Science.gov

Sample records for accident damage protection

  1. 49 CFR 178.345-8 - Accident damage protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Accident damage protection. 178.345-8 Section 178.345-8 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for...

  2. 49 CFR 178.337-10 - Accident damage protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Accident damage protection. 178.337-10 Section 178.337-10 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for...

  3. 49 CFR 178.338-10 - Accident damage protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... strength of the material, shall be used. The protective device or the housing must be made of steel at least 3/16-inch thick, or other material of equivalent strength. (c) Rear-end tank protection. Rear-end... of the loaded cargo tank and attachments, using a safety factor of four based on the tensile...

  4. 49 CFR 178.338-10 - Accident damage protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... strength of the material, shall be used. The protective device or the housing must be made of steel at least 3/16-inch thick, or other material of equivalent strength. (c) Rear-end tank protection. Rear-end... of the loaded cargo tank and attachments, using a safety factor of four based on the tensile...

  5. 49 CFR 178.338-10 - Accident damage protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... strength of the material, shall be used. The protective device or the housing must be made of steel at least 3/16-inch thick, or other material of equivalent strength. (c) Rear-end tank protection. Rear-end... of the loaded cargo tank and attachments, using a safety factor of four based on the tensile...

  6. 49 CFR 178.338-10 - Accident damage protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... strength of the material, shall be used. The protective device or the housing must be made of steel at least 3/16-inch thick, or other material of equivalent strength. (c) Rear-end tank protection. Rear-end... of the loaded cargo tank and attachments, using a safety factor of four based on the tensile...

  7. 49 CFR 178.337-10 - Accident damage protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and... requirements of § 393.86 of this title; or (2) Conform to the requirements of § 178.345-8(d). (d) Chlorine tanks. A chlorine tank must be equipped with a protective housing and a manway cover to permit the...

  8. 49 CFR 178.337-10 - Accident damage protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the List of CFR Sections Affected which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and... requirements of § 393.86 of this title; or (2) Conform to the requirements of § 178.345-8(d). (d) Chlorine tanks. A chlorine tank must be equipped with a protective housing and a manway cover to permit the...

  9. 49 CFR 178.337-10 - Accident damage protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... citations affecting § 178.337-10, see the List of CFR Sections Affected which appears in the Finding Aids...(d). (d) Chlorine tanks. A chlorine tank must be equipped with a protective housing and a manway... the Chlorine Institute, Inc., Dwg. 137-5 (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter). (e) Piping...

  10. 49 CFR 178.345-8 - Accident damage protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of construction using a safety factor of 1.3. Deformation of the protection device is acceptable... not to exceed 6 feet. Suspension components and structural mounting members may be used to provide all... safe point of discharge away from any structural component of the cargo tank motor vehicle. (d)...

  11. 49 CFR 178.345-8 - Accident damage protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of construction using a safety factor of 1.3. Deformation of the protection device is acceptable... not to exceed 6 feet. Suspension components and structural mounting members may be used to provide all... safe point of discharge away from any structural component of the cargo tank motor vehicle. (d)...

  12. 49 CFR 178.345-8 - Accident damage protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of construction using a safety factor of 1.3. Deformation of the protection device is acceptable... not to exceed 6 feet. Suspension components and structural mounting members may be used to provide all... safe point of discharge away from any structural component of the cargo tank motor vehicle. (d)...

  13. 49 CFR 178.345-8 - Accident damage protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of construction using a safety factor of 1.3. Deformation of the protection device is acceptable... not to exceed 6 feet. Suspension components and structural mounting members may be used to provide all... safe point of discharge away from any structural component of the cargo tank motor vehicle. (d)...

  14. 49 CFR 178.338-10 - Accident damage protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... shall equal twice the loaded weight of the tank and attachments. A safety factor of four, based on the... steel at least 3/16-inch thick, or other material of equivalent strength. (c) Rear-end tank protection... weight of the loaded cargo tank and attachments, using a safety factor of four based on the...

  15. 49 CFR 178.337-10 - Accident damage protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and... requirements of § 393.86 of this title; or (2) Conform to the requirements of § 178.345-8(d). (d) Chlorine tanks. A chlorine tank must be equipped with a protective housing and a manway cover to permit the...

  16. Risk and protection factors in fatal accidents.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Emmanuelle; Martensen, Heike; Papadimitriou, Eleonora; Yannis, George

    2010-03-01

    This paper aims at addressing the interest and appropriateness of performing accident severity analyses that are limited to fatal accident data. Two methodological issues are specifically discussed, namely the accident-size factors (the number of vehicles in the accident and their level of occupancy) and the comparability of the baseline risk. It is argued that - although these two issues are generally at play in accident severity analyses - their effects on, e.g., the estimation of survival probability, are exacerbated if the analysis is limited to fatal accident data. As a solution, it is recommended to control for these effects by (1) including accident-size indicators in the model, (2) focusing on different sub-groups of road-users while specifying the type of opponent in the model, so as to ensure that comparable baseline risks are worked with. These recommendations are applied in order to investigate risk and protection factors of car occupants involved in fatal accidents using data from a recently set up European Fatal Accident Investigation database (Reed and Morris, 2009). The results confirm that the estimated survival probability is affected by accident-size factors and by type of opponent. The car occupants' survival chances are negatively associated with their own age and that of their vehicle. The survival chances are also lower when seatbelt is not used. Front damage, as compared to other damaged car areas, appears to be associated with increased survival probability, but mostly in the case in which the accident opponent was another car. The interest of further investigating accident-size factors and opponent effects in fatal accidents is discussed. PMID:20159090

  17. Chemical Protection Against Radiation Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campaigne, Ernest

    1969-01-01

    Discusses potential war time and medical uses for chemical compounds giving protection against radiation damage. Describes compounds known to protect, research aimed at discovering such compounds, and problems of toxicity. (EB)

  18. Radiation damage aspects of the chernobyl accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, N.; Nenot, J. C.

    During the night of 25 to 26 April 1986, the most severe nuclear accident occurred at the Chernobyl power station, about 150km north of Kiev, in the Ukraine. It resulted in the irradiation of 237 workers at dose levels justifying medical care. The most severe cases (115) were hospitalized in Moscow, with 20 patients with doses higher than 6 Gy. In most cases, the treatment was classical, based on transfusion of red cells and platelets, and heavy supportive therapy. For 19 patients with severe aplasia, transplantations of bone marrow (13) or foetal liver (6) were decided. Of these patients only one survived, which justifies the statement from U.S.S.R. physicians: after an accident the indications of grafting are limited and its risks may not justify its use. Most of the complications were related to radiation burns which involved 56 victims and resulted in fatal outcomes in at least 19 patients. The population was evacuated from a 30 km zone around the site; based on direct measurements and calculations, the collective dose was evaluated at 1.6 × 10 4 man Sv, with an individual average lower than 250 mSv. The European part of U.S.S.R. with 75 million persons is supposed to have received a collective dose likely to increase the natural mortality by less than 0.1%. The numbers with cancer in the Northern Hemisphere might increase by 0.004% over the next 50 years.

  19. Protective clothing for accident and emergency personnel.

    PubMed Central

    Steedman, D J

    1994-01-01

    There is a significant risk of clothing soilure and skin contamination from patients' blood or other body fluids whilst working in an accident and emergency (A&E) department. It is therefore unhygienic to wear personal clothing and traditional uniforms do not provide adequate protection. Contamination occurs despite operating 'universal precautions' and emergency presentations often preclude adopting such precautions despite the anticipation of possible contact with blood or other body fluids. The protection afforded to medical staff working in an A&E department by a suit made from a liquid repellent polyester fabric was assessed during the period 2 November 1992-1 January 1993. Ninety-one splash incidents were recorded. A total of 85.7% of splashes (78) were with patients' blood, 13.1% with vomitus (12) and 1.1% with pus (1). There were no instances of splashes to the suit that resulted in strike through to the inner surface or visible contamination of underlying skin. However, some 15.4% of splashes (14) resulted in contamination of exposed skin and 78.6% of these (11) occurred between glove and sleeve. Clothing of appropriated design and fabric can afford skin protection from blood and body fluid contamination. Such clothing alone does not provide overall protection and other precautions currently recommended should be taken. PMID:7921544

  20. Collider and detector protection at beam accidents

    SciTech Connect

    I. L. Rakhno; N. V. Mokhov; A. I. Drozhdin

    2003-12-10

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occurred at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section.

  1. Cardiovascular diseases: oxidative damage and antioxidant protection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P-Y; Xu, X; Li, X-C

    2014-10-01

    Atherosclerosis, the hardening of arteries under oxidative stress is related to oxidative changes of low density lipoproteins (LDL). The antioxidants prevent the formation of oxidized LDL during atherogenesis. Perhaps more than one mechanism is involved in the atherosclerosis disease where LDL is oxidized in all the cells of arterial wall during the development of this disease. The oxidation of LDL produces lipid peroxidation products such as isoprostans from arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids, oxysterols from cholesterol, hydroxyl fatty acids, lipid peroxides and aldehydes. The lipid peroxidation bioassay can serve as a marker for the risk of cardiovascular. An in vivo test of levels of oxidative lipid damage is an early prediction of development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Serum paraoxonase (PON) activity is correlated to severity of the coronary artery disease. The antioxidants level in the serum and serum paraoxonase activity provides information for the risk of CVD. The antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase is responsible for dismutation of superoxide, a free radical chain initiator. The subcellular changes in the equilibrium in favor of free radicals can cause increase in the oxidative stress which leads to cardiomyopathy, heart attack or cardiac dysfunction. The oxidative damage and defense of heart disease has been reported where dietary antioxidants protect the free radical damage to DNA, proteins and lipids. The ascorbic acid, vitamin C is an effective antioxidant and high vitamin E intake can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) by inhibition of atherogenic forms of oxidized LDL. The vitamin A and beta-carotene protect lipid peroxidation and provitamin-A activity. It has been recently suggested that the protection of oxidative damage and related CVD is best served by antioxidants found in the fruits and vegetables. The oxidative damage and antioxidant protection of CVD have been described here. PMID:25392110

  2. Retinal Light Damage: Mechanisms and Protection

    PubMed Central

    Organisciak, Daniel T.; Vaughan, Dana K.

    2009-01-01

    By its action on rhodopsin, light triggers the well-known visual transduction cascade, but can also induce cell damage and death through phototoxic mechanisms -- a comprehensive understanding of which is still elusive despite more than 40 years of research. Herein, we integrate recent experimental findings to address several hypotheses of retinal light damage, premised in part on the close anatomical and metabolic relationships between the photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium. We begin by reviewing the salient features of light damage, recently joined by evidence for retinal remodeling which has implications for the prognosis of recovery of function in retinal degenerations. We then consider select factors that influence the progression of the damage process and the extent of visual cell loss. Traditional, genetically-modified, and emerging animal models are discussed, with particular emphasis on cone visual cells. Exogenous and endogenous retinal protective factors are explored, with implications for light damage mechanisms and some suggested avenues for future research. Synergies are known to exist between our long term light environment and photoreceptor cell death in retinal disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of light damage in a variety of animal models can provide valuable insights into the effects of light in clinical disorders and may form the basis of future therapies to prevent or delay visual cell loss. PMID:19951742

  3. Radiation protection issues on preparedness and response for a severe nuclear accident: experiences of the Fukushima accident.

    PubMed

    Homma, T; Takahara, S; Kimura, M; Kinase, S

    2015-06-01

    Radiation protection issues on preparedness and response for a severe nuclear accident are discussed in this paper based on the experiences following the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The criteria for use in nuclear emergencies in the Japanese emergency preparedness guide were based on the recommendations of International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publications 60 and 63. Although the decision-making process for implementing protective actions relied heavily on computer-based predictive models prior to the accident, urgent protective actions, such as evacuation and sheltering, were implemented effectively based on the plant conditions. As there were no recommendations and criteria for long-term protective actions in the emergency preparedness guide, the recommendations of ICRP Publications 103, 109, and 111 were taken into consideration in determining the temporary relocation of inhabitants of heavily contaminated areas. These recommendations were very useful in deciding the emergency protective actions to take in the early stages of the Fukushima accident. However, some suggestions have been made for improving emergency preparedness and response in the early stages of a severe nuclear accident. PMID:25915551

  4. Damage Detection/Locating System Providing Thermal Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Jones, Thomas W. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor); Qamar, A. Shams (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A damage locating system also provides thermal protection. An array of sensors substantially tiles an area of interest. Each sensor is a reflective-surface conductor having operatively coupled inductance and capacitance. A magnetic field response recorder is provided to interrogate each sensor before and after a damage condition. Changes in response are indicative of damage and a corresponding location thereof.

  5. Aging, Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA), and high potential testing of damaged cables

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, R.A.; Jacobus, M.J.

    1994-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the effects of high potential testing of cables and to assess the survivability of aged and damaged cables under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions. High potential testing at 240 Vdc/mil on undamaged cables suggested that no damage was incurred on the selected virgin cables. During aging and LOCA testing, Okonite ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) cables with a bonded jacket experienced unexpected failures. The failures appear to be primarily related to the level of thermal aging and the presence of a bonded jacket that ages more rapidly than the insulation. For Brand Rex crosslinked polyolefin (XLPO) cables, the results suggest that 7 mils of insulation remaining should give the cables a high probability of surviving accident exposure following aging. The voltage necessary to detect when 7 mils of insulation remain on unaged Brand Rex cables is approximately 35 kVdc. This voltage level would almost certainly be unacceptable to a utility for use as a damage assessment tool. However, additional tests indicated that a 35 kvdc voltage application would not damage virgin Brand Rex cables when tested in water. Although two damaged Rockbestos silicone rubber cables also failed during the accident test, no correlation between failures and level of damage was apparent.

  6. 22 CFR 102.13 - Protective services with respect to deceased victims of accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Protective services with respect to deceased victims of accidents. 102.13 Section 102.13 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ECONOMIC AND OTHER FUNCTIONS CIVIL AVIATION United States Aircraft Accidents Abroad § 102.13 Protective services with...

  7. 22 CFR 102.13 - Protective services with respect to deceased victims of accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Protective services with respect to deceased victims of accidents. 102.13 Section 102.13 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ECONOMIC AND OTHER FUNCTIONS CIVIL AVIATION United States Aircraft Accidents Abroad § 102.13 Protective services with...

  8. 22 CFR 102.13 - Protective services with respect to deceased victims of accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Protective services with respect to deceased victims of accidents. 102.13 Section 102.13 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ECONOMIC AND OTHER FUNCTIONS CIVIL AVIATION United States Aircraft Accidents Abroad § 102.13 Protective services with...

  9. 22 CFR 102.13 - Protective services with respect to deceased victims of accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Protective services with respect to deceased victims of accidents. 102.13 Section 102.13 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ECONOMIC AND OTHER FUNCTIONS CIVIL AVIATION United States Aircraft Accidents Abroad § 102.13 Protective services with...

  10. Description of particle induced damage on protected silver coatings.

    PubMed

    Schwinde, Stefan; Schürmann, Mark; Jobst, Paul Johannes; Kaiser, Norbert; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    In the visible to infrared spectral range, highly-reflective silver mirrors are applied in the manufacture of optical instruments such as telescopes. However, it is still difficult to combine high reflectivity and long-term stability of the protected silver coating. We show that the deposition of impervious protective layers is necessary but often not sufficient for long-term environmental stability. Hygroscopic air borne particles absorbed by the protections surface attract water molecules and form a solution. This solution first damages the protection, subsequently permeates the protection and finally damages the silver whereby the reflectivity is reduced. We demonstrate this particular damage mechanism with different experiments and describe this mechanism in detail. PMID:26192652

  11. Assessment of light water reactor fuel damage during a reactivity initiated accident

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.E.; Seiffert, S.L.; Martinson, Z.R.; McCardell, R.K.; Owen, D.E.; Fukuda, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of LWR fuel damage during a reactivity initiated accident and comments on the adequacy of the present USNRC design requirements. Results from early SPERT tests are reviewed and compared with results from recent computer simulations and PBF tests. A progression of fuel rod and cladding damage events is presented. High strain rate deformation of relatively cool irradiated cladding early in the transient may result in fracture at a radial average peak fuel enthalpy of approximately 140 cal/g UO/sub 2/. Volume expansion of previously irradiated fuel upon melting may cause deformation and rupture of the cladding, and coolant channel blockage at higher peak enthalpies.

  12. Mangroves can provide protection against wind damage during storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Saudamini; Crépin, Anne-Sophie

    2013-12-01

    Research has established that mangroves can protect lives and property from storms by buffering the impacts of storm surges. However, their effects in attenuating wind velocity and providing protection from wind damage during storms are not known. This study examined whether mangroves attenuate damage from cyclonic winds and found that they provide substantial protection to properties, even relatively far away from mangroves and the coast. We devised a theoretical model of wind protection by mangroves and calibrated and applied this model using data from the 1999 cyclone in the Odisha region of India. The model predicted and quantified the actual level of damage reasonably accurately and showed that mangroves reduced wind damage to houses. The wind protection value of mangroves in reducing house damage amounted to approximately US$177 per hectare at 1999 prices. This provides additional evidence of the storm protection ecosystem services that mangroves supply in the region and an additional reason to invest in mangrove ecosystems to provide better adaptability to coastal disasters such as storms.

  13. Insulin Protects against Hepatic Damage Postburn

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Marc G; Kraft, Robert; Song, Juquan; Gauglitz, Gerd G; Cox, Robert A; Brooks, Natasha C; Finnerty, Celeste C; Kulp, Gabriela A; Herndon, David N; Boehning, Darren

    2011-01-01

    Burn injury causes hepatic dysfunction associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress/UPR leads to hepatic apoptosis and activation of the Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway, leading to vast metabolic alterations. Insulin has been shown to attenuate hepatic damage and to improve liver function. We therefore hypothesized that insulin administration exerts its effects by attenuating postburn hepatic ER stress and subsequent apoptosis. Male Sprague Dawley rats received a 60% total body surface area (TBSA) burn injury. Animals were randomized to receive saline (controls) or insulin (2.5 IU/kg q. 24 h) and euthanized at 24 and 48 h postburn. Burn injury induced dramatic changes in liver structure and function, including induction of the ER stress response, mitochondrial dysfunction, hepatocyte apoptosis, and up-regulation of inflammatory mediators. Insulin decreased hepatocyte caspase-3 activation and apoptosis significantly at 24 and 48 h postburn. Furthermore, insulin administration decreased ER stress significantly and reversed structural and functional changes in hepatocyte mitochondria. Finally, insulin attenuated the expression of inflammatory mediators IL-6, MCP-1, and CINC-1. Insulin alleviates burn-induced ER stress, hepatocyte apoptosis, mitochondrial abnormalities, and inflammation leading to improved hepatic structure and function significantly. These results support the use of insulin therapy after traumatic injury to improve patient outcomes. PMID:21267509

  14. Reducing systems protecting the bacterial cell envelope from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Arts, Isabelle S; Gennaris, Alexandra; Collet, Jean-François

    2015-06-22

    Exposure of cells to elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) damages DNA, membrane lipids and proteins, which can potentially lead to cell death. In proteins, the sulfur-containing residues cysteine and methionine are particularly sensitive to oxidation, forming sulfenic acids and methionine sulfoxides, respectively. The presence of protection mechanisms to scavenge ROS and repair damaged cellular components is therefore essential for cell survival. The bacterial cell envelope, which constitutes the first protection barrier from the extracellular environment, is particularly exposed to the oxidizing molecules generated by the host cells to kill invading microorganisms. Therefore, the presence of oxidative stress defense mechanisms in that compartment is crucial for cell survival. Here, we review recent findings that led to the identification of several reducing pathways protecting the cell envelope from oxidative damage. We focus in particular on the mechanisms that repair envelope proteins with oxidized cysteine and methionine residues and we discuss the major questions that remain to be solved. PMID:25957772

  15. Free radical tissue damage: Protective role of antioxidant nutrients

    SciTech Connect

    Machling, L.J.; Bendich, A. )

    1987-12-01

    Highly reactive molecules called free radicals can cause tissue damage by reacting with polyunsaturated fatty acids in cellular membranes, nucleotides in DNA, and critical sulfhydryl bonds in proteins. Free radicals can originate endogenously from normal metabolic reactions or exogenously as components of tobacco smoke and air pollutants and indirectly through the metabolism of certain solvents, drugs, and pesticides as well as through exposure to radiation. There is some evidence that free radical damage contributes to the etiology of many chronic health problems such as emphysema, cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases, cataracts, and cancer. The extent of tissue damage is the result of the balance between the free radicals generated and the antioxidant protective defense system. Several dietary micronutrients contribute greatly to the protective system. Based on the growing interest in free radical biology and the lack of effective therapies for many of the chronic diseases, the usefulness of essential, safe nutrients in protecting against the adverse effects of oxidative injury warrants further study.

  16. Computational Aerodynamics of Shuttle Orbiter Damage Scenarios in Support of the Columbia Accident Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibb, Karen L.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    2004-01-01

    In support of the Columbia Accident Investigation, inviscid computations of the aerodynamic characteristics for various Shuttle Orbiter damage scenarios were performed using the FELISA unstructured CFD solver. Computed delta aerodynamics were compared with the reconstructed delta aerodynamics in order to postulate a progression of damage through the flight trajectory. By performing computations at hypervelocity flight and CF4 tunnel conditions, a bridge was provided between wind tunnel testing in Langley's 20-Inch CF4 facility and the flight environment experienced by Columbia during re-entry. The rapid modeling capability of the unstructured methodology allowed the computational effort to keep pace with the wind tunnel and, at times, guide the wind tunnel efforts. These computations provided a detailed view of the flowfield characteristics and the contribution of orbiter components (such as the vertical tail and wing) to aerodynamic forces and moments that were unavailable from wind tunnel testing. The damage scenarios are grouped into three categories. Initially, single and multiple missing full RCC panels were analyzed to determine the effect of damage location and magnitude on the aerodynamics. Next is a series of cases with progressive damage, increasing in severity, in the region of RCC panel 9. The final group is a set of wing leading edge and windward surface deformations that model possible structural deformation of the wing skin due to internal heating of the wing structure. By matching the aerodynamics from selected damage scenarios to the reconstructed flight aerodynamics, a progression of damage that is consistent with the flight data, debris forensics, and wind tunnel data is postulated.

  17. Follow-up studies on genome damage in children after Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

    PubMed

    Fucic, Aleksandra; Aghajanyan, Anna; Druzhinin, Vladimir; Minina, Varvara; Neronova, Elizaveta

    2016-09-01

    As children are more susceptible to ionizing radiation than adults, each nuclear accident demands special attention and care of this vulnerable population. The Chernobyl nuclear disaster occurred in a region populated with a large number of children, but despite all efforts and expertise of nuclear specialists, it was not possible to avoid casualties. As vast regions of Ukraine, Belarus and Russia were exposed to doses of ionizing radiation, which are known to be related with different diseases, shortly after the accident medical surveillance was launched, which also included analysis of genome damage. Child population affected by internal and external radiation consisted of subjects exposed prenatally, postnatally (both evacuated and non-evacuated), born by irradiated fathers who worked as liquidators, and parents exposed environmentally. In all groups of children during the last 30 years who were exposed to doses which were significantly higher than that recommended for general population of 1 mSv per year, increased genome damage was detected. Increased genome damage includes statistically higher frequency of dicentric and ring chromosomes, chromated and chromosome breaks, acentric fragments, translocations, and micronuclei. The presence of rogue cells confirmed internal contamination. Genome instability and radiosensitivity in children was detected both in evacuated and continuously exposed children. Today the population exposed to ionizing radiation in 1986 is in reproductive period of life and follow-up of this population and their offspring is of great importance. This review aims to give insight in results of studies, which reported genome damage in children in journals without language restrictions. PMID:27329326

  18. Radiological protection issues arising during and after the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

    PubMed

    González, Abel J; Akashi, Makoto; Boice, John D; Chino, Masamichi; Homma, Toshimitsu; Ishigure, Nobuhito; Kai, Michiaki; Kusumi, Shizuyo; Lee, Jai-Ki; Menzel, Hans-Georg; Niwa, Ohtsura; Sakai, Kazuo; Weiss, Wolfgang; Yamashita, Shunichi; Yonekura, Yoshiharu

    2013-09-01

    Following the Fukushima accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) convened a task group to compile lessons learned from the nuclear reactor accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, with respect to the ICRP system of radiological protection. In this memorandum the members of the task group express their personal views on issues arising during and after the accident, without explicit endorsement of or approval by the ICRP. While the affected people were largely protected against radiation exposure and no one incurred a lethal dose of radiation (or a dose sufficiently large to cause radiation sickness), many radiological protection questions were raised. The following issues were identified: inferring radiation risks (and the misunderstanding of nominal risk coefficients); attributing radiation effects from low dose exposures; quantifying radiation exposure; assessing the importance of internal exposures; managing emergency crises; protecting rescuers and volunteers; responding with medical aid; justifying necessary but disruptive protective actions; transiting from an emergency to an existing situation; rehabilitating evacuated areas; restricting individual doses of members of the public; caring for infants and children; categorising public exposures due to an accident; considering pregnant women and their foetuses and embryos; monitoring public protection; dealing with 'contamination' of territories, rubble and residues and consumer products; recognising the importance of psychological consequences; and fostering the sharing of information. Relevant ICRP Recommendations were scrutinised, lessons were collected and suggestions were compiled. It was concluded that the radiological protection community has an ethical duty to learn from the lessons of Fukushima and resolve any identified challenges. Before another large accident occurs, it should be ensured that inter alia: radiation risk coefficients of potential

  19. Reformulated meat products protect against ischemia-induced cardiac damage.

    PubMed

    Asensio-Lopez, M C; Lax, A; Sanchez-Mas, J; Avellaneda, A; Planes, J; Pascual-Figal, D A

    2016-02-17

    The protective effects of the antioxidants present in food are of great relevance for cardiovascular health. This study evaluates whether the extracts from reformulated meat products with a reduction in fat and/or sodium content exert a cardioprotective effect against ischemia-induced oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes, compared with non-meat foods. Ischemic damage caused loss of cell viability, increased reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation and decreased the antioxidant activity. Pretreatment for 24 h with digested or non-digested extracts from reformulated meat products led to protection against ischemia-induced oxidative damage: increased cell viability, reduced oxidative stress and restored the antioxidant activity. Similar results were obtained using extracts from tuna fish, but not with the extracts of green peas, salad or white beans. These results suggest that reformulated meat products have a beneficial impact in protecting cardiac cells against ischemia, and they may represent a source of natural antioxidants with benefits for cardiovascular health. PMID:26751429

  20. Glimepiride protects neurons against amyloid-β-induced synapse damage.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Craig; West, Ewan; Nolan, William; McHale-Owen, Harriet; Williams, Alun; Bate, Clive

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease is associated with the accumulation within the brain of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides that damage synapses and affect memory acquisition. This process can be modelled by observing the effects of Aβ on synapses in cultured neurons. The addition of picomolar concentrations of soluble Aβ derived from brain extracts triggered the loss of synaptic proteins including synaptophysin, synapsin-1 and cysteine string protein from cultured neurons. Glimepiride, a sulphonylurea used for the treatment of diabetes, protected neurons against synapse damage induced by Aβ. The protective effects of glimepiride were multi-faceted. Glimepiride treatment was associated with altered synaptic membranes including the loss of specific glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins including the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) that acts as a receptor for Aβ42, increased synaptic gangliosides and altered cell signalling. More specifically, glimepiride reduced the Aβ-induced increase in cholesterol and the Aβ-induced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) in synapses that occurred within cholesterol-dense membrane rafts. Aβ42 binding to glimepiride-treated neurons was not targeted to membrane rafts and less Aβ42 accumulated within synapses. These studies indicate that glimepiride modified the membrane micro-environments in which Aβ-induced signalling leads to synapse damage. In addition, soluble PrP(C), released from neurons by glimepiride, neutralised Aβ-induced synapse damage. Such observations raise the possibility that glimepiride may reduce synapse damage and hence delay the progression of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26432105

  1. Protective effect of Pterostilbene against free radical mediated oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pterostilbene, a methoxylated analog of Resveratrol, is gradually gaining more importance as a therapeutic drug owing to its higher lipophilicity, bioavailability and biological activity than Resveratrol. This study was undertaken to characterize its ability to scavenge free radicals such as superoxide, hydroxyl and hydrogen peroxide and to protect bio-molecules within a cell against oxidative insult. Methods Anti-oxidant activity of Pterostilbene was evaluated extensively by employing several in vitro radical scavenging/inhibiting assays and pulse radiolysis study. In addition, its ability to protect rat liver mitochondria against tertiary-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) and hydroxyl radical generated oxidative damage was determined by measuring the damage markers such as protein carbonyls, protein sulphydryls, lipid hydroperoxides, lipid peroxides and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine. Pterostilbene was also evaluated for its ability to inhibit •OH radical induced single strand breaks in pBR322 DNA. Result Pterostilbene exhibited strong anti-oxidant activity against various free radicals such as DPPH, ABTS, hydroxyl, superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in a concentration dependent manner. Pterostilbene conferred protection to proteins, lipids and DNA in isolated mitochondrial fractions against TBHP and hydroxyl radical induced oxidative damage. It also protected pBR322 DNA against oxidative assault. Conclusions Thus, present study provides an evidence for the strong anti-oxidant property of Pterostilbene, methoxylated analog of Resveratrol, thereby potentiating its role as an anti-oxidant. PMID:24070177

  2. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J.; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress plays a key role in UV-induced cell and tissue injuries. • Quercitrin decreases ROS generation and restores antioxidants irradiated by UVB. • Quercitrin reduces UVB-irradiated oxidative DNA damage, apoptosis, and inflammation. • Quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB-induced skin injuries.

  3. Lifting and protecting residential structures from subsidence damage using airbags

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, T.L.; Bennett, R.M.

    1998-12-31

    Conventional practice in protecting residential structures from subsidence damage concentrates on saving the superstructure. The foundation is sacrificed, even though it represents the structural component with the greatest replacement cost. In this study, airbags were used to lift a 20 ft x 30 ft structure to test their ability to protect both the foundation and superstructure from ground settlement. Two contiguous sides of the test foundation were unreinforced, and the other two contiguous sides incorporated footing and wall reinforcement. The airbags successfully lifted the structure without causing damage, even on the unreinforced sides. This paper gives a procedure for determining airbag spacing, and describes installation and operation techniques of the airbags. The paper then focuses on the performance of the airbags in lifting the structure, and shows that airbags can preserve existing foundations during subsidence movements.

  4. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1997 -- A status report. Volume 26

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Muhlheim, M.D.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W.

    1998-11-01

    This report describes the five operational events in 1997 that affected five commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage accidents. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer-screening the 1997 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those events that could be precursors. Candidate precursors were selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1996 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  5. Thermomechanical analysis of a damaged thermal protection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Wei Heok

    Research on the effects of damage on the thermomechanical performance and structural integrity of thermal protection systems (TPS) has been limited. The objective of this research is to address this need by conducting experiments and finite element (FE) analysis on damaged TPS. The TPS selected for study is the High-Temperature Reusable Insulation (HRSI) tiles that are used extensively on NASA's Space Shuttle Orbiter. The TPS considered, which consists of a LI-900 tile, the strain isolator pad and the underlying structure, is subjected to the thermal loading and re-entry static pressure of the Access to Space reference vehicle. The damage to the TPS emulates hypervelocity-impact-type damage, which is approximated in the current research by a cylindrical hole ending with a spherical cap. Preliminary FE analysis using several simplifying assumptions, was conducted to determine the accuracy of using an approximate axisymmetric model compared to a complete three-dimensional model for both heat transfer and thermal stress analyses. Temperature results from the two models were found to be reasonable close; however, thermal stress results displayed significant differences. The sensitivity of the FE results to the various simplifying assumptions was also examined and it was concluded that for reliable results, the simplifying assumptions were not acceptable. Subsequently, an exact three-dimensional model was developed and validated by comparison with experimental data. Re-entry static pressures and temperatures were simulated using a high-temperature experimental facility that consists of a quartz radiant heater and a vacuum chamber with appropriate instrumentation. This facility was developed during the course of this dissertation. Temperatures on the top and bottom surfaces of the TPS specimen as well as strains in the underlying structure were recorded for FE model validation. The validated FE model was then combined with improved thermal loads based on the interactions

  6. Quercitrin Protects Skin from UVB-induced Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Yong-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. PMID:23545178

  7. Plasmalogen phospholipids protect internodal myelin from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Luoma, Adrienne M; Kuo, Fonghsu; Cakici, Ozgur; Crowther, Michelle N; Denninger, Andrew R; Avila, Robin L; Brites, Pedro; Kirschner, Daniel A

    2015-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in a range of degenerative conditions, including aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and neurological disorders. Myelin is a lipid-rich multilamellar sheath that facilitates rapid nerve conduction in vertebrates. Given the high energetic demands and low antioxidant capacity of the cells that elaborate the sheaths, myelin is considered intrinsically vulnerable to oxidative damage, raising the question whether additional mechanisms prevent structural damage. We characterized the structural and biochemical basis of ROS-mediated myelin damage in murine tissues from both central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). To determine whether ROS can cause structural damage to the internodal myelin, whole sciatic and optic nerves were incubated ex vivo with a hydroxyl radical-generating system consisting of copper (Cu), hydrogen peroxide (HP), and ortho-phenanthroline (OP). Quantitative assessment of unfixed tissue by X-ray diffraction revealed irreversible compaction of myelin membrane stacking in both sciatic and optic nerves. Incubation in the presence of the hydroxyl radical scavenger sodium formate prevented this damage, implicating hydroxyl radical species. Myelin membranes are particularly enriched in plasmalogens, a class of ether-linked phospholipids proposed to have antioxidant properties. Myelin in sciatic nerve from plasmalogen-deficient (Pex7 knockout) mice was significantly more vulnerable to Cu/OP/HP-mediated ROS-induced compaction than myelin from WT mice. Our results directly support the role of plasmalogens as endogenous antioxidants providing a defense that protects ROS-vulnerable myelin. PMID:25801291

  8. RNA protects a nucleoprotein complex against radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Bury, Charles S; McGeehan, John E; Antson, Alfred A; Carmichael, Ian; Gerstel, Markus; Shevtsov, Mikhail B; Garman, Elspeth F

    2016-05-01

    Radiation damage during macromolecular X-ray crystallographic data collection is still the main impediment for many macromolecular structure determinations. Even when an eventual model results from the crystallographic pipeline, the manifestations of radiation-induced structural and conformation changes, the so-called specific damage, within crystalline macromolecules can lead to false interpretations of biological mechanisms. Although this has been well characterized within protein crystals, far less is known about specific damage effects within the larger class of nucleoprotein complexes. Here, a methodology has been developed whereby per-atom density changes could be quantified with increasing dose over a wide (1.3-25.0 MGy) range and at higher resolution (1.98 Å) than the previous systematic specific damage study on a protein-DNA complex. Specific damage manifestations were determined within the large trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) bound to a single-stranded RNA that forms a belt around the protein. Over a large dose range, the RNA was found to be far less susceptible to radiation-induced chemical changes than the protein. The availability of two TRAP molecules in the asymmetric unit, of which only one contained bound RNA, allowed a controlled investigation into the exact role of RNA binding in protein specific damage susceptibility. The 11-fold symmetry within each TRAP ring permitted statistically significant analysis of the Glu and Asp damage patterns, with RNA binding unexpectedly being observed to protect these otherwise highly sensitive residues within the 11 RNA-binding pockets distributed around the outside of the protein molecule. Additionally, the method enabled a quantification of the reduction in radiation-induced Lys and Phe disordering upon RNA binding directly from the electron density. PMID:27139628

  9. RNA protects a nucleoprotein complex against radiation damage

    PubMed Central

    Bury, Charles S.; McGeehan, John E.; Antson, Alfred A.; Carmichael, Ian; Gerstel, Markus; Shevtsov, Mikhail B.; Garman, Elspeth F.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation damage during macromolecular X-ray crystallographic data collection is still the main impediment for many macromolecular structure determinations. Even when an eventual model results from the crystallographic pipeline, the manifestations of radiation-induced structural and conformation changes, the so-called specific damage, within crystalline macromolecules can lead to false interpretations of biological mechanisms. Although this has been well characterized within protein crystals, far less is known about specific damage effects within the larger class of nucleoprotein complexes. Here, a methodology has been developed whereby per-atom density changes could be quantified with increasing dose over a wide (1.3–25.0 MGy) range and at higher resolution (1.98 Å) than the previous systematic specific damage study on a protein–DNA complex. Specific damage manifestations were determined within the large trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) bound to a single-stranded RNA that forms a belt around the protein. Over a large dose range, the RNA was found to be far less susceptible to radiation-induced chemical changes than the protein. The availability of two TRAP molecules in the asymmetric unit, of which only one contained bound RNA, allowed a controlled investigation into the exact role of RNA binding in protein specific damage susceptibility. The 11-fold symmetry within each TRAP ring permitted statistically significant analysis of the Glu and Asp damage patterns, with RNA binding unexpectedly being observed to protect these otherwise highly sensitive residues within the 11 RNA-binding pockets distributed around the outside of the protein molecule. Additionally, the method enabled a quantification of the reduction in radiation-induced Lys and Phe disordering upon RNA binding directly from the electron density. PMID:27139628

  10. Protective action alternatives for accidents at nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Tingle, A.; Pratt, W.T.; McGuire, S.A.

    1987-06-01

    Protective action calculations have been performed for five different light water reactors (LWRs) and containment designs using high and low fission product releases for early and late containment failures for each plant. These fission product release estimates were obtained from studies performed for the recently published ''Reactor Risk Reference Document'' (NUREG-1150). Five protective actions were considered for the risks of exceeding various dose levels to the red marrow versus centerline distance from the plants using site-specific meteorology. The strategies considered were 4 hours of normal activity, basement sheltering, large building sheltering, evacuation at release, and evacuation 1 hour after release. The evacuations were computed using 10 mph evacuation speed for all sites. Additional calculations were performed for the dose contributions due to the cloud, ground, and inhalation pathways.

  11. Fisetin Protects DNA Against Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Lin, Huajuan; Tu, Qian; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Xican

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNA damage, then to investigate the possible mechanism. Methods: The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro, including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation), •O2- scavenging (pyrogallol autoxidation), DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays. Results: Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-induced DNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 µM). It also increased its radical-scavenging percentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in •OH scavenging, •O2- scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 µM, 34.05±0.87 µM, 9.69±0.53 µM, 2.43±0.14 µM, and 1.49±0.16 µM, respectively. Conclusion: Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damage possibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging approach, which is assumed to be hydrogen atom (H•) and/or single electron (e) donation (HAT/SET) pathways. In the HAT pathway, the 3’,4’-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an important role, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form. PMID:27478791

  12. Evaluation of warning and protective action implementation times for chemical weapons accidents. [None

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, J.H.

    1988-04-01

    This is a preliminary evaluation of warning systems and protective action options for off-site emergency planning for chemical weapons accidents. The analysis concentrates on the timing of warning and protective action implementation which is defined as the length of time it will take to protect off-site populations given different warning systems and protective action configurations. The evaluation concludes: (1) A specialized warning system using tone alert radios, automatic telephone dialing systems, sirens, or some combination thereof is desirable within 10 km of the fixed sites. (2) A rapid means of respiratory protection and expedient protective sheltering are the protective actions that could be most rapidly implemented within 10 km of a fixed-site release point. (3) Populations at distances greater than 10 km should have time to evacuate without the installation of specialized warning systems except in institutional facilities such as schools and nursing homes. (4) The detection and warning decision times are critical elements in determining the feasibility of population protection. A 5-to-15-minute organizational response is needed to provide warning to potentially threatened populations. Even an expedient organizational response, however, will not provide 100% assurance that everyone will have time to learn of the accident and take action. 9 refs., 4 tabs.

  13. Protein degradation and protection against misfolded or damaged proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Alfred L.

    2003-12-01

    The ultimate mechanism that cells use to ensure the quality of intracellular proteins is the selective destruction of misfolded or damaged polypeptides. In eukaryotic cells, the large ATP-dependent proteolytic machine, the 26S proteasome, prevents the accumulation of non-functional, potentially toxic proteins. This process is of particular importance in protecting cells against harsh conditions (for example, heat shock or oxidative stress) and in a variety of diseases (for example, cystic fibrosis and the major neurodegenerative diseases). A full understanding of the pathogenesis of the protein-folding diseases will require greater knowledge of how misfolded proteins are recognized and selectively degraded.

  14. Chromatin Compaction Protects Genomic DNA from Radiation Damage

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Hideaki; Hanafusa, Tomo; Mori, Toshiaki; Shimura, Mari; Iida, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Kenichi; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Genomic DNA is organized three-dimensionally in the nucleus, and is thought to form compact chromatin domains. Although chromatin compaction is known to be essential for mitosis, whether it confers other advantages, particularly in interphase cells, remains unknown. Here, we report that chromatin compaction protects genomic DNA from radiation damage. Using a newly developed solid-phase system, we found that the frequency of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in compact chromatin after ionizing irradiation was 5–50-fold lower than in decondensed chromatin. Since radical scavengers inhibited DSB induction in decondensed chromatin, condensed chromatin had a lower level of reactive radical generation after ionizing irradiation. We also found that chromatin compaction protects DNA from attack by chemical agents. Our findings suggest that genomic DNA compaction plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity. PMID:24130727

  15. Medicinal protection with Chinese herb-compound against radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.J.; Qian, J.K.; Yang, G.H.; Wang, B.Z.; Wen, X.L. )

    1990-08-01

    Experiments were carried out on mice and the subjects irradiated for cancer therapy to evaluate the protective efficacy of a Chinese medicinal herb-compound (CMHC). The lethality and the degree of leucopenia caused by radiation in mice medicated with CMHC were significantly less in comparison with control mice (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.001, respectively). CMHC significantly improved the WBC and the thrombocytes in irradiated workers (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.001, respectively). The WBC count of 40 patients under radiotherapy while treated with CMHC recovered from 3450 +/- 77/c.mm to 5425 +/- 264/c.mm (p less than 0.001); whereas, in the control group, without any medication, the WBC count dropped significantly (p less than 0.001). Our results revealed the applicabilities of CMHC in protection against radiation damage in spaceflight and in other fields.

  16. Sirtuin 6 protects the heart from hypoxic damage

    SciTech Connect

    Maksin-Matveev, Anna; Kanfi, Yariv; Hochhauser, Edith; Isak, Ahuva; Cohen, Haim Y.; Shainberg, Asher

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) is a protein associated with prolonged life expectancy. We investigated whether life extension is associated with cardioprotection against hypoxia. The proposed study is to develop approaches to reduce hypoxic damage through the use of the sirtuin pathway and to elucidate the mechanism involved. For that purpose we subjected cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice (TG) with over-expression of SIRT6, to hypoxic stress in cell cultures. We hypothesized that cardiomyocytes from transgenic mice subjected to prolonged hypoxia may release survival factors or fewer damage markers to protect them from hypoxic stress compared with wild type (WT) mice. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) released to the medium and propidium iodide (PI) binding, were markedly decreased following hypoxia in TG cardiomyocytes. The protective mechanism of SIRT6 over-expression includes the activation of pAMPKα pathway, the increased protein level of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2), the inhibition of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), the decrease of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the reduction in the protein level of phospho-protein kinase B (pAkt) during hypoxia. Together, all these processes impede the necrosis/apoptosis pathways leading to the improved survival of cardiomyocytes following hypoxia, which might explain life extension. - Highlights: • Sirtuin 6 is a protein associated with prolonged life expectancy. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 protects cardiocytes from hypoxia and oxidative stress. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 activates the pAMPKα pathway and the Bcl2 expression. • Over-expression of sirtuin 6 decreases ROS formation and pAkt level during hypoxia. • These pathways protect cardiocytes from hypoxia and might explain lifespan extension.

  17. Antioxidant and DNA damage protection potentials of selected phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Sevgi, Kemal; Tepe, Bektas; Sarikurkcu, Cengiz

    2015-03-01

    In this study, ten different phenolic acids (caffeic, chlorogenic, cinnamic, ferulic, gallic, p-hydroxybenzoic, protocatechuic, rosmarinic, syringic, and vanillic acids) were evaluated for their antioxidant and DNA damage protection potentials. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by using four different test systems named as β-carotene bleaching, DPPH free radical scavenging, reducing power and chelating effect. In all test systems, rosmarinic acid showed the maximum activity potential, while protocatechuic acid was determined as the weakest antioxidant in β-carotene bleaching, DPPH free radical scavenging, and chelating effect assays. Phenolic acids were also screened for their protective effects on pBR322 plasmid DNA against the mutagenic and toxic effects of UV and H2O2. Ferulic acid was found as the most active phytochemical among the others. Even at the lowest concentration value (0.002 mg/ml), ferulic acid protected all of the bands in the presence of H2O2 and UV. It is followed by caffeic, rosmarinic, and vanillic acids. On the other hand, cinnamic acid (at 0.002 mg/ml), gallic acid (at 0.002 mg/ml), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (at 0.002 and 0.004 mg/ml), and protocatechuic acid (at 0.002 and 0.004 mg/ml) could not protect plasmid DNA. PMID:25542528

  18. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents, 1986: A status report: Main report and Appendixes A,B, and C

    SciTech Connect

    Minarick, J W; Harris, J D; Austin, P N; Cletcher, J W; Hagen, E W

    1988-05-01

    The Accident Sequence Precursor Program reviews licensee event reports of operational events that have occurred at LWRs to identify and categorize precursors to potential severe core-damage accidents. Accident sequences considered in the study are those associated with inadequate core cooling. Accident sequence precursors are events that are important elements in such sequences. Such precursors could be infrequent initiating events or equipment failures that, when coupled with one or more postulated events, could result in a plant condition with inadequate core cooling. Originally proposed in the Risk Assessment Review Group Report (Lewis Committee report) in 1978, the study - subsequently named the Accident Sequence Precursor Program - was initiated at the Nuclear Operations Analysis Center in 1979. Earlier reports by the program involved assessment of events that occurred in 1969-1981 and 1984-1985. The present report involves the assessment of events that occurred during 1986. A nuclear plant has safety systems for mitigating the consequences of accidents or off-normal initiating events that may occur during the course of plant operation. These systems are built to high-quality standards and are redundant; nonetheless, they have a nonzero probability of failing or being in a failed state when required to operate. This report uses LERs and other plant data, estimated system unavailabilities, the expected average frequency of initiating events (LOFWs, LOOPs, LOCAs), and event details to evaluate the potential impact of the following two situations.

  19. Electrochemically Reduced Water Protects Neural Cells from Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki, Takeki; Kinjo, Tomoya; Nakamichi, Noboru; Teruya, Kiichiro; Kabayama, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Aging-related neurodegenerative disorders are closely associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stresses and their incidence tends to increase with aging. Brain is the most vulnerable to reactive species generated by a higher rate of oxygen consumption and glucose utilization compared to other organs. Electrochemically reduced water (ERW) was demonstrated to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) in several cell types. In the present study, the protective effect of ERW against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) was investigated in several rodent neuronal cell lines and primary cells. ERW was found to significantly suppress H2O2 (50–200 μM) induced PC12 and SFME cell deaths. ERW scavenged intracellular ROS and exhibited a protective effect against neuronal network damage caused by 200 μM H2O2 in N1E-115 cells. ERW significantly suppressed NO-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells despite the fact that it did not have the ability to scavenge intracellular NO. ERW significantly suppressed both glutamate induced Ca2+ influx and the resulting cytotoxicity in primary cells. These results collectively demonstrated for the first time that ERW protects several types of neuronal cells by scavenging ROS because of the presence of hydrogen and platinum nanoparticles dissolved in ERW. PMID:25383141

  20. Electrochemically reduced water protects neural cells from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Taichi; Yan, Hanxu; Hamasaki, Takeki; Kinjo, Tomoya; Nakamichi, Noboru; Teruya, Kiichiro; Kabayama, Shigeru; Shirahata, Sanetaka

    2014-01-01

    Aging-related neurodegenerative disorders are closely associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stresses and their incidence tends to increase with aging. Brain is the most vulnerable to reactive species generated by a higher rate of oxygen consumption and glucose utilization compared to other organs. Electrochemically reduced water (ERW) was demonstrated to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) in several cell types. In the present study, the protective effect of ERW against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) was investigated in several rodent neuronal cell lines and primary cells. ERW was found to significantly suppress H2O2 (50-200 μM) induced PC12 and SFME cell deaths. ERW scavenged intracellular ROS and exhibited a protective effect against neuronal network damage caused by 200 μM H2O2 in N1E-115 cells. ERW significantly suppressed NO-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells despite the fact that it did not have the ability to scavenge intracellular NO. ERW significantly suppressed both glutamate induced Ca(2+) influx and the resulting cytotoxicity in primary cells. These results collectively demonstrated for the first time that ERW protects several types of neuronal cells by scavenging ROS because of the presence of hydrogen and platinum nanoparticles dissolved in ERW. PMID:25383141

  1. Immunosuppressive treatment protects against angiotensin II-induced renal damage.

    PubMed

    Muller, Dominik N; Shagdarsuren, Erdenechimeg; Park, Joon-Keun; Dechend, Ralf; Mervaala, Eero; Hampich, Franziska; Fiebeler, Anette; Ju, Xinsheng; Finckenberg, Piet; Theuer, Jürgen; Viedt, Christiane; Kreuzer, Joerg; Heidecke, Harald; Haller, Hermann; Zenke, Martin; Luft, Friedrich C

    2002-11-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II promotes renal infiltration by immunocompetent cells in double-transgenic rats (dTGRs) harboring both human renin and angiotensinogen genes. To elucidate disease mechanisms, we investigated whether or not dexamethasone (DEXA) immunosuppression ameliorates renal damage. Untreated dTGRs developed hypertension, renal damage, and 50% mortality at 7 weeks. DEXA reduced albuminuria, renal fibrosis, vascular reactive oxygen stress, and prevented mortality, independent of blood pressure. In dTGR kidneys, p22phox immunostaining co-localized with macrophages and partially with T cells. dTGR dendritic cells expressed major histocompatibility complex II and CD86, indicating maturation. DEXA suppressed major histocompatibility complex II+, CD86+, dendritic, and T-cell infiltration. In additional experiments, we treated dTGRs with mycophenolate mofetil to inhibit T- and B-cell proliferation. Reno-protective actions of mycophenolate mofetil and its effect on dendritic and T cells were similar to those obtained with DEXA. We next investigated whether or not Ang II directly promotes dendritic cell maturation in vitro. Ang II did not alter CD80, CD83, and MHC II expression, but increased CCR7 expression and cell migration. To explore the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha on dendritic cell maturation in vivo, we treated dTGRs with the soluble TNF-alpha receptor etanercept. This treatment had no effect on blood pressure, but decreased albuminuria, nuclear factor-kappaB activation, and infiltration of all immunocompetent cells. These data suggest that immunosuppression prevents dendritic cell maturation and T-cell infiltration in a nonimmune model of Ang II-induced renal damage. Ang II induces dendritic migration directly, whereas in vivo TNF-alpha is involved in dendritic cell infiltration and maturation. Thus, Ang II may initiate events leading to innate and acquired immune response. PMID:12414515

  2. Immunosuppressive Treatment Protects Against Angiotensin II-Induced Renal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Dominik N.; Shagdarsuren, Erdenechimeg; Park, Joon-Keun; Dechend, Ralf; Mervaala, Eero; Hampich, Franziska; Fiebeler, Anette; Ju, Xinsheng; Finckenberg, Piet; Theuer, Jürgen; Viedt, Christiane; Kreuzer, Joerg; Heidecke, Harald; Haller, Hermann; Zenke, Martin; Luft, Friedrich C.

    2002-01-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II promotes renal infiltration by immunocompetent cells in double-transgenic rats (dTGRs) harboring both human renin and angiotensinogen genes. To elucidate disease mechanisms, we investigated whether or not dexamethasone (DEXA) immunosuppression ameliorates renal damage. Untreated dTGRs developed hypertension, renal damage, and 50% mortality at 7 weeks. DEXA reduced albuminuria, renal fibrosis, vascular reactive oxygen stress, and prevented mortality, independent of blood pressure. In dTGR kidneys, p22phox immunostaining co-localized with macrophages and partially with T cells. dTGR dendritic cells expressed major histocompatibility complex II and CD86, indicating maturation. DEXA suppressed major histocompatibility complex II+, CD86+, dendritic, and T-cell infiltration. In additional experiments, we treated dTGRs with mycophenolate mofetil to inhibit T- and B-cell proliferation. Reno-protective actions of mycophenolate mofetil and its effect on dendritic and T cells were similar to those obtained with DEXA. We next investigated whether or not Ang II directly promotes dendritic cell maturation in vitro. Ang II did not alter CD80, CD83, and MHC II expression, but increased CCR7 expression and cell migration. To explore the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α on dendritic cell maturation in vivo, we treated dTGRs with the soluble TNF-α receptor etanercept. This treatment had no effect on blood pressure, but decreased albuminuria, nuclear factor-κB activation, and infiltration of all immunocompetent cells. These data suggest that immunosuppression prevents dendritic cell maturation and T-cell infiltration in a nonimmune model of Ang II-induced renal damage. Ang II induces dendritic migration directly, whereas in vivo TNF-α is involved in dendritic cell infiltration and maturation. Thus, Ang II may initiate events leading to innate and acquired immune response. PMID:12414515

  3. Liposomal Antioxidants for Protection against Oxidant-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Suntres, Zacharias E.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical, can be formed as normal products of aerobic metabolism and can be produced at elevated rates under pathophysiological conditions. Overproduction and/or insufficient removal of ROS result in significant damage to cell structure and functions. In vitro studies showed that antioxidants, when applied directly and at relatively high concentrations to cellular systems, are effective in conferring protection against the damaging actions of ROS, but results from animal and human studies showed that several antioxidants provide only modest benefit and even possible harm. Antioxidants have yet to be rendered into reliable and safe therapies because of their poor solubility, inability to cross membrane barriers, extensive first-pass metabolism, and rapid clearance from cells. There is considerable interest towards the development of drug-delivery systems that would result in the selective delivery of antioxidants to tissues in sufficient concentrations to ameliorate oxidant-induced tissue injuries. Liposomes are biocompatible, biodegradable, and nontoxic artificial phospholipid vesicles that offer the possibility of carrying hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and amphiphilic molecules. This paper focus on the use of liposomes for the delivery of antioxidants in the prevention or treatment of pathological conditions related to oxidative stress. PMID:21876690

  4. Protective Behaviour of Citizens to Transport Accidents Involving Hazardous Materials: A Discrete Choice Experiment Applied to Populated Areas nearby Waterways

    PubMed Central

    de Bekker-Grob, Esther W.; Bergstra, Arnold D.; Bliemer, Michiel C. J.; Trijssenaar-Buhre, Inge J. M.; Burdorf, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Background To improve the information for and preparation of citizens at risk to hazardous material transport accidents, a first important step is to determine how different characteristics of hazardous material transport accidents will influence citizens’ protective behaviour. However, quantitative studies investigating citizens’ protective behaviour in case of hazardous material transport accidents are scarce. Methods A discrete choice experiment was conducted among subjects (19–64 years) living in the direct vicinity of a large waterway. Scenarios were described by three transport accident characteristics: odour perception, smoke/vapour perception, and the proportion of people in the environment that were leaving at their own discretion. Subjects were asked to consider each scenario as realistic and to choose the alternative that was most appealing to them: staying, seeking shelter, or escaping. A panel error component model was used to quantify how different transport accident characteristics influenced subjects’ protective behaviour. Results The response was 44% (881/1,994). The predicted probability that a subject would stay ranged from 1% in case of a severe looking accident till 62% in case of a mild looking accident. All three transport accident characteristics proved to influence protective behaviour. Particularly a perception of strong ammonia or mercaptan odours and visible smoke/vapour close to citizens had the strongest positive influence on escaping. In general, ‘escaping’ was more preferred than ‘seeking shelter’, although stated preference heterogeneity among subjects for these protective behaviour options was substantial. Males were less willing to seek shelter than females, whereas elderly people were more willing to escape than younger people. Conclusion Various characteristics of transport accident involving hazardous materials influence subjects’ protective behaviour. The preference heterogeneity shows that information needs

  5. UV radiation and freshwater zooplankton: damage, protection and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Rautio, Milla; Tartarotti, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    While many laboratory and field studies show that zooplankton are negatively affected when exposed to high intensities of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), most studies also indicate that zooplankton are well adapted to cope with large variations in their UVR exposure in the pelagic zone of lakes. The response mechanisms of zooplankton are diverse and efficient and may explain the success and richness of freshwater zooplankton in optically variable waters. While no single behavioural or physiological protection mechanism seems to be superior, and while several unexplained and contradictory patterns exist in zooplankton UVR ecology, recent increases in our understanding are consistent with UVR playing an important role for zooplankton. This review examines the variability in freshwater zooplankton responses to UVR, with a focus on crustacean zooplankton (Cladocera and Copepoda). We present an overview of UVR-induced damages, and the protection and recovery mechanisms freshwater zooplankton use when exposed to UVR. We review the current knowledge of UVR impact on freshwater zooplankton at species and community levels, and discuss briefly how global change over the last three decades has influenced the UVR milieu in lakes. PMID:21516254

  6. Ascorbic acid (AA) metabolism in protection against radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, R.C.; Koch, M.J.

    1986-03-05

    The possibility is considered that AA protects tissues against radiation damage by scavenging free radicals that result from radiolysis of water. A physiologic buffer (pH 6.7) was incubated with /sup 14/C-AA and 1 mM thiourea (to slow spontaneous oxidation of AA). Aliquots were assayed by HPLC and scintillation spectrometry to identify the /sup 14/C-label. Samples exposed to Cobalt-60 radiation had a half time of AA decay of < 3 minutes compared with nonirradiated samples (t/sub 1/2/ > 30 minutes) indicating that AA scavenges radiation-induced free radicals and forms the ascorbate free radical (AFR). Pairs of /sup 14/C-AFR disproportionate, with the net effect of /sup 14/C-dehydroascorbic acid formation from /sup 14/C-AA. Having established that AFR result from ionizing radiation in an aqueous solution, the possibility was evaluated that a tissue factor reduces AFR. Cortical tissue from the kidneys of male rats was minced, homogenized in buffer and centrifuged at 8000 xg. The supernatant was found to slow the rate of radiation-induced AA degradation by > 90% when incubated at 23/sup 0/C in the presence of 15 ..mu..M /sup 14/C-AA. Samples of supernatant maintained at 100/sup 0/C for 10 minutes or precipitated with 5% PCA did not prevent radiation-induced AA degradation. AA may have a specific role in scavenging free radicals generated by ionizing radiation and thereby protect body tissues.

  7. Radiological protection from radioactive waste management in existing exposure situations resulting from a nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Hattori, Takatoshi

    2013-01-01

    In environmental remediation after nuclear accidents, radioactive wastes have to be appropriately managed in existing exposure situations with contamination resulting from the emission of radionuclides by such accidents. In this paper, a framework of radiation protection from radioactive waste management in existing exposure situations for application to the practical and reasonable waste management in contaminated areas, referring to related ICRP recommendations was proposed. In the proposed concept, intermediate reference levels for waste management are adopted gradually according to the progress of the reduction in the existing ambient dose in the environment on the basis of the principles of justification and optimisation by taking into account the practicability of the management of radioactive waste and environmental remediation. It is essential to include the participation of relevant stakeholders living in existing exposure situations in the selection of reference levels for the existing ambient dose and waste management. PMID:22719047

  8. Radiological protection from radioactive waste management in existing exposure situations resulting from a nuclear accident

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Daisuke; Hattori, Takatoshi

    2013-01-01

    In environmental remediation after nuclear accidents, radioactive wastes have to be appropriately managed in existing exposure situations with contamination resulting from the emission of radionuclides by such accidents. In this paper, a framework of radiation protection from radioactive waste management in existing exposure situations for application to the practical and reasonable waste management in contaminated areas, referring to related ICRP recommendations was proposed. In the proposed concept, intermediate reference levels for waste management are adopted gradually according to the progress of the reduction in the existing ambient dose in the environment on the basis of the principles of justification and optimisation by taking into account the practicability of the management of radioactive waste and environmental remediation. It is essential to include the participation of relevant stakeholders living in existing exposure situations in the selection of reference levels for the existing ambient dose and waste management. PMID:22719047

  9. Carbonic Anhydrase Protects Fatty Liver Grafts against Ischemic Reperfusion Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bejaoui, Mohamed; Pantazi, Eirini; De Luca, Viviana; Panisello, Arnau; Folch-Puy, Emma; Hotter, Georgina; Capasso, Clemente; T. Supuran, Claudiu; Rosselló-Catafau, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are ubiquitous metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and a proton. CAs are involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes, including acid-base homeostasis, electrolyte balance, oxygen delivery to tissues and nitric oxide generation. Given that these processes are found to be dysregulated during ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI), and taking into account the high vulnerability of steatotic livers to preservation injury, we hypothesized a new role for CA as a pharmacological agent able to protect against ischemic damage. Two different aspects of the role of CA II in fatty liver grafts preservation were evaluated: 1) the effect of its addition to Institut Georges Lopez (IGL-1) storage solution after cold ischemia; 2) and after 24h of cold storage followed by two hours of normothermic ex-vivo perfusion. In all cases, liver injury, CA II protein concentration, CA II mRNA levels and CA II activity were determined. In case of the ex-vivo perfusion, we further assessed liver function (bile production, bromosulfophthalein clearance) and Western blot analysis of phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK), mitogen activated protein kinases family (MAPKs) and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) parameters (GRP78, PERK, IRE, eIF2α and ATF6). We found that CA II was downregulated after cold ischemia. The addition of bovine CA II to IGL-1 preservation solution efficiently protected steatotic liver against cold IRI. In the case of reperfusion, CA II protection was associated with better function, AMPK activation and the prevention of ERS and MAPKs activation. Interestingly, CA II supplementation was not associated with enhanced CO2 hydration. The results suggest that CA II modulation may be a promising target for fatty liver graft preservation. PMID:26225852

  10. Radiation protection: an analysis of thyroid blocking. [Effectiveness of KI in reducing radioactive uptake following potential reactor accident

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, D C; Blond, R M

    1980-01-01

    An analysis was performed to provide guidance to policymakers concerning the effectiveness of potassium iodide (KI) as a thyroid blocking agent in potential reactor accident situations, the distance to which (or area within which) it should be distributed, and its relative effectiveness compared to other available protective measures. The analysis was performed using the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400) consequence model. Four categories of accidents were addressed: gap activity release accident (GAP), GAP without containment isolation, core melt with a melt-through release, and core melt with an atmospheric release. Cost-benefit ratios (US $/thyroid nodule prevented) are given assuming that no other protective measures are taken. Uncertainties due to health effects parameters, accident probabilities, and costs are assessed. The effects of other potential protective measures, such as evacuation and sheltering, and the impact on children (critical population) are evaluated. Finally, risk-benefit considerations are briefly discussed.

  11. The protective effect of a helmet in three bicycle accidents--A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Fahlstedt, Madelen; Halldin, Peter; Kleiven, Svein

    2016-06-01

    There is some controversy regarding the effectiveness of helmets in preventing head injuries among cyclists. Epidemiological, experimental and computer simulation studies have suggested that helmets do indeed have a protective effect, whereas other studies based on epidemiological data have argued that there is no evidence that the helmet protects the brain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of a helmet in single bicycle accident reconstructions using detailed finite element simulations. Strain in the brain tissue, which is associated with brain injuries, was reduced by up to 43% for the accident cases studied when a helmet was included. This resulted in a reduction of the risk of concussion of up to 54%. The stress to the skull bone went from fracture level of 80 MPa down to 13-16 MPa when a helmet was included and the skull fracture risk was reduced by up to 98% based on linear acceleration. Even with a 10% increased riding velocity for the helmeted impacts, to take into account possible increased risk taking, the risk of concussion was still reduced by up to 46% when compared with the unhelmeted impacts with original velocity. The results of this study show that the brain injury risk and risk of skull fracture could have been reduced in these three cases if a helmet had been worn. PMID:26974030

  12. Protective Effect of Folic Acid on Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Cui, Huan; Zhang, Haiyang; Guan, Xiaoju; Zhang, Zheng; Jia, Chaonan; Wu, Jia; Yang, Hui; Qiu, Wenting; Zhang, Chuanwu; Yang, Zuopeng; Chen, Zhu; Mao, Guangyun

    2015-01-01

    < 0.001). Test of interaction between hypercholesterolemia and FA supplementation on urinary 8-OHdG reduction was significant (P = 0.001). The present study demonstrates that FA fortification is independently linked to the reduction of urinary 8-OHdG/Cr in a dose-related pattern, which suggests that FA is beneficial to protect against oxidative damage to DNA. This effect is apparently stronger in those with hypercholesterolemia. The authors provide a new insight into the prevention and reversal of oxidative DNA damage. PMID:26559255

  13. 49 CFR 192.355 - Customer meters and regulators: Protection from damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... damage. (a) Protection from vacuum or back pressure. If the customer's equipment might create either a vacuum or a back pressure, a device must be installed to protect the system. (b) Service regulator...

  14. Modified hydroxyethyl starch protects cells from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Sergey K; Sergeeva, Olga Yu; Vlasov, Petr S; Zavyalova, Margarita S; Belostotskaya, Galina B; Garamus, Vasil M; Khrustaleva, Raisa S; Stepanek, Petr; Domnina, Nina S

    2015-12-10

    This article describes the synthesis of novel starch-antioxidant conjugates, which show great potential for biomedical applications to protect cells from oxidative damage. These conjugates were synthesized by the modification of a hydroxyethyl starch (molecular weight=200,000g/mol) with various sterically hindered phenols that differ in radical scavenging activity. They possess substantial radical scavenging activity toward a model free radical. It was found that the polymer conjugate conformation depends on the antioxidant structure and degree of substitution. We constructed the complete conformational phase behavior for the polymers with increasing degrees of substitution from small-angle neutron scattering data. It was observed that the conjugate conformation changes are the result of water shifting from a thermodynamically favorable solvent to an unfavorable one, a process that then leads to compaction of the conjugate. We selected the conjugates that possess high substitution degree but still exhibit coil conformation for biological studies. The high efficiency of the conjugates was confirmed by different in vitro (hypotonic hemolysis of erythrocytes/osmotic resistance of erythrocytes and the change of [Ca(2+)]i inside freshly isolated cardiomyocytes) and in vivo (acute hemorrhage/massive blood loss) methods. PMID:26428130

  15. Establishing protective long term measures after severe nuclear accidents using multiple criteria.

    PubMed

    Papazoglou, I A; Kollas, J G

    1997-05-01

    This paper proposes a methodology supporting decisions on protective measures following severe nuclear accidents and demonstrates its use. A multicriteria decision analysis approach is adopted where value tradeoffs are postponed until the very last stage of the decision process. All feasible solutions are implicitly considered and evaluated in the chosen criteria. Technically inferior solutions are excluded. Only the non-dominated or efficient solutions forming the "efficient frontier" are retained and presented to the decision makers. Implementation of inefficient solutions is in this way avoided. A choice among the efficient solutions, although it implies value tradeoffs among the multiple criteria, avoids the direct and apriori assessment of preferences. An interactive computer package has been developed with which the decision maker can choose a point on the efficient frontier in the consequence space and immediately see the corresponding alternative in the decision space. The methodology is demonstrated through an application on the choice among possible protective measures in contaminated areas of the former USSR after the Chernobyl accident using as criteria the collective effective life-time dose received by the population and the cost associated with each possible decision. PMID:9106708

  16. Blueberry-Enriched Diet Protects Rat Heart from Ischemic Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ahmet, Ismayil; Spangler, Edward; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Sollott, Steven J.; Joseph, James A.; Ingram, Donald K.; Talan, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Objectives to assess the cardioprotective properties of a blueberry enriched diet (BD). Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a major role in ischemia-related myocardial injury. The attempts to use synthetic antioxidants to block the detrimental effects of ROS have produced mixed or negative results precipitating the interest in natural products. Blueberries are readily available product with the highest antioxidant capacity among fruits and vegetables. Methods and Results Following 3-mo of BD or a regular control diet (CD), the threshold for mitochondrial permeability transition (tMPT) was measured in isolated cardiomyocytes obtained from young male Fischer-344 rats. Compared to CD, BD resulted in a 24% increase (p<0.001) of ROS indexed tMPT. The remaining animals were subjected to a permanent ligation of the left descending coronary artery. 24 hrs later resulting myocardial infarction (MI) in rats on BD was 22% less than in CD rats (p<0.01). Significantly less TUNEL(+) cardiomyocytes (2% vs 9%) and 40% less inflammation cells were observed in the myocardial area at risk of BD compared to CD rats (p<0.01). In the subgroup of rats, after coronary ligation the original diet was either continued or switched to the opposite one, and cardiac remodeling and MI expansion were followed by serial echocardiography for 10 weeks. Measurements suggested that continuation of BD or its withdrawal after MI attenuated or accelerated rates of post MI cardiac remodeling and MI expansion. Conclusion A blueberry-enriched diet protected the myocardium from induced ischemic damage and demonstrated the potential to attenuate the development of post MI chronic heart failure. PMID:19536295

  17. Characterization of Space Shuttle External Tank Thermal Protection System (TPS) Materials in Support of the Columbia Accident Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles D.

    2004-01-01

    NASA suffered the loss of the seven-member crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia on February 1, 2003 when the vehicle broke apart upon re-entry to the Earth's atmosphere. The final report of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) determined that the accident was caused by a launch ascent incident-a suitcase-sized chunk of insulating foam on the Shuttle's External Tank (ET) broke off, and moving at almost 500 mph, struck an area of the leading edge of the Shuttle s left wing. As a result, one or more of the protective Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the wing leading edge were damaged. Upon re-entry, superheated air approaching 3,000 F breached the wing damage and caused the vehicle breakup and loss of crew. The large chunk of insulating foam that broke off during the Columbia launch was determined to come from the so-called bipod ramp area where the Shuttle s orbiter (containing crew) is attached to the ET. Underneath the foam in the bipod ramp area is a layer of TPS that is a cork-filled silicone rubber composite. In March 2003, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama received cured samples of the foam and composite for testing from the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) in New Orleans, Louisiana. The MAF is where the Shuttle's ET is manufactured. The foam and composite TPS materials for the ET have been well characterized for mechanical property data at the super-cold temperatures of the liquid oxygen and hydrogen fuels used in the ET. However, modulus data on these materials is not as well characterized. The TA Instruments 2980 Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) was used to determine the modulus of the two TPS materials over a range of -145 to 95 C in the dual cantilever bending mode. Multi-strain, fixed frequency DMA tests were followed by multi-frequency, fixed strain tests to determine the approximate bounds of linear viscoelastic behavior for the two materials. Additional information is included in the original extended

  18. DNA damage by smoke: Protection by turmeric and other inhibitors of ROS

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivas, L.; Shalini, V.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Twigs-dry leaves smoke condensate (TDS), as a source of clastogenic ROS and carcinogenic PAH, was investigated for its in vitro DNA-damaging effect in calf thymus DNA and human peripheral lymphocytes. An aqueous turmeric component--Aq.T--with an established antioxidant activity, was tested as a DNA protectant. TDS induced 13-fold damage to calf thymus DNA as judged by the emergence of a DNA damage specific, fluorescent product (em: 405 nm). Aq.T at 800 ng/microL extended 69% protection to calf thymus DNA and was comparable to the other protectants such as curcumin, BHA, vitamin E, SOD, and CAT. In human peripheral lymphocytes, TDS induced extensive DNA damage in comparison with the tumor promoter TPA, as judged by FADU. Aq.T at 300 ng/microL extended 90% protection to human lymphocyte DNA against TDS-induced damage, and was more effective than the other protectants--DABCO, D-mannitol, sodium benzoate, vitamin E (ROS quenchers), SOD, CAT (antioxidant enzymes), tannic acid, flufenamic acid, BHA, BHT, n-PG, curcumin and quercetin (antioxidants). Aq.T offered 65% protection to human lymphocyte DNA against TPA-induced damage and was comparable to SOD. The above results indicate that TDS induces substantial DNA damage in calf thymus DNA and human lymphocytes and Aq.T is an efficient protectant.

