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Sample records for accident dosimeter intercomparison

  1. PNNL Results from 2009 Silene Criticality Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Robin L.; Conrady, Matthew M.

    2010-06-30

    This document reports the results of testing of the Hanford Personnel Nuclear Accident Dosimeter (PNAD) during a criticality accident dosimeter intercomparison exercise at the CEA Valduc Center on October 13, 14, and 15, 2009.

  2. PNNL Results from 2010 CALIBAN Criticality Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Robin L.; Conrady, Matthew M.

    2011-10-28

    This document reports the results of the Hanford personnel nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) and fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD) during a criticality accident dosimeter intercomparison exercise at the CEA Valduc Center on September 20-23, 2010. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) participated in a criticality accident dosimeter intercomparison exercise at the Commissariat a Energie Atomique (CEA) Valduc Center near Dijon, France on September 20-23, 2010. The intercomparison exercise was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nuclear Criticality Safety Program, with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as the lead Laboratory. PNNL was one of six invited DOE Laboratory participants. The other participating Laboratories were: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Savannah River Site (SRS), the Y-12 National Security Complex at Oak Ridge, and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The goals of PNNL's participation in the intercomparison exercise were to test and validate the procedures and algorithm currently used for the Hanford personnel nuclear accident dosimeters (PNADs) on the metallic reactor, CALIBAN, to test exposures to PNADs from the side and from behind a phantom, and to test PNADs that were taken from a historical batch of Hanford PNADs that had varying degrees of degradation of the bare indium foil. Similar testing of the PNADs was done on the Valduc SILENE test reactor in 2009 (Hill and Conrady, 2010). The CALIBAN results are reported here.

  3. Nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies.

    PubMed

    Sims, C S

    1989-09-01

    Twenty-two nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies utilizing the fast-pulse Health Physics Research Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducted since 1965. These studies have provided a total of 62 different organizations a forum for discussion of criticality accident dosimetry, an opportunity to test their neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry systems under a variety of simulated criticality accident conditions, and the experience of comparing results with reference dose values as well as with the measured results obtained by others making measurements under identical conditions. Sixty-nine nuclear accidents (27 with unmoderated neutron energy spectra and 42 with eight different shielded spectra) have been simulated in the studies. Neutron doses were in the 0.2-8.5 Gy range and gamma doses in the 0.1-2.0 Gy range. A total of 2,289 dose measurements (1,311 neutron, 978 gamma) were made during the intercomparisons. The primary methods of neutron dosimetry were activation foils, thermoluminescent dosimeters, and blood sodium activation. The main methods of gamma dose measurement were thermoluminescent dosimeters, radiophotoluminescent glass, and film. About 68% of the neutron measurements met the accuracy guidelines (+/- 25%) and about 52% of the gamma measurements met the accuracy criterion (+/- 20%) for accident dosimetry.

  4. Intercomparison of high energy neutron personnel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Akabani, G.; Loesch, R.M.

    1993-03-01

    An intercomparison of high-energy neutron personnel dosimeters was performed to evaluate the uniformity of the response characteristics of typical neutron dosimeters presently in use at US Department of Energy (DOE) accelerator facilities. It was necessary to perform an intercomparison because there are no national or international standards for high-energy neutron dosimetry. The testing that is presently under way for the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is limited to the use of neutron sources that range in energy from about 1 keV to 2 MeV. Therefore, the high-energy neutron dosimeters presently in use at DOE accelerator facilities are not being tested effectively. This intercomparison employed neutrons produced by the {sup 9}Be(p,n){sup 9}B interaction at the University of Washington cyclotron, using 50-MeV protons. The resulting neutron energy spectrum extended to a maximum of approximately 50-MeV, with a mean energy of about 20-MeV. Intercomparison results for currently used dosimeters, including Nuclear Type A (NTA) film, thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo, and track-etch dosimeters (TEDs), indicated a wide variation in response to identical doses of high-energy neutrons. Results of this study will be discussed along with a description of plans for future work.

  5. Angular dependence of a simple accident dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, R. T.; Romero, L. L.; Olsher, R. H.

    2004-01-01

    A simple dosimeter made of a sulfur tablet, bare and cadmium covered indium foils and a cadmium covered copper foil has been modeled using MCNP5. Studies of the model without phantom or other confounding factors have shown that the cross sections and fluence-to-dose factors generated by the Monte Carlo method agree with those generated by analytic expressions for the high energy component. The threshold cross sections for the detectors on a phantom were calculated. The resulting doses assigned agree well with exposures made to three critical assemblies. In this study the angular dependence on a phantom is studied and compared with measurements taken on the GODIVA reactor. The dosimeter positions on the phantom are facing the source, on the back and the side. In previous papers the modeling of a simple dosimeter made of a sulfur tablet, bare and cadmium covered indium foils and a cadmium covered copper foil has been modeled using MCNP5. The conclusion made was that most of the neutron dose from criticality assemblies results from the high energy neutron fluences determined by the sulfur and indium detectors. The results using doses measured from the GODIVA, SHEBA, and bare and lead shielded SILENE reactors confirmed this. The angular dependence of an accident dosemeter is of interest in evaluating the exposure of personnel. To investigate this effect accident dosemeters were placed on a phantom and exposed to the GODIVA reactor at phantom orientations of 0{sup o}, 45{sup o}, 90{sup o}, 135{sup o}, and 180{sup o} to the assembly center line.

  6. Seventeenth nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison study: August 11-15, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Greene, R.T.

    1981-04-01

    The Seventeenth Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted August 11-15, 1980, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Nuclear criticality accidents with three different neutron and gamma ray energy spectra were simulated by operating the Health Physics Research Reactor in the pulse mode. Participants from 13 organizations exposed dosimeters set up as area monitors and mounted on phantoms for personnel monitoring. Analysis of experimental results reported by participants showed that less than 60% of the neutron dose measurements using foil activation, thermoluminescent, or sodium activation methods and less than 20% of the gamma dose measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters met nuclear criticality accident dosimetry guidelines which suggest accuracies of +-25% for neutron dose and +-20% for gamma dose. This indicates that continued development and evaluation of criticality accident dosimetry systems for area and personnel monitoring are required to improve measurement accuracy so that existing standards can be met.

  7. Evaluation of LLNL's Nuclear Accident Dosimeters at the CALIBAN Reactor September 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, D P; Wysong, A R; Heinrichs, D P; Wong, C T; Merritt, M J; Topper, J D; Gressmann, F A; Madden, D J

    2011-06-21

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory uses neutron activation elements in a Panasonic TLD holder as a personnel nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD). The LLNL PNAD has periodically been tested using a Cf-252 neutron source, however until 2009, it was more than 25 years since the PNAD has been tested against a source of neutrons that arise from a reactor generated neutron spectrum that simulates a criticality. In October 2009, LLNL participated in an intercomparison of nuclear accident dosimeters at the CEA Valduc Silene reactor (Hickman, et.al. 2010). In September 2010, LLNL participated in a second intercomparison of nuclear accident dosimeters at CEA Valduc. The reactor generated neutron irradiations for the 2010 exercise were performed at the Caliban reactor. The Caliban results are described in this report. The procedure for measuring the nuclear accident dosimeters in the event of an accident has a solid foundation based on many experimental results and comparisons. The entire process, from receiving the activated NADs to collecting and storing them after counting was executed successfully in a field based operation. Under normal conditions at LLNL, detectors are ready and available 24/7 to perform the necessary measurement of nuclear accident components. Likewise LLNL maintains processing laboratories that are separated from the areas where measurements occur, but contained within the same facility for easy movement from processing area to measurement area. In the event of a loss of LLNL permanent facilities, the Caliban and previous Silene exercises have demonstrated that LLNL can establish field operations that will very good nuclear accident dosimetry results. There are still several aspects of LLNL's nuclear accident dosimetry program that have not been tested or confirmed. For instance, LLNL's method for using of biological samples (blood and hair) has not been verified since the method was first developed in the 1980's. Because LLNL and the other DOE

  8. Twenty-second ORNL intercomparison of criticality accident dosimetry systems, August 12-16, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Oyan, R.; Sims, C.S.

    1986-05-01

    The twenty-second in a series of criticality accident dosimetry intercomparison studies was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Dosimetry Applications Research Facility during August 12-16, 1985. The Health Physics Research Reactor operated in the pulse mode over Storage Pit No. 1 was used to simulate three criticality accidents with different radiation fields. Participants from nine organizations measured neutron doses between 0.36 and 3.78 Gy and gamma doses between 0.22 and 0.80 Gy at area monitoring stations and on phantoms. Approximately 68% of all neutron dose estimates based on foil activation, thermoluminescent, hair activation, and blood sodium activation methods were within +-25% of reference values. About 44% of all gamma results measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-700 or CaSO/sub 4/ phosphors) were within 20% of reference doses. The generally poor measurement accuracy exhibited in this study indicates a need for continuing ORNL accident dosimetry intercomparison and training programs.

  9. Performance of the CEDS Accident Dosimetry System at the 1995 Los Alamos National Laboratory Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, K.L.; Schwanke, L.J.

    1996-12-01

    In July 1995, LANL hosted an accident dosimetry intercomparison. When all reactors on the Oak Ridge Reservation were idled in 1988, the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR), which had been used for 22 previous intercomparisons dating from 1965, was shut down for an indefinite period. The LANL group began characterization of two critical assemblies for dosimetry purposes. As a result, NAD-23 was conceived and 10 DOE facilities accepted invitations to participate in the intercomparison. This report is a summary of the performance of one of the participants, the Centralized External Dosimetry System (CEDS). The CEDS is a cooperative personnel dosimetry arrangement between three DOE sites in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Many successes and failures are reported herein. Generally, the TL dosimeters performed poorly and always over-reported the delivered dose. The TLD processing procedures contain efforts that would lead to large biases in the reported absorbed dose, and omit several key steps in the TLD reading process. The supralinear behavior of lithium fluoride (LiF) has not been characterized for this particular dosimeter and application (i.e., in high-dose mixed neutron/gamma fields). The use of TLD materials may also be precluded given the limitations of the LiF material itself, the TLD reading system, and the upper dose level to which accident dosimetry systems are required to perform as set forth in DOE regulations. The indium foil results confirm the expected inability of that material to predict the magnitude of the wearer`s dose reliably, although it is quite suitable as a quick-sort material. Biological sample (hair) results were above the minimum detectable activity (MDA) for only one of the tests. Several questions as to the best methods for sample handling and processing remain.

  10. Results from 2010 Caliban Criticality Dosimetry Intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.

    2011-10-12

    The external dosimetry program participated in a criticality dosimetry intercomparison conducted at the Caliban facility in Valduc, France in 2010. Representatives from the dosimetry and instrumentation groups were present during testing which included irradiations of whole-body beta/gamma (HBGT) and neutron thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), a fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD), electronic alarming dosimeters, and a humanoid phantom filled with reference man concentrations of sodium. This report reviews the testing procedures, preparations, irradiations, and presents results of the tests.

  11. INTERCOMPARISON OF RESULTS FOR A PWR ROD EJECTION ACCIDENT

    SciTech Connect

    DIAMOND,D.J.; ARONSON,A.; JO,J.; AVVAKUMOV,A.; MALOFEEV,V.; SIDOROV,V.; FERRARESI,P.; GOUIN,C.; ANIEL,S.; ROYER,M.E.

    1999-10-01

    This study is part of an overall program to understand the uncertainty in best-estimate calculations of the local fuel enthalpy during the rod ejection accident. Local fuel enthalpy is used as the acceptance criterion for this design-basis event and can also be used to estimate fuel damage for the purpose of determining radiological consequences. The study used results from neutron kinetics models in PARCS, BARS, and CRONOS2, codes developed in the US, the Russian Federation, and France, respectively. Since BARS uses a heterogeneous representation of the fuel assembly as opposed to the homogeneous representations in PARCS and CRONOS, the effect of the intercomparison was primarily to compare different intra-assembly models. Quantitative comparisons for core power, reactivity, assembly fuel enthalpy and pin power were carried out. In general the agreement between methods was very good providing additional confidence in the codes and providing a starting point for a quantitative assessment of the uncertainty in calculated fuel enthalpy using best-estimate methods.

  12. Determination of possible damage/degradation of the Sandia National Laboratories Personal Nuclear Accident Dosimeter (PNAD).

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Charles Augustus; Ward, Dann C.

    2008-05-01

    This report describes the results of an inspection performed on the existing stock of SNL Personal Nuclear Accident Dosimeters (PNADs). The current stock is approximately 20 years old, and has not been examined since their initial acceptance. A small random sample of PNADs were opened (a destructive process) and the contents visually examined. Sample contents were not degraded and indicate that the existing stock of SNL PNADs is acceptable for continued use.

  13. 1983 international intercomparison of nuclear accident dosimetry systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Greene, R.T.; Sims, C.S.

    1985-04-01

    An international intercomparison of nuclear accident dosimetry systems was conducted during September 12-16, 1983, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the Health Physics Research Reactor operated in the pulse mode to simulate criticality accidents. This study marked the twentieth in a series of annual accident dosimetry intercomparisons conducted at ORNL. Participants from ten organizations attended this intercomparison and measured neutron and gamma doses at area monitoring stations and on phantoms for three different shield conditions. Results of this study indicate that foil activation techniques are the most popular and accurate method of determining accident-level neutron doses at area monitoring stations. For personnel monitoring, foil activation, blood sodium activation, and thermoluminescent (TL) methods are all capable of providing accurate dose estimates in a variety of radiation fields. All participants in this study used TLD's to determine gamma doses with very good results on the average. Chemical dosemeters were also shown to be capable of yielding accurate estimates of total neutron plus gamma doses in a variety of radiation fields. While 83% of all neutron measurements satisfied regulatory standards relative to reference values, only 39% of all gamma results satisfied corresponding guidelines for gamma measurements. These results indicate that continued improvement in accident dosimetry evaluation and measurement techniques is needed.

  14. Evaluation of the response to xenon-133 radiations by thermoluminescent dosimeters used during the accident at Three Mile Island.

    PubMed

    Riley, R J; Zanzonico, P B; Masterson, M E; St Germain, J M; Laughlin, J S

    1982-03-01

    An evaluation is presented of the accuracy and sensitivity of three types of TLD's used during the accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station. This evaluation indicated that, due to the method of calibration, all the dosimeters over-responded to 133Xe radiations. The response ranged from slightly above unity to almost two. Exposures of the TLD's were of two types, namely, the characteristic X-rays either were or were not filtered from the beam. The angular sensitivity of the dosimeters is also reported.

  15. Twenty-first nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison study, August 6-10, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Ragan, G.E.; Sims, C.S.

    1985-05-01

    The twenty-first in a series of nuclear accident dosimetry (NAD) intercomparison (NAD) studies was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Dosimetry Applications Research Facility during August 6-10, 1984. The Health Physics Research Reactor operated in the pulse mode was used to simulate three criticality accidents with different radiation fields. Participants from five organizations measured neutron doses between 0.53 and 4.36 Gy and gamma doses between 0.19 and 1.01 Gy at area monitoring stations and on phantoms. About 75% of all neutron dose estimates based on foil activation, hair activation, simulated blood sodium activation, and thermoluminescent methods were within +-25% of reference values. Approximately 86% of all gamma results measured using thermoluminescent (TLD-700 or CaSO/sub 4/) systems were within +-20% of reference doses which represents a significant improvement over previous studies. Improvements observed in the ability of intercomparison participants to estimate neutron and gamma doses under criticality accident conditions can be partly attributed to experience in previous NAD studies which have provided practical tests of dosimetry systems, enabled participants to improve evaluation methods, and standardized dose reporting conventions. 16 refs., 15 tabs.

  16. 1987 Neutron and gamma personnel dosimeter intercomparison study using a D/sub 2/O-moderated /sup 252/Cf source

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; West, L.E.; Sims, C.S.; Welty, T.J.

    1989-05-01

    The thirteenth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study (i.e., PDIS 13) was conducted during April 1987 as a joint effort by Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Dosimetry Applications Research Group and the Southwest Radiation Calibration Center at the University of Arkansas. A total of 48 organizations (34 from the US and 14 from abroad) participated in PDIS 13. Participants submitted a total of 1,113 neutron and gamma dosimeters for this mixed field study. The dosimeters were transferred by mail and were handled by experimental personnel at ORNL and the University of Arkansas. The type of neutron dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: TLD-albedo (49%), direct interaction TLD (31%), CR-39 (17%), film (3%). The type of gamma dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: Li/sub 2/B/sub 4/O/sub 7/, alone or in combination with CaSO/sub 4/, (69%), /sup 7/LiF (28%), natural LiF (3%). Radiation exposures in PDIS 13 were limited to 0.5 and 1.5 mSv from /sup 252/Cf moderated by 15-cm of D/sub 2/O. Traditional exposures using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) were not possible due to the fact that all reactors at ORNL, including the HPRR, were shutdown by order of the Department of Energy at the time the intercomparison was performed. Planned exposures using a /sup 238/PuBe source were negated by a faulty timing mechanism. Based on accuracy and precision, direct interaction TLD dosimeters exhibited the best performance in PDIS 13 neutron measurements. They were followed, in order of best performance, by CR-39, TLD albedo, and film. The Li/sub 2/B/sub 4/O/sub 7/ type TLD dosimeters exhibited the best performance in PDIS 13 gamma measurements. They were followed by natural LiF, /sup 7/LiF, and film. 12 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  17. Intercomparison of environmental gamma doses measured with A NaI (Tl) survey meter and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in the Poonch division of Azad Kashmir, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Muhammad; Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Ahmad, Khalil; Akhter, Jabeen; Khan, Abdul Razzaq; Saeed, Raja Azhar; Rahman, Saeed Ur; Matiullah; Rajput, Muhammad Usman

    2014-12-01

    This study presents the intercomparison of the outdoor environmental gamma dose rates measured using a NaI (Tl) based survey meter along with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and estimation of excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR), for the inhabitants of Poonch division of the Azad Kashmir, Pakistan. CaF2: Dy (TLD-200) card dosimeters were installed at height of 1 m from ground at fifteen different locations covering the entire Poonch division comprising of three districts. During three distinct two month time periods within the six month study period, all the installed dosimeters were exposed to outdoor environmental gamma radiations, retrieved and read out at Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Health Physics Division, PINSTECH laboratory, Islamabad. The ambient outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were also taken with NaI (Tl) based portable radiometric instrument at 1 m above the ground. To estimate the annual gamma doses, NaI (Tl) based survey data were used for one complete year following the deployment of the dosimeters. The mean annual gamma dose rates measured by TLDs and survey meter were found as 1.47±0.10 and 0.862±0.003 mGy/y respectively. Taking into account a 29% outdoor occupancy factor, the annual average effective dose rate for individuals was estimated as 0.298±0.04 and 0.175±0.03 mSv/y by TLDs and survey meter, respectively. For outdoor exposure, the ELCR was calculated from the TLD and survey meter measurements. The environmental outdoor average annual effective dose obtained in present study are less than the estimated world average terrestrial and cosmic gamma ray dose rate of 0.9 mSv/y reported in UNSCEAR 2000. The possible origins of gamma doses in the area and incompatibilities of results obtained from the two different measurement techniques are also discussed.

  18. Criticality accident dosimetry systems: an international intercomparison at the SILENE reactor in 2002.

    PubMed

    Médioni, R; Asselineau, B; Verrey, B; Trompier, F; Itié, C; Texier, C; Muller, H; Pelcot, G; Clairand, I; Jacquet, X; Pochat, J L

    2004-01-01

    In criticality accident dosimetry and more generally for high dose measurements, special techniques are used to measure separately the gamma ray and neutron components of the dose. To improve these techniques and to check their dosimetry systems (physical and/or biological), a total of 60 laboratories from 29 countries (America, Europe, Asia) participated in an international intercomparaison, which took place in France from 9 to 21 June 2002, at the SILENE reactor in Valduc and at a pure gamma source in Fontenay-aux-Roses. This intercomparison was jointly organised by the IRSN and the CEA with the help of the NEA/OCDE and was partly supported by the European Communities. This paper describes the aim of this intercomparison, the techniques used by the participants and the two radiation sources and their characteristics. The experimental arrangements of the dosemeters for the irradiations in free air or on phantoms are given. Then the dosimetric quantities measured and reported by the participants are summarised, analysed and compared with the reference values. The present paper concerns only the physical dosimetry and essentially experiments performed on the SILENE facility. The results obtained with the biological dosimetry are published in two other papers of this issue.

  19. The ENEA criticality accident dosimetry system: a contribution to the 2002 international intercomparison at the SILENE reactor.

    PubMed

    Gualdrini, G; Bedogni, R; Fantuzzi, E; Mariotti, F

    2004-01-01

    The present paper summarises the activity carried out at the ENEA Radiation Protection Institute for updating the methodologies employed for the evaluation of the neutron and photon dose to the exposed workers in case of a criticality accident, in the framework of the 'International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems' (Silène reactor, IRSN-CEA-Valduc June 2002). The evaluation of the neutron spectra and the neutron dosimetric quantities relies on activation detectors and on unfolding algorithms. Thermoluminescent detectors are employed for the gamma dose measurement. The work is aimed at accurately characterising the measurement system and, at the same time, testing the algorithms. Useful spectral information were included, based on Monte Carlo simulations, to take into account the potential accident scenarios of practical interest. All along this exercise intercomparison a particular attention was devoted to the 'traceability' of all the experimental and computational parameters and therefore, aimed at an easy treatment by the user.

  20. Reference dosimetry measurements for the international intercomparison of criticality accident dosimetry SILENE 9-21 June 2002.

    PubMed

    Asselineau, B; Trompier, F; Texier, C; Itié, C; Médioni, R; Tikunov, D; Muller, H; Pelcot, G

    2004-01-01

    An international intercomparison of criticality accident dosimetry systems took place in the SILENE reactor, in June 2002. Participants from 60 laboratories irradiated their dosemeters (physical and biological) using two different configurations of the reactor. In preparation for this intercomparison, the leakage radiation fields were characterised by spectrometry and dosimetry measurements using the ROSPEC spectrometer associated with a NE-213 scintillator, ionisation chambers, GM counters, diodes and thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs). For this intercomparison, a large area was required to irradiate the dosemeters both in free air and on phantoms. Therefore, measurements of the uniformity of the field were performed with activation detectors and TLDs for neutron and gammas, respectively. This paper describes the procedures used and the results obtained.

  1. International Intercomparison Exercise for Nuclear Accident Dosimetry at the DAF Using GODIVA-IV

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, David; Hudson, Becka

    2016-12-15

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Program operated under the direction of Dr. Jerry McKamy completed the first NNSA Nuclear Accident Dosimetry exercise on May 27, 2016. Participants in the exercise were from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), Savanah River Site (SRS), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), US Navy, the Atomic Weapons Establishment (United Kingdom) under the auspices of JOWOG 30, and the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (France) by special invitation and NCSP memorandum of understanding. This exercise was the culmination of a series of Integral Experiment Requests (IER) that included the establishment of the Nuclear Criticality Experimental Research Center, (NCERC) the startup of the Godiva Reactor (IER-194), the establishment of a the Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Laboratory (NAD LAB) in Mercury, NV, and the determination of reference dosimetry values for the mixed neutron and photon radiation field of Godiva within NCERC.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories results for the 2010 criticality accident dosimetry exercise, at the CALIBAN reactor, CEA Valduc France.

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Dann C.

    2011-09-01

    This document describes the personal nuclear accident dosimeter (PNAD) used by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and presents PNAD dosimetry results obtained during the Nuclear Accident Dosimeter Intercomparison Study held 20-23 September, 2010, at CEA Valduc, France. SNL PNADs were exposed in two separate irradiations from the CALIBAN reactor. Biases for reported neutron doses ranged from -15% to +0.4% with an average bias of -7.7%. PNADs were also exposed on the back side of phantoms to assess orientation effects.

  3. Radiation dosimeters

    DOEpatents

    Hoelsher, James W.; Hegland, Joel E.; Braunlich, Peter F.; Tetzlaff, Wolfgang

    1992-01-01

    Radiation dosimeters and dosimeter badges. The dosimeter badges include first and second parts which are connected to join using a securement to produce a sealed area in which at least one dosimeter is held and protected. The badge parts are separated to expose the dosimeters to a stimulating laser beam used to read dose exposure information therefrom. The badge is constructed to allow automated disassembly and reassembly in a uniquely fitting relationship. An electronic memory is included to provide calibration and identification information used during reading of the dosimeter. Dosimeter mounts which reduce thermal heating requirements are shown. Dosimeter constructions and production methods using thin substrates and phosphor binder-layers applied thereto are also taught.

  4. Final Design for an International Intercomparison Exercise for Nuclear Accident Dosimetry at the DAF Using Godiva-IV: IER-148 CED-2 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrichs, Dave; Beller, Tim; Burch, Jennifer; Cummings, Rick; Duluc, Matthieu; Gadd, Milan; Goda, Joetta; Hickman, David; McAvoy, Doug; Rathbone, Bruce; Sullivan, Randy; Trompier, Francois; Veinot, Ken; Ward, Dann; Will, Rashelle; Wilson, Chris; Zieziulewicz, Thomas

    2014-09-30

    This document is the Final Design (CED-2) Report for IER-148, “International Inter-comparison Exercise for Nuclear Accident Dosimetry at the DAF Using Godiva-IV.” The report describes the structure of the exercise consisting of three irradiations; identifies the participating laboratories and their points of contact; provides the details of all dosimetry elements and their placement in proximity to Godiva-IV on support stands or phantoms ; and lists the counting and spectroscopy equipment each laboratory will utilize in the Mercury NAD Lab. The exercise is tentatively scheduled for one week in August 2015.

  5. Wristwatch dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, M.A.; Waechter, D.A.; Umbarger, C.J.

    1986-08-26

    The disclosure is directed to a wristwatch dosimeter utilizing a CdTe detector, a microprocessor and an audio and/or visual alarm. The dosimeter is entirely housable with a conventional digital watch case having an additional aperture enabling the detector to receive radiation. 10 figs.

  6. Wristwatch dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, Michael A.; Waechter, David A.; Umbarger, C. John

    1986-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a wristwatch dosimeter utilizing a CdTe detector, a microprocessor and an audio and/or visual alarm. The dosimeter is entirely housable with a conventional digital watch case having an additional aperture enabling the detector to receive radiation.

  7. Kevlar® as a Potential Accident Radiation Dosimeter for First Responders, Law Enforcement and Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Romanyukha, Alexander; Trompier, François; Benevides, Luis A

    2016-08-01

    Today the armed forces and law enforcement personnel wear body armor, helmets, and flak jackets composed substantially of Kevlar® fiber to prevent bodily injury or death resulting from physical, ballistic, stab, and slash attacks. Therefore, there is a high probability that during a radiation accident or its aftermath, the Kevlar®-composed body armor will be irradiated. Preliminary study with samples of Kevlar® foundation fabric obtained from body armor used by the U.S. Marine Corps has shown that all samples evaluated demonstrated an EPR signal, and this signal increased with radiation dose. Based on these results, the authors predict that, with individual calibration, exposure at dose above 1 Gy can be reliably detected in Kevlar® samples obtained from body armor. As a result of these measurements, a post-event reconstruction of exposure dose can be obtained by taking various samples throughout the armor body and helmet worn by the same irradiated individual. The doses can be used to create a whole-body dose map that would be of vital importance in a case of a partial body or heterogeneous exposure.

  8. PERSONNEL DOSIMETER

    DOEpatents

    Birkhoff, R.D.; Hubbell, H.H. Jr.; Johnson, R.M.

    1959-02-24

    A personnel dosimeter sensitive to both gamma and beta radiation is described. The dosimeter consists of an electrical conductive cylinder having a wall thickness of substantially 7 milligrams per square centimeter and an electrode disposed axially within the cylinder and insulated therefrom to maintain a potential impressed between the electrode and the cylinder. A cylindrical perforated shield provided with a known percentage of void area is disposed concentrically about the cylinder. The shield is formed of a material which does not contain more than 15 percent of an element higher than atomic weight 13. The dose actually received is at most the gamma dose plus the beta dose indicated by discharge of the dosimeter divided by the known percentage.

  9. RADIATION DOSIMETER

    DOEpatents

    Balkwell, W.R. Jr.; Adams, G.D. Jr.

    1960-05-10

    An improvement was made in the determination of amounts of ionizing radiation, particularly low-energy beta particles of less than 1000 rad total dose by means of fluid-phase dosimeter employing a stabilized-- sensitized ferrous-ferric colorimetric system in a sulphuric acid medium. The improvement in the dosimeter consists of adding to the ferrous-ferric system in concentrations of 10/sub -2/ to 10/sup -4/M an organic compound having one or more carboxylic or equivalent groups, such compounds being capable of chelating or complexing the iron ions in the solution. Suitable sensitizing and stabilizing agents are benzoic, phthalic, salicylic, malonic, lactic, maleic, oxalic, citric, succinic, phenolic tartaric, acetic, and adipic acid, as well as other compounds which are added to the solution alone or in certain combinations. As in conventional fluid-phase dosimeters, the absorbed dosage is correlated with a corresponding change in optical density at particular wavelengths of the solution.

  10. Description and evaluation of the Hanford personnel dosimeter program from 1944 through 1989. [Contain Glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.H.; Fix, J.J.; Baumgartner, W.V.; Nichols, L.L.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the evolution of personnel dosimeter technology at Hanford since the inception of Hanford operations in 1944. Each of the personnel dosimeter systems used by people working or visiting Hanford is described. In addition, the procedures used to calibrate and calculate dose for each of the dosimeter systems are described. The accuracy of the recorded dose, primarily whole body deep dose, for the different dosimeter systems is evaluated. The evaluation is based on an extensive review of historical literature, as well as a 1989 intercomparison study of all film dosimeters and performance testing of the thermoluminescent dosimeter, also conducted during 1989. 73 refs., 40 figs., 41 tabs.

  11. Thermoluminescence dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Zendle, Robert

    1985-01-01

    A thermoluminescence dosimeter having a very small rate of decline of sensitivity during subsequent uses after heating is disclosed. The dosimeter includes a detector crystal and a glass enclosure in which the detector crystal is located. The glass enclosure is air tight and is filled with a super dry inert fill gas. The inert fill gas is nonreactive with the detector crystal when the detector crystal is heated to thermoluminescence. The fill gas is selected from the group consisting of air, nitrogen, and argon, suitable admixed with 5 to 25 percent helium. The detector crystal consists essentially of calcium fluoride. The fill gas is preferably contained at a subatmospheric pressure in the glass enclosure.

