMID:25803956

  1. Hills, ridges, mountains, and roads: geographical factors and access to care in rural Kentucky.

    PubMed

    Ramsbottom-Lucier, M; Emmett, K; Rich, E C; Wilson, J F

    1996-01-01

    Access to health care remains an important issue facing many individuals. Barriers to health care include financial factors, characteristics of the individuals and of the health care delivery system, as well as geographical factors. Using a telephone survey of Kentucky residents, this study investigated the relationship between the road quality and county elevation and access to health care for individuals in rural and urban areas of the state. Controlling the comparison for known individual characteristics, community characteristics, and medical infrastructure characteristics, this study uncovered that worse road conditions, measured by a road "rideability" index, were associated with longer times to reach medical care. It also found an association between higher county elevations and shorter times to reach medical care.

  2. Sex Disparities in Access to Acute Stroke Care: Can Telemedicine Mitigate this Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Catherine; Boehme, Amelia K.; Albright, Karen C.; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Mullen, Michael T.; Branas, Charles C.; Grotta, James C.; Savitz, Sean I.; Carr, Brendan G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Women have more frequent and severe ischemic strokes than men, and are less likely to receive treatment for acute stroke. Primary stroke centers (PSCs) have been shown to utilize treatment more frequently. Further, as telemedicine (TM) has expanded access to acute stroke care we sought to investigate the association between PSC, TM and access to acute stroke care in the state of Texas. Methods Texas hospitals and resources were identified from the 2009 American Hospital Association Annual Survey. Hospitals were categorized as: (1) stand-alone PSCs not using telemedicine for acute stroke care, (2) PSCs using telemedicine for acute stroke care (PSC-TM), (3) non-PSC hospitals using telemedicine for acute stroke care, or (4) non-PSC hospitals not using telemedicine for acute stroke care. The proportion of the population who could reach a PSC within 60 minutes was determined for stand-alone PSCs, PSC-TM, and non-PSCs using TM for stroke care. Results Overall, women were as likely to have 60-minute access to a PSC or PSC-TM as their male counterparts (POR 1.02, 95% CI 1.02-1.03). Women were also just as likely to have access to acute stroke care via PSC or PSC-TM or TM as men (POR 1.03, 95% CI 1.02-1.04). Discussion Our study found no sex disparities in access to stand alone PSCs or to hospitals using TM in the state of Texas. The results of this study suggest that telemedicine can be used as part of an inclusive strategy to improve access to care equally for men and women.

  3. Effects of physician joint ventures on health care costs, access, and quality: exploring some issues.

    PubMed

    Ahern, M; Scott, E

    1992-01-01

    Increasingly, physicians are joint-venturing with health care businesses such as physical therapy centers, diagnostic imaging centers, ambulatory surgical centers, and other services. Simultaneously, outpatient costs have been rising. Theoretical and empirical evidence, including results of an exploratory survey of experts, indicate that these two events are linked. Specifically, joint ventures between referring physicians and health care businesses often appear to increase costs, increase utilization, reduce quality of care, and reduce access.

  4. Increasing Access to Health Care Providers with Nurse Practitioner Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Del Marjorie

    2014-01-01

    Emergency department visits increased from 102.8 million to 136.1 million in 2009, resulting in crowding and increased wait times, affecting U.S. hospitals' ability to provide safe, timely patient care resulting in dangerous delays and serious health problems shown by research. The purpose of this project was to determine if competencies developed…

  5. Capabilities of a mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation service for severe respiratory failure delivered by intensive care specialists.

    PubMed

    Sherren, P B; Shepherd, S J; Glover, G W; Meadows, C I S; Langrish, C; Ioannou, N; Wyncoll, D; Daly, K; Gooby, N; Agnew, N; Barrett, N A

    2015-06-01

    We conducted a single-centre observational study of retrievals for severe respiratory failure over 12 months. Our intensivist-delivered retrieval service has mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation capabilities. Sixty patients were analysed: 34 (57%) were female and the mean (SD) age was 44.1 (13.6) years. The mean (SD) PaO2 /FI O2 ratio at referral was 10.2 (4.1) kPa and median (IQR [range]) Murray score was 3.25 (3.0-3.5 [1.5-4.0]). Forty-eight patients (80%) required veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation at the referring centre. There were no cannulation or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation-related complications. The median (IQR [range]) retrieval distance was 47.2 (14.9-77.0 [2.3-342.0]) miles. There were no major adverse events during retrieval. Thirty-seven patients (77%) who received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation survived to discharge from the intensive care unit and 36 patients (75%) were alive after six months. Senior intensivist-initiated and delivered mobile extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is safe and associated with a high incidence of survival.

  6. [Intraosseous access for in-hospital emergencies. Intensive medical care case study].

    PubMed

    Werner, M; Daniel, H-P; Hoitz, J

    2010-07-01

    Since the release of the 2005 resuscitation guidelines intraosseous infusion has been recognized as the favorite alternative vascular access in emergency patients. It is no longer restricted to paediatric emergencies but is also considered the vascular access of choice for adult patients with difficult venous access. Intraosseous access has been used in an increasing proportion of patients especially in an out-of-hospital emergency care setting while only limited experience exists for in-hospital usage of this technique. This article reports on a case of intraosseous access performed in a critically ill patient directly after admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) due to difficult peripheral venous access. Despite the extensive medical resources available in the ICU (i.e. central venous catheterization) less invasive means were used to render appropriate care. Based on this case different strategies of critical care and possible improvements will be discussed. Intraosseous infusion should be regarded as an infrequently needed but potentially life-saving procedure that is still too often considered as an option at later stages during in-hospital emergency care. PMID:20628712

  7. Access to care for transgender veterans in the Veterans Health Administration: 2006-2013.

    PubMed

    Kauth, Michael R; Shipherd, Jillian C; Lindsay, Jan; Blosnich, John R; Brown, George R; Jones, Kenneth T

    2014-09-01

    A 2011 Veterans Health Administration directive mandated medically necessary care for transgender veterans. Internal education efforts informed staff of the directive and promoted greater access to care. For fiscal years 2006 through 2013, we identified 2662 unique individuals with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnoses related to transgender status in Veterans Health Administration medical records, with 40% of new cases in the 2 years following the directive. A bottom-up push for services by veterans and top-down education likely worked synergistically to speed implementation of the new policy and increase access to care. PMID:25100417

  8. Access to care among displaced Mississippi residents in FEMA travel trailer parks two years after Katrina.

    PubMed

    Shehab, Nadine; Anastario, Michael P; Lawry, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    The health care needs of Gulf Coast residents displaced by Hurricane Katrina in 2005 who remain in travel trailer parks nearly three years later have not been evaluated. We conducted a population-based assessment of the health care access of residents of these travel trailer parks in Mississippi. Our findings indicate a worsening of chronic disease, mental illness, and barriers to health care access since displacement. Meeting both the chronic disease and the mental health needs of people displaced by the hurricanes of 2005 is essential for ensuring their full recovery and that of the region.

  9. Social conditions and self-management are more powerful determinants of health than access to care.

    PubMed

    Pincus, T; Esther, R; DeWalt, D A; Callahan, L F

    1998-09-01

    Professional organizations advocate universal access to medical care as a primary approach to improving health in the population. Access to medical services is critical to outcomes of acute processes managed in an inpatient hospital, the setting of most medical education, research, and training, but seems to be limited in its capacity to affect outcomes of outpatient care, the setting of most medical activities. Persistent and widening disparities in health according to socioeconomic status provide evidence of limitations of access to care. First, job classification, a measure of socioeconomic status, was a better predictor of cardiovascular death than cholesterol level, blood pressure, and smoking combined in employed London civil servants with universal access to the National Health Service. Second, disparities in health according to socioeconomic status widened between 1970 and 1980 in the United Kingdom despite universal access (similar trends were seen in the United States). Third, in the United States, noncompletion of high school is a greater risk factor than biological factors for development of many diseases, an association that is explained only in part by age, ethnicity, sex, or smoking status. Fourth, level of formal education predicted cardiovascular mortality better than random assignment to active drug or placebo over 3 years in a clinical trial that provides optimal access to care. Increased recognition of limitations of universal access by physicians and their professional societies may enhance efforts to improve the health of the population. PMID:9735069

  10. The effects of telemedicine on racial and ethnic disparities in access to acute stroke care

    PubMed Central

    Lyerly, Michael J; Wu, Tzu-Ching; Mullen, Michael T; Albright, Karen C; Wolff, Catherine; Boehme, Amelia K; Branas, Charles C; Grotta, James C; Savitz, Sean I; Carr, Brendan G

    2016-01-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities have been previously reported in acute stroke care. We sought to determine the effect of telemedicine (TM) on access to acute stroke care for racial and ethnic minorities in the state of Texas. Data were collected from the US Census Bureau, The Joint Commission and the American Hospital Association. Access for racial and ethnic minorities was determined by summing the population that could reach a primary stroke centre (PSC) or telemedicine spoke within specified time intervals using validated models. TM extended access to stroke expertise by 1.5 million residents. The odds of providing 60-minute access via TM were similar in Blacks and Whites (prevalence odds ratios (POR) 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000), even after adjustment for urbanization (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.001). The odds of providing access via TM were also similar for Hispanics and non-Hispanics (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000), even after adjustment for urbanization (POR 1.000, 95% CI 1.000–1.000). We found that telemedicine increased access to acute stroke care for 1.5 million Texans. While racial and ethnic disparities exist in other components of stroke care, we did not find evidence of disparities in access to the acute stroke expertise afforded by telemedicine. PMID:26116854

  11. Access to care for Chagas disease in the United States: a health systems analysis.

    PubMed

    Manne-Goehler, Jennifer; Reich, Michael R; Wirtz, Veronika J

    2015-07-01

    There are 300,000 estimated cases of Chagas disease in the United States but limited data on access to care. This study analyzed trends in access to care for Chagas disease in the United States and assessed the national and state barriers to access. Data on cases in blood donors and drug releases were obtained from the AABB (formerly American Association of Blood Banks) and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), respectively. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 30 key informants at the national level and in five states where treatment had been released. Interview responses were analyzed according to the health systems dimensions of regulation, financing, payment, organization, and persuasion. Data indicate that 1,908 cases were identified in the blood donation system from 2007 to 2013 and that CDC released 422 courses of benznidazole or nifurtimox during this period. The barriers to access at the national level include limited diagnostic and institutionalized referral and care processes, lack of financing for patient-care activities, and limited awareness and training among providers. This study demonstrates that access to treatment of Chagas disease in the United States is limited. The lack of licensing is only one of several barriers to access, highlighting the need for a health systems perspective when scaling up access to these essential medicines.

  12. Access to HIV Care and Support Services for African American Transwomen Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Erin C.; Arayasirikul, Sean; Johnson, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Low access to HIV care and support has led to survival rates for transwomen that are half that of other populations at risk for HIV. Within the population, HIV disproportionately impacts African American transwomen. Interventions to increase access to HIV care and support are needed to better serve those most affected and vulnerable within the population. We conducted a study of barriers and facilitators to care and support services for African American transwomen to fill a gap in the literature to improve access for this particularly impacted population. A total of 10 in-depth interviews were conducted with African American transwomen living with HIV who lived outside the metro area of San Francisco. Three overarching thematic topics emerged-gender stigma, peer, and institutional distrust - giving insight into African American transwomen's barriers to HIV care and support services. A number of factors within these themes impacted access, such as whether organizations offered gender-related care, the geography of organizations as it relates to safe transportation and location, confidentiality and trust of peers and organizations, and trauma. Specific instrumental, institutional and emotional supports are provided that that may increase access to care and support services for African American transwomen living with HIV. PMID:24817835

  13. Access to Care and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention: A Cross-Sectional Study in 2 Latino Communities.

    PubMed

    Alcalá, Héctor E; Albert, Stephanie L; Roby, Dylan H; Beckerman, Jacob; Champagne, Philippe; Brookmeyer, Ron; Prelip, Michael L; Glik, Deborah C; Inkelas, Moira; Garcia, Rosa-Elenna; Ortega, Alexander N

    2015-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading killer of Americans. CVD is understudied among Latinos, who have high levels of CVD risk factors. This study aimed to determine whether access to health care (ie, insurance status and having a usual source of care) is associated with 4 CVD prevention factors (ie, health care utilization, CVD screening, information received from health care providers, and lifestyle factors) among Latino adults and to evaluate whether the associations depended on CVD clinical risk/disease.Data were collected as part of a community-engaged food environment intervention study in East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights, CA. Logistic regressions were fitted with insurance status and usual source of care as predictors of the 4 CVD prevention factors while controlling for demographics. Analyses were repeated with interactions between self-reported CVD clinical risk/disease and access to care measures.Access to health care significantly increased the odds of CVD prevention. Having a usual source of care was associated with all factors of prevention, whereas being insured was only associated with some factors of prevention. CVD clinical risk/disease did not moderate any associations.Although efforts to reduce CVD risk among Latinos through the Affordable Care Act could be impactful, they might have limited impact in curbing CVD among Latinos, via the law's expansion of insurance coverage. CVD prevention efforts must expand beyond the provision of insurance to effectively lower CVD rates.

  14. Behavioral health care for children: the massachusetts child psychiatry access project.

    PubMed

    Straus, John H; Sarvet, Barry

    2014-12-01

    Access to behavioral health care for children is essential to achieving good health care outcomes. Pediatric primary care providers have an essential role to play in identifying and treating behavioral health problems in children. However, they lack adequate training and resources and thus have generally been unable to meet children's need for behavioral health care. The Massachusetts Child Psychiatry Access Project has addressed this problem by delivering telephone child psychiatry consultations and specialized care coordination support to over 95 percent of the pediatric primary care providers in Massachusetts. Established in 2004, the project consists of six regional hubs, each of which has one full-time-equivalent child psychiatrist, licensed therapist, and care coordinator. Collectively, the hubs are available to over 95 percent of the 1.5 million children in Massachusetts. In fiscal year 2013 the Massachusetts Child Psychiatry Access Project served 10,553 children. Pediatric primary care providers enrolled in the project reported a dramatic improvement in their ability to meet the psychiatric needs of their patients. Telephone child psychiatry consultation programs for pediatric primary care providers, many modeled after the Massachusetts project, have spread across the United States.

  15. Expanding access to primary care without additional budgets? A case study from Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Marschall, Paul; Flessa, Steffen

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the impact of increased access to primary care on provider costs in the rural health district of Nouna, Burkina Faso. This study question is crucial for health care planning in this district, as other research work shows that the population has a higher need for health care services. From a public health perspective, an increase of utilisation of first-line health facilities would be necessary. However, the governmental budget that is needed to finance improved access was not known. The study is based on data of 2004 of a comprehensive provider cost information system. This database provides us with the actual costs of each primary health care facility (Centre de Santé et de Promotion Sociale, CSPS) in the health district. We determine the fixed and variable costs of each institution and calculate the average cost per service unit rendered in 2004. Based on the cost structure of each CSPS, we calculate the total costs if the demand for health care services increased. We conclude that the total provider costs of primary care (and therefore the governmental budget) would hardly rise if the coverage of the population were increased. This is mainly due to the fact that the highest variable costs are drugs, which are fully paid for by the customers (Bamako Initiative). The majority of other costs are fixed. Consequently, health care reforms that improve access to health care institutions must not fear dramatically increasing the costs of health care services. PMID:18197447

  16. Dental care access for low-income and immigrant cancer patients in New York City.

    PubMed

    Howard, Jocelyn R; Ramirez, Julia; Li, Yuelin; Gany, Francesca

    2015-02-01

    This exploratory study assesses the dental care needs and access of low-income, mostly immigrant cancer patients enrolled in New York City's Integrated Cancer Care Action Network (ICCAN). A nested cohort of patients from ICCAN responded to a dental needs assessment that surveyed current dental health as well as access to, and use of, dental services. 373 patients participated. Self-report of having a dentist to visit, current dental problems, income, and insurance most significantly predicted a dentist visit in the past year. Discussing treatment-related oral side effects with the oncologist greatly increased the likelihood of seeing a dentist, but few patients reported having had this conversation. There is a lack of oral care information flowing from oncologists to low income patients. We found a high number of reported dental problems: concerning because of potential treatment interference and risk for infection. Finally, ability to pay largely determined dental care access in our study participants.

  17. Why do we observe a limited impact of primary care access measures on clinical quality indicators?

    PubMed

    Chung, Sukyung; Panattoni, Laura; Hung, Dorothy; Johns, Nicole; Trujillo, Laurel; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2014-01-01

    The study assessed the effects of enhanced primary care access and continuity on clinical quality in a large, multipayer, multispecialty ambulatory care organization with fee-for-service provider incentives. The difference-in-differences estimates indicate that access to own primary care physician is a statistically significant predictor of improved clinical quality, although the effect size is small such that clinical significance may be negligible. Reduced time for own primary care physician appointment and increased enrollment in electronic personal health record are positive predictors of chronic disease management processes and preventive screening but are inconsistently associated with clinical outcomes. Challenges in identifying relationships between access and quality outcomes in a real-world setting are also discussed. PMID:24594563

  18. Women are still deprived of access to lifesaving essential and emergency obstetric care.

    PubMed

    Islam, Monir; Yoshida, Sachiyo

    2009-08-01

    Two decades have passed since the global community agreed in Nairobi to the Safe Motherhood Initiative to reduce maternal deaths. However, every year 536,000 pregnant women are dying. There is no ambiguity about why most of these women are dying. These tragedies are avoidable if women have timely access to quality essential obstetric and emergency care. Rural and poor women are mostly excluded from accessing skilled and emergency care. Quality facility-based care is the best option to reduce maternal mortality. Scaling up essential interventions and services-particularly for those who are excluded-is a substantial and challenging undertaking. We need to challenge our policy makers and program managers to refocus program content; to shift focus from development of new technologies toward development of viable organizational strategies to provide access to essential and emergency obstetric care 24 hours a day 7 days a week, and account for every birth and every death. PMID:19540492

  19. Blueprint for Implementing New Processes in Acute Care: Rescuing Adult Patients With Intraosseous Access.

    PubMed

    Chreiman, Kristen M; Kim, Patrick K; Garbovsky, Lyudmila A; Schweickert, William D

    2015-01-01

    The intraosseous (IO) access initiative at an urban university adult level 1 trauma center began from the need for a more expeditious vascular access route to rescue patients in extremis. The goal of this project was a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving to increase access of IO catheters to rescue patients in all care areas. The initiative became a collaborative effort between nursing, physicians, and pharmacy to embark on an acute care endeavor to standardize IO access. This is a descriptive analysis of processes to effectively develop collaborative strategies to navigate hospital systems and successfully implement multilayered initiatives. Administration should empower nurse to advance their practice to include IO for patient rescue. Intraosseous access may expedite resuscitative efforts in patients in extremis who lack venous access or where additional venous access is required for life-saving therapies. Limiting IO dwell time may facilitate timely definitive venous access. Continued education and training by offering IO skill laboratory refreshers and annual e-learning didactic is optimal for maintaining proficiency and knowledge. More research opportunities exist to determine medication safety and efficacy in adult patients in the acute care setting. PMID:26352658

  20. Evaluation of health care service quality in Poland with the use of SERVQUAL method at the specialist ambulatory health care center

    PubMed Central

    Manulik, Stanisław; Rosińczuk, Joanna; Karniej, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Service quality and customer satisfaction are very important components of competitive advantage in the health care sector. The SERVQUAL method is widely used for assessing the quality expected by patients and the quality of actually provided services. Objectives The main purpose of this study was to determine if patients from state and private health care facilities differed in terms of their qualitative priorities and assessments of received services. Materials and methods The study included a total of 412 patients: 211 treated at a state facility and 201 treated at a private facility. Each of the respondents completed a 5-domain, 22-item SERVQUAL questionnaire. The actual quality of health care services in both types of facilities proved significantly lower than expected. Results All the patients gave the highest scores to the domains constituting the core aspects of health care services. The private facility respondents had the highest expectations with regard to equipment, and the state facility ones regarding contacts with the medical personnel. Conclusion Health care quality management should be oriented toward comprehensive optimization in all domains, rather than only within the domain identified as the qualitative priority for patients of a given facility. PMID:27536075

  1. [Access to cancer care: the cost of treatment matters].

    PubMed

    Tirelli, Umberto

    2014-05-01

    The approval of new antiviral agents and the wide-ranging costs of ophthalmic therapies with comparable efficacy have renewed the debate over the cost-effectiveness of novel drugs. In oncology, more expensive treatments do not always substantially change the outcome of the disease, but they merely prolong life expectancy by a few weeks even at the cost of significant side effects. Treatment costs are a key factor the physician should consider when sharing care decisions with the patient. In addition, fund allocation for purchasing high cost medications results in limited investment in clinical research and human resources - doctors, nurses and other healthcare staff - that play a central role in patient care. Regulatory agencies should be more demanding, reimbursing pharmaceutical companies on the basis of treatment outcome.

  2. Increasing access--a qualitative study of homelessness and palliative care in a major urban center.

    PubMed

    Krakowsky, Yonah; Gofine, Mirriam; Brown, Pnina; Danziger, Jana; Knowles, Holly

    2013-05-01

    Rates of morbidity and mortality are significantly higher in homeless populations. Homeless people experience many barriers to receive adequate palliative care. This qualitative study examines how a major urban city's palliative care resources can be improved to increase access and better serve the homeless. Audiotaped interviews were preformed with 7 homeless care providers in Toronto, Canada, and their transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. The findings of the study suggest that in order to increase access and to serve the city's terminally ill homeless better, the following 4 areas must be addressed: (1) increasing positive interaction between the health care system and the homeless, (2) training staff to deal with the unique issues confronting the homeless, (3) providing patient-centered care, and (4) diversifying the methods of delivery.

  3. Will universal access to antiretroviral therapy ever be possible? The health care worker challenge.

    PubMed

    Maddison, André R; Schlech, Walter F

    2010-01-01

    The United Nations millennium development goal of providing universal access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for patients living with HIV/AIDS by 2010 is unachievable. Currently, four million people are receiving ART, of an estimated 13.7 million who need it. A major challenge to achieving this goal is the shortage of health care workers in low-income and low-resource areas of the world. Sub-Saharan African countries have 68% of the world's burden of illness from AIDS, yet have only 3% of health care workers worldwide. The shortage of health care providers is primarily caused by a national and international 'brain drain,' poor distribution of health care workers within countries, and health care worker burnout.Even though the millennium development goal to provide universal access to ART will not be met by 2010, it is imperative to continue to build on the momentum created by these humanitarian goals. The present literature review was written with the purpose of attracting research and policy attention toward evidence from small-scale projects in sub-Saharan Africa, which have been successful at increasing access to ART. Specifically, a primary-care model of ART delivery, which focuses on decentralization of services, task shifting and community involvement will be discussed. To improve the health care worker shortage in sub-Saharan Africa, the conventional model of health care delivery must be replaced with an innovative model that utilizes doctors, nurses and community members more effectively.

  4. Racial composition of residential areas associates with access to pre-ESRD nephrology care.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Suma; Rodriguez, Rudolph A; Austin, Peter C; Saskin, Refik; Fernandez, Alicia; Moist, Louise M; O'Hare, Ann M

    2010-07-01

    Referral to a nephrologist before initiation of chronic dialysis occurs less frequently for blacks than whites, but the reasons for this disparity are incompletely understood. Here, we examined the contribution of racial composition by zip code on access and quality of nephrology care before initiation of renal replacement therapy (RRT). We retrospectively studied a cohort study of 92,000 white and black adults who initiated RRT in the United States between June 1, 2005, and October 5, 2006. The percentage of patients without pre-ESRD nephrology care ranged from 30% among those who lived in zip codes with <5% black residents to 41% among those who lived in areas with >50% black residents. In adjusted analyses, as the percentage of blacks in residential areas increased, the likelihood of not receiving pre-ESRD nephrology care increased. Among patients who received nephrology care, the quality of care (timing of care and proportion of patients who received a pre-emptive renal transplant, who initiated therapy with peritoneal dialysis, or who had a permanent hemodialysis access) did not differ by the racial composition of their residential area. In conclusion, racial composition of residential areas associates with access to nephrology care but not with quality of the nephrology care received.

