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Sample records for accessory olfactory systems

  1. One nose, one brain: contribution of the main and accessory olfactory system to chemosensation.

    PubMed

    Mucignat-Caretta, Carla; Redaelli, Marco; Caretta, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The accessory olfactory system is present in most tetrapods. It is involved in the perception of chemical stimuli, being implicated also in the detection of pheromones. However, it is sensitive also to some common odorant molecules, which have no clear implication in intraspecific chemical communication. The accessory olfactory system may complement the main olfactory system and may contribute different perceptual features to the construction of a unitary representation, which merges the different chemosensory qualities. Crosstalk between the main and accessory olfactory systems occurs at different levels of central processing, in brain areas where the inputs from the two systems converge. Interestingly, centrifugal projections from more caudal brain areas are deeply involved in modulating both main and accessory sensory processing. A high degree of interaction between the two systems may be conceived and partial overlapping appears to occur in many functions. Therefore, the central chemosensory projections merge inputs from different organs to obtain a complex chemosensory picture. PMID:23162438

  2. [Blockade of the pheromonal effects in rat by central deafferentation of the accessory olfactory system].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Criado, J E

    1979-06-01

    Female rats reared without sex odours from male rats have a five day stral cycle. With exposure to male odour the estral cycle is shortened from five to four days. This pheromonal effect is blocked on deafferenting the vomeronasal system by electrolytically damaging both accessory olfactory bulbs.

  3. Faecal bile acids are natural ligands of the mouse accessory olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Wayne I; Dinser, Jordan A; Cansler, Hillary L; Zhang, Xingjian; Dinh, Daniel D; Browder, Natasha S; Riddington, Ian M; Meeks, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    The accessory olfactory system (AOS) guides behaviours that are important for survival and reproduction, but understanding of AOS function is limited by a lack of identified natural ligands. Here we report that mouse faeces are a robust source of AOS chemosignals and identify bile acids as a class of natural AOS ligands. Single-unit electrophysiological recordings from accessory olfactory bulb neurons in ex vivo preparations show that AOS neurons are strongly and selectively activated by peripheral stimulation with mouse faecal extracts. Faecal extracts contain several unconjugated bile acids that cause concentration-dependent neuronal activity in the AOS. Many AOS neurons respond selectively to bile acids that are variably excreted in male and female mouse faeces, and others respond to bile acids absent in mouse faeces. These results identify faeces as a natural source of AOS information, and suggest that bile acids may be mammalian pheromones and kairomones. PMID:27324439

  4. Faecal bile acids are natural ligands of the mouse accessory olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Wayne I.; Dinser, Jordan A.; Cansler, Hillary L.; Zhang, Xingjian; Dinh, Daniel D.; Browder, Natasha S.; Riddington, Ian M.; Meeks, Julian P.

    2016-01-01

    The accessory olfactory system (AOS) guides behaviours that are important for survival and reproduction, but understanding of AOS function is limited by a lack of identified natural ligands. Here we report that mouse faeces are a robust source of AOS chemosignals and identify bile acids as a class of natural AOS ligands. Single-unit electrophysiological recordings from accessory olfactory bulb neurons in ex vivo preparations show that AOS neurons are strongly and selectively activated by peripheral stimulation with mouse faecal extracts. Faecal extracts contain several unconjugated bile acids that cause concentration-dependent neuronal activity in the AOS. Many AOS neurons respond selectively to bile acids that are variably excreted in male and female mouse faeces, and others respond to bile acids absent in mouse faeces. These results identify faeces as a natural source of AOS information, and suggest that bile acids may be mammalian pheromones and kairomones. PMID:27324439

  5. [Oxidative metabolism of main and accessory olfactory bulbs, limpic system and hypothalamus during the estral cycle of the rat (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Criado, J E

    1979-06-01

    The in vitro oxidative metabolism of hypothalamus, olfactory and limbic systems from female rats in the estrous cycle have been measured. The accessory olfactory bulb becomes most active during diestrous when the hypothalamus reaches its lowest values.

  6. Either main or accessory olfactory system signaling can mediate the rewarding effects of estrous female chemosignals in sexually naive male mice.

    PubMed

    Korzan, Wayne J; Freamat, Mihael; Johnson, Adam G; Cherry, James A; Baum, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    A long-held view has been that interest of male mice in female body odors reflects an activation of reward circuits in the male brain following their detection by the vomeronasal organ (VNO) and processing via the accessory olfactory system. We found that adult, sexually naive male mice acquired a conditioned place preference (CPP) after repeatedly receiving estrous female urine on the nose and being placed in an initially nonpreferred chamber with soiled estrous bedding on the floor. CPP was not acquired in control mice that received saline on the nose before being placed in a nonpreferred chamber with clean bedding. Robust acquisition of a CPP using estrous female odors as the reward persisted in separate groups of mice in which VNO-accessory olfactory function was disrupted by bilateral lesioning of the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) or in which main olfactory function was disrupted by zinc sulfate lesions of the main olfactory epithelium (MOE). By contrast, no CPP was acquired for estrous odors in males that received combined AOB and MOE lesions. Either the main or the accessory olfactory system suffices to mediate the rewarding effects of estrous female odors in the male mouse, even in the absence of prior mating experience. The main olfactory system is part of the circuitry that responds to chemosignals involved in motivated behavior, a role that may be particularly important for humans who lack a functional accessory olfactory system.

  7. Centrifugal telencephalic afferent connections to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs.

    PubMed

    Mohedano-Moriano, Alicia; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Pro-Sistiaga, Palma; de Moya-Pinilla, Miguel; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2012-01-01

    Parallel to the olfactory system, most mammals possess an accessory olfactory or vomeronasal system. The olfactory and vomeronasal epithelia project to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, which in turn project to adjacent areas of the telencephalon, respectively. New data indicate that projections arising from the main and accessory olfactory bulbs partially converge in the rostral telencephalon and are non-overlapping at caudal telencephalic levels. Therefore, the basal telencephalon should be reclassified in olfactory, vomeronasal, and mixed areas. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that virtually all olfactory- and vomeronasal-recipient structures send reciprocal projections to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, respectively. Further, non-chemosensory recipient structures also projects centrifugally to the olfactory bulbs. These feed-back projections appear to be essential modulating processing of chemosensory information. The present work aims at characterizing centrifugal projections to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs arising from olfactory, vomeronasal, mixed, and non-chemosensory recipient telencephalic areas. This issue has been addressed by using tracer injections in the rat and mouse brain. Tracer injections were delivered into the main and accessory olfactory bulbs as well as in olfactory, vomeronasal, mixed, and non-chemosensory recipient telencephalic structures. The results confirm that olfactory- and vomeronasal-recipient structures project to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, respectively. Interestingly, olfactory (e.g., piriform cortex), vomeronasal (e.g., posteromedial cortical amygdala), mixed (e.g., the anterior medial amygdaloid nucleus), and non-chemosensory-recipient (e.g., the nucleus of the diagonal band) structures project to the main and to the accessory olfactory bulbs thus providing the possibility of simultaneous modulation and interaction of both systems at different stages of chemosensory processing.

  8. Centrifugal telencephalic afferent connections to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs

    PubMed Central

    Mohedano-Moriano, Alicia; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Pro-Sistiaga, Palma; de Moya-Pinilla, Miguel; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2012-01-01

    Parallel to the olfactory system, most mammals possess an accessory olfactory or vomeronasal system. The olfactory and vomeronasal epithelia project to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, which in turn project to adjacent areas of the telencephalon, respectively. New data indicate that projections arising from the main and accessory olfactory bulbs partially converge in the rostral telencephalon and are non-overlapping at caudal telencephalic levels. Therefore, the basal telencephalon should be reclassified in olfactory, vomeronasal, and mixed areas. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that virtually all olfactory- and vomeronasal-recipient structures send reciprocal projections to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, respectively. Further, non-chemosensory recipient structures also projects centrifugally to the olfactory bulbs. These feed-back projections appear to be essential modulating processing of chemosensory information. The present work aims at characterizing centrifugal projections to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs arising from olfactory, vomeronasal, mixed, and non-chemosensory recipient telencephalic areas. This issue has been addressed by using tracer injections in the rat and mouse brain. Tracer injections were delivered into the main and accessory olfactory bulbs as well as in olfactory, vomeronasal, mixed, and non-chemosensory recipient telencephalic structures. The results confirm that olfactory- and vomeronasal-recipient structures project to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, respectively. Interestingly, olfactory (e.g., piriform cortex), vomeronasal (e.g., posteromedial cortical amygdala), mixed (e.g., the anterior medial amygdaloid nucleus), and non-chemosensory-recipient (e.g., the nucleus of the diagonal band) structures project to the main and to the accessory olfactory bulbs thus providing the possibility of simultaneous modulation and interaction of both systems at different stages of chemosensory processing

  9. Subicular and CA1 hippocampal projections to the accessory olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa-Prieto, C; Ubeda-Banon, I; Mohedano-Moriano, A; Pro-Sistiaga, P; Saiz-Sanchez, D; Insausti, R; Martinez-Marcos, A

    2009-02-01

    The hippocampal formation is anatomically and functionally related to the olfactory structures especially in rodents. The entorhinal cortex (EC) receives afferent projections from the main olfactory bulb; this constitutes an olfactory pathway to the hippocampus. In addition to the olfactory system, most mammals possess an accessory olfactory (or vomeronasal) system. The relationships between the hippocampal formation and the vomeronasal system are virtually unexplored. Recently, a centrifugal projection from CA1 to the accessory olfactory bulb has been identified using anterograde tracers. In the study reported herein, experiments using anterograde tracers confirm this projection, and injections of retrograde tracers show the distribution and morphology of a population of CA1 and ventral subicular neurons projecting to the accessory olfactory bulb of rats. These results extend previous descriptions of hippocampal projections to the accessory olfactory bulb by including the ventral subiculum and characterizing the morphology, neurochemistry (double labeling with somatostatin), and distribution of such neurons. These data suggest feedback hippocampal control of chemosensory stimuli in the accessory olfactory bulb. Whether this projection processes spatial information on conspecifics or is involved in learning and memory processes associated with chemical stimuli remains to be elucidated.

  10. Structure and diversity in mammalian accessory olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Meisami, E; Bhatnagar, K P

    1998-12-15

    The accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) is the first neural integrative center for the olfactory-like vomeronasal sensory system. In this article, we first briefly present an overview of vomeronasal system organization and review the history of the discovery of mammalian AOB. Next, we briefly review the evolution of the vomeronasal system in vertebrates, in particular the reptiles. Following these introductory aspects, the structure of the rodent AOB, as typical of the well-developed mammalian AOB, is presented, detailing laminar organization and cell types as well as aspects of the homology with the main olfactory bulb. Then, the evolutionary origin and diversity of the AOB in mammalian orders and species is discussed, describing structural, phylogenetic, and species-specific variation in the AOB location, shape, and size and morphologic differentiation and development. The AOB is believed to be absent in fishes but present in terrestrial tetrapods including amphibians; among the reptiles AOB is absent in crocodiles, present in turtles, snakes, and some lizards where it may be as large or larger than the main bulb. The AOB is absent in bird and in the aquatic mammals (whales, porpoises, manatees). Among other mammals, AOB is present in the monotremes and marsupials, edentates, and in the majority of the placental mammals like carnivores, herbivores, as well as rodents and lagomorphs. Most bat species do not have an AOB and among those where one is found, it shows marked variation in size and morphologic development. Among insectivores and primates, AOB shows marked variation in occurrence, size, and morphologic development. It is small in shrews and moles, large in hedgehogs and prosimians; AOB continues to persist in New World monkeys but is not found in the adults of the higher primates such as the Old World monkeys, apes, and humans. In many species where AOB is absent in the adult, it often develops in the embryo and fetus but regresses in later stages of

  11. Olfactory system and demyelination.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gonzalez, D; Murcia-Belmonte, V; Clemente, D; De Castro, F

    2013-09-01

    Within the central nervous system, the olfactory system represents one of the most exciting scenarios since it presents relevant examples of long-life sustained neurogenesis and continuous axonal outgrowth from the olfactory epithelium with the subsequent plasticity phenomena in the olfactory bulb. The olfactory nerve is composed of nonmyelinated axons with interesting ontogenetic interpretations. However, the centripetal projections from the olfactory bulb are myelinated axons which project to more caudal areas along the lateral olfactory tract. In consequence, demyelination has not been considered as a possible cause of the olfactory symptoms in those diseases in which this sense is impaired. One prototypical example of an olfactory disease is Kallmann syndrome, in which different mutations give rise to combined anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, together with different satellite symptoms. Anosmin-1 is the extracellular matrix glycoprotein altered in the X-linked form of this disease, which participates in cell adhesion and migration, and axonal outgrowth in the olfactory system and in other regions of the central nervous system. Recently, we have described a new patho-physiological role of this protein in the absence of spontaneous remyelination in multiple sclerosis. In the present review, we hypothesize about how both main and satellite neurological symptoms of Kallmann syndrome may be explained by alterations in the myelination. We revisit the relationship between the olfactory system and myelin highlighting that minor histological changes should not be forgotten as putative causes of olfactory malfunction.

  12. Sexual dimorphism in the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract in the rat.

    PubMed

    Collado, P; Guillamón, A; Valencia, A; Segovia, S

    1990-11-01

    This work investigates the existence of sex differences in the volume and number of neurons and glial cells in the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT). Males showed larger volume and number of cells than female rats. Early postnatal (day 1 after birth) orchidectomy in males, and androgenization in females, reversed these differences. No sex differences were found in BAOT glial cells. The sexual dimorphism found in the neuron/glial cell ratio reflects sex differences in neuron number. The existence of sexual dimorphism in the BAOT supports our earlier hypothesis which states that the vomeronasal system (VNS) is sexually dimorphic.

  13. Ex vivo preparations of the intact vomeronasal organ and accessory olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Wayne I; Hammen, Gary F; Meeks, Julian P

    2014-01-01

    The mouse accessory olfactory system (AOS) is a specialized sensory pathway for detecting nonvolatile social odors, pheromones, and kairomones. The first neural circuit in the AOS pathway, called the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), plays an important role in establishing sex-typical behaviors such as territorial aggression and mating. This small (<1 mm(3)) circuit possesses the capacity to distinguish unique behavioral states, such as sex, strain, and stress from chemosensory cues in the secretions and excretions of conspecifics. While the compact organization of this system presents unique opportunities for recording from large portions of the circuit simultaneously, investigation of sensory processing in the AOB remains challenging, largely due to its experimentally disadvantageous location in the brain. Here, we demonstrate a multi-stage dissection that removes the intact AOB inside a single hemisphere of the anterior mouse skull, leaving connections to both the peripheral vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) and local neuronal circuitry intact. The procedure exposes the AOB surface to direct visual inspection, facilitating electrophysiological and optical recordings from AOB circuit elements in the absence of anesthetics. Upon inserting a thin cannula into the vomeronasal organ (VNO), which houses the VSNs, one can directly expose the periphery to social odors and pheromones while recording downstream activity in the AOB. This procedure enables controlled inquiries into AOS information processing, which can shed light on mechanisms linking pheromone exposure to changes in behavior.

  14. Ex vivo preparations of the intact vomeronasal organ and accessory olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Wayne I; Hammen, Gary F; Meeks, Julian P

    2014-01-01

    The mouse accessory olfactory system (AOS) is a specialized sensory pathway for detecting nonvolatile social odors, pheromones, and kairomones. The first neural circuit in the AOS pathway, called the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), plays an important role in establishing sex-typical behaviors such as territorial aggression and mating. This small (<1 mm(3)) circuit possesses the capacity to distinguish unique behavioral states, such as sex, strain, and stress from chemosensory cues in the secretions and excretions of conspecifics. While the compact organization of this system presents unique opportunities for recording from large portions of the circuit simultaneously, investigation of sensory processing in the AOB remains challenging, largely due to its experimentally disadvantageous location in the brain. Here, we demonstrate a multi-stage dissection that removes the intact AOB inside a single hemisphere of the anterior mouse skull, leaving connections to both the peripheral vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) and local neuronal circuitry intact. The procedure exposes the AOB surface to direct visual inspection, facilitating electrophysiological and optical recordings from AOB circuit elements in the absence of anesthetics. Upon inserting a thin cannula into the vomeronasal organ (VNO), which houses the VSNs, one can directly expose the periphery to social odors and pheromones while recording downstream activity in the AOB. This procedure enables controlled inquiries into AOS information processing, which can shed light on mechanisms linking pheromone exposure to changes in behavior. PMID:25145699

  15. Ex Vivo Preparations of the Intact Vomeronasal Organ and Accessory Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Wayne I.; Hammen, Gary F.; Meeks, Julian P.

    2014-01-01

    The mouse accessory olfactory system (AOS) is a specialized sensory pathway for detecting nonvolatile social odors, pheromones, and kairomones. The first neural circuit in the AOS pathway, called the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), plays an important role in establishing sex-typical behaviors such as territorial aggression and mating. This small (<1 mm3) circuit possesses the capacity to distinguish unique behavioral states, such as sex, strain, and stress from chemosensory cues in the secretions and excretions of conspecifics. While the compact organization of this system presents unique opportunities for recording from large portions of the circuit simultaneously, investigation of sensory processing in the AOB remains challenging, largely due to its experimentally disadvantageous location in the brain. Here, we demonstrate a multi-stage dissection that removes the intact AOB inside a single hemisphere of the anterior mouse skull, leaving connections to both the peripheral vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) and local neuronal circuitry intact. The procedure exposes the AOB surface to direct visual inspection, facilitating electrophysiological and optical recordings from AOB circuit elements in the absence of anesthetics. Upon inserting a thin cannula into the vomeronasal organ (VNO), which houses the VSNs, one can directly expose the periphery to social odors and pheromones while recording downstream activity in the AOB. This procedure enables controlled inquiries into AOS information processing, which can shed light on mechanisms linking pheromone exposure to changes in behavior. PMID:25145699

  16. Segregated pathways to the vomeronasal amygdala: differential projections from the anterior and posterior divisions of the accessory olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Mohedano-Moriano, Alicia; Pro-Sistiaga, Palma; Ubeda-Bañón, Isabel; Crespo, Carlos; Insausti, Ricardo; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2007-04-01

    Apically and basally located receptor neurons in the vomeronasal sensory epithelium express G(i2 alpha)- and G(o alpha)-proteins, V1R and V2R vomeronasal receptors, project to the anterior and posterior accessory olfactory bulb and respond to different stimuli, respectively. The extent to which secondary projections from the two portions of the accessory olfactory bulb are convergent in the vomeronasal amygdala is controversial. This issue is addressed by using anterograde and retrograde tract-tracing methods in rats including electron microscopy. Injections of dextran-amines, Fluoro Gold, cholera toxin-B subunit and Fast Blue were delivered to the anterior and posterior accessory olfactory bulb, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, dorsal anterior amygdala and bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract/anteroventral medial amygdaloid nucleus. We have demonstrated that, apart from common vomeronasal-recipient areas, only the anterior accessory olfactory bulb projects to the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, medial division, posteromedial part, and only the posterior accessory olfactory bulb projects to the dorsal anterior amygdala and deep cell layers of the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract and the anteroventral medial amygdaloid nucleus. These results provide evidence that, excluding areas of convergence, the V1R and V2R vomeronasal pathways project to specific areas of the amygdala. These two vomeronasal subsystems are therefore anatomically and functionally separated in the telencephalon.

  17. Cladistic Analysis of Olfactory and Vomeronasal Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Pro-Sistiaga, Palma; Mohedano-Moriano, Alicia; Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Gutierrez-Castellanos, Nicolás; Lanuza, Enrique; Martinez-Garcia, Fernando; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2010-01-01

    Most tetrapods possess two nasal organs for detecting chemicals in their environment, which are the sensory detectors of the olfactory and vomeronasal systems. The seventies’ view that the olfactory system was only devoted to sense volatiles, whereas the vomeronasal system was exclusively specialized for pheromone detection was challenged by accumulating data showing deep anatomical and functional interrelationships between both systems. In addition, the assumption that the vomeronasal system appeared as an adaptation to terrestrial life is being questioned as well. The aim of the present work is to use a comparative strategy to gain insight in our understanding of the evolution of chemical “cortex.” We have analyzed the organization of the olfactory and vomeronasal cortices of reptiles, marsupials, and placental mammals and we have compared our findings with data from other taxa in order to better understand the evolutionary history of the nasal sensory systems in vertebrates. The olfactory and vomeronsasal cortices have been re-investigated in garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis), short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica), and rats (Rattus norvegicus) by tracing the efferents of the main and accessory olfactory bulbs using injections of neuroanatomical anterograde tracers (dextran-amines). In snakes, the medial olfactory tract is quite evident, whereas the main vomeronasal-recipient structure, the nucleus sphaericus is a folded cortical-like structure, located at the caudal edge of the amygdala. In marsupials, which are acallosal mammals, the rhinal fissure is relatively dorsal and the olfactory and vomeronasal cortices relatively expanded. Placental mammals, like marsupials, show partially overlapping olfactory and vomeronasal projections in the rostral basal telencephalon. These data raise the interesting question of how the telencephalon has been re-organized in different groups according to the biological relevance of chemical senses. PMID:21290004

  18. Cladistic analysis of olfactory and vomeronasal systems.

    PubMed

    Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Pro-Sistiaga, Palma; Mohedano-Moriano, Alicia; Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Gutierrez-Castellanos, Nicolás; Lanuza, Enrique; Martinez-Garcia, Fernando; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2011-01-01

    Most tetrapods possess two nasal organs for detecting chemicals in their environment, which are the sensory detectors of the olfactory and vomeronasal systems. The seventies' view that the olfactory system was only devoted to sense volatiles, whereas the vomeronasal system was exclusively specialized for pheromone detection was challenged by accumulating data showing deep anatomical and functional interrelationships between both systems. In addition, the assumption that the vomeronasal system appeared as an adaptation to terrestrial life is being questioned as well. The aim of the present work is to use a comparative strategy to gain insight in our understanding of the evolution of chemical "cortex." We have analyzed the organization of the olfactory and vomeronasal cortices of reptiles, marsupials, and placental mammals and we have compared our findings with data from other taxa in order to better understand the evolutionary history of the nasal sensory systems in vertebrates. The olfactory and vomeronsasal cortices have been re-investigated in garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis), short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica), and rats (Rattus norvegicus) by tracing the efferents of the main and accessory olfactory bulbs using injections of neuroanatomical anterograde tracers (dextran-amines). In snakes, the medial olfactory tract is quite evident, whereas the main vomeronasal-recipient structure, the nucleus sphaericus is a folded cortical-like structure, located at the caudal edge of the amygdala. In marsupials, which are acallosal mammals, the rhinal fissure is relatively dorsal and the olfactory and vomeronasal cortices relatively expanded. Placental mammals, like marsupials, show partially overlapping olfactory and vomeronasal projections in the rostral basal telencephalon. These data raise the interesting question of how the telencephalon has been re-organized in different groups according to the biological relevance of chemical senses.

  19. Sexual dimorphism in accessory olfactory bulb mitral cells: a quantitative Golgi study.

    PubMed

    Caminero, A A; Segovia, S; Guillamón, A

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify the existence of sexual dimorphism in the dendritic field of accessory olfactory bulb mitral cells in rats and to investigate the effects of male orchidectomy and female androgenization on the day of birth upon this dendritic field. The rapid Golgi method was used to conduct a quantitative study of various characteristics of the dendritic field of accessory olfactory bulb mitral cells. The results indicated greater values for males than females for the following characteristics: (i) somatic area; (ii) degree of branching in the dendritic field; (iii) total dendritic length; and (iv) dendritic density around the neuronal soma. Orchidectomy of males, as well as androgenization of females, on the day of birth inverted these differences.

  20. Maternal behavior induced in male rats by bilateral lesions of the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, M A; Collado, P; Segovia, S; Guillamón, A; del Cerro, M C

    1992-10-01

    In the present study, we investigate the effect of bilateral electrolytic lesions of the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT) in male Wistar rats that did not have care-pups experience, using a test of induced maternal behavior. Consistent with our previous findings in virgin female rats (10), there was a significantly shorter sensitization (3 days) and retrieval (2 days) latencies in the BAOT-lesioned group than in the sham-lesioned and intact-control male groups (12 days for both). Based on these findings, we propose that BAOT, a sexually dimorphic nucleus of the vomeronasal system, exerts an inhibitory modulation in the expression of parental behavior in male and female virgin rats. It may do so by maintaining an olfactory-based tonic inhibition of maternal behavior, thereby resulting in the adults' tonic avoidance of the pups until this inhibition is abolished by lesion, or reduced or overridden by appropriate hormonal and/or sensory influences.

  1. Bicuculline induces synapse formation on primary cultured accessory olfactory bulb neurons.

    PubMed

    Kato-Negishi, Midori; Muramoto, Kazuyo; Kawahara, Masahiro; Hosoda, Ritsuko; Kuroda, Yoichiro; Ichikawa, Masumi

    2003-09-01

    To investigate the roles of the GABAergic inhibitory system of accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) in pheromonal memory formation, we have developed a primary culture system of AOB neurons, which had numerous excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Using this culture system of AOB neurons, we examined the correlation in rats between neuronal excitation and synaptic morphology by bicuculline-induced disinhibition of cultured AOB neurons. The exposure to bicuculline induced long-lasting oscillatory changes in the intracellular calcium level ([Ca2+]in) of cultured non-GABAergic multipolar neurons, which were identified as mitral/tufted cells (MT cells). These MT cells exhibited the appearance of dendritic filopodia structures after a 10-min treatment with bicuculline. By labelling presynaptic terminals with FM4-64, the appearance of new presynaptic terminals was clearly observed on newly formed filopodia after 120 min treatment with bicuculline. These results suggest that bicuculline-induced [Ca2+]in oscillation of MT cells induces the growth of filopodia and subsequently the formation of new presynaptic terminals. Furthermore, tetrodotoxin or the deprivation of extracellular calcium blocked bicuculline-induced synapse formation. The present results indicate that the long-lasting [Ca2+]in oscillation caused by bicuculline-induced disinhibition of cultured MT cells is significantly implicated in the mechanism underlying synapse formation on cultured AOB neurons. Our established culture system of AOB neurons will aid in clarifying the mechanism of synapse formation between AOB neurons and the molecular mechanism of pheromonal memory formation. PMID:14511315

  2. Perinatal administration of diazepam alters sexual dimorphism in the rat accessory olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Laso, C; Valencia, A; Rodríguez-Zafra, M; Calés, J M; Guillamón, A; Segovia, S

    1994-01-14

    The present study examines the effects of pre and/or early postnatal administration of diazepam on the mitral cell and on the light and dark granule cell populations in the sexually dimorphic accessory olfactory bulb of the rat. Quantitative differences related to sex were observed in the numbers of the three types of neurons, with vehicle males showing greater numbers of cells than vehicle females. The number of mitral cells in males decreased to the levels shown by female rats following prenatal and pre-postnatal diazepam treatments, whereas the DZ treatments did not affect the females. In addition, the diazepam administration during the prenatal, postnatal and pre-postnatal periods decreased the numbers of both light and dark granule cells in males, while these two granule cell subpopulations were not affected in diazepam treated females. These results indicate that perinatal administration of diazepam can alter the sexual dimorphism in the accessory olfactory bulb and that the GABAA/benzodiazepine receptor complex is involved in the sexual differentiation this part of the brain.

  3. Extracting Behaviorally Relevant Traits from Natural Stimuli: Benefits of Combinatorial Representations at the Accessory Olfactory Bulb.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Anat; Ben-Shaul, Yoram

    2016-03-01

    For many animals, chemosensation is essential for guiding social behavior. However, because multiple factors can modulate levels of individual chemical cues, deriving information about other individuals via natural chemical stimuli involves considerable challenges. How social information is extracted despite these sources of variability is poorly understood. The vomeronasal system provides an excellent opportunity to study this topic due to its role in detecting socially relevant traits. Here, we focus on two such traits: a female mouse's strain and reproductive state. In particular, we measure stimulus-induced neuronal activity in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) in response to various dilutions of urine, vaginal secretions, and saliva, from estrus and non-estrus female mice from two different strains. We first show that all tested secretions provide information about a female's receptivity and genotype. Next, we investigate how these traits can be decoded from neuronal activity despite multiple sources of variability. We show that individual neurons are limited in their capacity to allow trait classification across multiple sources of variability. However, simple linear classifiers sampling neuronal activity from small neuronal ensembles can provide a substantial improvement over that attained with individual units. Furthermore, we show that some traits are more efficiently detected than others, and that particular secretions may be optimized for conveying information about specific traits. Across all tested stimulus sources, discrimination between strains is more accurate than discrimination of receptivity, and detection of receptivity is more accurate with vaginal secretions than with urine. Our findings highlight the challenges of chemosensory processing of natural stimuli, and suggest that downstream readout stages decode multiple behaviorally relevant traits by sampling information from distinct but overlapping populations of AOB neurons. PMID:26938460

  4. Extracting Behaviorally Relevant Traits from Natural Stimuli: Benefits of Combinatorial Representations at the Accessory Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, Anat; Ben-Shaul, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    For many animals, chemosensation is essential for guiding social behavior. However, because multiple factors can modulate levels of individual chemical cues, deriving information about other individuals via natural chemical stimuli involves considerable challenges. How social information is extracted despite these sources of variability is poorly understood. The vomeronasal system provides an excellent opportunity to study this topic due to its role in detecting socially relevant traits. Here, we focus on two such traits: a female mouse’s strain and reproductive state. In particular, we measure stimulus-induced neuronal activity in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) in response to various dilutions of urine, vaginal secretions, and saliva, from estrus and non-estrus female mice from two different strains. We first show that all tested secretions provide information about a female’s receptivity and genotype. Next, we investigate how these traits can be decoded from neuronal activity despite multiple sources of variability. We show that individual neurons are limited in their capacity to allow trait classification across multiple sources of variability. However, simple linear classifiers sampling neuronal activity from small neuronal ensembles can provide a substantial improvement over that attained with individual units. Furthermore, we show that some traits are more efficiently detected than others, and that particular secretions may be optimized for conveying information about specific traits. Across all tested stimulus sources, discrimination between strains is more accurate than discrimination of receptivity, and detection of receptivity is more accurate with vaginal secretions than with urine. Our findings highlight the challenges of chemosensory processing of natural stimuli, and suggest that downstream readout stages decode multiple behaviorally relevant traits by sampling information from distinct but overlapping populations of AOB neurons. PMID:26938460

  5. Olfactory system oscillations across phyla

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Leslie M.

    2014-01-01

    Neural oscillations are ubiquitous in olfactory systems of mammals, insects and molluscs. Neurophysiological and computational investigations point to common mechanisms for gamma or odor associated oscillations across phyla (40–100 Hz in mammals, 20–30 Hz in insects, 0.5–1.5 Hz in molluscs), engaging the reciprocal dendrodendritic synapse between excitatory principle neurons and inhibitory interneurons in the olfactory bulb, antennal lobe, or procerebrum. Recent studies suggest important mechanisms that may modulate gamma oscillations, including neuromodulators and centrifugal input to the olfactory bulb and antennal lobe. Beta (20 Hz) and theta (2–12 Hz) oscillations coordinate activity within and across brain regions. Olfactory beta oscillations are associated with odor learning and depend on centrifugal olfactory bulb input, while theta oscillations are strongly associated with respiration. PMID:25460070

  6. Electrophysiological Evidence for a Direct Link between the Main and Accessory Olfactory Bulbs in the Adult Rat

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Barroso, Victor; Ordaz-Sánchez, Benito; Peña-Ortega, Fernando; Larriva-Sahd, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    It is accepted that the main- and accessory- olfactory systems exhibit overlapping responses to pheromones and odorants. We performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in adult rat olfactory bulb slices to define a possible interaction between the first central relay of these systems: the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) and the main olfactory bulb (MOB). This was tested by applying electrical field stimulation in the dorsal part of the MOB while recording large principal cells (LPCs) of the anterior AOB (aAOB). Additional recordings of LPCs were performed at either side of the plane of intersection between the aAOB and posterior-AOB (pAOB) halves, or linea alba, while applying field stimulation to the opposite half. A total of 92 recorded neurons were filled during whole-cell recordings with biocytin and studied at the light microscope. Neurons located in the aAOB (n = 6, 8%) send axon collaterals to the MOB since they were antidromically activated in the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists (APV and CNQX). Recorded LPCs evoked orthodromic excitatory post-synaptic responses (n = 6, aAOB; n = 1, pAOB) or antidromic action potentials (n = 8, aAOB; n = 7, pAOB) when applying field stimulation to the opposite half of the recording site (e.g., recording in aAOB; stimulating in pAOB, and vice-versa). Observation of the filled neurons revealed that indeed, LPCs send axon branches that cross the linea alba to resolve in the internal cellular layer. Additionally, LPCs of the aAOB send axon collaterals to dorsal-MOB territory. Notably, while performing AOB recordings we found a sub-population of neurons (24% of the total) that exhibited voltage-dependent bursts of action potentials. Our findings support the existence of: 1. a direct projection from aAOB LPCs to dorsal-MOB, 2. physiologically active synapses linking aAOB and pAOB, and 3. pacemaker-like neurons in both AOB halves. This work was presented in the form of an Abstract on SfN 2014 (719.14/EE17). PMID:26858596

  7. Electrophysiological Evidence for a Direct Link between the Main and Accessory Olfactory Bulbs in the Adult Rat.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Barroso, Victor; Ordaz-Sánchez, Benito; Peña-Ortega, Fernando; Larriva-Sahd, Jorge A

    2015-01-01

    It is accepted that the main- and accessory- olfactory systems exhibit overlapping responses to pheromones and odorants. We performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in adult rat olfactory bulb slices to define a possible interaction between the first central relay of these systems: the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) and the main olfactory bulb (MOB). This was tested by applying electrical field stimulation in the dorsal part of the MOB while recording large principal cells (LPCs) of the anterior AOB (aAOB). Additional recordings of LPCs were performed at either side of the plane of intersection between the aAOB and posterior-AOB (pAOB) halves, or linea alba, while applying field stimulation to the opposite half. A total of 92 recorded neurons were filled during whole-cell recordings with biocytin and studied at the light microscope. Neurons located in the aAOB (n = 6, 8%) send axon collaterals to the MOB since they were antidromically activated in the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists (APV and CNQX). Recorded LPCs evoked orthodromic excitatory post-synaptic responses (n = 6, aAOB; n = 1, pAOB) or antidromic action potentials (n = 8, aAOB; n = 7, pAOB) when applying field stimulation to the opposite half of the recording site (e.g., recording in aAOB; stimulating in pAOB, and vice-versa). Observation of the filled neurons revealed that indeed, LPCs send axon branches that cross the linea alba to resolve in the internal cellular layer. Additionally, LPCs of the aAOB send axon collaterals to dorsal-MOB territory. Notably, while performing AOB recordings we found a sub-population of neurons (24% of the total) that exhibited voltage-dependent bursts of action potentials. Our findings support the existence of: 1. a direct projection from aAOB LPCs to dorsal-MOB, 2. physiologically active synapses linking aAOB and pAOB, and 3. pacemaker-like neurons in both AOB halves. This work was presented in the form of an Abstract on SfN 2014 (719.14/EE17).

  8. Electrophysiological Evidence for a Direct Link between the Main and Accessory Olfactory Bulbs in the Adult Rat.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Barroso, Victor; Ordaz-Sánchez, Benito; Peña-Ortega, Fernando; Larriva-Sahd, Jorge A

    2015-01-01

    It is accepted that the main- and accessory- olfactory systems exhibit overlapping responses to pheromones and odorants. We performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in adult rat olfactory bulb slices to define a possible interaction between the first central relay of these systems: the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) and the main olfactory bulb (MOB). This was tested by applying electrical field stimulation in the dorsal part of the MOB while recording large principal cells (LPCs) of the anterior AOB (aAOB). Additional recordings of LPCs were performed at either side of the plane of intersection between the aAOB and posterior-AOB (pAOB) halves, or linea alba, while applying field stimulation to the opposite half. A total of 92 recorded neurons were filled during whole-cell recordings with biocytin and studied at the light microscope. Neurons located in the aAOB (n = 6, 8%) send axon collaterals to the MOB since they were antidromically activated in the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists (APV and CNQX). Recorded LPCs evoked orthodromic excitatory post-synaptic responses (n = 6, aAOB; n = 1, pAOB) or antidromic action potentials (n = 8, aAOB; n = 7, pAOB) when applying field stimulation to the opposite half of the recording site (e.g., recording in aAOB; stimulating in pAOB, and vice-versa). Observation of the filled neurons revealed that indeed, LPCs send axon branches that cross the linea alba to resolve in the internal cellular layer. Additionally, LPCs of the aAOB send axon collaterals to dorsal-MOB territory. Notably, while performing AOB recordings we found a sub-population of neurons (24% of the total) that exhibited voltage-dependent bursts of action potentials. Our findings support the existence of: 1. a direct projection from aAOB LPCs to dorsal-MOB, 2. physiologically active synapses linking aAOB and pAOB, and 3. pacemaker-like neurons in both AOB halves. This work was presented in the form of an Abstract on SfN 2014 (719.14/EE17). PMID:26858596

  9. Expression of corticosteroid binding globulin in the rat olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Dölz, Wilfried; Eitner, Annett; Caldwell, Jack D; Jirikowski, Gustav F

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoids are known to act on the olfactory system although their mode of action is still unclear since nuclear glucocorticoid receptors are mostly absent in the olfactory mucosa. In this study we used immunocytochemistry, in situ hybridization, and RT-PCR to study the expression and distribution of corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) in the rat olfactory system. Mucosal goblet cells could be immunostained for CBG. Nasal secretion contained measurable amounts of CBG suggesting that CBG is liberated. CBG immunoreactivity was localized in many of the basal cells of the olfactory mucosa, while mature sensory cells contained CBG only in processes as determined by double immunostaining with the olfactory marker protein OMP. This staining was most pronounced in the vomeronasal organ (VNO). The appearance of CBG in the non-sensory and sensory parts of the VNO and in nerve terminals in the accessory bulb indicated axonal transport. Portions of the periglomerular cells, the mitral cells and the tufted cells were also CBG positive. CBG encoding transcripts were confirmed by RT-PCR in homogenates of the olfactory mucosa and VNO. Olfactory CBG may be significant for uptake, accumulation and transport of glucocorticoids, including aerosolic cortisol.

  10. Aging in the olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Arie S; Rodriguez-Gil, Diego J; Imamura, Fumiaki; Greer, Charles A

    2014-02-01

    With advancing age, the ability of humans to detect and discriminate odors declines. In light of the rapid progress in analyzing molecular and structural correlates of developing and adult olfactory systems, the paucity of information available on the aged olfactory system is startling. A rich literature documents the decline of olfactory acuity in aged humans, but the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Using animal models, preliminary work is beginning to uncover differences between young and aged rodents that may help address the deficits seen in humans, but many questions remain unanswered. Recent studies of odorant receptor (OR) expression, synaptic organization, adult neurogenesis, and the contribution of cortical representation during aging suggest possible underlying mechanisms and new research directions.

  11. Olfactory system oscillations across phyla.

    PubMed

    Kay, Leslie M

    2015-04-01

    Neural oscillations are ubiquitous in olfactory systems of mammals, insects and molluscs. Neurophysiological and computational investigations point to common mechanisms for gamma or odor associated oscillations across phyla (40-100Hz in mammals, 20-30Hz in insects, 0.5-1.5Hz in molluscs), engaging the reciprocal dendrodendritic synapse between excitatory principle neurons and inhibitory interneurons in the olfactory bulb (OB), antennal lobe (AL), or procerebrum (PrC). Recent studies suggest important mechanisms that may modulate gamma oscillations, including neuromodulators and centrifugal input to the OB and AL. Beta (20Hz) and theta (2-12Hz) oscillations coordinate activity within and across brain regions. Olfactory beta oscillations are associated with odor learning and depend on centrifugal OB input, while theta oscillations are strongly associated with respiration.

  12. Prolonged Intracellular Na+ Dynamics Govern Electrical Activity in Accessory Olfactory Bulb Mitral Cells.

    PubMed

    Zylbertal, Asaph; Kahan, Anat; Ben-Shaul, Yoram; Yarom, Yosef; Wagner, Shlomo

    2015-12-01

    Persistent activity has been reported in many brain areas and is hypothesized to mediate working memory and emotional brain states and to rely upon network or biophysical feedback. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism by which persistent neuronal activity can be generated without feedback, relying instead on the slow removal of Na+ from neurons following bursts of activity. We show that mitral cells in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), which plays a major role in mammalian social behavior, may respond to a brief sensory stimulation with persistent firing. By combining electrical recordings, Ca2+ and Na+ imaging, and realistic computational modeling, we explored the mechanisms underlying the persistent activity in AOB mitral cells. We found that the exceptionally slow inward current that underlies this activity is governed by prolonged dynamics of intracellular Na+ ([Na+]i), which affects neuronal electrical activity via several pathways. Specifically, elevated dendritic [Na+]i reverses the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger activity, thus modifying the [Ca2+]i set-point. This process, which relies on ubiquitous membrane mechanisms, is likely to play a role in other neuronal types in various brain regions. PMID:26674618

  13. Prolonged Intracellular Na+ Dynamics Govern Electrical Activity in Accessory Olfactory Bulb Mitral Cells.

    PubMed

    Zylbertal, Asaph; Kahan, Anat; Ben-Shaul, Yoram; Yarom, Yosef; Wagner, Shlomo

    2015-12-01

    Persistent activity has been reported in many brain areas and is hypothesized to mediate working memory and emotional brain states and to rely upon network or biophysical feedback. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism by which persistent neuronal activity can be generated without feedback, relying instead on the slow removal of Na+ from neurons following bursts of activity. We show that mitral cells in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), which plays a major role in mammalian social behavior, may respond to a brief sensory stimulation with persistent firing. By combining electrical recordings, Ca2+ and Na+ imaging, and realistic computational modeling, we explored the mechanisms underlying the persistent activity in AOB mitral cells. We found that the exceptionally slow inward current that underlies this activity is governed by prolonged dynamics of intracellular Na+ ([Na+]i), which affects neuronal electrical activity via several pathways. Specifically, elevated dendritic [Na+]i reverses the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger activity, thus modifying the [Ca2+]i set-point. This process, which relies on ubiquitous membrane mechanisms, is likely to play a role in other neuronal types in various brain regions.

  14. Prolonged Intracellular Na+ Dynamics Govern Electrical Activity in Accessory Olfactory Bulb Mitral Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zylbertal, Asaph; Kahan, Anat; Ben-Shaul, Yoram; Yarom, Yosef; Wagner, Shlomo

    2015-01-01

    Persistent activity has been reported in many brain areas and is hypothesized to mediate working memory and emotional brain states and to rely upon network or biophysical feedback. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism by which persistent neuronal activity can be generated without feedback, relying instead on the slow removal of Na+ from neurons following bursts of activity. We show that mitral cells in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), which plays a major role in mammalian social behavior, may respond to a brief sensory stimulation with persistent firing. By combining electrical recordings, Ca2+ and Na+ imaging, and realistic computational modeling, we explored the mechanisms underlying the persistent activity in AOB mitral cells. We found that the exceptionally slow inward current that underlies this activity is governed by prolonged dynamics of intracellular Na+ ([Na+]i), which affects neuronal electrical activity via several pathways. Specifically, elevated dendritic [Na+]i reverses the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger activity, thus modifying the [Ca2+]i set-point. This process, which relies on ubiquitous membrane mechanisms, is likely to play a role in other neuronal types in various brain regions. PMID:26674618

  15. Sexual Stimulation Increases the Survival of New Cells in the Accessory Olfactory Bulb of the Male Rat

    PubMed Central

    Unda, Nancy M.; Portillo, Wendy; Corona, Rebeca; Paredes, Raúl G.

    2016-01-01

    Sexual behavior in rodents is modulated by the olfactory system. The olfactory bulb (OB) is a structure that undergoes continues neurogenesis in adulthood. We have previously shown that 15 days after males rats pace the sexual interaction and ejaculate 1 or 3 times, there is an increase in the density of new cells that reach the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB). The aim of the present study was to evaluate if sexual behavior in male rats increases the density of new neurons that survive 45 days after sexual behavior in the AOB and in the main OB (MOB). Male rats were randomly divided in four groups: (1) Control (Ctr), males without sexual interaction; (2) Exposed (Exp), males only exposed to a sexually receptive female; (3) No pacing (NP), males that mated in conditions in which the female paced the sexual interaction; (4) One ejaculation (1E), males that paced the sexual interaction with a receptive female and ejaculated once; and (5) Three ejaculations (3E), males that paced the sexual interaction and were allowed to ejaculate three times. All males were injected with the DNA synthesis marker 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU), and were tested in one of the above conditions. 45 days later they were sacrificed, and the OBs were processed to identify new cells and evaluate if they had differentiated into neurons. Our data indicate that males that ejaculated three times showed an increase in the density of new cells that survive in the posterior part of the granular cell layer of the AOB and have more new neurons that the control group. However, no significant differences were found in the percentage of new cells that differentiate into neurons. No significant increase in the density of new cells was observed in the MOB. Our data show that pacing the sexual interaction until three ejaculations increases the density of new cells and neurons in the granular layer of the AOB, confirming that sexual behavior induces long-lasting plastic changes in the OB. PMID:26973447

  16. Sexual Stimulation Increases the Survival of New Cells in the Accessory Olfactory Bulb of the Male Rat.

    PubMed

    Unda, Nancy M; Portillo, Wendy; Corona, Rebeca; Paredes, Raúl G

    2016-01-01

    Sexual behavior in rodents is modulated by the olfactory system. The olfactory bulb (OB) is a structure that undergoes continues neurogenesis in adulthood. We have previously shown that 15 days after males rats pace the sexual interaction and ejaculate 1 or 3 times, there is an increase in the density of new cells that reach the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB). The aim of the present study was to evaluate if sexual behavior in male rats increases the density of new neurons that survive 45 days after sexual behavior in the AOB and in the main OB (MOB). Male rats were randomly divided in four groups: (1) Control (Ctr), males without sexual interaction; (2) Exposed (Exp), males only exposed to a sexually receptive female; (3) No pacing (NP), males that mated in conditions in which the female paced the sexual interaction; (4) One ejaculation (1E), males that paced the sexual interaction with a receptive female and ejaculated once; and (5) Three ejaculations (3E), males that paced the sexual interaction and were allowed to ejaculate three times. All males were injected with the DNA synthesis marker 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU), and were tested in one of the above conditions. 45 days later they were sacrificed, and the OBs were processed to identify new cells and evaluate if they had differentiated into neurons. Our data indicate that males that ejaculated three times showed an increase in the density of new cells that survive in the posterior part of the granular cell layer of the AOB and have more new neurons that the control group. However, no significant differences were found in the percentage of new cells that differentiate into neurons. No significant increase in the density of new cells was observed in the MOB. Our data show that pacing the sexual interaction until three ejaculations increases the density of new cells and neurons in the granular layer of the AOB, confirming that sexual behavior induces long-lasting plastic changes in the OB. PMID:26973447

  17. Identification of G protein α subunits in the main olfactory system and vomeronasal system of the Japanese Striped snake, Elaphe quadrivirgata.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Daisuke; Koshi, Katsuo; Ono, Hisaya K; Sasaki, Kuniaki; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    In the olfactory system, G proteins couple to the olfactory receptors, and G proteins expressed in the main olfactory system and vomeronasal system vary according to animal species. In this study, G protein α subunits expressed in the main olfactory system and vomeronasal system of the snake were identified by immunohistochemistry. In the olfactory epithelium, only anti-Gαolf/s antibody labeled the cilia of the receptor cells. In the vomeronasal epithelium, only anti-Gαo antibody labeled the microvilli of the receptor cells. In the accessory olfactory bulb, anti-Gαo antibody stained the whole glomerular layer. These results suggest that the main olfactory system and the vomeronasal system of the snake express Gαolf and Gαo as G proteins coupling to the olfactory receptors, respectively.

  18. Robo-2 controls the segregation of a portion of basal vomeronasal sensory neuron axons to the posterior region of the accessory olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Prince, Janet E A; Cho, Jin Hyung; Dumontier, Emilie; Andrews, William; Cutforth, Tyler; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Parnavelas, John; Cloutier, Jean-François

    2009-11-11

    The ability of sensory systems to detect and process information from the environment relies on the elaboration of precise connections between sensory neurons in the periphery and second order neurons in the CNS. In mice, the accessory olfactory system is thought to regulate a wide variety of social and sexual behaviors. The expression of the Slit receptors Robo-1 and Robo-2 in vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) suggests they may direct the stereotypic targeting of their axons to the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB). Here, we have examined the roles of Robo-1 and Robo-2 in the formation of connections by VSN axons within the AOB. While Robo-1 is not necessary for the segregation of VSN axons within the anterior and posterior regions of the AOB, Robo-2 is required for the targeting of some basal VSN axons to the posterior region of the AOB but is dispensable for the fasciculation of VSN axons. Furthermore, the specific ablation of Robo-2 expression in VSNs leads to mistargeting of a portion of basal VSN axons to the anterior region of the AOB, indicating that Robo-2 expression is required on projecting VSN axons. Together, these results identify Robo-2 as a receptor that controls the targeting of basal VSN axons to the posterior AOB.

  19. Transient and sustained afterdepolarizations in accessory olfactory bulb mitral cells are mediated by distinct mechanisms that are differentially regulated by neuromodulators

    PubMed Central

    Shpak, Guy; Zylbertal, Asaph; Wagner, Shlomo

    2015-01-01

    Social interactions between mammalian conspecifics rely heavily on molecular communication via the main and accessory olfactory systems. These two chemosensory systems show high similarity in the organization of information flow along their early stages: social chemical cues are detected by the sensory neurons of the main olfactory epithelium and the vomeronasal organ. These neurons then convey sensory information to the main (MOB) and accessory (AOB) olfactory bulbs, respectively, where they synapse upon mitral cells that project to higher brain areas. Yet, the functional difference between these two chemosensory systems remains unclear. We have previously shown that MOB and AOB mitral cells exhibit very distinct intrinsic biophysical properties leading to different types of information processing. Specifically, we found that unlike MOB mitral cells, AOB neurons display persistent firing responses to strong stimuli. These prolonged responses are mediated by long-lasting calcium-activated non-selective cationic current (Ican). In the current study we further examined the firing characteristics of these cells and their modulation by several neuromodulators. We found that AOB mitral cells display transient depolarizing afterpotentials (DAPs) following moderate firing. These DAPs are not found in MOB mitral cells that show instead robust hyperpolarizing afterpotentials. Unlike Ican, the DAPs of AOB mitral cells are activated by low levels of intracellular calcium and are relatively insensitive to flufenamic acid. Moreover, the cholinergic agonist carbachol exerts opposite effects on the persistent firing and DAPs of AOB mitral cells. We conclude that these phenomena are mediated by distinct biophysical mechanisms that may serve to mediate different types of information processing in the AOB at distinct brain states. PMID:25642164

  20. Roles of olfactory system dysfunction in depression.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ti-Fei; Slotnick, Burton M

    2014-10-01

    The olfactory system is involved in sensory functions, emotional regulation and memory formation. Olfactory bulbectomy in rat has been employed as an animal model of depression for antidepressant discovery studies for many years. Olfaction is impaired in animals suffering from chronic stress, and patients with clinical depression were reported to have decreased olfactory function. It is believed that the neurobiological bases of depression might include dysfunction in the olfactory system. Further, brain stimulation, including nasal based drug delivery could provide novel therapies for management of depression.

  1. Shared and differential traits in the accessory olfactory bulb of caviomorph rodents with particular reference to the semiaquatic capybara.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Rodrigo; Santibáñez, Rodrigo; Parra, Daniela; Coppi, Antonio A; Abrahão, Luciana M B; Sasahara, Tais H C; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2011-05-01

    The vomeronasal system is crucial for social and sexual communication in mammals. Two populations of vomeronasal sensory neurons, each expressing Gαi2 or Gαo proteins, send projections to glomeruli of the rostral or caudal accessory olfactory bulb, rAOB and cAOB, respectively. In rodents, the Gαi2- and Gαo-expressing vomeronasal pathways have shown differential responses to small/volatile vs. large/non-volatile semiochemicals, respectively. Moreover, early gene expression suggests predominant activation of rAOB and cAOB neurons in sexual vs. aggressive contexts, respectively. We recently described the AOB of Octodon degus, a semiarid-inhabiting diurnal caviomorph. Their AOB has a cell indentation between subdomains and the rAOB is twice the size of the cAOB. Moreover, their AOB receives innervation from the lateral aspect, contrasting with the medial innervation of all other mammals examined to date. Aiming to relate AOB anatomy with lifestyle, we performed a morphometric study on the AOB of the capybara, a semiaquatic caviomorph whose lifestyle differs remarkably from that of O. degus. Capybaras mate in water and scent-mark their surroundings with oily deposits, mostly for male-male communication. We found that, similar to O. degus, the AOB of capybaras shows a lateral innervation of the vomeronasal nerve, a cell indentation between subdomains and heterogeneous subdomains, but in contrast to O. degus the caudal portion is larger than the rostral one. We also observed that four other caviomorph species present a lateral AOB innervation and a cell indentation between AOB subdomains, suggesting that those traits could represent apomorphies of the group. We propose that although some AOB traits may be phylogenetically conserved in caviomorphs, ecological specializations may play an important role in shaping the AOB.

  2. Shared and differential traits in the accessory olfactory bulb of caviomorph rodents with particular reference to the semiaquatic capybara

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Rodrigo; Santibáñez, Rodrigo; Parra, Daniela; Coppi, Antonio A; Abrahão, Luciana M B; Sasahara, Tais H C; Mpodozis, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The vomeronasal system is crucial for social and sexual communication in mammals. Two populations of vomeronasal sensory neurons, each expressing Gαi2 or Gαo proteins, send projections to glomeruli of the rostral or caudal accessory olfactory bulb, rAOB and cAOB, respectively. In rodents, the Gαi2- and Gαo-expressing vomeronasal pathways have shown differential responses to small/volatile vs. large/non-volatile semiochemicals, respectively. Moreover, early gene expression suggests predominant activation of rAOB and cAOB neurons in sexual vs. aggressive contexts, respectively. We recently described the AOB of Octodon degus, a semiarid-inhabiting diurnal caviomorph. Their AOB has a cell indentation between subdomains and the rAOB is twice the size of the cAOB. Moreover, their AOB receives innervation from the lateral aspect, contrasting with the medial innervation of all other mammals examined to date. Aiming to relate AOB anatomy with lifestyle, we performed a morphometric study on the AOB of the capybara, a semiaquatic caviomorph whose lifestyle differs remarkably from that of O. degus. Capybaras mate in water and scent-mark their surroundings with oily deposits, mostly for male–male communication. We found that, similar to O. degus, the AOB of capybaras shows a lateral innervation of the vomeronasal nerve, a cell indentation between subdomains and heterogeneous subdomains, but in contrast to O. degus the caudal portion is larger than the rostral one. We also observed that four other caviomorph species present a lateral AOB innervation and a cell indentation between AOB subdomains, suggesting that those traits could represent apomorphies of the group. We propose that although some AOB traits may be phylogenetically conserved in caviomorphs, ecological specializations may play an important role in shaping the AOB. PMID:21457258

  3. Information processing in the mammalian olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Gheusi, Gilles; Vincent, Jean-Didier

    2005-01-01

    Recently, modern neuroscience has made considerable progress in understanding how the brain perceives, discriminates, and recognizes odorant molecules. This growing knowledge took over when the sense of smell was no longer considered only as a matter for poetry or the perfume industry. Over the last decades, chemical senses captured the attention of scientists who started to investigate the different stages of olfactory pathways. Distinct fields such as genetic, biochemistry, cellular biology, neurophysiology, and behavior have contributed to provide a picture of how odor information is processed in the olfactory system as it moves from the periphery to higher areas of the brain. So far, the combination of these approaches has been most effective at the cellular level, but there are already signs, and even greater hope, that the same is gradually happening at the systems level. This review summarizes the current ideas concerning the cellular mechanisms and organizational strategies used by the olfactory system to process olfactory information. We present findings that exemplified the high degree of olfactory plasticity, with special emphasis on the first central relay of the olfactory system. Recent observations supporting the necessity of such plasticity for adult brain functions are also discussed. Due to space constraints, this review focuses mainly on the olfactory systems of vertebrates, and primarily those of mammals.

  4. Unraveling Cajal's view of the olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Figueres-Oñate, María; Gutiérrez, Yolanda; López-Mascaraque, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory system has a highly regular organization of interconnected synaptic circuits from the periphery. It is therefore an excellent model for understanding general principles about how the brain processes information. Cajal revealed the basic cell types and their interconnections at the end of the XIX century. Since his original descriptions, the observation and analysis of the olfactory system and its components represents a major topic in neuroscience studies, providing important insights into the neural mechanisms. In this review, we will highlight the importance of Cajal contributions and his legacy to the actual knowledge of the olfactory system. PMID:25071462

  5. [Odor sensing system and olfactory display].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2014-01-01

    In this review, an odor sensing system and an olfactory display are introduced into people in pharmacy. An odor sensing system consists of an array of sensors with partially overlapping specificities and pattern recognition technique. One of examples of odor sensing systems is a halitosis sensor which quantifies the mixture composition of three volatile sulfide compounds. A halitosis sensor was realized using a preconcentrator to raise sensitivity and an electrochemical sensor array to suppress the influence of humidity. Partial least squares (PLS) method was used to quantify the mixture composition. The experiment reveals that the sufficient accuracy was obtained. Moreover, the olfactory display, which present scents to human noses, is explained. A multi-component olfactory display enables the presentation of a variety of smells. The two types of multi-component olfactory display are described. The first one uses many solenoid valves with high speed switching. The valve ON frequency determines the concentration of the corresponding odor component. The latter one consists of miniaturized liquid pumps and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer. It enables the wearable olfactory display without smell persistence. Finally, the application of the olfactory display is demonstrated. Virtual ice cream shop with scents was made as a content of interactive art. People can enjoy harmony among vision, audition and olfaction. In conclusion, both odor sensing system and olfactory display can contribute to the field of human health care.

  6. Postnatal administration of dihydrotestosterone to the male rat abolishes sexual dimorphism in the accessory olfactory bulb: a volumetric study.

    PubMed

    Valencia, A; Collado, P; Calés, J M; Segovia, S; Pérez Laso, C; Rodríguez Zafra, M; Guillamón, A

    1992-07-24

    The regulatory action of the non-aromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on sexual differentiation of the volume of the rat accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) was studied. Postnatal treatment with DHT (180 micrograms/day) carried out daily between days 6 and 20 produced a drastic reduction in overall AOB size and that of its constituent neural layers in genetic males with respect to intact and control males. The volumetric measures found in DHT-treated males did not differ from those shown by the intact females. These results, which indicate a demasculinization and a feminization of the AOB volume in gonadally intact male rats induced by DHT, are discussed in relation to the presumably regulatory role of DHT on neuron populations during the sexual organizational process of the brain.

  7. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Perinatal monitoring system and accessories. 884.2740 Section 884.2740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Monitoring Devices § 884.2740 Perinatal monitoring system and accessories. (a) Identification. A...

  8. Main and accessory olfactory bulbs and their projections in the brain anticipate feeding in food-entrained rats.

    PubMed

    Caba, Mario; Pabello, Marcela; Moreno, Maria Luisa; Meza, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) has a circadian clock independent of the suprachiasmatic nucleus, but very little is known about the functional significance of its oscillations. The OB plays a major role in food intake as it contributes to the evaluation of the hedonic properties of food, it is necessary for a normal pattern of locomotor behavior and their ablation disrupts feeding patterns. Previously we demonstrated that OB of rabbit pups can be entrained by periodic nursing but it was not clear whether food was the entraining signal. Here we hypothesized that OB can be entrained by a food pulse during the day in adult rats under a restricted feeding schedule. Then we expect that OB will have a high activation before food presentation when animals show food anticipatory activity (FAA). To this aim we determined by immunohistochemistry the expression of FOS protein, as an indicator of neural activation, in the mitral and granular cell layers of the main and accessory OB. Additionally we also explored two of the OB brain targets, the piriform cortex (PC) and bed nuclei of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT), in three groups: ad libitum (ALF), restricted feeding (RF), and fasted rats after restricted feeding (RF-F). In ALF group FOS levels in both main and accessory OB were low during the day and high during the night at the normal onset of the increase of activity, in agreement with previous reports. On the contrary in RF and RF-F groups FOS was high at the time of FAA, just before food presentation, when animals are in a state of high arousal and during food consumption but was low during the night. In their brain targets, we observed a similar pattern as OB in all groups with the only difference being that FOS levels remained high during the night in RF-F group. We conclude that the OB is entrained by food restriction by showing high activation at the time of food presentation, which persists during fasting and impose a similar FOS pattern to the two brain targets

  9. 21 CFR 876.5820 - Hemodialysis system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... system controls and monitors the dialysate circulating through the dialysate compartment of the dialyzer. (1) The extracorporeal blood system and accessories consists of tubing, pumps, pressure monitors, air...) The dialysate delivery system consists of mechanisms that monitor and control the...

  10. Pheromones from males of different familiarity exert divergent effects on adult neurogenesis in the female accessory olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jyun-Han; Han, Yueh-Ting; Yu, Jenn-Yah; Wang, Tsu-Wei

    2013-08-01

    Pheromones from urine of unfamiliar conspecific male animals can reinitiate a female's estrus cycle to cause pregnancy block through the vomeronasal organ (VNO)-accessory olfactory bulb (AOB)-hypothalamic pathway. This phenomenon is called the Bruce effect. Pheromones from the mate of the female, however, do not trigger re-entrance of the estrus cycle because an olfactory memory toward its mate is formed. The activity of the VNO-AOB-hypothalamic pathway is negatively modulated by GABAergic granule cells in the AOB. Since these cells are constantly replenished by neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle throughout adulthood and adult neurogenesis is required for mate recognition and fertility, we tested the hypothesis that pheromones from familiar and unfamiliar males may have different effects on adult AOB neurogenesis in female mice. When female mice were exposed to bedding used by a male or lived with one, cell proliferation and neuroblast production in the SVZ were increased. Furthermore, survival of newly generated cells in the AOB was enhanced. This survival effect was transient and mediated by norepinephrine. Interestingly, male bedding-induced newborn cell survival in the AOB but not cell proliferation in the SVZ was attenuated when females were subjected to bedding from an unfamiliar male. Our results indicate that male pheromones from familiar and unfamiliar males exert different effects on neurogenesis in the adult female AOB. Given that adult neurogenesis is required for reproductive behaviors, these divergent pheromonal effects may provide a mechanism for the Bruce effect. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 73: 632-645, 2013.