  12. Thermoluminescence dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Zendle, R.

    1983-11-03

    A thermoluminescence dosimeter having a very small rate of decline of sensitivity during subsequent uses after heating is disclosed. The dosimeter includes a detector crystal and a glass enclosure in which the detector crystal is located. The glass enclosure is air tight and is filled with a super dry inert fill gas. The inert fill gas is nonreactive with the detector crystal when the detector crystal is heated to thermoluminescence. The fill gas is selected from the group consisting of air, nitrogen, and argon, suitable admixed with 5 to 25 percent helium. The detector crystal consists essentially of calcium fluoride. The fill gas is preferably contained at a subatmospheric pressure in the glass enclosure.

  13. Composite material dosimeters

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a composite material containing a mix of dosimeter material powder and a polymer powder wherein the polymer is transparent to the photon emission of the dosimeter material powder. By mixing dosimeter material powder with polymer powder, less dosimeter material is needed compared to a monolithic dosimeter material chip. Interrogation is done with excitation by visible light.

  14. Seventh Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Greene, R.T.

    1981-12-01

    The Seventh Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted March 31-April 10, 1981, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dosimeters from 34 participating agencies were mounted on anthropomorphic phantoms and exposed to a range of low-level dose equivalents (1.5-15.0mSv neutron and 0.1-2.8 mSv gamma) which could be encountered during routine personnel monitoring in mixed radiation fields. The Health Physics Research Reactor, operating in the steady-state mode, served as the source of radiation for two equivalent sets of six separate exposures. Lucite and concrete shields along with the unshielded reactor provided three different neutron and gamma spectra for five of the exposures in each set. Results reported by the participating agencies showed that no single type of neutron dosimeter exhibited acceptable performance characteristics for all mixed-field environments encountered in this study. Film, TLD, and TLD-albed dosimeters were found to be inadequate for neutron dose equivalent measurements when large numbers of slow neutrons are present unless significant corrections are made to measured results. Track dosimeters indicated the least sensitivity to spectral characteristics, but did not always yield to the most accurate results. Gamma dose measurements showed that TLD-700 dosimeters produced significantly more accurate results than film dosimeters which tend to overestimate gamma doses in mixed radiation fields.

  15. LLNL Results from CALIBAN-PROSPERO Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Experiments in September 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Lobaugh, M. L.; Hickman, D. P.; Wong, C. W.; Wysong, A. R.; Merritt, M. J.; Heinrichs, D. P.; Topper, J. D.

    2015-05-21

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses thin neutron activation foils, sulfur, and threshold energy shielding to determine neutron component doses and the total dose from neutrons in the event of a nuclear criticality accident. The dosimeter also uses a DOELAP accredited Panasonic UD-810 (Panasonic Industrial Devices Sales Company of America, 2 Riverfront Plaza, Newark, NJ 07102, U.S.A.) thermoluminescent dosimetery system (TLD) for determining the gamma component of the total dose. LLNL has participated in three international intercomparisons of nuclear accident dosimeters. In October 2009, LLNL participated in an exercise at the French Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission- CEA) Research Center at Valduc utilizing the SILENE reactor (Hickman, et.al. 2010). In September 2010, LLNL participated in a second intercomparison at CEA Valduc, this time with exposures at the CALIBAN reactor (Hickman et al. 2011). This paper discusses LLNL’s results of a third intercomparison hosted by the French Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety- IRSN) with exposures at two CEA Valduc reactors (CALIBAN and PROSPERO) in September 2014. Comparison results between the three participating facilities is presented elsewhere (Chevallier 2015; Duluc 2015).

  16. Fundamentals of gel dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuley, K. B.; Nasr, A. T.

    2013-06-01

    Fundamental chemical and physical phenomena that occur in Fricke gel dosimeters, polymer gel dosimeters, micelle gel dosimeters and genipin gel dosimeters are discussed. Fricke gel dosimeters are effective even though their radiation sensitivity depends on oxygen concentration. Oxygen contamination can cause severe problems in polymer gel dosimeters, even when THPC is used. Oxygen leakage must be prevented between manufacturing and irradiation of polymer gels, and internal calibration methods should be used so that contamination problems can be detected. Micelle gel dosimeters are promising due to their favourable diffusion properties. The introduction of micelles to gel dosimetry may open up new areas of dosimetry research wherein a range of water-insoluble radiochromic materials can be explored as reporter molecules.

  17. Pocket radiation dosimeter--dosimeter charger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Manning, Frank W.

    1984-01-01

    This invention is a novel pocket-type radiation dosimeter comprising an electrometric radiation dosimeter and a charging circuit therefor. The instrument is especially designed to be amenable to mass production, to have a long shelf life, and to be compact, lightweight, and usable by the layman. The dosimeter proper may be of conventional design. The charging circuit includes a shake-type electrostatic generator, a voltage doubler for integrating generator output voltages of one polarity, and a switch operated by an external permanent magnet.

  18. Pocket radiation dosimeter: dosimeter charger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Manning, F.W.

    1982-03-17

    This invention is a novel pocket-type radiation dosimeter comprising an electrometric radiation dosimeter and a charging circuit therefor. The instrument is especially designed to be amenable to mass production, to have a long shelf life, and to be compact, lightweight, and usable by the layman. The dosimeter proper may be of conventional design. The charging circuit includes a shake-type electrostatic generator, a voltage doubler for integrating generator output voltages of one polarity, and a switch operated by an external permanent magnet.

  19. Wrist-watch dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Wolf, M.A.; Waechter, D.A.; Umbarger, C.J.

    1982-04-16

    The disclosure is directed to a wristwatch dosimeter utilizing a CdTe detector, a microprocessor and an audio and/or visual alarm. The dosimeter is entirely housable within a conventional digital watch case having an additional aperture enabling the detector to receive radiation.

  20. DNA UVB dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Regan, J D; Yoshida, H

    1995-11-01

    DNA can be used to establish and monitor solar UVB dose. Since the principal molecular site of UVB damage in living organisms is DNA, it is logical to quantitate biologically effective solar UVB in DNA dosimeters. In addition to their particular sensitivity to UVB, DNA dosimeters have the advantage of a 2 pi geometry for collecting diffuse UVB radiation from all vectors, low cost, small size and portability, and no moving parts. Both molecular (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and biological (bacteriophage plaques) dosimeters can be quantitated as endpoints to yield the total dose. DNA dosimeters integrate the absorbed energy of all UVB wavelengths (290-320 nm), are highly sensitive to the differential biological effectiveness of these wavelengths, and also integrate over time in hours, days or weeks of exposure. Our experiments have focused on the demonstration of DNA solar dosimeters in the ocean at various depths, the application of the dosimeters to the terrestrial monitoring of solar UVB under various conditions, and the development of a mini-dosimeter which uses nanograms of DNA and is assayed by polymerase chain reaction.

  1. Performance testing of extremity dosimeters against a draft standard

    SciTech Connect

    Harty, R.; Reece, W.D.; Hooker, C.D.; McDonald, J.C.

    1990-09-01

    The assurance of worker radiation safety is directly related to the performance of personnel dosimetry. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has long recognized this critical relationship and has addressed this issue by instituting the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) which strives to improve the quality of personnel dosimetry through performance testing, dosimetry calibration, intercomparisons, evaluations and accreditations. One area of personnel dosimetry that has not been specifically addressed by DOELAP is extremity dosimeter testing. This task was directed at assessing the problems of implementing extremity dosimeter performance testing. A series of performance tests were made based on a draft standard written by the Health Physics Society Standards Committee (HPSSC) using extremity dosimeters currently in use at DOE and DOE contractor facilities. The results of this study indicate the need to incorporate performance testing of extremity dosimetry systems into DOELAP. Based on the results of this study, recommendations are made for improvements to the draft standard. 20 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Temporal dosimeter and method

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Lopez, Thomas A.

    2003-09-30

    The invention includes a temporal dosimeter. One dosimeter embodiment includes a housing that is opaque to visible light but transparent to ionizing radiation. The dosimeter also includes a sensor for recording dosages of ionizing radiation, a drive mechanism, a power source, and rotatable shields that work together to produce a compound aperture to unveil different portions of the sensor at different times to ionizing radiation. Another dosimeter embodiment includes a housing, a sensor, a shield with an aperture portion, and a linear actuator drive mechanism coupled to the sensor for moving the sensor past the aperture portion. The sensor turns as it moves past the aperture, tracing a timeline record of exposure to ionizing radiation along a helical path on the sensor.

  3. ULTRASONIC NEUTRON DOSIMETER

    DOEpatents

    Truell, R.; de Klerk, J.; Levy, P.W.

    1960-02-23

    A neutron dosimeter is described which utilizes ultrasonic waves in the megacycle region for determination of the extent of neutron damage in a borosilicate glass through ultrasonic wave velocity and attenuation measurements before and after damage.

  4. Dosimeter Design Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-05

    Mexico’s COSMIAC Center created a series of two different dosimeters for space flight. The first dosimeter was for low earth orbit and as such...to measure the radiation at various altitudes and orbital inclinations. By understanding the actual levels, this allows developers of large (and...unlimited    2    Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Satellites flown in LEO are often provided with natural protection from harmful effects normally found in the

  5. Magnetic field dosimeter development

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    In recent years there has been increased concern over potential health hazards related to exposure of personnel to magnetic fields. If exposure standards are to be established, then a means for measuring magnetic field dose must be available. To meet this need, the Department of Energy has funded development of prototype dosimeters at the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This manual reviews the principle of operation of the dosimeter and also contains step-by-step instructions for its operation.

  6. Length of stain dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Payload customers for the Space Shuttle have recently expressed concerns about the possibility of their payloads at an adjacent pad being contaminated by plume effluents from a shuttle at an active pad as they await launch on an inactive pad. As part of a study to satisfy such concerns a ring of inexpensive dosimeters was deployed around the active pad at the inter-pad distance. However, following a launch, dosimeters cannot be read for several hours after the exposure. As a consequence factors such as different substrates, solvent systems, and possible volatilization of HCl from the badges were studied. This observation led to the length of stain (LOS) dosimeters of this invention. Commercial passive LOS dosimeters are sensitive only to the extent of being capable of sensing 2 ppm to 20 ppm if the exposure is 8 hours. To map and quantitate the HCl generated by Shuttle launches, and in the atmosphere within a radius of 1.5 miles from the active pad, a sensitivity of 2 ppm HCl in the atmospheric gases on an exposure of 5 minutes is required. A passive length of stain dosimeter has been developed having a sensitivity rendering it capable of detecting a gas in a concentration as low as 2 ppm on an exposure of five minutes.

  7. Personnel-dosimetry intercomparison studies at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.

    1982-01-01

    Since 1974, seven annual personnel dosimetry intercomparison studies have been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the Health Physics Reactor. These studies have produced more than 2000 measurements by 72 participating organizations of neutron and gamma dose equivalents between 0.1 to 15.0 mSv in six mixed radiation fields. The relative performance of three basic types of personnel neutron dosimeters (nuclear emulsion film, thermoluminescent, and track-etch) and two basic types of gamma dosimeters (film and thermoluminescent) was assessed based on experimental results obtained during the seven intercomparisons.

  8. X-rays sensing properties of MEH-PPV, Alq₃ and additive components: a new organic dosimeter as a candidate for minimizing the risk of accidents of patients undergoing radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Schimitberger, T; Ferreira, G R; Akcelrud, L C; Saraiva, M F; Bianchi, R F

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report our experimental design in searching a smart and easy-to-read dosimeter used to detect 6 MV X-rays for improving patient safety in radiation oncology. The device was based on an organic emissive solutions of poly(2-methoxy-5(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylenevinylene) (MEH-PPV), aluminum-tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq₃) and additive components which were characterized by UV-Vis absorption, photoluminescence and CIE color coordinate diagram. The optical properties of MEH-PPV/Alq₃ solutions have been examined as function of radiation dose over the range of 0-100 Gy. It has shown that MEH-PPV/Alq₃ solutions are specifically sensitive to X-rays, since the effect of radiation on this organic system is strongly correlated with the efficient spectral overlap between Alq₃ emission and the absorption of degraded MEH-PPV, which alters the color and photoemission of MEH-PPV/Alq₃ mixtures from red to yellow, and then to green. The rate of this change is more sensitive when MEH-PPV/Alq₃ is irradiated in the presence of benzoyl peroxide than when in the presence of hindered phenolic stabilizers, respectively, an accelerator and an inhibitor to activate or inhibit free radical formation. This gives rise to optimize the response curve of the dosimeter. It is clear from the experimental results that organic emissive semiconductors have potential to be used as dedicated and low-cost dosimeters to provide an independent check of beam output of a linear accelerator and therefore to give patients the opportunity to have information on the dose prescription or equipment-related problems a few minutes before being exposed to radiation.

  9. Fact-finding Survey in Response to the Manipulation of Personal Alarm Dosimeter Collection Efficiency: Lessons Learned About Post-Emergency Radiation Protection from the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi APP Accident.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Shojiro

    2015-01-01

    During emergency work at TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Atomic Power Plant on December 1, 2011 a subcontractor demanded that its contracted workers cover their personal alarm dosimeters (PAD) with 3-cm-thick lead plates to lower dosimeter readings. As a response, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) conducted a fact-finding survey to identify similar cases and devise measures to prevent a recurrence of this incident. To screen the suspected cases, the MHLW extracted: a) cases in which a PAD reading was at least 15% higher than the reading obtained from a radio-photolumine-scence dosimeter (RPD), where the dose was greater than 5 mSv in a month (1813 data points), and b) dose data in which PAD readings were less than 50% of the expected dose, where exposure dose may exceed 1 mSv in a day (56 workers, 17,148 data points). From these screenings, the MHLW identified 50 instances from TEPCO and nine primary contractors, including four general contractors, two plant manufacturers, and three plant maintenance companies as the subjects of the due diligence study of exposure data, including interviews. The results of the survey provide lessons that can also be applied to transition from emergency radiation protection to normal operation, as the application of emergency dose limits had ceased on December 16, 2011, in the affected plant. Based on the results of the survey, the MHLW provided administrative guidance documents to TEPCO and 37 primary contractors. The major points of these documents include: a) identification of recorded dose values by comparison of PAD readings to RPD readings, b) storage and management of RPDs and control badges, c) circulation management of PADs and access control to the affected plant, d) estimation of planned doses and setting of alarm values of PADs, e) actions to be taken by contractors if worker dose limits are reached, and f) physical measures to prevent recurrence of the incident.

  10. Dose equivalent neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, Richard V.; Hankins, Dale E.; Tomasino, Luigi; Gomaa, Mohamed A. M.

    1983-01-01

    A neutron dosimeter is disclosed which provides a single measurements indicating the amount of potential biological damage resulting from the neutron exposure of the wearer, for a wide range of neutron energies. The dosimeter includes a detecting sheet of track etch detecting material such as a carbonate plastic, for detecting higher energy neutrons, and a radiator layer containing conversion material such as .sup.6 Li and .sup.10 B lying adjacent to the detecting sheet for converting moderate energy neutrons to alpha particles that produce tracks in the adjacent detecting sheet. The density of conversion material in the radiator layer is of an amount which is chosen so that the density of tracks produced in the detecting sheet is proportional to the biological damage done by neutrons, regardless of whether the tracks are produced as the result of moderate energy neutrons striking the radiator layer or as the result of higher energy neutrons striking the sheet of track etch material.

  11. Dosimeter Badge Detects Hydrazines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Rebecca C.; Travis, Joshua C.; Moore, Gerald; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan; Carver, Patricia; Brenner, Karen

    1993-01-01

    Disposable dosimeter badge indicates approximate cumulative exposure to hydrazine or monomethyl hydrazine in air. Indication is change in colors of both paper tapes; one coated with para-N, N-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde. Colors of exposed tapes compared with colors on two preprinted color wheels to obtain estimate of exposure. Badges help minimize risks associated with exposure of personnel to hydrazine or monomethyl hydrazine, or suspected carcinogens. Also used as stationary monitors by taping them on walls or equipment at strategic locations.

  12. Use of accident experience in developing criteria for teleoperator equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Vallario, E.J.; Selby, J.M.

    1985-10-01

    The 1961 SL-1 reactor accident in Idaho and the Recuplex accident at Hanford are reviewed to identify problems common to emergency situations, lessons learned from accidents, criteria for emergency equipment, and recommendations for using robotics to solve problems during emergencies. Teleoperator equipment could be used to assess the extent of the damage and the condition of the reactor, retrieve dosimeters, evacuate and treat accident victims, clean up debris and decontaminate accident areas. 2 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Hanford personnel dosimeter supporting studies FY-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    This report examined specific functional components of the routine external personnel dosimeter program at Hanford. Components studied included: dosimeter readout; dosimeter calibration; dosimeter field response; dose calibration algorithm; dosimeter design; and TLD chip acceptance procedures. Additional information is also presented regarding the dosimeter response to light- and medium-filtered x-rays, high energy photons and neutrons. This study was conducted to clarify certain data obtained during the FY-1980 studies.

  14. Ionization chamber dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Renner, Tim R.; Nyman, Mark A.; Stradtner, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    A method for fabricating an ion chamber dosimeter collecting array of the type utilizing plural discrete elements formed on a uniform collecting surface which includes forming a thin insulating layer over an aperture in a frame having surfaces, forming a predetermined pattern of through holes in the layer, plating both surfaces of the layer and simultaneously tilting and rotating the frame for uniform plate-through of the holes between surfaces. Aligned masking and patterned etching of the surfaces provides interconnects between the through holes and copper leads provided to external circuitry.

  15. PERSONNEL NEUTRON DOSIMETER

    DOEpatents

    Fitzgerald, J.J.; Detwiler, C.G. Jr.

    1960-05-24

    A description is given of a personnel neutron dosimeter capable of indicating the complete spectrum of the neutron dose received as well as the dose for each neutron energy range therein. The device consists of three sets of indium foils supported in an aluminum case. The first set consists of three foils of indium, the second set consists of a similar set of indium foils sandwiched between layers of cadmium, whereas the third set is similar to the second set but is sandwiched between layers of polyethylene. By analysis of all the foils the neutron spectrum and the total dose from neutrons of all energy levels can be ascertained.

  16. Pistol-shaped dosimeter charger

    DOEpatents

    Maples, Robert A.

    1985-01-01

    A pistol-shaped charger assembly clamps a cylindrical radiation dosimeter against one edge thereof. A triggerlike lever on the handgrip of the assembly is manually pivoted to actuate a piezoelectric current generator held in the handgrip and thereby charge the dosimeter.

  17. Pistol-shaped dosimeter charger

    DOEpatents

    Maples, R.A.

    A pistol-shaped charger assembly clamps a cylindrical radiation dosimeter against one edge thereof. A triggerlike lever on the handgrip of the assembly is manually pivoted to actuate a piezoelectric current generator held in the handgrip and thereby charge the dosimeter.

  18. A new radiochromic dosimeter film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidney, L. N.; Lynch, D. C.; Willet, P. S.

    By employing acid-sensitive leuco dyes in a chlorine-containing polymer matrix, a new radiochromic dosimeter film has been developed for gamma, electron beam, and ultraviolet radiation. These dosimeter films undergo a color change from colorless to royal blue, red fuchsia, or black, depending on dye selection, and have been characterized using a visible spectrophotometer over an absorbed dose range of 1 to 100 kGy. The primary features of the film are improved color stability before and after irradiation, whether stored in the dark or under artificial lights, and improved moisture resistance. The effects of absorbed dose, dose rate, and storage conditions on dosimeter performance are discussed. The dosimeter material may be produced as a free film or coated onto a transparent substrate and optionally backed with adhesive. Potential applications for these materials include gamma sterilization indicator films for food and medical products, electron beam dosimeters, and in-line radiation monitors for electron beam and ultraviolet processing.

  19. Individual external dose monitoring of all citizens of Date City by passive dosimeter 5 to 51 months after the Fukushima NPP accident (series): 1. Comparison of individual dose with ambient dose rate monitored by aircraft surveys.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Makoto; Hayano, Ryugo

    2016-12-06

    Date (da'te) City in Fukushima Prefecture has conducted a population-wide individual dose monitoring program after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident, which provides a unique and comprehensive data set of the individual doses of citizens. The purpose of this paper, the first in the series, is to establish a method for estimating effective doses based on the available ambient dose rate survey data. We thus examined the relationship between the individual external doses and the corresponding ambient doses assessed from airborne surveys. The results show that the individual doses were about 0.15 times the ambient doses, the coefficient of 0.15 being a factor of 4 smaller than the value employed by the Japanese government, throughout the period of the airborne surveys used. The method obtained in this study could aid in the prediction of individual doses in the early phase of future radiological accidents involving large-scale contamination.

  20. Personnel electronic neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Falk, R.B.; Tyree, W.H.

    1982-03-03

    A personnel electronic dosimeter includes a neutron-proton and neutron-alpha converter for providing an electrical signal having a magnitude proportional to the energy of a detected proton or alpha particle produced from the converter, a pulse generator circuit for generating a pulse having a duration controlled by the weighed effect of the amplitude of the electrical signal, an oscillator enabled by the pulse for generating a train of clock pulses for a time dependent upon the pulse length, a counter for counting the clock pulses, and an indicator for providing a direct reading and aural alarm when the count indicates that the wearer has been exposed to a selected level of neutron dose equivalent.

  1. Personnel electronic neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Falk, Roger B.; Tyree, William H.

    1984-12-18

    A personnel electronic dosimeter includes a neutron-proton and neutron-alpha converter for providing an electrical signal having a magnitude proportional to the energy of a detected proton or alpha particle produced from the converter, a pulse generator circuit for generating a pulse having a duration controlled by the weighed effect of the amplitude of the electrical signal, an oscillator enabled by the pulse for generating a train of clock pulses for a time dependent upon the pulse length, a counter for counting the clock pulses, and an indicator for providing a direct reading and aural alarm when the count indicates that the wearer has been exposed to a selected level of neutron dose equivalent.

  2. Miniature spectrally selective dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R. R.; MacConochie, I. O.; Poole, B. D., Jr.

    1980-10-01

    A miniature spectrally selective dosimeter capable of measuring selected bandwidths of radiation exposure on small mobile areas is described. This is achieved by the combination of photovoltaic detectors, electrochemical integrators (E-cells) and filters in a small compact case which can be easily attached in close proximity to and substantially parallel to the surface being measured. In one embodiment two photovoltaic detectors, two E-cells, and three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a safety pin. In another embodiment, two detectors, one E-cell, three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a clip to clip over a side piece of an eye glass frame.

  3. Miniature spectrally selective dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, R. R.; Macconochie, I. O.; Poole, B. D., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A miniature spectrally selective dosimeter capable of measuring selected bandwidths of radiation exposure on small mobile areas is described. This is achieved by the combination of photovoltaic detectors, electrochemical integrators (E-cells) and filters in a small compact case which can be easily attached in close proximity to and substantially parallel to the surface being measured. In one embodiment two photovoltaic detectors, two E-cells, and three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a safety pin. In another embodiment, two detectors, one E-cell, three filters are packaged in a small case with attaching means consisting of a clip to clip over a side piece of an eye glass frame.

  4. Brachytherapy dosimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutinho, L. M.; Castro, I. F. C.; Peralta, L.; Abreu, M. C.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2015-07-01

    In-vivo and in-situ measurement of the radiation dose administered during brachytherapy faces several technical challenges, requiring a very compact, tissue-equivalent, linear and highly sensitive dosimeter, particularly in low-dose rate brachytherapy procedures, which use radioactive seeds with low energy and low dose deposition rate. In this work we present a scintillating optical fiber dosimeter composed of a flexible sensitive probe and a dedicated electronic readout system based on silicon photomultiplier photodetection, capable of operating both in pulse and current modes. The performance of the scintillating fiber optic dosimeter was evaluated in low energy regimes, using an X-ray tube operating at voltages of 40-50 kV and currents below 1 mA, to assess minimum dose response of the scintillating fiber. The dosimeter shows a linear response with dose and is capable of detecting mGy dose variations like an ionization chamber. Besides fulfilling all the requirements for a dosimeter in brachytherapy, the high sensitivity of this device makes it a suitable candidate for application in low-dose rate brachytherapy. According to Peralta and Rego [1], the BCF-10 and BCF-60 scintillating optical fibers used in dosimetry exhibit high variations in their sensitivity for photon beams in the 25-100 kVp energy range. Energy linearity for energies below 50 keV needs to be further investigated, using monochromatic X-ray photons.

  5. Spectrophotometry of PRESAGETM polyurethane dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstajic, N.; Wai, P.; Adamovics, J.; Doran, S.

    2004-01-01

    Preliminary optical density results on irradiated PRESAGE dosimeter are outlined in this article. PRESAGE is a solid dosimeter, based on a clear polyurethane combined with the leuco-dye leuco-malachite green. The purpose of these measurements was a) to obtain spectra for optimizing the wavelength of a new light source for the equipment and b) to obtain a dose-response relation. 10 PRESAGE cuvettes were given uniform doses from 0.1 to 40 Gy and later read out by spectrophotometer. The instrument used was CAMSPEC M350 Double Beam Spectrophotometer.

  6. Dose-equivalent neutron dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, R.V.; Hankins, D.E.; Tomasino, L.; Gomaa, M.A.M.

    1981-01-07

    A neutron dosimeter is disclosed which provides a single measurement indicating the amount of potential biological damage resulting from the neutron exposure of the wearer, for a wide range of neutron energies. The dosimeter includes a detecting sheet of track etch detecting material such as a carbonate plastic, for detecting higher energy neutrons, and a radiator layer contaning conversion material such as /sup 6/Li and /sup 10/B lying adjacent to the detecting sheet for converting moderate energy neutrons to alpha particles that produce tracks in the adjacent detecting sheet.

  7. Miniature personal UV solar dosimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, R. R.; Macconochie, I. O.; Poole, B. D., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Small light-powered meter measures accumulated radiation in ultraviolet or other selected regions. Practical advantages are device's low cost, small size, accuracy, and adaptability to specific wave-band measurements. Medical applications include detection of skin cancer, vitamin D production, and jaundice. Dosimeter also measures sunlight for solar energy designs, agriculture and meteorology, and monitors stability of materials and environmental and occupational lighting.

  8. RADIATION DOSIMETER AND DOSIMETRIC METHODS

    DOEpatents

    Taplin, G.V.

    1958-10-28

    The determination of ionizing radiation by means of single fluid phase chemical dosimeters of the colorimetric type is presented. A single fluid composition is used consisting of a chlorinated hydrocarbon, an acidimetric dye, a normalizer and water. Suitable chlorinated hydrocarbons are carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, trichlorethane, ethylene dichioride and tetracbloroethylene. Suitable acidimetric indicator dyes are phenol red, bromcresol purple, and creosol red. Suitable normallzers are resorcinol, geraniol, meta cresol, alpha -tocopberol, and alpha -naphthol.

  9. Agricultural model intercomparison and improvement project: Overview of model intercomparisons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improvement of crop simulation models to better estimate growth and yield is one of the objectives of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP). The overall goal of AgMIP is to provide an assessment of crop model through rigorous intercomparisons and evaluate future clim...

  10. Fast-neutron solid-state dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Kecker, K.H.; Haywood, F.F.; Perdue, P.T.; Thorngate, J.H.

    1975-07-22

    This patent relates to an improved fast-neutron solid-state dosimeter that does not require separation of materials before it can be read out, that utilizes materials that do not melt or otherwise degrade at about 300$sup 0$C readout temperature, that provides a more efficient dosimeter, and that can be reused. The dosimeters are fabricated by intimately mixing a TL material, such as CaSO$sub 4$:Dy, with a powdered polyphenyl, such as p-sexiphenyl, and hot- pressing the mixture to form pellets, followed by out-gassing in a vacuum furnace at 150$sup 0$C prior to first use dosimeters. (auth)

  11. Eleventh ORNL personnel dosimetry intercomparison study, May 22-23, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Oyan, R.; Sims, C.S.

    1986-07-01

    The Eleventh Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during May 22-23, 1985. Dosimeter badges from 44 participating organizations were mounted on Lucite block phantoms and exposed to four mixed-radiation fields with neutron dose equivalents around 5 mSv and gamma dose equivalents between 0.1 and 0.7 mSv. Results of this study indicated that no participants had difficulty obtaining measurable indication of neutron exposure at the provided dose equivalent levels, and very few had difficulty obtaining indication of gamma exposure at dose equivalents as low as 0.10 mSv. Average neutron results for all dosimeter types were within 20% of reference values with no obvious spectrum dependence. Different dosimeter types (albedo, direct interaction TLD, film, recoil track, and combination albedo-track) with 10 or more reported measurements provided average results within 35% of reference values for all spectra. With regard to precision, about 80% of the reported neutron results had single standard deviations within 10% at the means which indicates that precision is not a problem relative to accuracy for most participants. Average gamma results were greater than reference values by factors of 1.07 to 1.52 for the four exposures with TLD systems being more accurate than film. About 80% of all neutron results and 67% of all gamma results met regulatory standards for measurement accuracy and approximately 70% of all neutron data satisfied national dosimetry accreditation criteria for accuracy plus precision. In general, neutron dosimeter performance observed in this intercomparison was much improved compared to that observed in the prior studies while gamma dosimeter performance was about the same.

  12. Czech results at criticality dosimetry intercomparison 2002.

    PubMed

    Frantisek, Spurný; Jaroslav, Trousil

    2004-01-01

    Two criticality dosimetry systems were tested by Czech participants during the intercomparison held in Valduc, France, June 2002. The first consisted of the thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) (Al-P glasses) and Si-diodes as passive neutron dosemeters. Second, it was studied to what extent the individual dosemeters used in the Czech routine personal dosimetry service can give a reliable estimation of criticality accident exposure. It was found that the first system furnishes quite reliable estimation of accidental doses. For routine individual dosimetry system, no important problems were encountered in the case of photon dosemeters (TLDs, film badge). For etched track detectors in contact with the 232Th or 235U-Al alloy, the track density saturation for the spark counting method limits the upper dose at approximately 1 Gy for neutrons with the energy >1 MeV.

  13. BETA-GAMMA PERSONNEL DOSIMETER

    DOEpatents

    Davis, D.M.; Gupton, E.D.; Hart, J.C.; Hull, A.P.

    1961-01-17

    A personnel dosimeter is offered which is sensitive to both gamma and soft beta radiations from all directions within a hemisphere. The device is in the shape of a small pill box which is worn on a worker-s wrist. The top and sides of the device are provided with 50 per cent void areas to give 50 per cent response to the beta rays and complete response to the gamma rays. The device is so constructed as to have a response which will approximate the dose received by the basal layer of the human epidermis.

  14. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, D.A.; Erkkila, B.H.; Vasilik, D.G.

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  15. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, David A.; Erkkila, Bruce H.; Vasilik, Dennis G.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  16. Dosimeter and method for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Johns, Deidre M.