  5. Identifying the key elements of an education package to up-skill multidisciplinary adult specialist palliative care teams caring for young adults with life-limiting conditions: an online Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Sivell, Stephanie; Lidstone, Victoria; Taubert, Mark; Thompson, Catherine; Nelson, Annmarie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To collect the views of experts to inform the development of an education package for multidisciplinary adult specialist palliative care (SPC) teams caring for young people with life-limiting conditions. Methods A modified online Delphi process collated expert opinion on format, delivery and content of an education package to up-skill adult SPC teams. Round 1 participants (n=44) answered free-text questions, generating items for Round 2. In Round 2, 68 participants rated the extent to which they agreed/disagreed with the items on 5-point Likert-type scales. Median and mean scores assessed the importance of each item. IQR scores assessed level of consensus for each item; items lacking consensus were rerated by 35 participants in Round 3. Results In the Delphi, consensus was reached on a range of suggested formats, on who should deliver the training, and on several clinical, psychosocial and practical topics. Conclusions Development of a continuous/rolling programme of education, tailored for content and mode of delivery and incorporated into working practice is recommended. As a direct outcome of the results of this study, a series of six linked study days has been established, focusing specifically on the issues around caring for young adults with life-limiting conditions and palliative care needs. PMID:24670554

  6. The Palliative Care Information Act and Access to Palliative Care in Terminally ill Patients: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Victoria, Kitty; Patel, Sarita

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that over 50% of end-of-life discussions take place for the first time in the hospital and that terminally ill patients often have unrealistic views regarding the possible scope of treatment. The Palliative Care information Act (PCIA) was passed in an attempt to address the lack of access for terminally ill patients to palliative care services. A multi-database systematic review was performed on published studies from 2010 to present, and there were none found measuring the effectiveness of the PCIA. Objectives: We aimed to study the effect of the PCIA on access to palliative care services. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of all terminally ill patients who died at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center from January 2010 to August 2013 in relation to passing of the PCIA. Results: Prelaw (prior to the law passing), 12.3% of the terminal patients received palliative care consults, 25% during the transition period (time between passing of law and when it came into effect) and 37.7% postlaw (after coming into effect) (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Legislation can have a significant effect on terminally ill patient's access to palliative care services and can change the culture of a hospital to be more pro-palliative for the appropriate populations. PMID:27803564

  7. Health and access to care for undocumented migrants living in the European Union: a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Aniek; Howard, Natasha; Wolffers, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Background Literature on health and access to care of undocumented migrants in the European Union (EU) is limited and heterogeneous in focus and quality. Authors conducted a scoping review to identify the extent, nature and distribution of existing primary research (1990–2012), thus clarifying what is known, key gaps, and potential next steps. Methods Authors used Arksey and O’Malley’s six-stage scoping framework, with Levac, Colquhoun and O’Brien’s revisions, to review identified sources. Findings were summarized thematically: (i) physical, mental and social health issues, (ii) access and barriers to care, (iii) vulnerable groups and (iv) policy and rights. Results Fifty-four sources were included of 598 identified, with 93% (50/54) published during 2005–2012. EU member states from Eastern Europe were under-represented, particularly in single-country studies. Most study designs (52%) were qualitative. Sampling descriptions were generally poor, and sampling purposeful, with only four studies using any randomization. Demographic descriptions were far from uniform and only two studies focused on undocumented children and youth. Most (80%) included findings on health-care access, with obstacles reported at primary, secondary and tertiary levels. Major access barriers included fear, lack of awareness of rights, socioeconomics. Mental disorders appeared widespread, while obstetric needs and injuries were key reasons for seeking care. Pregnant women, children and detainees appeared most vulnerable. While EU policy supports health-care access for undocumented migrants, practices remain haphazard, with studies reporting differing interpretation and implementation of rights at regional, institutional and individual levels. Conclusions This scoping review is an initial attempt to describe available primary evidence on health and access to care for undocumented migrants in the European Union. It underlines the need for more and better-quality research, increased

  8. Barriers to access to care reported by women living with HIV across 27 countries

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Margaret; Samarina, Anna; Xi, He; Valdez Ramalho Madruga, José; Hocqueloux, Laurent; Loutfy, Mona; Fournelle, Marie-Josée; Norton, Michael; Van Wyk, Jean; Zachry, Woodie; Martinez, Marisol

    2015-01-01

    Increased access to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) is necessary in order to achieve an AIDS-free generation. Importantly, slightly over half of the people living with HIV are women. Small studies have described many barriers to accessing treatment and care among women living with HIV. This cross-sectional, non-interventional, epidemiological study assessed the prevalence of barriers to accessing care for women living with HIV across 27 countries, divided into four global regions. HIV-positive women attending routine clinical visits were offered the opportunity to participate in the study. Data describing the study sites and demographic characteristics of the participating women were collected. Participating women filled out questionnaires including the Barriers to Care Scale (BACS) questionnaire, on which they reported the extent to which they found each of the 12 potential barriers to accessing health care problematic. A total of 1931 women living with HIV were included in the study: 760 from Western Europe and Canada (WEC), 532 from Central and Eastern Europe (CEE), 519 from Latin America (LA), and 120 from China. The mean age of participating women was 40.1 ± 11.4 years. A total of 88.2% were currently taking ART. A total of 81.8% obtained HIV treatment under a government health plan. The most prevalent barrier to care was community HIV/AIDS stigma. Community HIV/AIDS knowledge, lack of supportive/understanding work environments, lack of employment opportunities, and personal financial resources were also highly prevalent barriers to accessing care. These findings indicate that, more than 30 years after the start of the AIDS epidemic, stigma is still a major issue for women living with HIV. Continued efforts are needed to improve community education on HIV/AIDS in order to maximize access to health care among women living with HIV. PMID:26168817

  9. The family-school-primary care triangle and the access to mental health care among migrant and ethnic minorities.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Marta; Moleiro, Carla

    2012-08-01

    Understanding the concepts of mental health and help seeking behaviours of migrant and ethnic minority families constitutes an important step toward improving the intercultural competence of health and education professionals. This paper addresses these goals among ethnic and migrant minorities in Portugal. For this a multi-informant approach was selected. The study involved nine focus groups (N = 39) conducted with different samples: young immigrants (12-17 years), immigrant parents, teachers and health professionals. The results showed similarities and differences in concepts of mental health, as well as help seeking processes. Stigma continued to be recognized as a barrier in the access to mental health care. The paper argues that providing adequate training on mental health on cultural diversity competencies to health and education professionals can contribute to a better inter-communication and -relation system in the family-school-primary care triangle and thus facilitate access to mental health care for youth. PMID:21947737

  10. Assessing the spatial accessibility of hospital care in Sichuan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jay; Liu, Huiran; Wang, Xiuli; Xie, Hongmei; Delamater, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    Regional disparities in geographical access to hospital care are found throughout China. Understanding variations in the spatial accessibility of hospital care has the potential to provide decision support in healthcare planning. This study examines the hospital system in the Sichuan Province in China, which provides healthcare for more than 80 million people. We examine the impacts of accessibility characterisation via the conventional measurement approach by comparing the results to those derived using a floating catchment area approach. Employing a geographical information system based on population and hospital administrative data, we conducted a province-wide study of the spatial accessibility of hospital care in Sichuan Province, China. A shortest-path analysis and the enhanced two-step floating catchment area (E2SFCA) method were implemented. Substantial differences between these two approaches were found, including a roughly 15% difference in the total number of under-served areas. Generally, spatial accessibility was higher in the eastern regions of Sichuan. More than 5.5 million people were found to have limited access, with large variations across the province. These results indicate that the official method used by policy makers in China may not capture the true nature of spatial accessibility throughout the region. We recommend that the E2SFCA method be implemented for health services research in China, providing decision makers with more accurate information when setting healthcare policies.

  11. Women's perceptions of access to prenatal care in the United States: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Phillippi, Julia C

    2009-01-01

    Women report many barriers to accessing prenatal care. This article reviews the literature from 1990 to the present on women's perceptions of access to prenatal care within the United States. Barriers can be classified into societal, maternal, and structural dimensions. Women may not be motivated to seek care, especially for unintended pregnancies. Societal and maternal reasons cited for poor motivation include a fear of medical procedures or disclosing the pregnancy to others, depression, and a belief that prenatal care is unnecessary. Structural barriers include long wait times, the location and hours of the clinic, language and attitude of the clinic staff and provider, the cost of services, and a lack of child-friendly facilities. Knowledge of women's views of access can help in development of policies to decrease barriers. Structural barriers could be reduced through changes in clinic policy and prenatal care format, and the creation of child-friendly waiting and examination rooms. Maternal and societal barriers can be addressed through community education. A focus in future research on facilitators of access can assist in creating open pathways to perinatal care for all women.

  12. Addressing the emotional barriers to access to reproductive care.

    PubMed

    Rich, Camilla W; Domar, Alice D

    2016-05-01

    Health care professionals make the medical care of infertility patients a priority, with the goal of achieving a singleton pregnancy for each. Patients who never seek out care, who do not return for treatment after the diagnostic workup, or who drop out of treatment are rarely noticed. Yet this is the outcome for the majority of patients, and the primary reason after financial for treatment termination is the emotional aspect. Attending to the psychological needs of our patients must become a higher priority, to provide all patients true access to care. PMID:27054306

  13. Medicaid and indigent care issue brief: youth access to tobacco.

    PubMed

    Kendell, N

    2000-06-01

    Tobacco use is the single leading preventable cause of death in the United States. Annually, tobacco causes more than 430,000 deaths and costs the nation approximately $50 billion - $73 billion in medical expenses alone. Smoking among American adolescents increased 78 percent between 1988 and 1996. Each day, more than 6,000 youth under age 18 try their first cigarette, and more than 3,000 become daily smokers. State legislatures currently are pursuing a wide range of legislative proposals that are designed to limit youth access to tobacco products and to ensure that their state laws comply with current federal requirements. State laws vary in their approach, and are unevenly enforced. Until recently, current laws did not penalize minors for using or possessing tobacco; instead, punishment focused on retailers. These punishments, however, have proved ineffective because retailers rarely are prosecuted for breaking these laws. This document will highlight legislative approaches since 1992, the year the federal Synar Amendment was enacted.

  14. Comparison of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise therapy, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    White, PD; Goldsmith, KA; Johnson, AL; Potts, L; Walwyn, R; DeCesare, JC; Baber, HL; Burgess, M; Clark, LV; Cox, DL; Bavinton, J; Angus, BJ; Murphy, G; Murphy, M; O'Dowd, H; Wilks, D; McCrone, P; Chalder, T; Sharpe, M

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Trial findings show cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and graded exercise therapy (GET) can be effective treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome, but patients' organisations have reported that these treatments can be harmful and favour pacing and specialist health care. We aimed to assess effectiveness and safety of all four treatments. Methods In our parallel-group randomised trial, patients meeting Oxford criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome were recruited from six secondary-care clinics in the UK and randomly allocated by computer-generated sequence to receive specialist medical care (SMC) alone or with adaptive pacing therapy (APT), CBT, or GET. Primary outcomes were fatigue (measured by Chalder fatigue questionnaire score) and physical function (measured by short form-36 subscale score) up to 52 weeks after randomisation, and safety was assessed primarily by recording all serious adverse events, including serious adverse reactions to trial treatments. Primary outcomes were rated by participants, who were necessarily unmasked to treatment assignment; the statistician was masked to treatment assignment for the analysis of primary outcomes. We used longitudinal regression models to compare SMC alone with other treatments, APT with CBT, and APT with GET. The final analysis included all participants for whom we had data for primary outcomes. This trial is registered at http://isrctn.org, number ISRCTN54285094. Findings We recruited 641 eligible patients, of whom 160 were assigned to the APT group, 161 to the CBT group, 160 to the GET group, and 160 to the SMC-alone group. Compared with SMC alone, mean fatigue scores at 52 weeks were 3·4 (95% CI 1·8 to 5·0) points lower for CBT (p=0·0001) and 3·2 (1·7 to 4·8) points lower for GET (p=0·0003), but did not differ for APT (0·7 [−0·9 to 2·3] points lower; p=0·38). Compared with SMC alone, mean physical function scores were 7·1 (2·0 to 12·1) points higher for CBT (p=0·0068) and 9·4

  15. Determinants of unequal HIV care access among people living with HIV in Peru

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Equity in access to health care among people living with HIV (PLHA) has not been extensively studied in Peru despite the fact there is significant social diversity within this group. We aimed to assess the extent to which health care provision to PLHA, including ARVT, was equitable and, if appropriate, identify factors associated with lower access. Methods We conducted a survey among adult PLHA in four cities in Peru, recruited through respondent-driven sampling (RDS), to collect information on socio-demographic characteristics, social network size, household welfare, economic activity, use of HIV-related services including ARV treatment, and health-related out-of-pocket expenses. Results Between September 2008 and January 2009, 863 individuals from PLHA organizations in four cities of Peru were enrolled. Median age was 35 (IQR = 29–41), and mostly male (62%). Overall, 25% reported to be gay, 11% bisexual and 3% transgender. Most PLHA (96%) reported access to some kind of HIV-related health service, and 84% were receiving those services at a public facility. Approximately 85% of those reporting access to care were receiving antiretroviral treatment (ARV), and 17% of those not in treatment already had indication to start treatment. Among those currently on ARV, 36% percent reported out-of-pocket expenses within the last month. Transgender identity and age younger than 35 years old, were associated with lower access to health care. Conclusions Our findings contribute to a better social and demographic characterization of the situation of PLHAs, their access to HIV care and their source of care, and provide an assessment of equity in access. In the long term, it is expected that HIV care access, as well as its social determinants, will impact on the morbidity and mortality rates among those affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic. HIV care providers and program managers should further characterize the barriers to healthcare access and develop strategies to

  16. Adverse or acceptable: negotiating access to a post-apartheid health care contract

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As in many fragile and post-conflict countries, South Africa’s social contract has formally changed from authoritarianism to democracy, yet access to services, including health care, remains inequitable and contested. We examine access barriers to quality health services and draw on social contract theory to explore ways in which a post-apartheid health care contract is narrated, practiced and negotiated by patients and providers. We consider implications for conceptualizing and promoting more inclusive, equitable health services in a post-conflict setting. Methods Using in-depth interviews with 45 patients and 67 providers, and field observations from twelve health facilities in one rural and two urban sub-districts, we explore access narratives of those seeking and delivering – negotiating - maternal health, tuberculosis and antiretroviral services in South Africa. Results Although South Africa’s right to access to health care is constitutionally guaranteed, in practice, a post-apartheid health care contract is not automatically or unconditionally inclusive. Access barriers, including poverty, an under-resourced, hierarchical health system, the nature of illness and treatment, and negative attitudes and actions, create conditions for insecure or adverse incorporation into this contract, or even exclusion (sometimes temporary) from health care services. Such barriers are exacerbated by differences in the expectations that patients and providers have of each other and the contract, leading to differing, potentially conflicting, identities of inclusion and exclusion: defaulting versus suffering patients, uncaring versus overstretched providers. Conversely, caring, respectful communication, individual acts of kindness, and institutional flexibility and leadership may mitigate key access barriers and limit threats to the contract, fostering more positive forms of inclusion and facilitating easier access to health care. Conclusions Building health in

  17. Using geographic information system tools to improve access to MS specialty care in Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Culpepper, William J; Cowper-Ripley, Diane; Litt, Eric R; McDowell, Tzu-Yun; Hoffman, Paul M

    2010-01-01

    Access to appropriate and timely healthcare is critical to the overall health and well-being of patients with chronic diseases. In this study, we used geographic information system (GIS) tools to map Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and their access to MS specialty care. We created six travel-time bands around VHA facilities with MS specialty care and calculated the number of VHA patients with MS who resided in each time band and the number of patients who lived more than 2 hours from the nearest specialty clinic in fiscal year 2007. We demonstrate the utility of using GIS tools in decision-making by providing three examples of how patients' access to care is affected when additional specialty clinics are added. The mapping technique used in this study provides a powerful and valuable tool for policy and planning personnel who are evaluating how to address underserved populations and areas within the VHA healthcare system. PMID:20848371

  18. Using geographic information system tools to improve access to MS specialty care in Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Culpepper, William J; Cowper-Ripley, Diane; Litt, Eric R; McDowell, Tzu-Yun; Hoffman, Paul M

    2010-01-01

    Access to appropriate and timely healthcare is critical to the overall health and well-being of patients with chronic diseases. In this study, we used geographic information system (GIS) tools to map Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and their access to MS specialty care. We created six travel-time bands around VHA facilities with MS specialty care and calculated the number of VHA patients with MS who resided in each time band and the number of patients who lived more than 2 hours from the nearest specialty clinic in fiscal year 2007. We demonstrate the utility of using GIS tools in decision-making by providing three examples of how patients' access to care is affected when additional specialty clinics are added. The mapping technique used in this study provides a powerful and valuable tool for policy and planning personnel who are evaluating how to address underserved populations and areas within the VHA healthcare system.

  19. Does government oversight improve access to nursing home care? Longitudinal evidence from US counties.

    PubMed

    Howard, Larry L

    2014-01-01

    Gains in life expectancy around the world have increasingly placed pressure on governments to ensure that the elderly receive assistance with activities of daily living. This research examines the impact of government oversight of Medicaid payment policies on access to nursing home care services in the United States. Variation in price levels induced by a federal policy shift in 1997 is used to identify the effect of Medicaid reimbursements on the number of nursing homes and beds available. Court rulings prior to the policy change are used to categorically define a range of oversight treatments at the state level. Difference-in-differences estimates indicate a significant decline in access to nursing home care services for individuals living in states in which courts consistently ruled that Medicaid reimbursements did not meet the minimum standard implied by federal law. The findings suggest that nursing home care services were made more accessible through a combination of legislative and judicial oversight of Medicaid payment policies.

  20. Delays in Cancer Care Among Low-Income Minorities Despite Access

    PubMed Central

    Nonzee, Narissa J.; Ragas, Daiva M.; Ha Luu, Thanh; Phisuthikul, Ava M.; Tom, Laura; Dong, XinQi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Narrowing the racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in breast and cervical cancer requires an in-depth understanding of motivation for adherence to cancer screening and follow-up care. To inform patient-centered interventions, this study aimed to identify reasons why low-income women adhered to or delayed breast or cervical cancer screening, follow-up and treatment despite access to cancer care-related services. Methods: Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted among women with access to cancer care-related services receiving care at an academic cancer center, federally qualified health centers, or free clinics in the Chicago metropolitan area. Transcripts were coded and analyzed for themes related to rationales for adherence. Results: Among 138 participants, most were African American (46%) or Hispanic (36%), English speaking (70%), and between ages 41 and 65 years (64%). Primary drivers of nonadherence included lack of knowledge of resources, denial or fear, competing obligations, and embarrassment. Facilitators included abnormality identification, patient activation, provider-initiated actions, and motivation from family or friends. Conclusions: Interventions targeting increased adherence to care among low-income and ethnic minority women should direct efforts to proactive, culturally and patient-informed education that enables patients to access resources and use the health care system, address misconceptions about cancer, ensure health care providers' communication of screening guidelines, and leverage the patient's social support network. PMID:26070037

  1. Access to infertility care in the developing world: the family promotion gap.

    PubMed

    Asemota, Obehi A; Klatsky, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Infertility in resource-poor settings is an overlooked global health problem. Although scarce health care resources must be deployed thoughtfully, prioritization of resources may be different for recipient and donor countries, the latter of whom focus on maternal health care, prevention, and family planning. For women and couples with involuntary childlessness, the negative psychosocial, sociocultural, and economic consequences in low-income countries are severe, possibly more so than in most Western societies. Despite the local importance of infertility, few resources are committed to help advance infertility care in regions like sub-Saharan Africa. The worldwide prevalence of infertility is remarkably similar across low-, middle-, and high-income countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes infertility as a global health problem and established universal access to reproductive health care as one of the United Nation's Millennium Developmental Goals for 2015. Currently, access to infertility care is varied and is usually only attainable by the very wealthy in low-income countries. We provide an overview on the current state of access to infertility care in low-income countries such as in sub-Saharan Africa and a rationale for providing comprehensive reproductive care and possible solutions for providing cost-effective infertility services in these settings.

  2. Poverty, out-of-pocket payments and access to health care: evidence from Tajikistan.

    PubMed

    Falkingham, Jane

    2004-01-01

    Most countries of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have either initiated or are contemplating reform of the health sector. With negative real income growth and falling government revenues, a key concern of many governments is to secure additional finance through non-budgetary sources such as hypothecated payroll taxes, voluntary insurance, and increased private finance through patient cost-sharing. However, before such reforms can be considered, information is needed both on the current levels and distribution of household expenditures on health care, and the extent to which increased charges may affect access to health services, especially amongst the poor. This paper uses the Tajikistan Livings Standard Survey to investigate the level and distribution of out-of-pocket payments for health care in Tajikistan and to examine the extent to which such payments act as barriers to health-care access. The data show that there are significant differences in health-care utilisation rates across socio-economic groups and that these differences are related to ability to pay. Official and informal payments are acting both to deter people from seeking medical assistance and once advice has been sought, from receiving the most appropriate treatment. Despite informal exemptions, out-of-pocket payments for health care are exacting a high toll on household welfare with households being forced to sell assets or go into debt to meet the costs of care. Urgent action is needed to ensure equity in access to health care. PMID:14604611

  3. Using a Mystery-Caller Approach to Examine Access to Prostate Cancer Care in Philadelphia

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Craig Evan; Ross, Michelle E.; Armstrong, Katrina; Branas, Charles C.; Rhodes, Karin V.; Bekelman, Justin E.; Wentz, Alicia; Stillson, Christian; Radhakrishnan, Archana; Oyeniran, Enny; Grande, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prior work suggests that access to health care may influence the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Mystery-caller methods have been used previously to measure access to care for health services such as primary care, where patients’ self-initiate requests for care. We used a mystery-caller survey for specialized prostate cancer care to assess dimensions of access to prostate cancer care. Materials and Methods We created an inventory of urology and radiation oncology practices in southeastern Pennsylvania. Using a ‘mystery caller’ approach, a research assistant posing as a medical office scheduler in a primary care office, attempted to make a new patient appointment on behalf of a referred patient. Linear regression was used to determine the association between time to next available appointment with practice and census tract characteristics. Results We successfully obtained information on new patient appointments from 198 practices out of the 223 in the region (88.8%). Radiation oncology practices were more likely to accept Medicaid compared to urology practices (91.3% vs 36.4%) and had shorter mean wait times for new patient appointments (9.0 vs 12.8 days). We did not observe significant differences in wait times according to census tract characteristics including neighborhood socioeconomic status and the proportion of male African American residents. Conclusions Mystery-caller methods that reflect real-world referral processes from primary care offices can be used to measure access to specialized cancer care. We observed significant differences in wait times and insurance acceptance between radiation oncology and urology practices. PMID:27723780

  4. Health care access and advocacy for immigrant and other underserved elders.

    PubMed

    Yee, D L

    1992-01-01

    Little is known about health care access and advocacy for elders of color, and even less is known about immigrant elders, whose growing number is the major reason that almost one of every three older persons in the U.S. by the year 2050 will be an elder of color. This paper explores a number of access barriers faced by underserved elders, including inequitable long-term care services and counterproductive "colorblind" approaches to caregiving. It also addresses barriers, such as problematic immigration policies, that present particular challenges to elderly immigrants. While available materials provide baseline information and help providers learn about underserved elders, real change in how target populations gain access to health and social services comes when providers make explicit efforts to improve the accessibility and quality of services. PMID:1606278

  5. Inequalities in access to pediatric ESRD care: a global health challenge.

    PubMed

    Harambat, Jérôme; Ekulu, Pepe Mfutu

    2016-03-01

    The increasing attention paid to chronic kidney disease (CKD) as a major cause of mortality and disability, as well as the advances in management of CKD in children, have created a growing demand for pediatric renal replacement therapy (RRT) worldwide. A study by Koch Nogueira and colleagues of children on the transplant waiting list showed large disparities in access to pediatric kidney transplantation between regions in Brazil. This finding raises a wider question about inequalities in access to CKD care in children. Here we review the available data on the global burden of end-stage renal disease in children, the need for pediatric RRT, and its actual provision worldwide. We focus on inequalities in access to renal care for children that currently exist between and within countries. Reduction in worldwide inequalities in access to RRT in children remains a challenge, which requires greater awareness and effective interventions and policies.