  11. 21 CFR 876.5630 - Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... accessories is a device that is used as an artificial kidney system for the treatment of patients with renal failure or toxemic conditions, and that consists of a peritoneal access device, an administration set...

  12. 21 CFR 876.5630 - Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... accessories is a device that is used as an artificial kidney system for the treatment of patients with renal failure or toxemic conditions, and that consists of a peritoneal access device, an administration set...

  13. 21 CFR 876.5630 - Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... accessories is a device that is used as an artificial kidney system for the treatment of patients with renal failure or toxemic conditions, and that consists of a peritoneal access device, an administration set...

  14. Evolving olfactory systems on the fly.

    PubMed

    Ramdya, Pavan; Benton, Richard

    2010-07-01

    The detection of odour stimuli in the environment is universally important for primal behaviours such as feeding, mating, kin interactions and escape responses. Given the ubiquity of many airborne chemical signals and the similar organisation of animal olfactory circuits, a fundamental question in our understanding of the sense of smell is how species-specific behavioural responses to odorants can evolve. Recent comparative genomic, developmental and physiological studies are shedding light on this problem by providing insights into the genetic mechanisms that underlie anatomical and functional evolution of the olfactory system. Here we synthesise these data, with a particular focus on insect olfaction, to address how new olfactory receptors and circuits might arise and diverge, offering glimpses into how odour-evoked behaviours could adapt to an ever-changing chemosensory world.

  15. Processing by the main olfactory system of chemosignals that facilitate mammalian reproduction.

    PubMed

    Baum, Michael J; Cherry, James A

    2015-02-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Chemosignals and Reproduction". Most mammalian species possess two parallel circuits that process olfactory information. One of these circuits, the accessory system, originates with sensory neurons in the vomeronasal organ (VNO). This system has long been known to detect non-volatile pheromonal odorants from conspecifics that influence numerous aspects of social communication, including sexual attraction and mating as well as the release of luteinizing hormone from the pituitary gland. A second circuit, the main olfactory system, originates with sensory neurons in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE). This system detects a wide range of non-pheromonal odors relevant to survival (e.g., food and predator odors). Over the past decade evidence has accrued showing that the main olfactory system also detects a range of volatile odorants that function as pheromones to facilitate mate recognition and activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal neuroendocrine axis. We review early studies as well as the new literature supporting the view that the main olfactory system processes a variety of different pheromonal cues that facilitate mammalian reproduction.

  16. Adult Neurogenesis and the Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Whitman, Mary C.; Greer, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Though initially described in the early 1960s, it is only within the past decade that the concept of continuing adult neurogenesis has gained widespread acceptance. Neuroblasts from the subventricular zone (SVZ) migrate along the rostral migratory stream (RMS) into the olfactory bulb, where they differentiate into interneurons. Neuroblasts from the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal formation show relatively little migratory behavior, and differentiate into dentate gyrus granule cells. In sharp contrast to embryonic and perinatal development, these newly differentiated neurons must integrate into a fully functional circuit, without disrupting ongoing performance. Here, after a brief historical overview and introduction to olfactory circuitry, we review recent advances in the biology of neural stem cells, mechanisms of migration in the RMS and olfactory bulb, differentiation and survival of new neurons, and finally mechanisms of synaptic integration. Our primary focus is on the olfactory system, but we also contrast the events occurring there with those in the hippocampal formation. Although both SVZ and SGZ neurogenesis are involved in some types of learning, their full functional significance remains unclear. Since both systems offer models of integration of new neuroblasts, there is immense interest in using neural stem cells to replace neurons lost in injury or disease. Though many questions remain unanswered, new insights appear daily about adult neurogenesis, regulatory mechanisms, and the fates of the progeny. We discuss here some of the central features of these advances, as well as speculate on future research directions. PMID:19615423

  17. Acid sensing by the Drosophila olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Ai, Minrong; Min, Soohong; Grosjean, Yael; Leblanc, Charlotte; Bell, Rati; Benton, Richard; Suh, Greg S B

    2010-12-01

    The odour of acids has a distinct quality that is perceived as sharp, pungent and often irritating. How acidity is sensed and translated into an appropriate behavioural response is poorly understood. Here we describe a functionally segregated population of olfactory sensory neurons in the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, that are highly selective for acidity. These olfactory sensory neurons express IR64a, a member of the recently identified ionotropic receptor (IR) family of putative olfactory receptors. In vivo calcium imaging showed that IR64a+ neurons projecting to the DC4 glomerulus in the antennal lobe are specifically activated by acids. Flies in which the function of IR64a+ neurons or the IR64a gene is disrupted had defects in acid-evoked physiological and behavioural responses, but their responses to non-acidic odorants remained unaffected. Furthermore, artificial stimulation of IR64a+ neurons elicited avoidance responses. Taken together, these results identify cellular and molecular substrates for acid detection in the Drosophila olfactory system and support a labelled-line mode of acidity coding at the periphery. PMID:21085119

  18. Interneurons in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; Flores-Cuadrado, Alicia; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2016-02-01

    The principal olfactory structures display Alzheimer's disease (AD) related pathology at early stages of the disease. Consequently, olfactory deficits are among the earliest symptoms. Reliable olfactory tests for accurate clinical diagnosis are rarely made. In addition, neuropathological analysis postmortem of olfactory structures is often not made. Therefore, the relationship between the clinical features and the underlying pathology is poorly defined. Traditionally, research into Alzheimer's disease has focused on the degeneration of cortical temporal projection neurons and cholinergic neurons. Recent evidence has demonstrated the neurodegeneration of interneuron populations in AD. This review provides an updated overview of the pathological involvement of interneuron populations in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Effects of estradiol on the development of sexual dimorphism in the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract in the rat.

    PubMed

    Collado, P; Valencia, A; Del Abril, A; Rodríguez-Zafra, M; Pérez-Laso, C; Segovia, S; Guillamón, A

    1993-10-15

    Orchidectomized males injected with a single dose of estradiol benzoate (EB) on the day of birth (D1) showed a volume and neuron number in the nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT) similar to that of control males. However, orchidectomized males and those orchidectomized and given a single dose of DHT on D1 showed a decrease in BAOT volume and neuron number with respect to control males. These results support the notion that estradiol induces the morphological masculinization of this structure. The inability of DHT in counteracting the effect of orchidectomy is addressed taking into account the inhibitory action of androgens.

  20. Harmful effects of cadmium on olfactory system in mice.

    PubMed

    Bondier, Jean-Robert; Michel, Germaine; Propper, Alain; Badot, Pierre-Marie

    2008-10-01

    The inhalation of certain metals can result in olfactory epithelial injury, an altered sense of smell, and direct delivery of the metal from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulbs and other parts of the central nervous system. The purpose of this study was to examine whether mice given an intranasal instillation of cadmium would develop altered olfactory function and to assess whether cadmium may be transported directly from the olfactory epithelium to the central nervous system. To evaluate cadmium's ability to induce anosmia and on the basis of olfactory epithelium sensitivity to metals, the aim of this study was first to study cadmium effects on the olfactory function and secondly to check whether cadmium may be transported from the nasal area to the central nervous system. After an intranasal instillation of a solution containing CdCl2 at 136 mM, we observed in treated mice: (1) a partial destruction of the olfactory epithelium, which is reduced to three or four basal cell layers followed by a progressive regeneration; (2) a loss of odor discrimination with a subsequent recovery; and (3) a cadmium uptake by olfactory bulbs demonstrated using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, but not by other parts of the central nervous system. Cadmium was delivered to the olfactory bulbs, most likely along the olfactory nerve, thereby bypassing the intact blood-brain barrier. We consider that cadmium can penetrate olfactory epithelium and hence be transported to olfactory bulbs. The olfactory route could therefore be a likely way to reach the brain and should be taken into account for occupational risk assessments for this metal.

  1. 21 CFR 876.5820 - Hemodialysis system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... system, and accessories. Blood from a patient flows through the tubing of the extracorporeal blood system..., conductivity, flow rate, and pressure of the dialysate and circulates dialysate through the dialysate... (liquid or powder) and alarms to indicate abnormal dialysate conditions. This dialysate delivery...

  2. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Perinatal monitoring system and accessories. 884.2740 Section 884.2740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... heart rate by means of combining and coordinating uterine contraction and fetal heart monitors...

  3. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Perinatal monitoring system and accessories. 884.2740 Section 884.2740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... heart rate by means of combining and coordinating uterine contraction and fetal heart monitors...

  4. 21 CFR 884.2740 - Perinatal monitoring system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Perinatal monitoring system and accessories. 884.2740 Section 884.2740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... heart rate by means of combining and coordinating uterine contraction and fetal heart monitors...

  5. 21 CFR 876.5630 - Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories. 876.5630 Section 876.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices §...

  6. Differential plasticity of microglial cells in the rostrocaudal neuraxis of the accessory olfactory bulb of female mice following mating and stud male exposure.

    PubMed

    Okere, Chuma O

    2012-04-11

    The formation of an olfactory recognition memory by female mice for the stud male pheromones requires two fundamental conditions: incidence of mating and retention of the stud male with the female for a critical 6h interval following mating. This biologically critical recognition memory results from plasticity of reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB). In this study, a microglia marker antibody (ionized calcium-binding adaptor protein, Iba1) was used to determine how mating and stud pheromones affect microglia in the AOB rostrocaudal axis in female mice. The results showed that compared with estrus and mating only, mating and pheromone exposure significantly increased Iba1 immunoreactivity in the AOB evidenced by increased complexity of ramified microglial processes characteristic of resting microglial morphological phenotype, particularly in the rostral AOB. The density of Iba1 staining after mating and stud pheromone exposure was higher in the rostral - compared to caudal - AOB and was most prevalent in the external plexiform layer, the site of reciprocal mitral-granule dendrodendritic synapses. While cells with activated phenotype were observed in caudal AOB during estrus, mating/pheromone exposure appeared to induce a morphological transformation to the resting microglia phenotype. Since previous evidence implicate the rostral AOB in processing pheromonal signals and microglial cells monitor active synapses, these observations have important functional implications for a potential role for microglia in processing pheromonal signals in the AOB during the formation of olfactory memory.

  7. 22 CFR 121.8 - End-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false End-items, components, accessories, attachments...-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software and systems. (a) An end-item is...) Accessories and attachments are associated equipment for any component, end-item or system, and which are...

  8. Phylogenic studies on the olfactory system in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Kazuyuki; Taniguchi, Kazumi

    2014-06-01

    The olfactory receptor organs and their primary centers are classified into several types. The receptor organs are divided into fish-type olfactory epithelium (OE), mammal-type OE, middle chamber epithelium (MCE), lower chamber epithelium (LCE), recess epithelium, septal olfactory organ of Masera (SO), mammal-type vomeronasal organ (VNO) and snake-type VNO. The fish-type OE is observed in flatfish and lungfish, while the mammal-type OE is observed in amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. The MCE and LCE are unique to Xenopus and turtles, respectively. The recess epithelium is unique to lungfish. The SO is observed only in mammals. The mammal-type VNO is widely observed in amphibians, lizards and mammals, while the snake-type VNO is unique to snakes. The VNO itself is absent in turtles and birds. The mammal-type OE, MCE, LCE and recess epithelium seem to be descendants of the fish-type OE that is derived from the putative primitive OE. The VNO may be derived from the recess epithelium or fish-type OE and differentiate into the mammal-type VNO and snake-type VNO. The primary olfactory centers are divided into mammal-type main olfactory bulbs (MOB), fish-type MOB and mammal-type accessory olfactory bulbs (AOB). The mammal-type MOB first appears in amphibians and succeeds to reptiles, birds and mammals. The fish-type MOB, which is unique to fish, may be the ancestor of the mammal-type MOB. The mammal-type AOB is observed in amphibians, lizards, snakes and mammals and may be the remnant of the fish-type MOB.

  9. Phylogenic Studies on the Olfactory System in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    TANIGUCHI, Kazuyuki; TANIGUCHI, Kazumi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The olfactory receptor organs and their primary centers are classified into several types. The receptor organs are divided into fish-type olfactory epithelium (OE), mammal-type OE, middle chamber epithelium (MCE), lower chamber epithelium (LCE), recess epithelium, septal olfactory organ of Masera (SO), mammal-type vomeronasal organ (VNO) and snake-type VNO. The fish-type OE is observed in flatfish and lungfish, while the mammal-type OE is observed in amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. The MCE and LCE are unique to Xenopus and turtles, respectively. The recess epithelium is unique to lungfish. The SO is observed only in mammals. The mammal-type VNO is widely observed in amphibians, lizards and mammals, while the snake-type VNO is unique to snakes. The VNO itself is absent in turtles and birds. The mammal-type OE, MCE, LCE and recess epithelium seem to be descendants of the fish-type OE that is derived from the putative primitive OE. The VNO may be derived from the recess epithelium or fish-type OE and differentiate into the mammal-type VNO and snake-type VNO. The primary olfactory centers are divided into mammal-type main olfactory bulbs (MOB), fish-type MOB and mammal-type accessory olfactory bulbs (AOB). The mammal-type MOB first appears in amphibians and succeeds to reptiles, birds and mammals. The fish-type MOB, which is unique to fish, may be the ancestor of the mammal-type MOB. The mammal-type AOB is observed in amphibians, lizards, snakes and mammals and may be the remnant of the fish-type MOB. PMID:24531771

  10. Fault tolerant architecture for artificial olfactory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfivand, Nasser; Nizar Hamidon, Mohd; Abdolzadeh, Vida

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, to cover and mask the faults that occur in the sensing unit of an artificial olfactory system, a novel architecture is offered. The proposed architecture is able to tolerate failures in the sensors of the array and the faults that occur are masked. The proposed architecture for extracting the correct results from the output of the sensors can provide the quality of service for generated data from the sensor array. The results of various evaluations and analysis proved that the proposed architecture has acceptable performance in comparison with the classic form of the sensor array in gas identification. According to the results, achieving a high odor discrimination based on the suggested architecture is possible.

  11. Face detection for interactive tabletop viewscreen system using olfactory display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kunio; Kanazawa, Fumihiro

    2009-10-01

    An olfactory display is a device that delivers smells to the nose. It provides us with special effects, for example to emit smell as if you were there or to give a trigger for reminding us of memories. The authors have developed a tabletop display system connected with the olfactory display. For delivering a flavor to user's nose, the system needs to recognition and measure positions of user's face and nose. In this paper, the authors describe an olfactory display which enables to detect the nose position for an effective delivery.

  12. System identification of Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Anmo J; Lazar, Aurel A; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B

    2011-02-01

    The lack of a deeper understanding of how olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) encode odors has hindered the progress in understanding the olfactory signal processing in higher brain centers. Here we employ methods of system identification to investigate the encoding of time-varying odor stimuli and their representation for further processing in the spike domain by Drosophila OSNs. In order to apply system identification techniques, we built a novel low-turbulence odor delivery system that allowed us to deliver airborne stimuli in a precise and reproducible fashion. The system provides a 1% tolerance in stimulus reproducibility and an exact control of odor concentration and concentration gradient on a millisecond time scale. Using this novel setup, we recorded and analyzed the in-vivo response of OSNs to a wide range of time-varying odor waveforms. We report for the first time that across trials the response of OR59b OSNs is very precise and reproducible. Further, we empirically show that the response of an OSN depends not only on the concentration, but also on the rate of change of the odor concentration. Moreover, we demonstrate that a two-dimensional (2D) Encoding Manifold in a concentration-concentration gradient space provides a quantitative description of the neuron's response. We then use the white noise system identification methodology to construct one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) Linear-Nonlinear-Poisson (LNP) cascade models of the sensory neuron for a fixed mean odor concentration and fixed contrast. We show that in terms of predicting the intensity rate of the spike train, the 2D LNP model performs on par with the 1D LNP model, with a root mean-square error (RMSE) increase of about 5 to 10%. Surprisingly, we find that for a fixed contrast of the white noise odor waveforms, the nonlinear block of each of the two models changes with the mean input concentration. The shape of the nonlinearities of both the 1D and the 2D LNP model appears to be

  13. On the organization of olfactory and vomeronasal cortices.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2009-01-12

    Classically, the olfactory and vomeronasal pathways are thought to run in parallel non-overlapping axes in the forebrain subserving different functions. The olfactory and vomeronasal epithelia project to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs (primary projections), which in turn project to different areas of the telencephalon in a non-topographic fashion (secondary projections) and so on (tertiary projections). New data indicate that projections arising from the main and accessory olfactory bulbs converge widely in the rostral basal telencephalon. In contrast, in the vomeronasal system, cloning two classes of vomeronasal receptors (V1R and V2R) has led to the distinction of two anatomically and functionally independent pathways that reach some common, but also some different, targets in the amygdala. Tertiary projections from the olfactory and vomeronasal amygdalae are directed to the ventral striatum, which thus becomes a site for processing and potential convergence of chemosensory stimuli. Functional data indicate that the olfactory and vomeronasal systems are able to detect and process volatiles (presumptive olfactory cues) as well as pheromones in both epithelia and bulbs. Collectively, these data indicate that the anatomical and functional distinction between the olfactory and vomeronasal systems should be re-evaluated. Specifically, the recipient cortex should be reorganized to include olfactory, vomeronasal (convergent and V1R and V2R specific areas) and mixed (olfactory and vomeronasal) chemosensory cortices. This new perspective could help to unravel olfactory and vomeronasal interactions in behavioral paradigms.

  14. The development of the olfactory organs in newly hatched monotremes and neonate marsupials.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nanette Yvette

    2011-08-01

    Olfactory cues are thought to play a crucial role in the detection of the milk source at birth in mammals. It has been shown that a marsupial, the tammar wallaby, can detect olfactory cues from its mother's pouch at birth. This study investigates whether the main olfactory and accessory olfactory system are similarly well developed in other marsupials and monotremes at birth/hatching as in the tammar. Sections of the head of various marsupial and two monotreme species were investigated by light microscopy. Both olfactory systems were less well developed in the kowari and Eastern quoll. No olfactory or vomeronasal or terminal nerves could be observed; the main olfactory bulb (MOB) had only two layers while no accessory olfactory bulb or ganglion terminale were visible. All other investigated marsupials and monotremes showed further developed olfactory systems with olfactory, vomeronasal and terminal nerves, a three-layered MOB, and in the marsupials a prominent ganglion terminale. The main olfactory system was further developed than the accessory olfactory system in all species investigated. The olfactory systems were the least developed in species in which the mother's birth position removed most of the difficulty in reaching the teat, placing the neonate directly in the pouch. In monotremes they were the furthest developed as Bowman glands were found underlying the main olfactory epithelium. This may reflect the need to locate the milk field each time they drink as they cannot permanently attach to it, unlike therian mammals. While it still needs to be determined how an odour signal could be further processed in the brain, this study suggests that marsupials and monotremes possess well enough developed olfactory systems to be able to detect an odour cue from the mammary area at birth/hatching. It is therefore likely that neonate marsupials and newly hatched monotremes find their way to the milk source using olfactory cues, as has been previously suggested for the

  15. The development of the olfactory organs in newly hatched monotremes and neonate marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Nanette Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Olfactory cues are thought to play a crucial role in the detection of the milk source at birth in mammals. It has been shown that a marsupial, the tammar wallaby, can detect olfactory cues from its mother's pouch at birth. This study investigates whether the main olfactory and accessory olfactory system are similarly well developed in other marsupials and monotremes at birth/hatching as in the tammar. Sections of the head of various marsupial and two monotreme species were investigated by light microscopy. Both olfactory systems were less well developed in the kowari and Eastern quoll. No olfactory or vomeronasal or terminal nerves could be observed; the main olfactory bulb (MOB) had only two layers while no accessory olfactory bulb or ganglion terminale were visible. All other investigated marsupials and monotremes showed further developed olfactory systems with olfactory, vomeronasal and terminal nerves, a three-layered MOB, and in the marsupials a prominent ganglion terminale. The main olfactory system was further developed than the accessory olfactory system in all species investigated. The olfactory systems were the least developed in species in which the mother's birth position removed most of the difficulty in reaching the teat, placing the neonate directly in the pouch. In monotremes they were the furthest developed as Bowman glands were found underlying the main olfactory epithelium. This may reflect the need to locate the milk field each time they drink as they cannot permanently attach to it, unlike therian mammals. While it still needs to be determined how an odour signal could be further processed in the brain, this study suggests that marsupials and monotremes possess well enough developed olfactory systems to be able to detect an odour cue from the mammary area at birth/hatching. It is therefore likely that neonate marsupials and newly hatched monotremes find their way to the milk source using olfactory cues, as has been previously suggested for the

  16. The development of the olfactory organs in newly hatched monotremes and neonate marsupials.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nanette Yvette

    2011-08-01

    Olfactory cues are thought to play a crucial role in the detection of the milk source at birth in mammals. It has been shown that a marsupial, the tammar wallaby, can detect olfactory cues from its mother's pouch at birth. This study investigates whether the main olfactory and accessory olfactory system are similarly well developed in other marsupials and monotremes at birth/hatching as in the tammar. Sections of the head of various marsupial and two monotreme species were investigated by light microscopy. Both olfactory systems were less well developed in the kowari and Eastern quoll. No olfactory or vomeronasal or terminal nerves could be observed; the main olfactory bulb (MOB) had only two layers while no accessory olfactory bulb or ganglion terminale were visible. All other investigated marsupials and monotremes showed further developed olfactory systems with olfactory, vomeronasal and terminal nerves, a three-layered MOB, and in the marsupials a prominent ganglion terminale. The main olfactory system was further developed than the accessory olfactory system in all species investigated. The olfactory systems were the least developed in species in which the mother's birth position removed most of the difficulty in reaching the teat, placing the neonate directly in the pouch. In monotremes they were the furthest developed as Bowman glands were found underlying the main olfactory epithelium. This may reflect the need to locate the milk field each time they drink as they cannot permanently attach to it, unlike therian mammals. While it still needs to be determined how an odour signal could be further processed in the brain, this study suggests that marsupials and monotremes possess well enough developed olfactory systems to be able to detect an odour cue from the mammary area at birth/hatching. It is therefore likely that neonate marsupials and newly hatched monotremes find their way to the milk source using olfactory cues, as has been previously suggested for the

  17. Genetic control of wiring specificity in the fly olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Hong, Weizhe; Luo, Liqun

    2014-01-01

    Precise connections established between pre- and postsynaptic partners during development are essential for the proper function of the nervous system. The olfactory system detects a wide variety of odorants and processes the information in a precisely connected neural circuit. A common feature of the olfactory systems from insects to mammals is that the olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) expressing the same odorant receptor make one-to-one connections with a single class of second-order olfactory projection neurons (PNs). This represents one of the most striking examples of targeting specificity in developmental neurobiology. Recent studies have uncovered central roles of transmembrane and secreted proteins in organizing this one-to-one connection specificity in the olfactory system. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of how this wiring specificity is genetically controlled and focus on the mechanisms by which transmembrane and secreted proteins regulate different stages of the Drosophila olfactory circuit assembly in a coordinated manner. We also discuss how combinatorial coding, redundancy, and error-correcting ability could contribute to constructing a complex neural circuit in general.

  18. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and....5880 Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. (a) Identification. An isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories is a device that is used to support a donated or...

  19. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and....5880 Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. (a) Identification. An isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories is a device that is used to support a donated or...

  20. The olfactory system as a puzzle: playing with its pieces.

    PubMed

    Díaz, D; Gómez, C; Muñoz-Castañeda, R; Baltanás, F; Alonso, J R; Weruaga, E

    2013-09-01

    The mammalian olfactory bulb (OB) has all the features of a whole mammalian brain but in a more reduced space: neuronal lamination, sensory inputs, afferences, or efferences to other centers of the central nervous system, or a contribution of new neural elements. Therefore, it is widely considered as "a brain inside the brain." Although this rostral region has the same origin and general layering as the other cerebral cortices, some distinctive features make it very profitable in experimentation in neurobiology: the sensory inputs are driven directly on its surface, the main output can be accessed anatomically, and new elements appear in it throughout adult life. These three morphological characteristics have been manipulated to analyze further the response of the whole OB. The present review offers a general outlook into the consequences of such experimentation in the anatomy, connectivity and neurochemistry of the OB after (a) sensory deprivation, mainly by naris occlusion; (b) olfactory deinnervation by means of olfactory epithelium damage, olfactory nerve interruption, or even olfactory tract disruption; (c) the removal of the principal neurons of the OB; and (d) management of the arrival of newborn interneurons from the rostral migratory stream. These experiments were performed using surgical or chemical methods, but also by means of the analysis of genetic models, some of whose olfactory components are missing, colorless or mismatching within the wild-type scenario of odor processing.

  1. Firing properties of accessory olfactory bulb mitral/tufted cells in response to urine delivered to the vomeronasal organ of gray short-tailed opossums.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-Ji; Huang, Guang-Zhe; Halpern, Mimi

    2007-05-01

    In comparison with many mammals, there is limited knowledge of the role of pheromones in conspecific communication in the gray short-tailed opossum. Here we report that mitral/tufted (M/T) cells of the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) of male opossums responded to female urine but not to male urine with two distinct patterns: excitation followed by inhibition or inhibition. Either pattern could be mimicked by application of guanosine 5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate and blocked by guanosine 5'-O-2-thiodiphosphate, indicating that the response of neurons in this pathway is through a G-protein-coupled receptor mechanism. In addition, the inhibitor of phospholipase C (PLC), U73122, significantly blocked urine-induced responses. Male and female urine were ineffective as stimuli for M/T cells in the AOB of female opossums. These results indicate that urine of diestrous females contains a pheromone that directly stimulates vomeronasal neurons through activation of PLC by G-protein-coupled receptor mechanisms and that the response to urine is sexually dimorphic.

  2. Adult neurogenesis in the olfactory system and neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Gallarda, B W; Lledo, P-M

    2012-12-01

    The olfactory system is unique in many respects-two of which include the process of adult neurogenesis which continually supplies it with newborn neurons, and the fact that neurodegenerative diseases are often accompanied by a loss of smell. A link between these two phenomena has been hypothesized, but recent evidence for the lack of robust adult neurogenesis in the human olfactory system calls into question this hypothesis. Nevertheless, model organisms continue to play a critical role in the exploration of neurodegenerative disease. In part one of this review we discuss the most promising recent technological advancements for studying adult neurogenesis in the murine olfactory system. Part two continues by looking at emerging evidence related to adult neurogenesis in neurodegenerative disease studied in model organisms and the differences between animal and human olfactory system adult neurogenesis. Hopefully, the careful application of advanced research methods to the study of neurodegenerative disease in model organisms, while taking into account the recently reported differences between the human and model organism olfactory system, will lead to a better understanding of the reasons for the susceptibility of olfaction to disease.

  3. Intermittency Coding in the Primary Olfactory System: A Neural Substrate for Olfactory Scene Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Il Memming; Bobkov, Yuriy V.; Ache, Barry W.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial and temporal characteristics of the visual and acoustic sensory input are indispensable attributes for animals to perform scene analysis. In contrast, research in olfaction has focused almost exclusively on how the nervous system analyzes the quality and quantity of the sensory signal and largely ignored the spatiotemporal dimension especially in longer time scales. Yet, detailed analyses of the turbulent, intermittent structure of water- and air-borne odor plumes strongly suggest that spatio-temporal information in longer time scales can provide major cues for olfactory scene analysis for animals. We show that a bursting subset of primary olfactory receptor neurons (bORNs) in lobster has the unexpected capacity to encode the temporal properties of intermittent odor signals. Each bORN is tuned to a specific range of stimulus intervals, and collectively bORNs can instantaneously encode a wide spectrum of intermittencies. Our theory argues for the existence of a novel peripheral mechanism for encoding the temporal pattern of odor that potentially serves as a neural substrate for olfactory scene analysis. PMID:24431452

  4. Intermittency coding in the primary olfactory system: a neural substrate for olfactory scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Il Memming; Bobkov, Yuriy V; Ache, Barry W; Príncipe, José C

    2014-01-15

    The spatial and temporal characteristics of the visual and acoustic sensory input are indispensable attributes for animals to perform scene analysis. In contrast, research in olfaction has focused almost exclusively on how the nervous system analyzes the quality and quantity of the sensory signal and largely ignored the spatiotemporal dimension especially in longer time scales. Yet, detailed analyses of the turbulent, intermittent structure of water- and air-borne odor plumes strongly suggest that spatio-temporal information in longer time scales can provide major cues for olfactory scene analysis for animals. We show that a bursting subset of primary olfactory receptor neurons (bORNs) in lobster has the unexpected capacity to encode the temporal properties of intermittent odor signals. Each bORN is tuned to a specific range of stimulus intervals, and collectively bORNs can instantaneously encode a wide spectrum of intermittencies. Our theory argues for the existence of a novel peripheral mechanism for encoding the temporal pattern of odor that potentially serves as a neural substrate for olfactory scene analysis.

  5. Functional MRI of the Olfactory System in Conscious Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hao; Pustovyy, Oleg M.; Waggoner, Paul; Beyers, Ronald J.; Schumacher, John; Wildey, Chester; Barrett, Jay; Morrison, Edward; Salibi, Nouha; Denney, Thomas S.; Vodyanoy, Vitaly J.; Deshpande, Gopikrishna

    2014-01-01

    We depend upon the olfactory abilities of dogs for critical tasks such as detecting bombs, landmines, other hazardous chemicals and illicit substances. Hence, a mechanistic understanding of the olfactory system in dogs is of great scientific interest. Previous studies explored this aspect at the cellular and behavior levels; however, the cognitive-level neural substrates linking them have never been explored. This is critical given the fact that behavior is driven by filtered sensory representations in higher order cognitive areas rather than the raw odor maps of the olfactory bulb. Since sedated dogs cannot sniff, we investigated this using functional magnetic resonance imaging of conscious dogs. We addressed the technical challenges of head motion using a two pronged strategy of behavioral training to keep dogs' head as still as possible and a single camera optical head motion tracking system to account for residual jerky movements. We built a custom computer-controlled odorant delivery system which was synchronized with image acquisition, allowing the investigation of brain regions activated by odors. The olfactory bulb and piriform lobes were commonly activated in both awake and anesthetized dogs, while the frontal cortex was activated mainly in conscious dogs. Comparison of responses to low and high odor intensity showed differences in either the strength or spatial extent of activation in the olfactory bulb, piriform lobes, cerebellum, and frontal cortex. Our results demonstrate the viability of the proposed method for functional imaging of the olfactory system in conscious dogs. This could potentially open up a new field of research in detector dog technology. PMID:24466054

  6. Sexual Behavior Increases Cell Proliferation in the Rostral Migratory Stream and Promotes the Differentiation of the New Cells into Neurons in the Accessory Olfactory Bulb of Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Rebeca; Retana-Márquez, Socorro; Portillo, Wendy; Paredes, Raúl G.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated, that 15 days after female rats pace the sexual interaction, there is an increase in the number of new cells that reach the granular cell layer (GrL) of the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB). The aim of the present study was to evaluate, if the first sexual experience in the female rat increases cell proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the rostral migratory stream (RMS). We also tested if this behavior promotes the survival of the new cells that integrate into the main olfactory bulb (MOB) and AOB 45 days after the behavioral test. Sexually, naive female rats were injected with the DNA synthesis marker 5′-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) on the day of the behavioral test. They were randomly divided into the following groups: Female rats placed alone in the mating cage (1); Females exposed to amyl acetate odor [banana scent, (2)]; Females that could see, hear, and smell the male but physical contact was not possible [exposed to male, (3)]; Female rats that could pace the sexual interaction (4); and females that mated without the possibility of pacing the sexual interaction (5). Animals were sacrificed 2 days after the behavioral test (proliferation) or 45 days later (survival). Our results show that 2 days after females were exposed to banana scent or to the male, they had a higher number of cells in the SVZ. Females, that mated in pace and no-paced conditions had more new cells in the RMS. At 45 days, no significant differences were found in the number of new cells that survived in the MOB or in the AOB. However, mating increased the percentage of new cells, that differentiated into neurons in the GrL of the AOB. These new cells expressed c-Fos after a second sexual encounter just before the females were sacrificed. No significant differences in plasma levels of estradiol and progesterone were observed between groups. Our results indicate that the first sexual experience increases cell proliferation in the RMS and mating

  7. Cell-based microfluidic platform for mimicking human olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hwan; Oh, Eun Hae; Park, Tai Hyun

    2015-12-15

    Various attempts have been made to mimic the human olfactory system using human olfactory receptors (hORs). In particular, OR-expressed cell-based odorant detection systems mimic the smell sensing mechanism of humans, as they exploit endogenous cellular signaling pathways. However, the majority of such cell-based studies have been performed in the liquid phase to maintain cell viability, and liquid odorants were used as detection targets. Here, we present a microfluidic device for the detection of gaseous odorants which more closely mimics the human olfactory system. Cells expressing hOR were cultured on a porous membrane. The membrane was then flipped over and placed between two compartments. The upper compartment is the gaseous part where gaseous odorants are supplied, while the lower compartment is the aqueous part where viable cells are maintained in the liquid medium. Using this simple microfluidic device, we were able to detect gaseous odorant molecules by a fluorescence signal. The fluorescence signal was generated by calcium influx resulting from the interaction between odorant molecules and the hOR. The system allowed detection of gaseous odorant molecules in real-time, and the findings showed that the fluorescence responses increased dose-dependently in the range of 0-2 ppm odorant. In addition, the system can discriminate among gaseous odorant molecules. This microfluidic system closely mimics the human olfactory system in the sense that the submerged cells detect gaseous odorants.

  8. Virtual vision system with actual flavor by olfactory display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kunio; Kanazawa, Fumihiro

    2010-11-01

    The authors have researched multimedia system and support system for nursing studies on and practices of reminiscence therapy and life review therapy. The concept of the life review is presented by Butler in 1963. The process of thinking back on one's life and communicating about one's life to another person is called life review. There is a famous episode concerning the memory. It is called as Proustian effects. This effect is mentioned on the Proust's novel as an episode that a story teller reminds his old memory when he dipped a madeleine in tea. So many scientists research why smells trigger the memory. The authors pay attention to the relation between smells and memory although the reason is not evident yet. Then we have tried to add an olfactory display to the multimedia system so that the smells become a trigger of reminding buried memories. An olfactory display is a device that delivers smells to the nose. It provides us with special effects, for example to emit smell as if you were there or to give a trigger for reminding us of memories. The authors have developed a tabletop display system connected with the olfactory display. For delivering a flavor to user's nose, the system needs to recognition and measure positions of user's face and nose. In this paper, the authors describe an olfactory display which enables to detect the nose position for an effective delivery.

  9. Macaque accessory optic system: II. Connections with the pretectum

    SciTech Connect

    Baleydier, C.; Magnin, M.; Cooper, H.M. )

    1990-12-08

    Connections of the accessory optic system (AOS) with the pretectum are described in the macaque monkey. Injections of tritiated amino acids in the pretectum demonstrate a major contralateral projection to the dorsal (DTN), lateral (LTN), and medial (MTN) terminal nuclei of the AOS and a sparser projection to the ipsilateral LTN. Injections of retrograde tracers, Fast Blue (FB), or wheat germ agglutinin horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) plus nonconjugated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the LTN show that the pretectal-LTN projection originates from two nuclei. The main source of pretectal efferents to the LTN is from the pretectal olivary nucleus (OPN) and is entirely contralateral. This projection, which appears unique to primates, originates from the large multipolar cells of the OPN. In addition to this projection, the nucleus of the optic tract (NOT) projects to the ipsilateral LTN, as in nonprimates. Injection of WGA-HRP in the pretectum shows a reciprocal predominantely ipsilateral projection from the LTN to the pretectum. Retinas were observed after injection of FB in the LTN. The retinal ganglion cells projecting to the AOS are mainly distributed near the fovea and in the nasal region of the contralateral eye, suggesting a nasotemporal pattern of decussation. The demonstration of a direct connection between LTN and OPN forces to a reconsideration of the functional role of the AOS. Previous descriptions of luminance responsive cells in the LTN support a possible participation of this nucleus in the control of the pupillary light reflex.

  10. A Robust Feedforward Model of the Olfactory System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yilun; Sharpee, Tatyana O

    2016-04-01

    Most natural odors have sparse molecular composition. This makes the principles of compressed sensing potentially relevant to the structure of the olfactory code. Yet, the largely feedforward organization of the olfactory system precludes reconstruction using standard compressed sensing algorithms. To resolve this problem, recent theoretical work has shown that signal reconstruction could take place as a result of a low dimensional dynamical system converging to one of its attractor states. However, the dynamical aspects of optimization slowed down odor recognition and were also found to be susceptible to noise. Here we describe a feedforward model of the olfactory system that achieves both strong compression and fast reconstruction that is also robust to noise. A key feature of the proposed model is a specific relationship between how odors are represented at the glomeruli stage, which corresponds to a compression, and the connections from glomeruli to third-order neurons (neurons in the olfactory cortex of vertebrates or Kenyon cells in the mushroom body of insects), which in the model corresponds to reconstruction. We show that should this specific relationship hold true, the reconstruction will be both fast and robust to noise, and in particular to the false activation of glomeruli. The predicted connectivity rate from glomeruli to third-order neurons can be tested experimentally. PMID:27065441

  11. A Robust Feedforward Model of the Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yilun; Sharpee, Tatyana O.

    2016-01-01

    Most natural odors have sparse molecular composition. This makes the principles of compressed sensing potentially relevant to the structure of the olfactory code. Yet, the largely feedforward organization of the olfactory system precludes reconstruction using standard compressed sensing algorithms. To resolve this problem, recent theoretical work has shown that signal reconstruction could take place as a result of a low dimensional dynamical system converging to one of its attractor states. However, the dynamical aspects of optimization slowed down odor recognition and were also found to be susceptible to noise. Here we describe a feedforward model of the olfactory system that achieves both strong compression and fast reconstruction that is also robust to noise. A key feature of the proposed model is a specific relationship between how odors are represented at the glomeruli stage, which corresponds to a compression, and the connections from glomeruli to third-order neurons (neurons in the olfactory cortex of vertebrates or Kenyon cells in the mushroom body of insects), which in the model corresponds to reconstruction. We show that should this specific relationship hold true, the reconstruction will be both fast and robust to noise, and in particular to the false activation of glomeruli. The predicted connectivity rate from glomeruli to third-order neurons can be tested experimentally. PMID:27065441

  12. A Robust Feedforward Model of the Olfactory System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yilun; Sharpee, Tatyana O

    2016-04-01

    Most natural odors have sparse molecular composition. This makes the principles of compressed sensing potentially relevant to the structure of the olfactory code. Yet, the largely feedforward organization of the olfactory system precludes reconstruction using standard compressed sensing algorithms. To resolve this problem, recent theoretical work has shown that signal reconstruction could take place as a result of a low dimensional dynamical system converging to one of its attractor states. However, the dynamical aspects of optimization slowed down odor recognition and were also found to be susceptible to noise. Here we describe a feedforward model of the olfactory system that achieves both strong compression and fast reconstruction that is also robust to noise. A key feature of the proposed model is a specific relationship between how odors are represented at the glomeruli stage, which corresponds to a compression, and the connections from glomeruli to third-order neurons (neurons in the olfactory cortex of vertebrates or Kenyon cells in the mushroom body of insects), which in the model corresponds to reconstruction. We show that should this specific relationship hold true, the reconstruction will be both fast and robust to noise, and in particular to the false activation of glomeruli. The predicted connectivity rate from glomeruli to third-order neurons can be tested experimentally.

  13. Coding and transformations in the olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naoshige; Poo, Cindy; Haddad, Rafi

    2014-01-01

    How is sensory information represented in the brain? A long-standing debate in neural coding is whether and how timing of spikes conveys information to downstream neurons. Although we know that neurons in the olfactory bulb (OB) exhibit rich temporal dynamics, the functional relevance of temporal coding remains hotly debated. Recent recording experiments in awake behaving animals have elucidated highly organized temporal structures of activity in the OB. In addition, the analysis of neural circuits in the piriform cortex (PC) demonstrated the importance of not only OB afferent inputs but also intrinsic PC neural circuits in shaping odor responses. Furthermore, new experiments involving stimulation of the OB with specific temporal patterns allowed for testing the relevance of temporal codes. Together, these studies suggest that the relative timing of neuronal activity in the OB conveys odor information and that neural circuits in the PC possess various mechanisms to decode temporal patterns of OB input.

  14. A Robust Feedforward Model of the Olfactory System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yilun; Sharpee, Tatyana

    Most natural odors have sparse molecular composition. This makes the principles of compressing sensing potentially relevant to the structure of the olfactory code. Yet, the largely feedforward organization of the olfactory system precludes reconstruction using standard compressed sensing algorithms. To resolve this problem, recent theoretical work has proposed that signal reconstruction could take place as a result of a low dimensional dynamical system converging to one of its attractor states. The dynamical aspects of optimization, however, would slow down odor recognition and were also found to be susceptible to noise. Here we describe a feedforward model of the olfactory system that achieves both strong compression and fast reconstruction that is also robust to noise. A key feature of the proposed model is a specific relationship between how odors are represented at the glomeruli stage, which corresponds to a compression, and the connections from glomeruli to Kenyon cells, which in the model corresponds to reconstruction. We show that provided this specific relationship holds true, the reconstruction will be both fast and robust to noise, and in particular to failure of glomeruli. The predicted connectivity rate from glomeruli to the Kenyon cells can be tested experimentally. This research was supported by James S. McDonnell Foundation, NSF CAREER award IIS-1254123, NSF Ideas Lab Collaborative Research IOS 1556388.

  15. Organization of the olfactory system of nymphalidae butterflies.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Mikael A; Schäpers, Alexander; Nässel, Dick R; Janz, Niklas

    2013-05-01

    Olfaction is in many species the most important sense, essential for food search, mate finding, and predator avoidance. Butterflies have been considered a microsmatic group of insects that mainly rely on vision due to their diurnal lifestyle. However, an emerging number of studies indicate that butterflies indeed use the sense of smell for locating food and oviposition sites. To unravel the neural substrates for olfaction, we performed an anatomical study of 2 related butterfly species that differ in food and host plant preference. We found many of the anatomical structures and pathways, as well as distribution of neuroactive substances, to resemble that of their nocturnal relatives among the Lepidoptera. The 2 species differed in the number of one type of olfactory sensilla, thus indicating a difference in sensitivity to certain compounds. Otherwise no differences could be observed. Our findings suggest that the olfactory system in Lepidoptera is well conserved despite the long evolutionary time since butterflies and moths diverged from a common ancestor.

  16. Identification and functional analysis of olfactory receptor family reveal unusual characteristics of the olfactory system in the migratory locust.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhifeng; Yang, Pengcheng; Chen, Dafeng; Jiang, Feng; Li, Yan; Wang, Xianhui; Kang, Le

    2015-11-01

    Locusts represent the excellent model of insect olfaction because the animals are equipped with an unusual olfactory system and display remarkable density-dependent olfactory plasticity. However, information regarding receptor molecules involved in the olfactory perception of locusts is very limited. On the basis of genome sequence and antennal transcriptome of the migratory locust, we conduct the identification and functional analysis of two olfactory receptor families: odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs). In the migratory locust, there is an expansion of OR family (142 ORs) while distinctly lower number of IR genes (32 IRs) compared to the repertoires of other insects. The number of the locust OR genes is much less than that of glomeruli in antennal lobe, challenging the general principle of the "one glomerulus-one receptor" observed in other insects. Most OR genes are found in tandem arrays, forming two large lineage-specific subfamilies in the phylogenetic tree. The "divergent IR" subfamily displays a significant contraction, and most of the IRs belong to the "antennal IR" subfamily in the locust. Most ORs/IRs have olfactory-specific expression while some broadly- or internal-expressed members are also found. Differing from holometabolous insects, the migratory locust contains very similar expression profiles of ORs/IRs between nymph and adult stages. RNA interference and behavioral assays indicate that an OR-based signaling pathway, not IR-based, mediates the attraction of locusts to aggregation pheromones. These discoveries provide insights into the unusual olfactory system of locusts and enhance our understanding of the evolution of insect olfaction. PMID:26265180

  17. Identification and functional analysis of olfactory receptor family reveal unusual characteristics of the olfactory system in the migratory locust.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhifeng; Yang, Pengcheng; Chen, Dafeng; Jiang, Feng; Li, Yan; Wang, Xianhui; Kang, Le

    2015-11-01

    Locusts represent the excellent model of insect olfaction because the animals are equipped with an unusual olfactory system and display remarkable density-dependent olfactory plasticity. However, information regarding receptor molecules involved in the olfactory perception of locusts is very limited. On the basis of genome sequence and antennal transcriptome of the migratory locust, we conduct the identification and functional analysis of two olfactory receptor families: odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs). In the migratory locust, there is an expansion of OR family (142 ORs) while distinctly lower number of IR genes (32 IRs) compared to the repertoires of other insects. The number of the locust OR genes is much less than that of glomeruli in antennal lobe, challenging the general principle of the "one glomerulus-one receptor" observed in other insects. Most OR genes are found in tandem arrays, forming two large lineage-specific subfamilies in the phylogenetic tree. The "divergent IR" subfamily displays a significant contraction, and most of the IRs belong to the "antennal IR" subfamily in the locust. Most ORs/IRs have olfactory-specific expression while some broadly- or internal-expressed members are also found. Differing from holometabolous insects, the migratory locust contains very similar expression profiles of ORs/IRs between nymph and adult stages. RNA interference and behavioral assays indicate that an OR-based signaling pathway, not IR-based, mediates the attraction of locusts to aggregation pheromones. These discoveries provide insights into the unusual olfactory system of locusts and enhance our understanding of the evolution of insect olfaction.

  18. Dendritic Organization of Olfactory Inputs to Medial Amygdala Neurons.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Sepideh; Power, John M; Albers, Eva H H; Sullivan, Robert K S; Sah, Pankaj

    2015-09-23

    The medial amygdala (MeA) is a central hub in the olfactory neural network. It receives vomeronasal information directly from the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) and main olfactory information largely via odor-processing regions such as the olfactory cortical amygdala (CoA). How these inputs are processed by MeA neurons is poorly understood. Using the GAD67-GFP mouse, we show that MeA principal neurons receive convergent AOB and CoA inputs. Somatically recorded AOB synaptic inputs had slower kinetics than CoA inputs, suggesting that they are electrotonically more distant. Field potential recording, pharmacological manipulation, and Ca(2+) imaging revealed that AOB synapses are confined to distal dendrites and segregated from the proximally located CoA synapses. Moreover, unsynchronized AOB inputs had significantly broader temporal summation that was dependent on the activation of NMDA receptors. These findings show that MeA principal neurons process main and accessory olfactory inputs differentially in distinct dendritic compartments. Significance statement: In most vertebrates, olfactory cues are processed by two largely segregated neural pathways, the main and accessory olfactory systems, which are specialized to detect odors and nonvolatile chemosignals, respectively. Information from these two pathways ultimately converges at higher brain regions, one of the major hubs being the medial amygdala. Little is known about how olfactory inputs are processed by medial amygdala neurons. This study shows that individual principal neurons in this region receive input from both pathways and that these synapses are spatially segregated on their dendritic tree. We provide evidence suggesting that this dendritic segregation leads to distinct input integration and impact on neuronal output; hence, dendritic mechanisms control olfactory processing in the amygdala. PMID:26400933

  19. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and....5880 Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. (a) Identification. An isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accesssories is a device that is used to support a donated or...

  20. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and....5880 Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. (a) Identification. An isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accesssories is a device that is used to support a donated or...

  1. 22 CFR 121.8 - End-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., parts, firmware, software and systems. 121.8 Section 121.8 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE...-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software and systems. (a) An end-item is.... Firmware includes but is not limited to circuits into which software has been programmed. (f)...

  2. 22 CFR 121.8 - End-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., parts, firmware, software and systems. 121.8 Section 121.8 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE...-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software and systems. (a) An end-item is.... Firmware includes but is not limited to circuits into which software has been programmed. (f)...

  3. 22 CFR 121.8 - End-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software, and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., parts, firmware, software, and systems. 121.8 Section 121.8 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE...-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software, and systems. (a) An end-item is.... Firmware includes but is not limited to circuits into which software has been programmed. (f)...

  4. 22 CFR 121.8 - End-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software and systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., parts, firmware, software and systems. 121.8 Section 121.8 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE...-items, components, accessories, attachments, parts, firmware, software and systems. (a) An end-item is.... Firmware includes but is not limited to circuits into which software has been programmed. (f)...

  5. An endocannabinoid system is present in the mouse olfactory epithelium but does not modulate olfaction.

    PubMed

    Hutch, C R; Hillard, C J; Jia, C; Hegg, C C

    2015-08-01

    Endocannabinoids modulate a diverse array of functions including progenitor cell proliferation in the central nervous system, and odorant detection and food intake in the mammalian central olfactory system and larval Xenopus laevis peripheral olfactory system. However, the presence and role of endocannabinoids in the peripheral olfactory epithelium have not been examined in mammals. We found the presence of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor protein and mRNA in the olfactory epithelium. Using either immunohistochemistry or calcium imaging we localized CB1 receptors on neurons, glia-like sustentacular cells, microvillous cells and progenitor-like basal cells. To examine the role of endocannabinoids, CB1- and CB2- receptor-deficient (CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-)) mice were used. The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) was present at high levels in both C57BL/6 wildtype and CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice. 2-AG synthetic and degradative enzymes are expressed in wildtype mice. A small but significant decrease in basal cell and olfactory sensory neuron numbers was observed in CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice compared to wildtype mice. The decrease in olfactory sensory neurons did not translate to impairment in olfactory-mediated behaviors assessed by the buried food test and habituation/dishabituation test. Collectively, these data indicate the presence of an endocannabinoid system in the mouse olfactory epithelium. However, unlike in tadpoles, endocannabinoids do not modulate olfaction. Further investigation on the role of endocannabinoids in progenitor cell function in the olfactory epithelium is warranted. PMID:26037800

  6. An endocannabinoid system is present in the mouse olfactory epithelium but does not modulate olfaction.

    PubMed

    Hutch, C R; Hillard, C J; Jia, C; Hegg, C C

    2015-08-01

    Endocannabinoids modulate a diverse array of functions including progenitor cell proliferation in the central nervous system, and odorant detection and food intake in the mammalian central olfactory system and larval Xenopus laevis peripheral olfactory system. However, the presence and role of endocannabinoids in the peripheral olfactory epithelium have not been examined in mammals. We found the presence of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor protein and mRNA in the olfactory epithelium. Using either immunohistochemistry or calcium imaging we localized CB1 receptors on neurons, glia-like sustentacular cells, microvillous cells and progenitor-like basal cells. To examine the role of endocannabinoids, CB1- and CB2- receptor-deficient (CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-)) mice were used. The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) was present at high levels in both C57BL/6 wildtype and CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice. 2-AG synthetic and degradative enzymes are expressed in wildtype mice. A small but significant decrease in basal cell and olfactory sensory neuron numbers was observed in CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice compared to wildtype mice. The decrease in olfactory sensory neurons did not translate to impairment in olfactory-mediated behaviors assessed by the buried food test and habituation/dishabituation test. Collectively, these data indicate the presence of an endocannabinoid system in the mouse olfactory epithelium. However, unlike in tadpoles, endocannabinoids do not modulate olfaction. Further investigation on the role of endocannabinoids in progenitor cell function in the olfactory epithelium is warranted.

  7. Artificial olfactory system with fault-tolerant sensor array.

    PubMed

    Lotfivand, Nasser; Abdolzadeh, Vida; Hamidon, Mohd Nizar

    2016-07-01

    Numerous applications of artificial olfaction resulting from research in many branches of sciences have caused considerable interest in the enhancement of these systems. In this paper, we offer an architecture which is suitable for critical applications, such as medical diagnosis, where reliability and precision are deemed important. The proposed architecture is able to tolerate failures in the sensors of the array. In this study, the discriminating ability of the proposed architecture in detecting complex odors, as well as the performance of the proposed architecture in encountering sensor failure, were investigated and compared with the generic architecture. The results demonstrated that by applying the proposed architecture in the artificial olfactory system, the performance of system in the healthy mode was identical to the classic structure. However, in the faulty situation, the proposed architecture implied high identification ability of odor samples, while the generic architecture showed very poor performance in the same situation. Based on the results, it was possible to achieve high odor identification through the developed artificial olfactory system using the proposed architecture.

  8. CD36 is involved in oleic acid detection by the murine olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Oberland, Sonja; Ackels, Tobias; Gaab, Stefanie; Pelz, Thomas; Spehr, Jennifer; Spehr, Marc; Neuhaus, Eva M

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory signals influence food intake in a variety of species. To maximize the chances of finding a source of calories, an animal's preference for fatty foods and triglycerides already becomes apparent during olfactory food search behavior. However, the molecular identity of both receptors and ligands mediating olfactory-dependent fatty acid recognition are, so far, undescribed. We here describe that a subset of olfactory sensory neurons expresses the fatty acid receptor CD36 and demonstrate a receptor-like localization of CD36 in olfactory cilia by STED microscopy. CD36-positive olfactory neurons share olfaction-specific transduction elements and project to numerous glomeruli in the ventral olfactory bulb. In accordance with the described roles of CD36 as fatty acid receptor or co-receptor in other sensory systems, the number of olfactory neurons responding to oleic acid, a major milk component, in Ca(2+) imaging experiments is drastically reduced in young CD36 knock-out mice. Strikingly, we also observe marked age-dependent changes in CD36 localization, which is prominently present in the ciliary compartment only during the suckling period. Our results support the involvement of CD36 in fatty acid detection by the mammalian olfactory system. PMID:26441537

  9. CD36 is involved in oleic acid detection by the murine olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Oberland, Sonja; Ackels, Tobias; Gaab, Stefanie; Pelz, Thomas; Spehr, Jennifer; Spehr, Marc; Neuhaus, Eva M.

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory signals influence food intake in a variety of species. To maximize the chances of finding a source of calories, an animal’s preference for fatty foods and triglycerides already becomes apparent during olfactory food search behavior. However, the molecular identity of both receptors and ligands mediating olfactory-dependent fatty acid recognition are, so far, undescribed. We here describe that a subset of olfactory sensory neurons expresses the fatty acid receptor CD36 and demonstrate a receptor-like localization of CD36 in olfactory cilia by STED microscopy. CD36-positive olfactory neurons share olfaction-specific transduction elements and project to numerous glomeruli in the ventral olfactory bulb. In accordance with the described roles of CD36 as fatty acid receptor or co-receptor in other sensory systems, the number of olfactory neurons responding to oleic acid, a major milk component, in Ca2+ imaging experiments is drastically reduced in young CD36 knock-out mice. Strikingly, we also observe marked age-dependent changes in CD36 localization, which is prominently present in the ciliary compartment only during the suckling period. Our results support the involvement of CD36 in fatty acid detection by the mammalian olfactory system. PMID:26441537

  10. 21 CFR 876.5880 - Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Isolated kidney perfusion and transport system and accessories. 876.5880 Section 876.5880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... storage or freezing container with or without bag or preservatives, pulsatile or nonpulsatile...

  11. Nasal Administration of Cholera Toxin as a Mucosal Adjuvant Damages the Olfactory System in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Okada, Kazunari; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Mori, Kensaku; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) induces severe diarrhea in humans but acts as an adjuvant to enhance immune responses to vaccines when administered orally. Nasally administered CT also acts as an adjuvant, but CT and CT derivatives, including the B subunit of CT (CTB), are taken up from the olfactory epithelium and transported to the olfactory bulbs and therefore may be toxic to the central nervous system. To assess the toxicity, we investigated whether nasally administered CT or CT derivatives impair the olfactory system. In mice, nasal administration of CT, but not CTB or a non-toxic CT derivative, reduced the expression of olfactory marker protein (OMP) in the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulbs and impaired odor responses, as determined with behavioral tests and optical imaging. Thus, nasally administered CT, like orally administered CT, is toxic and damages the olfactory system in mice. However, CTB and a non-toxic CT derivative, do not damage the olfactory system. The optical imaging we used here will be useful for assessing the safety of nasal vaccines and adjuvants during their development for human use and CT can be used as a positive control in this test. PMID:26422280

  12. Induction of an Olfactory Memory by the Activation of a Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaba, Hideto; Hayashi, Yasunori; Higuchi, Takashi; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    1994-07-01

    Female mice form an olfactory memory of male pheromones at mating; exposure to the pheromones of a strange male after that mating will block pregnancy. The formation of this memory is mediated by the accessory olfactory system, in which an increase in norepinephrine after mating reduces inhibitory transmission of γ-aminobutyric acid from the granule cells to the mitral cells. This study shows that the activation of mGluR2, a metabotropic glutamate receptor that suppresses the γ-aminobutyric acid inhibition of the mitral cells, permits the formation of a specific olfactory memory without the occurrence of mating by infusion of mGluR2 agonists into the female's accessory olfactory bulb. This memory faithfully reflects the memory formed at mating.

  13. Complex metabolically demanding sensory processing in the olfactory system: implications for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Diego; Hellier, Jennifer L; Salcedo, Ernesto

    2014-09-01

    Although the olfactory system is not generally associated with seizures, sharp application of odor eliciting activity in a large number of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) has been shown to elicit seizures. This is most likely due to increased ictal activity in the anterior piriform cortex-an area of the olfactory system that has limited GABAergic interneuron inhibition of pyramidal output cell activity. Such hyperexcitability in a well-characterized and highly accessible system makes olfaction a potentially powerful model system to examine epileptogenesis.

  14. Hybrid vehicle powertrain system with power take-off driven vehicle accessory

    DOEpatents

    Beaty, Kevin D.; Bockelmann, Thomas R.; Zou, Zhanijang; Hope, Mark E.; Kang, Xiaosong; Carpenter, Jeffrey L.

    2006-09-12

    A hybrid vehicle powertrain system includes a first prime mover, a first prime mover driven power transmission mechanism having a power take-off adapted to drive a vehicle accessory, and a second prime mover. The second prime mover is operable to drive the power transmission mechanism alone or in combination with the first prime mover to provide power to the power take-off through the power transmission mechanism. The invention further includes methods for operating a hybrid vehicle powertrain system.

  15. The olfactory nerve: a shortcut for influenza and other viral diseases into the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    van Riel, Debby; Verdijk, Rob; Kuiken, Thijs

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory nerve consists mainly of olfactory receptor neurons and directly connects the nasal cavity with the central nervous system (CNS). Each olfactory receptor neuron projects a dendrite into the nasal cavity on the apical side, and on the basal side extends its axon through the cribriform plate into the olfactory bulb of the brain. Viruses that can use the olfactory nerve as a shortcut into the CNS include influenza A virus, herpesviruses, poliovirus, paramyxoviruses, vesicular stomatitis virus, rabies virus, parainfluenza virus, adenoviruses, Japanese encephalitis virus, West Nile virus, chikungunya virus, La Crosse virus, mouse hepatitis virus, and bunyaviruses. However, mechanisms of transport via the olfactory nerve and subsequent spread through the CNS are poorly understood. Proposed mechanisms are either infection of olfactory receptor neurons themselves or diffusion through channels formed by olfactory ensheathing cells. Subsequent virus spread through the CNS could occur by multiple mechanisms, including trans-synaptic transport and microfusion. Viral infection of the CNS can lead to damage from infection of nerve cells per se, from the immune response, or from a combination of both. Clinical consequences range from nervous dysfunction in the absence of histopathological changes to severe meningoencephalitis and neurodegenerative disease.

  16. The olfactory bulb structure of African giant rat (Cricetomys gambianus, Waterhouse 1840) I: cytoarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Olude, M A; Ogunbunmi, T K; Olopade, J O; Ihunwo, A O

    2014-09-01

    The olfactory system typically consists of two parallel systems: the main olfactory system and the accessory olfactory system. The main olfactory bulb (MOB) acts as the initial processing site for volatile chemical stimuli and receives input from the olfactory receptor cells located in the olfactory epithelium. The African giant rat is reputed to have abilities to detect landmines and tuberculosis samples by sniffing. This study therefore is a preliminary study on the histological and immunohistochemical anatomy of the olfactory bulb of the African giant rat (Cricetomys gambianus, Waterhouse). Nissl and Klüver-Barrera histological staining of the olfactory bulb revealed a cytoarchitecture typical of most mammals with 6 cell layers, and 1-2-layered glomeruli measuring approximately 150 μm each in diameter. Immunohistochemical staining with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) revealed cellular conformations relative to most mammals. GFAP immunohistochemistry also revealed cell bodies and processes within the periglomerular area which may potentiate signaling from the olfactory receptor cells, while CNPase largely showed soma and evidence of myelin sheath deposition, confirming myelination at different layers of the bulb. Neurogenesis was examined using the neurogenic markers doublecortin (DCX) and Ki-67. Migration of newly generated cells was observed in all layers of the MOB with DCX and in most layers with Ki-67. The anatomy of the olfactory bulb is described as relatively large in the African giant rat, having a neuroarchitecture similar to most rodents.

  17. Explosives and landmine detection using an artificial olfactory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Joel E.; Waggoner, L. Paul; Kauer, John S.