  19. Determination of possible damage/degradation of the Sandia National Laboratories Personal Nuclear Accident Dosimeter (PNAD).

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Charles Augustus; Ward, Dann C.

    2008-05-01

    This report describes the results of an inspection performed on the existing stock of SNL Personal Nuclear Accident Dosimeters (PNADs). The current stock is approximately 20 years old, and has not been examined since their initial acceptance. A small random sample of PNADs were opened (a destructive process) and the contents visually examined. Sample contents were not degraded and indicate that the existing stock of SNL PNADs is acceptable for continued use.

  20. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents. A status report, 1982--1983

    SciTech Connect

    Forester, J.A.; Mitchell, D.B.; Whitehead, D.W.

    1997-04-01

    This study is a continuation of earlier work that evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1994 events affecting commercial light-water reactors. One-hundred nine operational events that affected 51 reactors during 1982 and 1983 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer screening the 1982-83 licensee event reports from commercial light-water reactors to select events that could be precursors to core damage. Candidates underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. This report discusses the general rationale for the study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  1. 22 CFR 102.13 - Protective services with respect to deceased victims of accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... victims of accidents. 102.13 Section 102.13 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ECONOMIC AND OTHER... to deceased victims of accidents. (a) Interim disposition of remains. Generally, local authorities will assume custody of the remains of deceased victims of the accident and consign them to a...

  2. Injuries from traffic accidents and use of protection equipment in the Brazilian population, according to a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Andrade, Silvânia Suely Caribé de Araújo; Gomes, Nayara; da Silva, Marta Maria Alves; de Morais Neto, Otaliba Libânio; dos Reis, Ademar Arthur Chioro; Nardi, Antônio Carlos Figueiredo

    2016-02-01

    The article aims to describe the injuries in traffic according to demographic characteristics, use of protective equipment, use of health services, activity limitations and disabilities. The percentage involvement in traffic accidents with injuries, the percentage of use of protective equipment, use of health services, limitation of daily activities, disability and sequelae, according to educational level, race, color, sex, age and region of residence it estimated.The use of safety belt in the adult population was 79.4%and 50.2% in the front seats and back, respectively; the helmet use among motorcycle drivers and passengers were respectively 83.4 and 80.1. Safety equipment are less used in the North and Northeast and in the countryside. Reported car accident last month 3.1%, being higher in males 4.5%, the people of complete primary schooling and School graduate, young adult and the brown race-color. Among the injured received some form of health care due to this accident 52.4%, were admitted 7.7%. They reported having had limitation of daily activities, disabilities and consequences arising from traffic accidents 14.1%. Car accidents are high in the country. PMID:26910148

  3. Metal Oxide Silicon /MOS/ transistors protected from destructive damage by wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.; Devine, E. J.

    1966-01-01

    Loop of flexible, small diameter, nickel wire protects metal oxide silicon /MOS/ transistors from a damaging electrostatic potential. The wire is attached to a music-wire spring, slipped over the MOS transistor case, and released so the spring tensions the wire loop around all the transistor leads, shorting them together. This allows handling without danger of damage.

  4. Protection of radiation detectors from fast neutron damage

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.

    1984-01-30

    A circuit for biasing a solid state crystal used as a radiation detector in which the passage of the initial gamma ray pulse from the explosion of a nearby tactical nuclear weapon is utilized to temporarily remove the bias from said crystal for a time sufficient to permit the fast neutron pulse from the same explosion to pass by without permanently damaging the counter crystal. The circuit comprises an RC circuit between the bias supply and the crystal with a reverse biased diode across the capacitor.

  5. Caryocar brasiliense camb protects against genomic and oxidative damage in urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, N.B.R.; Rangel, M.P.; Martins, V.; Hage, M.; Gelain, D.P.; Barbeiro, D.F.; Grisolia, C.K.; Parra, E.R.; Capelozzi, V.L.

    2015-01-01

    The antioxidant effects of Caryocar brasiliense Camb, commonly known as the pequi fruit, have not been evaluated to determine their protective effects against oxidative damage in lung carcinogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated the role of pequi fruit against urethane-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress in forty 8-12 week old male BALB/C mice. An in vivo comet assay was performed to assess DNA damage in lung tissues and changes in lipid peroxidation and redox cycle antioxidants were monitored for oxidative stress. Prior supplementation with pequi oil or its extract (15 µL, 60 days) significantly reduced urethane-induced oxidative stress. A protective effect against DNA damage was associated with the modulation of lipid peroxidation and low protein and gene expression of nitric oxide synthase. These findings suggest that the intake of pequi fruit might protect against in vivo genotoxicity and oxidative stress. PMID:26200231

  6. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 22: Appendix I

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. |

    1995-12-01

    Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

  7. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1995 A status report

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    Ten operational events that affected 10 commercial light-water reactors during 1995 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 x 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by first computer-screening the 1995 licensee event reports from commercial light-water reactors to identify those events that could potentially be precursors. Candidate precursors were selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969-1981 and 1984-1994 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for the events.

  8. Topical vitamin C protects porcine skin from ultraviolet radiation-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Darr, D; Combs, S; Dunston, S; Manning, T; Pinnell, S

    1992-09-01

    Ultraviolet radiation damage to the skin is due, in part, to the generation of reactive oxygen species. Vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) functions as a biological co-factor and antioxidant due to its reducing properties. Topical application of vitamin C has been shown to elevate significantly cutaneous levels of this vitamin in pigs, and this correlates with protection of the skin from UVB damage as measured by erythema and sunburn cell formation. This protection is biological and due to the reducing properties of the molecule. Further, we provide evidence that the vitamin C levels of the skin can be severely depleted after UV irradiation, which would lower this organ's innate protective mechanism as well as leaving it at risk of impaired healing after photoinduced damage. In addition, vitamin C protects porcine skin from UVA-mediated phototoxic reactions (PUVA) and therefore shows promise as a broad-spectrum photoprotectant. PMID:1390169

  9. The Protection of China's Ancient Cities from Flood Damage.

    PubMed

    Qingzhou, W

    1989-09-01

    Over many centuries, the repeated and serious flooding of many of China's ancient cities has led to the development of various measures to mitigate the impact of floods. These have included structural measures, such as the construction of walls, dams and dykes, with tree planting for soil consolidation; installation of drainage systems and water storage capacity; the raising of settlement levels and the strengthening of building materials. Non-structural measures include warning systems and planning for emergency evacuation. Urban planning and architectural design have evolved to reduce flood damage, and government officials have been appointed with specific responsibilities for managing the flood control systems. In view of the serious consequences of modern neglect of these well-tried methods, this paper examines China's historical experience of flooding and demonstrates its continuing relevance for today. A brief historical survey is followed by a detailed discussion of various flood prevention measures. The paper is illustrated by city plans from ancient local chronicles. PMID:20958678

  10. Oxidant conditioning protects cartilage from mechanically induced damage.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Prem; Hecht, Benjamin A; Pedersen, Douglas R; Lavery, Matthew R; Maynard, Jerry; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Martin, James A

    2010-07-01

    Articular cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis has been linked to abnormal mechanical stresses that are known to cause chondrocyte apoptosis and metabolic derangement in in vitro models. Evidence implicating oxidative damage as the immediate cause of these harmful effects suggests that the antioxidant defenses of chondrocytes might influence their tolerance for mechanical injury. Based on evidence that antioxidant defenses in many cell types are stimulated by moderate oxidant exposure, we hypothesized that oxidant preconditioning would reduce acute chondrocyte death and proteoglycan depletion in cartilage explants after exposure to abnormal mechanical stresses. Porcine cartilage explants were treated every 48 h with tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide (tBHP) at nonlethal concentrations (25, 100, 250, and 500 microM) for a varying number of times (one, two, or four) prior to a bout of unconfined axial compression (5 MPa, 1 Hz, 1800 cycles). When compared with untreated controls, tBHP had significant positive effects on post-compression viability, lactate production, and proteoglycan losses. Overall, the most effective regime was 100 microM tBHP applied four times. RNA analysis revealed significant effects of 100 microM tBHP on gene expression. Catalase, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), and glyceraldehyde 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were significantly increased relative to untreated controls in explants treated four times with 100 microM tBHP, a regime that also resulted in a significant decrease in matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) expression. These findings demonstrate that repeated exposure of cartilage to sublethal concentrations of peroxide can moderate the acute effects of mechanical stress, a conclusion supported by evidence of peroxide-induced changes in gene expression that could render chondrocytes more resistant to oxidative damage. PMID:20058262

  11. Effective protection of biological membranes against photo-oxidative damage: Polymeric antioxidant forming a protecting shield over the membrane.

    PubMed

    Mertins, Omar; Mathews, Patrick D; Gomide, Andreza B; Baptista, Mauricio S; Itri, Rosangela

    2015-10-01

    We have prepared a chitosan polymer modified with gallic acid in order to develop an efficient protection strategy biological membranes against photodamage. Lipid bilayers were challenged with photoinduced damage by photosensitization with methylene blue, which usually causes formation of hydroperoxides, increasing area per lipid, and afterwards allowing leakage of internal materials. The damage was delayed by a solution of gallic acid in a concentration dependent manner, but further suppressed by the polymer at very low concentrations. The membrane of giant unilamellar vesicles was covered with this modified macromolecule leading to a powerful shield against singlet oxygen and thus effectively protecting the lipid membrane from oxidative stress. The results have proven the discovery of a promising strategy for photo protection of biological membranes. PMID:26055894

  12. Treatment with spermidine protects chrysanthemum seedlings against salinity stress damage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Naiyuan; Shi, Xiaomeng; Guan, Zhiyong; Zhao, Shuang; Zhang, Fei; Chen, Sumei; Fang, Weiming; Chen, Fadi

    2016-08-01

    Salinity-stressed plants of salinity sensitive ('Qx096') and tolerant ('Qx097') chrysanthemum cultivar were treated with a range of concentrations of spermidine (Spd). Plant performance, as indicated by various parameters associated with growth, was improved by the treatment, as was the tissue content of soluble protein and proline. The extent of both Na(+) accumulation and K(+) loss was reduced. Activity levels of the stress-related enzymes SOD, POD, APX and CAT were significantly increased and the production of malondialdehyde (MDA) decreased. The suggestion was that treatment with 1.5 mM Spd would be an effective means alleviating salinity-stress induced injury through its positive effect on photosynthetic efficiency, reactive oxygen species scavenging ability and the control of ionic balance and osmotic potential. Its protective capacity was more apparent in 'Qx096' than in 'Qx097'. PMID:27173095

  13. Lipopolysaccharide hyporesponsiveness: protective or damaging response to the brain?

    PubMed

    Pardon, Marie Christine

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxins are widely used as experimental models of systemic bacterial infection and trigger robust inflammation by potently activating toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4) expressed on innate immune cells. Their ability to trigger robust neuroinflammation despite poor brain penetration can prove useful for the understanding of how inflammation induced by viral infections contributes to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. A single LPS challenge often result in a blunted inflammatory response to subsequent stimulation by LPS and other TLR ligands, but the extent to which endotoxin tolerance occur in the brain requires further clarification. LPS is also thought to render the brain transiently resistant to subsequent brain injuries by attenuating the concomitant pro-inflammatory response. While LPS hyporesponsiveness and preconditioning are classically seen as protective mechanisms limiting the toxic effects of sustained inflammation, recent research casts doubt as to whether they have beneficial or detrimental roles on the brain and in neurodegenerative disease. These observations suggest that spatio-temporal aspects of the immune responses to LPS and the disease status are determinant factors. Endotoxin tolerance may lead to a late pro-inflammatory response with potential harmful consequences. And while reduced TLR4 signaling reduces the risk of neurodegenerative diseases, up-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines associated with LPS hyporesponsiveness can have deleterious consequences to the brain by inhibiting the protective phenotype of microglia, aggravating the progression of some neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. Beneficial effects of LPS preconditioning, however appear to require a stimulation of anti-inflammatory mediators rather than an attenuation of the pro-inflammatory response. PMID:26662122

  14. [Medico-criminal examination of damages to clothes in flight accidents].

    PubMed

    Zviagin, V N; Alpatov, I M

    2005-01-01

    Examination of cloths is a permanent sphere in the practice of forensic-medical expert and an indispensable expertise stage providing for decision-making on the key issues set before the expert. Although, the examination of cloth in forensic-medical expertise has been productive, research in this field slowed down during the recent decades; definition of new sets of evident informative signs has been also suspended. The methodological potentialities of examination of cloths items were demonstrated by examples of aviation incidents because such incidents reflect the principle variations of impacts, i.e. blow, explosion, fire, compression and chemical factors etc., which are subject to examination in the forensic-medical practice. Identification of mechanism causing damage and other signs on cloths helps a lot the forensic-medical expert in solving quite a number of issues related with circumstances of an incident and with a nature of an impact encountered by a person. PMID:15881138

  15. G6PD protects from oxidative damage and improves healthspan in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nóbrega-Pereira, Sandrina; Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J.; Brioche, Thomas; Gomez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Salvador-Pascual, Andrea; Flores, Juana M.; Viña, Jose; Serrano, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are constantly generated by cells and ROS-derived damage contributes to ageing. Protection against oxidative damage largely relies on the reductive power of NAPDH, whose levels are mostly determined by the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD). Here, we report a transgenic mouse model with moderate overexpression of human G6PD under its endogenous promoter. Importantly, G6PD-Tg mice have higher levels of NADPH, lower levels of ROS-derived damage, and better protection from ageing-associated functional decline, including extended median lifespan in females. The G6PD transgene has no effect on tumour development, even after combining with various tumour-prone genetic alterations. We conclude that a modest increase in G6PD activity is beneficial for healthspan through increased NADPH levels and protection from the deleterious effects of ROS. PMID:26976705

  16. Present concept on current water protection and remediation activities for the areas contaminated by the 1986 Chernobyl accident

    SciTech Connect

    Voitsekhovitch, O.; Prister, B.; Nasvit, O.; Los, I.; Berkovski, V.

    1996-07-01

    The results of radiation monitoring data and migration pathway analysis of water bodies within areas affected by the 1986 Chernobyl accident provide a unique opportunity for decision-makers working in other extensively contaminated regions to optimize their approaches to surface and groundwater protection. Most engineering measures within the Chernobyl 30-km exclusion zone were focused on preventing secondary contamination of surface and groundwater from entering the Pripyat River and the Kiev Reservoir. However, implementation of these measures required huge financial and human resources. Therefore, lessons about post-accidental water protection activities can be learned form the Chernobyl example. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Present concept on current water protection and remediation activities for the areas contaminated by the 1986 Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Voitsekhovitch, O; Prister, B; Nasvit, O; Los, I; Berkovski, V

    1996-07-01

    The results of radiation monitoring data and migration pathway analysis of water bodies within areas affected by the 1986 Chernobyl accident provide a unique opportunity for decision-makers working in other extensively contaminated regions to optimize their approaches to surface and groundwater protection. Most engineering measures within the Chernobyl 30-km exclusion zone were focused on preventing secondary contamination of surface and groundwater from entering the Pripyat River and the Kiev Reservoir. However, implementation of these measures required huge financial and human resources. Therefore, lessons about post-accidental water protection activities can be learned from the Chernobyl example. PMID:8655324

  18. Eccentric localization of catalase to protect chromosomes from oxidative damages during meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Seok; You, Seung Yeop; Cho, Sungrae; Jeon, Hyuk-Joon; Lee, Sukchan; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Jeong Su

    2016-09-01

    The maintenance of genomic integrity and stability is essential for the survival of every organism. Unfortunately, DNA is vulnerable to attack by a variety of damaging agents. Oxidative stress is a major cause of DNA damage because reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced as by-products of normal cellular metabolism. Cells have developed eloquent antioxidant defense systems to protect themselves from oxidative damage along with aerobic metabolism. Here, we show that catalase (CAT) is present in mouse oocytes to protect the genome from oxidative damage during meiotic maturation. CAT was expressed in the nucleus to form unique vesicular structures. However, after nuclear envelope breakdown, CAT was redistributed in the cytoplasm with particular focus at the chromosomes. Inhibition of CAT activity increased endogenous ROS levels, but did not perturb meiotic maturation. In addition, CAT inhibition produced chromosomal defects, including chromosome misalignment and DNA damage. Therefore, our data suggest that CAT is required not only to scavenge ROS, but also to protect DNA from oxidative damage during meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes. PMID:27160095

  19. Protective effect of calcium folinate against methotrexate-induced endosalpinx damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Yan-Ping; Wang, Han-Chu; Zhao, Jing; Zheng, Fei-Yun

    2011-03-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of calcium folinate (CF) applied in 10% of the methotrexate (MTX) dosage against morphologic and steroid-receptor damage induced by MTX in rat endosalpinx. The result indicated that endosalpingitis, the ultrastructural damage of endosalpinx, and a change in estrogen and P receptor expression induced by low- and high-dose MTX in endosalpinx can be reversed completely and partly (B1, B2) by combined treatment with CF, suggesting that CF combined with MTX protects against the side effects induced by MTX. PMID:20869049

  20. Zinc protects HepG2 cells against the oxidative damage and DNA damage induced by ochratoxin A

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Juanjuan; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Wentao; Luo, YunBo; Hao, Junran; Shen, Xiao Li; Yang, Xuan; Li, Xiaohong; Huang, Kunlun

    2013-04-15

    Oxidative stress and DNA damage are the most studied mechanisms by which ochratoxin A (OTA) induces its toxic effects, which include nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity and genotoxicity. Zinc, which is an essential trace element, is considered a potential antioxidant. The aim of this paper was to investigate whether zinc supplement could inhibit OTA-induced oxidative damage and DNA damage in HepG2 cells and the mechanism of inhibition. The results indicated that that exposure of OTA decreased the intracellular zinc concentration; zinc supplement significantly reduced the OTA-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity but did not affect the OTA-induced decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}). Meanwhile, the addition of the zinc chelator N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) strongly aggravated the OTA-induced oxidative damage. This study also demonstrated that zinc helped to maintain the integrity of DNA through the reduction of OTA-induced DNA strand breaks, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation and DNA hypomethylation. OTA increased the mRNA expression of metallothionein1-A (MT1A), metallothionein2-A (MT2A) and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Zinc supplement further enhanced the mRNA expression of MT1A and MT2A, but it had no effect on the mRNA expression of SOD1 and catalase (CAT). Zinc was for the first time proven to reduce the cytotoxicity of OTA through inhibiting the oxidative damage and DNA damage, and regulating the expression of zinc-associated genes. Thus, the addition of zinc can potentially be used to reduce the OTA toxicity of contaminated feeds. - Highlights: ► OTA decreased the intracellular zinc concentration. ► OTA induced the formation of 8-OHdG in HepG2 cells. ► It was testified for the first time that OTA induced DNA hypomethylation. ► Zinc protects against the oxidative damage and DNA damage induced by

  1. The protection of RIVERLIFE by mitigation of flood damages RIVERLIFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, M. J.

    2003-04-01

    The long-term development objective of the RIVERLIFE project is to contribute to sustainable human end economic development in the Timis-Bega river basin area as part of the Danube River Basin (DRB), through reinforcing the capacities of Romanian central and local authorities to develop effective mechanisms and tools for integrated river basin management in the Timis-Bega basin. The overall objective of the project is to assist the country in the EU enlargement and accession process to meet the EU requirements of water related Directives with emphasis on the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD). The specific objective of the project is to support the WFD implementation process at the level of a sub-unit within the limits of the DRB, through the development of a River Basin Management Plan (RBMP). The project will also facilitate the implementation of the Danube River Protection Convention (DRPC) as an essential element in the implementation of the Directive in the transboundary river basins. Expected outcomes in the recipient country consist of (i) responding to a real hazard problem, which affects the quality of life of many citizens, and (ii) improvement in the environmental conditions in the targeted areas. Flooding is one of the major natural hazards to human society and an important influence on social and economic development for Romania causing financially greater losses per annum on average than any other natural hazard. One key concept of the WFD is the coordination, organization and regulation of water management at the level of river basins. Therefore, river basin districts are shaped in such a way as to include not only the surface run-off through streams and rivers to the sea, but the total area of land and sea together with the associated groundwater and coastal waters. The concept allows even for the small river basins directly discharging into the sea to be combined into one river basin district. As a principle, the complex decisions on the use or

  2. Investigation of Stinson Beach Park storm damage and evaluation of alternative shore protection measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, R.M.; Whelan, G.

    1984-07-01

    An investigation was made of storm damage during the winter of 1982-83 to the National Park Service's Stinson Beach Park. The investigation included an assessment of the storm damage, evaluation of physical processes contributing to the damage, subsequent beach recovery, and the feasibility of implementing shoreline protection measure to reduce future risk. During the winter of 1982-83, the beach was almost completely denuded of sand, wave overwash damaged the foredune, vegetation on the foredune was destroyed, and backshore flooding occurred. Two structures and a parking lot were endangered as the shoreline receded. Subsequent recovery of the park beach was rapid. By January 1982 sand had moved back onshore and a beach berm was beginning to reform. The foredune and dune vegetation received the only permanent damage. Four shoreline protection alternatives were evaluated. These include no action, dune development/enhancement, construction of a rock riprap revetment, and offshore installation of artificial seaweed. The first costs (estimated costs, excluding maintenance) range from about $90,000 to $475,000. The least-cost protection measure is riprap revetment, which protects the two structures and parking lot endangered during the 1982-83 winter storms. Construction of a foredune along the entire park beach is the highest cost protection measure. If no shore protection action measures are implemented, wave overwash of the foredune can be expected to occur on the average of every 2 to 3 years, and beach degradation, similar to that during the 1982-83 winter, can be expected to occur on the average of every 10 to 12 years. 12 references, 19 figures, 18 tables.

  3. Characterization of Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System (TPS) Materials for Return-to-Flight following the Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Doug

    2006-01-01

    During the Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation, it was determined that a large chunk of polyurethane insulating foam (= 1.67 lbs) on the External Tank (ET) came loose during Columbia's ascent on 2-1-03. The foam piece struck some of the protective Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of Columbia's left wing in the mid-wing area. This impact damaged Columbia to the extent that upon re-entry to Earth, superheGed air approaching 3,000 F caused the vehicle to break up, killing all seven astronauts on board. A paper after the Columbia Accident Investigation highlighted thermal analysis testing performed on External Tank TPS materials (1). These materials included BX-250 (now BX-265) rigid polyurethane foam and SLA-561 Super Lightweight Ablator (highly-filled silicone rubber). The large chunk of foam from Columbia originated fiom the left bipod ramp of the ET. The foam in this ramp area was hand-sprayed over the SLA material and various fittings, allowed to dry, and manually shaved into a ramp shape. In Return-to-Flight (RTF) efforts following Columbia, the decision was made to remove the foam in the bipod ramp areas. During RTF efforts, further thermal analysis testing was performed on BX-265 foam by DSC and DMA. Flat panels of foam about 2-in. thick were sprayed on ET tank material (aluminum alloys). The DSC testing showed that foam material very close to the metal substrate cured more slowly than bulk foam material. All of the foam used on the ET is considered fully cured about 21 days after it is sprayed. The RTF culminated in the successful launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on 7-26-05. Although the flight was a success, there was another serious incident of foam loss fiom the ET during Shuttle ascent. This time, a rather large chunk of BX-265 foam (= 0.9 lbs) came loose from the liquid hydrogen (LH2) PAL ramp, although the foam did not strike the Shuttle Orbiter containing the crew. DMA testing was performed on foam samples taken fiom

  4. Protective Effects of Extracts from Fructus rhodomyrti against Oxidative DNA Damage In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Yuebin; Xu, Xinyun; Wu, Shuang; Huang, Juan; Misra, Hara; Li, Yunbo

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the potential protective effects of extracts from Fructus rhodomyrti (FR) against oxidative DNA damage using a cellular system and the antioxidant ability on potassium bromate- (KBrO3-) mediated oxidative stress in rats. Methods. The effects of FR on DNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were evaluated by comet assay in primary spleen lymphocytes cultures. The effects of FR on the activities of SOD, CAT, and GPx and the levels of GSH, hydroperoxides, and 8-OHdG were determined in the plasma and tissues of rats treated with KBrO3. Results. FR was shown to effectively protect against DNA damage induced by H2O2  in vitro, and the maximum protective effect was observed when FR was diluted 20 times. Endogenous antioxidant status, namely, the activities of SOD, CAT, and GPx and the levels of GSH were significantly decreased in the plasma, the liver, and the kidney of the KBrO3-treated rats, while the pretreatment of FR prevented the decreases of these parameters. In addition, the pretreatment of FR was also able to prevent KBrO3-induced increases in the levels of hydroperoxides and 8-OHdG in the plasma, the liver, and the kidney in rats. Conclusions. Our findings suggested that FR might act as a chemopreventive agent with antioxidant properties offering effective protection against oxidative DNA damage in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24089629

  5. Derinat Protects Skin against Ultraviolet-B (UVB)-Induced Cellular Damage.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wen-Li; Lu, Jian-He; Noda, Mami; Wu, Ching-Ying; Liu, Jia-Dai; Sakakibara, Manabu; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Yu, Hsin-Su; Lin, Ming-Wei; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Yan, Shian-Jang; Yoshioka, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UVB) is one of the most cytotoxic and mutagenic stresses that contribute to skin damage and aging through increasing intracellular Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Derinat (sodium deoxyribonucleate) has been utilized as an immunomodulator for the treatment of ROS-associated diseases in clinics. However, the molecular mechanism by which Derinat protects skin cells from UVB-induced damage is poorly understood. Here, we show that Derinat significantly attenuated UVB-induced intracellular ROS production and decreased DNA damage in primary skin cells. Furthermore, Derinat reduced intracellular ROS, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and DNA damage in the skin of the BALB/c-nu mice exposed to UVB for seven days in vivo. Importantly, Derinat blocked the transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels (TRPCs), as demonstrated by calcium imaging. Together, our results indicate that Derinat acts as a TRPCs blocker to reduce intracellular ROS production and DNA damage upon UVB irradiation. This mechanism provides a potential new application of Derinat for the protection against UVB-induced skin damage and aging. PMID:26569211

  6. Cytogenetic damage in lymphocytes for the purpose of dose reconstruction: a review of three recent radiation accidents.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, A; Gregoire, E; Hayata, I; Roy, L; Sommer, S; Stephan, G; Voisin, P

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood of radiation accident victims is an established method of biological dosimetry. The dose estimate on the basis of an in vitro calibration curve is straightforward when the radiation exposure is homogeneous and the analysis not delayed. In recent years three radiation accidents occurred, where the irradiation or sampling conditions precluded a simple estimation of the dose. During the Georgian accident soldiers carried in their pockets small sources of 137Cs leading to partial and protracted body exposures. During the Tokai-mura accident, three employees involved in the process of 235U enrichment were exposed to very high doses of gamma rays and neutrons. During the Bialystok accident, five patients with breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy were exposed to a single dose of electrons which reached about 100 Gy. In the present paper the approaches chosen to estimate, by cytogenetic methods, the doses absorbed by the people involved in the accidents are described. PMID:15162038

  7. Mitochondrial Telomerase Protects Cancer Cells from Nuclear DNA Damage and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Singhapol, Chatchawan; Pal, Deepali; Czapiewski, Rafal; Porika, Mahendar; Nelson, Glyn; Saretzki, Gabriele C.

    2013-01-01

    Most cancer cells express high levels of telomerase and proliferate indefinitely. In addition to its telomere maintenance function, telomerase also has a pro-survival function resulting in an increased resistance against DNA damage and decreased apoptosis induction. However, the molecular mechanisms for this protective function remain elusive and it is unclear whether it is connected to telomere maintenance or is rather a non-telomeric function of the telomerase protein, TERT. It was shown recently that the protein subunit of telomerase can shuttle from the nucleus to the mitochondria upon oxidative stress where it protects mitochondrial function and decreases intracellular oxidative stress. Here we show that endogenous telomerase (TERT protein) shuttles from the nucleus into mitochondria upon oxidative stress in cancer cells and analyzed the nuclear exclusion patterns of endogenous telomerase after treatment with hydrogen peroxide in different cell lines. Cell populations excluded TERT from the nucleus upon oxidative stress in a heterogeneous fashion. We found a significant correlation between nuclear localization of telomerase and high DNA damage, while cells which excluded telomerase from the nucleus displayed no or very low DNA damage. We modeled nuclear and mitochondrial telomerase using organelle specific localization vectors and confirmed that mitochondrial localization of telomerase protects the nucleus from inflicted DNA damage and apoptosis while, in contrast, nuclear localization of telomerase correlated with higher amounts of DNA damage and apoptosis. It is known that nuclear DNA damage can be caused by mitochondrially generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). We demonstrate here that mitochondrial localization of telomerase specifically prevents nuclear DNA damage by decreasing levels of mitochondrial ROS. We suggest that this decrease of oxidative stress might be a possible cause for high stress resistance of cancer cells and could be especially

  8. Fuel containment, lightning protection and damage tolerance in large composite primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Charles F.; James, Arthur M.

    1985-01-01

    The damage-tolerance characteristics of high strain-to-failure graphite fibers and toughened resins were evaluated. Test results show that conventional fuel tank sealing techniques are applicable to composite structures. Techniques were developed to prevent fuel leaks due to low-energy impact damage. For wing panels subjected to swept stroke lightning strikes, a surface protection of graphite/aluminum wire fabric and a fastener treatment proved effective in eliminating internal sparking and reducing structural damage. The technology features developed were incorporated and demonstrated in a test panel designed to meet the strength, stiffness, and damage tolerance requirements of a large commercial transport aircraft. The panel test results exceeded design requirements for all test conditions. Wing surfaces constructed with composites offer large weight savings if design allowable strains for compression can be increased from current levels.

  9. Anthracyclines Induce DNA Damage Response-Mediated Protection against Severe Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Nuno; Chora, Angelo; Raquel, Helena; Pejanovic, Nadja; Pereira, Pedro; Hartleben, Björn; Neves-Costa, Ana; Moita, Catarina; Pedroso, Dora; Pinto, Andreia; Marques, Sofia; Faridi, Hafeez; Costa, Paulo; Gozzelino, Raffaella; Zhao, Jimmy L.; Soares, Miguel P.; Gama-Carvalho, Margarida; Martinez, Jennifer; Zhang, Qingshuo; Döring, Gerd; Grompe, Markus; Simas, J. Pedro; Huber, Tobias B.; Baltimore, David; Gupta, Vineet; Green, Douglas R.; Ferreira, João A.; Moita, Luis F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Severe sepsis remains a poorly understood systemic inflammatory condition with high mortality rates and limited therapeutic options in addition to organ support measures. Here we show that the clinically approved group of anthracyclines acts therapeutically at a low dose regimen to confer robust protection against severe sepsis in mice. This salutary effect is strictly dependent on the activation of DNA damage response and autophagy pathways in the lung, as demonstrated by deletion of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) or the autophagy-related protein 7 (Atg7) specifically in this organ. The protective effect of anthracyclines occurs irrespectively of pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to severe sepsis. These findings demonstrate that DNA damage responses, including the ATM and Fancony Anemia pathways, are important modulators of immune responses and might be exploited to confer protection to inflammation-driven conditions, including severe sepsis. PMID:24184056

  10. Anthracyclines induce DNA damage response-mediated protection against severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Nuno; Chora, Angelo; Raquel, Helena; Pejanovic, Nadja; Pereira, Pedro; Hartleben, Björn; Neves-Costa, Ana; Moita, Catarina; Pedroso, Dora; Pinto, Andreia; Marques, Sofia; Faridi, Hafeez; Costa, Paulo; Gozzelino, Raffaella; Zhao, Jimmy L; Soares, Miguel P; Gama-Carvalho, Margarida; Martinez, Jennifer; Zhang, Qingshuo; Döring, Gerd; Grompe, Markus; Simas, J Pedro; Huber, Tobias B; Baltimore, David; Gupta, Vineet; Green, Douglas R; Ferreira, João A; Moita, Luis F

    2013-11-14

    Severe sepsis remains a poorly understood systemic inflammatory condition with high mortality rates and limited therapeutic options in addition to organ support measures. Here we show that the clinically approved group of anthracyclines acts therapeutically at a low dose regimen to confer robust protection against severe sepsis in mice. This salutary effect is strictly dependent on the activation of DNA damage response and autophagy pathways in the lung, as demonstrated by deletion of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) or the autophagy-related protein 7 (Atg7) specifically in this organ. The protective effect of anthracyclines occurs irrespectively of pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to severe sepsis. These findings demonstrate that DNA damage responses, including the ATM and Fanconi Anemia pathways, are important modulators of immune responses and might be exploited to confer protection to inflammation-driven conditions, including severe sepsis. PMID:24184056

  11. 77 FR 45417 - Pipeline Safety: Inspection and Protection of Pipeline Facilities After Railway Accidents

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... either during a railroad accident or other event occurring in the right-of-way. Further, the advisory... to identify and notify underground utilities that an incident has occurred in the vicinity of their... emergency communication procedures. At the site of the derailment was a 12-inch diameter underground...

  12. Molecular marker approaches for tracking redox damage and protection in keratins.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Jolon M; Cornellison, Charisa D; Grosvenor, Anita J; Clerens, Stefan; Deb-Choudhury, Santanu

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing awareness of the importance of reductive and oxidative (redox) protein damage in protein-based materials including, hair, wool, nails, and skin. Light-induced damage to protein-based materials is of particular concern because of its impact on age-related degradation and product life spans. Consequently, cosmetic applications frequently target hair and skin restoration, where the integrity of the constituent filamentous proteins is essential to a healthy appearance. The keratins constitute an important subset of the structural proteins within skin, hair, and wool. We will introduce a means to assess damage to this important group of proteins at the molecular level, utilizing proteomic techniques to track the formation or degradation of sensitive peptides within intermediate filament proteins. The degradation of three molecular markers of redox damage, the peptides SFGYR, LASDDFR, and DVEEWYIR, along with the formation of their oxidized products, is demonstrated after exposure to ultraviolet A, ultraviolet B, and blue light. The method is shown to be suitable for evaluating the protective effect of treatments, as lower levels of oxidative markers were observed after the application of a protective fiber treatment. Molecular-level redox tracking will allow more targeted design and evaluation of protection and repair treatments for protein systems. PMID:24602820

  13. Mcl-1 protects prostate cancer cells from cell death mediated by chemotherapy-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Teresita; de Las Pozas, Alicia; Parrondo, Ricardo; Palenzuela, Deanna; Cayuso, William; Rai, Priyamvada; Perez-Stable, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 is highly expressed in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), resulting in resistance to apoptosis and association with poor prognosis. Although predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, there is evidence that Mcl-1 exhibits nuclear localization where it is thought to protect against DNA damage-induced cell death. The role of Mcl-1 in mediating resistance to chemotherapy-induced DNA damage in prostate cancer (PCa) is not known. We show in human PCa cell lines and in TRAMP, a transgenic mouse model of PCa, that the combination of the antimitotic agent ENMD-1198 (analog of 2-methoxyestradiol) with betulinic acid (BA, increases proteotoxic stress) targets Mcl-1 by increasing its proteasomal degradation, resulting in increased γH2AX (DNA damage) and apoptotic/necrotic cell death. Knockdown of Mcl-1 in CRPC cells leads to elevated γH2AX, DNA strand breaks, and cell death after treatment with 1198 + BA- or doxorubicin. Additional knockdowns in PC3 cells suggests that cytoplasmic Mcl-1 protects against DNA damage by blocking the mitochondrial release of apoptosis-inducing factor and thereby preventing its nuclear translocation and subsequent interaction with the cyclophilin A endonuclease. Overall, our results suggest that chemotherapeutic agents that target Mcl-1 will promote cell death in response to DNA damage, particularly in CRPC. PMID:26425662

  14. Protecting the radiation-damaged skin from friction: a mini review

    SciTech Connect

    Herst, Patries M

    2014-06-15

    Radiation-induced skin reactions are an unavoidable side effect of external beam radiation therapy, particularly in areas prone to friction and excess moisture such as the axilla, head and neck region, perineum and skin folds. Clinical studies investigating interventions for preventing or managing these reactions have largely focussed on formulations with moisturising, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and wound healing properties. However, none of these interventions has emerged as a consistent candidate for best practice. Much less emphasis has been placed on evaluating ways to protect the radiation-damaged skin from friction and excess moisture. This mini review analyses the clinical evidence for barrier products that form a protective layer by adhering very closely to the skin folds and do not cause further trauma to the radiation-damaged skin upon removal. A database search identified only two types of barrier products that fitted these criteria and these were tested in two case series and six controlled clinical trials. Friction protection was most effective when the interventions were used from the start of treatment and continued for several weeks after completion of treatment. Soft silicone dressings (Mepilex Lite and Mepitel Film) and Cavilon No Sting Barrier Film, but not Cavilon Moisturizing Barrier Cream, decreased skin reaction severity, most likely due to differences in formulation and skin build-up properties. It seems that prophylactic use of friction protection of areas at risk could be a worthwhile addition to routine care of radiation-damaged skin.

  15. Protecting the radiation-damaged skin from friction: a mini review

    PubMed Central

    Herst, Patries M

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced skin reactions are an unavoidable side effect of external beam radiation therapy, particularly in areas prone to friction and excess moisture such as the axilla, head and neck region, perineum and skin folds. Clinical studies investigating interventions for preventing or managing these reactions have largely focussed on formulations with moisturising, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and wound healing properties. However, none of these interventions has emerged as a consistent candidate for best practice. Much less emphasis has been placed on evaluating ways to protect the radiation-damaged skin from friction and excess moisture. This mini review analyses the clinical evidence for barrier products that form a protective layer by adhering very closely to the skin folds and do not cause further trauma to the radiation-damaged skin upon removal. A database search identified only two types of barrier products that fitted these criteria and these were tested in two case series and six controlled clinical trials. Friction protection was most effective when the interventions were used from the start of treatment and continued for several weeks after completion of treatment. Soft silicone dressings (Mepilex Lite and Mepitel Film) and Cavilon No Sting Barrier Film, but not Cavilon Moisturizing Barrier Cream, decreased skin reaction severity, most likely due to differences in formulation and skin build-up properties. It seems that prophylactic use of friction protection of areas at risk could be a worthwhile addition to routine care of radiation-damaged skin. PMID:26229646

  16. Protecting the radiation-damaged skin from friction: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Herst, Patries M

    2014-06-01

    Radiation-induced skin reactions are an unavoidable side effect of external beam radiation therapy, particularly in areas prone to friction and excess moisture such as the axilla, head and neck region, perineum and skin folds. Clinical studies investigating interventions for preventing or managing these reactions have largely focussed on formulations with moisturising, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and wound healing properties. However, none of these interventions has emerged as a consistent candidate for best practice. Much less emphasis has been placed on evaluating ways to protect the radiation-damaged skin from friction and excess moisture. This mini review analyses the clinical evidence for barrier products that form a protective layer by adhering very closely to the skin folds and do not cause further trauma to the radiation-damaged skin upon removal. A database search identified only two types of barrier products that fitted these criteria and these were tested in two case series and six controlled clinical trials. Friction protection was most effective when the interventions were used from the start of treatment and continued for several weeks after completion of treatment. Soft silicone dressings (Mepilex Lite and Mepitel Film) and Cavilon No Sting Barrier Film, but not Cavilon Moisturizing Barrier Cream, decreased skin reaction severity, most likely due to differences in formulation and skin build-up properties. It seems that prophylactic use of friction protection of areas at risk could be a worthwhile addition to routine care of radiation-damaged skin. PMID:26229646

  17. Oxidative stress diverts tRNA synthetase to nucleus for protection against DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Wei, Na; Shi, Yi; Truong, Lan N; Fisch, Kathleen M; Xu, Tao; Gardiner, Elisabeth; Fu, Guangsen; Hsu, Yun-Shiuan Olivia; Kishi, Shuji; Su, Andrew I; Wu, Xiaohua; Yang, Xiang-Lei

    2014-10-23

    Tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) is known for its essential aminoacylation function in protein synthesis. Here we report a function for TyrRS in DNA damage protection. We found that oxidative stress, which often downregulates protein synthesis, induces TyrRS to rapidly translocate from the cytosol to the nucleus. We also found that angiogenin mediates or potentiates this stress-induced translocalization. The nuclear-localized TyrRS activates transcription factor E2F1 to upregulate the expression of DNA damage repair genes such as BRCA1 and RAD51. The activation is achieved through direct interaction of TyrRS with TRIM28 to sequester this vertebrate-specific epigenetic repressor and its associated HDAC1 from deacetylating and suppressing E2F1. Remarkably, overexpression of TyrRS strongly protects against UV-induced DNA double-strand breaks in zebrafish, whereas restricting TyrRS nuclear entry completely abolishes the protection. Therefore, oxidative stress triggers an essential cytoplasmic enzyme used for protein synthesis to translocate to the nucleus to protect against DNA damage. PMID:25284223

  18. Superoxide Dismutase 1 Protects Hepatocytes from Type I Interferon-Driven Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Anannya; Hegazy, Ahmed N.; Deigendesch, Nikolaus; Kosack, Lindsay; Cupovic, Jovana; Kandasamy, Richard K.; Hildebrandt, Andrea; Merkler, Doron; Kühl, Anja A.; Vilagos, Bojan; Schliehe, Christopher; Panse, Isabel; Khamina, Kseniya; Baazim, Hatoon; Arnold, Isabelle; Flatz, Lukas; Xu, Haifeng C.; Lang, Philipp A.; Aderem, Alan; Takaoka, Akinori; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Colinge, Jacques; Ludewig, Burkhard; Löhning, Max; Bergthaler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tissue damage caused by viral hepatitis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Using a mouse model of viral hepatitis, we identified virus-induced early transcriptional changes in the redox pathways in the liver, including downregulation of superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1). Sod1−/− mice exhibited increased inflammation and aggravated liver damage upon viral infection, which was independent of T and NK cells and could be ameliorated by antioxidant treatment. Type I interferon (IFN-I) led to a downregulation of Sod1 and caused oxidative liver damage in Sod1−/− and wild-type mice. Genetic and pharmacological ablation of the IFN-I signaling pathway protected against virus-induced liver damage. These results delineate IFN-I mediated oxidative stress as a key mediator of virus-induced liver damage and describe a mechanism of innate-immunity-driven pathology, linking IFN-I signaling with antioxidant host defense and infection-associated tissue damage. Video Abstract PMID:26588782

  19. Can spin trapping compounds like PBN protect against self-inflicted damage in polymorphonuclear leukocytes?

    PubMed

    Seawright, L; Tanigawa, M; Tanigawa, T; Kotake, Y; Janzen, E G

    1995-07-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) have been suggested to be damaged by superoxide radical generated on their own. The protective capacity of a spin trapping compound, phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN) was evaluated for this damage which occurs after the induction of superoxide generation. The life span of PMNs after superoxide generation was measured in the presence of PBN using the cell counting method, and effects of PBN on the amount of superoxide generated were quantitated using both cytochrome c reduction and spin trapping with DMPO. Results indicated significant extension of life span when PBN was present, and the extension was dose dependent. However, the magnitude of life span extension was not as large as expected from the decrease of superoxide generation. Possible mechanisms for the protection of PMNs by PBN are discussed. PMID:7647921

  20. Borate protection of softwood from Coptotermes acinaciformis (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) damage: variation in protection thresholds explained.

    PubMed

    Peters, Brenton C; Fitzgerald, Christopher J

    2006-10-01

    Laboratory and field data reported in the literature are confusing with regard to "adequate" protection thresholds for borate timber preservatives. The confusion is compounded by differences in termite species, timber species and test methodology. Laboratory data indicate a borate retention of 0.5% mass/mass (m/m) boric acid equivalent (BAE) would cause > 90% termite mortality and restrict mass loss in test specimens to < or = 5%. Field data generally suggest that borate retentions appreciably > 0.5% m/m BAE are required. We report two field experiments with varying amounts of untreated feeder material in which Coptotermes acinaciformis (Froggatt) (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) responses to borate-treated radiata (Monterey) pine, Pinus radiata D. Don, were measured. The apparently conflicting results between laboratory and field data are explained by the presence or absence of untreated feeder material in the test environment. In the absence of untreated feeder material, wood containing 0.5% BAE provided adequate protection from Coptotermes sp., whereas in the presence of untreated feeder material, increased retentions were required. Furthermore, the retentions required increased with increased amounts of susceptible material present. Some termites, Nasutitermes sp. and Mastotermes darwiniensis Froggatt, for example, are borate-tolerant and borate timber preservatives are not a viable management option with these species. The lack of uniform standards for termite test methodology and assessment criteria for efficacy across the world is recognized as a difficulty with research into the performance of timber preservatives with termites. The many variables in laboratory and field assays make "prescriptive" standards difficult to recommend. The use of "performance" standards to define efficacy criteria ("adequate" protection) is discussed. PMID:17066808

  1. Ascorbic acid protects lipids in human plasma and low-density lipoprotein against oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, B. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors exposed human blood plasma and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to many different oxidative challenges and followed the temporal consumption of endogenous antioxidants in relation to the initiation of oxidative damage. Under all types of oxidizing conditions, ascorbic acid completely protects lipids in plasma and LDL against detectable peroxidative damage as assessed by a specific and highly sensitive assay for lipid peroxidation. Ascorbic acid proved to be superior to the other water-soluble plasma antioxidants bilirubin, uric acid, and protein thiols as well as to the lipoprotein-associated antioxidants alpha-tocopherol, ubiquinol-10, lycopene, and beta-carotene. Although these antioxidants can lower the rate of detectable lipid peroxidation, they are not able to prevent its initiation. Only ascorbic acid is reactive enough to effectively intercept oxidants in the aqueous phase before they can attack and cause detectable oxidative damage to lipids.

  2. Antioxidant mediated protective effect of Parthenium hysterophorus against oxidative damage using in vitro models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Parthenium hysterophorus L. (Asteraceae) is a common weed occurring throughout the globe. In traditional medicine its decoction has been used for treatment of many infectious and degenerative diseases. This work was therefore designed to assess the phytochemical constitution of P. hysterophorus flower and root extracts and to evaluate their reducing power, radical scavenging activity as well as protective efficacy against membrane lipid damage. Methods Dried flower and root samples were sequentially extracted with non-polar and polar solvents using Soxhlet apparatus. The phytochemical screening was done using standard chemical methods and thin layer chromatography. Total phenolic content was determined spectrophotometrically. Reducing power and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity assays were used to measure antioxidant activity. Protection against membrane damage was evaluated by inhibition of lipid peroxidation (TBARS assay) in rat kidney homogenate. Results Flavonoids, terpenoids, alkaloids and cardiac glycosides were present in all the extract. The total phenol contents in flower and root extracts were found to be in the range 86.69-320.17 mg propyl gallate equivalent (PGE)/g and 55.47-253.84 mg PGE/g, respectively. Comparatively better reducing power was observed in hexane fractions of flower (0.405) and root (0.282). Benzene extract of flower and ethyl acetate fraction of root accounted for appreciable hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (75-77%). Maximum protection against membrane lipid peroxidative damage among flower and root extracts was provided by ethanol (55.26%) and ethyl acetate (48.95%) fractions, respectively. Total phenolic content showed positive correlations with reducing power and lipid peroxidation inhibition (LPOI) % in floral extracts as well as with hydroxyl radical scavenging activity and LPOI % in root extracts. Conclusion Study established that phytochemicals present in P. hysterophorus extracts have considerable antioxidant

  3. Antioxidant-mediated protective effect of potato peel extract in erythrocytes against oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nandita; Rajini, P S

    2008-05-28

    Potato peels are waste by-product of the potato processing industry. They are reportedly rich in polyphenols. Our earlier studies have shown that extracts derived from potato peel (PPE) possess strong antioxidant activity in chemical and biological model systems in vitro, attributable to its polyphenolic content. The main objective of this study was to investigate the ability of PPE to protect erythrocytes against oxidative damage, in vitro. The protection rendered by PPE in erythrocytes was studied in terms of resistance to oxidative damage, morphological alterations as well as membrane structural alterations. The total polyphenolic content in PPE was found to be 3.93 mg/g powder. The major phenolic acids present in PPE were predominantly: gallic acid, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid and protocatechuic acid. We chose the experimental prooxidant system: FeSO(4) and ascorbic acid to induce lipid peroxidation in rat RBCs and human RBC membranes. PPE was found to inhibit lipid peroxidation with similar effectiveness in both the systems (about 80-85% inhibition by PPE at 2.5 mg/ml). While PPE per se did not cause any morphological alteration in the erythrocytes, under the experimental conditions, PPE significantly inhibited the H(2)O(2)-induced morphological alterations in rat RBCs as revealed by scanning electron microscopy. Further, PPE was found to offer significant protection to human erythrocyte membrane proteins from oxidative damage induced by ferrous-ascorbate. In conclusion, our results indicate that PPE is capable of protecting erythrocytes against oxidative damage probably by acting as a strong antioxidant. PMID:18452909

  4. Retinoid protection against x-ray-induced chromatid damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, K K; Parshad, R; Price, F M; Tarone, R E; Kraemer, K H

    1992-01-01

    Oral administration of isotretinoin (13-cis retinoic acid) was shown previously (Kraemer, K. H., J. J. DiGiovanna, A. N. Moshell, R. E. Tarone, and G. L. Peck. 1988. N. Engl. J. Med. 318:1633-1637) to reduce the frequency of skin cancers in xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients. The mechanism of protection was unclear. In the present study, x-ray-induced chromatid damage in PHA-stimulated blood lymphocytes from five XP patients receiving isotretinoin was approximately half that in blood samples from the same patients before or subsequent to treatment. The x-ray-induced chromatid damage in blood lymphocytes from a normal control was reduced significantly by cocultivation with blood or plasma from an XP patient receiving isotretinoin or by addition of 10(-6) M isotretinoin to cultures 1 h before x-irradiation. A similar reduction in x-ray-induced chromatid damage was reported previously by adding to the culture medium, mannitol, a scavenger of the free hydroxyl radical, or catalase, which decomposes hydrogen peroxide; both of these products are generated during ionizing radiation. The present observations suggest that isotretinoin acts as a scavenger of such radiation products, thereby providing protection against x-ray-induced chromatid damage. PMID:1430230

  5. Protective effect of diphenyl diselenide on acute liver damage induced by 2-nitropropane in rats.

    PubMed

    Borges, Lysandro P; Borges, Vanessa Corralo; Moro, Angelica Venturini; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; Rocha, Joao Batista Teixeira; Zeni, Gilson

    2005-05-15

    The effect of diphenyl diselenide, (PhSe)2, administration on 2-nitropropane (2-NP)-induced hepatic damage was examined in male rats. Rats were pre-treated with a single dose of diphenyl diselenide (10, 50 or 100 micromol/kg). Afterward, they received only one dose of 2-NP (100 mg/kg body weight dissolved in olive oil). The parameters that indicate tissue damage such as plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), creatinine and urea were determined. Since toxicity induced by 2-NP is related to oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation was also evaluated. Diphenyl diselenide (100 micromol/kg) significantly reduced plasma ALT, gamma-GGT, AFP levels when compared to 2-NP group. Treatment with diphenyl diselenide, at all doses, effectively protects the increase of lipid peroxidation when compared to 2-NP group. Histological examination revealed that 2-NP treatment causes a moderate swelling and degenerative alterations on hepatocytes and diphenyl diselenide (100 micromol/kg) protects against these alterations. Diphenyl diselenide (50 and 100 micromol/kg) significantly decreased the urea level. This study evidences the protective effect of diphenyl diselenide by 2-NP-induced acute hepatic damage. PMID:15804453

  6. Protective effects of black tea extract against oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ježovičová, Miriam; Koňariková, Katarína; Ďuračková, Zdeňka; Keresteš, Ján; Králik, Gabriel; Žitňanová, Ingrid

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the genoprotective and radioprotective effects of black tea extract (BTE) against the induction of single strand DNA breaks in human lymphocytes subjected to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or gamma-rays (2 Gy dose). Lymphocytes were incubated with or without different concentrations of BTE (0.005-500 µg/ml) for 30 min, followed by treatment with or without H2O2 (0.088 µmol/l) for 5 min. To examine the radioprotective effect of BTE, the lymphocytes were incubated with or without BTE for 30 and 60 min prior to and following in vitro irradiation. Oxidative damage to DNA was monitored using a comet assay. BTE at lower concentrations prevented H2O2-induced DNA damage. An increase in BTE concentrations resulted in increased formation of single strand DNA breaks. BTE also exerted significant protective effects against gamma radiation-induced total DNA damage in healthy lymphocytes during their 30 or 60 min incubation with BTE prior to or following irradiation. Therefore, the protective effect of BTE against irradiation was time-dependent. The results contribute to the research on potential beneficial effects of natural compounds, such as BTE, in cancer and its protective effects of normal tissue during radiation therapy. PMID:26718244

  7. Quercetin protects against high glucose-induced damage in bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Rong; Du, Yu-Jun; Chen, Lei; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Pan, Yue-Hai; Liu, Jian-Feng; Liu, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a group of bone marrow-derived pro-angiogenic cells, contribute to vascular repair after damage. EPC dysfunction exists in diabetes and results in poor wound healing in diabetic patients with trauma or surgery. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of quercetin, a natural flavonoid on high glucose‑induced damage in EPCs. Treatment with high glucose (40 mM) decreased cell viability and migration, and increased oxidant stress, as was evidenced by the elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase in bone marrow-derived EPCs. Moreover, high glucose reduced the levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation, nitric oxide (NO) production and intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Quercetin supplement protected against high glucose‑induced impairment in cell viability, migration, oxidant stress, eNOS phosphorylation, NO production and cGMP levels. Quercetin also increased Sirt1 expression in EPCs. Inhibition of Sirt1 by a chemical antagonist sirtinol abolished the protective effect of quercetin on eNOS phosphorylation, NO production and cGMP levels following high glucose stress. To the best of our knowledge, the results provide the first evidence that quercetin protects against high glucose‑induced damage by inducing Sirt1-dependent eNOS upregulation in EPCs, and suggest that quercetin is a promising therapeutic agent for diabetic patients undergoing surgery or other invasive procedures. PMID:25197782

  8. Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2 Protects the Heart From Ischemic Damage

    PubMed Central

    Völkers, Mirko; Konstandin, Mathias H.; Doroudgar, Shirin; Toko, Haruhiro; Quijada, Pearl; Din, Shabana; Joyo, Anya; Ornelas, Luis; Samse, Kaitleen; Thuerauf, Donna J.; Gude, Natalie; Glembotski, Christopher C.; Sussman, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) comprises 2 structurally distinct multiprotein complexes, mTOR complexes 1 and 2 (mTORC1 and mTORC2). Deregulation of mTOR signaling occurs during and contributes to the severity of myocardial damage from ischemic heart disease. However, the relative roles of mTORC1 versus mTORC2 in the pathogenesis of ischemic damage are unknown. Methods and Results Combined pharmacological and molecular approaches were used to alter the balance of mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling in cultured cardiac myocytes and in mouse hearts subjected to conditions that mimic ischemic heart disease. The importance of mTOR signaling in cardiac protection was demonstrated by pharmacological inhibition of both mTORC1 and mTORC2 with Torin1, which led to increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and tissue damage after myocardial infarction. Predominant mTORC1 signaling mediated by suppression of mTORC2 with Rictor similarly increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and tissue damage after myocardial infarction. In comparison, preferentially shifting toward mTORC2 signaling by inhibition of mTORC1 with PRAS40 led to decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis and tissue damage after myocardial infarction. Conclusions These results suggest that selectively increasing mTORC2 while concurrently inhibiting mTORC1 signaling is a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of ischemic heart disease. PMID:24008870

  9. Autophagy confers DNA damage repair pathways to protect the hematopoietic system from nuclear radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weiwei; Yuan, Na; Wang, Zhen; Cao, Yan; Fang, Yixuan; Li, Xin; Xu, Fei; Song, Lin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Han; Yan, Lili; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Suping; Wang, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is essentially a metabolic process, but its in vivo role in nuclear radioprotection remains unexplored. We observed that ex vivo autophagy activation reversed the proliferation inhibition, apoptosis, and DNA damage in irradiated hematopoietic cells. In vivo autophagy activation improved bone marrow cellularity following nuclear radiation exposure. In contrast, defective autophagy in the hematopoietic conditional mouse model worsened the hematopoietic injury, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and DNA damage caused by nuclear radiation exposure. Strikingly, in vivo defective autophagy caused an absence or reduction in regulatory proteins critical to both homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA damage repair pathways, as well as a failure to induce these proteins in response to nuclear radiation. In contrast, in vivo autophagy activation increased most of these proteins in hematopoietic cells. DNA damage assays confirmed the role of in vivo autophagy in the resolution of double-stranded DNA breaks in total bone marrow cells as well as bone marrow stem and progenitor cells upon whole body irradiation. Hence, autophagy protects the hematopoietic system against nuclear radiation injury by conferring and intensifying the HR and NHEJ DNA damage repair pathways and by removing ROS and inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:26197097

  10. Protective effect of diallyl trisulfide against naphthalene-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yongchun; Wang, Kaiming; Liu, Guangpu; Yang, Min; Zhao, Zhongxi; Li, Shanzhong; Cai, Jianhua; Cao, Jimin

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective effects of diallyl trisulfide (DATS) against naphthalene-induced oxidative and inflammatory damage in the livers and lungs of mice. Elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels showed significant hepatic damage after the challenge with 100 mg/kg naphthalene. Hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) contents and the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) increased significantly, accompanying a decrease in the hepatic activity of total superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) levels after the naphthalene damage. In addition, the serum levels of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and interleukin 8 (IL-8) increased significantly in the groups damaged with naphthalene. The main parameters related to oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in the lungs, including the NO, MPO, and GSH contents, were determined, and the histopathological and immunohistochemical changes in the lung and liver tissues were also observed. In the DATS-treated groups, all of the oxidative and inflammatory damage in the serum, liver, and lung tissues were significantly prevented. PMID:26813860

  11. Protections of bovine serum albumin protein from damage on functionalized graphene-based electrodes by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bolu; Gou, Yuqiang; Xue, Zhiyuan; Zheng, Xiaoping; Ma, Yuling; Hu, Fangdi; Zhao, Wanghong

    2016-05-01

    A sensitive electrochemical sensor based on bovine serum albumin (BSA)/poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) functionalized graphene nanosheets (PDDA-G) composite film modified glassy carbon electrode (BSA/PDDA-G/GCE) had been developed to investigate the oxidative protein damage and protections of protein from damage by flavonoids. The performance of this sensor was remarkably improved due to excellent electrical conductivity, strong adsorptive ability, and large effective surface area of PDDA-G. The BSA/PDDA-G/GCE displayed the greatest degree of BSA oxidation damage at 40min incubation time and in the pH5.0 Fenton reagent system (12.5mM FeSO4, 50mM H2O2). The antioxidant activities of four flavonoids had been compared by fabricated sensor based on the relative peak current ratio of SWV, because flavonoids prevented BSA damage caused by Fenton reagent and affected the BSA signal in a solution containing Co(bpy)3(3+). The sensor was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). UV-vis spectrophotometry and FTIR were also used to investigate the generation of hydroxyl radical and BSA damage, respectively. On the basis of results from electrochemical methods, the order of the antioxidant activities of flavonoids is as follows: (+)-catechin>kaempferol>apigenin>naringenin. A novel, direct SWV analytical method for detection of BSA damage and assessment of the antioxidant activities of four flavonoids was developed and this electrochemical method provided a simple, inexpensive and rapid detection of BSA damage and evaluation of the antioxidant activities of samples. PMID:26952415

  12. Dandelion Extracts Protect Human Skin Fibroblasts from UVB Damage and Cellular Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yafan; Li, Shuangshuang

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation causes damage in skin by generating excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), leading to skin photoageing. Dandelion extracts have long been used for traditional Chinese medicine and native American medicine to treat cancers, hepatitis, and digestive diseases; however, less is known on the effects of dandelion extracts in skin photoageing. Here we found that dandelion leaf and flower extracts significantly protect UVB irradiation-inhibited cell viability when added before UVB irradiation or promptly after irradiation. Dandelion leaf and flower extracts inhibited UVB irradiation-stimulated MMP activity and ROS generation. Dandelion root extracts showed less action on protecting HDFs from UVB irradiation-induced MMP activity, ROS generation, and cell death. Furthermore, dandelion leaf and flower but not root extracts stimulated glutathione generation and glutathione reductase mRNA expression in the presence or absence of UVB irradiation. We also found that dandelion leaf and flower extracts help absorb UVB irradiation. In addition, dandelion extracts significantly protected HDFs from H2O2-induced cellular senescence. In conclusion, dandelion extracts especially leaf and flower extracts are potent protective agents against UVB damage and H2O2-induced cellular senescence in HDFs by suppressing ROS generation and MMP activities and helping UVB absorption. PMID:26576225

  13. Protective Effect of Ginsenoside R0 on Anoxic and Oxidative Damage In vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhou; Wang, Yuhui; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Peng, Tao; Li, Yanqing; Zhang, Yi

    2012-11-01

    To examine the neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside R0, we investigated the effects of ginsenoside R0 in PC12 cells under an anoxic or oxidative environment with Edaravone as a control. PC12 neuroendocrine cells were used as a model target. Anoxic damage or oxidative damage in PC12 cells were induced by adding sodium dithionite or hydrogen peroxide respectively in cultured medium. Survival ratios of different groups were detected by an AlamarBlue assay. At the same time, the apoptosis of PC12 cells were determined with flow cytometry. The putative neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside R0 is thought to be exerted through enhancing the activity of antioxidant enzymes Superoxide dismutases (SOD). The activity of SOD and the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), were measured to evaluate the protective and therapeutic effects of ginsenoside R0. Ginsenoside R0 treated cells had a higher SOD activity, lower MDA level and lower ROS, and their survival ratio was higher with a lower apoptosis rate. It is suggested that ginsenoside R0 has a protective effect in the cultured PC12 cells, and the protection efficiency is higher than Edaravone. The protective mechanisms of these two are different. The prevent ability of ginsenoside R0 is higher than its repair ability in neuroprotection in vitro. PMID:24009848

  14. Dandelion Extracts Protect Human Skin Fibroblasts from UVB Damage and Cellular Senescence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yafan; Li, Shuangshuang

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation causes damage in skin by generating excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), leading to skin photoageing. Dandelion extracts have long been used for traditional Chinese medicine and native American medicine to treat cancers, hepatitis, and digestive diseases; however, less is known on the effects of dandelion extracts in skin photoageing. Here we found that dandelion leaf and flower extracts significantly protect UVB irradiation-inhibited cell viability when added before UVB irradiation or promptly after irradiation. Dandelion leaf and flower extracts inhibited UVB irradiation-stimulated MMP activity and ROS generation. Dandelion root extracts showed less action on protecting HDFs from UVB irradiation-induced MMP activity, ROS generation, and cell death. Furthermore, dandelion leaf and flower but not root extracts stimulated glutathione generation and glutathione reductase mRNA expression in the presence or absence of UVB irradiation. We also found that dandelion leaf and flower extracts help absorb UVB irradiation. In addition, dandelion extracts significantly protected HDFs from H2O2-induced cellular senescence. In conclusion, dandelion extracts especially leaf and flower extracts are potent protective agents against UVB damage and H2O2-induced cellular senescence in HDFs by suppressing ROS generation and MMP activities and helping UVB absorption. PMID:26576225

  15. Serotonin and Dopamine Protect from Hypothermia/Rewarming Damage through the CBS/ H2S Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Talaei, Fatemeh; Bouma, Hjalmar R.; Van der Graaf, Adrianus C.; Strijkstra, Arjen M.; Schmidt, Martina; Henning, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Biogenic amines have been demonstrated to protect cells from apoptotic cell death. Herein we show for the first time that serotonin and dopamine increase H2S production by the endogenous enzyme cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and protect cells against hypothermia/rewarming induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and apoptosis. Treatment with both compounds doubled CBS expression through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and increased H2S production in cultured rat smooth muscle cells. In addition, serotonin and dopamine treatment significantly reduced ROS formation. The beneficial effect of both compounds was minimized by inhibition of their re-uptake and by pharmacological inhibition of CBS or its down-regulation by siRNA. Exogenous administration of H2S and activation of CBS by Prydoxal 5′-phosphate also protected cells from hypothermic damage. Finally, serotonin and dopamine pretreatment of rat lung, kidney, liver and heart prior to 24 h of hypothermia at 3°C followed by 30 min of rewarming at 37°C upregulated the expression of CBS, strongly reduced caspase activity and maintained the physiological pH compared to untreated tissues. Thus, dopamine and serotonin protect cells against hypothermia/rewarming induced damage by increasing H2S production mediated through CBS. Our data identify a novel molecular link between biogenic amines and the H2S pathway, which may profoundly affect our understanding of the biological effects of monoamine neurotransmitters. PMID:21829469

  16. Hole hopping through tyrosine/tryptophan chains protects proteins from oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Harry B.; Winkler, Jay R.

    2015-01-01

    Living organisms have adapted to atmospheric dioxygen by exploiting its oxidizing power while protecting themselves against toxic side effects. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species formed during oxidative stress, as well as high-potential reactive intermediates formed during enzymatic catalysis, could rapidly and irreversibly damage polypeptides were protective mechanisms not available. Chains of redox-active tyrosine and tryptophan residues can transport potentially damaging oxidizing equivalents (holes) away from fragile active sites and toward protein surfaces where they can be scavenged by cellular reductants. Precise positioning of these chains is required to provide effective protection without inhibiting normal function. A search of the structural database reveals that about one third of all proteins contain Tyr/Trp chains composed of three or more residues. Although these chains are distributed among all enzyme classes, they appear with greatest frequency in the oxidoreductases and hydrolases. Consistent with a redox-protective role, approximately half of the dioxygen-using oxidoreductases have Tyr/Trp chain lengths ≥3 residues. Among the hydrolases, long Tyr/Trp chains appear almost exclusively in the glycoside hydrolases. These chains likely are important for substrate binding and positioning, but a secondary redox role also is a possibility. PMID:26195784

  17. The effect of various cosmetic pretreatments on protecting hair from thermal damage by hot flat ironing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Rigoletto, R; Koelmel, D; Zhang, G; Gillece, T W; Foltis, L; Moore, D J; Qu, X; Sun, C

    2011-01-01

    Hot flat irons are used to create straight hair styles. As these devices operate at temperatures over 200 °C they can cause significant damage to hair keratin. In this study, hair thermal damage and the effect of various polymeric pretreatments were investigated using FTIR imaging spectroscopy, DSC, dynamic vapor sorption (DVS), AFM, SEM, and thermal image analysis. FTIR imaging spectroscopy of hair cross sections provides spatially resolved molecular information such as protein distribution and structure. This approach was used to monitor thermally induced modification of hair protein, including the conversion of α-helix to β-sheet and protein degradation. DSC measurements of thermally treated hair also demonstrated degradation of hair keratin. DVS of thermally treated hair shows the reduced water regain and lower water retention, compared to the non-thermally treated hair, which might be attributed to the protein conformation changes due to heat damage. The protection of native protein structure associated with selected polymer pretreatments leads to improved moisture restoration and water retention of hair. This contributes to heat control on repeated hot flat ironing. Thermally stressing hair led to significantly increased hair breakage when subjected to combing. These studies indicate that hair breakage can be reduced significantly when hair is pretreated with selected polymers such as VP/acrylates/lauryl methacrylate copolymer, polyquaternium-55, and a polyelectrolyte complex of PVM/MA copolymer and polyquaternium-28. In addition, polymeric pretreatments provide thermal protection against thermal degradation of keratin in the cortex as well as hair surface damage. The morphological improvement in cuticle integrity and smoothness with the polymer pretreatment plays an important role in their anti-breakage effect. Insights into structure-property relationships necessary to provide thermal protection to hair are presented. PMID:21635854

  18. [Protection of the thyroid in children and fetuses in case of nuclear accident].

    PubMed

    Vernis, M; Hindie, E; Galle, P

    1997-05-01

    The administration of stable iodine in order to keep the thyroid gland away from radioactive iodine isotope contamination has long been regarded with caution by the health authorities, mainly because of the potential toxicity of iodine in newborns, young children and adults with thyroid pathology. Therefore, the risk of oral stable iodine given for a limited period of time must be compared to the risk of cancer due to radioactive exposure. The analysis of complications following the nuclear accidents of Marshall Islands in 1954 and Tchernobyl in 1986 has shown that newborn infants and young children, have the highest risk, the main complications being cancer (papillary carcinoma) and hypothyroidism. In the most exposed areas of Bielorussia, the incidence of child thyroid cancer has been approximately multiplied by 100. On the other hand, studies of children from Utah who were contaminated after nuclear tests in the Nevada desert have shown that following mild iodine radioactive exposure, the risk is not significant. Among complications attributed to stable iodine, only those related to an oral intake over a limited period of time should be considered. On the basis of nuclear medicine experience and scientific literature, the risk can be considered as negligible in adults but not in children. However, the Polish experience in children has reported a low risk and only benign complications, mainly transient hypothyroidism. Thus from current knowledge, it appears that the potent risks linked to stable iodine administration should not contraindicate the collective preventive stable iodine administration in case of nuclear accident. PMID:9230999

  19. [Triterpenoids from Inonotus obliquus protect mice against oxidative damage induced by CCl4].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fen-Qin; Yan, Lin; Cui, Xian-Hong; Lin, Sheng; Wang, Cong; Zhang, Hui; Kang, Xiao-Yan; Ji, Bian-Sheng

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the effects of lanosterol (1), inotodiol (2) and trametenolic acid (3) from Inonotus obliquus against oxidative damage induced by CCl4 in mice, 1, 2 and 3 (20, 10 and 5 mg x kg(-1)) were respectively administered to mice, once a day for 3 days. Then the mice were induced to oxidative damage by CCl4 on the third day 30 min after the administration. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) and the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and reductive glutathione (GSH) in serum and liver homogenate were determined. And the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentration in serum were detected. The results showed that treatment with compound 1, 2 and 3 could significantly increase the activities of SOD, CAT and GSH-PX in serum and liver homogenate. Furthermore, the content of GSH in serum and liver homogenate increased and MDA content decreased markedly. In addition, compound 1, 2 and 3 could significantly inhibit the activities of ALT and AST in serum, and decrease the IL-6 concentration in serum remarkably. So, compound 1, 2 and 3 can protect mice against oxidative stress injury induced by CCl4. Furthermore, compound 1, 2 and 3 can protect cells from damage through inhibition on ALT, AST and the expression of IL-6. PMID:22812017

  20. Reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide during ischemia protects against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Andrew; Bond, Richard; McLean, Peter; Uppal, Rakesh; Benjamin, Nigel; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2004-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is thought to protect against the damaging effects of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, whereas xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) normally causes damage through the generation of reactive oxygen species. In the heart, inorganic nitrite has the potential to act as an endogenous store of NO, liberated specifically during ischemia. Using a detection method that we developed, we report that under ischemic conditions both rat and human homogenized myocardium and the isolated perfused rat heart (Langendorff preparation) generate NO from in a reaction that depends on XOR activity. Functional studies of rat hearts in the Langendorff apparatus showed that nitrite (10 and 100 µM) reduced infarct size from 47.3 ± 2.8% (mean percent of control ± SEM) to 17.9 ± 4.2% and 17.4 ± 1.0%, respectively (P < 0.001), and was associated with comparable improvements in recovery of left ventricular function. This protective effect was completely blocked by the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazole-1-oxyl 3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO). In summary, the generation of NO from •, rather than damaging.