  6. Service innovation in glaucoma management: using a web-based electronic patient record to facilitate virtual specialist supervision of a shared care glaucoma programme

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Heathcote R; Diamond, Jeremy P

    2015-01-01

    Aim To assess the importance of specialist supervision in a new model of glaucoma service delivery. Methods An optometrist supported by three technicians managed each glaucoma clinic. Patients underwent testing and clinical examination before the optometrist triaged them into one of five groups: ‘normal’, ‘stable’, ‘low risk’, ‘unstable’ and ‘high risk’. Patient data were uploaded to an electronic medical record to facilitate virtual review by a glaucoma specialist. Results 24 257 glaucoma reviews at three glaucoma clinics during a 31-month period were analysed. The clinic optometrists and glaucoma specialists had substantial agreement (κ 0.69). 13 patients were identified to be high risk by the glaucoma specialist that had not been identified as such by the optometrist. Glaucoma specialists amended 13% of the optometrists’ interim decisions resulting in an overall reduction in review appointments by 2.4%. Conclusions Employing technicians and optometrists to triage glaucoma patients into groups defined by risk of blindness allows higher risk patients to be directed to a glaucoma specialist. Virtual review allows the glaucoma specialist to remain in overall control while reducing the risk that patients are treated or followed-up unnecessarily. Demand for glaucoma appointments can be reduced allowing scarce medical resources to be directed to patients most in need. PMID:25336582

  7. Monitoring access to out-of-hours care services in Scotland – a review

    PubMed Central

    Godden, Sylvia; Hilton, Simon; Pollock, Allyson M

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Changes in the contractual responsibilities of primary care practitioners and health boards have resulted in a plethora of arrangements relating to out-of-hours healthcare services. Rather than being guaranteed access to a GP (usually either their own or another through a local GP co-operative), patients have a number of alternative routes to services. Our objective was to identify and assess the availability and adequacy of relevant standards, responsibilities and information systems in Scotland to monitor the impact of contractual changes to out-of-hours healthcare services on equity of access. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting All providers of primary care out-of-hours services in Scotland. Participants Not applicable. Main outcome measures First, identification and policy review of current standards and performance monitoring systems, data and information, primarily through directly contacting national and local organizations responsible for monitoring out-of-hours care, supplemented by literature searches to highlight specific issues arising from the review; and second, mapping of data items by out-of-hours provider type to identify overlap and significant gaps. Results In Scotland, data monitoring systems have not kept pace with changes in the organization of out-of-hours care, so the impact on access to services for different population groups is unknown. There are significant gaps in information collected with respect to workforce, distribution of services, service utilisation and clinical outcomes. Conclusions Since 2004 there have been major changes to the way patients access out-of-hours healthcare in the UK. In Scotland, none of the current systems provide information on whether the new services satisfy the key NHS principle of equity of access. There is an urgent need for a comprehensive review of data standards and systems relating to out-of-hours care in order to monitor and evaluate inputs, processes and outcomes of care not least in

  8. Breast cancer center: improving access to patient care.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jatinder; Edge, Stephen B; Bonaccio, Ermelinda; Schwert, Kathleen Trapp; Braun, Brian

    2014-02-01

    To improve access for patients to the Breast Cancer Center at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, the Opportunities for Improvement Project team defined 3 goals: reduce the delay to initial appointment, reduce delays in treatment at the Breast Cancer Center, and reduce delays in the start of endocrine therapy. The team developed a set of tools using Lean methodology that helped to address variables contributing to inefficiencies that result in delays. The idea behind these tools was to integrate all the business variables, such as volume, clinical space, physician availability, services offered in the Breast Program, and patient types, to produce a system or schedule that is more predictable. A new schedule for physicians, independent mid-level clinics, a survivorship program, a primary nursing model, and new roles and responsibilities were defined and implemented. Mean scores in a Press Ganey survey for wait-time questions improved by 10 points, and patient complaints decreased by almost 40%. The team concluded that delays in the Breast Program were symptoms of a larger dysfunction in systems. Fixing the problems required a comprehensive approach to review all the variables that resulted in delays. PMID:24614049

  9. [The growing endangerment of specialists in private practice--opening up access to hospital outpatient clinics from a legal point of view].

    PubMed

    Luxenburger, Bernd

    2006-01-01

    There are two new rules of the German Health System Modernisation Act (GMG) affecting the activity of specialists in private practice: the authorization of a hospital according to Sect. 116 a (SGB V; Title Five of the Social Code) subsidiary to the registration of a SHI physicians and the authorization of a hospital-based physician. Negative effects on office-based physician in private practice will only occur if, for example, an ambulatory healthcare centre (MVZ) is being established by the hospital owner. Currently, Sect. 116 b SGB V also does not have any negative impact on office-based specialists. The benefits catalogue according to Sect. 116 b Para 3 SGB V has so far been narrowly defined. And, in the face of the diverging interests within the Joint Federal Committee Health Insurances/NationalAssociation of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians and Health Reform Consensus Act (GKG)--a noticeable broadening of this catalogue is not to be expected. Also, such a broadening of the scope of this catalogue will be counteracted by the fact that no legal right exists to the conclusion of a contract with the health insurance companies and that the health insurers will actually have to additionally reimburse for medical services according to the catalogue of Sect. 116b Para 3 SGB V beyond the total reimbursement budget.

  10. Prospective evaluation of an internet-linked handheld computer critical care knowledge access system

    PubMed Central

    Lapinsky, Stephen E; Wax, Randy; Showalter, Randy; Martinez-Motta, J Carlos; Hallett, David; Mehta, Sangeeta; Burry, Lisa; Stewart, Thomas E

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Critical care physicians may benefit from immediate access to medical reference material. We evaluated the feasibility and potential benefits of a handheld computer based knowledge access system linking a central academic intensive care unit (ICU) to multiple community-based ICUs. Methods Four community hospital ICUs with 17 physicians participated in this prospective interventional study. Following training in the use of an internet-linked, updateable handheld computer knowledge access system, the physicians used the handheld devices in their clinical environment for a 12-month intervention period. Feasibility of the system was evaluated by tracking use of the handheld computer and by conducting surveys and focus group discussions. Before and after the intervention period, participants underwent simulated patient care scenarios designed to evaluate the information sources they accessed, as well as the speed and quality of their decision making. Participants generated admission orders during each scenario, which were scored by blinded evaluators. Results Ten physicians (59%) used the system regularly, predominantly for nonmedical applications (median 32.8/month, interquartile range [IQR] 28.3–126.8), with medical software accessed less often (median 9/month, IQR 3.7–13.7). Eight out of 13 physicians (62%) who completed the final scenarios chose to use the handheld computer for information access. The median time to access information on the handheld handheld computer was 19 s (IQR 15–40 s). This group exhibited a significant improvement in admission order score as compared with those who used other resources (P = 0.018). Benefits and barriers to use of this technology were identified. Conclusion An updateable handheld computer system is feasible as a means of point-of-care access to medical reference material and may improve clinical decision making. However, during the study, acceptance of the system was variable. Improved training and new

  11. Public managed care and service access in outpatient substance abuse treatment units.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Emmeline; Wells, Rebecca; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2011-10-01

    The continued growth of public managed behavioral health care has raised concerns about possible effects on services provided. This study uses a national sample of outpatient substance abuse treatment units surveyed in 2005 to examine associations between public managed care and service access, measured as both the types of services provided and the amount of treatment received by clients. The percentage of clients funded through public managed care versus other types of public funding was positively associated with treatment units' odds of providing some types of resource-intensive services and with the odds of providing transportation to clients, but was negatively associated with the average number of individual therapy sessions clients received over the course of treatment. In general, public managed care does not appear to restrict access to outpatient substance abuse treatment, although states should monitor these contracts to ensure clients receive adequate courses of individual treatment. PMID:21184286

  12. Health care access and use among handicapped students in five public school systems.

    PubMed

    Singer, J D; Butler, J A; Palfrey, J S

    1986-01-01

    The authors studied the health care access and utilization patterns for a stratified random sample of 1,726 special education students in five large metropolitan school systems. Overall, 7% of the special education students had no regular source of care, 26% had no regular physician, and 38% had not visited a physician in the previous year; 13% had no health insurance. Each of these measures was worse for nonwhite and poorer children as well as for those whose mothers who had less formal education. Insurance coverage was associated with physician visits, with 45% of the uninsured children visiting a physician compared with 63% of those with public insurance and 66% of those with private insurance. Odds ratios for all health care access and use measures showed striking geographic variations. Thus, even for children identified as handicapped by their communities, barriers to health care are evident and are significantly greater for groups traditionally at risk.

  13. Food insecure families: description of access and barriers to food from one pediatric primary care center.

    PubMed

    DeMartini, Tori L; Beck, Andrew F; Kahn, Robert S; Klein, Melissa D

    2013-12-01

    Despite evidence that food insecurity negatively impacts child health, health care providers play little role in addressing the issue. To inform potential primary care interventions, we sought to assess a range of challenges faced by food insecure (FI) families coming to an urban, pediatric primary care setting. A cross-sectional study was performed at a hospital-based, urban, academic pediatric primary care clinic that serves as a medical home for approximately 15,000 patients with 35,000 annual visits. Subjects included a convenience sample of caregivers of children presenting for either well child or ill care over a 4 months period in 2012. A self-administered survey assessed household food security status, shopping habits, transportation access, budgeting priorities, and perceptions about nutrition access in one's community. Bivariate analyses between food security status and these characteristics were performed using Chi square statistics or Fisher's exact test. The survey was completed by 199 caregivers. Approximately 33% of families were FI; 93% received food-related governmental assistance. FI families were more likely to obtain food from a corner/convenience store, utilize food banks, require transportation other than a household car, and prioritize paying bills before purchasing food. FI families perceived less access to healthy, affordable foods within their community. Thus, FI families may face unique barriers to accessing food. Knowledge of these barriers could allow clinicians to tailor in-clinic screening and create family-centered interventions.

  14. Differences in care between general medicine and respiratory specialists in the management of patients hospitalized for acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wijayaratne, Kurugamage; Wilson, Jessica; Sivakumaran, Pathmanathan; Sriram, Krishna B.

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT: Hospitalized patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) may be managed by either respiratory specialists (RS) or general medicine physicians (GMP). While previous studies have audited the hospital AECOPD management of RS, only a small number of studies have evaluated the management of GMP. AIMS: The aims of this study were to firstly examine the differences in AECOPD management of GMP and RS and secondly compare their care to national COPD guidelines. METHODS: A retrospective review was undertaken of consecutive AECOPD patients admitted to two hospitals (one hospital where all AECOPD patients were managed by RS and another where all AECOPD patients were managed by GMP) over a 3-month period. Electronic medical records, medical case notes, pathology and radiology data for the admission were reviewed. RESULTS: There were 201 COPD exacerbations in 169 patients (49.7% male, mean age 72.3). GMP managed 84 (41.7%) exacerbations. In comparison to RS, GMP performed fewer spirometry tests, blood gas analysis and less frequently treated patients with guideline-recommended medications. Referral to pulmonary rehabilitation was poor for both groups of clinicians. Median length of stay was shorter in GMP patients versus RS patients (3 days vs. 5 days, P = 0.001). There were no differences in the 12-month re-admission (41.7% vs. 38.5%, P = 0.664) and mortality rates (10.7% vs. 6%, P = 0.292) between both groups of patients. CONCLUSION: Our study found differences in the hospital AECOPD management of GMP and RS, but these did not translate into different clinical outcomes between their patients. We also found suboptimal adherence to national COPD guidelines, suggesting that there is scope for improvement in the AECOPD management of both groups of clinicians. PMID:24250732

  15. Is Accessing Dental Care Becoming More Difficult? Evidence from Canada's Middle-Income Population

    PubMed Central

    Ramraj, Chantel; Sadeghi, Laleh; Lawrence, Herenia P.; Dempster, Laura; Quiñonez, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore trends in access to dental care among middle-income Canadians. Methods A secondary data analysis of six Canadian surveys that collected information on dental insurance coverage, cost-barriers to dental care, and out-of-pocket expenditures for dental care was conducted for select years from 1978 to 2009. Descriptive analyses were used to outline and compare trends among middle-income Canadians with other levels of income as well as national averages. Results By 2009, middle-income Canadians had the lowest levels of dental insurance coverage (48.7%) compared to all other income groups. They reported the greatest increase in cost-barriers to dental care, from 12.6% in 1996 to 34.1% by 2009. Middle-income Canadians had the largest rise in out-of-pocket expenditures for dental care since 1978. Conclusions This study suggests that affordability issues in accessing dental care are no longer just a problem for the lowest income groups in Canada, but are now impacting middle-income earners as a consequence of their lack of, or decreased access to, comprehensive dental insurance. PMID:23437378

  16. A geographical perspective on access to sexual and reproductive health care for women in rural Africa.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Murray, Alan T; Agadjanian, Victor

    2013-11-01

    Utilization of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services can significantly impact health outcomes, such as pregnancy and birth, prenatal and neonatal mortality, maternal morbidity and mortality, and vertical transmission of infectious diseases like HIV/AIDS. It has long been recognized that access to SRH services is essential to positive health outcomes, especially in rural areas of developing countries, where long distances as well as poor transportation conditions, can be potential barriers to health care acquisition. Improving accessibility of health services for target populations is therefore critical for specialized healthcare programs. Thus, understanding and evaluation of current access to health care is crucial. Combining spatial information using geographical information system (GIS) with population survey data, this study details a gravity model-based method to measure and evaluate access to SRH services in rural Mozambique, and analyzes potential geographic access to such services, using family planning as an example. Access is found to be a significant factor in reported behavior, superior to traditional distance-based indicators. Spatial disparities in geographic access among different population groups also appear to exist, likely affecting overall program success.

  17. A geographical perspective on access to sexual and reproductive health care for women in rural Africa

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jing; Murray, Alan T.; Agadjanian, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services can significantly impact health outcomes, such as pregnancy and birth, prenatal and neonatal mortality, maternal morbidity and mortality, and vertical transmission of infectious diseases like HIV/AIDS. It has long been recognized that access to SRH services is essential to positive health outcomes, especially in rural areas of developing countries, where long distances as well as poor transportation conditions, can be potential barriers to health care acquisition. Improving accessibility of health services for target populations is therefore critical for specialized healthcare programs. Thus, understanding and evaluation of current access to health care is crucial. Combining spatial information using geographical information system (GIS) with population survey data, this study details a gravity model-based method to measure and evaluate access to SRH services in rural Mozambique, and analyzes potential geographic access to such services, using family planning as an example. Access is found to be a significant factor in reported behavior, superior to traditional distance-based indicators. Spatial disparities in geographic access among different population groups also appear to exist, likely affecting overall program success. PMID:24034952

  18. Chronic Disease Patients’ Experiences With Accessing Health Care in Rural and Remote Areas

    PubMed Central

    Brundisini, F; Giacomini, M; DeJean, D; Vanstone, M; Winsor, S; Smith, A

    2013-01-01

    Background Rurality can contribute to the vulnerability of people with chronic diseases. Qualitative research can identify a wide range of health care access issues faced by patients living in a remote or rural setting. Objective To systematically review and synthesize qualitative research on the advantages and disadvantages rural patients with chronic diseases face when accessing both rural and distant care. Data Sources This report synthesizes 12 primary qualitative studies on the topic of access to health care for rural patients with chronic disease. Included studies were published between 2002 and 2012 and followed adult patients in North America, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. Review Methods Qualitative meta-synthesis was used to integrate findings across primary research studies. Results Three major themes were identified: geography, availability of health care professionals, and rural culture. First, geographic distance from services poses access barriers, worsened by transportation problems or weather conditions. Community supports and rurally located services can help overcome these challenges. Second, the limited availability of health care professionals (coupled with low education or lack of peer support) increases the feeling of vulnerability. When care is available locally, patients appreciate long-term relationships with individual clinicians and care personalized by familiarity with the patient as a person. Finally, patients may feel culturally marginalized in the urban health care context, especially if health literacy is low. A culture of self-reliance and community belonging in rural areas may incline patients to do without distant care and may mitigate feelings of vulnerability. Limitations Qualitative research findings are not intended to generalize directly to populations, although meta-synthesis across a number of qualitative studies builds an increasingly robust understanding that is more likely to be transferable. Selected studies

  19. MAIN TRENDS IN ACCESS TO PRIMARY HEALTH CARE FOR ADOLESCENTS IN GEORGIA.

    PubMed

    Mirzikashvili, N; Kazakhashvili, N

    2016-03-01

    This study identifies barriers to accessing primary health care among youth in Georgia to inform strategies for improving the appropriateness, quality and usage of primary health care services. The quantitative survey was conducted throughout Georgia among 1000 adolescents 11-19 years of age via interview. Multi stage probability sampling was used to administer questionnaires in the schools, universities and in the streets between March-May 2014 and September-October 2014. Young people in Georgia identified a range of problems in accessing primary health services. By far the most important issues were preventive checkups, geographical access, cost of care, and perceptions about the quality of care. The majority of respondents (78.4%) declared that they do not visit family doctor when well, and 81.9% said that no information was provided about reproductive health issues. Most (77.3%) stated that their family doctor had never talked about health promotion or life style risk factors. Access to health care is still problematic in the villages; and in some areas young people must travel more than 30 minutes by public transport. Limited access in rural areas compared to urban areas was statistically significant (p<0.05). As our survey data shows, most adolescents do not visit a health provider annually, obviating opportunities to integrate prevention into clinical encounters. Because repeated contacts with a primary care provider may occur over several years, clinicians should ideally have multiple opportunities to screen and counsel an adolescent patient for risky health behaviors. However, young people report that there is little screening or discussion about healthy lifestyles. The biggest health challenge for young people in Georgia is overcoming barriers (socioeconomic, geographic, trust, and perceived competence) to visit a doctor for regular preventive checkups and to get health behavior advice from health professional. Addressing the health and development needs

  20. Health Care Experiences and Perceived Barriers to Health Care Access: A Qualitative Study Among African Migrants in Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Katherine B.; Yu, Fan; Yang, Jingqi; Wang, Jason; Schrock, Joshua M.; Bodomo, Adams B.; Yang, Ligang; Yang, Bin; Nehl, Eric J.; Tucker, Joseph D.; Wong, Frank Y.

    2014-01-01

    Guangzhou, one of China's largest cities and a main trading port in South China, has attracted many African businessmen and traders migrating to the city for financial gains. Previous research has explored the cultural and economic roles of this newly emerging population; however, little is known about their health care experiences while in China. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were used to assess health care experiences and perceived barriers to health care access among African migrants in Guangzhou, China. Overall, African migrants experienced various barriers to accessing health care and were dissatisfied with local health services. The principal barriers to care reported included affordability, legal issues, language barriers, and cultural differences. Facing multiple barriers, African migrants have limited access to care in Guangzhou. Local health settings are not accustomed to the African migrant population, suggesting that providing linguistically and culturally appropriate services may improve access to care for the migrants. PMID:25294415

  1. Primary care satellite clinics and improved access to general and mental health services.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenheck, R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the relationship between the implementation of community-based primary care clinics and improved access to general health care and/or mental health care, in both the general population and among people with disabling mental illness. STUDY SETTING: The 69 new community-based primary care clinics in underserved areas, established by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) between the last quarter of FY 1995 and the second quarter of FY 1998, including the 21 new clinics with a specialty mental health care component. DATA SOURCES: VA inpatient and outpatient workload files, 1990 U.S. Census data, and VA Compensation and Pension files were used to determine the proportion of all veterans, and the proportion of disabled veterans, living in each U.S. county who used VA general health care services and VA mental health services before and after these clinics began operation. DESIGN: Analysis of covariance was used to compare changes, from late FY 1995 through early FY 1998, in access to VA services in counties in which new primary care clinics were located, in counties in which clinics that included specialized mental health components were located, and for comparison, in other U.S. counties, adjusting for potentially confounding factors. KEY FINDINGS: Counties in which new clinics were located showed a significant increase from the FY 1995-FY 1998 study dates in the proportion of veterans who used general VA health care services. This increase was almost twice as large as that observed in comparison counties (4.2% vs. 2.5%: F = 12.6, df = 1,3118, p = .0004). However, the introduction of these clinics was not associated with a greater use of specialty VA mental health services in the general veteran population, or of either general health care services or mental health services among veterans who received VA compensation for psychiatric disorders. In contrast, in counties with new clinics that included a mental health component the proportion of

  2. Increasing access to prenatal care: disease prevention and sound business practice.

    PubMed

    Wilson-Mitchell, Karline

    2014-02-01

    Following our study of birth outcomes for uninsured new immigrant and refugee women in Toronto, we discovered clinically significant numbers of women with hypertension and diabetes. As this population ages and prevalence increases, the expense of treating uncontrolled chronic illness increases. Prudent health policy change, a reduction in treatment delays, and equitable access to care will decrease clinical risk and limit the financial burden on the health care system. This unanticipated finding supports the argument for establishing government-funded maternity care insurance for all women. Such policies could prevent perinatal complications and decrease the rate of uncontrolled chronic illness later in life.

  3. Creating a front porch in systems of care: improving access to behavioral health services for diverse children and families.

    PubMed

    Callejas, Linda M; Hernandez, Mario; Nesman, Teresa; Mowery, Debra

    2010-02-01

    Despite recognition of the central role that service accessibility (and availability) should assume within a system of care, the definition proposed in the feature article of this special issue does not identify specific factors that systems of care must take into account in order to serve diverse children with serious emotional disturbance and their families in a culturally competent manner. This paper provides support for inclusion of the concepts of access and availability in the system of care definition and presents important factors that systems of care must take into account in order to increase access in a culturally competent manner, a core system of care value.