    2004-09-01

    We are developing a portable, artificial olfactory system based on multiple attributes of the sense of smell to identify air-borne odors, including those associated with buried landmines. Brief (1-2 sec) air samples are drawn over an array of optically-interrogated, cross-reactive chemical sensors. These consist of polymers with high sensitivity and relatively narrow specificity for nitroaromatics (Timothy Swager, MIT), as well as those with broader responses, thus permitting discrimination among substances that may be confused for nitroaromatics. Biologically-based pattern matching algorithms automatically identify odors as one of several to which the device has been trained. In discrimination tests, after training to one concentration of 6 odors, the device gave 95% correct identification when tested at the original plus three different concentrations. Thus, as required in real world applications, the device can identify odors at multiple concentrations without explicitly training on each. In sensitivity tests, the device showed 100% detection and no false alarms for the landmine-related compound DNT at concentrations as low as 500 pp-trillion (quantified by GC/MS) - 10 times lower than average canine behavioral thresholds. To investigate landmine detection capabilities, field studies were conducted at Ft. Leonard Wood, MO. In calibration tests, signals from buried PMA1A anti-personnel landmines were clearly discriminated from background. In a limited 9 site "blind" test, PMA1A detection was 100% with false alarms of 40%. Although requiring further development, these data indicate that a device with appropriate sensors and exploiting olfactory principles can detect and discriminate low concentration vapor signatures, including those of buried landmines.

  18. An endocannabinoid system is present in the mouse olfactory epithelium but does not modulate olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Hutch, Chelsea; Hillard, Cecilia J.; Jia, Cuihong; Hegg, Colleen C.

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids modulate a diverse array of functions including progenitor cell proliferation in the central nervous system, and odorant detection and food intake in the mammalian central olfactory system and larval Xenopus laevis peripheral olfactory system. However, the presence and role of endocannabinoids in the peripheral olfactory epithelium has not been examined in mammals. We found the presence of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor protein and mRNA in the olfactory epithelium. Using either immunohistochemistry or calcium imaging we localized CB1 receptors on neurons, glia like sustentacular cells, microvillous cells and progenitor-like basal cells. To examine the role of endocannabinoids, CB1 and CB2 receptor deficient (CB1−/−/CB2−/−) mice were used. The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) was present at high levels in both C57BL/6 wildtype and CB1−/−/CB2−/− mice. 2-AG synthetic and degradative enzymes are expressed in wildtype mice. A small but significant decrease in basal cell and olfactory sensory neuron numbers was observed in CB1−/−/CB2−/− mice compared to wildtype mice. The decrease in olfactory sensory neurons did not translate to impairment in olfactory-mediated behaviors assessed by the buried food test and habituation/dishabituation test. Collectively, these data indicate the presence of an endocannabinoid system in the mouse olfactory epithelium. However, unlike in tadpoles, endocannabinoids do not modulate olfaction. Further investigation on the role of endocannabinoids in progenitor cell function in the olfactory epithelium is warranted. PMID:26037800

  19. 21 CFR 876.5820 - Hemodialysis system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... system controls and monitors the dialysate circulating through the dialysate compartment of the dialyzer...) The dialysate delivery system consists of mechanisms that monitor and control the temperature... chair without a scale, the dialyzer holder set, dialysis tie gun and ties, and hemodialysis...

  20. 21 CFR 876.5820 - Hemodialysis system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... system controls and monitors the dialysate circulating through the dialysate compartment of the dialyzer...) The dialysate delivery system consists of mechanisms that monitor and control the temperature... chair without a scale, the dialyzer holder set, dialysis tie gun and ties, and hemodialysis...

  1. 21 CFR 876.5820 - Hemodialysis system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... to the hemodialysis system include the unpowered dialysis chair without a scale, the powered dialysis chair without a scale, the dialyzer holder set, dialysis tie gun and ties, and hemodialysis start/stop... the dialysate delivery system, such as the unpowered dialysis chair, hemodialysis start/stop...

  2. A fast 3D reconstruction system with a low-cost camera accessory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiwei; Gibson, Graham M.; Hay, Rebecca; Bowman, Richard W.; Padgett, Miles J.; Edgar, Matthew P.

    2015-06-01

    Photometric stereo is a three dimensional (3D) imaging technique that uses multiple 2D images, obtained from a fixed camera perspective, with different illumination directions. Compared to other 3D imaging methods such as geometry modeling and 3D-scanning, it comes with a number of advantages, such as having a simple and efficient reconstruction routine. In this work, we describe a low-cost accessory to a commercial digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera system allowing fast reconstruction of 3D objects using photometric stereo. The accessory consists of four white LED lights fixed to the lens of a commercial DSLR camera and a USB programmable controller board to sequentially control the illumination. 3D images are derived for different objects with varying geometric complexity and results are presented, showing a typical height error of <3 mm for a 50 mm sized object.

  3. A fast 3D reconstruction system with a low-cost camera accessory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiwei; Gibson, Graham M; Hay, Rebecca; Bowman, Richard W; Padgett, Miles J; Edgar, Matthew P

    2015-06-09

    Photometric stereo is a three dimensional (3D) imaging technique that uses multiple 2D images, obtained from a fixed camera perspective, with different illumination directions. Compared to other 3D imaging methods such as geometry modeling and 3D-scanning, it comes with a number of advantages, such as having a simple and efficient reconstruction routine. In this work, we describe a low-cost accessory to a commercial digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera system allowing fast reconstruction of 3D objects using photometric stereo. The accessory consists of four white LED lights fixed to the lens of a commercial DSLR camera and a USB programmable controller board to sequentially control the illumination. 3D images are derived for different objects with varying geometric complexity and results are presented, showing a typical height error of <3 mm for a 50 mm sized object.

  4. A fast 3D reconstruction system with a low-cost camera accessory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiwei; Gibson, Graham M.; Hay, Rebecca; Bowman, Richard W.; Padgett, Miles J.; Edgar, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    Photometric stereo is a three dimensional (3D) imaging technique that uses multiple 2D images, obtained from a fixed camera perspective, with different illumination directions. Compared to other 3D imaging methods such as geometry modeling and 3D-scanning, it comes with a number of advantages, such as having a simple and efficient reconstruction routine. In this work, we describe a low-cost accessory to a commercial digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera system allowing fast reconstruction of 3D objects using photometric stereo. The accessory consists of four white LED lights fixed to the lens of a commercial DSLR camera and a USB programmable controller board to sequentially control the illumination. 3D images are derived for different objects with varying geometric complexity and results are presented, showing a typical height error of <3 mm for a 50 mm sized object. PMID:26057407

  5. Immunocytochemical characterisation of ensheathing glia in the olfactory and vomeronasal systems of Ambystoma mexicanum (Caudata: Ambystomatidae).

    PubMed

    Lazzari, Maurizio; Bettini, Simone; Franceschini, Valeria

    2016-03-01

    The olfactory and vomeronasal systems of vertebrates are characterised by neurogenesis occurring throughout life. The regenerative ability of olfactory receptor neurons relies on specific glial cells, the olfactory and vomeronasal axon-surrounding cells. Numerous studies have examined mammalian olfactory ensheathing cells which are considered potential candidates for spinal cord injury repair using cell-based therapy. With regard to non-mammalian vertebrates, limited information is available on these glial cells in fish, and there is no information on them in terrestrial anamniotes, the amphibians. In the present research, we studied the immunocytochemical characteristics of axon-surrounding cells in Ambystoma mexicanum. Urodeles have relatively simple olfactory and vomeronasal systems, and represent a good model for studying ensheathing cells in extant representatives of basal tetrapods. Sections from the decalcified heads of A. mexicanum were immunocytochemically processed for the detection of proteins used in research on mammalian olfactory-ensheathing cells. S100, GFAP and NCAM were clearly observed. p75NTR, Gal-1 and PSA-NCAM showed weak staining. No vimentin immunopositivity was observed. The corresponding areas of the olfactory and vomeronasal pathways displayed the same staining characteristics, with the exception of Gal-1, p75NTR and PSA-NCAM in the mucosae. The degree of marker expression was not uniform throughout the sensory pathways. In contrast to fish, both olfactory and vomeronasal nerves displayed uniform staining intensity. This study showed that some markers for mammalian and fish-ensheathing glia are also applicable in urodeles. The olfactory systems of vertebrates show similarities, and also clear dissimilarities. Further investigations are required to ascertain the functional significance of these regional and interspecific differences.

  6. Immunocytochemical characterisation of ensheathing glia in the olfactory and vomeronasal systems of Ambystoma mexicanum (Caudata: Ambystomatidae).

    PubMed

    Lazzari, Maurizio; Bettini, Simone; Franceschini, Valeria

    2016-03-01

    The olfactory and vomeronasal systems of vertebrates are characterised by neurogenesis occurring throughout life. The regenerative ability of olfactory receptor neurons relies on specific glial cells, the olfactory and vomeronasal axon-surrounding cells. Numerous studies have examined mammalian olfactory ensheathing cells which are considered potential candidates for spinal cord injury repair using cell-based therapy. With regard to non-mammalian vertebrates, limited information is available on these glial cells in fish, and there is no information on them in terrestrial anamniotes, the amphibians. In the present research, we studied the immunocytochemical characteristics of axon-surrounding cells in Ambystoma mexicanum. Urodeles have relatively simple olfactory and vomeronasal systems, and represent a good model for studying ensheathing cells in extant representatives of basal tetrapods. Sections from the decalcified heads of A. mexicanum were immunocytochemically processed for the detection of proteins used in research on mammalian olfactory-ensheathing cells. S100, GFAP and NCAM were clearly observed. p75NTR, Gal-1 and PSA-NCAM showed weak staining. No vimentin immunopositivity was observed. The corresponding areas of the olfactory and vomeronasal pathways displayed the same staining characteristics, with the exception of Gal-1, p75NTR and PSA-NCAM in the mucosae. The degree of marker expression was not uniform throughout the sensory pathways. In contrast to fish, both olfactory and vomeronasal nerves displayed uniform staining intensity. This study showed that some markers for mammalian and fish-ensheathing glia are also applicable in urodeles. The olfactory systems of vertebrates show similarities, and also clear dissimilarities. Further investigations are required to ascertain the functional significance of these regional and interspecific differences. PMID:25433448

  7. Temporal processing in the olfactory system: can we see a smell?

    PubMed

    Gire, David H; Restrepo, Diego; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Greer, Charles; De Carlos, Juan A; Lopez-Mascaraque, Laura

    2013-05-01

    Sensory processing circuits in the visual and olfactory systems receive input from complex, rapidly changing environments. Although patterns of light and plumes of odor create different distributions of activity in the retina and olfactory bulb, both structures use what appears on the surface similar temporal coding strategies to convey information to higher areas in the brain. We compare temporal coding in the early stages of the olfactory and visual systems, highlighting recent progress in understanding the role of time in olfactory coding during active sensing by behaving animals. We also examine studies that address the divergent circuit mechanisms that generate temporal codes in the two systems, and find that they provide physiological information directly related to functional questions raised by neuroanatomical studies of Ramon y Cajal over a century ago. Consideration of differences in neural activity in sensory systems contributes to generating new approaches to understand signal processing.

  8. System-like consolidation of olfactory memories in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Sandoval, Isaac; Martin-Peña, Alfonso; Berry, Jacob A; Davis, Ronald L

    2013-06-01

    System consolidation, as opposed to cellular consolidation, is defined as the relatively slow process of reorganizing the brain circuits that maintain long-term memory. This concept is founded in part on observations made in mammals that recently formed memories become progressively independent of brain regions initially involved in their acquisition and retrieval and dependent on other brain regions for their long-term storage. Here we present evidence that olfactory appetitive and aversive memories in Drosophila evolve using a system-like consolidation process. We show that all three classes of mushroom body neurons (MBNs) are involved in the retrieval of short- and intermediate-term memory. With the passage of time, memory retrieval becomes independent of α'/β' and γ MBNs, and long-term memory becomes completely dependent on α/β MBNs. This shift in neuronal dependency for behavioral performance is paralleled by shifts in the activity of the relevant neurons during the retrieval of short-term versus long-term memories. Moreover, transient neuron inactivation experiments using flies trained to have both early and remote memories showed that the α'/β' MBNs have a time-limited role in memory processing. These results argue that system consolidation is not a unique feature of the mammalian brain and memory systems, but rather a general and conserved feature of how different temporal memories are encoded from relatively simple to complex brains.

  9. Concentration-invariant odor representation in the olfactory system by presynaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Danke; Li, Yuanqing; Wu, Si

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates a network model for implementing concentration-invariant representation for odors in the olfactory system. The network consists of olfactory receptor neurons, projection neurons, and inhibitory local neurons. Receptor neurons send excitatory inputs to projection neurons, which are modulated by the inhibitory inputs from local neurons. The modulation occurs at the presynaptic site from a receptor neuron to a projection one, leading to the operation of divisive normalization. The responses of local interneurons are determined by the total activities of olfactory receptor neurons. We find that with a proper parameter condition, the responses of projection neurons become effectively independent of the odor concentration. Simulation results confirm our theoretical analysis.

  10. Molecular and neuronal homology between the olfactory systems of zebrafish and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Luis R.; Ahuja, Gaurav; Ivandic, Ivan; Syed, Adnan S.; Marioni, John C.; Korsching, Sigrun I.; Logan, Darren W.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the two major olfactory organs of rodents, the olfactory mucosa (OM) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO), unraveled the molecular basis of smell in vertebrates. However, some vertebrates lack a VNO. Here we generated and analyzed the olfactory transcriptome of the zebrafish and compared it to the olfactory transcriptomes of mouse to investigate the evolutionary and molecular relationship between single and dual olfactory systems. Our analyses revealed a high degree of molecular conservation, with orthologs of mouse olfactory cell-specific markers and all but one of their chemosensory receptor classes expressed in the single zebrafish olfactory organ. Zebrafish chemosensory receptor genes are expressed across a large dynamic range and their RNA abundance correlates positively with the number of neurons expressing that RNA. Thus we estimate the relative proportions of neuronal sub-types expressing different chemosensory receptors. Receptor repertoire size drives the absolute abundance of different classes of neurons, but we find similar underlying patterns in both species. Finally, we identified novel marker genes that characterize rare neuronal populations in both mouse and zebrafish. In sum, we find that the molecular and cellular mechanisms underpinning olfaction in teleosts and mammals are similar despite 430 million years of evolutionary divergence. PMID:26108469

  11. Impaired sense of smell and altered olfactory system in RAG-1(-∕-) immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Rattazzi, Lorenza; Cariboni, Anna; Poojara, Ridhika; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; D'Acquisto, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    Immune deficiencies are often associated with a number of physical manifestations including loss of sense of smell and an increased level of anxiety. We have previously shown that T and B cell-deficient recombinase activating gene (RAG-1)(-∕-) knockout mice have an increased level of anxiety-like behavior and altered gene expression involved in olfaction. In this study, we expanded these findings by testing the structure and functional development of the olfactory system in RAG-1 (-∕-) mice. Our results show that these mice have a reduced engagement in different types of odors and this phenotype is associated with disorganized architecture of glomerular tissue and atrophy of the main olfactory epithelium. Most intriguingly this defect manifests specifically in adult age and is not due to impairment in the patterning of the olfactory neuron staining at the embryo stage. Together these findings provide a formerly unreported biological evidence for an altered function of the olfactory system in RAG-1 (-∕-) mice.

  12. A computational framework for temporal sharpening of stimulus input in the olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Zak, Joseph D

    2016-04-01

    The olfactory bulb glomerulus is a dense amalgamation of many unique and interconnected cell types. The mechanisms by which these neurons transform incoming information from the sensory periphery have been extensively studied but often with conflicting findings. A recent study by Carey et al. (J Neurophysiol 113: 3 112-3129, 2015) details the computational framework for parallel modes of temporal refinement of stimulus input to the olfactory system mediated by local neurons within individual glomeruli.

  13. Adult neurogenesis in the olfactory system shapes odor memory and perception.

    PubMed

    Gheusi, Gilles; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory system is a dynamic place. In mammals, not only are sensory neurons located in the sensory organ renewed through adult life, but also its first central relay is reconstructed by continuous neuronal recruitment. Despite these numerous morphological and physiological changes, olfaction is a unique sensory modality endowed with a privileged link to memory. This raises a clear conundrum; how does the olfactory system balance its neuronal turnover with its participation in long-term memory? This review concentrates on the functional aspects of adult neurogenesis, addressing how the integration of late-born neurons participates in olfactory perception and memory. After outlining the properties of adult neurogenesis in the olfactory system, and after describing their regulation by internal and environmental factors, we ask how the process of odorant perception can be influenced by constant neuronal turnover. We then explore the possible functional roles that newborn neurons might have for olfactory memory. Throughout this review, and as we concentrate almost exclusively on mammalian models, we stress the idea that adult neurogenesis is yet another form of plasticity used by the brain to copes with a constantly changing olfactory world.

  14. The rostral migratory stream and olfactory system: smell, disease and slippery cells.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Maurice A; Monzo, Hector J; Faull, Richard L M

    2009-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, olfaction is an important sense that is used to detect odors of different kinds that can warn of off food, to produce a mothering instinct in a flock or group of animals, and to warn of danger such as fire or poison. The olfactory system is made up of a long-distance rostral migratory stream that arises from the subventricular zone in the wall of the lateral ventricle, mainly comprises neuroblasts, and stretches all the way through the basal forebrain to terminate in the olfactory bulb. The olfactory bulb receives a constant supply of new neurons that allow ongoing integration of new and different smells, and these are integrated into either the granule cell layer or the periglomerular layer. The continuous turnover of neurons in the olfactory bulb allows us to study the proliferation, migration, and differentiation of neurons and their application in therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. In this chapter, we will examine the notion that the olfactory system might be the route of entry for factors that cause or contribute to neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. We will also discuss the enzymes that may be involved in the addition of polysialic acid to neural cell adhesion molecule, which is vital for allowing the neuroblasts to move through the rostral migratory stream. Finally, we will discuss a possible role of endosialidases for removing polysialic acid from neural cell adhesion molecules, which causes neuroblasts to stop migrating and terminally differentiate into olfactory bulb interneurons.

  15. Critical role of GFRα1 in the development and function of the main olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Marks, Carolyn; Belluscio, Leonardo; Ibáñez, Carlos F

    2012-11-28

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and its receptor GFRα1 are prominently expressed in the olfactory epithelium (OE) and olfactory bulb (OB), but their importance for olfactory system development is completely unknown. We have investigated the consequences of GFRα1 deficiency for mouse olfactory system development and function. In the OE, GFRα1 was expressed in basal precursors, immature olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), and olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), but was excluded from mature OSNs. The OE of newborn Gfra1 knock-out mice was thinner and contained fewer OSNs, but more dividing precursors, suggesting deficient neurogenesis. Immature OSN axon bundles were enlarged and associated OECs increased, indicating impaired migration of OECs and OSN axons. In the OB, GFRα1 was expressed in immature OSN axons and OECs of the nerve layer, as well as mitral and tufted cells, but was excluded from GABAergic interneurons. In newborn knock-outs, the nerve layer was dramatically reduced, exhibiting fewer axons and OECs. Bulbs were smaller and presented fewer and disorganized glomeruli and a significant reduction in mitral cells. Numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase-, calbindin-, and calretinin-expressing interneurons were also reduced in newborn mice lacking Gfra1. At birth, the OE and OB of Gdnf knock-out mice displayed comparable phenotypes. Similar deficits were also found in adult heterozygous Gfra1(+/-) mutants, which in addition displayed diminished responses in behavioral tests of olfactory function. We conclude that GFRα1 is critical for the development and function of the main olfactory system, contributing to the development and allocation of all major classes of neurons and glial cells.

  16. The endocannabinoid system controls food intake via olfactory processes.

    PubMed

    Soria-Gómez, Edgar; Bellocchio, Luigi; Reguero, Leire; Lepousez, Gabriel; Martin, Claire; Bendahmane, Mounir; Ruehle, Sabine; Remmers, Floor; Desprez, Tifany; Matias, Isabelle; Wiesner, Theresa; Cannich, Astrid; Nissant, Antoine; Wadleigh, Aya; Pape, Hans-Christian; Chiarlone, Anna Paola; Quarta, Carmelo; Verrier, Daniéle; Vincent, Peggy; Massa, Federico; Lutz, Beat; Guzmán, Manuel; Gurden, Hirac; Ferreira, Guillaume; Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Grandes, Pedro; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    Hunger arouses sensory perception, eventually leading to an increase in food intake, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We found that cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptors promote food intake in fasted mice by increasing odor detection. CB1 receptors were abundantly expressed on axon terminals of centrifugal cortical glutamatergic neurons that project to inhibitory granule cells of the main olfactory bulb (MOB). Local pharmacological and genetic manipulations revealed that endocannabinoids and exogenous cannabinoids increased odor detection and food intake in fasted mice by decreasing excitatory drive from olfactory cortex areas to the MOB. Consistently, cannabinoid agonists dampened in vivo optogenetically stimulated excitatory transmission in the same circuit. Our data indicate that cortical feedback projections to the MOB crucially regulate food intake via CB1 receptor signaling, linking the feeling of hunger to stronger odor processing. Thus, CB1 receptor-dependent control of cortical feedback projections in olfactory circuits couples internal states to perception and behavior. PMID:24509429

  17. Chemical olfactory signals and parenthood in mammals.

    PubMed

    Corona, Rebeca; Lévy, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Chemosignals and Reproduction". In mammalian species, odor cues emitted by the newborn are essential to establish maternal behavior at parturition and coordinate early mother-infant interactions. Offspring odors become potent attractive stimuli at parturition promoting the contact with the young to ensure that normal maternal care develops. In some species odors provide a basis for individual recognition of the offspring and highly specialized neural mechanisms for learning the infant signals have evolved. Both the main and the accessory olfactory systems are involved in the onset of maternal care, but only the former contributes to individual odor discrimination of the young. Electrophysiological and neurochemical changes occur in the main olfactory bulb leading to a coding of the olfactory signature of the familiar young. Olfactory neurogenesis could also contribute to motherhood and associated learning. Parturition and interactions with the young influence neurogenesis and some evidence indicates a functional link between olfactory neurogenesis and maternal behavior. Although a simple compound has been found which regulates anogenital licking in the rat, studies identifying the chemical nature of these odors are lacking. Neonatal body odors seem to be particularly salient to human mothers who are able to identify their infant's odors. Recent studies have revealed some neural processing of these cues confirming the importance of mother-young chemical communication in our own species.

  18. Strong links between genomic and anatomical diversity in both mammalian olfactory chemosensory systems.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Eva C; Steiper, Michael E

    2014-05-22

    Mammalian olfaction comprises two chemosensory systems: the odorant-detecting main olfactory system (MOS) and the pheromone-detecting vomeronasal system (VNS). Mammals are diverse in their anatomical and genomic emphases on olfactory chemosensation, including the loss or reduction of these systems in some orders. Despite qualitative evidence linking the genomic evolution of the olfactory systems to specific functions and phenotypes, little work has quantitatively tested whether the genomic aspects of the mammalian olfactory chemosensory systems are correlated to anatomical diversity. We show that the genomic and anatomical variation in these systems is tightly linked in both the VNS and the MOS, though the signature of selection is different in each system. Specifically, the MOS appears to vary based on absolute organ and gene family size while the VNS appears to vary according to the relative proportion of functional genes and relative anatomical size and complexity. Furthermore, there is little evidence that these two systems are evolving in a linked fashion. The relationships between genomic and anatomical diversity strongly support a role for natural selection in shaping both the anatomical and genomic evolution of the olfactory chemosensory systems in mammals. PMID:24718758

  19. Strong links between genomic and anatomical diversity in both mammalian olfactory chemosensory systems

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Eva C.; Steiper, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian olfaction comprises two chemosensory systems: the odorant-detecting main olfactory system (MOS) and the pheromone-detecting vomeronasal system (VNS). Mammals are diverse in their anatomical and genomic emphases on olfactory chemosensation, including the loss or reduction of these systems in some orders. Despite qualitative evidence linking the genomic evolution of the olfactory systems to specific functions and phenotypes, little work has quantitatively tested whether the genomic aspects of the mammalian olfactory chemosensory systems are correlated to anatomical diversity. We show that the genomic and anatomical variation in these systems is tightly linked in both the VNS and the MOS, though the signature of selection is different in each system. Specifically, the MOS appears to vary based on absolute organ and gene family size while the VNS appears to vary according to the relative proportion of functional genes and relative anatomical size and complexity. Furthermore, there is little evidence that these two systems are evolving in a linked fashion. The relationships between genomic and anatomical diversity strongly support a role for natural selection in shaping both the anatomical and genomic evolution of the olfactory chemosensory systems in mammals. PMID:24718758

  20. Glycosylation patterns are sexually dimorphic throughout development of the olfactory system in Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Nicholas J; Hildebrand, John G; Tolbert, Leslie P

    2004-08-01

    In the moth Manduca sexta, development of the adult olfactory system depends on complex interactions between olfactory receptor neurons in the antenna, antennal-lobe neurons in the brain, and several classes of glial cells. As one approach to characterizing molecules that may play roles in these interactions, we used lectins to screen antennae and antennal lobes at different stages of adult development. We find that each of the major neural cell types has a distinct pattern of labeling by lectins. Effects of enzymatic and other treatments on lectin labeling lead us to conclude that the predominant lectin ligands are: glycosphingolipids and an O-linked, fucose-containing glycoprotein on axons of olfactory receptor neurons, O-linked glycoproteins on antennal-lobe neurons, and N-linked glycoproteins on all classes of glial cells in the primary olfactory pathway. Wheat germ agglutinin labels all olfactory axons uniformly during much of development, but labeling becomes restricted to the pheromone-responsive olfactory receptor neurons in the adult male. Succinylated WGA reveals differences in these axon classes earlier, as glomerului develop from protoglomeruli. The adult female displays a less pronounced difference in labeling of axons targeting ordinary and sexually dimorphic glomeruli. Differences in labeling of receptor axons targeted to ordinary and sexually dimorphic glomeruli may be correlated with differences in function or connectivity in different regions of the antennal lobe.

  1. Olfactory system gamma oscillations: the physiological dissection of a cognitive neural system

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Líbano, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Oscillatory phenomena have been a focus of dynamical systems research since the time of the classical studies on the pendulum by Galileo. Fast cortical oscillations also have a long and storied history in neurophysiology, and olfactory oscillations have led the way with a depth of explanation not present in the literature of most other cortical systems. From the earliest studies of odor-evoked oscillations by Adrian, many reports have focused on mechanisms and functional associations of these oscillations, in particular for the so-called gamma oscillations. As a result, much information is now available regarding the biophysical mechanisms that underlie the oscillations in the mammalian olfactory system. Recent studies have expanded on these and addressed functionality directly in mammals and in the analogous insect system. Sub-bands within the rodent gamma oscillatory band associated with specific behavioral and cognitive states have also been identified. All this makes oscillatory neuronal networks a unique interdisciplinary platform from which to study neurocognitive and dynamical phenomena in intact, freely behaving animals. We present here a summary of what has been learned about the functional role and mechanisms of gamma oscillations in the olfactory system as a guide for similar studies in other cortical systems. PMID:19003484

  2. Imaging evolutionarily conserved neural networks: preferential activation of the olfactory system by food-related odor.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Praveen; Stolberg, Tara; Sullivanjr, J M; Ferris, Craig F

    2012-04-21

    Rodents routinely forge and rely on hippocampal-dependent spatial memory to guide them to sources of caloric rich food in their environment. Has evolution affected the olfactory system and its connections to the hippocampus and limbic cortex, so rodents have an innate sensitivity to energy rich food and their location? To test this notion, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging in awake rats to observe changes in brain activity in response to four odors: benzaldehyde (almond odor), isoamyl acetate (banana odor), methyl benzoate (rosy odor), and limonene (citrus odor). We chose the almond odor because nuts are high in calories and would be expected to convey greater valance as compared to the other odors. Moreover, the standard food chow is devoid of nuts, so laboratory bred rats would not have any previous exposure to this food. Activation maps derived from computational analysis using a 3D segmented rat MRI atlas were dramatically different between odors. Animals exposed to banana, rosy and citrus odors showed modest activation of the primary olfactory system, hippocampus and limbic cortex. However, animals exposed to almond showed a robust increase in brain activity in the primary olfactory system particularly the main olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus and tenia tecta. The most significant difference in brain activation between odors was observed in the hippocampus and limbic cortex. These findings show that fMRI can be used to identify neural circuits that have an innate sensitivity to environmental stimuli that may help in an animal's survival. PMID:22343130

  3. Differential responses to branched and unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons in the rat olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Sabrina L.; Johnson, Brett A.; Chen, Andrew L.; Leon, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to understand mammalian olfactory processing, we have been describing the responses to systematically different odorants in the glomerular layer of the main olfactory bulb of rats. Previously, we have demonstrated chemotopically organized and distinct olfactory responses to a homologous series of straight-chained alkanes that consisted of purely hydrocarbon structures, indicating that hydrocarbon chains could serve as molecular features in the combinatorial coding of odorant information. To better understand the processing of hydrocarbon odorants, we now have examined responses to other types of chemical changes in this kind of molecules, namely branching and carbon-carbon bond saturation. To this end, we used the [14C]2-deoxyglucose method to determine glomerular responses to a group of eight-carbon branched alkane isomers, unsaturated octenes (double-bonded), and octynes (triple-bonded). In contrast to the differential responses we observed previously for straight-chained alkanes of differing carbon number, the rat olfactory system was not particularly sensitive to these variations in branching and bond saturation. This result was unexpected, given the distinct molecular conformations and property profiles of the odorants. The similarity in activity patterns was paralleled by a similarity in spontaneous perceptual responses measured using a habituation assay. These results demonstrate again the functional relationship between bulbar activity patterns and odor perception. The results further suggest that the olfactory system does not respond equally to all aspects of odorant chemistry, functioning as a specific, rather than a general chemical analysis system. PMID:17029262

  4. The wiring diagram of a glomerular olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Berck, Matthew E; Khandelwal, Avinash; Claus, Lindsey; Hernandez-Nunez, Luis; Si, Guangwei; Tabone, Christopher J; Li, Feng; Truman, James W; Fetter, Rick D; Louis, Matthieu; Samuel, Aravinthan Dt; Cardona, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell enables animals to react to long-distance cues according to learned and innate valences. Here, we have mapped with electron microscopy the complete wiring diagram of the Drosophila larval antennal lobe, an olfactory neuropil similar to the vertebrate olfactory bulb. We found a canonical circuit with uniglomerular projection neurons (uPNs) relaying gain-controlled ORN activity to the mushroom body and the lateral horn. A second, parallel circuit with multiglomerular projection neurons (mPNs) and hierarchically connected local neurons (LNs) selectively integrates multiple ORN signals already at the first synapse. LN-LN synaptic connections putatively implement a bistable gain control mechanism that either computes odor saliency through panglomerular inhibition, or allows some glomeruli to respond to faint aversive odors in the presence of strong appetitive odors. This complete wiring diagram will support experimental and theoretical studies towards bridging the gap between circuits and behavior. PMID:27177418

  5. Sensational placodes: Neurogenesis in the otic and olfactory systems

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Esther C.; Saxena, Ankur; Alsina, Berta; Bronner, Marianne E.; Whitfield, Tanya T.

    2014-01-01

    For both the intricate morphogenetic layout of the sensory cells in the ear and the elegantly radial arrangement of the sensory neurons in the nose, numerous signaling molecules and genetic determinants are required in concert to generate these specialized neuronal populations that help connect us to our environment. In this review, we outline many of the proteins and pathways that play essential roles in the differentiation of otic and olfactory neurons and their integration into their non-neuronal support structures. In both cases, well-known signaling pathways together with region-specific factors transform thickened ectodermal placodes into complex sense organs containing numerous, diverse neuronal subtypes. Olfactory and otic placodes, in combination with migratory neural crest stem cells, generate highly specialized subtypes of neuronal cells that sense sound, position and movement in space, odors and pheromones throughout our lives. PMID:24508480

  6. Chemotopic Odorant Coding in a Mammalian Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brett A.; Leon, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Systematic mapping studies involving 365 odorant chemicals have shown that glomerular responses in the rat olfactory bulb are organized spatially in patterns that are related to the chemistry of the odorant stimuli. This organization involves the spatial clustering of principal responses to numerous odorants that share key aspects of chemistry such as functional groups, hydrocarbon structural elements, and/or overall molecular properties related to water solubility. In several of the clusters, responses shift progressively in position according to odorant carbon chain length. These response domains appear to be constructed from orderly projections of sensory neurons in the olfactory epithelium and may also involve chromatography across the nasal mucosa. The spatial clustering of glomerular responses may serve to “tune” the principal responses of bulbar projection neurons by way of inhibitory interneuronal networks, allowing the projection neurons to respond to a narrower range of stimuli than their associated sensory neurons. When glomerular activity patterns are viewed relative to the overall level of glomerular activation, the patterns accurately predict the perception of odor quality, thereby supporting the notion that spatial patterns of activity are the key factors underlying that aspect of the olfactory code. A critical analysis suggests that alternative coding mechanisms for odor quality, such as those based on temporal patterns of responses, enjoy little experimental support. PMID:17480025

  7. Dog and mouse: toward a balanced view of the mammalian olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Arthur W.; Sánchez-Quinteiro, Pablo; Salazar, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Although the most intensively studied mammalian olfactory system is that of the mouse, in which olfactory chemical cues of one kind or another are detected in four different nasal areas [the main olfactory epithelium (MOE), the septal organ (SO), Grüneberg's ganglion, and the sensory epithelium of the vomeronasal organ (VNO)], the extraordinarily sensitive olfactory system of the dog is also an important model that is increasingly used, for example in genomic studies of species evolution. Here we describe the topography and extent of the main olfactory and vomeronasal sensory epithelia of the dog, and we report finding no structures equivalent to the Grüneberg ganglion and SO of the mouse. Since we examined adults, newborns, and fetuses we conclude that these latter structures are absent in dogs, possibly as the result of regression or involution. The absence of a vomeronasal component based on VR2 receptors suggests that the VNO may be undergoing a similar involutionary process. PMID:25309347

  8. Copper-induced deregulation of microRNA expression in the zebrafish olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Bammler, Theo K.; Beyer, Richard P.; Gallagher, Evan P.

    2016-01-01

    Although environmental trace metals, such as copper (Cu), can disrupt normal olfactory function in fish, the underlying molecular mechanisms of metal-induced olfactory injury have not been elucidated. Current research has suggested the involvement of epigenetic modifications. To address this hypothesis, we analyzed microRNA (miRNA) profiles in the olfactory system of Cu-exposed zebrafish. Our data revealed 2, 10, and 28 differentially expressed miRNAs in a dose-response manner corresponding to three increasing Cu concentrations. Numerous deregulated miRNAs were involved in neurogenesis (e.g. let-7, miR-7a, miR-128 and miR-138), indicating a role for Cu-mediated toxicity via interference with neurogenesis processes. Putative gene targets of deregulated miRNAs were identified when interrogating our previously published microarray database, including those involved in cell growth and proliferation, cell death, and cell morphology. Moreover, several miRNAs (e.g. miR-203a, miR-199*, miR-16a, miR-16c, and miR-25) may contribute to decreased mRNA levels of their host genes involved in olfactory signal transduction pathways and other critical neurological processes via a post-transcriptional mechanism. Our findings provide novel insight into the epigenetic regulatory mechanisms of metal-induced neurotoxicity of the fish olfactory system, and identify novel miRNA biomarkers of metal exposures. PMID:23745839

  9. Effects of inhalation of cadmium on the rat olfactory system: behavior and morphology.

    PubMed

    Sun, T J; Miller, M L; Hastings, L

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the effects of cadmium on olfaction, two separate studies were conducted in which male adult rats were exposed to CdO, via inhalation, for 5 h per day, 5 days a week for 20 weeks. Target exposure values of 250 and 500 micrograms/m3 were measured at 200 and 325 micrograms/m3 for the low concentration in two experiments, and 550 and 660 micrograms/m3 for the high concentration. Prior to exposure, olfactory thresholds were obtained using a conditioned suppression technique. After 20 weeks of cadmium exposure, there was no evidence of anosmia in any of the rats nor were there any significant changes observed in olfactory thresholds. Although olfaction was not impaired, cadmium levels in the olfactory bulbs of exposed rats were significantly elevated compared to controls. Cardiac and respiratory histopathology were observed at all exposure levels, but there was no evidence of nasal pathology related to exposure to cadmium. Failure of cadmium to produce olfactory dysfunction may be due to the protective effects of metallothionein and/or to the highly resilient nature of the rodent olfactory system.

  10. What role does the quorum-sensing accessory gene regulator system play during Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia?

    PubMed

    Painter, Kimberley L; Krishna, Aishwarya; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh; Edwards, Andrew M

    2014-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of bacteremia, which frequently results in serious secondary infections such as infective endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and septic arthritis. The ability of S. aureus to cause such a wide range of infections has been ascribed to its huge armoury of different virulence factors, many of which are under the control of the quorum-sensing accessory gene regulator (Agr) system. However, a significant fraction of S. aureus bacteremia cases are caused by agr-defective isolates, calling into question the role of Agr in invasive staphylococcal infections. This review draws on recent work to define the role of Agr during bacteremia and explain why the loss of this major virulence regulator is sometimes a price worth paying for S. aureus.

  11. Role of Nrf2 antioxidant defense in mitigating cadmium-induced oxidative stress in the olfactory system of zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lu; Gallagher, Evan P.

    2013-01-15

    Exposure to trace metals can disrupt olfactory function in fish leading to a loss of behaviors critical to survival. Cadmium (Cd) is an olfactory toxicant that elicits cellular oxidative stress as a mechanism of toxicity while also inducing protective cellular antioxidant genes via activation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) pathway. However, the molecular mechanisms of Cd-induced olfactory injury have not been characterized. In the present study, we investigated the role of the Nrf2-mediated antioxidant defense pathway in protecting against Cd-induced olfactory injury in zebrafish. A dose-dependent induction of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant genes associated with cellular responses to oxidative stress was observed in the olfactory system of adult zebrafish following 24 h Cd exposure. Zebrafish larvae exposed to Cd for 3 h showed increased glutathione S-transferase pi (gst pi), glutamate–cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (gclc), heme oxygenase 1 (hmox1) and peroxiredoxin 1 (prdx1) mRNA levels indicative of Nrf2 activation, and which were blocked by morpholino-mediated Nrf2 knockdown. The inhibition of antioxidant gene induction in Cd-exposed Nrf2 morphants was associated with disruption of olfactory driven behaviors, increased cell death and loss of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Nrf2 morphants also exhibited a downregulation of OSN-specific genes after Cd exposure. Pre-incubation of embryos with sulforaphane (SFN) partially protected against Cd-induced olfactory tissue damage. Collectively, our results indicate that oxidative stress is an important mechanism of Cd-mediated injury in the zebrafish olfactory system. Moreover, the Nrf2 pathway plays a protective role against cellular oxidative damage and is important in maintaining zebrafish olfactory function. -- Highlights: ► Oxidative stress is an important mechanism of Cd-mediated olfactory injury. ► Cd induces antioxidant gene expression in the zebrafish olfactory system. ► The

  12. Brief embryonic cadmium exposure induces a stress response and cell death in the developing olfactory system followed by long-term olfactory deficits in juvenile zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Blechinger, Scott R.; Kusch, Robin C.; Haugo, Kristine; Matz, Carlyn; Chivers, Douglas P.; Krone, Patrick H.

    2007-10-01

    The toxic effects of cadmium and other metals have been well established. A primary target of these metals is known to be the olfactory system, and fish exposed to a number of different waterborne metals display deficiencies in olfaction. Importantly, exposure over embryonic/larval development periods can cause deficits in chemosensory function in juvenile fish, but the specific cell types affected are unknown. We have previously characterized a transgenic zebrafish strain expressing the green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene linked to the hsp70 gene promoter, and shown it to be a useful tool for examining cell-specific toxicity in living embryos and larvae. Here we show that the hsp70/eGFP transgene is strongly and specifically upregulated within the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) of transgenic zebrafish larvae following a brief 3-h exposure to water-borne cadmium. This molecular response was closely correlated to an endpoint for tissue damage within the olfactory placode, namely cell death. Furthermore, cadmium-induced olfactory cytotoxicity in zebrafish larvae gives rise to more permanent effects. Juvenile zebrafish briefly exposed to cadmium during early larval development display deficits in olfactory-dependent predator avoidance behaviors 4-6 weeks after a return to clean water. Lateral line neuromasts of exposed zebrafish larvae also activate both the endogenous hsp70 gene and the hsp70/eGFP transgene. The data reveal that even a very brief exposure period that gives rise to cell death within the developing olfactory placode results in long-term deficits in olfaction, and that hsp70/eGFP may serve as an effective indicator of sublethal cadmium exposure in sensory cells.

  13. A modular, computer-controlled system for olfactory stimulation in the MRI environment.

    PubMed

    Andrieu, Patrice; Bonnans, Vincent; Meneses, Jaime; Millot, Jean-Louis; Moulin, Thierry; Gharbi, Tijani

    2014-03-01

    Although the cerebral networks involved in sensory perception are of general interest in neuroscience, registration of the effects of olfactory stimulation, especially in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment, presents particular problems and constraints. This article presents details of a reliable and portable system for olfactory stimulation that is modular in design and based on microcontroller technology. It has the following characteristics: (1) It is under software control; (2) the presentation of olfactory stimulation can be synchronized with respiration; (3) it can be manually controlled; and (4) it is fully compatible with an MRI environment. The principle underlying this system is to direct an odor to the subject's nostrils by switching airflow to different odor diffusers. The characteristics of this system were established using (1) ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy, to measure its response time, and (2) gas chromatography, to measure the repeatability of odor presentation in terms of gas concentration. A response time of 200 ± 25 ms was obtained for the system, and the standard deviations of the gas concentration delivered during stimulation ranged from 1.5% to 22%, depending on the odor, the airflow, and the dilution of the odor used. Since it is portable, controlled by software, and reliable, on the basis of the results we obtained, this system will lend itself to a wide range of applications in olfactory neuroscience.

  14. The wiring diagram of a glomerular olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Berck, Matthew E; Khandelwal, Avinash; Claus, Lindsey; Hernandez-Nunez, Luis; Si, Guangwei; Tabone, Christopher J; Li, Feng; Truman, James W; Fetter, Rick D; Louis, Matthieu; Samuel, Aravinthan DT; Cardona, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell enables animals to react to long-distance cues according to learned and innate valences. Here, we have mapped with electron microscopy the complete wiring diagram of the Drosophila larval antennal lobe, an olfactory neuropil similar to the vertebrate olfactory bulb. We found a canonical circuit with uniglomerular projection neurons (uPNs) relaying gain-controlled ORN activity to the mushroom body and the lateral horn. A second, parallel circuit with multiglomerular projection neurons (mPNs) and hierarchically connected local neurons (LNs) selectively integrates multiple ORN signals already at the first synapse. LN-LN synaptic connections putatively implement a bistable gain control mechanism that either computes odor saliency through panglomerular inhibition, or allows some glomeruli to respond to faint aversive odors in the presence of strong appetitive odors. This complete wiring diagram will support experimental and theoretical studies towards bridging the gap between circuits and behavior. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14859.001 PMID:27177418

  15. Development of the olfactory pathways in platypus and echidna.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S

    2012-01-01

    The two groups of living monotremes (platypus and echidnas) have remarkably different olfactory structures in the adult. The layers of the main olfactory bulb of the short-beaked echidna are extensively folded, whereas those of the platypus are not. Similarly, the surface area of the piriform cortex of the echidna is large and its lamination complex, whereas in the platypus it is small and simple. It has been argued that the modern echidnas are derived from a platypus-like ancestor, in which case the extensive olfactory specializations of the modern echidnas would have developed relatively recently in monotreme evolution. In this study, the development of the constituent structures of the olfactory pathway was studied in sectioned platypus and echidna embryos and post-hatchlings at the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin, Germany. The aim was to determine whether the olfactory structures follow a similar maturational path in the two monotremes during embryonic and early post-hatching ages or whether they show very different developmental paths from the outset. The findings indicate that anatomical differences in the central olfactory system between the short-beaked echidna and the platypus begin to develop immediately before hatching, although details of differences in nasal cavity architecture emerge progressively during late post-hatching life. These findings are most consistent with the proposition that the two modern monotreme lineages have followed independent evolutionary paths from a less olfaction-specialized ancestor. The monotreme olfactory pathway does not appear to be sufficiently structurally mature at birth to allow olfaction-mediated behaviour, because central components of both the main and accessory olfactory system have not differentiated at the time of hatching. PMID:22156550

  16. Evolving a Neural Olfactorimotor System in Virtual and Real Olfactory Environments

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Paul A.; Anderson, Todd O.

    2012-01-01

    To provide a platform to enable the study of simulated olfactory circuitry in context, we have integrated a simulated neural olfactorimotor system with a virtual world which simulates both computational fluid dynamics as well as a robotic agent capable of exploring the simulated plumes. A number of the elements which we developed for this purpose have not, to our knowledge, been previously assembled into an integrated system, including: control of a simulated agent by a neural olfactorimotor system; continuous interaction between the simulated robot and the virtual plume; the inclusion of multiple distinct odorant plumes and background odor; the systematic use of artificial evolution driven by olfactorimotor performance (e.g., time to locate a plume source) to specify parameter values; the incorporation of the realities of an imperfect physical robot using a hybrid model where a physical robot encounters a simulated plume. We close by describing ongoing work toward engineering a high dimensional, reversible, low power electronic olfactory sensor which will allow olfactorimotor neural circuitry evolved in the virtual world to control an autonomous olfactory robot in the physical world. The platform described here is intended to better test theories of olfactory circuit function, as well as provide robust odor source localization in realistic environments. PMID:23112772

  17. The Combined Role of the Main Olfactory and Vomeronasal Systems in Social Communication in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Kelliher, Kevin R

    2009-01-01

    The main olfactory and the vomeronasal systems are the two systems by which most vertebrates detect chemosensory cues that mediate social behavior. Much research has focused on how one system or the other is critical for particular behaviors. This has lead to a vision of two distinct and complexly autonomous olfactory systems. A closer look at research over the past 30 years reveals a different picture however. These two seemingly distinct systems are much more integrated than previously thought. One novel set of chemosensory cues in particular (MHC Class I peptide ligands) can show us how both systems are capable of detecting the same chemosensory cues, through different mechanisms yet provide the same general information (genetic individuality). Future research will need to now focus on how two seemingly distinct chemosensory systems together detect pheromones and mediate social behaviors. Do these systems work independently, synergistically or competitively in communicating between individuals of the same species? PMID:17959176

  18. Multiple sites of adaptation lead to contrast encoding in the Drosophila olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Cafaro, Jon

    2016-04-01

    Animals often encounter large increases in odor intensity that can persist for many seconds. These increases in the background odor are often accompanied by increases in the variance of the odor stimulus. Previous studies have shown that a persistent odor stimulus (odor background) results in a decrease in the response to brief odor pulses in the olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). However, the contribution of adapting mechanisms beyond theORNs is not clear. Thus, it is unclear how adaptive mechanisms are distributed within the olfactory circuit and what impact downstream adaptation may have on the encoding of odor stimuli. In this study, adaptation to the same odor stimulus is examined at multiple levels in the well studied and accessibleDrosophilaolfactory system. The responses of theORNs are compared to the responses of the second order, projection neurons (PNs), directly connected to them. Adaptation inPNspike rate was found to be much greater than adaptation in theORNspike rate. This greater adaptation allowsPNs to encode odor contrast (ratio of pulse intensity to background intensity) with little ambiguity. Moreover, distinct neural mechanisms contribute to different aspects of adaptation; adaptation to the background odor is dominated by adaptation in spike generation in bothORNs andPNs, while adaptation to the odor pulse is dominated by changes within olfactory transduction and the glomerulus. These observations suggest that the olfactory system adapts at multiple sites to better match its response gain to stimulus statistics. PMID:27053295

  19. Multiple sites of adaptation lead to contrast encoding in the Drosophila olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Cafaro, Jon

    2016-04-01

    Animals often encounter large increases in odor intensity that can persist for many seconds. These increases in the background odor are often accompanied by increases in the variance of the odor stimulus. Previous studies have shown that a persistent odor stimulus (odor background) results in a decrease in the response to brief odor pulses in the olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). However, the contribution of adapting mechanisms beyond theORNs is not clear. Thus, it is unclear how adaptive mechanisms are distributed within the olfactory circuit and what impact downstream adaptation may have on the encoding of odor stimuli. In this study, adaptation to the same odor stimulus is examined at multiple levels in the well studied and accessibleDrosophilaolfactory system. The responses of theORNs are compared to the responses of the second order, projection neurons (PNs), directly connected to them. Adaptation inPNspike rate was found to be much greater than adaptation in theORNspike rate. This greater adaptation allowsPNs to encode odor contrast (ratio of pulse intensity to background intensity) with little ambiguity. Moreover, distinct neural mechanisms contribute to different aspects of adaptation; adaptation to the background odor is dominated by adaptation in spike generation in bothORNs andPNs, while adaptation to the odor pulse is dominated by changes within olfactory transduction and the glomerulus. These observations suggest that the olfactory system adapts at multiple sites to better match its response gain to stimulus statistics.

  20. Ontogenetic Development of the Derived Olfactory System of the Mantellid Frog Mantidactylus betsileanus.

    PubMed

    Nowack, Christine; Vences, Miguel

    2016-07-01

    The nasal cavity of Mantidactylus betsileanus, a frog of the Madagascar-Comoroan endemic family Mantellidae, is characterized by a unique internal architecture. Unlike the state commonly observed in anurans, the two discernible olfactory subsystems of M. betsileanus (the main olfactory organ and the vomeronasal organ) are anatomically separated from each other, suggesting an enhanced functional differentiation. Here we evaluate the ontogenetic formation of this extraordinary anatomical state based on a histological study of a developmental series of M. betsileanus. The olfactory system of premetamorphic tadpoles, and most of its changes during metamorphosis, resembles that of other anurans. At the end of metamorphosis however, a growing obstruction of the passage between main olfactory organ and vomeronasal organ takes place, leading to the deviant morphological state previously described for adults. The late appearance of this atypical anatomical feature in the course of ontogeny agrees with the phylogenetic hypothesis of the observed obstruction representing a derived state for these frogs. From a functional point of view, the apparent autonomy of the vomeronasal organ is possibly linked to the presence of clade-specific femoral glands that are known to produce pheromones and that likewise are fully expressed in adults only. Anat Rec, 299:943-950, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27084295

  1. Recent Trend in Development of Olfactory Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Yasuyuki

    An olfactory display is a device that generates scented air with desired concentration of aroma, and delivers it to the user's olfactory organ. In this article, the nature of olfaction is briefly described from the view point of how to configure olfactory displays. Next, component technologies to compose olfactory displays, i.e., making scents and delivering scents, are categorized. Several existing olfactory display systems are introduced to show the current status of research and development of olfactory displays.

  2. Differential Muscarinic Modulation in the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard S.; Hu, Ruilong; DeSouza, Andre; Eberly, Christian L.; Krahe, Krista; Chan, Wilson

    2015-01-01

    modulation differentially regulates two parallel circuits that process chemosensory information, the accessory and main olfactory bulb (AOB and MOB, respectively). These circuits consist of remarkably similar synaptic arrangement and neuronal types, yet cholinergic regulation produced strikingly opposing effects in output and intrinsic neurons. Despite these differences, the chemogenetic reduction of cholinergic activity in freely behaving animals disrupted odor discrimination of simple odors, and the investigation of social odors associated with behaviors signaled by the Vomeronasal system. PMID:26224860

  3. How to escape from Haller's rule: Olfactory system complexity in small and large Trichogramma evanescens parasitic wasps.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, Emma; Smid, Hans M

    2016-06-15

    While Haller's rule states that small animals have relatively larger brains, minute Trichogramma evanescens Westwood (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) parasitic wasps scale brain size linearly with body size. This linear brain scaling allows them to decrease brain size beyond the predictions of Haller's rule, and is facilitated by phenotypic plasticity in brain size. In the present study we addressed whether this plasticity resulted in adaptations to the complexity of the morphology of the olfactory system of small and large T. evanescens. We used confocal laser scanning microscopy to compare size and number of glomeruli in the antennal lobe in the brain, and scanning electron microscopy to compare length and number of olfactory sensilla on the antennae. The results show a similar level of complexity of the olfactory system morphology of small and large wasps. Wasps with a similar genotype but very different brain and body size have similarly sized olfactory sensilla and most of them occur in equal numbers on the antennae. Small and large wasps also have a similar number of glomeruli in the antennal lobe. Glomeruli in small brains are, however, smaller in both absolute and relative volume. These similarities between small and large wasps may indicate that plasticity in brain size does not require plasticity in the gross morphology of the olfactory system. It may be vital for wasps of all sizes to have a large number of olfactory receptor types, to maintain olfactory precision in their search for suitable hosts, and consequently maintain their reproductive success and Darwinian fitness.

  4. Question of reference frames: visual direction-selective neurons in the accessory optic system of goldfish.

    PubMed

    Masseck, Olivia Andrea; Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter

    2009-11-01

    We investigated if visual direction-selective neurons in the pretectal area (APT) of goldfish (Carassius auratus auratus) preferred visual stimuli resulting from rotations around axes corresponding to the best responsive axes of the semicircular canals [optic flow that is consistent to a maximal activation of the horizontal canal pair (yaw), to a maximal activation of the right anterior/left posterior semicircular canal pair (RALP), and to a maximal activation of the left anterior/right posterior semicircular canal pair (LARP)]. Our sample of neurons recorded in the left pretectum had two preferred axes of rotation: first, rotation around the yaw axis and second, rotation around the RALP axis. Both axes of rotation correspond to best responsive axes of the semicircular canals. For this reason, coding in a reference frame defined by the vestibular system or the pulling direction of the eye muscles is suggested. In our population of recorded APT neurons, we did not find segregation of different preferred axes of rotation into different anatomical structures. Furthermore in all axes no bias for clockwise or counterclockwise rotations was obvious. This is particularly noteworthy for the yaw axis because preference for temporo-nasal and naso-temporal rotations was found at the same recording side. Hence we conclude that in fish the accessory optic system may consist of one nucleus on each side of the midbrain only, the APT. Segregation into different nuclei coding for different axes and different senses of rotation probably first developed in amphibians.

  5. Role of Rb during Neurogenesis and Axonal Guidance in the Developing Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Carine; Omais, Saad; Al Lafi, Sawsan; El Jamal, Nadim; Noubani, Mohammad; Skaf, Larissa; Ghanem, Noël

    2016-01-01

    The Retinoblastoma protein, Rb, was shown to regulate distinct aspects of neurogenesis in the embryonic and adult brain besides its primary role in cell cycle control. It is still unknown, however, whether Rb is required for tissue morphogenesis and the establishment of synaptic connections between adjacent tissues during development. We have investigated here the role of Rb during development of the olfactory system (OS), which heavily relies on reciprocal interactions between the olfactory epithelium (OE) and the olfactory bulb (OB). We show that mice carrying a telencephalic-specific deletion of Rb display several neurogenic defects in the OS during late development. In the OE, loss of Rb leads to ectopic proliferation of late-born progenitors (Tuj-1+), abnormal radial migration and terminal maturation of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). In the OB, deletion of Rb causes severe lamination defects with loss of clear boundaries between distinct layers. Importantly, starting around E15.5 when OB glomerulogenesis is initiated, many OSNs axons that project along the olfactory nerve layer (ONL) fail to properly innervate the nascent bulb, thus resulting in partial loss of connectivity between OE-OB and gradual neuronal degeneration in both tissues peaking at birth. This deficiency correlates with deregulated expressions of two key chemo-repellant molecules, Robo2/Slit1 and Nrp2/Sema3F that control the formation of dorsal-ventral topographic map of OSNs connections with OB glomeruli. This study highlights a critical requirement for Rb during neurogenesis and the establishment of proper synaptic connections inside the OS during development. PMID:27667971

  6. Role of Rb during Neurogenesis and Axonal Guidance in the Developing Olfactory System.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Carine; Omais, Saad; Al Lafi, Sawsan; El Jamal, Nadim; Noubani, Mohammad; Skaf, Larissa; Ghanem, Noël

    2016-01-01

    The Retinoblastoma protein, Rb, was shown to regulate distinct aspects of neurogenesis in the embryonic and adult brain besides its primary role in cell cycle control. It is still unknown, however, whether Rb is required for tissue morphogenesis and the establishment of synaptic connections between adjacent tissues during development. We have investigated here the role of Rb during development of the olfactory system (OS), which heavily relies on reciprocal interactions between the olfactory epithelium (OE) and the olfactory bulb (OB). We show that mice carrying a telencephalic-specific deletion of Rb display several neurogenic defects in the OS during late development. In the OE, loss of Rb leads to ectopic proliferation of late-born progenitors (Tuj-1+), abnormal radial migration and terminal maturation of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). In the OB, deletion of Rb causes severe lamination defects with loss of clear boundaries between distinct layers. Importantly, starting around E15.5 when OB glomerulogenesis is initiated, many OSNs axons that project along the olfactory nerve layer (ONL) fail to properly innervate the nascent bulb, thus resulting in partial loss of connectivity between OE-OB and gradual neuronal degeneration in both tissues peaking at birth. This deficiency correlates with deregulated expressions of two key chemo-repellant molecules, Robo2/Slit1 and Nrp2/Sema3F that control the formation of dorsal-ventral topographic map of OSNs connections with OB glomeruli. This study highlights a critical requirement for Rb during neurogenesis and the establishment of proper synaptic connections inside the OS during development. PMID:27667971

  7. Role of Rb during Neurogenesis and Axonal Guidance in the Developing Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Carine; Omais, Saad; Al Lafi, Sawsan; El Jamal, Nadim; Noubani, Mohammad; Skaf, Larissa; Ghanem, Noël

    2016-01-01

    The Retinoblastoma protein, Rb, was shown to regulate distinct aspects of neurogenesis in the embryonic and adult brain besides its primary role in cell cycle control. It is still unknown, however, whether Rb is required for tissue morphogenesis and the establishment of synaptic connections between adjacent tissues during development. We have investigated here the role of Rb during development of the olfactory system (OS), which heavily relies on reciprocal interactions between the olfactory epithelium (OE) and the olfactory bulb (OB). We show that mice carrying a telencephalic-specific deletion of Rb display several neurogenic defects in the OS during late development. In the OE, loss of Rb leads to ectopic proliferation of late-born progenitors (Tuj-1+), abnormal radial migration and terminal maturation of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). In the OB, deletion of Rb causes severe lamination defects with loss of clear boundaries between distinct layers. Importantly, starting around E15.5 when OB glomerulogenesis is initiated, many OSNs axons that project along the olfactory nerve layer (ONL) fail to properly innervate the nascent bulb, thus resulting in partial loss of connectivity between OE-OB and gradual neuronal degeneration in both tissues peaking at birth. This deficiency correlates with deregulated expressions of two key chemo-repellant molecules, Robo2/Slit1 and Nrp2/Sema3F that control the formation of dorsal-ventral topographic map of OSNs connections with OB glomeruli. This study highlights a critical requirement for Rb during neurogenesis and the establishment of proper synaptic connections inside the OS during development.

  8. Disruption of Aedes aegypti Olfactory System Development through Chitosan/siRNA Nanoparticle Targeting of semaphorin-1a

    PubMed Central

    Mysore, Keshava; Flannery, Ellen M.; Tomchaney, Michael; Severson, David W.; Duman-Scheel, Molly

    2013-01-01

    Despite the devastating impact of mosquito-borne illnesses on human health, surprisingly little is known about mosquito developmental biology, including development of the olfactory system, a tissue of vector importance. Analysis of mosquito olfactory developmental genetics has been hindered by a lack of means to target specific genes during the development of this sensory system. In this investigation, chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles were used to target semaphorin-1a (sema1a) during olfactory system development in the dengue and yellow fever vector mosquito Aedes aegypti. Immunohistochemical analyses and anterograde tracing of antennal sensory neurons, which were used to track the progression of olfactory development in this species, revealed antennal lobe defects in sema1a knockdown fourth instar larvae. These findings, which correlated with a larval odorant tracking behavioral phenotype, identified previously unreported roles for Sema1a in the developing insect larval olfactory system. Analysis of sema1a knockdown pupae also revealed a number of olfactory phenotypes, including olfactory receptor neuron targeting and projection neuron defects coincident with a collapse in the structure and shape of the antennal lobe and individual glomeruli. This study, which is to our knowledge the first functional genetic analysis of insect olfactory development outside of D. melanogaster, identified critical roles for Sema1a during Ae. aegypti larval and pupal olfactory development and advocates the use of chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles as an effective means of targeting genes during post-embryonic Ae. aegypti development. Use of siRNA nanoparticle methodology to understand sensory developmental genetics in mosquitoes will provide insight into the evolutionary conservation and divergence of key developmental genes which could be exploited in the development of both common and species-specific means for intervention. PMID:23696908

  9. Disruption of Aedes aegypti olfactory system development through chitosan/siRNA nanoparticle targeting of semaphorin-1a.

    PubMed

    Mysore, Keshava; Flannery, Ellen M; Tomchaney, Michael; Severson, David W; Duman-Scheel, Molly

    2013-01-01

    Despite the devastating impact of mosquito-borne illnesses on human health, surprisingly little is known about mosquito developmental biology, including development of the olfactory system, a tissue of vector importance. Analysis of mosquito olfactory developmental genetics has been hindered by a lack of means to target specific genes during the development of this sensory system. In this investigation, chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles were used to target semaphorin-1a (sema1a) during olfactory system development in the dengue and yellow fever vector mosquito Aedes aegypti. Immunohistochemical analyses and anterograde tracing of antennal sensory neurons, which were used to track the progression of olfactory development in this species, revealed antennal lobe defects in sema1a knockdown fourth instar larvae. These findings, which correlated with a larval odorant tracking behavioral phenotype, identified previously unreported roles for Sema1a in the developing insect larval olfactory system. Analysis of sema1a knockdown pupae also revealed a number of olfactory phenotypes, including olfactory receptor neuron targeting and projection neuron defects coincident with a collapse in the structure and shape of the antennal lobe and individual glomeruli. This study, which is to our knowledge the first functional genetic analysis of insect olfactory development outside of D. melanogaster, identified critical roles for Sema1a during Ae. aegypti larval and pupal olfactory development and advocates the use of chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles as an effective means of targeting genes during post-embryonic Ae. aegypti development. Use of siRNA nanoparticle methodology to understand sensory developmental genetics in mosquitoes will provide insight into the evolutionary conservation and divergence of key developmental genes which could be exploited in the development of both common and species-specific means for intervention.