    2003-06-24

    A very sensitive dosimeter that detects ionizing radiation is described. The dosimeter includes a breakable sealed container. A solution of a reducing agent is inside the container. The dosimeter has an air-tight dosimeter body with a transparent portion and an opaque portion. The transparent portion includes a transparent chamber that holds the breakable container with the reducing agent. The opaque portion includes an opaque chamber that holds an emulsion of silver salt (AgX) selected from silver chloride, silver bromide, silver iodide, and combinations of them. A passageway in the dosimeter provides fluid communication between the transparent chamber and the opaque chamber. The dosimeter may also include a chemical pH indicator in the breakable container that provides a detectable color change to the solution for a pH of about 3-10. The invention also includes a method of detecting ionizing radiation that involves producing the dosimeter, breaking the breakable container, allowing the solution to flow through the passageway and contact the emulsion, detecting any color change in the solution and using the color change to determine a radiation dosage.

  17. Radiation Monitoring Equipment Dosimeter Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, Kenneth A.; Golightly, Michael J.; Quam, William

    1992-01-01

    Spacecraft crews risk exposure to relatively high levels of ionizing radiation. This radiation may come from charged particles trapped in the Earth's magnetic fields, charged particles released by solar flare activity, galactic cosmic radiation, energetic photons and neutrons generated by interaction of these primary radiations with spacecraft and crew, and man-made sources (e.g., nuclear power generators). As missions are directed to higher radiation level orbits, viz., higher altitudes and inclinations, longer durations, and increased flight frequency, radiation exposure could well become a major factor for crew stay time and career lengths. To more accurately define the radiological exposure and risk to the crew, real-time radiation monitoring instrumentation, which is capable of identifying and measuring the various radiation components, must be flown. This presentation describes a radiation dosimeter instrument which was successfully flown on the Space Shuttle, the RME-3.

  18. Diffusion properties of a radiochromic hydrogel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skyt, P. S.; Kinnari, T. S.; Wahlstedt, I.; Yates, E. S.; Muren, L. P.; Petersen, J. B. B.; Balling, P.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the diffusion properties of a radiochromic hydrogel dosimeter based on leuco malachite green dye in a gelatine matrix. One half of each dosimeter was irradiated while the other half was left un-irradiated creating dose gradients over which diffusion could be investigated. Read-out of the optical response was performed with a high-resolution optical scanner. The dosimeters were found to exhibit a low diffusion rate but a high auto-oxidation level leading to a fading of the contrast in the dose response with time.

  19. Fiber-type dosimeter with improved illuminator

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    A single-piece, molded plastic, Cassigrainian-type condenser arrangement is incorporated in a tubular-shaped personal pocket dosimeter of the type which combines an ionization chamber with an optically-read fiber electrometer to provide improved illumination of the electrometer fiber. The condenser routes incoming light from one end of the dosimeter tubular housing around a central axis charging pin assembly and focuses the light at low angles to the axis so that it falls within the acceptance angle of the electrometer fiber objective lens viewed through an eyepiece lens disposed in the opposite end of the dosimeter. This results in improved fiber illumination and fiber image contrast.

  20. Fiber-type dosimeter with improved illuminator

    DOEpatents

    Fox, R.J.

    1985-12-23

    A single-piece, molded plastic, Cassigrainian-type condenser arrangement is incorporated in a tubular-shaped personal pocket dosimeter of the type which combines an ionization chamber with an optically-read fiber electrometer to provide improved illumination of the electrometer fiber. The condenser routes incoming light from one end of the dosimeter tubular housing around a central axis charging pin assembly and focuses the light at low angles to the axis so that it falls within the acceptance angle of the electrometer fiber objective lens viewed through an eyepiece lens disposed in the opposite end of the dosimeter. This results in improved fiber illumination and fiber image contrast.

  1. Performance criteria for dosimeter angular response

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, P.L.; Fox, R. A.; Cummings, F. M.; McDonald, J. C.; Jones, K.L.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides criteria for evaluating the response of personnel dosimeters to radiation at nonperpendicular incidence. The US Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) ensures that dosimetry systems at DOE facilities meet acceptable standards for precision and accuracy. In the past, these standards were limited to tests for system variability, energy dependence, and level of detection. The proposed criteria will broaden the scope of DOELAP to include the angular response of personnel dosimeters. Because occupational exposures in the workplace are rarely due to radiation from only one direction, dosimeters must accurately assign individual dose equivalent from irradiation at any forward angle of incidence. Including an angular response criterion in DOELAP would improve the quality of personnel monitoring provided that the criterion is developed from appropriate dose quantities. This report provides guidance for assigning individual dose equivalents for radiation fields at nonperpendicular incidence to the dosimeter. 21 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. The shelf life of dyed polymethylmethacrylate dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bett, R.; Watts, M. F.; Plested, M. E.

    2002-03-01

    The long-term stability of the radiation response of Harwell Red 4034 and Amber 3042 Perspex Dosimeters has been monitored for more than 15 years, and the resulting data used in the justification of their shelf-life specifications.

  3. Polymer gel dosimeter based on itaconic acid.

    PubMed

    Mattea, Facundo; Chacón, David; Vedelago, José; Valente, Mauro; Strumia, Miriam C

    2015-11-01

    A new polymeric dosimeter based on itaconic acid and N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide was studied. The preparation method, compositions of monomer and crosslinking agent and the presence of oxygen in the dosimetric system were analyzed. The resulting materials were irradiated with an X-ray tube at 158cGy/min, 226cGymin and 298cGy/min with doses up to 1000Gy. The dosimeters presented a linear response in the dose range 75-1000Gy, sensitivities of 0.037 1/Gyat 298cGy/min and an increase in the sensitivity with lower dose rates. One of the most relevant outcomes in this study was obtaining different monomer to crosslinker inclusion in the formed gel for the dosimeters where oxygen was purged during the preparation method. This effect has not been reported in other typical dosimeters and could be attributed to the large differences in the reactivity among these species.

  4. SOIL moisture data intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Yann; Rodriguez-Frenandez, Nemesio; Al-Yaari, Amen; Parens, Marie; Molero, Beatriz; Mahmoodi, Ali; Mialon, Arnaud; Richaume, Philippe; Bindlish, Rajat; Mecklenburg, Susanne; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity satellite (SMOS) was launched in November 2009 and started delivering data in January 2010. Subsequently, the satellite has been in operation for over 6 years while the retrieval algorithms from Level 1 to Level 2 underwent significant evolutions as knowledge improved. Other approaches for retrieval at Level 2 over land were also investigated while Level 3 and 4 were initiated. In this présentation these improvements are assessed by inter-comparisons of the current Level 2 (V620) against the previous version (V551) and new products either using neural networks or Level 3. In addition a global evaluation of different SMOS soil moisture (SM) products is performed comparing products with those of model simulations and other satellites (AMSR E/ AMSR2 and ASCAT). Finally, all products were evaluated against in situ measurements of soil moisture (SM). The study demonstrated that the V620 shows a significant improvement (including those at level1 improving level2)) with respect to the earlier version V551. Results also show that neural network based approaches can yield excellent results over areas where other products are poor. Finally, global comparison indicates that SMOS behaves very well when compared to other sensors/approaches and gives consistent results over all surfaces from very dry (African Sahel, Arizona), to wet (tropical rain forests). RFI (Radio Frequency Interference) is still an issue even though detection has been greatly improved while RFI sources in several areas of the world are significantly reduced. When compared to other satellite products, the analysis shows that SMOS achieves its expected goals and is globally consistent over different eco climate regions from low to high latitudes and throughout the seasons.

  5. Automated saturated standard cell intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, B.E.; Deitesfeld, C.A.

    1987-10-05

    A cost effective, highly efficient, and automatic method of intercomparing standard cells has been sought after and implemented, utilizing computer control and a commercially available scanner. This system reduces intercomparison time from 4 hours to 30 minutes using the standard National Bureau of Standard (NBS) 4 x 4 design. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Neutron personnel dosimetry intercomparison studies at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory: a summary (1981-1986).

    PubMed

    Swaja, R E; Sims, C S

    1988-09-01

    To provide an opportunity for dosimetrists to test and calibrate their neutron personnel monitoring systems, the staff of the Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted personnel dosimetry intercomparison studies (PDIS) periodically since 1974. During these studies, personnel dosimeters are mailed to ORNL, exposed to low-level (less than 15 mSv) neutron dose equivalents in a variety of mixed-radiation fields, and then returned to the participants for evaluation. These intercomparisons have provided more data on neutron dosimeter performance than any other periodic test program conducted to date. This report presents a summary and analysis of about 3450 neutron dose equivalent measurements reported for PDIS 7 through 12 (1981-1986) with emphasis on low dose equivalent sensitivity, accuracy and precision, and performance relative to accreditation standards for the basic types of personnel dosimetry systems. Relationships of the PDIS results to occupational neutron monitoring, accreditation testing, and methods to improve personnel neutron dosimetry performance are also discussed.

  7. Environmental dosimeter of the thermoluminescent type

    DOEpatents

    Eichner, F.N.; Kocher, L.F.

    1974-01-29

    A dosimeter for accurately monitoring normally low-energy radiation including a thermoluminescent CaF phosphor enclosed within a tantalum capsule is described. The tantalum acts as a filter to weaken the measured dose due to photons having energies below about 0.2 MeV. Tantalum end caps are maintained on the capsule body by a polyolefin sheath formed from heat-contractable tubing. After exposing the dosimeter to environmental radiation, it is placed in a shielded chamber for about 24 h and subsequently annealed at about 80 deg C to release radiation energy accumulated in low-temperature traps. The dosimeter is then disassembled and the phosphors photometrically read at temperatures about 50 deg C to determine the absorbed radiation dose. (Official Gazette)

  8. System for use with solid state dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.D.; McDonald, J.C.; Eichner, F.N.; Tomeraasen, P.L.

    1990-09-04

    The present invention constitutes a system for determining the amounts of ionizing radiation to which dosimeters using thermoluminescent materials have been exposed. In accordance with this system, the thermoluminescent materials which comprise the dosimeters are first cooled by contact with a cryogenic substance such as liquefied nitrogen. The thermoluminescent materials are then optically stimulated by exposure to ultraviolet light. Thereafter, the amounts of visible light emitted by the thermoluminescent materials are detected and counted as the materials are allowed to warm up to room temperature. The amounts of luminescence exhibited by the materials are related to radiation exposure and provide a sensitive measure of radiation dosage. It has been discovered that the above procedure is most effective when heavily doped thermoluminescent materials are used and that the procedure allows many useful plastic materials to now be employed in dosimeter constructions. 3 figs.

  9. System for use with solid state dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D.; McDonald, Joseph C.; Eichner, Fred N.; Tomeraasen, Paul L.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a system for determining the amounts of ionizing radiation to which dosimeters using thermoluminescent materials have been exposed. In accordance with this system, the thermoluminescent materials which comprise the dosimeters are first cooled by contact with a cryogenic substance such as liquified nitrogen. The thermoluminescent materials are then optically stimulated by exposure to ultraviolet light. Thereafter, the amounts of visible light emitted by the thermoluminescent materials are detected and counted as the materials are allowed to warm up to room temperature. The amounts of luminescence exhibited by the materials are related to radiation exposure and provide a sensitive measure of radiation dosage. It has been discovered that the above procedure is most effective when heavily doped thermoluminescent materials are used and that the procedure allows many useful plastic materials to now be employed in dosimeter constructions.

  10. Solid state neutron dosimeter for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nagarkar, V.; Entine, G.; Stoppel, P.; Cirignano, L. ); Swinehart, P. )

    1992-08-01

    One of the most important contributions to the radiation exposure of astronauts engaged in space flight is the significant flux of high energy neutrons arising from both primary and secondary sources of ionizing radiation. Under NASA sponsorship, the authors are developing a solid state neutron sensor capable of being incorporated into a very compact, flight instrument to provide high quality real time measurement of this important radiation flux. The dosimeter uses a special, high neutron sensitivity, PIN diode that is insensitive t the other forms of ionizing radiation. The dosimeter will have the ability to measure and record neutron dose over a range of 50 microgray to tens of milligrays (5 millirads to several rads) over a flight of up to 30 days. the performance characteristics of the PIN diode with a detailed description of the overall dosimeter is presented. in this paper.

  11. Chemical Dosimeter Tube With Coaxial Sensing Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E.

    1993-01-01

    Improved length-of-stain (LOS) chemical dosimeter indicates total dose of chemical vapor in air. Made with rods and tubes of various diameters to obtain various sensitivities and dynamic ranges. Sensitivity larger and dose range smaller when more room for diffusion in gap between tube and rod. Offers greater resistance to changing of color of exposed dye back to color of unexposed condition, greater sensitivity, and higher degree of repeatability. Developed to measure doses of gaseous HCI, dosimeter modified by use of other dyes to indicate doses of other chemical vapors.

  12. Fiber optic dosimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutinho, L. M.; Castro, I. F.; Peralta, L.; Abreu, M. C.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2014-08-01

    A small dimension, real-time readout dosimeter is desirable for specific applications in medical physics as for example, dose measurement in prostate brachytherapy. This particular radiotherapy procedure consists in the permanent deposition of low energy, low-dose and low-dose rate small sized radioactive seeds. We developed a scintillating fiber optic based dosimeter suitable for in-vivo, real-time low dose and low dose rate measurements. Due to the low scintillation light produced in the scintillating fiber, a high sensitive and high gain light detector is required. The Silicon Photomultipliers are an interesting option that allowed us to obtain good results in our studies.

  13. DEPRON dosimeter for ``Lomonosov'' satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilkov, Ivan; Vedenkin, Nikolay; Panasyuk, Mikhail; Amelyushkin, Aleksandr; Petrov, Vasily; Nechayev, Oleg; Benghin, Victor

    appearance of the instrument DEPRON (Dosimeter of Electrons, PROtons and Neutrons) was determined. DEPRON is intended for registration of the absorbed doses and linear energy transfer spectra for high-energy electrons, protons and nuclei of space radiation, as well as registration of thermal and slow neutrons. The experiment based on DEPRON instrument is aimed at the studies of the distribution of space radiation dose rate at high latitude paths in order to study the flight paths of perspective manned spacecraft. Present work provides a brief description of the DEPRON instrument, its calibration results and the structure of the output data.

  14. Measurements of SNAC2 area dosimeters placed in different configurations around the PROSPERO reactor and comparison with TRIPOLI-4 calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, G.; Chambru, L.; Authier, N.

    2015-07-01

    In the context of criticality accident alarm system tests, several experiments were carried out in 2013 on the PROSPERO reactor to study the response to neutron and gamma of different devices and dosimeters, particularly on the SNAC2 dosimeter. This article presents the results of this criticality dosimeter in different configurations, and compares the experimental measurements with the results of calculation performed with the TRIPOLI-4 Monte-Carlo Neutral Particles transport code. PROSPERO is a metallic critical assembly managed by the Criticality, Neutron Science and Measurement Department located at the French CEA Research Center of Valduc. The core, surrounded by a reflector of depleted uranium, is composed of 2 horizontal cylindrical blocks made of a highly enriched uranium alloy which can be placed in contact, and of 4 depleted uranium control rods which allow the reactor to be driven. This reactor, placed in a cell 10 m x 8 m x 6 m high, with 1.4-meter-thick concrete walls, is used as a fast neutron spectrum source and is operated at stable power level in delayed critical state, which can vary from 3 mW to 3 kW. PROSPERO is extensively used for electronic hardening or to study the effect of the neutrons on various materials. The SNAC2 criticality dosimeter is a zone dosimeter allowing the off line measurement of criticality accident neutron doses. This dosimeter consists of the pile up of seven activation foils embedded into a 23 mm diameter x 21 mm height cadmium container. The activation measurement of each foil, using a gamma spectroscopy technique, gives information about the neutron reaction rates. The SNAC2 software allows the spectrum unfolding from these values, taking into account the hypothesis of a particular spectrum shape, in three components: a Maxwell spectrum component for the thermal range, a 1/E component for the epithermal range, and a Watt spectrum component for the high energy range. Moreover, from the neutron spectrum, the SNAC

  15. Summary and analsysis of the 1986 ORNL personnel dosimetry intercomparison study

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Weng, P.S.; Sims, C.S.; Yeh, S.H.

    1987-04-01

    The Twelfth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during April 14 to 17, 1986. Objectives of this study were to determine neutron dosimeter performance characteristics at neutron dose equivalent levels near the minimum specified for accreditation testing programs and to provide several radiation fields different from those that have been considered in prior ORNL intercomparisons. Dosimeter badges from 49 participating organizations were mounted on Lucite block phantoms and exposed to six mixed-radiation fields (five using the Health Physics Research Reactor and one using a PuBe source) with neutron dose equivalents of about 1.5 mSv and gamma dose equivalents between 0.04 and 5.37 mSv. Results of this study indicated that participants had no difficulty obtaining measurable indication of neutron exposure at dose equivalent levels of about 1.5 mSv. Average neutron results for all dosimeter types were within approximately 60% of reference values with hard spectra being more accurately measured than soft spectra. Considering all irradiations, albedo and direct interaction TLD systems provided about the same performance characteristics. With regard to precision, about 58% of the reported neutron results had single standard deviations within 10% at the means which indicates that precision was not a problem relative to accuracy for over half of the participants. Average gamma results varied from 0.98 to 2.22 times reference values for all exposures with TLD systems being more accurate than film. Some participants, especially those using film, had difficulty obtaining measurable indication of gamma exposures at dose equivalent levels lower than 0.09 mSv. About 69% of all neutron results and 77% of all gamma results met regulatory standards for measurement accuracy and approximately 65% of all neutron data satisfied national dosimetry accreditation criteria for accuracy plus precision. 18 refs., 1 fig., 30 tabs.

  16. Nuclear accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Mobley, J.A.

    1982-05-01

    A nuclear accident with radioactive contamination can happen anywhere in the world. Because expert nuclear emergency teams may take several hours to arrive at the scene, local authorities must have a plan of action for the hours immediately following an accident. The site should be left untouched except to remove casualties. Treatment of victims includes decontamination and meticulous wound debridement. Acute radiation syndrome may be an overwhelming sequela.

  17. NOTE: Cell-phone interference with pocket dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djajaputra, David; Nehru, Ramasamy; Bruch, Philip M.; Ayyangar, Komanduri M.; Raman, Natarajan V.; Enke, Charles A.

    2005-05-01

    Accurate reporting of personal dose is required by regulation for hospital personnel that work with radioactive material. Pocket dosimeters are commonly used for monitoring this personal dose. We show that operating a cell phone in the vicinity of a pocket dosimeter can introduce large and erroneous readings of the dosimeter. This note reports a systematic study of this electromagnetic interference. We found that simple practical measures are enough to mitigate this problem, such as increasing the distance between the cell phone and the dosimeter or shielding the dosimeter, while maintaining its sensitivity to ionizing radiation, by placing it inside a common anti-static bag.

  18. Compton effect thermally activated depolarization dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Paul R.

    1978-01-01

    A dosimetry technique for high-energy gamma radiation or X-radiation employs the Compton effect in conjunction with radiation-induced thermally activated depolarization phenomena. A dielectric material is disposed between two electrodes which are electrically short circuited to produce a dosimeter which is then exposed to the gamma or X radiation. The gamma or X-radiation impinging on the dosimeter interacts with the dielectric material directly or with the metal composing the electrode to produce Compton electrons which are emitted preferentially in the direction in which the radiation was traveling. A portion of these electrons becomes trapped in the dielectric material, consequently inducing a stable electrical polarization in the dielectric material. Subsequent heating of the exposed dosimeter to the point of onset of ionic conductivity with the electrodes still shorted through an ammeter causes the dielectric material to depolarize, and the depolarization signal so emitted can be measured and is proportional to the dose of radiation received by the dosimeter.

  19. Response characteristics of selected personnel neutron dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Fix, J.J.; Hadley, R.T.; Holbrook, K.L.; Yoder, R.C.; Roberson, P.L.; Endres, G.W.R.; Nichols, L.L.; Schwartz, R.B.

    1983-09-01

    Performance characteristics of selected personnel neutron dosimeters in current use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities were determined from their evaluation of neutron dose equivalent received after irradiations with specific neutron sources at either the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) or the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The characteristics assessed included: lower detection level, energy response, precision and accuracy. It was found that when all of the laboratories employed a common set of calibrations, the overall accuracy was approximately +-20%, which is within uncertainty expected for these dosimeters. For doses above 80 mrem, the accuracy improved to better than 10% when a common calibration was used. Individual differences found in this study may reflect differences in calibration technique rather than differences in the dose rates of actual calibration standards. Second, at dose rates above 100 mrem, the precision for the best participants was generally below +-10% which is also within expected limits for these types of dosimeters. The poorest results had a standard deviation of about +-25%. At the lowest doses, which were sometimes below the lower detection limit, the precision often approached or exceeded +-100%. Third, the lower level of detection for free field /sup 252/Cf neutrons generally ranged between 20 and 50 mrem. Fourth, the energy dependence study provided a characterization of the response of the dosimeters to neutron energies far from the calibration energy. 11 references, 22 figures, 26 tables.

  20. Pen Ink as an Ultraviolet Dosimeter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Nathan; Turner, Joanna; Parisi, Alfio; Spence, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    A technique for using highlighter ink as an ultraviolet dosimeter has been developed for use by secondary school students. The technique requires the students to measure the percentage of colour fading in ink drawn onto strips of paper that have been exposed to sunlight, which can be calibrated to measurements of the ultraviolet irradiance using…

  1. Analysis of nonstandard noise dosimeter microphone positions.

    PubMed

    Byrne, David C; Reeves, Efrem R

    2008-03-01

    This study was conducted as part of a project involving the evaluation of a new type of noise exposure monitoring paradigm. Laboratory tests were conducted to assess how "nonstandard" dosimeter microphones and microphone positions measured noise levels under different acoustical conditions (i.e., diffuse field and direct field). The data presented in this article reflect measurement differences due to microphone position and mounting/supporting structure only and are not an evaluation of any particular complete dosimeter system. To varying degrees, the results obtained with the dosimeter microphones used in this study differed from the reference results obtained in the unperturbed (subject absent) sound field with a precision (suitable for use in an ANSI Type 1 sound level meter) (1)/(2)-inch (12.7 mm) measurement microphone. Effects of dosimeter microphone placement in a diffuse field were found to be minor for most of the test microphones/locations, while direct field microphone placement effects were found to be quite large depending on the microphone position and supporting structure, sound source location, and noise spectrum.

  2. Underwater remote-reading dosimeter evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Clow, H.E.; Emmons, G. )

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports on problems inherent in attempting to measure underwater dose rates and monitor and control diver exposures. At Connecticut Yankee, the authors had a specific procedure in effect to cover diving evolutions; however, the authors were not satisfied with the methods available to us for monitoring a diver's dose during a dive. The authors looked around and discovered that the ideal monitoring method was already at hand. In the past, the authors had successfully used the Xetex 503A Teledose system for high dose rate jobs under are variety of circumstances, but not underwater. The basic Teledose system consists of a base station and five individual electronic dosimeter/transmitters that can be worn by workers. The dosimeters are GM-tube types packaged in high-impact plastic or metal cases, each powered by a single 9-volt battery. The dosimeters do not have their own read-outs - instead, they transmit a coded pulse for each mR detected via a loop antenna to the base station, where the accumulated exposure for each of the five dosimeter units is displayed.

  3. Investigating hydrogel dosimeter decomposition by chemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The chemical oxidative decomposition of leucocrystal violet micelle hydrogel dosimeters was investigated using the reaction of ferrous ions with hydrogen peroxide or sodium bicarbonate with hydrogen peroxide. The second reaction is more effective at dye decomposition in gelatin hydrogels. Additional chemical analysis is required to determine the decomposition products.

  4. INTERCOMPARISON OF EYE LENS DOSEMETERS.

    PubMed

    Behrens, R; Hupe, O; Busch, F; Denk, J; Engelhardt, J; Günther, K; Hödlmoser, H; Jordan, M; Strohmaier, J

    2016-03-23

    An intercomparison of eye lens dosemeters has been conducted in terms of the quantityHp(3). For the first time, besides photon radiation also beta radiation qualities were included. Three dosemeter types designed for the quantityHp(3) and ten forHp(0.07) took part in the intercomparison. As shown in a previous intercomparison for photon radiation only, the dosemeters designed forHp(0.07) and calibrated in terms ofHp(3) performed well in photon radiation fields. But for beta radiation, it turned out thatHp(0.07) dosemeters over-responded up to a factor of 5 000 (with respect to the trueHp(3) dose) in the medium beta energy range ((85)Kr with a beta endpoint energy of 0.69 MeV), while someHp(3) dosemeters performed quite well. For medium (57 keV) and high (662 keV) energy photon radiation, all dosemeter types showed response values well within the trumpet curve according to the current draft of ISO 14146.

  5. Exploring the dose response of radiochromic dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skyt, P. S.; Wahlstedt, I.; Yates, E. S.; Muren, L. P.; Petersen, J. B. B.; Balling, P.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the dose response of a newly developed radio-chromic hydrogel dosimeter based on leuco malachite green dye in a gelatine matrix. The original dosimeter composition was first investigated in terms of dose response and dose-rate dependence. In addition, the initiating compounds producing chlorine radicals were substituted with compounds producing fluorine radicals, oxygen-centered radicals, carbon-centered radicals and bromine radicals. Also the surfactant was substituted by other compounds of different molecular size and charge. The original composition gave a dose response of 3.5·10-3 Gy-1cm-1 at 6 Gy/min with a dose rate dependence giving a 27 % increase when decreasing the dose rate to 1 Gy/min. None of the substituted initiating components contributed to an increase in dose response while only one surfactant increased the dose response slightly.

  6. Performance Evaluation of a Colorimetric Hydrazine Dosimeter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-16

    air has been developed. The passive badge consists of a dosimeter card containing a vanillin solution coated on a thin paper substrate. The active...patch consists of a thick cellulose substrate coated with a vanillin solution. When placed in a plastic sample holder attached to a personnel pump, up to...5 L/min can be drawn through the active badge substrate. Through a condensation reaction, vanillin reacts with hydrazine to form a colored product

  7. Radiological properties of normoxic polymer gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Venning, A.J.; Nitschke, K.N.; Keall, P.J.; Baldock, C.

    2005-04-01

    The radiological properties of the normoxic polymer gel dosimeters MAGIC, MAGAS, and MAGAT [methacrylic and ascorbic acid in gelatin initiated by copper; methacrylic acid gelatine gel with ascorbic acid; and methacrylic acid gelatine and tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride, respectively] have been investigated. The radiological water equivalence was determined by comparing the polymer gel macroscopic photon and electron interaction cross sections over the energy range from 10 keV to 20 MeV and by Monte Carlo modeling of depth doses. Normoxic polymer gel dosimeters have a high gelatine and monomer concentration and therefore mass density (kg m{sup -3}) up to 3.8% higher than water. This results in differences between the cross-section ratios of the normoxic polymer gels and water of up to 3% for the attenuation, energy absorption, and collision stopping power coefficient ratios through the Compton dominant energy range. The mass cross-section ratios were within 2% of water except for the mass attenuation and energy absorption coefficients ratios, which showed differences with water of up to 6% for energies less than 100 keV. Monte Carlo modeling was undertaken for the polymer gel dosimeters to model the electron and photon transport resulting from a 6 MV photon beam. The absolute percentage differences between gel and water were within 1% and the relative percentage differences were within 3.5%. The results show that the MAGAT gel formulation is the most radiological water equivalent of the normoxic polymer gel dosimeters investigated due to its lower mass density measurement compared with MAGAS and MAGIC gels.

  8. Models and Measurements Intercomparison 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Jae H. (Editor); Ko, Malcolm K. W. (Editor); Jackman, Charles H. (Editor); Plumb, R. Alan (Editor); Kaye, Jack A. (Editor); Sage, Karen H. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    Models and Measurement Intercomparison II (MM II) summarizes the intercomparison of results from model simulations and observations of stratospheric species. Representatives from twenty-three modeling groups using twenty-nine models participated in these MM II exercises between 1996 and 1999. Twelve of the models were two- dimensional zonal-mean models while seventeen were three-dimensional models. This was an international effort as seven were from outside the United States. Six transport experiments and five chemistry experiments were designed for various models. Models participating in the transport experiments performed simulations of chemically inert tracers providing diagnostics for transport. The chemistry experiments involved simulating the distributions of chemically active trace cases including ozone. The model run conditions for dynamics and chemistry were prescribed in order to minimize the factors that caused differences in the models. The report includes a critical review of the results by the participants and a discussion of the causes of differences between modeled and measured results as well as between results from different models, A sizable effort went into preparation of the database of the observations. This included a new climatology for ozone. The report should help in evaluating the results from various predictive models for assessing humankind perturbations of the stratosphere.

  9. Hanford beta-gamma personnel dosimeter prototypes and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, J.J.; Holbrook, K.L.; Soldat, K.L.

    1983-04-01

    Upgraded and modified Hanford dosimeter prototypes were evaluated for possible use at Hanford as a primary beta-gamma dosimeter. All prototypes were compatible with the current dosimeter card and holder design, as well as processing with the automated Hanford readers. Shallow- and deep-dose response was determined for selected prototypes using several beta sources, K-fluorescent x rays and filtered x-ray techniques. All prototypes included a neutron sensitive chip. A progressive evaluation of the performance of each of the upgrades to the current dosimeter is described. In general, the performance of the current dosimeter can be upgraded using individual chip sensitivity factors to improve precision and an improved algorithm to minimize bias. The performance of this dosimeter would be adequate to pass all categories of the ANSI N13.11 performance criteria for dosimeter procesors, provided calibration techniques compatible with irradiations adopted in the standard were conducted. The existing neutron capability of the dosimeter could be retained. Better dosimeter performance to beta-gamma radiation can be achieved by modifying the Hanford dosimeter so that four of the five chip positions are devoted to calculating these doses instead of the currently used two chip positions. A neutron sensitive chip was used in the 5th chip position, but all modified dosimeter prototypes would be incapable of discriminating between thermal and epithermal neutrons. An improved low energy beta response can be achieved for the current dosimeter and all prototypes considered by eliminating the security credential. Further improvement can be obtained by incorporating the 15-mil thick TLD-700 chips.

  10. Standard Procedure for Calibrating an Areal Calorimetry Based Dosimeter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    provided to assist in calibrating other dosimeters. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Millimeter waves, dosimeter, calorimeter, CLT, Carbon-loaded Teflon 16. SECURITY...Bioeffects Branch CL Center Left CLT Carbon-loaded Teflon CR Center Right GPIB General Purpose Interface Bus IR Infrared LC Lower Center...used carbon-loaded Teflon ® (CLT) as the radio frequency (RF) absorber for the dosimeter. The methodology presented will use CLT for the calibration

  11. GAMMA AND X-RAY DOSIMETER AND DOSIMETRIC METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Taplin, G.V.; Douglas, C.H.; Sigoloff, S.C.