  4. Expanding Health Care Access Through Education: Dissemination and Implementation of the ECHO Model.

    PubMed

    Katzman, Joanna G; Galloway, Kevin; Olivas, Cynthia; McCoy-Stafford, Kimberly; Duhigg, Daniel; Comerci, George; Kalishman, Summers; Buckenmaier, Chester C; McGhee, Laura; Joltes, Kristin; Bradford, Andrea; Shelley, Brian; Hernandez, Jessica; Arora, Sanjeev

    2016-03-01

    Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) is an evidence-based model that provides high-quality medical education for common and complex diseases through telementoring and comanagement of patients with primary care clinicians. In a one to many knowledge network, the ECHO model helps to bridge the gap between primary care clinicians and specialists by enhancing the knowledge, skills, confidence, and practice of primary care clinicians in their local communities. As a result, patients in rural and urban underserved areas are able to receive best practice care without long waits or having to travel long distances. The ECHO model has been replicated in 43 university hubs in the United States and five other countries. A new replication tool was developed by the Project ECHO Pain team and U.S. Army Medical Command to ensure a high-fidelity replication of the model. The adoption of the tool led to successful replication of ECHO in the Army Pain initiative. This replication tool has the potential to improve the fidelity of ECHO replication efforts around the world.

  5. Expanding Health Care Access Through Education: Dissemination and Implementation of the ECHO Model.

    PubMed

    Katzman, Joanna G; Galloway, Kevin; Olivas, Cynthia; McCoy-Stafford, Kimberly; Duhigg, Daniel; Comerci, George; Kalishman, Summers; Buckenmaier, Chester C; McGhee, Laura; Joltes, Kristin; Bradford, Andrea; Shelley, Brian; Hernandez, Jessica; Arora, Sanjeev

    2016-03-01

    Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) is an evidence-based model that provides high-quality medical education for common and complex diseases through telementoring and comanagement of patients with primary care clinicians. In a one to many knowledge network, the ECHO model helps to bridge the gap between primary care clinicians and specialists by enhancing the knowledge, skills, confidence, and practice of primary care clinicians in their local communities. As a result, patients in rural and urban underserved areas are able to receive best practice care without long waits or having to travel long distances. The ECHO model has been replicated in 43 university hubs in the United States and five other countries. A new replication tool was developed by the Project ECHO Pain team and U.S. Army Medical Command to ensure a high-fidelity replication of the model. The adoption of the tool led to successful replication of ECHO in the Army Pain initiative. This replication tool has the potential to improve the fidelity of ECHO replication efforts around the world. PMID:26926747

  6. [Factors affecting access to health care institutions by the internally displaced population in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Mogollón-Pérez, Amparo Susana; Vázquez, María Luisa

    2008-04-01

    In Colombia, the on-going armed conflict causes displacement of thousands of persons that suffer its economic, social, and health consequences. Despite government regulatory efforts, displaced people still experience serious problems in securing access to health care. In order to analyze the institutional factors that affect access to health care by the internally displaced population, a qualitative, exploratory, and descriptive study was carried out by means of semi-structured individual interviews with a criterion sample of stakeholders (81). A narrative content analysis was performed, with mixed generation of categories and segmentation of data by themes and informants. Inadequate funding, providers' problems with reimbursement by insurers, and lack of clear definition as to coverage under the Social Security System in Health pose barriers to access to health care by the internally displaced population. Bureaucratic procedures, limited inter- and intra-sector coordination, and scarce available resources for public health service providers also affect access. Effective government action is required to ensure the right to health care for this population.

  7. Poor People, Poor Places and Access to Health Care in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, James B.

    2008-01-01

    Research suggests that community-level poverty is associated with access to health care net of individual-level characteristics, but no research investigates whether this association differs by individual-level income. Using data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys, the U.S. Census Bureau and the Health Resource and Services Administration,…

  8. Rural Health Care Information Access and the Use of the Internet: Opportunity for University Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Das, Biswa R.; Leatherman, John C.; Bressers, Bonnie M.

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has potential for improving health information delivery and strengthening connections between rural populations and local health service providers. An exploratory case study six rural health care markets in Kansas showed that about 70% of adults use the Internet, with substantial use for accessing health information. While there are…

  9. Expanding the Role of Nurse Practitioners: Effects on Rural Access to Care for Injured Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, Jeanne M.; Wickizer, Thomas M.; Franklin, Gary M.; Cheadle, Allen D.; Berkowitz, Bobbie

    2008-01-01

    Context: A 3-year pilot program to expand the role of nurse practitioners (NPs) in the Washington State workers' compensation system was implemented in 2004 (SHB 1691), amid concern about disparities in access to health care for injured workers in rural areas. SHB 1691 authorized NPs to independently perform most functions of an attending…

  10. Child Care for Low-Income Children with Disabilities: Access, Quality, and Parental Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Shavaun; Kisker, Ellen E.; Peterson, Carla A.; Carta, Judith J.; Jeon, Hyun-Joo

    2006-01-01

    Using data from the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project, this study analyzed the similarities and differences of variables associated with child care services for low-income families with young children with disabilities and low-income families with typically developing children. Four major variables were analyzed: access to child…

  11. Predicting Health Care Utilization among Latinos: Health Locus of Control Beliefs or Access Factors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Jesus, Maria; Xiao, Chenyang

    2014-01-01

    There are two competing research explanations to account for Latinos' underutilization of health services relative to non-Latino Whites in the United States. One hypothesis examines the impact of health locus of control (HLOC) beliefs, while the other focuses on the role of access factors on health care use. To date, the relative strength of…

  12. Hearing Parents' and Carers' Voices: Experiences of Accessing Quality Long Day Care in Northern Regional Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Nonie; Tinning, Beth

    2012-01-01

    This article explores parents' and carers' experiences of accessing quality long day care in northern regional Australia. The data was gathered in 2009, after the collapse of ABC Developmental Learning Centres (herein referred to as ABC Learning) and before the implementation of the "National Quality Framework," and provides a snapshot of…

  13. Australian health policy on access to medical care for refugees and asylum seekers

    PubMed Central

    Correa-Velez, Ignacio; Gifford, Sandra M; Bice, Sara J

    2005-01-01

    Since the tightening of Australian policy for protection visa applicants began in the 1990s, access to health care has been increasingly restricted to asylum seekers on a range of different visa types. This paper summarises those legislative changes and discusses their implications for health policy relating to refugees and asylum seekers in Australia. Of particular concern are asylum seekers on Bridging Visas with no work rights and no access to Medicare. The paper examines several key questions: What is the current state of play, in terms of health screening and medical care policies, for asylum seekers and refugees? Relatedly, how has current policy changed from that of the past? How does Australia compare with other countries in relation to health policy for asylum seekers and refugees? These questions are addressed with the aim of providing a clear description of the current situation concerning Australian health policy on access to medical care for asylum seekers and refugees. Issues concerning lack of access to appropriate health care and related services are raised, ethical and practical issues are explored, and current policy gaps are investigated. PMID:16212674

  14. Smile Alabama! Initiative: Interim Results from a Program To Increase Children's Access to Dental Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene-McIntyre, Mary; Finch, Mary Hayes; Searcy, John

    2003-01-01

    An Alabama initiative aimed to improve access to oral health care for Medicaid-eligible children through four components: improved Medicaid claims processing, increased reimbursement for providers, outreach and educational activities to support providers, and parent and patient education about children's oral health. In the first 3 program years,…

  15. Accessibility of Early Childhood Education and Care: A State of Affairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenbroeck, Michel; Lazzari, Arianna

    2014-01-01

    We analyse both academic literature and practice reports to discover the main causes for unequal accessibility of high quality early childhood care and education (ECEC). In order to understand and to remedy this inequality we need to consider the interplay between elements of governance, of the management of services and elements on the level of…

  16. Access to Care for Methadone Maintenance Patients in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hettema, Jennifer E.; Sorensen, James L.

    2009-01-01

    This policy commentary addresses a significant access to care issue that faces methadone maintenance patients seeking residential treatment in the United States. Methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) has demonstrated strong efficacy in the outpatient treatment of opiate dependence. However, many opiate dependent patients are also in need of more…

  17. Creating Access to Opportunities for Youth in Transition from Foster Care. An AYPF Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russ, Erin; Fryar, Garet

    2014-01-01

    What happens to youth in foster care when they turn 18? Many face unprecedented challenges like homelessness, lack of financial resources, difficulty accessing educational opportunities, and unemployment. In this issue brief, The American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF) document these challenges and opportunities in three distinct yet overlapping areas…

  18. Promoting Ecological Health Resilience for Minority Youth: Enhancing Health Care Access through the School Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clauss-Ehlers, Caroline C. C.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the demographic realities of children of color in the U.S., with a focus on health care needs and access issues that have an enormous influence on health status. An ecologic model is presented that incorporates cultural values and community structures into the school health center. (Contains 50 references.) (GCP)

  19. A Correlational Analysis: Electronic Health Records (EHR) and Quality of Care in Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Arshia A.

    2012-01-01

    Driven by the compulsion to improve the evident paucity in quality of care, especially in critical access hospitals in the United States, policy makers, healthcare providers, and administrators have taken the advise of researchers suggesting the integration of technology in healthcare. The Electronic Health Record (EHR) System composed of multiple…

  20. [Factors affecting access to health care institutions by the internally displaced population in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Mogollón-Pérez, Amparo Susana; Vázquez, María Luisa

    2008-04-01

    In Colombia, the on-going armed conflict causes displacement of thousands of persons that suffer its economic, social, and health consequences. Despite government regulatory efforts, displaced people still experience serious problems in securing access to health care. In order to analyze the institutional factors that affect access to health care by the internally displaced population, a qualitative, exploratory, and descriptive study was carried out by means of semi-structured individual interviews with a criterion sample of stakeholders (81). A narrative content analysis was performed, with mixed generation of categories and segmentation of data by themes and informants. Inadequate funding, providers' problems with reimbursement by insurers, and lack of clear definition as to coverage under the Social Security System in Health pose barriers to access to health care by the internally displaced population. Bureaucratic procedures, limited inter- and intra-sector coordination, and scarce available resources for public health service providers also affect access. Effective government action is required to ensure the right to health care for this population. PMID:18392351

  1. Involuntary Consent: Conditioning Access to Health Care on Participation in Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Yearby, Ruqaiijah A

    2016-09-01

    American bioethics has served as a safety net for the rich and powerful, often failing to protect minorities and the economically disadvantaged. For example, minorities and the economically disadvantaged are often unduly influenced into participating in clinical trials that promise monetary gain or access to health care. This is a violation of the bioethical principle of "respect for persons," which requires that informed consent for participation in clinical trials is voluntary and free of undue influence. Promises of access to health care invalidate the voluntariness of informed consent not only because it unduly induces minorities and the economically disadvantaged to participate in clinical trials to obtain access to potentially life saving health care, but it is also manipulative because some times the clinical trial is conducted by the very institutions that are denying minorities and the economically disadvantaged access to health care. To measure whether consent is voluntary and free of undue influence, federal agencies should require researchers to use the Vulnerability and Equity Impact Assessment tool, which I have created based on the Health Equity Impact Assessment tool, to determine whether minorities and the economically disadvantaged are being unduly influenced into participating in clinical trials in violation of the "respect for persons" principle. PMID:27587449

  2. Acquired Severe Disabilities and Complex Health Care Needs: Access to Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Sarah L.; Dymond, Stacy K.

    2016-01-01

    This case study examined one high school student's access to inclusive education and experiences in an inclusive English class after he acquired severe disabilities and complex health care needs from a nontraumatic brain injury. Multiple sources of data (i.e., interviews, field notes, and documents) were collected and analyzed to formulate…

  3. Accessing the Health Care Financing System: A Resource Guide for Local Education Agencies. Bulletin No. 91298.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    This guide is intended to assist Wisconsin school districts in accessing the health care financing system as a means of supporting specialized services. Topics covered include: determination of a local education agency's potential for third-party covered services; the need to become a certified provider dependent upon the funding source;…

  4. Disparities in Access to Care Among Rural Working-Age Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Saundra; Moore, Charity G.; Probst, Janice C.; Samuels, Michael E.

    2004-01-01

    Nationally, minority population disparities in health and in the receipt of health services are well documented but are infrequently examined within rural populations. The purpose of this study is to provide a national picture of health insurance coverage and access to care among rural minorities. A cross-sectional analysis using the 1999-2000…

  5. 78 FR 31530 - Applications for New Awards; Child Care Access Means Parents in School Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... Applications for New Awards; Child Care Access Means Parents in School Program AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary... School (CCAMPIS) Program Notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2013. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 84.335A.DATES: Applications Available: May 24,...

  6. Overcoming barriers to health-care access: A qualitative study among African migrants in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lavinia; Brown, Katherine B; Hall, Brian J; Yu, Fan; Yang, Jingqi; Wang, Jason; Schrock, Joshua M; Bodomo, Adams B; Yang, Ligang; Yang, Bin; Nehl, Eric J; Tucker, Joseph D; Wong, Frank Y

    2016-10-01

    Guangzhou is China's third most populous city, and the region's burgeoning manufacturing economy has attracted many young African businessmen and entrepreneurs to the city. The aims of this study were to examine strategies that African migrants in Guangzhou have adopted in response to health-care barriers, and explore their perceptions of how to address their needs. Twenty-five semi-structured interviews and two focus groups were conducted among African migrants residing in Guangzhou, China. Facing multiple barriers to care, African migrants have adopted a number of suboptimal and unsustainable approaches to access health care. These included: using their Chinese friends or partners as interpreters, self-medicating, using personal connections to medical doctors, and travelling to home countries or countries that offer English-speaking doctors for health care. Health-care providers and health organisations in Guangzhou have not yet acquired sufficient cultural competence to address the needs of African migrants residing in the city. Introducing linguistically and culturally competent health-care services in communities concentrated with African migrants may better serve the population. With the growing international migration to China, it is essential to develop sustainable approaches to improving health-care access for international migrants, particularly those who are marginalised.

  7. Overcoming barriers to health-care access: A qualitative study among African migrants in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lavinia; Brown, Katherine B; Hall, Brian J; Yu, Fan; Yang, Jingqi; Wang, Jason; Schrock, Joshua M; Bodomo, Adams B; Yang, Ligang; Yang, Bin; Nehl, Eric J; Tucker, Joseph D; Wong, Frank Y

    2016-10-01

    Guangzhou is China's third most populous city, and the region's burgeoning manufacturing economy has attracted many young African businessmen and entrepreneurs to the city. The aims of this study were to examine strategies that African migrants in Guangzhou have adopted in response to health-care barriers, and explore their perceptions of how to address their needs. Twenty-five semi-structured interviews and two focus groups were conducted among African migrants residing in Guangzhou, China. Facing multiple barriers to care, African migrants have adopted a number of suboptimal and unsustainable approaches to access health care. These included: using their Chinese friends or partners as interpreters, self-medicating, using personal connections to medical doctors, and travelling to home countries or countries that offer English-speaking doctors for health care. Health-care providers and health organisations in Guangzhou have not yet acquired sufficient cultural competence to address the needs of African migrants residing in the city. Introducing linguistically and culturally competent health-care services in communities concentrated with African migrants may better serve the population. With the growing international migration to China, it is essential to develop sustainable approaches to improving health-care access for international migrants, particularly those who are marginalised. PMID:26400191

  8. Oral healthcare access and adequacy in alternative long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Smith, Barbara J; Ghezzi, Elisa M; Manz, Michael C; Markova, Christiana P

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine practices and perceived barriers to access related to oral health by surveying administrators in Michigan alternative long-term care facilities (ALTCF). A 24-item questionnaire was mailed to all 2,275 Michigan ALTCF serving residents aged 60+. Facility response rate was 22% (n = 508). Eleven percent of facilities had a written dental care plan; 18% stated a dentist examined new residents; and 19% of facilities had an agreement with a dentist to come to the facility, with 52% of those being for emergency care only. The greatest perceived barriers were willingness of general and specialty dentists to treat residents at the nursing facility and/or private offices as well as financial concerns. Substantial barriers to care were uniformly perceived. Oral health policies and practices within Michigan ALTCF vary, as measured by resources, attitudes, and the availability of professional care. There is limited involvement by dental professionals in creating policy and providing consultation and service.

  9. [Essential drugs and pharmaceutical care: reflection on the access to drugs through lawsuits in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Sant'ana, João Maurício Brambati; Pepe, Vera Lúcia Edais; Osorio-de-Castro, Claudia Garcia Serpa; Ventura, Miriam

    2011-02-01

    The guarantee of pharmaceutical care as a legal right established by the Brazilian federal constitution of 1988 led to an increase in lawsuits to put that right into practice. This phenomenon has been dubbed the judicialization of pharmaceutical care. Studies on this topic have revealed, on the one hand, deficiencies in the access of Unified Health Care (SUS) users to drugs included in Ministry of Health pharmaceutical care lists, and, on the other hand, limitations of the legal system to deal with the situation. The present article addresses these issues in the context of the conceptual framework that supports the Brazilian drug policy and pharmaceutical care policy, especially the notions of essential drugs and allocation of scarce resources.

  10. Toward a strategy of patient-centered access to primary care.

    PubMed

    Berry, Leonard L; Beckham, Dan; Dettman, Amy; Mead, Robert

    2014-10-01

    Patient-centered access (PCA) to primary care services is rapidly becoming an imperative for efficiently delivering high-quality health care to patients. To enhance their PCA-related efforts, some medical practices and health systems have begun to use various tactics, including team-based care, satellite clinics, same-day and group appointments, greater use of physician assistants and nurse practitioners, and remote access to health services. However, few organizations are addressing the PCA imperative comprehensively by integrating these various tactics to develop an overall PCA management strategy. Successful integration means taking into account the changing competitive and reimbursement landscape in primary care, conducting an evidence-based assessment of the barriers and benefits of PCA implementation, and attending to the particular needs of the institution engaged in this important effort. This article provides a blueprint for creating a multifaceted but coordinated PCA strategy-one aimed squarely at making patient access a centerpiece of how health care is delivered. The case of a Wisconsin-based health system is used as an illustrative example of how other institutions might begin to conceive their fledgling PCA strategies without proposing it as a one-size-fits-all model. PMID:25199953

  11. Access to prenatal care: inequalities in a region with high maternal mortality in southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Katrini Guidolini; Santos Neto, Edson Theodoro Dos; Gama, Silvana Granado Nogueira da; Oliveira, Adauto Emmerich

    2016-05-01

    Aim This article aims to evaluate access to prenatal care according to the dimensions of availability, affordability and acceptability in the SUS microregion of southeastern Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional study conducted in 2012-2013 that selected 742 postpartum women in seven hospitals in the region chosen for the research. The information was collected, processed and submitted to the chi-square test and the nonparametric Spearman's test, with p-values less than 5% (p < 0.05). Results Although the SUS constitutionally guarantees universal access to health care, there are still inequalities between pregnant women from rural and urban areas in terms of the availability of health care and among families earning up to minimum wage and more than one minimum wage per month in terms of affordability; however, the acceptability of health care was equal, regardless of the modality of the health services. Conclusion The location, transport resources and financing of health services should be reorganised, and the training of health professionals should be enhanced to provide more equitable health care access to pregnant women. PMID:27166912

  12. Toward a strategy of patient-centered access to primary care.

    PubMed

    Berry, Leonard L; Beckham, Dan; Dettman, Amy; Mead, Robert

    2014-10-01

    Patient-centered access (PCA) to primary care services is rapidly becoming an imperative for efficiently delivering high-quality health care to patients. To enhance their PCA-related efforts, some medical practices and health systems have begun to use various tactics, including team-based care, satellite clinics, same-day and group appointments, greater use of physician assistants and nurse practitioners, and remote access to health services. However, few organizations are addressing the PCA imperative comprehensively by integrating these various tactics to develop an overall PCA management strategy. Successful integration means taking into account the changing competitive and reimbursement landscape in primary care, conducting an evidence-based assessment of the barriers and benefits of PCA implementation, and attending to the particular needs of the institution engaged in this important effort. This article provides a blueprint for creating a multifaceted but coordinated PCA strategy-one aimed squarely at making patient access a centerpiece of how health care is delivered. The case of a Wisconsin-based health system is used as an illustrative example of how other institutions might begin to conceive their fledgling PCA strategies without proposing it as a one-size-fits-all model.

  13. Accessibility and use of essential medicines in health care: Current progress and challenges in India.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Dipika; Purohit, Vilok K

    2013-01-01

    Essential Medicine Concept, a major breakthrough in health care, started in 1977 when World Health Organization (WHO) published its first list. Appropriate use of essential medicines is one of the most cost-effective components of modern health care. The selection process has evolved from expert evaluation to evidence-based selection. The first Indian list was published in 1996 and the recent revision with 348 medicines was published in 2011 after 8 years. Health expenditure is less in India as compared to developed countries. India faces a major challenge in providing access to medicines for its 1.2 billion people by focusing on providing essential medicines. In the future, countries will face challenges in selecting high-cost medicines for oncology, orphan diseases and other conditions. There is a need to develop strategies to improve affordable access to essential medicines under the current health care reform. PMID:23662019

  14. Access to prenatal care: assessment of the adequacy of different indices.

    PubMed

    Santos Neto, Edson Theodoro dos; Oliveira, Adauto Emmerich; Zandonade, Eliana; Leal, Maria do Carmo

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to compare the evaluation of adequate access to prenatal care according to different indices. Data to construct the indices were obtained from 1,006 patient interviews, prenatal cards, and medical charts for postpartum women who had been admitted for childbirth at maternity hospitals in Greater Metropolitan Vitória, Espírito Santo State, Brazil, from April to September 2010. The various indices for the evaluation of prenatal care were compared to the Kotelchuck index (1994) as the standard reference. Prevalence rates for adequacy were calculated, as were agreement, sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, accuracy, and likelihood ratios. The Takeda index showed the highest prevalence of adequacy (55.8%). The highest agreement was between the indices proposed by Villar et al. and Rosen et al. (adjusted kappa = 0.84). The study concludes that the Carvalho & Novaes index and the Brazilian Ministry of Health index are relevant for assessing adequate access to prenatal care.

  15. Barriers to accessing health care in Nigeria: implications for child survival

    PubMed Central

    Adedini, Sunday A.; Odimegwu, Clifford; Bamiwuye, Olusina; Fadeyibi, Opeyemi; Wet, Nicole De

    2014-01-01

    Background Existing studies indicate that about one in every six children dies before age five in Nigeria. While evidence suggests that improved access to adequate health care holds great potential for improved child survival, previous studies indicate that there are substantial barriers to accessing health care in Nigeria. There has not been a systematic attempt to examine the effects of barriers to health care on under-five mortality in Nigeria. This study is designed to address this knowledge gap. Data and method Data came from a nationally representative sample of 18,028 women (aged 15–49) who had a total of 28,647 live births within the 5 years preceding the 2008 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey. The risk of death in children below age five was estimated using Cox proportional hazard models and results are presented as hazards ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Results indicate higher under-five mortality risks for children whose mothers had cultural barriers and children whose mothers had resource-related barriers to health care (HR: 1.44, CI: 1.32–1.57, p<0.001), and those whose mothers had physical barriers (HR: 1.13, CI: 1.04–1.24, p<0.001), relative to children whose mothers reported no barriers. Barriers to health care remained an important predictor of child survival even after adjusting for the effects of possible confounders. Conclusion Findings of this study stressed the need for improved access to adequate health care in Nigeria through the elimination of barriers to access. This would enable the country to achieve a significant reduction in childhood mortality. PMID:24647128

  16. [Access to health care for destitute persons at Public Assistance Hospitals in Paris].