  1. Protective Effect of Acacia nilotica (L.) against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatocellular Damage in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Narayanan; Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekaran

    2013-01-01

    The potential biological functions of A. nilotica have long been described in traditional system of medicine. However, the protective effect of A. nilotica on acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity is still unknown. The present study attempted to investigate the protective effect of A. nilotica against acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in Wistar rats. The biochemical liver functional tests Alanine transaminase (ALT), Aspartate transaminase (AST), Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin, total protein, oxidative stress test (Lipid peroxidation), antioxidant parameter glutathione (GSH), and histopathological changes were examined. Our results show that the pretreatment with A. nilotica (250 mg/kg·bw) orally revealed attenuation of serum activities of ALT, AST, ALP, liver weight, and total bilirubin levels that were enhanced by administration of acetaminophen. Further, pretreatment with extract elevated the total protein and GSH level and decreased the level of LPO. Histopathological analysis confirmed the alleviation of liver damage and reduced lesions caused by acetaminophen. The present study undoubtedly provides a proof that hepatoprotective action of A. nilotica extract may rely on its effect on reducing the oxidative stress in acetaminophen-induced hepatic damage in rat model. PMID:23864853

  2. Dexamethasone and betamethasone protect against LPS-induced brain damage in the neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yi; Fan, Lir-Wan; Zheng, Baoying; Campbell, Leigh R.; Cai, Zhengwei; Rhodes, Philip G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to test whether dexamethasone (Dex) and betamethasone (Beta), two of the most commonly used corticosteroids, protect against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced white matter damage and neurobehavioral dysfunction. LPS or sterile saline was injected into the brain white matter of rat pups at postnatal day 5 (P5) and Dex or Beta was given intraperitoneally to the rat pups 1 h before the LPS microinjection. Brain inflammatory response, brain damage, and myelination were examined at P6, P8 and P14. Neurobehavioral tests were performed from P3 through P22. Our results demonstrate that Dex and Beta markedly diminish the LPS-induced brain inflammatory response, restore myelin basic protein (MBP) expression and alleviate lateral ventricle dilation. Both corticosteroids demonstrate significant protection against most of LPS-induced behavioral deficits, including those in rearing, vibrissa-elicited forelimb-placing, beam walking, learning and elevated plus-maze test. Notably, only Beta improved the locomotion and stereotype dysfunction. In contrast to their beneficial effects, neither drug prevented LPS-induced delay in body weight gain from P6 through P21. Our study suggests that if their adverse effects are minimized, corticosteroids may be the potential candidate drugs to prevent brain damage in premature infants. PMID:22314662

  3. The protective effect of curcumin on hepatotoxicity and ultrastructural damage induced by cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Hu, Peng-Chao; Gao, Fang-Fang; Lv, Jia-Wei; Xu, Shuai; Kuang, Chang-Chun; Wei, Lei; Zhang, Jing-Wei

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the protective effect of curcumin (CU) on the hepatic ultrastructural damage induced by cisplatin in mice. 18 adult Kunming mice were randomly divided into normal saline (NS) group, cisplatin treatment group (CP) and CU + CP group (n = 6 for each group). Mice in control group and CP group were administered with NS (20 mL/kg/day) and CU + CP group were i.p injected with CU (200 mg/kg/day) for 10 days. Then cisplatin (50 mg/kg/day) was injected in mice of CP group and CU + CP group, while those in control group were given the same volume of NS. Five days after injection all mice were killed and liver dissected. The hepatic morphological structures were observed under light microscope and transmission electron microscope. The results indicated that CU alleviated the hepatic histopathological damages induced by cisplatin, which included declined body weight, vacuolated cytoplasm and blurred liver trabecular structure. Moreover, no hepatic ultrastructural damages were observed in the CU protective group with condensed and marginated nuclear chromatin, bile canaliculi outstreched and bile deposited. PMID:25079681

  4. Lycopene protects against acute zearalenone-induced oxidative, endocrine, inflammatory and reproductive damages in male mice.

    PubMed

    Boeira, Silvana Peterini; Funck, Vinícius Rafael; Borges Filho, Carlos; Del'Fabbro, Lucian; de Gomes, Marcelo Gomes; Donato, Franciele; Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire; Oliveira, Mauro Schneider; Jesse, Cristiano Ricardo; Furian, Ana Flávia

    2015-03-25

    Male mice received lycopene for 10 days before a single oral administration of zearalenone (ZEA). After 48 h testes and blood were collected. Mice treated with lycopene/ZEA exhibited amelioration of the hematological changes. Lycopene prevented the reduction in the number and motility of spermatozoa and testosterone levels, indicating a protective effect in the testicular damage induced by ZEA. Lycopene was also effective in protecting against the decrease in glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activities caused by ZEA in the testes. Exposure of animals to ZEA induced modification of antioxidant and inflammatory status with increase of reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and increase of the oxidized glutathione, interleukins 1β, 2, 6, 10, tumor necrosis factor-α and bilirubin levels. Lycopene prevented ZEA-induced changes in GSH levels and inhibited the processes of inflammation, reducing the damage induced by ZEA. Altogether, our results indicate that lycopene was able to prevent ZEA-induced damage in the mice. PMID:25682699

  5. A protective role for zinc on intestinal peroxidative damage during oral iron repletion.

    PubMed

    Sreedhar, B; Subramaniyan, R; Nair, K Madhavan

    2004-06-11

    Oral iron-supplementation is a general practice to correct iron deficiency anemia. Exposure of iron-deficient intestine to large doses of iron is known to induce oxidative damage, leading to loss of functional integrity, and reduced mucosal cell turnover. Conditioning of intestine with anti-oxidants during iron administration was shown to suppress iron-induced oxidative damage. Zinc is known to protect cells from peroxidative damage by inducing metallothionein and maintaining the sulfhydryl group stability. Nevertheless, co-administration of iron and zinc may antagonize each other with respect to absorption. In the present study, we show that combined supplementation of iron and zinc though marginally inhibits iron uptake significantly attenuates the oxidative stress by induction of metallothionein and elevating the levels of GSH. Further, presence of zinc in situ reduced the iron-induced hydroxyl radical production in the intestinal mucosa, as assessed by EPR spectroscopy. These results strongly suggest a protective role for zinc on iron-induced oxidative stress, which might have implications in anemia control programs. PMID:15147971

  6. YAP activation protects urothelial cell carcinoma from treatment-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ciamporcero, E; Shen, H; Ramakrishnan, S; Yu Ku, S; Chintala, S; Shen, L; Adelaiye, R; Miles, K M; Ullio, C; Pizzimenti, S; Daga, M; Azabdaftari, G; Attwood, K; Johnson, C; Zhang, J; Barrera, G; Pili, R

    2016-03-24

    Current standard of care for muscle-invasive urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) is surgery along with perioperative platinum-based chemotherapy. UCC is sensitive to cisplatin-based regimens, but acquired resistance eventually occurs, and a subset of tumors is intrinsically resistant. Thus, there is an unmet need for new therapeutic approaches to target chemotherapy-resistant UCC. Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a transcriptional co-activator that has been associated with bladder cancer progression and cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer. In contrast, YAP has been shown to induce DNA damage associated apoptosis in non-small cell lung carcinoma. However, no data have been reported on the YAP role in UCC chemo-resistance. Thus, we have investigated the potential dichotomous role of YAP in UCC response to chemotherapy utilizing two patient-derived xenograft models recently established. Constitutive expression and activation of YAP inversely correlated with in vitro and in vivo cisplatin sensitivity. YAP overexpression protected while YAP knockdown sensitized UCC cells to chemotherapy and radiation effects via increased accumulation of DNA damage and apoptosis. Furthermore, pharmacological YAP inhibition with verteporfin inhibited tumor cell proliferation and restored sensitivity to cisplatin. In addition, nuclear YAP expression was associated with poor outcome in UCC patients who received perioperative chemotherapy. In conclusion, these results suggest that YAP activation exerts a protective role and represents a pharmacological target to enhance the anti-tumor effects of DNA damaging modalities in the treatment of UCC. PMID:26119935

  7. YAP activation protects urothelial cell carcinoma from treatment-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Ciamporcero, Eric; Shen, He; Ramakrishnan, Swathi; Ku, Sheng Yu; Chintala, Sreenivasulu; Shen, Li; Adelaiye, Remi; Miles, Kiersten Marie; Ullio, Chiara; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Daga, Martina; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Attwood, Kris; Johnson, Candace; Zhang, Jianmin; Barrera, Giuseppina; Pili, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Current standard of care for muscle-invasive urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) is surgery along with perioperative platinum-based chemotherapy. UCC is sensitive to cisplatin-based regimens, but acquired resistance eventually occurs, and a subset of tumors is intrinsically resistant. Thus, there is an unmet need for new therapeutic approaches to target chemotherapy-resistant UCC. Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a transcriptional co-activator that has been associated with bladder cancer progression and cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer. In contrast, YAP has been shown to induce DNA damage associated apoptosis in non-small cell lung carcinoma. However, no data have been reported on the YAP role in UCC chemo-resistance. Thus, we have investigated the potential dichotomous role of YAP in UCC response to chemotherapy utilizing two patient-derived xenograft models recently established. Constitutive expression and activation of YAP inversely correlated with in vitro and in vivo cisplatin sensitivity. YAP overexpression protected while YAP knock-down sensitized UCC cells to chemotherapy and radiation effects via increased accumulation of DNA damage and apoptosis. Furthermore, pharmacological YAP inhibition with verteporfin inhibited tumor cell proliferation and restored sensitivity to cisplatin. In addition, nuclear YAP expression was associated with poor outcome in UCC patients who received perioperative chemotherapy. In conclusion, these results suggest that YAP activation exerts a protective role and represents a pharmacological target to enhance the anti-tumor effects of DNA damaging modalities in the treatment of UCC. PMID:26119935

  8. Antioxidative Activity of Platinum Nanocolloid and Its Protective Effect Against Chemical-Induced Hepatic Cellular Damage.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi-Ran; Do, Le Thanh; Chung, Yong-Hoon; Yoo, Hoon; Yu, Rina

    2015-08-01

    Oxidative stress, a major cause of cellular injuries, is closely associated with a variety of chronic diseases such as cancer, liver diseases, degenerative brain disease and aging. In this study, we investigated antioxidant properties of platinum nanocolloid (PNC) against various oxidative stress conditions in vitro/in vivo by treating PNC on liver cell or tissue. Antioxidant activities of the PNC were determined by measuring quenching capacity on reactive oxygen species and its protective action against hydrogen peroxide or CCl4-induced oxidative cellular damage in HepG2 cell or liver tissue of mice. In vitro study, PNC markedly suppressed the production H2O2, ·OH, α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl radical and nitric oxide in a dose-dependent manner. PNC also inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative cellular damage in HepG2 hepatocytes. In vivo study with mice, PNC reduced hepatic lipid peroxidation and CCl4 induced toxicity. Our results support that platinum nanocolloid has antioxidant activities and protects hepatic cellular oxidative damage. Thus platinum nanocolloid may have a potential to be used as an antioxidant supplement. PMID:26369119

  9. Accident progression event tree analysis for postulated severe accidents at N Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wyss, G.D.; Camp, A.L.; Miller, L.A.; Dingman, S.E.; Kunsman, D.M. ); Medford, G.T. )

    1990-06-01

    A Level II/III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for N Reactor, a Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford reservation in Washington. The accident progression analysis documented in this report determines how core damage accidents identified in the Level I PRA progress from fuel damage to confinement response and potential releases the environment. The objectives of the study are to generate accident progression data for the Level II/III PRA source term model and to identify changes that could improve plant response under accident conditions. The scope of the analysis is comprehensive, excluding only sabotage and operator errors of commission. State-of-the-art methodology is employed based largely on the methods developed by Sandia for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in support of the NUREG-1150 study. The accident progression model allows complex interactions and dependencies between systems to be explicitly considered. Latin Hypecube sampling was used to assess the phenomenological and systemic uncertainties associated with the primary and confinement system responses to the core damage accident. The results of the analysis show that the N Reactor confinement concept provides significant radiological protection for most of the accident progression pathways studied.

  10. Preserved DNA Damage Checkpoint Pathway Protects against Complications in Long-Standing Type 1 Diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, Shweta; Gupta, Manoj; Khamaisi, Mogher; Martinez, Rachael; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Wagner, Bridget; Guye, Patrick; Busskamp, Volker; Shirakawa, Jun; Wu, Gongxiong; Liew, Chong Wee; Clauss, Therese RW; Valdez, Ivan; EL Ouaaman, Abdelfattah; Dirice, Ercument; Takatani, Tomozumi; Keenan, Hillary; Smith, Richard D.; Church, George; Weiss, Ron; Wagers, Amy J.; Qian, Weijun; King, George L.; Kulkami, Rohit N.

    2015-08-04

    Themechanisms underlying the development of complications in type 1 diabetes (T1D) are poorly understood. Disease modeling of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients with longstanding T1D(disease durationR50 years) with severe (Medalist +C) or absent to mild complications (Medalist *C) revealed impaired growth, reprogramming, and differentiation in Medalist +C. Genomics and proteomics analyses suggested differential regulation of DNA damage checkpoint proteins favoring protection from cellular apoptosis in Medalist *C. In silico analyses showed altered expression patterns of DNA damage checkpoint factors among the Medalist groups to be targets of miR200, whose expression was significantly elevated in Medalist +C serum. Notably, neurons differentiated from Medalist +C iPSCs exhibited enhanced susceptibility to genotoxic stress that worsened upon miR200 overexpression. Furthermore, knockdown of miR200 in Medalist +C fibroblasts and iPSCs rescued checkpoint protein expression and reduced DNA damage.WeproposemiR200-regulated DNA damage checkpoint pathway as a potential therapeutic target for treating complications of diabetes.

  11. p53-dependent SIRT6 expression protects Aβ42-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eun Sun; Choi, Hyunjung; Song, Hyundong; Hwang, Yu Jin; Kim, Ahbin; Ryu, Hoon; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia and age-related neurodegenerative disease. Elucidating the cellular changes that occur during ageing is an important step towards understanding the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. SIRT6 is a member of the mammalian sirtuin family of anti-aging genes. However, the relationship between SIRT6 and AD has not yet been elucidated. Here, we report that SIRT6 protein expression levels are reduced in the brains of both the 5XFAD AD mouse model and AD patients. Aβ42, a major component of senile plaques, decreases SIRT6 expression, and Aβ42-induced DNA damage is prevented by the overexpression of SIRT6 in HT22 mouse hippocampal neurons. Also, there is a strong negative correlation between Aβ42-induced DNA damage and p53 levels, a protein involved in DNA repair and apoptosis. In addition, upregulation of p53 protein by Nutlin-3 prevents SIRT6 reduction and DNA damage induced by Aβ42. Taken together, this study reveals that p53-dependent SIRT6 expression protects cells from Aβ42-induced DNA damage, making SIRT6 a promising new therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. PMID:27156849

  12. Stanniocalcin-1 protects bovine intestinal epithelial cells from oxidative stress-induced damage

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-ming; Guo, Rui; Hui, Lin; Ye, Yong-gang; Xiang, Jing-mei; Wan, Chun-yun; Zou, Miao; Ma, Rui; Sun, Xiao-zhuan; Yang, Shi-jin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic enteritis can produce an excess of reactive oxygen species resulting in cellular damage. Stanniocalcin-1(STC-1) reportedly possesses anti-oxidative activity, the aim of this study was to define more clearly the direct contribution of STC-1 to anti-oxidative stress in cattle. In this study, primary intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for different time intervals to mimic chronic enteritis-induced cellular damage. Prior to treatment with 200 µM H2O2, the cells were transfected with a recombinant plasmid for 48 h to over-express STC-1. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) double staining and trypan blue exclusion assays were then performed to measure cell viability and apoptosis of the cells, respectively. The expression of STC-1 and apoptosis-related proteins in the cells was monitored by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The results indicated that both STC-1 mRNA and protein expression levels positively correlated with the duration of H2O2 treatment. H2O2 damaged the bovine IECs in a time-dependent manner, and this effect was attenuated by STC-1 over-expression. Furthermore, over-expression of STC-1 up-regulated Bcl-2 protein expression and slightly down-regulated caspase-3 production in the damaged cells. Findings from this study suggested that STC-1 plays a protective role in intestinal cells through an antioxidant mechanism. PMID:24962416

  13. Effective protection of Terminalia catappa L. leaves from damage induced by carbon tetrachloride in liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xinhui; Gao, Jing; Wang, Yanping; Fan, Yi-Mei; Xu, Li-Zhi; Zhao, Xiao-Ning; Xu, Qiang; Qian, Zhong Ming

    2006-03-01

    The protective effects of chloroform extracts of Terminalia catappa L. leaves (TCCE) on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver damage and the possible mechanisms involved in the protection were investigated in mice. We found that increases in the activity of serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase and the level of liver lipid peroxidation (2.0-fold, 5.7-fold and 2.8-fold) induced by CCl4 were significantly inhibited by oral pretreatment with 20, 50 or 100 mg/kg of TCCE. Morphological observation further confirmed the hepatoprotective effects of TCCE. In addition, the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (14.8%), intramitochondrial Ca2+ overload (2.1-fold) and suppression of mitochondrial Ca2+-ATPase activity (42.0%) in the liver of CCl4-insulted mice were effectively prevented by pretreatment with TCCE. It can be concluded that TCCE have protective activities against liver mitochondrial damage induced by CCl4, which suggests a new mechanism of the hepatoprotective effects of TCCE. PMID:16169207

  14. Nrf2 protects against As(III)-induced damage in mouse liver and bladder

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tao; Huang, Zheping; Chan, Jefferson Y.; Zhang, Donna D.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic compounds are classified as toxicants and human carcinogens. Environmental exposure to arsenic imposes a big health issue worldwide. Arsenic elicits its toxic efforts through many mechanisms, including generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nrf2 is the primary transcription factor that controls expression of a main cellular antioxidant response, which is required for neutralizing ROS and thus defending cells from exogenous insults. Previously, we demonstrated a protective role of Nrf2 against arsenic-induced toxicity using a cell culture model. In this report, we present evidence that Nrf2 protects against liver and bladder injury in response to six-weeks of arsenic exposure in a mouse model. Nrf2−/− mice displayed more severe pathological changes in the liver and bladder, compared to Nrf2+/+ mice. Furthermore, Nrf2−/− mice were more sensitive to arsenic-induced DNA hypomethylation, oxidative DNA damage, and apoptotic cell death. These results indicate a protective role of Nrf2 against arsenic toxicity in vivo. Hence, this work demonstrates the feasibility of using dietary compounds that target activation of the Nrf2 signaling pathway to alleviate arsenic-induced damage. PMID:19538980

  15. Protective action of vinpocetine against experimentally induced gastric damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Nosálová, V; Machová, J; Babulová, A

    1993-09-01

    The efficacy of vinpocetine (CAS 42971-09-5) to prevent gastric mucosal damage induced by several noxious agents and its antisecretory effect were studied in rats. Vinpocetine administered orally or intraperitoneally inhibited the development of gastric lesions induced by 96% ethanol in a dose-dependent way. The highest protective activity was observed when vinpocetine was given intraperitoneally 30 min before ethanol, and its effect was still significant when administered 120 min before ethanol exposure. Oral administration of vincamine also displayed gastroprotective action in this model. Pretreatment with indometacin counteracted the protective action of vinpocetine against ethanol-induced damage, suggesting the involvement of a prostaglandin-mediated mechanism. The protective effect of vinpocetine was compared with that of prostaglandin E2, sucralfate, and tripotassium dicitrate bismuthate. The antiulcer activity of vinpocetine was demonstrated also in gastric injury induced by phenylbulazone and in chronic gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid. Histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion in pylorus-ligated rats was partially inhibited by vinpocetine administered intraduodenally. The activity of vinpocetine established in these experiments is indicative of its potential clinical value as a gastroprotective agent. PMID:8240463

  16. Protection of Erwinia amylovora bacteriophage Y2 from UV-induced damage by natural compounds

    PubMed Central

    Born, Yannick; Bosshard, Lars; Duffy, Brion; Loessner, Martin J.; Fieseler, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages have regained much attention as biocontrol agents against bacterial pathogens. However, with respect to stability, phages are biomolecules and are therefore sensitive to a number of environmental influences. UV-irradiation can readily inactivate phage infectivity, which impedes their potential application in the plant phyllosphere. Therefore, phages for control of Erwinia amylovora, the causative agent of fire blight, need to be protected from UV-damage by adequate measures. We investigated the protective effect of different light-absorbing substances on phage particles exposed to UV-light. For this, natural extracts from carrot, red pepper, and beetroot, casein and soy peptone in solution, and purified substances such as astaxanthin, aromatic amino acids, and Tween 80 were prepared and tested as natural sunscreens for phage. All compounds were found to significantly increase half-life of UV-irradiated phage particles and they did not negatively affect phage viability or infectivity. Altogether, a range of readily available, natural substances are suitable as UV-protectants to prevent phage particles from UV-light damage. PMID:26904378

  17. Ginger-derived nanoparticles protect against alcohol-induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiaoying; Deng, Zhong-Bin; Mu, Jingyao; Zhang, Lifeng; Yan, Jun; Miller, Donald; Feng, Wenke; McClain, Craig J; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2015-01-01

    Daily exposure of humans to nanoparticles from edible plants is inevitable, but significant advances are required to determine whether edible plant nanoparticles are beneficial to our health. Additionally, strategies are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying any beneficial effects. Here, as a proof of concept, we used a mouse model to show that orally given nanoparticles isolated from ginger extracts using a sucrose gradient centrifugation procedure resulted in protecting mice against alcohol-induced liver damage. The ginger-derived nanoparticle (GDN)-mediated activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) led to the expression of a group of liver detoxifying/antioxidant genes and inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species, which partially contributes to the liver protection. Using lipid knock-out and knock-in strategies, we further identified that shogaol in the GDN plays a role in the induction of Nrf2 in a TLR4/TRIF-dependent manner. Given the critical role of Nrf2 in modulating numerous cellular processes, including hepatocyte homeostasis, drug metabolism, antioxidant defenses, and cell-cycle progression of liver, this finding not only opens up a new avenue for investigating GDN as a means to protect against the development of liver-related diseases such as alcohol-induced liver damage but sheds light on studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying interspecies communication in the liver via edible plant-derived nanoparticles. PMID:26610593

  18. Ginger-derived nanoparticles protect against alcohol-induced liver damage

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiaoying; Deng, Zhong-Bin; Mu, Jingyao; Zhang, Lifeng; Yan, Jun; Miller, Donald; Feng, Wenke; McClain, Craig J.; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2015-01-01

    Daily exposure of humans to nanoparticles from edible plants is inevitable, but significant advances are required to determine whether edible plant nanoparticles are beneficial to our health. Additionally, strategies are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying any beneficial effects. Here, as a proof of concept, we used a mouse model to show that orally given nanoparticles isolated from ginger extracts using a sucrose gradient centrifugation procedure resulted in protecting mice against alcohol-induced liver damage. The ginger-derived nanoparticle (GDN)–mediated activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) led to the expression of a group of liver detoxifying/antioxidant genes and inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species, which partially contributes to the liver protection. Using lipid knock-out and knock-in strategies, we further identified that shogaol in the GDN plays a role in the induction of Nrf2 in a TLR4/TRIF-dependent manner. Given the critical role of Nrf2 in modulating numerous cellular processes, including hepatocyte homeostasis, drug metabolism, antioxidant defenses, and cell-cycle progression of liver, this finding not only opens up a new avenue for investigating GDN as a means to protect against the development of liver-related diseases such as alcohol-induced liver damage but sheds light on studying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying interspecies communication in the liver via edible plant–derived nanoparticles. PMID:26610593

  19. Crash protectiveness to occupant injury and vehicle damage: An investigation on major car brands.

    PubMed

    Huang, Helai; Li, Chunyang; Zeng, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    This study sets out to investigate vehicles' crash protectiveness on occupant injury and vehicle damage, which can be deemed as an extension of the traditional crash worthiness. A Bayesian bivariate hierarchical ordered logistic (BVHOL) model is developed to estimate the occupant protectiveness (OP) and vehicle protectiveness (VP) of 23 major car brands in Florida, with considering vehicles' crash aggressivity and controlling external factors. The proposed model not only takes over the strength of the existing hierarchical ordered logistic (HOL) model, i.e. specifying the order characteristics of crash outcomes and cross-crash heterogeneities, but also accounts for the correlation between the two crash responses, driver injury and vehicle damage. A total of 7335 two-vehicle-crash records with 14,670 cars involved in Florida are used for the investigation. From the estimation results, it's found that most of the luxury cars such as Cadillac, Volvo and Lexus possess excellent OP and VP while some brands such as KIA and Saturn perform very badly in both aspects. The ranks of the estimated safety performance indices are even compared to the counterparts in Huang et al. study [Huang, H., Hu, S., Abdel-Aty, M., 2014. Indexing crash worthiness and crash aggressivity by major car brands. Safety Science 62, 339-347]. The results show that the rank of occupant protectiveness index (OPI) is relatively coherent with that of crash worthiness index, but the ranks of crash aggressivity index in both studies is more different from each other. Meanwhile, a great discrepancy between the OPI rank and that of vehicle protectiveness index is found. What's more, the results of control variables and hyper-parameters estimation as well as comparison to HOL models with separate or identical threshold errors, demonstrate the validity and advancement of the proposed model and the robustness of the estimated OP and VP. PMID:26551733

  20. Performance of collision damage mitigation braking systems and their effects on human injury in the event of car-to-pedestrian accidents.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yasuhiro; Han, Yong; Mizuno, Koji

    2011-11-01

    The number of traffic deaths in Japan was 4,863 in 2010. Pedestrians account for the highest number (1,714, 35%), and vehicle occupants the second highest (1,602, 33%). Pedestrian protection is a key countermeasure to reduce casualties in traffic accidents. A striking vehicle's impact velocity could be considered a parameter influencing the severity of injury and possibility of death in pedestrian crashes. A collision damage mitigation braking system (CDMBS) using a sensor to detect pedestrians could be effective for reducing the vehicle/pedestrian impact velocity. Currently in Japan, cars equipped with the CDMBS also have vision sensors such as a stereo camera for pedestrian detection. However, the ability of vision sensors in production cars to properly detect pedestrians has not yet been established. The effect of reducing impact velocity on the pedestrian injury risk has also not been determined. The first objective of this study is to evaluate the performance of the CDMBS in detecting pedestrians when it is installed in production cars. The second objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of reducing impact velocity on mitigating pedestrian injury. Firstly, impact experiments were performed using a car with the CDMBS in which the car collided with a pedestrian surrogate. In these tests, the velocity was chosen for the various test runs to be 20, 40 and 60 km/h, respectively, which were based on the velocity distribution in real-world pedestrian crashes. The results indicated that the impact velocity reduction ranged approximately from 10 to 15 km/h at the standing location of a pedestrian surrogate at both daytime and nighttime lighting conditions. These results show that the system has the potential to reduce pedestrian casualties from car-to-pedestrian contacts. Secondly, finite-element analyses were performed simulating vehicle-to- pedestrian impacts with the THUMS pedestrian models. The vehicle models selected for the study included a medium sedan

  1. Hydrolysates of citrus plants stimulate melanogenesis protecting against UV-induced dermal damage.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Lin, Jen-Wen; Hsiao, Pei-Ling; Tsai, Shang-Yuan; Wen, Kuo-Ching

    2011-04-01

    The sun-tanning process occurs as a spontaneous response to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. UV will induce tanning and DNA damage, processes that can lead to photoaging and skin disorders such as hyperpigmentation and cancer. The pigment melanin protects skin from UV damage; therefore, an efficient melanin-promoting suntan lotion could be highly beneficial. In this study, a process was developed to increase the content of naringenin in citrus extracts and to determine whether a higher naringenin content of citrus would induce melanogenesis. Melanin content and tyrosinase expression in mouse B16 melanoma cells were assayed after treatment with citrus plant extracts and their hydrolysates. The results indicate that hydrolysis increased the naringenin content in citrus extracts and that citrus preparations stimulated cellular melanogenesis and tyrosinase expression. It is suggested that this method is applicable to the industrial production of melanin-promoting suntan lotions with antiphotocarcinogenic properties derived from citrus rind and citrus products. PMID:20857432

  2. Isorhamnetin Protects Human Keratinocytes against Ultraviolet B-Induced Cell Damage.

    PubMed

    Han, Xia; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Yoo, Eun Sook; Koh, Young Sang; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Shin, Jennifer H; Park, Yeunsoo; Yoo, Suk Jae; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-07-01

    Isorhamnetin (3-methylquercetin) is a flavonoid derived from the fruits of certain medicinal plants. This study investigated the photoprotective properties of isorhamnetin against cell damage and apoptosis resulting from excessive ultraviolet (UV) B exposure in human HaCaT keratinocytes. Isorhamnetin eliminated UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and attenuated the oxidative modification of DNA, lipids, and proteins in response to UVB radiation. Moreover, isorhamnetin repressed UVB-facilitated programmed cell death in the keratinocytes, as evidenced by a reduction in apoptotic body formation, and nuclear fragmentation. Additionally, isorhamnetin suppressed the ability of UVB light to trigger mitochondrial dysfunction. Taken together, these results indicate that isorhamnetin has the potential to protect human keratinocytes against UVB-induced cell damage and death. PMID:26157553

  3. Isorhamnetin Protects Human Keratinocytes against Ultraviolet B-Induced Cell Damage

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xia; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Madduma Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara; Yoo, Eun Sook; Koh, Young Sang; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Shin, Jennifer H; Park, Yeunsoo; Yoo, Suk Jae; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-01-01

    Isorhamnetin (3-methylquercetin) is a flavonoid derived from the fruits of certain medicinal plants. This study investigated the photoprotective properties of isorhamnetin against cell damage and apoptosis resulting from excessive ultraviolet (UV) B exposure in human HaCaT keratinocytes. Isorhamnetin eliminated UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and attenuated the oxidative modification of DNA, lipids, and proteins in response to UVB radiation. Moreover, isorhamnetin repressed UVB-facilitated programmed cell death in the keratinocytes, as evidenced by a reduction in apoptotic body formation, and nuclear fragmentation. Additionally, isorhamnetin suppressed the ability of UVB light to trigger mitochondrial dysfunction. Taken together, these results indicate that isorhamnetin has the potential to protect human keratinocytes against UVB-induced cell damage and death. PMID:26157553

  4. Protection from radiation-induced damage to spermatogenesis by hormone treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kurdoglu, B.; Wilson, G.; Parchuri, N.; Ye, W.; Meistrich, M.L.

    1994-07-01

    Infertility caused by killing of the spermatogonial stem cells occurs frequently in men treated for cancer with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. We investigated whether pretreatment of rats with testosterone plus estradiol, which reversibly inhibits the completion of spermatogenesis and protects spermatogonial stem cells from procarbazine-induced damage, would also protect these cells from radiation. Adult male LBNF rats were implanted for 6 weeks with capsules containing testosterone and estradiol and then irradiated with doses from 2.5-7.0 Gy. Controls were irradiated with 1.8-3.5 Gy. Implants were removed 1 day after irradiation, and all animals were killed 10 weeks later for assessment of stem cell survival by counting repopulating tubules in histological sections and by sperm head counts. At doses of 2.5 and 3.5 Gy the repopulation indices and sperm head counts were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the rats treated with testosterone and estradiol than in the controls. Protection factors calculated from the dose-response curves were in the range of 1.5-2.2. Elucidation of the mechanism of protection is essential to apply it to clinical situations. The fact that the spermatogonia are protected against radiation as well as procarbazine indicates that the mechanism does not involve drug delivery or metabolism. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Milk phospholipid's protective effects against UV damage in skin equivalent models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dargitz, Carl; Russell, Ashley; Bingham, Michael; Achay, Zyra; Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Laiho, Lily H.

    2012-03-01

    Exposure of skin tissue to UV radiation has been shown to cause DNA photodamage. If this damaged DNA is allowed to replicate, carcinogenesis may occur. DNA damage is prevented from being passed on to daughter cells by upregulation of the protein p21. p21 halts the cells cycle allowing the cell to undergo apoptosis, or repair its DNA before replication. Previous work suggested that milk phospholipids may possess protective properties against UV damage. In this study, we observed cell morphology, cell apoptosis, and p21 expression in tissue engineered epidermis through the use of Hematoxylin and Eosin staining, confocal microscopy, and western blot respectively. Tissues were divided into four treatment groups including: a control group with no UV and no milk phospholipid treatment, a group exposed to UV alone, a group incubated with milk phospholipids alone, and a group treated with milk phospholipids and UV. All groups were incubated for twenty-four hours after treatment. Tissues were then fixed, processed, and embedded in paraffin. Performing western blots resulted in visible p21 bands for the UV group only, implying that in every other group, p21 expression was lesser. Numbers of apoptotic cells were determined by observing the tissues treated with Hoechst dye under a confocal microscope, and counting the number of apoptotic and total cells to obtain a percentage of apoptotic cells. We found a decrease in apoptotic cells in tissues treated with milk phospholipids and UV compared to tissues exposed to UV alone. Collectively, these results suggest that milk phospholipids protect cell DNA from damage incurred from UV light.

  6. Protective effect of carboxymethyl-glucan (CM-G) against DNA damage in patients with advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Magnani, Marciane; Castro-Gomez, Raul Jorge Hernan; Mori, Mateus Prates; Kuasne, Hellen; Gregório, Emerson Pereira; Libos, Farid; de Syllos Cólus, Ilce Mara

    2011-01-01

    Carboxymethyl-glucan (CM-G) is a soluble derivative from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (1 → 3)(1 → 6)-β-D-glucan. The protective efficiency of CM-G against DNA damage in cells from patients with advanced prostate cancer (PCa), and undergoing Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT), was evaluated. DNA damage scores were obtained by the comet assay, both before and after treatment with CM-G. The reduction in DNA damage, ranging from 18% to 87%, with an average of 59%, was not related to the increased number of leukocytes in peripheral blood. The results demonstrate for the first time the protective effect of CM-G against DNA damage in patients with advanced PCa. Among smokers, three presented the highest reduction in DNA damage after treatment with CM-G. There was no observable relationship between DNA damage scores before and after treatment, and age, alcoholism and radiotherapy. PMID:21637556

  7. Differential protection by nitroxides and hydroxylamines to radiation-induced and metal ion-catalyzed oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Sandhya; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Samuni, Ayelet M; Samuni, Amram; DeGraff, William; Krishna, Murali C; Mitchell, James B

    2002-11-14

    Modulation of radiation- and metal ion-catalyzed oxidative-induced damage using plasmid DNA, genomic DNA, and cell survival, by three nitroxides and their corresponding hydroxylamines, were examined. The antioxidant property of each compound was independently determined by reacting supercoiled DNA with copper II/1,10-phenanthroline complex fueled by the products of hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase (HX/XO) and noting the protective effect as assessed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The nitroxides and their corresponding hydroxylamines protected approximately to the same degree (33-47% relaxed form) when compared to 76.7% relaxed form in the absence of protectors. Likewise, protection by both the nitroxide and corresponding hydroxylamine were observed for Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide. In contrast, when plasmid DNA damage was induced by ionizing radiation (100 Gy), only nitroxides (10 mM) provide protection (32.4-38.5% relaxed form) when compared to radiation alone or in the presence of hydroxylamines (10 mM) (79.8% relaxed form). Nitroxide protection was concentration dependent. Radiation cell survival studies and DNA double-strand break (DBS) assessment (pulse field electrophoresis) showed that only the nitroxide protected or prevented damage, respectively. Collectively, the results show that nitroxides and hydroxylamines protect equally against the damage mediated by oxidants generated by the metal ion-catalyzed Haber-Weiss reaction, but only nitroxides protect against radiation damage, suggesting that nitroxides may more readily react with intermediate radical species produced by radiation than hydroxylamines. PMID:12399020

  8. Some lessons on radiological protection learnt from the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Kai, M

    2012-03-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant released a large quantity of radioactive iodine and caesium into the environment. In terms of radiological protection, the evacuation and food restrictions that were adopted in a timely manner by the authorities effectively reduced the dose received by people living in the affected area. Since late March, the transition from an emergency to an existing exposure situation has been in progress. In selecting the reference exposure levels in some areas under an existing exposure situation, the authorities tried to follow the situation-based approach recommended by the ICRP. However, a mixture of emergency and post-emergency approaches confused the people living in the contaminated areas because the reactor conditions continued to be not completely stable. In deriving the criteria in an existing exposure situation, the regulatory authority selected 20 mSv y(-1). The mothers in the affected area believed that a dose of 20 mSv y(-1) was unacceptably high for children since 1 mSv y(-1) is the dose limit for the public under normal conditions. Internet information accelerated concern about the internal exposure to children and the related health effects. From some experiences after the accident the following lessons could be learned. The selection of reference doses in existing exposure situations after an accident must be openly communicated with the public using a risk-informed approach. The detriment-adjusted nominal risk coefficient was misused for calculating the hypothetical number of cancer deaths by some non-radiation experts. It would not be possible to resolve this problem unless the ICRP addressed an alternative risk assessment to convey the meaning and associated uncertainty of the risk to an exposed population. A situation-based approach in addition to a risk-informed approach needs to be disseminated properly in order to select the level of protection that would be the best possible under the

  9. MiR-25 protects cardiomyocytes against oxidative damage by targeting the mitochondrial calcium uniporter.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lei; Huang, Bi-Jun; Ma, Xiu-E; Wang, Shi-Yi; Feng, Jing; Lv, Fei; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yi; Li, Chang-Ming; Liang, Dan-Dan; Li, Jun; Xu, Liang; Chen, Yi-Han

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs, whose expression levels vary in different cell types and tissues. Emerging evidence indicates that tissue-specific and -enriched miRNAs are closely associated with cellular development and stress responses in their tissues. MiR-25 has been documented to be abundant in cardiomyocytes, but its function in the heart remains unknown. Here, we report that miR-25 can protect cardiomyocytes against oxidative damage by down-regulating mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). MiR-25 was markedly elevated in response to oxidative stimulation in cardiomyocytes. Further overexpression of miR-25 protected cardiomyocytes against oxidative damage by inactivating the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. MCU was identified as a potential target of miR-25 by bioinformatical analysis. MCU mRNA level was reversely correlated with miR-25 under the exposure of H2O2, and MCU protein level was largely decreased by miR-25 overexpression. The luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR-25 bound directly to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of MCU mRNA. MiR-25 significantly decreased H2O2-induced elevation of mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration, which is likely to be the result of decreased activity of MCU. We conclude that miR-25 targets MCU to protect cardiomyocytes against oxidative damages. This finding provides novel insights into the involvement of miRNAs in oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes. PMID:25764156

  10. Protection by WR-151327 against late-effect damage from fission-spectrum neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology); Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Considerable effort has been expended to develop chemical agents capable of modifying radiation-induced damage to biological systems. The authors describe here differences in the radioprotective effect of WR-151327, depending on the sex of the animal and the post-irradiation time interval considered. The greatest effect in female animals is prior to 805 days post irradiation. The greater protection in male animals is seen during the time increment following 850 days after irradiation. While it is difficult at present to ascribe these effects to a particulate model, it is suggestive that hormonal factors may play a role in aminothiol protection against radiation-induced life shortening and concomitant tumor induction in the B6CF{sub 1} hybrid mouse system. With respect to subsequent tumor induction, their preliminary findings to be published elsewhere suggest that tumors of lymphoreticular origin are the class of tumors most affected by the administration of a radioprotector prior to irradiation. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Carbon tetrachloride-induced kidney damage and protective effect of Amaranthus lividus L. in rats.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz-Ozden, Tugba; Can, Ayse; Karatug, Ayse; Pala-Kara, Zeliha; Okyar, Alper; Bolkent, Sehnaz

    2016-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the protective effect of water extract of Amaranthus lividus L. (A. lividus) (Amaranthaceae) on carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced toxicity in kidneys of rats. For this purpose, male albino Wistar rats were pretreated with A. lividus (250 and 500 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)) daily for 9 days and a single dose of CCl4 was applied intraperitoneally (50% in olive oil; 1.5 mL/kg b.w.) on the 10th day. All rats were killed 24 h after CCl4 administration, and kidneys were excised and used for determination of histopathological and biochemical parameters. CCl4 administration caused a remarkable increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO) and glutathione levels and glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities and a decrease in catalase (CAT) activity when compared to the control group. Pretreatment with A. lividus (250 and 500 mg/kg b.w.) significantly prevented the elevation in LPO level and MPO activity as well as protected the decrease in CAT activity but did not alter other biochemical parameters. The protective effect of A. lividus was further evident through the decreased histological alterations in kidneys. In conclusion, this study has indicated that A. lividus possesses protective and antioxidant effects against CCl4-induced oxidative kidney damage. PMID:25415872

  12. A damage assessment model of oil spill accident combining historical data and satellite remote sensing information: a case study in Penglai 19-3 oil spill accident of China.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lai; Hu, Zhuowei; Dong, Lin; Zhao, Wenji

    2015-02-15

    Oil spills are one of the major sources of marine pollution; it is important to conduct comprehensive assessment of losses that occur as a result of these events. Traditional methods are required to assess the three parts of losses including cleanup, socioeconomic losses, and environmental costs. It is relatively slow because assessment is complex and time consuming. A relatively quick method was developed to improve the efficiency of assessment, and then applied to the Penglai 19-3 accident. This paper uses an SAR image to calculate the oil spill area through Neural Network Classification, and uses historical oil-spill data to build the relationship between loss and other factors including sea-surface wind speed, and distance to the coast. A multiple regression equation was used to assess oil spill damage as a function of the independent variables. Results of this study can be used for regulating and quickly dealing with oil spill assessment. PMID:25530016

  13. Protective Effect of Sundakai (Solanum torvum) Seed Protein (SP) Against Oxidative Membrane Damage in Human Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sivapriya, M; Gowda, S S Thammanna; Srinivas, Leela

    2015-12-01

    Lipid peroxidation by ROS at the membrane level disturbs the inherit integrity of components activating subsequent alterations in the function. In this study, the protective effect of purified Sundakai (Solanum torvum) seed protein (SP) was tested against oxidative membrane damage in erythrocyte membrane. SP prevented oxidative RBC lysis induced by pro-oxidants; Fe:As (2:20 μmol), periodate (0.4 mM), and t-BOOH (1 mM) up to 86, 81, and 86 %, respectively. Further, SP prevented the Fe:As-induced K(+) leakage up to the tune of 95 %. The inhibition offered by SP on K(+) leakage was comparable to inhibition offered by quinine sulfate, a known K(+) channel blocker. SP dose dependently restored Na(+)K(+) ATPase and Ca(2+)Mg(2+) ATPase activities in erythrocyte membrane. The restoration of ATPase activity by SP was two times more than standard antioxidants BHA and α-tocopherol. Besides, SP at 1.6 μmol restored the membrane proteins over Fe:As induction when analyzed by SDS-PAGE, which was comparable to protection offered by BHA. In conclusion, SP is an effective antioxidant in preventing oxidative membrane damage and associated functions mediated by ROS. As SP is non-toxic, it can be used as an effective bioprotective antioxidant agent to cellular components. PMID:26374653

  14. Oenanthe Javanica Extract Protects Against Experimentally Induced Ischemic Neuronal Damage via its Antioxidant Effects

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joon Ha; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Kim, In Hye; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Jae-Chul; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich-Na; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Hong, SeongKweon; Kang, Il Jun; Won, Moo-Ho; Kim, Jong-Dai

    2015-01-01

    Background: Water dropwort (Oenanthe javanica) as a popular traditional medicine in Asia shows various biological properties including antioxidant activity. In this study, we firstly examined the neuroprotective effect of Oenanthe javanica extract (OJE) in the hippocampal cornus ammonis 1 region (CA1 region) of the gerbil subjected to transient cerebral ischemia. Methods: Gerbils were established by the occlusion of common carotid arteries for 5 min. The neuroprotective effect of OJE was estimated by cresyl violet staining. In addition, 4 antioxidants (copper, zinc superoxide dismutase [SOD], manganese SOD, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase) immunoreactivities were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Results: Pyramidal neurons in the CA1 region showed neuronal death at 5 days postischemia; at this point in time, all antioxidants immunoreactivities disappeared in CA1 pyramidal neurons and showed in many nonpyramidal cells. Treatment with 200 mg/kg, not 100 mg/kg, OJE protected CA1 pyramidal neurons from ischemic damage. In addition, 200 mg/kg OJE treatment increased or maintained antioxidants immunoreactivities. Especially, among the antioxidants, glutathione peroxidase immunoreactivity was effectively increased in the CA1 pyramidal neurons of the OJE-treated sham-operated and ischemia-operated groups. Conclusion: Our present results indicate that treatment with OJE can protect neurons from transient ischemic damage and that the neuroprotective effect may be closely associated with increased or maintained intracellular antioxidant enzymes by OJE. PMID:26521793

  15. DNA Protection against Oxidative Damage Using the Hydroalcoholic Extract of Garcinia mangostana and Alpha-Mangostin.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Silva, Ronaldo; Pereira, Alanna Cibelle Fernandes; Dos Santos Alves, Rúbens Prince; Guecheva, Temenouga N; Henriques, João A P; Brendel, Martin; Pungartnik, Cristina; Rios-Santos, Fabrício

    2016-01-01

    Garcinia mangostana, popularly known as "mangosteen fruit," originates from Southeast Asia and came to Brazil about 80 years ago where it mainly grows in the states of Pará and Bahia. Although mangosteen or its extracts have been used for ages in Asian folk medicine, data on its potential genotoxicity is missing. We, therefore, evaluated genotoxicity/mutagenicity of hydroethanolic mangosteen extract [HEGM, 10 to 640 μg/mL] in established test assays (Comet assay, micronucleus test, and Salmonella/microsome test). In the Comet assay, HEGM-exposed human leukocytes showed no DNA damage. No significant HEGM-induced mutation in TA98 and TA100 strains of Salmonella typhimurium (with or without metabolic activation) was observed and HEGM-exposed human lymphocytes had no increase of micronuclei. However, HEGM suggested exposure concentration-dependent antigenotoxic potential in leukocytes and antioxidant potential in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. HEGM preloading effectively protected against H2O2-induced DNA damage in leukocytes (Comet assay). Preloading of yeast with HEGM for up to 4 h significantly protected the cells from lethality of chronic H2O2-exposure, as expressed in better survival. Absence of genotoxicity and demonstration of an antigenotoxic and antioxidant potential suggest that HEGM or some substances contained in it may hold promise for pharmaceutical or nutraceutical application. PMID:27042187

  16. Lactobacillus protects the integrity of intestinal epithelial barrier damaged by pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qinghua; Yuan, Lixia; Deng, Jun; Yang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens invade intestinal mucosal barrier through phagocytosis of antigen presenting cells (dendritic cell, microfold cells), or through the invasion into the intestinal epithelial directly. Some pathogens could damage the cell junction between epithelial cells and use the paracellular pathway as an entrance to invade. Moreover, some Lactobacillus could inhibit the adhesion of the pathogens and protect the integrity of the cell junction and mucosal barrier. This research focused on the potential therapeutic effect of Lactobacillus fructosus (L. fructosus) C2 to attenuate ETEC K88 or S. typhimurium SL1344 induced changes to mucosal barrier. The results demonstrated that treatment of polarized Caco-2 cells with L. fructosus C2 reduced the permeation of dextran, and expression of IL-8, p-ERK, and p-JNK when cells were infected with pathogenic bacteria. The findings indicated that L. fructosus C2 exerted a protective effect against the damage to the integrity of Caco-2 cells by ETEC or S. typhimurium infection. PMID:25859435

  17. Protective effect of Eruca sativa seed oil against oral nicotine induced testicular damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Aziz, Gamal Said; El-Fark, Magdy Omar; Hamdy, Raid Mahmoud

    2016-08-01

    Nicotine is a pharmacologically active component of the tobacco that adversely affects the male reproductive system and fertility. Nicotine administration in experimental animals was found to affect spermatogenesis, epididymal sperm count, motility and the fertilizing potential of sperms. The goal of this work is to assess the protective or ameliorative effect of Eruca Sativa seed oil against testicular damage induced by oral administration of nicotine in rats. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were used and divided into three groups; control, nicotine treated and nicotine and Eruca seed oil treated groups. After three weeks of treatment, the rats were weighed and sacrificed where testes were removed and weighed then calculating relative testis weights. The testes were processed for routine paraffin embedding and staining and the sections were examined for different morphometric and histopathological changes. The results show that nicotine administration had an effect on the body and testis weight and various morphometric parameters of the testis. It also induced varying degrees of structural damage to the seminiferous tubules, with shrinkage and absence of mature spermatids. Disorganized, vacuolization and loss of germinal cells were noticed in the basement membrane. The co-administration of Eruca Sativa seed oil led to improvement in the morphometric and histopathological changes of the seminiferous tubules. In conclusion, Eruca Sativa seed oil treatment in this study had a protective role by reversing, almost completely, all morphometric and histological changes in the testis induced by nicotine administration. PMID:27289444

  18. DNA Protection against Oxidative Damage Using the Hydroalcoholic Extract of Garcinia mangostana and Alpha-Mangostin

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho-Silva, Ronaldo; Pereira, Alanna Cibelle Fernandes; dos Santos Alves, Rúbens Prince; Guecheva, Temenouga N.; Henriques, João A. P.; Brendel, Martin; Rios-Santos, Fabrício

    2016-01-01

    Garcinia mangostana, popularly known as “mangosteen fruit,” originates from Southeast Asia and came to Brazil about 80 years ago where it mainly grows in the states of Pará and Bahia. Although mangosteen or its extracts have been used for ages in Asian folk medicine, data on its potential genotoxicity is missing. We, therefore, evaluated genotoxicity/mutagenicity of hydroethanolic mangosteen extract [HEGM, 10 to 640 μg/mL] in established test assays (Comet assay, micronucleus test, and Salmonella/microsome test). In the Comet assay, HEGM-exposed human leukocytes showed no DNA damage. No significant HEGM-induced mutation in TA98 and TA100 strains of Salmonella typhimurium (with or without metabolic activation) was observed and HEGM-exposed human lymphocytes had no increase of micronuclei. However, HEGM suggested exposure concentration-dependent antigenotoxic potential in leukocytes and antioxidant potential in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. HEGM preloading effectively protected against H2O2-induced DNA damage in leukocytes (Comet assay). Preloading of yeast with HEGM for up to 4 h significantly protected the cells from lethality of chronic H2O2-exposure, as expressed in better survival. Absence of genotoxicity and demonstration of an antigenotoxic and antioxidant potential suggest that HEGM or some substances contained in it may hold promise for pharmaceutical or nutraceutical application. PMID:27042187

  19. Hesperidin protects testicular and spermatological damages induced by cisplatin in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaya, K; Ciftci, O; Cetin, A; Doğan, H; Başak, N

    2015-09-01

    The clinic usage of cisplatin, an anticancer drug, is limited due to it has many side effects in many systems and organs. In this context, it was aimed to investigate the protective effect of hesperidin, a citrus flavonoid, on testicular and spermatological damages induced by cisplatin in rats. The rats were randomly divided into four groups. The first group was kept as a control. In the second groups, cisplatin was given at the single dose of 7 mg kg(-1) intraperitoneally. In the third group, hesperidin was orally administered at the dose of 50 mg/kg day(-1) for 14 days. In the fourth group, cisplatin and hesperidin were given together at the same doses. Cisplatin treatment caused significant reductions enzymatic (SOD, CAT and GPx) and nonenzymatic (GSH) antioxidants and significant induction level of TBARS. In addition, cisplatin treatment caused decreased sperm motility, epididymal sperm concentration, increased abnormal sperm rate and histopathological damage. In contrast, hesperidin treatment significantly attenuated the harmful effects. In conclusion, this study clearly demonstrated that hesperidin has protective effects on cisplatin-induced reproductive system toxicity depending on its antioxidant properties. Thus, it is thought that hesperidin may be useful against cisplatin toxicity in patients with cancer in terms of reproductive system. PMID:25220503

  20. XPD localizes in mitochondria and protects the mitochondrial genome from oxidative DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Fang, Hongbo; Chi, Zhenfen; Wu, Zan; Wei, Di; Mo, Dongliang; Niu, Kaifeng; Balajee, Adayabalam S.; Hei, Tom K.; Nie, Linghu; Zhao, Yongliang

    2015-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD/ERCC2) encodes an ATP-dependent helicase that plays essential roles in both transcription and nucleotide excision repair of nuclear DNA, however, whether or not XPD exerts similar functions in mitochondria remains elusive. In this study, we provide the first evidence that XPD is localized in the inner membrane of mitochondria, and cells under oxidative stress showed an enhanced recruitment of XPD into mitochondrial compartment. Furthermore, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and levels of oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) common deletion were significantly elevated, whereas capacity for oxidative damage repair of mtDNA was markedly reduced in both XPD-suppressed human osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells and XPD-deficient human fibroblasts. Immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry analysis was used to identify interacting factor(s) with XPD and TUFM, a mitochondrial Tu translation elongation factor was detected to be physically interacted with XPD. Similar to the findings in XPD-deficient cells, mitochondrial common deletion and oxidative damage repair capacity in U2OS cells were found to be significantly altered after TUFM knock-down. Our findings clearly demonstrate that XPD plays crucial role(s) in protecting mitochondrial genome stability by facilitating an efficient repair of oxidative DNA damage in mitochondria. PMID:25969448

  1. DNA damage protective effect of honey-sweetened cashew apple nectar in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Silva, Robson Alves da; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; Dias, Lucas Pinheiro; Costa, Maiane Papke; Abreu, Bianca Regina Ribas de; Cunha, Kênya Silva; Lehmann, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Fruits and derivatives, such as juices, are complex mixtures of chemicals, some of which may have mutagenic and/or carcinogenic potential, while others may have antimutagenic and/or anticancer activities. The modulating effects of honey-sweetened cashew apple nectar (HSCAN), on somatic mutation and recombination induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and mitomycin C (MMC) were evaluated with the wing spot test in Drosophila melanogaster using co- and post-treatment protocols. Additionally, the antimutagenic activity of two HSCAN components, cashew apple pulp and honey, in MMC-induced DNA damage was also investigated. HSCAN reduced the mutagenic activity of both EMS and MMC in the co-treatment protocol, but had a co-mutagenic effect when post-administered. Similar results were also observed with honey on MMC mutagenic activity. Cashew apple pulp was effective in exerting protective or enhancing effects on the MMC mutagenicity, depending on the administration protocol and concentration used. Overall, these results indicate that HSCAN, cashew apple and honey seem capable of modulating not only the events that precede the induced DNA damages, but also the Drosophila DNA repair processes involved in the correction of EMS and MMC-induced damages. PMID:27560988

  2. DNA damage protective effect of honey-sweetened cashew apple nectar in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Silva, Robson Alves da; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; Dias, Lucas Pinheiro; Costa, Maiane Papke; Abreu, Bianca Regina Ribas de; Cunha, Kênya Silva; Lehmann, Mauricio

    2016-07-25

    Fruits and derivatives, such as juices, are complex mixtures of chemicals, some of which may have mutagenic and/or carcinogenic potential, while others may have antimutagenic and/or anticancer activities. The modulating effects of honey-sweetened cashew apple nectar (HSCAN), on somatic mutation and recombination induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and mitomycin C (MMC) were evaluated with the wing spot test in Drosophila melanogaster using co- and post-treatment protocols. Additionally, the antimutagenic activity of two HSCAN components, cashew apple pulp and honey, in MMC-induced DNA damage was also investigated. HSCAN reduced the mutagenic activity of both EMS and MMC in the co-treatment protocol, but had a co-mutagenic effect when post-administered. Similar results were also observed with honey on MMC mutagenic activity. Cashew apple pulp was effective in exerting protective or enhancing effects on the MMC mutagenicity, depending on the administration protocol and concentration used. Overall, these results indicate that HSCAN, cashew apple and honey seem capable of modulating not only the events that precede the induced DNA damages, but also the Drosophila DNA repair processes involved in the correction of EMS and MMC-induced damages. PMID:27459259

  3. DNA damage protective effect of honey-sweetened cashew apple nectar in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Robson Alves; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues; Dias, Lucas Pinheiro; Costa, Maiane Papke; de Abreu, Bianca Regina Ribas; Cunha, Kênya Silva; Lehmann, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Fruits and derivatives, such as juices, are complex mixtures of chemicals, some of which may have mutagenic and/or carcinogenic potential, while others may have antimutagenic and/or anticancer activities. The modulating effects of honey-sweetened cashew apple nectar (HSCAN), on somatic mutation and recombination induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and mitomycin C (MMC) were evaluated with the wing spot test in Drosophila melanogaster using co- and post-treatment protocols. Additionally, the antimutagenic activity of two HSCAN components, cashew apple pulp and honey, in MMC-induced DNA damage was also investigated. HSCAN reduced the mutagenic activity of both EMS and MMC in the co-treatment protocol, but had a co-mutagenic effect when post-administered. Similar results were also observed with honey on MMC mutagenic activity. Cashew apple pulp was effective in exerting protective or enhancing effects on the MMC mutagenicity, depending on the administration protocol and concentration used. Overall, these results indicate that HSCAN, cashew apple and honey seem capable of modulating not only the events that precede the induced DNA damages, but also the Drosophila DNA repair processes involved in the correction of EMS and MMC-induced damages. PMID:27560988

  4. Dexmedetomidine protects from post-myocardial ischaemia reperfusion lung damage in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Kip, Gülay; Çelik, Ali; Bilge, Mustafa; Alkan, Metin; Kiraz, Hasan Ali; Özer, Abdullah; Şıvgın, Volkan; Erdem, Özlem; Arslan, Mustafa; Kavutçu, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    was significantly higher in the DIR group than in the DIRD and C groups. Conclusion Our results confirm that dexmedetomidine has protective effects against the lung damage resulting from I/R in diabetic rats. Future studies conducted to evaluate the effects of the use of dexmedetomidine on damage to various organs following different I/R durations may help understanding possible protective effects of dexmedetomidine and underlying mechanisms in tissue damage related to I/R injury. PMID:26387799

  5. Mitochondrial Peroxiredoxin-3 protects against hyperglycemia induced myocardial damage in Diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Arkat, Silpa; Umbarkar, Prachi; Singh, Sarojini; Sitasawad, Sandhya L

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress has emerged as a key contributor towards the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Peroxiredoxin-3 (Prx-3), a mitochondrial antioxidant, scavenges H2O2 and offers protection against ROS related pathologies. We observed a decrease in the expression of Prx-3 in the hearts of streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats, and also high glucose treated H9c2 cardiac cells, which may augment oxidative stress mediated damage. Hence we hypothesized that overexpression of Prx-3 could prevent the cardiac damage associated with diabetes. In this study we used quercetin (QUE) to achieve Prx-3 induction in vivo, while a Prx-3 overexpressing H9c2 cell line was employed for carrying out in vitro studies. Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ. Quercetin (50mg/kg body weight) was delivered orally to hyperglycemic and age matched control rats for 2 months. Quercetin treatment induced the myocardial expression of Prx-3 but not Prx-5 both in control and STZ rats. Prx-3 induction by quercetin prevented diabetes induced oxidative stress as confirmed by decrease in expression of markers such as 4-HNE and mitochondrial uncoupling protein, UCP-3. It was also successful in reducing cardiac cell apoptosis, hypertrophy and fibrosis leading to amelioration of cardiac contractility defects. Overexpression of Prx-3 in cultured H9c2 cardiac cells could significantly diminish high glucose inflicted mitochondrial oxidative damage and apoptosis, thus strengthening our hypothesis. These results suggest that diabetes induced cardiomyopathy can be prevented by elevating Prx-3 levels thereby providing extensive protection to the diabetic heart. PMID:27393003

  6. Zoledronate Attenuates Accumulation of DNA Damage in Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Protects Their Function

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Juhi; Mohanty, Sindhu T.; Madan, Sanjeev; Fernandes, James A.; Hal Ebetino, F.; Russell, R. Graham G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) undergo a decline in function following ex vivo expansion and exposure to irradiation. This has been associated with accumulation of DNA damage and has important implications for tissue engineering approaches or in patients receiving radiotherapy. Therefore, interventions, which limit accumulation of DNA damage in MSC, are of clinical significance. We were intrigued by findings showing that zoledronate (ZOL), an anti‐resorptive nitrogen containing bisphosphonate, significantly extended survival in patients affected by osteoporosis. The effect was too large to be simply due to the prevention of fractures. Moreover, in combination with statins, it extended the lifespan in a mouse model of Hutchinson Gilford Progeria Syndrome. Therefore, we asked whether ZOL was able to extend the lifespan of human MSC and whether this was due to reduced accumulation of DNA damage, one of the important mechanisms of aging. Here, we show that this was the case both following expansion and irradiation, preserving their ability to proliferate and differentiate in vitro. In addition, administration of ZOL before irradiation protected the survival of mesenchymal progenitors in mice. Through mechanistic studies, we were able to show that inhibition of mTOR signaling, a pathway involved in longevity and cancer, was responsible for these effects. Our data open up new opportunities to protect MSC from the side effects of radiotherapy in cancer patients and during ex vivo expansion for regenerative medicine approaches. Given that ZOL is already in clinical use with a good safety profile, these opportunities can be readily translated for patient benefit. Stem Cells 2016;34:756–767 PMID:26679354

  7. Immunization with Pneumolysin Protects Against Both Retinal and Global Damage Caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Melissa E.; Norcross, Erin W.; Moore, Quincy C.; Fratkin, Jonathan; Thompson, Hilary

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To determine whether immunization with pneumolysin (PLY) protects against pneumococcal endophthalmitis. Methods New Zealand white rabbits were immunized with a mutant form of PLY that retains only 1% of its cytolytic activity until serum IgG titers were ≥51,200. For a negative control, rabbits were immunized with phosphate-buffered saline (mock). Each vitreous was injected with 102 colony-forming units of a clinical endophthalmitis isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Severity of endophthalmitis was graded by slit lamp examination at 24 and 48 h postinfection (PI). Serial dilutions of vitreous were plated for bacterial colony-forming units quantitation, eyes were extracted for histology, and a whole blood survival assay was performed. Results Immunized rabbits had a significantly lower mean slit lamp examination score at 24 and 48 h PI when compared to mock immunized rabbits (P ≤ 0.002). There was not a significant difference in bacterial load in the vitreous at 24 or 48 h PI. Histological sections showed that retinas of mock immunized rabbits appeared to be destroyed, whereas those of PLY immunized rabbits remained largely intact. Damage spread to the aqueous humor, stroma, and conjunctiva of mock immunized rabbits by 48 h PI. Minimal damage was observed in the vitreous of PLY immunized rabbits and did not spread to other parts of the eye. Whole blood from immunized rabbits inhibited the growth of bacteria better than whole blood from mock immunized rabbits. Conclusion Immunization with PLY helps protect the eye from damage caused by pneumococcal endophthalmitis. PMID:21034245

  8. Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Ahmadi, Abbas; Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. Highlights: ► Cisplatin (CIS) affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. ► Effect of Nano-Se on CIS-induced spermatotoxicity was investigated. ► CIS-exposure induces oxidative sperm DNA damage

  9. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1992, A status report. Volume 17, Main report and Appendix A

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.F.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Cross-Dial, A.E.; Morris, R.H.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N.; Dolan, B.W.; Jansen, J.M.; Minarick, J.W.; Lau, W.; Salyer, W.D.

    1993-12-01

    Twenty-seven operational events with conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage of 1.0 {times} 10E-06 or higher occurring at commercial light-water reactors during 1992 are considered to be precursors to potential core damage. These are described along with associated significance estimates, categorization, and subsequent analyses. The report discusses (1) the general rationale for this study, (2) the selection and documentation of events as precursors, (3) the estimation and use of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage to rank precursor events, and (4) the plant models used in the analysis process.

  10. Beneficial protective effect of pramipexole on light-induced retinal damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Shibagaki, Keiichi; Okamoto, Kazuyoshi; Katsuta, Osamu; Nakamura, Masatsugu

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the effects of pramipexole, a potent dopamine receptor D2/D3 agonist, on light-induced retinal damage in mice, H2O2-induced retinal pigment epithelium ARPE-19 cell injury in humans, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity in a cell-free system. Pramipexole (0.1 and 1 mg/kg body weight) was orally administered to mice 1 h before light exposure (5000 lux, 2 h). Electrophysiological and morphologic studies were performed to evaluate the effects of the pramipexole on light-induced retinal damage in mice. Pramipexole significantly prevented the reduction of the a- and b-wave electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes caused by light exposure in a dose-dependent manner. In parallel, damage to the inner and outer segments (IS/OS) of the photoreceptors, loss of photoreceptor nuclei, and the number of Tdt-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) caused by light exposure were notably ameliorated by pramipexole. Additionally, pramipexole suppressed H2O2-induced ARPE-19 cell death in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of pramipexole was significant at concentrations of 10(-6) M or higher. Pramipexole also significantly prevented H2O2-induced activation of caspases-3/7 and the intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a concentration-dependent manner ranging from 10(-5) to 10(-3) M. Furthermore, pramipexole increased the scavenging activity toward a hydroxyl radical generated from H2O2 in a Fenton reaction. Our results suggest that pramipexole protects against light-induced retinal damage as an antioxidant and that it may be a novel and effective therapy for retinal degenerative disorders, such as dry age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26213307

  11. mGluR5 protect astrocytes from ischemic damage in postnatal CNS white matter

    PubMed Central

    Vanzulli, Ilaria; Butt, Arthur M.

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes perform essential neuron-supporting functions in the central nervous system (CNS) and their disruption has devastating effects on neuronal integrity in multiple neuropathologies. Although astrocytes are considered resistant to most pathological insults, ischemia can result in astrocyte injury and astrocytes in postnatal white matter are particularly vulnerable. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) are neuroprotective in ischemia and are widely expressed by astrocytes throughout CNS grey matter, but their potential cytoprotective role in astrocytes had not been determined. Here, we identify functional expression of group I mGluR in white matter astrocytes and demonstrate their activation protects astrocytes from ischemic damage in the postnatal mouse optic nerve. Optic nerve astrocytes are shown to express mGluR5 using immunolabelling of sections and explant cultures from transgenic reporter mice in which GFAP drives expression of EGFP. In addition, using Fluo-4 calcium imaging in isolated intact optic nerves, we show that the group I/II mGluR agonist ACPD and the specific group I mGluR agonist DHPG evoke glial Ca2+ signals that were significantly inhibited by the group I mGluR antagonist AIDA. A key finding is that activation of group I mGluR protects astrocytes against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in situ, in isolated intact optic nerves from GFAP-EGFP mice. This study identifies a role for group I mGluR in protecting astrocytes against ischemia in postnatal white matter and suggests this may be a strategy for limiting damage in neuropathologies involving excitotoxity. PMID:26189008

  12. Sirt1 protects against high-fat diet-induced metabolic damage

    PubMed Central

    Pfluger, Paul T.; Herranz, Daniel; Velasco-Miguel, Susana; Serrano, Manuel; Tschöp, Matthias H.

    2008-01-01

    The identification of new pharmacological approaches to effectively prevent, treat, and cure the metabolic syndrome is of crucial importance. Excessive exposure to dietary lipids causes inflammatory responses, deranges the homeostasis of cellular metabolism, and is believed to constitute a key initiator of the metabolic syndrome. Mammalian Sirt1 is a protein deacetylase that has been involved in resveratrol-mediated protection from high-fat diet-induced metabolic damage, but direct proof for the implication of Sirt1 has remained elusive. Here, we report that mice with moderate overexpression of Sirt1 under the control of its natural promoter exhibit fat mass gain similar to wild-type controls when exposed to a high-fat diet. Higher energy expenditure appears to be compensated by a parallel increase in food intake. Interestingly, transgenic Sirt1 mice under a high-fat diet show lower lipid-induced inflammation along with better glucose tolerance, and are almost entirely protected from hepatic steatosis. We present data indicating that such beneficial effects of Sirt1 are due to at least two mechanisms: induction of antioxidant proteins MnSOD and Nrf1, possibly via stimulation of PGC1α, and lower activation of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNFα and IL-6, via down-modulation of NFκB activity. Together, these results provide direct proof of the protective potential of Sirt1 against the metabolic consequences of chronic exposure to a high-fat diet. PMID:18599449

  13. A Low-Dose Electron Diffraction Assay for Protection of Protein Structure against Damage from Drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massover, William H.

    2004-04-01

    A new assay using low-dose electron diffraction to measure the protection of protein structure against damage from drying is described. When thin single crystals of catalase are dried within water alone, low-dose electron diffraction yields no Bragg spots. Drying within an experimental aqueous solution that permits detection of diffraction spots thereby indicates a positive result, and the extent of these Bragg reflections into the high angle range gives a quantitative measure of the degree of protection. Bragg spots out to 3.7 3.9 [Angstrom capital A, ring] are recorded for drying within 100 mM solutions of the known structure-preserving sugars, sucrose, tannin, and trehalose. The ability of trehalose to maintain native protein structure during drying starts between 10 and 25 mM, and changes only slightly at concentrations above this threshold; with drying in 150-mM trehalose, catalase crystals yield diffraction spots out to 3.7 [Angstrom capital A, ring]. Drying within the organic nonsugar polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone gives Bragg spots to 4.0 [Angstrom capital A, ring]. This new assay should be useful to measure the unexamined structure-preserving capabilities of modified sugars, other nonsugars, and mixtures to identify which protective matrix maintains native protein structure to the greatest extent during drying; electron crystallography using that optimal matrix should yield protein structure at improved levels of high resolution.

  14. Protective effect of Cichorium glandulosum seeds from ultraviolet B-induced damage in rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo; Chen, Yuxin; Ma, Bingxin; Zhou, Gao; Tong, Jing; He, Jingsheng; Wang, Youwei

    2014-05-01

    Cichorium glandulosum Boiss. et Huet, a common herb for treating hepatitis, is indigenous to Europe, Western Asia, and the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China. This study aims at evaluating the protective activity of different extracts from C. glandulosum seeds against experimental oxidation- and ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced damage in rat liver mitochondria. The antioxidant property of different extracts from C. glandulosum seeds was investigated by employing various established in vitro systems, such as α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid), and reducing power assay. The protective effects of different C. glandulosum seed extracts against UVB-induced phototoxicity in a mitochondria model were also evaluated by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, glutathione, lipid hydroperoxide, conjugated diene, and 4-hydroxynonenal. The main compounds in C. glandulosum seeds were identified by HPLC-PDA-ESI-MS/MS. The results showed that C. glandulosum seed extracts have strong antioxidant activity, in which the ethyl acetate extract (EE) and n-butanol extract (BE) showed better activity than other extracts. In a UVB-induced mitochondria model, both EE and BE have better antioxidant activity and protective effects against phototoxicity than the petroleum ether extract, chloroform extract, and water extract. The differences in antioxidant activity and photoprotective capacity among these five extracts are associated with their phenolic compound content. Therefore, research on this function of C. glandulosum seeds may broaden their applications in the food and medical industry. PMID:24595542

  15. Protective Role of Comfrey Leave Extracts on UV-induced Zebrafish Fin Damage

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chien-Chung; Chou, Chi-Yuan; Chang, Yao-Chin; Wang, Hsuan-Wen; Wen, Chi-Chung; Chen, Yau-Hung

    2014-01-01

    In zebrafish, UV exposure leads to fin malformation phenotypes including fin reduction or absence. The present study evaluated UV-protective activities of comfrey leaves extracts in a zebrafish model by recording fin morphological changes. Chemopreventive effects of comfrey leave extracts were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression. The results showed that (1) the mean times of return to normal fin in the UV+comfrey (50 and 100 ppm) groups were 3.43 and 2.86 days and were quicker compared with that in the UV only group (4.21 days); (2) zebrafish fins in the UV+comfrey (50 and 100 ppm) groups were 2.05 and 3.25 times more likely to return to normal than those in the UV only group; and (3) comfrey leave extracts had UV-absorbance abilities and significantly reduced ROS production in UV-exposed zebrafish embryos, which may attenuate UV-mediated apoptosis. In conclusion, comfrey leaves extracts may have the potential to be developed as UV-protective agents to protect zebrafish embryos from UV-induced damage. PMID:25352712

  16. Detection of impact damage on thermal protection systems using thin-film piezoelectric sensors for integrated structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Jeong K.; Kuhr, Samuel J.; Jata, Kumar V.