  10. An information theoretic model of information processing in the Drosophila olfactory system: the role of inhibitory neurons for system efficiency.

    PubMed

    Faghihi, Faramarz; Kolodziejski, Christoph; Fiala, André; Wörgötter, Florentin; Tetzlaff, Christian

    2013-12-20

    Fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) rely on their olfactory system to process environmental information. This information has to be transmitted without system-relevant loss by the olfactory system to deeper brain areas for learning. Here we study the role of several parameters of the fly's olfactory system and the environment and how they influence olfactory information transmission. We have designed an abstract model of the antennal lobe, the mushroom body and the inhibitory circuitry. Mutual information between the olfactory environment, simulated in terms of different odor concentrations, and a sub-population of intrinsic mushroom body neurons (Kenyon cells) was calculated to quantify the efficiency of information transmission. With this method we study, on the one hand, the effect of different connectivity rates between olfactory projection neurons and firing thresholds of Kenyon cells. On the other hand, we analyze the influence of inhibition on mutual information between environment and mushroom body. Our simulations show an expected linear relation between the connectivity rate between the antennal lobe and the mushroom body and firing threshold of the Kenyon cells to obtain maximum mutual information for both low and high odor concentrations. However, contradicting all-day experiences, high odor concentrations cause a drastic, and unrealistic, decrease in mutual information for all connectivity rates compared to low concentration. But when inhibition on the mushroom body is included, mutual information remains at high levels independent of other system parameters. This finding points to a pivotal role of inhibition in fly information processing without which the system efficiency will be substantially reduced.

  11. Evolutionary radiation of visual and olfactory brain systems in primates, bats and insectivores.

    PubMed

    Barton, R A; Purvis, A; Harvey, P H

    1995-06-29

    How brains have evolved in response to particular selection pressures is illuminated by ecological correlates of differences in brain structure among contemporary species. The focus of most comparative studies has been on the overall size of brains relative to body size, hence ignoring the ways in which selection operates on specific neural systems. Here we investigate evolutionary radiations in the size of visual and olfactory brain structures within three orders of mammals: primates, bats and insectivores. The comparative relationships within these three orders show both similarities and differences. After removal of the allometric effect of overall brain size, the sizes of different structures within each sensory modality are positively correlated in all three orders. Correlations between visual and olfactory structures, however, are negative in primates, negative but non-significant in insectivores, and positive in bats. In both primates and insectivores, nocturnal lineages tend to have larger olfactory structures than do diurnal or partly diurnal lineages, and among the primates diurnal lineages have larger striate visual cortexes. Hence the apparent trade-off between vision and olfaction in primates seems to be related to the divergence of nocturnal and diurnal forms. However, negative correlations between visual and olfactory structures were also found when nocturnal strepsirhines and diurnal haplorhines were analysed separately, suggesting that ecological variables in addition to activity timing may be significant. Indeed, there were also associations with diet: frugivory was associated with enlargements of the geniculostriate visual system in diurnal primates, enlargements of olfactory structures in nocturnal primates, and possibly enlargements of both in bats. Further ecological associations were found within insectivores: aquatic lineages had smaller olfactory structures than in their non-aquatic counterparts, and fossorial lineages had smaller optic

  12. Cobalt Chloride Treatment Used to Ablate the Lateral Line System Also Impairs the Olfactory System in Three Freshwater Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Julie M.; Field, Karen E.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2016-01-01

    Fishes use multimodal signals during both inter- and intra-sexual displays to convey information about their sex, reproductive state, and social status. These complex behavioral displays can include visual, auditory, olfactory, tactile, and hydrodynamic signals, and the relative role of each sensory channel in these complex multi-sensory interactions is a common focus of neuroethology. The mechanosensory lateral line system of fishes detects near-body water movements and is implicated in a variety of behaviors including schooling, rheotaxis, social communication, and prey detection. Cobalt chloride is commonly used to chemically ablate lateral line neuromasts, thereby eliminating water-movement cues to test for mechanosensory-mediated behavioral functions. However, cobalt acts as a nonspecific calcium channel antagonist and could potentially disrupt function of all superficially located sensory receptor cells, including those for chemosensing. Here, we examined whether CoCl2 treatment used to ablate the lateral line system also impairs olfaction in three freshwater fishes, the African cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni, goldfish Carassius auratus, and the Mexican blind cavefish Astyanax mexicanus. To examine the impact of CoCl2 on the activity of peripheral receptors, we quantified DASPEI fluorescence intensity of the olfactory epithelium from fish exposed to control and CoCl2 solutions. In addition, we examined brain activation in olfactory processing regions of A. burtoni immersed in either control or cobalt solutions. All three species exposed to CoCl2 had decreased DASPEI staining of the olfactory epithelium, and in A. burtoni, cobalt treatment caused reduced neural activation in olfactory processing regions of the brain. To our knowledge this is the first empirical evidence demonstrating that the same CoCl2 treatment used to ablate the lateral line system also impairs olfactory function. These data have important implications for the use of CoCl2 in future

  13. Cobalt Chloride Treatment Used to Ablate the Lateral Line System Also Impairs the Olfactory System in Three Freshwater Fishes.

    PubMed

    Butler, Julie M; Field, Karen E; Maruska, Karen P

    2016-01-01

    Fishes use multimodal signals during both inter- and intra-sexual displays to convey information about their sex, reproductive state, and social status. These complex behavioral displays can include visual, auditory, olfactory, tactile, and hydrodynamic signals, and the relative role of each sensory channel in these complex multi-sensory interactions is a common focus of neuroethology. The mechanosensory lateral line system of fishes detects near-body water movements and is implicated in a variety of behaviors including schooling, rheotaxis, social communication, and prey detection. Cobalt chloride is commonly used to chemically ablate lateral line neuromasts, thereby eliminating water-movement cues to test for mechanosensory-mediated behavioral functions. However, cobalt acts as a nonspecific calcium channel antagonist and could potentially disrupt function of all superficially located sensory receptor cells, including those for chemosensing. Here, we examined whether CoCl2 treatment used to ablate the lateral line system also impairs olfaction in three freshwater fishes, the African cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni, goldfish Carassius auratus, and the Mexican blind cavefish Astyanax mexicanus. To examine the impact of CoCl2 on the activity of peripheral receptors, we quantified DASPEI fluorescence intensity of the olfactory epithelium from fish exposed to control and CoCl2 solutions. In addition, we examined brain activation in olfactory processing regions of A. burtoni immersed in either control or cobalt solutions. All three species exposed to CoCl2 had decreased DASPEI staining of the olfactory epithelium, and in A. burtoni, cobalt treatment caused reduced neural activation in olfactory processing regions of the brain. To our knowledge this is the first empirical evidence demonstrating that the same CoCl2 treatment used to ablate the lateral line system also impairs olfactory function. These data have important implications for the use of CoCl2 in future

  14. Genetic dissection of pheromone processing reveals main olfactory system-mediated social behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Tomohiko; Hattori, Tatsuya; Asaba, Akari; Inoue, Naokazu; Kanomata, Nobuhiro; Kikusui, Takefumi; Kobayakawa, Reiko; Kobayakawa, Ko

    2015-01-20

    Most mammals have two major olfactory subsystems: the main olfactory system (MOS) and vomeronasal system (VNS). It is now widely accepted that the range of pheromones that control social behaviors are processed by both the VNS and the MOS. However, the functional contributions of each subsystem in social behavior remain unclear. To genetically dissociate the MOS and VNS functions, we established two conditional knockout mouse lines that led to either loss-of-function in the entire MOS or in the dorsal MOS. Mice with whole-MOS loss-of-function displayed severe defects in active sniffing and poor survival through the neonatal period. In contrast, when loss-of-function was confined to the dorsal MOB, sniffing behavior, pheromone recognition, and VNS activity were maintained. However, defects in a wide spectrum of social behaviors were observed: attraction to female urine and the accompanying ultrasonic vocalizations, chemoinvestigatory preference, aggression, maternal behaviors, and risk-assessment behaviors in response to an alarm pheromone. Functional dissociation of pheromone detection and pheromonal induction of behaviors showed the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON)-regulated social behaviors downstream from the MOS. Lesion analysis and neural activation mapping showed pheromonal activation in multiple amygdaloid and hypothalamic nuclei, important regions for the expression of social behavior, was dependent on MOS and AON functions. Identification of the MOS-AON-mediated pheromone pathway may provide insights into pheromone signaling in animals that do not possess a functional VNS, including humans.

  15. Macaque accessory optic system: I. Definition of the medial terminal nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, H.M.; Baleydier, C.; Magnin, M. )

    1990-12-08

    The organization of the accessory optic system (AOS) has been studied in the macaque monkey following intravitreal injections of tritiated amino acids in one eye. Retinal projections to the dorsal (DTN) and the lateral (LTN) terminal nuclei are identical to those previously described in other primate species. We observed an additional group of retinorecipient cells of the AOS, located between the cerebral peduncle and the substantia nigra, which we define as the interstitial nucleus of the superior fasiculus, medial fibers. In this report, we focus our attention on the medial terminal nucleus (MTN). Although a ventral division of this nucleus (MTNv) was not observed in the macaque, the retina projects to a group of cells in the midbrain reticular formation (MRF), which we argue to be homologous to the dorsal division of the MTN (MTNd). To provide evidence in support of this homology, the retinal projection to the MTNv and MTNd was also examined in 21 additional species from 11 orders of mammals including carnivores, marsupials, lagomorphs, rodents, bats, insectivores, tree shrews, hyraxes, pholidotes, edentates, and five additional species of primates. Whereas the retina projects to both ventral and dorsal divisions in all species studied, in haplorhine primates only the projection to the MTNd is conserved. The relative topological position of the MTNd in the MRF, dorsomedial to the substantia nigra and ventrolateral to the red nucleus, remains constant throughout the mammals. The trajectory of fiber paths innervating the MTNd is also similar in all species. In addition, the MTNd has comparable afferent and efferent connections with retina, pretectum, and vestibular nuclei in all species thus far studied. These results support the unequivocal conclusion that the MTNd is an unvarying feature of the mammalian AOS.

  16. Olfactory Receptors in Non-Chemosensory Organs: The Nervous System in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Isidro; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Carmona, Margarita; Carro, Eva; Aronica, Eleonora; Kovacs, Gabor G; Grison, Alice; Gustincich, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) and down-stream functional signaling molecules adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3), olfactory G protein α subunit (Gαolf), OR transporters receptor transporter proteins 1 and 2 (RTP1 and RTP2), receptor expression enhancing protein 1 (REEP1), and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are expressed in neurons of the human and murine central nervous system (CNS). In vitro studies have shown that these receptors react to external stimuli and therefore are equipped to be functional. However, ORs are not directly related to the detection of odors. Several molecules delivered from the blood, cerebrospinal fluid, neighboring local neurons and glial cells, distant cells through the extracellular space, and the cells' own self-regulating internal homeostasis can be postulated as possible ligands. Moreover, a single neuron outside the olfactory epithelium expresses more than one receptor, and the mechanism of transcriptional regulation may be different in olfactory epithelia and brain neurons. OR gene expression is altered in several neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) subtypes MM1 and VV2 with disease-, region- and subtype-specific patterns. Altered gene expression is also observed in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia with a major but not total influence of chlorpromazine treatment. Preliminary parallel observations have also shown the presence of taste receptors (TASRs), mainly of the bitter taste family, in the mammalian brain, whose function is not related to taste. TASRs in brain are also abnormally regulated in neurodegenerative diseases. These seminal observations point to the need for further studies on ORs and TASRs chemoreceptors in the mammalian brain. PMID:27458372

  17. Olfactory Receptors in Non-Chemosensory Organs: The Nervous System in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Isidro; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Carmona, Margarita; Carro, Eva; Aronica, Eleonora; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Grison, Alice; Gustincich, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) and down-stream functional signaling molecules adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3), olfactory G protein α subunit (Gαolf), OR transporters receptor transporter proteins 1 and 2 (RTP1 and RTP2), receptor expression enhancing protein 1 (REEP1), and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are expressed in neurons of the human and murine central nervous system (CNS). In vitro studies have shown that these receptors react to external stimuli and therefore are equipped to be functional. However, ORs are not directly related to the detection of odors. Several molecules delivered from the blood, cerebrospinal fluid, neighboring local neurons and glial cells, distant cells through the extracellular space, and the cells’ own self-regulating internal homeostasis can be postulated as possible ligands. Moreover, a single neuron outside the olfactory epithelium expresses more than one receptor, and the mechanism of transcriptional regulation may be different in olfactory epithelia and brain neurons. OR gene expression is altered in several neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s disease (PD), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) subtypes MM1 and VV2 with disease-, region- and subtype-specific patterns. Altered gene expression is also observed in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia with a major but not total influence of chlorpromazine treatment. Preliminary parallel observations have also shown the presence of taste receptors (TASRs), mainly of the bitter taste family, in the mammalian brain, whose function is not related to taste. TASRs in brain are also abnormally regulated in neurodegenerative diseases. These seminal observations point to the need for further studies on ORs and TASRs chemoreceptors in the mammalian brain. PMID:27458372

  18. Morphology and physiology of the olfactory system of blood-feeding insects.

    PubMed

    Guidobaldi, F; May-Concha, I J; Guerenstein, P G

    2014-01-01

    Several blood-feeding (hematophagous) insects are vectors of a number of diseases including dengue, Chagas disease and leishmaniasis which persistently affect public health throughout Latin America. The vectors of those diseases include mosquitoes, triatomine bugs and sandflies. As vector control is an efficient way to prevent these illnesses it is important to understand the sensory biology of those harmful insects. We study the physiology of the olfactory system of those insects and apply that knowledge on the development of methods to manipulate their behavior. Here we review some of the latest information on insect olfaction with emphasis on hematophagous insects. The insect olfactory sensory neurons are housed inside hair-like organs called sensilla which are mainly distributed on the antenna and mouthparts. The identity of many of the odor compounds that those neurons detect are already known in hematophagous insects. They include several constituents of host (vertebrate) odor, sex, aggregation and alarm pheromones, and compounds related to egg-deposition behavior. Recent work has contributed significant knowledge on how odor information is processed in the insect first odor-processing center in the brain, the antennal lobe. The quality, quantity, and temporal features of the odor stimuli are encoded by the neural networks of the antennal lobe. Information regarding odor mixtures is also encoded. While natural mixtures evoke strong responses, synthetic mixtures that deviate from their natural counterparts in terms of key constituents or proportions of those constituents evoke weaker responses. The processing of olfactory information is largely unexplored in hematophagous insects. However, many aspects of their olfactory behavior are known. As in other insects, responses to relevant single odor compounds are weak while natural mixtures evoke strong responses. Future challenges include studying how information about odor mixtures is processed in their brain

  19. Anatomical and functional analysis of domestication effects on the olfactory system of the silkmoth Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Bisch-Knaden, Sonja; Daimon, Takaaki; Shimada, Toru; Hansson, Bill S.; Sachse, Silke

    2014-01-01

    The silkmoth Bombyx mori is the main producer of silk worldwide and has furthermore become a model organism in biological research, especially concerning chemical communication. However, the impact domestication might have had on the silkmoth's olfactory sense has not yet been investigated. Here, we show that the pheromone detection system in B. mori males when compared with their wild ancestors Bombyx mandarina seems to have been preserved, while the perception of environmental odorants in both sexes of domesticated silkmoths has been degraded. In females, this physiological impairment was mirrored by a clear reduction in olfactory sensillum numbers. Neurophysiological experiments with hybrids between wild and domesticated silkmoths suggest that the female W sex chromosome, so far known to have the sole function of determining femaleness, might be involved in the detection of environmental odorants. Moreover, the coding of odorants in the brain, which is usually similar among closely related moths, differs strikingly between B. mori and B. mandarina females. These results indicate that domestication has had a strong impact on odour detection and processing in the olfactory model species B. mori. PMID:24258720

  20. Anatomical and functional analysis of domestication effects on the olfactory system of the silkmoth Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Bisch-Knaden, Sonja; Daimon, Takaaki; Shimada, Toru; Hansson, Bill S; Sachse, Silke

    2014-01-01

    The silkmoth Bombyx mori is the main producer of silk worldwide and has furthermore become a model organism in biological research, especially concerning chemical communication. However, the impact domestication might have had on the silkmoth's olfactory sense has not yet been investigated. Here, we show that the pheromone detection system in B. mori males when compared with their wild ancestors Bombyx mandarina seems to have been preserved, while the perception of environmental odorants in both sexes of domesticated silkmoths has been degraded. In females, this physiological impairment was mirrored by a clear reduction in olfactory sensillum numbers. Neurophysiological experiments with hybrids between wild and domesticated silkmoths suggest that the female W sex chromosome, so far known to have the sole function of determining femaleness, might be involved in the detection of environmental odorants. Moreover, the coding of odorants in the brain, which is usually similar among closely related moths, differs strikingly between B. mori and B. mandarina females. These results indicate that domestication has had a strong impact on odour detection and processing in the olfactory model species B. mori.

  1. Onset and dynamic expression of S100 proteins in the olfactory organ and the lateral line system in zebrafish development.

    PubMed

    Sandulescu, Corina M; Teow, Ru Yi; Hale, Melina E; Zhang, Chunbo

    2011-04-01

    In the zebrafish olfactory epithelium, three morphologically distinct olfactory neurons express different marker proteins. We utilize this feature to access developmental dynamics of one of the neuron types, the crypt cells, to determine whether they are differentiated at a stage similar to other olfactory neurons. Immunohistochemical studies using an S100 antibody that specifically recognizes crypt cells showed that S100-positive cells appear in olfactory rosettes as early as at 2day postfertilization (dpf). However, some of the rosettes did not have any S100-positive cells until 4 dpf. The number of S100-positive cells in individual rosettes increased steadily over the next 3days before it decreased significantly. There were 7.8 S100-positive cells per rosettes on average in larvae at 7 dpf. The number reduced to 2.2 at 9 dpf. A recovery to a pre-reduction level was detected in 12 dpf larvae. We also observed S100-positive cells in neuromasts of the lateral line system in 2 dpf larvae, suggesting that the crypt cells and sensory cells in the neuromasts have similar onsets of differentiation. Our data have provided a time line of differentiation of crypt cells in development of the olfactory system and demonstrated that this type of cell is differentiated at a stage similar to ciliated and microvillous olfactory neurons. A nonlinear growth trajectory of the crypt cell population in the first nine days of zebrafish development implicates a possible functional significance of crypt cells in early life stages of zebrafish.

  2. The olfactory system of the tammar wallaby is developed at birth and directs the neonate to its mother's pouch odours.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nanette Y; Fletcher, Terrence P; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2009-11-01

    In kangaroos and wallabies at birth the highly altricial newborn young climbs unassisted from the urogenital opening to the teat. Negative geotropism is important for the initial climb to the pouch opening, but nothing is known of the signals that then direct the neonate downwards to the teat. Here we show that the newborn tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) has the olfactory apparatus to detect smell. Both the main olfactory system and vomeronasal organ (VNO) are developed at the time of birth. Receptor cells of the main olfactory epithelium immunopositive for G(oalpha)-protein project to the three layered main olfactory bulb (MOB). The receptor epithelium of the VNO contains G-protein immunopositive cells and has olfactory knob-like structures. The VNO is connected to an area between the two MOBs. Next, using a functional test, we show that neonates can respond to odours from their mother's pouch. When neonatal young are presented with a choice of a pouch-odour-soaked swab or a saline swab, they choose the swab with their mother's pouch secretions significantly more often (P<0.05) than the saline swab. We conclude that both olfactory systems are capable of receiving odour signals at birth, a function that must be a critical adaptation for the survival of an altricial marsupial neonate such as the tammar for its journey to the pouch.

  3. Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to copper: Neurophysiological and histological effects on the olfactory system

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.A.; Rose, J.D.; Jenkins, R.A.; Gerow, K.G.; Bergman, H.L.

    1999-09-01

    Olfactory epithelial structure and olfactory bulb neurophysiological responses were measured in chinook salmon and rainbow trout in response to 25 to 300 {micro}g copper (Cu)/L. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, the number of olfactory receptors was significantly reduced in chinook salmon exposed to {ge}50 {micro}g Cu/L and in rainbow trout exposed to {ge}200 {micro}g cu/L for 1 h. The number of receptors was significantly reduced in both species following exposure to 25 {micro}g Cu/L for 4 h. Transmission electron microscopy of olfactory epithelial tissue indicated that the loss of receptors was from cellular necrosis. Olfactory bulk electroencephalogram (EEG) responses to 10{sup {minus}3} M L-serine were initially reduced by all Cu concentrations but were virtually eliminated in chinook salmon exposed to {ge}50 {micro}g Cu/L and in rainbow trout exposed to {ge}200 {micro}g Cu/L within 1 h of exposure. Following Cu exposure, EEG response recovery rates were slower in fish exposed to higher Cu concentrations. The higher sensitivity of the chinook salmon olfactory system to Cu-induced histological damage and neurophysiological impairment parallels the relative species sensitivity observed in behavioral avoidance experiments. This difference in species sensitivity may reduce the survival and reproductive potential of chinook salmon compared with that of rainbow trout in Cu-contaminated waters.

  4. [The 2004 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for research into smell receptors and the organization of the olfactory system].

    PubMed

    Burbach, J P H

    2004-12-25

    The 2004 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to Richard Axel and Linda B. Buck, for their discovery of smell receptors and the organisation of the olfactory system. Their original discovery concerned the identification of some 1000 genes that code for smell receptors in the olfactory epithelium of the rat. They also demonstrated that each receptor can only be activated by a limited number of odourants and that there is some overlap in specificity with other smell receptors. Odourants in inhaled air are specifically recognized and bound by the smell receptors on the olfactory neurones in the nasal epithelium. The activated neurones send an electrical signal to the mitral cells, the dendrites of which lie in the glomeruli of the olfactory bulb. In each olfactory neuron only one smell receptor gene is expressed. Neurones with the same type of receptor are spread throughout the epithelium but converge in the same glomerulus. An olfactory map is formed by means of mitral-cell projections which run to the cerebral cortex as well as to other parts of the brain. Possibly the information gained about odourants will be applied in the areas of physiology and pathophysiology; in the field of pharmacology for example where odourants may be used in the treatment of disorders of fertility, behaviour or mood.

  5. Olfactory sensitivity in mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Wackermannová, M; Pinc, L; Jebavý, L

    2016-07-18

    Olfaction enables most mammalian species to detect and discriminate vast numbers of chemical structures called odorants and pheromones. The perception of such chemical compounds is mediated via two major olfactory systems, the main olfactory system and the vomeronasal system, as well as minor systems, such as the septal organ and the Grueneberg ganglion. Distinct differences exist not only among species but also among individuals in terms of their olfactory sensitivity; however, little is known about the mechanisms that determine these differences. In research on the olfactory sensitivity of mammals, scientists thus depend in most cases on behavioral testing. In this article, we reviewed scientific studies performed on various mammalian species using different methodologies and target chemical substances. Human and non-human primates as well as rodents and dogs are the most frequently studied species. Olfactory threshold studies on other species do not exist with the exception of domestic pigs. Olfactory testing performed on seals, elephants, and bats focused more on discriminative abilities than on sensitivity. An overview of olfactory sensitivity studies as well as olfactory detection ability in most studied mammalian species is presented here, focusing on comparable olfactory detection thresholds. The basics of olfactory perception and olfactory sensitivity factors are also described. PMID:27070753

  6. The accessory limb model: an alternative experimental system of limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tetsuya; Gardiner, David M; Makanae, Aki; Satoh, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Accessory limb model (ALM) was developed as an experimental model and functional assay for limb regeneration. The ALM provides several ways to identify pathways and test for signaling molecules that regulate limb regeneration. Here, we summarize the history of the ALM and describe the specific details involved in inducing ectopic blastemas and limbs from a skin wound on the side of the arm. PMID:25740480

  7. alpha-Synucleinopathy in the human olfactory system in Parkinson's disease: involvement of calcium-binding protein- and substance P-positive cells.

    PubMed

    Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Argandoña-Palacios, Lucia; Garcia-Muñozguren, Susana; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2010-06-01

    Hyposmia is an early symptom of idiopathic Parkinson's disease but the pathological bases of such dysfunction are largely unknown. The distribution of alpha-synuclein, which forms Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, and the types of neurons (based on their neurotransmitters) affected by alpha-synucleinopathy were investigated in the olfactory system in Parkinson's disease. Immunohistochemical distribution of alpha-synuclein and its co-localization with tyrosine hydroxylase, somatostatin, calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin and substance P in the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, olfactory tubercle and piriform, periamygdaloid and rostral entorhinal cortices of idiopathic Parkinson's disease cases (n = 11) and age-matched controls (n = 11) were investigated. Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites were present in the olfactory bulb, particularly in mitral cells and in the inner plexiform layer. alpha-synuclein was particularly abundant in the different divisions of the anterior olfactory nucleus (bulbar, intrapeduncular, retrobulbar and cortical). In contrast, Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites were less abundant in the olfactory tubercle and olfactory cortices. In the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus and olfactory cortices, cells affected by alpha-synucleinopathy rarely co-localized tyrosine hydroxylase or somatostatin, but they frequently co-localized calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin and substance P. The present data provide evidence that alpha-synucleinopathy affects neurons along the olfactory pathway. Dopamine- and somatostatin-positive cells are rarely affected; whereas the cell types most vulnerable to neurodegeneration include glutamate- (mitral cells), calcium-binding protein- and substance P-positive cells. These results provide data on the distribution and cell types involved by alpha-synucleinopathy in the human olfactory system during Parkinson disease that may be useful for future clinical investigation.

  8. Exotic models may offer unique opportunities to decipher specific scientific question: the case of Xenopus olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Gascuel, Jean; Amano, Tosikazu

    2013-09-01

    The fact that olfactory systems are highly conserved in all animal species from insects to mammals allow the generalization of findings from one species to another. Most of our knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of the olfactory system comes from data obtained in a very limited number of biological models such as rodents, Zebrafish, Drosophila, and a worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. These models have proved useful to answer most questions in the field of olfaction, and thus concentrating on these few models appear to be a pragmatic strategy. However, the diversity of the organization and physiology of the olfactory system amongst phyla appear to be greater than generally assumed and the four models alone may not be sufficient to address all the questions arising from the study of olfaction. In this article, we will illustrate the idea that we should take advantage of biological diversity to address specific scientific questions and will show that the Xenopus olfactory system is a very good model to investigate: first, olfaction in aerial versus aquatic conditions and second, mechanisms underlying postnatal reorganization of the olfactory system especially those controlled by tyroxine hormone.

  9. Comparative analyses of olfactory systems in terrestrial crabs (Brachyura): evidence for aerial olfaction?

    PubMed

    Krieger, Jakob; Braun, Philipp; Rivera, Nicole T; Schubart, Christoph D; Müller, Carsten H G; Harzsch, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Adaptations to a terrestrial lifestyle occurred convergently multiple times during the evolution of the arthropods. This holds also true for the "true crabs" (Brachyura), a taxon that includes several lineages that invaded land independently. During an evolutionary transition from sea to land, animals have to develop a variety of physiological and anatomical adaptations to a terrestrial life style related to respiration, reproduction, development, circulation, ion and water balance. In addition, sensory systems that function in air instead of in water are essential for an animal's life on land. Besides vision and mechanosensory systems, on land, the chemical senses have to be modified substantially in comparison to their function in water. Among arthropods, insects are the most successful ones to evolve aerial olfaction. Various aspects of terrestrial adaptation have also been analyzed in those crustacean lineages that evolved terrestrial representatives including the taxa Anomala, Brachyura, Amphipoda, and Isopoda. We are interested in how the chemical senses of terrestrial crustaceans are modified to function in air. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed the brains and more specifically the structure of the olfactory system of representatives of brachyuran crabs that display different degrees of terrestriality, from exclusively marine to mainly terrestrial. The methods we used included immunohistochemistry, detection of autofluorescence- and confocal microscopy, as well as three-dimensional reconstruction and morphometry. Our comparative approach shows that both the peripheral and central olfactory pathways are reduced in terrestrial members in comparison to their marine relatives, suggesting a limited function of their olfactory system on land. We conclude that for arthropod lineages that invaded land, evolving aerial olfaction is no trivial task.

  10. Comparative analyses of olfactory systems in terrestrial crabs (Brachyura): evidence for aerial olfaction?

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Jakob; Braun, Philipp; Rivera, Nicole T.; Schubart, Christoph D.; Müller, Carsten H.G.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptations to a terrestrial lifestyle occurred convergently multiple times during the evolution of the arthropods. This holds also true for the “true crabs” (Brachyura), a taxon that includes several lineages that invaded land independently. During an evolutionary transition from sea to land, animals have to develop a variety of physiological and anatomical adaptations to a terrestrial life style related to respiration, reproduction, development, circulation, ion and water balance. In addition, sensory systems that function in air instead of in water are essential for an animal’s life on land. Besides vision and mechanosensory systems, on land, the chemical senses have to be modified substantially in comparison to their function in water. Among arthropods, insects are the most successful ones to evolve aerial olfaction. Various aspects of terrestrial adaptation have also been analyzed in those crustacean lineages that evolved terrestrial representatives including the taxa Anomala, Brachyura, Amphipoda, and Isopoda. We are interested in how the chemical senses of terrestrial crustaceans are modified to function in air. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed the brains and more specifically the structure of the olfactory system of representatives of brachyuran crabs that display different degrees of terrestriality, from exclusively marine to mainly terrestrial. The methods we used included immunohistochemistry, detection of autofluorescence- and confocal microscopy, as well as three-dimensional reconstruction and morphometry. Our comparative approach shows that both the peripheral and central olfactory pathways are reduced in terrestrial members in comparison to their marine relatives, suggesting a limited function of their olfactory system on land. We conclude that for arthropod lineages that invaded land, evolving aerial olfaction is no trivial task. PMID:26713228

  11. Trade-off between information format and capacity in the olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Aldworth, Zane N; Stopfer, Mark A

    2015-01-28

    As information about the sensory environment passes between layers within the nervous system, the format of the information often changes. To examine how information format affects the capacity of neurons to represent stimuli, we measured the rate of information transmission in olfactory neurons in intact, awake locusts (Schistocerca americana) while pharmacologically manipulating patterns of correlated neuronal activity. Blocking the periodic inhibition underlying odor-elicited neural oscillatory synchronization increased information transmission rates. This suggests oscillatory synchrony, which serves other information processing roles, comes at a cost to the speed with which neurons can transmit information. Our results provide an example of a trade-off between benefits and costs in neural information processing.

  12. Chemosensory signals and their receptors in the olfactory neural system.

    PubMed

    Ihara, S; Yoshikawa, K; Touhara, K

    2013-12-19

    Chemical communication is widely used among various organisms to obtain essential information from their environment required for life. Although a large variety of molecules have been shown to act as chemical cues, the molecular and neural basis underlying the behaviors elicited by these molecules has been revealed for only a limited number of molecules. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the signaling molecules whose flow from receptor to specific behavior has been characterized. Discussing the molecules utilized by mice, insects, and the worm, we focus on how each organism has optimized its reception system to suit its living style. We also highlight how the production of these signaling molecules is regulated, an area in which considerable progress has been recently made.

  13. Viral infection and dissemination through the olfactory pathway and the limbic system by Theiler's virus.

    PubMed

    Wada, Y; Fujinami, R S

    1993-07-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection of mice can produce a biphasic disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Most susceptible strains of mice survive the acute infection and develop a chronic demyelinating disease. In this report, we analyzed the routes of spread of TMEV within the CNS of nude mice and target sites eventually infected in the CNS. Compared to the immunocompetent mouse, in which an antiviral immune response is mounted but virus persists, the nude mouse develops a severe encephalomyelitis due to the lack of functional T lymphocytes and provides a useful model for the study of viral dissemination. We demonstrated, by immunohistochemistry, the presence of viral antigen in defined regions of the CNS, corresponding to various structures of the limbic system. In addition, we found a different time course for viral spread using two different sites of intracerebral inoculation, ie, via the olfactory bulb or the cortex. Limbic structures were rapidly infected following olfactory bulb infection and then showed a decrease in viral load, presumably due to loss of target neurons. Using either route of infection, the virus was able to disseminate to similar regions. These results indicate that limbic structures and their connections are very important for the spread of TMEV in the brain. In the spinal cord, not only neuronal but hematogenous pathways were suspected to be involved in the dissemination of Theiler's virus.

  14. Viral infection and dissemination through the olfactory pathway and the limbic system by Theiler's virus.

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Y.; Fujinami, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection of mice can produce a biphasic disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Most susceptible strains of mice survive the acute infection and develop a chronic demyelinating disease. In this report, we analyzed the routes of spread of TMEV within the CNS of nude mice and target sites eventually infected in the CNS. Compared to the immunocompetent mouse, in which an antiviral immune response is mounted but virus persists, the nude mouse develops a severe encephalomyelitis due to the lack of functional T lymphocytes and provides a useful model for the study of viral dissemination. We demonstrated, by immunohistochemistry, the presence of viral antigen in defined regions of the CNS, corresponding to various structures of the limbic system. In addition, we found a different time course for viral spread using two different sites of intracerebral inoculation, ie, via the olfactory bulb or the cortex. Limbic structures were rapidly infected following olfactory bulb infection and then showed a decrease in viral load, presumably due to loss of target neurons. Using either route of infection, the virus was able to disseminate to similar regions. These results indicate that limbic structures and their connections are very important for the spread of TMEV in the brain. In the spinal cord, not only neuronal but hematogenous pathways were suspected to be involved in the dissemination of Theiler's virus. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8317548

  15. An Investigation on the Role of Spike Latency in an Artificial Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Eugenio; Polese, Davide; Dini, Francesca; Paolesse, Roberto; Filippini, Daniel; Lundström, Ingemar; Di Natale, Corrado

    2011-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that the reactions to external stimuli may appear only few hundreds of milliseconds after the physical interaction of the stimulus with the proper receptor. This behavior suggests that neurons transmit the largest meaningful part of their signal in the first spikes, and than that the spike latency is a good descriptor of the information content in biological neural networks. In this paper this property has been investigated in an artificial sensorial system where a single layer of spiking neurons is trained with the data generated by an artificial olfactory platform based on a large array of chemical sensors. The capability to discriminate between distinct chemicals and mixtures of them was studied with spiking neural networks endowed with and without lateral inhibitions and considering as output feature of the network both the spikes latency and the average firing rate. Results show that the average firing rate of the output spikes sequences shows the best separation among the experienced vapors, however the latency code is able in a shorter time to correctly discriminate all the tested volatile compounds. This behavior is qualitatively similar to those recently found in natural olfaction, and noteworthy it provides practical suggestions to tail the measurement conditions of artificial olfactory systems defining for each specific case a proper measurement time. PMID:22194721

  16. Olfactory bulb and retrobulbar regions in the hedgehog tenrec: organization and interconnections.

    PubMed

    Radtke-Schuller, S; Künzle, H

    2000-08-01

    The Madagascan lesser hedgehog tenrec (Echinops telfairi) is a terrestrial, nocturnal insectivore with a low encephalization index and a huge olfactory bulb. To gain insight into the organization and evolution of olfactory regions in placental mammals, the cytoarchitecture (Nissl), neurochemical attributes [zinc and acetylcholinesterase stain, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPh)-diaphorase, and calcium-binding proteins], and interconnections (injections of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase and biotinylated dextran amine) of tenrec bulbar and retrobulbar regions were examined. The tenrec has a well-laminated main olfactory bulb, and modified (atypical) glomeruli are found that, to date, have been demonstrated only in murine rodents. Compared with the main olfactory bulb, the accessory bulb is relatively small, with clearly different staining characteristics, particularly with respect to NADPh-diaphorase, anticalbindin, and anticalretinin. External and central anterior olfactory nuclei also show characteristic cytoarchitectural and chemoarchitectural features. The medial olfactory peduncle seems to differ considerably from that in rodents. A small taenial structure can be separated from the hippocampal continuation. This taenia tecti presumably corresponds to the superior part of the tenia tecti in rodents, but no homologue of the rodent's prominent inferior taenia tecti could be found. The connections of bulbar and retrobulbar regions are similar to those seen in other mammals. Interbulbar projection systems connect the two olfactory bulbs through an external (topographic) and central (nontopographic) anterior nucleus; however, the topographic arrangement of the intrabulbar association system seems to differ from that seen in rodents. A reciprocity of direct olfactory bulb connections with the frontal (sulcal/orbital) cortex was found in the tenrec that has not been reported so far in other species.

  17. Similar increases in extracellular lactic acid in the limbic system during epileptic and/or olfactory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fornai, F; Bassi, L; Gesi, M; Giorgi, F S; Guerrini, R; Bonaccorsi, I; Alessandrì, M G

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that physiological stimulation of brain activity increases anaerobic glucose consumption, both in humans and in experimental animals. To investigate this phenomenon further, we measured extracellular lactate levels within different rat brain regions, using microdialysis. Experiments were performed comparing the effects of natural, physiological olfactory stimulation of the limbic system with experimental limbic seizures. Olfactory stimulation was carried out by using different odors (i.e. both conventional odors: 2-isobutyl-3-methoxypyrazine, green pepper essence; thymol; and 2-sec-butylthiazoline, a sexual pheromone). Limbic seizures were either induced by systemic injection of pilocarpine (200-400 mg/kg) or focally elicited by microinfusions of chemoconvulsants (bicuculline 118 pmol and cychlothiazide 1.2 nmol) within the anterior piriform cortex. Seizures induced by systemic pilocarpine tripled lactic acid within the hippocampus, whereas limbic seizures elicited by focal microinfusion of chemoconvulsants within the piriform cortex produced a less pronounced increase in extracellular lactic acid. Increases in extracellular lactate occurring during olfactory stimulation with the sexual pheromone (three times the baseline levels) were non-significantly different from those occurring after systemic pilocarpine. Increases in lactic acid following natural olfactory stimulation were abolished both by olfactory bulbectomy and by the focal microinfusion of tetrodotoxin, while they were significantly attenuated by the local application of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist AP-5. Increases in hippocampal lactate induced by short-lasting stimuli (olfactory stimulation or microinfusion of subthreshold doses of chemoconvulsants, bicuculline 30 pmol) were reproducible after a short delay (1 h) and cumulated when applied sequentially. In contrast, limbic status epilepticus led to a long-lasting refractoriness to additional lactate-raising stimuli

  18. 14 CFR 27.1163 - Powerplant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... involved; (2) Use the provisions on the engine for mounting; and (3) Be sealed in such a way as to prevent contamination of the engine oil system and the accessory system. (b) Unless other means are provided, torque... drive system to prevent damage to these components from excessive accessory load. Powerplant...

  19. 14 CFR 27.1163 - Powerplant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... involved; (2) Use the provisions on the engine for mounting; and (3) Be sealed in such a way as to prevent contamination of the engine oil system and the accessory system. (b) Unless other means are provided, torque... drive system to prevent damage to these components from excessive accessory load. Powerplant...

  20. Functional Rehabilitation of Cadmium-Induced Neurotoxicity Despite Persistent Peripheral Pathophysiology in the Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecki, Lindsey A.; Moberly, Andrew H.; Turkel, Daniel J.; Rubinstein, Tom; Pottackal, Joseph; Rosenthal, Michelle C.; McCandlish, Elizabeth F. K.; Buckley, Brian; McGann, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Intranasal exposure to the heavy metal cadmium has been linked to olfactory dysfunction and neurotoxicity. Here, we combine optical imaging of in vivo neurophysiology, genetically defined anatomical tract tracing, mass spectrometry, and behavioral psychophysical methods to evaluate the persistent harmful effects of acute intranasal exposure to cadmium in a mouse model and to investigate the functional consequences of sensory rehabilitation training. We find that an acute intranasal instillation of cadmium chloride leads to an accumulation of cadmium in the brain's olfactory bulb that persists for at least 4 weeks. This is accompanied by persistent severe pathophysiology of the olfactory nerve, a gradual reduction in axonal projections from the olfactory epithelium, and complete impairment on an olfactory detection task. Remarkably, 2 weeks of odorant-guided operant conditioning training proved sufficient to restore olfactory detection performance to control levels in cadmium-exposed mice. Optical imaging from rehabilitated mice showed that this training did not cause any detectable restoration of olfactory nerve function, suggesting that the recovery of function was mediated by central neuroplasticity in which the brain learned to interpret the degraded sensory input. These data demonstrate that sensory learning can mask even severe damage from neurotoxicants and suggest that explicit sensory training may be useful in rehabilitation of olfactory dysfunction. PMID:22287023

  1. Trade-Off between Information Format and Capacity in the Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Stopfer, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    As information about the sensory environment passes between layers within the nervous system, the format of the information often changes. To examine how information format affects the capacity of neurons to represent stimuli, we measured the rate of information transmission in olfactory neurons in intact, awake locusts (Schistocerca americana) while pharmacologically manipulating patterns of correlated neuronal activity. Blocking the periodic inhibition underlying odor-elicited neural oscillatory synchronization increased information transmission rates. This suggests oscillatory synchrony, which serves other information processing roles, comes at a cost to the speed with which neurons can transmit information. Our results provide an example of a trade-off between benefits and costs in neural information processing. PMID:25632129

  2. Impaired sense of smell and altered olfactory system in RAG-1−∕− immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Rattazzi, Lorenza; Cariboni, Anna; Poojara, Ridhika; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; D'Acquisto, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    Immune deficiencies are often associated with a number of physical manifestations including loss of sense of smell and an increased level of anxiety. We have previously shown that T and B cell-deficient recombinase activating gene (RAG-1)−∕− knockout mice have an increased level of anxiety-like behavior and altered gene expression involved in olfaction. In this study, we expanded these findings by testing the structure and functional development of the olfactory system in RAG-1−∕− mice. Our results show that these mice have a reduced engagement in different types of odors and this phenotype is associated with disorganized architecture of glomerular tissue and atrophy of the main olfactory epithelium. Most intriguingly this defect manifests specifically in adult age and is not due to impairment in the patterning of the olfactory neuron staining at the embryo stage. Together these findings provide a formerly unreported biological evidence for an altered function of the olfactory system in RAG-1−∕− mice. PMID:26441494

  3. Anatomy, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry of the olfactory subsystems in mice

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Arthur W.; Núñez, Gonzalo; Sánchez Quinteiro, Pablo; Salazar, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    The four regions of the murine nasal cavity featuring olfactory neurons were studied anatomically and by labeling with lectins and relevant antibodies with a view to establishing criteria for the identification of olfactory subsystems that are readily applicable to other mammals. In the main olfactory epithelium and the septal organ the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are embedded in quasi-stratified columnar epithelium; vomeronasal OSNs are embedded in epithelium lining the medial interior wall of the vomeronasal duct and do not make contact with the mucosa of the main nasal cavity; and in Grüneberg's ganglion a small isolated population of OSNs lies adjacent to, but not within, the epithelium. With the exception of Grüneberg's ganglion, all the tissues expressing olfactory marker protein (OMP) (the above four nasal territories, the vomeronasal and main olfactory nerves, and the main and accessory olfactory bulbs) are also labeled by Lycopersicum esculentum agglutinin, while Ulex europaeus agglutinin I labels all and only tissues expressing Gαi2 (the apical sensory neurons of the vomeronasal organ, their axons, and their glomerular destinations in the anterior accessory olfactory bulb). These staining patterns of UEA-I and LEA may facilitate the characterization of olfactory anatomy in other species. A 710-section atlas of the anatomy of the murine nasal cavity has been made available on line. PMID:25071468

  4. The Laser Accessory Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Ashvin

    1988-09-01

    Wandering through the exhibit hall yesterday, I noticed that if you look at the laser companies and if you look at the accessory companies, there are pretty much the same number of accessory booths as well as the laser companies. There was one difference. Laser company booths are all sexy looking, very flashy, big booths. Whereas if you look at the accessories booths, they were small, not so prominent.

  5. Advantages of reusable accessories.

    PubMed

    Wolfsen, H C

    2000-04-01

    Despite scant evidence supporting the use of disposable accessories, these devices have been widely disseminated. Manufacturers and governmental regulators, the most devout proponents of one-time use accessories, have framed the issue in economic terms-parsimonious practitioners reusing disposable accessories at the risk of cross-contamination, mechanical failure and product liability. This simplistic view represents revisionist history and ignores the long tradition of reusing these devices. This article reviews the numerous studies that support the safe and cost effective reuse of disposable and reusable accessories.

  6. 14 CFR 25.1192 - Engine accessory section diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine accessory section diaphragm. 25.1192....1192 Engine accessory section diaphragm. For reciprocating engines, the engine power section and all portions of the exhaust system must be isolated from the engine accessory compartment by a diaphragm...

  7. 14 CFR 25.1192 - Engine accessory section diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engine accessory section diaphragm. 25.1192....1192 Engine accessory section diaphragm. For reciprocating engines, the engine power section and all portions of the exhaust system must be isolated from the engine accessory compartment by a diaphragm...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1192 - Engine accessory section diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engine accessory section diaphragm. 25.1192....1192 Engine accessory section diaphragm. For reciprocating engines, the engine power section and all portions of the exhaust system must be isolated from the engine accessory compartment by a diaphragm...

  9. 14 CFR 25.1192 - Engine accessory section diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine accessory section diaphragm. 25.1192....1192 Engine accessory section diaphragm. For reciprocating engines, the engine power section and all portions of the exhaust system must be isolated from the engine accessory compartment by a diaphragm...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1192 - Engine accessory section diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine accessory section diaphragm. 25.1192....1192 Engine accessory section diaphragm. For reciprocating engines, the engine power section and all portions of the exhaust system must be isolated from the engine accessory compartment by a diaphragm...

  11. Maternal Olfactory Cues Synchronize the Circadian System of Artificially Raised Newborn Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Montúfar-Chaveznava, Rodrigo; Trejo-Muñoz, Lucero; Hernández-Campos, Oscar; Navarrete, Erika; Caldelas, Ivette

    2013-01-01

    In European newborn rabbits, once-daily nursing acts as a strong non-photic entraining cue for the pre-visual circadian system. Nevertheless, there is a lack of information regarding which of the non-photic cues are capable of modulating pup circadian system. In this study, for the first time, we determined that the mammary pheromone 2-methylbut-2-enal (2MB2) presented in the maternal milk acts as a non-photic entraining cue. We evaluated the effect of once-daily exposure to maternal olfactory cues on the temporal pattern of core body temperature, gross locomotor activity and metabolic variables (liver weight, serum glucose, triacylglycerides, free fatty acids, cholecystokinin and cholesterol levels) in newborn rabbits. Rabbit pups were separated from their mothers from postnatal day 1 (P1) to P8 and were randomly assigned to one of the following conditions: nursed by a lactating doe (NAT); exposed to a 3-min pulse of maternal milk (M-Milk), mammary pheromone (2MB2), or water (H2O). To eliminate maternal stimulation, the pups of the last three groups were artificially fed once every 24-h. On P8, the rabbits were sacrificed at different times of the day. In temperature and activity, the NAT, M-Milk and 2MB2 groups exhibited clear diurnal rhythmicity with a conspicuous anticipatory rise hours prior to nursing. In contrast, the H2O group exhibited atypical rhythmicity in both parameters, lacking the anticipatory component. At the metabolic level, all of the groups exhibited a diurnal pattern with similar phases in liver weight and metabolites examined. The results obtained in this study suggest that during pre-visual stages of development, the circadian system of newborn rabbits is sensitive to the maternal olfactory cues contained in milk, indicating that these cues function as non-photic entraining signals mainly for the central oscillators regulating the expression of temperature and behavior, whereas in metabolic diurnal rhythmicity, these cues lack an effect

  12. Maternal olfactory cues synchronize the circadian system of artificially raised newborn rabbits.

    PubMed

    Montúfar-Chaveznava, Rodrigo; Trejo-Muñoz, Lucero; Hernández-Campos, Oscar; Navarrete, Erika; Caldelas, Ivette

    2013-01-01

    In European newborn rabbits, once-daily nursing acts as a strong non-photic entraining cue for the pre-visual circadian system. Nevertheless, there is a lack of information regarding which of the non-photic cues are capable of modulating pup circadian system. In this study, for the first time, we determined that the mammary pheromone 2-methylbut-2-enal (2MB2) presented in the maternal milk acts as a non-photic entraining cue. We evaluated the effect of once-daily exposure to maternal olfactory cues on the temporal pattern of core body temperature, gross locomotor activity and metabolic variables (liver weight, serum glucose, triacylglycerides, free fatty acids, cholecystokinin and cholesterol levels) in newborn rabbits. Rabbit pups were separated from their mothers from postnatal day 1 (P1) to P8 and were randomly assigned to one of the following conditions: nursed by a lactating doe (NAT); exposed to a 3-min pulse of maternal milk (M-Milk), mammary pheromone (2MB2), or water (H₂O). To eliminate maternal stimulation, the pups of the last three groups were artificially fed once every 24-h. On P8, the rabbits were sacrificed at different times of the day. In temperature and activity, the NAT, M-Milk and 2MB2 groups exhibited clear diurnal rhythmicity with a conspicuous anticipatory rise hours prior to nursing. In contrast, the H₂O group exhibited atypical rhythmicity in both parameters, lacking the anticipatory component. At the metabolic level, all of the groups exhibited a diurnal pattern with similar phases in liver weight and metabolites examined. The results obtained in this study suggest that during pre-visual stages of development, the circadian system of newborn rabbits is sensitive to the maternal olfactory cues contained in milk, indicating that these cues function as non-photic entraining signals mainly for the central oscillators regulating the expression of temperature and behavior, whereas in metabolic diurnal rhythmicity, these cues lack an effect

  13. Olfactory Learning in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Busto, Germain U.; Cervantes-Sandoval, Isaac; Davis, Ronald L.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of olfactory learning in Drosophila have provided key insights into the brain mechanisms underlying learning and memory. One type of olfactory learning, olfactory classical conditioning, consists of learning the contingency between an odor with an aversive or appetitive stimulus. This conditioning requires the activity of molecules that can integrate the two types of sensory information, the odorant as the conditioned stimulus and the aversive or appetitive stimulus as the unconditioned stimulus, in brain regions where the neural pathways for the two stimuli intersect. Compelling data indicate that a particular form of adenylyl cyclase functions as a molecular integrator of the sensory information in the mushroom body neurons. The neuronal pathway carrying the olfactory information from the antennal lobes to the mushroom body is well described. Accumulating data now show that some dopaminergic neurons provide information about aversive stimuli and octopaminergic neurons about appetitive stimuli to the mushroom body neurons. Inhibitory inputs from the GABAergic system appear to gate olfactory information to the mushroom bodies and thus control the ability to learn about odors. Emerging data obtained by functional imaging procedures indicate that distinct memory traces form in different brain regions and correlate with different phases of memory. The results from these and other experiments also indicate that cross talk between mushroom bodies and several other brain regions is critical for memory formation. PMID:21186278

  14. Connectivity of Pathology: The Olfactory System as a Model for Network-Driven Mechanisms of Alzheimer’s Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Katherine H.; Chuah, Meng Inn; King, Anna E.; Vickers, James C.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been postulated to preferentially impact specific neural networks in the brain. The olfactory system is a well-defined network that has been implicated in early stages of the disease, marked by impairment in olfaction and the presence of pathological hallmarks of the disease, even before clinical presentation. Discovering the cellular mechanisms involved in the connectivity of pathology will provide insight into potential targets for treatment. We review evidence from animal studies on sensory alteration through denervation or enrichment, which supports the notion of using the olfactory system to investigate the implications of connectivity and activity in the spread of pathology in AD. PMID:26696886

  15. Homeobox gene distal-less is required for neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth in the Drosophila olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Plavicki, Jessica; Mader, Sara; Pueschel, Eric; Peebles, Patrick; Boekhoff-Falk, Grace

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate Dlx genes have been implicated in the differentiation of multiple neuronal subtypes, including cortical GABAergic interneurons, and mutations in Dlx genes have been linked to clinical conditions such as epilepsy and autism. Here we show that the single Drosophila Dlx homolog, distal-less, is required both to specify chemosensory neurons and to regulate the morphologies of their axons and dendrites. We establish that distal-less is necessary for development of the mushroom body, a brain region that processes olfactory information. These are important examples of distal-less function in an invertebrate nervous system and demonstrate that the Drosophila larval olfactory system is a powerful model in which to understand distal-less functions during neurogenesis. PMID:22307614

  16. Synaptic inhibition controls transient oscillatory synchronization in a model of the insect olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Assisi, Collins; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2011-01-01

    In a variety of neuronal systems it has been hypothesized that inhibitory interneurons corral principal neurons into synchronously firing groups that encode sensory information and sub-serve behavior (Buzsáki and Chrobak, 1995; Buzsáki, 2008). This mechanism is particularly relevant to the olfactory system where spatiotemporal patterns of projection neuron (PN) activity act as robust markers of odor attributes (Laurent et al., 1996; Wehr and Laurent, 1996). In the insect antennal lobe (AL), a network of local inhibitory interneurons arborizes extensively throughout the AL (Leitch and Laurent, 1996) providing inhibitory input to the cholinergic PNs. Our theoretical work has attempted to elaborate the exact role of inhibition in the generation of odor specific PN responses (Bazhenov et al., 2001a,b; Assisi et al., 2011). In large-scale AL network models we characterized the inhibitory sub-network by its coloring (Assisi et al., 2011) and showed that it can entrain excitatory PNs to the odor specific patterns of transient synchronization. In this focused review, we further examine the dynamics of entrainment in more detail by simulating simple model networks in various parameter regimes. Our simulations in conjunction with earlier studies point to the key role played by lateral (between inhibitory interneurons) and feedback (from inhibitory interneurons to principal cells) inhibition in the generation of experimentally observed patterns of transient synchrony. PMID:22529800

  17. Specific projection of displaced retinal ganglion cells upon the accessory optic system in the pigeon (Columbia livia).

    PubMed

    Karten, J H; Fite, K V; Brecha, N

    1977-04-01

    In the pigeon, the nucleus of the basal optic root, a component of the accessory optic system, projects directly upon the vestibulo-cerebellum. This nucleus receives a prominent projection composed of large-diameter retinal axons, known as the basal optic root. The cells of origin of this tract were identified using horseradish peroxidase (donor:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.11.1.7) as a retrograde marker. Injections of horseradish peroxidase confined primarily to the basal optic root nucleus labeled displaced ganglion cells of the contralateral retina. Cell sizes were 18-30 micronm and the dendrites of these cells were confined to the first stratum of the inner plexiform layer. Approximately 3700 displaced ganglion cells were labeled after injections of horseradish peroxidase into basal optic root. In contrast, no displaced ganglion cells were labeled after injections of horseradish peroxidase into the optic tectum, which labeled only cells in the ganglion cell layer proper. These findings indicate that displaced ganglion cells constitute a unique population of retinal neurons that give rise to a bisynaptic pathway directed to the cerebellum via the nucleus of the basal optic root. These displaced ganglion cells may play a major role inoculomotor reflexes.

  18. Retinal ganglion cells projecting to the accessory optic system in optokinetic blind albinotic rats are direction-selective.

    PubMed

    Krause, Martin; Distler, Claudia; Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter

    2014-07-01

    The optokinetic deficits in albinotic rats and ferrets are caused by the loss of direction selectivity in the accessory optic system (AOS). However, the underlying mechanisms for this loss are still not clear. Here we tested the hypothesis that, in albino rats, the retinal input to the AOS lacks direction selectivity and, as a consequence, neurons in the AOS are direction non-selective. We investigated ON-center direction-selective retinal ganglion cells, the major input to the AOS, in pigmented Long Evans and albino Wistar rats using extracellular in vitro patch-clamp techniques. To visualise putative AOS-projecting direction-selective ganglion cells, we retrogradely labeled them by injection of the infrared-sensitive dye indocyanine green into the medial terminal nucleus of the AOS. The present study is the first to present physiological evidence for retinal ON-center direction-selective ganglion cells in rat. Our results show that, in albinotic and pigmented rats, ON-center retinal ganglion cells projecting to the AOS are similarly direction-selective, suggesting that the optokinetic deficit must be caused by the abolition of direction selectivity in the AOS itself. PMID:24698401

  19. Learning about the functions of the olfactory system from people without a sense of smell.

    PubMed

    Croy, Ilona; Negoias, Simona; Novakova, Lenka; Landis, Basile N; Hummel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The olfactory system provides numerous functions to humans, influencing ingestive behavior, awareness of environmental hazards and social communication. Approximately 1/5 of the general population exhibit an impaired sense of smell. However, in contrast to the many affected, only few patients complain of their impairment. So how important is it for humans to have an intact sense of smell? Or is it even dispensable, at least in the Western world? To investigate this, we compared 32 patients, who were born without a sense of smell (isolated congenital anosmia--ICA) with 36 age-matched controls. A broad questionnaire was used, containing domains relevant to olfaction in daily life, along with a questionnaire about social relationships and the BDI-questionnaire. ICA-patients differed only slightly from controls in functions of daily life related to olfaction. These differences included enhanced social insecurity, increased risk for depressive symptoms and increased risk for household accidents. In these domains the sense of olfaction seems to play a key role.

  20. A spiking neural network model of self-organized pattern recognition in the early mammalian olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Bernhard A; Lansner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory sensory information passes through several processing stages before an odor percept emerges. The question how the olfactory system learns to create odor representations linking those different levels and how it learns to connect and discriminate between them is largely unresolved. We present a large-scale network model with single and multi-compartmental Hodgkin-Huxley type model neurons representing olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in the epithelium, periglomerular cells, mitral/tufted cells and granule cells in the olfactory bulb (OB), and three types of cortical cells in the piriform cortex (PC). Odor patterns are calculated based on affinities between ORNs and odor stimuli derived from physico-chemical descriptors of behaviorally relevant real-world odorants. The properties of ORNs were tuned to show saturated response curves with increasing concentration as seen in experiments. On the level of the OB we explored the possibility of using a fuzzy concentration interval code, which was implemented through dendro-dendritic inhibition leading to winner-take-all like dynamics between mitral/tufted cells belonging to the same glomerulus. The connectivity from mitral/tufted cells to PC neurons was self-organized from a mutual information measure and by using a competitive Hebbian-Bayesian learning algorithm based on the response patterns of mitral/tufted cells to different odors yielding a distributed feed-forward projection to the PC. The PC was implemented as a modular attractor network with a recurrent connectivity that was likewise organized through Hebbian-Bayesian learning. We demonstrate the functionality of the model in a one-sniff-learning and recognition task on a set of 50 odorants. Furthermore, we study its robustness against noise on the receptor level and its ability to perform concentration invariant odor recognition. Moreover, we investigate the pattern completion capabilities of the system and rivalry dynamics for odor mixtures. PMID

  1. A spiking neural network model of self-organized pattern recognition in the early mammalian olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Bernhard A.; Lansner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory sensory information passes through several processing stages before an odor percept emerges. The question how the olfactory system learns to create odor representations linking those different levels and how it learns to connect and discriminate between them is largely unresolved. We present a large-scale network model with single and multi-compartmental Hodgkin–Huxley type model neurons representing olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in the epithelium, periglomerular cells, mitral/tufted cells and granule cells in the olfactory bulb (OB), and three types of cortical cells in the piriform cortex (PC). Odor patterns are calculated based on affinities between ORNs and odor stimuli derived from physico-chemical descriptors of behaviorally relevant real-world odorants. The properties of ORNs were tuned to show saturated response curves with increasing concentration as seen in experiments. On the level of the OB we explored the possibility of using a fuzzy concentration interval code, which was implemented through dendro-dendritic inhibition leading to winner-take-all like dynamics between mitral/tufted cells belonging to the same glomerulus. The connectivity from mitral/tufted cells to PC neurons was self-organized from a mutual information measure and by using a competitive Hebbian–Bayesian learning algorithm based on the response patterns of mitral/tufted cells to different odors yielding a distributed feed-forward projection to the PC. The PC was implemented as a modular attractor network with a recurrent connectivity that was likewise organized through Hebbian–Bayesian learning. We demonstrate the functionality of the model in a one-sniff-learning and recognition task on a set of 50 odorants. Furthermore, we study its robustness against noise on the receptor level and its ability to perform concentration invariant odor recognition. Moreover, we investigate the pattern completion capabilities of the system and rivalry dynamics for odor mixtures. PMID

  2. Convergence of olfactory and vomeronasal projections in the rat basal telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Pro-Sistiaga, Palma; Mohedano-Moriano, Alicia; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Del Mar Arroyo-Jimenez, Maria; Marcos, Pilar; Artacho-Pérula, Emilio; Crespo, Carlos; Insausti, Ricardo; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2007-10-01

    Olfactory and vomeronasal projections have been traditionally viewed as terminating in contiguous non-overlapping areas of the basal telencephalon. Original reports, however, described areas such as the anterior medial amygdala where both chemosensory afferents appeared to overlap. We addressed this issue by injecting dextran amines in the main or accessory olfactory bulbs of rats and the results were analyzed with light and electron microscopes. Simultaneous injections of different fluorescent dextran amines in the main and accessory olfactory bulbs were performed and the results were analyzed using confocal microscopy. Similar experiments with dextran amines in the olfactory bulbs plus FluoroGold in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis indicate that neurons projecting through the stria terminalis could be integrating olfactory and vomeronasal inputs. Retrograde tracing experiments using FluoroGold or dextran amines confirm that areas of the rostral basal telencephalon receive inputs from both the main and accessory olfactory bulbs. While both inputs clearly converge in areas classically considered olfactory-recipient (nucleus of the lateral olfactory tract, anterior cortical amygdaloid nucleus, and cortex-amygdala transition zone) or vomeronasal-recipient (ventral anterior amygdala, bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract, and anteroventral medial amygdaloid nucleus), segregation is virtually complete at posterior levels such as the posteromedial and posterolateral cortical amygdalae. This provides evidence that areas so far considered receiving a single chemosensory modality are likely sites for convergent direct olfactory and vomeronasal inputs. Therefore, areas of the basal telencephalon should be reclassified as olfactory, vomeronasal, or mixed chemosensory structures, which could facilitate understanding of olfactory-vomeronasal interactions in functional studies.