    PubMed

    Brücker, G; Nguyen, D T; Lebas, J

    1997-11-01

    All legal French residents are entitled to health care. The 1992 regulatory measures, which create a contractual agreement between the government and public medical institutions, aim at facilitating access to health care by resolving the financial obstacles to accessing health care. The Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP) has set up a medical reception center in several hospitals since 1993. This system is integrated in the general structure of each hospital: in some cases, there is a single and centralized unit; in other cases, all departments of the hospital, including the emergency room, are involved in caring for destitute patients. Whatever the type of the structure may be, social workers are a key element to helping the patients recover their social rights. Thirty to seventy-percent of patients visiting these centers regain access to social and health care coverage. The epidemiological survey of the active file of patients revealed that 70% are male, more than 50% are non-French nationals, half of which do not have legal immigration status in France. Homeless people represent 40 to 80% of the population. The average age is around 35. The number of medical visits varies greatly from one hospital to another and range from 20 to 60 per month. The reasons for visiting the center and the identified medical disorders are strongly related to the patients' life conditions and vary significantly with the risk factors related to the social and economic situation. The frequency of some diseases (psychiatric disorders, tuberculosis, infections by the HIV and HCV) is higher in this population than in general population. Delayed visits to the medical center represents a severity factor. The hospitals' mission statement is not only to ensure that patients facing a precarious social and professional situation have equal access to health care, but also to help such patients recover their social rights, facilitate their integration in the society and fight against

  17. Evaluating Adult Cystic Fibrosis Care in BC: Disparities in Access to a Multidisciplinary Treatment Centre.

    PubMed

    Roberts, James M; Wilcox, Pearce G; Quon, Bradley S

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cystic fibrosis (CF) care that is delivered through dedicated, multidisciplinary CF clinics is believed to be partly responsible for improvements in the length and quality of life of persons with CF. We hypothesized patients living farthest from a CF clinic would be seen less frequently than recommended, which would result in reduced access to guideline-recommended care and poorer health outcomes. Methods. We performed a retrospective chart review of 168 patients who accessed CF care primarily through the St. Paul's Hospital Adult CF Clinic. Subjects were stratified into four geographical groups according to the estimated one-way travel time by automobile from their home address to the clinic (<45 mins, 45-150 mins, 150-360 mins, and >360 mins). Results. There were no significant differences in pulmonary function, nutritional status, CF-related complications, or access to guideline-recommended CF pulmonary therapies between the four groups. Compared to the reference (<45 mins) group, subjects in the two farthest groups (>150 mins) were less likely to be seen in the clinic quarterly as recommended by current CF care guidelines (p = 0.002). Those in the farthest group (>360 mins) were at risk for more rapid decline in lung function compared to the reference group (FEV1% predicted annual change: -3.1%/year [95% CI -5.1 to -1.1] versus -0.9%/year [95% CI -1.6 to 0.1], resp., p = 0.04). Conclusions. Access to CF care is a challenge for individuals who live outside Metro Vancouver and has health policy implications. Further initiatives should be undertaken to ensure equitable care for people living with CF. PMID:27445568

  18. The barriers to accessing primary care resulting in hospital presentation for exacerbation of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a large teaching hospital in London.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Marium; Khachi, Hasanin

    2016-08-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) account direct costs of £1 billion each per year in the United Kingdom (UK). A national review of asthma deaths found that a significant proportion of patients die without seeking medical assistance or before emergency medical care could be provided. This study aims to establish the pathway that patients undertake to access care in the lead up to an accident and emergency (A&E) attendance and/or inpatient admission. Patients attending A&E and/or following an inpatient admission due to an exacerbation of asthma or COPD were reviewed by a specialist respiratory pharmacist during weekday working hours. Over a one-year period, 920 (224 asthma and 696 COPD) presentations for exacerbation of asthma and COPD were reviewed. Although the majority of the patients were registered with a general practitioner (GP), less than 50% received medical attention from their GP and/or had an active intervention prior to presenting to hospital. These findings correlate with those found in the national review of asthma deaths. At a time of increasing demands on healthcare resources, these results pose the question of how we can better triage patients to appropriate care settings to minimise unscheduled care and improve patient outcomes. PMID:27492527

  19. Children with special health care needs: how immigrant status is related to health care access, health care utilization, and health status.

    PubMed

    Javier, Joyce R; Huffman, Lynne C; Mendoza, Fernando S; Wise, Paul H

    2010-07-01

    To compare health care access, utilization, and perceived health status for children with SHCN in immigrant and nonimmigrant families. This cross-sectional study used data from the 2003 California Health Interview Survey to identify 1404 children (ages 0-11) with a special health care need. Chi-square and logistic regression analyses were used to examine relations between immigrant status and health access, utilization, and health status variables. Compared to children with special health care needs (CSHCN) in nonimmigrant families, CSHCN in immigrant families are more likely to be uninsured (10.4 vs. 4.8%), lack a usual source of care (5.9 vs. 1.9%), report a delay in medical care (13.0 vs. 8.1%), and report no visit to the doctor in the past year (6.8 vs. 2.6%). They are less likely to report an emergency room visit in the past year (30.0 vs. 44.0%), yet more likely to report fair or poor perceived health status (33.0 vs. 16.0%). Multivariate analyses suggested that the bivariate findings for children with SHCN in immigrant families largely reflected differences in family socioeconomic status, parent's language, parental education, ethnicity, and children's insurance status. Limited resources, non-English language, and limited health-care use are some of the barriers to staying healthy for CSHCN in immigrant families. Public policies that improve access to existing insurance programs and provide culturally and linguistically appropriate care will likely decrease health and health care disparities for this population.

  20. Sex-related differences in access to care among patients with premature acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Roxanne; Humphries, Karin H.; Shimony, Avi; Bacon, Simon L.; Lavoie, Kim L.; Rabi, Doreen; Karp, Igor; Tsadok, Meytal Avgil; Pilote, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Background: Access to care may be implicated in disparities between men and women in death after acute coronary syndrome, especially among younger adults. We aimed to assess sex-related differences in access to care among patients with premature acute coronary syndrome and to identify clinical and gender-related determinants of access to care. Methods: We studied 1123 patients (18–55 yr) admitted to hospital for acute coronary syndrome and enrolled in the GENESIS-PRAXY cohort study. Outcome measures were door-to-electrocardiography, door-to-needle and door-to-balloon times, as well as proportions of patients undergoing cardiac catheterization, reperfusion or nonprimary percutaneous coronary intervention. We performed univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses to identify clinical and gender-related determinants of timely procedures and use of invasive procedures. Results: Women were less likely than men to receive care within benchmark times for electrocardiography (≤ 10 min: 29% v. 38%, p = 0.02) or fibrinolysis (≤ 30 min: 32% v. 57%, p = 0.01). Women with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI) were less likely than men to undergo reperfusion therapy (primary percutaneous coronary intervention or fibrinolysis) (83% v. 91%, p = 0.01), and women with non–ST-segment elevation MI or unstable angina were less likely to undergo nonprimary percutaneous coronary intervention (48% v. 66%, p < 0.001). Clinical determinants of poorer access to care included anxiety, increased number of risk factors and absence of chest pain. Gender-related determinants included feminine traits of personality and responsibility for housework. Interpretation: Among younger adults with acute coronary syndrome, women and men had different access to care. Moreover, fewer than half of men and women with ST-segment elevation MI received timely primary coronary intervention. Our results also highlight that men and women with no chest pain and those with anxiety

  1. A study of Iranian immigrants’ experiences of accessing Canadian health care services: a grounded theory

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Immigration is not a new phenomenon but, rather, has deep roots in human history. Documents from every era detail individuals who left their homelands and struggled to reestablish their lives in other countries. The aim of this study was to explore and understand the experience of Iranian immigrants who accessed Canadian health care services. Research with immigrants is useful for learning about strategies that newcomers develop to access health care services. Methods The research question guiding this study was, “What are the processes by which Iranian immigrants learn to access health care services in Canada?” To answer the question, a constructivist grounded theory approach was applied. Initially, unstructured interviews were conducted with 17 participants (11 women and six men) who were adults (at least 18 years old) and had immigrated to Canada within the past 15 years. Eight participants took part in a second interview, and four participants took part in a third interview. Results Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, “tackling the stumbling blocks of access” emerged as the core category. The basic social process (BSP), becoming self-sufficient, was a transitional process and had five stages: becoming a stranger; feeling helpless; navigating/seeking information; employing strategies; and becoming integrated and self-sufficient. We found that “tackling the stumbling blocks of access” was the main struggle throughout this journey. Some of the immigrants were able to overcome these challenges and became proficient in accessing health care services, but others were unable to make the necessary changes and thus stayed in earlier stages/phases of transition, and sometimes returned to their country of origin. Conclusion During the course of this journey a substantive grounded theory was developed that revealed the challenges and issues confronted by this particular group of immigrants. This process explains why some Iranian

  2. Delivery Complications Associated With Prenatal Care Access for Medicaid-Insured Mothers in Rural and Urban Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laditka, Sarah B.; Laditka, James N.; Bennett, Kevin J.; Probst, Janice C.

    2005-01-01

    Pregnancy complications affect many women. It is likely that some complications can be avoided through routine primary and prenatal care of reasonable quality. The authors examined access to health care during pregnancy for mothers insured by Medicaid. The access indicator is potentially avoidable maternity complications (PAMCs). Potentially…

  3. Accessibility of mHealth Self-Care Apps for Individuals with Spina Bifida.

    PubMed

    Yu, Daihua X; Parmanto, Bambang; Dicianno, Brad E; Pramana, Gede

    2015-01-01

    As the smartphone becomes ubiquitous, mobile health is becoming a viable technology to empower individuals to engage in preventive self-care. An innovative mobile health system called iMHere (Internet Mobile Health and Rehabilitation) has been developed at the University of Pittsburgh to support self-care and adherence to self-care regimens for individuals with spina bifida and other complex conditions who are vulnerable to secondary complications. The goal of this study was to explore the accessibility of iMHere apps for individuals with spina bifida. Six participants were asked to perform tasks in a lab environment. Though all of the participants were satisfied with the iMHere apps and would use them again in the future, their needs and preferences to access and use iMHere apps differed. Personalization that provides the ability for a participant to modify the appearance of content, such as the size of the icons and the color of text, could be an ideal solution to address potential issues and barriers to accessibility. The importance of personalization--and potential strategies--for accessibility are discussed. PMID:26755902

  4. Increasing Access to Oral Health Care for People Living with HIV/AIDS in Rural Oregon

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jill; Mofidi, Mahyar; Bednarsh, Helene; Gambrell, Alan; Tobias, Carol R.

    2012-01-01

    Access to oral health care for people living with HIV/AIDS is a severe problem. This article describes the design and impact of an Innovations in Oral Health Care Initiative program, funded through the Health Resources and Services Administration HIV/AIDS Bureau's Special Projects of National Significance (SPNS) program, that expanded oral health-care services for these individuals in rural Oregon. From April 2007 to August 2010, 473 patients received dental care (exceeding the target goal of 410 patients) and 153 dental hygiene students were trained to deliver oral health care to HIV-positive patients. The proportion of patients receiving oral health care increased from 10% to 65%, while the no-show rate declined from 40% to 10%. Key implementation components were leveraging SPNS funding and services to create an integrated delivery system, collaborations that resulted in improved service delivery systems, using dental hygiene students to deliver oral health care, enhanced care coordination through the services of a dental case manager, and program capacity to adjust to unanticipated needs. PMID:22547878

  5. A legal "right" to mental health care? Impediments to a global vision of mental health care access.

    PubMed

    Glover-Thomas, N; Chima, S C

    2015-12-01

    Mental health law across many jurisdictions provides a legal framework for the compulsory detention and, where appropriate, treatment in hospital of people with mental health problems. Latent within many of these "systems" of mental health provision is the concern that the quality of care people receive does not always meet legal and ethical norms. For many, there remains the very serious recognition that access to mental health care in its entirety remains elusive. International human rights discourse has influenced the shaping of modern mental health laws in many developed countries. In 2008, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) entered into force. For many countries, such as South Africa, the CRPD provides a human rights instrument with the scope to establish a worldwide means of bolstering human rights. This paper examines both the UK and the broader African position with regard to the extent redress can be sought if and when an individual does not receive the care and treatment needed. Within this, consideration will be given to one of the paradoxes of mental health care which bedevil mental health systems: How do legal frameworks for detaining and treating people without their consent work when there is no corresponding enforceable right that appropriate treatment or suitable conditions of detention must be provided. The focus of this paper is the question of whether there is indeed a legal "right" to mental health care.

  6. A legal "right" to mental health care? Impediments to a global vision of mental health care access.

    PubMed

    Glover-Thomas, N; Chima, S C

    2015-12-01

    Mental health law across many jurisdictions provides a legal framework for the compulsory detention and, where appropriate, treatment in hospital of people with mental health problems. Latent within many of these "systems" of mental health provision is the concern that the quality of care people receive does not always meet legal and ethical norms. For many, there remains the very serious recognition that access to mental health care in its entirety remains elusive. International human rights discourse has influenced the shaping of modern mental health laws in many developed countries. In 2008, the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) entered into force. For many countries, such as South Africa, the CRPD provides a human rights instrument with the scope to establish a worldwide means of bolstering human rights. This paper examines both the UK and the broader African position with regard to the extent redress can be sought if and when an individual does not receive the care and treatment needed. Within this, consideration will be given to one of the paradoxes of mental health care which bedevil mental health systems: How do legal frameworks for detaining and treating people without their consent work when there is no corresponding enforceable right that appropriate treatment or suitable conditions of detention must be provided. The focus of this paper is the question of whether there is indeed a legal "right" to mental health care. PMID:26620626

  7. Improving Access to Noninstitutional Long-Term Care for American Indian Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Betty Jo (Josea); Creekmur, Beth; Cote, Sarah; Saliba, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Home-based primary care (HBPC) is an effective model of noninstitutional long-term care developed in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to provide ongoing care to homebound persons. Significant rural populations of American Indians have limited access to services designed for frail older adults. Fourteen Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs) initiated efforts to expand access to HBPC in concert with local tribes and Indian Health Service (IHS) facilities. This study characterizes the resulting emerging models of HBPC and co-management. Using an observational design, key respondent telephone interviews (n = 37) were conducted with stakeholders representing the 14 VAMCs to describe these HBPC programs, and HBPC models were evaluated in relation to VAMC organizational culture as revealed on the annual VA All Employee Survey. Twelve VAMCs independently developed HBPC expansion programs for American Indian veterans, and six different program models were implemented. Two models were unique to collaborations between VAMCs and tribes; in these collaborations, the tribes retained primary care responsibilities. VAMC used the other four models for delivery of care in remote rural areas to all veteran populations, American Indians and non-Indians alike. Strategies to improve access by reducing geographic barriers occur in all models. Comparing mean VAMC organizational culture ratings, as defined in the Competing Values Framework, revealed significant group differences for one of these six models. Findings from this study illustrate the flexibility of the HBPC program and opportunities for co-management and expansion of healthcare access for American Indians and non-Indians, particularly in rural areas. PMID:25854124

  8. Racial Differences in Clostridium difficile Infection Rates Are Attributable to Disparities in Health Care Access.

    PubMed

    Mao, Eric J; Kelly, Colleen R; Machan, Jason T

    2015-10-01

    This study confirms previously reported racial differences in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) rates in the United States and explores the nature of those differences. We conducted a retrospective study using the 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample, the largest all-payer database of hospital discharges in the United States. We identified hospital stays most likely to include antibiotic treatment for infections, based on hospital discharge diagnoses, and we examined how CDI rates varied, in an attempt to distinguish between genotypic and environmental racial differences. Logistic regressions for the survey design were used to test hypotheses. Among patients likely to have received antibiotics, white patients had higher CDI rates than black, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American patients (P < 0.0001). CDI rates increased with higher income levels and were higher for hospitalizations paid by private insurance versus those paid by Medicaid or classified as self-pay or free care (P < 0.0001). Among patients admitted from skilled nursing facilities, where racial bias in health care access is less, racial differences in CDI rates disappeared (P = 1.0). Infected patients did not show racial differences in rates of complicated CDI or death (P = 1.0). Although white patients had greater CDI rates than nonwhite patients, racial differences in CDI rates disappeared in a population for which health care access was presumed to be less racially biased. This provides evidence that apparent racial differences in CDI risks may represent health care access disparities, rather than genotypic differences. CDI represents a deviation from the paradigm that increased health care access is associated with less morbidity. PMID:26248363

  9. Barriers of access to care in a managed competition model: lessons from Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The health sector reform in Colombia, initiated by Law 100 (1993) that introduced a managed competition model, is generally presented as a successful experience of improving access to care through a health insurance regulated market. The study's objective is to improve our understanding of the factors influencing access to the continuum of care in the Colombian managed competition model, from the social actors' point of view. Methods An exploratory, descriptive-interpretative qualitative study was carried out, based on case studies of four healthcare networks in rural and urban areas. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted to a three stage theoretical sample: I) cases, II) providers and III) informants: insured and uninsured users (35), health professionals (51), administrative personnel (20), and providers' (18) and insurers' (10) managers. Narrative content analysis was conducted; segmented by cases, informant's groups and themes. Results Access, particularly to secondary care, is perceived as complex due to four groups of obstacles with synergetic effects: segmented insurance design with insufficient services covered; insurers' managed care and purchasing mechanisms; providers' networks structural and organizational limitations; and, poor living conditions. Insurers' and providers' values based on economic profit permeate all factors. Variations became apparent between the two geographical areas and insurance schemes. In the urban areas barriers related to market functioning predominate, whereas in the rural areas structural deficiencies in health services are linked to insufficient public funding. While financial obstacles are dominant in the subsidized regime, in the contributory scheme supply shortage prevails, related to insufficient private investment. Conclusions The results show how in the Colombian healthcare system structural and organizational barriers to care access, that are common in developing countries, are widened by both

  10. mHealth: A Mechanism to Deliver More Accessible, More Effective Mental Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Price, Matthew; Yuen, Erica K.; Goetter, Elizabeth M.; Herbert, James D.; Forman, Evan M.; Acierno, Ron; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    The increased popularity and functionality of mobile devices has a number of implications for the delivery of mental health services. Effective use of mobile applications has the potential to (a) increase access to evidence-based care; (b) better inform consumers of care and more actively engage them in treatment; (c) increase the use of evidence-based practices; and (d) enhance care after formal treatment has concluded. The current paper presents an overview of the many potential uses of mobile applications as a means to facilitate ongoing care at various stages of treatment. Examples of current mobile applications in behavioural treatment and research are described, and the implications of such uses are discussed. Finally, we provide recommendations for methods to include mobile applications into current treatment and outline future directions for evaluation. PMID:23918764

  11. Health care quality, access, cost, workforce, and surgical education: the ultimate perfect storm.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Marshall Z

    2012-01-01

    The discussions on health care reform over the past two years have focused on cost containment while trying to maintain quality of care. Focusing on just cost and quality unfortunately does not address other very important factors that impact on our health care delivery system. Availability of a well-trained workforce, maintaining the sophisticated medical/surgical education system, and ultimately access to quality care by the public are critical to maintaining and enhancing our health care delivery system. Unfortunately, all five of these components are under at risk. Thus, we have evolving the ultimate perfect storm affecting our health care delivery system. Although not ideal and given the uniqueness of our population and their expectations, our current delivery system is excellent compared to other countries. However, the cost of our current system is rising at an alarming rate. Currently, health care consumes 17% of our gross domestic product. If our system is not revised this will continue to rise and by 2025 it will consume 48%. The dilemma, given the current state of our overall economy and rising debt, is how to address this major problem. Unfortunately, the Affordable Care Act, which is now law, does not address most of the issues and the cost was initially grossly under estimated. Furthermore, the law does not address the issues of workforce, maintaining our medical education system or ultimately, access. A major revision of our system will be necessary to truly create a system that protects and enhances all five of the components of our health care delivery system. To effectively accomplish this will require addressing those issues that lead to wasteful spending and diversion of our health care dollars to profit instead of care. Improved and efficient delivery systems that reduce complications, reduction of duplication of tertiary and quaternary programs or services within the same markets (i.e. regionalization of care), health insurance reform, and

  12. Racial disparities in access to care for men in a public assistance program for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miller, David C.; Gelberg, Lillian; Kwan, Lorna; Stepanian, Sevan; Fink, Arlene; Andersen, Ronald M.; Litwin, Mark S.

    2009-01-01

    California’s IMPACT program provides all its enrollees with health insurance and social service resources. We hypothesized that racial/ethnic disparities in access to care might be attenuated among men served by this program. Our objective was to evaluate racial/ethnic differences in health services utilization and patient-reported health care outcomes among disadvantaged men in a prostate cancer public-assistance program, and to identify modifiable factors that might explain persistent disparities in this health care setting. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 357 low-income men enrolled in IMPACT from 2001 through 2005. We evaluated realized access to care with two health services utilization measures: (1) use of emergency department care without hospitalization and, (2) frequency of prostate-specific antigen testing. We also measured two patient-experience outcomes: (1) satisfaction with care received from IMPACT, and (2) confidence in IMPACT care providers. We observed significant bivariate associations between race/ethnicity and patient-experience outcomes (p<0.05), but not utilization measures. In multivariable models, Hispanic men were more likely than white men to report complete satisfaction with health care received in IMPACT (adjusted OR=5.15, 95% CI 1.17-22.6); however, the association between race/ethnicity and satisfaction was not statistically significant (p=0.11). Language preference and self-efficacy in patient-physician interactions are potentially-modifiable predictors of patient-experience outcomes. We observed no racial/ethnic disparities in health services utilization among disadvantaged men served by a disease-specific public assistance program. The greater satisfaction and confidence among Hispanic men are explained by modifiable variables that suggest avenues for improvement. PMID:18496745

  13. Access to childbirth care by adolescents and young people in the Northeastern region of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Érida Zoé Lustosa; Gomes, Keila Rejane Oliveira; da Gama, Silvana Granado Nogueira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To identify the factors that interfere with the access of adolescents and young people to childbirth care for in the Northeast region of Brazil. METHODS Cross-sectional study with 3,014 adolescents and young people admitted to the selected maternity wards to give birth in the Northeast region of Brazil. The sample design was probabilistic, in two stages: the first corresponded to the health establishments and the second to women who had recently given birth and their babies. The data was collected by means of interviews and consulting the hospital records, from pre-tested electronic form. Descriptive statistics were used for the univariate analysis, Pearson’s Chi-square test for the bivariate analysis and multiple logistic regressions for the multivariate analysis. Sociodemographic variables, obstetrical history, and birth care were analyzed. RESULTS Half of the adolescents and young people interviewed had not been given guidance on the location that they should go to when in labor, and among those who had, 23.5% did not give birth in the indicated health service. Furthermore, one third (33.3%) had to travel in search of assisted birth, and the majority (66.7%) of the postpartum women came to maternity by their own means. In the bivariate analysis, the variables marital status, paid work, health insurance, number of previous pregnancies, parity, city location, and type of health establishment showed a significant association (p < 0.20) with inadequate access to childbirth care. The multivariate analysis showed that married adolescents and young people (p < 0.015), with no health insurance (p < 0.002) and from the countryside (p < 0.001) were more likely to have inadequate access to childbirth care. CONCLUSIONS Adolescents and young women, married, without health insurance, and from the countryside are more likely to have inadequate access to birth care. The articulation between outpatient care and birth care can improve this access and