    2008-03-01

    Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) can be subjected to impact damage during flight and/or during ground maintenance and/or repair. AFRL/RXLP is developing a reliable and robust on-board sensing/monitoring capability for next generation thermal protection systems to detect and assess impact damage. This study was focused on two classes of metallic thermal protection tiles to determine threshold for impact damage and develop sensing capability of the impacts. Sensors made of PVDF piezoelectric film were employed and tested to evaluate the detectability of impact signals and assess the onset or threshold of impact damage. Testing was performed over a range of impact energy levels, where the sensors were adhered to the back of the specimens. The PVDF signal levels were analyzed and compared to assess damage, where digital microscopy, visual inspection, and white light interferometry were used for damage verification. Based on the impact test results, an assessment of the impact damage thresholds for each type of metallic TPS system was made.

  17. Protective effect of pomegranate-derived products on UVB-mediated damage in human reconstituted skin.

    PubMed

    Afaq, Farrukh; Zaid, Mohammad Abu; Khan, Naghma; Dreher, Mark; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2009-06-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, particularly its UVB (290-320 nm) component, is the primary cause of many adverse biological effects including photoageing and skin cancer. UVB radiation causes DNA damage, protein oxidation and induces matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Photochemoprevention via the use of botanical antioxidants in affording protection to human skin against UVB damage is receiving increasing attention. Pomegranate, from the tree Punica granatum, contains anthocyanins and hydrolysable tannins and possesses strong antioxidant and anti-tumor-promoting properties. In this study, we determined the effect of pomegranate-derived products--POMx juice, POMx extract and pomegranate oil (POMo)--against UVB-mediated damage using reconstituted human skin (EpiDerm(TM) FT-200). EpiDerm was treated with POMx juice (1-2 microl/0.1 ml/well), POMx extract (5-10 microg/0.1 ml/well) and POMo (1-2 microl/0.1 ml/well) for 1 h prior to UVB (60 mJ/cm(2)) irradiation and was harvested 12 h post-UVB to assess protein oxidation, markers of DNA damage and photoageing by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Pretreatment of Epiderm with pomegranate-derived products resulted in inhibition of UVB-induced (i) cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), (ii) 8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), (iii) protein oxidation and (iv) proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein expression. We also found that pretreatment of Epiderm with pomegranate-derived products resulted in inhibition of UVB-induced (i) collagenase (MMP-1), (ii) gelatinase (MMP-2, MMP-9), (iii) stromelysin (MMP-3), (iv) marilysin (MMP-7), (v) elastase (MMP-12) and (vi) tropoelastin. Gelatin zymography revealed that pomegranate-derived products inhibited UVB-induced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. Pomegranate-derived products also caused a decrease in UVB-induced protein expression of c-Fos and phosphorylation of c-Jun. Collectively, these results suggest that all three pomegranate-derived products may be useful

  18. World commercial aircraft accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, C.Y.

    1993-01-01

    This report is a compilation of all accidents world-wide involving aircraft in commercial service which resulted in the loss of the airframe or one or more fatality, or both. This information has been gathered in order to present a complete inventory of commercial aircraft accidents. Events involving military action, sabotage, terrorist bombings, hijackings, suicides, and industrial ground accidents are included within this list. Included are: accidents involving world commercial jet aircraft, world commercial turboprop aircraft, world commercial pistonprop aircraft with four or more engines and world commercial pistonprop aircraft with two or three engines from 1946 to 1992. Each accident is presented with information in the following categories: date of the accident, airline and its flight numbers, type of flight, type of aircraft, aircraft registration number, construction number/manufacturers serial number, aircraft damage, accident flight phase, accident location, number of fatalities, number of occupants, cause, remarks, or description (brief) of the accident, and finally references used. The sixth chapter presents a summary of the world commercial aircraft accidents by major aircraft class (e.g. jet, turboprop, and pistonprop) and by flight phase. The seventh chapter presents several special studies including a list of world commercial aircraft accidents for all aircraft types with 100 or more fatalities in order of decreasing number of fatalities, a list of collision accidents involving commercial aircrafts, and a list of world commercial aircraft accidents for all aircraft types involving military action, sabotage, terrorist bombings, and hijackings.

  19. Wnt activation protects against neomycin-induced hair cell damage in the mouse cochlea.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Chen, Y; Qi, J; Zhang, Y; He, Y; Ni, W; Li, W; Zhang, S; Sun, S; Taketo, M M; Wang, L; Chai, R; Li, H

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in hair cell (HC) development, regeneration, and differentiation in the mouse cochlea; however, the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in HC protection remains unknown. In this study, we took advantage of transgenic mice to specifically knockout or overactivate the canonical Wnt signaling mediator β-catenin in HCs, which allowed us to investigate the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in protecting HCs against neomycin-induced damage. We first showed that loss of β-catenin in HCs made them more vulnerable to neomycin-induced injury, while constitutive activation of β-catenin in HCs reduced HC loss both in vivo and in vitro. We then showed that loss of β-catenin in HCs increased caspase-mediated apoptosis induced by neomycin injury, while β-catenin overexpression inhibited caspase-mediated apoptosis. Finally, we demonstrated that loss of β-catenin in HCs led to increased expression of forkhead box O3 transcription factor (Foxo3) and Bim along with decreased expression of antioxidant enzymes; thus, there were increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after neomycin treatment that might be responsible for the increased aminoglycoside sensitivity of HCs. In contrast, β-catenin overexpression reduced Foxo3 and Bim expression and ROS levels, suggesting that β-catenin is protective against neomycin-induced HC loss. Our findings demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signaling has an important role in protecting HCs against neomycin-induced HC loss and thus might be a new therapeutic target for the prevention of HC death. PMID:26962686

  20. Wnt activation protects against neomycin-induced hair cell damage in the mouse cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Liu, L; Chen, Y; Qi, J; Zhang, Y; He, Y; Ni, W; Li, W; Zhang, S; Sun, S; Taketo, M M; Wang, L; Chai, R; Li, H

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in hair cell (HC) development, regeneration, and differentiation in the mouse cochlea; however, the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in HC protection remains unknown. In this study, we took advantage of transgenic mice to specifically knockout or overactivate the canonical Wnt signaling mediator β-catenin in HCs, which allowed us to investigate the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in protecting HCs against neomycin-induced damage. We first showed that loss of β-catenin in HCs made them more vulnerable to neomycin-induced injury, while constitutive activation of β-catenin in HCs reduced HC loss both in vivo and in vitro. We then showed that loss of β-catenin in HCs increased caspase-mediated apoptosis induced by neomycin injury, while β-catenin overexpression inhibited caspase-mediated apoptosis. Finally, we demonstrated that loss of β-catenin in HCs led to increased expression of forkhead box O3 transcription factor (Foxo3) and Bim along with decreased expression of antioxidant enzymes; thus, there were increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after neomycin treatment that might be responsible for the increased aminoglycoside sensitivity of HCs. In contrast, β-catenin overexpression reduced Foxo3 and Bim expression and ROS levels, suggesting that β-catenin is protective against neomycin-induced HC loss. Our findings demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signaling has an important role in protecting HCs against neomycin-induced HC loss and thus might be a new therapeutic target for the prevention of HC death. PMID:26962686

  1. Fasting protects mice from lethal DNA damage by promoting small intestinal epithelial stem cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Tinkum, Kelsey L.; Stemler, Kristina M.; White, Lynn S.; Loza, Andrew J.; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Michalski, Basia M.; Kuzmicki, Catherine; Pless, Robert; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Short-term fasting protects mice from lethal doses of chemotherapy through undetermined mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that fasting preserves small intestinal (SI) architecture by maintaining SI stem cell viability and SI barrier function following exposure to high-dose etoposide. Nearly all SI stem cells were lost in fed mice, whereas fasting promoted sufficient SI stem cell survival to preserve SI integrity after etoposide treatment. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple SI stem cell populations, marked by Lgr5, Bmi1, or HopX expression, contributed to fasting-induced survival. DNA repair and DNA damage response genes were elevated in SI stem/progenitor cells of fasted etoposide-treated mice, which importantly correlated with faster resolution of DNA double-strand breaks and less apoptosis. Thus, fasting preserved SI stem cell viability as well as SI architecture and barrier function suggesting that fasting may reduce host toxicity in patients undergoing dose intensive chemotherapy. PMID:26644583

  2. Electron flow through biological molecules: Does hole hopping protect proteins from oxidative damage?

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Jay R.; Gray, Harry B.

    2016-01-01

    Biological electron transfers often occur between metal-containing cofactors that are separated by very large molecular distances. Employing photosensitizer-modified iron and copper proteins, we have shown that single-step electron tunneling can occur on nanosecond to microsecond timescales at distances between 15 and 20 angstroms. We also have shown that charge transport can occur over even longer distances by hole hopping (multistep tunneling) through intervening tyrosines and tryptophans. In this Perspective, we advance the hypothesis that such hole hopping through Tyr/Trp chains could protect oxygenase, dioxygenase, and peroxidase enzymes from oxidative damage. In support of this view, by examining the structures of P450 (CYP102A) and 2OG-Fe (TauD) enzymes, we have identified candidate Tyr/Trp chains that could transfer holes from uncoupled high-potential intermediates to reductants in contact with protein surface sites. PMID:26537399

  3. Protective effect of stress-induced liver damage by saponin fraction from Codonopsis lanceolata.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Ho; Lee, Jaehwi; Yoo, Dae Sung; Lee, Yong Gyu; Byeon, Se Eun; Hong, Eock Kee; Cho, Jae Youl

    2009-10-01

    Saponins are valuable principles found in various herbal medicine with pharmaceutical, cosmetical and nutraceutical merits. In this study, we evaluated the protective role of saponin fraction (Cl-SF), prepared from Codonopsis lanceolata, an ethnopharmacologically famous plant in Korea, China and Japan, on water immersion stress-induced liver damage and radical generation. Cl-SF clearly decreased the up-regulated levels of serum glutamate-oxalacetate transaminase and glutamate-pyruvate-transaminase induced by water-immersed stress conditions. Furthermore, Cl-SF seemed to block the stress-induced radicals. Thus, Griess and DPPH assays revealed that Cl-SF significantly suppressed both radical generation in sodium nitroprusside-treated RAW264.7 cells and nitric oxide production in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Therefore, these results suggest that Cl-SF may be considered as a promising stress-regulatory principle with radical scavenging actions. PMID:19898808

  4. Pinacidil protects osteoblastic cells against antimycin A-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Mi; Jung, Woon Won; Suh, Kwang Sik

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the protective effect of a non-selective mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channel (mito-KATP) opener, pinacidil, on antimycin A-induced oxidative damage in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Antimycin A inhibits mitochondrial electron transport by binding to complex III. Osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were treated with antimycin A in the presence or absence of pinacidil and markers of mitochondrial function and oxidative stress were subsequently examined. The effects of pinacidil on the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt and cyclic adenosine monophosphate‑responsive element-binding protein (CREB) were also examined. In osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells exposed to antimycin A, pinacidil inhibited antimycin A-induced cell death. The protective effects of pinacidil on cell survival were prevented by the addition of LY294002 (a PI3K inhibitor), an Akt inhibitor or auranofin [a thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) inhibitor], but not by KATP channel inhibitor glibenclamide. Pinacidil inhibited antimycin A-induced inactivation of PI3K and Akt as well as phosphorylation of CREB and TrxR. Furthermore, pinacidil prevented antimycin A-induced mitochondrial superoxide release, mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation, reduced ATP synthesis and intracellular [Ca2+] elevation. In conclusion, these results suggested that pinacidil may rescue osteoblastic cells from antimycin A-induced cellular damage, potentially via antioxidant activity and restoration of mitochondrial function, which are mediated in part by the PI3K/Akt/CREB signaling pathway. PMID:25334089

  5. Protective Effects of Resveratrol against UVA-Induced Damage in ARPE19 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chi-Ming; Huang, Cheng-Hua; Li, Hsin-Ju; Hsiao, Chien-Yu; Su, Ching-Chieh; Lee, Pei-Lan; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation, especially UVA, can penetrate the lens, reach the retina, and induce oxidative stress to retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Even though it is weakly absorbed by protein and DNA, it may trigger the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and generate oxidative injury; oxidative injury to the retinal pigment epithelium has been implicated to play a contributory role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Studies showed that resveratrol, an abundant and active component of red grapes, can protect several cell types from oxidative stress. In this study, adult RPE cells being treated with different concentrations of resveratrol were used to evaluate the protective effect of resveratrol on RPE cells against UVA-induced damage. Cell viability assay showed that resveratrol reduced the UVA-induced decrease in RPE cell viability. Through flow cytometry analysis, we found that the generation of intracellular H2O2 induced by UVA irradiation in RPE cells could be suppressed by resveratrol in a concentration-dependent manner. Results of Western blot analysis demonstrated that resveratrol lowered the activation of UVA-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-jun-NH2 terminal kinase and p38 kinase in RPE cells. In addition, there was also a reduction in UVA-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in RPE cells pretreated with resveratrol. Our observations suggest that resveratrol is effective in preventing RPE cells from being damaged by UVA radiation, and is worth considering for further development as a chemoprotective agent for the prevention of early AMD. PMID:25775159

  6. Protectivity of blue honeysuckle extract against oxidative human endothelial cells and rat hepatocyte damage.

    PubMed

    Palíková, Irena; Valentová, Katerina; Oborná, Ivana; Ulrichová, Jitka

    2009-08-12

    The effect of Lonicera caerulea L. (blue honeysuckle) phenolic fraction (18.5% anthocyanins) on cell viability and against oxidative damage in low density lipoproteins (oxLDL), in rat microsomes and in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), was tested. The phenolic fraction was nontoxic to rat hepatocytes and HUVEC at tested concentrations (1-1000 microg/mL) and time intervals up to 24 h inclusive. Phenolic fraction inhibited rat liver microsome peroxidation, induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBH), with IC(50) values of 160 +/- 20 microg/mL. The fraction at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 microg/mL delayed LDL oxidation, induced by Cu(2+), by 130 +/- 20%, 200 +/- 30%, and 400 +/- 10%, respectively. The treatment of HUVEC with oxidatively modified LDL induced an increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation, and resulted in lower formazan formation from 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) uptake, most pronounced for 200 microg/mL (24 h oxidation) after 2 h of incubation. The protective effect of the phenolic fraction against cell damage caused by oxLDL was noted at 0.1 microg/mL for HUVEC and against tBH at 1000 microg/mL for both HUVEC and hepatocytes. The observed protective effects were probably due to the antioxidant properties of L. caerulea constituents, mainly anthocyanins. Microsome peroxidation and LDL oxidation inhibition results provide promising perspectives into the prevention of some oxidative stress-associated diseases. Other data are important in in vitro systems but seem to be accidental in vivo. PMID:19572653

  7. Bioavailability of andrographolide and protection against carbon tetrachloride-induced oxidative damage in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haw-Wen; Huang, Chin-Shiu; Li, Chien-Chun; Lin, Ai-Hsuan; Huang, Yu-Ju; Wang, Tsu-Shing; Yao, Hsien-Tsung; Lii, Chong-Kuei

    2014-10-01

    Andrographolide, a bioactive diterpenoid, is identified in Andrographis paniculata. In this study, we investigated the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of andrographolide in rats and studied whether andrographolide enhances antioxidant defense in a variety of tissues and protects against carbon tetrachloride-induced oxidative damage. After a single 50-mg/kg administration, the maximum plasma concentration of andrographolide was 1 μM which peaked at 30 min. The bioavailability of andrographolide was 1.19%. In a hepatoprotection study, rats were intragastrically dosed with 30 or 50 mg/kg andrographolide for 5 consecutive days. The results showed that andrographolide up-regulated glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL) catalytic and modifier subunits, superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1, heme oxygenase (HO)-1, and glutathione (GSH) S-transferase (GST) Ya/Yb protein and mRNA expression in the liver, heart, and kidneys. The activity of SOD, GST, and GSH reductase was also increased in rats dosed with andrographolide (p < 0.05). Immunoblot analysis and EMSA revealed that andrographolide increased nuclear Nrf2 contents and Nrf2 binding to DNA, respectively. After the 5-day andrographolide treatment, one group of animals was intraperitoneally injected with carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) at day 6. Andrographolide pretreatment suppressed CCl{sub 4}-induced plasma aminotransferase activity and hepatic lipid peroxidation (p < 0.05). These results suggest that andrographolide is quickly absorbed in the intestinal tract in rats with a bioavailability of 1.19%. Andrographolide protects against chemical-induced oxidative damage by up-regulating the gene transcription and activity of antioxidant enzymes in various tissues. - Highlights: • The bioavailability of andrographolide is 1.19% in rats. • Plasma concentration reaches 1 μM after giving 50 mg/kg andrographolide. • Andrographolide up-regulates Nrf2-dependent antioxidant genes. • Andrographolide increases antioxidant defense

  8. Are Himalayan Sherpas better protected against brain damage associated with extreme altitude climbs?

    PubMed

    Garrido, E; Segura, R; Capdevila, A; Pujol, J; Javierre, C; Ventura, J L

    1996-01-01

    1. The potential risk of brain damage when low-landers attempt to climb the highest summits is a well-known fact. However, very little is known about what occurs to Himalayan natives, perfectly adapted to high altitude, when performing the same type of activity. 2. Taking into account their long-life climbing experience at extreme altitudes, we examined seven of the most recognized Sherpas with the aim of performing a comprehensive neurological evaluation based on medical history, physical examination and magnetic resonance brain imaging. We compared them with one group of 21 lowland elite climbers who had ascended to altitudes of over 8000 m, and another control group of 21 healthy individuals who had never been exposed to high altitude. 3. While all of the lowland climbers presented psychoneurological symptoms during or after the expeditions, and 13 of them (61%) showed magnetic resonance abnormalities (signs of mild cortical atrophy and/or periventricular high-intensity signal areas in the white matter), only one Sherpa (14%) showed similar changes in the scans, presenting neurological symptoms at extreme altitude. The neurological examination was normal in all three groups, and no neuroimaging abnormalities were detected in the control group. 4. The significant differences, in both clinical and neuroimaging terms, suggest that Sherpa highlanders have better brain protection when exposed to extreme altitude. Although the key to protection against cerebral hypoxia cannot be established, it is possible that an increase in the usually short period of acclimatization could minimize brain damage in those low-landers who attempt the highest summits without supplementary oxygen. PMID:8697710

  9. Protective effects of resveratrol against UVA-induced damage in ARPE19 cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chi-Ming; Huang, Cheng-Hua; Li, Hsin-Ju; Hsiao, Chien-Yu; Su, Ching-Chieh; Lee, Pei-Lan; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation, especially UVA, can penetrate the lens, reach the retina, and induce oxidative stress to retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Even though it is weakly absorbed by protein and DNA, it may trigger the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and generate oxidative injury; oxidative injury to the retinal pigment epithelium has been implicated to play a contributory role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Studies showed that resveratrol, an abundant and active component of red grapes, can protect several cell types from oxidative stress. In this study, adult RPE cells being treated with different concentrations of resveratrol were used to evaluate the protective effect of resveratrol on RPE cells against UVA-induced damage. Cell viability assay showed that resveratrol reduced the UVA-induced decrease in RPE cell viability. Through flow cytometry analysis, we found that the generation of intracellular H2O2 induced by UVA irradiation in RPE cells could be suppressed by resveratrol in a concentration-dependent manner. Results of Western blot analysis demonstrated that resveratrol lowered the activation of UVA-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-jun-NH2 terminal kinase and p38 kinase in RPE cells. In addition, there was also a reduction in UVA-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in RPE cells pretreated with resveratrol. Our observations suggest that resveratrol is effective in preventing RPE cells from being damaged by UVA radiation, and is worth considering for further development as a chemoprotective agent for the prevention of early AMD. PMID:25775159

  10. Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Ahmadi, Abbas; Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. PMID:23260366

  11. Bioavailability of andrographolide and protection against carbon tetrachloride-induced oxidative damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haw-Wen; Huang, Chin-Shiu; Li, Chien-Chun; Lin, Ai-Hsuan; Huang, Yu-Ju; Wang, Tsu-Shing; Yao, Hsien-Tsung; Lii, Chong-Kuei

    2014-10-01

    Andrographolide, a bioactive diterpenoid, is identified in Andrographis paniculata. In this study, we investigated the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of andrographolide in rats and studied whether andrographolide enhances antioxidant defense in a variety of tissues and protects against carbon tetrachloride-induced oxidative damage. After a single 50-mg/kg administration, the maximum plasma concentration of andrographolide was 1μM which peaked at 30min. The bioavailability of andrographolide was 1.19%. In a hepatoprotection study, rats were intragastrically dosed with 30 or 50mg/kg andrographolide for 5 consecutive days. The results showed that andrographolide up-regulated glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL) catalytic and modifier subunits, superoxide dismutase (SOD)-1, heme oxygenase (HO)-1, and glutathione (GSH) S-transferase (GST) Ya/Yb protein and mRNA expression in the liver, heart, and kidneys. The activity of SOD, GST, and GSH reductase was also increased in rats dosed with andrographolide (p<0.05). Immunoblot analysis and EMSA revealed that andrographolide increased nuclear Nrf2 contents and Nrf2 binding to DNA, respectively. After the 5-day andrographolide treatment, one group of animals was intraperitoneally injected with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) at day 6. Andrographolide pretreatment suppressed CCl4-induced plasma aminotransferase activity and hepatic lipid peroxidation (p<0.05). These results suggest that andrographolide is quickly absorbed in the intestinal tract in rats with a bioavailability of 1.19%. Andrographolide protects against chemical-induced oxidative damage by up-regulating the gene transcription and activity of antioxidant enzymes in various tissues. PMID:25110055

  12. Pyrroloquinoline quinone protects mouse brain endothelial cells from high glucose-induced damage in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhong; Chen, Guo-qiang; Yu, Gui-ping; Liu, Chang-jian

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), an oxidoreductase cofactor, on high glucose-induced mouse endothelial cell damage in vitro. Methods: Mouse brain microvascular endothelial bEND.3 cells were exposed to different glucose concentrations (5.56, 25 and 40 mmol/L) for 24 or 48 h. The cell viability was examined using MTT assay. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the apoptosis and ROS levels in the cells. MitoTracker Green staining was used to examine the mitochondria numbers in the cells. Western blot analysis was used to analyze the expression of HIF-1α and the proteins in JNK pathway. Results: Treatment of bEND.3 cells with high glucose significantly decreased the cell viability, while addition of PQQ (1 and 10 μmol/L) reversed the high glucose-induced cell damage in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, PQQ (100 μmol/L) significantly suppressed the high glucose-induced apoptosis and ROS production in the cells. PQQ significantly reversed the high glucose-induced reduction in both the mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondria number in the cells. The high glucose treatment significantly increased the expression of HIF-1α and JNK phosphorylation in the cells, and addition of PQQ led to a further increase of HIF-1α level and a decrease of JNK phosphorylation. Addition of JNK inhibitor SP600125 (10 μmol/L) also significantly suppressed high glucose-induced apoptosis and JNK phosphorylation in bEND.3 cells. Conclusion: PQQ protects mouse brain endothelial cells from high glucose damage in vitro by suppressing intracellular ROS and apoptosis via inhibiting JNK signaling pathway. PMID:25283505

  13. Protective effect of histamine microinjected into cerebellar fastigial nucleus on stress gastric mucosal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xiao; Yang, Jun; Fei, Su-Juan; Zhu, Jin-Zhou; Zhu, Sheng-Ping; Liu, Zhang-Bo; Li, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Jian-Fu

    2015-12-10

    In the study, we investigated the effect of histamine microinjected into cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN) on stress gastric mucosal damage (SGMD), and its mechanisms in rats. The model of SGMD was established by restraining and water (21±1°C)-immersion for 3h. The gastric mucosal damage index (GMDI) indicated the severity of gastric mucosal damage. Histamine or receptor antagonist was microinjected into the FN. The decussation of superior cerebellar peduncle (DSCP) and the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) were destroyed, respectively. The pathological changes of gastric mucosa were evaluated using biological signal acquisition system, Laser-Doppler flowmeter, and western blotting. We found that the microinjection of histamine (0.05, 0.5, and 5μg) into FN significantly attenuated the SGMD, in a dose-dependent manner, whereas, the microinjection of histamine H2 receptor antagonist, ranitidine, and glutamic acid decarboxylase antagonist, 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA) exacerbated the SGMD. The protective effect of histamine on SGMD was abolished by electrical lesion of DSCP or chemical ablation of LHA. The microinjection of histamine decreased the discharge frequency of the greater splanchnic nerve, and the gastric mucosal blood flow was increased. In addition, the cellular proliferation was enhanced, but the cellular apoptosis was reduced in the gastric mucosa. Also the pro-apoptosis protein, Bax, and caspase-3 were down-regulated, and the anti-apoptosis protein, Bcl-2 was up-regulated following microinjection of histamine. In conclusion, the FN participated in the regulation of SGMD after histamine microinjected into FN, and cerebellar-hypothalamic circuits (include: DSCP, LHA) contribute to the process, which may provide a new therapeutic strategy for SGMD. PMID:26474912

  14. Hyperoside protects human primary melanocytes against H2O2-induced oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    YANG, BIN; YANG, QIN; YANG, XIN; YAN, HONG-BO; LU, QI-PING

    2016-01-01

    Cuscutae semen has been shown to have beneficial effects in the treatment of vitiligo, recorded in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia, whereas the effects of its constituent compounds remains to be elucidated. Using a tetrazolium bromide assay, the present study found that hyperoside (0.5–200 µg/ml) significantly increased the viability of human melanocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The present study used a cell model of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative damage to examine the effect of hyperoside on human primary melanocytes. The results demonstrated that hyperoside pretreatment for 2 h decreased cell apoptosis from 54.03±9.11 to 17.46±3.10% in the H2O2-injured melanocytes. The levels of oxidative stress in the mitochondrial membrane potential of the melanocytes increased following hyperoside pretreatment. The mRNA and protein levels of B-cell lymphoma-2/Bcl-2-associated X protein and caspase 3 were regulated by hyperoside, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling were also mediated by hyperoside. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that hyperoside protected the human primary melanocytes against oxidative damage. PMID:27082158

  15. STAT3 modulates β-cell cycling in injured mouse pancreas and protects against DNA damage.

    PubMed

    De Groef, S; Renmans, D; Cai, Y; Leuckx, G; Roels, S; Staels, W; Gradwohl, G; Baeyens, L; Heremans, Y; Martens, G A; De Leu, N; Sojoodi, M; Van de Casteele, M; Heimberg, H

    2016-01-01

    Partial pancreatic duct ligation (PDL) of mouse pancreas induces a doubling of the β-cell mass mainly through proliferation of pre-existing and newly formed β-cells. The molecular mechanism governing this process is still largely unknown. Given the inflammatory nature of PDL and inflammation-induced signaling via the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), the activation and the role of STAT3 in PDL-induced β-cell proliferation were investigated. Duct ligation stimulates the expression of several cytokines that can act as ligands inducing STAT3 signaling and phosphorylation in β-cells. β-Cell cycling increased by conditional β-cell-specific Stat3 knockout and decreased by STAT3 activation through administration of interleukin-6. In addition, the level of DNA damage in β-cells of PDL pancreas increased after deletion of Stat3. These data indicate a role for STAT3 in maintaining a steady state in the β-cell, by modulating its cell cycle and protection from DNA damage. PMID:27336716

  16. Pyridoxamine protects proteins from damage by hypohalous acids in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Madu, Hartman; Avance, Josh; Chetyrkin, Sergei; Darris, Carl; Rose, Kristie Lindsey; Sanchez, Otto A; Hudson, Billy; Voziyan, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes is characterized, in part, by activation of toxic oxidative and glycoxidative pathways that are triggered by persistent hyperglycemia and contribute to diabetic complications. Inhibition of these pathways may benefit diabetic patients by delaying the onset of complications. One such inhibitor, pyridoxamine (PM), had shown promise in clinical trials. However, the mechanism of PM action in vivo is not well understood. We have previously reported that hypohalous acids can cause disruption of the structure and function of renal collagen IV in experimental diabetes (K.L. Brown et al., Diabetes 64:2242-2253, 2015). In the present study, we demonstrate that PM can protect protein functionality from hypochlorous and hypobromous acid-derived damage via a rapid direct reaction with and detoxification of these hypohalous acids. We further demonstrate that PM treatment can ameliorate specific hypohalous acid-derived structural and functional damage to the renal collagen IV network in a diabetic animal model. These findings suggest a new mechanism of PM action in diabetes, namely sequestration of hypohalous acids, which may contribute to known therapeutic effects of PM in human diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26159508

  17. The polypeptide in Chlamys farreri can protect human dermal fibroblasts from ultraviolet B damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yujiang; Zhan, Songmei; Cao, Pengli; Liu, Ning; Chen, Xuehong; Wang, Yuejun; Wang, Chunbo

    2005-09-01

    To investigate the effect of polypeptide from Chlamys farreri (PCF) on NHDF in vitro, we modeled oxidative damage on normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) exposed to ultraviolet B (UVB). In this study, 3-[4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were tested to measure cell viability. Enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), catalase (CAT) and xanthine oxidase (XOD) were determined biochemically. Total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC) and anti-superoxide anion capacity (A-SAC) were also determined. Ultrastructure of fibroblasts was observed under transmission electron microscope. The results showed that: UVB (1.176×10-4 J/cm2) suppressed the growth of fibroblasts and the introduction of PCF (0.25% 1%) before UVB reduced the suppression in a concentration-dependent manner. PCF could enhance the activities of SOD, GSH-PX and T-AOC as well as A-SAC. Also PCF could inhibit XOD activity, while it did not affect CAT activity. Ultrastructure of fibroblasts were damaged after UVB irradiation, concentration-dependent PCF reduced the destructive effect of UVB on cells. These results indicated that PCF can protect human dermal fibroblasts from being harmed by UVB irradiation via its antioxidant proerty.

  18. Protective effects of adipose-derived stem cells secretome on human dermal fibroblasts from ageing damages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Guo, Shu; Liu, Xuehui; Xv, Nan; Zhang, Shuangyi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Combined effects of intrinsic and extrinsic ageing factors on skin tissue and the therapies have been rarely studied before. ADSCs have gained popularity in anti-ageing field, which may provide promising methods to fight against skin ageing. Objective: To find out the fate of HDFs exposed to intrinsic or extrinsic ageing factors or both of them and further examine the impacts of ADSC-CM on the damaged HDFs. Methods: We irradiated HDFs with UVB at different senescent levels, and then treated them with ADSC-CM. After 48 h, we detected cellular proliferative activity, morphology, SA-β-Gal expression, apoptosis, mRNA expression of collagen I, collagen III and elastin. Results: Intrinsic ageing factors inhibited cellular proliferation, increased senescent ratio and reduced mRNA expression of collagen I, collagen III and elastin, so did UVB, except for its induction of elastin mRNA expression. Furthermore, ADSC-CM treatment can slightly or significantly improve cellular proliferative activity and restore functions both in irradiated and non-irradiated HDFs. Besides, ADSC-CM treatment decreased cellular apoptosis and senescence induced by UVB but had no obvious effect on cellular senescence induced by intrinsic ageing factors. The results were similar in three generations of HDFs, yet in different degrees. Conclusions: The results suggest that ADSCs secretome protect HDFs from ageing damages but with some limitations. PMID:26884843

  19. Protective effects of antioxidants against UVA-induced DNA damage in human skin fibroblasts in culture.

    PubMed

    Emonet-Piccardi, N; Richard, M J; Ravanat, J L; Signorini, N; Cadet, J; Béani, J C

    1998-10-01

    Ultraviolet A radiation (UVA, 320-400 nm) is mutagenic and induces genomic damage to skin cells. N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), selenium and zinc have been shown to have antioxidant properties and to exhibit protective effects against UVA cytotoxicity. The present work attempts to delineate the effect of these compounds on genomic integrity of human skin fibroblasts exposed to UVA radiation using the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) or Comet assay. The cells were incubated with NAC (5 mM), sodium selenite (0.6 microM) or zinc chloride (100 microM). Then cells were embedded in low melting point agarose, and immediately submitted to UVA fluences ranging from 1 to 6J/cm2. In the Comet assay, the tail moment increased by 45% (1 J/cm2) to 89% (6J/cm2) in non-supplemented cells (p)<0.01). DNA damage was significantly prevented by NAC, Se and Zn, with a similar efficiency from 1 to 4J/cm2 (p < 0.05). For the highest UVA dose (6J/cm2), Se and Zn were more effective than NAC (p < 0.01). PMID:9860045

  20. Protective effect of black raspberry seed containing anthocyanins against oxidative damage to DNA, protein, and lipid.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi-Hee; Shim, Soon-Mi; Kim, Gun-Hee

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to determine bioactive components and radical scavenging capacity of black raspberry seed extracts as byproducts obtaining during the juice (FSE) and wine (WSE) making process. Cyanidin-3-O-rutinoside was identified as a major anthocyanin and the total anthocyanin contents of fresh and wine seed were 78.24 and 41.61 mg/100 g of dry weight, respectively. The total phenolic and flavonoid contents of FSE and WSE were 2.31 g gallic acid equivalent (GAE) and 360.95 mg catechin equivalent (CE), and 2.44 g GAE and 379.54 mg CE per 100 g dry weight, respectively. The oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) values were 1041.9 μM TE/g for FSE and 1060.4 μM TE/g for WSE. Pretreatment of the FSE and WSE inhibited the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA and protein damage induced by hydroxyl radicals, and Fe(3+)/ascorbic acid-induced lipid peroxidation in a dose dependent manner. WSE more effectively protected from oxidative damage than FSE. Results from the current study suggest that black raspberry seeds as byproducts from juice and wine processing could be potential sources for natural antioxidants. PMID:27162401

  1. Common Practice Lightning Strike Protection Characterization Technique to Quantify Damage Mechanisms on Composite Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatkowski, George N.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Ticatch, Larry A.; Mielnik, John J.; Mcneill, Patrick A.

    2013-01-01

    To support FAA certification airworthiness standards, composite substrates are subjected to lightning direct-effect electrical waveforms to determine performance characteristics of the lightning strike protection (LSP) conductive layers used to protect composite substrates. Test results collected from independent LSP studies are often incomparable due to variability in test procedures & applied practices at different organizations, which impairs performance correlations between different LSP data sets. Under a NASA supported contract, The Boeing Company developed technical procedures and documentation as guidance in order to facilitate a test method for conducting universal common practice lightning strike protection test procedures. The procedures obtain conformity in future lightning strike protection evaluations to allow meaningful performance correlations across data sets. This universal common practice guidance provides the manufacturing specifications to fabricate carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) test panels, including finish, grounding configuration, and acceptable methods for pretest nondestructive inspection (NDI) and posttest destructive inspection. The test operations guidance elaborates on the provisions contained in SAE ARP5416 to address inconsistencies in the generation of damage protection performance data, so as to provide for maximum achievable correlation across capable lab facilities. In addition, the guidance details a direct effects test bed design to aid in quantification of the multi-physical phenomena surrounding a lightning direct attachment supporting validation data requirements for the development of predictive computational modeling. The lightning test bed is designed to accommodate a repeatable installation procedure to secure the test panel and eliminate test installation uncertainty. It also facilitates a means to capture the electrical waveform parameters in 2 dimensions, along with the mechanical displacement and thermal

  2. ICRP Publication 111 - Application of the Commission's recommendations to the protection of people living in long-term contaminated areas after a nuclear accident or a radiation emergency.

    PubMed

    Lochard, J; Bogdevitch, I; Gallego, E; Hedemann-Jensen, P; McEwan, A; Nisbet, A; Oudiz, A; Oudiz, T; Strand, P; Janssens, A; Lazo, T; Carr, Z; Sugier, A; Burns, P; Carboneras, P; Cool, D; Cooper, J; Kai, M; Lecomte, J-F; Liu, H; Massera, G; McGarry, A; Mrabit, K; Mrabit, M; Sjöblom, K-L; Tsela, A; Weiss, W

    2009-06-01

    In this report, the Commission provides guidance for the protection of people living in long-term contaminated areas resulting from either a nuclear accident or a radiation emergency. The report considers the effects of such events on the affected population. This includes the pathways of human exposure, the types of exposed populations, and the characteristics of exposures. Although the focus is on radiation protection considerations, the report also recognises the complexity of post-accident situations, which cannot be managed without addressing all the affected domains of daily life, i.e. environmental, health, economic, social, psychological, cultural, ethical, political, etc. The report explains how the 2007 Recommendations apply to this type of existing exposure situation, including consideration of the justification and optimisation of protection strategies, and the introduction and application of a reference level to drive the optimisation process. The report also considers practical aspects of the implementation of protection strategies, both by authorities and the affected population. It emphasises the effectiveness of directly involving the affected population and local professionals in the management of the situation, and the responsibility of authorities at both national and local levels to create the conditions and provide the means favouring the involvement and empowerment of the population. The role of radiation monitoring, health surveillance, and the management of contaminated foodstuffs and other commodities is described in this perspective. The Annex summarises past experience of longterm contaminated areas resulting from radiation emergencies and nuclear accidents, including radiological criteria followed in carrying out remediation measures. PMID:20472181

  3. Protective effects of myricetin against ultraviolet-B-induced damage in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jheng-Hua; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Fang, Jia-You; Yang, Cheng; Chan, Chi-Ming; Wu, Nan-Lin; Kang, Shung-Wen; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2010-02-01

    Myricetin is a flavonoid similar to quercetin, which is commonly found in natural foods such as berries, vegetables, teas, wine, and herbs. It is considered to be an antioxidant which is capable of quenching photoaging-causing free radicals within the skin. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying protective effect of myricetin on ultraviolet-B (UVB)-induced damage to keratinocytes. We found that myricetin concentration-dependently attenuated UVB-induced keratinocyte death as determined by a cell viability assay. Pretreatment with myricetin also reduced the UVB-induced malondialdehyde level. Moreover, UVB-induced H(2)O(2) generation in keratinocytes was inhibited by myricetin according to flow cytometry, suggesting that myricetin can act as a free radical scavenger when keratinocytes experience photodamage. Furthermore, UVB-induced activation of c-jun-NH(2) terminal kinase (JNK) in keratinocytes was inhibited by myricetin. UVB-induced pre-G(1) phase arrest leading to apoptotic changes in keratinocytes was blocked by myricetin. Taken together, the protective mechanisms of keratinocyte by myricetin against UVB-induced photodamage occur by the inhibition of UVB-induced intracellular hydrogen peroxide production, lipid peroxidation and JNK activation. Therefore, myricetin is suitable for further development as an anti-aging agent for skin care. PMID:19778600

  4. γ-Oryzanol protects against acute cadmium-induced oxidative damage in mice testes.

    PubMed

    Spiazzi, Cristiano C; Manfredini, Vanusa; Barcellos da Silva, Fabiana E; Flores, Erico M M; Izaguirry, Aryele P; Vargas, Laura M; Soares, Melina B; Santos, Francielli W

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium is a non-essential heavy metal that is present at low levels mainly in food and water and also in cigar smoke. The present study evaluated the testicular damage caused by acute cadmium exposure and verified the protective role of γ-oryzanol (ORY). Mice were administrated with a single dose of 2.5mg/kg of CdCl2, and then treated with ORY (50mM in canola oil, 5mL/kg). Testes were removed after 24h and tested for lipid peroxidation (TBARS), protein carbonylation, DNA breakage, ascorbic acid, cadmium and non-proteic thiols contents, and for the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and δ-aminolevulic acid dehydratase (δ-ALA-D). Cadmium presented a significant alteration in all parameters, except GPx and CAT activities. Therapy reduced in a slight degree cadmium concentration in testes (around 23%). ORY restored SOD and GST activities as well as TBARS production to the control levels. Furthermore, ORY partially recovered δ-ALA-D activity inhibited by cadmium. This study provides the first evidence on the therapeutic properties of ORY in protecting against cadmium-induced testicular toxicity. PMID:23395783

  5. N-acetylcysteine amide protects against methamphetamine-induced tissue damage in CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Tobwala, S; Ercal, N

    2012-09-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), a highly addictive drug used worldwide, induces oxidative stress in various animal organs, especially the brain. This study evaluated oxidative damage caused by METH to tissues in CD-1 mice and identified a therapeutic drug that could protect against METH-induced toxicity. Male CD-1 mice were pretreated with a novel thiol antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA, 250 mg/kg body weight) or saline. Following this, METH (10 mg/kg body weight) or saline intraperitoneal injections were administered every 2 h over an 8-h period. Animals were killed 24 h after the last exposure. NACA-treated animals exposed to METH experienced significantly lower oxidative stress in their kidneys, livers, and brains than the untreated group, as indicated by their levels of glutathione, malondialdehyde, and protein carbonyl and their catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity. This suggests that METH induces oxidative stress in various organs and that a combination of NACA as a neuro- or tissue-protective agent, in conjunction with current treatment, might effectively treat METH abusers. PMID:22354084

  6. Oral Administration of Fermented Soymilk Products Protects the Skin of Hairless Mice against Ultraviolet Damage

    PubMed Central

    Kano, Mitsuyoshi; Kubota, Norihiro; Masuoka, Norie; Hori, Tetsuji; Miyazaki, Kouji; Ishikawa, Fumiyasu

    2016-01-01

    The protective effect of isoflavones on skin damage from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and their bioavailability were investigated in ovariectomized hairless mice fed diets composed of fermented soymilk containing aglycone forms of isoflavones or control soymilk containing glucose-conjugated forms of isoflavones. The erythema intensity of dorsal skin was significantly higher in ovariectomized mice than in sham-operated mice (p < 0.05). The erythema intensity and epidermal thickness of dorsal skin were significantly lower in the fermented soymilk diet group than in the control diet group (each p < 0.05). Levels of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in dorsal skin were significantly lower in the fermented soymilk diet group than in the control group (p < 0.05). Serum and dorsal skin isoflavone concentrations were significantly higher in the fermented soymilk diet group than in the soymilk diet group (p < 0.05). These results indicate that oral administration of a fermented soymilk diet increases isoflavone concentrations in the blood and skin, effectively scavenging the reactive oxygen species generated by UV irradiation and exerting an estrogen-like activity, with a consequent protective effect on skin photodamage in hairless mice. PMID:27556484

  7. Blockade of intracellular actions of calcium may protect against ischaemic damage to the gerbil brain.

    PubMed Central

    Asano, T.; Ikegaki, I.; Satoh, S.; Mochizuki, D.; Hidaka, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Shibuya, M.; Sugita, K.

    1991-01-01

    1. The brain cytoprotective effects of a putative calcium-associated protein kinase inhibitor, HA1077, as well as a calcium entry blocker nicardipine were evaluated in models of cerebral ischaemia in Mongolian gerbils. Morphological changes characterizing delayed neuronal death of selectively vulnerable CA1 pyramidal neurones in the hippocampus of the Mongolian gerbil brain occurred 7 days after transient bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries. 2. A single injection of HA1077 (1 and 3 mg kg-1, i.p.) 5 min after the occlusion led to a dose-dependent protection of the CA1 neurones. Repeated administrations of HA1077 (1 and 3 mg kg-1, i.p., twice daily for 7 days post-ischaemia) revealed an increase in the number of normal cells, compared to findings with a single administration. 3. In contrast to HA1077, nicardipine (0.3 and 1 mg kg-1, i.p.) did not reduce neuronal degeneration. 4. HA1077 did not interact with the ion channel within which MK-801 binds, as determined by receptor binding. 5. The calcium ionophore, A23187, caused a tonic contraction in canine cerebral arterial strips. HA1077, but not nicardipine, relaxed the A23187-induced contraction, concentration-dependently. 6. These results suggest that blockade of the intracellular actions of calcium may provide protection against ischaemic damage in the brain. Images Figure 1 PMID:1912980

  8. Oral Administration of Fermented Soymilk Products Protects the Skin of Hairless Mice against Ultraviolet Damage.

    PubMed

    Kano, Mitsuyoshi; Kubota, Norihiro; Masuoka, Norie; Hori, Tetsuji; Miyazaki, Kouji; Ishikawa, Fumiyasu

    2016-01-01

    The protective effect of isoflavones on skin damage from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and their bioavailability were investigated in ovariectomized hairless mice fed diets composed of fermented soymilk containing aglycone forms of isoflavones or control soymilk containing glucose-conjugated forms of isoflavones. The erythema intensity of dorsal skin was significantly higher in ovariectomized mice than in sham-operated mice (p < 0.05). The erythema intensity and epidermal thickness of dorsal skin were significantly lower in the fermented soymilk diet group than in the control diet group (each p < 0.05). Levels of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in dorsal skin were significantly lower in the fermented soymilk diet group than in the control group (p < 0.05). Serum and dorsal skin isoflavone concentrations were significantly higher in the fermented soymilk diet group than in the soymilk diet group (p < 0.05). These results indicate that oral administration of a fermented soymilk diet increases isoflavone concentrations in the blood and skin, effectively scavenging the reactive oxygen species generated by UV irradiation and exerting an estrogen-like activity, with a consequent protective effect on skin photodamage in hairless mice. PMID:27556484

  9. Antioxidant, cytotoxic, antitumor, and protective DNA damage metabolites from the red sea brown alga Sargassum sp

    PubMed Central

    Ayyad, Seif-Eldin N.; Ezmirly, Saleh T.; Basaif, Salim A.; Alarif, Walied M.; Badria, Adel F.; Badria, Farid A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Macroalgae can be viewed as a potential antioxidant and anti-inflammatory sources owing to their capability of producing compounds for its protection from environmental factors such as heat, pollution, stress, oxygen concentration, and UV radiations. Objective: To isolate major compounds which are mainly responsible for the pharmacological activity of brown alga under investigation, Sargassum sp. Materials and Methods: Algal material was air dried, extracted with a mixture of organic solvents, and fractionated with different adsorbents. The structures of obtained pure compounds were elucidated with different spectroscopic techniques, and two pure materials were tested for protection of DNA from damage, antioxidant, antitumor, and cytotoxicity. Results: Four pure compounds were obtained, of which fucosterol (1) and fucoxanthin (4) were tested; it was found that fucoxanthin has strong antioxidant and cytotoxicity against breast cancer (MCF-7) with IC50 = 11.5 μg/ml. Conclusion: The naturally highly conjugated safe compound fucoxanthin could be used as antioxidant and as an antitumor compound. PMID:22022163

  10. Ocular Aldehyde Dehydrogenases: Protection against Ultraviolet Damage and Maintenance of Transparency for Vision

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Thompson, David C.; Koppaka, Vindhya; Jester, James V.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes catalyze the NAD(P)+-dependent oxidation of a wide variety of endogenous and exogenous aldehydes to their corresponding acids. Some members of the ALDH superfamily of enzymes are abundantly expressed in the mammalian cornea and lens in a taxon-specific manner. Considered to be corneal and lens crystallins, they confer protective and transparent properties upon these ocular tissues. ALDH3A1 is highly expressed in the cornea of most mammals, with the exception of rabbit that expresses exclusively ALDH1A1 in the cornea. ALDH1A1 is present in both the cornea and lens of several animal species. As a result of their catalytic and non-catalytic functions, ALDH3A1 and ALDH1A1 proteins protect inner ocular tissues from ultraviolet radiation and reactive oxygen-induced damage. In addition, these corneal crystallins contribute to cellular transparency in corneal stromal keratocytes, supporting a structural role of these ALDH proteins. A putative regulatory function of ALDH3A1 on corneal cell proliferation has also been proposed. Finally, the three retinaldehye dehydrogenases cooperatively mediate retinoic acid signaling during the eye development. PMID:23098688

  11. Protective Effect of Cleistocalyx nervosum var. paniala Fruit Extract against Oxidative Renal Damage Caused by Cadmium.

    PubMed

    Poontawee, Warut; Natakankitkul, Surapol; Wongmekiat, Orawan

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium nephrotoxicity is a serious environmental health problem as it will eventually end up with end stage renal disease. The pathobiochemical mechanism of this toxic heavy metal is related to oxidative stress. This study investigated whether Cleistocalyx nervosum var. paniala fruit extract (CNFE) could protect the kidney against oxidative injury caused by cadmium. Initial analysis of the extract revealed antioxidant abilities and high levels of polyphenols, particularly catechin. Its potential renal benefits was further explored in rats treated with vehicle, CNFE, cadmium (2 mg/kg), and cadmium plus CNFE (0.5, 1, 2 g/kg) for four weeks. Oxidative renal injury was developed after cadmium exposure as evidenced by blood urea nitrogen and creatinine retention, glomerular filtration reduction, renal structural damage, together with increased nitric oxide and malondialdehyde, but decreased antioxidant thiols, superoxide dismutase, and catalase in renal tissues. Cadmium-induced nephrotoxicity was diminished in rats supplemented with CNFE, particularly at the doses of 1 and 2 g/kg. It is concluded that CNFE is able to protect against the progression of cadmium nephrotoxicity, mostly via its antioxidant power. The results also point towards a promising role for this naturally-occurring antioxidant to combat other human disorders elicited by disruption of redox homeostasis. PMID:26805807

  12. Disaccharides Protect Antigens from Drying-Induced Damage in Routinely Processed Tissue Sections.

    PubMed

    Boi, Giovanna; Scalia, Carla Rossana; Gendusa, Rossella; Ronchi, Susanna; Cattoretti, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Drying of the tissue section, partial or total, during immunostaining negatively affects both the staining of tissue antigens and the ability to remove previously deposited antibody layers, particularly during sequential rounds of de-staining and re-staining for multiple antigens. The cause is a progressive loss of the protein-associated water up to the removal of the non-freezable water, a step which abolishes the immunoavailability of the epitope. In order to describe and prevent these adverse effects, we tested, among other substances, sugars, which are known to protect unicellular organisms from freezing and dehydration, and stabilize drugs and reagents in solid state form in medical devices. Disaccharides (lactose, sucrose) prevented the air drying-induced antigen masking and protected tissue-bound antigens and antibodies from air drying-induced damage. Complete removal of the bound antibody layers by chemical stripping was permitted if lactose was present during air drying. Lactose, sucrose and other disaccharides prevent air drying artifacts, allow homogeneous, consistent staining and the reuse of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections for repeated immunostaining rounds by guaranteeing constant staining quality in suboptimal hydration conditions. PMID:26487185

  13. Zinc protects against ultraviolet A1-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in cultured human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Leccia, M T; Richard, M J; Favier, A; Béani, J C

    1999-09-01

    Ultraviolet A1 (UVA1) radiation generates reactive oxygen species and the oxidative stress is known as a mediator of DNA damage and of apoptosis. We exposed cultured human cutaneous fibroblasts to UVA1 radiation (wavelengths in the 340-450-nm range with emission peak at 365 nm) and, using the alkaline unwinding method, we showed an immediate significant increase of DNA strand breaks in exposed cells. Apoptosis was determined by detecting cytoplasmic nucleosomes (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method) at different time points in fibroblasts exposed to different irradiation doses. In our conditions, UVA1 radiation induced an early (8 h) and a delayed (18 h) apoptosis. Delayed apoptosis increased in a UVA dose-dependent manner. Zinc is an important metal for DNA protection and has been shown to have inhibitory effects on apoptosis. The addition of zinc (6.5 mg/L) as zinc chloride to the culture medium significantly decreased immediate DNA strand breaks in human skin fibroblasts. Moreover, zinc chloride significantly decreased UVA1-induced early and delayed apoptosis. Thus, these data show for the first time in normal cutaneous cultured cells that UVA1 radiation induces apoptosis. This apoptosis is biphasic and appears higher 18 h after the stress. Zinc supplementation can prevent both immediate DNA strand breakage and early and delayed apoptosis, suggesting that this metal could be of interest for skin cell protection against UVA1 irradiation. PMID:10468155

  14. Protective Effects of Tinospora crispa Stem Extract on Renal Damage and Hemolysis during Plasmodium berghei Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nutham, Narain; Sakulmettatham, Sakuna; Klongthalay, Suwit; Chutoam, Palatip; Somsak, Voravuth

    2015-01-01

    Renal damage and hemolysis induced by malaria are associated with mortality in adult patients. It has been speculated that oxidative stress condition induced by malaria infection is involved in its pathology. Thus, we aimed to investigate the protective effects of Tinospora crispa stem extract on renal damage and hemolysis during Plasmodium berghei infection. T. crispa stem extract was prepared using hot water method and used for oral treatment in mice. Groups of ICR mice were infected with 1 × 107 parasitized erythrocytes of P. berghei ANKA by intraperitoneal injection and given the extracts (500, 1000, and 2000 mg/kg) twice a day for 4 consecutive days. To assess renal damage and hemolysis, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and hematocrit (%Hct) levels were then evaluated, respectively. Malaria infection resulted in renal damage and hemolysis as indicated by increasing of BUN and creatinine and decreasing of %Hct, respectively. However, protective effects on renal damage and hemolysis were observed in infected mice treated with these extracts at doses of 1000 and 2000 mg/kg. In conclusion, T. crispa stem extract exerted protective effects on renal damage and hemolysis induced by malaria infection. This plant may work as potential source in the development of variety of herbal formulations for malarial treatment. PMID:26600953

  15. The efficacy of post porosity plasma protection against vacuum-ultraviolet damage in porous low-k materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lionti, K.; Volksen, W.; Darnon, M.; Magbitang, T.; Dubois, G.

    2015-03-21

    As of today, plasma damage remains as one of the main challenges to the reliable integration of porous low-k materials into microelectronic devices at the most aggressive node. One promising strategy to limit damage of porous low-k materials during plasma processing is an approach we refer to as post porosity plasma protection (P4). In this approach, the pores of the low-k material are filled with a sacrificial agent prior to any plasma treatment, greatly minimizing the total damage by limiting the physical interactions between plasma species and the low-k material. Interestingly, the contribution of the individual plasma species to the total plasma damage is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the specific damaging effect of vacuum-ultraviolet (v-UV) photons on a highly porous, k = 2.0 low-k material and we assessed the P4 protective effect against them. It was found that the impact of the v-UV radiation varied depending upon the v-UV emission lines of the plasma. More importantly, we successfully demonstrated that the P4 process provides excellent protection against v-UV damage.

  16. Protective Effects of Tinospora crispa Stem Extract on Renal Damage and Hemolysis during Plasmodium berghei Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nutham, Narain; Sakulmettatham, Sakuna; Klongthalay, Suwit; Chutoam, Palatip; Somsak, Voravuth

    2015-01-01

    Renal damage and hemolysis induced by malaria are associated with mortality in adult patients. It has been speculated that oxidative stress condition induced by malaria infection is involved in its pathology. Thus, we aimed to investigate the protective effects of Tinospora crispa stem extract on renal damage and hemolysis during Plasmodium berghei infection. T. crispa stem extract was prepared using hot water method and used for oral treatment in mice. Groups of ICR mice were infected with 1 × 10(7) parasitized erythrocytes of P. berghei ANKA by intraperitoneal injection and given the extracts (500, 1000, and 2000 mg/kg) twice a day for 4 consecutive days. To assess renal damage and hemolysis, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and hematocrit (%Hct) levels were then evaluated, respectively. Malaria infection resulted in renal damage and hemolysis as indicated by increasing of BUN and creatinine and decreasing of %Hct, respectively. However, protective effects on renal damage and hemolysis were observed in infected mice treated with these extracts at doses of 1000 and 2000 mg/kg. In conclusion, T. crispa stem extract exerted protective effects on renal damage and hemolysis induced by malaria infection. This plant may work as potential source in the development of variety of herbal formulations for malarial treatment. PMID:26600953

  17. Oxidative damage to extracellular fluids by ozone and possible protective effects of thiols.

    PubMed

    Van der Vliet, A; O'Neil, C A; Eiserich, J P; Cross, C E

    1995-08-01

    Environmental levels of ozone (O3) frequently exceed air quality standards in many urban areas, and much research has been devoted to pathophysiological effects of O3 inhalation. Inhaled O3 will interact primarily with respiratory tract lining fluids (RTLF) and with constituents therein. It is believed that interaction of O3 with constituents in RTLF occurs by reactive absorption. We investigated interactions of O3 with human blood plasma, used as a model extracellular fluid representing RTLF, and studied oxidation of plasma antioxidants, proteins, and lipids. Plasma was exposed to various concentrations of O3 in humidified air, supplied at a continuous flow, in a system that mimics exposure of RTLF to inhaled O3 in vivo. Interaction of O3 with plasma appeared to be caused by reactive absorption of O3 by plasma. It was found that O3 reacts primarily with the aqueous antioxidants ascorbate and urate. Reactive absorption of O3 by plasma ascorbate and urate was found to be more efficient at low (2 ppm) O3 levels than at high (16 ppm) levels. We were also able to detect oxidative damage to plasma proteins and lipids after prolonged exposure to O3. Second, we investigated whether GSH or dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) could prevent oxidative damage to plasma proteins and lipids by O3, under our exposure conditions. In contrast to plasma, RTLF contain relatively high amounts of GSH, which may contribute to antioxidant protection to respiratory tract epithelial cells. DHLA is an endogenous dithiol and has potent antioxidant properties. Addition of either GSH or DHLA to plasma (at concentrations up to 1 mM) prior to O3 exposure did not inhibit oxidation of plasma proteins and lipids during exposure to O3, nor did it attenuate depletion rates of ascorbate or urate. Our results indicate that added thiols cause increased reactive absorption of O3, rather than preventing reaction of O3 with other plasma constituents. Thiol supplementation could afford protection against O3-induced

  18. Protective Effect of Psidium guajava in Arsenic-induced Oxidative Stress and Cytological Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Neeraj; Roy, Manju; Roy, Sushovan; Gupta, Neelu

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the protective effect of aqueous extract of Psidium guajava leaves against sodium arsenite-induced toxicity in experimental rats. Animals were divided into four groups. Control group received arsenic free distilled water and three treatment groups (II, III, and IV) exposed to the arsenic (NaAsO2) (20 mg/kg b.wt) through drinking water. Group III and IV were administered a daily oral dose of P. guajava leaf extract 50 and 100 mg/kg b.wt. (AEPG50 and AEPG100) for the period of 6 weeks. Blood samples and organs were collected at the end of the experiment. Arsenic exposure resulted in significant rise in lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels in erythrocyte, liver, kidney, and brain. In addition toxin decreased (P<0.05) the level of reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activities in the studied tissues. Residual effect of arsenic in various tissues was also observed. Histopathological results revealed mild to severe type of necrosis and degenerative changes in kidney and liver of arsenic intoxicated animals. Cytological alteration in brain tissue was also observed. Treatment with AEPG100 (aqueous extract of P. guajava) @100 mg/kg body weight) significantly restored activities of oxidative stress markers like LPO levels, GSH levels, SOD, and CAT activities but having the limited protective activity of the herbal extract was observed on tissues architecture. It is therefore concluded that prophylactic co-administration of AEPG could provide specific protection from oxidative injury and to some extent on tissue damage. PMID:23293461

  19. Anatomy of an Accident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobley, Michael

    1984-01-01

    The findings of industrial safety engineers in the areas of accident causation and prevention are wholly applicable to adventure programs. Adventure education instructors can use safety engineering concepts to assess the risk in a particular activity, understand factors that cause accidents, and intervene to minimize injuries and damages if…

  20. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 21: Main report and appendices A--H

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. |

    1995-12-01

    Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

  1. Ultraviolet damage to the eye revisited: eye-sun protection factor (E-SPF®), a new ultraviolet protection label for eyewear

    PubMed Central

    Behar-Cohen, Francine; Baillet, Gilles; de Ayguavives, Tito; Garcia, Paula Ortega; Krutmann, Jean; Peña-García, Pablo; Reme, Charlotte; Wolffsohn, James S

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation potentially damages the skin, the immune system, and structures of the eye. A useful UV sun protection for the skin has been established. Since a remarkable body of evidence shows an association between UV radiation and damage to structures of the eye, eye protection is important, but a reliable and practical tool to assess and compare the UV-protective properties of lenses has been lacking. Among the general lay public, misconceptions on eye-sun protection have been identified. For example, sun protection is mainly ascribed to sunglasses, but less so to clear lenses. Skin malignancies in the periorbital region are frequent, but usual topical skin protection does not include the lids. Recent research utilized exact dosimetry and demonstrated relevant differences in UV burden to the eye and skin at a given ambient irradiation. Chronic UV effects on the cornea and lens are cumulative, so effective UV protection of the eyes is important for all age groups and should be used systematically. Protection of children’s eyes is especially important, because UV transmittance is higher at a very young age, allowing higher levels of UV radiation to reach the crystalline lens and even the retina. Sunglasses as well as clear lenses (plano and prescription) effectively reduce transmittance of UV radiation. However, an important share of the UV burden to the eye is explained by back reflection of radiation from lenses to the eye. UV radiation incident from an angle of 135°–150° behind a lens wearer is reflected from the back side of lenses. The usual antireflective coatings considerably increase reflection of UV radiation. To provide reliable labeling of the protective potential of lenses, an eye-sun protection factor (E-SPF®) has been developed. It integrates UV transmission as well as UV reflectance of lenses. The E-SPF® compares well with established skin-sun protection factors and provides clear messages to eye health care providers and to

  2. Protective effects of different antioxidants against cadmium induced oxidative damage in rat testis and prostate tissues.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Sarwat; Zahra, Asia; Irum, Umaira; Iftikhar, Natasha; Ullah, Hizb

    2014-08-01

    The present study was performed to determine the effects of different antioxidants on testicular histopathology and oxidative damage induced by cadmium (Cd) in rat testis and prostate. Twenty five rats were equally divided into five groups (n = 5/group). The control group was injected subcutaneously with saline while the Cd alone treated group received a subcutaneous injection of 0.2 mg/kg CdCl(2). Other groups were treated with sulphoraphane (25 µg/rat), vitamin E (75 mg/kg), and Ficus Religiosa plant extract (100 mg/kg) orally along with subcutaneous injections of 0.2 mg/kg CdCl(2) for fifteen days. Oxidative damage in the testicular and prostate tissues were assessed by the estimation of catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione reductase (GSR) activity. Lipid peroxidation (TBARS), protein estimation, and histomorphology were also assessed. Cadmium exposure caused a significant decrease in antioxidant enzymes like CAT, POD, SOD, GSR, protein concentrations, and a marked increase in TBARS activity in rat testis and prostate. Histological examination of adult male rat testes showed a disruption in the arrangement of seminiferous tubules along with a reduction in the number of germ cells, Leydig cells, tunica albuginea thickness, diameter of seminiferous tubules, and height of germinal epithelium. Co-treatment with vitamin E, sulphoraphane, and Ficus religiosa were found to be effective in reversing Cd induced toxicity, representing potential therapeutic options to protect the reproductive tissues from the detrimental effects of Cd toxicity. PMID:24758558

  3. Magnolol protects against trimethyltin-induced neuronal damage and glial activation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Da Jung; Kim, Yong Sik

    2016-03-01

    Trimethyltin (TMT), an organotin with potent neurotoxic effects by selectively damaging to hippocampus, is used as a tool for creating an experimental model of neurodegeneration. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of magnolol, a natural biphenolic compound, on TMT-induced neurodegeneration and glial activation in vitro and in vivo. In HT22 murine neuroblastoma cells, TMT induced necrotic/apoptotic cell death and oxidative stress, including intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), protein carbonylation, induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and activation of all mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) family proteins. However, magnolol treatment significantly suppressed neuronal cell death by inhibiting TMT-mediated ROS generation and activation of JNK and p38 MAPKs. In BV-2 microglial cells, magnolol efficiently attenuated TMT-induced microglial activation via suppression of ROS generation and activation of JNK, p38 MAPKs, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling. In an in vivo mouse study, TMT induced massive neuronal damage and enhanced oxidative stress at day 2. We also observed a concomitant increase in glial cells and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression on the same day. These features of TMT toxicity were reversed by treatment of magnolol. We observed that p-JNK and p-p38 MAPK levels were increased in the mouse hippocampus at day 1 after TMT treatment and that magnolol blocked TMT-induced JNK and p38 MAPK activation. Magnolol administration prevented TMT-induced hippocampal neurodegeneration and glial activation, possibly through the regulation of TMT-mediated ROS generation and MAPK activation. PMID:26756313

  4. Protective action of erythropoietin on neuronal damage induced by activated microglia.

    PubMed

    Wenker, Shirley D; Chamorro, María E; Vittori, Daniela C; Nesse, Alcira B

    2013-04-01

    Inflammation is a physiological defense response, but may also represent a potential pathological process in neurological diseases. In this regard, microglia have a crucial role in either progression or amelioration of degenerative neuronal damage. Because of the role of hypoxia in pro-inflammatory mechanisms in the nervous system, and the potential anti-inflammatory protective effect of erythropoietin (Epo), we focused our investigation on the role of this factor on activation of microglia and neuroprotection. Activation of microglial cells (EOC-2) was achieved by chemical hypoxia induced by cobalt chloride (CoCl2 ) and characterized by increased levels of nitrite, tumor necrosis factor-α and reactive oxygen species production, as well as up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. Under these conditions, cell proliferation data and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining demonstrated a mitogenic effect of chemical hypoxia. Even though pre-treatment with Epo did not prevent nitrite production, inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression or tumor necrosis factor-α secretion, it prevented the oxidative stress induced by CoCl2 as well as cell proliferation. Neuronal cells (SH-SY5Y) cultured in the presence of conditioned medium from activated EOC-2 cells or macrophages (RAW 264.7) developed significant apoptosis, an effect that was abolished by Epo via Epo/Epo receptor activation. The results show that even though Epo did not exert a direct anti-inflammatory effect on microglia activation, it did increase the resistance of neurons to subsequent damage from pro-inflammatory agents. In addition to its anti-apoptotic ability, the Epo antioxidant effect may have an indirect influence on neuronal survival by modulation of the pro-inflammatory environment. PMID:23384249

  5. Potential protective effect of arginine against 4-nitrophenol-induced ovarian damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei-Feng; Li, Yan-Sen; Dai, Peng-Yuan; Li, Chun-Mei

    2016-01-01

    4-nitrophenol (PNP) is generally regarded as a diesel exhaust particle (DEP). Arginine plays an important role as a new feed additive, possessing highly efficient antioxidant activities. Here we investigated the effects of dietary supplementation with arginine against ovarian damage induced by PNP in rats. A total of thirty-two female rats postnatal day 28 (PND 28) were randomly divided into four groups. Two groups were fed with basal diet or 13 g/kg arginine in diet for 4 weeks, respectively; the other two groups were given PNP (100 mg/kg b.w.) daily by subcutaneous injection for 2 weeks following pretreatment with either basal diet or arginine diet for 2 weeks. The values of body weight gain (BWG), average daily gain (ADG) and percentage weight gain (PWG) upon PNP treatment were significantly reduced than those in other groups. The relative liver weight in the PNP group was significantly decreased compared with the control group. Treatment with PNP significant reduced the number of corpora lutea, although serum 17β-estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) concentrations were unchanged. The morphology of the ovaries in PNP-treated rats displayed necrosis, follicular deformation and granulosa cells irregular arrangement. Moreover, exposure to PNP enhanced production of malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and decreased the activities of total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) and catalase (CAT), and the co-administration of arginine can attenuate the oxidative stress caused by PNP. These results suggest that arginine may have a protective effect against ovarian damage induced by PNP owing to its antioxidant capacity effect. PMID:27193729

  6. H. R. 3124: A bill to require the Secretary of Transportation to take actions to protect against railroad accidents involving hazardous materials, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, July 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the US House of Representatives on July 31, 1991 to require the Secretary of Transportation to take actions to protect against railroad accidents involving hazardous materials. One of the main aspects of this legislation is to identify railroad routes which present the greatest danger of accidents and to find alternative routes.

  7. Antioxidant activity of Coriandrum sativum and protection against DNA damage and cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Coriandrum sativum is a popular culinary and medicinal herb of the Apiaceae family. Health promoting properties of this herb have been reported in pharmacognostical, phytochemical and pharmacological studies. However, studies on C. sativum have always focused on the aerial parts of the herb and scientific investigation on the root is limited. The aim of this research was to investigate the antioxidant and anticancer activities of C. sativum root, leaf and stem, including its effect on cancer cell migration, and its protection against DNA damage, with special focus on the roots. Methods Powdered roots, leaves and stems of C. sativum were extracted through sequential extraction using hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water. Total phenolic content, FRAP and DPPH radical scavenging activities were measured. Anti-proliferative activitiy on the breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, was assayed using the MTT assay. Activities of the antioxidant enzymes, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and of the caspases-3, -8 and -9 were assayed on treatment with the extract. Cell cycle progression was analysed using flow cytometry. The scratch motility assay was used to assess inhibition of MCF-7 cell migration. DNA damage in 3 T3-L1 fibroblasts was evaluated by the comet assay. The components in the extract were identified by HPLC and GC-MS. Results The ethyl acetate extract of C. sativum roots showed the highest antiproliferative activity on MCF-7 cells (IC50 = 200.0 ± 2.6 μg/mL) and had the highest phenolic content, FRAP and DPPH scavenging activities among the extracts. C. sativum root inhibited DNA damage and prevented MCF-7 cell migration induced by H2O2, suggesting its potential in cancer prevention and inhibition of metastasis. The extract exhibited anticancer activity in MCF-7 cells by affecting antioxidant enzymes possibly leading to H2O2 accumulation, cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and apoptotic cell death by

  8. The Protecting Effect of Deoxyschisandrin and Schisandrin B on HaCaT Cells against UVB-Induced Damage.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wei; Gao, Wei; Wang, Datao; Liu, Qingxiu; Zheng, Siwen; Wang, Yingping

    2015-01-01

    Schisandra chinensis is a traditional Chinese medicine that has multiple biological activities, including antioxidant, anticancer, tonic, and anti-aging effects. Deoxyschisandrin (SA) and schisandrin B (SB), the two major lignans isolated from S. chinensis, exert high antioxidant activities in vitro and in vivo by scavenging free radicals, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ultraviolet B-ray (UVB) radiation induces the production of ROS and DNA damage, which eventually leads to cell death by apoptosis. However, it is unknown whether SA or SB protects cells against UVB-induced cellular DNA damage. Our study showed that both SA and SB effectively protected HaCaT cells from UVB-induced cell death by antagonizing UVB-mediated production of ROS and induction of DNA damage. Our results showed that both SA and SB significantly prevented UVB-induced loss of cell viability using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Dichloro-dihydro-fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) assays showed that the production of ROS following UVB exposure was inhibited by treatment with SA and SB. Moreover, SA and SB decreased the UVB-induced DNA damage in HaCaT cells by comet assays. In addition, SA and SB also prevented UVB-induced cell apoptosis and the cleavage of caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9. In a word, our results imply that the antioxidants SA and SB could protect cells from UVB-induced cell damage via scavenging ROS. PMID:25978330

  9. Protective effect of Xingnaojia formulation on rats with brain and liver damage caused by chronic alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    LI, SHUANG; WANG, SU; GUO, ZHI-GANG; HUANG, NING; ZHAO, FAN-RONG; ZHU, MO-LI; MA, LI-JUAN; LIANG, JIN-YING; ZHANG, YU-LIN; HUANG, ZHONG-LIN; WAN, GUANG-RUI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effect of a formulation of traditional Chinese medicine extracts known as Xingnaojia (XNJ) on the liver function, learning ability and memory of rats with chronic alcoholism and to verify the mechanism by which it protects the brain and liver. A rat model of chronic alcoholism was used in the study. The spatial learning ability and memory of the rats were tested. The rats were then sacrificed and their brains and hepatic tissues were isolated. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and levels of glutamate (Glu), N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subtype 2B (NR2B), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in the hippocampus were analyzed. The ultrastructure of the hepatic tissue was observed by electron microscopy. In addition, the activities of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in serum were tested and the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol (TCHOL) were analyzed. XNJ enhanced the learning and memory of rats with chronic alcoholism. Treatment with XNJ increased the activity of SOD, and decreased the expression levels of NR2B mRNA and NR2B, CB1 and CDK5 proteins in the brain tissues compared with those in the model rats. It also increased the activity of ALDH in the serum and liver, decreased the serum levels of LDL, TG and TCHOL and increased the serum level of HDL. These results indicate that XNJ exhibited a protective effect against brain and liver damage in rats with chronic alcoholism. PMID:26640531

  10. Protection of human erythrocyte using Crinumasiaticum extract and lycorine from oxidative damage induced by 2-amidinopropane

    PubMed Central

    Ilavenil, S.; Kaleeswaran, B.; Sumitha, P.; Tamilvendan, D.; Ravikumar, S.