  3. Preliminary Modeling and Simulation Study on Olfactory Cell Sensation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Jun; Chen Peihua; Liu Qingjun; Wang Ping; Yang Wei

    2009-05-23

    This paper introduced olfactory sensory neuron's whole-cell model with a concrete voltage-gated ionic channels and simulation. Though there are many models in olfactory sensory neuron and olfactory bulb, it remains uncertain how they express the logic of olfactory information processing. In this article, the olfactory neural network model is also introduced. This model specifies the connections among neural ensembles of the olfactory system. The simulation results of the neural network model are consistent with the observed olfactory biological characteristics such as 1/f-type power spectrum and oscillations.

  4. Preliminary Modeling and Simulation Study on Olfactory Cell Sensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Yang, Wei; Chen, Peihua; Liu, Qingjun; Wang, Ping

    2009-05-01

    This paper introduced olfactory sensory neuron's whole-cell model with a concrete voltage-gated ionic channels and simulation. Though there are many models in olfactory sensory neuron and olfactory bulb, it remains uncertain how they express the logic of olfactory information processing. In this article, the olfactory neural network model is also introduced. This model specifies the connections among neural ensembles of the olfactory system. The simulation results of the neural network model are consistent with the observed olfactory biological characteristics such as 1/f-type power spectrum and oscillations.

  5. 75 FR 67634 - Parts and Accessories Necessary for Safe Operation: Antilock Brake Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ...: Antilock Brake Systems'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 57393). This direct final rule amends 49 CFR Part... for Safe Operation: Antilock Brake Systems AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, DOT... Necessary for Safe Operation: Antilock Brake Systems,'' published on September 21, 2010, in the...

  6. Trpc2 is expressed in two olfactory subsystems, the main and the vomeronasal system of larval Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Alfredo; Syed, Adnan S.; Tantalaki, Evangelia; Korsching, Sigrun I.; Manzini, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Complete segregation of the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal epithelium is first observed in amphibians. In contrast, teleost fishes possess a single olfactory surface, in which genetic components of the main and vomeronasal olfactory systems are intermingled. The transient receptor potential channel TRPC2, a marker of vomeronasal neurons, is present in the single fish sensory surface, but is already restricted to the vomeronasal epithelium in a terrestrial amphibian, the red-legged salamander (Plethodon shermani). Here we examined the localization of TRPC2 in an aquatic amphibian and cloned the Xenopus laevis trpc2 gene. We show that it is expressed in both the MOE and the vomeronasal epithelium. This is the first description of a broad trpc2 expression in the MOE of a tetrapod. The expression pattern of trpc2 in the MOE is virtually undistinguishable from that of MOE-specific v2rs, indicating that they are co-expressed in the same neuronal subpopulation. PMID:24737764

  7. Functional neurology of a brain system: a 3D olfactory bulb model to process natural odorants.

    PubMed

    Migliore, Michele; Cavarretta, Francesco; Hines, Michael L; Shepherd, Gordon M

    2013-01-01

    The network of interactions between mitral and granule cells in the olfactory bulb is a critical step in the processing of odor information underlying the neural basis of smell perception. We are building the first computational model in 3 dimensions of this network in order to analyze the rules for connectivity and function within it. The initial results indicate that this network can be modeled to simulate experimental results on the activation of the olfactory bulb by natural odorants, providing a much more powerful approach for 3D simulation of brain neurons and microcircuits.

  8. Olfactory receptor neuron profiling using sandalwood odorants.

    PubMed

    Bieri, Stephan; Monastyrskaia, Katherine; Schilling, Boris

    2004-07-01

    The mammalian olfactory system can discriminate between volatile molecules with subtle differences in their molecular structures. Efforts in synthetic chemistry have delivered a myriad of smelling compounds of different qualities as well as many molecules with very similar olfactive properties. One important class of molecules in the fragrance industry are sandalwood odorants. Sandalwood oil and four synthetic sandalwood molecules were selected to study the activation profile of endogenous olfactory receptors when exposed to compounds from the same odorant family. Dissociated rat olfactory receptor neurons were exposed to the sandalwood molecules and the receptor activation studied by monitoring fluxes in the internal calcium concentration. Olfactory receptor neurons were identified that were specifically stimulated by sandalwood compounds. These neurons expressed olfactory receptors that can discriminate between sandalwood odorants with slight differences in their molecular structures. This is the first study in which an important class of perfume compounds was analyzed for its ability to activate endogenous olfactory receptors in olfactory receptor neurons.

  9. Development of the main olfactory system and main olfactory epithelium-dependent male mating behavior are altered in Go-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Mi; Kim, Sung-Soo; Choi, Chan-Il; Cha, Hye Lim; Oh, Huy-Hyen; Ghil, Sungho; Lee, Young-Don; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung

    2016-09-27

    In mammals, initial detection of olfactory stimuli is mediated by sensory neurons in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO). The heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein Go is widely expressed in the MOE and VNO of mice. Early studies indicated that Go expression in VNO sensory neurons is critical for directing social and sexual behaviors in female mice [Oboti L, et al. (2014) BMC Biol 12:31]. However, the physiological functions of Go in the MOE have remained poorly defined. Here, we examined the role of Go in the MOE using mice lacking the α subunit of Go Development of the olfactory bulb (OB) was perturbed in mutant mice as a result of reduced neurogenesis and increased cell death. The balance between cell types of OB interneurons was altered in mutant mice, with an increase in the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive interneurons at the expense of calbindin-positive interneurons. Sexual behavior toward female mice and preference for female urine odors by olfactory sensory neurons in the MOE were abolished in mutant male mice. Our data suggest that Go signaling is essential for the structural and functional integrity of the MOE and for specification of OB interneurons, which in turn are required for the transmission of pheromone signals and the initiation of mating behavior with the opposite sex. PMID:27625425

  10. Development of the main olfactory system and main olfactory epithelium-dependent male mating behavior are altered in Go-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung-Mi; Kim, Sung-Soo; Choi, Chan-Il; Cha, Hye Lim; Oh, Huy-Hyen; Ghil, Sungho; Lee, Young-Don; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, initial detection of olfactory stimuli is mediated by sensory neurons in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO). The heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein Go is widely expressed in the MOE and VNO of mice. Early studies indicated that Go expression in VNO sensory neurons is critical for directing social and sexual behaviors in female mice [Oboti L, et al. (2014) BMC Biol 12:31]. However, the physiological functions of Go in the MOE have remained poorly defined. Here, we examined the role of Go in the MOE using mice lacking the α subunit of Go. Development of the olfactory bulb (OB) was perturbed in mutant mice as a result of reduced neurogenesis and increased cell death. The balance between cell types of OB interneurons was altered in mutant mice, with an increase in the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive interneurons at the expense of calbindin-positive interneurons. Sexual behavior toward female mice and preference for female urine odors by olfactory sensory neurons in the MOE were abolished in mutant male mice. Our data suggest that Go signaling is essential for the structural and functional integrity of the MOE and for specification of OB interneurons, which in turn are required for the transmission of pheromone signals and the initiation of mating behavior with the opposite sex. PMID:27625425

  11. Development of the main olfactory system and main olfactory epithelium-dependent male mating behavior are altered in Go-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Mi; Kim, Sung-Soo; Choi, Chan-Il; Cha, Hye Lim; Oh, Huy-Hyen; Ghil, Sungho; Lee, Young-Don; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung

    2016-09-27

    In mammals, initial detection of olfactory stimuli is mediated by sensory neurons in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO). The heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein Go is widely expressed in the MOE and VNO of mice. Early studies indicated that Go expression in VNO sensory neurons is critical for directing social and sexual behaviors in female mice [Oboti L, et al. (2014) BMC Biol 12:31]. However, the physiological functions of Go in the MOE have remained poorly defined. Here, we examined the role of Go in the MOE using mice lacking the α subunit of Go Development of the olfactory bulb (OB) was perturbed in mutant mice as a result of reduced neurogenesis and increased cell death. The balance between cell types of OB interneurons was altered in mutant mice, with an increase in the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive interneurons at the expense of calbindin-positive interneurons. Sexual behavior toward female mice and preference for female urine odors by olfactory sensory neurons in the MOE were abolished in mutant male mice. Our data suggest that Go signaling is essential for the structural and functional integrity of the MOE and for specification of OB interneurons, which in turn are required for the transmission of pheromone signals and the initiation of mating behavior with the opposite sex.

  12. Bacopa monnieri ameliorates memory deficits in olfactory bulbectomized mice: possible involvement of glutamatergic and cholinergic systems.

    PubMed

    Le, Xoan Thi; Pham, Hang Thi Nguyet; Do, Phuong Thi; Fujiwara, Hironori; Tanaka, Ken; Li, Feng; Van Nguyen, Tai; Nguyen, Khoi Minh; Matsumoto, Kinzo

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of alcoholic extract of Bacopa monnieri (L.) Wettst. (BM) on cognitive deficits using olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mice and the underlying molecular mechanisms of its action. OBX mice were treated daily with BM (50 mg/kg, p.o.) or a reference drug, tacrine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), 1 week before and continuously 3 days after OBX. Cognitive performance of the animals was analyzed by the novel object recognition test, modified Y maze test, and fear conditioning test. Brain tissues of OBX animals were used for neurochemical and immunohistochemical studies. OBX impaired non-spatial short-term memory, spatial working memory, and long-term fair memory. BM administration ameliorated these memory disturbances. The effect of BM on short-term memory deficits was abolished by a muscarinic receptor antagonist, scopolamine. OBX downregulated phosphorylation of synaptic plasticity-related signaling proteins: NR1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1), and calmodulin-dependent kinase II but not cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), and reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA in the hippocampus. OBX also reduced choline acetyltransferase in the hippocampus and cholinergic neurons in the medial septum, and enlarged the size of lateral ventricle. BM administration reversed these OBX-induced neurochemical and histological alterations, except the decrease of GluR1 phosphorylation, and enhanced CREB phosphorylation. Moreover, BM treatment inhibited ex vivo activity of acetylcholinesterase in the brain. These results indicate that BM treatment ameliorates OBX-induced cognition dysfunction via a mechanism involving enhancement of synaptic plasticity-related signaling and BDNF transcription and protection of cholinergic systems from OBX-induced neuronal damage.

  13. Insights into the olfactory system of the ectoparasite Caligus rogercresseyi: molecular characterization and gene transcription analysis of novel ionotropic receptors.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Acuña, Gustavo; Valenzuela-Muñoz, Valentina; Marambio, Jorge Pino; Wadsworth, Simon; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2014-10-01

    Although various elements of the olfactory system have been elucidated in insects, it remains practically unstudied in crustaceans at a molecular level. Among crustaceans, some species are classified as ectoparasites that impact the finfish aquaculture industry. Thus, there is an urgent need to identify and comprehend the signaling pathways used by these in host recognition. The present study, through RNA-seq and qPCR analyses, found novel transcripts involved in the olfactory system of Caligus rogercresseyi, in addition to the transcriptomic patterns expressed during different stages of salmon lice development. From a transcriptomic library generated by Illumina sequencing, contigs that annotated for ionotropic receptors and other genes implicated in the olfactory system were identified and extracted. Full length mRNA was obtained for the ionotropic glutamate receptor 25, which had 3923 bp, and for the glutamate receptor ionotropic kainate 2, which had 2737 bp. Furthermore, two other transcripts identified as glutamate receptor, ionotropic kainate 2-like were found. In silico analysis was performed for the transcription expression from different stages of development in C. rogercresseyi, and clusters according to RPKM values were constructed. Gene transcription data were validated through qPCR assays in ionotropic receptors, and showed an expression of glutamate receptor 25 associated with the copepodid stage whereas adults, especially male adults, were associated with the kainate 2 and kainate 2-like transcripts. Additionally, gene transcription analysis of the ionotropic receptors showed an overexpression in response to the presence of masking compounds and immunostimulant in salmon diets. This response correlated to a reduction in sea lice infection following in vivo challenge. Diets with masking compounds showed a decrease of lice infestation of up to 25%. This work contributes to the available knowledge on chemosensory systems in this ectoparasite, providing

  14. Distribution of centrifugal neurons targeting the soma clusters of the olfactory midbrain among decapod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M

    1997-03-28

    To determine the distribution of two systems of centrifugal neurons innervating the soma clusters of the olfactory midbrain across decapod crustaceans, brains of the following nine species comprising most infraorders were immunostained with antibodies against dopamine and the neuropeptides substance P and FMRFamide: Macrobrachium rosenbergii, Homarus americanus, Cherax destructor, Orconectes limosus, Procambarus clarkii, Astacus leptodactylus, Carcinus maenas, Eriocheir sinensis and Pagurus bernhardus. One system consisting of several neurons with dopamine-like immunoreactivity that originate in the eyestalk ganglia was present in the four crayfish but not in any other species. These neurons project mainly into the lateral soma clusters (cluster 10) comprising the somata of ascending olfactory projection neurons and innervate very sparsely the medial soma clusters (clusters 9 and 11) containing the somata of local interneurons. In the innervation pattern of the lateral cluster, the dopamine-immunoreactive neurons showed large species-specific differences. The other system comprises a pair of giant neurons with substance P-like immunoreactivity. These neurons have somata in the median protocerebrum of the central brain and major projections into the lateral clusters and the core of the olfactory lobes, the neuropils that are the first synaptic relay in the central olfactory pathway of decapods; minor arborizations are present in the medial clusters. The system of substance P-immunoreactive giant neurons was present and of great morphological similarity in all studied species. Only in one species, the shrimp Macrobrachium rosenbergii, evidence for co-localization of FMRFamide-like with substance P-like immunoreactivity in these neurons was obtained. These and previously collected data indicate that the centrifugal neurons with dopamine-like immunoreactivity may be associated with the presence of an accessory lobe, a second-order neuropil that receives input from the

  15. Cytokines and olfactory bulb microglia in response to bacterial challenge in the compromised primary olfactory pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The primary olfactory pathway is a potential route through which microorganisms from the periphery could potentially access the central nervous system. Our previous studies demonstrated that if the olfactory epithelium was damaged, bacteria administered into the nasal cavity induced nitric oxide production in olfactory ensheathing cells. This study investigates the cytokine profile of olfactory tissues as a consequence of bacterial challenge and establishes whether or not the bacteria are able to reach the olfactory bulb in the central nervous system. Methods The olfactory epithelium of C57BL/6 mice was damaged by unilateral Triton X-100 nasal washing, and Staphylococcus aureus was administered ipsilaterally 4 days later. Olfactory mucosa and bulb were harvested 6 h, 24 h and 5 days after inoculation and their cytokine profile compared to control tissues. The fate of S. aureus and the response of bulbar microglia were examined using fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Results In the olfactory mucosa, administered S. aureus was present in supporting cells of the olfactory epithelium, and macrophages and olfactory nerve bundles in the lamina propria. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated S. aureus was observed within the olfactory mucosa and bulb 6 h after inoculation, but remained restricted to the peripheral layers up to 5 days later. At the 24-h time point, the level of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-α in the compromised olfactory tissues challenged with bacteria (12,466 ± 956 pg/ml and 552 ± 193 pg/ml, respectively) was significantly higher than that in compromised olfactory tissues alone (6,092 ± 1,403 pg/ml and 80 ± 2 pg/ml, respectively). Immunohistochemistry confirmed that IL-6 was present in several cell types including olfactory ensheathing cells and mitral cells of the olfactory bulb. Concurrently, there was a 4.4-, 4.5- and 2.8-fold increase in the density of i

  16. Dopamine reward circuitry: two projection systems from the ventral midbrain to the nucleus accumbens-olfactory tubercle complex

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Satoshi

    2007-01-01

    Anatomical and functional refinements of the meso-limbic dopamine system of the rat are discussed. Present experiments suggest that dopaminergic neurons localized in the posteromedial ventral tegmental area (VTA) and central linear nucleus raphe selectively project to the ventromedial striatum (medial olfactory tubercle and medial nucleus accumbens shell), whereas the anteromedial VTA has few if any projections to the ventral striatum, and the lateral VTA largely projects to the ventrolateral striatum (accumbens core, lateral shell and lateral tubercle). These findings complement the recent behavioral findings that cocaine and amphetamine are more rewarding when administered into the ventromedial striatum than into the ventrolateral striatum. Drugs such as nicotine and opiates are more rewarding when administered into the posterior VTA or the central linear nucleus than into the anterior VTA. A review of the literature suggests that: (1) the midbrain has corresponding zones for the accumbens core and medial shell; (2) the striatal portion of the olfactory tubercle is a ventral extension of the nucleus accumbens shell; (3) a model of two dopamine projection systems from the ventral midbrain to the ventral striatum is useful for understanding reward function. The medial projection system is important in the regulation of arousal characterized by affect and drive, and plays a different role in goal-directed learning than the lateral projection system, as described in the variation-selection hypothesis of striatal functional organization. PMID:17574681

  17. Centrifugal innervation of the mammalian olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Matsutani, Shinji; Yamamoto, Noboru

    2008-12-01

    Although it has been known for decades that the mammalian olfactory bulb receives a substantial number of centrifugal inputs from other regions of the brain, relatively few data have been available on the function of the centrifugal olfactory system. Knowing the role of the centrifugal projection and how it works is of critical importance to fully understanding olfaction. The centrifugal fibers can be classified into two groups, a group that release neuromodulators, such as noradrenaline, serotonin, or acetylcholine, and a group originating in the olfactory cortex. Accumulating evidence suggests that centrifugal neuromodulatory inputs are associated with acquisition of odor memory. Because the distribution of the terminals on these fibers is diffuse and widespread, the neuromodulatory inputs must affect diverse subsets of bulbar neurons at the same time. In contrast, knowledge of the role of centrifugal fibers from the olfactory cortical areas is limited. Judging from recent morphological evidence, these fibers may modify the activity of neurons located in sparse and discrete loci in the olfactory bulb. Given the modular organization of the olfactory bulb, centrifugal fibers from the olfactory cortex may help coordinate the activities of restricted subsets of neurons belonging to distinct functional modules in an odor-specific manner. Because the olfactory cortex receives inputs from limbic and neocortical areas in addition to inputs from the bulb, the centrifugal inputs from the cortex can modulate odor processing in the bulb in response to non-olfactory as well as olfactory cues.

  18. Olfactory signaling in insects.

    PubMed

    Wicher, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    The detection of volatile chemical information in insects is performed by three types of olfactory receptors, odorant receptors (ORs), specific gustatory receptor (GR) proteins for carbon dioxide perception, and ionotropic receptors (IRs) which are related to ionotropic glutamate receptors. All receptors form heteromeric assemblies; an OR complex is composed of an odor-specific OrX protein and a coreceptor (Orco). ORs and GRs have a 7-transmembrane topology as for G protein-coupled receptors, but they are inversely inserted into the membrane. Ligand-gated ion channels (ionotropic receptors) and ORs operate as IRs activated by volatile chemical cues. ORs are evolutionarily young receptors, and they first appear in winged insects and seem to be evolved to allow an insect to follow sparse odor tracks during flight. In contrast to IRs, the ORs can be sensitized by repeated subthreshold odor stimulation. This process involves metabotropic signaling. Pheromone receptors are especially sensitive and require an accessory protein to detect the lipid-derived pheromone molecules. Signaling cascades involved in pheromone detection depend on intensity and duration of stimuli and underlie a circadian control. Taken together, detection and processing of volatile information in insects involve ionotropic as well as metabotropic mechanisms. Here, I review the cellular signaling events associated with detection of cognate ligands by the different types of odorant receptors.

  19. Phylogeny of the vomeronasal system and of receptor cell types in the olfactory and vomeronasal epithelia of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Eisthen, H L

    1992-10-01

    In this paper, the evolutionary origin of the vomeronasal system as a discrete sensory system separate from olfaction is examined. The presence of a discrete vomeronasal system appears to be a derived character in tetrapods, and its presence in larval amphibians indicates that the system did not arise as a terrestrial adaptation. The vomeronasal system has been lost independently in several taxa, including crocodilians, some bats, cetaceans, and some primates. The presence of microvillar receptor cells in the vomeronasal epithelium appears to be the ancestral condition for tetrapods, and alternative hypotheses concerning the ancestral condition for receptor cell types in the vertebrate olfactory epithelium are discussed. Finally, the possibility that the vomeronasal system is present in some fishes in a form that has not been recognized is discussed in relation to the phylogenetic distribution of receptor cell types in vertebrates. PMID:1392068

  20. Functional promiscuity in a mammalian chemosensory system: extensive expression of vomeronasal receptors in the main olfactory epithelium of mouse lemurs

    PubMed Central

    Hohenbrink, Philipp; Dempewolf, Silke; Zimmermann, Elke; Mundy, Nicholas I.; Radespiel, Ute

    2014-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is functional in most terrestrial mammals, though progressively reduced in the primate lineage, and is used for intraspecific communication and predator recognition. Vomeronasal receptor (VR) genes comprise two families of chemosensory genes (V1R and V2R) that have been considered to be specific for the VNO. However, recently a large number of VRs were reported to be expressed in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) of mice, but there is little knowledge of the expression of these genes outside of rodents. To explore the function of VR genes in mammalian evolution, we analyzed and compared the expression of 64 V1R and 2 V2R genes in the VNO and the MOE of the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus), the primate with the largest known VR repertoire. We furthermore compared expression patterns in adults of both sexes and seasons, and in an infant. A large proportion (83–97%) of the VR loci was expressed in the VNO of all individuals. The repertoire in the infant was as rich as in adults, indicating reliance on olfactory communication from early postnatal development onwards. In concordance with mice, we also detected extensive expression of VRs in the MOE, with proportions of expressed loci in individuals ranging from 29 to 45%. TRPC2, which encodes a channel protein crucial for signal transduction via VRs, was co-expressed in the MOE in all individuals indicating likely functionality of expressed VR genes in the MOE. In summary, the large VR repertoire in mouse lemurs seems to be highly functional. Given the differences in the neural pathways of MOE and VNO signals, which project to higher cortical brain centers or the limbic system, respectively, this raises the intriguing possibility that the evolution of MOE-expression of VRs enabled mouse lemurs to adaptively diversify the processing of VR-encoded olfactory information. PMID:25309343

  1. Attention and Olfactory Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the relation between attention and consciousness is an important part of our understanding of consciousness. Attention, unlike consciousness, can be systematically manipulated in psychophysical experiments and a law-like relation between attention and consciousness is waiting to be discovered. Most attempts to discover the nature of this relation are focused on a special type of attention: spatial visual attention. In this review I want to introduce another type of attention to the discussion: attention to the olfactory modality. I will first clarify the position of attention to smells in a general taxonomy of attention. I will then review the mechanisms and neuroanatomy of attention and consciousness in the olfactory system before using the newly introduced system to provide evidence that attention is necessary for consciousness. PMID:22203813

  2. Accessory oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Gnaneswaran, Manica Ramamoorthy; Varadarajan, Usha; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Kamatchi, Sangeetha

    2012-01-01

    This is a rare case report of a patient around 11 years with the complaint of extra mouth who reported to the hospital for removal of that extra mouth. On examination there was accessory oral cavity with small upper and lower lips, seven teeth and saliva was drooling out. Under general anesthesia crevicular incision from 32 to 43 was put and labial gingiva with alveolar mucosa was reflected completely and bone exposed to lower border of mandible. There were seven teeth resembling lower permanent anterior teeth in the accessory mouth, which was excised with the accessory lips. 41 extracted and osteotomy carried out extending the incision from the extracted site and osteotomy carried out. Dermoid cyst both below and above the mylohyoid muscle and rudimentary tongue found and excised and the specimen sent for histopathological examination. The wound was closed and uneventful healing noted to the satisfaction of the patient. This is a rare and interesting case which has been documented. PMID:23833508

  3. Structural differences in the drone olfactory system of two phylogenetically distant Apis species, A. florea and A. mellifera.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, A; Brückner, D

    2001-02-01

    mating behavior, the queen's mandibular gland secretion is the main pheromone regulating queen-worker interactions (Free 1987). In this context, several studies have demonstrated the behavioral significance of single components (Slessor et al. 1988) and differences in the composition of the secretion between Apis species (Plettner et al. 1996, 1997; Keeling et al. 2000). Regarding the interspecific differences in the queen's signal, the question arises whether this variation is reflected in the olfactory system of drones and workers of the various species.

  4. Structural differences in the drone olfactory system of two phylogenetically distant Apis species, A. florea and A. mellifera.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, A; Brückner, D

    2001-02-01

    mating behavior, the queen's mandibular gland secretion is the main pheromone regulating queen-worker interactions (Free 1987). In this context, several studies have demonstrated the behavioral significance of single components (Slessor et al. 1988) and differences in the composition of the secretion between Apis species (Plettner et al. 1996, 1997; Keeling et al. 2000). Regarding the interspecific differences in the queen's signal, the question arises whether this variation is reflected in the olfactory system of drones and workers of the various species. PMID:11320892

  5. [Occupational olfactory changes: diagnostic trends].

    PubMed

    Chiappino, G; Broich, G; Mascagni, P; Picchi, O

    1998-01-01

    Olfactory testing has been of minor interest in Occupational Health due to the lack of testing methods able to detect malingering. On the other hand there is evidence that occupational exposure to several, mainly neurotoxic, substances may result in olfactory damage. We have combined three different testing methods in one package in order to assure a forensic-degree level of results. The package consists of: 1. primary neuron functionality testing with a single olfactory stimulant; 2. olfactory-trigeminal discrimination testing with regular sniff-test; 3. odor identification score by Doty's UPSIT test. Final judgement of a link between olfactory system impairment and occupational exposure to chemicals requires a good knowledge of the present and past occupational exposure and of the general conditions of the patient. It requires collaboration between the Occupational Health specialist and the expert in Olfactology and may be completed with endoscopy, radiography and other specific controls. We suggest that a more extensive use of appropriate olfactory testing should be established at least for special risk groups of workers. This will not only detect occupational health damage that would otherwise have remained unknown, but can also furnish new information on the neurotoxic effects of many inhalable chemicals. PMID:9847530

  6. Accessory fissures of the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, D.; Tarver, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Accessory fissures of the lung are commonly observed in lung specimens, but are often unappreciated or misinterpreted in radiographs and computer tomographic (CT) scans. They usually occur at the boundaries between bronchopulmonary segments. Most common are the inferior accessory fissure, which demarcates the medial basal segment; the superior accessory fissure, which demarcates the superior segment; and the left minor fissure, which demarcates the lingula. This essay will illustrate the findings of the common accessory fissures both on plain radiographs and on CT scans.

  7. Examination of Endogenous Rotund Expression and Function in Developing Drosophila Olfactory System Using CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Protein Tagging.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingyun; Barish, Scott; Okuwa, Sumie; Volkan, Pelin C

    2015-12-01

    The zinc-finger protein Rotund (Rn) plays a critical role in controlling the development of the fly olfactory system. However, little is known about its molecular function in vivo. Here, we added protein tags to the rn locus using CRISPR-Cas9 technology in Drosophila to investigate its subcellular localization and the genes that it regulates . We previously used a reporter construct to show that rn is expressed in a subset of olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) precursors and it is required for the diversification of ORN fates. Here, we show that tagged endogenous Rn protein is functional based on the analysis of ORN phenotypes. Using this method, we also mapped the expression pattern of the endogenous isoform-specific tags in vivo with increased precision. Comparison of the Rn expression pattern from this study with previously published results using GAL4 reporters showed that Rn is mainly present in early steps in antennal disc patterning, but not in pupal stages when ORNs are born. Finally, using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we showed a direct binding of Rotund to a previously identified regulatory element upstream of the bric-a-brac gene locus in the developing antennal disc. PMID:26497147

  8. Examination of Endogenous Rotund Expression and Function in Developing Drosophila Olfactory System Using CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Protein Tagging.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingyun; Barish, Scott; Okuwa, Sumie; Volkan, Pelin C

    2015-12-01

    The zinc-finger protein Rotund (Rn) plays a critical role in controlling the development of the fly olfactory system. However, little is known about its molecular function in vivo. Here, we added protein tags to the rn locus using CRISPR-Cas9 technology in Drosophila to investigate its subcellular localization and the genes that it regulates . We previously used a reporter construct to show that rn is expressed in a subset of olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) precursors and it is required for the diversification of ORN fates. Here, we show that tagged endogenous Rn protein is functional based on the analysis of ORN phenotypes. Using this method, we also mapped the expression pattern of the endogenous isoform-specific tags in vivo with increased precision. Comparison of the Rn expression pattern from this study with previously published results using GAL4 reporters showed that Rn is mainly present in early steps in antennal disc patterning, but not in pupal stages when ORNs are born. Finally, using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we showed a direct binding of Rotund to a previously identified regulatory element upstream of the bric-a-brac gene locus in the developing antennal disc.

  9. Bilateral accessory thoracodorsal artery.

    PubMed

    Natsis, Konstantinos; Totlis, Trifon; Tsikaras, Prokopios; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2006-09-01

    The subscapular artery arises from the third part of the axillary artery and gives off the circumflex scapular and the thoracodorsal arteries. Although anatomical variations of the axillary artery are very common, the existence of a unilateral accessory thoracodorsal artery has been described in the literature only once. There are no reports of bilateral accessory thoracodorsal artery, in the literature. In the present study, a bilateral accessory thoracodorsal artery, originating on either side of the third part of the axillary artery, is described in a 68-year-old female cadaver. All the other branches of the axillary artery had a typical origin, course, distribution and termination. This extremely rare anatomical variation apart from the anatomical importance also has clinical significance for surgeons in this area. Especially, during the dissection or mobilization of the latissimus dorsi that is partly used for coverage problems in many regions of the body and also in dynamic cardiomyoplasty, any iatrogenic injury of this accessory artery may result in ischemia and functional loss of the graft.

  10. Accessory parotid gland tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramachar, Sreevathsa M.; Huliyappa, Harsha A.

    2012-01-01

    Tumors of accessory parotid gland are considered in the differential diagnosis of a mid cheek mass. Parotidectomy is the procedure of choice. All pathological types of parotid main gland tumors occur in the accessory parotid gland also. Presenting as a mid cheek or infrazygomatic mass, the tumors of this accessory parotid gland are notorious for recurrences, if adequate margins are not achieved. We describe two such cases of such a tumor. 40-year-old male with a slowly progressive mid cheek mass was operated by a mid cheek incision. Histopathology of the tumor was pleomorphic adenoma. Facial nerve paresis recovered complelety in 6 months. A 52-year-old female with progressive mid cheek mass who underwent parotidectomy and neck dissection by a modified Blair's incision was diagnosed with extranodal marginal zone lymphoma with focal transformation to a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Chemotherapy with CHOP regime was initiated. There was no recurrence at 6 months of follow-up. Lymphoma of accessory parotid gland is a very rare tumor. Standard parotidectomy incision is advocated to prevent damage to facial nerve branches. PMID:23483721

  11. Controlled Speed Accessory Drive demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehn, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    A Controlled Speed Accessory Drive System was examined in an effort to improve the fuel economy of passenger cars. Concept feasibility and the performance of a typical system during actual road driving conditions were demonstrated. The CSAD system is described as a mechanical device which limits engine accessory speeds, thereby reducing parasitic horsepower losses and improving overall vehicle fuel economy. Fuel consumption data were compiled for fleets of GSA vehicles. Various motor pool locations were selected, each representing different climatic conditions. On the basis of a total accumulated fleet usage of nearly three million miles, an overall fuel economy improvement of 6 percent to 7 percent was demonstrated. Coincident chassis dynamometer tests were accomplished on selected vehicles to establish the effect of different accessory drive systems on exhaust emissions, and to evaluate the magnitude of the mileage benefits which could be derived.

  12. Light and transmission electron microscopy study of the peripheral olfactory organ of the guppy, Poecilia reticulata (Teleostei, Poecilidae).

    PubMed

    Lazzari, Maurizio; Bettini, Simone; Ciani, Franco; Franceschini, Valeria

    2007-09-01

    A study of the peripheral olfactory organ, with special attention to the olfactory epithelium, has been carried out in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata). Guppy is well known to have a vision-based sexual behavior. The olfactory chamber caudally opens directly in an accessory nasal sac, which is bent medially and gives rise to two recesses that can be considered secondary accessory nasal sacs, antero-medial and postero-medial, respectively. The sensory epithelium, which lines only the medial wall of the nasal cavity, is basically flat rising in a very low lamella only in the posterior part. The olfactory receptors are not evenly distributed in the olfactory mucosa, but aggregate in shallow folds separated by epithelial cells with evident microridges. Ciliated olfactory sensory neurons and microvillous olfactory sensory neurons are clearly identified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Scarce crypt olfactory neurons are found throughout the sensory folds. The nasal sacs indicates the capacity to regulate the flow of odorant molecules over the sensory epithelium, possibly through a pump-like mechanism associated with gill ventilation. The organization of the olfactory organ in guppy is simple and reminds what is found in early posthatching stages of fish which at the adult state have a well developed olfactory organ. This simple organization supports the idea that the guppy rely on olfaction less than other fish species provided with more extended olfactory receptorial surface.

  13. Reutilization of accessories in gastrointestinal endoscopic practice.

    PubMed

    Haber, G

    2000-10-01

    The key issues that determine the decision between reusable versus disposable accessories are cost and functionality. In most health-care systems the availability and dissemination of endoscopic services relates directly to the resources (i.e. budget) of that system. Given the limitations of health-care budgets, access to endoscopic services will depend upon the cost efficiency of endoscopic practice. The onus on endoscopists and health-care providers, therefore, is to meticulously evaluate the necessary steps for safe reutilization of accessories. This paper addresses the principles of reuse, quality assurance and particularly disinfection practices. Any change to a more costly disposable accessory policy must bear the responsibility of denied access to endoscopic services in a system with finite resources.

  14. Mechanical accessories for mobile teleoperators

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.J.; Herndon, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    The choice of optimum mechanical accessories for mobile teleoperators involves matching the criteria for emergency response with the available technology. This paper presents a general background to teleoperations, a potpourri of the manipulator systems available, and an argument for force reflecting manipulation. The theme presented is that the accomplishment of humanlike endeavors in hostile environments will be most successful when man model capabilities are utilized. The application of recent electronic technology to manipulator development has made new tools available to be applied to emergency response activities. The development activities described are products of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Neural Correlates of Olfactory Learning: Critical Role of Centrifugal Neuromodulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Max L.; Chen, Wei R.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory system is well established for its remarkable capability of undergoing experience-dependent plasticity. Although this process involves changes at multiple stages throughout the central olfactory pathway, even the early stages of processing, such as the olfactory bulb and piriform cortex, can display a high degree of…

  16. Iatrogenic accessory nerve injury.

    PubMed Central

    London, J.; London, N. J.; Kay, S. P.

    1996-01-01

    Accessory nerve injury produces considerable disability. The nerve is most frequently damaged as a complication of radical neck dissection, cervical lymph node biopsy and other surgical procedures. The problem is frequently compounded by a failure to recognise the error immediately after surgery when surgical repair has the greatest chance of success. We present cases which outline the risk of accessory nerve injury, the spectrum of clinical presentations and the problems produced by a failure to recognise the deficit. Regional anatomy, consequences of nerve damage and management options are discussed. Diagnostic biopsy of neck nodes should not be undertaken as a primary investigation and, when indicated, surgery in this region should be performed by suitably trained staff under well-defined conditions. Awareness of iatrogenic injury and its consequences would avoid delays in diagnosis and treatment. Images Figure 2 PMID:8678450

  17. Evolution of insect olfactory receptors

    PubMed Central

    Missbach, Christine; Dweck, Hany KM; Vogel, Heiko; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Stensmyr, Marcus C; Hansson, Bill S; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory sense detects a plethora of behaviorally relevant odor molecules; gene families involved in olfaction exhibit high diversity in different animal phyla. Insects detect volatile molecules using olfactory (OR) or ionotropic receptors (IR) and in some cases gustatory receptors (GRs). While IRs are expressed in olfactory organs across Protostomia, ORs have been hypothesized to be an adaptation to a terrestrial insect lifestyle. We investigated the olfactory system of the primary wingless bristletail Lepismachilis y-signata (Archaeognatha), the firebrat Thermobia domestica (Zygentoma) and the neopteran leaf insect Phyllium siccifolium (Phasmatodea). ORs and the olfactory coreceptor (Orco) are with very high probability lacking in Lepismachilis; in Thermobia we have identified three Orco candidates, and in Phyllium a fully developed OR/Orco-based system. We suggest that ORs did not arise as an adaptation to a terrestrial lifestyle, but evolved later in insect evolution, with Orco being present before the appearance of ORs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02115.001 PMID:24670956

  18. Long-term effects on the olfactory system of exposure to hydrogen sulphide

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, A. R.; Zavala, G.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study chronic effects of hydrogen sulphide (H2S) on cranial nerve I (nervi olfactorii), which have been only minimally described. METHODS: Chemosensations (smell and taste) were evaluated in eight men who complained of continuing dysfunction 2-3 years after the start of occupational exposure to H2S. Various bilateral (both nostrils) and unilateral (one nostril at a time) odour threshold tests with standard odorants as well as the Chicago smell test, a three odour detection and identification test and the University of Pennsylvania smell identification test, a series of 40 scratch and sniff odour identification tests were administered. RESULTS: Six of the eight patients showed deficits of various degrees. Two had normal scores on objective tests, but thought that they continued to have problems. H2S apparently can cause continuing, sometimes unrecognised olfactory deficits. CONCLUSION: Further exploration into the extent of such problems among workers exposed to H2S is warranted.   PMID:10450248

  19. 14 CFR 29.1163 - Powerplant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... involved; (2) Use the provisions on the engine for mounting; and (3) Be sealed in such a way as to prevent contamination of the engine oil system and the accessory system. (b) Electrical equipment subject to arcing or... be a hazard if they malfunction, there must be means to prevent their hazardous rotation...

  20. 14 CFR 29.1163 - Powerplant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... involved; (2) Use the provisions on the engine for mounting; and (3) Be sealed in such a way as to prevent contamination of the engine oil system and the accessory system. (b) Electrical equipment subject to arcing or... be a hazard if they malfunction, there must be means to prevent their hazardous rotation...

  1. Advanced Accessory Power Supply Topologies

    SciTech Connect

    Marlino, L.D.

    2010-06-15

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) began December 8, 2000 and ended September 30, 2009. The total funding provided by the Participant (General Motors Advanced Technology Vehicles [GM]) during the course of the CRADA totaled $1.2M enabling the Contractor (UT-Battelle, LLC [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a.k.a. ORNL]) to contribute significantly to the joint project. The initial task was to work with GM on the feasibility of developing their conceptual approach of modifying major components of the existing traction inverter/drive to develop low cost, robust, accessory power. Two alternate methods for implementation were suggested by ORNL and both were proven successful through simulations and then extensive testing of prototypes designed and fabricated during the project. This validated the GM overall concept. Moreover, three joint U.S. patents were issued and subsequently licensed by GM. After successfully fulfilling the initial objective, the direction and duration of the CRADA was modified and GM provided funding for two additional tasks. The first new task was to provide the basic development for implementing a cascaded inverter technology into hybrid vehicles (including plug-in hybrid, fuel cell, and electric). The second new task was to continue the basic development for implementing inverter and converter topologies and new technology assessments for hybrid vehicle applications. Additionally, this task was to address the use of high temperature components in drive systems. Under this CRADA, ORNL conducted further research based on GM’s idea of using the motor magnetic core and windings to produce bidirectional accessory power supply that is nongalvanically coupled to the terminals of the high voltage dc-link battery of hybrid vehicles. In order not to interfere with the motor’s torque, ORNL suggested to use the zero-sequence, highfrequency harmonics carried by the main fundamental motor current for producing the accessory power

  2. Transcriptomes of mouse olfactory epithelium reveal sexual differences in odorant detection.

    PubMed

    Shiao, Meng-Shin; Chang, Andrew Ying-Fei; Liao, Ben-Yang; Ching, Yung-Hao; Lu, Mei-Yeh Jade; Chen, Stella Maris; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2012-01-01

    To sense numerous odorants and chemicals, animals have evolved a large number of olfactory receptor genes (Olfrs) in their genome. In particular, the house mouse has ~1,100 genes in the Olfr gene family. This makes the mouse a good model organism to study Olfr genes and olfaction-related genes. To date, whether male and female mice possess the same ability in detecting environmental odorants is still unknown. Using the next generation sequencing technology (paired-end mRNA-seq), we detected 1,088 expressed Olfr genes in both male and female olfactory epithelium. We found that not only Olfr genes but also odorant-binding protein (Obp) genes have evolved rapidly in the mouse lineage. Interestingly, Olfr genes tend to express at a higher level in males than in females, whereas the Obp genes clustered on the X chromosome show the opposite trend. These observations may imply a more efficient odorant-transporting system in females, whereas a more active Olfr gene expressing system in males. In addition, we detected the expression of two genes encoding major urinary proteins, which have been proposed to bind and transport pheromones or act as pheromones in mouse urine. This observation suggests a role of main olfactory system (MOS) in pheromone detection, contrary to the view that only accessory olfactory system (AOS) is involved in pheromone detection. This study suggests the sexual differences in detecting environmental odorants in MOS and demonstrates that mRNA-seq provides a powerful tool for detecting genes with low expression levels and with high sequence similarities.

  3. Monoallelic Expression of Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, Kevin; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell collects vital information about the environment by detecting a multitude of chemical odorants. Breadth and sensitivity are provided by a huge number of chemosensory receptor proteins, including more than 1,400 olfactory receptors (ORs). Organizing the sensory information generated by these receptors so that it can be processed and evaluated by the central nervous system is a major challenge. This challenge is overcome by monogenic and monoallelic expression of OR genes. The single OR expressed by each olfactory sensory neuron determines the neuron’s odor sensitivity and the axonal connections it will make to downstream neurons in the olfactory bulb. The expression of a single OR per neuron is accomplished by coupling a slow chromatin-mediated activation process to a fast negative-feedback signal that prevents activation of additional ORs. Singular OR activation is likely orchestrated by a network of interchromosomal enhancer interactions and large-scale changes in nuclear architecture. PMID:26359778

  4. Olfactory dysfunction in Down's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Murphy, C; Jinich, S

    1996-01-01

    Down's Syndrome subjects over 40 years old show neuropathology similar to that of Alzheimer's disease. The olfactory system is particularly vulnerable in Alzheimer's disease, both anatomically and functionally. Several measures of sensory and cognitive functioning were studied in the older Down's Syndrome patient, with the hypothesis of significant olfactory dysfunction. Participants were 23 Down's subjects, and 23 controls. The Dementia Rating Scale showed mean scores of 103 for Down's subjects and 141 for controls. Down's subjects showed significant deficits in odor detection threshold, odor identification, and odor recognition memory. Normal performance in a taste threshold task, similar to the olfactory threshold task in subject demands, suggested that the Down's syndrome subjects' poor performance was not due to task demands. Deficits in olfaction may provide a sensitive and early indicator of the deterioration and progression of the brain in older subjects with Down's Syndrome.

  5. [Algorithm of early diagnosis and treatment of nasal cavity and accessory sinuses of the nose in students of educational establishments of the water-borne transport system].

    PubMed

    Kariuk, Iu A

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm of early diagnosis and treatment of nasal cavity and accessory sinuses of the nose in students of educational establishments of the water-borne transport system has been developed. Inclusion of such methods as screening diagnosis of inflammatory diseases of paranasal sinuses, original roentgenologic and zonographic imaging of paranasal and frontal sinuses made it possible to substantially improve the quality of diagnosis, shorten duration of the examination, and reduce radiation exposure of the patients. The proposed algorithm was used to provide therapeutic and rehabilitation services to 260 patients admitted to the Clinical Hospital No 1 of the federal state institution , Russian Agency for Health Care.

  6. The evolutionary function of conscious information processing is revealed by its task-dependency in the olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Although many responses to odorous stimuli are mediated without olfactory information being consciously processed, some olfactory behaviors require conscious information processing. I will here contrast situations in which olfactory information is processed consciously to situations in which it is processed non-consciously. This contrastive analysis reveals that conscious information processing is required when an organism is faced with tasks in which there are many behavioral options available. I therefore propose that it is the evolutionary function of conscious information processing to guide behaviors in situations in which the organism has to choose between many possible responses. PMID:24550876

  7. Systemic injection of kainic acid: Gliosis in olfactory and limbic brain regions quantified with ( sup 3 H)PK 11195 binding autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Altar, C.A.; Baudry, M. )

    1990-09-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases may result from excessive stimulation of excitatory amino acid receptors by endogenous ligands. Because neuronal degeneration is associated with glial proliferation and hypertrophy, the degenerative changes throughout rat brain following the systemic administration of kainic acid (12 mg/kg) were mapped with quantitative autoradiography of (3H)PK 11195. This radioligand binds to a mitochondrial benzodiazepine binding site (MBBS) on microglia and astrocytes. Analysis of eight horizontal and four coronal brain levels revealed up to 16-fold increases in (3H)PK 11195 binding from 1 to 5 weeks but not 1 day after kainate injection. Increases in (3H)PK 11195 binding were predominantly in ventral limbic brain regions and olfactory projections to neocortical areas, with the olfactory cortex greater than subiculum/CA1 greater than anterior olfactory nucleus, medial thalamic nucleus, and piriform cortex greater than cingulate cortex and rostral hippocampus greater than dentate gyrus, septum, and amygdala greater than entorhinal cortex and temporal cortex. Little or no enhancement of (3H)PK 11195 binding was observed in numerous regions including the caudate-putamen, substantia nigra, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, cerebellum, thalamic nuclei, choroid plexus, medulla, parietal or occipital cortex, or pons. A 2-fold greater extent of neurodegeneration was obtained in ventral portions of the olfactory bulb, entorhinal cortex, temporal cortex, and dentate gyrus compared with the dorsal portions of these structures. The pattern of increase in (3H)PK 11195 binding closely matched the patterns of neuronal degeneration reported following parenteral kainate injection. These findings strengthen the notion that quantitative autoradiography of (3H)PK 11195 is a valuable tool to quantify the extent of neuronal degeneration.

  8. Nasopalatine ducts and flehmen behavior in the mandrill: reevaluating olfactory communication in Old World primates.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Marie J E; Mboumba, Sylvère; Ditsoga, Claude; Drea, Christine M

    2013-07-01

    Compared to other modes of communication, chemical signaling between conspecifics generally has been overlooked in Old World primates, despite the presence in this group of secretory glands and scent-marking behavior, as well as the confirmed production and perception of olfactory signals. In other mammalian species, flehmen is a behavior thought to transport primarily nonvolatile, aqueous-soluble odorants via specialized ducts to the vomeronasal organ (VNO). By contrast, Old World primates are traditionally thought to lack a functional VNO, relying instead on the main olfactory system to process volatile odorants from their environment. Here, in the mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx), we document unusual morphological and behavioral traits that typically are associated with the uptake of conspecific chemical cues for processing by an accessory olfactory system. Notably, we confirmed that both sexes possess open nasopalatine ducts and, in response to the presentation of conspecific odorants, we found that both sexes showed stereotyped behavior consistent with the flehmen response. If, as in other species, flehmen in the mandrill serves to mediate social or reproductive information, we expected its occurrence to vary with characteristics of either the signaler or receiver. Flehmen, particularly in a given male, occurred most often in response to odorants derived from male, as opposed to female, conspecifics. Moreover, odorants derived during the breeding season elicited more flehmen responses than did odorants collected during the birthing season. Lastly, odorants from reproductively cycling females also elicited more responses than did odorants from contracepted females. Although confirming a link between the nasopalatine ducts, flehmen behavior, and olfactory processing in mandrills would require further study, our observations provide new information to suggest anatomical variability within Old World primates, calling further attention to the underappreciated role of

  9. Rhabdovirus accessory genes.

    PubMed

    Walker, Peter J; Dietzgen, Ralf G; Joubert, D Albert; Blasdell, Kim R

    2011-12-01

    The Rhabdoviridae is one of the most ecologically diverse families of RNA viruses with members infecting a wide range of organisms including placental mammals, marsupials, birds, reptiles, fish, insects and plants. The availability of complete nucleotide sequences for an increasing number of rhabdoviruses has revealed that their ecological diversity is reflected in the diversity and complexity of their genomes. The five canonical rhabdovirus structural protein genes (N, P, M, G and L) that are shared by all rhabdoviruses are overprinted, overlapped and interspersed with a multitude of novel and diverse accessory genes. Although not essential for replication in cell culture, several of these genes have been shown to have roles associated with pathogenesis and apoptosis in animals, and cell-to-cell movement in plants. Others appear to be secreted or have the characteristics of membrane-anchored glycoproteins or viroporins. However, most encode proteins of unknown function that are unrelated to any other known proteins. Understanding the roles of these accessory genes and the strategies by which rhabdoviruses use them to engage, divert and re-direct cellular processes will not only present opportunities to develop new anti-viral therapies but may also reveal aspects of cellar function that have broader significance in biology, agriculture and medicine.

  10. Subjective and objective olfactory abnormalities in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marie; Zopf, Yurdagül; Elm, Cornelia; Pechmann, Georg; Hahn, Eckhart G; Schwab, Dieter; Kornhuber, Johannes; Thuerauf, Norbert Joachim

    2014-07-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) is still unknown, but the involvement of the olfactory system in CD appears possible. No study to date has systematically assessed the olfactory function in CD patients. We investigated the olfactory function in CD patients in active (n = 31) and inactive disease (n = 27) and in a control group of age- and sex-matched healthy subjects (n = 35). Subjective olfactory testing was applied using the Sniffin' Sticks test. For olfactory testing, olfactory event-related potentials (OERPs) were obtained with a 4-channel olfactometer using phenyl ethyl alcohol (PEA) and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S). Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) was employed as control stimulus, and chemosomatosensory event-related potentials (CSSERPs) were registered. Results of the Sniffin' Sticks test revealed significantly different olfactory hedonic judgment with increased olfactory hedonic estimates for pleasant odorants in CD patients in active disease compared with healthy subjects. A statistical trend was found toward lower olfactory thresholds in CD patients. In objective olfactory testing, CD patients showed lower amplitudes of OERPs and CSSERPs. Additionally, OERPs showed significantly shorter N1- and P2 latencies following stimulation of the right nostril with H(2)S in CD patients in inactive disease compared with controls. Our study demonstrates specific abnormalities of olfactory perception in CD patients.

  11. In the nose of the beholder: are olfactory influences on human mate choice driven by variation in immune system genes or sex hormone levels?

    PubMed

    Roberts, Thomas; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2010-11-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) is the most polymorphic region of the genome, coding for proteins that mediate human immune response. This polymorphism may be maintained by balancing selection and certain populations show deviations from expected gene frequencies. Supporting this hypothesis, studies into olfactory preferences have suggested that females prefer the scent of males with dissimilar HLA to their own. However, it has also been proposed that androstenones play a role in female mate choice, and as these molecules inhibit the immune system, this has implications for the theory of HLA-driven mate preference. This review will critically analyze the findings of studies investigating olfactory preference in humans, and their implications for these two contrasting theories of mate choice.

  12. An odor detection system based on automatically trained mice by relative go no-go olfactory operant conditioning.

    PubMed

    He, Jing; Wei, JingKuan; Rizak, Joshua D; Chen, YanMei; Wang, JianHong; Hu, XinTian; Ma, YuanYe

    2015-05-06

    Odor detection applications are needed by human societies in various circumstances. Rodent offers unique advantages in developing biologic odor detection systems. This report outlines a novel apparatus designed to train maximum 5 mice automatically to detect odors using a new olfactory, relative go no-go, operant conditioning paradigm. The new paradigm offers the chance to measure real-time reliability of individual animal's detection behavior with changing responses. All of 15 water-deprivation mice were able to learn to respond to unpredictable delivering of the target odor with higher touch frequencies via a touch sensor. The mice were continually trained with decreasing concentrations of the target odor (n-butanol), the average correct percent significantly dropped when training at 0.01% solution concentration; the alarm algorithm showed excellent recognition of odor detection behavior of qualified mice group through training. Then, the alarm algorithm was repeatedly tested against simulated scenario for 4 blocks. The mice acted comparable to the training period during the tests, and provided total of 58 warnings for the target odor out of 59 random deliveries and 0 false alarm. The results suggest this odor detection method is promising for further development in respect to various types of odor detection applications.

  13. An odor detection system based on automatically trained mice by relative go no-go olfactory operant conditioning

    PubMed Central

    He, Jing; Wei, JingKuan; Rizak, Joshua D.; Chen, YanMei; Wang, JianHong; Hu, XinTian; Ma, YuanYe

    2015-01-01

    Odor detection applications are needed by human societies in various circumstances. Rodent offers unique advantages in developing biologic odor detection systems. This report outlines a novel apparatus designed to train maximum 5 mice automatically to detect odors using a new olfactory, relative go no-go, operant conditioning paradigm. The new paradigm offers the chance to measure real-time reliability of individual animal’s detection behavior with changing responses. All of 15 water-deprivation mice were able to learn to respond to unpredictable delivering of the target odor with higher touch frequencies via a touch sensor. The mice were continually trained with decreasing concentrations of the target odor (n-butanol), the average correct percent significantly dropped when training at 0.01% solution concentration; the alarm algorithm showed excellent recognition of odor detection behavior of qualified mice group through training. Then, the alarm algorithm was repeatedly tested against simulated scenario for 4 blocks. The mice acted comparable to the training period during the tests, and provided total of 58 warnings for the target odor out of 59 random deliveries and 0 false alarm. The results suggest this odor detection method is promising for further development in respect to various types of odor detection applications. PMID:25944031

  14. Histochemical and ultrastructural analyses of the lubrication systems in the olfactory organs of soft-shelled turtle

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMUTA, Shoko; YOKOSUKA, Makoto; TANIGUCHI, Kazumi; YAMAMOTO, Yoshio; NAKAMUTA, Nobuaki

    2016-01-01

    In general, the nasal cavity of turtles is divided into two chambers: the upper chamber, lined with the olfactory epithelium containing ciliated olfactory receptor cells, and the lower chamber, lined with the vomeronasal epithelium containing microvillous receptor cells. In the nasal cavity of soft-shelled turtles, however, differences between the upper and lower chamber epithelia are unclear due to the presence of ciliated receptor cells in both epithelia. In the olfactory organ of vertebrates, the surface of sensory epithelium is covered with secretory products of associated glands and supporting cells, playing important roles in the olfaction by dissolving odorants and transporting them to the olfactory receptors. Here, the associated glands and supporting cells in the olfactory organ of soft-shelled turtles were analyzed histochemically and ultrastructurally. The upper chamber epithelium possessed associated glands, constituted by cells containing serous secretory granules; whereas, the lower chamber epithelium did not. In the upper chamber epithelium, secretory granules filled the supranuclear region of supporting cells, while most of the granules were distributed near the free border of supporting cells in the lower chamber epithelium. The secretory granules in the supporting cells of both epithelia were seromucous, but alcian blue stained them differently from each other. In addition, distinct expression of carbohydrates was suggested by the differences in lectin binding. These data indicate the quantitative and qualitative differences in the secretory properties between the upper and lower chamber epithelia, suggesting their distinct roles in the olfaction. PMID:26782135

  15. Catheter Ablation of Right-Sided Accessory Pathways in Adults Using the Three-Dimensional Mapping System: A Randomized Comparison to the Conventional Approach.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuedong; Qiu, Jia; Yang, Yang; Tang, Anli

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) mapping and navigation systems have been widely used for the ablation of atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia, but the applicability of these systems for the ablation of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) due to right-sided accessory pathways (RAPs) remains unknown. The goal of this prospective randomized study was to compare the safety, efficiency, and efficacy of nonfluoroscopic and conventional fluoroscopic mapping techniques in guiding catheter ablation of SVT due to RAPs. Of the 393 consecutive patients with SVT who were randomized to receive either conventional fluoroscopic or Ensite NavX mapping-guided ablation, 64 patients with RAPs were included for analysis. Endpoints for ablation were no evidence of RAP conduction and no inducible atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia (AVRT). The 3D group showed fewer ablation pulses and a shorter total ablation time compared to the conventional group, although the acute procedural success did not differ significantly between the two groups. Total procedure time, electrophysiological study time, total fluoroscopy time, and cumulative radiation doses were also significantly reduced in the 3D group. Patients in the conventional group with a right atrium diameter (RAD) ≥ 47 mm required a longer fluoroscopy time. There was no significant difference in the recurrence rates between the two groups over a follow-up period of 3 to 29 months. There were no permanent complications. The 3D mapping system may be a preferred alternative for patients with AVRT due to RAPs, especially for patients with a large RAD (≥ 47 mm).

  16. Catheter Ablation of Right-Sided Accessory Pathways in Adults Using the Three-Dimensional Mapping System: A Randomized Comparison to the Conventional Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Anli

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) mapping and navigation systems have been widely used for the ablation of atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia, but the applicability of these systems for the ablation of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) due to right-sided accessory pathways (RAPs) remains unknown. The goal of this prospective randomized study was to compare the safety, efficiency, and efficacy of nonfluoroscopic and conventional fluoroscopic mapping techniques in guiding catheter ablation of SVT due to RAPs. Of the 393 consecutive patients with SVT who were randomized to receive either conventional fluoroscopic or Ensite NavX mapping-guided ablation, 64 patients with RAPs were included for analysis. Endpoints for ablation were no evidence of RAP conduction and no inducible atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia (AVRT). The 3D group showed fewer ablation pulses and a shorter total ablation time compared to the conventional group, although the acute procedural success did not differ significantly between the two groups. Total procedure time, electrophysiological study time, total fluoroscopy time, and cumulative radiation doses were also significantly reduced in the 3D group. Patients in the conventional group with a right atrium diameter (RAD) ≥ 47 mm required a longer fluoroscopy time. There was no significant difference in the recurrence rates between the two groups over a follow-up period of 3 to 29 months. There were no permanent complications. The 3D mapping system may be a preferred alternative for patients with AVRT due to RAPs, especially for patients with a large RAD (≥ 47 mm). PMID:26083408

  17. Relation of the volume of the olfactory bulb to psychophysical measures of olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Mazal, Patricia Portillo; Haehner, Antje; Hummel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to investigate whether changes in olfactory bulb volume relate to changes in specific olfactory functions. We studied currently available peer-reviewed articles on the volume of the human olfactory bulb that also included a psychophysical measure of olfactory function. In the present review, we observed a very clear and consistent correlation between general olfactory function and olfactory bulb (OB) volume. We were not able to find a clear relationship between a specific smell component and OB volume, even when analyzing pathologic conditions separately. In some cases, changes were observed for different subtests, but these changes did not significantly correlate with OB volume or had only a borderline correlation. In other cases, we found contradictory data. Several factors may contribute to the difficulties in finding correlations with the different components of smell: (1) the OB volume may be influenced by information from olfactory receptor neurons (bottom-up effect), information from central nervous system (top-down effect) and by direct damage; (2) most pathologic conditions affect more than one area of the olfactory pathway; (3) small sample sizes of hyposmic subjects were used. We believe that it is necessary to do further studies with larger numbers of subjects to answer the currently investigated question.

  18. Effects of handedness on olfactory event-related potentials in a simple olfactory task.

    PubMed

    Gottschlich, Marie; Hummel, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to re-investigate the influence of handedness on simple olfactory tasks to further clarify the role of handedness in chemical senses. Similar to language and other sensory systems, effects of handedness should be expected. Young, healthy subjects participated in this study, including 24 left-handers and 24 right-handers, with no indication of any major nasal or health problems. The two groups did not differ in terms of sex and age (14 women and 10 men in each group). They had a mean age of 24.0 years. Olfactory event-related potentials were recorded after left or right olfactory stimulation with the rose-like odor phenyl ethyl alcohol (PEA) or the smell of rotten eggs (hydrogen sulfide, H2S). Results suggested that handedness has no major influence on amplitude or latency of olfactory event-related potentials when it comes to simple olfactory tasks.

  19. Accessories or necessities? Exploring consensus on usage of stoma accessories.

    PubMed

    Rudoni, Caroline; Dennis, Heather

    Usage and opinion of accessory products in stoma care vary enormously. The aim of this study was to identify what constitutes an accessory product and to find out whether there is any standardization regarding their recommendation. Views of both patients and stoma nurses were examined. Patients identify accessory products as being necessary both physically and psychologically in improving their quality of life. While stoma nurses identify that the psychological effects of having a stoma should never be underestimated, there is still concern regarding the cost of recommending these products and their clinical necessity. It would appear that clinical necessity is based on nurses' opinions and is not always evidence or research based. Since accessory products have been shown to be essential to many patients with a stoma, should stoma nurses be more empathetic when considering their recommendation?

  20. Deep Sequencing of the Murine Olfactory Receptor Neuron Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Kanageswaran, Ninthujah; Demond, Marilen; Nagel, Maximilian; Schreiner, Benjamin S. P.; Baumgart, Sabrina; Scholz, Paul; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Doerner, Julia F.; Conrad, Heike; Oberland, Sonja; Wetzel, Christian H.; Neuhaus, Eva M.; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    The ability of animals to sense and differentiate among thousands of odorants relies on a large set of olfactory receptors (OR) and a multitude of accessory proteins within the olfactory epithelium (OE). ORs and related signaling mechanisms have been the subject of intensive studies over the past years, but our knowledge regarding olfactory processing remains limited. The recent development of next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques encouraged us to assess the transcriptome of the murine OE. We analyzed RNA from OEs of female and male adult mice and from fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-sorted olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) obtained from transgenic OMP-GFP mice. The Illumina RNA-Seq protocol was utilized to generate up to 86 million reads per transcriptome. In OE samples, nearly all OR and trace amine-associated receptor (TAAR) genes involved in the perception of volatile amines were detectably expressed. Other genes known to participate in olfactory signaling pathways were among the 200 genes with the highest expression levels in the OE. To identify OE-specific genes, we compared olfactory neuron expression profiles with RNA-Seq transcriptome data from different murine tissues. By analyzing different transcript classes, we detected the expression of non-olfactory GPCRs in ORNs and established an expression ranking for GPCRs detected in the OE. We also identified other previously undescribed membrane proteins as potential new players in olfaction. The quantitative and comprehensive transcriptome data provide a virtually complete catalogue of genes expressed in the OE and present a useful tool to uncover candidate genes involved in, for example, olfactory signaling, OR trafficking and recycling, and proliferation. PMID:25590618

  1. Dimorphic Olfactory Lobes in the Arthropoda

    PubMed Central

    Strausfeld, Nicholas; Reisenman, Carolina E.