  14. Perspectives of People Living with HIV on Access to Health Care: Protocol for a Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Maybank, Allison; Hurley, Oliver; Modir, Hilary; Farrell, Alison; Marshall, Zack; Kendall, Claire; Johnston, Sharon; Hogel, Matthew; Rourke, Sean B; Liddy, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Background Strategies to improve access to health care for people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV) have demonstrated limited success. Whereas previous approaches have been informed by the views of health providers and decision-makers, it is believed that incorporating patient perspectives into the design and evaluations of health care programs will lead to improved access to health care services. Objective We aim to map the literature on the perspectives of PLHIV concerning access to health care services, to identify gaps in evidence, and to produce an evidence-informed research action plan to guide the Living with HIV program of research. Methods This scoping review includes peer-reviewed and grey literature from 1946 to May 2014 using double data extraction. Variations of the search terms “HIV”, “patient satisfaction”, and “health services accessibility” are used to identify relevant literature. The search strategy is being developed in consultation with content experts, review methodologists, and a librarian, and validated using gold standard studies identified by those stakeholders. The inclusion criteria are (1) the study includes the perspectives of PLHIV, (2) study design includes qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods, and (3) outcome measures are limited to patient satisfaction, their implied needs, beliefs, and desires in relation to access to health care. The papers are extracted by two independent reviewers, including quality assessment. Data is then collated, summarized, and thematically analyzed. Results A total of 12,857 references were retrieved, of which 326 documents were identified as eligible in pre-screening, and 64 articles met the inclusion criteria (56% qualitative studies, 38% quantitative studies and 6% mixed-method studies). Only four studies were conducted in Canada. Data synthesis is in progress and full results are expected in June, 2016. Conclusions This scoping review will record and characterize the

  15. Primary and Specialty Medical Care Among Ethnically Diverse, Older Rural Adults With Type 2 Diabetes: The ELDER Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose Residents in rural communities in the United States, especially ethnic minority group members, have limited access to primary and specialty health care that is critical for diabetes management. This study examines primary and specialty medical care utilization among a rural, ethnically diverse, older adult population with diabetes. Methods Data were drawn from a cross-sectional face-to-face survey of randomly selected African American (n = 220), Native American (n = 181), and white (n = 297) Medicare beneficiaries ≥65 years old with diabetes in 2 rural counties in central North Carolina. Participants were asked about utilization of a primary care doctor and of specialists (nutritionist, diabetes specialist, eye doctor, bladder specialist, kidney specialist, heart specialist, foot specialist) in the past year. Findings Virtually all respondents (99.0%) reported having a primary care doctor and seeing that doctor in the past year. About 42% reported seeing a doctor for diabetes-related care. On average, participants reported seeing 2 specialists in the past year, and 54% reported seeing >1 specialist. Few reported seeing a diabetes specialist (5.7%), nutritionist (10.9%), or kidney specialist (17.5%). African Americans were more likely than others to report seeing a foot specialist (P<.01), while men were more likely than women to have seen a bladder specialist (P =.02), kidney specialist (P =.001), and heart specialist (P =.004), after adjusting for potential confounders. Predictors of the number of specialists seen include gender, education, poverty status, diabetes medication use, and self-rated health. Conclusions These data indicate low utilization of specialty diabetes care providers across ethnic groups and reflect the importance of primary care providers in diabetes care in rural areas. PMID:16092292

  16. Health care access and utilization among ex-offenders in Baltimore: implications for policy.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Anita Smith; O'Keefe, Anne Marie; James, Xanthia

    2010-05-01

    The U.S. has the highest rate of incarceration in the world, releasing 12 million ex-offenders each year. These ex-offenders are disproportionately male, Black, poor, under-educated, and unhealthy, and return to our nation's poorest neighborhoods. Through a survey questionnaire and focus groups, this study examined the health status, health needs, access to and utilization of health care services among a sample of ex-offenders living in transitional housing in Baltimore City. More than half reported at least two major, chronic health problems. Only 40% had any form of health coverage; even more predictive of the ability to obtain health services was being able to name a specific provider (doctor, clinic or health organization). Recommendations for halting the downward spiral of poverty and sickness for this population and their communities include providing assistance with accessing, understanding, and navigating our complex and consumer-unfriendly health care system. PMID:20453363

  17. Access to primary care for socioeconomically disadvantaged older people in rural areas: a realist review

    PubMed Central

    Ford, John A; Wong, Geoff; Jones, Andy P; Steel, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this review is to identify and understand the contexts that effect access to high-quality primary care for socioeconomically disadvantaged older people in rural areas. Design A realist review. Data sources MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases and grey literature (from inception to December 2014). Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Broad inclusion criteria were used to allow articles which were not specific, but might be relevant to the population of interest to be considered. Studies meeting the inclusion criteria were assessed for rigour and relevance and coded for concepts relating to context, mechanism or outcome. Analysis An overarching patient pathway was generated and used as the basis to explore contexts, causal mechanisms and outcomes. Results 162 articles were included. Most were from the USA or the UK, cross-sectional in design and presented subgroup data by age, rurality or deprivation. From these studies, a patient pathway was generated which included 7 steps (problem identified, decision to seek help, actively seek help, obtain appointment, get to appointment, primary care interaction and outcome). Important contexts were stoicism, education status, expectations of ageing, financial resources, understanding the healthcare system, access to suitable transport, capacity within practice, the booking system and experience of healthcare. Prominent causal mechanisms were health literacy, perceived convenience, patient empowerment and responsiveness of the practice. Conclusions Socioeconomically disadvantaged older people in rural areas face personal, community and healthcare barriers that limit their access to primary care. Initiatives should be targeted at local contextual factors to help individuals recognise problems, feel welcome, navigate the healthcare system, book appointments easily, access appropriate transport and have sufficient time with professional staff to improve their experience of healthcare; all of which

  18. Does government oversight improve access to nursing home care? Longitudinal evidence from US counties.

    PubMed

    Howard, Larry L

    2014-01-01

    Gains in life expectancy around the world have increasingly placed pressure on governments to ensure that the elderly receive assistance with activities of daily living. This research examines the impact of government oversight of Medicaid payment policies on access to nursing home care services in the United States. Variation in price levels induced by a federal policy shift in 1997 is used to identify the effect of Medicaid reimbursements on the number of nursing homes and beds available. Court rulings prior to the policy change are used to categorically define a range of oversight treatments at the state level. Difference-in-differences estimates indicate a significant decline in access to nursing home care services for individuals living in states in which courts consistently ruled that Medicaid reimbursements did not meet the minimum standard implied by federal law. The findings suggest that nursing home care services were made more accessible through a combination of legislative and judicial oversight of Medicaid payment policies. PMID:25526725

  19. Barriers to health care access faced by black immigrants in the US: theoretical considerations and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Wafula, Edith Gonzo; Snipes, Shedra Amy

    2014-08-01

    Although 54 % of the total black immigrant population is from the Caribbean and 34 % is from Africa, we know relatively little about barriers to healthcare access faced by black immigrants. This paper reviews literature on the barriers that black immigrants face as they traverse the healthcare system and develops a conceptual framework to address barriers to healthcare access experienced by this population. Our contribution is twofold: (1) we synthesize the literature on barriers that may lead to inequitable healthcare access for black immigrants, and (2) we offer a theoretical perspective on how to address these barriers. Overall, the literature indicates that structural barriers can be overcome by providing interpreters, cultural competency training for healthcare professionals, and community-based care. Our model reflects individual and structural factors that may promote these initiatives.

  20. [Problems of accessibility for the population of Georgian modern outpatient and inpatient care].

    PubMed

    Bolkvadze, R A; Gerzmava, O Kh

    2014-12-01

    Which began in 2013, the implementation of the priority national project - Universal health programs for population of Georgia - has important social significance, given the increased accessibility of the population in case of timely and quality medical care. Various forms of public participation in the payment of services received in varying degrees allow us to find a compromise between containment of demand and increase access to treatment. And if the insurance in its various forms, largely solves the last problem, but may create a problem of rising costs, the different types of direct payments more efficient demand, however creates a need to control access to health care for populations with a high demand for medical care. Co-payments under the defined government programs and directly to the patient, on the one hand, imply severally pay for health care and the fear of the occurrence of catastrophic costs of treatment, and on the other hand, allow you to control the rising costs of the health system. The problem of reducing the availability of medical care is overcome by introducing exemptions from co-payments for vulnerable groups, which in turn leads to a substantial increase in government spending. It must be emphasized that the tools developed and the results of the calculations can be used to compare the effects of the introduction of various schemes of co-payments and choose the most suitable scheme, in terms of the extent of the burden of private expenditure on treatment, as well as income and expenses of the health system in general. PMID:25617109

  1. Disparities in access to preventive health care services among insured children in a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    King, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Children with insurance have better access to care and health outcomes if their parents also have insurance. However, little is known about whether the type of parental insurance matters. This study attempts to determine whether the type of parental insurance affects the access to health care services of children.I used data from the 2009-2013 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and estimated multivariate logistic regressions (N = 26,152). I estimated how family insurance coverage affects the probability that children have a usual source of care, well-child visits in the past year, unmet medical and prescription needs, less than 1 dental visit per year, and unmet dental needs.Children in families with mixed insurance (child publicly insured and parent privately insured) were less likely to have a well-child visit than children in privately insured families (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.76-0.98). When restricting the sample to publicly insured children, children with privately insured parents were less likely to have a well-child visit (odds ratio = 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.73-0.92), less likely to have a usual source of care (odds ratio = 0.79, 95% confidence interval 0.67-0.94), and more likely to have unmet dental needs (odds ratio = 1.68, 95% confidence interval 1.10-2.58).Children in families with mixed insurance tend to fare poorly compared to children in publicly insured families. This may indicate that children in these families may be underinsured. Expanding parental eligibility for public insurance or subsidizing private insurance for children would potentially improve their access to preventive care. PMID:27428239

  2. Disparities in access to preventive health care services among insured children in a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    King, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Children with insurance have better access to care and health outcomes if their parents also have insurance. However, little is known about whether the type of parental insurance matters. This study attempts to determine whether the type of parental insurance affects the access to health care services of children. I used data from the 2009–2013 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and estimated multivariate logistic regressions (N = 26,152). I estimated how family insurance coverage affects the probability that children have a usual source of care, well-child visits in the past year, unmet medical and prescription needs, less than 1 dental visit per year, and unmet dental needs. Children in families with mixed insurance (child publicly insured and parent privately insured) were less likely to have a well-child visit than children in privately insured families (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.76–0.98). When restricting the sample to publicly insured children, children with privately insured parents were less likely to have a well-child visit (odds ratio = 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.73–0.92), less likely to have a usual source of care (odds ratio = 0.79, 95% confidence interval 0.67–0.94), and more likely to have unmet dental needs (odds ratio = 1.68, 95% confidence interval 1.10–2.58). Children in families with mixed insurance tend to fare poorly compared to children in publicly insured families. This may indicate that children in these families may be underinsured. Expanding parental eligibility for public insurance or subsidizing private insurance for children would potentially improve their access to preventive care. PMID:27428239

  3. Disparities in access to preventive health care services among insured children in a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    King, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Children with insurance have better access to care and health outcomes if their parents also have insurance. However, little is known about whether the type of parental insurance matters. This study attempts to determine whether the type of parental insurance affects the access to health care services of children.I used data from the 2009-2013 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and estimated multivariate logistic regressions (N = 26,152). I estimated how family insurance coverage affects the probability that children have a usual source of care, well-child visits in the past year, unmet medical and prescription needs, less than 1 dental visit per year, and unmet dental needs.Children in families with mixed insurance (child publicly insured and parent privately insured) were less likely to have a well-child visit than children in privately insured families (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval 0.76-0.98). When restricting the sample to publicly insured children, children with privately insured parents were less likely to have a well-child visit (odds ratio = 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.73-0.92), less likely to have a usual source of care (odds ratio = 0.79, 95% confidence interval 0.67-0.94), and more likely to have unmet dental needs (odds ratio = 1.68, 95% confidence interval 1.10-2.58).Children in families with mixed insurance tend to fare poorly compared to children in publicly insured families. This may indicate that children in these families may be underinsured. Expanding parental eligibility for public insurance or subsidizing private insurance for children would potentially improve their access to preventive care.

  4. Improving access to computer-based library and drug information services in patient-care areas.

    PubMed

    Tobia, R C; Bierschenk, N F; Knodel, L C; Bowden, V M

    1990-01-01

    A project to increase access to drug and biomedical information through electronic linkage of drug information and library services to three patient-care areas is described. In February 1987, microcomputer work stations were installed in the Bexar County Hospital District's hospital emergency department, medical residents' office, and ambulatory-care clinic, as well as in The University of Texas Health Science Center's library reference area and drug information service office. Drug information was available on compact disk through the Micromedex Computerized Clinical Information System (CCIS) database, which includes DRUGDEX, POISINDEX, EMERGINDEX, and IDENTIDEX. Each work station was also connected to the library's computer via modem, allowing access to the Library Information System, books, journals, audiovisual materials, miniMEDLINE, and an electronic mail system. During the six-month project, the system was used 5487 times by 702 people. The system was successful in providing drug and other information in clinical settings and in introducing clinical staff members to new information technology. To increase access to the system after the project ended, the CD-ROM version was discontinued, and the distributed tape version of CCIS for VAX computers was added to the library's online information system, making drug information more available throughout the campus and teaching hospitals. In 1988-89 an average of 200 people accessed the tape version of CCIS each month. Although it is difficult to replace the convenience of an onsite library, at least some drug and biomedical information needs in the clinical setting can be met through computer networking.

  5. MPEG-21 as an access control tool for the National Health Service Care Records Service.

    PubMed

    Brox, Georg A

    2005-01-01

    Since the launch of the National Health Service (NHS) Care Records Service with plans to share patient information across England, there has been an emphasis on the need for manageable access control methods. MPEG-21 is a structured file format which includes an Intellectual Property Management and Protection (IPMP) function using XML to present all digitally stored items in the patient record. Using DICreator software, patient records consisting of written text, audio-recordings, non-X-ray digital imaging and video sequences were linked up successfully. Audio records were created using Talk-Back 2002 to standardize and optimize recording quality. The recorded reports were then linked and archived using iTunes. A key was used each time the file was displayed to secure access to confidential patient data. The building of the correct file structure could be monitored during the entire creation of the file. The results demonstrated the ability to ensure secure access of the MPEG-21 file by both health-care professionals and patients by use of different keys and a specific MPEG-21 browser. The study also showed that the enabling of IPMP will provide accurate audit trails to authenticate appropriate access to medical information. PMID:16035983

  6. Medical specialist attendance in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Balzer, Katrin; Butz, Stefanie; Bentzel, Jenny; Boulkhemair, Dalila; Lühmann, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    The care in nursing homes was examined based on scientific studies. The analysis focuses on dementia and type II diabetes. There is evidence for deficits in the supply of medical specialist attendance to nursing home residents with these diseases in Germany. Compared with corresponding guidelines the medical care for nursing home residents may be too low or inadequate.

  7. Medical specialist attendance in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Balzer, Katrin; Butz, Stefanie; Bentzel, Jenny; Boulkhemair, Dalila; Lühmann, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    The care in nursing homes was examined based on scientific studies. The analysis focuses on dementia and type II diabetes. There is evidence for deficits in the supply of medical specialist attendance to nursing home residents with these diseases in Germany. Compared with corresponding guidelines the medical care for nursing home residents may be too low or inadequate. PMID:23755088

  8. Access to Complex Abortion Care Service and Planning Improved through a Toll-Free Telephone Resource Line.

    PubMed

    Norman, Wendy V; Hestrin, Barbara; Dueck, Royce

    2014-01-01

    Background. Providing equitable access to the full range of reproductive health services over wide geographic areas presents significant challenges to any health system. We present a review of a service provision model which has provided improved access to abortion care; support for complex issues experienced by women seeking nonjudgmental family planning health services; and a mechanism to collect information on access barriers. The toll-free pregnancy options service (POS) of British Columbia Women's Hospital and Health Centre sought to improve access to services and overcome barriers experienced by women seeking abortion. Methods. We describe the development and implementation of a province-wide toll-free telephone counseling and access facilitation service, including establishment of a provincial network of local abortion service providers in the Canadian province of British Columbia from 1998 to 2010. Results. Over 2000 women annually access service via the POS line, networks of care providers are established and linked to central support, and central program planners receive timely information on new service gaps and access barriers. Conclusion. This novel service has been successful in addressing inequities and access barriers identified as priorities before service establishment. The service provided unanticipated benefits to health care planning and monitoring of provincial health care related service delivery and gaps. This model for low cost health service delivery may realize similar benefits when applied to other health care systems where access and referral barriers exist. PMID:24693291

  9. Access to women's health care: a qualitative study of barriers perceived by homeless women.

    PubMed

    Gelberg, Lillian; Browner, C H; Lejano, Elena; Arangua, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    Homelessness is an escalating national problem and women are disproportionately affected. Nevertheless, few studies have focused on the special circumstances associated with being a homeless woman. For instance, while both genders experience serious barriers to obtaining health care, homeless women face an additional burden by virtue of their sexual and reproductive health needs. The current study was conducted as the first stage of a qualitative/quantitative investigation of homeless women's access and barriers to family planning and women's health care. We interviewed 47 homeless women of diverse ages and ethnic backgrounds. A qualitative approach was initially taken to explore the factors homeless women themselves perceive as barriers to their use of birth control and women's health services, and factors they believe would facilitate their use. Key findings are that health is not a priority for homeless women, that transportation and scheduling can be particularly burdensome for homeless women, and that being homeless leads some to feel stigmatized by health care providers. Despite being homeless, having children was extremely important to the women in our study. At the same time, those interested in contraception confronted significant barriers in their efforts to prevent pregnancies. We conclude with suggested interventions that would make general, gynecological, and reproductive health care more accessible to homeless women.

  10. The cultural moral right to a basic minimum of accessible health care.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Paul T

    2011-03-01

    (1) The conception of a cultural moral right is useful in capturing the social-moral realities that underlie debate about universal health care. In asserting such rights, individuals make claims above and beyond their legal rights, but those claims are based on the society's existing commitments and moral culture. In the United States such a right to accessible basic health care is generated by various empirical social facts, primarily the conjunction of the legal requirement of access to emergency care with widely held principles about unfair free riding and just sharing of costs between well and ill. The right can get expressed in social policy through either single-payer or mandated insurance. (2) The same elements that generate this right provide modest assistance in determining its content, the structure and scope of a basic minimum of care. They justify limits on patient cost sharing, require comparative effectiveness, and make cost considerations relevant. They shed light on the status of expensive, marginally life extending, last-chance therapies, as well as life support for PVS patients. They are of less assistance in settling contentious debates about screening for breast and prostate cancer and treatments for infertility and erectile dysfunction, but even there they establish a useful framework for discussion. Scarcity of resources need not be a leading conceptual consideration in discerning a basic minimum. More important are the societal elements that generate the cultural moral right to a basic minimum. PMID:21598847

  11. Income Related Inequality of Health Care Access in Japan: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Misuzu; Hata, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to analyze the association between income level and health care access in Japan. Data from a total of 222,259 subjects (age range, 0–74 years) who submitted National Health Insurance claims in Chiba City from April 2012 to March 2014 and who declared income for the tax period from January 1 to December 31, 2012 were integrated and analyzed. The generalized estimating equation, in which household was defined as a cluster, was used to evaluate the association between equivalent income and utilization and duration of hospitalization and outpatient care services. A significant positive linear association was observed between income level and outpatient visit rates among all age groups of both sexes; however, a significantly higher rate and longer period of hospitalization, and longer outpatient care, were observed among certain lower income subgroups. To control for decreased income due to hospitalization, subjects hospitalized during the previous year were excluded, and the data was then reanalyzed. Significant inverse associations remained in the hospitalization rate among 40–59-year-old men and 60–69-year-old women, and in duration of hospitalization among 40–59 and 60–69-year-olds of both sexes and 70–74-year-old women. These results suggest that low-income individuals in Japan have poorer access to outpatient care and more serious health conditions than their higher income counterparts. PMID:26978270

  12. Income Related Inequality of Health Care Access in Japan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Misuzu; Sato, Yasunori; Nagashima, Kengo; Takahashi, Sho; Hata, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to analyze the association between income level and health care access in Japan. Data from a total of 222,259 subjects (age range, 0-74 years) who submitted National Health Insurance claims in Chiba City from April 2012 to March 2014 and who declared income for the tax period from January 1 to December 31, 2012 were integrated and analyzed. The generalized estimating equation, in which household was defined as a cluster, was used to evaluate the association between equivalent income and utilization and duration of hospitalization and outpatient care services. A significant positive linear association was observed between income level and outpatient visit rates among all age groups of both sexes; however, a significantly higher rate and longer period of hospitalization, and longer outpatient care, were observed among certain lower income subgroups. To control for decreased income due to hospitalization, subjects hospitalized during the previous year were excluded, and the data was then reanalyzed. Significant inverse associations remained in the hospitalization rate among 40-59-year-old men and 60-69-year-old women, and in duration of hospitalization among 40-59 and 60-69-year-olds of both sexes and 70-74-year-old women. These results suggest that low-income individuals in Japan have poorer access to outpatient care and more serious health conditions than their higher income counterparts. PMID:26978270

  13. Equal access to health care: a Lutheran lay person's expanded footnote.

    PubMed

    Delkeskamp-Hayes, Corinna

    1996-01-01

    Can proposing a policy of equal access to health care be justified on Christian grounds? The notion of a "Christian justification" with regard to Christians' political activity is explored in relation to the New Testament texts. The less demanding policy of granting "rights to (basic) health care," the meaning of Jesus' healing activities, early Christian welfare schemes, and Christian grounds for the ascription of "rights" are each discussed. As a result, with some stretching of the neighbor-love and missionary imperatives it is proposed that a basic health care policy can be legitimized. With regard to equal access to health care, however, all attempts to derive an equalizing imperative from the spiritual "equality among humans" or by way of the "love your neighbor as yourself" imperative are shown to fail. Particular attention is given to whether "attending to the least of my brothers' needs" obliges Christians to satisfy those needs optimally, as well as to the personal involvement aspect of the love-commandment in its simultaneously spiritual and temporal orientations. PMID:11654658

  14. Income Related Inequality of Health Care Access in Japan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Misuzu; Sato, Yasunori; Nagashima, Kengo; Takahashi, Sho; Hata, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to analyze the association between income level and health care access in Japan. Data from a total of 222,259 subjects (age range, 0-74 years) who submitted National Health Insurance claims in Chiba City from April 2012 to March 2014 and who declared income for the tax period from January 1 to December 31, 2012 were integrated and analyzed. The generalized estimating equation, in which household was defined as a cluster, was used to evaluate the association between equivalent income and utilization and duration of hospitalization and outpatient care services. A significant positive linear association was observed between income level and outpatient visit rates among all age groups of both sexes; however, a significantly higher rate and longer period of hospitalization, and longer outpatient care, were observed among certain lower income subgroups. To control for decreased income due to hospitalization, subjects hospitalized during the previous year were excluded, and the data was then reanalyzed. Significant inverse associations remained in the hospitalization rate among 40-59-year-old men and 60-69-year-old women, and in duration of hospitalization among 40-59 and 60-69-year-olds of both sexes and 70-74-year-old women. These results suggest that low-income individuals in Japan have poorer access to outpatient care and more serious health conditions than their higher income counterparts.

  15. Expanded Access to Non-VA Care Through the Veterans Choice Program. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) revises its medical regulations that implement section 101 of the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 (hereafter referred to as "the Choice Act"), which requires VA to establish a program to furnish hospital care and medical services through eligible non-VA health care providers to eligible veterans who either cannot be seen within the wait-time goals of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) or who qualify based on their place of residence (hereafter referred to as the "Veterans Choice Program" or the "Program"). These regulatory revisions are required by the most recent amendments to the Choice Act made by the Construction Authorization and Choice Improvement Act of 2014, and by the Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice Improvement Act of 2015. The Construction Authorization and Choice Improvement Act of 2014 amended the Choice Act to define additional criteria that VA may use to determine that a veteran's travel to a VA medical facility is an "unusual or excessive burden," and the Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice Improvement Act of 2015 amended the Choice Act to cover all veterans enrolled in the VA health care system, remove the 60-day limit on an episode of care, modify the wait-time and 40-mile distance eligibility criteria, and expand provider eligibility based on criteria as determined by VA. This interim final rule revises VA regulations consistent with the changes made to the Choice Act as described above.