    1958-08-19

    An improvement in colorimetric gamma and x-ray dosimeter systems and a self-contained. hand carried dostmeter of the afore-mentioned type ts described. A novel point of the invention ltes in the addition of specific quantities of certain normalizing agents to the two phase chlorinated hydro-carbon-aqueous dyc colortmetric dosimeter to eliminate the after reaction and thereby extend the utility of such systein. The structure of the two phase colorimetric dosimeter tubes and the carrying case for the tubes of the portable dosimeter are unique features.

  12. Criticality accident dosimetry with ESR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    d'Errico, F; Fattibene, P; Onori, S; Pantaloni, M

    1996-01-01

    The suitability of the ESR alanine and sugar detectors for criticality accident dosimetry was experimentally investigated during an intercomparison of dosimetry techniques. Tests were performed irradiating detectors both free-in-air and on-phantom during controlled critcality excursions at the SILENE reactor in Valduc, France. Several grays of absorbed dose were imparted in neutron gamma-ray fields of various relative intensities and spectral distributions. Analysed results confirmed the potential of these systems which can immediately provide an acute dose assessment with an average underestimate of 30%in the various fields. This performance allows for the screening of severely exposed individuals and meets the IAEA recommendations on the early estimate of accident absorbed doses.

  13. Preliminary investigation and application of a novel deformable PRESAGE® dosimeter

    PubMed Central

    Juang, T; Newton, J; Das, S; Adamovics, J; Oldham, M

    2013-01-01

    Deformable 3D dosimeters have potential applications in validating deformable dose mapping algorithms. This study evaluates a novel deformable PRESAGE® dosimeter and its application toward validating the deformable algorithm employed by VelocityAI. The deformable PRESAGE® dosimeter exhibited a linear dose response with a sensitivity of 0.0032 ΔOD/(Gy/cm). Comparison of an experimental dosimeter irradiated with an MLC pencilbeam checkerboard pattern under lateral compression up to 27% to a non-deformed control dosimeter irradiated with the same pattern verified dose tracking under deformation. CTs of the experimental dosimeter prior to and during compression were exported into VelocityAI and used to map an Eclipse dose distribution calculated on the compressed dosimeter to its original shape. A comparison between the VelocityAI dose distribution and the distribution from the dosimeter showed field displacements up to 7.3 mm and up to a 175% difference in field dimensions. These results highlight the need for validating deformable dose mapping algorithms to ensure patient safety and quality of care. PMID:24454522

  14. Evaluation of a Colorimetric Personal Dosimeter for Nitrogen Oxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Philip

    A personal colorimetric dosimeter for nitrogen dioxide was developed. Tests were performed to determine the response of these strips to various concentrations of NO2. The dosimeter strips were satisfactory for approximate determinations of total exposure (concentration + time) of nitrogen dioxide. The total exposure was calculated in terms of time…

  15. A novel structure optical fiber radiation dosimeter for radiotherapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weimin; Qin, Zhuang; Ma, Yu; Zhao, Wenhui; Hu, Yaosheng; Zhang, Daxin; Chen, Ziyin; Lewis, Elfed

    2016-04-01

    An investigation into a novel in-vivo PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) fiber-optic dosimeter to monitor the dose of ionizing radiation, both for instantaneous and integrating measurements, for radiotherapy applications is proposed. This fiber sensor is designed as an intracorporal X-ray ionizing sensor to enhance the curative effect of radiotherapy. The fiber-optic dosimeter is made in a PMMA fiber, whose core is micromachined to create a small diameter (0.25 to 0.5 mm) hole at one fiber end. An inorganic scintillating material, terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) is chosen as the sensing material, because it can fluoresce on immediately under exposure of ionizing radiation (X-Rays or electron beam). This sensing material is filled and packaged in the small hole by epoxy resin adhesive. This kind of novel structure dosimeter shows high light coupling efficiency compared with other kind of inorganic scintillation dosimeter. This fiber-optic dosimeter shows good repeatability with a maximum deviation of 0.16%. The testing results of the fiber-optic dosimeter are perfectly proportional to the data of IC with R2 as 0.9999. In addition, the fiber sensor shows excellent isotropic in its radial angular dependence. All the experiments indicate that the fiber-optic dosimeter is properly used for patient in-vivo dosimeter such as brachytherapy applications or intraoperative radiation therapy.

  16. Laser readable thermoluminescent radiation dosimeters and methods for producing thereof

    DOEpatents

    Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.

    1989-04-25

    Thin layer thermoluminescent radiation dosimeters for use in laser readable dosimetry systems, and methods of fabricating such thin layer dosimeters are disclosed. The thin layer thermoluminescent radiation dosimeters include a thin substrate made from glass or other inorganic materials capable of withstanding high temperatures and high heating rates. A thin layer of a thermoluminescent phosphor material is heat bonded to the substrate using an inorganic binder such as glass. The dosimeters can be mounted in frames and cases for ease in handling. Methods of the invention include mixing a suitable phosphor composition and binder, both being in particulate or granular form. The mixture is then deposited onto a substrate such as by using mask printing techniques. The dosimeters are thereafter heated to fuse and bond the binder and phosphor to the substrate. 34 figs.

  17. Laser readable thermoluminescent radiation dosimeters and methods for producing thereof

    DOEpatents

    Braunlich, Peter F.; Tetzlaff, Wolfgang

    1989-01-01

    Thin layer thermoluminescent radiation dosimeters for use in laser readable dosimetry systems, and methods of fabricating such thin layer dosimeters. The thin layer thermoluminescent radiation dosimeters include a thin substrate made from glass or other inorganic materials capable of withstanding high temperatures and high heating rates. A thin layer of a thermoluminescent phoshphor material is heat bonded to the substrate using an inorganic binder such as glass. The dosimeters can be mounted in frames and cases for ease in handling. Methods of the invention include mixing a suitable phosphor composition and binder, both being in particulate or granular form. The mixture is then deposited onto a substrate such as by using mask printing techniques. The dosimeters are thereafter heated to fuse and bond the binder and phosphor to the substrate.

  18. Dosimetry of criticality accidents using activations of the blood and hair

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    The evaluation of the dose that a person received in a criticality accident can be difficult. Most accidents have occurred when the person was not wearing nuclear accident dosimetry and since the NRC no longer requires these dosimeters, future dose evaluations may have to be based on body activations and gamma-to-neutron dose ratios. To aid in a dose evaluation we have compiled in a table the results from numerous criticality accident studies using 10 different critical assemblies, each with different neutron leakage spectra. There are several problems involved in applying these results accurately, the most significant problem being the determination of the configuration of the fissile material at the time of the accident. Other problems include a lack of information concerning the location, orientation, and possible shielding between the person and the accident assembly.

  19. Radiation accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Saenger, E.L.

    1986-09-01

    It is essential that emergency physicians understand ways to manage patients contaminated by radioactive materials and/or exposed to external radiation sources. Contamination accidents require careful surveys to identify the metabolic pathway of the radionuclides to guide prognosis and treatment. The level of treatment required will depend on careful surveys and meticulous decontamination. There is no specific therapy for the acute radiation syndrome. Prophylactic antibodies are desirable. For severely exposed patients treatment is similar to the supportive care given to patients undergoing organ transplantation. For high-dose extremity injury, no methods have been developed to reverse the fibrosing endarteritis that eventually leads to tissue death so frequently found with this type of injury. Although the Three Mile Island episode of March 1979 created tremendous public concern, there were no radiation injuries. The contamination outside the reactor building and the release of radioiodine were negligible. The accidental fuel element meltdown at Chernobyl, USSR, resulted in many cases of acute radiation syndrome. More than 100,000 people were exposed to high levels of radioactive fallout. The general principles outlined here are applicable to accidents of that degree of severity.

  20. EURADOS intercomparison on emergency radiobioassay.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunsheng; Battisti, Paolo; Berard, Philippe; Cazoulat, Alain; Cuellar, Antonio; Cruz-Suarez, Rodolfo; Dai, Xiongxin; Giardina, Isabella; Hammond, Derek; Hernandez, Carolina; Kiser, Stephen; Ko, Raymond; Kramer-Tremblay, Sheila; Lecompte, Yannick; Navarro, Eva; Navas, Cristina; Sadi, Baki; Sierra, Inmaculada; Verrezen, Freddy; Lopez, Maria A

    2015-12-01

    Nine laboratories participated in an intercomparison exercise organised by the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) for emergency radiobioassay involving four high-risk radionuclides ((239)Pu, (241)Am, (90)Sr and (226)Ra). Diverse methods of analysis were used by the participating laboratories for the in vitro determination of each of the four radionuclides in urine samples. Almost all the methods used are sensitive enough to meet the requirements for emergency radiobioassay derived for this project in reference to the Clinical Decision Guide introduced by the NCRP. Results from most of the methods meet the requirements of ISO 28218 on accuracy in terms of relative bias and relative precision. However, some technical gaps have been identified. For example, some laboratories do not have the ability to assay samples containing (226)Ra, and sample turnaround time would be expected to be much shorter than that reported by many laboratories, as timely results for internal contamination and early decisions on medical intervention are highly desired. Participating laboratories are expected to learn from each other on the methods used to improve the interoperability among these laboratories.

  1. SU-E-T-265: Presage Thin Sheet Dosimeter Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Dumas, M; Rakowski, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the sensitivity and stability of the Presage dosimeter in sheet form for different concentrations of chemicals and for a diverse range of clinical photon energies. Methods: Presage polymer dosimeters are formulated to investigate and optimize their sensitivity and stability. The dosimeter is composed of clear polyurethane base, leucomalachite green reporting dye, and bromoform radical initiator in 1mm thick sheets. The chemicals are well mixed together, cast in an aluminum mold, and left to cure at 60 psi for a minimum of 2 days. Dosimeter response will be characterized at multiple energies including Co-60, 6 MV, 15 MV, 50 kVp, and 250 kVp. The dosimeters are read by an Epson 10000 XL scanner at 800 dpi, 2{sup 16} bit depth. Red component images are analyzed with ImageJ. Results: Analysis of optical density verse dose for Co-60 energies indicates that the bromoform containing Presage was able to quantify dose from 0 to 300 Gy, with saturation beyond 300 Gy. Initial results show two regions of linear response, 0–100 Gy and 150–300 Gy. The 150–300 Gy region has a sensitivity of 0.0024 net OD/Gy. Further results on other energies are still in progress. Conclusions: This work shows the potential for use of thin sheets of Presage dosimeter as a dosimeter capable of being analyzed with a flatbed scanner.

  2. Light scattering in optical CT scanning of Presage dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Adamovics, J.; Cheeseborough, J. C.; Chao, K. S.; Wuu, C. S.

    2010-11-01

    The intensity of the scattered light from the Presage dosimeters was measured using a Thorlabs PM100D optical power meter (Thorlabs Inc, Newton, NJ) with an optical sensor of 1 mm diameter sensitive area. Five Presage dosimeters were made as cylinders of 15.2 cm, 10 cm, 4 cm diameters and irradiated with 6 MV photons using a Varian Clinac 2100EX. Each dosimeter was put into the scanning tank of an OCTOPUS" optical CT scanner (MGS Research Inc, Madison, CT) filled with a refractive index matching liquid. A laser diode was positioned at one side of the water tank to generate a stationary laser beam of 0.8 mm width. On the other side of the tank, an in-house manufactured positioning system was used to move the optical sensor in the direction perpendicular to the outgoing laser beam from the dosimeters at an increment of 1 mm. The amount of scattered photons was found to be more than 1% of the primary light signal within 2 mm from the laser beam but decreases sharply with increasing off-axis distance. The intensity of the scattered light increases with increasing light attenuations and/or absorptions in the dosimeters. The scattered light at the same off-axis distance was weaker for dosimeters of larger diameters and for larger detector-to-dosimeter distances. Methods for minimizing the effect of the light scattering in different types of optical CT scanners are discussed.

  3. SU-E-T-749: Thorough Calibration of MOSFET Dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Plenkovich, D; Thomas, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To improve the accuracy of the MOSFET calibration procedure by performing the measurement several times and calculating the average value of the calibration factor for various photon and electron energies. Methods: The output of three photon and six electron beams of Varian Trilogy linear accelerator SN 5878 was calibrated. Five reinforced standard sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters were placed in the calibration jig and connected to the Reader Module. As the backscatter material was used 7 cm of Virtual Water. The MOSFET dosimeters were covered with 1.5 cm thick bolus for the regular and SRS 6 MV beams, 3 cm bolus for 15 MV beam, 1.5 cm bolus for 6 MeV electron beam, and 2 cm bolus for the electron energies of 9, 12, 15, 18, and 22 MeV. The dosimeters were exposed to 100 MU, and the calibration factor was determined using the mobileMOSFET software. To improve the accuracy of calibration, this procedure was repeated ten times and the calibration factors were averaged. Results: As the number of calibrations was increasing the variability of calibration factors of different dosimeters was decreasing. After ten calibrations, the calibration factors for all five dosimeters were within 1% of one another for all energies, except 6 MV SRS photons and 6 MeV electrons, for which the variability was 2%. Conclusions: The described process results in calibration factors which are almost independent of modality or energy. Once calibrated, the dosimeters may be used for in-vivo dosimetry or for daily verification of the beam output. Measurement of the radiation dose under bolus and scatter to the eye are examples of frequent use of calibrated MOSFET dosimeters. The calibration factor determined for full build-up is used under these circumstances. To the best of our knowledge, such thorough procedure for calibrating MOSFET dosimeters has not been reported previously. Best Medical Canada provided MOSFET dosimeters for this project.

  4. Investigation of thermoluminescence properties of mobile phone screen displays as dosimeters for accidental dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozik, Anna; Marczewska, B.; Bilski, P.; Kłosowski, M.

    2014-11-01

    The rapid assessment of the radiation dose after unexpected exposure is a task of accidental dosimetry. In case of a radiological accident glasses originating from mobile phone screens, placed usually near the human body, could be used as emergency thermoluminescent (TL) personal dosimeters. The time between irradiation and TL readout is crucial and therefore preparation of the mobile phone screens and their readout conditions should be optimized. The influence of the samples etching, bleaching and selection of the optical filters based on measurement of the emission spectrum of irradiated glass samples during heating for different types of mobile phones were the subjects of our investigation. Obtained results showed that glasses extracted from different brands of mobile phones have different dosimetric properties but all of them give a luminescent signal which can be used to calculate the dose.

  5. Guidelines for the calibration of personnel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Roberson, P.L.; Holbrook, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    This guide describes minimum acceptable performance levels for personnel dosimetry systems used at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal is to improve both the quality of radiological calibrations and the methods of comparing reported occupational doses between DOE facilities. Reference calibration techniques are defined. A standard for evaluation of personnel dosimetry systems and recommended design parameters for personnel dosimeters are also included. Approximate intervals for the radiation energies for which these guidelines are appropriate are 15 keV to 2 MeV for photons; above 0.3 MeV for beta particles; and 1 keV to 2 MeV for neutrons. An analysis of ANSI N13.11 was completed using performance evaluations of selected personnel dosimetry systems in use at DOE facilities. The results of this analysis are incorporated in the guidelines.

  6. Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1987-01-01

    A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique.

  7. Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1987-07-14

    A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique. 7 figs.

  8. A new dosimeter formulation for deformable 3D dose verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høye, E. M.; Skyt, P. S.; Yates, E. S.; Muren, L. P.; Petersen, J. B. B.; Balling, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present the characteristics of a new silicone-based radiochromic dosimeter containing the leuco-malachite green (LMG) dye. The dose response as well as the dose-rate and photon-energy dependence of the dosimeter were characterized. To optimise the dose response, different concentrations of the chemical components were investigated. The dose response was found to decrease exponentially as a function of time after irradiation. A cylindrical dosimeter was produced and irradiated with a volumetric modulated arc therapy plan; the standard deviation between measured and calculated dose was 5% of the total dose.

  9. INTERCOMPARISON OF OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING SYSTEMS FOR ROADSIDE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation describes results of an intercomparison of three optical remote sensing systems for measurements of nitric oxide emitted from passenger cars and light-duty trucks. The intercomparison included a standards comparison to establish comparability of standards, follo...

  10. Personal noise dosimeters: accuracy and reliability in varied settings.

    PubMed

    Cook-Cunningham, Sheri Lynn

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the accuracy, reliability, and characteristics of three brands of personal noise dosimeters (N = 7 units) in both pink noise (PN) environments and natural environments (NEs) through the acquisition of decibel readings, Leq readings and noise doses. Acquisition periods included repeated PN conditions, choir room rehearsals and participant (N = 3) Leq and noise dosages procured during a day in the life of a music student. Among primary results: (a) All dosimeters exhibited very strong positive correlations for PN measurements across all instruments; (b) all dosimeters were within the recommended American National Standard Institute (ANSI) SI.25-1991 standard of ±2 dB (A) of a reference measurement; and (c) all dosimeters were within the recommended ANSI SI.25-1991 standard of ±2 dB (A) when compared with each other. Results were discussed in terms of using personal noise dosimeters within hearing conservation and research contexts and recommendations for future research. Personal noise dosimeters were studied within the contexts of PN environments and NEs (choral classroom and the day in the life of collegiate music students). This quantitative study was a non-experimental correlation design. Three brands of personal noise dosimeters (Cirrus doseBadge, Quest Edge Eg5 and Etymotic ER200D) were tested in two environments, a PN setting and a natural setting. There were two conditions within each environment. In the PN environment condition one, each dosimeter was tested individually in comparison with two reference measuring devices (Ivie and Easera) while PN was generated by a Whites Instrument PN Tube. In condition two, the PN procedures were replicated for longer periods while all dosimeters measured the sound levels simultaneously. In the NE condition one, all dosimeters were placed side by side on a music stand and recorded sound levels of choir rehearsals over a 7-h rehearsal period. In NE, condition two noise levels were measured during

  11. Desert Dust Satellite Retrieval Intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carboni, E.; Thomas, G. E.; Sayer, A. M.; Siddans, R.; Poulsen, C. A.; Grainger, R. G.; Ahn, C.; Antoine, D.; Bevan, S.; Braak, R.; Brindley, H.; DeSouza-Mchado, S.; Deuze, J. L.; Diner, D.; Ducos, F.; Grey, W.; Hsu, C.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Kahn, R.; North, P. R. J.; Salustro, C.; Smith, A.; Tanre, D.; Torres, O.; Veihelmann, B.

    2012-01-01

    This work provides a comparison of satellite retrievals of Saharan desert dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) during a strong dust event through March 2006. In this event, a large dust plume was transported over desert, vegetated, and ocean surfaces. The aim is to identify and understand the differences between current algorithms, and hence improve future retrieval algorithms. The satellite instruments considered are AATSR, AIRS, MERIS, MISR, MODIS, OMI, POLDER, and SEVIRI. An interesting aspect is that the different algorithms make use of different instrument characteristics to obtain retrievals over bright surfaces. These include multi-angle approaches (MISR, AATSR), polarisation measurements (POLDER), single-view approaches using solar wavelengths (OMI, MODIS), and the thermal infrared spectral region (SEVIRI, AIRS). Differences between instruments, together with the comparison of different retrieval algorithms applied to measurements from the same instrument, provide a unique insight into the performance and characteristics of the various techniques employed. As well as the intercomparison between different satellite products, the AODs have also been compared to co-located AERONET data. Despite the fact that the agreement between satellite and AERONET AODs is reasonably good for all of the datasets, there are significant differences between them when compared to each other, especially over land. These differences are partially due to differences in the algorithms, such as as20 sumptions about aerosol model and surface properties. However, in this comparison of spatially and temporally averaged data, at least as significant as these differences are sampling issues related to the actual footprint of each instrument on the heterogeneous aerosol field, cloud identification and the quality control flags of each dataset.

  12. An intercomparison of nitric oxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, J. M., Jr.; Gregory, G. L.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Carroll, M. A.; Mcfarland, M.; Ridley, B. A.; Davis, D. D.; Bradshaw, J.; Rodgers, M. O.; Torres, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Results from an intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted at Wallops Island, VA, in July 1983. Instruments intercompared included a laser-induced fluorescence system and two chemiluminescence instruments. The intercomparisons were performed with ambient air at NO mixing ratios ranging from 10 to 60 pptv and NO-enriched ambient air at mixing ratios from 20 to 170 pptv. All instruments sampled from a common manifold. The techniques exhibited a high degree of correlation among themselves and with changes in the NO mixing ratio. Agreement among the three techniques was placed at approximately + or - 30 percent. Within this level of agreement, no artifacts or species interferences were identified.

  13. Antioxidant effect of green tea on polymer gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuel, E. J. J.; Sathiyaraj, P.; Deena, T.; Kumar, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    Extract from Green Tea (GTE) acts as an antioxidant in acrylamide based polymer gel dosimeter. In this work, PAGAT gel was used for investigation of antioxidant effect of GTE.PAGAT was called PAGTEG (Polyacrylamide green tea extract gel dosimeter) after adding GTE. Free radicals in water cause pre polymerization of polymer gel before irradiation. Polyphenols from GTE are highly effective to absorb the free radicals in water. THPC is used as an antioxidant in polymer gel dosimeter but here we were replaced it by GTE and investigated its effect by spectrophotometer. GTE added PAGAT samples response was lower compared to THPC added sample. To increase the sensitivity of the PAGTEG, sugar was added. This study confirmed that THPC was a good antioxidant for polymer gel dosimeter. However, GTE also can be used as an antioxidant in polymer gel if use less quantity (GTE) and add sugar as sensitivity enhancer.

  14. Method and apparatus for reading free falling dosimeter punchcodes

    DOEpatents

    Langsted, James M.

    1992-12-22

    A punchcode reader is provided for reading data encoded in a punchcode hole array on a dosimeter. The dosimeter falls through a passage in the reader containing photosensor detectors disposed along the passage which provide output signals to a microprocessor. The signals are processed to determine the orientation of the dosimeter in the reader, the location and state of punchcode holes in a two row array thereby decoding the encoded data. Multiple rate of fall calculations are made, and if appropriate matching of the punchcode array is not obtained in three tries, an error signal is outputted to the operator. The punchcode reader also provides for storage of data from multiple dosimeters passed through the reader, and for the output of decoded data to an external display or a computer for further processing.

  15. Method and apparatus for reading free falling dosimeter punchcodes

    DOEpatents

    Langsted, J.M.

    1992-12-22

    A punchcode reader is provided for reading data encoded in a punchcode hole array on a dosimeter. The dosimeter falls through a passage in the reader containing photosensor detectors disposed along the passage which provide output signals to a microprocessor. The signals are processed to determine the orientation of the dosimeter in the reader, the location and state of punchcode holes in a two row array thereby decoding the encoded data. Multiple rate of fall calculations are made, and if appropriate matching of the punchcode array is not obtained in three tries, an error signal is output to the operator. The punchcode reader also provides for storage of data from multiple dosimeters passed through the reader, and for the output of decoded data to an external display or a computer for further processing. 8 figs.

  16. Investigating potential physicochemical errors in polymer gel dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedaghat, Mahbod; Bujold, Rachel; Lepage, Martin

    2011-09-01

    Measurement errors in polymer gel dosimetry can originate either during irradiation or scanning. One concern related to the exothermic nature of polymerization reaction was that the heat released in polymer gel dosimeters during irradiation modifies their dose response. In this paper, the effect of heat released from the exothermal polymerization reaction on the dose response of a number of dosimeters was studied. In addition, we investigated whether heat-generated geometric distortion existed in newly proposed gel dosimeters that contain highly thermoresponsive polymers. Our results suggest that despite a significant internal temperature increase in some gel compositions, their dose responses are not affected when oxygen is well expelled mechanically from the gel mixture. We also report on significant pre-irradiation instability in some recently developed polymer gel dosimeters but that geometric distortions were not observed. Data obtained by a set of small calibration vials are compared to those obtained from larger phantoms, and potential physicochemical causes of deviations between them are identified.

  17. Radiation measured during ISS-Expedition 13 with different dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Dazhuang; Semones, Edward; Gaza, Ramona; Johnson, Steve; Zapp, Neal; Lee, Kerry; George, Tamra

    Radiation measured during ISS-Expedition 13 with different dosimeters D. Zhou1,2,*, E. Semones1, R. Gaza1,2, S. Johnson1, N. Zapp1, K. Lee1, T. George1 1Johnson Space Center - NASA, 2101 Nasa Parkway, Houston 77058, USA 2Universities Space Research Association, 3600 Bay Area Blvd, Houston 77058, USA *Corresponding author. E-mail address: dazhuang.zhou-1@nasa.gov (D. Zhou). Abstract Radiation in low Earth orbit (LEO) is mainly composed of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR), solar energetic particles and particles in SAA (South Atlantic Anomaly). The biological impact of space radiation to astronauts depends strongly on the particles' linear energy transfer (LET) and is dominated by high LET radiation. It is important to measure the LET spectrum for the space radiation field and to investigate the influence of radiation on astronauts. At present, the preferred active dosimeters sensitive to all LET are the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and silicon detectors in various configurations; the preferred passive dosimeters are thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) sensitive to low LET as well as CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) sensitive to high LET. The TEPC, CR-39 PNTDs, TLDs and OSLDs were used to investigate the radiation exposure for the ISS mission Expedition 13 (ISS-12S) in LEO. LET spectra and radiation quantities (fluence, absorbed dose, dose equivalent and quality factor) were measured for the space mission with different dosimeters. This paper introduces the operational principles for the dosimeters, describes the method to combine the results measured by TLDs/OSLDs and CR-39 PNTDs, and presents the LET spectra and the radiation quantities measured. Keywords: space radiation; cosmic rays; active and passive dosimeters; LET spectra

  18. Methods and means of checking thermoluminescent and radiophotoluminescent dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Fominykh, V.I.; Oborin, A.V.; Sebekin, A.P.; Uryaev, I.A.

    1987-06-01

    The authors discuss methods of checking thermoluminescent and radiophotoluminescent dosimeters which are used often in monitoring radiation safety in various areas including nuclear power stations. When the dosimeters are checked in the fields of standard beta-ray sources, it is recommended that the standard absorbed-dose or equivalent-dose measures for beta radiation should be sources of /sup 90/Sr + /sup 90/Y, /sup 204/Tl, and /sup 147/Pm. Various safety guidelines are discussed.

  19. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dosimeter and probe

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1995-01-01

    A dosimeter and probe for measuring exposure to chemical and biological compounds is disclosed. The dosimeter or probe includes a collector which may be analyzed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The collector comprises a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active material having a coating applied thereto to improve the adsorption properties of the collector. The collector may also be used in automated sequential devises, in probe array devices.

  20. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dosimeter and probe

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1995-03-21

    A dosimeter and probe for measuring exposure to chemical and biological compounds is disclosed. The dosimeter or probe includes a collector which may be analyzed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The collector comprises a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active material having a coating applied thereto to improve the adsorption properties of the collector. The collector may also be used in automated sequential devices, in probe array devices. 10 figures.

  1. Response of the Hanford Combination Neutron Dosimeter in plutonium environments

    SciTech Connect

    Endres, A.W.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Baumgartner, W.V.

    1996-02-01

    This report documents response characteristics and the development of dose algorithms for the Hanford Combination Neutron Dosimeter (HCNO) implemented on January 1, 1995. The HCND was accredited under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) during 1994. The HCND employs two neutron dose components consisting of (1) an albedo thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD), and (2) a track-etch dosimeter (TED). Response characteristics of these two dosimeter components were measured under the low-scatter conditions of the Hanford 318 Building Calibration Laboratory, and under the high-scatter conditions in the workplace at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The majority of personnel neutron dose at Hanford (currently and historically) occurs at the PFP. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable sources were used to characterize dosimeter response in the laboratory. At the PFP, neutron spectra and dose-measuring instruments, including a multisphere spectrometer, tissue equivalent proportional counters, and specially calibrated rem meters, were used to determine the neutron dose under several configurations from three different plutonium sources: (1) plutonium tetrafluoride, (2) plutonium metal, and (3) plutonium oxide. In addition, measurements were performed at many selected work locations. The HCNDs were included in all measurements. Comparison of dosimeter- and instrument-measured dose equivalents provided the data necessary to develop HCND dose algorithms and to assess the accuracy of estimated neutron dose under actual work conditions.

  2. Radiation measured for ISS-Expedition 12 with different dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, D.; Semones, E.; Gaza, R.; Johnson, S.; Zapp, N.; Weyland, M.

    2007-10-01

    Radiation in low Earth orbit (LEO) is mainly from Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR), solar energetic particles and particles in South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). These particles' radiation impact to astronauts depends strongly on the particles' linear energy transfer (LET) and is dominated by high LET radiation. It is important to investigate the LET spectrum for the radiation field and the influence of radiation on astronauts. At present, the best active dosimeters used for all LET are the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and silicon detectors; the best passive dosimeters are thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) or optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) for low LET and CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) for high LET. TEPC, CR-39 PNTDs, TLDs and OSLDs were used to investigate the radiation for space mission Expedition 12 (ISS-11S) in LEO. LET spectra and radiation quantities (fluence, absorbed dose, dose equivalent and quality factor) were measured for the mission with these different dosimeters. This paper introduces the operation principles for these dosimeters, describes the method to combine the results measured by CR-39 PNTDs and TLDs/OSLDs, presents the experimental LET spectra and the radiation quantities.

  3. Applicability of the polysulphone horizontal calibration to differently inclined dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Casale, Giuseppe R; Siani, Anna Maria; Diémoz, Henri; Kimlin, Michael G; Colosimo, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Polysulphone (PS) dosimetry has been a widely used technique for more than 30 years to quantify the erythemally effective UV dose received by anatomic sites (personal exposure). The calibration of PS dosimeters is an important issue as their spectral response is different from the erythemal action spectrum. It is performed exposing a set of PS dosimeters on a horizontal plane and measuring the UV doses received by dosimeters using calibrated spectroradiometers or radiometers. In this study, data collected during PS field campaigns (from 2004 to 2006), using horizontal and differently inclined dosimeters, were analyzed to provide some considerations on the transfer of the horizontal calibration to differently inclined dosimeters, as anatomic sites usually are. The role of sky conditions, of the angle of incidence between the sun and the normal to the slope, and of the type of surrounding surface on the calibration were investigated. It was concluded that PS horizontal calibrations apply to differently inclined dosimeters for incidence angles up to approximately 70° and for surfaces excluding ones with high albedo. Caution should be used in the application of horizontal calibrations for cases of high-incidence angle and/or high albedo surfaces.