    2010-01-01

    The intention of this investigation was to evaluate the free radical scavenging activity and erythrocyte protective activity of ethanolic extract of Crinumasiaticum (L) and lycorine. The ethanolic extract of C. asiaticum (L) and lycorine were found to have different levels of antioxidant properties in the test models. Both ethanolic extract of C. asiaticum (L) (0.5–2.5 mg/ml) and lycorine (0.010 mg–0.050 mg/ml) increases the percentage of lipid peroxidation inhibition (26.25 ± 0.23% and 19.25 ± 0.23%) and enhances the free radical scavenging activity (20.92 ± 0.22% and 20.52 ± 0.22%), scavenging of hydrogen peroxide (25.67 ± 0.17% and 23.07 ± 0.3%) superoxide anion scavenging activity (27.69 ± 0.16% and 16.09 ± 0.7%) at concentration of 2.5 and 0.050 mg of C. asiaticum (L) and lycorine, respectively. But compared with tocopherol (P < 0.05) less activity was observed by C. asiaticum (L) and lycorine. The ethanolic extract of C. asiaticum (L) and lycorine were normalized to reduce the level of glutathione and also to sustain the status of protein in erythrocytes during the peroxyl radical [2,2-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH)] induced oxidative damage in ex vivo model. The present results of the investigations demonstrated that protective nature of the C. asiaticum (L) and lycorine will be considered as a significant natural antioxidant source. PMID:23961122

  11. Cholesterol synthesis inhibitors protect against platelet-activating factor-induced neuronal damage

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Rumbold, Louis; Williams, Alun

    2007-01-01

    Background Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is implicated in the neuronal damage that accompanies ischemia, prion disease and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since some epidemiological studies demonstrate that statins, drugs that reduce cholesterol synthesis, have a beneficial effect on mild AD, we examined the effects of two cholesterol synthesis inhibitors on neuronal responses to PAF. Methods Primary cortical neurons were treated with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors (simvastatin or squalestatin) prior to incubation with different neurotoxins. The effects of these drugs on neuronal cholesterol levels and neuronal survival were measured. Immunoblots were used to determine the effects of simvastatin or squalestatin on the distribution of the PAF receptor and an enzyme linked immunoassay was used to quantify the amounts of PAF receptor. Results PAF killed primary neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with simvastatin or squalestatin reduced neuronal cholesterol and increased the survival of PAF-treated neurons. Neuronal survival was increased 50% by 100 nM simvastatin, or 20 nM squalestatin. The addition of mevalonate restored cholesterol levels, and reversed the protective effect of simvastatin. Simvastatin or squalestatin did not affect the amounts of the PAF receptor but did cause it to disperse from within lipid rafts. Conclusion Treatment of neurons with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors including simvastatin and squalestatin protected neurons against PAF. Treatment caused a percentage of the PAF receptors to disperse from cholesterol-sensitive domains. These results raise the possibility that the effects of statins on neurodegenerative disease are, at least in part, due to desensitisation of neurons to PAF. PMID:17233902

  12. The Flaxseed-Derived Lignan Phenolic Secoisolariciresinol Diglucoside (SDG) Protects Non-Malignant Lung Cells from Radiation Damage

    PubMed Central

    Velalopoulou, Anastasia; Tyagi, Sonia; Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Arguiri, Evguenia; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2015-01-01

    Plant phenolic compounds are common dietary antioxidants that possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Flaxseed (FS) has been reported to be radioprotective in murine models of oxidative lung damage. Flaxseed’s protective properties are attributed to its main biphenolic lignan, secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG). SDG is a free radical scavenger, shown in cell free systems to protect DNA from radiation-induced damage. The objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro radioprotective efficacy of SDG in murine lung cells. Protection against irradiation (IR)-induced DNA double and single strand breaks was assessed by γ-H2AX labeling and alkaline comet assay, respectively. The role of SDG in modulating the levels of cytoprotective enzymes was evaluated by qPCR and confirmed by Western blotting. Additionally, effects of SDG on clonogenic survival of irradiated cells were evaluated. SDG protected cells from IR-induced death and ameliorated DNA damage by reducing mean comet tail length and percentage of γ-H2AX positive cells. Importantly, SDG significantly increased gene and protein levels of antioxidant HO-1, GSTM1 and NQO1. Our results identify the potent radioprotective properties of the synthetic biphenolic SDG, preventing DNA damage and enhancing the antioxidant capacity of normal lung cells; thus, rendering SDG a potential radioprotector against radiation exposure. PMID:26703588

  13. Low concentrations of isothiocyanates protect mesenchymal stem cells from oxidative injuries, while high concentrations exacerbate DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Zanichelli, Fulvia; Capasso, Stefania; Di Bernardo, Giovanni; Cipollaro, Marilena; Pagnotta, Eleonora; Cartenì, Maria; Casale, Fiorina; Iori, Renato; Giordano, Antonio; Galderisi, Umberto

    2012-09-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) are molecules naturally present in many cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, black radish, daikon radish, and cauliflowers). Several studies suggest that cruciferous vegetable consumption may reduce cancer risk and slow the aging process. To investigate the effect of ITCs on cellular DNA damage, we evaluated the effects of two different ITCs [sulforaphane (SFN) and raphasatin (RPS)] on the biology of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which, in addition to their ability to differentiate into mesenchymal tissues, contribute to the homeostatic maintenance of many organs. The choice of SFN and RPS relies on two considerations: they are among the most popular cruciferous vegetables in the diet of western and eastern countries, respectively, and their bioactive properties may differ since they possess specific molecular moiety. Our investigation evidenced that MSCs incubated with low doses of SFN and RPS show reduced in vitro oxidative stress. Moreover, these cells are protected from oxidative damages induced by hydrogen peroxide, while no protection was evident following treatment with the UV ray of a double strand DNA damaging drug, such as doxorubicin. High concentrations of both ITCs induced cytotoxic effects in MSC cultures and further increased DNA damage induced by peroxides. In summary, our study suggests that ITCs, at low doses, may contribute to slowing the aging process related to oxidative DNA damage. Moreover, in cancer treatment, low doses of ITCs may be used as an adjuvant to reduce chemotherapy-induced oxidative stress, while high doses may synergize with anticancer drugs to promote cell DNA damage. PMID:22684843

  14. cAMP-Inhibits Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 and Protects Neurons against Amyloid-β-Induced Synapse Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Williams, Alun

    2015-01-01

    A key event in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the production of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides and the loss of synapses. In cultured neurons Aβ triggered synapse damage as measured by the loss of synaptic proteins. α-synuclein (αSN), aggregates of which accumulate in Parkinson’s disease, also caused synapse damage. Synapse damage was associated with activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), an enzyme that regulates synapse function and structure, and the production of prostaglandin (PG) E2. In synaptosomes PGE2 increased concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) which suppressed the activation of cPLA2 demonstrating an inhibitory feedback system. Thus, Aβ/αSN-induced activated cPLA2 produces PGE2 which increases cAMP which in turn suppresses cPLA2 and, hence, its own production. Neurons pre-treated with pentoxifylline and caffeine (broad spectrum phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors) or the PDE4 specific inhibitor rolipram significantly increased the Aβ/αSN-induced increase in cAMP and consequently protected neurons against synapse damage. The addition of cAMP analogues also inhibited cPLA2 and protected neurons against synapse damage. These results suggest that drugs that inhibit Aβ-induced activation of cPLA2 and cross the blood–brain barrier may reduce synapse damage in AD. PMID:26389963

  15. cAMP-Inhibits Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A₂ and Protects Neurons against Amyloid-β-Induced Synapse Damage.

    PubMed

    Bate, Clive; Williams, Alun

    2015-01-01

    A key event in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the production of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides and the loss of synapses. In cultured neurons Aβ triggered synapse damage as measured by the loss of synaptic proteins. α-synuclein (αSN), aggregates of which accumulate in Parkinson's disease, also caused synapse damage. Synapse damage was associated with activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A₂ (cPLA₂), an enzyme that regulates synapse function and structure, and the production of prostaglandin (PG) E₂. In synaptosomes PGE₂ increased concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) which suppressed the activation of cPLA₂ demonstrating an inhibitory feedback system. Thus, Aβ/αSN-induced activated cPLA₂ produces PGE₂ which increases cAMP which in turn suppresses cPLA₂ and, hence, its own production. Neurons pre-treated with pentoxifylline and caffeine (broad spectrum phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors) or the PDE4 specific inhibitor rolipram significantly increased the Aβ/αSN-induced increase in cAMP and consequently protected neurons against synapse damage. The addition of cAMP analogues also inhibited cPLA₂ and protected neurons against synapse damage. These results suggest that drugs that inhibit Aβ-induced activation of cPLA₂ and cross the blood-brain barrier may reduce synapse damage in AD. PMID:26389963

  16. Insect-Damaged Corn Stalks Decompose at Rates Similar to Bt-Protected, Non-Damaged Corn Stalks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relative decomposability of corn (Zea mays L.) residues from insect (Bt)-protected hybrids and conventional hybrids cultivated under insect pressure was investigated in two studies. Above-ground biomass, residue macromolecular composition, and stalk physical strength were also measured. In the...

  17. Protective effect of α-mangostin against iodixanol-induced apoptotic damage in LLC-PK1 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dahae; Choi, Young Ok; Kim, Ki Hyun; Chin, Young-Won; Namgung, Hojin; Yamabe, Noriko; Jung, Kiwon

    2016-08-01

    Radiographic contrast media facilitate the visibility of internal body structures, but its use to patients with lowered renal function needs to be careful because of severe side effect in kidney. The present study aims to evaluate potential protective effect and mechanism of Alpha mangostin (α-mangostin) against contrast-induced apoptotic damage in LLC-PK1 cells. As a result, α-mangostin in non-toxic concentrations improved the viability of the iodixanol-treated cells up to 90.42% against contrast-induced damage in LLC-PK1 cells. Iodixanol treatment increased the phosphorylation of p38, ERK and cleavage of caspase-3 in LLC-PK1 cells, which were significantly decreased by co-treatment with α-mangostin (2.5 and 5μM). The protective effect of α-mangostin on contrast-induced apoptotic damage was mediated by the inhibition of MAPKs and caspase activation. PMID:27293071

  18. Myricetin, quercetin, (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin protect against N-nitrosamines-induced DNA damage in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Delgado, M E; Haza, A I; García, A; Morales, P

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of myricetin, quercetin, (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin, against N-nitrosodibutylamine (NDBA) and N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP)-induced DNA damage in human hepatoma cells (HepG2). DNA damage (strand breaks and oxidized purines/pyrimidines) was evaluated by the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis or Comet assay. (+)-Catechin at the lowest concentration (10 microM) showed the maximum reduction of DNA strand breaks (23%), the formation of endonuclease III (Endo III, 19-21%) and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg, 28-40%) sensitive sites induced by NDBA or NPIP. (-)-Epicatechin also decreased DNA strand breaks (10 microM, 20%) and the oxidized pyrimidines/purines (33-39%) induced by NDBA or NPIP, respectively. DNA strand breaks induced by NDBA or NPIP were weakly reduced by myricetin at the lowest concentration (0.1 microM, 10-19%, respectively). Myricetin also reduced the oxidized purines (0.1 microM, 17%) and pyrimidines (0.1 microM, 15%) induced by NDBA, but not the oxidized pyrimidines induced by NPIP. Quercetin did not protect against NDBA-induced DNA damage, but it reduced the formation of Endo III and Fpg sensitive sites induced by NPIP (0.1 microM, 17-20%, respectively). In conclusion, our results indicate that (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin at the concentrations tested protect human derived cells against oxidative DNA damage effects of NDBA and NPIP. However, myricetin at the concentrations tested only protects human cells against oxidative DNA damage induced by NDBA and quercetin against oxidative DNA damage induced by NPIP. PMID:19628030

  19. Mitochondrial anti-oxidant protects IEX-1 deficient mice from organ damage during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Haley; Wu, Mei X

    2014-12-01

    Sepsis, a leading cause of mortality in intensive care units worldwide, is often a result of overactive and systemic inflammation following serious infections. We found that mice lacking immediate early responsive gene X-1 (IEX-1) were prone to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced endotoxemia. A nonlethal dose of LPS provoked numerous aberrations in IEX-1 knockout (KO) mice including pancytopenia, increased serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and lung neutrophilia, concurrent with liver and kidney damage, followed by death. Given these results, in conjunction with a proven role for IEX-1 in the regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis during stress, we pre-treated IEX-1 KO mice with Mitoquinone (MitoQ), a mitochondrion-based antioxidant prior to LPS injection. The treatment significantly reduced ROS formation in circulatory cells and protected against pancytopenia and multiple organ failure, drastically increasing the survival rate of IEX-1 KO mice challenged by this low dose of LPS. This study confirms significant contribution of mitochondrial ROS to the etiology of sepsis. PMID:25466275

  20. The protective effect of Malva sylvestris on rat kidney damaged by vanadium

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The protective effect of the common mallow (Malva sylvestris) decoction on renal damages in rats induced by ammonium metavanadate poisoning was evaluated. On the one hand, vanadium toxicity is associated to the production of reactive oxygen species, causing a lipid peroxidation and an alteration in the enzymatic antioxidant defence. On the other hand, many medicinal plants are known to possess antioxidant and radical scavenging properties, thanks to the presence of flavonoids. These properties were confirmed in Malva sylvestris by two separate methods; namely, the Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl assay and the Nitroblue Tetrazolium reduction assay. Results In 80 rats exposed to ammonium metavanadate (0.24 mmol/kg body weight in drinking water) for 90 days, lipid peroxidation levels and superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities were measured in kidney. A significant increase in the formation of free radicals and antioxidant enzyme activities was noticed. In addition, a histological examination of kidney revealed a structural deterioration of the renal cortical capsules and a shrinking of the Bowman space. In animals intoxicated by metavanadate but also given a Malva sylvestris decoction (0.2 g dry mallow/kg body weight), no such pathologic features were observed: lipid peroxidation levels, antioxidant enzyme activities and histological features appeared normal as compared to control rats. Conclusion Malva sylvestris is proved to have a high antioxidative potential thanks to its richness in phenolic compounds. PMID:21513564

  1. Mulberry Fruit Extract Protects against Memory Impairment and Hippocampal Damage in Animal Model of Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kaewkaen, Pratchaya; Tong-un, Terdthai; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Kaewrueng, Wiroje; Wongcharoenwanakit, Sathaporn

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, the preventive strategy of vascular dementia, one of the challenge problems of elderly, has received attention due to the limitation of therapeutic efficacy. In this study, we aimed to determine the protective effect and possible mechanism of action of mulberry fruit extract on memory impairment and brain damage in animal model of vascular dementia. Male Wistar rats, weighing 300–350 g, were orally given mulberry extract at doses of 2, 10 and 50 mg/kg at a period of 7 days before and 21 days after the occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (Rt.MCAO). It was found that rats subjected to mulberry fruits plus Rt.MCAO showed the enhanced memory, the increased densities of neuron, cholinergic neuron, Bcl-2-immunopositive neuron together with the decreased oxidative stress in hippocampus. Taken all data together, the cognitive enhancing effect of mulberry fruit extract observed in this study might be partly associated with the increased cholinergic function and its neuroprotective effect in turn occurs partly via the decreased oxidative stress and apoptosis. Therefore, mulberry fruit is the potential natural cognitive enhancer and neuroprotectant. However, further researches are essential to elucidate the possible active ingredient. PMID:22952555

  2. Corosolic acid inhibits the proliferation of glomerular mesangial cells and protects against diabetic renal damage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Qiang; Tian, Wen; Liu, Xiao-Xiao; Zhang, Kai; Huo, Jun-Cheng; Liu, Wen-Juan; Li, Ping; Xiao, Xiong; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Cao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus (DM). This study aimed to explore the effects of corosolic acid (CA) on the renal damage of DM and the mechanisms behind these effects. The renoprotective effect of CA was investigated in type 1 diabetic rats and db/db mice. The kidneys and glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs) were used to study the proliferation of GMCs by immunostaining and MTT assay. Further immunoblotting, siRNA, qPCR analysis, and detecting of NADPH oxidase activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were performed to explore relevant molecular mechanisms. In CA-treated diabetic animals, diabetes-induced albuminuria, increased serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen were significantly attenuated, and glomerular hypertrophy, mesangial expansion and fibrosis were ameliorated. Furthermore, CA significantly inhibited proliferation of GMCs and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK in both diabetic animals and high glucose (HG)-induced GMCs. CA also normalized Δψm and inhibited HG-induced NADPH oxidase activity, ROS generation and NOX4, NOX2, p22phox and p47phox expression. More importantly, CA inhibited GMC proliferation mediated by NADPH/ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. These findings suggest that CA exert the protective effect on DN by anti-proliferation resulted from inhibition of p38 MAPK- and NADPH-mediated inactivation of ERK1/2. PMID:27229751

  3. Acetone Extract of Almond Hulls Provides Protection against Oxidative Damage and Membrane Protein Degradation.

    PubMed

    Meshkini, Azadeh

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have revealed that among foods, the consumption of edible nuts has beneficial effects on health which are attributed to their high content of potent antioxidants. Among nuts, the whole seed of the almond (Prunus dulcis) has been demonstrated to possess potent free radical scavenging activity, which is related to the presence of phenolic compounds. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the polyphenol content and the antioxidant ability of almond hull, which is an agriculture solid waste. The present results revealed that among different extraction methods, the acetone extract of almond hulls has a high content of phenolic and flavonoid compounds and a high antioxidant ability, which were determined by using the phosphomolybdenum method and by measuring the potency of the antioxidant, respectively. Moreover, the experimental data disclosed that the acetone extract of almond hulls provides protection against the oxidative damage and the membrane protein degradation that are caused in human erythrocytes by hydrogen peroxide. These phenomena may likely be due to the recruitment of antioxidants by cell membranes and/or translocation to cytosol. Overall, almond hull extract could be considered as a natural source of antioxidants, and its consumption could have a positive effect on human health. PMID:27342887

  4. Carnosine pretreatment protects against hypoxia-ischemia brain damage in the neonatal rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Song, Lili; Cheng, Xiuyong; Yang, Yi; Luan, Bin; Jia, Liting; Xu, Falin; Zhang, Zhan

    2011-09-30

    Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia brain injury is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in neonates and lacks an effective treatment thus far. Carnosine has been demonstrated to play a neuroprotective role in the adult brain injuries. However, there is no information available concerning its neuroprotective role in the immature brains after hypoxia-ischemia insults. Therefore, we investigated whether carnosine could also confer neuroprotective effects in a neonatal rat hypoxia-ischemia model. Hypoxia-ischemia was induced in rats on postnatal day 7 (P7). Carnosine (250 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally, 30 min prior to hypoxia-ischemia induction. Morphological brain injury and biochemical markers of apoptosis and oxidative stress were evaluated 24 h after hypoxia-ischemia induction. Cognitive performance was evaluated by the Morris Water Maze test on P28-P33. We found that pretreatment with carnosine significantly reduced the infarct volume and the number of terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in the hypoxia-ischemia brain. Carnosine also inhibited mRNA expression of apoptosis-inducing factor(AIF) and caspase-3, which was accompanied by an increase in superoxide dismutase(SOD)activity and a decrease in the malondialdehyde(MDA)level in carnosine-treated rats. Furthermore, carnosine also improved the spatial learning and memory abilities of rats declined due to hypoxia-ischemia. These results demonstrate that carnosine can protect rats against hypoxia-ischemia-induced brain damage by antioxidation. PMID:21693116

  5. Antioxidant and DNA damage protecting potentials of polysaccharide extracted from Phellinus baumii using a delignification method.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qun-Li; Zhang, Zuo-Fa; Lv, Guo-Ying; Cai, Wei-Ming; Cheng, Jun-Wen; Wang, Jian-Gong; Fan, Lei-Fa

    2016-11-01

    A delignification method was employed to extract the polysaccharide from the fruiting body of Phellinus baumii. The three parameters, processing temperature, ratio of water to raw material and amount of acetic acid every time were optimized using the Box-Behnken design. As a result, the optimal extraction conditions were: processing temperature 70.3°C, ratio of water to raw material of 34.7mL/g and amount of acetic acid of 0.32mL every time. Under these conditions, the highest yield of polysaccharide (10.28%) was obtained. The main fraction (PPB-2) purified from PPB was composed of fucose, arabinose, galactose, glucose, xylose and mannose, while glucose was the predominant monosaccharide. PPB-2 exhibited noticeable antioxidant activity and strong protection against oxidative DNA damage. These findings implied that acid-chlorite delignification was a superior method to extract the polysaccharide from P. baumii and PPB-2 may be useful for cancer chemoprevention. PMID:27516306

  6. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices A--D. Volume 2, Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the Potential risks during low Power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the Plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. We recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful. This document, Volume 2, Pt. 2 provides appendices A through D of this report.

  7. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices E (Sections E.1--E.8). Volume 2, Part 3A

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. The authors recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful.

  8. The Effects of Foam Thermal Protection System on the Damage Tolerance Characteristics of Composite Sandwich Structures for Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Hodge, A. J.; Jackson, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    For any structure composed of laminated composite materials, impact damage is one of the greatest risks and therefore most widely tested responses. Typically, impact damage testing and analysis assumes that a solid object comes into contact with the bare surface of the laminate (the outer ply). However, most launch vehicle structures will have a thermal protection system (TPS) covering the structure for the majority of its life. Thus, the impact response of the material with the TPS covering is the impact scenario of interest. In this study, laminates representative of the composite interstage structure for the Ares I launch vehicle were impact tested with and without the planned TPS covering, which consists of polyurethane foam. Response variables examined include maximum load of impact, damage size as detected by nondestructive evaluation techniques, and damage morphology and compression after impact strength. Results show that there is little difference between TPS covered and bare specimens, except the residual strength data is higher for TPS covered specimens.

  9. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix I, Volume 2, Part 5

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Bley, D.; Johnson, D.; Holmes, B.

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL) and Sandia National Labs. (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this volume of the report is to document the approach utilized in the level-1 internal events PRA for the Surry plant, and discuss the results obtained. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1, which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis examining accidents initiated by internal events (including internal fire and flood) was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis.

  10. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix E (Sections E.9-E.16), Volume 2, Part 3B

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Wong, S.M.; Bley, D.; Johnson, D.

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

  11. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendices F-H, Volume 2, Part 4

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Bley, D.; Johnson, D.; Holmes, B.

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

  12. Protective role of hydrogen-rich water on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Yao; Wu, Qi-Fei; Wan, Yong; Song, Si-Dong; Xu, Jia; Xu, Xin-Sen; Chang, Hu-Lin; Tai, Ming-Hui; Dong, Ya-Feng; Liu, Chang

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of the hydrogen-rich water (HRW) in the prevention of aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats. METHODS: Forty male rats were allocated into four groups: normal control group, HRW group, aspirin group, and HRW plus aspirin group. The protective efficacy was tested by determining the gastric mucosal damage score. Malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), myeloperoxidase (MPO), interleukin (IL)-06 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in gastric tissues were evaluated. The serum levels of IL-1β and TNF-α were also detected. Histopathology of gastric tissues and localization of Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) were detected using hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry, respectively. RESULTS: Pretreatment with HRW obviously reduced aspirin-induced gastric damage scores (4.04 ± 0.492 vs 2.10 ± 0.437, P < 0.05). The oxidative stress levels of MDA and MPO in the gastric tissues increased significantly in the aspirin-treated group compared with the HRW group (2.43 ± 0.145 vs 1.79 ± 0.116 nmol/mg prot, P < 0.05 and 2.53 ± 0.238 vs 1.40 ± 0.208 U/g tissue, P < 0.05, respectively). HRW could obviously elevated the SOD levels in the gastric tissues (37.94 ± 8.44 vs 59.55 ± 9.02 nmol/mg prot, P < 0.05). Pretreatment with HRW significantly reduced IL-06 and TNF-α in the gastric tissues (46.65 ± 5.50 vs 32.15 ± 4.83 pg/mg, P < 0.05 and 1305.08 ± 101.23 vs 855.96 ± 93.22 pg/mg, P < 0.05), and IL-1β and TNF-α in the serum (505.38 ± 32.97 vs 343.37 ± 25.09 pg/mL, P < 0.05 and 264.53 ± 28.63 vs 114.96 ± 21.79 pg/mL, P < 0.05) compared to treatment with aspirin alone. HRW could significantly decrease the COX-2 expression in the gastric tissues (staining score: 8.4 ± 2.1 vs 2.9 ± 1.5, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: HRW pretreatment alleviated the aspirin-induced gastric lesions by inhibiting the oxidative stress, inflammatory reaction and reducing the COX-2 in the gastric tissues. PMID:24587639

  13. Evaluation of Antioxidant and DNA Damage Protection Activity of the Hydroalcoholic Extract of Desmostachya bipinnata L. Stapf

    PubMed Central

    Bhimathati, Solomon Sunder Raj

    2014-01-01

    Desmostachya bipinnata Stapf (Poaceae/Gramineae) is an official drug of ayurvedic pharmacopoeia. Various parts of this plant were used extensively in traditional and folklore medicine to cure various human ailments. The present study was aimed to evaluate the antioxidant and DNA damage protection activity of hydroalcoholic extract of Desmostachya bipinnata both in vitro and in vivo, to provide scientific basis for traditional usage of this plant. The extract showed significant antioxidant activity in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 264.18 ± 3.47 μg/mL in H2O2 scavenging assay and prevented the oxidative damage to DNA in presence of DNA damaging agent (Fenton's reagent) at a concentration of 50 μg/mL. Also, the presence of extract protected yeast cells in a dose-dependent manner against DNA damaging agent (Hydroxyurea) in spot assay. Moreover, the presence of extract exhibited significant antioxidant activity in vivo by protecting yeast cells against oxidative stressing agent (H2O2). Altogether, the results of current study revealed that Desmostachya bipinnata is a potential source of antioxidants and lends pharmacological credence to the ethnomedical use of this plant in traditional system of medicine, justifying its therapeutic application for free-radical-induced diseases. PMID:24574873

  14. Protective Effect of Brazilian Propolis against Liver Damage with Cholestasis in Rats Treated with α-Naphthylisothiocyanate

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tadashi; Ohta, Yoshiji; Ohashi, Koji; Ikeno, Kumiko; Watanabe, Rie; Tokunaga, Kenji; Harada, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-01

    We examined the protective effect of Brazilian propolis against liver damage with cholestasis in rats treated with α-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) in comparison with that of vitamin E (VE). Rats orally received Brazilian propolis ethanol extract (BPEE) (25, 50, or 100 mg/kg), VE (250 mg/kg) or vehicle at 12 h after intraperitoneal injection of ANIT (75 mg/kg) and were killed 24 h after the injection. Vehicle-treated rats showed liver cell damage and cholestasis, judging from the levels of serum marker enzymes and components. The vehicle group had increased serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, phospholipid, and lipid peroxide levels, increased hepatic lipid peroxide, reduced glutathione, and ascorbic acid levels and myeloperoxidase activity, and decreased hepatic superoxide dismutase activity. BPEE (50 mg/kg) administered to ANIT-treated rats prevented liver cell damage and cholestasis and attenuated these serum and hepatic biochemical changes except hepatic ascorbic acid, although administered BPEE (25 or 100 mg/kg) was less effective. VE administered to ANIT-treated rats prevented liver cell damage, but not cholestasis, and attenuated increased serum lipid peroxide level, increased hepatic lipid peroxide level and myeloperoxidase activity, and decreased hepatic superoxide dismutase activity. These results indicate that BPEE protects against ANIT-induced liver damage with cholestasis in rats more effectively than VE. PMID:23710219

  15. Celastrus and its bioactive celastrol protect against bone damage in autoimmune arthritis by modulating osteoimmune cross-talk.

    PubMed

    Nanjundaiah, Siddaraju M; Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H; Yu, Hua; Tong, Li; Stains, Joseph P; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2012-06-22

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by bone erosion and cartilage destruction in the joints. Many of the conventional antiarthritic drugs are effective in suppressing inflammation, but they do not offer protection against bone damage. Furthermore, the prolonged use of these drugs is associated with severe adverse reactions. Thus, new therapeutic agents that can control both inflammation and bone damage but with minimal side effects are sought. Celastrus is a Chinese herb that has been used for centuries in folk medicine for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. However, its utility for protection against inflammation-induced bone damage in arthritis and the mechanisms involved therein have not been examined. We tested celastrus and its bioactive component celastrol for this attribute in the adjuvant-induced arthritis model of RA. The treatment of arthritic rats with celastrus/celastrol suppressed inflammatory arthritis and reduced bone and cartilage damage in the joints as demonstrated by histology and bone histomorphometry. The protective effects against bone damage are mediated primarily via the inhibition of defined mediators of osteoclastic bone remodeling (e.g. receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)), the deviation of RANKL/osteoprotegerin ratio in favor of antiosteoclastic activity, and the reduction in osteoclast numbers. Furthermore, both the upstream inducers (proinflammatory cytokines) and the downstream effectors (MMP-9) of the osteoclastogenic mediators were altered. Thus, celastrus and celastrol controlled inflammation-induced bone damage by modulating the osteoimmune cross-talk. These natural products deserve further consideration and evaluation as adjuncts to conventional therapy for RA. PMID:22549786

  16. Fingolimod protects against neonatal white matter damage and long-term cognitive deficits caused by hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Serdar, Meray; Herz, Josephine; Kempe, Karina; Lumpe, Katharina; Reinboth, Barbara S; Sizonenko, Stéphane V; Hou, Xinlin; Herrmann, Ralf; Hadamitzky, Martin; Heumann, Rolf; Hansen, Wiebke; Sifringer, Marco; van de Looij, Yohan; Felderhoff-Müser, Ursula; Bendix, Ivo

    2016-02-01

    . Cerebral immune cell counts remained unchanged by hyperoxia and by FTY720 treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that beneficial effects of FTY720 in neonatal oxygen-induced brain injury may be rather attributed to its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory capacity acting in concert with a direct protection of developing oligodendrocytes than to a modulation of peripheral lymphocyte trafficking. Thus, FTY720 might be a potential new therapeutic option for the treatment of neonatal brain injury through reduction of white matter damage. PMID:26456693

  17. In vitro free radical scavenging and DNA damage protective property of Coriandrum sativum L. leaves extract.

    PubMed

    Harsha, S N; Anilakumar, K R

    2014-08-01

    Coriandrum sativum L. (coriander), an everyday spice in the Indian kitchen is known to add flavor to the cuisine. It is an annual herb belonging to the Apiaceae (Umbellifera) family. The hydro-alcohol extract of Coriandrum sativum L. at the dose of 1 mg/ml was subjected to a series of in vitro assays viz. 2, 2'- diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, lipid peroxidation by thiobarbituric acid, reducing power and nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenging in order to study its antioxidant efficacy in detail. The amount of flavonoids in 70% ethanol extract was found to be 44.5 μg and that of the total phenols was 133.74 μg gallic acid equivalents per mg extract. The extracts of the leaves showed metal chelating power, with IC50 values, 368.12 μg/ml where as that of standard EDTA was 26.7 μg/ml. The IC50 values for 2, 2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid radical scavenging was 222 μg/ml where as that of standard ascorbic acid was 22.6 μg/ml. The NO scavenging activity of the extract of the leaves showed IC50 value of 815.6 μg/ml; at the same time the standard BHA had 49.1 μg/ml. All the plant extracts provided DNA damage protection; however, the protection provided at the dose of 8 μg/ml was comparable to that of standard gallic acid. The Coriandrum sativum leaf extract was able to prevent in vitro lipid peroxidation with IC50 values; 589.6 μg/ml where as that of standard BHA was 16.3 μg/ml. Our results also showed significant ferric reducing power indicating the hydrogen donating ability of the extract. This study indicated the potential of the leaf extract as a source of natural antioxidants or nutraceuticals that could be of use in food industry with potential application to reduce oxidative stress in living system. PMID:25114344

  18. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Wei; Liu, Fu-Chao; Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system. PMID:26637174

  19. Photo-protective effect of americanin B against ultraviolet B-induced damage in cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Yao, Cheng Wen; Cha, Ji Won; Shin, Jennifer H; Yoo, Suk Jae; Hyun, Jin Won

    2014-11-01

    Excessive ultraviolet (UV) radiation, a constituent of sunlight, can induce multiple types of skin damage. We recently demonstrated that americanin B, a lignin compound, protected cells against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced damage by exerting antioxidant effects and inhibiting apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the ability of americanin B to protect against cell injury induced by UVB (280-320nm), the most harmful UV wavelengths, in human HaCaT keratinocytes. Americanin B absorbed UVB, eliminated UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and decreased the extent of UVB-induced oxidative modification of lipids, proteins, and DNA. In addition, americanin B inhibited UVB-induced apoptosis, as indicated by reductions in apoptotic body formation and DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, americanin B reversed the depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane induced by UVB exposure. These protective activities were associated with down-regulation of apoptosis-promoting proteins, Bax, caspase-9, and caspase-3 and up-regulation of an apoptosis inhibitor, Bcl-2. These results suggest that americanin B can protect human keratinocytes against UVB-induced cell damage. PMID:25461549

  20. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system. PMID:26637174

  1. Enhanced protective activity of nano formulated andrographolide against arsenic induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    Das, Sujata; Pradhan, Goutam Kumar; Das, Subhadip; Nath, Debjani; Das Saha, Krishna

    2015-12-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic over a period of time induces toxicity, primarily in liver but gradually in all systems of the body. Andrographolide (AG), a major diterpene lactone of Andrographis paniculata, shows a wide array of physiological functions including hepatoprotection. Therapeutic applications of AG are however seriously constrained because of its insolubility, poor bioavailability, and short plasma half-life. Nanoparticulation of AG is a possible solution to these problems. In the present study we investigated the effectiveness of polylactide co-glycolide (PLGA) nanocapsulated andrographolide (NA) against arsenic induced liver damage in mice. NA of average diameter 65.8 nm and encapsulation efficiency of 64% were prepared. Sodium arsenite at a dose of 40 mg/L supplied via drinking water in mice significantly raised the serum level of liver function markers such as AST, ALT, and ALP, and caused arsenic deposition in liver and ROS generation, though it did not show any lethality up to 30 days of exposure. However, even liver toxicity was not observed when mice were given AG and NA orally at doses up to 100 mg/kg bwt and 20 mg/kg bwt respectively on alternate days for one month. Treatment of non-toxic doses of AG or NA on alternate days along with arsenic significantly decreased the arsenic induced elevation of the serum level of ALT, AST and ALP, and arsenic deposition in liver. AG and NA increased the level of hepatic antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT), and the level of reduced glutathione (GSH). Also, the ROS level was lowered in mice exposed to arsenic but treated with AG or NA. Protective efficiency of NA is about five times more than that of AG. Administration of NA to arsenic-treated mice caused signs of improvement in liver tissue architecture. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that NA could be beneficial against arsenic-induced liver toxicity. PMID:26485141

  2. Protective effect of Ugni molinae Turcz against oxidative damage of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Orellana, P; Avello, M; Villena, F

    2007-01-01

    Ugni molinae Turcz, also known as "Murtilla", is a plant that grows in the south of Chile. Infusions of its leaves have long been used in traditional native herbal medicine. The chemical composition of the leaves indicates the presence of polyphenols, which have antioxidant properties. In the present work, the antioxidant properties of U. molinae were evaluated in human erythrocytes exposed in vitro to oxidative stress induced by HClO. The experiments were carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and hemolysis measurements. The SEM observations showed that HClO induced a morphological alteration in the red blood cells from a discoid to an echinocytic form. According to the bilayer couple hypothesis, the formation of echinocytes indicates that HClO was inserted in the outer leaflet of the erythrocyte membrane. However, a concentration as low as 10 microM gallic acid equivalents (GAE) U. molinae aqueous extract neutralized the shape change effect of HClO applied in a concentration as high as 0.25 mM. The significant protection of U. molinae aqueous extract was also shown in the hemolysis experiments. In fact, very low concentrations of the extract considerably reduced the deleterious capacity of HClO to induce hemolysis in red blood cells. It is concluded that the location of the extract components into the membrane bilayer and the resulting restriction on its fluidity might hinder the diffusion of HClO and its consequent damaging effects. This conclusion can also imply that this restriction could apply to the diffusion of free radicals into cell membranes and the subsequent decrease of the kinetics of free radical reactions. PMID:17030381

  3. Protective effects of total flavonoids from Flos Puerariae on retinal neuronal damage in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dai; Yang, Fang; Cheng, Hongke; Liu, Chao; Sun, Ming; Wu, Kaili

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the potential protective effects of total flavonoids from Flos Puerariae (TFF) on retinal neural cells in diabetic mice. Methods C57BL/6J mice were intraperitoneally injected with streptozotocin to generate type I diabetes in a murine model, as indicated by blood glucose levels ≥11.1 mmol/l. TFF was administered intragastrically at a dose of 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg/day. After 10 weeks of administration, the mice were euthanized, and the eyes were dissected. Retinal histology was examined, and the thickness of the retina was measured. Ultrastructural changes in the retinal ganglion cells and capillary basement membrane were observed with electron microscopy. Apoptosis of retinal neural cells was determined with the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling assay. Bax and Bcl-2 expression in the retinal tissues was determined with immunohistochemical staining and western blotting. Results Compared with the diabetic mice, the blood glucose level decreased (p<0.01) and the bodyweight increased (p<0.05) in the 100 and 200 mg/kg TFF-treated groups. The thickness of the retina significantly increased (p<0.01), and the retinal capillary basement membrane (BM) thickness was reduced in the 100 and 200 mg/kg TFF-treated diabetic mice (DM). The 100 and 200 mg/kg TFF treatments also attenuated the diabetes-induced apoptosis of retinal neural cells. Consistent with these effects, TFF treatment decreased the Bax expression level and, concurrently, increased the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax. Conclusions TFF attenuated diabetes-induced apoptosis in retinal neurons by inhibiting Bax expression and increasing the ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax, which suggests that TFF might prevent retinal neuronal damage in diabetes mellitus. PMID:24146535

  4. Neuronal oxidative injury and dendritic damage induced by carbofuran: Protection by memantine

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Ramesh C. . E-mail: ramesh.gupta@murraystate.edu; Milatovic, Snjezana; Dettbarn, Wolf-D.; Aschner, Michael; Milatovic, Dejan

    2007-03-15

    Carbamate insecticides mediate their neurotoxicity by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inactivation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats acutely intoxicated with the carbamate insecticide carbofuran (1.5 mg/kg, sc) developed hypercholinergic signs within 5-7 min of exposure, with maximal severity characterized by seizures within 30-60 min, lasting for about 2 h. At the time of peak severity, compared with controls, AChE was maximally inhibited (by 82-90%), radical oxygen species (ROS) markers (F{sub 2}-isoprostanes, F{sub 2}-IsoPs; and F{sub 4}-neuroprostanes, F{sub 4}-NeuroPs) were elevated 2- to 3-fold, and the radical nitrogen species (RNS) marker citrulline was elevated 4- to 8-fold in discrete brain regions (cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus). In addition, levels of high-energy phosphates (HEPs) were significantly reduced (ATP, by 43-56%; and phosphocreatine, by 37-48%). Values of total adenine nucleotides and total creatine compounds declined markedly (by 41-56% and 35-45%, respectively), while energy charge potential remained unchanged. Quantitative morphometric analysis of pyramidal neurons of the hippocampal CA1 region revealed significant decreases in dendritic lengths (by 64%) and spine density (by 60%). Pretreatment with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist memantine (18 mg/kg, sc), in combination with atropine sulfate (16 mg/kg, sc), significantly attenuated carbofuran-induced changes in AChE activity and levels of F{sub 2}-IsoPs and F{sub 4}-NeuroPs, declines in HEPs, as well as the alterations in morphology of hippocampal neurons. MEM and ATS pretreatment also protected rats from carbofuran-induced hypercholinergic behavioral activity, including seizures. These findings support the involvement of ROS and RNS in seizure-induced neuronal injury and suggest that memantine by preventing carbofuran-induced neuronal hyperactivity blocks pathways associated with oxidative damage in neurons.

  5. Protection of the lung from ionizing irradiation damage by inhalation gene therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Epperly, M.J.; Jahroudi, N.; Rosenstein, M.

    1995-12-31

    One of the limiting factors for radiation therapy of lung cancer is the dose given to normal lung tissue. A method by which to transiently elevate bronchoalveolar cell levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), which is involved in the reduction of oxygen-free radicals immediately prior to and after lung irradiation, might significantly reduce the level of DNA breaks and decrease pulmonary radiation damage. To develop a system for inhalation gene therapy and radiation protection, normal human epithelial cell line IB3-1 cells were transfected with a human MnSOD transgene containing plasmid and cotransfected with a plasmid containing the neo transgene. Colonies selected for growth in 300 {mu}g/ml G418 were expanded and demonstrated to transcribe transgene-specific MnSOD mRNA by RT-PCR and showed elevated levels of biochemically active enzyme. Clonogenic irradiation survival curves were performed on the positive clones. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were anesthesitized by nembutal anesthesia and injected intratracheally with liposomes containing 500 {mu}g MnSOD transgene plasmid or an adenovirus containing the {beta}-gal marker gene, delivering 10{sup 9} infectious units. A third group of animals received no transgene therapy. All mice were either unirradiated or received thoracic (both lungs) irradiation to doses of 1000 to 3000 cGy in 5000 cGy increments. Animals were sacrificed at 24, 48 and 72 hours or one week after irradiation, and the acute changes of pulmonary exudate, alveolar cell swelling and early inflammatory cell infiltrates quantitated by histopathologic examination of lung sections. Lung fragments were analyzed for histochemically detectable {beta}-gal expression in primary, secondary and tertiary bronchioles and alveoli, and by RT-PCR for detectable levels of MnSOD transgene message using primers that spanned the 5{sup 1} end of the human MnSOD message and sequences in the plasmid vector.

  6. [The change in efficiency of protective measures for reduction of 137Cs accumulation by agricultural plants in various periods after the Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Panov, A V; Aleksakhin, R M; Muzalevskaia, A A

    2011-01-01

    Dynamics of 137Cs transfer factors to plants and the effects of protective measures on this radionuclide accumulation in the agricultural production is estimated on the example of the south-western regions of Bryansk District. Three periods in decreasing the 137Cs content in plants during 20 years after the Chernobyl accident are identified. The contribution of radionuclide decay, natural biogeochemical processes and protective measures aimed at reduction of the 137Cs accumulation in agricultural plants during various periods after radioactive fallout is shown. Maximum permissible levels of 137Cs contamination of cultivated lands, where crop products meeting current standards may be obtained, at different scopes of protective measures on radioactive-contaminated territories are forecasted. Periods after radioactive fallout, when crop and forage products meeting radiological standards are obtained, are assessed. PMID:21520624

  7. 29 CFR 1960.29 - Accident investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accident investigation. 1960.29 Section 1960.29 Labor... MATTERS Inspection and Abatement § 1960.29 Accident investigation. (a) While all accidents should be investigated, including accidents involving property damage only, the extent of such investigation shall...

  8. 29 CFR 1960.29 - Accident investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accident investigation. 1960.29 Section 1960.29 Labor... MATTERS Inspection and Abatement § 1960.29 Accident investigation. (a) While all accidents should be investigated, including accidents involving property damage only, the extent of such investigation shall...

  9. Protective effect of dieckol isolated from Ecklonia cava against ethanol caused damage in vitro and in zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Cheol; Kim, Kil-Nam; Kang, Sung-Myung; Yang, Xiudong; Kim, Eun-A; Song, Choon Bok; Nah, Jae-Woon; Jang, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Jung-Suck; Jung, Won-Kyo; Jeon, You-Jin

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, the protective effects of phlorotannins isolated from Ecklonia cava against ethanol-induced cell damage and apoptosis were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Three phlorotannin compounds, namely phloroglucinol, eckol and dieckol, were successively isolated and identified from the extract. Dieckol showed the strongest protective effect against ethanol-induced cell apoptosis in Chang liver cells, with the lowest cytotoxicity. It was observed that dieckol reduced cell apoptosis through activation of Bcl-xL and PARP, and down-regulation of Bax and caspase-3 in Western blot analyses. In the in vivo study, the protective effect of ethanol induced by dieckol was investigated in a zebrafish model. The dieckol treated group scavenged intracellural reactive oxygen species and prevented lipid peroxidation and ethanol induced cell death in the zebrafish embryo. In conclusion, dieckol isolated from E. cava might possess a potential protective effect against ethanol-induced liver diseases. PMID:24189014

  10. Fortilin potentiates the peroxidase activity of Peroxiredoxin-1 and protects against alcohol-induced liver damage in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Abhijnan; Pinkaew, Decha; Doan, Hung Q.; Jacob, Reed B.; Verma, Sunil K.; Friedman, Hana; Peterson, Alan C.; Kuyumcu-Martinez, Muge N.; McDougal, Owen M.; Fujise, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Fortilin, a pro-survival molecule, inhibits p53-induced apoptosis by binding to the sequence-specific DNA-binding domain of the tumor suppressor protein and preventing it from transcriptionally activating Bax. Intriguingly, fortilin protects cells against ROS-induced cell death, independent of p53. The signaling pathway through which fortilin protects cells against ROS-induced cell death, however, is unknown. Here we report that fortilin physically interacts with the antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin-1 (PRX1), protects it from proteasome-mediated degradation, and keeps it enzymatically active by blocking its deactivating phosphorylation by Mst1, a serine/threonine kinase. At the whole animal level, the liver-specific overexpression of fortilin reduced PRX1 phosphorylation in the liver, enhanced PRX1 activity, and protected the transgenic animals against alcohol-induced, ROS-mediated, liver damage. These data suggest the presence of a novel oxidative-stress-handling pathway where the anti-p53 molecule fortilin augments the peroxidase PRX1 by protecting it against degradation and inactivation of the enzyme. Fortilin-PRX1 interaction in the liver could be clinically exploited further to prevent acute alcohol-induced liver damage in humans. PMID:26726832

  11. Protection of the mouse from genetic radiation damage by an optimal-dose-ratio combination of ATP, AET, and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Benova, D; Baev, I

    1978-07-15

    The study concerned antiradiation effects in germ-cell genetic structures produced by a combination of ATP, AET, and serotonin at dose ratio optimal for lethality namely, 45:3:1, as arrived at in our previous work. Such a combination was found to reduce by a factor of 2 the translocation yields observed after 400 R X-rays to mouse spermatogonia. In terms of animal survival, ATP has been shown to contribute little to total protection achieved by the same combination; in terms of genetic damage; however, the role of ATP proved essential. Removal of ATP from the combination led to a significant reduction in protective effect. PMID:668857

  12. Hyperprolinemia induces DNA, protein and lipid damage in blood of rats: antioxidant protection.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Andréa G K; Scherer, Emilene B; da Cunha, Aline A; Manfredini, Vanusa; Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Vanzin, Camila Simioni; Vargas, Carmen R; Wyse, Angela T S

    2014-09-01

    The present study investigated the effects of hyperprolinemia on oxidative damage to biomolecules (protein, lipids and DNA) and the antioxidant status in blood of rats. The influence of the antioxidants on the effects elicited by proline was also examined. Wistar rats received two daily injections of proline and/or vitamin E plus C (6th-28th day of life) and were killed 12h after the last injection. Results showed that hyperprolinemia induced a significant oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and DNA demonstrated by increased carbonyl content, malondialdehyde levels and a greater damage index in comet assay, respectively. The concomitant antioxidants administration to proline treatment completely prevented oxidative damage to proteins, but partially prevented lipids and DNA damage. We also observed that the non-enzymatic antioxidant potential was decreased by proline treatment and partially prevented by antioxidant supplementation. The plasma levels of vitamins E and C significantly increased in rats treated exogenously with these vitamins but, interestingly, when proline was administered concomitantly with vitamin E plus C, the levels of these vitamins were similar to those found in plasma of control and proline rats. Our findings suggest that hyperprolinemia promotes oxidative damage to the three major classes of macromolecules in blood of rats. These effects were accomplished by decrease in non-enzymatic antioxidant potential and decrease in vitamins administered exogenously, which significantly decreased oxidative damage to biomolecules studied. These data suggest that antioxidants may be an effective adjuvant therapeutic to limit oxidative damage caused by proline. PMID:24980685

  13. Protection of radiation induced DNA and membrane damages by total triterpenes isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (Fr.) P. Karst.

    PubMed

    Smina, T P; Maurya, D K; Devasagayam, T P A; Janardhanan, K K

    2015-05-25

    The total triterpenes isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma lucidum was examined for its potential to prevent γ-radiation induced membrane damage in rat liver mitochondria and microsomes. The effects of total triterpenes on γ-radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in pBR 322 plasmid DNA in vitro and human peripheral blood lymphocytes ex vivo were evaluated. The protective effect of total triterpenes against γ-radiation-induced micronuclei formations in mice bone marrow cells in vivo were also evaluated. The results indicated the significant effectiveness of Ganoderma triterpenes in protecting the DNA and membrane damages consequent to the hazardous effects of radiation. The findings suggest the potential use of Ganoderma triterpenes in radio therapy. PMID:25824410

  14. Antioxidant and DNA damage protective properties of anthocyanin-rich extracts from Hibiscus and Ocimum: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Biswatrish; Kumar, Dhananjay; Sasmal, Dinakar; Mukhopadhyay, Kunal

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanin extracts (AEs) from Ocimum tenuiflorum (leaf), Hibiscus rosa-sinensis (petal) and Hibiscus sabdariffa (calyx) were investigated and compared for in vitro antioxidant activity and DNA damage protective property. Total phenolic content (TPC) and total anthocyanin content (TAC) of the AEs were determined and the major anthocyanins were characterised. In vitro antioxidant activities were assessed by ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity, 2-deoxy-D-ribose degradation assay and lipid peroxidation assay. The protective property of the AEs was also examined against oxidative DNA damage by H2O2 and UV using pUC19 plasmid. All the AEs particularly those from O. tenuiflorum demonstrated efficient antioxidant activity and protected DNA from damage. Strong correlation between antioxidant capacity and TPC and TAC was observed. Significant correlation between antioxidant capacity and TPC and TAC ascertained that phenolics and anthocyanins were the major contributors of antioxidant activity. PMID:24730725

  15. Protective and damaging effects of stress mediators: central role of the brain

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Bruce S.

    2006-01-01

    The mind involves the whole body, and two-way communication between the brain and the cardiovascular, immune, and other systems via neural and endocrine mechanisms. Stress is a condition of the mind-body interaction, and a factor in the expression of disease that differs among individuals. It is not just the dramatic stressful events that exact their toll, but rather the many events of daily life that elevate and sustain activities of physiological systems and cause sleep deprivation, overeating, and other health-damaging behaviors, producing the feeling of being “stressed out.” Over time, this results in wear and tear on the body, which is called “allostatic load,” and it reflects not only the impact of life experiences but also of genetic load, individual lifestyle habits reflecting items such as diet, exercise, and substance abuse, and developmental experiences that set life-long patterns of behavior and physiological reactivity. Hormones associated with stress and allostatic load protect the body in the short run and promote adaptation by the process known as allostasis, but in the long run allostatic load causes changes in the body that can lead to disease. The brain is the key organ of stress, allostasis, and allostatic load, because it determines what is threatening and therefore stressful, and also determines the physiological and behavioral responses. Brain regions such as the hippocampus, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex respond to acute and chronic stress by undergoing structural remodeling, which alters behavioral and physiological responses. Translational studies in humans with structural and functional imaging reveal smaller hippocampal volume in stress-related conditions, such as mild cognitive impairment in aging and prolonged major depressive illness, as well as in individuals with low self-esteem. Alterations in amygdala and prefrontal cortex are also reported. Besides Pharmaceuticals, approaches to alleviate chronic stress and reduce

  16. Protective Effect of SAHA against LPS-induced Liver Damage in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yili; Zhou, Peter; Liu, Baoling; Bambakidis, Ted; Mazitschek, Ralph; Alam, Hasan B.; Li, Yongqing

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has a deleterious effect on several organs including the liver and eventually leads to endotoxic shock and death. LPS-induced hepatotoxicity is characterized by disturbed intracellular redox balance and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, leading to liver injury. We have shown that treatment with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI), improves survival in a murine model of LPS-induced shock, but the protective effect of SAHA against liver damage remains unknown. The goal of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying SAHA action in murine livers. METHOD Male C57BL/6J mice (6-8 weeks) weighing 20-25 g were randomly divided into three groups: (A) a sham group was given isotonic sodium chloride solution (10 μL/g body weight, intraperitoneal, i.p.) with DMSO (1 μl/g body weight, i.p.); (B) a LPS group was challenged with LPS (20 mg/kg, i.p.) dissolved in isotonic sodium chloride solution with DMSO; (C) a LPS plus SAHA group was treated with SAHA (50 mg/kg, i.p.) dissolved in DMSO immediately after injection of LPS (20 mg/kg, i.p.). Mice were anesthetized, and their livers were harvested 6 or 24 hours after injection to analyze whether SAHA affected production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of apoptotic proteins in the liver cells of challenged mice. RESULTS SAHA counteracted LPS-induced production of ROS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and nitrite) and reversed an LPS-induced decrease in antioxidant enzyme, glutathione (GSH). SAHA also attenuated LPS-induced hepatic apoptosis. Moreover, SAHA inhibited activation of the redox-sensitive kinase, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase-1 (ASK1), and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p38 and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). CONCLUSION Our data indicates, for the first time, that SAHA is capable of alleviating LPS-induced hepatotoxicity and suggests that a blockade of the upstream

  17. Protective Effects of Gelam Honey against Oxidative Damage in Young and Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sahhugi, Zulaikha; Jubri, Zakiah

    2014-01-01

    Aging is characterized by progressive decline in physiological and body function due to increase in oxidative damage. Gelam honey has been accounted to have high phenolic and nonphenolic content to attenuate oxidative damage. This study was to determine the effect of local gelam honey on oxidative damage of aged rats. Twenty-four male Spraque-Dawley rats were divided into young (2 months) and aged (19 months) groups. Each group was further divided into control (fed with plain water) and supplemented with 2.5 mg/kg body weight of gelam honey for 8 months. DNA damage level was determined by comet assay and plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activity of blood and cardiac antioxidant enzymes was determined by spectrophotometer. The DNA damage and MDA level were reduced in both gelam honey supplemented groups. Gelam honey increases erythrocytes CAT and cardiac SOD activities in young and cardiac CAT activity in young and aged groups. The DNA damage was increased in the aged group compared to young group, but reduced at the end of the study. The decline of oxidative damage in rats supplemented with gelam honey might be through the modulation of antioxidant enzyme activities. PMID:25505937

  18. Zingerone protects against stannous chloride-induced and hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative DNA damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Iyappan; Narayanan, Nithya; Rabindran, Remitha; Jayasree, P R; Manish Kumar, P R

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we report the dose-dependent antioxidant activity and DNA protective effects of zingerone. At 500 μg/mL, the DPPH radical scavenging activity of zingerone and ascorbic acid as a standard was found to be 86.7 and 94.2 % respectively. At the same concentration, zingerone also showed significant reducing power (absorbance 0.471) compared to that of ascorbic acid (absorbance 0.394). The in vitro toxicity of stannous chloride (SnCl2) was evaluated using genomic and plasmid DNA. SnCl2-induced degradation of genomic DNA was found to occur at a concentration of 0.8 mM onwards with complete degradation at 1.02 mM and above. In the case of plasmid DNA, conversion of supercoiled DNA into the open circular form indicative of DNA nicking activity was observed at a concentration of 0.2 mM onwards; complete conversion was observed at a concentration of 1.02 mM and above. Zingerone was found to confer protection against SnCl2-induced oxidative damage to genomic and plasmid DNA at concentrations of 500 and 750 μg/mL onwards, respectively. This protective effect was further confirmed in the presence of UV/H2O2-a known reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating system-wherein protection by zingerone against ROS-mediated DNA damage was observed at a concentration of 250 μg/mL onwards in a dose-dependent manner. This study clearly indicated the in vitro DNA protective property of zingerone against SnCl2-induced, ROS-mediated DNA damage. PMID:24006104

  19. Inactivation of NADPH Oxidases NOX4 and NOX5 Protects Human Primary Fibroblasts from Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Weyemi, Urbain; Redon, Christophe E.; Aziz, Towqir; Choudhuri, Rohini; Maeda, Daisuke; Parekh, Palak R.; Bonner, Michael Y.; Arbiser, Jack L.; Bonner, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to ionizing radiation from medical procedures has increased sharply in the last three decades. Recent epidemiological studies suggest a direct relationship between exposure to ionizing radiation and health problems, including cancer incidence. Therefore, minimizing the impact of radiation exposure in patients has become a priority in the development of future clinical practices. Crucial players in radiation-induced DNA damage include reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the sources of these have remained elusive. To the best of our knowledge, we show here for the first time that two members of the ROS-generating NADPH oxidase family (NOXs), NOX4 and NOX5, are involved in radiation-induced DNA damage. Depleting these two NOXs in human primary fibroblasts resulted in reduced levels of DNA damage as measured by levels of radiation-induced foci, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and the comet assay coupled with increased cell survival. NOX involvement was substantiated with fulvene-5, a NOXs-specific inhibitor. Moreover, fulvene-5 mitigated radiation-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells ex vivo. Our results provide evidence that the inactivation of NOXs protects cells from radiation-induced DNA damage and cell death. These findings suggest that NOXs inhibition may be considered as a future pharmacological target to help minimize the negative effects of radiation exposure for millions of patients each year. PMID:25706776

  20. Protective effect of the extracts from Cnidium officinale against oxidative damage induced by hydrogen peroxide via antioxidant effect.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Park, Jae Ho; Lee, Hee Kyeong; Ju, So Yeong; Hong, Se Chul; Lee, Jeong Rak; Chung, Gyu Young; Lim, Jae Hwan; Jeong, Hyung Jin

    2009-03-01

    The dried rhizomes of Cnidium officinale are used as herbal drugs in the treatment of pain, inflammation, menstrual disturbance and antivitamin deficiency disease, and also act as a blood pressure depressant. In addition, there are several reports suggesting that they have pharmacological properties to tumor metastasis and angiogenesis, and that they act as an inhibitor of high glucose-induced proliferation of glomerular mesangial cells. However, little has been known about the functional role of the extracts from C. officinale on oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis caused by ROS. In this work, we have investigated the DPPH radical, hydroxyl radical and intracellular ROS scavenging capacity, and Fe(2+) chelating activity of the extracts from C. officinale. In addition, we evaluated whether the extracts are capable of reducing H(2)O(2)-induced DNA and cell damage in the human skin fibroblast cell. These extracts showed a dose-dependent free-radical scavenging capacity and a protective effect on DNA damage and the lipid peroxidation causing the cell damage by ROS. These antioxidant activities and inhibitory effects of the extracts on DNA and cell damage may further explain that C. officinale is useful as a herbal medicine for cancer chemoprevention. PMID:19101603

  1. Protective activity of butyrate on hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in isolated human colonocytes and HT29 tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Rosignoli, P; Fabiani, R; De Bartolomeo, A; Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Pelli, M A; Morozzi, G

    2001-10-01

    Epidemiological studies support the involvement of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in colon physiology and the protective role of butyrate on colon carcinogenesis. Among the possible mechanisms by which butyrate may exert its anti-carcinogenicity an antioxidant activity has been recently suggested. We investigated the effects of butyrate and mixtures of SCFA (butyrate, propionate and acetate) on DNA damage induced by H(2)O(2) in isolated human colonocytes and in two human colon tumour cell lines (HT29 and HT29 19A). Human colonocytes were isolated from endoscopically obtained samples and the DNA damage was assessed by the comet assay. H(2)O(2) induced DNA damage in normal colonocytes in a dose-dependent manner which was statistically significant at concentrations over 10 microM. At 15 microM H(2)O(2) DNA damage in HT29 and HT29 19A cells was significantly lower than that observed in normal colonocytes (P < 0.01). Pre-incubation of the cells with physiological concentrations of butyrate (6.25 and 12.5 mM) reduced H(2)O(2) (15 microM) induced damage by 33 and 51% in human colonocytes, 45 and 75% in HT29 and 30 and 80% in HT29 19A, respectively. Treatment of cells with a mixture of 25 mM acetate + 10.4 mM propionate + 6.25 mM butyrate did not induce DNA damage, while a mixture of 50 mM acetate + 20.8 mM propionate + 12.5 mM butyrate was weakly genotoxic only towards normal colonocytes. However, both mixtures were able to reduce the H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage by about 50% in all cell types. The reported protective effect of butyrate might be important in pathogenetic mechanisms mediated by reactive oxygen species, and aids understanding of the apparent protection toward colorectal cancer exerted by dietary fibres, which enhance the butyrate bioavailability in the colonic mucosa. PMID:11577008

  2. Vitamin C Compound Mixtures Prevent Ozone-Induced Oxidative Damage in Human Keratinocytes as Initial Assessment of Pollution Protection

    PubMed Central

    Valacchi, Giuseppe; Sticozzi, Claudia; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Cervellati, Franco; Demaude, Julien; Chen, Nannan; Krol, Yevgeniy; Oresajo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction One of the main functions of cutaneous tissues is to protect our body from the outdoor insults. Ozone (O3) is among the most toxic stressors to which we are continuously exposed and because of its critical location, the skin is one of the most susceptible tissues to the oxidative damaging effect of O3. O3 is not able to penetrate the skin, and although it is not a radical per se, the damage is mainly a consequence of its ability to induce oxidative stress via the formation of lipid peroxidation products. Aim of Study In this study we investigated the protective effect of defined “antioxidant” mixtures against O3 induced oxidative stress damage in human keratinocytes and understand their underlying mechanism of action. Results Results showed that the mixtures tested were able to protect human keratinocytes from O3-induced cytotoxicity, inhibition of cellular proliferation, decrease the formation of HNE protein adducts, ROS, and carbonyls levels. Furthermore, we have observed the decreased activation of the redox sensitive transcription factor NF-kB, which is involved in transcribing pro-inflammatory cytokines and therefore constitutes one of the main players associated with O3 induced skin inflammation. Cells exposed to O3 demonstrated a dose dependent increase in p65 subunit nuclear expression as a marker of NF-kB activation, while pre-treatment with the mixtures abolished NF-kB nuclear translocation. In addition, a significant activation of Nrf2 in keratinocytes treated with the mixtures was also observed. Conclusion Overall this study was able to demonstrate a protective effect of the tested compounds versus O3-induced cell damage in human keratinocytes. Pre-treatment with the tested compounds significantly reduced the oxidative damage induced by O3 exposure and this protective effect was correlated to the abolishment of NF-kB nuclear translocation, as well as activation of Nrf2 nuclear translocation activating the downstream defence enzymes

  3. The Protective Role of Symmetric Stem Cell Division on the Accumulation of Heritable Damage

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Peter T.; Lander, Arthur D.

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell divisions are either asymmetric—in which one daughter cell remains a stem cell and one does not—or symmetric, in which both daughter cells adopt the same fate, either stem or non-stem. Recent studies show that in many tissues operating under homeostatic conditions stem cell division patterns are strongly biased toward the symmetric outcome, raising the question of whether symmetry confers some benefit. Here, we show that symmetry, via extinction of damaged stem-cell clones, reduces the lifetime risk of accumulating phenotypically silent heritable damage (mutations or aberrant epigenetic changes) in individual stem cells. This effect is greatest in rapidly cycling tissues subject to accelerating rates of damage accumulation over time, a scenario that describes the progression of many cancers. A decrease in the rate of cellular damage accumulation may be an important factor favoring symmetric patterns of stem cell division. PMID:25121484

  4. The effect of phytosterol protects rats against 4-nitrophenol-induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiaqin; Song, Meiyan; Li, Yansen; Zhang, Yonghui; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Li, ChunMei

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of phytosterol (PS) in regard to liver damage induced by 4-nitrophenol (PNP). Twenty rats were randomly divided into four groups (Control, PS, PNP, and PNP+PS). The PS and PNP+PS groups were pretreated with PS for one week. The PNP and PNP+PS groups were injected subcutaneously with PNP for 28 days. The control group received a basal diet and was injected with vehicle alone. Treatment with PS prevented the elevation of the total bilirubin levels, as well as an increase in serum alkaline transaminase and aspartate transaminase, which are typically caused by PNP-induced liver damage. Histopathologically showed that liver damage was significantly mitigated by PS treatment. However, there was no significant change in antioxidant enzyme activities, and the Nrf2-antioxidant system was not activated after treatment with PS. These results suggest that PS could mitigate liver damage induced by PNP, but does not enhance antioxidant capacity. PMID:26748050

  5. The protective role of symmetric stem cell division on the accumulation of heritable damage.

    PubMed

    McHale, Peter T; Lander, Arthur D

    2014-08-01

    Stem cell divisions are either asymmetric-in which one daughter cell remains a stem cell and one does not-or symmetric, in which both daughter cells adopt the same fate, either stem or non-stem. Recent studies show that in many tissues operating under homeostatic conditions stem cell division patterns are strongly biased toward the symmetric outcome, raising the question of whether symmetry confers some benefit. Here, we show that symmetry, via extinction of damaged stem-cell clones, reduces the lifetime risk of accumulating phenotypically silent heritable damage (mutations or aberrant epigenetic changes) in individual stem cells. This effect is greatest in rapidly cycling tissues subject to accelerating rates of damage accumulation over time, a scenario that describes the progression of many cancers. A decrease in the rate of cellular damage accumulation may be an important factor favoring symmetric patterns of stem cell division. PMID:25121484

  6. Interactions of amino acids with oxidized guanine in the gas phase associated with the protection of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Yang, Hongfang; Zhang, Meng; Bu, Yuxiang

    2013-04-01

    Density functional theory calculations were employed to study the stabilization process of the guanine radical cation through amino acid interactions as well as to understand the protection mechanisms. On the basis of our calculations, several protection mechanisms are proposed in this work subject to the type of the amino acid. Our results indicate that a series of three-electron bonds can be formed between the amino acids and the guanine radical cation which may serve as relay stations supporting hole transport. In the three-electron-bonded, π-π-stacked, and H-bonded modes, amino acids can protect guanine from oxidation or radiation damage by sharing the hole, while amino acids with reducing properties can repair the guanine radical cation through proton-coupled electron transfer or electron transfer. Another important finding is that positively charged amino acids (ArgH(+), LysH(+), and HisH(+)) can inhibit ionization of guanine through raising its ionization potential. In this situation, a negative dissociation energy for hydrogen bonds in the hole-trapped and positively charged amino acid-Guanine dimer is observed, which explains the low hole-trapping efficiency. We hope that this work provides valuable information on how to protect DNA from oxidation- or radiation-induced damages in biological systems. PMID:23427004

  7. Concentration-Dependent Protection by Ethanol Extract of Propolis against γ-Ray-Induced Chromosome Damage in Human Blood Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Montoro, A.; Barquinero, J. F.; Almonacid, M.; Montoro, A.; Sebastià, N.; Verdú, G.; Sahuquillo, V.; Serrano, J.; Saiz, M.; Villaescusa, J. I.; Soriano, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Radioprotection with natural products may be relevant to the mitigation of ionizing radiation-induced damage in mammalian systems; in this sense, propolis extracts have shown effects such as antioxidant, antitumoral, anti-inflammatory, and immunostimulant. We report for the first time a cytogenetic study to evaluate the radioprotective effect, in vitro, of propolis against radiation-induced chromosomal damage. Lymphocytes were cultured with increasing concentrations of ethanol extract of propolis (EEP), including 20, 40, 120, 250, 500, 750, 1000, and 2000 μg mL−1 and then exposed to 2 Gy γ-rays. A significant and concentration-dependent decrease is observed in the frequency of chromosome aberrations in samples treated with EEP. The protection against the formation of dicentrics was concentration-dependent, with a maximum protection at 120 μg mL−1 of EEP. The observed frequency of dicentrics is described as negative exponential function, indicating that the maximum protectible fraction of dicentrics is approximately 44%. Free radical scavenging and antioxidant activities are the mechanisms that these substances use to protect cells from ionizing radiation. PMID:20981159

  8. Lactoferrin Directly Scavenges Hydroxyl Radicals and Undergoes Oxidative Self-Degradation: A Possible Role in Protection against Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, Yuki; Imase, Megumi; Oda, Hirotsugu; Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined the protective effect of lactoferrin against DNA damage induced by various hydroxyl radical generation systems. Lactoferrin (LF) was examined with regard to its potential role as a scavenger against radical oxygen species using bovine milk LF. Native LF, iron-saturated LF (holo-LF), and apolactoferrin (apo-LF) effectively suppressed strand breaks in plasmid DNA due to hydroxyl radicals produced by the Fenton reaction. In addition, both native LF and holo-LF clearly protected calf thymus DNA from fragmentation due to ultraviolet irradiation in the presence of H2O2. We also demonstrated a protective effect of all three LF molecules against 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation in calf thymus DNA following ultraviolet (UV) irradiation with H2O2. Our results clearly indicate that native LF has reactive oxygen species-scavenging ability, independent of its nature as a masking component for transient metals. We also demonstrated that the protective effect of LF against oxidative DNA damage is due to degradation of LF itself, which is more susceptible to degradation than other bovine milk proteins. PMID:24424315

  9. Lunasin peptide purified from Solanum nigrum L. protects DNA from oxidative damage by suppressing the generation of hydroxyl radical via blocking fenton reaction.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Boo; De Lumen, Ben O; Jeong, Hyung Jin

    2010-07-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is the most critical factor implicated in carcinogenesis and other disorders. However, the protective effects of lunasin against oxidative DNA damage have not yet reported. In this study, we report here the protective effect of lunasin purified from Solanum nigrum L. against oxidative DNA. Lunasin protected DNA from the oxidative damage induced by Fe(2+) ion and hydroxyl radical. To better understand the mechanism for the protective effect of lunasin against DNA damage, the abilities to chelate Fe(2+), scavenge the generated hydroxyl radical and block the generation of hydroxyl radical were evaluated. Although it did not scavenge generated hydroxyl radical, lunasin blocked the generation of hydroxyl radical by chelating Fe(2+) ion. We conclude that lunasin protects DNA from oxidation by blocking fenton reaction between Fe(2+) and H(2)O(2) by chelating Fe(2+) and that consumption of lunasin may play an important role in the chemoprevention for the oxidative carcinogenesis. PMID:20083341

  10. Analysis of the reasons for accidents and of protective measures against induced voltage on aerial electrical transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Misrikhanov, M. Sh.; Mirzaabdullaev, A. O.