  16. International survey of older adults finds shortcomings in access, coordination, and patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Robin; Moulds, Donald; Squires, David; Doty, Michelle M; Anderson, Chloe

    2014-12-01

    Industrialized nations face the common challenge of caring for aging populations, with rising rates of chronic disease and disability. Our 2014 computer-assisted telephone survey of the health and care experiences among 15,617 adults age sixty-five or older in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States has found that US older adults were sicker than their counterparts abroad. Out-of-pocket expenses posed greater problems in the United States than elsewhere. Accessing primary care and avoiding the emergency department tended to be more difficult in the United States, Canada, and Sweden than in other surveyed countries. One-fifth or more of older adults reported receiving uncoordinated care in all countries except France. US respondents were among the most likely to have discussed health-promoting behaviors with a clinician, to have a chronic care plan tailored to their daily life, and to have engaged in end-of-life care planning. Finally, in half of the countries, one-fifth or more of chronically ill adults were caregivers themselves. PMID:25410260

  17. Trauma in elderly people: access to the health system through pre-hospital care1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Hilderjane Carla; Pessoa, Renata de Lima; de Menezes, Rejane Maria Paiva

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to identify the prevalence of trauma in elderly people and how they accessed the health system through pre-hospital care. Method: documentary and retrospective study at a mobile emergency care service, using a sample of 400 elderly trauma victims selected through systematic random sampling. A form validated by experts was used to collect the data. Descriptive statistical analysis was applied. The chi-square test was used to analyze the association between the variables. Results: Trauma was predominant among women (52.25%) and in the age range between 60 and 69 years (38.25%), average age 74.19 years (standard deviation±10.25). Among the mechanisms, falls (56.75%) and traffic accidents (31.25%) stood out, showing a significant relation with the pre-hospital care services (p<0.001). Circulation, airway opening, cervical control and immobilization actions were the most frequent and Basic Life Support Services (87.8%) were the most used, with trauma referral hospitals as the main destination (56.7%). Conclusion: trauma prevailed among women, victims of falls, who received pre-hospital care through basic life support services and actions and were transported to the trauma referral hospital. It is important to reorganize pre-hospital care, avoiding overcrowded hospitals and delivering better care to elderly trauma victims. PMID:27143543

  18. Financing American Indian health care: impacts and options for improving access and quality.

    PubMed

    Langwell, Kathryn; Anagnopoulos, Cheryl; Ryan, Frank; Melson, Jacob; Iron Rope, Sandor

    2009-10-01

    (1) Indian Health Service (HIS) per patient funding is less than half of national per capita health spending, and declined further between 2003 and 2006. (2) Under-funding of the IHS system has led to explicit rationing of services to American Indian and Alaska Native patients, with many specialized services provided only for "life or limb threatening" conditions. (3) IHS patients report experiencing access barriers and rate the quality of care process substantially lower than do Medicaid beneficiaries, but most indicate they prefer to use IHS for their health care. (4) Options to increase the funding for American Indian and Alaska Native health care exist, but would impose higher costs on federal and state budgets and are unlikely to be feasible in the current economic environment. However, IHS might be able to make certain organizational changes that would increase efficiency and its ability to extend existing funding to cover more services. PMID:19847975

  19. Understanding access to care and health needs of Hispanic women from an urban community.

    PubMed

    Jerome-D'Emilia, Bonnie; Dunphy Suplee, Patricia; Gardner, Marcia R

    2014-01-01

    As a first step in a proposed program of community-based participatory research, this study investigated access to care and specific health needs in a population of Hispanic women from a medically underserved, urban community. There were 66 Hispanic women recruited at a local church to complete a 94-item researcher-developed survey. Thirty-two percent of women in the study were not U.S. citizens. Being insured, being a citizen, and having a medical diagnosis were significant in satisfaction with care. The most prevalent health issue for this population was being overweight or obese. This study demonstrates the use of the community needs assessment process in the development of interventions to improve a community's health and health care. This is especially true in the Hispanic community in which large variations based on culture and country of origin will impact the success of planned interventions.

  20. HRSA's Models That Work Program: implications for improving access to primary health care.

    PubMed Central

    Crump, R L; Gaston, M H; Fergerson, G

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of the Models That Work Campaign (MTW) is improving access to health care for vulnerable and underserved populations. A collaboration between the Bureau of Primary Health Care (BPHC) at the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and 39 cosponsors--among them national associations, state and federal agencies, community-based organizations, foundations, and businesses--this initiative gives recognition and visibility to innovative and effective service delivery models. Models are selected based on a set of criteria that includes delivery of high quality primary care services, community participation, integration of health and social services, quantifiable outcomes, and replicability. Winners of the competition are showcased nationally and hired to provide training to other communities, to document and publish their strategies, and to provide onsite technical assistance on request. Images p220-a p222-a p223-a PMID:10476990

  1. The Walking Egg Project: Universal access to infertility care - from dream to reality.

    PubMed

    Ombelet, W

    2013-01-01

    Childlessness and infertility care are neglected aspects of family planning in resource-poor countries, although the consequences of involuntary childlessness are much more dramatic and can create more wide ranging societal problems compared to Western societies, particularly for women. Because many families in developing countries completely depend on children for economic survival, childlessness has to be regarded as a social and public health issue and not only as an individual medical problem. In the Walking Egg Project we strive to raise awareness surrounding childlessness in resource-poor countries and to make infertility care in all its aspects, including assisted reproductive technologies, available and accessible for a much larger part of the world population. We hope to achieve this goal through innovation and research, advocacy and networking, training and capacity building and service delivery. The Walking Egg non-profit organization has chosen a holistic approach of reproductive health and therefore strengthening infertility care should go together with strengthening other aspects of family planning and mother care. Right from the start The Walking Project has approached the problem of infertility in a multidisciplinary and global manner. It gathers medical, social, ethical, epidemiological, juridical and economical scientists and experts along with artists and philosophers to discuss and work together towards its goal. We recently developed a simplified tWE lab IVF culture system with excellent results. According to our first cost calculation, the price of a single IVF cycle using the methodologies and protocols we described, seems to be less than 200 Euros. We realize that universal access to infertility care can only be achieved when good quality but affordable infertility care is linked to effective family planning and safe motherhood programmes. Only a global project with respect to sociocultural, ethical, economical and political differences can

  2. A welcome to the workshop on "professional promises: Hopes and gaps in access to oral health care".

    PubMed

    Catalanotto, Frank A

    2006-11-01

    Starting with the belief held by some of the workshop participants that access to basic oral health care is a natural human right and that the oral health care system in the United States must serve the common good, we conducted a meeting of ethicists, practicing dentists, dental hygienists, dental educators, and others to discuss ethical issues related to access to care. As one of the meeting organizers, the author discusses in these introductory remarks his background and personal perspectives on why the dental profession has a moral obligation to better address the access issue.

  3. A Comparison of Two Approaches to Increasing Access to Care: Expanding Coverage versus Increasing Physician Fees

    PubMed Central

    White, Chapin

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of a coverage expansion versus a Medicaid physician fee increase on children's utilization of physician services. Primary Data Source National Health Interview Survey (1997–2009). Study Design We use the Children's Health Insurance Program, enacted in 1997, as a natural experiment, and we performed a panel data regression analysis using the state-year as the unit of observation. Outcomes include physician visits per child per year and the following indicators of access to primary care: whether the child saw a physician, pediatrician, or visited an ER in the last year, and whether the parents reported experiencing a non-cost-related access problem. We analyzed these outcomes among all children, and separately among socioeconomic status (SES) quartiles defined based on family income and parents' education. Principal Findings Children's Health Insurance Program had a major impact on the extent and nature of children's insurance coverage. However, it is not associated with any change in the aggregate quantity of physician services, and its associations with indicators of access are mixed. Increases in physician fees are associated with broad-based improvements in indicators of access. Conclusions The findings suggest that (1) coverage expansions, even if they substantially reduce patient cost sharing, do not necessarily increase physician utilization, and (2) increasing the generosity of provider payments in public programs can improve access among low-SES children, and, through spillover effects, increase higher-SES children as well. PMID:22299763

  4. Accessing community-based and long-term care services: challenges facing persons with frontotemporal dementia and their families.

    PubMed

    Morhardt, Darby

    2011-11-01

    There are several barriers to accessing services for persons with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and few studies have examined service needs and satisfaction with services for family caregivers of persons with FTD. Persons with FTD and their families have reported consistent difficulties in their attempts to access care and support. These are: (1) difficulty obtaining a diagnosis; (2) financial concerns due to loss of employment, job-related income; (3) problems accessing social security disability insurance; and (4) lack of adequate community-based and long-term care services and resources. Successful care practices such as use of an interdisciplinary team and helpful care models such as person-centered care and the antecedent-behavior-consequence method are described. Further investigation and research are needed to understand best care strategies for persons with FTD. PMID:21826393

  5. Epilepsy Care in Ontario: An Economic Analysis of Increasing Access to Epilepsy Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, James M.; Snead, O. Carter; Chandra, Kiran; Blackhouse, Gord; Goeree, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Background In August 2011 a proposed epilepsy care model was presented to the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee (OHTAC) by an Expert Panel on a Provincial Strategy for Epilepsy Care in Ontario. The Expert Panel recommended leveraging existing infrastructure in the province to provide enhanced capacity for epilepsy care. The point of entry for epilepsy care and the diagnostic evaluation for surgery candidacy and the epilepsy surgery would occur at regional and district epilepsy centres in London, Hamilton, Toronto, and Ottawa and at new centres recommended for northern and eastern Ontario. This economic analysis report was requested by OHTAC to provide information about the estimated budgetary impact on the Ontario health care system of increasing access to epilepsy surgery and to examine the cost-effectiveness of epilepsy surgery in both children and adults. Methods A prevalence-based “top-down” health care system budgetary impact model from the perspective of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care was developed to estimate the potential costs associated with expanding health care services to increase access to epilepsy care in general and epilepsy surgery in particular. A 5-year period (i.e., 2012–2016) was used to project annual costs associated with incremental epilepsy care services. Ontario Health Survey estimates of epilepsy prevalence, published epilepsy incidence data, and Canadian Census results for Ontario were used to approximate the number of individuals with epilepsy in the province. Applying these population estimates to data obtained from a recent field evaluation study that examined patterns of care and costs associated with epilepsy surgery in children, a health care system budget impact was calculated and the total costs and incremental costs associated with increasing access to surgery was estimated. In order to examine the cost-effectiveness of epilepsy surgery in children, a decision analysis compared epilepsy surgery to

  6. Attitudes of health care trainees about genetics and disability: issues of access, health care communication, and decision making.

    PubMed

    Ormond, Kelly E; Gill, Carol J; Semik, Patrick; Kirschner, Kristi L

    2003-08-01

    Prior studies suggest that knowledge and attitudes of health care professionals influence patient communication and medical decision-making. To study this dynamic in the context of genetic disability, we developed a survey on health professionals' attitudes regarding disability and genetic screening and pilot-tested it on a sample of medical students, residents, and genetic counseling students (N=85). Despite minimal experience with disability or genetics, most respondents reported feeling comfortable dealing with genetics (59%) and disability (75%). The majority felt that disability caused significant suffering for both the person (51%) and family (64%), and that research should be directed toward preventing genetic disability (62%). Similar to prior literature, perceived "Quality of Life" was most often based on degrees of physical and cognitive functioning, pain, and social support. However, differences were found between genetic counseling trainees and other medical trainees in their relative emphasis of social versus medical issues in questions of disability and genetic testing, and these response patterns were associated with differences in the groups' priorities for offering information about social resources. Respondents agreed that access to genetic testing and information is personal and that testing should be available upon request for oneself (68%) and to a lesser degree for one's fetus (55%) or child (41%). However, the same individuals frequently stated that society should regulate access to such technologies. Although most felt that the patient and professional should jointly make such decisions on a case-by-case basis, it was also seen as appropriate for the health care professional to occasionally decline genetic testing. It seems appropriate that training and experience influence knowledge and attitudes. Therefore, it is critical to document knowledge and attitudes of various health care providers and trainees, including differences between

  7. Access to and quality of health and social care for rare diseases: patients' and caregivers' experiences.

    PubMed

    Kodra, Y; Morosini, P R; Petrigliano, R; Agazio, E; Salerno, P; Taruscio, D

    2007-01-01

    People suffering from rare diseases, independently of the condition, often experience the same problems in receiving adequate health and social care. It is not clear how these problems differ in severity among different diseases and in different countries and how they change in time. In the framework of the NEPHIRD (Network of Public Health Institutions on Rare Diseases), a European project, funded by DG-SANCO (EU Commission), an effort was made to develop a simple but comprehensive tool to show patients' and/or caregivers' opinions about the quality and accessibility of health and social services. The self-filled questionnaire asks how often patients or caregivers had both negative and positive experiences about the quality and accessibility of health and social services and their opinion on their improvement, on 5-level scales. A pilot survey was carried out in several European Countries among members of Myasthenia Gravis, Neurofibromatosis, Prader Willi and Rett Syndrome volunteers' associations. Descriptive and comparative analyses were performed using Stata and Epi Info 2000. In total, 302 questionnaires were completed in France, Italy, Romania, Spain, Turkey and United Kingdom during 2004-05. In general, respondents thought that health care accessibility was worse than quality, and that social care and legal provisions were worse than health care, with some differences among countries. For all diseases, and for both patients and caregivers, the most frequent reported positive experiences were health professionals' kindness and readiness to help (all medians ranged from 3 to 5). As for the efforts for improvement made by public services in the last three years, the opinions were generally favourable. This study has several limitations. However the assessment tool that has been developed has some innovative and interesting features and may be considered a useful attempt to compare patients' and caregivers' experiences for a range of different diseases

  8. A remote data access architecture for home-monitoring health-care applications.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao-Hung; Young, Shuenn-Tsong; Kuo, Te-Son

    2007-03-01

    With the aging of the population and the increasing patient preference for receiving care in their own homes, remote home care is one of the fastest growing areas of health care in Taiwan and many other countries. Many remote home-monitoring applications have been developed and implemented to enable both formal and informal caregivers to have remote access to patient data so that they can respond instantly to any abnormalities of in-home patients. The aim of this technology is to give both patients and relatives better control of the health care, reduce the burden on informal caregivers and reduce visits to hospitals and thus result in a better quality of life for both the patient and his/her family. To facilitate their widespread adoption, remote home-monitoring systems take advantage of the low-cost features and popularity of the Internet and PCs, but are inherently exposed to several security risks, such as virus and denial-of-service (DoS) attacks. These security threats exist as long as the in-home PC is directly accessible by remote-monitoring users over the Internet. The purpose of the study reported in this paper was to improve the security of such systems, with the proposed architecture aimed at increasing the system availability and confidentiality of patient information. A broker server is introduced between the remote-monitoring devices and the in-home PCs. This topology removes direct access to the in-home PC, and a firewall can be configured to deny all inbound connections while the remote home-monitoring application is operating. This architecture helps to transfer the security risks from the in-home PC to the managed broker server, on which more advanced security measures can be implemented. The pros and cons of this novel architecture design are also discussed and summarized. PMID:16621655

  9. Community, service, and policy strategies to improve health care access in the changing urban environment.

    PubMed

    Andrulis, D P

    2000-06-01

    Urban communities continue to face formidable historic challenges to improving public health. However, reinvestment initiatives, changing demographics, and growth in urban areas are creating changes that offer new opportunities for improving health while requiring that health systems be adapted to residents' health needs. This commentary suggests that health care improvement in metropolitan areas will require setting local, state, and national agendas around 3 priorities. First, health care must reorient around powerful population dynamics, in particular, cultural diversity, growing numbers of elderly, those in welfare-workplace transition, and those unable to negotiate an increasingly complex health system. Second, communities and governments must assess the consequences of health professional shortages, safety net provider closures and conversions, and new marketplace pressures in terms of their effects on access to care for vulnerable urban populations; they must also weigh the potential value of emerging models for improving those populations' care. Finally, governments at all levels should use their influence through accreditation, standards, tobacco settlements, and other financing streams to educate and guide urban providers in directions that respond to urban communities' health care needs.

  10. The expanding medical and behavioral resources with access to care for everyone health plan.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Gilead I; O'Connell, Ryan; Katz, David L; Manson, JoAnn E; Hutchison, William R; Landau, Charles; Yonkers, Kimberly A

    2009-04-01

    Healthcare Professionals for Healthcare Reform is a group of physicians and others interested in health care reform who, recognizing the urgent need for change, convened to propose a universal health care plan that builds on the strengths of the U.S. health care system and improves on its coverage, efficiency, and capacity for patient choice. The group proposes a tiered plan, the core of which (Tier 1) would be lifetime, basic, publicly funded coverage for the entire population on the basis of the best evidence about which therapies are considered life saving, life-sustaining, or preventive. Optional coverage (Tier 2) would be funded by private insurance and cover all therapies considered to help with quality of life and functional impairment. Items considered to be luxury or cosmetic (Tier 3) would generally not be covered, as is the case under the current system. The entire system would be overseen by a quasi-governmental, largely independent organization known as "The Board," which would resemble the Federal Reserve and interact with U.S. Department of Health and Human Services agencies to oversee implementation and coverage. By building on the current health care system while introducing other features and efficiencies, the Expanding Medical and Behavioral Resources with Access to Care for Everyone (EMBRACE) plan for universal health insurance coverage offers several advantages over alternative plans that have been proposed.

  11. Community, service, and policy strategies to improve health care access in the changing urban environment.

    PubMed

    Andrulis, D P

    2000-06-01

    Urban communities continue to face formidable historic challenges to improving public health. However, reinvestment initiatives, changing demographics, and growth in urban areas are creating changes that offer new opportunities for improving health while requiring that health systems be adapted to residents' health needs. This commentary suggests that health care improvement in metropolitan areas will require setting local, state, and national agendas around 3 priorities. First, health care must reorient around powerful population dynamics, in particular, cultural diversity, growing numbers of elderly, those in welfare-workplace transition, and those unable to negotiate an increasingly complex health system. Second, communities and governments must assess the consequences of health professional shortages, safety net provider closures and conversions, and new marketplace pressures in terms of their effects on access to care for vulnerable urban populations; they must also weigh the potential value of emerging models for improving those populations' care. Finally, governments at all levels should use their influence through accreditation, standards, tobacco settlements, and other financing streams to educate and guide urban providers in directions that respond to urban communities' health care needs. PMID:10846501

  12. Community, service, and policy strategies to improve health care access in the changing urban environment.

    PubMed Central

    Andrulis, D P

    2000-01-01

    Urban communities continue to face formidable historic challenges to improving public health. However, reinvestment initiatives, changing demographics, and growth in urban areas are creating changes that offer new opportunities for improving health while requiring that health systems be adapted to residents' health needs. This commentary suggests that health care improvement in metropolitan areas will require setting local, state, and national agendas around 3 priorities. First, health care must reorient around powerful population dynamics, in particular, cultural diversity, growing numbers of elderly, those in welfare-workplace transition, and those unable to negotiate an increasingly complex health system. Second, communities and governments must assess the consequences of health professional shortages, safety net provider closures and conversions, and new marketplace pressures in terms of their effects on access to care for vulnerable urban populations; they must also weigh the potential value of emerging models for improving those populations' care. Finally, governments at all levels should use their influence through accreditation, standards, tobacco settlements, and other financing streams to educate and guide urban providers in directions that respond to urban communities' health care needs. PMID:10846501

  13. Barriers to accessing surgical care in Pakistan: healthcare barrier model and quantitative systematic review.

    PubMed

    Irfan, Furqan B; Irfan, Bismah B; Spiegel, David A

    2012-07-01

    Inadequate access to surgical services results in increased morbidity and mortality from a spectrum of conditions in Pakistan. We employed a modification of Andersen's model of health services utilization and developed a 'Healthcare Barrier Model,' to characterize the barriers to accessing health care in developing countries, using surgical care in Pakistan as a case study. We performed a literature search from MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SCOPUS, Global Health Database, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and selected 64 of 3113 references for analysis. Patient-related variables included age (elderly), gender (female), preferential use of alternative health providers (Hakeem, traditional healers, others), personal perceptions regarding disease and potential for treatment, poverty, personal expenses for healthcare, lack of social support, geographic constraints to accessing a health facility, and compromised general health status as it relates to the development of surgical disease. Environmental barriers include deficiencies in governance, the burden of displaced or refugee populations, and aspects of the medicolegal system, which impact treatment and referral. Barriers relating to the health system include deficiencies in capacity (infrastructure, physical resources, human resources) and organization, and inadequate monitoring. Provider-related barriers include deficiencies in knowledge and skills (and ongoing educational opportunities), delays in referral, deficient communication, and deficient numbers of female health providers for female patients. The Healthcare Barrier model addresses this broad spectrum of barriers and is designed to help formulate a framework of healthcare barriers. To overcome these barriers will require a multidisciplinary, multisectoral effort aimed at strengthening the health system. PMID:22079839

  14. Access technology and dementia care: influences on residents' everyday lives in a secure unit.

    PubMed

    Margot-Cattin, Isabel; Nygård, Louise

    2006-06-01

    There is a need to understand how technology can best be used to facilitate well-being in people with dementia. This study sought to describe how access control technology influenced the everyday lives of people with dementia living in a secure unit. The staff members and the unit's residents participated in the study. Data were collected through ethnographic observations and semi-structured interviews over 6 months, and were analyzed using the constant comparative method. The results show how access technology supported the residents' sense of security, territoriality, orientation, and adaptation to the environment. However, certain conditions were necessary for these influences to appear. Overall, the results indicate that access control technology may be used to support the well-being of people with dementia, and to increase their opportunities to feel in place in a secure unit. However, there is an urgent need in the future for further exploration of the conditions for use of technology in the field of dementia care, and the necessity of making careful evaluations of the use of technology in this field cannot be overemphasized. PMID:16856468

  15. Inflows of foreign-born physicians and their access to employment and work experiences in health care in Finland: qualitative and quantitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In many developed countries, including Finland, health care authorities customarily consider the international mobility of physicians as a means for addressing the shortage of general practitioners (GPs). This study i) examined, based on register information, the numbers of foreign-born physicians migrating to Finland and their employment sector, ii) examined, based on qualitative interviews, the foreign-born GPs’ experiences of accessing employment and work in primary care in Finland, and iii) compared experiences based on a survey of the psychosocial work environment among foreign-born physicians working in different health sectors (primary care, hospitals and private sectors). Methods Three different data sets were used: registers, theme interviews among foreign-born GPs (n = 12), and a survey for all (n = 1,292; response rate 42%) foreign-born physicians living in Finland. Methods used in the analyses were qualitative content analysis, analysis of covariance, and logistic regression analysis. Results The number of foreign-born physicians has increased dramatically in Finland since the year 2000. In 2000, a total of 980 foreign-born physicians held a Finnish licence and lived in Finland, accounting for less than 4% of the total number of practising physicians. In 2009, their proportion of all physicians was 8%, and a total of 1,750 foreign-born practising physicians held a Finnish licence and lived in Finland. Non-EU/EEA physicians experienced the difficult licensing process as the main obstacle to accessing work as a physician. Most licensed foreign-born physicians worked in specialist care. Half of the foreign-born GPs could be classified as having an ‘active’ job profile (high job demands and high levels of job control combined) according to Karasek’s demand-control model. In qualitative interviews, work in the Finnish primary health centres was described as multifaceted and challenging, but also stressful. Conclusions Primary care may not

  16. Gatekeeper Training and Access to Mental Health Care at Universities and Colleges

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, Sarah Ketchen; Speer, Nicole; Brunwasser, Steven; Hahn, Elisabeth; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Gatekeeper-training programs (GKTs) are an increasingly popular approach to addressing access to mental health care in adolescent and young adult populations. This study evaluates the effectiveness of a widely used GKT program, Mental Health First Aid (MHFA), in college student populations. Methods A randomized control trial was conducted on 32 colleges and universities between 2009 and 2011. Campus residence halls were assigned to the intervention (MHFA plus preexisting trainings) or control condition (pre-existing trainings only) using matched pair randomization. The trainings were delivered to resident advisors (RAs). Outcome measures include service utilization, knowledge and attitudes about services, self-efficacy, intervention behaviors, and mental health symptoms. Data come from two sources: (1) surveys completed by the students (RAs and residents) (N=2,543), 2-3 months pre- and post-intervention; and (2) utilization records from campus mental health centers, aggregated by residence. Results The training increases trainees’ self-perceived knowledge (regression-adjusted effect size (ES)=0.38, p<0.001), self-perceived ability to identify students in distress (ES=0.19, p=0.01), and confidence to help (ES=0.17, p=0.04). There are no apparent effects, however, on utilization of mental health care in the student communities in which the trainees live. Conclusions Although GKTs are widely used to increase access to mental health care, these programs may require modifications in order to achieve their objectives. PMID:25043834

  17. Better access, quality, and cost for clinically complex veterans with home-based primary care.

    PubMed

    Edes, Thomas; Kinosian, Bruce; Vuckovic, Nancy H; Nichols, Linda Olivia; Becker, Margaret Mary; Hossain, Monir

    2014-10-01

    In successfully reducing healthcare expenditures, patient goals must be met and savings differentiated from cost shifting. Although the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Home Based Primary Care (HBPC) program for chronically ill individuals has resulted in cost reduction for the VA, it is unknown whether cost reduction results from restricting services or shifting costs to Medicare and whether HBPC meets patient goals. Cost projection using a hierarchical condition category (HCC) model adapted to the VA was used to determine VA plus Medicare projected costs for 9,425 newly enrolled HBPC recipients. Projected annual costs were compared with observed annualized costs before and during HBPC. To assess patient perspectives of care, 31 veterans and caregivers were interviewed from three representative programs. During HBPC, Medicare costs were 10.8% lower than projected, VA plus Medicare costs were 11.7% lower than projected, and combined hospitalizations were 25.5% lower than during the period without HBPC. Patients reported high satisfaction with HBPC team access, education, and continuity of care, which they felt contributed to fewer exacerbations, emergency visits, and hospitalizations. HBPC improves access while reducing hospitalizations and total cost. Medicare is currently testing the HBPC approach through the Independence at Home demonstration. PMID:25333529

  18. The possible effects of health professional mobility on access to care for patients.

    PubMed

    Glinos, Irene A

    2014-01-01

    The chapter explains how health professional mobility impacts on the resources and capacity available within a health system, and how this affects service delivery and access. The contrasting experiences of destination countries, which receive foreign inflows of health professionals, and of source countries, which loose workforce due to outflows, are illustrated with country examples. The evidence opens the debate on how EU countries compete for health workforce, what this means for resource-strained, crisis-hit Member States, and whether there is any room for intra-European solidarity. The nexus between patient mobility and health professional mobility is moreover highlighted. This take on free mobility in the EU has received little attention, and while evidence is scarce, it calls for careful analysis when considering the possible effects of free movement on access to care in national health systems. The chapter reformulates the question on 'who wins' and 'who looses' from freedom of movement in the EU to turn our attention away from those who go abroad for care and instead focus on those who stay at home.