    2009-01-01

    Specialized olfactory lobe glomeruli relating to sexual or caste differences have been observed in at least five orders of insects, suggesting an early appearance of this trait in insect evolution. Dimorphism is not limited to nocturnal species, but occurs even in insects that are known to use vision for courtship. Other than a single description there is no evidence for similar structures occuring in the Crustacea, suggesting that the evolution of dimorphic olfactory systems may typify terrestrial arthropods. PMID:19686183

  2. Dimorphic olfactory lobes in the arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Strausfeld, Nicholas; Reisenman, Carolina E

    2009-07-01

    Specialized olfactory lobe glomeruli relating to sexual or caste differences have been observed in at least five orders of insects, suggesting an early appearance of this trait in insect evolution. Dimorphism is not limited to nocturnal species, but occurs even in insects that are known to use vision for courtship. Other than a single description, there is no evidence for similar structures occurring in the Crustacea, suggesting that the evolution of dimorphic olfactory systems may typify terrestrial arthropods.

  3. 14 CFR 33.25 - Accessory attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accessory attachments. 33.25 Section 33.25... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.25 Accessory attachments. The engine must operate properly with the accessory drive and mounting attachments loaded. Each engine accessory drive...

  4. Postnatal neurogenesis in the olfactory bulbs of a lizard. A tritiated thymidine autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Verdugo, J M; Llahi, S; Ferrer, I; Lopez-Garcia, C

    1989-04-10

    Autoradiographically labelled cells were observed in the olfactory bulbs of perinatal, young and adult specimens of the lizard Podarcis hispanica following intraperitoneal injection of tritiated thymidine (5 muCi/g b.wt). After survival times of 7, 18 and 28 days labelled cells were found in the granular layer of both main and accessory bulbs. A few labelled cells were observed in the ependyma, mitral and glomerular layer. In the main olfactory bulb, one week of survival time resulted in labelling of cells in the innermost part of the granular layer. Longer survival times (up to 4 weeks), resulted in labelling of cells mainly in the outermost part of the granular layer. This spatio-temporal gradient was not observed in the accessory bulb. Nevertheless, longer survival times resulted in greater number of labelled cells located in the dorsal and ventral parts of the granular layer of the accessory bulb.

  5. Inhibition of Inflammation-Associated Olfactory Loss by Etanercept in an Inducible Olfactory Inflammation Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yong Gi; Lane, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of a soluble human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) receptor blocker (Etanercept) on an inducible olfactory inflammation (IOI) mouse model Study Design An in vivo study using a transgenic mouse model Setting Research laboratory Subjects and Methods To study the impact of chronic inflammation on the olfactory system, a transgenic mouse model of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS)-associated olfactory loss was utilized (IOI mouse), expressing TNF-α in a temporally-controlled fashion specifically within the olfactory epithelium. In one group of mice (n=4), Etanercept was injected intraperitoneally (100 µg/dose, 3 times/week) concurrent with a 2-week period of TNF-α expression. A second group of mice (n=2) underwent induction of TNF-α expression for 8 weeks, with Etanercept treatment administered during the final 2 weeks of inflammation. Olfactory function was assayed by elecro-olfactogram (EOG), and olfactory tissue was processed for histology and immunohistochemical staining. Each group was compared with equal number of control group. Results Compared to non-treated IOI mice, Etanercept -treated IOI mice showed significantly improved EOG responses after 2 weeks (p<0.001). After 8 weeks of induced inflammation, there was massive loss of olfactory epithelium and no EOG response in non-treated IOI mice. However, in Etanercept - treated mice, regeneration of olfactory epithelium was observed. Conclusion Concomitant administration of Etanercept in IOI mice results in interruption of TNF-α-induced olfactory loss and induction of neuroepithelial regeneration. This demonstrates that Etanercept has potential utility as a tool for elucidating the role of TNF-α in other olfactory inflammation models. PMID:26932943

  6. Methods to measure olfactory behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Zou, Junhui; Wang, Wenbin; Pan, Yung-Wei; Lu, Song; Xia, Zhengui

    2015-02-02

    Mice rely on the sense of olfaction to detect food sources, recognize social and mating partners, and avoid predators. Many behaviors of mice, including learning and memory, social interaction, fear, and anxiety are closely associated with their function of olfaction, and behavior tasks designed to evaluate those brain functions may use odors as cues. Accurate assessment of olfaction is not only essential for the study of olfactory system but also critical for proper interpretation of various mouse behaviors, especially learning and memory, emotionality and affect, and sociality. Here we describe a series of behavior experiments that offer multidimensional and quantitative assessments for mouse olfactory function, including olfactory habituation, discrimination, odor preference, odor detection sensitivity, and olfactory memory, with respect to both social and nonsocial odors.

  7. Anatomical specializations for enhanced olfactory sensitivity in kiwi, Apteryx mantelli.

    PubMed

    Corfield, Jeremy R; Eisthen, Heather L; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Parsons, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    The ability to function in a nocturnal and ground-dwelling niche requires a unique set of sensory specializations. The New Zealand kiwi has shifted away from vision, instead relying on auditory and tactile stimuli to function in its environment and locate prey. Behavioral evidence suggests that kiwi also rely on their sense of smell, using olfactory cues in foraging and possibly also in communication and social interactions. Anatomical studies appear to support these observations: the olfactory bulbs and tubercles have been suggested to be large in the kiwi relative to other birds, although the extent of this enlargement is poorly understood. In this study, we examine the size of the olfactory bulbs in kiwi and compare them with 55 other bird species, including emus, ostriches, rheas, tinamous, and 2 extinct species of moa (Dinornithiformes). We also examine the cytoarchitecture of the olfactory bulbs and olfactory epithelium to determine if any neural specializations beyond size are present that would increase olfactory acuity. Kiwi were a clear outlier in our analysis, with olfactory bulbs that are proportionately larger than those of any other bird in this study. Emus, close relatives of the kiwi, also had a relative enlargement of the olfactory bulbs, possibly supporting a phylogenetic link to well-developed olfaction. The olfactory bulbs in kiwi are almost in direct contact with the olfactory epithelium, which is indeed well developed and complex, with olfactory receptor cells occupying a large percentage of the epithelium. The anatomy of the kiwi olfactory system supports an enhancement for olfactory sensitivities, which is undoubtedly associated with their unique nocturnal niche. PMID:25376305

  8. Anatomical specializations for enhanced olfactory sensitivity in kiwi, Apteryx mantelli.

    PubMed

    Corfield, Jeremy R; Eisthen, Heather L; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Parsons, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    The ability to function in a nocturnal and ground-dwelling niche requires a unique set of sensory specializations. The New Zealand kiwi has shifted away from vision, instead relying on auditory and tactile stimuli to function in its environment and locate prey. Behavioral evidence suggests that kiwi also rely on their sense of smell, using olfactory cues in foraging and possibly also in communication and social interactions. Anatomical studies appear to support these observations: the olfactory bulbs and tubercles have been suggested to be large in the kiwi relative to other birds, although the extent of this enlargement is poorly understood. In this study, we examine the size of the olfactory bulbs in kiwi and compare them with 55 other bird species, including emus, ostriches, rheas, tinamous, and 2 extinct species of moa (Dinornithiformes). We also examine the cytoarchitecture of the olfactory bulbs and olfactory epithelium to determine if any neural specializations beyond size are present that would increase olfactory acuity. Kiwi were a clear outlier in our analysis, with olfactory bulbs that are proportionately larger than those of any other bird in this study. Emus, close relatives of the kiwi, also had a relative enlargement of the olfactory bulbs, possibly supporting a phylogenetic link to well-developed olfaction. The olfactory bulbs in kiwi are almost in direct contact with the olfactory epithelium, which is indeed well developed and complex, with olfactory receptor cells occupying a large percentage of the epithelium. The anatomy of the kiwi olfactory system supports an enhancement for olfactory sensitivities, which is undoubtedly associated with their unique nocturnal niche.

  9. The sense of smell: multiple olfactory subsystems.

    PubMed

    Breer, H; Fleischer, J; Strotmann, J

    2006-07-01

    The mammalian olfactory system is not uniformly organized but consists of several subsystems each of which probably serves distinct functions. Not only are the two major nasal chemosensory systems, the vomeronasal organ and the main olfactory epithelium, structurally and functionally separate entities, but the latter is further subcompartimentalized into overlapping expression zones and projection-related subzones. Moreover, the populations of 'OR37' neurons not only express a unique type of olfactory receptors but also are segregated in a cluster-like manner and generally project to only one receptor-specific glomerulus. The septal organ is an island of sensory epithelium on the nasal septum positioned at the nasoplatine duct; it is considered as a 'mini-nose' with dual function. A specific chemosensory function of the most recently discovered subsystem, the so-called Grueneberg ganglion, is based on the expression of olfactory marker protein and the axonal projections to defined glomeruli within the olfactory bulb. This complexity of distinct olfactory subsystems may be one of the features determining the enormous chemosensory capacity of the sense of smell.

  10. Cytological organization of the alpha component of the anterior olfactory nucleus and olfactory limbus

    PubMed Central

    Larriva-Sahd, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the microscopic organization of a wedge-shaped area at the intersection of the main (MOB) and accessory olfactory bulbs (AOBs), or olfactory limbus (OL), and an additional component of the anterior olfactory nucleus or alpha AON that lies underneath of the AOB. The OL consists of a modified bulbar cortex bounded anteriorly by the MOB and posteriorly by the AOB. In Nissl-stained specimens the OL differs from the MOB by a progressive, antero-posterior decrease in thickness or absence of the external plexiform, mitral/tufted cell, and granule cell layers. On cytoarchitectual grounds the OL is divided from rostral to caudal into three distinct components: a stripe of glomerular-free cortex or preolfactory area (PA), a second or necklace glomerular area, and a wedge-shaped or interstitial area (INA) crowned by the so-called modified glomeruli that appear to belong to the anterior AOB. The strategic location and interactions with the main and AOBs, together with the previously noted functional and connectional evidence, suggest that the OL may be related to both sensory modalities. The alpha component of the anterior olfactory nucleus, a slender cellular cluster (i.e., 650 × 150 μm) paralleling the base of the AOB, contains two neuron types: a pyramidal-like neuron and an interneuron. Dendrites of pyramidal-like cells (P-L) organize into a single bundle that ascends avoiding the AOB to resolve in a trigone bounded by the edge of the OL, the AOB and the dorsal part of the anterior olfactory nucleus. Utrastructurally, the neuropil of the alpha component contains three types of synaptic terminals; one of them immunoreactive to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase, isoform 67. PMID:22754506

  11. Oscillation and coding in a formal neural network considered as a guide for plausible simulations of the insect olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Horcholle-Bossavit, Ginette; Quenet, Brigitte; Foucart, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    For the analysis of coding mechanisms in the insect olfactory system, a fully connected network of synchronously updated McCulloch and Pitts neurons (MC-P type) was developed [Quenet, B., Horn, D., 2003. The dynamic neural filter: a binary model of spatio-temporal coding. Neural Comput. 15 (2), 309-329]. Considering the update time as an intrinsic clock, this "Dynamic Neural Filter" (DNF), which maps regions of input space into spatio-temporal sequences of neuronal activity, is able to produce exact binary codes extracted from the synchronized activities recorded at the level of projection neurons (PN) in the locust antennal lobe (AL) in response to different odors [Wehr, M., Laurent, G., 1996. Odor encoding by temporal sequences of firing in oscillating neural assemblies. Nature 384, 162-166]. Here, in a first step, we separate the populations of PN and local inhibitory neurons (LN) and use the DNF as a guide for simulations based on biological plausible neurons (Hodgkin-Huxley: H-H type). We show that a parsimonious network of 10 H-H neurons generates action potentials whose timing represents the required codes. In a second step, we construct a new type of DNF in order to study the population dynamics when different delays are taken into account. We find synaptic matrices which lead to both the emergence of robust oscillations and spatio-temporal patterns, using a formal criterion, based on a Normalized Euclidian Distance (NED), in order to measure the use of the temporal dimension as a coding dimension by the DNF. Similarly to biological PN, the activity of excitatory neurons in the model can be both phase-locked to different cycles of oscillations which remind local field potential (LFP), and nevertheless exhibit dynamic behavior complex enough to be the basis of spatio-temporal codes.

  12. Involvement of TRPV1 in the Olfactory Bulb in Rimonabant-Induced Olfactory Discrimination Deficit.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sherry Shu-Jung

    2016-02-29

    Rimonabant is well recognized as a cannabinoid CB₁ receptor antagonist/inverse agonist. Rimonabant not only antagonizes the effects induced by exogenous cannabinoids and endocannabinoids at CB₁ receptors, it also exerts several pharmacological and behavioral effects independent of CB₁ receptor inactivation. For example, rimonabant can function as a low-potency mixed agonist/antagonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1). Hence, it is important to explain the underlying mechanisms of the diverse physiological effects induced by rimonabant with caution. Interestingly, CB₁ receptor has recently been suggested to play a role in olfactory functions. Olfaction not only is involved in food intake, visual perception and social interaction, but also is proposed as a putative marker for schizophrenia and autism. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether CB₁ receptor and TRPV1 played a role in olfactory functions. We first used the genetic disruption approach to examine the role of CB₁ receptor in olfactory functions and found that CB₁ knockout mice exhibited olfactory discrimination deficit. However, it is important to point out that these CB₁ knockout mice, despite their normal locomotivity, displayed deficiencies in the olfactory foraging and novel object exploration tasks. These results imply that general exploratory behaviors toward odorant and odorless objects are compromised in CB₁ knockout mice. We next turned to the pharmacological approach to examine the role of CB₁ receptor and TRPV1 in olfactory functions. We found that the short-term administration of rimonabant, injected systemically or directly into the olfactory bulb (OB), impaired olfactory discrimination that was rescued by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (CPZ), via the same route of rimonabant, in wild-type mice. These results suggest that TRPV1 in the OB is involved in rimonabant-induced olfactory discrimination deficit. However, the

  13. Olfactory Perceptual Learning Requires Action of Noradrenaline in the Olfactory Bulb: Comparison with Olfactory Associative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinera, Jennifer; Kermen, Florence; Sacquet, Joëlle; Didier, Anne; Mandairon, Nathalie; Richard, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Noradrenaline contributes to olfactory-guided behaviors but its role in olfactory learning during adulthood is poorly documented. We investigated its implication in olfactory associative and perceptual learning using local infusion of mixed a1-ß adrenergic receptor antagonist (labetalol) in the adult mouse olfactory bulb. We reported that…

  14. Biophysical and physiological characterization of ZraP from Escherichia coli, the periplasmic accessory protein of the atypical ZraSR two-component system.

    PubMed

    Petit-Härtlein, Isabelle; Rome, Kevin; de Rosny, Eve; Molton, Florian; Duboc, Carole; Gueguen, Erwan; Rodrigue, Agnès; Covès, Jacques

    2015-12-01

    The ZraSR system belongs to the family of TCSs (two-component signal transduction systems). In Escherichia coli, it was proposed to participate in zinc balance and to protect cytoplasmic zinc overload by sequestering this metal ion into the periplasm. This system controls the expression of the accessory protein ZraP that would be a periplasmic zinc scavenger. ZraPSR is functionally homologous with CpxPAR that integrates signals of envelope perturbation, including misfolded periplasmic proteins. The auxiliary periplasmic regulator CpxP inhibits the Cpx pathway by interacting with CpxA. Upon envelope stress sensing, the inhibitory function of CpxP is relieved, resulting in CpxR activation. Similarly to CpxPAR, ZraPSR probably plays a role in envelope stress response as a zinc-dependent chaperone activity was demonstrated for ZraP in Salmonella. We have purified ZraP from E. coli and shown that it is an octamer containing four interfacial metal-binding sites contributing to dimer stability. These sites are located close to the N-terminus, whereas the C-terminus is involved in polymerization of the protein to form a tetramer of dimers. In vitro, ZraP binds copper with a higher affinity than zinc and displays chaperone properties partially dependent on zinc binding. In vivo, zinc-bound ZraP is a repressor of the expression of the zraPSR operon. However, we have demonstrated that none of the Zra proteins are involved in zinc or copper resistance. We propose an integrated mechanism in which zinc is a marker of envelope stress perturbation and ZraPSR TCS is a sentinel sensing and responding to zinc entry into the periplasm.

  15. [Hypothesis on the function of olfactory receptor cells].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, A A

    1995-01-01

    The scientific studies of sensory systems (including olfactory organs) are carried out during a century. Usually a preliminary theory of object is suggested and detailed in accordance with the new data. However only the strong criticized theories of smell reception more than thirty) are now in the theoretical part of the olfactory organ physiology. The theory is necessary for planning the further investigations of olfactory organ; revealing the mystery of the biological sensors to improve the artificial ones; the improvement of the methods to obtain new biological active substances (perfume, drugs, insecticides). These circumstances justify the attempt to suggest the theory of the olfactory receptor cell functioning.

  16. Sleep and olfactory cortical plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Dylan C.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    In many systems, sleep plays a vital role in memory consolidation and synaptic homeostasis. These processes together help store information of biological significance and reset synaptic circuits to facilitate acquisition of information in the future. In this review, we describe recent evidence of sleep-dependent changes in olfactory system structure and function which contribute to odor memory and perception. During slow-wave sleep, the piriform cortex becomes hypo-responsive to odor stimulation and instead displays sharp-wave activity similar to that observed within the hippocampal formation. Furthermore, the functional connectivity between the piriform cortex and other cortical and limbic regions is enhanced during slow-wave sleep compared to waking. This combination of conditions may allow odor memory consolidation to occur during a state of reduced external interference and facilitate association of odor memories with stored hedonic and contextual cues. Evidence consistent with sleep-dependent odor replay within olfactory cortical circuits is presented. These data suggest that both the strength and precision of odor memories is sleep-dependent. The work further emphasizes the critical role of synaptic plasticity and memory in not only odor memory but also basic odor perception. The work also suggests a possible link between sleep disturbances that are frequently co-morbid with a wide range of pathologies including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and depression and the known olfactory impairments associated with those disorders. PMID:24795585

  17. Construction of odor representations by olfactory bulb microcircuits.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Like other sensory systems, the olfactory system transduces specific features of the external environment and must construct an organized sensory representation from these highly fragmented inputs. As with these other systems, this representation is not accurate per se, but is constructed for utility, and emphasizes certain, presumably useful, features over others. I here describe the cellular and circuit mechanisms of the peripheral olfactory system that underlie this process of sensory construction, emphasizing the distinct architectures and properties of the two prominent computational layers in the olfactory bulb. Notably, while the olfactory system solves essentially similar conceptual problems to other sensory systems, such as contrast enhancement, activity normalization, and extending dynamic range, its peculiarities often require qualitatively different computational algorithms than are deployed in other sensory modalities. In particular, the olfactory modality is intrinsically high dimensional, and lacks a simple, externally defined basis analogous to wavelength or pitch on which elemental odor stimuli can be quantitatively compared. Accordingly, the quantitative similarities of the receptive fields of different odorant receptors (ORs) vary according to the statistics of the odor environment. To resolve these unusual challenges, the olfactory bulb appears to utilize unique nontopographical computations and intrinsic learning mechanisms to perform the necessary high-dimensional, similarity-dependent computations. In sum, the early olfactory system implements a coordinated set of early sensory transformations directly analogous to those in other sensory systems, but accomplishes these with unique circuit architectures adapted to the properties of the olfactory modality.

  18. Design principles of the sparse coding network and the role of “sister cells” in the olfactory system of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Danke; Li, Yuanqing; Wu, Si; Rasch, Malte J.

    2013-01-01

    Sensory systems face the challenge to represent sensory inputs in a way to allow easy readout of sensory information by higher brain areas. In the olfactory system of the fly drosopohila melanogaster, projection neurons (PNs) of the antennal lobe (AL) convert a dense activation of glomeruli into a sparse, high-dimensional firing pattern of Kenyon cells (KCs) in the mushroom body (MB). Here we investigate the design principles of the olfactory system of drosophila in regard to the capabilities to discriminate odor quality from the MB representation and its robustness to different types of noise. We focus on understanding the role of highly correlated homotypic projection neurons (“sister cells”) found in the glomeruli of flies. These cells are coupled by gap-junctions and receive almost identical sensory inputs, but target randomly different KCs in MB. We show that sister cells might play a crucial role in increasing the robustness of the MB odor representation to noise. Computationally, sister cells thus might help the system to improve the generalization capabilities in face of noise without impairing the discriminability of odor quality at the same time. PMID:24167488

  19. Phase II CRADA ORNL99-0568 Report : Developing Transmission-Less Inverter Drive Systems for Axial-Gap Permanent magnet Accessory and Traction Motors and Generators

    SciTech Connect

    McKeever, J.W.

    2001-08-06

    Researchers of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNLs) Power Electronics and Electric Machine Research Center (PEEMRC) collaborated with Visual Computing Systems (VCS) to develop an electric axial-gap permanent magnet (PM) motor controlled by a self-sensing inverter for driving vehicle accessories such as power steering, air conditioning, and brakes. VCS designed an 8 kW motor based on their Segmented Electromagnetic Array (SEMA) technology. ORNL designed a 10 kW inverter to fit within the volume of a housing, which had been integrated with the motor. This modular design was pursued so that multiple modules could be used for higher power applications. ORNL built the first inverter under the cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) ORNL 98-0514 and drove a refurbished Delta motor with no load during the Merit Review at ORNL on Monday, May 17, 1999. Inverter circuitry and instructions for assembling the inverters were sent to VCS. A report was prepared and delivered during the Future Car Congress in April 2000, at Arlington, Virginia. Collaboration continued under CRADA ORNL 99-0568 as VCS designed and built a SEMA motor with a dual coil platter to be the traction motor for an electric truck. VCS and ORNL assembled two 45 kW inverters. Each inverter drove one coil, which was designed to deliver 15 kW continuous power and 45 kW peak power for 90 s. The vehicle was road tested as part of the Future Truck Competition. A report was prepared and delivered during the PCIM in October 2000, at Boston, Massachusetts.

  20. Suppression of Background Odor Effect in Odor Sensing System Using Olfactory Adaptation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohba, Tsuneaki; Yamanaka, Takao

    In this study, a new method for suppressing the background odor effect is proposed. Since odor sensors response to background odors in addition to a target odor, it is difficult to detect the target odor information. In the conventional odor sensing systems, the effect of the background odors are compensated by subtracting the response to the background odors (the baseline response). Although this simple subtraction method is effective for constant background odors, it fails in the compensation for time-varying background odors. The proposed method for the background suppression is effective even for the time-varying background odors.

  1. Automobile accessories: Assessment and improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.

    1995-11-01

    With mandates and regulatory policies to meet both the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), designing vehicles of the future will become a difficult task. As we look into the use of electric and hybrid vehicles, reduction of the required power demand by influential automobile components is necessary in order to obtain performance and range goals. Among those automobile components are accessories. Accessories have a profound impact on the range and mileage of future vehicles with limited amounts of energy or without power generating capabilities such as conventional vehicles. Careful assessment of major power consuming accessories helps us focus on those that need improvement and contributes to attainment of mileage and range goals for electric and hybrid vehicles.

  2. Advantages of disposable endoscopic accessories.

    PubMed

    Petersen, B T

    2000-04-01

    Despite the prevailing emphasis on falling reimbursements and cost containment, the use of disposable endoscopic accessories has grown tremendously. They offer simplicity of use, certain sterility, and reduced labor costs in exchange for higher purchase costs per procedure and the burden of waste disposal. Disposable accessories provide greater variety, complexity, and utility. They carry a cost burden that may be acceptable when the devices are difficult to reprocess, when they incorporate features that justify the added cost, or when their unit cost approaches purchase plus reprocessing costs for reusable alternatives, such as for biopsy forceps. Units with small volumes may prefer the ease of disposable accessories independent of relative cost issues, while large high-volume units may need to evaluate cost data more carefully to maintain sustainable practices.

  3. Structural differences in the drone olfactory system of two phylogenetically distant Apis species, A. florea and A. mellifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockmann, Axel; Brückner, Dorothea

    2001-01-01

    Male insects that are attracted by sex pheromones to find their female mates over long distances have specialized olfactory subsystems. Morphologically, these subsystems are characterized by a large number of receptor neurons sensitive to components of the female's pheromones and hypertrophied glomerular subunits ('macroglomeruli' or 'macroglomerular complexes') in the antennal lobes, in which the axons of the receptor neurons converge. The olfactory subsystems are adapted for an increased sensitivity to perceive minute amounts of pheromones. In Apis mellifera, drones have 18,600 olfactory poreplate sensilla per antenna, each equipped with receptor neurons sensitive to the queen's sex pheromone, and four voluminous macroglomeruli (MG1-MG4) in the antennal lobes. In contrast, we show that drones of the phylogenetically distant species, Apis florea, have only 1,200 poreplate sensilla per antenna and only two macroglomeruli in their antennal lobes. These macroglomeruli are homologous in anatomical position to the two most prominent macroglomeruli in A. mellifera, the MG1 and MG2, but they are much smaller in size. The morphological and anatomical differences described here suggest major modifications in the sex-pheromone processing subsystem of both species: (1) less pheromone sensitivity in A. florea and (2) a more complex sex-pheromone processing and thus a more complex sex-pheromone communication in A. mellifera.

  4. Ionotropic Crustacean Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Elizabeth A.; Bobkov, Yuriy; Ukhanov, Kirill; Ache, Barry W.

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs), the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling. PMID:23573266

  5. Comparative analysis of deutocerebral neuropils in Chilopoda (Myriapoda): implications for the evolution of the arthropod olfactory system and support for the Mandibulata concept

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Originating from a marine ancestor, the myriapods most likely invaded land independently of the hexapods. As these two evolutionary lineages conquered land in parallel but separately, we are interested in comparing the myriapod chemosensory system to that of hexapods to gain insights into possible adaptations for olfaction in air. Our study connects to a previous analysis of the brain and behavior of the chilopod (centipede) Scutigera coleoptrata in which we demonstrated that these animals do respond to volatile substances and analyzed the structure of their central olfactory pathway. Results Here, we examined the architecture of the deutocerebral brain areas (which process input from the antennae) in seven additional representatives of the Chilopoda, covering all major subtaxa, by histology, confocal laser-scan microscopy, and 3D reconstruction. We found that in all species that we studied the majority of antennal afferents target two separate neuropils, the olfactory lobe (chemosensory, composed of glomerular neuropil compartments) and the corpus lamellosum (mechanosensory). The numbers of olfactory glomeruli in the different chilopod taxa ranged from ca. 35 up to ca. 90 and the shape of the glomeruli ranged from spheroid across ovoid or drop-shape to elongate. Conclusion A split of the afferents from the (first) pair of antennae into separate chemosensory and mechanosensory components is also typical for Crustacea and Hexapoda, but this set of characters is absent in Chelicerata. We suggest that this character set strongly supports the Mandibulata hypothesis (Myriapoda + (Crustacea + Hexapoda)) as opposed to the Myriochelata concept (Myriapoda + Chelicerata). The evolutionary implications of our findings, particularly the plasticity of glomerular shape, are discussed. PMID:22214384

  6. Photoperiod mediated changes in olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Walton, James C; Pyter, Leah M; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2012-01-01

    Brain plasticity, in relation to new adult mammalian neurons generated in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus, has been well described. However, the functional outcome of new adult olfactory neurons born in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles is not clearly defined, as manipulating neurogenesis through various methods has given inconsistent and conflicting results in lab mice. Several small rodent species, including Peromyscus leucopus, display seasonal (photoperiodic) brain plasticity in brain volume, hippocampal function, and hippocampus-dependent behaviors; plasticity in the olfactory system of photoperiodic rodents remains largely uninvestigated. We exposed adult male P. leucopus to long day lengths (LD) and short day lengths (SD) for 10 to 15 weeks and then examined olfactory bulb cell proliferation and survival using the thymidine analog BrdU, olfactory bulb granule cell morphology using Golgi-Cox staining, and behavioral investigation of same-sex conspecific urine. SD mice did not differ from LD counterparts in granular cell morphology of the dendrites or in dendritic spine density. Although there were no differences due to photoperiod in habituation to water odor, SD mice rapidly habituated to male urine, whereas LD mice did not. In addition, short day induced changes in olfactory behavior were associated with increased neurogenesis in the caudal plexiform and granule cell layers of the olfactory bulb, an area known to preferentially respond to water-soluble odorants. Taken together, these data demonstrate that photoperiod, without altering olfactory bulb neuronal morphology, alters olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in Peromyscus leucopus. PMID:22912730

  7. Photoperiod mediated changes in olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Walton, James C; Pyter, Leah M; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2012-01-01

    Brain plasticity, in relation to new adult mammalian neurons generated in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus, has been well described. However, the functional outcome of new adult olfactory neurons born in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles is not clearly defined, as manipulating neurogenesis through various methods has given inconsistent and conflicting results in lab mice. Several small rodent species, including Peromyscus leucopus, display seasonal (photoperiodic) brain plasticity in brain volume, hippocampal function, and hippocampus-dependent behaviors; plasticity in the olfactory system of photoperiodic rodents remains largely uninvestigated. We exposed adult male P. leucopus to long day lengths (LD) and short day lengths (SD) for 10 to 15 weeks and then examined olfactory bulb cell proliferation and survival using the thymidine analog BrdU, olfactory bulb granule cell morphology using Golgi-Cox staining, and behavioral investigation of same-sex conspecific urine. SD mice did not differ from LD counterparts in granular cell morphology of the dendrites or in dendritic spine density. Although there were no differences due to photoperiod in habituation to water odor, SD mice rapidly habituated to male urine, whereas LD mice did not. In addition, short day induced changes in olfactory behavior were associated with increased neurogenesis in the caudal plexiform and granule cell layers of the olfactory bulb, an area known to preferentially respond to water-soluble odorants. Taken together, these data demonstrate that photoperiod, without altering olfactory bulb neuronal morphology, alters olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in Peromyscus leucopus.

  8. Photoperiod Mediated Changes in Olfactory Bulb Neurogenesis and Olfactory Behavior in Male White-Footed Mice (Peromyscus leucopus)

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Zachary M.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2012-01-01

    Brain plasticity, in relation to new adult mammalian neurons generated in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus, has been well described. However, the functional outcome of new adult olfactory neurons born in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles is not clearly defined, as manipulating neurogenesis through various methods has given inconsistent and conflicting results in lab mice. Several small rodent species, including Peromyscus leucopus, display seasonal (photoperiodic) brain plasticity in brain volume, hippocampal function, and hippocampus-dependent behaviors; plasticity in the olfactory system of photoperiodic rodents remains largely uninvestigated. We exposed adult male P. leucopus to long day lengths (LD) and short day lengths (SD) for 10 to 15 weeks and then examined olfactory bulb cell proliferation and survival using the thymidine analog BrdU, olfactory bulb granule cell morphology using Golgi-Cox staining, and behavioral investigation of same-sex conspecific urine. SD mice did not differ from LD counterparts in granular cell morphology of the dendrites or in dendritic spine density. Although there were no differences due to photoperiod in habituation to water odor, SD mice rapidly habituated to male urine, whereas LD mice did not. In addition, short day induced changes in olfactory behavior were associated with increased neurogenesis in the caudal plexiform and granule cell layers of the olfactory bulb, an area known to preferentially respond to water-soluble odorants. Taken together, these data demonstrate that photoperiod, without altering olfactory bulb neuronal morphology, alters olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in Peromyscus leucopus. PMID:22912730

  9. Development of olfactory projection neuron dendrites that contribute to wiring specificity of the Drosophila olfactory circuit.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Chisako; Anzo, Marie; Miura, Masayuki; Chihara, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    The antennal lobe (AL) of Drosophila is the first olfactory processing center in which olfactory input and output are spatially organized into distinct channels via glomeruli to form a discrete neural map. In each glomerulus, the axons of a single type of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) synapse with the dendrites of a single type of projection neurons (PNs). The AL is an ideal place to study how the wiring specificity between specific types of ORNs and PNs is established during development. During the past two decades, the involvement of diverse molecules in the specification and patterning of ORNs and PNs has been reported. Furthermore, local interneurons-another component of glomeruli-have been recently catalogued and their functions have been gradually dissected. Although there is accumulating knowledge about the involvement of these three cell types in the wiring specificity of the olfactory system, in this review, we focus especially on the development of PN dendrites.

  10. Olfactory sensations produced by high-energy photon irradiation of the olfactory receptor mucosa in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, S.M.; Thomas, R.J.; Loverock, L.T.; Spittle, M.F. )

    1991-04-01

    During irradiation of volumes that incorporate the olfactory system, a proportion of patients have complained of a pungent smell. A retrospective study was carried out to determine the prevalence of this side-effect. A questionnaire was sent to 40 patients whose treatment volumes included the olfactory region and also to a control group treated away from this region. The irradiated tumor volumes included the frontal lobe, whole brain, nasopharynx, pituitary fossa, and maxillary antrum. Of the 25 patients who replied, 60% experienced odorous symptoms during irradiation. They described the odor as unpleasant and consistent with ozone. Stimulation of olfactory receptors is considered to be caused by the radiochemical formation of ozone and free radicals in the mucus overlying the olfactory mucosa.

  11. Olfactory Mucosa Tissue Based Biosensor for Bioelectronic Nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingjun; Ye, Weiwei; Yu, Hui; Hu, Ning; Cai, Hua; Wang, Ping

    2009-05-01

    Biological olfactory system can distinguish thousands of odors. In order to realize the biomimetic design of electronic nose on the principle of mammalian olfactory system, we have reported bioelectronic nose based on cultured olfactory cells. In this study, the electrical property of the tissue-semiconductor interface was analyzed by the volume conductor theory and the sheet conductor model. Olfactory mucosa tissue of rat was isolated and fixed on the surface of the light-addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS), with the natural stations of the neuronal populations and functional receptor unit of the cilia well reserved. By the extracellular potentials of the olfactory receptor cells of the mucosa tissue monitored, both the simulation and the experimental results suggested that this tissue-semiconductor hybrid system was sensitive to odorants stimulation.

  12. Intrahepatic accessory spleen: imaging features.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Luciano; Caputo, Maria; Galati, Gaspare

    2004-06-01

    The authors present a case report of a 60-year-old man with a hepatic unknown mass. For diagnosis, they used ECO, CT (with and without contrast), MR (with and without contrast) and an ultrasound-assisted percutaneous lesion biopsy. Thus the mass-lesion in the liver appeared to be an intrahepatic accessory spleen in a patient afflicted with chronic hepatitis.

  13. Teaching Techniques for Accessory Percussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micallef, Ken

    2007-01-01

    Everyone is familiar with the main percussion instruments of the contemporary orchestra: bass drum, snare drum, suspended cymbal, vibraphone, and timpani. But as source material broadens, so do the demands placed on the percussion section. Accessory, or auxiliary percussion, can make the difference between a typical rendition of a well-known piece…

  14. A Screen for Genes Expressed in the Olfactory Organs of Drosophila melanogaster Identifies Genes Involved in Olfactory Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Tunstall, Narelle E.; Herr, Anabel; de Bruyne, Marien; Warr, Coral G.

    2012-01-01

    Background For insects the sense of smell and associated olfactory-driven behaviours are essential for survival. Insects detect odorants with families of olfactory receptor proteins that are very different to those of mammals, and there are likely to be other unique genes and genetic pathways involved in the function and development of the insect olfactory system. Methodology/Principal Findings We have performed a genetic screen of a set of 505 Drosophila melanogaster gene trap insertion lines to identify novel genes expressed in the adult olfactory organs. We identified 16 lines with expression in the olfactory organs, many of which exhibited expression of the trapped genes in olfactory receptor neurons. Phenotypic analysis showed that six of the lines have decreased olfactory responses in a behavioural assay, and for one of these we showed that precise excision of the P element reverts the phenotype to wild type, confirming a role for the trapped gene in olfaction. To confirm the identity of the genes trapped in the lines we performed molecular analysis of some of the insertion sites. While for many lines the reported insertion sites were correct, we also demonstrated that for a number of lines the reported location of the element was incorrect, and in three lines there were in fact two pGT element insertions. Conclusions/Significance We identified 16 new genes expressed in the Drosophila olfactory organs, the majority in neurons, and for several of the gene trap lines demonstrated a defect in olfactory-driven behaviour. Further characterisation of these genes and their roles in olfactory system function and development will increase our understanding of how the insect olfactory system has evolved to perform the same essential function to that of mammals, but using very different molecular genetic mechanisms. PMID:22530061

  15. Odorant concentration differentiator for intermittent olfactory signals.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Terufumi; Kazawa, Tomoki; Sakurai, Takeshi; Fukushima, Ryota; Uchino, Keiro; Yamagata, Tomoko; Namiki, Shigehiro; Haupt, Stephan Shuichi; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2014-12-10

    Animals need to discriminate differences in spatiotemporally distributed sensory signals in terms of quality as well as quantity for generating adaptive behavior. Olfactory signals characterized by odor identity and concentration are intermittently distributed in the environment. From these intervals of stimulation, animals process odorant concentration to localize partners or food sources. Although concentration-response characteristics in olfactory neurons have traditionally been investigated using single stimulus pulses, their behavior under intermittent stimulus regimens remains largely elusive. Using the silkmoth (Bombyx mori) pheromone processing system, a simple and behaviorally well-defined model for olfaction, we investigated the neuronal representation of odorant concentration upon intermittent stimulation in the naturally occurring range. To the first stimulus in a series, the responses of antennal lobe (AL) projection neurons (PNs) showed a concentration dependence as previously shown in many olfactory systems. However, PN response amplitudes dynamically changed upon exposure to intermittent stimuli of the same odorant concentration and settled to a constant, largely concentration-independent level. As a result, PN responses emphasized odorant concentration changes rather than encoding absolute concentration in pulse trains of stimuli. Olfactory receptor neurons did not contribute to this response transformation which was due to long-lasting inhibition affecting PNs in the AL. Simulations confirmed that inhibition also provides advantages when stimuli have naturalistic properties. The primary olfactory center thus functions as an odorant concentration differentiator to efficiently detect concentration changes, thereby improving odorant source orientation over a wide concentration range.

  16. Integrating temperature with odor processing in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Kludt, Eugen; Okom, Camille; Brinkmann, Alexander; Schild, Detlev

    2015-05-20

    Temperature perception has long been classified as a somesthetic function solely. However, in recent years several studies brought evidence that temperature perception also takes place in the olfactory system of rodents. Temperature has been described as an effective stimulus for sensory neurons of the Grueneberg ganglion located at the entrance of the nose. Here, we investigate whether a neuronal trace of temperature stimulation can be observed in the glomeruli and mitral cells of the olfactory bulb, using calcium imaging and fast line-scanning microscopy. We show in the Xenopus tadpole system that the γ-glomerulus, which receives input from olfactory neurons, is highly sensitive to temperature drops at the olfactory epithelium. We observed that thermo-induced activity in the γ-glomerulus is conveyed to the mitral cells innervating this specific neuropil. Surprisingly, a substantial number of thermosensitive mitral cells were also chemosensitive. Moreover, we report another unique feature of the γ-glomerulus: it receives ipsilateral and contralateral afferents. The latter fibers pass through the contralateral bulb, cross the anterior commissure, and then run to the ipsilateral olfactory bulb, where they target the γ-glomerulus. Temperature drops at the contralateral olfactory epithelium also induced responses in the γ-glomerulus and in mitral cells. Temperature thus appears to be a relevant physiological input to the Xenopus olfactory system. Each olfactory bulb integrates and codes temperature signals originating from receptor neurons of the ipsilateral and contralateral nasal cavities. Finally, temperature and chemical information is processed in shared cellular networks.

  17. Acetylcholine and Olfactory Perceptual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Donald A.; Fletcher, Max L.; Sullivan, Regina M.

    2004-01-01

    Olfactory perceptual learning is a relatively long-term, learned increase in perceptual acuity, and has been described in both humans and animals. Data from recent electrophysiological studies have indicated that olfactory perceptual learning may be correlated with changes in odorant receptive fields of neurons in the olfactory bulb and piriform…

  18. Forty years of olfactory navigation in birds.

    PubMed

    Gagliardo, Anna

    2013-06-15

    Forty years ago, Papi and colleagues discovered that anosmic pigeons cannot find their way home when released at unfamiliar locations. They explained this phenomenon by developing the olfactory navigation hypothesis: pigeons at the home loft learn the odours carried by the winds in association with wind direction; once at the release site, they determine the direction of displacement on the basis of the odours perceived locally and orient homeward. In addition to the old classical experiments, new GPS tracking data and observations on the activation of the olfactory system in displaced pigeons have provided further evidence for the specific role of olfactory cues in pigeon navigation. Although it is not known which odours the birds might rely on for navigation, it has been shown that volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere are distributed as fairly stable gradients to allow environmental odour-based navigation. The investigation of the potential role of olfactory cues for navigation in wild birds is still at an early stage; however, the evidence collected so far suggests that olfactory navigation might be a widespread mechanism in avian species.

  19. Neuropeptide S facilitates mice olfactory function through activation of cognate receptor-expressing neurons in the olfactory cortex.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu-Feng; Zhao, Peng; Dong, Chao-Yu; Li, Jing; Kong, Xiang-Pan; Wang, Hai-Liang; Dai, Li-Rong; Hou, Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a newly identified neuromodulator located in the brainstem and regulates various biological functions by selectively activating the NPS receptors (NPSR). High level expression of NPSR mRNA in the olfactory cortex suggests that NPS-NPSR system might be involved in the regulation of olfactory function. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of NPS or co-injection of NPSR antagonist on the olfactory behaviors, food intake, and c-Fos expression in olfactory cortex in mice. In addition, dual-immunofluorescence was employed to identify NPS-induced Fos immunereactive (-ir) neurons that also bear NPSR. NPS (0.1-1 nmol) i.c.v. injection significantly reduced the latency to find the buried food, and increased olfactory differentiation of different odors and the total sniffing time spent in olfactory habituation/dishabituation tasks. NPS facilitated olfactory ability most at the dose of 0.5 nmol, which could be blocked by co-injection of 40 nmol NPSR antagonist [D-Val(5)]NPS. NPS administration dose-dependently inhibited food intake in fasted mice. Ex-vivo c-Fos and NPSR immunohistochemistry in the olfactory cortex revealed that, as compared with vehicle-treated mice, NPS markedly enhanced c-Fos expression in the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), piriform cortex (Pir), ventral tenia tecta (VTT), the anterior cortical amygdaloid nucleus (ACo) and lateral entorhinal cortex (LEnt). The percentage of Fos-ir neurons that also express NPSR were 88.5% and 98.1% in the AON and Pir, respectively. The present findings demonstrated that NPS, via selective activation of the neurons bearing NPSR in the olfactory cortex, facilitates olfactory function in mice.

  20. The Dlx5 and Foxg1 transcription factors, linked via miRNA-9 and -200, are required for the development of the olfactory and GnRH system.

    PubMed

    Garaffo, Giulia; Conte, Daniele; Provero, Paolo; Tomaiuolo, Daniela; Luo, Zheng; Pinciroli, Patrizia; Peano, Clelia; D'Atri, Ilaria; Gitton, Yorick; Etzion, Talya; Gothilf, Yoav; Gays, Dafne; Santoro, Massimo M; Merlo, Giorgio R

    2015-09-01

    During neuronal development and maturation, microRNAs (miRs) play diverse functions ranging from early patterning, proliferation and commitment to differentiation, survival, homeostasis, activity and plasticity of more mature and adult neurons. The role of miRs in the differentiation of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) is emerging from the conditional inactivation of Dicer in immature ORN, and the depletion of all mature miRs in this system. Here, we identify specific miRs involved in olfactory development, by focusing on mice null for Dlx5, a homeogene essential for both ORN differentiation and axon guidance and connectivity. Analysis of miR expression in Dlx5(-/-) olfactory epithelium pointed to reduced levels of miR-9, miR-376a and four miRs of the -200 class in the absence of Dlx5. To functionally examine the role of these miRs, we depleted miR-9 and miR-200 class in reporter zebrafish embryos and observed delayed ORN differentiation, altered axonal trajectory/targeting, and altered genesis and position of olfactory-associated GnRH neurons, i.e. a phenotype known as Kallmann syndrome in humans. miR-9 and miR-200-class negatively control Foxg1 mRNA, a fork-head transcription factor essential for development of the olfactory epithelium and of the forebrain, known to maintain progenitors in a stem state. Increased levels of z-foxg1 mRNA resulted in delayed ORN differentiation and altered axon trajectory, in zebrafish embryos. This work describes for the first time the role of specific miR (-9 and -200) in olfactory/GnRH development, and uncovers a Dlx5-Foxg1 regulation whose alteration affects receptor neuron differentiation, axonal targeting, GnRH neuron development, the hallmarks of the Kallmann syndrome.

  1. The Dlx5 and Foxg1 transcription factors, linked via miRNA-9 and -200, are required for the development of the olfactory and GnRH system

    PubMed Central

    Garaffo, Giulia; Conte, Daniele; Provero, Paolo; Tomaiuolo, Daniela; Luo, Zheng; Pinciroli, Patrizia; Peano, Clelia; D'Atri, Ilaria; Gitton, Yorick; Etzion, Talya; Gothilf, Yoav; Gays, Dafne; Santoro, Massimo M.; Merlo, Giorgio R.

    2015-01-01

    During neuronal development and maturation, microRNAs (miRs) play diverse functions ranging from early patterning, proliferation and commitment to differentiation, survival, homeostasis, activity and plasticity of more mature and adult neurons. The role of miRs in the differentiation of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) is emerging from the conditional inactivation of Dicer in immature ORN, and the depletion of all mature miRs in this system. Here, we identify specific miRs involved in olfactory development, by focusing on mice null for Dlx5, a homeogene essential for both ORN differentiation and axon guidance and connectivity. Analysis of miR expression in Dlx5−/− olfactory epithelium pointed to reduced levels of miR-9, miR-376a and four miRs of the -200 class in the absence of Dlx5. To functionally examine the role of these miRs, we depleted miR-9 and miR-200 class in reporter zebrafish embryos and observed delayed ORN differentiation, altered axonal trajectory/targeting, and altered genesis and position of olfactory-associated GnRH neurons, i.e. a phenotype known as Kallmann syndrome in humans. miR-9 and miR-200-class negatively control Foxg1 mRNA, a fork-head transcription factor essential for development of the olfactory epithelium and of the forebrain, known to maintain progenitors in a stem state. Increased levels of z-foxg1 mRNA resulted in delayed ORN differentiation and altered axon trajectory, in zebrafish embryos. This work describes for the first time the role of specific miR (-9 and -200) in olfactory/GnRH development, and uncovers a Dlx5–Foxg1 regulation whose alteration affects receptor neuron differentiation, axonal targeting, GnRH neuron development, the hallmarks of the Kallmann syndrome. PMID:25937343

  2. Role of the Accessory Parotid Gland in the Etiology of Parotitis: Statistical Analysis of Sialographic Features

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wangyong; Hu, Fengchun; Liu, Xingguang; Guo, Songcan; Tao, Qian

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study aimed to identify if the existence of the accessory parotid gland correlated with the etiology of parotitis. This may aid the development of better treatment strategies in the future. Sialographic features of cases with parotitis and healthy subjects were reviewed. The chi-square test was used to compare the incidence of accessory parotid gland between the groups. The Student’s t test was used to compare the length of Stensen’s duct, the length from the orifice to the confluence of the accessory duct, and the angle between the accessory duct and Stensen’s duct between the groups. The incidence of accessory parotid gland in patients with parotitis was 71.8% (28/39), which was significantly higher than that in healthy subjects (P = 0.005). Patients with parotitis had a longer Stensen’s duct than healthy subjects (P = 0.003). There was no significant difference in the length from the orifice to the confluence of the accessory duct or the angle between the accessory duct and Stensen’s duct (P = 0.136 and 0.511, respectively) between the groups. The accessory parotid gland might play a role in the pathogenesis of parotitis. The existence of an accessory parotid gland is likely to interfere with salivary flow. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of salivary flow in the ductal system would be useful in future etiologic studies on parotitis. PMID:26913509

  3. Role of the Accessory Parotid Gland in the Etiology of Parotitis: Statistical Analysis of Sialographic Features.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wangyong; Hu, Fengchun; Liu, Xingguang; Guo, Songcan; Tao, Qian

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study aimed to identify if the existence of the accessory parotid gland correlated with the etiology of parotitis. This may aid the development of better treatment strategies in the future. Sialographic features of cases with parotitis and healthy subjects were reviewed. The chi-square test was used to compare the incidence of accessory parotid gland between the groups. The Student's t test was used to compare the length of Stensen's duct, the length from the orifice to the confluence of the accessory duct, and the angle between the accessory duct and Stensen's duct between the groups. The incidence of accessory parotid gland in patients with parotitis was 71.8% (28/39), which was significantly higher than that in healthy subjects (P = 0.005). Patients with parotitis had a longer Stensen's duct than healthy subjects (P = 0.003). There was no significant difference in the length from the orifice to the confluence of the accessory duct or the angle between the accessory duct and Stensen's duct (P = 0.136 and 0.511, respectively) between the groups. The accessory parotid gland might play a role in the pathogenesis of parotitis. The existence of an accessory parotid gland is likely to interfere with salivary flow. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of salivary flow in the ductal system would be useful in future etiologic studies on parotitis. PMID:26913509

  4. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-02-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons are identified by their Go-like immunoreactivity, and show a distinct spatial distribution within the olfactory epithelium, similar to, but significantly different from that of crypt neurons. Furthermore, kappe neurons project to a single identified target glomerulus within the olfactory bulb, mdg5 of the mediodorsal cluster, whereas crypt neurons are known to project exclusively to the mdg2 glomerulus. Kappe neurons are negative for established markers of ciliated, microvillous and crypt neurons, but appear to have microvilli. Kappe neurons constitute the fourth type of olfactory sensory neurons reported in teleost fishes and their existence suggests that encoding of olfactory stimuli may require a higher complexity than hitherto assumed already in the peripheral olfactory system.

  5. Olfactory dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong-Ming; Lu, Da; Liu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Hui-Hong; Zhou, Yu-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder with the earliest clinical symptom of olfactory dysfunction, which is a potential clinical marker for AD severity and progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. This article reviews relevant research on olfactory dysfunction in AD and evaluates the predictive value of olfactory dysfunction for the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical features of AD, as well as for the conversion of cognitive impairment to AD. We summarize problems of existing studies and provide a useful reference for further studies in AD olfactory dysfunction and for clinical applications of olfactory testing. PMID:27143888

  6. Locally vascularized pelvic accessory spleen.

    PubMed

    Iorio, F; Frantellizzi, V; Drudi, Francesco M; Maghella, F; Liberatore, M

    2016-01-01

    Polysplenism and accessory spleen are congenital, usually asymptomatic anomalies. A rare case of polysplenism with ectopic spleen in pelvis of a 67-year-old, Caucasian female is reported here. A transvaginal ultrasound found a soft well-defined homogeneous and vascularized mass in the left pelvis. Patient underwent MRI evaluation and contrast-CT abdominal scan: images with parenchymal aspect, similar to spleen were obtained. Abdominal scintigraphy with 99mTc-albumin nanocolloid was performed and pelvic region was studied with planar scans and SPECT. The results showed the presence of an uptake area of the radiopharmaceutical in the pelvis, while the spleen was normally visualized. These findings confirmed the presence of an accessory spleen with an artery originated from the aorta and a vein that joined with the superior mesenteric vein. To our knowledge, in the literature, there is just only one case of a true ectopic, locally vascularized spleen in the pelvis.

  7. 21 CFR 884.1690 - Hysteroscope and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... direct viewing of the cervical canal and the uterine cavity by a telescopic system introduced into the... specialized instrument or device delivery system; do not have adapters, connectors, channels, or do not have portals for electrosurgical, laser, or other power sources. Such hysteroscope accessory...

  8. 21 CFR 884.1690 - Hysteroscope and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... direct viewing of the cervical canal and the uterine cavity by a telescopic system introduced into the... specialized instrument or device delivery system; do not have adapters, connectors, channels, or do not have portals for electrosurgical, laser, or other power sources. Such hysteroscope accessory...

  9. Transcriptional biomarkers and mechanisms of copper-induced olfactory injury in zebrafish.

    PubMed Central

    Tilton, Fred; Tilton, Susan C.; Bammler, Theo K.; Beyer, Richard; Farin, Frederico; Stapleton, Patricia L.; Gallagher, Evan P.

    2012-01-01

    Metals such as copper disrupt olfactory function in fish. Unfortunately, little is understood of the molecular consequences of copper olfactory impairment, thus hindering the development of relevant diagnostic tools of olfactory injury. To address this critical data gap, we analyzed gene expression within olfactory tissues of adult zebrafish exposed to CuCl2 (6, 16, 40 ppb) for 24 hrs. Transcriptional markers of copper impairment within the entire olfactory system were identified and specific genes of interest (e.g. S100a, parvalbumin 8, olfactory marker protein, and calbindin 2-like protein) were confirmed with quantitative real-time PCR. In addition, we performed gene set analysis (GSA) using both a-priori and custom pathways of gene sets specifically targeting the olfactory signal transduction (OST) pathway. These analyses revealed down-regulated gene sets related to calcium channels and ion transport, g-proteins, and olfactory receptors. Collectively, these data demonstrate that copper causes a depression of transcription of key genes within the OST pathway and elsewhere within olfactory tissues, likely resulting in an olfactory system less responsive to odorants. Further, these data provide a mechanistic explanation in support of earlier studies of functional olfactory impairment in fish following copper exposure. PMID:19174923

  10. Macrophages: important accessory cells for reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Cohen, P E; Nishimura, K; Zhu, L; Pollard, J W

    1999-11-01

    Macrophages are found throughout reproductive tissues. To determine their role(s), we have studied mice homozygous for a null mutation (Csfm(op)) in the gene encoding the major macrophage growth factor, colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1). Both male and female Csfm(op)/Csfm(op) mice have fertility defects. Males have low sperm number and libido as a consequence of dramatically reduced circulating testosterone. Females have extended estrous cycles and poor ovulation rates. CSF-1 is the principal growth factor regulating macrophage populations in the testis, male accessory glands, ovary, and uterus. However, analyses of CSF-1 nullizygous mice suggest that the primary reproductive defect is in the development of feedback regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Although not correlating with deficiencies of microglia populations, electrophysiological investigations indicate an impairment of neuronal responses. This suggests that microglia, under the influence of CSF-1, act to organize neuronal connectivity during development and that the absence of this function results in a perturbation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Macrophages also appear to have functions in the differentiated tissues of the reproductive system, including having a positive influence on steroidogenic cells. These data suggest that macrophages, through their trophic functions, can be considered as essential accessory cells for normal reproductive functioning.

  11. Accessory spleen hypertrophy mimicking colon cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ates, I; Yazici, O; Yazilitas, D; Ozdemir, N; Zengin, N

    2016-09-01

    Accessory spleen is a congenital form of an ectopic splenic tissue. In this report, we present a case of a patient who was followed with the diagnosis of rectal and sigmoid colon cancer and an accessory spleen hypertrophy, which was thought to be colon cancer metastasis in the left hypochondriac region. After colectomy and splenectomy, accessory spleen that mimics cancer metastasis was diffrentially diagnosed using scintigraphy. PMID:27685531

  12. Accessory suprarenal gland: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kirici, Y; Mas, M R; Saglamkaya, U; Oztas, E; Ozan, H

    2001-06-01

    The suprarenal glands are normally located at the superomedial aspect of the kidneys. Accessory cortical masses are seen in approximately half of the newborn but usually disappear later. Several cases with accessory cortical tissues located near the main suprarenal glands have been reported but their usual locations have been rarely described. Here we report a case with accessory cortical tissue located on the right in the retrocrural space with compression symptoms. Such a lesion may be confused with lymphadenopathy radiologically.

  13. 21 CFR 876.1500 - Endoscope and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., and allow observation or manipulation of body cavities, hollow organs, and canals. The device consists of various rigid or flexible instruments that are inserted into body spaces and may include an optical system for conveying an image to the user's eye and their accessories may assist in gaining...

  14. 21 CFR 876.1500 - Endoscope and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., and allow observation or manipulation of body cavities, hollow organs, and canals. The device consists of various rigid or flexible instruments that are inserted into body spaces and may include an optical system for conveying an image to the user's eye and their accessories may assist in gaining...

  15. 21 CFR 876.1500 - Endoscope and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., and allow observation or manipulation of body cavities, hollow organs, and canals. The device consists of various rigid or flexible instruments that are inserted into body spaces and may include an optical system for conveying an image to the user's eye and their accessories may assist in gaining...

  16. 21 CFR 876.1500 - Endoscope and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., and allow observation or manipulation of body cavities, hollow organs, and canals. The device consists of various rigid or flexible instruments that are inserted into body spaces and may include an optical system for conveying an image to the user's eye and their accessories may assist in gaining...

  17. New-type cable accessories for power distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Sanjo, K.; Kawano, K.; Shiraoka, K.; Yasuda, N.; Yatsuka, K.

    1982-12-01

    This paper describes new types of cable accessories for improving the reliability of power distribution cable systems. The practical development of a 25kV-class cable termination, and a waterproof sleeve for cable joints based on heat-shrinkable components made of irradiated polyolefine is discussed. Furthermore, the theoretical and practical data are given.

  18. 21 CFR 884.1720 - Gynecologic laparoscope and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of a specialized instrument or device delivery system, do not have adapters, connector channels, or... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gynecologic laparoscope and accessories. 884.1720 Section 884.1720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  19. 21 CFR 884.1690 - Hysteroscope and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... specialized instrument or device delivery system; do not have adapters, connectors, channels, or do not have... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hysteroscope and accessories. 884.1690 Section 884.1690 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  20. Nitric oxide synthesis in locust olfactory interneurones

    PubMed

    Elphick; Rayne; Riveros-Moreno; Moncada; Shea

    1995-01-01

    The brain of the locust Schistocerca gregaria contains a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) that has similar properties to mammalian neuronal NOS. It catalyses the production of equimolar quantities of nitric oxide (NO) and citrulline from l-arginine in a Ca2+/calmodulin- and NADPH-dependent manner and is inhibited by the Nomega-nitro and Nomega-monomethyl analogues of l-arginine. In Western blots, an antiserum to the 160 kDa rat cerebellar NOS subunit recognises a locust brain protein with a molecular mass of approximately 135 kDa. NOS is located in several parts of the locust brain, including the mushroom bodies, but it is particularly abundant in the olfactory processing centres, the antennal lobes. Here it is present in two groups of local interneurones (a pair and a cluster of about 50) that project into the neuropile of the antennal lobes. The processes of these neurones terminate in numerous glomerulus-like structures where the synapses between primary olfactory receptor neurones and central interneurones are formed. NOS-containing local interneurones have also been identified in the mammalian olfactory bulb, suggesting that NO performs analogous functions in locust and mammalian olfactory systems. As yet, nothing is known about the role of NO in olfaction, but it seems likely that it is involved in the processing of chemosensory input to the brain. The locust antennal lobe may be an ideal 'simple' system in which this aspect of NO function can be examined.

  1. Olfactory processing: detection of rapid changes.

    PubMed

    Croy, Ilona; Krone, Franziska; Walker, Susannah; Hummel, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Changes in the olfactory environment have a rather poor chance of being detected. Aim of the present study was to determine, whether the same (cued) or different (uncued) odors can generally be detected at short inter stimulus intervals (ISI) below 2.5 s. Furthermore we investigated, whether inhibition of return, an attentional phenomenon facilitating the detection of new stimuli at longer ISI, is present in the domain of olfaction. Thirteen normosmic people (3 men, 10 women; age range 19-27 years; mean age 23 years) participated. Stimulation was performed using air-dilution olfactometry with 2 odors: phenylethylalcohol and hydrogen disulfide. Reaction time to target stimuli was assessed in cued and uncued conditions at ISIs of 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 s. There was a significant main effect of ISI, indicating that odors presented only 1 s apart are missed frequently. Uncued presentation facilitated detection at short ISIs, implying that changes of the olfactory environment are detected better than presentation of the same odor again. Effects in relation to "olfactory inhibition of return," on the other hand, are not supported by our results. This suggests that attention works different for the olfactory system compared with the visual and auditory systems.

  2. Olfactory bulb recovery following reversible deafferentation with repeated detergent application in the adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Paskin, T R; Iqbal, T R; Byrd-Jacobs, C A

    2011-11-24

    The neuroplasticity and regenerative properties of the olfactory system make it a useful model for studying the ability of the nervous system to recover from damage. We have developed a novel method for examining the effects of long-term deafferentation and regeneration of the olfactory organ and resulting influence on the olfactory bulb in adult zebrafish. To test the hypothesis that repeated damage to the olfactory epithelium causes reduced olfactory bulb afferent input and cessation of treatment allows recovery, we chronically ablated the olfactory organ every 2-3 days for 3 weeks with the detergent Triton X-100 while another group was allowed 3 weeks of recovery following treatment. Animals receiving chronic treatment showed severe morphological disruption of the olfactory organ, although small pockets of epithelium remained. These pockets were labeled by anti-calretinin, indicating the presence of mature olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Following a recovery period, the epithelium was more extensive and neuronal labeling increased, with three different morphologies of sensory neurons observed. Repeated peripheral exposure to Triton X-100 also affected the olfactory bulb. Bulb volumes and anti-tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactivity, which is an indicator of afferent activity, were diminished in the olfactory bulb of the chronically treated group compared to the control side. In the recovery group, there was little difference in bulb volume or antibody staining. These results suggest that repeated, long-term nasal irrigation with Triton X-100 eliminates a substantial number of mature OSNs and reduces afferent input to the olfactory bulb. It also appears that these effects are reversible and regeneration will occur in both the peripheral olfactory organ and the olfactory bulb when given time to recover following cessation of treatment. We report here a new method that allows observation not only of the effects of deafferentation on the olfactory bulb but also

  3. Simplification of olfactory stimuli in pseudo-gustatory displays.

    PubMed

    Narumi, Takuji; Miyaura, Masaaki; Tanikawa, Tomohiro; Hirose, Michitaka

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a technique that simplifies pseudo-gustatory systems by using the cross-modal effect between vision and olfaction to change only the visual and olfactory stimuli without altering the ingredients of the food. Conventional pseudo-gustatory simulations require one olfactory stimulus for each flavor. In contrast, we hypothesize that the cross-modal effect between vision and olfaction in a pseudo-gustatory presentation can be utilized to reduce the required number of olfactory stimuli, and verify this hypothesis using a pseudo-gustatory display with our proposed method. This pseudo-gustatory display uses the visual-olfactory cross-modal effect and the key scent components decided on the basis of similarity analysis of olfactory perception. We also investigate how users perceive the taste of a drink under various visual and olfactory conditions, both with and without the visual-olfactory interactions. Our results indicate that the cross-modal effect between vision and olfaction can effectively simplify pseudo-gustatory simulations.