    2009-01-15

    The problem of safety during work on aerial transmission lines under an induced voltage is examined. Results are presented from a study of the causes of accidents over the last 20 years in electrical grids in this country. A determination of different levels of induced voltage on disconnected aerial transmission lines as a function of their grounding scheme is proposed. The order of magnitudes for each level are given, along with approximate expressions for calculating them.

  11. Protective effects of phenolic fraction of blue honeysuckle fruits against UVA-induced damage to human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Svobodová, Alena; Rambousková, Jana; Walterová, Daniela; Vostálová, Jitka

    2008-06-01

    In this study, the UVA (photo)protective activity of the phenolic fraction of L. caerulea fruits (PFLC) was assessed in human keratinocytes HaCaT. The keratinocytes were pre- or post-treated with PFLC (1-250 mg/l) and exposed to UVA irradiation (10-30 J/cm(2)). The results showed that both pre- and post-treatment with PFLC significantly suppressed UVA-induced ROS production, which was also revealed as a decrease in intracellular lipid peroxidation and elevation of reduced glutathione. Protection was concentration-dependent with a maximum at 50 mg/l. These results suggest that PFLC attenuates UVA-induced oxidative stress by reduction of ROS generation and ROS-mediated damage. For this reason, PFLC has potentially skin-protective functions against the deleterious effects of sunlight. PMID:18404271

  12. Acetyl salicylic acid protected against heat stress damage in chicken myocardial cells and may associate with induced Hsp27 expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Xu, Jiao; Song, Erbao; Tang, Shu; Zhang, Xiaohui; Kemper, N; Hartung, J; Bao, Endong

    2015-07-01

    We investigated whether acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) protects chicken myocardial cells from heat stress-mediated damage in vivo and whether the induction of Hsp27 expression is connected with this function. Pathological changes, damage-related enzyme levels, and Hsp27 expression were studied in chickens following heat stress (40 ± 1 °C for 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15, or 24 h, respectively) with or without ASA administration (1 mg/kg BW, 2 h prior). Appearance of pathological lesions such as degenerations and karyopyknosis as well as the myocardial damage-related enzyme activation indicated that heat stress causes considerable injury to the myocardial cells in vivo. Myocardial cell injury was most serious in chickens exposed to heat stress without prior ASA administration; meanwhile, ASA pretreatment acted protective function against high temperature-induced injury. Hsp27 expression was induced under all experimental conditions but was one-fold higher in the ASA-pretreated animals (0.3138 ± 0.0340 ng/mL) than in untreated animals (0.1437 ± 0.0476 ng/mL) 1 h after heat stress exposure, and such an increase was sustained over the length of the experiment. Our findings indicate that pretreatment with ASA protects chicken myocardial cells from acute heat stress in vivo with almost no obvious side effects, and this protection may involve an enhancement of Hsp27 expression. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying this effect require further investigation. PMID:25956131

  13. Protective role of diallyl tetrasulfide on cadmium-induced testicular damage in adult rats: a biochemical and histological study.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Murugavel; Pari, Leelavinothan

    2011-06-01

    Cadmium (Cd)-induced oxidative damage is the most serious problem that leads to reproductive system failure in both human and animals. Our previous studies indicate that diallyl tetrasulfide (DTS) from garlic has the cytoprotective and antioxidant activity against Cd-induced toxicity in vivo and in vitro. The present investigation was carried out to find the influence of DTS on peroxidative damage induced by Cd in rat testes. The Cd-exposed rat testis showed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in testes to body weight ratio, along with a significant (p < 0.05) increase in Cd accumulation, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl levels. In Cd-exposed rats, we also observed a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in the activities of antioxidant (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase) and glutathione metabolizing (glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione reductase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) enzymes as well as reduced levels of non-enzymic (reduced glutathione, ascorbate and total sulphydryl groups) antioxidants. In contrast, treatment with DTS (40 mg/kg body weight orally) significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the accumulation of Cd and lipid peroxidation markers and also significantly improved the activities of antioxidant defense system in testes. Testicular protection by DTS is further substantiated by remarkable reduction of Cd-induced pathological changes. Our study has revealed that DTS renders protection against Cd-induced testicular injury by reducing Cd-mediated oxidative damage. PMID:21245201

  14. Protective effect of ellagic acid and pumpkin seed oil against methotrexate-induced small intestine damage in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Boghdady, Noha A

    2011-12-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity is one of the most serious side effects in the methotrexate (MTX) treatment. This study was designed to investigate whether ellagic acid (EA) and/or pumpkin seed oil (PSO) had a protective effect on MTX-induced small intestine damage. Forty albino rats were randomized into five groups of 8 rats each. Group I served as a normal control group. In Group II, MTX was administered as a single dose (20 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. Groups III, IV and V were pre-treated respectively with either PSO (40 mg/kg), EA (10 mg/kg) or 0.2% DMSO (vehicle control) orally every day by gavage for 5 days and then they received MTX. All animals were sacrificed 5 days after the intraperitoneal injection of MTX for histopathological examination, estimation of serum prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level, assay of tissue malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH) and nitric oxide (NO) levels and myloperoxidase (MPO), xanthine oxidase (XO) and adenosine deaminase (AD) activities. Administration of EA and/or PSO decreased the intestinal damage, PGE2, MDA and NO levels and MPO, XO and AD activities and increased GSH level. These results suggest that EA and PSO protect the small intestine of rats from MTX-induced damage through their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and thus have potential as a promising drug in the prevention of undesired side effects of MTX. PMID:22329239

  15. Lespedeza davurica (Lax.) Schindl. extract protects against cytokine-induced β-cell damage and streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhesh Raj; Rhyu, Dong Young

    2015-01-01

    Lespedeza has been used for the management of diabetes in folklore medicine. The purpose of this study is to investigate the protective effects of the methanol extract of Lespedeza davurica (LD) on cytokine-induced β-cell damage and streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetes. RINm5F cells were treated with interleukin- (IL-) 1β and interferon- (IFN-) γ to induce pancreatic β-cell damage. The exposure of LD extract significantly decreased cell death, nitric oxide (NO) production, nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and nucleus factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 activation. Antidiabetic effects of LD extract were observed by oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in normal rats and by checking the biochemical, physiological, and histopathological parameters in STZ-induced diabetic rats. In OGTT, glucose clearance levels improved by oral treatment of LD extract. The water intake, urine volume, blood glucose, and serum TG, TC, TBARS, and DPP-IV levels were significantly decreased, and liver glycogen content was significantly increased by treatment of LD extract (250 mg/kg BW) in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Also, insulin immunoreactivity of the pancreases was increased in LD extract administrated rats compared with diabetic control rats. These results indicate that LD extract may protect pancreatic β-cell damage and regulate the blood glucose in STZ-induced diabetic rats. PMID:25793188

  16. 49 CFR 192.355 - Customer meters and regulators: Protection from damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Customer meters and regulators: Protection from... Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.355 Customer meters and regulators: Protection from... that houses a customer meter or regulator at a place where vehicular traffic is anticipated, must...

  17. 49 CFR 192.355 - Customer meters and regulators: Protection from damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Customer meters and regulators: Protection from... Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.355 Customer meters and regulators: Protection from... that houses a customer meter or regulator at a place where vehicular traffic is anticipated, must...

  18. 49 CFR 192.355 - Customer meters and regulators: Protection from damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer meters and regulators: Protection from... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.355 Customer meters and regulators: Protection...

  19. 49 CFR 192.355 - Customer meters and regulators: Protection from damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Customer... vacuum or a back pressure, a device must be installed to protect the system. (b) Service regulator vents... escape freely into the atmosphere and away from any opening into the building; and (3) Be protected...

  20. Protective effects of carvacrol and pomegranate against methotrexate-induced intestinal damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Türkcü, Gül; Alabalık, Ulaş; Keleş, Ayşe Nur; Bozkurt, Mehtap; İbiloğlu, İbrahim; Fırat, Uğur; Büyükbayram, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this experimental study was to evaluate the efficacy of carvacrol (CVR) and pomegranate (PMG) against methotrexate (MTX)-induced intestinal damage using histopathological and immunohistochemical techniques. Methods: Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 195-250 g, were divided into four groups: control, MTX treatment alone, MTX plus CVR and MTX plus PMG. A single dose of CVR (73 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to group III on the first day of the experiment, PMG (225 mg/kg/day) was administered orogastrically (with a gavage needle) once daily for 7 days and a single dose of MTX (20 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally on the second day of the experiment. Intestinal tissues were obtained on 8th day, and examined for villus damage, crypt damage, and inflammation. Ki-67 and Caspase 3 staining was used for immunohistochemical evaluation. Results: MTX treatment induced villus shortening and fusion, epithelial atrophy, crypt loss, inflammatory infiltrate in the lamina propria, and goblet cell depletion. The CVR and PMG decreased the severity of intestinal damage caused by MTX treatment. In the MTX-received group, significant inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in the lamina propria. Compared to the MTX-received group, the PMG and CVR groups showed less villus and crypt damage and less inflammation in the lamina propria. Fewer Ki-67 positive cells were observed in the crypts of the MTX-received groups compared to the control group. There were more Ki-67 positive cells in the CVR and PMG groups compared to MTX group. The MTX-received group exhibited more caspase-3 positive cells than the control group, and the number of caspase-3 positive cells were decreased in the CVR and PMG treated groups. Conclusion: This study is the first to show that PMG and CVR decrease MTX-related damage and apoptotic activity in intestinal tissue. PMID:26629037

  1. Alkbh8 Regulates Selenocysteine-Protein Expression to Protect against Reactive Oxygen Species Damage

    PubMed Central

    Endres, Lauren; Dziergowska, Agnieszka; Małkiewicz, Andrzej; Melendez, J. Andres; Dedon, Peter C.; Begley, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental and metabolic sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can damage DNA, proteins and lipids to promote disease. Regulation of gene expression can prevent this damage and can include increased transcription, translation and post translational modification. Cellular responses to ROS play important roles in disease prevention, with deficiencies linked to cancer, neurodegeneration and ageing. Here we detail basal and damage-induced translational regulation of a group of oxidative-stress response enzymes by the tRNA methyltransferase Alkbh8. Using a new gene targeted knockout mouse cell system, we show that Alkbh8-/- embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) display elevated ROS levels, increased DNA and lipid damage and hallmarks of cellular stress. We demonstrate that Alkbh8 is induced in response to ROS and is required for the efficient expression of selenocysteine-containing ROS detoxification enzymes belonging to the glutathione peroxidase (Gpx1, Gpx3, Gpx6 and likely Gpx4) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) families. We also show that, in response to oxidative stress, the tRNA modification 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2′-O-methyluridine (mcm5Um) increases in normal MEFs to drive the expression of ROS detoxification enzymes, with this damage-induced reprogramming of tRNA and stop-codon recoding corrupted in Alkbh8-/- MEFS. These studies define Alkbh8 and tRNA modifications as central regulators of cellular oxidative stress responses in mammalian systems. In addition they highlight a new animal model for use in environmental and cancer studies and link translational regulation to the prevention of DNA and lipid damage. PMID:26147969

  2. Analysis of damaging effects of laser-plasma accelerated shrapnels on protecting glass shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinkova, Michaela; Kalal, Milan; Shmatov, Mikhail L.

    2013-11-01

    Analysis of the damage caused by laser plasma accelerated fragments of metal target was performed. Measured as well as calculated parameters of craters and shrapnel found in BK7 glass blastshield are presented. Method applied for the measurement of parameters of craters is described. Potential damage of optical elements by the so-called striking cores (high-velocity stable objects arising due to collapse of cones or some other target parts toward their axes) that can be generated in IFE related experiments is evaluated.

  3. Interleukin-22 protects intestinal stem cells from immune-mediated tissue damage and regulates sensitivity to graft vs. host disease

    PubMed Central

    Hanash, Alan M.; Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Hua, Guoqiang; O’Connor, Margaret H.; Young, Lauren F.; Singer, Natalie V.; West, Mallory L.; Jenq, Robert R.; Holland, Amanda M.; Kappel, Lucy W.; Ghosh, Arnab; Tsai, Jennifer J.; Rao, Uttam K.; Yim, Nury L.; Smith, Odette M.; Velardi, Enrico; Hawryluk, Elena; Murphy, George F.; Liu, Chen; Fouser, Lynette A.; Kolesnick, Richard; Blazar, Bruce R.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Little is known about the maintenance of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and progenitors during immune-mediated tissue damage or about the susceptibility of transplant recipients to tissue damage mediated by the donor immune system during graft vs. host disease (GVHD). We demonstrate here that deficiency of recipient-derived IL-22 increased acute GVHD tissue damage and mortality, that ISCs were eliminated during GVHD, and that ISCs as well as their downstream progenitors expressed the IL-22 receptor. Intestinal IL-22 was produced after bone marrow transplant by IL-23-responsive innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) from the transplant recipients, and intestinal IL-22 increased in response to pre-transplant conditioning. However, ILC frequency and IL-22 amounts were decreased by GVHD. Recipient IL-22 deficiency led to increased crypt apoptosis, depletion of ISCs, and loss of epithelial integrity. Our findings reveal IL-22 as a critical regulator of tissue sensitivity to GVHD and a protective factor for ISC during inflammatory intestinal damage. PMID:22921121

  4. Protective activity of C-geranylflavonoid analogs from Paulownia tomentosa against DNA damage in 137Cs irradiated AHH-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyung-In; Jeong, Min Ho; Jo, Wol Soon

    2014-09-01

    Radiotherapy is an important form of treatment for a wide range of cancers, but it can damage DNA and cause adverse effects. We investigated if the diplacone analogs of P. tomentosa were radio-protective in a human lymphoblastoid cell line (AHH-1). Four geranylated flavonoids, diplacone, 3'-O-methyl-5'-hydroxydiplacone, 3'-O-methyl-5'-O-methyldiplacone and 3'-O-methyldiplacol, were tested for their antioxidant and radio-protective effects. Diplacone analogs effectively scavenged free radicals and inhibited radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in vitro. They significantly decreased levels of reactive oxygen species and cellular DNA damage in 2 Gy-irradiated AHH-1 cells. Glutathione levels and superoxide dismutase activity in irradiated AHH-1 cells increased significantly after treatment with these analogs. The enhanced biological anti-oxidant activity and radioprotective activity of diplacone analogs maintained the survival of irradiated AHH-1 cells in a clonogenic assay. These data suggest that diplacone analogs may protect healthy tissue surrounding tumor cells during radiotherapy to ensure better control of radiotherapy and allow higher doses of radiotherapy to be employed. PMID:25918796

  5. Protection of human γB-crystallin from UV-induced damage by epigallocatechin gallate: spectroscopic and docking studies.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Susmitnarayan; Bag, Sudipta; Bose, Madhuparna; Das, Amit Kumar; Ghosh, Ananta Kumar; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2016-08-16

    The transparency of the human eye lens depends on the solubility and stability of the structural proteins of the eye lens, the crystallins. Although the mechanism of cataract formation is still unclear, it is believed to involve protein misfolding and/or aggregation of proteins due to the influence of several external factors such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation, low pH, temperature and exposure to chemical agents. In this article, we report the study of UV induced photo-damage (under oxidative stress) of recombinant human γB-crystallin in vitro in the presence of the major green tea polyphenol, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). We have shown that EGCG has the ability to protect human γB-crystallin from oxidative stress-induced photo-damage. PMID:27410057

  6. Dystrophin expression following the transplantation of normal muscle precursor cells protects mdx muscle from contraction-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Joel; Dumont, Nicolas; Lebel, Carl; Quenneville, Simon P; Côté, Claude H; Frenette, Jérome; Tremblay, Jacques P

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most frequent muscular dystrophy. Currently, there is no cure for the disease. The transplantation of muscle precursor cells (MPCs) is one of the possible treatments, because it can restore the expression of dystrophin in DMD muscles. In this study, we investigated the effects of myoblasts injected with cardiotoxin on the contractile properties and resistance to eccentric contractions of transplanted and nontransplanted muscles. We used the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) as a model for our study. We conclude that the sole presence of dystrophin in a high percentage of muscle fibers is not sufficient by itself to increase the absolute or the specific force in the EDL of transplanted mdx muscle. This lack of strength increase may be due to the extensive damage that was produced by the cardiotoxin, which was coinjected with the myoblasts. However, the dystrophin presence is sufficient to protect muscle from eccentric damage as indicated by the force drop results. PMID:20650035

  7. Nucleobase-Based Barbiturates: Their Protective Effect against DNA Damage Induced by Bleomycin-Iron, Antioxidant, and Lymphocyte Transformation Assay

    PubMed Central

    Dhorajiya, Bhaveshkumar D.; Dholakiya, Bharatkumar Z.; Ibrahim, Ahmed S.; Badria, Farid A.

    2014-01-01

    A number of nucleobase-based barbiturates have been synthesized by combination of nucleic acid bases and heterocyclic amines and barbituric acid derivatives through green and efficient multicomponent route and one pot reaction. This approach was accomplished efficiently using aqueous medium to give the corresponding products in high yield. The newly synthesized compounds were characterized by spectral analysis (FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, HMBC, and UV spectroscopy) and elemental analysis. Representative of all synthesized compounds was tested and evaluated for antioxidant, bleomycin-dependent DNA damage, and Lymphocyte Transformation studies. Compounds TBC > TBA > TBG showed highest lymphocyte transformation assay, TBC > TBA > BG showed inhibitory antioxidant activity using ABTS methods, and TBC > BPA > BAMT > TBA > 1, 3-TBA manifested the best protective effect against DNA damage induced by bleomycin. PMID:24900997

  8. On the efficiency of Gore-Tex layer for brain protection from shock wave damage in cranioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, T.; Voinovich, P. A.; Nakagawa, A.; Hosseini, S. H. R.; Takayama, K.; Hirano, T.

    2004-11-01

    The effectiveness of a Gore-Tex layer for protecting soft tissue from damage in shock wave therapy is investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally. Analytical considerations based on the fundamentals of wave dynamics and two-dimensional numerical simulations based on the elastodynamic equations are carried out for underwater shock wave propagation and interaction with Gore-Tex membrane models of different complexity. The results clearly demonstrate that considerable attenuation of shock waves with Gore-Tex is due to the air trapped inside the membrane. The experimental results confirm that a Gore-Tex sheet placed in the liquid reduces the transmitted shock wave peak overpressure significantly, by up to two orders of magnitude. Another experimental series reveals what kind of damage in the rat brain tissue can be caused by shock waves of different intensity.

  9. Protective immunity and lack of histopathological damage two years after DNA vaccination against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Corbeil, Serge; Elliott, Diane G.; Anderson, Eric D.; LaPatra, Scott E.

    2006-01-01

    The DNA vaccine pIHNw-G encodes the glycoprotein of the fish rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Vaccine performance in rainbow trout was measured 3, 6, 13, 24, and 25 months after vaccination. At three months all fish vaccinated with 0.1 μg pIHNw-G had detectable neutralizing antibody (NAb) and they were completely protected from lethal IHNV challenge with a relative percent survival (RPS) of 100% compared to control fish. Viral challenges at 6, 13, 24, and 25 months post-vaccination showed protection with RPS values of 47–69%, while NAb seroprevalence declined to undetectable levels. Passive transfer experiments with sera from fish after two years post-vaccination were inconsistent but significant protection was observed in some cases. The long-term duration of protection observed here defined a third temporal phase in the immune response to IHNV DNA vaccination, characterized by reduced but significant levels of protection, and decline or absence of detectable NAb titers. Examination of multiple tissues showed an absence of detectable long-term histopathological damage due to DNA vaccination.

  10. Protection against cellular damage in the rat heart by hyperosmotic solutions.

    PubMed

    Harding, R J; Duncan, C J

    1999-10-01

    In this comparative study, rat hearts were perfused at 37 degrees C with three clearly defined protocols: the Ca2+ paradox, the O(2) paradox, and with 20 mM caffeine. Each protocol involved an initial priming (Ca(2+)(0) depletion or anoxia; stage 1) and subsequent full activation (Ca(2+)(0) repletion, caffeine or reoxygenation; stage 2) of the damage system of the sarcolemma. Creatine kinase release in stage 2 was completely inhibited (P < 0.001) in all three protocols when 420 mOsm was added to the perfusion medium throughout the experiments, or only during stage 1, or only during stage 2. Increasing the perfusion pressure in the Ca2+ paradox significantly (P < 0.001) exacerbated creatine kinase release, although this was still completely inhibited at 28 degrees C. Amiloride (1 mM) inhibited creatine kinase release completely at 40 cm of water pressure but only some 50% at 80 cm of water pressure. It is suggested that the transmembrane damage system needs to be uncoupled or deactivated by modifying its relationship with the cytosol or with the underlying cytoskeleton by hyperosmotic cell shrinkage for only one of the stages in all three protocols to block the damage pathway. Increased perfusion pressure has the opposite effect and exacerbates damage. PMID:10527760

  11. Naringin protects memory impairment and mitochondrial oxidative damage against aluminum-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Atish; Shur, Bhargabi; Kumar, Anil

    2013-09-01

    Aluminum has been indicated in neurodegenerative disorders and naringin, a bioflavonoid has been used to reduce neurotoxic effects of aluminum against aluminum chloride-induced rats. Therefore, present study has been designed to explore the possible role of naringin against aluminum-induced cognitive dysfunction and oxidative damage in rats. Aluminum (100 mg/kg) and naringin (40 and 80 mg/kg) drug treatment were administered orally for six weeks to male wistar rats. Various behavioral performance tasks, biochemical, mitochondrial oxidative parameters, and aluminum concentration in the brain were assessed. Aluminum chloride treatment significantly caused cognitive dysfunction and mitochondria oxidative damage as compared to vehicle treated control group. Besides, aluminum chloride treatment significantly increased acetyl cholinesterase activity and aluminum concentration in the brain as compared to sham. Chronic administration of naringin significantly improved cognitive performance and attenuated mitochondria oxidative damage, acetyl cholinesterase activity, and aluminum concentration in aluminum-treated rats as compared to control rats. Results of the study demonstrate neuroprotective potential of naringin against aluminum chloride-induced cognitive dysfunction and mitochondrial oxidative damage. PMID:23510099

  12. Triple-Layer Plastic Bags Protect Dry Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) Against Damage by Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) During Storage.

    PubMed

    Mutungi, C; Affognon, H D; Njoroge, A W; Manono, J; Baributsa, D; Murdock, L L

    2015-10-01

    Fumigated dry common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) that were artificially infested with Acanthoscelides obtectus Say, and others that were not artificially infested, were stored in hermetic triple-layer PICS (Lela Agro, Kano, Nigeria) or woven polypropylene (PP) bags for 6 mo at ambient laboratory temperature conditions of 22.6 ± 1.9°C and 60.1 ± 4.3% relative humidity. In an additional trial, beans contained in PP bags were treated with Actellic Super dust before introducing A. obtectus. Moisture content, number of live adult A. obtectus, seed damage, weight loss, and seed germination were determined at monthly intervals. At 6 mo, beans stored in PICS bags retained higher moisture than those stored in PP bags, but in all treatments the moisture level remained below that recommended for safe storage of beans. In the PICS bags, proliferation of A. obtectus did not proceed and at 6 mo, beans stored in these bags did not have insect-inflicted seed damage or weight loss. In contrast, seed damage and weight loss in PP bags exceeded economic threshold after 1 mo in the absence of Actellic Super dust (Syngenta Crop protection AG, Basle, Switzerland), and after 2 mo in the presence of it. Germination of beans stored in PP bags decreased greatly whereas the beans stored in PICS bags did not show reduced germination. Chemical free storage of common beans in PICS bags protects them against damage by A. obtectus. PMID:26453738

  13. Industrial accidents triggered by lightning.

    PubMed

    Renni, Elisabetta; Krausmann, Elisabeth; Cozzani, Valerio

    2010-12-15

    Natural disasters can cause major accidents in chemical facilities where they can lead to the release of hazardous materials which in turn can result in fires, explosions or toxic dispersion. Lightning strikes are the most frequent cause of major accidents triggered by natural events. In order to contribute towards the development of a quantitative approach for assessing lightning risk at industrial facilities, lightning-triggered accident case histories were retrieved from the major industrial accident databases and analysed to extract information on types of vulnerable equipment, failure dynamics and damage states, as well as on the final consequences of the event. The most vulnerable category of equipment is storage tanks. Lightning damage is incurred by immediate ignition, electrical and electronic systems failure or structural damage with subsequent release. Toxic releases and tank fires tend to be the most common scenarios associated with lightning strikes. Oil, diesel and gasoline are the substances most frequently released during lightning-triggered Natech accidents. PMID:20817399

  14. Protective effects of analogs of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone against x-radiation-induced testicular damage in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Schally, A.V.; Paz-Bouza, J.I.; Schlosser, J.V.; Karashima, T.; Debeljuk, L.; Gandle, B.; Sampson, M.

    1987-02-01

    Possible protective effects of the agonist (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH and antagonist N-Ac(D-Phe(pCl)/sup 1,2/,D-Trp/sup 3/,D-Arg/sup 6/,D-Ala/sup 10/)LH-RH against testicular damage caused by x-radiation were investigated in rats. Three months after being subjected to x-irradiation of the testes with 415 or 622 rads, control rats showed marked reduction in the weights of the testes and elevated levels of LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), indicating tubular damage. Histological studies demonstrated that, in testes of rats given 415 rads, most seminiferous tubules had only Sertoli cells and no germinal cells, and, in the group give 622 rads, the depression of spermatogenesis was even more marked. Rats pretreated for 50 days with LH-RH antagonist showed a complete recovery of testicular weights and spermatogenesis 3 months after 415 rads and showed partial recovery after 622 rads, and LH and FSH levels returned to normal in both of these groups. Three experiments were also carried out in which the rats were pretreated for 1-2 months with long-acting microcapsules of the agonist (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH. Some rats were then subjected to gonadal irradiation with 415 or 622 rads and allowed a recovery period of 2-4 months. On the basis of testicular weights, histology, and gonadotropin levels, it could be concluded that the agonist (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH did not protect the rat testes exposed to 622 rads and, at most, only partially protected against 415 rads. These results suggest that pretreatment with LH-RH antagonists and possibly agonists, might decrease the testicular damage caused by radiation and accelerate the recovery of reproductive functions.

  15. Trimetazidine protects low-density lipoproteins from oxidation and cultured cells exposed to H(2)O(2) from DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Tselepis, A; Doulias, P; Lourida, E; Glantzounis, G; Tsimoyiannis, E; Galaris, D

    2001-06-15

    Trimetazidine is a well-established anti-ischemic drug, which has been used for long time in the treatment of pathological conditions related with the generation of reactive oxygen species. However, although extensively studied, its molecular mode of action remains largely unknown. In the present study, the ability of trimetazidine to protect low-density lipoproteins (LDL) from oxidation and cultured cells from H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage was investigated. Trimetazidine, tested at concentrations 0.02 to 2.20 mM, was shown to offer significant protection to LDL exposed to three different oxidizing systems, namely copper, Fe/ascorbate, and met-myoglobin/H(2)O(2). The oxidizability of LDL was estimated by measuring, (i) the lag period, (ii) the maximal rate of conjugated diene formation, (iii) the total amount of conjugated dienes formed, (iv) the electrophoretic migration of LDL protein in agarose gels (REM), and (v) the inactivation of the enzyme PAF-acetylhydrolase present in LDL. In addition, the presence of trimetazidine decreased considerably the DNA damage in H(2)O(2)-exposed Jurkat cells in culture. H(2)O(2) was continuously generated by the action of glucose oxidase at a rate of 11.8 +/- 1.5 microM per min (60 ng enzyme per 100 microl), and DNA damage was assessed by the single cell gel electrophoresis assay (also called comet assay). The protection offered by trimetazidine in this system (about 30% at best) was transient, indicating modification of this agent during its action. These results indicate that trimetazidine can modulate the action of oxidizing agents in different systems. Although its mode of action is not clarified, the possibility that it acts as a lipid barrier permeable transition metal chelator is considered. PMID:11390180

  16. Protective Efficacy of Alpha-lipoic Acid against AflatoxinB1-induced Oxidative Damage in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.; Ma, Q. G.; Zhao, L. H.; Guo, Y. Q.; Duan, G. X.; Zhang, J. Y.; Ji, C.

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (α-LA) is not only involved in energy metabolism, but is also a powerful antioxidant that can protect against hepatic oxidative stress induced by some drugs, toxins, or under various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Here, we investigated the effect of α-LA against liver oxidative damage in broilers exposed to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). Birds were randomly divided into four groups and assigned different diets: basal diet, 300 mg/kg α-LA supplementation in basal diet, diet containing 74 μg/kg AFB1, and 300 mg/kg α-LA supplementation in diet containing 74 μg/kg AFB1, for 3 weeks. The results revealed that the addition of 300 mg/kg α-LA protected against the liver function damage of broilers induced by chronic low dose of AFB1 as estimated by a significant (p<0.05) change in levels of plasma total protein, albumin, alkaline phosphatase and the activities of liver glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase. The histopathological analysis also showed that liver tissues were injured in the AFB1 diet, but this effect was alleviated by the addition of 300 mg/kg α-LA. Additionally, AFB1 induced a profound elevation of oxidative stress in birds, as indicated by an increase in malondialdehyde level, a decrease in glutathione peroxidase activity and a depletion of the glutathione content in the liver. All of these negative effects were inhibited by treatment with α-LA. Our results suggest that the inhibition of AFB1-induced excess production of lipid peroxides and the maintenance of intracellular antioxidant status may play important roles in the protective effects of α-LA against AFB1-induced oxidative damage in the liver. PMID:25050030

  17. Thermal hydraulic features of the TMI accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolman, B.

    1985-10-01

    The Three Mile island (TMI)-2 accident resulted in extensive core damage and recent data confirms that the reactor vessel was challenged from molten core materials. A hypothesized TMI accident scenario is presented that consistently explains the TMI data and is also consistent with research findings from independent severe fuel damage experiments. The TMI data will prove useful in confirming our understanding of severe core damage accidents under realistic reactor systems conditions. This understanding will aid in addressing safety and regulatory issues related to severe core damage accidents in light water reactors.

  18. Antioxidant activity and protective effect of Clitoria ternatea flower extract on testicular damage induced by ketoconazole in rats*

    PubMed Central

    Iamsaard, Sitthichai; Burawat, Jaturon; Kanla, Pipatpong; Arun, Supatcharee; Sukhorum, Wannisa; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn; Uabundit, Nongnut; Wattathorn, Jintanaporn; Hipkaeo, Wiphawi; Fongmoon, Duriya; Kondo, Hisatake

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ketoconazole (KET), an antifungal drug, has adverse effects on the male reproductive system. Pre-treatments with antioxidant plant against testicular damage induced by KET are required. The flowers of Clitoria ternatea (CT) are proven to have hepatoprotective potential. However, the protective effect on KET-induced testicular damage has not been reported. Objective: To investigate the protective effect of CT flower extracts with antioxidant activity on male reproductive parameters including sperm concentration, serum testosterone level, histopathology of the testis, and testicular tyrosine phosphorylation levels in rats induced with KET. Methods: The antioxidant activity of CT flower extracts was determined using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Male rats were treated with CT flower extracts (10, 50, or 100 mg/kg BW) or distilled water via a gastric tube for 28 d (preventive period: Days 1–21) and induced by KET (100 mg/kg BW) via intraperitoneal injection for 7 d (induction period: Days 22–28). After the experiment, all animals were examined for the weights of the testis, epididymis plus vas deferens and seminal vesicle, serum testosterone levels, sperm concentration, histological structures and diameter of testis, and testicular tyrosine phosphorylation levels by immunoblotting. Results: The CT flower extracts had capabilities for DPPH scavenging and high reducing power. At 100 mg/kg BW, the extract had no toxic effects on the male reproductive system. Significantly, in CT+KET groups, CT flower extracts (50 and 100 mg/kg BW) alleviated the reduction of reproductive organ weight parameters, testosterone levels, and sperm concentration. In addition, CT flower extracts gave protection from testicular damage in KET-induced rats. Moreover, in the CT100+KET group, CT flower extracts significantly enhanced the expression of a testicular 50-kDa tyrosine phosphorylated protein compared with that of

  19. Phenolic compounds of Chromolaena odorata protect cultured skin cells from oxidative damage: implication for cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Phan, T T; Wang, L; See, P; Grayer, R J; Chan, S Y; Lee, S T

    2001-12-01

    Extracts from the leaves of Chromolaena odorata have been shown to be beneficial for treatment of wounds. The crude ethanol extract of the plant had been demonstrated to be a powerful antioxidant to protect fibroblasts and keratinocytes in vitro. In this study, the most active compounds were fractionated and identified from the crude extract using liquid chromatography coupled with UV spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The antioxidant effects of purified fractions on cultured fibroblasts and keratinocytes were investigated using colorimetric and lactate hydrogenase release assay. The results showed that the phenolic acids present (protocatechuic, p-hydroxybenzoic, p-coumaric, ferulic and vanillic acids) and complex mixtures of lipophilic flavonoid aglycones (flavanones, flavonols, flavones and chalcones) were major and powerful antioxidants to protect cultured skin cells against oxidative damage. In conclusion, the extract from C odorata contains a mixture of powerful antioxidant compounds that may be one of potential mechanism contributing to enhanced wound healing. PMID:11767105

  20. Effects of He and Ar ion kinetic energies in protection of organosilicate glass from O{sub 2} plasma damage

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joe; Graves, David B.; Kazi, Haseeb; Gaddam, Sneha; Kelber, Jeffry A.

    2013-07-15

    In-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ex-situ Fourier transform infrared studies of He plasma and Ar{sup +} ion bombardment pretreatments of organosilicate glass demonstrate that such pretreatments inhibit subsequent O{sub 2} plasma-induced carbon loss by forming a SiO{sub 2}-like damaged overlayer, and that the degree of protection correlates directly with increased ion kinetic energies, but not with the thickness of the SiO{sub 2} overlayer. This thickness is observed by XPS to be roughly constant and <1 nm regardless of ion energies involved. The data indicate that ion kinetic energies are an important parameter in protective noble gas plasma pretreatments to inhibit O{sub 2} plasma-induced carbon loss.

  1. A putative Leishmania DNA polymerase theta protects the parasite against oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Orgiler, Abel; Martínez-Jiménez, María I.; Alonso, Ana; Alcolea, Pedro J.; Requena, Jose M.; Thomas, María C.; Blanco, Luis; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania infantum is a protozoan parasite that is phagocytized by human macrophages. The host macrophages kill the parasite by generating oxidative compounds that induce DNA damage. We have identified, purified and biochemically characterized a DNA polymerase θ from L. infantum (LiPolθ), demonstrating that it is a DNA-dependent DNA polymerase involved in translesion synthesis of 8oxoG, abasic sites and thymine glycol lesions. Stably transfected L. infantum parasites expressing LiPolθ were significantly more resistant to oxidative and interstrand cross-linking agents, e.g. hydrogen peroxide, cisplatin and mitomycin C. Moreover, LiPolθ-overexpressing parasites showed an increased infectivity toward its natural macrophage host. Therefore, we propose that LiPolθ is a translesion synthesis polymerase involved in parasite DNA damage tolerance, to confer resistance against macrophage aggression. PMID:27131366

  2. A putative Leishmania DNA polymerase theta protects the parasite against oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Orgiler, Abel; Martínez-Jiménez, María I; Alonso, Ana; Alcolea, Pedro J; Requena, Jose M; Thomas, María C; Blanco, Luis; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-06-01

    Leishmania infantum is a protozoan parasite that is phagocytized by human macrophages. The host macrophages kill the parasite by generating oxidative compounds that induce DNA damage. We have identified, purified and biochemically characterized a DNA polymerase θ from L. infantum (LiPolθ), demonstrating that it is a DNA-dependent DNA polymerase involved in translesion synthesis of 8oxoG, abasic sites and thymine glycol lesions. Stably transfected L. infantum parasites expressing LiPolθ were significantly more resistant to oxidative and interstrand cross-linking agents, e.g. hydrogen peroxide, cisplatin and mitomycin C. Moreover, LiPolθ-overexpressing parasites showed an increased infectivity toward its natural macrophage host. Therefore, we propose that LiPolθ is a translesion synthesis polymerase involved in parasite DNA damage tolerance, to confer resistance against macrophage aggression. PMID:27131366

  3. A protective effect of musical expertise on cognitive outcome following brain damage?

    PubMed

    Omigie, Diana; Samson, Severine

    2014-12-01

    The current review examines the possibility that training-related changes that take place in the brains of musicians may have a beneficial effect on their cognitive outcome and recovery following neurological damage. First, we propose three different mechanisms by which training-related brain changes might result in relatively preserved function in musicians as compared to non-musicians with cerebral lesions. Next, we review the neuropsychological literature examining musical ability in professional musicians following brain damage, specifically of vascular, tumoral and epileptic aetiology. Finally, given that assessment of musician patients can greatly inform our understanding of the influence of premorbid experience on postmorbid recovery, we suggest some basic guidelines for the future evaluation of relevant patients. PMID:25380766

  4. Protecting the heritable genome: DNA damage response mechanisms in spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rübe, Claudia E; Zhang, Sheng; Miebach, Nadine; Fricke, Andreas; Rübe, Christian

    2011-02-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) must maintain the integrity of their genome to prevent reproduction failure and limit the hereditary risk associated with transmission to the progeny. SSCs must therefore have robust response mechanisms to counteract the potentially deleterious effects of DNA damage, with DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) representing the greatest threat to genomic integrity. Through in vivo analysis of the DNA damage response of SSCs within their physiological tissue context, we aimed to gain insights into the mechanisms by which SSCs preserve genome integrity. After whole-body irradiation of repair-proficient and repair-deficient (DNA-PK- and ATM-deficient) mice, the formation and rejoining of DSBs was analyzed in SSCs of testis compared with somatic cells of other tissues by enumerating γH2AX-, MDC1-, and 53BP1-foci. Caspase-3 and PARP-1 were used as markers for apoptotic cell death. Our results show that DNA damage response mechanisms in SSCs characterized by unique chromatin compositions are markedly different from those of somatic cells. In SSCs lacking compact heterochromatin, histone-associated signaling components of the DNA repair machinery are completely absent and radiation-induced DSBs are rejoined predominantly by DNA-PK-independent pathways, suggesting the existence of alternative repair mechanisms. As a complimentary mechanism characterized by low thresholds for ATM-dependent checkpoint activation, the differentiating progeny, but not the SSCs themselves, promote apoptosis in response to low levels of DNA damage. By evaluating SSCs within their stem cell niche, we show that DNA repair, cell-cycle checkpoints, and apoptosis function together to maintain the integrity of the heritable genome. PMID:21123119

  5. Coenzyme Q10 Protects Astrocytes from ROS-Induced Damage through Inhibition of Mitochondria-Mediated Cell Death Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Li; He, Mao-Tao; Chang, Yue; Mehta, Suresh L.; He, Qing-Ping; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Li, P. Andy

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) acts by scavenging reactive oxygen species to protect neuronal cells against oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was designed to examine whether CoQ10 was capable of protecting astrocytes from reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated damage. For this purpose, ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation was used as a tool to induce ROS stress to cultured astrocytes. The cells were treated with 10 and 25 μg/ml of CoQ10 for 3 or 24 h prior to the cells being exposed to UVB irradiation and maintained for 24 h post UVB exposure. Cell viability was assessed by MTT conversion assay. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed by respirometer. While superoxide production and mitochondrial membrane potential were measured using fluorescent probes, levels of cytochrome C (cyto-c), cleaved caspase-9, and caspase-8 were detected using Western blotting and/or immunocytochemistry. The results showed that UVB irradiation decreased cell viability and this damaging effect was associated with superoxide accumulation, mitochondrial membrane potential hyperpolarization, mitochondrial respiration suppression, cyto-c release, and the activation of both caspase-9 and -8. Treatment with CoQ10 at two different concentrations started 24 h before UVB exposure significantly increased the cell viability. The protective effect of CoQ10 was associated with reduction in superoxide, normalization of mitochondrial membrane potential, improvement of mitochondrial respiration, inhibition of cyto-c release, suppression of caspase-9. Furthermore, CoQ10 enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis. It is concluded that CoQ10 may protect astrocytes through suppression of oxidative stress, prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction, blockade of mitochondria-mediated cell death pathway, and enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25552930

  6. Protective effect of enzymatic extracts from microalgae against DNA damage induced by H2O2.

    PubMed

    Karawita, Rohan; Senevirathne, Mahinda; Athukorala, Yasantha; Affan, Abu; Lee, Young-Jae; Kim, Se-Kwon; Lee, Joon-Baek; Jeon, You-Jin

    2007-01-01

    The enzymatic extracts from seven species of microalgae (Pediastrum duplex, Dactylococcopsis fascicularis, Halochlorococcum porphyrae, Oltmannsiellopsis unicellularis, Achnanthes longipes, Navicula sp. and Amphora coffeaeformis) collected from three habitats (freshwater, tidal pool, and coastal benthic) at Jeju Island in Korea were investigated for their antioxidant activity. Of the extracts tested, the AMG 300 L (an exo 1, 4-alpha-D-glucosidase) extract of P. duplex, the Viscozyme extract of Navicula sp., and the Celluclast extract of A. longipes provided the most potential as antioxidants. Meanwhile, the Termamyl extract of P. duplex in an H(2)O(2) scavenging assay exhibited an approximate 60% scavenging effect. In this study, we report that the DNA damage inhibitory effects of P. duplex (Termamyl extract) and D. fascicularis (Kojizyme extract) were nearly 80% and 69% respectively at a concentration of 100 microg/ml. Thus, it is suggested that the microalgae tested in this study yield promising DNA damage inhibitory properties on mouse lymphoma L 5178 cells that are treated with H(2)O(2). Therefore, microalgae such as P. duplex may be an excellent source of naturally occurring antioxidant compounds with potent DNA damage inhibition potential. PMID:17520314

  7. How caterpillar-damaged plants protect themselves by attracting parasitic wasps.

    PubMed Central

    Turlings, T C; Loughrin, J H; McCall, P J; Röse, U S; Lewis, W J; Tumlinson, J H

    1995-01-01

    Parasitic and predatory arthropods often prevent plants from being severely damaged by killing herbivores as they feed on the plants. Recent studies show that a variety of plants, when injured by herbivores, emit chemical signals that guide natural enemies to the herbivores. It is unlikely that herbivore-damaged plants initiate the production of chemicals solely to attract parasitoids and predators. The signaling role probably evolved secondarily from plant responses that produce toxins and deterrents against herbivores and antibiotics against pathogens. To effectively function as signals for natural enemies, the emitted volatiles should be clearly distinguishable from background odors, specific for prey or host species that feed on the plant, and emitted at times when the natural enemies forage. Our studies on the phenomena of herbivore-induced emissions of volatiles in corn and cotton plants and studies conducted by others indicate that (i) the clarity of the volatile signals is high, as they are unique for herbivore damage, produced in relatively large amounts, and easily distinguishable from background odors; (ii) specificity is limited when different herbivores feed on the same plant species but high as far as odors emitted by different plant species and genotypes are concerned; (iii) the signals are timed so that they are mainly released during the daytime, when natural enemies tend to forage, and they wane slowly after herbivory stops. PMID:7753779

  8. The Protective Effect of Grape-Seed Proanthocyanidin Extract on Oxidative Damage Induced by Zearalenone in Kunming Mice Liver

    PubMed Central

    Long, Miao; Yang, Shu-Hua; Han, Jian-Xin; Li, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Dong, Shuang; Chen, Xinliang; Guo, Jiayi; Wang, Jun; He, Jian-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Although grape-seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) demonstrates strong anti-oxidant activity, little research has been done to clearly reveal the protective effects on the hepatotoxicity caused by zearalenone (ZEN). This study is to explore the protective effect of GSPE on ZEN-induced oxidative damage of liver in Kunming mice and the possible protective molecular mechanism of GSPE. The results indicated that GSPE could greatly reduce the ZEN-induced increase of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities. GSPE also significantly decreased the content of MDA but enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes SOD and GSH-Px. The analysis indicated that ZEN decreased both mRNA expression levels and protein expression levels of nuclear erythroid2-related factor2 (Nrf2). Nrf2 is considered to be an essential antioxidative transcription factor, as downstream GSH-Px, γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1), and quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) decreased simultaneously, whereas the pre-administration of GSPE groups was shown to elevate these expressions. The results indicated that GSPE exerted a protective effect on ZEN-induced hepatic injury and the mechanism might be related to the activation of the Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway. PMID:27231898

  9. The Protective Effect of Grape-Seed Proanthocyanidin Extract on Oxidative Damage Induced by Zearalenone in Kunming Mice Liver.

    PubMed

    Long, Miao; Yang, Shu-Hua; Han, Jian-Xin; Li, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Dong, Shuang; Chen, Xinliang; Guo, Jiayi; Wang, Jun; He, Jian-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Although grape-seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) demonstrates strong anti-oxidant activity, little research has been done to clearly reveal the protective effects on the hepatotoxicity caused by zearalenone (ZEN). This study is to explore the protective effect of GSPE on ZEN-induced oxidative damage of liver in Kunming mice and the possible protective molecular mechanism of GSPE. The results indicated that GSPE could greatly reduce the ZEN-induced increase of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities. GSPE also significantly decreased the content of MDA but enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes SOD and GSH-Px. The analysis indicated that ZEN decreased both mRNA expression levels and protein expression levels of nuclear erythroid2-related factor2 (Nrf2). Nrf2 is considered to be an essential antioxidative transcription factor, as downstream GSH-Px, γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1), and quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) decreased simultaneously, whereas the pre-administration of GSPE groups was shown to elevate these expressions. The results indicated that GSPE exerted a protective effect on ZEN-induced hepatic injury and the mechanism might be related to the activation of the Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway. PMID:27231898

  10. Protection of Space Vehicles from Micrometeoroid/Orbital Debris (MMOD) Damages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, Stephanie

    2007-01-01

    As the environment that puts space vehicles at risk can never be eliminated, space vehicles must implement protection against the MMOD environment. In general, this protection has been implemented on a risk estimate basis, largely focused on estimates of impactor size and estimated flux. However, there is some uncertainty in applying these methods from data gathered in earth orbit to excursions outside. This paper discusses different past thresholds and processes of the past and suggests additional refinement or methods that could be used for future space endeavors.

  11. The protective effect of MT-α-glucan against streptozotocin (STZ)-induced NIT-1 pancreatic β-cell damage.

    PubMed

    Hong, Lei; Qin, Wang; Shuzhen, Guo; Juncheng, Han; Hanju, Sun; Xiaoxiang, Zhang; Wutong, Wu

    2013-02-15

    The protective effect of an alpha-glucan (designated here as MT-α-glucan) from fruit body of maitake (Grifola frondosa) on NIT-1 pancreatic β-cells damaged by streptozotocin (STZ) in vitro was investigated. The cell viability, insulin secretion, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSHpx) and the content of reduced glutathione (GSH) increased significantly when the cells were incubated with MT-α-glucan (400, 200 μg ml(-1)). The content of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) production, and the activity of NO synthase (NOS), inducible NOS (iNOS) decreased significantly when the cells were incubated with MT-α-glucan. The destructive changes of NIT-1 cells ameliorated when incubated with MT-α-glucan under microscopic observation. These data suggested that MT-α-glucan had obvious protective effect on NIT-1 pancreatic β-cells damaged by STZ, which might be related to its effects of decreasing levels of β-cell-destroying factors such as oxidative stress and NO synthesis. PMID:23399148

  12. Protective effects of Artocarpus altilis (Moraceae) on cadmium-induced changes in sperm characteristics and testicular oxidative damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Adaramoye, O A; Akanni, O O

    2016-03-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a major environmental toxicant and an endocrine disruptor. We investigated the protective effects of methanol extract of Artocarpus altilis (AA) against Cd-induced testicular damage in rats while quercetin (Que) served as standard. The total flavonoids and phenolic contents (TFC and TPC), 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and hydroxyl (OH) radicals scavenging activities of AA were determined. In vivo, thirty male Wistar rats were assigned to six groups and orally treated with corn oil (control), Cd alone, Cd+Que, Cd+AA, Que and AA alone. Que and AA were given at doses of 25 and 200 mg kg(-1), respectively, for 3 weeks and challenged with two doses of Cd (1.5 mg kg(-1)). Results showed that TFC and TPC of AA increased with increase in concentration. AA scavenged DPPH and OH radicals in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of Cd significantly increased the relative weight of testis of rats. Lipid peroxidation was significantly increased while antioxidant parameters decreased in testis of Cd-treated rats. Also, Cd-treated rats had significantly reduced sperm count, motility, sialic acid, luteinising hormone and testosterone relative to controls. Pre-treatment with AA or Que significantly attenuated the biochemical alterations observed in Cd-treated rats. Overall, AA protects against Cd-induced testicular damage via antioxidative mechanism. PMID:25912632

  13. Protective effects of the extracts of Barringtonia racemosa shoots against oxidative damage in HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Kin Weng; Mat-Junit, Sarni; Aminudin, Norhaniza; Hassan, Fouad Abdulrahman; Ismail, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Barringtonia racemosa is a tropical plant with medicinal values. In this study, the ability of the water extracts of the leaf (BLE) and stem (BSE) from the shoots to protect HepG2 cells against oxidative damage was studied. Five major polyphenolic compounds consisting of gallic acid, ellagic acid, protocatechuic acid, quercetin and kaempferol were identified using HPLC-DAD and ESI-MS. Cell viability assay revealed that BLE and BSE were non-cytotoxic (cell viabilities >80%) at concentration less than 250 µg/ml and 500 µg/ml, respectively. BLE and BSE improved cellular antioxidant status measured by FRAP assay and protected HepG2 cells against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity. The extracts also inhibited lipid peroxidation in HepG2 cells as well as the production of reactive oxygen species. BLE and BSE could also suppress the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase during oxidative stress. The shoots of B. racemosa can be an alternative bioactive ingredient in the prevention of oxidative damage. PMID:26839752

  14. Protective effects of the extracts of Barringtonia racemosa shoots against oxidative damage in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Kin Weng; Mat-Junit, Sarni; Aminudin, Norhaniza; Hassan, Fouad Abdulrahman; Ismail, Amin; Abdul Aziz, Azlina

    2016-01-01

    Barringtonia racemosa is a tropical plant with medicinal values. In this study, the ability of the water extracts of the leaf (BLE) and stem (BSE) from the shoots to protect HepG2 cells against oxidative damage was studied. Five major polyphenolic compounds consisting of gallic acid, ellagic acid, protocatechuic acid, quercetin and kaempferol were identified using HPLC-DAD and ESI-MS. Cell viability assay revealed that BLE and BSE were non-cytotoxic (cell viabilities >80%) at concentration less than 250 µg/ml and 500 µg/ml, respectively. BLE and BSE improved cellular antioxidant status measured by FRAP assay and protected HepG2 cells against H2O2-induced cytotoxicity. The extracts also inhibited lipid peroxidation in HepG2 cells as well as the production of reactive oxygen species. BLE and BSE could also suppress the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase during oxidative stress. The shoots of B. racemosa can be an alternative bioactive ingredient in the prevention of oxidative damage. PMID:26839752

  15. Protective Effects of Salidroside on Mitochondrial Functions against Exertional Heat Stroke-Induced Organ Damage in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Peng, Ming; Yang, Yang; Xiao, Zhangwu; Song, Bin; Lin, Zhaofen

    2015-01-01

    Exertional heat stroke (EHS) results in a constellation of systemic inflammatory responses resulting in multiorgan failure and an extremely high mortality. The present study was designed to evaluate the protective effects of salidroside on EHS by improving mitochondrial functions in the rat model. Liver and heart mitochondria were observed by transmission electron microscopy and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) was detected by a fluorescent probe. Intramitochondrial free Ca2+ concentration, mitochondrial respiratory control ratio (RCR), reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) activity were detected by the corresponding kits. RT-PCR was performed to estimate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and manganese form of SOD (MnSOD) mRNA expression. The results demonstrated that salidroside was able to relieve EHS damage by reducing the swelling of mitochondria, ROS levels, and MDA activity, as well as increasing ΔΨm, RCR, free Ca2+ concentration, SOD, PGC-1α, and MnSOD mRNA levels. In conclusion, salidroside has protective effects on mitochondrial functions against exertional heat stroke-induced organ damage in the rat. PMID:26664452

  16. Sulforaphane protects against cytokine- and streptozotocin-induced {beta}-cell damage by suppressing the NF-{kappa}B pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Woo-Sung; Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Hyung-Jin; So, Hong-Seob; Park, Raekil; Kwon, Kang-Beom Park, Byung-Hyun

    2009-02-15

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is an indirect antioxidant that protects animal tissues from chemical or biological insults by stimulating the expression of several NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2)-regulated phase 2 enzymes. Treatment of RINm5F insulinoma cells with SFN increases Nrf2 nuclear translocation and expression of phase 2 enzymes. In this study, we investigated whether the activation of Nrf2 by SFN treatment or ectopic overexpression of Nrf2 inhibited cytokine-induced {beta}-cell damage. Treatment of RIN cells with IL-1{beta} and IFN-{gamma} induced {beta}-cell damage through a NF-{kappa}B-dependent signaling pathway. Activation of Nrf2 by treatment with SFN and induction of Nrf2 overexpression by transfection with Nrf2 prevented cytokine toxicity. The mechanism by which Nrf2 activation inhibited NF-{kappa}B-dependent cell death signals appeared to involve the reduction of oxidative stress, as demonstrated by the inhibition of cytokine-induced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. The protective effect of SFN was further demonstrated by the restoration of normal insulin secreting responses to glucose in cytokine-treated rat pancreatic islets. Furthermore, pretreatment with SFN blocked the development of type 1 diabetes in streptozotocin-treated mice.

  17. Protective effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Ran-Chou; Lu, Wen-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-04-01

    The protein expressions of neurotrophic factors can be enhanced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation in the brain. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the protective effect of LIPUS stimulation against aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model. LIPUS was administered 7 days before each aluminum chloride (AlCl3) administration, and concomitantly given with AlCl3 daily for a period of 6 weeks. Neurotrophic factors in hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. Behavioral changes in the Morris water maze and elevated plus maze were examined in rats after administration of AlCl3. Various biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the extent of brain damages. LIPUS is capable of prompting levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat brain. AlCl3 administration resulted in a significant increase in the aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity and beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in AlCl3 treated rats. LIPUS stimulation significantly attenuated aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, Aβ deposition and karyopyknosis in AlCl3 treated rats. Furthermore, LIPUS significantly improved memory retention in AlCl3-induced memory impairment. These experimental results indicate that LIPUS has neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cerebral damages and cognitive dysfunction.

  18. Protection against Whole Body γ-Irradiation Induced Oxidative Stress and Clastogenic Damage in Mice by Ginger Essential Oil.

    PubMed

    Jeena, Kottarapat; Liju, Vijayasteltar B; Ramanath, Viswanathan; Kuttan, Ramadasan

    2016-01-01

    Radioprotective effects of ginger essential oil (GEO) on mortality, body weight alteration, hematological parameters, antioxidant status and chromosomal damage were studied in irradiated mice. Regression analysis of survival data in mice exposed to radiation yielded LD50/30 as 7.12 and 10.14 Gy for control (irradiation alone) and experimental (GEO-treated irradiated) mice, respectively, with a dose reduction factor (DRF) of 1.42. In mice exposed to whole-body gamma-irradiation (6 Gy), GEO pre-treatment at 100 and 500 mg/kg b.wt (orally) significantly ameliorated decreased hematological and immunological parameters. Radiation induced reduction in intestinal tissue antioxidant enzyme levels such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione was also reversed following administration of GEO. Tissue architecture of small intestine which was damaged following irradiation was improved upon administration of GEO. Anticlastogenic effects of GEO were studied by micronuclei assay, chromosomal aberration and alkaline gel electrophoresis assay. GEO significantly decreased the formation of micronuclei, increased the P/N ratio, inhibited the formation of chromosomal aberrations and protected agaisnt cellular DNA damage in bone marrow cells as revealed by comet assay. These results are supportive of use of GEO as a potential radioprotective compound. PMID:27039766

  19. Protective effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Ran-Chou; Lu, Wen-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-01-01

    The protein expressions of neurotrophic factors can be enhanced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation in the brain. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the protective effect of LIPUS stimulation against aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model. LIPUS was administered 7 days before each aluminum chloride (AlCl3) administration, and concomitantly given with AlCl3 daily for a period of 6 weeks. Neurotrophic factors in hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. Behavioral changes in the Morris water maze and elevated plus maze were examined in rats after administration of AlCl3. Various biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the extent of brain damages. LIPUS is capable of prompting levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat brain. AlCl3 administration resulted in a significant increase in the aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity and beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in AlCl3 treated rats. LIPUS stimulation significantly attenuated aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, Aβ deposition and karyopyknosis in AlCl3 treated rats. Furthermore, LIPUS significantly improved memory retention in AlCl3-induced memory impairment. These experimental results indicate that LIPUS has neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cerebral damages and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25873429

  20. Crepidiastrum denticulatum Extract Protects the Liver Against Chronic Alcohol-Induced Damage and Fat Accumulation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji-Hye; Kang, Kyungsu; Yun, Ji Ho; Kim, Mi Ae

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Alcohol is a severe hepatotoxicant that causes liver abnormalities such as steatosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocarcinoma. Crepidiastrum denticulatum (CD) is a well-known, traditionally consumed vegetable in Korea, which was recently reported to have bioactive compounds with detoxification and antioxidant properties. In this study, we report the hepatoprotective effect of CD extract against chronic alcohol-induced liver damage in vivo. The rats that were given CD extract exhibited decreased alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase activities, which are liver damage markers that are typically elevated by alcohol consumption. The results were confirmed by histopathology with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Chronic alcohol consumption induced the formation of alcoholic fatty liver. However, treatment with CD extract dramatically decreased the hepatic lipid droplets. Treatment with CD extract also restored the antioxidative capacity and lipid peroxidation of the liver that had been changed by alcohol consumption. Furthermore, treatment with CD extract normalized the activities of the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase, which had been decreased by alcohol consumption. The results indicate that CD extract has protective effects against chronic alcohol hepatotoxicity in rats by increasing the liver's antioxidant capacity, and has potential as a dietary supplement intervention for patients with alcohol-induced liver damage. PMID:24650230

  1. Protective effect by maximal isometric contractions against maximal eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage of the knee extensors.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Kuo-Wei; Tseng, Wei-Chin; Lin, Ming-Ju; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Nosaka, Kazunori; Chen, Trevor C

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) performed before maximal eccentric contractions (MaxEC) would attenuate muscle damage of the knee extensors. Untrained men were placed to an experimental group that performed 6 sets of 10 MVIC at 90° knee flexion 2 weeks before 6 sets of 10 MaxEC or a control group that performed MaxEC only (n = 13/group). Changes in muscle damage markers were assessed before to 5 days after each exercise. Small but significant changes in maximal voluntary concentric contraction torque, range of motion (ROM) and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were evident at immediately to 2 days post-MVIC (p < 0.05), but other variables (e.g. thigh girth, myoglobin concentration, B-mode echo intensity) did not change significantly. Changes in all variables after MaxEC were smaller (p < 0.05) by 45% (soreness)-67% (CK) for the experimental than the control group. These results suggest that MVIC conferred potent protective effect against MaxEC-induced muscle damage. PMID:27366814

  2. Protective Effect of Boric Acid on Oxidative DNA Damage In Chinese Hamster Lung Fibroblast V79 Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Sezen; Ustundag, Aylin; Cemiloglu Ulker, Ozge; Duydu, Yalcın

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many studies have been published on the antioxidative effects of boric acid (BA) and sodium borates in in vitro studies. However, the boron (B) concentrations tested in these in vitro studies have not been selected by taking into account the realistic blood B concentrations in humans due to the lack of comprehensive epidemiological studies. The recently published epidemiological studies on B exposure conducted in China and Turkey provided blood B concentrations for both humans in daily life and workers under extreme exposure conditions in occupational setting. The results of these studies have made it possible to test antioxidative effects of BA in in vitro studies within the concentra- tion range relevant to humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective ef- fects of BA against oxidative DNA damage in V79 (Chinese hamster lung fibroblast) cells. The concentrations of BA tested for its protective effect was selected by taking the blood B concentrations into account reported in previously published epidemiological studies. Therefore, the concentrations of BA tested in this study represent the exposure levels for humans in both daily life and occupational settings. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, comet assay and neutral red uptake (NRU) assay methods were used to determinacy to toxicity and genotoxicity of BA and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Results The results of the NRU assay showed that BA was not cytotoxic within the tested concentrations (3, 10, 30, 100 and 200 µM). These non-cytotoxic concentrations were used for comet assay. BA pre-treatment significantly reduced (P<0.05, one-way ANOVA) the DNA damaging capacity of H2O2 at each tested BA concentrations in V79 cells. Conclusion Consequently, pre-incubation of V79 cells with BA has significantly reduced the H2O2-induced oxidative DNA damage in V79 cells. The protective effect of BA against oxidative DNA damage in V79 cells at 5, 10, 50, 100 and 200 μM (54, 108, 540

  3. High Throughput Screening Identifies a Novel Compound Protecting Cardiomyocytes from Doxorubicin-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gergely, Szabolcs; Hegedűs, Csaba; Lakatos, Petra; Kovács, Katalin; Gáspár, Renáta; Csont, Tamás; Virág, László

    2015-01-01

    Antracyclines are effective antitumor agents. One of the most commonly used antracyclines is doxorubicin, which can be successfully used to treat a diverse spectrum of tumors. Application of these drugs is limited by their cardiotoxic effect, which is determined by a lifetime cumulative dose. We set out to identify by high throughput screening cardioprotective compounds protecting cardiomyocytes from doxorubicin-induced injury. Ten thousand compounds of ChemBridge's DIVERSet compound library were screened to identify compounds that can protect H9C2 rat cardiomyocytes against doxorubicin-induced cell death. The most effective compound proved protective in doxorubicin-treated primary rat cardiomyocytes and was further characterized to demonstrate that it significantly decreased doxorubicin-induced apoptotic and necrotic cell death and inhibited doxorubicin-induced activation of JNK MAP kinase without having considerable radical scavenging effect or interfering with the antitumor effect of doxorubicin. In fact the compound identified as 3-[2-(4-ethylphenyl)-2-oxoethyl]-1,2-dimethyl-1H-3,1-benzimidazol-3-ium bromide was toxic to all tumor cell lines tested even without doxorubicine treatment. This benzimidazole compound may lead, through further optimalization, to the development of a drug candidate protecting the heart from doxorubicin-induced injury. PMID:26137186

  4. Teduglutide ([Gly2]GLP-2) protects small intestinal stem cells from radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Booth, C; Booth, D; Williamson, S; Demchyshyn, L L; Potten, C S

    2004-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 and its dipeptidyl peptidase (DP-IV) resistant analogue teduglutide are trophic for the gastrointestinal epithelium. Exposure increases villus height and crypt size and results in increased overall intestinal weight. As these effects may be mediated through stimulation of the stem cell compartment, they may promote intestinal healing and act as potential anti-mucositis agents in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy. A study was initiated to investigate the protective effects of teduglutide on the murine small intestinal epithelium following gamma-irradiation using the crypt microcolony assay as a measure of stem cell survival and functional competence. Teduglutide demonstrated intestinotrophic effects in both CD1 and BDF1 mouse strains. In BDF1 mice, subcutaneous injection of GLP-2 or teduglutide (0.2 mg/kg/day, b.i.d.) for 14 days increased intestinal weight by 28% and resulted in comparable increases in crypt size, villus height and area. Teduglutide given daily for 6 or 14 days prior to whole body, gamma-irradiation significantly increased crypt stem cell survival when compared with vehicle-treated controls. The mean levels of protection over a range of doses provided protection factors from 1.3 to 1.5. A protective effect was only observed when teduglutide was given before irradiation. These results suggest that teduglutide has the ability to modulate clonogenic stem cell survival in the small intestine and this may have a useful clinical application in the prevention of cancer therapy-induced mucositis. PMID:15548172

  5. Epithelium damage and protection during reopening of occluded airways in a physiologic microfluidic pulmonary airway model.

    PubMed

    Tavana, Hossein; Zamankhan, Parsa; Christensen, Paul J; Grotberg, James B; Takayama, Shuichi

    2011-08-01

    Airways of the peripheral lung are prone to closure at low lung volumes. Deficiency or dysfunction of pulmonary surfactant during various lung diseases compounds this event by destabilizing the liquid lining of small airways and giving rise to occluding liquid plugs in airways. Propagation of liquid plugs in airways during inflation of the lung exerts large mechanical forces on airway cells. We describe a microfluidic model of small airways of the lung that mimics airway architecture, recreates physiologic levels of pulmonary pressures, and allows studying cellular response to repeated liquid plug propagation events. Substantial cellular injury happens due to the propagation of liquid plugs devoid of surfactant. We show that addition of a physiologic concentration of a clinical surfactant, Survanta, to propagating liquid plugs protects the epithelium and significantly reduces cell death. Although the protective role of surfactants has been demonstrated in models of a propagating air finger in liquid-filled airways, this is the first time to study the protective role of surfactants in liquid plugs where fluid mechanical stresses are expected to be higher than in air fingers. Our parallel computational simulations revealed a significant decrease in mechanical forces in the presence of surfactant, confirming the experimental observations. The results support the practice of providing exogenous surfactant to patients in certain clinical settings as a protective mechanism against pathologic flows. More importantly, this platform provides a useful model to investigate various surface tension-mediated lung diseases at the cellular level. PMID:21487664

  6. Eucalyptus globulus extract protects upon acetaminophen-induced kidney damages in male rat

    PubMed Central

    Dhibi, Sabah; Mbarki, Sakhria; Elfeki, Abdelfettah; Hfaiedh, Najla

    2014-01-01

    Plants have historically been used in treating many diseases. Eucalyptus globules, a rich source of bioactive compounds, and have been shown to possess antioxidative properties. The purpose of this study, carried out on male Wistar rats, was to evaluate the beneficial effects of Eucalyptus globulus extract upon acetaminophen-induced damages in kidney. Our study is realized in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences of Sfax (Tunisia). 32 Wistar male rats; were divided into 4 batches: a control group (n=8), a group of rats treated with acetaminophen (goomg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection during 4 days (n=8), a group receiving Eucalyptus globulus extract (130 mg of dry leaves/kg/day) in drinking water during 42 days after 2 hours of acetaminophen administration (during 4 days) (n=8) and group received only Eucalyptus (n=8) during 42 days. After 6 weeks, animals from each group were rapidly sacrificed by decapitation. Blood serum was obtained by centrifugation. Under our experimental conditions, acetaminophen poisoning resulted in an oxidative stress evidenced by statistically significant losses in the activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide-dismutase (SOD), glutathione-peroxidase (GPX) activities and an increase in lipids peroxidation level in renal tissue of acetaminophen-treated group compared with the control group. Acetaminophen also caused kidney damage as evident by statistically significant (p<0.05) increase in levels of creatinine and urea and decreased levels of uric acid and proteins in blood. Histological analysis demonstrated alteration of proximal tubules, atrophy of the glomerule and dilatation of urinary space. Previous administration of plant extract is found to alleviate this acetaminophen-induced damage. PMID:24856382

  7. Protection against radiation-induced DNA damage by amino acids: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Jena, N R; Mishra, P C; Suhai, S

    2009-04-23

    Direct and indirect radiation-induced DNA damage is associated with the formation of radical cations (G(+)) and radical anions (G(-)) of guanine, respectively. Deprotonation of G(+) and dehydrogenation of G(-) generate guanine neutral radical [G(-H)] and guanine anion [G(-H)(-)], respectively. These products are of worrisome concern, as they are involved in reactions that are related to certain lethal diseases. It has been observed that guanyl radicals can be repaired by amino acids having strong reducing properties that are believed to be the residues of DNA-bound proteins such as histones. As a result, repair of G(-H) and G(-H)(-) by the amino acids cysteine and tyrosine has been studied here in detail by density functional theory in both the gas phase and aqueous medium using the polarized continuum and Onsager solvation models of self-consistent reaction field theory. Solvation in aqueous medium using three explicit water molecules was also studied. Four equivalent tautomers of each the above radical and anion that will be formed through proton and hydrogen loss from all of the nitrogen centers of guanine radical cation and guanine radical anion, respectively, were considered in the present study. It was found that in both the gas phase and aqueous medium, normal guanine can be retrieved from its radical-damaged form by a hydrogen-atom-transfer (HT) mechanism. Normal guanine can also be retrieved from its anionic damaged form in both the gas phase and aqueous medium through a two-electron-coupled proton-transfer (TECPT) mechanism or a one-step hydrogen-atom- and electron-transfer (OSHET) mechanism. The present results are discussed in light of the experimental findings. PMID:19334703

  8. Eucalyptus globulus extract protects upon acetaminophen-induced kidney damages in male rat.

    PubMed

    Dhibi, Sabah; Mbarki, Sakhria; Elfeki, Abdelfettah; Hfaiedh, Najla

    2014-05-01

    Plants have historically been used in treating many diseases. Eucalyptus globules, a rich source of bioactive compounds, and have been shown to possess antioxidative properties. The purpose of this study, carried out on male Wistar rats, was to evaluate the beneficial effects of Eucalyptus globulus extract upon acetaminophen-induced damages in kidney. Our study is realized in the Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences of Sfax (Tunisia). 32 Wistar male rats; were divided into 4 batches: a control group (n=8), a group of rats treated with acetaminophen (900 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection during 4 days (n=8), a group receiving Eucalyptus globulus extract (130 mg of dry leaves/kg/day) in drinking water during 42 days after 2 hours of acetaminophen administration (during 4 days) (n=8) and group received only Eucalyptus (n=8) during 42 days. After 6 weeks, animals from each group were rapidly sacrificed by decapitation. Blood serum was obtained by centrifugation. Under our experimental conditions, acetaminophen poisoning resulted in an oxidative stress evidenced by statistically significant losses in the activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide-dismutase (SOD), glutathione-peroxidase (GPX) activities and an increase in lipids peroxidation level in renal tissue of acetaminophen-treated group compared with the control group. Acetaminophen also caused kidney damage as evident by statistically significant (p<0.05) increase in levels of creatinine and urea and decreased levels of uric acid and proteins in blood. Histological analysis demonstrated alteration of proximal tubules, atrophy of the glomerule and dilatation of urinary space. Previous administration of plant extract is found to alleviate this acetaminophen-induced damage. PMID:24856382

  9. Chrysanthemum zawadskii extract protects osteoblastic cells from highly reducing sugar-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Suh, Kwang Sik; Rhee, Sang Youl; Jung, Woon Won; Kim, Nam Jae; Jang, Young Pyo; Kim, Hye Jin; Kim, Min Kyoung; Choi, Young Kil; Kim, Young Seol

    2013-07-01

    In this study, Chrysanthemum zawadskii extract (CZE) was investigated to determine its effects on 2-deoxy-D-ribose (dRib)-induced oxidative damage and cellular dysfunction in the MC3T3-E1 mouse osteoblastic cell line. Osteoblastic cells were treated with the highly reducing sugar, dRib, in the presence or absence of CZE. Cell viability, apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were subsequently examined. It was observed that dRib reduced cell survival, while it markedly increased the intracellular levels of ROS and apoptosis. However, pre-treatment of the cells with CZE attenuated all the dRib-induced effects. The antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), also prevented dRib-induced oxidative cell damage. In addition, treatment with CZE resulted in a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and collagen content, as well as in the expression of genes associated with osteoblast differentiation [ALP, collagen, osteopontin (OPN), osteoprotegerin (OPG), bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteocalcin (OC) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)2, BMP4 and BMP7]. In mechanistic studies of the antioxidative potential of CZE, we found that CZE reversed the dRib-induced decrease in the expression of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase B (AKT)1 and AKT2 genes, which are master regulators of survival-related signaling pathways. CZE also upregulated the gene expression of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD)2, SOD3 and glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4), which was inhibited by dRib. Taken together, these results suggest that CZE attenuates dRib-induced cell damage in osteoblastic cells and may be useful for the treatment of diabetes-associated bone disease. PMID:23652775

  10. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events during mid-loop operations

    SciTech Connect

    Budnitz, R.J.; Davis, P.R.; Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H.