  4. Potential High Resolution Dosimeters For MRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Rosenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Akselrod, M.; Sykora, J.; Bartz, J.; Ptaszkiewicz, M.; Olko, P.; Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Doran, S.; Brochard, T.; Kamlowski, A.; Cellere, G.; Paccagnella, A.; Siegbahn, E. A.; Prezado, Y.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Bravin, A.; Dusseau, L.; Berkvens, P.

    2010-07-01

    resolution and a dose range over several orders of magnitude. This paper will give an overview of all dosimeters tested in the past at the ESRF with their advantages and drawbacks. These detectors comprise: Ionization chambers, Alanine Dosimeters, MOSFET detectors, Gafchromic® films, Radiochromic polymers, TLDs, Polymer gels, Fluorescent Nuclear Track Detectors (Al2O3:C, Mg single crystal detectors), OSL detectors and Floating Gate-based dosimetry system. The aim of such a comparison shall help with a decision on which of these approaches is most suitable for high resolution dose measurements in MRT. The principle of these detectors will be presented including a comparison for some dosimeters exposed with the same irradiation geometry, namely a 1×1 cm5 field size with microbeam exposures at the surface, 0.1 cm and 1 cm in depth of a PMMA phantom. For these test exposures, the most relevant irradiation parameters for future clinical trials have been chosen: 50 micron FWHM and 400 micron c-t-c distance. The experimental data are compared with Monte Carlo calculations.

  5. Potential High Resolution Dosimeters For MRT

    SciTech Connect

    Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Brochard, T.; Prezado, Y.; Bravin, A.; Berkvens, P.; Rosenfeld, A.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Akselrod, M.; Sykora, J.; Bartz, J.; Ptaszkiewicz, M.; Olko, P.; Berg, A.; Wieland, M.; Doran, S.; Kamlowski, A.; Cellere, G.

    2010-07-23

    /s, micron resolution and a dose range over several orders of magnitude. This paper will give an overview of all dosimeters tested in the past at the ESRF with their advantages and drawbacks. These detectors comprise: Ionization chambers, Alanine Dosimeters, MOSFET detectors, Gafchromic registered films, Radiochromic polymers, TLDs, Polymer gels, Fluorescent Nuclear Track Detectors (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C, Mg single crystal detectors), OSL detectors and Floating Gate-based dosimetry system. The aim of such a comparison shall help with a decision on which of these approaches is most suitable for high resolution dose measurements in MRT. The principle of these detectors will be presented including a comparison for some dosimeters exposed with the same irradiation geometry, namely a 1x1 cm{sup 5} field size with microbeam exposures at the surface, 0.1 cm and 1 cm in depth of a PMMA phantom. For these test exposures, the most relevant irradiation parameters for future clinical trials have been chosen: 50 micron FWHM and 400 micron c-t-c distance. The experimental data are compared with Monte Carlo calculations.

  6. Indoor and Outdoor Spectroradiometer Intercomparison for Spectral Irradiance Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, R.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

    2014-05-01

    This report details the global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers that was organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The intercomparison was performed both indoors and outdoors on September 17, 2013. Five laboratories participated in the intercomparison using 10 spectroradiometers, and a coordinated measurement setup and a common platform were employed to compare spectral irradiances under both indoor and outdoor conditions. The intercomparison aimed to understand the performance of the different spectroradiometers and to share knowledge in making spectral irradiance measurements. This intercomparison was the first of its kind in the United States.

  7. Dose evaluation in criticality accidents using response of Panasonic TL personal dosemeters (UD-809/UD-802).

    PubMed

    Zeyrek, C T; Gündüz, H

    2012-09-01

    This study gives the results of dosimetry measurements carried out in the Silène reactor at Valduc (France) with neutron and photon personal thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) in mixed neutron and gamma radiation fields, in the frame of the international accident dosimetry intercomparison programme in 2002. The intercomparison consisted of a series of three irradiation scenarios. The scenarios took place at the Valduc site (France) by using the Silène experimental reactor. For neutron and photon dosimetry, Panasonic model UD-809 and UD-802 personal TLDs were used together.

  8. SPARC Reanalysis Intercomparison Project (S-RIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, M.; Long, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    The middle atmosphere and climate community use reanalyses widely to understand atmospheric processes and variability in the middle atmosphere, to validate climate models, and, potentially, for trend analysis. Yet different reanalyses give different results for the same diagnostic. There is thus a need for a coordinated reanalysis intercomparison project that shall start a comprehensive activity to compare all appropriate reanalysis data sets for key diagnostics to help understand the causes of differences and to use the results to provide guidance on appropriate usage of various reanalysis products in scientific studies. In addition, the reanalysis community will benefit from coordinated user feedback, which can lead to improvements in the next generation of reanalysis products. The Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC) Reanalysis Intercomparison Project (S-RIP) is a SPARC activity that was proposed in 2012 and approved in 2014. The goals of S-RIP are: (1) to create a communication platform between the SPARC community and the reanalysis centers; (2) to understand current reanalysis products and to contribute to future reanalysis improvements in the middle atmosphere region; and (3) to write up the results of the reanalysis intercomparison in peer reviewed papers and a SPARC report. The project duration is from 2013 to 2018. In the presentation, an overview of the project is made and some early intercomparison results are discussed.

  9. Preliminary evaluation of implantable MOSFET radiation dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Beddar, A S; Salehpour, M; Briere, T M; Hamidian, H; Gillin, M T

    2005-01-07

    In this paper, we report on measurements performed on a new prototype implantable radiation detector that uses metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) designed for in vivo dosimetry. The dosimeters, which are encapsulated in hermetically sealed glass cylinders, are used in an unbiased mode during irradiation, unlike other MOSFET detectors previously used in radiotherapy applications. They are powered by radio frequency telemetry for dose measurements, obviating the need for a power supply within each capsule. We have studied the dosimetric characteristics of these MOSFET detectors in vitro under irradiation from a 60Co source. The detectors show a dose reproducibility generally within 5% or better, with the main sources of error being temperature fluctuations occurring between the pre- and post-irradiation measurements as well as detector orientation. A better temperature-controlled environment leads to a reproducibility within 2%. Our preliminary in vitro results show clearly that true non-invasive in vivo dosimetry measurements are feasible and can be performed remotely using telemetric technology.

  10. A liquid fluorescence dosimeter for proton dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadrowitz, Roger; Coray, Adolf; Boehringer, Terence; Dunst, Jürgen; Rades, Dirk

    2012-03-01

    The pyromellitic acid (benzene-1,2,4,5-tetracrboxylic acid) dosimeter is a liquid, nearly tissue equivalent detector (the density of the solution is 1.000 56 g cm-3). This acid fluoresces after exposure to proton radiation, if excited with light. The detector was exposed to proton doses of 1.0-10.0 Gy (energies: 138 and 160 MeV). The correlation between fluorescence intensity and delivered energy dose is one to one and linear, whereby the deviation from the linear behavior for all measured values is less than 1%. Variations of the dose rate between 2.4 and 6.0 Gy s-1 had no influence on the correlation between dose and fluorescence. The quenching of the pyromellitic acid detector amounts to about 22% for 138 MeV protons in the Bragg peak. For the period of 1-26 days after exposure, an increase in fluorescence intensity of the exposed solutions (5.0 Gy) was noticed, which corresponds to a daily data drift averaging 0.91% if the solution is stored in the dark at 4 °C. Non-exposed solutions showed no change of the control value.

  11. A liquid fluorescence dosimeter for proton dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Nadrowitz, Roger; Coray, Adolf; Boehringer, Terence; Dunst, Jürgen; Rades, Dirk

    2012-03-07

    The pyromellitic acid (benzene-1,2,4,5-tetracrboxylic acid) dosimeter is a liquid, nearly tissue equivalent detector (the density of the solution is 1.000 56 g cm⁻³). This acid fluoresces after exposure to proton radiation, if excited with light. The detector was exposed to proton doses of 1.0-10.0 Gy (energies: 138 and 160 MeV). The correlation between fluorescence intensity and delivered energy dose is one to one and linear, whereby the deviation from the linear behavior for all measured values is less than 1%. Variations of the dose rate between 2.4 and 6.0 Gy s⁻¹ had no influence on the correlation between dose and fluorescence. The quenching of the pyromellitic acid detector amounts to about 22% for 138 MeV protons in the Bragg peak. For the period of 1-26 days after exposure, an increase in fluorescence intensity of the exposed solutions (5.0 Gy) was noticed, which corresponds to a daily data drift averaging 0.91% if the solution is stored in the dark at 4 °C. Non-exposed solutions showed no change of the control value.

  12. PDT Dose Dosimeter for Pleural Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michele M.; Darafsheh, Arash; Ahmad, Mahmoud; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    PDT dose is the product of the photosensitizer concentration and the light fluence in the target tissue. For improved dosimetry during plural photodynamic therapy (PDT), a PDT dose dosimeter was developed to measure both the light fluence and the photosensitizer concentration simultaneously in the same treatment location. Light fluence and spectral data were rigorously compared to other methods of measurement (e.g. photodiode, multi-fiber spectroscopy contact probe) to assess the accuracy of the measurements as well as their uncertainty. Photosensitizer concentration was obtained by measuring the fluorescence of the sensitizer excited by the treatment light. Fluence rate based on the intensity of the laser spectrum was compared to the data obtained by direct measurement of fluence rate by a fiber-coupled photodiode. Phantom studies were done to obtain an optical property correction for the fluorescence signal. Measurements were performed in patients treated Photofrin for different locations in the pleural cavity. Multiple sites were measured to investigate the heterogeneity of the cavity and to provide cross-validation via relative dosimetry. This novel method will allow for accurate real-time determination of delivered PDT dose and improved PDT dosimetry. PMID:27053825

  13. Solid state neutron dosimeter for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Entine, Gerald; Nagargar, Vivek; Sharif, Daud

    1990-01-01

    Personnel engaged in space flight are exposed to significant flux of high energy neutrons arising from both primary and secondary sources of ionizing radiation. Presently, there exist no compact neutron sensor capable of being integrated in a flight instrument to provide real time measurement of this radiation flux. A proposal was made to construct such an instrument using special PIN silicon diode which has the property of being insensitive to the other forms of ionizing radiation. Studies were performed to determine the design and construction of a better reading system to allow the PIN diode to be read with high precision. The physics of the device was studied, especially with respect to those factors which affect the sensitivity and reproducibility of the neutron response. This information was then used to develop methods to achieve high sensitivity at low neutron doses. The feasibility was shown of enhancing the PIN diode sensitivity to make possible the measurement of the low doses of neutrons encountered in space flights. The new PIN diode will make possible the development of a very compact, accurate, personal neutron dosimeter.

  14. Worms in space? A model biological dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Johnsen, Robert; Baillie, David; Rose, Ann

    2005-06-01

    Although it is well known that radiation causes mutational damage, little is known about the biological effects of long-term exposure to radiation in space. Exposure to radiation can result in serious heritable defects in experimental animals, and in humans, susceptibility to cancer, radiation-sickness, and death at high dosages. It is possible to do ground controlled studies of different types of radiation on experimental animals and to physically measure radiation on the space station or on space probes. However, the actual biological affects of long-term exposure to the full range of space radiation have not been studied, and little information is available about the biological consequences of solar flares. Biological systems are not simply passive recording instruments. They respond differently under different conditions, and thus it is important to be able to collect data from a living animal. There are technical difficulties that restrict the placement of an experimental organism in a space environment for long periods of time, in a manner that allows for the recovery of genetic data. Use of the self-fertilizing hermaphroditic nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans offers potential for the design of a biological dosimeter. In this paper, we describe the advantages of this model system and review the literature of C. elegans in space.

  15. A neutron dosemeter for nuclear criticality accidents.

    PubMed

    d'Errico, F; Curzio, G; Ciolini, R; Del Gratta, A; Nath, R

    2004-01-01

    A neutron dosemeter which offers instant read-out has been developed for nuclear criticality accidents. The system is based on gels containing emulsions of superheated dichlorodifluoromethane droplets, which vaporise into bubbles upon neutron irradiation. The expansion of these bubbles displaces an equivalent volume of gel into a graduated pipette, providing an immediate measure of the dose. Instant read-out is achieved using an array of transmissive optical sensors which consist of coupled LED emitters and phototransistor receivers. When the gel displaced in the pipette crosses the sensing region of the photomicrosensors, it generates a signal collected on a computer through a dedicated acquisition board. The performance of the device was tested during the 2002 International Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison in Valduc, France. The dosemeter was able to follow the initial dose gradient of a simulated accident, providing accurate values of neutron kerma; however, the emulsion was rapidly depleted of all its drops. A model of the depletion effects was developed and it indicates that an adequate dynamic range of the dose response can be achieved by using emulsions of smaller droplets.

  16. Luminescence techniques for dose reconstruction in accident situations: possibilites, limitations and uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Haskell, E.H.

    1996-12-31

    In a nuclear accident of even moderate size, locations will inevitably be exposed which do not have adequate monitoring. In these situations nontraditional dosimeters such as brick, tiles or other environmental materials have historically provided measurements against which models of transport and exposure could be tested. Given sufficient speed and accuracy, the utility of TL techniques applied to natural materials can extend well beyond model verification to a variety of dosimetric applications.

  17. Water-equivalent fiber radiation dosimeter with two scintillating materials

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhuang; Hu, Yaosheng; Ma, Yu; Lin, Wei; Luo, Xianping; Zhao, Wenhui; Sun, Weimin; Zhang, Daxin; Chen, Ziyin; Wang, Boran; Lewis, Elfed

    2016-01-01

    An inorganic scintillating material plastic optical fiber (POF) dosimeter for measuring ionizing radiation during radiotherapy applications is reported. It is necessary that an ideal dosimeter exhibits many desirable qualities, including water equivalence, energy independence, reproducibility, dose linearity. There has been much recent research concerning inorganic dosimeters. However, little reference has been made to date of the depth-dose characteristics of dosimeter materials. In the case of inorganic scintillating materials, they are predominantly non water-equivalent, with their effective atomic weight (Zeff) being typically much greater than that of water. This has been a barrier in preventing inorganic scintillating material dosimeter from being used in actual clinical applications. In this paper, we propose a parallel-paired fiber light guide structure to solve this problem. Two different inorganic scintillating materials are embedded separately in the parallel-paired fiber. It is shown that the information of water depth and absorbed dose at the point of measurement can be extracted by utilizing their different depth-dose properties. PMID:28018715

  18. Thermal neutron dosimeter by synthetic single crystal diamond devices.

    PubMed

    Almaviva, S; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E; Prestopino, G; Tucciarone, A; Verona, C; Verona-Rinati, G; Angelone, M; Pillon, M

    2009-07-01

    We report on a new solid state dosimeter based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) single crystal diamond fabricated at Roma "Tor Vergata" University laboratories. The dosimeter has been specifically designed for direct neutron dose measurements in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The response to thermal neutrons of the proposed diamond dosimeter is directly due to (10)B and, therefore, the dosimeter response is directly proportional to the boron absorbed doses in BNCT. Two single crystal diamond detectors are fabricated in a p-type/intrinsic/metal configuration and are sandwiched together with a boron containing layer in between the metallic contacts (see Fig.1). Neutron irradiations were performed at the Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) using the 2.5 MeV neutrons produced through the D(d,n)(3)He fusion reaction. Thermal neutrons were then produced by slowing down the 2.5 MeV neutrons using a cylindrical polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) moderator. The diamond dosimeter was placed in the center of the moderator. The products of (10)B(n,alpha)Li nuclear reaction were collected simultaneously giving rise to a single peak. Stable performance, high reproducibility, high efficiency and good linearity were observed.

  19. An assessment of radiotherapy dosimeters based on CVD grown diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramkumar, S.; Buttar, C. M.; Conway, J.; Whitehead, A. J.; Sussman, R. S.; Hill, G.; Walker, S.

    2001-03-01

    Diamond is potentially a very suitable material for use as a dosimeter for radiotherapy. Its radiation hardness, the near tissue equivalence and chemical inertness are some of the characteristics of diamond, which make it well suited for its application as a dosimeter. Recent advances in the synthesis of diamond by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technology have resulted in the improvement in the quality of material and increased its suitability for radiotherapy applications. We report in this paper, the response of prototype dosimeters based on two different types (CVD1 and CVD2) of CVD diamond to X-rays. The diamond devices were assessed for sensitivity, dependence of response on dose and dose rate, and compared with a Scanditronix silicon photon diode and a PTW natural diamond dosimeter. The diamond devices of CVD1 type showed an initial increase in response with dose, which saturates after ≈6 Gy. The diamond devices of CVD2 type had a response at low fields (<1162.8 V/cm) that was linear with dose and dose rate. At high fields (>1162.8 V/cm), the CVD2-type devices showed polarisation and dose-rate dependence. The sensitivity of the CVD diamond devices varied between 82 and 1300 nC/Gy depending upon the sample type and the applied voltage. The sensitivity of CVD diamond devices was significantly higher than that of natural diamond and silicon dosimeters. The results suggest that CVD diamond devices can be fabricated for successful use in radiotherapy applications.

  20. Portable magnetic field dosimeter with data acquisition capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T. Y.; Tenforde, T. S.

    1982-03-01

    Design concepts, engineering specifications, and performance test results are presented for a compact magnetic field dosimeter that is suitable for monitoring personnel exposures to steady-state and time-varying magnetic fields. The battery-operated dosimeter contains thin-film Hall sensors that record the magnetic induction (B) along three orthogonal axes. The Hall generators are operated in a pulsed mode, and the time rate of change of the magnetic induction (dB/dt) is determined for values of B recorded during consecutive sampling intervals (typically 75 ms). The pulsed mode operation also serves to reduce battery consumption. The dosimeter contains a programmable microprocessor-based logic circuit and 4096 12-bit words of permanent and random-access memory. Stored parameters include: (1) average values of B and dB/dt during a preset time interval (typically 5 min); (2) peak values of B and dB/dt during the preset interval; and (3) the number of times that specified threshold levels for these parameters are exceeded. An audible alarm is activated when B or dB/dt exceeds a specified threshold level. Sensitivity factors and threshold levels can be loaded into the dosimeter from a bench-mounted programmable calculator, which is also used at the end of each workday to record and process data stored in the dosimeter's random-access memory.

  1. Water-equivalent fiber radiation dosimeter with two scintillating materials.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhuang; Hu, Yaosheng; Ma, Yu; Lin, Wei; Luo, Xianping; Zhao, Wenhui; Sun, Weimin; Zhang, Daxin; Chen, Ziyin; Wang, Boran; Lewis, Elfed

    2016-12-01

    An inorganic scintillating material plastic optical fiber (POF) dosimeter for measuring ionizing radiation during radiotherapy applications is reported. It is necessary that an ideal dosimeter exhibits many desirable qualities, including water equivalence, energy independence, reproducibility, dose linearity. There has been much recent research concerning inorganic dosimeters. However, little reference has been made to date of the depth-dose characteristics of dosimeter materials. In the case of inorganic scintillating materials, they are predominantly non water-equivalent, with their effective atomic weight (Zeff) being typically much greater than that of water. This has been a barrier in preventing inorganic scintillating material dosimeter from being used in actual clinical applications. In this paper, we propose a parallel-paired fiber light guide structure to solve this problem. Two different inorganic scintillating materials are embedded separately in the parallel-paired fiber. It is shown that the information of water depth and absorbed dose at the point of measurement can be extracted by utilizing their different depth-dose properties.

  2. Accident prevention in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, O

    2007-01-01

    In order to prevent accidents in radiotherapy, it is important to learn from accidents that have occurred previously. Lessons learned from a number of accidents are summarised and underlying patterns are looked for in this paper. Accidents can be prevented by applying several safety layers of preventive actions. Categories of these preventive actions are discussed together with specific actions belonging to each category of safety layer. PMID:21614274

  3. Commissioning and implementation of an implantable dosimeter for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Buzurovic, Ivan; Showalter, Timothy N; Studenski, Matthew T; Den, Robert B; Dicker, Adam P; Cao, Junsheng; Xiao, Ying; Yu, Yan; Harrison, Amy

    2013-03-04

    In this article we describe commissioning and implementation procedures for the Dose Verification System (DVS) with permanently implanted in vivo wireless, telemetric radiation dosimeters for absolute dose measurements. The dosimeter uses a semiconductor device called a metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) to measure radiation dose. A MOSFET is a transistor that is generally used for amplifying or switching electronic signals. The implantable dosimeter was implemented with the goal of verifying the dose delivered to radiation therapy patients. For the purpose of acceptance testing, commissioning, and clinical implementation and to evaluate characteristics of the dosimeter, the following tests were performed: 1) temperature dependence, 2) reproducibility,3) field size dependence, 4) postirradiation signal drift, 5) dependence on average dose rate, 6) linearity test, 7) angular dependence (different gantry angle position), 8) angular dependence (different DVS angle position), 9) dose rate dependence,10) irradiation depth dependence, 11) effect of cone-beam exposure to the dosimeter, and 12) multiple reading effect. The dosimeter is not currently calibrated for use in the kV range; nonetheless, the effect of the cone-beam procedure on the MOSFET dosimeter was investigated. Phantom studies were performed in both air and water using an Elekta Synergy S Beam-Modulator linear accelerator. Commissioning and clinical implementation for prostate cancer patients receiving external-beam radiation therapy were performed in compliance with the general recommendations given for in vivo dosimetry devices. The reproducibility test in water at human body temperature (37°C) showed a 1.4% absolute difference, with a standard deviation of 5.72 cGy (i.e., SD = 2.9%). The constancy test shows that the average readings at room temperature were 3% lower compared to the readings at human body temperature, with a SD = 2%. Measurements were not dependent upon field size

  4. Imaging of Absorbed Dose in Radiotherapy by a Polymer Gel Dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanossi, E.; Gambarini, G.; Carrara, M.; Mariani, M.; Negri, A.

    2008-06-01

    Optical imaging of polymer gel dosimeters in form of layers was investigated to enquire their reliability for in-phantom dose measurements in photon or thermal neutron fields. The obtained dose measurements were compared with those achieved by means of Fricke gel dosimeters. Reliability of Fricke gel dosimeters was confirmed, whereas it has been shown that a conspicuous improvement of the adopted polymer gel dosimeters is necessary.

  5. Implanted Dosimeters Identify Radiation Overdoses During IMRT for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Den, Robert B.; Nowak, Kamila; Buzurovic, Ivan; Cao Junsheng; Harrison, Amy S.; Lawrence, Yaacov R.; Dicker, Adam P.; Showalter, Timothy N.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Image-guided dose-escalated radiotherapy is the standard of care for the treatment of prostate cancer. Although many published methods are available that account for prostate motion during delivery, evidence demonstrating that the planned dose is actually delivered on a daily basis is lacking. We report our initial clinical experience using implantable dosimeters to quantify and adjust the dose received during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients undergoing IMRT with cone-beam computed tomography (CT) image guidance for prostate cancer had the dose verification system with radiopaque metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor dosimeters implanted before treatment planning. All patients underwent planning with CT simulation in the supine position with custom immobilization, and the implanted dosimeters were located in the IMRT plans. The predicted dose for each dosimeter was defined and compared with the wireless readings before and after each treatment session. Investigations by physicians and medical physicists were initiated for two or more discrepancies >6% for any five consecutive fractions or for any discrepancy {>=}10%. Results: Using implanted in vivo dosimeters, dose measurements consistently >6% greater than the predicted values were observed during treatment for 3 of 20 prostate cancer patients who received IMRT with daily image guidance. A review of the daily cone-beam CT images revealed acceptable alignment of the prostate target volumes and implanted dosimeters but identified significant anatomic changes within the treated region. Repeat CT simulation and RT planning was performed, with resolution of the dose discrepancies in all 3 cases with the adoption of a new IMRT plan. Conclusions: Our report illustrates the potential effect of implanted in vivo dosimetry for prostate IMRT and emphasizes the importance of careful planning and delivery with attention to systematic shifts or anatomic

  6. Design, manufacture, and evaluation of an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom purpose-built for radiotherapy dosimetric intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, K. M.; Ebert, M. A.; Kron, T.; Howlett, S. J.; Cornes, D.; Hamilton, C. S.; Denham, J. W.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: An anthropomorphic pelvic phantom was designed and constructed to meet specific criteria for multicenter radiotherapy dosimetric intercomparison. Methods: Three dimensional external and organ outlines were generated from a computed tomography image set of a male pelvis, forming the basis of design for an anatomically realistic phantom. Clinically relevant points of interest were selected throughout the dataset where point-dose values could be measured with thermoluminescence dosimeters and a small-volume ionization chamber. Following testing, three materials were selected and the phantom was manufactured using modern prototyping techniques into five separate coronal slices. Time lines and resource requirements for the phantom design and manufacture were recorded. The ability of the phantom to mimic the entire treatment chain was tested. Results: The phantom CT images indicated that organ densities and geometries were comparable to those of the original patient. The phantom proved simple to load for dosimetry and rapid to assemble. Due to heat release during manufacture, small air gaps and density heterogeneities were present throughout the phantom. The overall cost for production of the prototype phantom was comparable to other commercial anthropomorphic phantoms. The phantom was shown to be suitable for use as a ''patient'' to mimic the entire treatment chain for typical external beam radiotherapy for prostate and rectal cancer. Conclusions: The phantom constructed for the present study incorporates all characteristics necessary for accurate Level III intercomparison studies. Following use in an extensive Level III dosimetric comparison over a large time scale and geographic area, the phantom retained mechanical stability and did not show signs of radiation-induced degradation.

  7. Inter-comparison of subglacial hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Fleurian, Basile; Werder, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    The recent emergence of a number of subglacial hydrological models allows us to obtain theoretical insights on basal processes; for instance on the coupling between water pressure and the sliding of glaciers. In ice-flow models, it is relatively clear what the simulated physics ought to be. Conversely, the physical processes incorporated into subglacial hydrology models are diverse as it is yet unclear which ones are of relevance for a particular setting. An inter-comparison of hydrology models will therefore need a somewhat different approach to the one used in the many ice-flow model inter-comparisons (EISMINT, ISMIP, etc.). Here, we present a set of experiments that will allow the comparison of the behavior of different hydrology models. The design of the benchmark aims at allowing the participation of a wide range of models based on different physical approaches. We aim at evaluating the models with a focus on the effective pressure which has the most impact on the dynamics of glaciers. The aim of this inter-comparison is to provide modellers with the necessary data to make an informed decision on which subglacial hydrology model to use for a particular study.

  8. A floating gate MOSFET dosimeter requiring no external bias supply

    SciTech Connect

    Tarr, N.G.; Mackay, G.F.; Thomson, I.; Shortt, K.

    1998-06-01

    MOSFET dosimeters incorporating an electrically floating polysilicon gate have been fabricated in a commercial CMOS technology. Charge is placed on the floating gate by tunneling from a small overlapping injector gate. Subsequent irradiation partially discharges the floating gate, producing a change in threshold voltage which can be used to infer the absorbed dose. No external power source is required during this sensing period. Sensitivities up to 70 mVGy{sup {minus}1} (0.7 mV/rad) have been obtained for temperature-compensated matched-pair dosimeters under {sup 60}Co gamma irradiation.

  9. Basic radiological characteristics of a non-scattering gel dosimeter for 3D dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kyung Hwan; Ji, Yunseo; Lee, Suk; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Park, Young Je; Yoon, Won Sup; Kim, Chul Yong; Cao, Yuanjie; Cho, Samju

    2016-12-01

    We used a spectrophotometer to compare the dosimetric properties of two non-scattering (radiochromic) gel dosimeters: a non-scattering gel dosimeter developed in-house and a PRESAGE™ gel dosimeter. We evaluated the dosimetric characteristics, including spectral absorption, dose linearity, reproducibility, and dose rate dependency of the two gel dosimeters. The non-scattering gel and the PRESAGE™ gel dosimeters showed peak sensitivity at wavelengths of 600 nm and 630 nm, respectively. Over a range of doses the best dose linearities of the non-scattering and the PRESAGE™ gel dosimeters resulted in R2 values of 0.99 at wavelengths of 600 nm and 630 nm, respectively. The reproducibility and dose-rate dependence of each of the two gel dosimeters were within the range of ±3 %. Our results revealed that the peak sensitivities of the two radiochromic gel dosimeters were significantly different; the in-house non-scattering gel dosimeter demonstrated peak sensitivity at a wavelength of 600 nm while the PRESAGE™ gel dosimeter had peak sensitivity at a wavelength of 630 nm. We confirmed that for 3D gel dosimetry, the in-house non-scattering gel dosimeter had a more stable dose response compared with a commercial non-scattering gel dosimeter.

  10. A simple convenient biological dosimeter for monitoring solar UV-B radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.C. )

    1991-05-31

    The use of dry Bacillus subtilis spores as a biological dosimeter for the monitoring of solar UV-B (290-330 nm) radiation was described. Our field tests had supported the utility of this dosimeter as a reproducible and reliable sunlight dosimeter.

  11. Visualization of Traffic Accidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jie; Shen, Yuzhong; Khattak, Asad

    2010-01-01

    Traffic accidents have tremendous impact on society. Annually approximately 6.4 million vehicle accidents are reported by police in the US and nearly half of them result in catastrophic injuries. Visualizations of traffic accidents using geographic information systems (GIS) greatly facilitate handling and analysis of traffic accidents in many aspects. Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), Inc. is the world leader in GIS research and development. ArcGIS, a software package developed by ESRI, has the capabilities to display events associated with a road network, such as accident locations, and pavement quality. But when event locations related to a road network are processed, the existing algorithm used by ArcGIS does not utilize all the information related to the routes of the road network and produces erroneous visualization results of event locations. This software bug causes serious problems for applications in which accurate location information is critical for emergency responses, such as traffic accidents. This paper aims to address this problem and proposes an improved method that utilizes all relevant information of traffic accidents, namely, route number, direction, and mile post, and extracts correct event locations for accurate traffic accident visualization and analysis. The proposed method generates a new shape file for traffic accidents and displays them on top of the existing road network in ArcGIS. Visualization of traffic accidents along Hampton Roads Bridge Tunnel is included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Deconnable self-reading pocket dosimeter containment with self-contained light

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Robyn L.; Arnold, Greg N.; McBride, Ryan G.

    1996-01-01

    A container for a self-reading pocket dosimeter includes a transparent tube for receiving the self-reading pocket dosimeter, a light source mounted at one end of the transparent tube, and an eyepiece mounted on an opposite end of the transparent tube for viewing a read-out of the self-reading pocket dosimeter. The container may further include an activation device for selectively supplying power to the light source. The container both protects the dosimeter from being contaminated and provides a light source for viewing the dosimeter.

  13. Hanford Personnel Dosimeter supporting studies FY-1980. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Endres, G.W.R.; Cummings, F.M.; Aldrich, J.M.; Thorson, M.R.; Kathren, R.L.