  4. Olfactory Environment Design for Human Spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, C. S.; Holland, F. J.

    2002-01-01

    Smell is usually deemed the least important of the five senses. To contradict this assertion, however, there is no shortage of scientific literature which concludes that olfaction is of very great significance to humans. Odours have been shown to have a variety of effects on humans, and are capable of changing both behaviour and cognitive processing in ways that we are frequently completely unconscious of. Examples of this include alertness, alteration of mood, capacity for ideation and intellectual performance. To date, the design of human spacecraft has concentrated on making their olfactory environments, where possible, `odour neutral' - that is ensuring that all unpleasant and/or offensive odours are removed. Here it suggested that spacecraft (and other extraterrestrial facilities for human inhabitation) might benefit from having their olfactory environments designed to be `odour positive', that is to use odours and olfaction for the positive benefit of their residents. This paper presents a summary of current olfactory research and considers both its positive and negative implications for humans in space. It then discusses `odour positive' design of spacecraft olfactory environments and the possible benefits accruing from this approach before examining its implications for the architecture of spacecraft environmental control systems.

  5. Neuropeptide complexity in the crustacean central olfactory pathway: immunolocalization of A-type allatostatins and RFamide-like peptides in the brain of a terrestrial hermit crab

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the olfactory system of malacostracan crustaceans, axonal input from olfactory receptor neurons associated with aesthetascs on the animal’s first pair of antennae target primary processing centers in the median brain, the olfactory lobes. The olfactory lobes are divided into cone-shaped synaptic areas, the olfactory glomeruli where afferents interact with local olfactory interneurons and olfactory projection neurons. The local olfactory interneurons display a large diversity of neurotransmitter phenotypes including biogenic amines and neuropeptides. Furthermore, the malacostracan olfactory glomeruli are regionalized into cap, subcap, and base regions and these compartments are defined by the projection patterns of the afferent olfactory receptor neurons, the local olfactory interneurons, and the olfactory projection neurons. We wanted to know how neurons expressing A-type allatostatins (A-ASTs; synonym dip-allatostatins) integrate into this system, a large family of neuropeptides that share the C-terminal motif –YXFGLamide. Results We used an antiserum that was raised against the A-type Diploptera punctata (Dip)-allatostatin I to analyse the distribution of this peptide in the brain of a terrestrial hermit crab, Coenobita clypeatus (Anomura, Coenobitidae). Allatostatin A-like immunoreactivity (ASTir) was widely distributed in the animal’s brain, including the visual system, central complex and olfactory system. We focussed our analysis on the central olfactory pathway in which ASTir was abundant in the primary processing centers, the olfactory lobes, and also in the secondary centers, the hemiellipsoid bodies. In the olfactory lobes, we further explored the spatial relationship of olfactory interneurons with ASTir to interneurons that synthesize RFamide-like peptides. We found that these two peptides are present in distinct populations of local olfactory interneurons and that their synaptic fields within the olfactory glomeruli are also mostly

  6. Three Accessories for a Rotating Platform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, James A.; Fryer, Oscar G.

    1980-01-01

    Describes three accessories developed to be used in conjunction with the rotating platform or turntable. Three demonstrations using these accessories are included. These demonstrations are: (a) conservation of angular momentum; (b) gravity-defying goblets; and (c) direct measurement of centripetal force. (HM)

  7. 21 CFR 890.5925 - Traction accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Traction accessory. 890.5925 Section 890.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5925 Traction accessory....

  8. 21 CFR 890.5925 - Traction accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Traction accessory. 890.5925 Section 890.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5925 Traction accessory....

  9. 21 CFR 890.5925 - Traction accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Traction accessory. 890.5925 Section 890.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5925 Traction accessory....

  10. 21 CFR 890.5925 - Traction accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Traction accessory. 890.5925 Section 890.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5925 Traction accessory....

  11. 21 CFR 890.5925 - Traction accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Traction accessory. 890.5925 Section 890.5925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5925 Traction accessory....

  12. Re-establishment of olfactory and taste functions

    PubMed Central

    Welge-Lüssen, Antje

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of olfactory disorders is appoximately 1-2% and they can seriously impact on the quality of life. Quantitative disorders (hyposmia, anosmia) are distinguished from qualitative disorders (parosmia, phantosmia). Olfactory disorders are classified according to the etiology and therapy is planned according to the underlying pathophysiology. In ENT patients olfactory disorders caused by sinonasal diseases are the most common ones, followed by postviral disorders. Therapy consists of topical and systemic steroids, whereas systemic application seems to be of greater value. It is very difficult to predict the improvement of olfactory function using surgery, moreover, the long term - success in surgery is questionable. Isolated taste disorders are rare and in most often caused by underlying diseases or side effects of medications. A meticulous history is necessary and helps to choose effective treatment. In selected cases zinc might be useful. PMID:22073054

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in normal and regenerating olfactory epithelium of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Frontera, Jimena Laura; Cervino, Ailen Soledad; Jungblut, Lucas David; Paz, Dante Agustín

    2015-03-01

    Olfactory epithelium has the capability to continuously regenerate olfactory receptor neurons throughout life. Adult neurogenesis results from proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells, and consequently, olfactory neuroepithelium offers an excellent opportunity to study neural regeneration and the factors involved in the maintenance and regeneration of all their cell types. We analyzed the expression of BDNF in the olfactory system under normal physiological conditions as well as during a massive regeneration induced by chemical destruction of the olfactory epithelium in Xenopus laevis larvae. We described the expression and presence of BDNF in the olfactory epithelium and bulb. In normal physiological conditions, sustentacular (glial) cells and a few scattered basal (stem) cells express BDNF in the olfactory epithelium as well as the granular cells in the olfactory bulb. Moreover, during massive regeneration, we demonstrated a drastic increase in basal cells expressing BDNF as well as an increase in BDNF in the olfactory bulb and nerve. Together these results suggest an important role of BDNF in the maintenance and regeneration of the olfactory system.

  14. Targeted Deletion of ERK5 MAP Kinase in the Developing Nervous System Impairs Development of GABAergic Interneurons in the Main Olfactory Bulb and Behavioral Discrimination between Structurally Similar Odorants

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Junhui; Pan, Yung-Wei; Wang, Zhenshan; Chang, Shih-Yu; Wang, Wenbin; Wang, Xin; Tournier, Cathy; Storm, Daniel R.; Xia, Zhengui

    2012-01-01

    ERK5 MAP kinase is highly expressed in the developing nervous system and has been implicated in promoting the survival of immature neurons in culture. However, its role in the development and function of the mammalian nervous system has not been established in vivo. Here, we report that conditional deletion of the erk5 gene in mouse neural stem cells during development reduces the number of GABAergic interneurons in the main olfactory bulb (OB). Our data suggest that this is due to a decrease in proliferation and an increase in apoptosis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and rostral migratory stream (RMS) of ERK5 mutant mice. Interestingly, ERK5 mutant mice have smaller OB and are impaired in odor discrimination between structurally similar odorants. We conclude that ERK5 is a novel signaling pathway regulating developmental OB neurogenesis and olfactory behavior. PMID:22442076

  15. Olfactory cell-based biosensor: a first step towards a neurochip of bioelectronic nose.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingjun; Cai, Hua; Xu, Ying; Li, Yan; Li, Rong; Wang, Ping

    2006-08-15

    Human olfactory system can distinguish thousands of odors. In order to realize the biomimetic design of electronic nose on the principle of mammalian olfactory system, this article reports an olfactory cell-based biosensor as a real bionic technique for odorants detection. Effective cultures of olfactory receptor neurons and olfactory bulb cells have been achieved on the semiconductor chip. Using light-addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS) as sensing chip to monitor extracellular potential of the neurons, the response under stimulations of the odorants or neurotransmitters, such as acetic acid and glutamic acid, was tested. The results demonstrate that this kind of hybrid system of LAPS and olfactory neurons, which is sensitive to odorous changes, has great potential and is promising to be used as a novel neurochip of bioelectronic nose for detecting odors.

  16. The loss of scents: do defects in olfactory sensory neuron development underlie human disease?

    PubMed

    Whitlock, Kathleen E

    2015-06-01

    The olfactory system is a fascinating and beguiling sensory system: olfactory sensory neurons detect odors underlying behaviors essential for mate choice, food selection, and escape from predators, among others. These sensory neurons are unique in that they have dendrites contacting the outside world, yet their first synapse lies in the central nervous system. The information entering the central nervous system is used to create odor memories that play a profound role in recognition of individuals, places, and appropriate foods. Here, the structure of the olfactory epithelium is given as an overview to discuss the origin of the olfactory placode, the plasticity of the olfactory sensory neurons, and finally the origins of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuroendocrine cells. For the purposes of this review, the development of the peripheral sensory system will be analyzed, incorporating recently published studies highlighting the potential novelties in development mechanisms. Specifically, an emerging model where the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb develop simultaneously from a continuous neurectoderm patterned at the end of gastrulation, and the multiple origins of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuroendocrine cells associated with the olfactory sensory system development will be presented. Advances in the understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying olfactory sensory system development allows for a more thorough understanding of the potential causes of human disease.

  17. Carcinoma in accessory axillary breast.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Seema; Mishra, Shashi Prakash; Kumar, Satendra; Khanna, Ajay Kumar

    2015-08-10

    We present a rare case of carcinoma developing in an accessory breast. The patient presented with a progressive lump in her right axilla for 1 year. On examination, there was a well-developed nipple areola complex in the right axilla overlying a hard, fixed 5 × 3 cm lump. On investigation, core biopsy revealed poorly differentiated carcinoma of the breast. Mammography also revealed features of a malignant lesion with skin and muscle infiltration. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was administered followed by modified radical mastectomy after three cycles. Immunohistochemistry study showed positive status of oestrogen and progesterone receptors, and negative HER-2 neu. Three more cycles of chemotherapy along with 50 Gy radiotherapy were given in an adjuvant setting followed by hormone therapy.

  18. Sex differences in the vomeronasal system.

    PubMed

    Guillamón, A; Segovia, S

    1997-01-01

    In the early eighties we found sex differences in the vomeronasal organ (VNO) and hypothesized that the vomeronasal system (VNS), a complex neural network involved in the control of reproductive behavior, might be sexually dimorphic. At that time sex differences had already been described for some structures that receive VNO input, such as the medial amygdala, the medial preoptic area, the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, and the ventral region of the premammillary nucleus. Since then, we have shown sex differences in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT), and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST). When new VNS connections were found, all of them ended in nuclei that present sex differences. In general, sex differences in the olfactory system show two morphological patterns: one in which males present greater morphological measures than females, and just the opposite. To explain the morphometric measures of males in the latter, it has been hypothesized that androgens serve as inhibitors. Our work on the involvement of the GABA(A) receptor in the development of AOB and maternal behavior sex differences also suggests that neonatal changes in neuronal membrane permeability to the ion Cl- differences. This might be the first animal model to help us to understand the situation in which human genetic and gonadal sex do not agree with brain and behavioral sex. Finally, we stress that sex differences in the VNS constitute a neurofunctional model for understanding sex differences in reproductive behaviors.

  19. Computational Biology of Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Crasto, Chiquito J.

    2011-01-01

    Olfactory receptors, in addition to being involved in first step of the physiological processes that leads to olfaction, occupy an important place in mammalian genomes. ORs constitute super families in these genomes. Elucidating ol-factory receptor function at a molecular level can be aided by a computationally derived structure and an understanding of its interactions with odor molecules. Experimental functional analyses of olfactory receptors in conjunction with computational studies serve to validate findings and generate hypotheses. We present here a review of the research efforts in: creating computational models of olfactory receptors, identifying binding strategies for these receptors with odorant molecules, performing medium to long range simulation studies of odor ligands in the receptor binding region, and identifying amino acid positions within the receptor that are responsible for ligand-binding and olfactory receptor activation. Written as a primer and a teaching tool, this review will help researchers extend the methodologies described herein to other GPCRs. PMID:21984880

  20. Structure and function of long-lived olfactory organotypic cultures from postnatal mice.

    PubMed

    Josephson, E M; Yilma, S; Vodyanoy, V; Morrison, E E

    2004-03-01

    The first synapse in the olfactory pathway mediates a significant transfer of information given the restricted association of specific olfactory receptor neurons with specific glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. To understand better how this connection is made and what the functional capacities of the participating cells are, we created a long-lived culture system composed of olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb tissues. Using the roller tube method of culturing, we grew epithelium-bulb cocultures, explanted from 1-4-day-old Swiss Webster mice, on Aclar for periods ranging from 18 hr to 68 days. The explants flattened so that in some areas the culture was only a few cells thick, making individual cells distinguishable. From 107 cultures studied, we identified the following cell types by expression of specific markers (oldest culture expressing marker, days in vitro, DIV): olfactory receptor neurons (neural cell adhesion molecule, 42 DIV); mature receptor neurons (olfactory marker protein, 28 DIV); postmitotic olfactory receptor neurons and olfactory bulb neurons (beta-tubulin, 68 DIV); astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein, glutamate/aspartate transporter, 68 DIV); olfactory horizontal basal cells (cytokeratin, 22 DIV). Neuronal processes formed glomeruli in 2-4-week-old cultures. We also recorded electro-olfactography responses to puffs of vapor collected over an odorant mixture containing ethyl butyrate, eugenol, (+) carvone, and (-) carvone from cultures as old as 21 DIV. These features of our olfactory culture system make this model useful for studying properties of immature and mature olfactory receptor neurons, pathfinding strategies of receptor axons, and mechanisms of information transfer in the olfactory glomerulus.

  1. Mechanisms of Regulation of Olfactory Transduction and Adaptation in the Olfactory Cilium

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Gabriela; Sebastião, Ana Maria; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory adaptation is a fundamental process for the functioning of the olfactory system, but the underlying mechanisms regulating its occurrence in intact olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are not fully understood. In this work, we have combined stochastic computational modeling and a systematic pharmacological study of different signaling pathways to investigate their impact during short-term adaptation (STA). We used odorant stimulation and electroolfactogram (EOG) recordings of the olfactory epithelium treated with pharmacological blockers to study the molecular mechanisms regulating the occurrence of adaptation in OSNs. EOG responses to paired-pulses of odorants showed that inhibition of phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and phosphatases enhanced the levels of STA in the olfactory epithelium, and this effect was mimicked by blocking vesicle exocytosis and reduced by blocking cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and vesicle endocytosis. These results suggest that G-coupled receptors (GPCRs) cycling is involved with the occurrence of STA. To gain insights on the dynamical aspects of this process, we developed a stochastic computational model. The model consists of the olfactory transduction currents mediated by the cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channels and calcium ion (Ca2+)-activated chloride (CAC) channels, and the dynamics of their respective ligands, cAMP and Ca2+, and it simulates the EOG results obtained under different experimental conditions through changes in the amplitude and duration of cAMP and Ca2+ response, two second messengers implicated with STA occurrence. The model reproduced the experimental data for each pharmacological treatment and provided a mechanistic explanation for the action of GPCR cycling in the levels of second messengers modulating the levels of STA. All together, these experimental and theoretical results indicate the existence of a mechanism of regulation of STA by signaling pathways that control GPCR

  2. The locust olfactory system as a case study for modeling dynamics of neurobiological networks: from discrete time neurons to continuous time neurons.

    PubMed

    Quenet, B; Horcholle-Bossavit, G

    2007-11-01

    Both chaotic and periodic activities are observed in networks of the central nervous systems. We choose the locust olfactory system as a good case study to analyze the relationships between networks' structure and the types of dynamics involved in coding mechanisms. In our modeling approach, we first build a fully connected recurrent network of synchronously updated McCulloch and Pitts neurons (MC-P type). In order to measure the use of the temporal dimension in the complex spatio-temporal patterns produced by the networks, we have defined an index the Normalized Euclidian Distance NED. We find that for appropriate parameters of input and connectivity, when adding some strong connections to the initial random synaptic matrices, it was easy to get the emergence of both robust oscillations and distributed synchrony in the spatiotemporal patterns. Then, in order to validate the MC-P model as a tool for analysis for network properties, we examine the dynamic behavior of networks of continuous time model neuron (Izhikevitch Integrate and Fire model -IFI-), implementing the same network characteristics. In both models, similarly to biological PN, the activity of excitatory neurons are phase-locked to different cycles of oscillations which remind the ones of the local field potential (LFP), and nevertheless exhibit dynamic behavior complex enough to be the basis of spatio-temporal codes. PMID:18075120

  3. Distribution pattern of neuropeptide Y in the brain, pituitary and olfactory system during the larval development of the toad Rhinella arenarum (Amphibia: Anura).

    PubMed

    Heer, T; Pozzi, A G; Yovanovich, C A; Paz, D A

    2009-04-01

    The first NPY-immunoreactivity (ir) in the central nervous system of Rhinella arenarum was obtained just after hatching in the pre-optic area, ventral thalamus and rostral rhombencephalon. During pre-metamorphosis, new NPY-ir cells were observed in other brain areas such as pallium, septum and striatum, infundibulum and pars intermedia of the pituitary. Further maturation continued through pro-metamorphosis with the appearance of cell groups in the diagonal band, amygdala, pre-optic nucleus, dorsal nucleus of the habenula, anterior ventral and dorsal thalamus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, tuberculum posterior, tectum, torus semicircularis, inter-peduncular nucleus and median eminence. During the metamorphic climax and soon after, the relative abundance of NPY-ir fibres decreased in all hypothalamic areas and the staining intensity and number of NPY-ir cells in the pallium also decreased, whereas no cells were found in the striatum, dorsal nucleus of the habenula and tectum. In the olfactory epithelium, nerve or bulb, neither cells nor NPY-ir fibres were found during the stages of development analysed. The ontogeny pattern of the NPY-ir neuronal system in the brain of Rh. arenarum is more similar to the spatiotemporal appearance reported for Rana esculenta than to that reported for Xenopus laevis. Many NPY-ir fibres were found in the median eminence and in the pars intermedia of the pituitary, supporting the idea that this neuropeptide may play a role in the modulation of hypophyseal secretion during development.

  4. A Micro-Preconcentrator Combined Olfactory Sensing System with a Micromechanical Cantilever Sensor for Detecting 2,4-Dinitrotoluene Gas Vapor.

    PubMed

    Chae, Myung-Sic; Kim, Jinsik; Yoo, Yong Kyoung; Kang, Ji Yoon; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Hwang, Kyo Seon

    2015-01-01

    Preventing unexpected explosive attacks and tracing explosion-related molecules require the development of highly sensitive gas-vapor detection systems. For that purpose, a micromechanical cantilever-based olfactory sensing system including a sample preconcentrator was developed to detect 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), which is a well-known by-product of the explosive molecule trinitrotoluene (TNT) and exists in concentrations on the order of parts per billion in the atmosphere at room temperature. A peptide receptor (His-Pro-Asn-Phe-Ser-Lys-Tyr-Ile-Leu-His-Gln-Arg) that has high binding affinity for 2,4-DNT was immobilized on the surface of the cantilever sensors to detect 2,4-DNT vapor for highly selective detection. A micro-preconcentrator (µPC) was developed using Tenax-TA adsorbent to produce higher concentrations of 2,4-DNT molecules. The preconcentration was achieved via adsorption and thermal desorption phenomena occurring between target molecules and the adsorbent. The µPC directly integrated with a cantilever sensor and enhanced the sensitivity of the cantilever sensor as a pretreatment tool for the target vapor. The response was rapidly saturated within 5 min and sustained for more than 10 min when the concentrated vapor was introduced. By calculating preconcentration factor values, we verified that the cantilever sensor provides up to an eightfold improvement in sensing performance.

  5. Unravelling the Olfactory Sense: From the Gene to Odor Perception.

    PubMed

    Silva Teixeira, Carla S; Cerqueira, Nuno M F S A; Silva Ferreira, António C

    2016-02-01

    Although neglected by science for a long time, the olfactory sense is now the focus of a panoply of studies that bring new insights and raises interesting questions regarding its functioning. The importance in the clarification of this process is of interest for science, but also motivated by the food and perfume industries boosted by a consumer society with increasingly demands for higher quality standards. In this review, a general overview of the state of art of science regarding the olfactory sense is presented with the main focus on the peripheral olfactory system. Special emphasis will be given to the deorphanization of the olfactory receptors (ORs), a critical issue because the specificity and functional properties of about 90% of human ORs remain unknown mainly due to the difficulties associated with the functional expression of ORs in high yields.

  6. Unravelling the Olfactory Sense: From the Gene to Odor Perception.

    PubMed

    Silva Teixeira, Carla S; Cerqueira, Nuno M F S A; Silva Ferreira, António C

    2016-02-01

    Although neglected by science for a long time, the olfactory sense is now the focus of a panoply of studies that bring new insights and raises interesting questions regarding its functioning. The importance in the clarification of this process is of interest for science, but also motivated by the food and perfume industries boosted by a consumer society with increasingly demands for higher quality standards. In this review, a general overview of the state of art of science regarding the olfactory sense is presented with the main focus on the peripheral olfactory system. Special emphasis will be given to the deorphanization of the olfactory receptors (ORs), a critical issue because the specificity and functional properties of about 90% of human ORs remain unknown mainly due to the difficulties associated with the functional expression of ORs in high yields. PMID:26688501

  7. Organization of olfactory centres in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Riabinina, Olena; Task, Darya; Marr, Elizabeth; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Alford, Robert; O'Brochta, David A.; Potter, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Mosquitoes are vectors for multiple infectious human diseases and use a variety of sensory cues (olfactory, temperature, humidity and visual) to locate a human host. A comprehensive understanding of the circuitry underlying sensory signalling in the mosquito brain is lacking. Here we used the Q-system of binary gene expression to develop transgenic lines of Anopheles gambiae in which olfactory receptor neurons expressing the odorant receptor co-receptor (Orco) gene are labelled with GFP. These neurons project from the antennae and maxillary palps to the antennal lobe (AL) and from the labella on the proboscis to the suboesophageal zone (SEZ), suggesting integration of olfactory and gustatory signals occurs in this brain region. We present detailed anatomical maps of olfactory innervations in the AL and the SEZ, identifying glomeruli that may respond to human body odours or carbon dioxide. Our results pave the way for anatomical and functional neurogenetic studies of sensory processing in mosquitoes. PMID:27694947

  8. Hunting for eruption ages in accessory minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    A primary goal in geochronology is to provide precise and accurate ages for tephras that serve as chronostratigraphic markers for constraining the timing and rates of volcanism, sedimentation, climate change, and catastrophic events in Earth history. Zircon remains the most versatile accessory mineral for dating silicic tephras due to its common preservation in distal pyroclastic deposits, as well as the robustness of its U-Pb and U-series systems even after host materials have been hydrothermally altered or weathered. Countless studies document that zircon may be complexly zoned in age due to inheritance, contamination, recycling of antecrysts, protracted crystallization in long-lived magma reservoirs, or any combination of these. Other accessory minerals such as allanite or chevkinite can retain similar records of protracted crystallization. If the goal is to date the durations of magmatic crystallization, differentiation, and/or magma residence, then these protracted chronologies within and between accessory minerals are a blessing. However, if the goal is to date the timing of eruption with high precision, i.e., absolute ages with millennial-scale uncertainties, then this age zoning is a curse. Observations from ion microprobe 238U-230Th dating of Pleistocene zircon and allanite provide insight into the record of near-eruption crystallization in accessory minerals and serve as a guide for high-precision whole-crystal dating. Although imprecise relative to conventional techniques, ion probe analysis allows high-spatial resolution 238U-230Th dating that can document multi-millennial age distributions at the crystal scale. Analysis of unpolished rims and continuous depth profiling of zircon from small and large volume eruptions (e.g., Coso, Mono Craters, Yellowstone) reveals that the final several micrometers of crystallization often yield ages that are indistinguishable from associated eruption ages from the 40Ar/39Ar or (U-Th)/He methods. Using this approach, we

  9. Plasticity of glomeruli and olfactory-mediated behavior in zebrafish following detergent lesioning of the olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    White, E J; Kounelis, S K; Byrd-Jacobs, C A

    2015-01-22

    The zebrafish olfactory system is a valuable model for examining neural regeneration after damage due to the remarkable plasticity of this sensory system and of fish species. We applied detergent to the olfactory organ and examined the effects on both morphology and function of the olfactory system in adult zebrafish. Olfactory organs were treated once with Triton X-100 unilaterally to study glomerular innervation patterns or bilaterally to study odor detection. Fish were allowed to recover for 4-10 days and were compared to untreated control fish. Axonal projections were analyzed using whole mount immunocytochemistry with anti-keyhole limpet hemocyanin, a marker of olfactory axons in teleosts. Chemical lesioning of the olfactory organ with a single dose of Triton X-100 had profound effects on glomerular distribution in the olfactory bulb at 4 days after treatment, with the most significant effects in the medial region of the bulb. Glomeruli had returned by 7 days post-treatment. Analysis of the ability of the fish to detect cocktails of amino acids or bile salts consisted of counting the number of turns the fish made before and after odorant delivery. Control fish turned more after exposure to both odorants. Fish tested 4 and 7 days after chemical lesioning made more turns in response to amino acids but did not respond to bile salts. At 10 days post-lesion, these fish had regained the ability to detect bile salts. Thus, the changes seen in bulbar innervation patterns correlated to odorant-mediated behavior. We show that the adult zebrafish brain has the capacity to recover rapidly from detergent damage of the olfactory epithelium, with both glomerular distribution and odorant-mediated behavior returning in 10 days.

  10. Diverse Representations of Olfactory Information in Centrifugal Feedback Projections

    PubMed Central

    Osakada, Fumitaka; Tarabrina, Anna; Kizer, Erin; Callaway, Edward M.; Gage, Fred H.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2016-01-01

    Although feedback or centrifugal projections from higher processing centers of the brain to peripheral regions have long been known to play essential functional roles, the anatomical organization of these connections remains largely unknown. Using a virus-based retrograde labeling strategy and 3D whole-brain reconstruction methods, we mapped the spatial organization of centrifugal projections from two olfactory cortical areas, the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON) and the piriform cortex, to the granule cell layer of the main olfactory bulb in the mouse. Both regions are major recipients of information from the bulb and are the largest sources of feedback to the bulb, collectively constituting circuits essential for olfactory coding and olfactory behavior. We found that, although ipsilateral inputs from the AON were uniformly distributed, feedback from the contralateral AON had a strong ventral bias. In addition, we observed that centrifugally projecting neurons were spatially clustered in the piriform cortex, in contrast to the distributed feedforward axonal inputs that these cells receive from the principal neurons of the bulb. Therefore, information carried from the bulb to higher processing structures by anatomically stereotypic projections is likely relayed back to the bulb by organizationally distinct feedback projections that may reflect different coding strategies and therefore different functional roles. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Principles of anatomical organization, sometimes instantiated as “maps” in the mammalian brain, have provided key insights into the structure and function of circuits in sensory systems. Generally, these characterizations focus on projections from early sensory processing areas to higher processing structures despite considerable evidence that feedback or centrifugal projections often constitute major conduits of information flow. Our results identify structure in the organization of centrifugal feedback projections to the

  11. Multidimensional representation of odors in the human olfactory cortex.

    PubMed

    Fournel, A; Ferdenzi, C; Sezille, C; Rouby, C; Bensafi, M

    2016-06-01

    What is known as an odor object is an integrated representation constructed from physical features, and perceptual attributes mainly mediated by the olfactory and trigeminal systems. The aim of the present study was to comprehend how this multidimensional representation is organized, by deciphering how similarities in the physical, olfactory and trigeminal perceptual spaces of odors are represented in the human brain. To achieve this aim, we combined psychophysics, functional MRI and multivariate representational similarity analysis. Participants were asked to smell odors diffused by an fMRI-compatible olfactometer and to rate each smell along olfactory dimensions (pleasantness, intensity, familiarity and edibility) and trigeminal dimensions (irritation, coolness, warmth and pain). An event-related design was implemented, presenting different odorants. Results revealed that (i) pairwise odorant similarities in anterior piriform cortex (PC) activity correlated with pairwise odorant similarities in chemical properties (P < 0.005), (ii) similarities in posterior PC activity correlated with similarities in olfactory perceptual properties (P <0.01), and (iii) similarities in amygdala activity correlated with similarities in trigeminal perceptual properties (P < 0.01). These findings provide new evidence that extraction of physical, olfactory and trigeminal features is based on specific fine processing of similarities between odorous stimuli in a distributed manner in the olfactory system. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2161-2172, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991044

  12. Multidimensional representation of odors in the human olfactory cortex.

    PubMed

    Fournel, A; Ferdenzi, C; Sezille, C; Rouby, C; Bensafi, M

    2016-06-01

    What is known as an odor object is an integrated representation constructed from physical features, and perceptual attributes mainly mediated by the olfactory and trigeminal systems. The aim of the present study was to comprehend how this multidimensional representation is organized, by deciphering how similarities in the physical, olfactory and trigeminal perceptual spaces of odors are represented in the human brain. To achieve this aim, we combined psychophysics, functional MRI and multivariate representational similarity analysis. Participants were asked to smell odors diffused by an fMRI-compatible olfactometer and to rate each smell along olfactory dimensions (pleasantness, intensity, familiarity and edibility) and trigeminal dimensions (irritation, coolness, warmth and pain). An event-related design was implemented, presenting different odorants. Results revealed that (i) pairwise odorant similarities in anterior piriform cortex (PC) activity correlated with pairwise odorant similarities in chemical properties (P < 0.005), (ii) similarities in posterior PC activity correlated with similarities in olfactory perceptual properties (P <0.01), and (iii) similarities in amygdala activity correlated with similarities in trigeminal perceptual properties (P < 0.01). These findings provide new evidence that extraction of physical, olfactory and trigeminal features is based on specific fine processing of similarities between odorous stimuli in a distributed manner in the olfactory system. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2161-2172, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Direct transport of inhaled xylene and its metabolites from the olfactory mucosa to the glomeruli of the olfactory bulbs

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.L.; Dahl, A.R.; Kracko, D.A.

    1994-11-01

    The olfactory epithelium is a unique tissue in that single receptor neurons have dendrites in contact with the external environment at the nasal airway, and axon terminals that penetrate the cribriform plate and synapse in the olfactory bulb. The Central Nervous System (CNS) is protected from systematically circulating toxicants by a blood-brain barrier primarily composed of tight junctions between endothelial cells in cerebral vessels and a high metabolic capacity within these cells. No such barrier has yet been defined to protect the CNS from inhaled toxicants. Because all inhalants do not seem to access the CNS directly, a nose-brain barrier seems plausible. The purpose of the work described here is to determine whether or not a nose-brain barrier exists and to define its components. Although such a barrier is likely to be multi-faceted, the present work focuses only on the importance of gross histologic and metabolic characteristics of the olfactory epithelium in olfactory transport.

  14. Odors Discrimination by Olfactory Epithelium Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingjun; Hu, Ning; Ye, Weiwei; Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    Humans are exploring the bionic biological olfaction to sense the various trace components of gas or liquid in many fields. For achieving the goal, we endeavor to establish a bioelectronic nose system for odor detection by combining intact bioactive function units with sensors. The bioelectronic nose is based on the olfactory epithelium of rat and microelectrode array (MEA). The olfactory epithelium biosensor generates extracellular potentials in presence of odor, and presents obvious specificity under different odors condition. The odor response signals can be distinguished with each other effectively by signal sorting. On basis of bioactive MEA hybrid system and the improved signal processing analysis, the bioelectronic nose will realize odor discrimination by the specific feature of signals response to various odors.

  15. High Fructose Diet inducing diabetes rapidly impacts olfactory epithelium and behavior in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rivière, Sébastien; Soubeyre, Vanessa; Jarriault, David; Molinas, Adrien; Léger-Charnay, Elise; Desmoulins, Lucie; Grebert, Denise; Meunier, Nicolas; Grosmaitre, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), a major public health issue reaching worldwide epidemic, has been correlated with lower olfactory abilities in humans. As olfaction represents a major component of feeding behavior, its alteration may have drastic consequences on feeding behaviors that may in turn aggravates T2D. In order to decipher the impact of T2D on the olfactory epithelium, we fed mice with a high fructose diet (HFruD) inducing early diabetic state in 4 to 8 weeks. After only 4 weeks of this diet, mice exhibited a dramatic decrease in olfactory behavioral capacities. Consistently, this decline in olfactory behavior was correlated to decreased electrophysiological responses of olfactory neurons recorded as a population and individually. Our results demonstrate that, in rodents, olfaction is modified by HFruD-induced diabetes. Functional, anatomical and behavioral changes occurred in the olfactory system at a very early stage of the disease. PMID:27659313

  16. Recovery of olfactory function induces neuroplasticity effects in patients with smell loss.

    PubMed

    Kollndorfer, Kathrin; Kowalczyk, Ksenia; Hoche, Elisabeth; Mueller, Christian A; Pollak, Michael; Trattnig, Siegfried; Schöpf, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    The plasticity of brain function, especially reorganization after stroke or sensory loss, has been investigated extensively. Based upon its special characteristics, the olfactory system allows the investigation of functional networks in patients with smell loss, as it holds the unique ability to be activated by the sensorimotor act of sniffing, without the presentation of an odor. In the present study, subjects with chronic peripheral smell loss and healthy controls were investigated using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare functional networks in one of the major olfactory areas before and after an olfactory training program. Data analysis revealed that olfactory training induced alterations in functional connectivity networks. Thus, olfactory training is capable of inducing neural reorganization processes. Furthermore, these findings provide evidence for the underlying neural mechanisms of olfactory training.

  17. Beta and gamma oscillatory activities associated with olfactory memory tasks: different rhythms for different functional networks?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Claire; Ravel, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory processing in behaving animals, even at early stages, is inextricable from top down influences associated with odor perception. The anatomy of the olfactory network (olfactory bulb, piriform, and entorhinal cortices) and its unique direct access to the limbic system makes it particularly attractive to study how sensory processing could be modulated by learning and memory. Moreover, olfactory structures have been early reported to exhibit oscillatory population activities easy to capture through local field potential recordings. An attractive hypothesis is that neuronal oscillations would serve to “bind” distant structures to reach a unified and coherent perception. In relation to this hypothesis, we will assess the functional relevance of different types of oscillatory activity observed in the olfactory system of behaving animals. This review will focus primarily on two types of oscillatory activities: beta (15–40 Hz) and gamma (60–100 Hz). While gamma oscillations are dominant in the olfactory system in the absence of odorant, both beta and gamma rhythms have been reported to be modulated depending on the nature of the olfactory task. Studies from the authors of the present review and other groups brought evidence for a link between these oscillations and behavioral changes induced by olfactory learning. However, differences in studies led to divergent interpretations concerning the respective role of these oscillations in olfactory processing. Based on a critical reexamination of those data, we propose hypotheses on the functional involvement of beta and gamma oscillations for odor perception and memory. PMID:25002840

  18. 19 CFR 10.920 - Accessories, spare parts, or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts, or tools. 10.920 Section... Promotion Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.920 Accessories, spare parts, or tools. (a) General. Accessories... accessories, spare parts, or tools will be treated as originating goods if the good is an originating...

  19. 19 CFR 10.456 - Accessories, spare parts or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... good will be treated as a material used in the production of the good, if— (a) The accessories, spare... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts or tools. 10.456 Section... Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.456 Accessories, spare parts or tools. Accessories, spare parts...

  20. 19 CFR 10.920 - Accessories, spare parts, or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts, or tools. 10.920 Section... Promotion Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.920 Accessories, spare parts, or tools. (a) General. Accessories... accessories, spare parts, or tools will be treated as originating goods if the good is an originating...

  1. 19 CFR 10.456 - Accessories, spare parts or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... good will be treated as a material used in the production of the good, if— (a) The accessories, spare... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts or tools. 10.456 Section... Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.456 Accessories, spare parts or tools. Accessories, spare parts...

  2. 19 CFR 10.456 - Accessories, spare parts or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... good will be treated as a material used in the production of the good, if— (a) The accessories, spare... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts or tools. 10.456 Section... Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.456 Accessories, spare parts or tools. Accessories, spare parts...

  3. 19 CFR 10.456 - Accessories, spare parts or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... good will be treated as a material used in the production of the good, if— (a) The accessories, spare... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts or tools. 10.456 Section... Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.456 Accessories, spare parts or tools. Accessories, spare parts...

  4. 19 CFR 10.456 - Accessories, spare parts or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... good will be treated as a material used in the production of the good, if— (a) The accessories, spare... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts or tools. 10.456 Section... Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.456 Accessories, spare parts or tools. Accessories, spare parts...

  5. 19 CFR 10.920 - Accessories, spare parts, or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts, or tools. 10.920 Section... Promotion Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.920 Accessories, spare parts, or tools. (a) General. Accessories... accessories, spare parts, or tools will be treated as originating goods if the good is an originating...

  6. Illuminating odors: when optogenetics brings to light unexpected olfactory abilities.

    PubMed

    Grimaud, Julien; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2016-06-01

    For hundreds of years, the sense of smell has generated great interest in the world literature, oenologists, and perfume makers but less of scientists. Only recently this sensory modality has gained new attraction in neuroscience when original tools issued from physiology, anatomy, or molecular biology were available to decipher how the brain makes sense of olfactory cues. However, this move was promptly dampened by the difficulties of developing quantitative approaches to study the relationship between the physical characteristics of stimuli and the sensations they create. An upswing of olfactory investigations occurred when genetic tools could be used in combination with devices borrowed from the physics of light (a hybrid technique called optogenetics) to scrutinize the olfactory system and to provide greater physiological precision for studying olfactory-driven behaviors. This review aims to present the most recent studies that have used light to activate components of the olfactory pathway, such as olfactory receptor neurons, or neurons located further downstream, while leaving intact others brain circuits. With the use of optogenetics to unravel the mystery of olfaction, scientists have begun to disentangle how the brain makes sense of smells. In this review, we shall discuss how the brain recognizes odors, how it memorizes them, and how animals make decisions based on odorants they are capable of sensing. Although this review deals with olfaction, the role of light will be central throughout.

  7. Illuminating odors: when optogenetics brings to light unexpected olfactory abilities

    PubMed Central

    Grimaud, Julien

    2016-01-01

    For hundreds of years, the sense of smell has generated great interest in the world literature, oenologists, and perfume makers but less of scientists. Only recently this sensory modality has gained new attraction in neuroscience when original tools issued from physiology, anatomy, or molecular biology were available to decipher how the brain makes sense of olfactory cues. However, this move was promptly dampened by the difficulties of developing quantitative approaches to study the relationship between the physical characteristics of stimuli and the sensations they create. An upswing of olfactory investigations occurred when genetic tools could be used in combination with devices borrowed from the physics of light (a hybrid technique called optogenetics) to scrutinize the olfactory system and to provide greater physiological precision for studying olfactory-driven behaviors. This review aims to present the most recent studies that have used light to activate components of the olfactory pathway, such as olfactory receptor neurons, or neurons located further downstream, while leaving intact others brain circuits. With the use of optogenetics to unravel the mystery of olfaction, scientists have begun to disentangle how the brain makes sense of smells. In this review, we shall discuss how the brain recognizes odors, how it memorizes them, and how animals make decisions based on odorants they are capable of sensing. Although this review deals with olfaction, the role of light will be central throughout. PMID:27194792

  8. Illuminating odors: when optogenetics brings to light unexpected olfactory abilities.

    PubMed

    Grimaud, Julien; Lledo, Pierre-Marie

    2016-06-01

    For hundreds of years, the sense of smell has generated great interest in the world literature, oenologists, and perfume makers but less of scientists. Only recently this sensory modality has gained new attraction in neuroscience when original tools issued from physiology, anatomy, or molecular biology were available to decipher how the brain makes sense of olfactory cues. However, this move was promptly dampened by the difficulties of developing quantitative approaches to study the relationship between the physical characteristics of stimuli and the sensations they create. An upswing of olfactory investigations occurred when genetic tools could be used in combination with devices borrowed from the physics of light (a hybrid technique called optogenetics) to scrutinize the olfactory system and to provide greater physiological precision for studying olfactory-driven behaviors. This review aims to present the most recent studies that have used light to activate components of the olfactory pathway, such as olfactory receptor neurons, or neurons located further downstream, while leaving intact others brain circuits. With the use of optogenetics to unravel the mystery of olfaction, scientists have begun to disentangle how the brain makes sense of smells. In this review, we shall discuss how the brain recognizes odors, how it memorizes them, and how animals make decisions based on odorants they are capable of sensing. Although this review deals with olfaction, the role of light will be central throughout. PMID:27194792

  9. Analysis of the goldfish Carassius auratus olfactory epithelium transcriptome reveals the presence of numerous non-olfactory GPCR and putative receptors for progestin pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Kolmakov, Nikolay N; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Canario, Adelino VM

    2008-01-01

    Background The goldfish (Carassius auratus) uses steroids and prostaglandins as pheromone cues at different stages of the reproductive cycle to facilitate spawning synchronization. Steroid progestin pheromone binding has been detected in goldfish olfactory membranes but the receptors responsible for this specific binding remain unknown. In order to shed some light on the olfactory epithelium transcriptome and search for possible receptor candidates a large set of EST from this tissue were analysed and compared to and combined with a similar zebrafish (Danio rerio) resource. Results We generated 4,797 high quality sequences from a normalized cDNA library of the goldfish olfactory epithelium, which were clustered in 3,879 unique sequences, grouped in 668 contigs and 3,211 singletons. BLASTX searches produced 3,243 significant (E-value < e-10) hits and Gene Ontology (GO) analysis annotated a further 1,223 of these genes (37.7%). Comparative analysis with zebrafish olfactory epithelium ESTs revealed 1,088 identical unigenes. The transcriptome size of both species was estimated at about 16,400 unigenes, based on the proportion of genes identified involved in Glucose Metabolic Process. Of 124 G-protein coupled receptors identified in the olfactory epithelium of both species, 56 were olfactory receptors. Beta and gamma membrane progestin receptors were also isolated by subcloning of RT-PCR products from both species and an olfactory epithelium specific splice form identified. Conclusion The high similarity between the goldfish and zebrafish olfactory systems allowed the creation of a 'cyprinid' olfactory epithelium library estimated to represent circa 70% of the transcriptome. These results are an important resource for the identification of components of signalling pathways involved in olfaction as well as putative targets for pharmacological and histochemical studies. The possible function of the receptors identified in the olfactory system is described. Moreover, the

  10. Basal telencephalic regions connected with the olfactory bulb in a Madagascan hedgehog tenrec.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H; Radtke-Schuller, S

    2000-08-01

    In an attempt to gain insight into the organization and evolution of the basal forebrain, the region was analysed cytoarchitecturally, chemoarchitecturally, and hodologically in a lower placental mammal, the lesser hedgehog tenrec. Particular emphasis was laid on the subdivision of the olfactory tubercle, the nuclear complex of the diagonal band, and the cortical amygdala. The proper tubercule and the rostrolateral tubercular seam differed from each other with regard to their immunoreactivity to calbindin and calretinin, as well as their afferents from the piriform cortex. Interestingly, the tubercular seam showed similar properties to the dwarf cell compartment, located immediately adjacent to the islands of Calleja. The most prominent input to the olfactory bulb (OfB) originated from the diagonal nuclear complex. This projection was ipsilateral, whereas the bulbar afferents from the hypothalamus and the mesopontine tegmentum were bilateral. The amygdala projected only sparsely to the OfB, but received a prominent bulbar projection. An exception was the nucleus of the lateral olfactory tract, which was poorly connected with the OfB. Unlike other species with an accessory OfB, the projections from the tenrec's main OfB did not show a topographic organization upon the lateral and medial olfactory amygdala. However, there was an accessory amygdala, which could be differentiated from the lateral nuclei by its intense reaction to NADPh-diaphorase. This reaction was poor in the diagonal nuclear complex as in monkey but unlike in rat. The variability of cell populations and olfactory bulb connections shown here may help to clarify both phylogenetic relationships and the significance of individual basal telencephalic subdivisions.

  11. 14 CFR 29.1163 - Powerplant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... continued rotation of an engine-driven cabin supercharger or any remote accessory driven by the engine will be a hazard if they malfunction, there must be means to prevent their hazardous rotation...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1163 - Powerplant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... in the event it malfunctions. (d) If the continued rotation of any accessory remotely driven by the engine is hazardous when malfunctioning occurs, a means to prevent rotation without interfering with...

  13. 14 CFR 29.1163 - Powerplant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... continued rotation of an engine-driven cabin supercharger or any remote accessory driven by the engine will be a hazard if they malfunction, there must be means to prevent their hazardous rotation...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1163 - Powerplant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... in the event it malfunctions. (d) If the continued rotation of any accessory remotely driven by the engine is hazardous when malfunctioning occurs, a means to prevent rotation without interfering with...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1163 - Powerplant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... in the event it malfunctions. (d) If the continued rotation of any accessory remotely driven by the engine is hazardous when malfunctioning occurs, a means to prevent rotation without interfering with...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1163 - Powerplant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... in the event it malfunctions. (d) If the continued rotation of any accessory remotely driven by the engine is hazardous when malfunctioning occurs, a means to prevent rotation without interfering with...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1163 - Powerplant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... in the event it malfunctions. (d) If the continued rotation of any accessory remotely driven by the engine is hazardous when malfunctioning occurs, a means to prevent rotation without interfering with...

  18. 14 CFR 29.1163 - Powerplant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... continued rotation of an engine-driven cabin supercharger or any remote accessory driven by the engine will be a hazard if they malfunction, there must be means to prevent their hazardous rotation...

  19. 46 CFR 169.671 - Accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Electrical Electrical Installations Operating at Potentials of Less Than 50 Volts on Vessels of Less Than 100 Gross Tons § 169.671 Accessories. Each light, receptacle and switch exposed to the weather must...

  20. The Accessory Genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Vanderlene L.; Ozer, Egon A.; Hauser, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains exhibit significant variability in pathogenicity and ecological flexibility. Such interstrain differences reflect the dynamic nature of the P. aeruginosa genome, which is composed of a relatively invariable “core genome” and a highly variable “accessory genome.” Here we review the major classes of genetic elements comprising the P. aeruginosa accessory genome and highlight emerging themes in the acquisition and functional importance of these elements. Although the precise phenotypes endowed by the majority of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome have yet to be determined, rapid progress is being made, and a clearer understanding of the role of the P. aeruginosa accessory genome in ecology and infection is emerging. PMID:21119020

  1. Olfactory function in patients with olfactory groove meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Welge-Luessen, A; Temmel, A; Quint, C; Moll, B; Wolf, S; Hummel, T

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Olfactory meningiomas are rare benign tumours and represent about 12% of all basal meningiomas. Anosmia is thought to be among the first symptoms, even though patients often present with headaches or visual problems. However, so far no detailed physophysical tests of olfactory function have been performed in a large number of those patients.
METHODS—Twelve patients (five men, seven women; mean age 52 years) with olfactory meningiomas were examined. In all patients extensive preoperative and postoperative lateralised olfactory testing was performed using the "Sniffin' Sticks" test battery, a psychometric testing tool. In eight cases the meningioma was lateralised (five left, three right), in four patients a bilateral meningioma was found. In addition to a detailed ear, nose, and throat examination MRI was performed in all patients.
RESULTS—In preoperative testing six patients were found to be anosmic on the side of the tumour, two were hyposmic. Four patients were normosmic. Postoperative investigations showed lateralised anosmia in four patients on the operated side, three were normosmic on the contralateral side and one hyposmic. The remaining eight patients were completely anosmic postoperatively.
CONCLUSIONS—(1) Contrary to expectations, olfactory testing seems to be of little help in detecting olfactory meningiomas. (2) The likelihood of normal postoperative olfactory function contralateral to the tumour was high when the tumour was less than 3 cm in diameter and preoperative normosmia had been established. (3) Preservation of olfactory function ipsilateral to the tumour seems to be extremely difficult, irrespective of tumour size or surgical approach.

 PMID:11160471

  2. Functional neuroanatomy of Drosophila olfactory memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba

    2014-01-01

    New approaches, techniques and tools invented over the last decade and a half have revolutionized the functional dissection of neural circuitry underlying Drosophila learning. The new methodologies have been used aggressively by researchers attempting to answer three critical questions about olfactory memories formed with appetitive and aversive reinforcers: (1) Which neurons within the olfactory nervous system mediate the acquisition of memory? (2) What is the complete neural circuitry extending from the site(s) of acquisition to the site(s) controlling memory expression? (3) How is information processed across this circuit to consolidate early-forming, disruptable memories to stable, late memories? Much progress has been made and a few strong conclusions have emerged: (1) Acquisition occurs at multiple sites within the olfactory nervous system but is mediated predominantly by the γ mushroom body neurons. (2) The expression of long-term memory is completely dependent on the synaptic output of α/β mushroom body neurons. (3) Consolidation occurs, in part, through circuit interactions between mushroom body and dorsal paired medial neurons. Despite this progress, a complete and unified model that details the pathway from acquisition to memory expression remains elusive. PMID:25225297

  3. Olfactory lateralization in homing pigeons: a GPS study on birds released with unilateral olfactory inputs.

    PubMed

    Gagliardo, Anna; Filannino, Caterina; Ioalè, Paolo; Pecchia, Tommaso; Wikelski, Martin; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2011-02-15

    A large body of evidence has shown that pigeons rely on an olfactory-based navigational map when homing from unfamiliar locations. Previous studies on pigeons released with one nostril occluded highlighted an asymmetry in favour of the right nostril, particularly concerning the initial orientation performance of naïve birds. Nevertheless, all pigeons experiencing only unilateral olfactory input showed impaired homing, regardless of the side of the occluded nostril. So far this phenomenon has been documented only by observing the birds' vanishing bearings. In the present work we recorded the flight tracks of pigeons with previous homing experience equipped with a GPS data logger and released from an unfamiliar location with the right or the left nostril occluded. The analysis of the tracks revealed that the flight path of the birds with the right nostril occluded was more tortuous than that of unmanipulated controls. Moreover, the pigeons smelling with the left nostril interrupted their journey significantly more frequently and displayed more exploratory activity than the control birds, e.g. during flights around a stopover site. These data suggest a more important involvement of the right olfactory system in processing the olfactory information needed for the operation of the navigational map.

  4. Laparoscopic excision of infarcted accessory spleen.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Yasmin; Cameron, Brian H; Maizlin, Zeev V; Boutross-Tadross, Odette

    2010-04-01

    An accessory spleen is present in about 10-30% of the population and, usually, does not cause symptoms. We present a case report of an unusual presentation of accessory spleen infarction, with a literature review. A 12-year old male presented with acute left-upper quadrant pain that slowly resolved. An ultrasound and computed tomography scan showed a 3.5 x 2.5 x 2 cm solid mass abutting and displacing the splenic flexure of the colon, with surrounding inflammatory changes. This was interpreted as a colonic duplication cyst, and the boy was treated with antibiotics and underwent elective laparoscopic exploration. It was removed laparoscopically without complication and, on pathologic examination, proved to be consistent with an infarcted accessory spleen. Less than two dozen similar cases of accessory spleen infarction have been reported in the literature, most presenting with acute abdominal pain. Preoperative diagnoses included appendicitis, ovarian torsion, neoplasm, and, in our case, colonic duplication. The natural course of infarcted accessory spleen would be to atrophy, but, even with advanced imaging techniques, it may be impossible to diagnose infarcted accessory spleen with enough confidence to avoid surgery.

  5. Efferent and afferent connections of the olfactory bulb and prepiriform cortex in the pigeon (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Atoji, Yasuro; Wild, J Martin

    2014-06-01

    Although olfaction in birds is known to be involved in a variety of behaviors, there is comparatively little detailed information on the olfactory brain. In the pigeon brain, the olfactory bulb (OB) is known to project to the prepiriform cortex (CPP), piriform cortex (CPi), and dorsolateral corticoid area (CDL), which together are called the olfactory pallium, but centrifugal pathways to the OB have not been fully explored. Fiber connections of CPi and CDL have been reported, but those of other olfactory pallial nuclei remain unknown. The present study examines the fiber connections of OB and CPP in pigeons to provide a more detailed picture of their connections using tract-tracing methods. When anterograde and retrograde tracers were injected in OB, projections to a more extensive olfactory pallium were revealed, including the anterior olfactory nucleus, CPP, densocellular part of the hyperpallium, tenia tecta, hippocampal continuation, CPi, and CDL. OB projected commissural fibers to the contralateral OB but did not receive afferents from the contralateral olfactory pallium. When tracers were injected in CPP, reciprocal ipsilateral connections with OB and nuclei of the olfactory pallium were observed, and CPP projected to the caudolateral nidopallium and the limbic system, including the hippocampal formation, septum, lateral hypothalamic nucleus, and lateral mammillary nucleus. These results show that the connections of OB have a wider distribution throughout the olfactory pallium than previously thought and that CPP provides a centrifugal projection to the OB and acts as a relay station to the limbic system.

  6. Olfactory receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Gabriela; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) superfamily represents the largest class of membrane protein in the human genome. More than a half of all GPCRs are dedicated to interact with odorants and are termed odorant-receptors (ORs). Linda Buck and Richard Axel, the Nobel Prize laureates in physiology or medicine in 2004, first cloned and characterized the gene family that encode ORs, establishing the foundations to the understanding of the molecular basis for odor recognition. In the last decades, a lot of progress has been done to unravel the functioning of the sense of smell. This chapter gives a general overview of the topic of olfactory receptor signaling and reviews recent advances in this field. PMID:26928542

  7. Orientation in birds. Olfactory navigation.

    PubMed

    Papi, F

    1991-01-01

    Research work on the olfactory navigation of birds, which has only recently attracted attention, has shown that many wild species rely on an osmotactic mechanism to find food sources, even at a considerable distance. The homing pigeon, the only bird to have been thoroughly investigated with respect to olfactory navigation, has been found to rely on local odours for homeward orientation, and to integrate olfactory cues perceived during passive transportation with those picked up at the release site. It is possible to design experiments in which birds are given false olfactory information, and predictions about the effects of this can be made and tested. Pigeons are able to home from unfamiliar sites because they acquire an olfactory map extending beyond the area they have flown over. The olfactory map is built up by associating wind-borne odours with the direction from which they come; this was shown by experiments which aimed to prevent, limit or alter this association. One aim of the research work has been to test whether pigeons flying over unfamiliar areas also rely or can learn to rely on non-olfactory cues, depending on their local availability, and/or on the methods of rearing and training applied to them. Various evaluations have been made of the results; the most recent experiments, however, confirm that pigeons do derive directional information from atmospheric odours. A neurobiological approach is also in progress; its results show that some telencephalic areas are involved in orientation and olfactory navigation. The lack of any knowledge about the distribution and chemical nature of the odorants which allow pigeons to navigate hinders progress in this area of research.

  8. Sniffing out the contributions of the olfactory tubercle to the sense of smell: hedonics, sensory integration, and more?

    PubMed

    Wesson, Daniel W; Wilson, Donald A

    2011-01-01

    Since its designation in 1896 as a putative olfactory structure, the olfactory tubercle has received little attention in terms of elucidating its role in the processing and perception of odors. Instead, research on the olfactory tubercle has mostly focused on its relationship with the reward system. Here we provide a comprehensive review of research on the olfactory tubercle-with an emphasis on the likely role of this region in olfactory processing and its contributions to perception. Further, we propose several testable hypotheses regarding the likely involvement of the olfactory tubercle in both basic (odor detection, discrimination, parallel processing of olfactory information) and higher-order (social odor processing, hedonics, multi-modal integration) functions. Together, the information within this review highlights an understudied yet potentially critical component in central odor processing.

  9. Olfactory Receptor Patterning in a Higher Primate

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Lisa F.; Saraiva, Luis R.; Kuang, Donghui; Yoon, Kyoung-hye

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory system detects a plethora of environmental chemicals that are perceived as odors or stimulate instinctive behaviors. Studies using odorant receptor (OR) genes have provided insight into the molecular and organizational strategies underlying olfaction in mice. One important unanswered question, however, is whether these strategies are conserved in primates. To explore this question, we examined the macaque, a higher primate phylogenetically close to humans. Here we report that the organization of sensory inputs in the macaque nose resembles that in mouse in some respects, but not others. As in mouse, neurons with different ORs are interspersed in the macaque nose, and there are spatial zones that differ in their complement of ORs and extend axons to different domains in the olfactory bulb of the brain. However, whereas the mouse has multiple discrete band-like zones, the macaque appears to have only two broad zones. It is unclear whether the organization of OR inputs in a rodent/primate common ancestor degenerated in primates or, alternatively became more sophisticated in rodents. The mouse nose has an additional small family of chemosensory receptors, called trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs), which may detect social cues. Here we find that TAARs are also expressed in the macaque nose, suggesting that TAARs may also play a role in human olfactory perception. We further find that one human TAAR responds to rotten fish, suggesting a possible role as a sentinel to discourage ingestion of food harboring pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:25209267

  10. Neurally Encoding Time for Olfactory Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Park, In Jun; Hein, Andrew M.; Bobkov, Yuriy V.; Reidenbach, Matthew A.; Ache, Barry W.; Principe, Jose C.

    2016-01-01

    Accurately encoding time is one of the fundamental challenges faced by the nervous system in mediating behavior. We recently reported that some animals have a specialized population of rhythmically active neurons in their olfactory organs with the potential to peripherally encode temporal information about odor encounters. If these neurons do indeed encode the timing of odor arrivals, it should be possible to demonstrate that this capacity has some functional significance. Here we show how this sensory input can profoundly influence an animal’s ability to locate the source of odor cues in realistic turbulent environments—a common task faced by species that rely on olfactory cues for navigation. Using detailed data from a turbulent plume created in the laboratory, we reconstruct the spatiotemporal behavior of a real odor field. We use recurrence theory to show that information about position relative to the source of the odor plume is embedded in the timing between odor pulses. Then, using a parameterized computational model, we show how an animal can use populations of rhythmically active neurons to capture and encode this temporal information in real time, and use it to efficiently navigate to an odor source. Our results demonstrate that the capacity to accurately encode temporal information about sensory cues may be crucial for efficient olfactory navigation. More generally, our results suggest a mechanism for extracting and encoding temporal information from the sensory environment that could have broad utility for neural information processing. PMID:26730727

  11. Neurally Encoding Time for Olfactory Navigation.

    PubMed

    Park, In Jun; Hein, Andrew M; Bobkov, Yuriy V; Reidenbach, Matthew A; Ache, Barry W; Principe, Jose C

    2016-01-01

    Accurately encoding time is one of the fundamental challenges faced by the nervous system in mediating behavior. We recently reported that some animals have a specialized population of rhythmically active neurons in their olfactory organs with the potential to peripherally encode temporal information about odor encounters. If these neurons do indeed encode the timing of odor arrivals, it should be possible to demonstrate that this capacity has some functional significance. Here we show how this sensory input can profoundly influence an animal's ability to locate the source of odor cues in realistic turbulent environments-a common task faced by species that rely on olfactory cues for navigation. Using detailed data from a turbulent plume created in the laboratory, we reconstruct the spatiotemporal behavior of a real odor field. We use recurrence theory to show that information about position relative to the source of the odor plume is embedded in the timing between odor pulses. Then, using a parameterized computational model, we show how an animal can use populations of rhythmically active neurons to capture and encode this temporal information in real time, and use it to efficiently navigate to an odor source. Our results demonstrate that the capacity to accurately encode temporal information about sensory cues may be crucial for efficient olfactory navigation. More generally, our results suggest a mechanism for extracting and encoding temporal information from the sensory environment that could have broad utility for neural information processing. PMID:26730727

  12. Olfactory organ of Octopus vulgaris: morphology, plasticity, turnover and sensory characterization.

    PubMed

    Polese, Gianluca; Bertapelle, Carla; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The cephalopod olfactory organ was described for the first time in 1844 by von Kölliker, who was attracted to the pair of small pits of ciliated cells on each side of the head, below the eyes close to the mantle edge, in both octopuses and squids. Several functional studies have been conducted on decapods but very little is known about octopods. The morphology of the octopus olfactory system has been studied, but only to a limited extent on post-hatching specimens, and the only paper on adult octopus gives a minimal description of the olfactory organ. Here, we describe the detailed morphology of young male and female Octopus vulgaris olfactory epithelium, and using a combination of classical morphology and 3D reconstruction techniques, we propose a new classification for O. vulgaris olfactory sensory neurons. Furthermore, using specific markers such as olfactory marker protein (OMP) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) we have been able to identify and differentially localize both mature olfactory sensory neurons and olfactory sensory neurons involved in epithelium turnover. Taken together, our data suggest that the O. vulgaris olfactory organ is extremely plastic, capable of changing its shape and also proliferating its cells in older specimens. PMID:27069253

  13. Evolutionary Genomics of Genes Involved in Olfactory Behavior in the Drosophila melanogaster Species Group

    PubMed Central

    Lavagnino, Nicolás; Serra, François; Arbiza, Leonardo; Dopazo, Hernán; Hasson, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    Previous comparative genomic studies of genes involved in olfactory behavior in Drosophila focused only on particular gene families such as odorant receptor and/or odorant binding proteins. However, olfactory behavior has a complex genetic architecture that is orchestrated by many interacting genes. In this paper, we present a comparative genomic study of olfactory behavior in Drosophila including an extended set of genes known to affect olfactory behavior. We took advantage of the recent burst of whole genome sequences and the development of powerful statistical tools to analyze genomic data and test evolutionary and functional hypotheses of olfactory genes in the six species of the Drosophila melanogaster species group for which whole genome sequences are available. Our study reveals widespread purifying selection and limited incidence of positive selection on olfactory genes. We show that the pace of evolution of olfactory genes is mostly independent of the life cycle stage, and of the number of life cycle stages, in which they participate in olfaction. However, we detected a relationship between evolutionary rates and the position that the gene products occupy in the olfactory system, genes occupying central positions tend to be more constrained than peripheral genes. Finally, we demonstrate that specialization to one host does not seem to be associated with bursts of adaptive evolution in olfactory genes in D. sechellia and D. erecta, the two specialists species analyzed, but rather different lineages have idiosyncratic evolutionary histories in which both historical and ecological factors have been involved. PMID:22346339

  14. Olfactory organ of Octopus vulgaris: morphology, plasticity, turnover and sensory characterization

    PubMed Central

    Polese, Gianluca; Bertapelle, Carla

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cephalopod olfactory organ was described for the first time in 1844 by von Kölliker, who was attracted to the pair of small pits of ciliated cells on each side of the head, below the eyes close to the mantle edge, in both octopuses and squids. Several functional studies have been conducted on decapods but very little is known about octopods. The morphology of the octopus olfactory system has been studied, but only to a limited extent on post-hatching specimens, and the only paper on adult octopus gives a minimal description of the olfactory organ. Here, we describe the detailed morphology of young male and female Octopus vulgaris olfactory epithelium, and using a combination of classical morphology and 3D reconstruction techniques, we propose a new classification for O. vulgaris olfactory sensory neurons. Furthermore, using specific markers such as olfactory marker protein (OMP) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) we have been able to identify and differentially localize both mature olfactory sensory neurons and olfactory sensory neurons involved in epithelium turnover. Taken together, our data suggest that the O. vulgaris olfactory organ is extremely plastic, capable of changing its shape and also proliferating its cells in older specimens. PMID:27069253

  15. Olfactory short-term memory encoding and maintenance - an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Lenk, Steffen; Bluschke, Annet; Beste, Christian; Iannilli, Emilia; Rößner, Veit; Hummel, Thomas; Bender, Stephan

    2014-09-01

    This study examined whether the memory encoding and short term maintenance of olfactory stimuli is associated with neurophysiological activation patterns which parallel those described for sensory modalities such as vision and auditory. We examined olfactory event-related potentials in an olfactory change detection task in twenty-four healthy adults and compared the measured activation to that found during passive olfactory stimulation. During the early olfactory post-processing phase, we found a sustained negativity over bilateral frontotemporal areas in the passive perception condition which was enhanced in the active memory task. There was no significant lateralization in either experimental condition. During the maintenance interval at the end of the delay period, we still found sustained activation over bilateral frontotemporal areas which was more negative in trials with correct - as compared to incorrect - behavioural responses. This was complemented by a general significantly stronger frontocentral activation. Summarizing, we were able to show that olfactory short term memory involves a parallel sequence of activation as found in other sensory modalities. In addition to olfactory-specific frontotemporal activations in the memory encoding phase, we found slow cortical potentials over frontocentral areas during the memory maintenance phase indicating the activation of a supramodal memory maintenance system. These findings could represent the neurophysiological underpinning of the 'olfactory flacon', the olfactory counter-part to the visual sketchpad and phonological loop embedded in Baddeley's working memory model.