    1994-08-01

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1) and the other at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf). Both the Brookhaven and Sandia projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults--so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling shutdown conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Surry Unit 1. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human error rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Surry have been adopted here, so that the results of the two studies can be as comparable as possible. Both the Brookhaven study and this study examine only two shutdown plant operating states (POSs) during refueling outages at Surry, called POS 6 and POS 10, which represent mid-loop operation before and after refueling, respectively. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POSs 6 and 10. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency of earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 6 and POS 10 is found to be low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}6}/year.

  11. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage

    SciTech Connect

    Budnitz, R.J.; Davis, P.R.; Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H.

    1994-08-01

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf), and the other at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1). Both the Sandia and Brookhaven projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults---so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling outage conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Grand Gulf. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human effort rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Grand Gulf have been adopted here, so that the results of the study can be as comparable as possible. Both the Sandia study and this study examine only one shutdown plant operating state (POS) at Grand Gulf, namely POS 5 representing cold shutdown during a refueling outage. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POS 5. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency for earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 5 is found to be quite low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}7}/year.

  12. The protective effects of the traditional Chinese herbs against renal damage induced by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Binwu; He, Dalin; Zhao, Jun; Chen, Xingfa; Nan, Xunyi

    2011-04-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL)-induced renal damage can occur as a result of multiple mechanisms. We have reported previously that Astragalus membranaceus, Salvia miltiorrhiza, a decoction of six drugs containing rhizoma Rehmanniae preparata and supplements of a few traditional Chinese medicinal herbs for invigorating the kidney and excreting calculus, have a protective effect on renal injury induced by high-energy shock waves (HESW) in rabbits. In this clinical study we further investigate the protective effects of these traditional Chinese herbs against renal damage induced by ESWL. Sixty consenting patients with renal calculus who underwent ESWL treatment were included and randomly assigned to the medication group or control group. Post-ESWL plasma nitric oxide (NO), endothelin-1 (ET-1), malondialdehyde (MDA), and serum tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) increased significantly in the controls (P < 0.05), while in the medication group, slightly but not significantly elevated levels of plasma ET-1, NO, and serum TNF-α were found. The difference between the groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased gradually in the controls, reaching a trough 72 h after ESWL (P < 0.05), while in the treated group it was unchanged, and remained at a level higher versus the controls (P < 0.05). Plasma NO peaked twice by 72 h and at 1 week in the controls (P < 0.05). Urinary enzymes and β(2)-microglobulin increased significantly and peaked by 24 h and immediately after ESWL (P < 0.05). These values were greater in the controls, and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05). This study demonstrates that the preparations of traditional Chinese medicines for invigorating the kidney and excreting calculus can reduce renal tubular damage induced by ESWL, and can shorten the recovery time of renal tubules in human subjects. PMID:20607528

  13. Protective effects of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents against manganese-induced oxidative damage and neuronal injury

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovic, Dejan; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Yu, Yingchun; Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana; Aschner, Michael

    2011-11-15

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels leads to neurotoxicity, referred to as manganism, which resembles Parkinson's disease (PD). Manganism is caused by neuronal injury in both cortical and subcortical regions, particularly in the basal ganglia. The basis for the selective neurotoxicity of Mn is not yet fully understood. However, several studies suggest that oxidative damage and inflammatory processes play prominent roles in the degeneration of dopamine-containing neurons. In the present study, we assessed the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Results from our in vitro study showed a significant (p < 0.01) increase in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs), as well as the depletion of ATP in primary rat cortical neurons following exposure to Mn (500 {mu}M) for 2 h. These effects were protected when neurons were pretreated for 30 min with 100 of an antioxidant, the hydrophilic vitamin E analog, trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), or an anti-inflammatory agent, indomethacin. Results from our in vivo study confirmed a significant increase in F{sub 2}-IsoPs levels in conjunction with the progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of the striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of mice exposed to Mn (100 mg/kg, s.c.) 24 h. Additionally, pretreatment with vitamin E (100 mg/kg, i.p.) or ibuprofen (140 {mu}g/ml in the drinking water for two weeks) attenuated the Mn-induced increase in cerebral F{sub 2}-IsoPs? and protected the MSNs from dendritic atrophy and dendritic spine loss. Our findings suggest that the mediation of oxidative stress/mitochondrial dysfunction and the control of alterations in biomarkers of oxidative injury, neuroinflammation and synaptodendritic degeneration may provide an effective, multi-pronged therapeutic strategy for protecting dysfunctional dopaminergic

  14. Image Processing and control of a programmable spatial light modulator for optic damage protection

    SciTech Connect

    Awwal, A; Leach, R; Brunton, G; Tse, E; Matone, J; Heebner, J

    2010-12-06

    The heart of the National Ignition Facility is a megajoule-class laser system consisting of 192 beams used to drive inertial confinement fusion reactions. A recently installed system of programmable, liquid-crystal-based spatial light modulators adds the capability of arbitrarily shaping the spatial beam profiles in order to enhance operational flexibility. Its primary intended use is for introducing 'blocker' obscurations shadowing isolated flaws on downstream optical elements that would otherwise be damaged by high fluence laser illumination. Because an improperly shaped blocker pattern can lead to equipment damage, both the position and shape of the obscurations must be carefully verified prior to high-fluence operations. An automatic alignment algorithm is used to perform detection and estimation of the imposed blocker centroid positions compared to their intended locations. Furthermore, in order to minimize the spatially-varying nonlinear response of the device, a calibration of the local magnification is performed at multiple sub-image locations. In this paper, we describe the control and associated image processing of this device that helps to enhance the safety and longevity of the overall system.

  15. Environmental Enrichment Protects the Retina from Early Diabetic Damage in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dorfman, Damián; Aranda, Marcos L.; González Fleitas, María Florencia; Chianelli, Mónica S.; Fernandez, Diego C.; Sande, Pablo H.; Rosenstein, Ruth E.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of reduced visual acuity and acquired blindness. Available treatments are not completely effective. We analyzed the effect of environmental enrichment on retinal damage induced by experimental diabetes in adult Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Three days after vehicle or streptozotocin injection, animals were housed in enriched environment or remained in a standard environment. Retinal function (electroretinogram, and oscillatory potentials), retinal morphology, blood-retinal barrier integrity, synaptophysin, astrocyte and Müller cell glial fibrillary acidic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor, tumor necrosis factor-α, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, as well as lipid peroxidation were assessed in retina from diabetic animals housed in standard or enriched environment. Environmental enrichment preserved scotopic electroretinogram a-wave, b-wave and oscillatory potential amplitude, avoided albumin-Evan's blue leakage, prevented the decrease in retinal synaptophysin and astrocyte glial fibrillary acidic protein levels, the increase in Müller cell glial fibrillary acidic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-α levels, as well as oxidative stress induced by diabetes. In addition, enriched environment prevented the decrease in retinal brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels induced by experimental diabetes. When environmental enrichment started 7 weeks after diabetes onset, retinal function was significantly preserved. These results indicate that enriched environment could attenuate the early diabetic damage in the retina from adult rats. PMID:25004165

  16. Accumulation of Flavonols over Hydroxycinnamic Acids Favors Oxidative Damage Protection under Abiotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Vicente; Mestre, Teresa C; Rubio, Francisco; Girones-Vilaplana, Amadeo; Moreno, Diego A; Mittler, Ron; Rivero, Rosa M

    2016-01-01

    Efficient detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to play a key role in enhancing the tolerance of plants to abiotic stresses. Although multiple pathways, enzymes, and antioxidants are present in plants, their exact roles during different stress responses remain unclear. Here, we report on the characterization of the different antioxidant mechanisms of tomato plants subjected to heat stress, salinity stress, or a combination of both stresses. All the treatments applied induced an increase of oxidative stress, with the salinity treatment being the most aggressive, resulting in plants with the lowest biomass, and the highest levels of H2O2 accumulation, lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation. However, the results obtained from the transcript expression study and enzymatic activities related to the ascorbate-glutathione pathway did not fully explain the differences in the oxidative damage observed between salinity and the combination of salinity and heat. An exhaustive metabolomics study revealed the differential accumulation of phenolic compounds depending on the type of abiotic stress applied. An analysis at gene and enzyme levels of the phenylpropanoid metabolism concluded that under conditions where flavonols accumulated to a greater degree as compared to hydroxycinnamic acids, the oxidative damage was lower, highlighting the importance of flavonols as powerful antioxidants, and their role in abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:27379130

  17. Studies on cerebral protection of digoxin against hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kaiwei; Tan, Danfeng; He, Miao; Guo, Dandan; Huang, Juan; Wang, Xia; Liu, Chentao; Zheng, Xiangrong

    2016-08-17

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) is a major cause of neonatal acute deaths and chronic nervous system damage. Our present study was designed to investigate the possible neuroprotective effect of digoxin-induced pharmacological preconditioning after hypoxia-ischemia and underlying mechanisms. Neonatal rats were assigned randomly to control, HIBD, or HIBD+digoxin groups. Pharmacological preconditioning was induced by administration of digoxin 72 h before inducing HIBD by carotid occlusion+hypoxia. Behavioral assays, and neuropathological and apoptotic assessments were performed to examine the effects; the expression of Na/K ATPase was also assessed. Rats in the HIBD group showed deficiencies on the T-maze, radial water maze, and postural reflex tests, whereas the HIBD+digoxin group showed significant improvements on all behavioral tests. The rats treated with digoxin showed recovery of pathological conditions, increased number of neural cells and proliferative cells, and decreased number of apoptotic cells. Meanwhile, an increased expression level of Na/K ATPase was observed after digoxin preconditioning treatment. The preconditioning treatment of digoxin contributed toward an improved functional recovery and exerted a marked neuroprotective effect including promotion of cell proliferation and reduction of apoptosis after HIBD, and the neuroprotective action was likely associated with increased expression of Na/K ATPase. PMID:27362436

  18. Ozone oxidative preconditioning: a protection against cellular damage by free radicals.

    PubMed

    León, O S; Menéndez, S; Merino, N; Castillo, R; Sam, S; Pérez, L; Cruz, E; Bocci, V

    1998-01-01

    There is some anecdotal evidence that oxygen-ozone therapy may be beneficial in some human diseases. However so far only a few biochemical and pharmacodynamic mechanisms have been elucidated. On the basis of preliminary data we postulated that controlled ozone administration would promote an oxidative preconditioning preventing the hepatocellular damage mediated by free radicals. Six groups of rats were classified as follows: (1) negative control, using intraperitoneal sunflower oil; (2) positive control using carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) as an oxidative challenge; (3) oxygen-ozone, pretreatment via rectal insufflation (15 sessions) and after it, CCl4; (4) oxygen, as group 3 but using oxygen only; (5) control oxygen-ozone, as group 3, but without CCl4; group (6) control oxygen, as group 5, but using oxygen only. We have evaluated critical biochemical parameters such as levels of transaminase, cholinesterase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, phospholipase A, calcium dependent ATPase, reduced glutathione, glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase and lipid peroxidation. Interestingly, in spite of CCl4 administration, group 3 did not differ from group 1, while groups 2 and 4 showed significant differences from groups 1 and 3 and displayed hepatic damage. To our knowledge these are the first experimental results showing that repeated administration of ozone in atoxic doses is able to induce an adaptation to oxidative stress thus enabling the animals to maintain hepatocellular integrity after CCl4 poisoning. PMID:9792340

  19. Oxidative DNA damage protective activity, antioxidant and anti-quorum sensing potentials of Moringa oleifera.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brahma N; Singh, B R; Singh, R L; Prakash, D; Dhakarey, R; Upadhyay, G; Singh, H B

    2009-06-01

    The aqueous extract of leaf (LE), fruit (FE) and seed (SE) of Moringa oleifera was assessed to examine the ability to inhibit the oxidative DNA damage, antioxidant and anti-quorum sensing (QS) potentials. It was found that these extracts could significantly inhibit the OH-dependent damage of pUC18 plasmid DNA and also inhibit synergistically with trolox, with an activity sequence of LE > FE > SE. HPLC and MS/MS analysis was carried out, which showed the presence of gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, ellagic acid, ferulic acid, kaempferol, quercetin and vanillin. The LE was with comparatively higher total phenolics content (105.04 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g), total flavonoids content (31.28 mg quercetin equivalents (QE)/g), and ascorbic acid content (106.95 mg/100 g) and showed better antioxidant activity (85.77%), anti-radical power (74.3), reducing power (1.1 ascorbic acid equivalents (ASE)/ml), inhibition of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, OH-induced deoxyribose degradation, and scavenging power of superoxide anion and nitric oxide radicals than did the FE, SE and standard alpha-tocopherol. Eventually, LE and FE were found to inhibit violacein production, a QS-regulated behavior in Chromobacterium violaceum 12472. PMID:19425184

  20. Photo-damage, photo-protection and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Marquioni-Ramella, Melisa D; Suburo, Angela M

    2015-09-26

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative retinal disease that causes blindness in people 60-65 years and older, with the highest prevalence appearing in people 90 years-old or more. Epidemiological estimates indicate that the number of cases is increasing, and will almost double in the next 20 years. Preventive measures require precise etiological knowledge. This is quite difficult, since AMD is a multifactorial condition with intricate relationships between causes and risk factors. In this review, we describe the impact of light on the structure and physiology of the retina and the pigment epithelium, taking into account the continuous exposure to natural and artificial light sources along the life of an individual. A large body of experimental evidence demonstrates the toxic effects of some lighting conditions on the retina and the pigment epithelium, and consensus exists about the importance of photo-oxidation phenomena in the causality chain between light and retinal damage. Here, we analyzed the transmission of light to the retina, and compared the aging human macula in healthy and diseased retinas, as shown by histology and non-invasive imaging systems. Finally, we have compared the putative retinal photo-sensitive molecular structures that might be involved in the genesis of AMD. The relationship between these compounds and retinal damage supports the hypothesis of light as an important initiating cause of AMD. PMID:26198091

  1. Accumulation of Flavonols over Hydroxycinnamic Acids Favors Oxidative Damage Protection under Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Vicente; Mestre, Teresa C.; Rubio, Francisco; Girones-Vilaplana, Amadeo; Moreno, Diego A.; Mittler, Ron; Rivero, Rosa M.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to play a key role in enhancing the tolerance of plants to abiotic stresses. Although multiple pathways, enzymes, and antioxidants are present in plants, their exact roles during different stress responses remain unclear. Here, we report on the characterization of the different antioxidant mechanisms of tomato plants subjected to heat stress, salinity stress, or a combination of both stresses. All the treatments applied induced an increase of oxidative stress, with the salinity treatment being the most aggressive, resulting in plants with the lowest biomass, and the highest levels of H2O2 accumulation, lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation. However, the results obtained from the transcript expression study and enzymatic activities related to the ascorbate-glutathione pathway did not fully explain the differences in the oxidative damage observed between salinity and the combination of salinity and heat. An exhaustive metabolomics study revealed the differential accumulation of phenolic compounds depending on the type of abiotic stress applied. An analysis at gene and enzyme levels of the phenylpropanoid metabolism concluded that under conditions where flavonols accumulated to a greater degree as compared to hydroxycinnamic acids, the oxidative damage was lower, highlighting the importance of flavonols as powerful antioxidants, and their role in abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:27379130

  2. Chronic Fluoride Toxicity and Myocardial Damage: Antioxidant Offered Protection in Second Generation Rats

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Mahaboob P.; Sujitha, N. S.

    2011-01-01

    This experiment was designed to investigate the extent of peroxidative changes and histological alterations in the myocardium of rats exposed to high fluoride for two generations, in addition to ameliorative role of selenium and vitamin E on the above indices. Adult albino Wistar rats were given fluoride through drinking water (200 ppm F) and maintained subsequently for two generations, while they were exposed to fluoride throughout the experiment. Fluoride treatment significantly increased the lipid peroxidation and decreased the activity of antioxidant enzymes, viz., catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione level in auricle and ventricle regions of the heart. Decreased feed and water consumption, organ somatic index and marginal drop in body growth rate were observed. Decreased antioxidant enzymes and increased malondialdehyde levels might be related to oxidative damage that occurs variably in the myocardium of rats. Biochemical changes were supported by the histological observations, which also revealed that chronic exposure to fluoride causes damage to the myocardium. Results of this study can be taken as an index of cardio-toxicity in rats exposed to water fluoridation. Further, oral supplementation of selenium and vitamin E not only inhibited oxidative stress but also enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes. Administration of antioxidants during fluoride exposure significantly overcame cardiac fluoride toxicity and therefore may be a therapeutic strategy for fluorotic victims. PMID:21976813

  3. Aloe vera gel protects liver from oxidative stress-induced damage in experimental rat model.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Taslima; Uddin, Borhan; Hossain, Shahdat; Sikder, Abdul Mannan; Ahmed, Sohel

    2013-01-01

    Aloe vera is a semi-tropical plant of Liliaceae family which has a wide range of applications in traditional medicine. In the present study, we sought to investigate the heptaoprotective potential of Aloe vera gel as a diet supplement. To achieve this goal, we have designed in vitro and in vivo experimental models of chemical-induced liver damage using male Sprague-Dawley rat. In the in vitro model, its effect was evaluated on Fenton's reaction-induced liver lipid peroxidation. Co-incubation with gel significantly reduced the generation of liver lipid peroxide (LPO). Next, to see the similar effect in vivo, gel was orally administered to rats once daily for 21 successive days. Following 1 hour of the last administration of gel, rats were treated with intra-peritoneal injection of CCl4. Dietary gel showed significant hepatoprotection against CCl4-induced damage as evident by restoration of liver LPO, serum transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, and total bilirubin towards near normal. The beneficial effects were pronounced with the doses used (400 and 800 mg/kg body weight). Besides, we did not observe any significant drop in serum albumin, globulin as well as total protein levels of gel-administered rats. Histopathology of the liver tissue further supported the biochemical findings confirming the hepatoprotective potential of dietary gel. PMID:23652643

  4. Protective role of intracellular glutathione against ethanol-induced damage in cultured rat gastric mucosal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mutoh, H.; Hiraishi, H.; Ota, S.; Yoshida, H.; Ivey, K.J.; Terano, A.; Sugimoto, T. )

    1990-06-01

    This study investigated whether intracellular glutathione is cytoprotective against ethanol-induced injury to cultured rat gastric mucosal cells in vitro. Secondly, it investigated whether reduced glutathione or oxidized glutathione is responsible for this cytoprotection. Cytolysis was quantified by measuring 51Cr release from prelabeled cells. Concentrations of ethanol greater than 12% caused cell damage and increased 51Cr release in a dose-dependent and time-related fashion. When a substrate for glutathione synthesis, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, was provided to cultured cells for 4 h before challenge with ethanol, cytolysis was significantly decreased corresponding with an increase in cellular glutathione content. Pretreatment with diethyl maleate, which depletes reduced glutathione without forming oxidized glutathione, potentiated ethanol-induced cell damage in a dose-dependent manner with the decrease of cellular glutathione content. The administration of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (which is specifically reduced by glutathione peroxidase to generate oxidized glutathione from reduced glutathione) or diamide (which nonenzymatically oxidizes reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione) enhanced ethanol injury. We conclude that in cultured gastric mucosal cells, (a) intracellular glutathione maintains integrity of gastric mucosal cells against ethanol in vitro; and (b) reduced glutathione rather than oxidized glutathione is responsible for this cytoprotection. We postulate that the presence of reduced glutathione is essential to allow glutathione peroxidase to catalyze the ethanol-generated toxic oxygen radical, hydrogen peroxide.

  5. NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase protects against oxidative damage in Escherichia coli K-12 through the action of oxaloacetate.

    PubMed

    Oh, Tae Jeong; Kim, In Gyu; Park, Seon Young; Kim, Kug Chan; Shim, Hye Won

    2002-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species including hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and hydroxyl radical (OH) can be generated by ionizing radiation and has the potential to induce diseases. We provide the evidence that NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase (MDH) is involved in the antioxidant role in preventing H(2)O(2) or γ-radiation-induced damage in Escherichia coli through the action of oxaloacetate. The E. colimdh mutant strain defective in MDH activity was more sensitive to H(2)O(2) or γ-radiation than was the wild type strain, when challenged in the exponential growth phase. The mdh mutant cells pretreated with oxaloacetate (2.5 mM), a product of NAD-dependent MDH activity, prior to H(2)O(2) treatment or γ-irradiation are resistant to H(2)O(2) or γ-radiation-induced damage, so cell survivability is restored to similar levels with the wild type. The SOS induction of umu'-'lacZ fusion gene by H(2)O(2) is significantly repressed by pretreatment of oxaloacetate in a dose-dependent way. These results indicate that oxaloacetate effectively protects E. coli cells against damage caused by oxidative stress. Oxaloacetate strongly prevented the DNA strand breaks by OH in a metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) system that generated H(2)O(2) as a mediator. By contrast, the prevention of DNA damage by oxaloacetate in an γ-irradiation system that directly generates OH from H(2)O in vitro was far less than that in an MCO system. Our results demonstrated that oxaloacetate, metabolite of NAD-dependent MDH action, plays a role as an antioxidant, possibly by scavenging H(2)O(2). PMID:21782581

  6. Gender disparity in LDL-induced cardiovascular damage and the protective role of estrogens against electronegative LDL

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Increased levels of the most electronegative type of LDL, L5, have been observed in the plasma of patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and can induce endothelial dysfunction. Because men have a higher predisposition to developing coronary artery disease than do premenopausal women, we hypothesized that LDL electronegativity is increased in men and promotes endothelial damage. Methods L5 levels were compared between middle-aged men and age-matched, premenopausal women with or without MetS. We further studied the effects of gender-influenced LDL electronegativity on aortic cellular senescence and DNA damage in leptin receptor–deficient (db/db) mice by using senescence-associated–β-galactosidase and γH2AX staining, respectively. We also studied the protective effects of 17β-estradiol and genistein against electronegative LDL–induced senescence in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). Results L5 levels were higher in MetS patients than in healthy subjects (P < 0.001), particularly in men (P = 0.001). LDL isolated from male db/db mice was more electronegative than that from male or female wild-type mice. In addition, LDL from male db/db mice contained abundantly more apolipoprotein CIII and induced more BAEC senescence than did female db/db or wild-type LDL. In the aortas of db/db mice but not wild-type mice, we observed cellular senescence and DNA damage, and the effect was more significant in male than in female db/db mice. Pretreatment with 17β-estradiol or genistein inhibited BAEC senescence induced by male or female db/db LDL and downregulated the expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha protein. Conclusion The gender dichotomy of LDL-induced cardiovascular damage may underlie the increased propensity to coronary artery disease in men. PMID:24666525

  7. Cryopreservation of Escherichia coli K12TG1: protection from the damaging effects of supercooling by freezing.

    PubMed

    Simonin, H; Bergaoui, I M; Perrier-Cornet, J M; Gervais, P

    2015-04-01

    Injuries in living cells caused by water freezing during a freeze-thaw process have been extensively reported. In particular, intracellular water freezing has long been incriminated in cell death caused by a high cooling rate, but this supposition could not always be demonstrated. This work aims to discriminate the role of water freezing, dehydration and cold-induced injuries in cellular damage occuring during cryopreservation. For this purpose, Escherichia coli K12TG1 suspensions were maintained in a supercooled or frozen state at -20°C for times ranging from 10 min to 5 h. The supercooled state was maintained for a long period at -20°C by applying a non-injurious isostatic pressure (P<40 MPa). Next, viability and membrane damage were determined by agar plating and fluorescence staining with propidium iodide and bis-oxonol. It was clear that keeping the cell suspensions in the supercooled state had a detrimental effect on both viability and plasma membrane permeability. Conversely, when cells were subjected to cold stress by freezing, the survival rate remained high throughout the experiment, and the cell membranes suffered little damage. Moreover, cells subjected to 5h of osmotic treatments at -20°C, conditions that mimic cryoconcentration upon freezing, and subsequently diluted and thawed suffered little damage. Dehydration due to cryoconcentration upon freezing protects the cells against the deleterious effects of supercooling, especially in the plasma membranes. The decrease in membrane leakage upon dehydration at low temperatures could be linked to differences in the gel state of the membrane revealed by a higher Laurdan general polarization (GP) value. PMID:25542651

  8. Quercitrin treatment protects endothelial progenitor cells from oxidative damage via inducing autophagy through extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Kangkang; Li, Maoquan; Bai, Jun; Wu, Yongfa; Zhou, Sili; Zhang, Xiaoping; Qu, Lefeng

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a disease resulting from impaired endothelial function, often caused by oxidant injury or inflammation. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a critical role in repairing damaged endothelium and protecting against atherosclerosis. Quercitrin, a plant-derived flavonoid compound, displays antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we showed that quercitrin treatment reduced the apoptosis of EPCs caused by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in a dose-dependent manner. Quercitrin improved tube formation, migration and adhesion of ox-LDL-treated EPCs. To determine the effect of quercitrin in vivo, EPCs treated with or without ox-LDL and quercitrin were locally injected into the ischemic hind limb muscle of nude mice. Those injected with EPCs treated with ox-LDL and quercitrin showed significantly increased local accumulation of EPCs, blood flow recovery and capillary density compared with the control and ox-LDL only groups. Furthermore, we showed that quercitrin enhanced autophagy and upregulated mitogen-activated protein kinase and ERK phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Autophagy inhibitors, chloroquine and 3-methyladenine, abrogated quercitrin-enhanced autophagy caused by ox-LDL as evidenced by decreased numbers of branch points, migratory cells and adherent cells, and increased numbers of apoptotic cells. The ERK inhibitor PD98059 abrogated quercitrin-enhanced autophagy, as identified by decreased autophagosome formation and downregulated ERK phosphorylation. The inhibition of ERK did not affect the expression of Rac1, but enhanced phosphorylation of Akt. Quercitrin treatment also increased the expression of E-cadherin, and PD98059 abrogated the upregulation of E-cadherin induced by quercitrin. Our findings suggested that autophagy is a protective mechanism in EPCs exposed to oxidative damage. Quercitrin can promote autophagy through the activation of ERK and the ERK signaling pathway is therefore

  9. Reciprocal Paracrine Interactions Between Normal Human Epithelial and Mesenchymal Cells Protect Cellular DNA from Radiation-Induced Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazawa, Yuka; Saenko, Vladimir Rogounovitch, Tatiana; Suzuki, Keiji; Mitsutake, Norisato; Matsuse, Michiko; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To explore whether interactions between normal epithelial and mesenchymal cells can modulate the extent of radiation-induced DNA damage in one or both types of cells. Methods and Materials: Human primary thyrocytes (PT), diploid fibroblasts BJ, MRC-5, and WI-38, normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), and endothelial human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUV-EC-C), cultured either individually or in co-cultures or after conditioned medium transfer, were irradiated with 0.25 to 5 Gy of {gamma}-rays and assayed for the extent of DNA damage. Results: The number of {gamma}-H2AX foci in co-cultures of PT and BJ fibroblasts was approximately 25% lower than in individual cultures at 1 Gy in both types of cells. Reciprocal conditioned medium transfer to individual cultures before irradiation resulted in approximately a 35% reduction of the number {gamma}-H2AX foci at 1 Gy in both types of cells, demonstrating the role of paracrine soluble factors. The DNA-protected state of cells was achieved within 15 min after conditioned medium transfer; it was reproducible and reciprocal in several lines of epithelial cells and fibroblasts, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells but not in epithelial and endothelial cells. Unlike normal cells, human epithelial cancer cells failed to establish DNA-protected states in fibroblasts and vice versa. Conclusions: The results imply the existence of a network of reciprocal interactions between normal epithelial and some types of mesenchymal cells mediated by soluble factors that act in a paracrine manner to protect DNA from genotoxic stress.

  10. Polysaccharides purified from Cordyceps cicadae protects PC12 cells against glutamate-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Opeyemi J; Feng, Yan; Olatunji, Oyenike O; Tang, Jian; Wei, Yuan; Ouyang, Zhen; Su, Zhaoliang

    2016-11-20

    Two polysaccharides CPA-1 and CPB-2 were isolated purified from Cordyceps cicadae by hot water extraction, ethanol precipitation and purification using anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Preliminary structural characterization of CPA-1 and CPB-2 were performed. The protective effect of CPA-1 and CPB-2 against glutamate-induced oxidative toxicity in PC12 cells was analyzed. The results indicated that pretreatment of PC12 cells with CPA-1 and CPB-2 significantly increased cell survival, Ca(2+) overload and ROS generation. CPA-1 and CPB-2 also markedly up-regulated the antioxidant status of pretreated PC12 cells. Our results suggested that Cordyceps cicadae polysaccharides can protect PC12 cells against glutamate excitotoxicity and might serve as therapeutic agents for neuronal disorders. PMID:27561486

  11. A Conformational Switch Triggers Nitrogenase Protection from Oxygen Damage by Shethna Protein II (FeSII).

    PubMed

    Schlesier, Julia; Rohde, Michael; Gerhardt, Stefan; Einsle, Oliver

    2016-01-13

    The two-component metalloprotein nitrogenase catalyzes the reductive fixation of atmospheric dinitrogen into bioavailable ammonium in diazotrophic prokaryotes. The process requires an efficient energy metabolism, so that although the metal clusters of nitrogenase rapidly decompose in the presence of dioxygen, many free-living diazotrophs are obligate aerobes. In order to retain the functionality of the nitrogen-fixing enzyme, some of these are able to rapidly "switch-off" nitrogenase, by shifting the enzyme into an inactive but oxygen-tolerant state. Under these conditions the two components of nitrogenase form a stable, ternary complex with a small [2Fe:2S] ferredoxin termed FeSII or the "Shethna protein II". Here we have produced and isolated Azotobacter vinelandii FeS II and have determined its three-dimensional structure to 2.1 Å resolution by X-ray diffraction. In the crystals, the dimeric protein was present in two distinct states that differ in the conformation of an extended loop in close proximity to the iron-sulfur cluster. We show that this rearrangement is redox-dependent and forms the molecular basis for oxygen-dependent conformational protection of nitrogenase. Protection assays highlight that FeSII binds to a preformed complex of MoFe and Fe protein upon activation, primarily through electrostatic interactions. The surface properties and known complexes of nitrogenase component proteins allow us to propose a model of the conformationally protected ternary complex of nitrogenase. PMID:26654855

  12. Co- and Post-Treatment with Lysine Protects Primary Fish Enterocytes against Cu-Induced Oxidative Damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Yin; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the work was primarily to explore the protective activity pathways of lysine against oxidative damage in fish in vivo and in enterocytes in vitro. First, grass carp were fed diets containing six graded levels of lysine (7.1-19.6 g kg-1 diet) for 56 days. Second, the enterocytes were treated with different concentrations of lysine (0-300 mg/L in media) prior to (pre-treatment), along with (co-treatment) or following (post-treatment) with 6 mg/L of Cu for 24 h. The results indicated that lysine improved grass carp growth performance. Meanwhile, lysine ameliorated lipid and protein oxidation by elevating the gene expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathioneperoxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and reductase (GR)), and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) mRNA levels in fish intestine. The in vitro studies showed that co- and post-treatment with lysine conferred significant protection against Cu-induced oxidative damage in fish primary enterocytes as measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) OD values, along with alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase activities, and the depletion of protein carbonyl (PC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine contents. Moreover, lysine co-treatment decreased the activities and mRNA level of cellular SOD, GPx, GST and GR compared with the Cu-only exposed group. Gene expression of the signalling molecule Nrf2 showed the same pattern as that of SOD activity, whereas Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1b (Keap1b) followed the opposite trend, indicating that co-treatment with lysine induced antioxidant enzymes that protected against oxidative stress through Nrf2 pathway. In addition, post-treatment with lysine increased proteasomal activity and blocked the Cu-stimulated increase in mRNA levels of GST and associated catalase (CAT) and GST activities (P<0.01 and P<0.001). GR activity and gene

  13. Co- and Post-Treatment with Lysine Protects Primary Fish Enterocytes against Cu-Induced Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-Yin; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Jiang, Jun; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the work was primarily to explore the protective activity pathways of lysine against oxidative damage in fish in vivo and in enterocytes in vitro. First, grass carp were fed diets containing six graded levels of lysine (7.1–19.6 g kg-1 diet) for 56 days. Second, the enterocytes were treated with different concentrations of lysine (0–300 mg/L in media) prior to (pre-treatment), along with (co-treatment) or following (post-treatment) with 6 mg/L of Cu for 24 h. The results indicated that lysine improved grass carp growth performance. Meanwhile, lysine ameliorated lipid and protein oxidation by elevating the gene expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathioneperoxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and reductase (GR)), and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) mRNA levels in fish intestine. The in vitro studies showed that co- and post-treatment with lysine conferred significant protection against Cu-induced oxidative damage in fish primary enterocytes as measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) OD values, along with alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase activities, and the depletion of protein carbonyl (PC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine contents. Moreover, lysine co-treatment decreased the activities and mRNA level of cellular SOD, GPx, GST and GR compared with the Cu-only exposed group. Gene expression of the signalling molecule Nrf2 showed the same pattern as that of SOD activity, whereas Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1b (Keap1b) followed the opposite trend, indicating that co-treatment with lysine induced antioxidant enzymes that protected against oxidative stress through Nrf2 pathway. In addition, post-treatment with lysine increased proteasomal activity and blocked the Cu-stimulated increase in mRNA levels of GST and associated catalase (CAT) and GST activities (P<0.01 and P<0.001). GR activity and gene

  14. (-)-SCR1693 Protects against Memory Impairment and Hippocampal Damage in a Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyin; Tian, Jingwei; Sun, Songmei; Dong, Qiuju; Zhang, Fangxi; Zhang, Xiumei

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) is one of the most common causes of vascular dementia (VaD) and is recognised as an etiological factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). CCH can induce severe cognitive deficits, as assessed by the water maze task, along with neuronal loss in the hippocampus. However, there are currently no effective, approved pharmacological treatments available for VaD. In the present study, we created a rat model of CCH using bilateral common carotid artery occlusion and found that (-)-SCR1693, a novel compound, prevented rats from developing memory deficits and neuronal damage in the hippocampus by rectifying cholinergic dysfunction and decreasing the accumulation of the phospho-tau protein. These results strongly suggest that (-)-SCR1693 has therapeutic potential for the treatment of CCH-induced VaD. PMID:27349344

  15. Focal brain damage protects against post-traumatic stress disorder in combat veterans.

    PubMed

    Koenigs, Michael; Huey, Edward D; Raymont, Vanessa; Cheon, Bobby; Solomon, Jeffrey; Wassermann, Eric M; Grafman, Jordan

    2008-02-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an often debilitating mental illness that is characterized by recurrent distressing memories of traumatic events. PTSD is associated with hypoactivity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), hyperactivity in the amygdala and reduced volume in the hippocampus, but it is unknown whether these neuroimaging findings reflect the underlying cause or a secondary effect of the disorder. To investigate the causal contribution of specific brain areas to PTSD symptoms, we studied a unique sample of Vietnam War veterans who suffered brain injury and emotionally traumatic events. We found a substantially reduced occurrence of PTSD among those individuals with damage to one of two regions of the brain: the vmPFC and an anterior temporal area that included the amygdala. These results suggest that the vmPFC and amygdala are critically involved in the pathogenesis of PTSD. PMID:18157125

  16. (-)-SCR1693 Protects against Memory Impairment and Hippocampal Damage in a Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoyin; Tian, Jingwei; Sun, Songmei; Dong, Qiuju; Zhang, Fangxi; Zhang, Xiumei

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) is one of the most common causes of vascular dementia (VaD) and is recognised as an etiological factor in the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). CCH can induce severe cognitive deficits, as assessed by the water maze task, along with neuronal loss in the hippocampus. However, there are currently no effective, approved pharmacological treatments available for VaD. In the present study, we created a rat model of CCH using bilateral common carotid artery occlusion and found that (-)-SCR1693, a novel compound, prevented rats from developing memory deficits and neuronal damage in the hippocampus by rectifying cholinergic dysfunction and decreasing the accumulation of the phospho-tau protein. These results strongly suggest that (-)-SCR1693 has therapeutic potential for the treatment of CCH-induced VaD. PMID:27349344

  17. TLR9 is important for protection against intestinal damage and for intestinal repair.

    PubMed

    Rose, William Alfred; Sakamoto, Kaori; Leifer, Cynthia Anne

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are innate receptors critical for host defense, and play a role in normal biological processes. For example, host DNA, a TLR9 ligand, stimulates epithelial repair following skin wounding. TLR signaling also plays a crucial role in regulating intestinal homeostasis. We therefore asked whether TLR9 is important for intestinal wound repair using a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced intestinal damage and repair model. We showed that TLR9-deficient mice are more susceptible to DSS, and exhibited delayed wound repair at both the clinical and histologic levels. TLR9-deficient mice showed reduced gene expression of hairy enhancer of split 1, an intestinal progenitor cell differentiation factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor, a growth factor important for epithelial cell restitution. Therefore, we conclude that TLR stimulation may play a normal role in regulating intestinal homeostasis and could potentially be a novel therapeutic target to enhance intestinal wound repair in inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:22893852

  18. GM1 monosialoganglioside pretreatment protects against soman-induced seizure-related brain damage.

    PubMed

    Ballough, G P; Cann, F J; Smith, C D; Forster, J S; Kling, C E; Filbert, M G

    1998-05-01

    The effects of GM1 monosialoganglioside pretreatment on brain damage resulting from soman-induced seizure activity were examined in this study. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused with GM1 via an osmotic minipump connected through a permanent cannula implanted intracerebroventricularly and challenged with soman (83 micrograms/kg, i.e., 1.25 x LD50) 4 d after initiation of GM1 infusion. Electrocorticographic recordings were monitored via indwelling cortical electrodes. Twenty-seven hours after soman administration, anesthetized rats were euthanized via transcardial perfusion with buffered paraformaldehyde. Brains were processed for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), cresyl violet (CV), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) immunohistochemistry. All soman-challenged rats not infused with GM1 (n = 14) developed status epilepticus (SE). PMID:9778643

  19. Photomultiplier circuit including means for rapidly reducing the sensitivity thereof. [and protection from radiation damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclenahan, J. O. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A simple, reliable and inexpensive control circuit is described for rapidly reducing the bias voltage across one or more of the dynode stages of a photomultiplier, to substantially decrease its sensitivity to incoming light at those times where excess light intensity might damage the tube. The control circuit comprises a switching device, such as a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR), coupled between a pair of the electrodes in the tube, preferably the cathode and first dynode, or the first and second dynodes, the switching device operating in response to a trigger pulse applied to its gate to short circuit the two electrodes. To insure the desired reduction in sensitivity, two switching stages, the devices be employed between two of the electrode stages, the devices being operated simultaneously to short circuit both stages.

  20. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Protects Mouse Cortical Neurons From Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia-Mediated Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Xiaoyang; Chi, Liying; Ke, Yan; Luo, Chun; Qian, Steven; Gozal, David; Liu, Rugao

    2007-01-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) syndrome has been recognized as a highly prevalent public health problem and is associated with major neurobehavioral morbidity. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a major pathological component of OSA, increases oxidative damage to the brain cortex and decreases neurocognitive function in rodent models resembling human OSA. We employed in vitro and in vivo approaches to identify the specific phases and subcellular compartments in which enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated during CIH. In addition, we utilized the cell culture and animal models to analyze the consequences of enhanced production of ROS on cortical neuronal cell damage and neurocognitive dysfunction. In a primary cortical neuron culture system, we demonstrated that the transition phase from hypoxia to normoxia (NOX) during CIH generates more ROS than the transition phase from NOX to hypoxia or hypoxia alone, all of which generate more ROS than NOX. Using selective inhibitors of the major pathways underlying ROS generation in the cell membrane, cytosol, and mitochondria, we showed that the mitochondria are the predominant source of enhanced ROS generation during CIH in mouse cortical neuronal cells. Furthermore, in both cell culture and transgenic mice, we demonstrated that overexpression of MnSOD decreased CIH-mediated cortical neuronal apoptosis, and reduced spatial learning deficits measured with the Morris water maze assay. Together, the data from the in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that CIH-mediated mitochondrial oxidative stress may play a major role in the neuronal cell loss and neurocognitive dysfunction in OSA. Thus, therapeutic strategies aiming at reducing ROS generation from mitochondria may improve the neurobehavioral morbidity in OSA. PMID:17719231

  1. Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibition Protects Against Myocardial Damage in Experimental Acute Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Carnieto, Alberto; Dourado, Paulo Magno Martins; da Luz, Protásio Lemos; Chagas, Antonio Carlos Palandri

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acute myocardial infarction is associated with tissue inflammation. Early coronary reperfusion clearly improves the outcome but may help propagate the inflammatory response and enhance tissue damage. Cyclooxygenase-2 is an enzyme that catalyzes the initial step in the formation of inflammatory prostaglandins from arachidonic acid. Cyclooxygenase-2 levels are increased when ischemic cardiac events occur. The overall function of COX-2 in the inflammatory process generated by myocardial ischemic damage has not yet been elucidated. GOAL The objective of this study was to determine whether a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (rofecoxib) could alter the evolution of acute myocardial infarction after reperfusion. METHODS AND RESULTS This study was performed with 48 mongrel dogs divided into two groups: controls and those treated with the drug. All animals were prepared for left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion. The dogs then underwent 180 minutes of coronary occlusion, followed by 30 minutes of reperfusion. Blood samples were collected from the venous sinus immediately before coronary occlusion and after 30 minutes of reperfusion for measurements of CPK-MB, CPK-MBm and troponin I. During the experiment we observed the mean blood pressure, heart rate and coronary flow. The coronary flow and heart rate did not change, but in the control group, there was blood pressure instability, in addition to maximal levels of CPK-MB post-infarction. The same results were observed for CPK-MBm and troponin I. CONCLUSION In a canine model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion, selective inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 with rofecoxib was not associated with early detrimental effects on the hemodynamic profile or the gross extent of infarction; in fact, it may be beneficial by limiting cell necrosis. PMID:19330252

  2. Protective effects of citrus and rosemary extracts on UV-induced damage in skin cell model and human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sánchez, A; Barrajón-Catalán, E; Caturla, N; Castillo, J; Benavente-García, O; Alcaraz, M; Micol, V

    2014-07-01

    Ultraviolet radiation absorbed by the epidermis is the major cause of various cutaneous disorders, including photoaging and skin cancers. Although topical sunscreens may offer proper skin protection, dietary plant compounds may significantly contribute to lifelong protection of skin health, especially when unconsciously sun UV exposed. A combination of rosemary and citrus bioflavonoids extracts was used to inhibit UV harmful effects on human HaCaT keratinocytes and in human volunteers after oral intake. Survival of HaCaT cells after UVB radiation was higher in treatments using the combination of extracts than in those performed with individual extracts, indicating potential synergic effects. The combination of extracts also decreased UVB-induced intracellular radical oxygen species (ROS) and prevented DNA damage in HaCaT cells by comet assay and decreased chromosomal aberrations in X-irradiated human lymphocytes. The oral daily consumption of 250 mg of the combination by human volunteers revealed a significant minimal erythema dose (MED) increase after eight weeks (34%, p<0.05). Stronger protection was achieved after 12 weeks (56%, p<0.01). The combination of citrus flavonoids and rosemary polyphenols and diterpenes may be considered as an ingredient for oral photoprotection. Their mechanism of action may deserve further attention. PMID:24815058

  3. Protective Effects of Hong Shan Capsule against Lethal Total-Body Irradiation-Induced Damage in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzhong; Xu, Jing; Xu, Weiheng; Qi, Yang; Lu, Yiming; Qiu, Lei; Hu, Zhenlin; Chu, Zhiyong; Chai, Yifeng; Zhang, Junping

    2015-01-01

    Hong Shan Capsule (HSC), a crude drug of 11 medicinal herbs, was used in clinical practice for the treatment of radiation injuries in China. In this study, we investigated its protection in rats against acute lethal total-body irradiation (TBI). Pre-administration of HSC reduced the radiation sickness characteristics, while increasing the 30-day survival of the irradiated rats. Administration of HSC also reduced the radiation sickness characteristics and increased the 30-day survival of mice after exposure to lethal TBI. Ultrastructural observation illustrated that the pretreatment of rats with HSC significantly attenuated the TBI-induced morphological changes in the different organs of irradiated rats. Gene expression profiles revealed the dramatic effect of HSC on alterations of gene expression caused by lethal TBI. Pretreatment with HSC prevented differential expression of 66% (1398 genes) of 2126 genes differentially expressed in response to TBI. Pathway enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly involved in a total of 32 pathways, such as pathways in cancer and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Our analysis indicated that the pretreatment of rats with HSC modulated these pathways induced by lethal TBI, such as multiple MAPK pathways, suggesting that pretreatment with HSC might provide protective effects on lethal TBI mainly or partially through the modulation of these pathways. Our data suggest that HSC has the potential to be used as an effective therapeutic or radio-protective agent to minimize irradiation damage. PMID:26274957

  4. Protection of Clitoria ternatea flower petal extract against free radical-induced hemolysis and oxidative damage in canine erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Phrueksanan, Wathuwan; Yibchok-anun, Sirinthorn; Adisakwattana, Sirichai

    2014-10-01

    The present study assessed the antioxidant activity and protective ability of Clitoria ternatea flower petal extract (CTE) against in vitro 2,2'-azobis-2-methyl-propanimidamide dihydrochloride (AAPH)-induced hemolysis and oxidative damage of canine erythrocytes. From the phytochemical analysis, CTE contained phenolic compounds, flavonoids, and anthocyanins. In addition, CTE showed antioxidant activity as measured by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) method and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay. CTE (400 µg/ml) remarkably protected erythrocytes against AAPH-induced hemolysis at 4 h of incubation. Moreover, CTE (400 µg/ml) reduced membrane lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl group formation and prevented the reduction of glutathione concentration in AAPH-induced oxidation of erythrocytes. The AAPH-induced morphological alteration of erythrocytes from a smooth discoid to an echinocytic form was effectively protected by CTE. The present results contribute important insights that CTE may have the potential to act as a natural antioxidant to prevent free radical-induced hemolysis, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes. PMID:25241390

  5. Protective Effects of Hong Shan Capsule against Lethal Total-Body Irradiation-Induced Damage in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianzhong; Xu, Jing; Xu, Weiheng; Qi, Yang; Lu, Yiming; Qiu, Lei; Hu, Zhenlin; Chu, Zhiyong; Chai, Yifeng; Zhang, Junping

    2015-01-01

    Hong Shan Capsule (HSC), a crude drug of 11 medicinal herbs, was used in clinical practice for the treatment of radiation injuries in China. In this study, we investigated its protection in rats against acute lethal total-body irradiation (TBI). Pre-administration of HSC reduced the radiation sickness characteristics, while increasing the 30-day survival of the irradiated rats. Administration of HSC also reduced the radiation sickness characteristics and increased the 30-day survival of mice after exposure to lethal TBI. Ultrastructural observation illustrated that the pretreatment of rats with HSC significantly attenuated the TBI-induced morphological changes in the different organs of irradiated rats. Gene expression profiles revealed the dramatic effect of HSC on alterations of gene expression caused by lethal TBI. Pretreatment with HSC prevented differential expression of 66% (1398 genes) of 2126 genes differentially expressed in response to TBI. Pathway enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly involved in a total of 32 pathways, such as pathways in cancer and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Our analysis indicated that the pretreatment of rats with HSC modulated these pathways induced by lethal TBI, such as multiple MAPK pathways, suggesting that pretreatment with HSC might provide protective effects on lethal TBI mainly or partially through the modulation of these pathways. Our data suggest that HSC has the potential to be used as an effective therapeutic or radio-protective agent to minimize irradiation damage. PMID:26274957

  6. Protection by zinc against UVA- and UVB-induced cellular and genomic damage in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Record, I R; Jannes, M; Dreosti, I E

    1996-01-01

    For many years, zinc salts have been used both topically and orally to treat minor burns and abrasions as well as to enhance wound repair in man and animals. In this study we describe the protective effects of zinc against UV-induced genotoxicity in vitro and against sunburn cell formation in mouse skin in vivo. Cultured skin cells from neonatal mice showed a dramatic increase in the number of micronuclei as a result of UVA and UVB irradiation. Inclusion of zinc at 5 micrograms/mL in the medium significantly reduced the frequency of micronuclei and of micronucleated cells. In hairless mice, topical application of zinc chloride for 5 consecutive days or a single application 2 h prior to UV exposure reduced the number of sunburn cells in the epidermis as did application of zinc 1 h after exposure. Application 2 h after irradiation also tended to have a protective effect, although there was a large variation between animals. It is proposed that an influx of zinc can protect epidermal cells against some of the more delayed effects of UV-induced damage. PMID:8862734

  7. Accident investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laynor, William G. Bud

    1987-01-01

    The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has attributed wind shear as a cause or contributing factor in 15 accidents involving transport-categroy airplanes since 1970. Nine of these were nonfatal; but the other six accounted for 440 lives. Five of the fatal accidents and seven of the nonfatal accidents involved encounters with convective downbursts or microbursts. Of other accidents, two which were nonfatal were encounters with a frontal system shear, and one which was fatal was the result of a terrain induced wind shear. These accidents are discussed with reference to helping the aircraft to avoid the wind shear or if impossible to help the pilot to get through the wind shear.

  8. The determinants of fishing vessel accident severity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Di

    2014-05-01

    The study examines the determinants of fishing vessel accident severity in the Northeastern United States using vessel accident data from the U.S. Coast Guard for 2001-2008. Vessel damage and crew injury severity equations were estimated separately utilizing the ordered probit model. The results suggest that fishing vessel accident severity is significantly affected by several types of accidents. Vessel damage severity is positively associated with loss of stability, sinking, daytime wind speed, vessel age, and distance to shore. Vessel damage severity is negatively associated with vessel size and daytime sea level pressure. Crew injury severity is also positively related to the loss of vessel stability and sinking. PMID:24473412

  9. New regulations for radiation protection for work involving radioactive fallout emitted by the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi APP accident: application expansion to recovery and reconstruction work.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Shojiro

    2014-01-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Atomic Power Plant that accompanied the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011 released a large amount of radioactive material. To rehabilitate the contaminated areas, the government of Japan decided to carry out decontamination work. In April 2012, the Nuclear Emergency Response Headquarters (NERH) started dividing the restricted areas into three sub-areas based on the ambient dose rate. In accordance with the rearrangement of the restricted area, NERH decided to allow resumption of business activities, including manufacturing and farming, as well as operation of hospitals, welfare facilities, and shops and related subordinate tasks, such as maintenance, repair, and transportation. As a result, the government needed regulations for radiation protection for workers engaged in those activities. The issues that arose in the deliberation of the regulations were distilled into two points: 1) whether radiation protection systems established for a planned exposure situation should apply to construction and agricultural work activities in an existing exposure situation, and 2) how to simplify the regulation in accordance with the nature of the work activities. Further research and development concerning the following issues are warranted: a) the relationship between the radioactive concentrations of materials handled and the risk of internal exposure, and b) the relationship between the radioactive concentration of the soil and the surface contamination level. PMID:24593039

  10. Protective Effect of Oral Hesperetin Against Unilateral Striatal 6-Hydroxydopamine Damage in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Kiasalari, Zahra; Khalili, Mohsen; Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Roghani, Mehrdad

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder due to loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC). PD finally leads to incapacitating symptoms including motor and cognitive deficits. This study was undertaken to assess protective effect of the flavanone hesperetin against striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesion and to explore in more detail some underlying mechanisms including apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress. In this research study, intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats received hesperetin (50 mg/kg/day) for 1 week. Hesperetin reduced apomorphine-induced rotational asymmetry and decreased the latency to initiate and the total time on the narrow beam task. It also attenuated striatal malondialdehyde and enhanced striatal catalase activity and GSH content, lowered striatal level of glial fibrillary acidic protein as an index of astrogliosis and increased Bcl2 with no significant change of the nuclear factor NF-kB as a marker of inflammation. Hesperetin treatment was also capable to mitigate nigral DNA fragmentation as an index of apoptosis and to prevent loss of SNC dopaminergic neurons. This study indicated the protective effect of hesperetin in an early model of PD via attenuation of apoptosis, astrogliosis marker and oxidative stress and it may be helpful as an adjuvant therapy for management of PD at its early stages. PMID:26700436

  11. Protective effect of secondary plant metabolites from Ipomoea aquatica Forsk. against carbofuran induced damages.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sanjukta; Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Dipesh; Ghosh, Santinath; Dhar, Pubali

    2013-12-01

    Plausible interactions between food contaminants and natural constituents in vivo and protective effect of polyphenols present in I. aquatica against carbofuran toxicity in Charles Foster rats were evaluated. Determinations based on antioxidant enzyme activities showed significant alterations in glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase in tissues (liver and brain) and plasma of pesticide treated group while polyphenolic extracts from I. aquatica (IAE) attenuated their activities when given alongwith carbofuran. IAE decreased enhanced lipid peroxidation levels in plasma and erythrocyte membrane and cholesterol levels in brain and plasma. IAE also minimized histopathological degenerative changes produced by carbofuran. While single cell gel electrophoresis showed that secondary metabolites in leafy vegetables produced a combinatorial effect with pesticide at cellular level, DNA fragmentation level in bone marrow cells showed a decline in the IAE treated rats. Food safety adversely affected by various chemical contaminants can be retained by plant polyphenols and secondary plant constituents that can be found together in bolus. Therefore, the present study gives an insight into the protective role of naturally found polyphenols against pesticide toxicity. PMID:24579377

  12. Protective Effect of Plantago major Extract against t-BOOH-Induced Mitochondrial Oxidative Damage and Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Mello, Joyce C; Gonzalez, Mariano V D; Moraes, Vivian W R; Prieto, Tatiana; Nascimento, Otaciro R; Rodrigues, Tiago

    2015-01-01

    Plantago major L. produces several chemical substances with anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities and its use in the treatment of oral and throat inflammation in popular medicine is well described. In this study, the antioxidant potential of the Plantago major hydroethanolic extract was screened and its protective action was evaluated against t-BOOH-induced oxidative stress. The extract was obtained by fractionated percolation using 50% ethanolic solution and, after drying, suspended in dimethyl sulfoxide. The chromatographic profile of crude extract was obtained with the identification of some phytochemical markers and the total phenols and flavonoids were quantified. The scavenger activity against DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radicals was determined and the antioxidant activity in biological systems was evaluated in isolated rat liver mitochondria and HepG2 cells. The extract exhibited a significant free radical scavenger activity at 0.1 mg/mL, and decreased the ROS (reactive oxygen species) generation in succinate-energized mitochondria. Such an effect was associated with the preservation of the intrinsic antioxidant defenses (reduced glutathione and NAD(P)H) against the oxidation by t-BOOH, and also to the protection of membranes from lipid oxidation. The cytoprotective effect of PmHE against t-BOOH induced cell death was also shown. These findings contribute to the understanding of the health benefits attributed to P. major. PMID:26404215

  13. Noscapine protects OLN-93 oligodendrocytes from ischemia-reperfusion damage: Calcium and nitric oxide involvement.

    PubMed

    Nadjafi, S; Ebrahimi, S-A; Rahbar-Roshandel, N

    2015-12-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of noscapine, a benzylisoquinoline alkaloid from opium poppy, on oligodendrocyte during ischemia/reperfusion-induced excitotoxic injury. Changes in intracellular calcium levels due to chemical ischemia and nitric oxide (NO) production during ischemia/reperfusion were evaluated as the hallmarks of ischemia-derived excitotoxic event. OLN-93 cell line (a permanent immature rat oligodendrocyte) was used as a model of oligodendrocyte. 30- or 60-minute-oxygen-glucose deprivation/24 hours reperfusion were used to induce excitotoxicity. MTT (3-[4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) assay was used to evaluate cell viability. Ratiometric fluorescence microscopy using Ca(2+)-sensitive indicator Fura-2/AM was utilized to assess intracellular calcium levels. NO production was evaluated by Griess method. Noscapine (4 μM) significantly attenuated intracellular Ca(2+) elevation (P < 0.001). Also, noscapine significantly decreased NO production during a 30-minute oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (P < 0.01). The inhibitory effect of noscapine (4 μM) on intracellular Ca(2+) was greater than ionotropic glutamate receptors antagonists. Noscapine is protective against ischemia/reperfusion-induced excitotoxic injury in OLN-93 oligodendrocyte. This protective effect seems to be related to attenuation of intracellular Ca(2+) overload and NO production. PMID:26690027

  14. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at ORNL. Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between dmaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur beause of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A parametric study was done for several uncertain variables. The study included investigating effects of plate contact area, convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity on fuel swelling, and initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects of damage propagation. Results provide useful insights into how variouss uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  15. Calcium channel blockers protect against aluminium-induced DNA damage and block adaptive response to genotoxic stress in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Achary, V Mohan M; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Panda, Brahma B

    2013-03-18

    Calcium is an important second messenger in signal transduction pathways. The role of Ca(2+) signalling in Al-induced DNA damage, cell death, and adaptive response to genotoxic stress caused by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) or methylmercuric chloride (MMCl) in the root cells of Allium cepa was investigated in the current study. Root cells in planta were treated with Al(3+) (800μM of AlCl(3)) for 3h without or with 2h pre-treatment with the Ca(2+) chelator (EGTA) or Ca(2+) channel blockers (lanthanum chloride, verapamil) or CaM/CDPK antagonist (W7). In addition, root cells in planta were conditioned by treatment with Al(3+) (5 or 10μM of AlCl(3)) for 2h followed by the genotoxic challenge with MMCl (1.25μM) or EMS (2.5 or 5mM) for 3h without or with the pre-treatment of the chosen Ca(2+) chelator/channel blockers/antagonist. Following the treatments, cell death and DNA damage were investigated in the root cells by comet assay. Furthermore, genotoxicity in the root meristems was determined after 18-30h of recovery. These results revealed that Al(3+) (800μM) significantly induced DNA damage and cell death in the root cells of A. cepa. On the other hand, conditioning of the root cells with Al(3+) at low concentrations (5 or 10μM) offered adaptive response leading to the protection against genotoxic stress induced by MMCl and EMS. Pre-treatment of root cells with the Ca(2+) chelator/channel blockers/antagonist not only alleviated Al(3+)-induced DNA damage and cell death induced but also blocked the Al(3+)-mediated adaptive response to genotoxic stress induced by MMCl and EMS. For the first time, the results of the present study highlighted the role of Ca(2+) signalling underlying the biphasic mode of action of Al(3+) that induced DNA damage and cell death at high doses and offered adaptation to genotoxic response in plants at low doses. PMID:23313746

  16. Preliminary scoping safety analyses of the limiting design basis protected accidents for the Fast Flux Test Facility tritium production core

    SciTech Connect

    Heard, F.J.

    1997-11-19

    The SAS4A/SASSYS-l computer code is used to perform a series of analyses for the limiting protected design basis transient events given a representative tritium and medical isotope production core design proposed for the Fast Flux Test Facility. The FFTF tritium and isotope production mission will require a different core loading which features higher enrichment fuel, tritium targets, and medical isotope production assemblies. Changes in several key core parameters, such as the Doppler coefficient and delayed neutron fraction will affect the transient response of the reactor. Both reactivity insertion and reduction of heat removal events were analyzed. The analysis methods and modeling assumptions are described. Results of the analyses and comparison against fuel pin performance criteria are presented to provide quantification that the plant protection system is adequate to maintain the necessary safety margins and assure cladding integrity.

  17. Protection of DFP-induced oxidative damage and neurodegeneration by antioxidants and NMDA receptor antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana; Aschner, Michael

    2009-10-15

    Prophylactic agents acutely administered in response to anticholinesterases intoxication can prevent toxic symptoms, including fasciculations, seizures, convulsions and death. However, anticholinesterases also have long-term unknown pathophysiological effects, making rational prophylaxis/treatment problematic. Increasing evidence suggests that in addition to excessive cholinergic stimulation, organophosphate compounds such as diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) induce activation of glutamatergic neurons, generation of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS), leading to neurodegeneration. The present study investigated multiple affectors of DFP exposure critical to cerebral oxidative damage and whether antioxidants and NMDA receptor antagonist memantine provide neuroprotection by preventing DFP-induced biochemical and morphometric changes in rat brain. Rats treated acutely with DFP (1.25 mg/kg, s.c.) developed onset of toxicity signs within 7-15 min that progressed to maximal severity of seizures and fasciculations within 60 min. At this time point, DFP caused significant (p < 0.01) increases in biomarkers of ROS (F{sub 2}-isoprostanes, F{sub 2}-IsoPs; and F{sub 4}-neuroprostanes, F{sub 4}-NeuroPs), RNS (citrulline), and declines in high-energy phosphates (HEP) in rat cerebrum. At the same time, quantitative morphometric analysis of pyramidal neurons of the hippocampal CA1 region revealed significant (p < 0.01) reductions in dendritic lengths and spine density. When rats were pretreated with the antioxidants N-tert-butyl-{alpha}-phenylnitrone (PBN, 200 mg/kg, i.p.), or vitamin E (100 mg/kg, i.p./day for 3 days), or memantine (18 mg/kg, i.p.), significant attenuations in DFP-induced increases in F{sub 2}-IsoPs, F{sub 4}-NeuroPs, citrulline, and depletion of HEP were noted. Furthermore, attenuation in oxidative damage following antioxidants or memantine pretreatment was accompanied by rescue from dendritic degeneration of pyramidal neurons in the CA1

  18. The protective effect of magnesium lithospermate B against glucose-induced intracellular oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jian; Ren, Xian; Hou, Rui-ying; Dai, Xing-ping; Zhao, Ying-chun; Xu, Xiao-jing; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Gan; Zhou, Hong-hao; Liu, Zhao-qian

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} LAB reduced the ROS production in HEK293T cells cultured under oxidative stress. High dose of glucose enhanced the expression of HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein in a time-dependent manner. {yields} LAB enhanced the expression of HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein in a dose-dependent manner treated with high dose of glucose. {yields} LAB plays an important role against glucose-induced intracellular oxidative damage. {yields} The enhanced expression of HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein caused by LAB is regulated via Nrf2 signal pathway. -- Abstract: Objectives: To investigate the effects of magnesium lithospermate B (LAB) on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by high dose of glucose or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, we explored the influences of LAB on the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) in HEK293T cells after treatment with high dose of glucose. Materials and methods: The total nuclear proteins in HEK293T cells were extracted with Cytoplasmic Protein Extraction Kit. The ROS level was determined by flow cytometry. The mRNA and protein expression of HO-1 and Nrf2 were determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot. Results: LAB reduced the ROS production in HEK293T cells cultured under oxidative stress. High dose of glucose enhanced the expression of HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein in a time-dependent manner. LAB enhanced the expression of HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein in a dose-dependent manner treated with high dose of glucose. The amount of Nrf2 translocation was enhanced after cells were pretreated with 50 {mu}mol/L or 100 {mu}mol/L LAB. Silencing of Nrf2 gene eliminated the enhanced expression of HO-1 protein induced by high dose of glucose plus LAB. Conclusions: LAB plays an important role against glucose-induced intracellular oxidative damage. The enhanced expression of HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein caused by LAB is regulated via Nrf2 signal pathway.

  19. Vitamins as radioprotectors in vivo II. protection by vitamin A and soybean oil against radiation damage caused by internal radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Harapanhalli, R.S.; Narra, V.R.; Yaghmai, V.; Azure, M.T.; Goddu, M.; Howell, R.W.; Rao, D.V.

    1994-07-01

    Tissue-incorporated radionuclides impart radiation energy over extended periods of time depending on their effective half-lives. The capacity of vitamin A dissolved in soybean oil to protect against the biological effects caused by internal radionuclides is investigated. The radiochemicals examined are DNA-binding {sup 125}IdU, cytoplasmically localized H{sup 125}IPDM and the {alpha}-particle emitter {sup 210}Po citrate. As in our previous studies, spermatogenesis in mice is used as the experimental model and spermatogonial cell survival is the biological end point. Surprisingly, soybean oil itself provides substantial and equal protection against the Auger effect of {sup 125}IdU, which is comparable to a high-LET radiation effect, as well as the low-LET effects of H{sup 125}IPDM, the dose modification factors (DMFs) being 3.6 {+-} 0.9 (SEM) and 3.4 {+-} 0.9, respectively. The protection afforded by the oil against the effects of 5.3 MeV {alpha} particles emitted by 210Po is also significant (DMF = 2.2 {+-} 0.4). The presence of vitamin A in the oil further enhanced the radioprotection against the effect of {sup 125}IdU (DMF = 4.8 {+-} 1.3) and H{sup 125}IKPDM (DMF = 5.1 {+-} 0.6); however, no enhancement is provided against the effects of {alpha} particles. These interesting results with soybean oil and vitamin A, together with data on the subcellular distribution of the protectors, provide clues regarding the mechanistic aspects of the protection. In addition, the data for vitamin A reaffirm our earlier conclusion that the mechanism by which DNA-bound Auger emitters impart biological damage is primarily indirect in nature. 29 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Saponins from Tribulus terrestris L. protect human keratinocytes from UVB-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Sisto, Margherita; Lisi, Sabrina; D'Amore, Massimo; De Lucro, Raffaella; Carati, Davide; Castellana, Donatello; La Pesa, Velia; Zuccarello, Vincenzo; Lofrumento, Dario D

    2012-12-01

    Chronic exposure to solar UVB radiation damages skin, increasing the risk to develop cancer. Hence the identification of compounds with a photoprotective efficacy is essential. This study examined the role of saponins derived from Tribulus terrestris L. (TT) on the modulation of apoptosis in normal human keratinocytes (NHEK) exposed to physiological doses of UVB and to evaluate their antitumoral properties. In NHEK, TT saponins attenuate UVB-induced programmed cell death through inhibition of intrinsic apoptotic pathway. In squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) TT saponins do not make the malignant keratinocytes more resistant to UVB and determine an enhanced apoptotic response. The photoprotective effect of TT saponins is tightly correlated to the enhancement of NER genes expression and the block of UVB-mediated NF-κB activation. Collectively, our study shows experimental evidence that TT has a preventive efficacy against UVB-induced carcinogenesis and the molecular knowledge on the mechanisms through which TT saponins regulate cell death suggests great potential for TT to be developed into a new medicine for cancer patients. PMID:23142932

  1. Blocking TGF-β1 Protects the Peritoneal Membrane from Dialysate-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Jesús; Aguilera, Abelardo; Selgas, Rafael; Sandoval, Pilar; Albar-Vizcaíno, Patricia; Pérez-Lozano, María Luisa; Ruiz-Carpio, Vicente; Majano, Pedro L.; Lamas, Santiago; Rodríguez-Pascual, Fernando; Borras-Cuesta, Francisco; Dotor, Javier

    2011-01-01

    During peritoneal dialysis (PD), mesothelial cells undergo mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT), a process associated with peritoneal-membrane dysfunction. Because TGF-β1 can induce MMT, we evaluated the efficacy of TGF-β1-blocking peptides in modulating MMT and ameliorating peritoneal damage in a mouse model of PD. Exposure of the peritoneum to PD fluid induced fibrosis, angiogenesis, functional impairment, and the accumulation of fibroblasts. In addition to expressing fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1), some fibroblasts co-expressed cytokeratin, indicating their mesothelial origin. These intermediate-phenotype (Cyto+/FSP-1+) fibroblasts had features of myofibroblasts with fibrogenic capacity. PD fluid treatment triggered the appearance of CD31+/FSP-1+ and CD45+/FSP-1+ cells, suggesting that fibroblasts also originate from endothelial cells and from cells recruited from bone marrow. Administration of blocking peptides significantly ameliorated fibrosis and angiogenesis, improved peritoneal function, and reduced the number of FSP-1+ cells, especially in the Cyto+/FSP-1+ subpopulation. Conversely, overexpression of TGF-β1 in the peritoneum by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer led to a marked accumulation of fibroblasts, most of which derived from the mesothelium. Taken together, these results demonstrate that TGF-β1 drives the peritoneal deterioration induced by dialysis fluid and highlights a role of TGF-β1-mediated MMT in the pathophysiology of peritoneal-membrane dysfunction. PMID:21742730

  2. Painting factor H onto mesenchymal stem cells protects the cells from complement- and neutrophil-mediated damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Qiu, Wen; Zhang, Lingjun; Fung, John; Lin, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are undergoing intensive testing in clinical trials as a promising new therapy for many inflammatory diseases and for regenerative medicine, but further optimization of current MSC-based therapies is required. In this study, we found that in addition to direct complement-mediated attack through the assembly of membrane attack complexes (MACs) that we and others have recently reported, of the released complement activation products, C5a, but not C3a, activates neutrophils in the blood to further damage MSCs through oxidative burst. In addition, we have developed a simple method for painting factor H, a native complement inhibitor, onto MSCs to locally inhibit complement activation on MSCs. MSCs painted with factor H are protected from both MAC- and neutrophil-mediated attack and are significantly more effective in inhibiting antigen-specific T cell responses than the mock-painted MSCs both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27343468

  3. Protection by Flavanol-Rich Foods Against Vascular Dysfunction and Oxidative Damage: 27th Hohenheim Consensus Conference1

    PubMed Central

    Sies, Helmut; Hollman, Peter C.H.; Grune, Tilman; Stahl, Wilhelm; Biesalski, Hans K.; Williamson, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Criteria for assessing the purported protection by flavanol-rich foods against vascular dysfunction and oxidative damage to biomolecules was the subject of the 27th Hohenheim Consensus Conference held on July 11, 2011. State-of-the-art evidence was put into perspective, focusing on several questions that were followed by a consensus answer. Among the topics addressed were the major sources of flavanols in the human diet, the bioavailability of flavanols, biomarkers for “health benefit,” and the biological function of flavanols. Consensus was reached on these topics. No conclusion was reached on the design of randomized, controlled trials for substantiation of health claims for flavanol-rich foods as to the necessity of a study arm with an isolated pharmacologically active compound, e.g., (−)-epicatechin. PMID:22516731

  4. Therapeutic and protective effects of Caesalpinia gilliesii and Cajanus cajan proteins against acetaminophen overdose-induced renal damage.