  19. Injury and violence in Los Angeles. Impact on access to health care and surgical education.

    PubMed

    Fleming, A W; Sterling-Scott, R P; Carabello, G; Imari-Williams, I; Allmond, B; Foster, R S; Kennedy, F; Shoemaker, W C

    1992-06-01

    The Los Angeles County (California) Trauma Hospital System was designed to ensure that all patients requiring specialized trauma care would be transported directly to a trauma center using established trauma triage criteria. The designation and implementation of all level 1, 2, and 3 (rural) trauma centers were completed between October 1983 and July 1985. However, by February 1, 1985, one level 2 trauma center withdrew, and nine other level 2 and 3 trauma centers followed suit over the next few months and years. The reasons for closure of these 10 trauma centers were almost exclusively related to economic factors. The major impact of trauma center closure on surgical educational programs at the Drew University of Medicine and Science and the Martin Luther King, Jr/Charles R. Drew Medical Center have been additive and cumulative. The high volume of patients with trauma has been cited, sometimes correctly and sometimes incorrectly, as the primary reason for a lack of access to health care for patients without trauma. We have developed a blueprint for survival that, when fully implemented, will improve access to health care for all residents in our catchment area and optimize surgical education. While the Los Angeles County Trauma Hospital System has had many difficulties during the last 9 years, the population it serves is greater than that in 42 states in the United States. The experiences gained in Los Angeles County may be beneficial to statewide systems in the United States and in countries of comparable size.

  20. The Social Implications of Health Care Reform: Reducing Access Barriers to Health Care Services for Uninsured Hispanic and Latino Americans in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Mitchell A.; Inguanzo, Marian M.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. health care system is currently facing one of its most significant social challenges in decades in terms of its ability to provide access to primary care services to the millions of Americans who have lost their health insurance coverage in the recent economic recession. National statistics compiled by the U.S. Census Bureau for 2009…

  1. Health-related beliefs and decisions about accessing HIV medical care among HIV-infected persons who are not receiving care.

    PubMed

    Beer, Linda; Fagan, Jennifer L; Valverde, Eduardo; Bertolli, Jeanne

    2009-09-01

    In the United States, the publically supported national HIV medical care system is designed to provide HIV medical care to those who would otherwise not receive such care. Nevertheless, many HIV-infected persons are not receiving medical care. Limited information is available from HIV-infected persons not currently in care about the reasons they are not receiving care. From November 2006 to February 2007, we conducted five focus groups at community-based organizations and health departments in five U.S. cities to elicit qualitative information about barriers to entering HIV care. The 37 participants were mostly male (n = 29), over the age of 30 (n = 34), and all but one had not received HIV medical care in the previous 6 months. The focus group discussions revealed health belief-related barriers that have often been overlooked by studies of access to care. Three key themes emerged: avoidance and disbelief of HIV serostatus, conceptions of illness and appropriate health care, and negative experiences with, and distrust of, health care. Our findings point to the potentially important influence of these health-related beliefs on individual decisions about whether to access HIV medical care. We also discuss the implications of these beliefs for provider-patient communication, and suggest that providers frame their communications with patients such that they are attentive to the issues identified by our respondents, to better engage patients as partners in the treatment process.

  2. Elements of the patient-centered medical home associated with health outcomes among veterans: the role of primary care continuity, expanded access, and care coordination.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Karin; Sun, Haili; Dolan, Emily; Maynard, Charles; Beste, Laruen; Bryson, Christopher; Schectman, Gordon; Fihn, Stephan D

    2014-01-01

    Care continuity, access, and coordination are important features of the patient-centered medical home model and have been emphasized in the Veterans Health Administration patient-centered medical home implementation, called the Patient Aligned Care Team. Data from more than 4.3 million Veterans were used to assess the relationship between these attributes of Patient Aligned Care Team and Veterans Health Administration hospitalization and mortality. Controlling for demographics and comorbidity, we found that continuity with a primary care provider was associated with a lower likelihood of hospitalization and mortality among a large population of Veterans receiving VA primary care.

  3. Elements of the patient-centered medical home associated with health outcomes among veterans: the role of primary care continuity, expanded access, and care coordination.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Karin; Sun, Haili; Dolan, Emily; Maynard, Charles; Beste, Laruen; Bryson, Christopher; Schectman, Gordon; Fihn, Stephan D

    2014-01-01

    Care continuity, access, and coordination are important features of the patient-centered medical home model and have been emphasized in the Veterans Health Administration patient-centered medical home implementation, called the Patient Aligned Care Team. Data from more than 4.3 million Veterans were used to assess the relationship between these attributes of Patient Aligned Care Team and Veterans Health Administration hospitalization and mortality. Controlling for demographics and comorbidity, we found that continuity with a primary care provider was associated with a lower likelihood of hospitalization and mortality among a large population of Veterans receiving VA primary care. PMID:25180648

  4. Survey of home hemodialysis patients and nursing staff regarding vascular access use and care

    PubMed Central

    Spry, Leslie A; Burkart, John M; Holcroft, Christina; Mortier, Leigh; Glickman, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    Vascular access infections are of concern to hemodialysis patients and nurses. Best demonstrated practices (BDPs) have not been developed for home hemodialysis (HHD) access use, but there have been generally accepted practices (GAPs) endorsed by dialysis professionals. We developed a survey to gather information about training provided and actual practices of HHD patients using the NxStage System One HHD machine. We used GAP to assess training used by nurses to teach HHD access care and then assess actual practice (adherence) by HHD patients. We also assessed training and adherence where GAPs do not exist. We received a 43% response rate from patients and 76% response from nurses representing 19 randomly selected HHD training centers. We found that nurses were not uniformly instructing HHD patients according to GAP, patients were not performing access cannulation according to GAP, nor were they adherent to their training procedures. Identification of signs and symptoms of infection was commonly trained appropriately, but we observed a reluctance to report some signs and symptoms of infection by patients. Of particular concern, when aggregating all steps surveyed, not a single nurse or patient reported training or performing all steps in accordance with GAP. We also identified practices for which there are no GAPs that require further study and may or may not impact outcomes such as infection. Further research is needed to develop strategies to implement and expand GAP, measure outcomes, and ultimately develop BDP for HHD to improve infectious complications. PMID:25154423

  5. Mental health screening of African American adolescents and facilitated access to care.

    PubMed

    Husky, Mathilde M; Kanter, Deborah A; McGuire, Leslie; Olfson, Mark

    2012-02-01

    This study retrospectively reviews de-identified records from school-based mental health screening in a predominantly African American community. We compare participation rates, screening results, referrals to services and access to care of white and African American adolescents. Among those offered screening, 20.1% of white students (n = 297), and 28.8% of African American students (n = 499) were screened (χ(2) = 32.47, df = 1, P < .001). African American students (45.1%) were significantly more likely than white students (33.0%), (AOR = 1.59; P = .003) to be identified as being at risk. In both racial groups, most youth accessed the school-based services (89.02%, 95% CI 82.25-95.79) and community services (86.57%, 95% CI 78.41-94.73) to which they were referred. The groups did not differ in the odds of accessing community-based services (AOR = .58; P = .49). African American students were, however, more likely than white students to access school-based services (AOR = 10.08; P = .022). The findings support the effectiveness of screening in school settings in predominantly African American communities.

  6. Migrant beer promoters' experiences accessing reproductive health care in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam: lessons for planners and providers.

    PubMed

    Webber, Gail C; Spitzer, Denise L; Somrongthong, Ratana; Dat, Truong Cong; Kounnavongsa, Somphone

    2015-03-01

    Migrant beer promoters in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam were surveyed to determine their experiences in accessing reproductive health care services in the cities of Phnom Penh, Vientiane, Bangkok, and Hanoi. A total of 7 health care institutions were chosen as popular with migrant beer promoters. Staff at these institutions provided information on the institution, and 390 beer promoters were surveyed about their experiences while accessing services. There were discrepancies between findings from the staff interviews and the experiences of the beer promoters. In general, the migrant women were satisfied with the cost, location, friendliness of the health care providers, and knowledge and skills of the providers. They were less positive about confidentiality and waiting times, though many still agreed that these were not an issue. Health care planners and providers should take note of the issues affecting access to reproductive health care services for migrant women when they design and implement services.

  7. Access to medical care under strain: new pressures in Canada and Australia.

    PubMed

    Gray, G

    1998-12-01

    Health policy changes intended to achieve cost control in OECD countries run the risk of reintroducing financial barriers to health care. However, although the problems faced are similar, different countries are dealing with the situation in different ways. For example, Canada and Australia, which share many similarities, have taken quite different policy paths in the last decade: Canada has preserved universal access, whereas Australian policy is promoting a two-tier system through the provision of public subsidies for private insurance. The evidence is that country-specific factors such as institutional arrangements, attitudes, and values intersect with economic and financial factors to shape policy outcomes. Moreover, the Canadian and Australian experiences suggest that in relation to access issues, attitudes and values are the key policy determinants. PMID:9866093

  8. Assessing Program Efficiency: A Time and Motion Study of the Mental Health Emergency Care — Rural Access Program in NSW Australia

    PubMed Central

    Saurman, Emily; Lyle, David; Kirby, Sue; Roberts, Russell

    2014-01-01

    The Mental Health Emergency Care-Rural Access Program (MHEC-RAP) is a telehealth solution providing specialist emergency mental health care to rural and remote communities across western NSW, Australia. This is the first time and motion (T&M) study to examine program efficiency and capacity for a telepsychiatry program. Clinical services are an integral aspect of the program accounting for 6% of all activities and 50% of the time spent conducting program activities, but half of this time is spent completing clinical paperwork. This finding emphasizes the importance of these services to program efficiency and the need to address variability of service provision to impact capacity. Currently, there is no efficiency benchmark for emergency telepsychiatry programs. Findings suggest that MHEC-RAP could increase its activity without affecting program responsiveness. T&M studies not only determine activity and time expenditure, but have a wider application assessing program efficiency by understanding, defining, and calculating capacity. T&M studies can inform future program development of MHEC-RAP and similar telehealth programs, both in Australia and overseas. PMID:25089774

  9. Improving efficiency or impairing access? Health care consolidation and quality of care: Evidence from emergency hospital closures in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Avdic, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Recent health care consolidation trends raise the important policy question whether improved emergency medical services and enhanced productivity can offset adverse quality effects from decreased access. This paper empirically analyzes how geographical distance from an emergency hospital affects the probability of surviving an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), accounting for health-based spatial sorting and data limitations on out-of-hospital mortality. Exploiting policy-induced variation in hospital distance derived from emergency hospital closures and detailed Swedish mortality data over two decades, results show a drastically decreasing probability of surviving an AMI as residential distance from a hospital increases one year after a closure occurred. The effect disappears in subsequent years, however, suggesting that involved agents quickly adapted to the new environment. PMID:27060525

  10. Increasing access to care for Brazos Valley, Texas: a rural community of solution.

    PubMed

    Garney, Whitney R; Drake, Kelly; Wendel, Monica L; McLeroy, Kenneth; Clark, Heather R; Ryder, Byron

    2013-01-01

    Compared with their urban counterparts, rural populations face substantial disparities in terms of health care and health outcomes, particularly with regard to access to health services. To address ongoing inequities, community perspectives are increasingly important in identifying health issues and developing local solutions that are effective and sustainable. This article has been developed by both academic and community representatives and presents a brief case study of the evolution of a regional community of solution (COS) servicing a 7-county region called the Brazos Valley, Texas. The regional COS gave rise to multiple, more localized COSs that implemented similar strategies designed to address access to care within rural communities. The regional COS, known as the Brazos Valley Health Partnership, was a result of a 2002 health status assessment that revealed that rural residents face poorer access to health services and their care is often fragmented. Their localized strategy, called a health resource center, was created as a "one-stop shop" where multiple health and social service providers could be housed to deliver services to rural residents. Initially piloted in Madison County, the resource center model was expanded into Burleson, Grimes, and Leon Counties because of community buy-in at each of these sites. The resource center concept allowed service providers, who previously were able to offer services only in more populous areas, to expand into the rural communities because of reduced overhead costs. The services provided at the health resource centers include transportation, information and referral, and case management along with others, depending on the location. To ensure successful ongoing operations and future planning of the resource centers, local oversight bodies known as health resource commissions were organized within each of the rural communities to represent local COSs. Through collaboration with local entities, these partnerships have

  11. Staff-related access deficit and antenatal care coverage across the NUTS level 1 regions of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yardim, Mahmut S

    2010-01-01

    At the heart of each health system, the workforce is central to advancing health. The World Health Organization has identified a threshold in workforce density below which high coverage of essential interventions, including those necessary to meet the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), is very unlikely. The International Labor Organization (ILO) has launched a similar indicator -staff related access deficit- using Thailand's health care professional density as a benchmark. The aim of this study is to assess the staff-related access deficit of the population across the 12 NUTS 1 level regions of Turkey. The main hypothesis is that staff-related access deficit has a correlation with and predicts the gap in antenatal care coverage (percentage of women unable to access to antenatal care) across different regions. Staff-related access deficit, as a threshold indicator, seems to have a linear relationship with the antenatal care coverage gap. The known inequalities in the distribution of the health care workforce among different regions of Turkey were put forward once more in this study using the SRA indicator. The staff-related access deficit indicator can be easily used to monitor the status of distributional inequalities of the health care workforce at different sub-national levels in the future. PMID:21375148

  12. Improving access to computer-based library and drug information services in patient-care areas.

    PubMed

    Tobia, R C; Bierschenk, N F; Knodel, L C; Bowden, V M

    1990-01-01

    A project to increase access to drug and biomedical information through electronic linkage of drug information and library services to three patient-care areas is described. In February 1987, microcomputer work stations were installed in the Bexar County Hospital District's hospital emergency department, medical residents' office, and ambulatory-care clinic, as well as in The University of Texas Health Science Center's library reference area and drug information service office. Drug information was available on compact disk through the Micromedex Computerized Clinical Information System (CCIS) database, which includes DRUGDEX, POISINDEX, EMERGINDEX, and IDENTIDEX. Each work station was also connected to the library's computer via modem, allowing access to the Library Information System, books, journals, audiovisual materials, miniMEDLINE, and an electronic mail system. During the six-month project, the system was used 5487 times by 702 people. The system was successful in providing drug and other information in clinical settings and in introducing clinical staff members to new information technology. To increase access to the system after the project ended, the CD-ROM version was discontinued, and the distributed tape version of CCIS for VAX computers was added to the library's online information system, making drug information more available throughout the campus and teaching hospitals. In 1988-89 an average of 200 people accessed the tape version of CCIS each month. Although it is difficult to replace the convenience of an onsite library, at least some drug and biomedical information needs in the clinical setting can be met through computer networking. PMID:2405657

  13. Refugee Resettlement Patterns and State-Level Health Care Insurance Access in the United States.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Pooja; Venkatesh, Arjun Krishna

    2016-04-01

    We sought to evaluate the relationship between state-level implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and resettlement patterns among refugees. We linked federal refugee resettlement data to ACA expansion data and found that refugee resettlement rates are not significantly different according to state-level insurance expansion or cost. Forty percent of refugees have resettled to states without Medicaid expansion. The wide state-level variability in implementation of the ACA should be considered by federal agencies seeking to optimize access to health insurance coverage among refugees who have resettled to the United States. PMID:26890186

  14. Measuring access to primary medical care: some examples of the use of geographical information systems.

    PubMed

    Parker, E B; Campbell, J L

    1998-06-01

    This paper explores the potential for geographical information system technology in defining some variables influencing the use of primary care medical services. Eighteen general practices in Scotland contributed to a study examining the accessibility of their services and their patients' use of the local Accident and Emergency Department. Geo-referencing of information was carried out through analysis of postcode data relating to practices and patients. This information was analyzed using ARC/INFO GIS software in conjunction with the ORACLE relational database and 1991 census information. The results demonstrate that GIS technology has an important role in defining and analyzing the use of health services by the population. PMID:10671022

  15. Indicators of accessibility to primary health care coverage in rural Odukpani, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Atting, I A; Egwu, I N

    1991-01-01

    Indicators of accessibility were investigated in Odukpani Local Government Area using a structured questionnaire administered to mothers or heads of households in the study area. The indicators considered included proportion of births attended by trained health personnel, proportion of children with diarrhea treated with oral rehydration therapy (ORT), distance from home to regular immunization site, and acceptability of primary health care services to the target population. Sociodemographic data revealed a typical developing country population profile and surprisingly high literacy rate (57.8%) relative to the national rate, an observation which may account for the appreciable level of awareness.

  16. Rural Community-Dwelling Elders' Reports of Access to Care: Are There Hispanic versus Non-Hispanic White Disparities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borders, Tyrone F.

    2004-01-01

    Consumer reports can provide useful information about the dimensions of access in need of improvement for particular population subgroups. To determine if there are Hispanic versus non- Hispanic white disparities in rural elders' reports of their health care access. A telephone survey was conducted among 2,097 rural community-dwelling elders in…

  17. THE ROLE OF THE NEUROMUSCULAR MEDICINE SPECIALIST AND PHYSIATRY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Craig M.; Fowler, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis The neuromuscular medicine, and physiatry specialists are key health care providers who work cooperatively with a multidisciplinary team to provide coordinated care for persons with Neuromuscular diseases (NMDs). The director or coordinator of the team must be aware of the potential issues specific to NMDs and be able to access the interventions that are the foundations for proper care in NMD. These include health maintenance and proper monitoring of disease progression and complications to provide anticipatory, preventive care and optimum management. Ultimate goals include maximizing health and functional capacities, performing medical monitoring and surveillance to inhibit and prevent complications, and promoting access and full integration into the community in order to optimize quality of life. PMID:22938874

  18. Nurse managed center: access to primary health care for urban Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Neff, Donna Felber; Kinion, Elizabeth S; Cardina, Christen

    2007-01-01

    Urban Native Americans represent a small, diverse minority with unique health needs. The purposes of this descriptive retrospective study were to describe (a) the characteristics and primary health problems of urban Native Americans who receive primary health care at an urban nurse managed center (NMC) and (b) the nursing interventions provided at an urban NMC to urban Native Americans. A sample of 334 participants patient data were abstracted from a computerized clinical data set and coded based on the Omaha Classification System. The majority were over 40 years of age, were female, were single, completed high school, and were poor and uninsured, and many were unemployed. The most frequent health problems were related to pain, cardiovascular symptoms, dentition problems, and respiratory illnesses. The most frequent nursing interventions were for surveillance of physical signs and symptoms. The NMC was an accessible source of primary health care for urban Native Americans in northeastern Ohio. PMID:17266403

  19. Canada's non-status immigrants: negotiating access to health care and citizenship.

    PubMed

    Miklavcic, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Illegal immigration in Canada is characterized mainly by non-status immigrants who legally enter Canada and stay after their legal status expires and by failed refugee claimants. For these persons, immigration status or its absence plays an important role in determining the degree of access to Canadian health care. This article situates the clinical setting as a site of contention and negotiation of citizenship and care in social networks as well as pragmatic and discursive strategies. Drawing on the case of a patient who faced imminent deportation and became suicidal, in this article I depict how psychiatrists and other health practitioners embrace "bearing witness" as an ethical practice, which intersects the medical and legal spheres.

  20. An Analysis of Medication Adherence of Sooner Health Access Network SoonerCare Choice Patients.

    PubMed

    Davis, Nicholas A; Kendrick, David C

    2014-01-01

    Medication adherence is a desirable but rarely available metric in patient care, providing key insights into patient behavior that has a direct effect on a patient's health. In this research, we determine the medication adherence characteristics of over 46,000 patients enrolled in the Sooner Health Access Network (HAN), based on Medicaid claims data from the Oklahoma Health Care Authority. We introduce a new measure called Specific Medication PDC (smPDC), based on the popular Proportion of Days Covered (PDC) method, using the last fill date for the end date of the measurement duration. The smPDC method is demonstrated by calculating medication adherence across the eligible patient population, for relevant subpopulations over a two-year period spanning 2012 - 2013. We leverage a clinical analytics platform to disseminate adherence measurements to providers. Aggregate results demonstrate that the smPDC method is relevant and indicates potential opportunities for health improvement for certain population segments. PMID:25954350