  16. Expression and function of the empty spiracles gene in olfactory sense organ development of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sonia; Hartmann, Beate; Reichert, Heinrich; Rodrigues, Veronica

    2010-11-01

    In Drosophila, the cephalic gap gene empty spiracles plays key roles in embryonic patterning of the peripheral and central nervous system. During postembryonic development, it is involved in the development of central olfactory circuitry in the antennal lobe of the adult. However, its possible role in the postembryonic development of peripheral olfactory sense organs has not been investigated. Here, we show that empty spiracles acts in a subset of precursors that generate the olfactory sense organs of the adult antenna. All empty spiracles-expressing precursor cells co-express the proneural gene amos and the early patterning gene lozenge. Moreover, the expression of empty spiracles in these precursor cells is dependent on both amos and lozenge. Functional analysis reveals two distinct roles of empty spiracles in the development of olfactory sense organs. Genetic interaction studies in a lozenge-sensitized background uncover a requirement of empty spiracles in the formation of trichoid and basiconic olfactory sensilla. MARCM-based clonal mutant analysis reveals an additional role during axonal targeting of olfactory sensory neurons to glomeruli within the antennal lobe. Our findings on empty spiracles action in olfactory sense organ development complement previous studies that demonstrate its requirement in olfactory interneurons and, taken together with studies on the murine homologs of empty spiracles, suggest that conserved molecular genetic programs might be responsible for the formation of both peripheral and central olfactory circuitry in insects and mammals.

  17. Expression and function of the empty spiracles gene in olfactory sense organ development of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sonia; Hartmann, Beate; Reichert, Heinrich; Rodrigues, Veronica

    2010-11-01

    In Drosophila, the cephalic gap gene empty spiracles plays key roles in embryonic patterning of the peripheral and central nervous system. During postembryonic development, it is involved in the development of central olfactory circuitry in the antennal lobe of the adult. However, its possible role in the postembryonic development of peripheral olfactory sense organs has not been investigated. Here, we show that empty spiracles acts in a subset of precursors that generate the olfactory sense organs of the adult antenna. All empty spiracles-expressing precursor cells co-express the proneural gene amos and the early patterning gene lozenge. Moreover, the expression of empty spiracles in these precursor cells is dependent on both amos and lozenge. Functional analysis reveals two distinct roles of empty spiracles in the development of olfactory sense organs. Genetic interaction studies in a lozenge-sensitized background uncover a requirement of empty spiracles in the formation of trichoid and basiconic olfactory sensilla. MARCM-based clonal mutant analysis reveals an additional role during axonal targeting of olfactory sensory neurons to glomeruli within the antennal lobe. Our findings on empty spiracles action in olfactory sense organ development complement previous studies that demonstrate its requirement in olfactory interneurons and, taken together with studies on the murine homologs of empty spiracles, suggest that conserved molecular genetic programs might be responsible for the formation of both peripheral and central olfactory circuitry in insects and mammals. PMID:20940227

  18. Lesion of the Olfactory Epithelium Accelerates Prion Neuroinvasion and Disease Onset when Prion Replication Is Restricted to Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Jenna; Wiley, James A.; Bessen, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Natural prion diseases of ruminants are moderately contagious and while the gastrointestinal tract is the primary site of prion agent entry, other mucosae may be entry sites in a subset of infections. In the current study we examined prion neuroinvasion and disease induction following disruption of the olfactory epithelium in the nasal mucosa since this site contains environmentally exposed olfactory sensory neurons that project directly into the central nervous system. Here we provide evidence for accelerated prion neuroinvasion and clinical onset from the olfactory mucosa after disruption and regeneration of the olfactory epithelium and when prion replication is restricted to neurons. In transgenic mice with neuron restricted replication of prions, there was a reduction in survival when the olfactory epithelium was disrupted prior to intranasal inoculation and there was >25% decrease in the prion incubation period. In a second model, the neurotropic DY strain of transmissible mink encephalopathy was not pathogenic in hamsters by the nasal route, but 50% of animals exhibited brain infection and/or disease when the olfactory epithelium was disrupted prior to intranasal inoculation. A time course analysis of prion deposition in the brain following loss of the olfactory epithelium in models of neuron-restricted prion replication suggests that neuroinvasion from the olfactory mucosa is via the olfactory nerve or brain stem associated cranial nerves. We propose that induction of neurogenesis after damage to the olfactory epithelium can lead to prion infection of immature olfactory sensory neurons and accelerate prion spread to the brain. PMID:25822718

  19. Manual therapy of the mandibular accessory ligaments for the management of temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Cuccia, Antonino Marco; Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico

    2011-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders are characterized by chronic or acute musculoskeletal or myofascial pain with dysfunction of the masticatory system. Treatment modalities include occlusal splints, patient education, activity modification, muscle and joint exercises, myofascial therapy, acupuncture, and manipulative therapy. In the physiology of the temporomandibular joint, accessory ligaments limit the movement of the mandible. A thorough knowledge of the anatomy of accessory ligaments is necessary for good clinical management of temporomandibular joint disorders. Although general principles regarding the anatomy of the ligaments are relatively clear, very little substantiated information on the dimension, orientation, and function of the ligaments has been published, to the authors' knowledge. The authors review the literature concerning the accessory ligaments of the temporomandibular joint and describe treatment options, including manual techniques for mobilizing the accessory ligaments. PMID:21357496

  20. Biomimetic chemical sensors using bioengineered olfactory and taste cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Liping; Zou, Ling; Zhao, Luhang; Wang, Ping; Wu, Chunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Biological olfactory and taste systems are natural chemical sensing systems with unique performances for the detection of environmental chemical signals. With the advances in olfactory and taste transduction mechanisms, biomimetic chemical sensors have achieved significant progress due to their promising prospects and potential applications. Biomimetic chemical sensors exploit the unique capability of biological functional components for chemical sensing, which are often sourced from sensing units of biological olfactory or taste systems at the tissue level, cellular level, or molecular level. Specifically, at the cellular level, there are mainly two categories of cells have been employed for the development of biomimetic chemical sensors, which are natural cells and bioengineered cells, respectively. Natural cells are directly isolated from biological olfactory and taste systems, which are convenient to achieve. However, natural cells often suffer from the undefined sensing properties and limited amount of identical cells. On the other hand, bioengineered cells have shown decisive advantages to be applied in the development of biomimetic chemical sensors due to the powerful biotechnology for the reconstruction of the cell sensing properties. Here, we briefly summarized the most recent advances of biomimetic chemical sensors using bioengineered olfactory and taste cells. The development challenges and future trends are discussed as well. PMID:25482234

  1. Anterior olfactory organ removal produces anxiety-like behavior and increases spontaneous neuronal firing rate in basal amygdala.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Carlos M; Gutiérrez-García, Ana G; Molina-Jiménez, Tania

    2013-09-01

    Some chemical cues may produce signs of anxiety and fear mediated by amygdala nuclei, but unknown is the role of two anterior olfactory epithelial organs, the septal and vomeronasal organs (SO-VNOs). The effects of SO-VNO removal were explored in different groups of Wistar rats using two complementary approaches: (i) the assessment of neuronal firing rate in basal and medial amygdala nuclei and (ii) behavioral testing. Fourteen days after SO-VNO removal, spontaneous activity in basal and medial amygdala nuclei in one group was determined using single-unit extracellular recordings. A separate group of rats was tested in the elevated plus maze, social interaction test, and open field test. Compared with sham-operated and intact control rats, SO-VNO removal produced a higher neuronal firing rate in the basal amygdala but not medial amygdala. In the behavioral tests, SO-VNO removal increased signs of anxiety in the elevated plus maze, did not alter locomotion, and increased self-directed behavior, reflecting anxiety-like behavior. Histological analysis showed neuronal destruction in the accessory olfactory bulb but not anterior olfactory nucleus in the SO-VNO group. The present results suggest the participation of SO-VNO/accessory olfactory bulb/basal amygdala relationships in the regulation of anxiety through a process of disinhibition.

  2. 21 CFR 878.4950 - Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories. 878.4950 Section 878.4950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY...

  3. 21 CFR 878.4960 - Operating tables and accessories and operating chairs and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Operating tables and accessories and operating chairs and accessories. 878.4960 Section 878.4960 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES...

  4. 21 CFR 878.4950 - Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories. 878.4950 Section 878.4950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY...

  5. 21 CFR 878.4960 - Operating tables and accessories and operating chairs and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Operating tables and accessories and operating chairs and accessories. 878.4960 Section 878.4960 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES...

  6. 21 CFR 878.4950 - Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories. 878.4950 Section 878.4950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY...

  7. 21 CFR 878.4960 - Operating tables and accessories and operating chairs and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Operating tables and accessories and operating chairs and accessories. 878.4960 Section 878.4960 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES...

  8. 21 CFR 878.4960 - Operating tables and accessories and operating chairs and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Operating tables and accessories and operating chairs and accessories. 878.4960 Section 878.4960 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES...

  9. 21 CFR 878.4950 - Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories. 878.4950 Section 878.4950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY...

  10. 21 CFR 878.4950 - Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manual operating table and accessories and manual operating chair and accessories. 878.4950 Section 878.4950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY...

  11. 21 CFR 878.4960 - Operating tables and accessories and operating chairs and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Operating tables and accessories and operating chairs and accessories. 878.4960 Section 878.4960 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES...

  12. Olfactory habituation in Drosophila-odor encoding and its plasticity in the antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Twick, Isabell; Lee, John Anthony; Ramaswami, Mani

    2014-01-01

    A ubiquitous feature of an animal's response to an odorant is that it declines when the odorant is frequently or continuously encountered. This decline in olfactory response, termed olfactory habituation, can have temporally or mechanistically different forms. The neural circuitry of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster's olfactory system is well defined in terms of component cells, which are readily accessible to functional studies and genetic manipulation. This makes it a particularly useful preparation for the investigation of olfactory habituation. In addition, the insect olfactory system shares many architectural and functional similarities with mammalian olfactory systems, suggesting that olfactory mechanisms in insects may be broadly relevant. In this chapter, we discuss the likely mechanisms of olfactory habituation in context of the participating cell types, their connectivity, and their roles in sensory processing. We overview the structure and function of key cell types, the mechanisms that stimulate them, and how they transduce and process odor signals. We then consider how each stage of olfactory processing could potentially contribute to behavioral habituation. After this, we overview a variety of recent mechanistic studies that point to an important role for potentiation of inhibitory synapses in the primary olfactory processing center, the antennal lobe, in driving the reduced response to familiar odorants. Following the discussion of mechanisms for short- and long-term olfactory habituation, we end by considering how these mechanisms may be regulated by neuromodulators, which likely play key roles in the induction, gating, or suppression of habituated behavior, and speculate on the relevance of these processes for other forms of learning and memory.

  13. Olfactory insights into sleep-dependent learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Laura K; Gottfried, Jay A

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is pervasive throughout most of the animal kingdom-even jellyfish and honeybees do it. Although the precise function of sleep remains elusive, research increasingly suggests that sleep plays a key role in memory consolidation. Newly formed memories are highly labile and susceptible to interference, and the sleep period offers an optimal window in which memories can be strengthened or modified. Interestingly, a small but growing research area has begun to explore the ability of odors to modulate memories during sleep. The unique anatomical organization of the olfactory system, including its intimate overlap with limbic systems mediating emotion and memory, and the lack of a requisite thalamic intermediary between the nasal periphery and olfactory cortex, suggests that odors may have privileged access to the brain during sleep. Indeed, it has become clear that the long-held assumption that odors have no impact on the sleeping brain is no longer tenable. Here, we summarize recent studies in both animal and human models showing that odor stimuli experienced in the waking state modulate olfactory cortical responses in sleep-like states, that delivery of odor contextual cues during sleep can enhance declarative memory and extinguish fear memory, and that olfactory associative learning can even be achieved entirely within sleep. Data reviewed here spotlight the emergence of a new research area that should hold far-reaching implications for future neuroscientific investigations of sleep, learning and memory, and olfactory system function. PMID:24767488

  14. Using Insect Electroantennogram Sensors on Autonomous Robots for Olfactory Searches

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Dominique; Arhidi, Lotfi; Demondion, Elodie; Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Lucas, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Robots designed to track chemical leaks in hazardous industrial facilities1 or explosive traces in landmine fields2 face the same problem as insects foraging for food or searching for mates3: the olfactory search is constrained by the physics of turbulent transport4. The concentration landscape of wind borne odors is discontinuous and consists of sporadically located patches. A pre-requisite to olfactory search is that intermittent odor patches are detected. Because of its high speed and sensitivity5-6, the olfactory organ of insects provides a unique opportunity for detection. Insect antennae have been used in the past to detect not only sex pheromones7 but also chemicals that are relevant to humans, e.g., volatile compounds emanating from cancer cells8 or toxic and illicit substances9-11. We describe here a protocol for using insect antennae on autonomous robots and present a proof of concept for tracking odor plumes to their source. The global response of olfactory neurons is recorded in situ in the form of electroantennograms (EAGs). Our experimental design, based on a whole insect preparation, allows stable recordings within a working day. In comparison, EAGs on excised antennae have a lifetime of 2 hr. A custom hardware/software interface was developed between the EAG electrodes and a robot. The measurement system resolves individual odor patches up to 10 Hz, which exceeds the time scale of artificial chemical sensors12. The efficiency of EAG sensors for olfactory searches is further demonstrated in driving the robot toward a source of pheromone. By using identical olfactory stimuli and sensors as in real animals, our robotic platform provides a direct means for testing biological hypotheses about olfactory coding and search strategies13. It may also prove beneficial for detecting other odorants of interests by combining EAGs from different insect species in a bioelectronic nose configuration14 or using nanostructured gas sensors that mimic insect antennae15

  15. Using insect electroantennogram sensors on autonomous robots for olfactory searches.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Dominique; Arhidi, Lotfi; Demondion, Elodie; Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Lucas, Philippe

    2014-08-04

    Robots designed to track chemical leaks in hazardous industrial facilities or explosive traces in landmine fields face the same problem as insects foraging for food or searching for mates: the olfactory search is constrained by the physics of turbulent transport. The concentration landscape of wind borne odors is discontinuous and consists of sporadically located patches. A pre-requisite to olfactory search is that intermittent odor patches are detected. Because of its high speed and sensitivity, the olfactory organ of insects provides a unique opportunity for detection. Insect antennae have been used in the past to detect not only sex pheromones but also chemicals that are relevant to humans, e.g., volatile compounds emanating from cancer cells or toxic and illicit substances. We describe here a protocol for using insect antennae on autonomous robots and present a proof of concept for tracking odor plumes to their source. The global response of olfactory neurons is recorded in situ in the form of electroantennograms (EAGs). Our experimental design, based on a whole insect preparation, allows stable recordings within a working day. In comparison, EAGs on excised antennae have a lifetime of 2 hr. A custom hardware/software interface was developed between the EAG electrodes and a robot. The measurement system resolves individual odor patches up to 10 Hz, which exceeds the time scale of artificial chemical sensors. The efficiency of EAG sensors for olfactory searches is further demonstrated in driving the robot toward a source of pheromone. By using identical olfactory stimuli and sensors as in real animals, our robotic platform provides a direct means for testing biological hypotheses about olfactory coding and search strategies. It may also prove beneficial for detecting other odorants of interests by combining EAGs from different insect species in a bioelectronic nose configuration or using nanostructured gas sensors that mimic insect antennae.

  16. Neural representations of novel objects associated with olfactory experience.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Marta; Schulze, Patrick; Suchan, Boris; Bellebaum, Christian

    2016-07-15

    Object conceptual knowledge comprises information related to several motor and sensory modalities (e.g. for tools, how they look like, how to manipulate them). Whether and to which extent conceptual object knowledge is represented in the same sensory and motor systems recruited during object-specific learning experience is still a controversial question. A direct approach to assess the experience-dependence of conceptual object representations is based on training with novel objects. The present study extended previous research, which focused mainly on the role of manipulation experience for tool-like stimuli, by considering sensory experience only. Specifically, we examined the impact of experience in the non-dominant olfactory modality on the neural representation of novel objects. Sixteen healthy participants visually explored a set of novel objects during the training phase while for each object an odor (e.g., peppermint) was presented (olfactory-visual training). As control conditions, a second set of objects was only visually explored (visual-only training), and a third set was not part of the training. In a post-training fMRI session, participants performed an old/new task with pictures of objects associated with olfactory-visual and visual-only training (old) and no training objects (new). Although we did not find any evidence of activations in primary olfactory areas, the processing of olfactory-visual versus visual-only training objects elicited greater activation in the right anterior hippocampus, a region included in the extended olfactory network. This finding is discussed in terms of different functional roles of the hippocampus in olfactory processes. PMID:27083305

  17. Using insect electroantennogram sensors on autonomous robots for olfactory searches.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Dominique; Arhidi, Lotfi; Demondion, Elodie; Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Lucas, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Robots designed to track chemical leaks in hazardous industrial facilities or explosive traces in landmine fields face the same problem as insects foraging for food or searching for mates: the olfactory search is constrained by the physics of turbulent transport. The concentration landscape of wind borne odors is discontinuous and consists of sporadically located patches. A pre-requisite to olfactory search is that intermittent odor patches are detected. Because of its high speed and sensitivity, the olfactory organ of insects provides a unique opportunity for detection. Insect antennae have been used in the past to detect not only sex pheromones but also chemicals that are relevant to humans, e.g., volatile compounds emanating from cancer cells or toxic and illicit substances. We describe here a protocol for using insect antennae on autonomous robots and present a proof of concept for tracking odor plumes to their source. The global response of olfactory neurons is recorded in situ in the form of electroantennograms (EAGs). Our experimental design, based on a whole insect preparation, allows stable recordings within a working day. In comparison, EAGs on excised antennae have a lifetime of 2 hr. A custom hardware/software interface was developed between the EAG electrodes and a robot. The measurement system resolves individual odor patches up to 10 Hz, which exceeds the time scale of artificial chemical sensors. The efficiency of EAG sensors for olfactory searches is further demonstrated in driving the robot toward a source of pheromone. By using identical olfactory stimuli and sensors as in real animals, our robotic platform provides a direct means for testing biological hypotheses about olfactory coding and search strategies. It may also prove beneficial for detecting other odorants of interests by combining EAGs from different insect species in a bioelectronic nose configuration or using nanostructured gas sensors that mimic insect antennae. PMID:25145980

  18. Functional representation of olfactory impairment in early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Förster, Stefan; Vaitl, Andreas; Teipel, Stefan J; Yakushev, Igor; Mustafa, Mona; la Fougère, Christian; Rominger, Axel; Cumming, Paul; Bartenstein, Peter; Hampel, Harald; Hummel, Thomas; Buerger, Katharina; Hundt, Walter; Steinbach, Silke

    2010-01-01

    We used [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET analysis to determine performance in different olfactory domains of patients with early AD compared to cognitively healthy subjects, and to map the functional metabolic representation of olfactory impairment in the patient sample. A cohort of patients with early AD (n=24), consisting of 6 subjects with incipient AD and 18 subjects with mild AD, and a control group of 28 age-matched non-demented individuals were assembled. Patients and controls were tested for olfactory performance using the "Sniffin' Sticks" test battery [odor identification (ID), discrimination (DIS) and threshold (THR)], while patients additionally underwent resting state FDG-PET. Voxel-wise PET results in the patients were correlated with olfaction scores using the general linear model in SPM5. Patients with early AD showed significantly reduced function in all three olfactory subdomains compared to controls. After controlling for effects due to patients' age, gender, cognitive status, and treating scores in the two other olfactory subdomains as nuisance variables, ID scores correlated with normalized FDG uptake in clusters with peaks in the right superior parietal lobule, fusiform gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and precuneus, while DIS scores correlated with a single cluster in the left postcentral cortex, and THR scores correlated with clusters in the right thalamus and cerebellum. The subtests employed in the "Sniffin' Sticks" test battery are complementary indicators of different aspects of olfactory dysfunction in early AD, and support the theory of a parallel organized olfactory system, revealed by FDG-PET correlation analysis. PMID:20847402

  19. Neural representations of novel objects associated with olfactory experience.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Marta; Schulze, Patrick; Suchan, Boris; Bellebaum, Christian

    2016-07-15

    Object conceptual knowledge comprises information related to several motor and sensory modalities (e.g. for tools, how they look like, how to manipulate them). Whether and to which extent conceptual object knowledge is represented in the same sensory and motor systems recruited during object-specific learning experience is still a controversial question. A direct approach to assess the experience-dependence of conceptual object representations is based on training with novel objects. The present study extended previous research, which focused mainly on the role of manipulation experience for tool-like stimuli, by considering sensory experience only. Specifically, we examined the impact of experience in the non-dominant olfactory modality on the neural representation of novel objects. Sixteen healthy participants visually explored a set of novel objects during the training phase while for each object an odor (e.g., peppermint) was presented (olfactory-visual training). As control conditions, a second set of objects was only visually explored (visual-only training), and a third set was not part of the training. In a post-training fMRI session, participants performed an old/new task with pictures of objects associated with olfactory-visual and visual-only training (old) and no training objects (new). Although we did not find any evidence of activations in primary olfactory areas, the processing of olfactory-visual versus visual-only training objects elicited greater activation in the right anterior hippocampus, a region included in the extended olfactory network. This finding is discussed in terms of different functional roles of the hippocampus in olfactory processes.

  20. [Olfactory sensory perception].

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Aler; Fresno, María Javiera; Santander, Hugo; Valenzuela, Saúl; Gutiérrez, Mario Felipe; Miralles, Rodolfo

    2011-03-01

    The five senses have had a fundamental importance for survival and socialization of human beings. From an evolutionary point of view the sense of smell is the oldest. This sense has a strong representation within the genome, allowing the existence of many types of receptors that allow us to capture multiple volatile odor producing molecules, sending electrical signals to higher centers to report the outside world. Several cortical areas are activated in the brain, which are interconnected to form an extensive and complex neural network, linking for example, areas involved with memory and emotions, thus giving this sense of perceptual richness. While the concept of flavor is largely related to the sense of taste, smell provides the necessary integration with the rest of the senses and higher functions. Fully understanding the sense of smell is relevant to health professionals. Knowing the characteristics of the receptors, the transduction processes and convergence of information in the higher centers involved, we can properly detect olfactory disorders in our patients. PMID:21879170

  1. [Olfactory sensory perception].

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Aler; Fresno, María Javiera; Santander, Hugo; Valenzuela, Saúl; Gutiérrez, Mario Felipe; Miralles, Rodolfo

    2011-03-01

    The five senses have had a fundamental importance for survival and socialization of human beings. From an evolutionary point of view the sense of smell is the oldest. This sense has a strong representation within the genome, allowing the existence of many types of receptors that allow us to capture multiple volatile odor producing molecules, sending electrical signals to higher centers to report the outside world. Several cortical areas are activated in the brain, which are interconnected to form an extensive and complex neural network, linking for example, areas involved with memory and emotions, thus giving this sense of perceptual richness. While the concept of flavor is largely related to the sense of taste, smell provides the necessary integration with the rest of the senses and higher functions. Fully understanding the sense of smell is relevant to health professionals. Knowing the characteristics of the receptors, the transduction processes and convergence of information in the higher centers involved, we can properly detect olfactory disorders in our patients.

  2. Olfactory receptors: G protein-coupled receptors and beyond.

    PubMed

    Spehr, Marc; Munger, Steven D

    2009-06-01

    Sensing the chemical environment is critical for all organisms. Diverse animals from insects to mammals utilize highly organized olfactory system to detect, encode, and process chemostimuli that may carry important information critical for health, survival, social interactions and reproduction. Therefore, for animals to properly interpret and react to their environment it is imperative that the olfactory system recognizes chemical stimuli with appropriate selectivity and sensitivity. Because olfactory receptor proteins play such an essential role in the specific recognition of diverse stimuli, understanding how they interact with and transduce their cognate ligands is a high priority. In the nearly two decades since the discovery that the mammalian odorant receptor gene family constitutes the largest group of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes, much attention has been focused on the roles of GPCRs in vertebrate and invertebrate olfaction. However, is has become clear that the 'family' of olfactory receptors is highly diverse, with roles for enzymes and ligand-gated ion channels as well as GPCRs in the primary detection of olfactory stimuli. PMID:19383089

  3. Bulbocortical interplay in olfactory information processing via synchronous oscillations.

    PubMed

    Fukai, T

    1996-04-01

    Emergence of synchronous oscillatory activity is an inherent feature of the olfactory systems of insects, mollusks and mammals. A class of simple computational models of the mammalian olfactory system consisting of olfactory bulb and olfactory cortex is constructed to explore possible roles of the related neural circuitry in olfactory information processing via synchronous oscillations. In the models, the bulbar neural circuitry is represented by a chain of oscillators and that of cortex is analogous to an associative memory network with horizontal synaptic connections. The models incorporate the backprojection from cortical units to the bulbar oscillators in particular ways. They exhibit rapid and robust synchronous oscillations in the presence of odorant stimuli, while they show either nonoscillatory states or propagating waves in the absence of stimuli, depending on the values of model parameters. In both models, the backprojection is shown to enhance the establishment of large-scale synchrony. The results suggest that the modulation of neural activity through centrifugal inputs may play an important role at the early stage of cortical information processing.

  4. Quantum Dot Distribution in the Olfactory Epithelium After Nasal Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzotto, D.; De Marchis, S.

    2010-10-01

    Nanoparticles are used in a wide range of human applications from industrial to bio-medical fields. However, the unique characteristics of nanoparticles, such as the small size, large surface area per mass and high reactivity raises great concern on the adverse effects of these particles on ecological systems and human health. There are several pioneer studies reporting translocation of inhaled particulates to the brain through a potential neuronal uptake mediated by the olfactory nerve (1, 2, 3). However, no direct evidences have been presented up to now on the pathway followed by the nanoparticles from the nose to the brain. In addition to a neuronal pathway, nanoparticles could gain access to the central nervous system through extracellular pathways (perineuronal, perivascular and cerebrospinal fluid paths). In the present study we investigate the localization of intranasally delivered fluorescent nanoparticles in the olfactory epithelium. To this purpose we used quantum dots (QDs), a model of innovative fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals commonly used in cell and animal biology (4). Intranasal treatments with QDs were performed acutely on adult CD1 mice. The olfactory epithelium was collected and analysed by confocal microscopy at different survival time after treatment. Data obtained indicate that the neuronal components of the olfactory epithelium are not preferentially involved in QDs uptake, thus suggesting nanoparticles can cross the olfactory epithelium through extracellular pathways.

  5. Extinction reverses olfactory fear-conditioned increases in neuron number and glomerular size.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Filomene G; Dias, Brian G; Ressler, Kerry J

    2015-10-13

    Although much work has investigated the contribution of brain regions such as the amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex to the processing of fear learning and memory, fewer studies have examined the role of sensory systems, in particular the olfactory system, in the detection and perception of cues involved in learning and memory. The primary sensory receptive field maps of the olfactory system are exquisitely organized and respond dynamically to cues in the environment, remaining plastic from development through adulthood. We have previously demonstrated that olfactory fear conditioning leads to increased odorant-specific receptor representation in the main olfactory epithelium and in glomeruli within the olfactory bulb. We now demonstrate that olfactory extinction training specific to the conditioned odor stimulus reverses the conditioning-associated freezing behavior and odor learning-induced structural changes in the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb in an odorant ligand-specific manner. These data suggest that learning-induced freezing behavior, structural alterations, and enhanced neural sensory representation can be reversed in adult mice following extinction training.

  6. Comprehensive connectivity of the mouse main olfactory bulb: analysis and online digital atlas

    PubMed Central

    Hintiryan, Houri; Gou, Lin; Zingg, Brian; Yamashita, Seita; Lyden, Hannah M.; Song, Monica Y.; Grewal, Arleen K.; Zhang, Xinhai; Toga, Arthur W.; Dong, Hong-Wei

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the first open resource for mouse olfactory connectivity data produced as part of the Mouse Connectome Project (MCP) at UCLA. The MCP aims to assemble a whole-brain connectivity atlas for the C57Bl/6J mouse using a double coinjection tracing method. Each coinjection consists of one anterograde and one retrograde tracer, which affords the advantage of simultaneously identifying efferent and afferent pathways and directly identifying reciprocal connectivity of injection sites. The systematic application of double coinjections potentially reveals interaction stations between injections and allows for the study of connectivity at the network level. To facilitate use of the data, raw images are made publicly accessible through our online interactive visualization tool, the iConnectome, where users can view and annotate the high-resolution, multi-fluorescent connectivity data (www.MouseConnectome.org). Systematic double coinjections were made into different regions of the main olfactory bulb (MOB) and data from 18 MOB cases (~72 pathways; 36 efferent/36 afferent) currently are available to view in iConnectome within their corresponding atlas level and their own bright-field cytoarchitectural background. Additional MOB injections and injections of the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), and other olfactory cortical areas gradually will be made available. Analysis of connections from different regions of the MOB revealed a novel, topographically arranged MOB projection roadmap, demonstrated disparate MOB connectivity with anterior versus posterior piriform cortical area (PIR), and exposed some novel aspects of well-established cortical olfactory projections. PMID:22891053

  7. Which solvent for olfactory testing?

    PubMed

    Philpott, C M; Goodenough, P C; Wolstenholme, C R; Murty, G E

    2004-12-01

    The physical properties of any carrier can deteriorate over time and thus alter the results in any olfactory test. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinically potential solvents as a clean odourless carrier for olfactory testing. Sweet almond oil, pure coconut oil, pure peach kernel oil, dipropylene glycol, monopropylene glycol, mineral oil and silicone oil were studied. The experimentation was conducted in two parts. First, an olfactory device was used to conduct air through the solvents on a weekly basis using a cohort of six volunteers to assess the perceived odour of each solvent at weekly intervals. Secondly a cross-reference test was performed using small bottled solutions of phenylethyl-alcohol and 1-butanol in 10-fold dilutions to compare any perceived difference in concentrations over a period of 8 weeks. We concluded that mineral oil is the most suitable carrier for the purpose of olfactory testing, possessing many desirable characteristics of an olfactory solvent, and that silicone oil may provide a suitable alternative for odorants with which it is miscible.

  8. A neural network model for olfactory glomerular activity prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, Zu; Tsuji, Toshio; Takiguchi, Noboru; Ohtake, Hisao

    2012-12-01

    Recently, the importance of odors and methods for their evaluation have seen increased emphasis, especially in the fragrance and food industries. Although odors can be characterized by their odorant components, their chemical information cannot be directly related to the flavors we perceive. Biological research has revealed that neuronal activity related to glomeruli (which form part of the olfactory system) is closely connected to odor qualities. Here we report on a neural network model of the olfactory system that can predict glomerular activity from odorant molecule structures. We also report on the learning and prediction ability of the proposed model.

  9. Identification and Comparison of Candidate Olfactory Genes in the Olfactory and Non-Olfactory Organs of Elm Pest Ambrostoma quadriimpressum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) Based on Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinliang; Chen, Qi; Zhao, Hanbo; Ren, Bingzhong

    2016-01-01

    The leaf beetle Ambrostoma quadriimpressum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is a predominant forest pest that causes substantial damage to the lumber industry and city management. However, no effective and environmentally friendly chemical method has been discovered to control this pest. Until recently, the molecular basis of the olfactory system in A. quadriimpressum was completely unknown. In this study, antennae and leg transcriptomes were analyzed and compared using deep sequencing data to identify the olfactory genes in A. quadriimpressum. Moreover, the expression profiles of both male and female candidate olfactory genes were analyzed and validated by bioinformatics, motif analysis, homology analysis, semi-quantitative RT-PCR and RT-qPCR experiments in antennal and non-olfactory organs to explore the candidate olfactory genes that might play key roles in the life cycle of A. quadriimpressum. As a result, approximately 102.9 million and 97.3 million clean reads were obtained from the libraries created from the antennas and legs, respectively. Annotation led to 34344 Unigenes, which were matched to known proteins. Annotation data revealed that the number of genes in antenna with binding functions and receptor activity was greater than that of legs. Furthermore, many pathway genes were differentially expressed in the two organs. Sixteen candidate odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 10 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 34 odorant receptors (ORs), 20 inotropic receptors [1] and 2 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) and their isoforms were identified. Additionally, 15 OBPs, 9 CSPs, 18 ORs, 6 IRs and 2 SNMPs were predicted to be complete ORFs. Using RT-PCR, RT-qPCR and homology analysis, AquaOBP1/2/4/7/C1/C6, AquaCSP3/9, AquaOR8/9/10/14/15/18/20/26/29/33, AquaIR8a/13/25a showed olfactory-specific expression, indicating that these genes might play a key role in olfaction-related behaviors in A. quadriimpressum such as foraging and seeking. AquaOBP4/C5, AquaOBP4/C5, AquaCSP7

  10. Absence of mitral cells in monolayer in monotremes. Variations in vertebrate olfactory bulbs.

    PubMed

    Switzer, R C; Johnson, J I

    1977-01-01

    An invariant feature of the olfactory bulb in placental and marsupial mammals is the arrangement of the perikarya of mitral cells in a monolayer. Contrasting with this is the arrangement found in the olfactory bulbs of the monotremes, platypus and echidna, where the large perikarya are not only absent from the position of a monolayer (usually forming the external boundary of the internal plexiform layer) but occupy a region which would characterize them as tufted cells. In other classes of amniote vertebrates, reptiles and birds, the placement of large perikarya in the olfactory bulb ranges from a compact layer to a broad band. Such an overview among several vertebrate classes suggests that a monolayer of mitral cells may be a specialized subset of the tufted-mitral cell population. The accessory olfactory formation among mammals also exhibits variation in the compactness of the large perikarya: a broadband in most but a compact layer in a few others such as the chinchilla and the capybara. Such specialized alignment of perikarya (and, consequently, of their dendritic and axonal elements) may enable more refined signal processing than does random alignment of these elements. Such speculations can be tested using appropriate phylogenetic sampling, and monotremes provide particularly advantageous test cases. PMID:899683

  11. Absence of mitral cells in monolayer in monotremes. Variations in vertebrate olfactory bulbs.

    PubMed

    Switzer, R C; Johnson, J I

    1977-01-01

    An invariant feature of the olfactory bulb in placental and marsupial mammals is the arrangement of the perikarya of mitral cells in a monolayer. Contrasting with this is the arrangement found in the olfactory bulbs of the monotremes, platypus and echidna, where the large perikarya are not only absent from the position of a monolayer (usually forming the external boundary of the internal plexiform layer) but occupy a region which would characterize them as tufted cells. In other classes of amniote vertebrates, reptiles and birds, the placement of large perikarya in the olfactory bulb ranges from a compact layer to a broad band. Such an overview among several vertebrate classes suggests that a monolayer of mitral cells may be a specialized subset of the tufted-mitral cell population. The accessory olfactory formation among mammals also exhibits variation in the compactness of the large perikarya: a broadband in most but a compact layer in a few others such as the chinchilla and the capybara. Such specialized alignment of perikarya (and, consequently, of their dendritic and axonal elements) may enable more refined signal processing than does random alignment of these elements. Such speculations can be tested using appropriate phylogenetic sampling, and monotremes provide particularly advantageous test cases.

  12. Olfactory dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Min; Yang, Li-Na; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Fu, Ying; Li, Ting; Qi, Yuan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Da-Qi; Zhang, Ningnannan; Liu, Jingchun; Yang, Li

    2016-06-15

    Association of changes in olfactory-related structures with olfactory function in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is not well understood. We used a T&T olfactometer test kit to evaluate olfactory function in 26 patients with MS and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). Then, Brain MRI were performed and olfactory-related structures were analyzed in these subjects. Olfactory detection and recognition threshold were significantly higher in the MS group, interestingly olfactory recognition threshold positively correlated with expanded disability status scale scores in these patients. Olfactory bulb (OB) volume reduced in patients with olfactory dysfunction (ODF). At the same time, reductions in gray matter (GM) volume were observed in the parahippocampal gyrus (PCG), amygdala, piriform cortex, and inferior frontal gyrus in patients with MS compared to HC. Atrophy of the PCG was more obvious in patients with ODF than patients without ODF and the PCG volume correlated with the olfactory recognition threshold, while no difference was found in fractional anisotropy values of tract-based spatial statistics analysis in the two groups. Olfactory function in patients with MS tends to become gradually more impaired with disability aggravation. Decreases in the volume of the OB and olfactory-related GM might provide valuable information about disease status in patients with MS with olfactory impairment. PMID:27206870

  13. Endocrine Modulation of Olfactory Responsiveness: Effects of the Orexigenic Hormone Ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Loch, Diana; Breer, Heinz; Strotmann, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    Finding food sources is a prerequisite for an acute food intake. This process is initiated by ghrelin released from X/A-like cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Because food finding often depends on olfaction, the question arises whether ghrelin may affect the responsiveness of the olfactory system. Monitoring odor-induced activation of the mouse olfactory epithelium via Egr1 expression revealed that after a nasal application of ghrelin, more sensory neurons responded upon odor exposure indicating an increased responsiveness. The higher reactivity of olfactory neurons was accompanied with an increased activity of receptor-specific glomeruli. In search for mechanisms underlying the ghrelin-mediated sensitization of olfactory neurons, it was shown that Ghsr1a, the ghrelin receptor gene, but not the hormone itself was expressed in the olfactory epithelium. Further analysis of isolated cells revealed that the receptor was in fact expressed in mature olfactory sensory neurons. Treatment with a ghrelin receptor antagonist abolished the ghrelin effect, strengthening the notion that ghrelin and its receptor are responsible for the enhanced neuronal responsiveness. In contrast to the effects of the "hunger" hormone ghrelin, the short-term "satiety" hormone PYY3-36 did not affect olfactory responsiveness. The results demonstrate that ghrelin, which signals acute hunger, renders the olfactory system more responsive to odors.

  14. Map Formation in the Olfactory Bulb by Axon Guidance of Olfactory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Auffarth, Benjamin; Kaplan, Bernhard; Lansner, Anders

    2011-01-01

    The organization of representations in the brain has been observed to locally reflect subspaces of inputs that are relevant to behavioral or perceptual feature combinations, such as in areas receptive to lower and higher-order features in the visual system. The early olfactory system developed highly plastic mechanisms and convergent evidence indicates that projections from primary neurons converge onto the glomerular level of the olfactory bulb (OB) to form a code composed of continuous spatial zones that are differentially active for particular physico-chemical feature combinations, some of which are known to trigger behavioral responses. In a model study of the early human olfactory system, we derive a glomerular organization based on a set of real-world, biologically relevant stimuli, a distribution of receptors that respond each to a set of odorants of similar ranges of molecular properties, and a mechanism of axon guidance based on activity. Apart from demonstrating activity-dependent glomeruli formation and reproducing the relationship of glomerular recruitment with concentration, it is shown that glomerular responses reflect similarities of human odor category perceptions and that further, a spatial code provides a better correlation than a distributed population code. These results are consistent with evidence of functional compartmentalization in the OB and could suggest a function for the bulb in encoding of perceptual dimensions. PMID:22013417

  15. Muscarinic ACh Receptors Contribute to Aversive Olfactory Learning in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Bryon; Molina-Fernández, Claudia; Ugalde, María Beatriz; Tognarelli, Eduardo I.; Angel, Cristian; Campusano, Jorge M.

    2015-01-01

    The most studied form of associative learning in Drosophila consists in pairing an odorant, the conditioned stimulus (CS), with an unconditioned stimulus (US). The timely arrival of the CS and US information to a specific Drosophila brain association region, the mushroom bodies (MB), can induce new olfactory memories. Thus, the MB is considered a coincidence detector. It has been shown that olfactory information is conveyed to the MB through cholinergic inputs that activate acetylcholine (ACh) receptors, while the US is encoded by biogenic amine (BA) systems. In recent years, we have advanced our understanding on the specific neural BA pathways and receptors involved in olfactory learning and memory. However, little information exists on the contribution of cholinergic receptors to this process. Here we evaluate for the first time the proposition that, as in mammals, muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) contribute to memory formation in Drosophila. Our results show that pharmacological and genetic blockade of mAChRs in MB disrupts olfactory aversive memory in larvae. This effect is not explained by an alteration in the ability of animals to respond to odorants or to execute motor programs. These results show that mAChRs in MB contribute to generating olfactory memories in Drosophila. PMID:26380118

  16. Serotonin modulates outward potassium currents in mouse olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Gao, S; Guo, X; Liu, T; Liu, J; Chen, W; Xia, Q; Chen, Y; Tang, Y

    2013-01-01

    Monoaminergic neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), also known as serotonin, plays important roles in modulating the function of the olfactory system. However, thus far, the knowledge about 5-HT and its receptors in olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) and their physiological role have not been fully characterized. In the present study, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed the presence of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) receptor subtypes in mouse olfactory epithelium at the mRNA level. With subtype selective antibodies and standard immunohistochemical techniques, both receptor subtypes were found to be positively labeled. To further elucidate the molecular mechanisms of 5-HT act on the peripheral olfactory transduction, the whole-cell patch clamp techniques were used on freshly isolated ORNs. We found that 5-HT decreased the magnitude of outward K(+) current in a dose-dependent manner and these inhibitory effects were markedly attenuated by the 5-HT(1A) receptor blocker WAY-100635 and the 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonist GR55562. These data suggested that 5-HT may play a role in the modulation of peripheral olfactory signals by regulating outward potassium currents, both 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) receptors were involved in this regulation.

  17. Disruption of Olfactory Receptor Neuron Patterning in Scutoid mutant Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Tom, W.; de Bruyne, M.; Haehnel, M.; Carlson, J. R.; Ray, A.

    2010-01-01

    Olfactory neurons show an extreme diversity of cell types with each cell usually expressing one member from a large family of 60 Odorant receptor (Or)genes in Drosophila. Little is known about the developmental processes and transcription factors that generate this stereotyped pattern of cellular diversity. Here we investigate the molecular and cellular basis of defects in olfactory system function in an unusual dominant mutant, Scutoid. We show that the defects map to olfactory neurons innervating a specific morphological class of sensilla on the antenna, large basiconics. Molecular analysis indicates defects in neurons expressing specific classes of receptor genes that map to large basiconic sensilla. Previous studies have shown that in Scutoid mutants the coding region of the transcriptional repressor snail is translocated near the no-ocelli promoter, leading to misexpression of snail in the developing eye-antenna disc. We show that ectopic expression of snail in developing olfactory neurons leads to severe defects in neurons of the antennal large basiconics supporting the model that the dominant olfactory phenotype in Scutoid is caused by misexpression of snail. PMID:20875862

  18. Circadian Regulation of Olfactory Receptor Neurons in the Cockroach Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Saifullah, A.S.M.; Page, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    In the cockroach, olfactory sensitivity as measured by the amplitude of the electroantennogram (EAG) is regulated by the circadian system. We wished to determine how this rhythm in antennal response was reflected in the activity of individual olfactory receptor neurons. The amplitude of the electroantennogram (EAG) and the activity of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in single olfactory sensilla were recorded simultaneously for 3–5 days in constant darkness from an antenna of the cockroach Leucophaea maderae. Both EAG amplitude and the spike frequency of the ORNs exhibited circadian rhythms with peak amplitude/activity occurring in the subjective day. The phases of the rhythms were dependent on the phase of the prior light cycle and thus were entrainable by light. Ablation of the optic lobes abolished the rhythm in EAG amplitude as has been previously reported. In contrast, the rhythm in ORN response persisted following surgery. These results indicated that a circadian clock outside the optic lobes can regulate the responses of olfactory receptor neurons and further that this modulation of the ORN response is not dependent on the circadian rhythm in EAG amplitude. PMID:19346451

  19. Hebbian learning for olfactory sequences.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew J; Cauchi, Laura; Miles, Christopher

    2013-06-01

    The present paper explores the generality of the Hebb repetition effect to the learning of olfactory sequences in order to assess commonality of memory functioning across sensory modalities. Participants completed a serial-order reconstruction task comprising sequences of four olfactory stimuli. Following presentation of each sequence, participants were re-presented with the odours and were required to reconstruct their order of presentation. Surreptitious re-presentation of the repeated sequence occurred on every third trial. This order reconstruction task produced a serial-position function comprising recency only for both the non-repeated and the repeated sequences. Importantly, serial-order reconstruction for the repeated odour sequence produced improved performance for that sequence compared to the non-repeated sequences. This observation of a Hebb repetition effect for olfactory sequences further supports the proposition that sequential learning can operate amodally.

  20. [Accessory symptomatology and therapy of Gilles de la Tourette's disease].

    PubMed

    Achkova, M; Terziev, D

    1987-01-01

    Eight patients with Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome were examined. They had typical multiple tics and accessory disturbances--impulsive and reactive symptoms. The authors described the classification of accessory symptoms and the therapeutic approaches.

  1. Opposite-sex attraction in male mice requires testosterone-dependent regulation of adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schellino, Roberta; Trova, Sara; Cimino, Irene; Farinetti, Alice; Jongbloets, Bart C.; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen; Panzica, Giancarlo; Giacobini, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia; Peretto, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Opposite-sex attraction in most mammals depends on the fine-tuned integration of pheromonal stimuli with gonadal hormones in the brain circuits underlying sexual behaviour. Neural activity in these circuits is regulated by sensory processing in the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), the first central station of the vomeronasal system. Recent evidence indicates adult neurogenesis in the AOB is involved in sex behaviour; however, the mechanisms underlying this function are unknown. By using Semaphorin 7A knockout (Sema7A ko) mice, which show a reduced number of gonadotropin-releasing-hormone neurons, small testicles and subfertility, and wild-type males castrated during adulthood, we demonstrate that the level of circulating testosterone regulates the sex-specific control of AOB neurogenesis and the vomeronasal system activation, which influences opposite-sex cue preference/attraction in mice. Overall, these data highlight adult neurogenesis as a hub for the integration of pheromonal and hormonal cues that control sex-specific responses in brain circuits. PMID:27782186

  2. Behavioural responses to olfactory cues in carrion crows.

    PubMed

    Wascher, Claudia A F; Heiss, Rebecca S; Baglione, Vittorio; Canestrari, Daniela

    2015-02-01

    Until recently, the use of olfactory signals in birds has been largely ignored, despite the fact that birds do possess a fully functioning olfactory system and have been shown to use odours in social and foraging tasks, predator detection and orientation. The present study investigates whether carrion crows (Corvus corone corone), a bird species living in complex social societies, respond behaviourally to olfactory cues of conspecifics. During our experiment, carrion crows were observed less often close to the conspecific scent compared to a control side. Because conspecific scent was extracted during handling, a stressful procedure for birds, we interpreted the general avoidance of the 'scent' side as disfavour against a stressed conspecific. However, males, unlike females, showed less avoidance towards the scent of a familiar individual compared to an unfamiliar one, which might reflect a stronger interest in the information conveyed and/or willingness to provide social support.

  3. Metamorphic remodeling of the olfactory organ of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Katarina; Kuttler, Josua; Hassenklöver, Thomas; Manzini, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    The amphibian olfactory system undergoes massive remodeling during metamorphosis. The transition from aquatic olfaction in larvae to semiaquatic or airborne olfaction in adults requires anatomical, cellular, and molecular modifications. These changes are particularly pronounced in Pipidae, whose adults have secondarily adapted to an aquatic life style. In the fully aquatic larvae of Xenopus laevis, the main olfactory epithelium specialized for sensing water-borne odorous substances lines the principal olfactory cavity (PC), whereas a separate olfactory epithelium lies in the vomeronasal organ (VNO). During metamorphosis, the epithelium of the PC is rearranged into the adult "air nose," whereas a new olfactory epithelium, the adult "water nose," forms in the emerging middle cavity (MC). Here we performed a stage-by-stage investigation of the anatomical changes of the Xenopus olfactory organ during metamorphosis. We quantified cell death in all olfactory epithelia and found massive cell death in the PC and the VNO, suggesting that the majority of larval sensory neurons is replaced during metamorphosis in both sensory epithelia. The moderate cell death in the MC shows that during the formation of this epithelium some cells are sorted out. Our results show that during MC formation some supporting cells, but not sensory neurons, are relocated from the PC to the MC and that they are eventually eliminated during metamorphosis. Together our findings illustrate the structural and cellular changes of the Xenopus olfactory organ during metamorphosis.

  4. A novel neural substrate for the transformation of olfactory inputs into motor output.

    PubMed

    Derjean, Dominique; Moussaddy, Aimen; Atallah, Elias; St-Pierre, Melissa; Auclair, François; Chang, Steven; Ren, Xiang; Zielinski, Barbara; Dubuc, Réjean

    2010-01-01

    It is widely recognized that animals respond to odors by generating or modulating specific motor behaviors. These reactions are important for daily activities, reproduction, and survival. In the sea lamprey, mating occurs after ovulated females are attracted to spawning sites by male sex pheromones. The ubiquity and reliability of olfactory-motor behavioral responses in vertebrates suggest tight coupling between the olfactory system and brain areas controlling movements. However, the circuitry and the underlying cellular neural mechanisms remain largely unknown. Using lamprey brain preparations, and electrophysiology, calcium imaging, and tract tracing experiments, we describe the neural substrate responsible for transforming an olfactory input into a locomotor output. We found that olfactory stimulation with naturally occurring odors and pheromones induced large excitatory responses in reticulospinal cells, the command neurons for locomotion. We have also identified the anatomy and physiology of this circuit. The olfactory input was relayed in the medial part of the olfactory bulb, in the posterior tuberculum, in the mesencephalic locomotor region, to finally reach reticulospinal cells in the hindbrain. Activation of this olfactory-motor pathway generated rhythmic ventral root discharges and swimming movements. Our study bridges the gap between behavior and cellular neural mechanisms in vertebrates, identifying a specific subsystem within the CNS, dedicated to producing motor responses to olfactory inputs.

  5. Olfactory dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yong-ming; Lu, Da; Liu, Li-ping; Zhang, Hui-hong; Zhou, Yu-ying

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder with the earliest clinical symptom of olfactory dysfunction, which is a potential clinical marker for AD severity and progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. This article reviews relevant research on olfactory dysfunction in AD and evaluates the predictive value of olfactory dysfunction for the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical features of AD, as well as for the conversion of cognitive impairment to AD. We summarize problems of existing studies and provide a useful reference for further studies in AD olfactory dysfunction and for clinical applications of olfactory testing. PMID:27143888

  6. Using Single Sensillum Recording to Detect Olfactory Neuron Responses of Bed Bugs to Semiochemicals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Liu, Nannan

    2016-01-01

    The insect olfactory system plays an important role in detecting semiochemicals in the environment. In particular, the antennal sensilla which house single or multiple neurons inside, are considered to make the major contribution in responding to the chemical stimuli. By directly recording action potential in the olfactory sensillum after exposure to stimuli, single sensillum recording (SSR) technique provides a powerful approach for investigating the neural responses of insects to chemical stimuli. For the bed bug, which is a notorious human parasite, multiple types of olfactory sensillum have been characterized. In this study, we demonstrated neural responses of bed bug olfactory sensilla to two chemical stimuli and the dose-dependent responses to one of them using the SSR method. This approach enables researchers to conduct early screening for individual chemical stimuli on the bed bug olfactory sensilla, which would provide valuable information for the development of new bed bug attractants or repellents and benefits the bed bug control efforts. PMID:26862929

  7. Electronic Position Sensor for Power Operated Accessory

    DOEpatents

    Haag, Ronald H.; Chia, Michael I.

    2005-05-31

    An electronic position sensor for use with a power operated vehicle accessory, such as a power liftgate. The position sensor includes an elongated resistive circuit that is mounted such that it is stationary and extends along the path of a track portion of the power operated accessory. The position sensor further includes a contact nub mounted to a link member that moves within the track portion such that the contact nub is slidingly biased against the elongated circuit. As the link member moves under the force of a motor-driven output gear, the contact nub slides along the surface of the resistive circuit, thereby affecting the overall resistance of the circuit. The position sensor uses the overall resistance to provide an electronic position signal to an ECU, wherein the signal is indicative of the absolute position of the power operated accessory. Accordingly, the electronic position sensor is capable of providing an electronic signal that enables the ECU to track the absolute position of the power operated accessory.

  8. Biting palsy of the accessory nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Paljärvi, L; Partanen, J

    1980-01-01

    A young man was bitten by his girl friend at the anterior border of the left trapezius muscle. Weakness of the trapezius resulted and a longstanding ache in the shoulder developed. Clinically and neurophysiologically, an axonotmesis type crush injury of the accessory nerve was verified. PMID:7431036

  9. Normal variants of the accessory hemiazygos vein

    PubMed Central

    Blackmon, J M; Franco, A

    2011-01-01

    This short communication describes two normal variants of the accessory hemiazygous vein in a 15-year-old female. The article demonstrates that knowledge of the aberrant venous anatomy and the collateral pathway is important for the practising radiologist. PMID:21697414

  10. 21 CFR 890.3910 - Wheelchair accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Wheelchair accessory. 890.3910 Section 890.3910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3910...

  11. 21 CFR 890.3910 - Wheelchair accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wheelchair accessory. 890.3910 Section 890.3910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3910...

  12. 21 CFR 890.3910 - Wheelchair accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Wheelchair accessory. 890.3910 Section 890.3910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3910...

  13. 21 CFR 890.3910 - Wheelchair accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Wheelchair accessory. 890.3910 Section 890.3910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3910...

  14. 21 CFR 890.3910 - Wheelchair accessory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Wheelchair accessory. 890.3910 Section 890.3910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3910...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5860 - Pressure tubing and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pressure tubing and accessories. 868.5860 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5860 Pressure tubing and accessories. (a) Identification. Pressure tubing and accessories are flexible or rigid devices intended...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5860 - Pressure tubing and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pressure tubing and accessories. 868.5860 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5860 Pressure tubing and accessories. (a) Identification. Pressure tubing and accessories are flexible or rigid devices intended...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5860 - Pressure tubing and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pressure tubing and accessories. 868.5860 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5860 Pressure tubing and accessories. (a) Identification. Pressure tubing and accessories are flexible or rigid devices intended...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1192 - Engine accessory compartment diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 23.1192 Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. For aircooled radial... accessory compartment by a diaphragm that meets the firewall requirements of § 23.1191....

  19. 14 CFR 23.1192 - Engine accessory compartment diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 23.1192 Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. For aircooled radial... accessory compartment by a diaphragm that meets the firewall requirements of § 23.1191....

  20. 14 CFR 23.1192 - Engine accessory compartment diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 23.1192 Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. For aircooled radial... accessory compartment by a diaphragm that meets the firewall requirements of § 23.1191....

  1. 14 CFR 23.1192 - Engine accessory compartment diaphragm.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. 23... Powerplant Powerplant Fire Protection § 23.1192 Engine accessory compartment diaphragm. For aircooled radial... accessory compartment by a diaphragm that meets the firewall requirements of § 23.1191....

  2. 21 CFR 876.5540 - Blood access device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Blood access device and accessories. 876.5540... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5540 Blood access device and accessories. (a) Identification. A blood access device and accessories is a device intended...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5540 - Blood access device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Blood access device and accessories. 876.5540... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5540 Blood access device and accessories. (a) Identification. A blood access device and accessories is a device intended...

  4. 21 CFR 876.5540 - Blood access device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Blood access device and accessories. 876.5540... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5540 Blood access device and accessories. (a) Identification. A blood access device and accessories is a device intended...

  5. 21 CFR 876.5540 - Blood access device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Blood access device and accessories. 876.5540... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5540 Blood access device and accessories. (a) Identification. A blood access device and accessories is a device intended...

  6. 21 CFR 872.6300 - Rubber dam and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rubber dam and accessories. 872.6300 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6300 Rubber dam and accessories. (a) Identification. A rubber dam and accessories is a device composed of a thin sheet of latex with a hole in...

  7. 21 CFR 872.6300 - Rubber dam and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rubber dam and accessories. 872.6300 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6300 Rubber dam and accessories. (a) Identification. A rubber dam and accessories is a device composed of a thin sheet of latex with a hole in...

  8. 19 CFR 10.1020 - Accessories, spare parts, or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts, or tools. 10.1020... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.1020 Accessories, spare parts, or tools. (a) General. Accessories, spare parts, or tools that are delivered with a good and that form part of the good's...

  9. 19 CFR 10.3020 - Accessories, spare parts, or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts, or tools. 10.3020...-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.3020 Accessories, spare parts, or tools. (a) General. Accessories, spare parts, or tools that are delivered with a good and that form part of the...

  10. 19 CFR 10.600 - Accessories, spare parts, or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts, or tools. 10.600 Section...-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.600 Accessories, spare parts, or tools. (a) General. Accessories, spare parts, or tools that are delivered with a good and that form...

  11. 19 CFR 10.3020 - Accessories, spare parts, or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts, or tools. 10.3020...-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.3020 Accessories, spare parts, or tools. (a) General. Accessories, spare parts, or tools that are delivered with a good and that form part of the...

  12. 19 CFR 10.2020 - Accessories, spare parts, or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts, or tools. 10.2020... Trade Promotion Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.2020 Accessories, spare parts, or tools. (a) General. Accessories, spare parts, or tools that are delivered with a good and that form part of the good's...

  13. 19 CFR 10.600 - Accessories, spare parts, or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts, or tools. 10.600 Section...-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.600 Accessories, spare parts, or tools. (a) General. Accessories, spare parts, or tools that are delivered with a good and that form...

  14. 19 CFR 10.1020 - Accessories, spare parts, or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts, or tools. 10.1020... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.1020 Accessories, spare parts, or tools. (a) General. Accessories, spare parts, or tools that are delivered with a good and that form part of the good's...

  15. 19 CFR 10.600 - Accessories, spare parts, or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts, or tools. 10.600 Section...-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.600 Accessories, spare parts, or tools. (a) General. Accessories, spare parts, or tools that are delivered with a good and that form...

  16. 19 CFR 10.1020 - Accessories, spare parts, or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts, or tools. 10.1020... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.1020 Accessories, spare parts, or tools. (a) General. Accessories, spare parts, or tools that are delivered with a good and that form part of the good's...

  17. 19 CFR 10.600 - Accessories, spare parts, or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts, or tools. 10.600 Section...-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.600 Accessories, spare parts, or tools. (a) General. Accessories, spare parts, or tools that are delivered with a good and that form...

  18. 19 CFR 10.600 - Accessories, spare parts, or tools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Accessories, spare parts, or tools. 10.600 Section...-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.600 Accessories, spare parts, or tools. (a) General. Accessories, spare parts, or tools that are delivered with a good and that form...

  19. 21 CFR 878.3925 - Plastic surgery kit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Plastic surgery kit and accessories. 878.3925... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3925 Plastic surgery kit and accessories. (a) Identification. A plastic surgery kit and accessories is a device intended...

  20. 21 CFR 878.3925 - Plastic surgery kit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Plastic surgery kit and accessories. 878.3925... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3925 Plastic surgery kit and accessories. (a) Identification. A plastic surgery kit and accessories is a device intended...