    1981-02-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 10 sections of this report which describe fundamental characteristics of the Hanford multipurpose personnel dosimeter (HMPD). Abstracts were not prepared for Appendix A and Appendix B which deal with calculated standard deviations for 100 mrem mixed field exposures and detailed calculations of standard deviations, respectively. (KRM)

  14. Validation of an Innovative Satellite-Based UV Dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, Marco; Masini, Andrea; Simeone, Emilio; Khazova, Marina

    2016-08-01

    We present an innovative satellite-based UV (ultraviolet) radiation dosimeter with a mobile app interface that has been validated by exploiting both ground-based measurements and an in-vivo assessment of the erythemal effects on some volunteers having a controlled exposure to solar radiation.Both validations showed that the satellite-based UV dosimeter has a good accuracy and reliability needed for health-related applications.The app with this satellite-based UV dosimeter also includes other related functionalities such as the provision of safe sun exposure time updated in real-time and end exposure visual/sound alert. This app will be launched on the global market by siHealth Ltd in May 2016 under the name of "HappySun" and available both for Android and for iOS devices (more info on http://www.happysun.co.uk).Extensive R&D activities are on-going for further improvement of the satellite-based UV dosimeter's accuracy.

  15. Portable battery-free charger for radiation dosimeters

    DOEpatents

    Manning, Frank W.

    1984-01-01

    This invention is a novel portable charger for dosimeters of the electrometer type. The charger does not require batteries or piezoelectric crystals and is of rugged construction. In a preferred embodiment, the charge includes a housing which carries means for mounting a dosimeter to be charged. The housing also includes contact means for impressing a charging voltage across the mounted dosimeter. Also, the housing carries a trigger for operating a charging system mounted in the housing. The charging system includes a magnetic loop including a permanent magnet for establishing a magnetic field through the loop. A segment of the loop is coupled to the trigger for movement thereby to positions opening and closing the loop. A coil inductively coupled with the loop generates coil-generated voltage pulses when the trigger is operated to open and close the loop. The charging system includes an electrical circuit for impressing voltage pulses from the coil across a capacitor for integrating the pulses and applying the resulting integrated voltage across the above-mentioned contact means for charging the dosimeter.

  16. Field test of fiber optic hydrazine dosimeters at Cape Canaveral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimcak, Charles M.; Chan, Y.; Jaduszliwer, B.

    1999-02-01

    We tested seventy-two hydrazine fuel fiber optic dosimeters for periods up to three months or Cape Canaveral in order to determine the effect of the local environment on its lifetime and sensitivity. The dosimeters were deployed at a diverse group of sites including fuel, oxidizer, and hydrocarbon fuel storage and transfer locations, a salt spray corrosion test facility, a satellite processing area, an estuarine marsh, a paint storage locker, and several indoor locations including chemical laboratory fume hoods and bathrooms. In addition, a group were set aside in a sealed enclosure for control purposes. The dosimeters were retrieved at monthly intervals and exposed to measured doses of hydrazine vapor to determine the effects of the field exposure on their hydrazine response. Our analysis indicated that 90% of the exposed dosimeters were able to sense hydrazine at a dose detectivity of less than 15 ppb-hr, a value that meets the current hydrazine sensing requirement. Consequently, we are planning to deploy a full scale, continuously operating fiber optic system for detecting potential hydrazine leaks during launch operations at Cape Canaveral.

  17. Improvements in opti-chromic dosimeters for radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humpherys, K. C.; Kantz, A. D.

    "Opti-Chromic" dosimeters consisting of radiachromic dye in flourinated polymer tubing have been introduced as a dosimetry system in the range from 10 1 to 5 × 10 4 Gy. Batches of "Opti-Chromic" dosimeters have been produced to evaluate performance under large scale industrial conditions. A systematic study was undertaken to determine the effect of various dosimeter parameters on radiation sensitivity, shelf life, and response characteristics at the higher absorbed doses. These parameters were (A) Type of flourinated polymer tubing; (B) Organic solvent used to activate the radiachromic dye; (C) Concentration of radiachromic dye; (D) Additives to provide proper viscosity, color stability, and high-dose response. Prototype batches were produced and experimental dosimeters exposed to a range of absorbed doses and the response measured as a function of shelf life and dose. The results of the study are presented, and an improved formulation recommended for application to Food Processing. Other formulations may be of value in specific requirements of sensitivity or temperature.

  18. Two methods for examining angular response of personnel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Plato, P.; Leib, R.; Miklos, J.

    1988-06-01

    The American National Standard ANSI N13.11-1983 is used to test the accuracy (bias plus precision) of dosimetry processors as part of the dosimetry accreditation program of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP). Section 3.8 of the ANSI N13.11-1983 standard requires that a study of the angular response of a dosimeter be carried out once, although no pass/fail criterion is given for angular response. The NVLAP accreditation program excluded Section 3.8, and thus no angular response data have been generated in an organized fashion. The objective of this project is to examine the feasibility of two alternative methods to test the angular response of personnel dosimeters. The first alternative involves static irradiations with the dosimeters at fixed angles to a radiation source. The second alternative involves dynamic irradiations with the dosimeters mounted on a rotating phantom. A Panasonic UD-802 personnel dosimetry system** was used to generate data to examine both alternatives. The results lead to two major conclusions. Firstly, Section 3.8 of the ANSI N13.11-1983 standard should be amended to require a pass/fail test for angular response. Secondly, a comparison between angular response data generated with a fixed or a rotating phantom shows that the rotating phantom is the more cost-effective method.

  19. Thin thermoluminescent dosimeter and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Simons, Gale G.; DeBey, Timothy M.

    1987-01-01

    An improved thermoluminescent ionizing radiation dosimeter of solid, extremely thin construction for more accurate low energy beta dosimetry is provided, along with a method of fabricating the dosimeter. In preferred forms, the dosimeter is a composite including a backing support (which may be tissue equivalent) and a self-sustaining body of solid thermoluminescent material such as LiF having a thickness of less than about 0.25 millimeters and a volume of at least about 0.0125 mm.sup.3. In preferred fabrication procedures, an initially thick (e.g., 0.89 millimeters) TLD body is wet sanded using 600 grit or less sandpaper to a thickness of less than about 0.25 millimeters, followed by adhesively attaching the sanded body to an appropriate backing. The sanding procedure permits routine production of extremely thin (about 0.05 millimeters) TLD bodies, and moreover serves to significantly reduce non-radiation-induced thermoluminescence. The composite dosimeters are rugged in use and can be subjected to annealing temperatures for increased accuracy.

  20. Thin thermoluminescent dosimeter and method of making same

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, G.G.; DeBey, T.M.

    1987-01-13

    An improved thermoluminescent ionizing radiation dosimeter of solid, extremely thin construction for more accurate low energy beta dosimetry is provided, along with a method of fabricating the dosimeter. In preferred forms, the dosimeter is a composite including a backing support (which may be tissue equivalent) and a self-sustaining body of solid thermoluminescent material such as LiF having a thickness of less than about 0.25 millimeters and a volume of at least about 0.0125 mm[sup 3]. In preferred fabrication procedures, an initially thick (e.g., 0.89 millimeters) TLD body is wet sanded using 600 grit or less sandpaper to a thickness of less than about 0.25 millimeters, followed by adhesively attaching the sanded body to an appropriate backing. The sanding procedure permits routine production of extremely thin (about 0.05 millimeters) TLD bodies, and moreover serves to significantly reduce non-radiation-induced thermoluminescence. The composite dosimeters are rugged in use and can be subjected to annealing temperatures for increased accuracy. 1 fig.

  1. Repository preclosure accident scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Yook, H.R.; Arbital, J.G.; Keeton, J.M.; Mosier, J.E.; Weaver, B.S.

    1984-09-01

    Waste-handling operations at a spent-fuel repository were investigated to identify operational accidents that could occur. The facility was subdivided, through systems engineering procedures, into individual operations that involve the waste and one specific component of the waste package, in one specific area of the handling facility. From this subdivision approximately 600 potential accidents involving waste package components were identified and then discussed. Supporting descriptive data included for each accident scenario are distance of drop, speed of collision, weight of package component, and weight of equipment involved. The energy of impact associated with each potential accident is calculated to provide a basis for comparison of the relative severities of all the accidents. The results and conclusions suggest approaches to accident consequence mitigation through waste package and facility design. 35 figures, 9 tables.

  2. Feasibility Study on Applying Radiophotoluminescent Glass Dosimeters for CyberKnife SRS Dose Verification

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shih-Ming; Hung, Chao-Hsiung; Liao, Yi-Jen; Fu, Hsiao-Mei; Tsai, Jo-Ting

    2017-01-01

    CyberKnife is one of multiple modalities for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Due to the nature of CyberKnife and the characteristics of SRS, dose evaluation of the CyberKnife procedure is critical. A radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter was used to verify the dose accuracy for the CyberKnife procedure and validate a viable dose verification system for CyberKnife treatment. A radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter, thermoluminescent dosimeter, and Kodak EDR2 film were used to measure the lateral dose profile and percent depth dose of CyberKnife. A Monte Carlo simulation for dose verification was performed using BEAMnrc to verify the measured results. This study also used a radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter coupled with an anthropomorphic phantom to evaluate the accuracy of the dose given by CyberKnife. Measurements from the radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter were compared with the results of a thermoluminescent dosimeter and EDR2 film, and the differences found were less than 5%. The radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter has some advantages in terms of dose measurements over CyberKnife, such as repeatability, stability, and small effective size. These advantages make radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters a potential candidate dosimeter for the CyberKnife procedure. This study concludes that radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters are a promising and reliable dosimeter for CyberKnife dose verification with clinically acceptable accuracy within 5%. PMID:28046056

  3. Feasibility Study on Applying Radiophotoluminescent Glass Dosimeters for CyberKnife SRS Dose Verification.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shih-Ming; Hung, Chao-Hsiung; Liao, Yi-Jen; Fu, Hsiao-Mei; Tsai, Jo-Ting; Huang, Yung-Hui; Huang, David Y C

    2017-01-01

    CyberKnife is one of multiple modalities for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Due to the nature of CyberKnife and the characteristics of SRS, dose evaluation of the CyberKnife procedure is critical. A radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter was used to verify the dose accuracy for the CyberKnife procedure and validate a viable dose verification system for CyberKnife treatment. A radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter, thermoluminescent dosimeter, and Kodak EDR2 film were used to measure the lateral dose profile and percent depth dose of CyberKnife. A Monte Carlo simulation for dose verification was performed using BEAMnrc to verify the measured results. This study also used a radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter coupled with an anthropomorphic phantom to evaluate the accuracy of the dose given by CyberKnife. Measurements from the radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter were compared with the results of a thermoluminescent dosimeter and EDR2 film, and the differences found were less than 5%. The radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter has some advantages in terms of dose measurements over CyberKnife, such as repeatability, stability, and small effective size. These advantages make radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters a potential candidate dosimeter for the CyberKnife procedure. This study concludes that radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters are a promising and reliable dosimeter for CyberKnife dose verification with clinically acceptable accuracy within 5%.

  4. VALIDATION OF HANFORD PERSONNEL AND EXTREMITY DOSIMETERS IN PLUTONIUM ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Scherpelz, Robert I.; Fix, John J.; Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2000-02-10

    A study was performed in the Plutonium Finishing Plant to assess the performance of Hanford personnel neutron dosimetry. The study was assessed whole body dosimetry and extremity dosimetry performance. For both parts of the study, the TEPC was used as the principle instrument for characterizing workplace neutron fields. In the whole body study, 12.7-cm-diameter TEPCs were used in ten different locations in the facility. TLD and TED personnel dosimeters were exposed on a water-filled phantom to enable a comparison of TEPC and dosimeter response. In the extremity study, 1.27-cm-diameter TEPCs were exposed inside the fingers of a gloveboxe glove. Extremity dosimeters were wrapped around the TEPCs. The glove was then exposed to six different cans of plutonium, simulating the exposure that a worker's fingers would receive in a glovebox. The comparison of TEPC-measured neutron dose equivalent to TLD-measured gamma dose equivalent provided neutron-to-gamma ratios that can be used to estimate the neutron dose equivalent received by a worker's finger based on the gamma readings of an extremity dosimeter. The study also utilized a Snoopy and detectors based on bubble technology for assessing neutron exposures, providing a comparison of the effectiveness of these instruments for workplace monitoring. The study concludes that the TLD component of the HCND performs adequately overall, with a positive bias of 30%, but exhibits excessive variability in individual results due to instabilities in the algorithm. The TED response was less variable but only 20% of the TEPC reference dose on average because of the low neutron energies involved. The neutron response of the HSD was more variable than the TLD component of the HCND and biased high by a factor of 8 overall due to its calibration to unmoderated 252Cf. The study recommends further work to correct instabilities in the HCND algorithm and to explore the potential shown by the bubble-based dosimeters.

  5. a Thermally Desorbable Miniature Passive Dosimeter for Organic Vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Jesus Antonio

    A thermally desorbable miniature passive dosimeter (MPD) for organic vapors has been developed in conformity with theoretical and practical aspects of passive dosimeter design. The device was optimized for low sample loadings resulting from short-term and/or low concentration level exposure. This was accomplished by the use of thermal desorption rather than solvent elution, which provided the GC method with significantly higher sensitivity. Laboratory evaluation of this device for factors critical to the performance of passive dosimeters using benzene as the test vapor included: desorption efficiency (97.2%), capacity (1400 ppm-min), sensitivity (7ng/sample or 0.06 ppmv for 15 minutes sampling) accuracy and precision, concentration level, environmental conditions (i.e., air face velocity, relative humidity) and sample stability during short (15 minutes) and long periods of time (15 days). This device has demonstrated that its overall accuracy meets NIOSH and OSHA requirements for a sampling and analytical method for the exposure concentration range of 0.1 to 50 ppm (v/v) and 15 minutes exposures. It was demonstrated that the MPD operates in accordance with theoretically predicted performance and should be adequate for short-term and/or low concentration exposure monitoring of organic vapors in the workplace. In addition a dynamic vapor exposure evaluation system for passive dosimeters have been validated using benzene as the test vapor. The system is capable of generating well defined short-square wave concentration profiles suitable for the evaluation of passive dosimeters for ceiling exposure monitoring.

  6. Laser accidents: Being Prepared

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K

    2003-01-24

    The goal of the Laser Safety Officer and any laser safety program is to prevent a laser accident from occurring, in particular an injury to a person's eyes. Most laser safety courses talk about laser accidents, causes, and types of injury. The purpose of this presentation is to present a plan for safety offices and users to follow in case of accident or injury from laser radiation.

  7. [Accidents with the "paraglider"].

    PubMed

    Lang, T H; Dengg, C; Gabl, M

    1988-09-01

    With a collective of 46 patients we show the details and kinds of accidents caused by paragliding. The base for the casuistry of the accidents was a questionnaire which was answered by most of the injured persons. These were questions about the theoretical and practical training, the course of the flight during the different phases, and the subjective point of view of the course of the accident. The patterns of the injuries showed a high incidence of injuries of the spinal column and high risks for the ankles. At the end, we give some advice how to prevent these accidents.

  8. Accident mortality among children

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, S.; Albrecht, R. M.; Grab, B.

    1956-01-01

    The authors present statistics on mortality from accidents, with special reference to those relating to the age-group 1-19 years. For a number of countries figures are given for the proportional mortality from accidents (the number of accident deaths expressed as a percentage of the number of deaths from all causes) and for the specific death-rates, per 100 000 population, from all causes of death, from selected causes, from all causes of accidents, and from various types of accident. From these figures it appears that, in most countries, accidents are becoming relatively increasingly prominent as a cause of death in childhood, primarily because of the conquest of other causes of death—such as infectious and parasitic diseases, which formerly took a heavy toll of children and adolescents—but also to some extent because the death-rate from motor-vehicle accidents is rising and cancelling out the reduction in the rate for other causes of accidental death. In the authors' opinion, further epidemiological investigations into accident causation are required for the purpose of devising quicker and more effective methods of accident prevention. PMID:13383361

  9. DOE Radiological Calibrations Intercomparison Program: Results of fiscal year 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, F.M.; McDonald, J.C.

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the FY 1987 results of the radiological calibrations intercomparison program. The intercomparison operation is discussed, and the equipment is described, particularly the instrument set, the beta source set, and relevant calculations. Solutions to problems and improvements in the program are suggested, and conclusions are then introduced. 9 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  10. Intercomparison results for FIFE flux aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macpherson, J. I.; Grossman, R. L.; Kelly, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    Three atmospheric research aircraft were used to explore the atmospheric boundary layer during FIFE: the National Research Council of Canada Twin Otter, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) King Air, and the University of Wyoming King Air. The aircraft were used to measure the mean and turbulent structure of the boundary layer and its variation with height, time, and space. These measurements are important to FIFE because they are being used to scale up point surface observations to landscape scales and because they can be used to relate satellite radiance measurements to boundary layer processes. Because the aircraft were used in coordinated flight patterns to investigate changes within and between intensive field campaigns, wing-to-wing intercomparisons were made so that measurements from one aircraft could be related to another. Intercomparisons were flown on 4 days in 1987 and 3 days in 1989. The eddy correlation measurements of the mixed layer fluxes of moisture and sensible heat were of particular interest to FIFE. Sensible heat fluxes agreed within 15 W/sq m and moisture fluxes agreed within 21 W/sq m. Mean wind component differences were within 1.0 m/s, air temperature within 0.3 C, and mixing ratio within 2 g/kg. Standard deviations showed similar good agreement, with mean differences generally less than 0.1 m/s for the wind components and 0.03 C for potential temperature. Intercomparisons between the NCAR King Air and the Twin Otter showed better agreement in 1989 than in 1987. Overall, the results suggest that data from the FIFE boundary layer aircraft will need little correction to account for instrument biases and spurious fluctuations.

  11. Stratospheric ozone intercomparison campaign (STOIC) 1989: Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Margitan, J.J.; McDermid, I.S.; Walsh, T.D.

    1995-05-20

    The NASA Upper Atmosphere Research Program organized a Stratospheric Ozone Intercomparison Campaign (STOIC) held in July-August 1989 at the Table Mountain Facility (TMF) of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The primary instruments participating in this campaign were several that had been developed by NASA for the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change: the JPL ozone lidar at TMF, the Goddard Space Flight Center trailer-mounted ozone lidar which was moved to TMF for this comparison, and the Millitech/LaRC microwave radiometer. To assess the performance of these new instruments, a validation/intercomparison campaign was undertaken using established techniques: balloon ozonesondes launched by personnel from the Wallops Flight Facility and from NOAA Geophysical Monitoring for Climate Change (GMCC) (now Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory), a NOAA GMCC Dobson spectrophotometer, and a Brewer spectrometer from the Atmospheric Environment Service of Canada, both being used for column as well as Umkehr profile retrievals. All of these instruments were located at TMF and measurements were made as close together in time as possible to minimize atmospheric variability as a factor in the comparisons. Daytime rocket measurements of ozone were made by Wallops Flight Facility personnel using ROCOZ-A instruments launched from San Nicholas Island. The entire campaign was conducted as a blind intercomparison, with the investigators not seeing each others data until all data had been submitted to a referee and archived at the end of the 2-week period (July 20 to August 2, 1989). Satellite data were also obtained from the Stratospheric aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II) aboard the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite and the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) aboard Nimbus 7. An examination of the data has found excellent agreement among the techniques, especially in the 20- to 40-km range. 37 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Stratospheric Ozone Intercomparison Campaign (STOIC) 1989: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margitan, J. J.; Barnes, R. A.; Brothers, G. B.; Butler, J.; Burris, J.; Connor, B. J.; Ferrare, R. A.; Kerr, J. B.; Komhyr, W. D.; McCormick, M. P.; McDermid, I. S.; McElroy, C. T.; McGee, T. J.; Miller, A. J.; Owens, M.; Parrish, A. D.; Parsons, C. L.; Torres, A. L.; Tsou, J. J.; Walsh, T. D.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Upper Atmosphere Research Program organized a Stratospheric Ozone Intercomparison Campaign (STOIC) held in July-August 1989 at the Table Mountain Facility (TMF) of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The primary instruments participating in this campaign were several that had been developed by NASA for the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change: the JPL ozone lidar at TMF, the Goddard Space Flight Center trailer-mounted ozone lidar which was moved to TMF for this comparison, and the Millitech/LaRC microwave radiometer. To assess the performance of these new instruments, a validation/intercomparison campaign was undertaken using established techniques: balloon ozonesondes launched by personnel from the Wallops Flight Facility and from NOAA Geophysical Monitoring for Climate Change (GMCC) (now Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory), a NOAA GMCC Dobson spectrophotometer, and a Brewer spectrometer from the Atmospheric Environment Service of Canada, both being used for column as well as Umkehr profile retrievals. All of these instruments were located at TMF and measurements were made as close together in time as possible to minimize atmospheric variability as a factor in the comparisons. Daytime rocket measurements of ozone were made by Wallops Flight Facility personnel using ROCOZ-A instruments launched from San Nicholas Island. The entire campaign was conducted as a blind intercomparison, with the investigators not seeing each others data until all data had been submitted to a referee and archived at the end of the 2-week period (July 20 to August 2, 1989). Satellite data were also obtained from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE 2) aboard the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite and the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) aboard Nimbus 7. An examination of the data has found excellent agreement among the techniques, especially in the 20- to 40-km range. As expected, there was little atmospheric variability during the

  13. VLBI Digital-Backend Intercomparison Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Alan; Beaudoin, Christopher; Cappallo, Roger; Niell, Arthur; Petrachenko, Bill; Ruszczyk, Chester A.; Titus, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Issues related to digital-backend (DBE) systems can be difficult to evaluate in either local tests or actual VLBI experiments. The 2nd DBE intercomparison workshop at Haystack Observatory on 25-26 October 2012 provided a forum to explicitly address validation and interoperability issues among independent global developers of DBE equipment. This special report discusses the workshop. It identifies DBE systems that were tested at the workshop, describes the test objectives and procedures, and reports and discusses the results of the testing.

  14. Airborne intercomparison of nitric oxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, James M., Jr.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Mcdougal, David S.; Torres, Arnold L.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1987-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted during missions flown in the fall of 1983 and spring of 1984. Instruments intercompared included a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system and two chemiluminescence instruments (CL). NO mixing ratios from below 5 pptv (parts per trillion by volume) to greater than 100 pptv were reported, with the majority less than 20 pptv. Good correlation was observed between the measurements reported by the CL and LIF techniques. The general level of agreement observed for the ensemble of measurements obtained during the two missions provides the basis from which one can conclude that equally 'valid' measurements of background levels of NO can be expected from either CL or LIF instruments. At the same time the periods of disagreement that were observed between the CL and LIF instruments as well as between the two CL instruments highlight the difficulty of obtaining reliable measurements with NO mixing ratios in the 5-20 pptv range and emphasize the vigilance that should be maintained in future NO measurements.

  15. Thorium in the workplace measurement intercomparison.

    PubMed

    Modna, D K; Jerome, S M; White, M A; Woods, M J

    2000-01-01

    The monitoring of radionuclides in the nuclear industry has been recognized as the most straightforward way of assessing health and safety issues associated with the exposure of the workforce to potentially harmful radiation doses. Much of this is achieved by measurements in the workplace itself and by the bioassay and monitoring of workers in the industry. However, there also exists a significant 'non-nuclear' industry where workers are exposed to radioactive materials, for example where this involves thorium, which is made wide use of in the aerospace and other high technology industries. As such work involves the processing of thorium bearing materials, the workforce is potentially exposed to 232Th and its daughter nuclides. Thus, to monitor the workforce effectively, it is important to be able to measure both 232Th and the decay products of 232Th where they are in an unknown state of radioactive equilibrium and this is where monitoring laboratories may experience some difficulty. Accordingly, the Health and Safety Laboratory in the UK has organized a EC wide project on the monitoring of thorium in the 'non-nuclear' workplace; this project is currently ongoing. We report the results of the first intercomparison of this project involving two solutions of 232Th, one in radioactive equilibrium and one not in equilibrium with its daughters. The results are presented with some comments on how this intercomparison has progressed and how these first results will inform the rest of the project.

  16. Modified ferrous ammonium sulfate benzoic acid xyelenol orange (MFBX) and thermoluminescent dosimeters--a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Brindha, S; Rose, J V R; Sathyan, S; Singh I, Rabi Raja; Ravindran, B Paul

    2002-06-07

    Radiation dosimetry deals with the determination of absorbed dose to the medium exposed to ionizing radiation. Chemical dosimetry depends on oxidation or reduction of chemicals by ionizing radiation. A ferrous ammonium sulfate benzoic acid xyelenol orange (FBX) dosimeter based on this principle is being used as a clinical dosimeter at present. Certain modifications were carried out in the preparation and storage of the FBX dosimeter to increase its shelf life. The resulting dosimeter was called a modified FBX (MFBX) dosimeter and has been used in our department for the past few years. An extensive study of the dose, dose rate and energy response of the dosimeter was carried out and compared with a thermoluminescent (LiF7) dosimeter. The results obtained were found to be comparable to the thermoluminescent (LiF7) dosimeter. Hence it was concluded that the MFBX dosimeter could be used for phantom dosimetry, data collection and in vivo measurements. Easier preparation and availability of the reagents are added advantages of using MFBX as a clinical dosimeter in small radiotherapy departments.

  17. [Accidents and injuries at work].

    PubMed

    Standke, W

    2014-06-01

    In the case of an accident at work, the person concerned is insured by law according to the guidelines of the Sozialgesetzbuch VII as far as the injuries have been caused by this accident. The most important source of information on the incident in question is the accident report that has to be sent to the responsible institution for statutory accident insurance and prevention by the employer, if the accident of the injured person is fatal or leads to an incapacity to work for more than 3 days (= reportable accident). Data concerning accidents like these are sent to the Deutsche Gesetzliche Unfallversicherung (DGUV) as part of a random sample survey by the institutions for statutory accident insurance and prevention and are analyzed statistically. Thus the key issues of accidents can be established and used for effective prevention. Although the success of effective accident prevention is undisputed, there were still 919,025 occupational accidents in 2011, with clear gender-related differences. Most occupational accidents involve the upper and lower extremities. Accidents are analyzed comprehensively and the results are published and made available to all interested parties in an effort to improve public awareness of possible accidents. Apart from reportable accidents, data on the new occupational accident pensions are also gathered and analyzed statistically. Thus, additional information is gained on accidents with extremely serious consequences and partly permanent injuries for the accident victims.

  18. Fricke Gel Dosimeter Tissue-Equivalence a Monte Carlo Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, M.; Bartesaghi, G.; Gambarini, G.; Brusa, D.; Castellano, G.; Carrara, M.

    2008-06-01

    Gel dosimetry has proved to be a valuable technique for absorbed dose distribution measurements in radiotherapy. FriXy-gel dosimeters consist of Fricke (ferrous sulphate) solution infused with xylenol orange. The solution is incorporated to a gel matrix in order to fix it to a solid structure allowing good spatial resolution and is imaged with a transportable optical system, measuring visible light transmittance before and after irradiation. This paper presents an evaluation of total photon mass attenuation coefficients at energies in the range of 50 keV-10MeV for the radiochromic FriXy gel dosimeter sensitive material. Mass attenuation coefficient estimations have been performed by means of Monte Carlo (PENELOPE) simulations. These calculations have been carried out for the FriXy gel sensitive material as well as for soft tissue (ICRU) and pure liquid water; a comparison of the obtained data shows good agreement between the different materials.

  19. An optical dosimeter for monitoring heavy metal ions in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, Anna G.; Regan, Fiona; Leamy, D.; Mencaglia, A. A.; Ciaccheri, L.

    2005-05-01

    This work presents an optochemical dosimeter for determining and discriminating nickel, copper, and cobalt ions in water that can be used as an early warning system for water pollution. An inexpensive fiber optic spectrophotometer monitors the sensor's spectral behavior under exposure to water solutions of heavy metal ions in the 1-10 mg/l concentration range. The Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method quantitatively determines the heavy metals and discriminates their type and combination.

  20. Accelerator room photoneutron and photon background measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D W; Hwang, C C

    1983-02-01

    Photoneutron dose equivalents and photon doses in the treatment room of a clinical linear accelerator were measured with sets of isotopically enriched LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters and a moderating sphere. Dosimeter neutron calibrations with 252Cf sources were repeated many times during the extended series of measurements because the 6LiF dosimeter sensitivity increased with successive neutron irradiations. Expressed as a fraction of the primary bremsstrahlung beam dose at maximum, the photoneutron background was 2.04 +/- 0.05 mrem/rad (10(-3) Sv/Gy) at 1 m lateral to beam center in the patient midplane at 25 MV. The fraction of this result due to thermal neutrons was found to be only about 2%. The photon background dose was 2.98 +/- 0.04 mrad/rad (10(-3) Gy/Gy). The photoneutron dose equivalent per unit primary dose was found to be nearly independent of the collimator size used but increased by 40% when the bremsstrahlung endpoint energy was increased from 20 to 35 MeV with no change in flattening filters.

  1. Method for preparing dosimeter for measuring skin dose

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Donald E.; Parker, DeRay; Boren, Paul R.

    1982-01-01

    A personnel dosimeter includes a plurality of compartments containing thermoluminescent dosimeter phosphors for registering radiation dose absorbed in the wearer's sensitive skin layer and for registering more deeply penetrating radiation. Two of the phosphor compartments communicate with thin windows of different thicknesses to obtain a ratio of shallowly penetrating radiation, e.g. beta. A third phosphor is disposed within a compartment communicating with a window of substantially greater thickness than the windows of the first two compartments for estimating the more deeply penetrating radiation dose. By selecting certain phosphors that are insensitive to neutrons and by loading the holder material with neutron-absorbing elements, energetic neutron dose can be estimated separately from other radiation dose. This invention also involves a method of injection molding of dosimeter holders with thin windows of consistent thickness at the corresponding compartments of different holders. This is achieved through use of a die insert having the thin window of precision thickness in place prior to the injection molding step.

  2. Dosimeter for measuring skin dose and more deeply penetrating radiation

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Donald E.; Parker, DeRay; Boren, Paul R.

    1981-01-01

    A personnel dosimeter includes a plurality of compartments containing thermoluminescent dosimeter phosphors for registering radiation dose absorbed in the wearer's sensitive skin layer and for registering more deeply penetrating radiation. Two of the phosphor compartments communicate with thin windows of different thicknesses to obtain a ratio of shallowly penetrating radiation, e.g. beta. A third phosphor is disposed within a compartment communicating with a window of substantially greater thickness than the windows of the first two compartments for estimating the more deeply penetrating radiation dose. By selecting certain phosphors that are insensitive to neutrons and by loading the holder material with netruon-absorbing elements, energetic neutron dose can be estimated separately from other radiation dose. This invention also involves a method of injection molding of dosimeter holders with thin windows of consistent thickness at the corresponding compartments of different holders. This is achieved through use of a die insert having the thin window of precision thickness in place prior to the injection molding step.