    PubMed

    Aly, Hanan F; Rizk, Maha Z; Abo-Elmatty, Dina M; Desoky, M M; Ibrahim, N A; Younis, Eman A

    2016-04-01

    The present work aims to evaluate the protective and ameliorative effects of two plant-derived proteins obtained from the seeds ofCajanus cajanandCaesalpinia gilliesii(Leguminosae) against the toxic effects of acetaminophen in kidney after chronic dose through determination of certain biochemical markers including total urea, creatinine, and kidney marker enzyme, that is, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). In addition histopathological examination of intoxicated and treated kidney with both proteins was performed. The present results show a significant increase in serum total urea and creatinine, while significant decrease in GAPDH. Improvement in all biochemical parameters studied was demonstrated, which was documented by the amelioration signs in rats kidney architecture. Thus, both plant protein extracts can counteract the nephrotoxic process, minimize damage to the kidney, delay disease progression, and reduce its complications. PMID:24280655

  5. Redox-active cerium oxide nanoparticles protect human dermal fibroblasts from PQ-induced damage

    PubMed Central

    von Montfort, Claudia; Alili, Lirija; Teuber-Hanselmann, Sarah; Brenneisen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Recently, it has been published that cerium (Ce) oxide nanoparticles (CNP; nanoceria) are able to downregulate tumor invasion in cancer cell lines. Redox-active CNP exhibit both selective pro-oxidative and antioxidative properties, the first being responsible for impairment of tumor growth and invasion. A non-toxic and even protective effect of CNP in human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) has already been observed. However, the effect on important parameters such as cell death, proliferation and redox state of the cells needs further clarification. Here, we present that nanoceria prevent HDF from reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced cell death and stimulate proliferation due to the antioxidative property of these particles. PMID:25479549

  6. Protective role of thymoquinone against liver damage induced by tamoxifen in female rats.

    PubMed

    Suddek, Ghada M

    2014-08-01

    One of the major reasons for terminating a clinical trial is the liver toxicity induced by chemotherapy. Tamoxifen (TAM) is an anti-estrogen used in the treatment and prevention of hormone-dependent breast cancer. Tamoxifen therapy may cause hepatic injury. The seeds of Nigella sativa, which contain the active ingredient thymoquinone (TQ), have been used in folk medicine for diverse ailments. TQ is reported to possess anticancer and hepatoprotective effects. In this study, the protective effects of TQ against TAM-induced hepatotoxicity in female rats were evaluated. Four groups of rats were used: control; TAM; TQ; TAM+TQ. TAM (45 mg·(kg body mass)(-1)·day(-1), by intraperitoneal injection (i.p.), for 10 consecutive days) resulted in elevated serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, total bilirubin, and gamma glutamyl transferase, as well as depletion of reduced glutathione in the liver and accumulation of lipid peroxides. Also, TAM treatment inhibited the hepatic activity of superoxide dismutase. Further, it raised the levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha in the liver and induced histopathological changes. Pretreatment with TQ (50 mg·(kg body mass)(-1)·day(-1); orally, for 20 consecutive days, starting 10 days before TAM injection) significantly prevented the elevation in serum activity of the assessed enzymes. TQ significantly inhibited TAM-induced hepatic GSH depletion and LPO accumulation. Consistently, TQ normalized the activity of SOD, inhibited the rise in TNF-α and ameliorated the histopathological changes. In conclusion, TQ protects against TAM-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:24941454

  7. Protective Role of Crocin Against Nicotine-induced Damages on Male Mice Liver

    PubMed Central

    Jalili, Cyrus; Tabatabaei, Hadis; Kakaberiei, Seyran; Roshankhah, Shiva; Salahshoor, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nicotine is a major pharmacologically active substance in cigarette smoke. It is mainly metabolized in liver and causes devastating effects. Crocin is the chemical ingredient primarily responsible for the color of saffron. It has different pharmacological effects such as antioxidant and anticancer. This study was designed to evaluate the protective role of crocin against nicotine on the liver of mice. Methods: Forty-eight mice were equally divided into 8 groups; control (normal saline), nicotine (2.5 mg/kg), crocin (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg) and crocin plus nicotine treated groups. Saline, crocin, nicotine and crocin/nicotine (once a day) were intraperitoneally injected for 4 weeks. The liver weight and histology, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and serum nitric oxide levels have been studied. Results: The results indicated that nicotine administration significantly decreased liver weight (48.37%) and increased the mean diameter of hepatocyte (239%), central hepatic vein (28.45%), liver enzymes level (ALP 29.43%, AST 21.81%, ALT 21.55%), and blood serum nitric oxide level (57.18%) compared to saline group (P < 0.05). However, crocin and crocin plus nicotine administration significantly boosted liver weight (49.54%) and decreased the mean diameter of hepatocyte (40.48%), central hepatic vein (15.44%), liver enzymes (ALP 22.02%, AST 19.05%, ALT 23.11%), and nitric oxide levels (35.80%) in all groups compared to nicotine group (percentages represent the maximum dose) (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Crocin showed its partly protective effect against nicotine-induced liver toxicity. PMID:26442615

  8. Protective effect of selenium and zinc on UV-A damage in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Leccia, M T; Richard, M J; Beani, J C; Faure, H; Monjo, A M; Cadet, J; Amblard, P; Favier, A

    1993-10-01

    Ultraviolet A radiation participates in cytotoxicity and carcinogenesis of the skin by a mechanism involving the generation of reactive oxygen species. Endogenous antiradical defense systems utilize metalloenzymes including Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase and Cu and Zn superoxide dismutase. The aim of the present work was to determine the protective effect of two trace elements, Se and Zn, on cultured human diploid fibroblasts exposed to UV-A radiation (broad-spectrum source with a maximum intensity at 375 nm). Selenium in the culture medium (0.1 mg/L) in the form of sodium selenite increased the synthesis and activity of glutathione peroxidase by 60.5% in the absence of exposure to UV-A radiation and by 35% after irradiation with 5 J/cm2 (P = 0.043). The presence of this element significantly increased the survival of UV-A-irradiated fibroblasts (P < 0.0001). This confirms the essential role of Se in the detoxifying activity of the enzyme. In addition, thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBAR), which are lipid peroxidation markers, decreased in the presence of exogenous Se: -19% and -22% without irradiation and after irradiation with 5 J/cm2 (P = 0.056). When Zn was added at the dose of 6.5 mg/L as ZnCl2, fibroblasts subjected to oxidizing stress induced by UV-A were protected from cytotoxicity (P < 0.0001). The TBAR production decreased significantly: -33% without irradiation and -34% after irradiation with 5 J/cm2 (P = 0.008). Superoxide dismutase activity, however, decreased after supplementing with Zn: -26% without irradiation and -20% after UV-A irradiation (P = 0.017). The antioxidant properties of Zn are thus apparently independent of superoxide dismutase activity. PMID:8248330

  9. Carnitine partially protects the rat testis against the late damage produced by doxorubicin administered during pre-puberty.

    PubMed

    Cabral, R E L; Okada, F K; Stumpp, T; Vendramini, V; Miraglia, S M

    2014-11-01

    Doxorubicin, an anticancer drug, is widely included in chemotherapy protocols to combat childhood cancer. Carnitine, an important quaternary amine, is present in testis and epididymis and is involved in sperm maturation; it has been used in infertility treatment. In a previous study, our group observed that L-carnitine given before etoposide, another chemotherapeutic drug, reduces the spermatogenic damage and protects germ cells against apoptosis. This study aimed to evaluate the antiapoptotic and cytoprotective actions of L-carnitine in long- and mid-term basis, on the seminiferous epithelium of doxorubicin-treated pre-pubertal rats. Forty-eight 30-day-old male Wistar rats were distributed into four groups: sham-control; doxorubicin; carnitine; carnitine/doxorubicin (L-carnitine injected 1 h before doxorubicin). The rats were submitted to euthanasia at 64 and 100 days of age and their testes were collected for biometric, morphometric, and histopathological analyses. The numerical density of apoptotic germ cells was obtained (TUNEL method). In adult phase (100 days), the following spermatic parameters were analyzed: mature spermatid (19 step) count and sperm daily production per testis; sperm number and transit time through the epididymal caput/corpus and cauda; frequency of morphologically abnormal spermatozoa (from epididymal fluid), as well as sperm DNA integrity (Comet assay). The testicular and spermatic parameters at both ages were improved in rats treated with carnitine before doxorubicin. At 64 days, the TUNEL-positive germ cell frequency was lower in the carnitine/doxorubicin-treated rats comparatively to the doxorubicin-treated rats. At 100 days of age, the sperm DNA fragmentation was also lower in the previously carnitine-treated rats, as evidenced by the analysis of three parameters. Carnitine reduced the late testicular and spermatic damages caused by doxorubicin, probably providing a partial cytoprotection against the deleterious action of doxorubicin

  10. Protective Effect of Thymoquinone against Cyclophosphamide-Induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis through Inhibiting DNA Damage and Upregulation of Nrf2 Expression.

    PubMed

    Gore, Prashant R; Prajapati, Chaitali P; Mahajan, Umesh B; Goyal, Sameer N; Belemkar, Sateesh; Ojha, Shreesh; Patil, Chandragouda R

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CYP) induced hemorrhagic cystitis is a dose-limiting side effect involving increased oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines and suppressed activity of nuclear factor related erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2). Thymoquinone (TQ), an active constituent of Nigella sativa seeds, is reported to increase the expression of Nrf2, exert antioxidant action, and anti-inflammatory effects in the experimental animals. The present study was designed to explore the effects of TQ on CYP-induced hemorrhagic cystitis in Balb/c mice. Cystitis was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of CYP (200 mg/kg). TQ was administered intraperitoneally at 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg doses twice a day, for three days before and three days after the CYP administration. The efficacy of TQ was determined in terms of the protection against the CYP-induced histological perturbations in the bladder tissue, reduction in the oxidative stress, and inhibition of the DNA fragmentation. Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine the expression of Nrf2. TQ protected against CYP-induced oxidative stress was evident from significant reduction in the lipid peroxidation, restoration of the levels of reduced glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities. TQ treatment significantly reduced the DNA damage evident as reduced DNA fragmentation. A significant decrease in the cellular infiltration, edema, epithelial denudation and hemorrhage were observed in the histological observations. There was restoration and rise in the Nrf2 expression in the bladder tissues of mice treated with TQ. These results confirm that, TQ ameliorates the CYP-induced hemorrhagic cystitis in mice through reduction in the oxidative stress, inhibition of the DNA damage and through increased expression of Nrf2 in the bladder tissues. PMID:27489498

  11. Protective Effect of Thymoquinone against Cyclophosphamide-Induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis through Inhibiting DNA Damage and Upregulation of Nrf2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Prashant R.; Prajapati, Chaitali P.; Mahajan, Umesh B.; Goyal, Sameer N.; Belemkar, Sateesh; Ojha, Shreesh; Patil, Chandragouda R.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CYP) induced hemorrhagic cystitis is a dose-limiting side effect involving increased oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines and suppressed activity of nuclear factor related erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2). Thymoquinone (TQ), an active constituent of Nigella sativa seeds, is reported to increase the expression of Nrf2, exert antioxidant action, and anti-inflammatory effects in the experimental animals. The present study was designed to explore the effects of TQ on CYP-induced hemorrhagic cystitis in Balb/c mice. Cystitis was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of CYP (200 mg/kg). TQ was administered intraperitoneally at 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg doses twice a day, for three days before and three days after the CYP administration. The efficacy of TQ was determined in terms of the protection against the CYP-induced histological perturbations in the bladder tissue, reduction in the oxidative stress, and inhibition of the DNA fragmentation. Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine the expression of Nrf2. TQ protected against CYP-induced oxidative stress was evident from significant reduction in the lipid peroxidation, restoration of the levels of reduced glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities. TQ treatment significantly reduced the DNA damage evident as reduced DNA fragmentation. A significant decrease in the cellular infiltration, edema, epithelial denudation and hemorrhage were observed in the histological observations. There was restoration and rise in the Nrf2 expression in the bladder tissues of mice treated with TQ. These results confirm that, TQ ameliorates the CYP-induced hemorrhagic cystitis in mice through reduction in the oxidative stress, inhibition of the DNA damage and through increased expression of Nrf2 in the bladder tissues. PMID:27489498

  12. Puerarin protects the rat liver against oxidative stress-mediated DNA damage and apoptosis induced by lead.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chan-Min; Ma, Jie-Qiong; Sun, Yun-Zhi

    2012-09-01

    Puerarin (PU), a natural flavonoid, has been reported to have many benefits and medicinal properties. In this study, we valuated the protective effect of puerarin against lead-induced oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis in rat liver. A total of forty male Wistar rats (8-week-old) was divided into 4 groups: control group; lead-treated group (500 mg Pb/l as the only drinking fluid); lead+puerarin treated group (500 mg Pb/l as the only drinking fluid plus 400 mg PU/kg bwt intra-gastrically once daily); and puerarin-treated group (400 mg PU/kg bwt intra-gastrically once daily). The experimental period was lasted for 75 successive days. Our data showed that puerarin significantly effectively improved the lead-induced histology changes in rat liver and decreased the serum ALT and AST activities in lead-treated rats. Puerarin markedly restored Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT and GPx activities and the GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver of lead-treated rat. Furthermore, the increase of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine induced by lead was effectively suppressed by puerarin. The enhanced caspase-3 activity in the rat liver induced by lead was also inhibited by puerarin. TUNEL assay showed that lead-induced apoptosis in rat liver was significantly inhibited by puerarin, which might be attributed to its antioxidant property. In conclusion, these results suggested that puerarin could protect the rat liver against lead-induced injury by reducing ROS production, renewing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and decreasing DNA oxidative damage. PMID:21146379

  13. Telomerase reverse transcriptase expression protects transformed human cells against DNA-damaging agents, and increases tolerance to chromosomal instability.

    PubMed

    Fleisig, H B; Hukezalie, K R; Thompson, C A H; Au-Yeung, T T T; Ludlow, A T; Zhao, C R; Wong, J M Y

    2016-01-14

    Reactivation of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) expression is found in more than 85% of human cancers. The remaining cancers rely on the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), a recombination-based mechanism for telomere-length maintenance. Prevalence of TERT reactivation over the ALT mechanism was linked to secondary TERT function unrelated to telomere length maintenance. To characterize this non-canonical function, we created a panel of ALT cells with recombinant expression of TERT and TERT variants: TERT-positive ALT cells showed higher tolerance to genotoxic insults compared with their TERT-negative counterparts. We identified telomere synthesis-defective TERT variants that bestowed similar genotoxic stress tolerance, indicating that telomere synthesis activity is dispensable for this survival phenotype. TERT expression improved the kinetics of double-strand chromosome break repair and reduced DNA damage-related nuclear division abnormalities, a phenotype associated with ALT tumors. Despite this reduction in cytological abnormalities, surviving TERT-positive ALT cells were found to have gross chromosomal instabilities. We sorted TERT-positive cells with cytogenetic changes and followed their growth. We found that the chromosome-number changes persisted, and TERT-positive ALT cells surviving genotoxic events propagated through subsequent generations with new chromosome numbers. Our data confirm that telomerase expression protects against double-strand DNA (dsDNA)-damaging events, and show that this protective function is uncoupled from its role in telomere synthesis. TERT expression promotes oncogene-transformed cell growth by reducing the inhibitory effects of cell-intrinsic (telomere attrition) and cell-extrinsic (chemical- or metabolism-induced genotoxic stress) challenges. These data provide the impetus to develop new therapeutic interventions for telomerase-positive cancers through simultaneous targeting of multiple telomerase activities. PMID

  14. Eriocaulon buergerianum extract protects PC12 cells and neurons in zebrafish against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced damage

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ericaulon buergerianum (Gujingcao) is an ophthalmic, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial Chinese medicinal herb. This study aims to investigate the neuroprotective effects of Ericaulon buergerianum ethanol extract (EBE) and to elucidate its underlying action mechanism. Methods The viability of dopaminergic (DA) neuron in zebrafish was examined by anti-tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunostaining. The locomotor activity of zebrafish was assessed with a digital video tracking system. The viability and cellular damage of the PC12 cells were determined by MTT and LDH assays respectively. The nuclear morphological changes in apoptotic cells were evaluated with DNA staining by Hoechst 33342 dye. Intracellular nitric oxide (NO) was quantified by DAF-FM diacetate staining. The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was determined by Western blot. Results EBE inhibited the 6-OHDA-induced decrease in total distance of movement in zebrafish. Pretreatments of EBE (25, 50, 100 and 200 μg/ml) increased the viability of 6-OHDA-damaged PC12 cells in a dose dependent manner. Protection against 6-OHDA-induced nuclear fragmentation and accumulation of apoptotic bodies was also observed in EBE pretreated cells. Anti-oxidative (inhibition of NO production and iNOS expression in PC12 cells in vitro) activities of EBE are related to its neuroprotective effects in 6-OHDA-induced DA neuron damage. Conclusion EBE exhibited significant neuroprotective activities in zebrafish, including recovery of dopaminergic neuron loss caused by 6-OHDA in a dose-dependent manner in vivo, inhibition of 6-OHDA-induced decrease of total distance in movement in zebrafish. The iNOS-NO pathway may be involved. PMID:21527031

  15. Protective Role of Nuclear Factor E2-Related Factor 2 against Acute Oxidative Stress-Induced Pancreatic β -Cell Damage.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jingqi; Zheng, Hongzhi; Wang, Huihui; Yang, Bei; Zhao, Rui; Lu, Chunwei; Liu, Zhiyuan; Hou, Yongyong; Xu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qiang; Qu, Weidong; Pi, Jingbo

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction that occurs in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a master regulator in the cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress. The present study found that MIN6 β-cells with stable knockdown of Nrf2 (Nrf2-KD) and islets isolated from Nrf2-knockout mice expressed substantially reduced levels of antioxidant enzymes in response to a variety of stressors. In scramble MIN6 cells or wild-type islets, acute exposure to oxidative stressors, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, resulted in cell damage as determined by decrease in cell viability, reduced ATP content, morphology changes of islets, and/or alterations of apoptotic biomarkers in a concentration- and/or time-dependent manner. In contrast, silencing of Nrf2 sensitized MIN6 cells or islets to the damage. In addition, pretreatment of MIN6 β-cells with NRF2 activators, including CDDO-Im, dimethyl fumarate (DMF), and tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), protected the cells from high levels of H2O2-induced cell damage. Given that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in regulating glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and persistent activation of NRF2 blunts glucose-triggered ROS signaling and GSIS, the present study highlights the distinct roles that NRF2 may play in pancreatic β-cell dysfunction that occurs in different stages of diabetes. PMID:25949772

  16. Silymarin Protects Epidermal Keratinocytes from Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Apoptosis and DNA Damage by Nucleotide Excision Repair Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Santosh K.; Mantena, Sudheer K.; Meeran, Syed M.

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a well recognized epidemiologic risk factor for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. This observation has been linked to the accumulation of UVB radiation-induced DNA lesions in cells, and that finally lead to the development of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of skin with silymarin, a plant flavanoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum), inhibits photocarcinogenesis in mice; however it is less understood whether chemopreventive effect of silymarin is mediated through the repair of DNA lesions in skin cells and that protect the cells from apoptosis. Here, we show that treatment of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) with silymarin blocks UVB-induced apoptosis of NHEK in vitro. Silymarin reduces the amount of UVB radiation-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by reduced amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and as measured by comet assay, and that ultimately may lead to reduced apoptosis of NHEK. The reduction of UV radiation-induced DNA damage by silymarin appears to be related with induction of nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes, because UV radiation-induced apoptosis was not blocked by silymarin in NER-deficient human fibroblasts. Cytostaining and dot-blot analysis revealed that silymarin repaired UV-induced CPDs in NER-proficient fibroblasts from a healthy individual but did not repair UV-induced CPD-positive cells in NER-deficient fibroblasts from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation-A disease. Similarly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that silymarin did not reduce the number of UVB-induced sunburn/apoptotic cells in the skin of NER-deficient mice, but reduced the number of sunburn cells in their wild-type counterparts. Together, these results suggest that silymarin exert the capacity to reduce UV radiation-induced DNA damage and, thus, prevent the harmful effects of UV radiation on the genomic stability of epidermal cells. PMID:21731736

  17. Silymarin protects epidermal keratinocytes from ultraviolet radiation-induced apoptosis and DNA damage by nucleotide excision repair mechanism.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Santosh K; Mantena, Sudheer K; Meeran, Syed M

    2011-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a well recognized epidemiologic risk factor for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. This observation has been linked to the accumulation of UVB radiation-induced DNA lesions in cells, and that finally lead to the development of skin cancers. Earlier, we have shown that topical treatment of skin with silymarin, a plant flavanoid from milk thistle (Silybum marianum), inhibits photocarcinogenesis in mice; however it is less understood whether chemopreventive effect of silymarin is mediated through the repair of DNA lesions in skin cells and that protect the cells from apoptosis. Here, we show that treatment of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) with silymarin blocks UVB-induced apoptosis of NHEK in vitro. Silymarin reduces the amount of UVB radiation-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by reduced amounts of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and as measured by comet assay, and that ultimately may lead to reduced apoptosis of NHEK. The reduction of UV radiation-induced DNA damage by silymarin appears to be related with induction of nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes, because UV radiation-induced apoptosis was not blocked by silymarin in NER-deficient human fibroblasts. Cytostaining and dot-blot analysis revealed that silymarin repaired UV-induced CPDs in NER-proficient fibroblasts from a healthy individual but did not repair UV-induced CPD-positive cells in NER-deficient fibroblasts from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum complementation-A disease. Similarly, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that silymarin did not reduce the number of UVB-induced sunburn/apoptotic cells in the skin of NER-deficient mice, but reduced the number of sunburn cells in their wild-type counterparts. Together, these results suggest that silymarin exert the capacity to reduce UV radiation-induced DNA damage and, thus, prevent the harmful effects of UV radiation on the genomic stability of epidermal cells. PMID:21731736

  18. Selenoprotein W was Correlated with the Protective Effect of Selenium on Chicken Myocardial Cells from Oxidative Damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Yao, Haidong; Zhao, Wenchao; Shi, Yuguang; Zhang, Ziwei; Xu, Shiwen

    2016-06-01

    Selenium (Se) mainly performs its function through Se-containing proteins. Selenoprotein W (SelW), one member of the selenoprotein family, plays important roles in the normal function of the heart. To investigate the possible relationship between Se and SelW for the regulation of oxidative damage in chicken embryo myocardial cells, we treated myocardial cells with Se and H2O2. Then, the levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine in the culture media, levels of SelW, inflammatory genes NF-κB, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, p53, and the cell cycle were analyzed. Furthermore, the correlation between SelW and the levels of these factors was determined. The results indicated that Se treatment increased the expression of SelW (P < 0.05) and caused a downregulation of p53, NF-κB, and TNF-α (P < 0.05). In contrast, H2O2 increased the expression of p53, NF-κB, TNF-α, and LDH (P < 0.05) and induced early cell apoptosis, which was alleviated by treatment with Se. In addition, SelW had a positive correlation with the levels of inflammatory genes investigated. Taken together, our findings suggested that SelW is sensitive to Se levels and oxidative stress, and may play a role in the protective function of Se against oxidative damage and inflammation in chicken myocardial cells. PMID:26463750

  19. Phenolic acid protects of renal damage induced by ochratoxin A in a 28-days-oral treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Cariddi, L N; Escobar, F M; Sabini, M C; Campra, N A; Bagnis, G; Decote-Ricardo, D; Freire-de-Lima, C G; Mañas, F; Sabini, L I; Dalcero, A M

    2016-04-01

    The present study aimed to characterize the chlorogenic acid (ChlA) capacity to reverse the toxic effects induced by ochratoxin A (OTA) in a subacute toxicity test in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed orally by gavage for 28 days with OTA (0.4mg/kg bw/day), ChlA (5mg/kg bw/day) or the combination OTA (0.4mg/kg bw/day)+ChlA (5mg/kg bw/day). No deaths, no decrease in feed intake or body weight in any experimental group were recorded. The negative control group and the animals treated with ChlA alone showed no changes in any parameters evaluated. In OTA-treated group significant changes such as decrease in urine volume, proteinuria, occult blood, increase in serum creatinine values; decrease in absolute and relative kidney weight and characteristics histopathological lesions that indicated kidney damage were observed. However, limited effect on oxidative stress parameters were detected in kidneys of OTA-treated group. Animals treated with the combination OTA+ChlA were showed as negative control group in the evaluation of several parameters of toxicity. In conclusion, ChlA, at given concentration, improved biochemical parameters altered in urine and serum and pathological damages in kidneys induced by OTA exposure, showing a good protective activity, but not by an apparent antioxidant mechanism. PMID:26987112

  20. EGFR mediates astragaloside IV-induced Nrf2 activation to protect cortical neurons against in vitro ischemia/reperfusion damages.

    PubMed

    Gu, Da-Min; Lu, Pei-Hua; Zhang, Ke; Wang, Xiang; Sun, Min; Chen, Guo-Qian; Wang, Qiong

    2015-02-13

    In this study, we tested the potential role of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) against oxygen and glucose deprivation/re-oxygenation (OGD/R)-induced damages in murine cortical neurons, and studied the associated signaling mechanisms. AS-IV exerted significant neuroprotective effects against OGD/R by reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, thereby attenuating oxidative stress and neuronal cell death. We found that AS-IV treatment in cortical neurons resulted in NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling activation, evidenced by Nrf2 Ser-40 phosphorylation, and its nuclear localization, as well as transcription of antioxidant-responsive element (ARE)-regulated genes: heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1) and sulphiredoxin 1 (SRXN-1). Knockdown of Nrf2 through lentiviral shRNAs prevented AS-IV-induced ARE genes transcription, and abolished its anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. Further, we discovered that AS-IV stimulated heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) release to trans-activate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in cortical neurons. Blockage or silencing EGFR prevented Nrf2 activation by AS-IV, thus inhibiting AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities against OGD/R. In summary, AS-IV protects cortical neurons against OGD/R damages through activating of EGFR-Nrf2 signaling. PMID:25582778

  1. Jatropha curcas leaf and bark fractions protect against ultraviolet radiation-B induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sundari, J; Selvaraj, R; Rajendra Prasad, N; Elumalai, R

    2013-11-01

    The present study is conducted to investigate the antioxidant potential of Jatropha curcas root bark extract (RB4 fraction) and leaf extract (L1 fraction), and to study their effects on UVB-radiation-induced DNA damage in cultured human blood lymphocytes. In this study, J. curcas showed strong antioxidant property in different free radical scavenging systems. Both the fractions effectively scavenged hydroxyl (OH), superoxide anion (O₂(·-)), 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH·) and 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid radical cation (ABTS(·+)) in a concentration-dependent manner. The IC₅₀ (Inhibitory Concentration 50) values of J. curcas fractions were compared to standard ascorbic acid used in this study. The antioxidant potential of a compound was directly proportional to the photoprotective effect. In this study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) were exposed to UVB-radiation and there was an increase in comet attributes (% tail DNA, tail length, tail movement and Olive tail moment). Jatropha curcas RB4 fraction and L1 fraction treatment before UVB-irradiation significantly decreased the % tail DNA, tail length, tail moment and Olive tail moment in irradiated HPBL. These results suggested that J. curcas exhibited strong antioxidant property and RB4 and L1 fractions protected UVB-radiation-induced DNA damage in HPBL. PMID:23995553

  2. Protective Effect of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Tribulus Terrestris on Cisplatin Induced Renal Tissue Damage in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Raoofi, Amir; Khazaei, Mozafar; Ghanbari, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: According beneficial effects of Tribulus terrestris (TT) extract on tissue damage, the present study investigated the influence of hydroalcoholic extract of TT plant on cisplatin (CIS) (EBEWE Pharma, Unterach, Austria) induced renal tissue damage in male mice. Methods: Thirty mice were divided into five groups (n = 6). The first group (control) was treated with normal saline (0.9% NaCl) and experimental groups with CIS (E1), CIS + 100 mg/kg extract of TT (E2), CIS + 300 mg/kg extract of TT (E3), CIS + 500 mg/kg extract of TT (E4) intraperitoneally. The kidneys were removed after 4 days of injections, and histological evaluations were performed. Results: The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's post-hoc test, paired-sample t-test, Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. In the CIS treated group, the whole kidney tissue showed an increased dilatation of Bowman's capsule, medullar congestion, and dilatation of collecting tubules and a decreased in the body weight and kidney weight. These parameters reached to the normal range after administration of fruit extracts of TT for 4 days. Conclusions: The results suggested that the oral administration of TT fruit extract at dose 100, 300 and 500 mg/kg body weight provided protection against the CIS induced toxicity in the mice. PMID:25789143

  3. In vitro protective effects of Thymus quinquecostatus Celak extracts on t-BHP-induced cell damage through antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yon-Suk; Lee, Seung-Jae; Hwang, Jin-Woo; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Seong-Eun; Kim, Ee-Hwa; Moon, Sang-Ho; Jeon, Byung-Tae; Park, Pyo-Jam

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antioxidative activities of water and 70% ethanolic extracts from the Thymus quinquecostatus Celak (TQC) for natural antioxidant source. The antioxidant activities were compared with other natural and synthetic antioxidants. The levels of total polyphenols and flavonoids were also determined. The extracts were found to have different levels of antioxidant properties in a few kind of assay. The results showed that higher radical scavenging activity, reducing power and antioxidant capacity in FRAP than those of BHT as a positive control. In addition, the extracts from the TQC leaf and stem showed stronger antioxidant activity than that of vitamin C, α-tocopherol in ferric thiocyanate (FTC) and thiobarbituric acid (TBA) methods. Cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic effect of water extracts from TQC was also prevented t-BHP-induced toxicity in Chang liver cells. Therefore, these results indicate that TQC extracts have antioxidant properties through its ability to enhance the cell viability, reduction of production of ROS, inhibition of oxidative damage, mitochondria dysfunction and ultimately inhibition of cell apoptosis. Based on the results described above, it is suggested that TQC has the potential to protect liver on t-BHP-induced cell damage and should be considered as a prospective functional food. PMID:22921350

  4. Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: An FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Cakmak G.; Miller L.; Zorlu, F.; Severcan, F.

    2012-03-03

    Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH{sub 2} groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH{sub 3} groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  5. Pretreatment with transforming growth factor beta-3 protects small intestinal stem cells against radiation damage in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Potten, C. S.; Booth, D.; Haley, J. D.

    1997-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, with its rapid cell replacement, is sensitive to cytotoxic damage and can be a site of dose-limiting toxicity in cancer therapy. Here, we have investigated the use of one growth modulator to manipulate the cell cycle status of gastrointestinal stem cells before cytotoxic exposure to minimize damage to this normal tissue. Transforming growth factor beta-3 (TGF-beta3), a known inhibitor of cell cycle progression through G1, was used to alter intestinal crypt stem cell sensitivity before 12-16 Gy of gamma irradiation, which was used as a model cytotoxic agent. Using a crypt microcolony assay as a measure of functional competence of gastrointestinal stem cells, it was shown that the administration of TGF-beta3 over a 24-h period before irradiation increased the number of surviving crypts by four- to six-fold. To test whether changes in crypt survival are reflected in the well-being of the animal, survival time analyses were performed. After 14.5 Gy of radiation, only 35% of the animals survived within a period of about 12 days, while prior treatment with TGF-beta3 provided significant protection against this early gastrointestinal animal death, with 95% of the treated animals surviving for greater than 30 days. PMID:9166937

  6. Alterations in antioxidant enzyme activities and oxidative damage in alcoholic rat tissues: protective role of Thespesia populnea.

    PubMed

    Pandanaboina, Sahitya Chetan; Kondeti, Shanmugam Ramudu; Rajbanshi, Sangeetha Lakshmi; Kunala, Pavan Nagavenkata; Pandanaboina, Saritha; Pandanaboina, Murali Mohan; Wudayagiri, Rajendra

    2012-05-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced hepato-renal injury and the development of new approaches to its treatment have been reported in various works. This study involves alcohol-induced oxidative stress linked to the metabolism of ethanol involving both mitochondrial and peroxisomal fractions of liver and kidney. Alcohol treatment resulted in the depletion of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST) activities, and reduced glutathione (GSH) content, higher level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and lower levels of protein carbonyls (PC) causing malfunction of hepatic and renal tissues, when compared to control rats. Thespesia populnea (TP) leaf extracts, administered to chronic alcohol ingested rats, were envisaged to possess significant antioxidant defence properties and help in the recovery of tissues from alcohol-induced oxidative damage. The results showed that degenerative changes in hepatic and renal cells of alcoholic groups were minimized by the administration of TP leaf extracts as also revealed by histopathological examination. The current findings indicate that treatment with TP extracts reduces alcohol-induced oxidative stress, thereby protecting the hepatic and renal tissue from alcohol-induced damage. PMID:26434274

  7. Iron-Mediated Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization in Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Oxidative Damage and Apoptosis: Protective Effects of Quercetin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanyan; Chen, Man; Xu, Yanyan; Yu, Xiao; Xiong, Ting; Du, Min; Sun, Jian; Liu, Liegang; Tang, Yuhan; Yao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Iron, in its free ferrous states, can catalyze Fenton reaction to produce OH∙, which is recognized as a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). As a result of continuous decomposition of iron-containing compounds, lysosomes contain a pool of redox-active iron. To investigate the important role of intralysosomal iron in alcoholic liver injury and the potential protection of quercetin, male C57BL/6J mice fed by Lieber De Carli diets containing ethanol (30% of total calories) were cotreated by quercetin or deferoxamine (DFO) for 15 weeks and ethanol-incubated mice primary hepatocytes were pretreated with FeCl3, DFO, and bafilomycin A1 at their optimal concentrations and exposure times. Chronic ethanol consumption caused an evident increase in lysosomal redox-active iron accompanying sustained oxidative damage. Iron-mediated ROS could trigger lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and subsequent mitochondria apoptosis. The hepatotoxicity was attenuated by reducing lysosomal iron while being exacerbated by escalating lysosomal iron. Quercetin substantially alleviated the alcoholic liver oxidative damage and apoptosis by decreasing lysosome iron and ameliorating iron-mediated LMP, which provided a new prospective of the use of quercetin against ALD. PMID:27057276

  8. Resveratrol Protects against High-Fat Diet Induced Renal Pathological Damage and Cell Senescence by Activating SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nannan; Li, Zhongchi; Xu, Kang; Wang, Yanying; Wang, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-related renal diseases have been a worldwide issue. Effective strategy that prevents high fat-diet induced renal damage is of great significance. Resveratrol, a natural plant polyphenol, is famous for its antioxidant activity, cardioprotective effects and anticancer properties. However whether resveratrol can play a role in the treatment of renal diseases is unknown. In this study, we added resveratrol in normal glucose or high glucose medium and provide evidences that resveratrol protects against high-glucose triggered oxidative stress and cell senescence. Moreover, mice were fed with standard diet, standard diet plus resveratrol, high-fat diet or high-fat diet plus resveratrol for 3 months, and results show that resveratrol treatment prevents high-fat diet induced renal pathological damage by activating SIRT1, a key member in the mammalian sirtuin family that response to calorie restriction life-extension method. This research confirms the potential role of resveratrol in the treatment of renal diseases and may provide an effective and convenient method to mimic the beneficial effects of calorie restriction. PMID:27582325

  9. Protective effect of boldine on oxidative mitochondrial damage in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Jang, Y Y; Song, J H; Shin, Y K; Han, E S; Lee, C S

    2000-10-01

    Increased oxidative stress has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of diabetic tissue damage. Several antioxidants have been described as beneficial for oxidative stress-associated diseases. Boldine ([s]-2,9-dihydroxy-1, 10-dimethoxyaporphine) is a major alkaloid found in the leaves and bark of boldo (Peumus boldus Molina), and has been shown to possess antioxidant activity and anti-inflammatory effects. From this point of view, the possible anti-diabetic effect of boldine and its mechanism were evaluated. The experiments were performed on male rats divided into four groups: control, boldine (100 mg kg(-1), daily in drinking water), diabetic [single dose of 80 mg kg(-1)of streptozotocin (STZ), i.p.] and diabetic simultaneously fed with boldine for 8 weeks. Diabetic status was evaluated periodically with changes of plasma glucose levels and body weight in rats. The effect of boldine on the STZ-induced diabetic rats was examined with the formation of malondialdehydes and carbonyls and the activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) in mitochondria of the pancreas, kidney and liver. The scavenging action of boldine on oxygen free radicals and the effect on mitochondrial free-radical production were also investigated. The treatment of boldine attenuated the development of hyperglycemia and weight loss induced by STZ injection in rats. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and carbonyls in liver, kidney and pancreas mitochondria were significantly increased in STZ-treated rats and decreased after boldine administration. The activities of mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in the liver, pancreas and kidney were significantly elevated in STZ-treated rats. Boldine administration decreased STZ-induced elevation of MnSOD activity in kidney and pancreas mitochondria, but not in liver mitochondria. In the STZ-treated group, glutathione peroxidase activities decreased in liver

  10. Anti-proliferative activity and protection against oxidative DNA damage by punicalagin isolated from pomegranate husk

    PubMed Central

    Aqil, Farrukh; Munagala, Radha; Vadhanam, Manicka V.; Kausar, Hina; Jeyabalan, Jeyaprakash; Schultz, David J.; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2012-01-01

    Ellagitannins are the most abundant polyphenols in pomegranate (Punica granatum) husk and contribute greatly towards its biological properties. A pre-enriched pomegranate husk powder was extracted with water and then further purified by an Amberlite XAD-16 column. Punicalagin (PC) anomers were eluted using a gradient of methanol and water. Fractions eluted with 20% and 25% methanol yielded 1.08 g of light brown powder (purity > 97%) from a total of 40 g of extract. This fraction was identified as PC by HPLC-UV using reference compounds and confirmed by FTICR-MS analysis. PC (10–40 µM) was found to significantly inhibit oxidative DNA products, about 70% inhibition at 40 µM (p=0.0017), resulting from Cu2+-catalyzed redox cycling of 4-hydroxy-17β-estradiol as analyzed by 32P-postlabeling. Evidence of high antioxidant activity of PC was also obtained based on ORAC assay (1556±79 µmol of TE/g), as well as by 2,2′-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS)-, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenging and ferrous ion-chelating activities (IC50=1.1, 17.1, 24 and 45.4 µg/ml, respectively). Further, PC exhibited strong anti-proliferative activity against the human lung, breast and cervical cancer cell lines. Together, these data suggest that PC can be isolated in its purified form by simple column chromatography, inhibits oxidative DNA damage and possesses high anti-proliferative activity. PMID:23493479

  11. Genipin protects lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptotic liver damage in D-galactosamine-sensitized mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok-Joo; Kim, Joon-Ki; Lee, Dong-Ung; Kwak, Jong-Hwan; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2010-06-10

    This study examined the effects of genipin, isolated from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, on d-galactosamine (GalN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hepatic apoptosis and liver failure. Mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of genipin (25, 50, 100 and 200mg/kg) 1h before GalN (700mg/kg)/LPS (10microg/kg) administration. The survival rate of the genipin group was significantly higher than that of the control. Genipin markedly reduced the increases in serum aminotransferase activities and lipid peroxidation. The glutathione content decreased in GalN/LPS group, and this decrease was attenuated by genipin. Increases in serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), which were observed in GalN/LPS-treated mice, were significantly reduced by genipin. Genipin attenuated the GalN/LPS-induced apoptosis of hepatocytes, as estimated by the caspase-3 and -8 activity assay, TNF-R1 associated death domain (TRADD) protein measurement and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) method. Moreover, increased cytosolic cytochrome c protein was reduced by genipin. After 3h of GalN/LPS injection, nuclear phosphorylated c-Jun (p-c-Jun) level was significantly increased, whereas it was attenuated by genipin. Also, the increased nuclear level of nuclear factor-kappaB and the decreased cytosolic level of IkappaB-alpha protein were significantly attenuated by genipin. Our results suggest that genipin offers marked hepatoprotection against damage induced by GalN/LPS related with its antioxidative, anti-apoptotic activities, and inhibition of NF-kappaB nuclear translocation and nuclear p-c-Jun expression. PMID:20303938

  12. Protection from Cigarette Smoke-Induced Lung Dysfunction and Damage by H2 Relaxin (Serelaxin).

    PubMed

    Pini, Alessandro; Boccalini, Giulia; Lucarini, Laura; Catarinicchia, Stefano; Guasti, Daniele; Masini, Emanuela; Bani, Daniele; Nistri, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is the major etiologic factor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is characterized by airway remodeling, lung inflammation and fibrosis, emphysema, and respiratory failure. The current therapies can improve COPD management but cannot arrest its progression and reduce mortality. Hence, there is a major interest in identifying molecules susceptible of development into new drugs to prevent or reduce CS-induced lung injury. Serelaxin (RLX), or recombinant human relaxin-2, is a promising candidate because of its anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic properties highlighted in lung disease models. Here, we used a guinea pig model of CS-induced lung inflammation, and remodeling reproducing some of the hallmarks of COPD. Animals exposed chronically to CS (8 weeks) were treated with vehicle or RLX, delivered by osmotic pumps (1 or 10 μg/day) or aerosol (10 μg/ml/day) during CS treatment. Controls were nonsmoking animals. RLX maintained airway compliance to a control-like pattern, likely because of its capability to counteract lung inflammation and bronchial remodeling. In fact, treatment of CS-exposed animals with RLX reduced the inflammatory recruitment of leukocytes, accompanied by a significant reduction of the release of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-1β). Moreover, RLX was able to counteract the adverse bronchial remodeling and emphysema induced by CS exposure by reducing goblet cell hyperplasia, smooth muscle thickening, and fibrosis. Of note, RLX delivered by aerosol has shown a comparable efficacy to systemic administration in reducing CS-induced lung dysfunction and damage. In conclusion, RLX emerges as a new molecule to counteract CS-induced inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27048661

  13. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between damaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur because of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A scoping study was conducted to learn what parameters are important for core damage propagation, and to obtain initial estimates of core melt mass for addressing recriticality and steam explosion events. The study included investigating the effects of the plate contact area, the convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity upon fuel swelling, and the initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects on damage propagation. The results provide useful insights into how various uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  14. [Protecting Safety During Dust Fires and Dust Explosions - The Example of the Formosa Fun Coast Water Park Accident].

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Hong; Wu, Jia-Wun; Li, Ya-Cing; Tang, Jia-Suei; Hsieh, Chun-Chien

    2016-02-01

    This paper will explore the fire and explosion characteristics of cornstarch powder as well as strategies for protecting the safety of people who are involved a dust fire or dust explosion. We discuss the 5 elements of dust explosions and conduct tests to analyze the fire and explosion characteristics of differently colored powders (yellow, golden yellow, pink, purple, orange and green). The results show that, while all of the tested powders were difficult to ignite, low moisture content was associated with significantly greater risks of ignition and flame spread. We found the auto-ignition temperature (AIT) of air-borne cornstarch powder to be between 385°C and 405°C, with yellow-colored cornstarch powder showing the highest AIT and pink-colored cornstarch powder showing the lowest AIT. The volume resistivity of all powder samples was approximately 108 Ω.m, indicating that they were nonconductive. Lighters and cigarettes are effective ignition sources, as their lit temperatures are higher than the AIT of cornstarch powder. In order to better protect the safety of individuals at venues where cornstarch powder is released, explosion control measures such as explosion containment facilities, vents, and explosion suppression and isolation devices should be installed. Furthermore, employees that work at these venues should be better trained in explosion prevention and control measures. We hope this article is a reminder to the public to recognize the fire and explosion characteristics of flammable powders as well as the preventive and control measures for dust explosions. PMID:26813056

  15. Evaluation of the Protective Effect of Silibinin Against Diazinon Induced Hepatotoxicity and Free-Radical Damage in Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Beydilli, Halil; Yilmaz, Nigar; Cetin, Esin Sakalli; Topal, Yasar; Celik, Ozgur Ilhan; Sahin, Cem; Topal, Hatice; Cigerci, Ibrahim Hakki; Sozen, Hamdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diazinon (0,0-Diethyl 0-(1-6-methyl-2-isoprophyl 4 pyrimidinyl) phosphorothioate) (DI) is a very effective organophosphate pesticide, used widely in agriculture. Consequently, data on poisoning cases secondary to DI exposure are important. The DI may affect a variety of tissues, including liver. Silibinin is a pharmacologically active constitute of Silybum marianum, with documented antioxidant activity. Objectives: The aim of our study was to evaluate both histopathologically and biochemically whether silibinin is protective in DI induced liver damage. Materials and Methods: Thirty two Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups, as follows: 1) control group - oral corn oil was given; 2) DI group - rats were administered orally 335 mg/kg in the corn oil solution; 3) Silibinin group - 100 mg/kg/day silibinin was given alone orally, every 24 hours for 7 days; 4) Silibinin + DI group - DI plus silibinin was given. All rats were sacrificed at the end of experiment. Superoxide dismutases (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), nitric oxide (NO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were investigated in serum and liver tissue. In addition, serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) enzyme activities were evaluated. The liver tissue was evaluated histopathologically with Hematoxilin & Eosin dye. Results: Biochemically, ALT, AST, NO, MPO in serum and NO, MPO in liver tissue were found to be significantly higher in DI group, compared to control group (P < 0.001). In Group Silibinin + DI, serum AST, ALT, NO, MPO levels were significantly lower (P < 0.01), and both serum and tissue SOD activities were significantly higher, compared to DI group (P < 0.001). Diazinon induced histopathological changes in liver tissue were: severe sinusoidal dilatation, moderate disruption of the radial alignment of hepatocytes around the central vein, severe vacuolization in the hepatocyte cytoplasm, inflammation around central vein and portal region. In rats

  16. [Pulse-modulated Electromagnetic Radiation of Extremely High Frequencies Protects Cellular DNA against Damaging Effect of Physico-Chemical Factors in vitro].

    PubMed

    Gapeyev, A B; Lukyanova, N A

    2015-01-01

    Using a comet assay technique, we investigated protective effects of. extremely high frequency electromagnetic radiation in combination with the damaging effect of X-ray irradiation, the effect of damaging agents hydrogen peroxide and methyl methanesulfonate on DNA in mouse whole blood leukocytes. It was shown that the preliminary exposure of the cells to low intensity pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation (42.2 GHz, 0.1 mW/cm2, 20-min exposure, modulation frequencies of 1 and 16 Hz) caused protective effects decreasing the DNA damage by 20-45%. The efficacy of pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation depended on the type of genotoxic agent and increased in a row methyl methanesulfonate--X-rays--hydrogen peroxide. Continuous electromagnetic radiation was ineffective. The mechanisms of protective effects may be connected with an induction of the adaptive response by nanomolar concentrations of reactive oxygen species formed by pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation. PMID:26591599

  17. Oxidative damage to mitochondria and protection by ebselen and other antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswami, V; Sies, H

    1990-10-01

    Iron/ascorbate induced lipid peroxidation in liver mitochondria isolated from normal and glutathione-depleted rats was monitored by low-level chemiluminescence and by accumulation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS). Antioxidant capacity was assessed by the duration of the lag phase preceding the onset of active peroxidation. The lag phases in state 4 and in the presence of uncouplers were similar, but shorter in the presence of ADP (state 3). In glutathione-depleted rats the lag periods were less than those in normal mitochondria. A biphasic pattern of loss of membrane alpha-tocopherol was typical in state 4 with about 55% remaining after 40 min, while in presence of ADP there was a steady and rapid loss to about 30% of the initial level. Synthetic antioxidants such as ebselen or its glutathione adduct protected mitochondrial membranes against peroxidative reactions. There was a 5-fold increase in the lag phase with 1 microM ebselen in state 4 (lag doubling concentration, 0.4 microM) and a significantly lower rate of loss of alpha-tocopherol with about 90% of the initial level still remaining after 40 min. Likewise, the lag doubling concentrations were 0.04 microM for diethyldithiocarbamate, 0.3 microM for 5-hydroxyindole, 10 microM for dihydroxyphenylalanine and serotonin, and about 40 microM for epinephrine and norepinephrine. PMID:2171535

  18. In vitro protective effects of resveratrol against oxidative damage in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; F Villena; Gallardo, M J

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (RV) is a potent antioxidant, anticancer and anti-inflammatory agent. Its main target of action is the cell membrane; however, its effect on that of human erythrocytes has been scarcely investigated. With the aim to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the interaction of RV with cell membranes both human erythrocytes and molecular models of its membrane have been utilized. The latter consisted in bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), representative of phospholipid classes located in the outer and inner monolayers of the erythrocyte membrane, respectively. Results by X-ray diffraction showed that RV produced a significant structural perturbation on DMPC bilayers, but no effects were observed in DMPE. Scanning electron (SEM) and defocusing microscopy (DM) observations showed that RV induced morphological alterations to the red cells from the normal discoid shape to echinocytes. These results imply that RV was located in the outer monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane. Results of its antioxidant properties showed that RV neutralized the oxidative capacity of HClO on DMPC and DMPE bilayers. On the other hand, SEM and DM observations as well as hemolysis assays demonstrated the protective effect of RV against the deleterious effects of HClO upon human erythrocytes. PMID:25268679

  19. Prochelator BHAPI Protects Cells against Paraquat-Induced Damage by ROS-Triggered Iron Chelation

    PubMed Central

    Kielar, Filip; Helsel, Marian E.; Wang, Qin

    2012-01-01

    A prochelator named BHAPI (N′-(1-(2-(4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaborolan-2-yl)benzyloxy)phenyl)ethylidene)isonitotinohdrazide) based on the structure of experimental metal chelator HAPI (N′-[1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)ethyliden]isonicotinoylhydrazide) has been synthesized. The prochelator, which shows limited affinity for metal ions, is converted efficiently upon reaction with hydrogen peroxide into its chelator form, which binds di- and trivalent metal ions, including Zn2+, Cu2+ and Fe3+. This work shows that the prochelator has a protective effect on cells under oxidative stress induced by either hydrogen peroxide or the cytotoxic herbicide paraquat. The effect of BHAPI and HAPI on cellular iron status was assessed by monitoring the mRNA level of the transferrin receptor. Whereas the chelator HAPI induces iron deficiency in cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells, the prochelator does not, providing evidence that the differential metal-binding capacity of these compounds observed in vitro is replicated in the cellular context. PMID:22700084

  20. Gastric Mucosal Protection by Aegle Marmelos Against Gastric Mucosal Damage: Role of Enterochromaffin Cell and Serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Purnima; Dutta, Shubha R.; Guha, Debjani

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) released from enterochromaffin (EC) cells in gastric mucosa inhibits gastric acidity by increasing the gastric mucus secretion. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of aqueous extract of Aegle marmelos (AM) ripe fruit pulp (250 mg/kg body weight) on mean ulcer index (MUI), EC cells, 5-HT content, and adherent mucosal thickness of ulcerated gastric tissue in adult albino rats. Material and Methods: Ulceration was induced by using aspirin (500 mg/kg, p.o.), cerebellar nodular lesion and applying cold-restraint stress. Results: In all cases increased MUI in gastric tissue along with decreased EC cell count was observed with concomitant decrease of 5-HT content and adherent mucosal thickness (P < 0.05). Pretreatment with AM for 14 days decreased MUI, increased EC cell count, and 5-HT content as well as adherent mucosal thickness in all ulcerated group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: AM produces gastric mucosal protection mediated by increased EC cell count and 5-HT levels. PMID:25672237

  1. Serum Response Factor Protects Retinal Ganglion Cells Against High-Glucose Damage.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan; Wang, Liang; Zhao, Junhong; Zhang, Hongbing; Tian, Ying; Liang, Houcheng; Ma, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Serum response factor (SRF), which encodes the MADS-box family of related proteins, is a common transcription factor related to the expression of genes associated with cell survival. However, SRF's role in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after high-glucose injury remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the protective role of SRF after high-glucose injury and its underlying mechanism. The in vitro RGC model subjected to high glucose was established by employing a 50 mmol/L glucose culture environment. As detected by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot, SRF was significantly upregulated in RGCs treated with high glucose. Overexpression of SRF significantly promoted survival among RGCs exposed to high glucose and inhibited RGC apoptosis. Knockdown of SRF exerted an inverse effect. Moreover, SRF upregulation enhanced expression of an antioxidant protein, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2), via control of the Fos-related antigen 1 (Fra-1). SRF upregulation also affected RGC survival after high-glucose treatment. Our findings showed that overexpression of SRF promoted survival of RGCs after high-glucose injury by regulating Fra-1 and Nrf2. PMID:26803311

  2. Moricandia arvensis extracts protect against DNA damage, mutagenesis in bacteria system and scavenge the superoxide anion.

    PubMed

    Skandrani, Ines; Bouhlel, Ines; Limem, Ilef; Boubaker, Jihed; Bhouri, Wissem; Neffati, Aicha; Ben Sghaier, Mohamed; Kilani, Soumaya; Ghedira, Kamel; Ghedira-Chekir, Leila

    2009-02-01

    The mutagenic potential of total aqueous, total oligomers flavonoids (TOF), ethyl acetate (EA), chloroform (Chl), petroleum ether (PE) and methanol (MeOH) extracts from aerial parts of Moricandia arvensis was assessed using Ames Salmonella tester strains TA100 and TA1535 with and without metabolic activation (S9), and using plasmid pBluescript DNA assay. None of the different extracts produced a mutagenic effect, except aqueous extract when incubated with Salmonella typhimurium TA100 after metabolic activation. Likewise, the antimutagenicity of the same extracts was tested using the "Ames test". Our results showed that M. arvensis extracts possess antimutagenic effects against sodium azide (SA) in the two tested Salmonella assay systems, except metabolized aqueous and PE extracts when tested with S. typhimurium TA100 assay system. Different extracts were also found to be effective in protecting plasmid DNA against the strand breakage induced by hydroxyl radicals, except PE and aqueous extracts. Antioxidant capacity of the tested extracts was evaluated using the enzymatic (xanthine/xanthine oxidase assay) (X/XOD) and the non enzymatic (NBT/Riboflavine assay) systems. TOF extract was the more effective one in inhibiting both xanthine oxidase activity and NBT reduction. PMID:19015021

  3. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1992, a status report; Volume 18: Appendices B, C, D, E, F, and G

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-01

    This document is part of a report which documents 1992 operational events selected as accident sequence precursors. This report describes the 27 precursors identified from the 1992 licensee event reports. It also describe containment-related events; {open_quote}interesting{close_quote} events; potentially significant events that were considered impractical to analyze; copies of the licensee event reports which were cited in the cases above; and comments from the licensee and NRC in response to the preliminary reports.

  4. Transforming growth factor alpha treatment alters intracellular calcium levels in hair cells and protects them from ototoxic damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Staecker, H; Dazert, S; Malgrange, B; Lefebvre, P P; Ryan, A F; Van de Water, T R

    1997-07-01

    To determine if transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) pretreatment protects hair cells from aminoglycoside induced injury by modifying their intracellular calcium concentration, we assayed hair cell calcium levels in organ of Corti explants both before and after aminoglycoside (i.e. neomycin, 10(-3) M) exposure either with or without growth factor pretreatment. After TGF alpha (500 ng/ml) treatment, the intracellular calcium level of hair cells showed a five-fold increase as compared to the levels observed in the hair cells of control cultures. After ototoxin exposure, calcium levels in hair cells of control explants showed an increase relative to their baseline levels, while in the presence of growth factors pretreatment, hair cells showed a relative reduction in calcium levels. Pretreatment of organ of Corti explants afforded significant protection of hair cell stereocilia bundle morphology from ototoxic damage when compared to explants exposed to ototoxin alone. This study correlates a rise in hair cell calcium levels with the otoprotection of hair cells by TGF alpha in organ of Corti explants. PMID:9263032

  5. Protective Effect of Carvacrol on Oxidative Stress and Cellular DNA Damage Induced by UVB Irradiation in Human Peripheral Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Aristatile, Balakrishnan; Al-Numair, Khalid S; Al-Assaf, Abdullah H; Veeramani, Chinnadurai; Pugalendi, Kodukkur Viswanathan

    2015-11-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB; 280-320 nm) radiation induces the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the biological system. In this study, we examined the protective effect of carvacrol on UVB-induced lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage with reference to alterations in cellular an-tioxidant status in human lymphocytes. A series of in vitro assays (hydroxyl radical, superoxide, nitric oxide, DPPH (2,2-Diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl), and ABTS (2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical scavenging assays) demonstrate antioxidant property of carvacrol in our study. UVB exposure significantly increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), lipid hydroperoxides (LHPs), % tail DNA and tail moment; decreased % cell viability and antioxidant status in UVB-irradiated lymphocytes. Treatment with carvacrol 30 min prior to UVB-exposure resulted in a significant decline of TBARS, LHP, % tail DNA, and tail moment and increased % cell viability as carvacrol concentration increased. UVB irradiated lymphocytes with carvacrol alone (at 10 μg/mL) gave no significant change in cell viability, TBARS, LHP, % tail DNA, and tail moment when compared with normal lymphocytes. On the basis of our results, we conclude that carvacrol, a dietary antioxidant, mediates its protective effect through modulation of UVB-induced ROS. PMID:26768646

  6. Kininogen deficiency protects from ischemic neurodegeneration in mice by reducing thrombosis, blood-brain barrier damage, and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Langhauser, Friederike; Göb, Eva; Kraft, Peter; Geis, Christian; Schmitt, Joachim; Brede, Marc; Göbel, Kerstin; Helluy, Xavier; Pham, Mirko; Bendszus, Martin; Jakob, Peter; Stoll, Guido; Meuth, Sven G.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; McCrae, Keith R.

    2012-01-01

    Thrombosis and inflammation are hallmarks of ischemic stroke still unamenable to therapeutic interventions. High-molecular-weight kininogen (KNG) is a central constituent of the contact-kinin system which represents an interface between thrombotic and inflammatory circuits and is critically involved in stroke development. Kng−/− mice are protected from thrombosis after artificial vessel wall injury and lack the proinflammatory mediator bradykinin. We investigated the consequences of KNG deficiency in models of ischemic stroke. Kng−/− mice of either sex subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion developed dramatically smaller brain infarctions and less severe neurologic deficits without an increase in infarct-associated hemorrhage. This protective effect was preserved at later stages of infarction as well as in elderly mice. Targeting KNG reduced thrombus formation in ischemic vessels and improved cerebral blood flow, and reconstitution of KNG-deficient mice with human KNG or bradykinin restored clot deposition and infarct susceptibility. Moreover, mice deficient in KNG showed less severe blood-brain barrier damage and edema formation, and the local inflammatory response was reduced compared with controls. Because KNG appears to be instrumental in pathologic thrombus formation and inflammation but dispensable for hemostasis, KNG inhibition may offer a selective and safe strategy for combating stroke and other thromboembolic diseases. PMID:22936662

  7. Kininogen deficiency protects from ischemic neurodegeneration in mice by reducing thrombosis, blood-brain barrier damage, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Langhauser, Friederike; Göb, Eva; Kraft, Peter; Geis, Christian; Schmitt, Joachim; Brede, Marc; Göbel, Kerstin; Helluy, Xavier; Pham, Mirko; Bendszus, Martin; Jakob, Peter; Stoll, Guido; Meuth, Sven G; Nieswandt, Bernhard; McCrae, Keith R; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2012-11-01

    Thrombosis and inflammation are hallmarks of ischemic stroke still unamenable to therapeutic interventions. High-molecular-weight kininogen (KNG) is a central constituent of the contact-kinin system which represents an interface between thrombotic and inflammatory circuits and is critically involved in stroke development. Kng(-/-) mice are protected from thrombosis after artificial vessel wall injury and lack the proinflammatory mediator bradykinin. We investigated the consequences of KNG deficiency in models of ischemic stroke. Kng(-/-) mice of either sex subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion developed dramatically smaller brain infarctions and less severe neurologic deficits without an increase in infarct-associated hemorrhage. This protective effect was preserved at later stages of infarction as well as in elderly mice. Targeting KNG reduced thrombus formation in ischemic vessels and improved cerebral blood flow, and reconstitution of KNG-deficient mice with human KNG or bradykinin restored clot deposition and infarct susceptibility. Moreover, mice deficient in KNG showed less severe blood-brain barrier damage and edema formation, and the local inflammatory response was reduced compared with controls. Because KNG appears to be instrumental in pathologic thrombus formation and inflammation but dispensable for hemostasis, KNG inhibition may offer a selective and safe strategy for combating stroke and other thromboembolic diseases. PMID:22936662

  8. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase B2 is Highly Expressed in the Retina and Protects Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Cells from Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Iranzu; Larrayoz, Ignacio M.; Campos, Maria M.; Rodriguez, Ignacio R.

    2010-01-01

    Methionine sulfoxide reductase B2 (MSRB2) is a mitochondrial enzyme that converts methionine sulfoxide (R) enantiomer back to methionine. This enzyme is suspected of functioning to protect mitochondrial proteins from oxidative damage. In this study we report that the retina is one of the human tissues with highest levels of MSRB2 mRNA expression. Other tissues with high expression were heart, kidney and skeletal muscle. Over-expression of a MSRB2-GFP fusion protein increased the MSR enzymatic activity three-fold in stably transfected cultured RPE cells. This overexpression augmented the resistance of these cells to the toxicity induced by 7-ketocholesterol, tert-butyl hydroperoxide and all-trans retinoic acid. By contrast, knockdown of MSRB2 by a miRNA in stably transfected cells did not convey increased sensitivity to the oxidative stress. In the monkey retina MSRB2 localized to the ganglion cell layer (GLC), the outer plexiform layer (OPL) and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). MSRB2 expression is most pronounced in the OPL of the macula and foveal regions suggesting an association with the cone synaptic mitochondria. Our data suggests that MSRB2 plays an important function in protecting cones from multiple type of oxidative stress and may be critical in preserving central vision. PMID:20026324

  9. Protection of DNA and erythrocytes from free radical induced oxidative damage by black gram (Vigna mungo L.) husk extract.

    PubMed

    Girish, Talakatta K; Vasudevaraju, Padmaraju; Prasada Rao, Ummiti J S

    2012-05-01

    Antioxidants present in various plant tissues exhibit health benefits by scavenging reactive oxygen species generated under various pathophysiological conditions. In the present study, bioactive compounds from black gram husk were extracted with water and the protection of black gram husk (BGH) extract against oxidative damage in DNA and erythrocytes were studied. BGH extract had total polyphenol content of 59 mg of gallic acid equivalents (GAE). The phenolic acids identified in the extract using RP-HPLC were gallic, protocatechuic, gentisic and ferulic acids. The extract showed good antioxidant properties. The IC(50) value for DPPH radical scavenging activity was found to be 3.92 μg of GAE. The BGH extract also showed α-glucosidase inhibition and the IC(50) value was found to be 2.78 μg of GAE. The oxidative hemolysis caused by hydrogen peroxide in rat erythrocytes was inhibited by BGH extract in a dose dependent manner. The IC(50) values for BGH extract and BHA for hemolysis were 11.5 and 14 μg of GAE, respectively. Morphological changes in erythrocyte membrane caused by hydrogen peroxide were protected by BGH extract. As BGH extract exhibited various antioxidant properties in different systems, it could be used as a functional food or nutraceutical product for health benefits. PMID:22330200

  10. Synergistic Application of Black Tea Extracts and Lactic Acid Bacteria in Protecting Human Colonocytes against Oxidative Damage.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Danyue; Shah, Nagendra P

    2016-03-23

    In view of the potential of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to enhance the antioxidant activity of food products, this work explored the effectiveness of LAB fermented black tea samples in alleviating H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human colonocytes. The antioxidant capacity of tea samples was evaluated in terms of cyto-protectiveness, mitochondria membrane potential (Δψm)-stabilizing activity, ROS-inhibitory effect, and antioxidant enzyme-modulating activity. The effect on oxidative DNA damage and repair was studied in CCD 841 by comet assay. Results showed that the protective effect of tea pretreatment was more pronounced in normal cells (CCD 841) than in carcinomas (Caco-2), and fermented samples were invariably more effective. Higher cell viability and Δψm were maintained and ROS production was markedly inhibited with tea pretreatment. The fermented tea samples also remarkably stimulated DNA repair, resulting in fewer strand breaks and oxidative lesions. Our study implied that LAB fermentation may be an efficient way to enhance the antioxidative effectiveness of black tea flavonoid-enriched foods. PMID:26790920

  11. Protective effects of melatonin against oxidative damage induced by Egyptian cobra (Naja haje) crude venom in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E; Ortiz, Francisco; Leonardo-Mendonça, Roberto C; Vergano-Villodres, Roberto; Guerrero-Martínez, Jose Antonio; López, Luis C; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Escames, Germaine

    2015-03-01

    Naja haje envenomation is one of the leading causes of death due to snakebite. Antiserum therapy sometimes fails to provide enough protection against venom toxicity. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of melatonin against N. haje venom in rats. The animals were injected with venom (0.25mg/kg) and/or melatonin (10mg/kg) and compared with vehicle-treated rats. There was oxidative/nitrosative damage and apoptosis in the liver, heart, and kidneys of venom-injected rats. Melatonin counteracted the increased lipoperoxidation and nitric oxide, prevented decreased glutathione peroxidase and reductase activity, reduced the glutathione disulfide/glutathione (GSSG/GSH) ratio, and maintained the GSH pool. Furthermore, melatonin administration was associated with a reduction of apoptosis, which was increased in venom-injected rats. Overall, these results suggest that melatonin mitigates oxidative/nitrosative stress in venom-induced cardio-hepato-renal injury in rats. Our results suggest that melatonin treatment may ameliorate some of the effects of N. haje envenomation. PMID:25542296

  12. Endogenous dynorphin protects against neurotoxin-elicited nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuron damage and motor deficits in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The striato-nigral projecting pathway contains the highest concentrations of dynorphin in the brain. The functional role of this opioid peptide in the regulation of mesencephalic dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons is not clear. We reported previously that exogenous dynorphin exerts potent neuroprotective effects against inflammation-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in vitro. The present study was performed to investigate whether endogenous dynorphin has neuroprotective roles in vivo. Methods 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and methamphetamine (MA), two commonly used neurotoxins in rodent models of Parkinson’s disease, were administered to wild-type (Dyn+/+) and prodynorphin-deficient mice (Dyn−/−). We examined dopaminergic neurotoxicity by using an automated video tracking system, HPLC, immunocytochemistry, and reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results Treatment with MPTP resulted in behavioral impairments in both strains. However, these impairments were more pronounced in Dyn-l- than in Dyn+/+. Dyn−/− showed more severe MPTP-induced dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra and striatum than Dyn+/+. Similarly, the levels of dopamine and its metabolites in the striatum were depleted to a greater extent in Dyn−/− than in Dyn+/+. Additional mechanistic studies revealed that MPTP treatment caused a higher degree of microglial activation and M1 phenotype differentiation in Dyn−/− than in Dyn+/+. Consistent with these observations, prodynorphin deficiency also exacerbated neurotoxic effects induced by MA, although this effect was less pronounced than that of MPTP. Conclusions The in vivo results presented here extend our previous in vitro findings and further indicate that endogenous dynorphin plays a critical role in protecting dopaminergic neurons through its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:22695044

  13. Protective effect of curcumin on cyclosporin A-induced endothelial dysfunction, antioxidant capacity, and oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Sagiroglu, Tamer; Kanter, Mehmet; Yagci, Mehmet Ali; Sezer, Atakan; Erboga, Mustafa

    2014-05-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is the most widely used immunosuppressive drug for preventing graft rejection and autoimmune disease. However, the therapeutic treatment induces several side effects such as nephrotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, hypertension, and hepatotoxicity. Curcumin has been successfully used as a potent antioxidant against many pathophysiological states. This experimental study was performed to test, during CsA treatment, the alterations of curcumin antioxidant properties against CsA-induced endothelial dysfunction. Rats were divided into four groups: control, curcumin alone, CsA, and CsA + curcumin; each group containing eight animals. The animals in the CsA + curcumin group were treated with CsA (10 days, 25 mg/kg, orally) and curcumin (15 days, 200 mg/kg, orally, starting 5 days before CsA administration). At the end of the treatments, the animals were killed; serum and aorta tissue were treated for biochemical and morphological analyses. The results indicate that CsA-induced aortic endothelial dysfunction was characterized by morphological and ultrastructural alterations in tissue architecture, changes in malondialdehyde and ferric reducing/antioxidant power levels, and increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl-transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) expression. In conclusion, our data suggest that the imbalance between production of free oxygen radicals and antioxidant defence systems, due to CsA administration, is a mechanism responsible for oxidative stress. Moreover, we show that curcumin plays a protective action against CsA-induced endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress, as supported by biochemical, ultrastructural, immunohistochemical, and TUNEL results. PMID:22903178

  14. 50 CFR 25.72 - Reporting of accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., but in no event later than 24 hours after the accident, by the persons involved, to the refuge manager... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reporting of accidents. 25.72 Section 25... Reporting of accidents. Accidents involving damage to property, injury to the public or injury to...

  15. 50 CFR 25.72 - Reporting of accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., but in no event later than 24 hours after the accident, by the persons involved, to the refuge manager... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting of accidents. 25.72 Section 25... Reporting of accidents. Accidents involving damage to property, injury to the public or injury to...

  16. Protective effect of captopril against clozapine-induced myocarditis in rats: role of oxidative stress, proinflammatory cytokines and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Basel A; Metwally, Metwally E; El-khawanki, Mohamed M; Hashim, Alaa M

    2014-06-01

    Clozapine (CLZ) is the most effective therapeutic alternative in the treatment of resistant schizophrenia. However, the cardiotoxicity of CLZ, particularly in young patients, has raised concerns about its safety. Captopril is a well-known angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor with antioxidant properties effective in treating hypertension and heart failure. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of captopril against clozapine-induced myocarditis in rats and the possible mechanisms behind this effect. The effect of captopril treatment [5 or 10mg/kg/d, injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) for 21days] on the cardiotoxic effect of coadministered CLZ (25mg/kg/d, i.p.) was assessed. Myocarditis was assessed histopathologically, immunohistochemically and biochemically. Frozen heart specimens were used to determine the amount of lipid peroxides product (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-10) and DNA degradation product(8-OHdG). Coadministration of captopril with the tested doses of CLZ decreased the histological hallmarks and biochemical markers (CK-MP and LDH) of myocarditis. In addition, captopril attenuated the effects of CLZ on oxidative stress parameters, NO and serum and cardiac 8-OHdG levels. Captopril significantly attenuated the effect of CLZ on all measured parameters in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggested that captopril exerts a protective action against CLZ-induced myocarditis. Multiple mechanisms contribute to this effect, including a decrease in cardiac oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokines production, modulation of antioxidant status and protection from oxidative DNA damage. Hence, captopril may be effective in reducing the incidence and severity of CLZ-induced myocarditis in humans. PMID:24709159

  17. Renal deterioration caused by carcinogens as a consequence of free radical mediated tissue damage: a review of the protective action of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Gultekin, Fatih; Hicyilmaz, Hicran

    2007-10-01

    This brief review summarizes some of the publications that document the preventive role of melatonin in kidney damage caused by carcinogens such as 2-nitropropane, arsenic, carbon tetrachloride, nitrilotriacetic acid and potassium bromate. Numerous chemicals generate excessive free radicals that eventually induce renal worsening. Melatonin partially or totally prevents free radical mediated tissue damages induced by many carcinogens. Protective actions of melatonin against the harmful effects of carcinogens are believed to stem from its direct free radical scavenging and indirect antioxidant activities. Dietary or pharmacologically given melatonin may attenuate the oxidative stress, thereby mitigating the subsequent renal damage. PMID:17823789

  18. Methanol extract of Ocimum gratissimum protects murine peritoneal macrophages from nicotine toxicity by decreasing free radical generation, lipid and protein damage and enhances antioxidant protection

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Santanu Kar; Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Das, Subhasis

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, methanol extract of Ocimum gratissimum Linn (ME-Og) was tested against nicotine-induced murine peritoneal macrophage in vitro. Phytochemical analysis of ME-Og shown high amount of flavonoid and phenolic compound present in it. The cytotoxic effect of ME-Og was studied in murine peritoneal macrophages at different concentrations (0.1 to 100 µg/ml) using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. To establish the protective role of ME-Og against nicotine toxicity, peritoneal macrophages from mice were treated with nicotine (10 mM), nicotine + ME-Og (1 to 25 µg/ml) for 12 h in culture media. The significantly (p < 0.05) increased super oxide anion generation, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyls, oxidized glutathione levels were observed in nicotine-treated group as compared to control group; those were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in ME-Og supplemented groups in concentration dependent manner. More over, significantly (p < 0.05) reduced antioxidant status due to nicotine exposure was effectively ameliorated by ME-Og supplementation in murine peritoneal macrophages. Among the different concentration of ME-Og, maximum protecti