  3. Real-time dosimeter targeted to nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Alexandre; Rosa, Carla C.; Santos, Pedro M. P.; Falcão, António N.; Lorentz, Katharina

    2014-08-01

    An intrinsic fiber optic dosimeter (FOD) targeted to nuclear applications is presented. The proposed real-time dosimeter provides dose information based on the historic record over time of the effects of ionizing radiation on single- and multimode pure silica fibers, and also on PMMA plastic fibers. The effect of 60Co gamma irradiation on optical links based on silica and plastic fibers were assessed, considering thermal environment effects over a wide range of variation of the operating parameters. Cerenkov radiation and radiation-induced absorption effects were in focus. The corresponding distortion and spectral transmission degradation were evaluated over wide range of the operating parameters. Radiation induced attenuation (RIA) has shown a spectral band dependent behaviour up to 840 Gy dose levels. The performance of different fibers was assessed against the performance of non-irradiated fibers. From the measurements of dose rate and total dose imparted by ionizing radiation in the fibers we verified that fibers with radiation resistance issues showed wavelength-dependent radiation sensitivity increasing with dose rate. Upon evaluation of correlations between the total dose, the induced loss at various dose rates and different wavelengths, it was concluded that intrinsic fiber dosimeters can be used for dose rates in the range 4 - 28 Gy/min., typical of severe radiation environments.

  4. Investigation of radiological properties and water equivalency of PRESAGE dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Gorjiara, Tina; Hill, Robin; Kuncic, Zdenka; Adamovics, John; Bosi, Stephen; Kim, Jung-Ha; Baldock, Clive

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: PRESAGE is a dosimeter made of polyurethane, which is suitable for 3D dosimetry in modern radiation treatment techniques. Since an ideal dosimeter is radiologically water equivalent, the authors investigated water equivalency and the radiological properties of three different PRESAGE formulations that differ primarily in their elemental compositions. Two of the formulations are new and have lower halogen content than the original formulation. Methods: The radiological water equivalence was assessed by comparing the densities, interaction probabilities, and radiation dosimetry properties of the three different PRESAGE formulations to the corresponding values for water. The relative depth doses were calculated using Monte Carlo methods for 50, 100, 200, and 350 kVp and 6 MV x-ray beams. Results: The mass densities of the three PRESAGE formulations varied from 5.3% higher than that of water to as much as 10% higher than that of water for the original formulation. The probability of photoelectric absorption in the three different PRESAGE formulations varied from 2.2 times greater than that of water for the new formulations to 3.5 times greater than that of water for the original formulation. The mass attenuation coefficient for the three formulations is 12%-50% higher than the value for water. These differences occur over an energy range (10-100 keV) in which the photoelectric effect is the dominant interaction. The collision mass stopping powers of the relatively lower halogen-containing PRESAGE formulations also exhibit marginally better water equivalency than the original higher halogen-containing PRESAGE formulation. Furthermore, the depth dose curves for the lower halogen-containing PRESAGE formulations are slightly closer to that of water for a 6 MV beam. In the kilovoltage energy range, the depth dose curves for the lower halogen-containing PRESAGE formulations are in better agreement with water than the original PRESAGE formulation. Conclusions: Based

  5. The Assessment of Effective Dose Equivalent Using Personnel Dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xie

    From January 1994, U.S. nuclear plants must develop a technically rigorous approach for determining the effective dose equivalent for their work forces. This dissertation explains concepts associated with effective dose equivalent and describes how to assess effective dose equivalent by using conventional personnel dosimetry measurements. A Monte Carlo computer code, MCNP, was used to calculate photon transport through a model of the human body. Published mathematical phantoms of the human adult male and female were used to simulate irradiation from a variety of external radiation sources in order to calculate organ and tissue doses, as well as effective dose equivalent using weighting factors from ICRP Publication 26. The radiation sources considered were broad parallel photon beams incident on the body from 91 different angles and isotropic point sources located at 234 different locations in contact with or near the body. Monoenergetic photons of 0.08, 0.3, and 1.0 MeV were considered for both sources. Personnel dosimeters were simulated on the surface of the body and exposed to with the same sources. From these data, the influence of dosimeter position on dosimeter response was investigated. Different algorithms for assessing effective dose equivalent from personnel dosimeter responses were proposed and evaluated. The results indicate that the current single-badge approach is satisfactory for most common exposure situations encountered in nuclear plants, but additional conversion factors may be used when more accurate results become desirable. For uncommon exposures involving source situated at the back of the body or source located overhead, the current approach of using multi-badges and assigning the highest dose is overly conservative and unnecessarily expensive. For these uncommon exposures, a new algorithm, based on two dosimeters, one on the front of the body and another one on the back of the body, has been shown to yield conservative assessment of

  6. Intercomparison of measurements of stratospheric hydrogen fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankin, William G.; Coffey, M. T.; Chance, K. V.; Traub, W. A.; Carli, B.; Mencaraglia, F.; Piccioli, S.; Farmer, C. B.; Seals, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of the vertical profile of hydrogen fluoride (HF) vapor in the stratosphere and of the vertical column amounts of HF above certain altitudes were made using a variety of spectroscopic instruments in the 1982 and 1983 Balloon Intercomparison Campaigns. Both emission instruments working in the far-infrared spectral region and absorption instruments using solar occultation in the 2.5-micron region were employed. No systematic differences were seen in results from the two spectral regions. A mean profile from 20 - 45 km is presented, with uncertainties ranging from 20 to 50 percent. Total columns measured from ground and from 12 km are consistent with the profile if the mixing ratio for HF is small in the troposphere and low stratosphere.

  7. The SPARC Intercomparison of Middle Atmosphere Climatologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randel, William; Fleming, Eric; Geller, Marvin; Gelman, Mel; Hamilton, Kevin; Karoly, David; Ortland, Dave; Pawson, Steve; Swinbank, Richard; Udelhofen, Petra

    2003-01-01

    Our current confidence in 'observed' climatological winds and temperatures in the middle atmosphere (over altitudes approx. 10-80 km) is assessed by detailed intercomparisons of contemporary and historic data sets. These data sets include global meteorological analyses and assimilations, climatologies derived from research satellite measurements, and historical reference atmosphere circulation statistics. We also include comparisons with historical rocketsonde wind and temperature data, and with more recent lidar temperature measurements. The comparisons focus on a few basic circulation statistics, such as temperature, zonal wind, and eddy flux statistics. Special attention is focused on tropical winds and temperatures, where large differences exist among separate analyses. Assimilated data sets provide the most realistic tropical variability, but substantial differences exist among current schemes.

  8. Inter-comparison of automatic rain gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nystuen, Jeffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    The Ocean Acoustics Division (OAD) of the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML), in cooperation with NOAA/NESDIS and NASA, has deployed six rain gauges for calibration and intercomparison purposes. These instruments include: (1) a weighing rain gauge, (2) a RM Young Model 50202 capacitance rain gauge, (3) a ScTI ORG-705 (long path) optical rain gauge, (4) a ScTI ORG-105 (mini-ORG) optical rain gauge, (5) a Belfort Model 382 tipping bucket rain gauge, and (6) a Distromet RD-69 disdrometer. The system has been running continuously since July 1993. During this time period, roughly 150 events with maximum rainfall rate over 10 mm/hr and 25 events with maximum rainfall rates over 100 mm/hr have been recorded. All rain gauge types have performed well, with intercorrelations 0.9 or higher. However, limitations for each type of rain gauge have been observed.

  9. The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project - Phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, Alan; Dowsett, Harry; Dolan, Aisling; Rowley, David; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Chandler, Mark; Hunter, Stephen; Lunt, Daniel; Pound, Matthew; Salzmann, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) is a co-ordinated international climate modelling initiative to study and understand climate and environments of the Late Pliocene, and their potential relevance in the context of future climate change. PlioMIP examines the consistency of model predictions in simulating Pliocene climate, and their ability to reproduce climate signals preserved by geological climate archives. Here we provide a description of the aim and objectives of the next phase of the model intercomparison project (PlioMIP Phase 2), and we present the experimental design and boundary conditions that will be utilised for climate model experiments in Phase 2. Following on from PlioMIP Phase 1, Phase 2 will continue to be a mechanism for sampling structural uncertainty within climate models. However, Phase 1 demonstrated the requirement to better understand boundary condition uncertainties as well as uncertainty in the methodologies used for data-model comparison. Therefore, our strategy for Phase 2 is to utilise state-of-the-art boundary conditions that have emerged over the last 5 years. These include a new palaeogeographic reconstruction, detailing ocean bathymetry and land/ice surface topography. The ice surface topography is built upon the lessons learned from offline ice sheet modelling studies. Land surface cover has been enhanced by recent additions of Pliocene soils and lakes. Atmospheric reconstructions of palaeo-CO2 are emerging on orbital timescales and these are also incorporated into PlioMIP Phase 2. New records of surface and sea surface temperature change are being produced that will be more temporally consistent with the boundary conditions and forcings used within models. Finally we have designed a suite of prioritized experiments that tackle issues surrounding the basic understanding of the Pliocene and its relevance in the context of future climate change in a discrete way.

  10. Design of Interrogation Protocols for Radiation Dose Measurements Using Optically-Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sara A; Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Jawad, Ali H; Boria, Andrew J; Buth, Tobias J; Dawson, Alexander S; Eng, Sheldon C; Frank, Samuel J; Green, Crystal A; Jacobs, Mitchell L; Liu, Kevin; Miklos, Joseph A; Nguyen, Hien; Rafique, Muhammad; Rucinski, Blake D; Smith, Travis; Tan, Yanliang

    2017-03-01

    Optically-stimulated luminescent dosimeters are capable of being interrogated multiple times post-irradiation. Each interrogation removes a fraction of the signal stored within the optically-stimulated luminescent dosimeter. This signal loss must be corrected to avoid systematic errors in estimating the average signal of a series of optically-stimulated luminescent dosimeter interrogations and requires a minimum number of consecutive readings to determine an average signal that is within a desired accuracy of the true signal with a desired statistical confidence. This paper establishes a technical basis for determining the required number of readings for a particular application of these dosimeters when using certain OSL dosimetry systems.

  11. Accident resistant transport container

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, John A.; Cole, James K.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  12. Accident resistant transport container

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.A.; Cole, K.K.

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  13. International NMR-based Environmental Metabolomics Intercomparison Exercise

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several fundamental requirements must be met so that NMR-based metabolomics and the related technique of metabonomics can be formally adopted into environmental monitoring and chemical risk assessment. Here we report an intercomparison exercise which has evaluated the effectivene...

  14. Radioxenon standards used in laboratory inter-comparisons.

    PubMed

    Gohla, H; Auer, M; Cassette, Ph; Hague, R K; Lechermann, M; Nadalut, B

    2016-03-01

    Preparation methods for (133)Xe standards of activity concentration and the results of the 2014 (133)Xe laboratory inter-comparison exercise are described. One element of the quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program for laboratories of the International Monitoring System (IMS) will be regular inter-comparison exercises. However, until recently, no activity concentration standards for benchmarking were available. Therefore, two (133)Xe activity concentration reference standards were produced independently by Idaho National Laboratory and Seibersdorf Laboratories and used for the 2014 laboratory inter-comparison exercise. The preparation of a complementary (127)Xe activity concentration standard as well as a (127)Xe laboratory inter-comparison exercise suggests (127)Xe as a suitable isotope for QA/QC of remote IMS noble gas stations.

  15. GODAE Inter-Comparisons in the Tasman and Coral Seas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    GODAE inter-comparisons in the Tasman and Coral Seas 11Volume 5 No 2 August 2012 Journal of Operational Oceanography GODAE inter-comparisons in...the Tasman and Coral Seas LEAD AUTHOR’S BIOGRAPHY Peter Oke is a Research Scientist at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research...compared for the Tasman and Coral Seas , off eastern Australia. Systems considered include those developed in Australia, France, the USA, and the UK

  16. Comprehensive Australasian multicentre dosimetric intercomparison: issues, logistics and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Ebert, M A; Harrison, K M; Cornes, D; Howlett, S J; Joseph, D J; Kron, T; Hamilton, C S; Denham, J W

    2009-02-01

    The present paper describes the logistics of the 2004-2008 Australasian Level III Dosimetry Intercomparison. Dosimetric intercomparisons (or 'audits') can be used in radiotherapy to evaluate the accuracy and quality of radiation delivery. An intercomparison was undertaken in New Zealand and Australia to evaluate the feasibility and logistics of ongoing dosimetric intercomparisons that evaluate all steps in the radiotherapy treatment process, known as a 'Level III' intercomparison. The study commenced in 2002 with the establishment of a study team, definition of the study protocol, acquisition of appropriate equipment and recruitment of participating radiotherapy centres. Measurements were undertaken between October 2004 and March 2008, and included collation of data on time, costs and logistics of the study. Forty independent Australian and New Zealand radiotherapy centres agreed to participate. Measurement visits were made to 37 of these centres. Data is presented on the costs of the study and the level of support required. The study involved the participation of 16 staff at the study centre who invested over 4000 hours in the study, and of over 200 professionals at participating centres. Recommendations are provided for future phantom-based intercomparisons. It is hoped that the present paper will be of benefit to any centres or groups contemplating similar activities by identifying the processes involved in establishing the study, the potential hazards and pitfalls, and expected resource requirements.

  17. DRDC Ottawa Participation in the SILENE Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Exercise. June 10-21, 2002

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-11-01

    biologique , et leur performance a &6 comparde A plusieurs dtablissements radiologiques internationaux civils de premi~re classe. En r~sum6, tous les...et concordaient avec les r~sultats des autres laboratoires presents. Les donn~es de dosimetrie biologique , obtenus A partir d𔄀chantillons envoy~s A...chromosomales et les courbes de r6ponse pr~tablies ont W utilis~es afin d’estimer les doses livrdes. Les r~sultats de dosim~tries physique et biologique d

  18. Electromagnetic field exposure dosimeter. Final report, September 1992-May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Feaga, A.C.; Hilliard, M.P.; Link, R.

    1994-07-28

    The growing concern about adverse health effects caused by electromagnetic radiation prompted the ideas for this dosimeter. Data have been presented that link prolonged exposure to electromagnetic radiation from power lines to leukemia and some types of cancer. At present, though, there is a lack of recording instrumentation to measure the prolonged exposure of an individual; thus, it is not possible to correlate properly the amount of exposure or dose to health effects. With the recent advances in small, low-power devices, a small measuring device can be developed. Once this is built, a large data base can be obtained to help correlate electromagnetic field exposure to health conditions. The objective of this project is to develop an instrument which can measure electromagnetic fields over a prolonged period of time. The instrument would be small, say about the size of a radio Walkman, and would be worn throughout the day while taking data, as the individual goes about normal activities. A PC would be used to retrieve the data from the instrument at the end of the day. The dosimeter comprises a triaxial ferrite-loaded coil sensor, a set of amplifiers and filters, analog-to-digital converters, a microcontroller, and random access data memory. The signals from the sensor are filtered into three frequency ranges: one to measure 60-Hz exposure and two harmonics, another to measure high-energy pulsed energy, and a third frequency range to record the activity level of the individual. The signals from the filters are digitized and read into a microcontroller. The microcontroller performs a few calculations and controls the flow of the data to either random access memory or to a computer. A computer is used to retrieve the data from the dosimeter, and can store and display the measured data.

  19. FBX aqueous chemical dosimeter for measurement of dosimetric parameters.

    PubMed

    Moussous, O; Medjadj, T; Benguerba, M

    2011-02-01

    We investigated the ferrous sulphate-benzoic acid-xylenol orange (FBX) aqueous chemical dosimeter for measurement of dosimetric parameters such as the output factor, backscatter factor and lateral beam profiles for different square fields sizes for (60)Co γ-rays. A water phantom was employed to measure these parameters. An ionization chamber (IC) was used for calibration and comparison. A comparison of the resulting measurements with an ionization chamber's measured parameters showed good agreement. We thus believe that the tissue equivalent FBX dosimetry system can measure the dosimetric parameters for (60)Co with reasonable accuracy.

  20. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Di; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Bottomley, Paul A.; Edelstein, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. Methods: An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B1) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. Results: A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ∼3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole‑body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on average

  1. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Edelstein, William A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. Methods: An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B{sub 1}) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. Results: A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ∼3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole‑body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on

  2. The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project - Phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, Alan; Dowsett, Harry; Dolan, Aisling; Rowley, David; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Chandler, Mark; Lunt, Daniel; Salzmann, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    The Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) is a coordinated international climate modelling initiative designed to understand climate and environments of the Late Pliocene, and their potential relevance in the context of future climate change. PlioMIP operates under the umbrella of the Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP), which examines multiple intervals in Earth history, the consistency of model predictions in simulating these intervals and their ability to reproduce climate signals preserved in geological climate archives. PlioMIP was initiated in 2008 and is closely aligned with the U.S. Geological Survey project known as PRISM (Pliocene Research Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping). PRISM has spent more than 25 years reconstructing and understanding mid-Pliocene climate (~3.3 to 3 million years ago), as well producing boundary condition data sets suitable for use with numerical climate models. The first phase of the PlioMIP (PlioMIP1: 2008-2014) resulted in the most complete analysis to date of the Pliocene climate. This included examination of large-scale features of global climate, detailed analyses of Pliocene ocean circulation and monsoon behaviour, and the ability of models to reproduce regional climate patterns reconstructed from both marine and terrestrial archives. The lessons learned from PlioMIP1 facilitated a revision of data and modelling approaches towards the understanding of the mid Pliocene. PlioMIP2 has now been launched, and includes significant improvements to many of the Pliocene palaeogeograhic boundary conditions used for driving climate models (new land/sea mask, topography, bathymetry and ice sheet reconstructions). Within Phase 2 modelling groups have the option of using dynamic global vegetation models to predict (rather than prescribe) land cover, and a broader portfolio of model experiments has been proposed to support efforts to better understand the Pliocene, as well as to use the Pliocene as a means

  3. [Accidents affecting potato harvesters].

    PubMed

    Hansen, J U

    1993-09-27

    During industrialization in agriculture, many farming machines have been introduced. It is well-known that farming is a dangerous workplace and that farm machinery cause many serious accidents every year. Four cases of accidents with potato harvesters are discussed. In three of four cases the farmers were injured while cleaning the machine without stopping it, which probably was the main cause of the accidents. Farmers are in general not careful enough when using farm machinery. Every year, farmers in Denmark are severely invalided in accidents with potato harvesters. A strategy to lower the accidents is proposed: 1. Information of farmers, farmer schools, machine constructors and importers about mechanisms of injury. 2. A better education of farmers in using potato harvesters (and other farming machines). 3. Better fencing of the potato harvesters. 4. If possibly constructional changes in the potato harvesters so things will not get stuck, or so that the machine will stop if things stuck. 5. Installation of switches on potato harvesters, which can be reached from all positions, stopping the machines immediately, or a remote switch control carried by the farmer.

  4. Chemical dosimetry system for criticality accidents.

    PubMed

    Miljanić, Saveta; Ilijas, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Ruder Bosković Institute (RBI) criticality dosimetry system consists of a chemical dosimetry system for measuring the total (neutron + gamma) dose, and a thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry system for a separate determination of the gamma ray component. The use of the chemical dosemeter solution chlorobenzene-ethanol-trimethylpentane (CET) is based on the radiolytic formation of hydrochloric acid, which protonates a pH indicator, thymolsulphonphthalein. The high molar absorptivity of its red form at 552 nm is responsible for a high sensitivity of the system: doses in the range 0.2-15 Gy can be measured. The dosemeter has been designed as a glass ampoule filled with the CET solution and inserted into a pen-shaped plastic holder. For dose determinations, a newly constructed optoelectronic reader has been used. The RBI team took part in the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002, with the CET dosimetry system. For gamma ray dose determination TLD-700 TL detectors were used. The results obtained with CET dosemeter show very good agreement with the reference values.

  5. Longevity Tests of High-Sensitivity BD-PND Bubble Dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Radev, R; Carlberg, E

    2002-07-09

    Medium- and very-high-sensitivity neutron bubble dosimeters (BD-PNDs) made by Bubble Technology Industries (BTI) were used to study the life span of such dosimeters in a standard setup with a {sup 252}Cf source. Although data on the longevity of bubble dosimeters with low and medium sensitivity exist, such data for dosimeters with high and very high sensitivity are not readily available. The manufacturer guarantees optimum dosimeter performance for 3 months after receipt. However, it is important to know the change in the dosimeters' characteristics with time, especially after the first 3 months. The long-term performance of four sets of very high sensitivity and one set of medium-sensitivity bubble dosimeters was examined for periods of up to 13 months. During that time, the detectors were exposed and reset more than 20 times. Although departures from initial detection sensitivity were observed in several cases, the detectors indicated a significantly longer life span than stated in the manufacturer's warranty. In addition, the change in the number of bubbles and in evaluated neutron dose as a function of the time from the end of exposure until the dosimeters were read was investigated.

  6. Ceric and ferrous dosimeters show precision for 50-5000 rad range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frigerio, N. A.; Henry, V. D.

    1968-01-01

    Ammonium thiocyanate, added to the usual ferrous sulfate dosimeter solution, yielded a very stable, precise and temperature-independent system eight times as sensitive as the classical Fricke system in the 50 to 5000 rad range. The ceric dosimeters, promising for use in mixed radiation fields, respond nearly independently of LET.

  7. PRESAGETM - Development and optimization studies of a 3D radiochromic plastic dosimeter - Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamovics, J.; Jordan, K.; Dietrich, J.

    2006-12-01

    This paper studies the polymerization of six different transparent plastics as potential 3D dosimeter matrices. In addition, six different leuco dyes and sixteen different free radical initiators were evaluated. Finally, the photoreactivity of the dosimeter was studied so that the effect of exposure to UV could be minimized.

  8. PRESAGETM - Development and optimization studies of a 3D radiochromic plastic dosimeter - Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamovics, J.; Guo, P.; Burgess, D.; Manzoor, A.; Oldham, M.

    2006-12-01

    In a previous paper we described the evaluation of seven different transparent plastics as dosimeter matrices along with six different leuco dyes as the radiochromic agent. Here we present the evaluation of the dosimeter sensitivity and post irradiation stability of an additional plastic matrix and five different leuco dyes.

  9. Comparative study of three types of civil defense high-range pocket dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Siskel, R.L.; Sims, C.S.; Swaja, R.

    1987-01-01

    Civil defense shelters are stocked with high-range (0- to 200-R) CDV-742 pocket dosimeters. These dosimeters are intended for use by people that must leave the shelter when the environmental radiation level is either high or unknown. A total of 67 CDV-742 dosimeters were obtained and studied during the summer of 1986 at Oak Ridge National Lab. Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR). Three different types of dosimeters (27 Bendix, 20 Landsverk-Gold, and 20 Landsverk-Yellow) in various combinations were exposed to 14 separate pulse operations of the HPRR. It can be concluded that the CDV-742 type dosimeters were not suitable for use in a neutron or mixed radiation field unless the spectra is known and correction factors determined in this study are properly applied. Further study is needed to determine the accuracy of these dosimeters in a pure gamma field and to determine their precision at the extreme ends of the dosimeter range. Furthermore, because of their failure rates, shelter occupants should consider exposure data from the Bendix and Landsverk-Yellow dosimeters to be highly unreliable unless sufficient evidence exists to support the exposure readings.

  10. Adaptation of a Pocket PC for Use as a Wearable Voice Dosimeter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popolo, Peter S.; Svec, Jan G.; Titze, Ingo R.

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with the adaptation of a commercially available Pocket PC for use as a voice dosimeter, a wearable device that measures the vocal dose of teachers or other individuals on the job, at home, and elsewhere during the course of an entire day. An engineering approach for designing a voice dosimeter is described, and design data are…

  11. Injuries are not accidents

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Injuries are the result of an acute exposure to exhort of energy or a consequence of a deficiency in a vital element that exceeds physiological thresholds resulting threatens life. They are classified as intentional or unintentional. Injuries are considered a global health issue because they cause more than 5 million deaths per year worldwide and they are an important contributor to the burden of disease, especially affecting people of low socioeconomic status in low- and middle-income countries. A common misconception exists where injuries are thought to be the same as accidents; however, accidents are largely used as chance events, without taken in consideration that all these are preventable. This review discusses injuries and accidents in the context of road traffic and emphasizes injuries as preventable events. An understanding of the essence of injuries enables the standardization of terminology in public use and facilitates the development of a culture of prevention among all of us. PMID:25386040

  12. Who by accident? The social morphology of car accidents.

    PubMed

    Factor, Roni; Yair, Gad; Mahalel, David

    2010-09-01

    Prior studies in the sociology of accidents have shown that different social groups have different rates of accident involvement. This study extends those studies by implementing Bourdieu's relational perspective of social space to systematically explore the homology between drivers' social characteristics and their involvement in specific types of motor vehicle accident. Using a large database that merges official Israeli road-accident records with socioeconomic data from two censuses, this research maps the social order of road accidents through multiple correspondence analysis. Extending prior studies, the results show that different social groups indeed tend to be involved in motor vehicle accidents of different types and severity. For example, we find that drivers from low socioeconomic backgrounds are overinvolved in severe accidents with fatal outcomes. The new findings reported here shed light on the social regularity of road accidents and expose new facets in the social organization of death.

  13. Effects of temperature and humidity during irradiation on the response of a film dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Hasan M.; Wahid, Mian S.

    1995-09-01

    A commercially available leuco dye containing polyvinyl butyral based film (FWT-63-02) has been investigated ctrophotometrically for its dosimetric characteristic and for its use as routine dosimeter in radiation processing for the absorbed dose range 0.1 to 10 kGy. The present study was carried out to evaluate the performance of dosimeter under different environmental conditions (i.e. effects of temperature and relative humidity during irradiation). The response was measured at peak wavelength of 600 nm as well as at a number of other wavelengths (550, 625, 640 and 650 nm). The dosimeter was found to show quite stable response up to a radiation chamber temperature of 40°C. The dosimeter also showed stable behavior at low or moderate relative humidity conditions (<76%) in the radiation chamber. The characteristics of the dosimeter are suitable for its possible application in radiation processing, food irradiation and sterilization applications.

  14. Feasibility of Ultra-Thin Fiber-Optic Dosimeters for Radiotherapy Dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bongsoo; Kwon, Guwon; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jaeseok; Yoo, Wook Jae; Ji, Young Hoon; Jang, Kyoung Won

    2015-11-17

    In this study, prototype ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters were fabricated using organic scintillators, wavelength shifting fibers, and plastic optical fibers. The sensor probes of the ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters consisted of very thin organic scintillators with thicknesses of 100, 150 and 200 μm. These types of sensors cannot only be used to measure skin or surface doses but also provide depth dose measurements with high spatial resolution. With the ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters, surface doses for gamma rays generated from a Co-60 therapy machine were measured. Additionally, percentage depth doses in the build-up regions were obtained by using the ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters, and the results were compared with those of external beam therapy films and a conventional fiber-optic dosimeter.

  15. Characterization of a Fricke dosimeter at high energy photon and electron beams used in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moussous, O; Khoudri, S; Benguerba, M

    2011-12-01

    The dosimetric features of the Fricke dosimeter in clinical linear accelerator beams are considered. Experimental data were obtained using various nominal energies 6 and 18 MV, 12 and 15 MeV, including the (60)Co γ-ray beam. The calibration of the dosimeters was performed using the ionization chamber as a reference dosimeter. Some general characteristics of Fricke dosimeter such as energy dependence, optical density (OD)-dose relationship, reproducibility, accuracy, dose rate dependence were analyzed. The Fricke solution shows linearity in OD-dose relationship, energy independence and a good reproducibility over the energy range investigated. The Fricke dosimeter was found to be suitable for carrying out absorbed dose to water measurements in the calibration of high energy electron and photon beams.

  16. An analysis of an implantable dosimeter system for external beam therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Robert D. . E-mail: bblack@siceltech.com; Scarantino, Charles W.; Mann, Gregory G.; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Ornitz, Robert D.; Nelms, Benjamin E.

    2005-09-01

    Background and Purpose: To review the data from an implantable radiation dosimetry system used in a clinical setting and to examine correlations between dosimeter readings and potential causative error sources. Materials and Methods: MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) based encapsulated dosimeters were evaluated in a phantom (in vitro) and in a study with 18 patients. The dosimeters were placed in the gross tumor volume or in collateral normal tissue. Predicted dose values were established by imaging the dosimeters in the planning CTs. Results: The in vitro study confirmed that bounding cumulative errors due to setup, planning, and machine output within a {+-}5% level is achievable. In patients, it was found that deviations from the targeted dose often exceeded the 5% level. Conclusions: The use of an implantable dosimeter system could provide an effective empiric check on the dose delivered at depth. Such a tool may have value for institutional quality assurance, as well as for therapy delivered to individual patients.

  17. Feasibility of Ultra-Thin Fiber-Optic Dosimeters for Radiotherapy Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bongsoo; Kwon, Guwon; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jaeseok; Yoo, Wook Jae; Ji, Young Hoon; Jang, Kyoung Won

    2015-01-01

    In this study, prototype ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters were fabricated using organic scintillators, wavelength shifting fibers, and plastic optical fibers. The sensor probes of the ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters consisted of very thin organic scintillators with thicknesses of 100, 150 and 200 μm. These types of sensors cannot only be used to measure skin or surface doses but also provide depth dose measurements with high spatial resolution. With the ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters, surface doses for gamma rays generated from a Co-60 therapy machine were measured. Additionally, percentage depth doses in the build-up regions were obtained by using the ultra-thin fiber-optic dosimeters, and the results were compared with those of external beam therapy films and a conventional fiber-optic dosimeter. PMID:26593917

  18. Smoke and Emissions Model Intercomparison Project (SEMIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, N. K.; Raffuse, S.; Strand, T.; Solomon, R.; Sullivan, D.; Wheeler, N.

    2008-12-01

    Fire emissions and smoke impacts from wildland fire are a growing concern due to increasing fire season severity, dwindling tolerance of smoke by the public, tightening air quality regulations, and their role in climate change issues. Unfortunately, while a number of models and modeling system solutions are available to address these issues, the lack of quantitative information on the limitations and difference between smoke and emissions models impedes the use of these tools for real-world applications (JFSP, 2007). We describe a new, open-access project to directly address this issue, the open-access Smoke Emissions Model Intercomparison Project (SEMIP) and invite the community to participate. Preliminary work utilizing the modular BlueSky framework to directly compare fire location and size information, fuel loading amounts, fuel consumption rates, and fire emissions from a number of current models that has found model-to-model variability as high as two orders of magnitude for an individual fire. Fire emissions inventories also show significant variability on both regional and national scales that are dependant on the fire location information used (ground report vs. satellite), the fuel loading maps assumed, and the fire consumption models employed. SEMIP expands on this work and creates an open-access database of model results and observations with the goal of furthering model development and model prediction usability for real-world decision support.

  19. Intercomparisons of nine sky brightness detectors.

    PubMed

    den Outer, Peter; Lolkema, Dorien; Haaima, Marty; van der Hoff, Rene; Spoelstra, Henk; Schmidt, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Nine Sky Quality Meters (SQMs) have been intercompared during a night time measurement campaign held in the Netherlands in April 2011. Since then the nine SQMs have been distributed across The Netherlands and form the Dutch network for monitoring night sky brightness. The goal of the intercomparison was to infer mutual calibration factors and obtain insight into the variability of the SQMs under different meteorological situations. An ensemble average is built from the individual measurements and used as a reference to infer the mutual calibration factors. Data required additional synchronization prior to the calibration determination, because the effect of moving clouds combined with small misalignments emerges as time jitter in the measurements. Initial scatter of the individual instruments lies between ±14%. Individual night time sums range from -16% to +20%. Intercalibration reduces this to 0.5%, and -7% to +9%, respectively. During the campaign the smallest luminance measured was 0.657 ± 0.003 mcd/m(2) on 12 April, and the largest value was 5.94 ± 0.03 mcd/m(2) on 2 April. During both occurrences interfering circumstances like snow cover or moonlight were absent.

  20. Intercomparison of aerosol instruments: number concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, E O; Sinclair, D; Tu, K W; Hinchliffe, L; Franklin, H

    1982-05-01

    An intercomparison of aerosol instruments conducted February 23-27, 1981, at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) focused on five instruments: the Pollak and TSI condensation nucleus counters; the Active Scattering Aerosol Spectrometer (ASAS-X); and two aerosol electrometers. Test aerosols of sodium chloride and ammonium fluorescein generated by nebulization/electrostatic classification were used to obtain 195 lines of comparison data. Concentrations measured by the ASAS-X and the TSI aerosol electrometer averaged respectively 1.388 and 1.581 times that measured by the Pollak. These ratios were very stable during the week and there was little effect of particle size or material. Most other comparisons were equally stable. However, a review of past work at EML and elsewhere led to the disturbing conclusion that these ratios may change from year to year, or from season to season. A filter sample was taken from microscopy, concurrent with readings from the ASAS-X and the TSI condensation nucleus counters. In this sample, the two instruments differed by 20%. Within its 20% uncertainty, the filter result matched both the TSI and ASAS-X readings.

  1. Criticality accident alarm system

    SciTech Connect

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    The American National Standard ANSI/ANS-8.3-1986, Criticality Accident Alarm System provides guidance for the establishment and maintenance of an alarm system to initiate personnel evacuation in the event of inadvertent criticality. In addition to identifying the physical features of the components of the system, the characteristics of accidents of concern are carefully delineated. Unfortunately, this ANSI Standard has led to considerable confusion in interpretation, and there is evidence that the minimum accident of concern'' may not be appropriate. Furthermore, although intended as a guide, the provisions of the standard are being rigorously applied, sometimes with interpretations that are not consistent. Although the standard is clear in the use of absorbed dose in free air of 20 rad, at least one installation has interpreted the requirement to apply to dose in soft tissue. The standard is also clear in specifying the response to both neutrons and gamma rays. An assembly of uranyl fluoride enriched to 5% {sup 235}U was operated to simulate a potential accident. The dose, delivered in a free run excursion 2 m from the surface of the vessel, was greater than 500 rad, without ever exceeding a rate of 20 rad/min, which is the set point for activating an alarm that meets the standard. The presence of an alarm system would not have prevented any of the five major accidents in chemical operations nor is it absolutely certain that the alarms were solely responsible for reducing personnel exposures following the accident. Nevertheless, criticality alarm systems are now the subject of great effort and expense. 13 refs.

  2. [Travel and accidents].

    PubMed

    Cha, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Traumatic pathologies are the most frequent medical events to be observed among French travellers. Accidents on the public highway by lack of respect of the fundamental rules of road security, particularly abroad, traffic conditions in bad repair in numerous emergent countries, usually the destination of mass tourism and underdeveloped organization of health care and local urgency help. Sports activities are also a source of accidents. A good physical training is essential. Drowning is a real plague, especially among children due to a lack of vigilance. Preventive measures are simple, keep them constantly in mind and apply them carefully so as to have beautiful memories of our trip back home.

  3. Accidents and repatriation.

    PubMed

    Leggat, Peter A; Fischer, Philip R

    2006-01-01

    Accidents and injury contribute greatly to the morbidity and mortality of travellers worldwide, with road traffic accidents being a major contributer. Those travelers with serious illness and injury may need specialised medical evacuation services, which may involve an air ambulance and a specialised medical team. Such aeromedical repatriations require considerable organisation and liaison between the sending and receiving medical services and other interested parties. However, the majority of travellers requiring emergency assistance are stable patients requiring referral for medical or dental attention or special requirements for carriage on scheduled aircraft.

  4. A modified Fricke gel dosimeter for fast electron blood dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Lama, L. S.; de Góes, E. G.; Sampaio, F. G. A.; Petchevist, P. C. D.; de Almeida, A.

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested for more than forty years that blood and blood components be irradiated before allogeneic transfusions for immunosuppressed patients in order to avoid the Transfusion-Associated Graft-versus-Host Disease (TA-GVHD). Whole blood, red blood cells, platelets and granulocytes may have viable T cells and should be irradiated before transfusion for different patient clinical conditions. According to international guides, absorbed doses from 25 up to 50 Gy should be delivered to the central middle plane of each blood bag. Although gamma and X-rays from radiotherapy equipments and dedicated cell irradiators are commonly used for this purpose, electron beams from Linear Accelerators (LINACs) could be used as well. In this work, we developed a methodology able to acquire dosimetric data from blood irradiations, especially after fast electrons exposures. This was achieved using a proposed Fricke Xylenol Gel (FXGp) dosimeter, which presents closer radiological characteristics (attenuation coefficients and stopping-powers) to the whole blood, as well as complete absorbed dose range linearity. The developed methodology and the FXGp dosimeter were also able to provide isodose curves and field profiles for the irradiated samples.

  5. TL detectors for gamma ray dose measurements in criticality accidents.

    PubMed

    Miljanić, Saveta; Zorko, Benjamin; Gregori, Beatriz; Knezević, Zeljka

    2007-01-01

    Determination of gamma ray dose in mixed neutron+gamma ray fields is still a demanding task. Dosemeters used for gamma ray dosimetry are usually in some extent sensitive to neutrons and their response variations depend on neutron energy i.e., on neutron spectra. Besides, it is necessary to take into account the energy dependence of dosemeter responses to gamma rays. In this work, several types of thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) placed in different holders used for gamma ray dose determination in the mixed fields were examined. Dosemeters were from three different institutions: Ruder Bosković Institute (RBI), Croatia, JoZef Stefan Institute (JSI), Slovenia and Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), Argentina. All dosemeters were irradiated during the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002. Three accidental scenarios were reproduced and in each irradiation the dosemeters were exposed placed on the front of phantom and 'free in air'. Following types of TLDs were used: 7LiF (TLD-700), CaF2:Mn and Al2O3:Mg,Y-all from RBI; CaF2:Mn from JSI and 7LiF (TLD-700) from ARN. Reported doses were compared with the reference values as well as with the values obtained from the results of all participants. The results show satisfactory agreement with other dosimetry systems used in the Intercomparison. The influence of different types of holders and applied corrections of dosemeters' readings are discussed.

  6. RESULTS FROM THE NORTH AMERICAN MERCURY MODEL INTER-COMPARISON STUDY (NAMMIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A North American Mercury Model Intercomparison Study (NAMMIS) has been conducted to build upon the findings from previous mercury model intercomparison in Europe. In the absence of mercury measurement networks sufficient for model evaluation, model developers continue to rely on...

  7. Tenth ORNL Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Chou, T.L.; Sims, C.S.; Greene, R.T.

    1985-03-01

    The Tenth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during April 9-11, 1984. Dosemeter badges from 31 participating organizations were mounted on 40cm Lucite phantoms and exposed to a range of dose equivalents which could be encountered during routine personnel monitoring in mixed radiation fields. The Health Physics Research Reactor served as the only source of radiation for eight of the ten irradiations which included a low (approx. 0.50 mSv) and high (approx. 10.00 mSv) neutron dose equivalent run for each of four shield conditions. Two irradiations were also conducted for which concrete- and Lucite-shield reactor irradiations were gamma-enhanced using a /sup 137/Cs source. Results indicated that some participants had difficulty obtaining measurable indication of neutron and gamma exposures at dose equivalents less than about 0.50 mSv and 0.20 mSv, respectively. Albedo dosemeters provided the best overall accuracy and precision for the neutron measurements. Direct interaction TLD systems showed significant variation in accuracy with incident spectrum, and threshold neutron dosemeters (film and recoil track) underestimated reference values by more than 50%. Gamma dose equivalents estimated in the mixed fields were higher than reference values with TL gamma dosemeters generally yielding more accurate results than film. Under the conditions of this study in which participants had information concerning exposure conditions and radiation field characteristics prior to dosemeter evaluation, only slightly more than half of all reported results met regulatory standards for neutron and gamma accuracy. 19 refs., 2 figs., 29 tabs.

  8. Development and characterization of a three-dimensional radiochromic film stack dosimeter for megavoltage photon beam dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    McCaw, Travis J. Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3D) dosimeters are particularly useful for verifying the commissioning of treatment planning and delivery systems, especially with the ever-increasing implementation of complex and conformal radiotherapy techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy. However, currently available 3D dosimeters require extensive experience to prepare and analyze, and are subject to large measurement uncertainties. This work aims to provide a more readily implementable 3D dosimeter with the development and characterization of a radiochromic film stack dosimeter for megavoltage photon beam dosimetry. Methods: A film stack dosimeter was developed using Gafchromic{sup ®} EBT2 films. The dosimeter consists of 22 films separated by 1 mm-thick spacers. A Virtual Water™ phantom was created that maintains the radial film alignment within a maximum uncertainty of 0.3 mm. The film stack dosimeter was characterized using simulations and measurements of 6 MV fields. The absorbed-dose energy dependence and orientation dependence of the film stack dosimeter were investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. The water equivalence of the dosimeter was determined by comparing percentage-depth-dose (PDD) profiles measured with the film stack dosimeter and simulated using Monte Carlo methods. Film stack dosimeter measurements were verified with thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) microcube measurements. The film stack dosimeter was also used to verify the delivery of an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) procedure. Results: The absorbed-dose energy response of EBT2 film differs less than 1.5% between the calibration and film stack dosimeter geometries for a 6 MV spectrum. Over a series of beam angles ranging from normal incidence to parallel incidence, the overall variation in the response of the film stack dosimeter is within a range of 2.5%. Relative to the response to a normally incident beam, the film stack dosimeter exhibits a 1% under-response when the

  9. Collective biodosimetry as a dosimetric "gold standard": a study of three radiation accidents.

    PubMed

    Pass, B; Baranov, A E; Kleshchenko, E D; Aldrich, J E; Scallion, P L; Gale, R P

    1997-03-01

    Quantification of the biologically relevant dose is required for the establishment of cause-and-effect between radiation detriment or burden and important biological outcomes. Most epidemiological studies of unanticipated radiation exposure fail to establish cause and effect because of an inability to construct a valid quantification of dose for the exposed population. No one biodosimetric technique (biophysical or biological) meets all the requirements of an ideal dosimeter and thus qualify as a "gold standard." This report combines new results with previously published data in order to establish a collective biodosimetry as a dosimetric "gold standard" for the victims of three radiation accidents. Combining new and previously published data is necessary as execution and planning of a comprehensive dosimetry is rarely done at the initial stages of a radiation accident. The first subject was a fireman during the initial moments of the Chernobyl nuclear accident; the second was the victim of an unspecified occupational accident; and the third was exposed to a 60Co sterilization source. There was generally good agreement among the various biodosimetric techniques used for the three accident victims.

  10. ISMIP6: Ice Sheet Model Intercomparison Project for CMIP6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowicki, S.

    2015-01-01

    ISMIP6 (Ice Sheet Model Intercomparison Project for CMIP6) targets the Cryosphere in a Changing Climate and the Future Sea Level Grand Challenges of the WCRP (World Climate Research Program). Primary goal is to provide future sea level contribution from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, along with associated uncertainty. Secondary goal is to investigate feedback due to dynamic ice sheet models. Experiment design uses and augment the existing CMIP6 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6) DECK (Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Characterization of Klima) experiments. Additonal MIP (Model Intercomparison Project)- specific experiments will be designed for ISM (Ice Sheet Model). Effort builds on the Ice2sea, SeaRISE (Sea-level Response to Ice Sheet Evolution) and COMBINE (Comprehensive Modelling of the Earth System for Better Climate Prediction and Projection) efforts.

  11. Characterization of the nanoDot OSLD dosimeter in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Scarboro, Sarah B.; Cody, Dianna; Followill, David; Court, Laurence; Stingo, Francesco C.; Kry, Stephen F.; Alvarez, Paola; Zhang, Di; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The extensive use of computed tomography (CT) in diagnostic procedures is accompanied by a growing need for more accurate and patient-specific dosimetry techniques. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) offer a potential solution for patient-specific CT point-based surface dosimetry by measuring air kerma. The purpose of this work was to characterize the OSLD nanoDot for CT dosimetry, quantifying necessary correction factors, and evaluating the uncertainty of these factors. Methods: A characterization of the Landauer OSL nanoDot (Landauer, Inc., Greenwood, IL) was conducted using both measurements and theoretical approaches in a CT environment. The effects of signal depletion, signal fading, dose linearity, and angular dependence were characterized through direct measurement for CT energies (80–140 kV) and delivered doses ranging from ∼5 to >1000 mGy. Energy dependence as a function of scan parameters was evaluated using two independent approaches: direct measurement and a theoretical approach based on Burlin cavity theory and Monte Carlo simulated spectra. This beam-quality dependence was evaluated for a range of CT scanning parameters. Results: Correction factors for the dosimeter response in terms of signal fading, dose linearity, and angular dependence were found to be small for most measurement conditions (<3%). The relative uncertainty was determined for each factor and reported at the two-sigma level. Differences in irradiation geometry (rotational versus static) resulted in a difference in dosimeter signal of 3% on average. Beam quality varied with scan parameters and necessitated the largest correction factor, ranging from 0.80 to 1.15 relative to a calibration performed in air using a 120 kV beam. Good agreement was found between the theoretical and measurement approaches. Conclusions: Correction factors for the measurement of air kerma were generally small for CT dosimetry, although angular effects, and particularly effects due

  12. Characterization of the nanoDot OSLD dosimeter in CT

    PubMed Central

    Scarboro, Sarah B.; Cody, Dianna; Alvarez, Paola; Followill, David; Court, Laurence; Stingo, Francesco C.; Zhang, Di; Kry, Stephen F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The extensive use of computed tomography (CT) in diagnostic procedures is accompanied by a growing need for more accurate and patient-specific dosimetry techniques. Optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) offer a potential solution for patient-specific CT point-based surface dosimetry by measuring air kerma. The purpose of this work was to characterize the OSLD nanoDot for CT dosimetry, quantifying necessary correction factors, and evaluating the uncertainty of these factors. Methods: A characterization of the Landauer OSL nanoDot (Landauer, Inc., Greenwood, IL) was conducted using both measurements and theoretical approaches in a CT environment. The effects of signal depletion, signal fading, dose linearity, and angular dependence were characterized through direct measurement for CT energies (80–140 kV) and delivered doses ranging from ∼5 to >1000 mGy. Energy dependence as a function of scan parameters was evaluated using two independent approaches: direct measurement and a theoretical approach based on Burlin cavity theory and Monte Carlo simulated spectra. This beam-quality dependence was evaluated for a range of CT scanning parameters. Results: Correction factors for the dosimeter response in terms of signal fading, dose linearity, and angular dependence were found to be small for most measurement conditions (<3%). The relative uncertainty was determined for each factor and reported at the two-sigma level. Differences in irradiation geometry (rotational versus static) resulted in a difference in dosimeter signal of 3% on average. Beam quality varied with scan parameters and necessitated the largest correction factor, ranging from 0.80 to 1.15 relative to a calibration performed in air using a 120 kV beam. Good agreement was found between the theoretical and measurement approaches. Conclusions: Correction factors for the measurement of air kerma were generally small for CT dosimetry, although angular effects, and particularly effects due

  13. CCD imaging for optical tomography of gel radiation dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Wolodzko, J G; Marsden, C; Appleby, A

    1999-11-01

    Several investigations have been carried out by a number of researchers over the past few years to evaluate the utility of imaging gel dosimeters for the three-dimensional measurement of radiation fields. These have been proposed to be of particular value in mapping radiation dose distributions associated with emerging and complex approaches to cancer treatment such as conformal (CRT), intensity modulated (IMRT), "gamma knife," and pencil beam radiotherapies. Imaging of the gels has been successfully accomplished with clinical MRI units and via laser-based optical scanning. However, neither of these methods is generally accessible to all potential users, limiting the broader study and implementation of this valuable tool. We report here the design, methodology, and results of a preliminary study carried out to evaluate the utility of a new, inexpensive, and simplified approach to tomographic imaging of gel radiation dosimeters. For the purpose of this initial investigation, an array of liquid scintillation vials was prepared, containing a ferrous sulphate xylenol orange (FSX) gelatin formulation. The FSX formulation undergoes a change in optical absorption characteristics following irradiation, and the resulting color change can be observed visually. The vials were irradiated individually to different doses. Three-dimensional imaging was accomplished by tomographic reconstruction from two-dimensional optical images acquired using a diffuse, fluorescent light source, a digital charge-coupled device camera, single-photon-emission-computed tomography software, and other simple components designed by the authors. The resulting transverse images were evaluated through a region-of-interest (ROI) analysis to obtain the average change in image density in each vial as a function of radiation dose. These measured ROI values were subjected to a linear regression analysis to fit them to a straight line, and to determine the goodness of fit. Results from multiple imaging trials

  14. Feasibility study of a lead monoxide-based dosimeter for quality assurance in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. T.; Han, M. J.; Heo, Y. J.; Park, J. E.; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. N.; Oh, K. M.; Cho, H. L.; Choi, Y. S.; Kim, J. Y.; Nam, S. H.; Park, S. K.

    2016-11-01

    Lately, cancer has been treated using high-energy radiation, and this requires highly reliable treatment plans. Therefore, a dosimeter with excellent performance, which is capable of precise dose measurement, is critical. In current clinical practices, an ionization chamber and diode utilizing the ionization reaction mechanism are widely used. Several studies have been carried out to determine optimal materials for the detector in a dosimeter to enable diagnostic imaging. Recently, studies with lead monoxide, which was shown to have low drift current and high resolving power at a high bias, were reported with the dosimeter exhibiting a fast response time against incident photons. This research aims to investigate the feasibility of a lead monoxide-based dosimeter for QA (quality assurance) in radiotherapy. In this paper, we report that the manufactured dosimeter shows similar linearity to a silicon diode and demonstrates similar characteristics in terms of PDD (percent depth dose) results for the thimble ionization chamber. Based on these results, it is demonstrated that the lead monoxide-based dosimeter complies with radiotherapy QA requirements, namely rapid response time, dose linearity, dose rate independence. Thus, we expect the lead monoxide-based dosimeter to be used commercially in the future.

  15. The responses of three kinds of passive dosimeters to secondary cosmic rays in the lower atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Chen, Bo; Zhuo, Weihai; Fan, Dunhuang; Zhao, Chao; Zhang, Yu

    2015-12-01

    For accurate measurements of the secondary cosmic rays by using passive dosimeters, the relative responses of the thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter, and radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter (RPLGD) were studied. The cosmic-ray shower generator was used to simulate the secondary cosmic rays at the sea level. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to calculate the air kerma and absorbed doses in each kind of dosimeter. The results showed that compared with their responses to gamma rays of (137)Cs, the relative responses of the TLD, OSL, and RPLGD were 0.786, 0.707, and 0.735 to the hard component of cosmic rays, respectively, and the values were 0.904, 0.838, and 0.857 to the soft component of cosmic rays, respectively. To verify the simulations results, an in situ measurement with the three kinds of dosimeters was performed at the same place. The results indicated that the secondary cosmic rays monitored with the three kinds of dosimeters were well consistent with each other provided their relative responses were taken into account.

  16. Monte Carlo-based energy response studies of diode dosimeters in radiotherapy photon beams.

    PubMed

    Arun, C; Palani Selvam, T; Dinkar, Verma; Munshi, Prabhat; Kalra, Manjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    This study presents Monte Carlo-calculated absolute and normalized (relative to a (60)Co beam) sensitivity values of silicon diode dosimeters for a variety of commercially available silicon diode dosimeters for radiotherapy photon beams in the energy range of (60)Co-24 MV. These values were obtained at 5 cm depth along the central axis of a water-equivalent phantom of 10 cm × 10 cm field size. The Monte Carlo calculations were based on the EGSnrc code system. The diode dosimeters considered in the calculations have different buildup materials such as aluminum, brass, copper, and stainless steel + epoxy. The calculated normalized sensitivity values of the diode dosimeters were then compared to previously published measured values for photon beams at (60)Co-20 MV. The comparison showed reasonable agreement for some diode dosimeters and deviations of 5-17 % (17 % for the 3.4 mm brass buildup case for a 10 MV beam) for some diode dosimeters. Larger deviations of the measurements reflect that these models of the diode dosimeter were too simple. The effect of wall materials on the absorbed dose to the diode was studied and the results are presented. Spencer-Attix and Bragg-Gray stopping power ratios (SPRs) of water-to-diode were calculated at 5 cm depth in water. The Bragg-Gray SPRs of water-to-diode compare well with Spencer-Attix SPRs for ∆ = 100 keV and above at all beam qualities.

  17. The responses of three kinds of passive dosimeters to secondary cosmic rays in the lower atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhen; Chen, Bo Zhuo, Weihai; Fan, Dunhuang; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Chao

    2015-12-15

    For accurate measurements of the secondary cosmic rays by using passive dosimeters, the relative responses of the thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter, and radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter (RPLGD) were studied. The cosmic-ray shower generator was used to simulate the secondary cosmic rays at the sea level. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to calculate the air kerma and absorbed doses in each kind of dosimeter. The results showed that compared with their responses to gamma rays of {sup 137}Cs, the relative responses of the TLD, OSL, and RPLGD were 0.786, 0.707, and 0.735 to the hard component of cosmic rays, respectively, and the values were 0.904, 0.838, and 0.857 to the soft component of cosmic rays, respectively. To verify the simulations results, an in situ measurement with the three kinds of dosimeters was performed at the same place. The results indicated that the secondary cosmic rays monitored with the three kinds of dosimeters were well consistent with each other provided their relative responses were taken into account.

  18. Some features of traffic accidents

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, G. M.

    1969-01-01

    Some aspects of urban and rural traffic accidents have been studied at the scene of some accidents in Birmingham and the county of Worcestershire. Accidents to pedestrians are essentially an urban problem, occur mainly at low speed, and most of the serious injury comes from the initial contact with the vehicle, rather than from secondary impacts with the road surface. The characteristics of motor-cycle accidents are more varied; in urban areas there are many side impacts, with consequent injury to the lower limbs, while rural collisions are predominantly front on, with a high incidence of head injury. Accidents to car occupants vary according to the environment. PMID:5359948

  19. Aircraft accidents : method of analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    The revised report includes the chart for the analysis of aircraft accidents, combining consideration of the immediate causes, underlying causes, and results of accidents, as prepared by the special committee, with a number of the definitions clarified. A brief statement of the organization and work of the special committee and of the Committee on Aircraft Accidents; and statistical tables giving a comparison of the types of accidents and causes of accidents in the military services on the one hand and in civil aviation on the other, together with explanations of some of the important differences noted in these tables.

  20. Applying STAMP in Accident Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy; Daouk, Mirna; Dulac, Nicolas; Marais, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Accident models play a critical role in accident investigation and analysis. Most traditional models are based on an underlying chain of events. These models, however, have serious limitations when used for complex, socio-technical systems. Previously, Leveson proposed a new accident model (STAMP) based on system theory. In STAMP, the basic concept is not an event but a constraint. This paper shows how STAMP can be applied to accident analysis using three different views or models of the accident process and proposes a notation for describing this process.

  1. ARM/GCSS/SPARC TWP-ICE CRM Intercomparison Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridlind, Ann; Ackerman, Andrew; Petch, Jon; Field, Paul; Hill, Adrian; McFarquhar, Greg; Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Minghua

    2010-01-01

    Specifications are provided for running a cloud-resolving model (CRM) and submitting results in a standardized format for inclusion in a n intercomparison study and archiving for public access. The simulated case study is based on measurements obtained during the 2006 Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) led by the U. S. department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The modeling intercomparison study is based on objectives developed in concert with the Stratospheric Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC) program and the GEWEX cloud system study (GCSS) program. The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) is a core project of the World Climate Research PRogramme (WCRP).

  2. Latin American and Caribbean intercomparison of surface contamination monitoring equipment.

    PubMed

    Cabral, T S; Ramos, M M O; Laranjeira, A S; Santos, D S; Suarez, R C

    2011-03-01

    In October 2009, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) sponsored an intercomparison exercise of surface contamination monitoring equipment, which was held at the Laboratório Nacional de Metrologia das Radiações Ionizantes, from the Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria, IRD/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro. This intercomparison was performed to evaluate the calibration accessibility in Latin America and the Caribbean. Thirteen countries within the region and IAEA have sent instruments to be compared, but only five countries and IAEA were considered apt to participate. Analysis of instruments, results and discussions are presented and recommendations are drawn.

  3. Environmental radioactive intercomparison program and radioactive standards program

    SciTech Connect

    Dilbeck, G.

    1993-12-31

    The Environmental Radioactivity Intercomparison Program described herein provides quality assurance support for laboratories involved in analyzing public drinking water under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Regulations, and to the environmental radiation monitoring activities of various agencies. More than 300 federal and state nuclear facilities and private laboratories participate in some phase of the program. This presentation describes the Intercomparison Program studies and matrices involved, summarizes the precision and accuracy requirements of various radioactive analytes, and describes the traceability determinations involved with radioactive calibration standards distributed to the participants. A summary of program participants, sample and report distributions, and additional responsibilities of this program are discussed.

  4. Response of TLD-albedo and nuclear track dosimeters exposed to plutonium sources

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Baumgartner, W.V.; Fix, J.J.

    1991-12-01

    Neutron dosimetry has been extensively studied at Hanford since the mid-1940s. At the present time, Hanford contractors use thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo dosimeters to record the neutron dose equivalent received by workers. The energy dependence of the TLD-albedo dosimeter has been recognized and documented since introduced at Hanford in 1964 and numerous studies have helped assure the accuracy of dosimeters. With the recent change in Hanford`s mission, there has been a significant decrease in the handling of plutonium tetrafluoride, and an increase in the handling of plutonium metal and plutonium oxide sources. This study was initiated to document the performance of the current Hanford TLD-albedo dosimeter under the low scatter conditions of the calibration laboratory and under the high scatter conditions in the work place under carefully controlled conditions at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The neutron fields at the PFP facility were measured using a variety of instruments, including a multisphere spectrometer, tissue equivalent proportional counters, and specially calibrated rem meters. Various algorithms were used to evaluate the TLD-albedo dosimeters, and the results are given in this report. Using current algorithms, the dose equivalents evaluated for bare sources and sources with less than 2.5 cm (1 in.) of acrylic plastic shielding in high scatter conditions typical of glove box operations are reasonably accurate. Recently developed CR-39 track etch dosimeters (TEDs) were also exposed in the calibration laboratory and at the PFP. The results indicate that the TED dosimeters are quite accurate for both bare and moderated neutron sources. Until personnel dosimeter is available that incorporates a direct measure of the neutron dose to a person, technical uncertainties in the accuracy of the recorded data will continue.

  5. Response of TLD-albedo and nuclear track dosimeters exposed to plutonium sources

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Baumgartner, W.V.; Fix, J.J.

    1991-12-01

    Neutron dosimetry has been extensively studied at Hanford since the mid-1940s. At the present time, Hanford contractors use thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo dosimeters to record the neutron dose equivalent received by workers. The energy dependence of the TLD-albedo dosimeter has been recognized and documented since introduced at Hanford in 1964 and numerous studies have helped assure the accuracy of dosimeters. With the recent change in Hanford's mission, there has been a significant decrease in the handling of plutonium tetrafluoride, and an increase in the handling of plutonium metal and plutonium oxide sources. This study was initiated to document the performance of the current Hanford TLD-albedo dosimeter under the low scatter conditions of the calibration laboratory and under the high scatter conditions in the work place under carefully controlled conditions at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The neutron fields at the PFP facility were measured using a variety of instruments, including a multisphere spectrometer, tissue equivalent proportional counters, and specially calibrated rem meters. Various algorithms were used to evaluate the TLD-albedo dosimeters, and the results are given in this report. Using current algorithms, the dose equivalents evaluated for bare sources and sources with less than 2.5 cm (1 in.) of acrylic plastic shielding in high scatter conditions typical of glove box operations are reasonably accurate. Recently developed CR-39 track etch dosimeters (TEDs) were also exposed in the calibration laboratory and at the PFP. The results indicate that the TED dosimeters are quite accurate for both bare and moderated neutron sources. Until personnel dosimeter is available that incorporates a direct measure of the neutron dose to a person, technical uncertainties in the accuracy of the recorded data will continue.

  6. An NMR relaxometry and gravimetric study of gelatin-free aqueous polyacrylamide dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babic, Steven; Schreiner, L. John

    2006-09-01

    In conformal radiation therapy, a high dose of radiation is given to a target volume to increase the probability of cure, and care is taken to minimize the dose to surrounding healthy tissue. The techniques used to achieve this are very complicated and the precise verification of the resulting three-dimensional (3D) dose distribution is required. Polyacrylamide gelatin (PAG) dosimeters with magnetic resonance imaging and optical computed tomography scanning provide the required 3D dosimetry with high spatial resolution. Many basic studies have characterized these chemical dosimeters that polymerize under irradiation. However, the investigation of the fundamental properties of the radiation-induced polymerization in PAG dosimeters is complicated by the presence of the background gelatin matrix. In this work, a gelatin-free model system for the study of the basic radiation-induced polymerization in PAG dosimeters has been developed. Experiments were performed on gelatin-free dosimeters, named aqueous polyacrylamide (APA) dosimeters, containing equal amounts of acrylamide and N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide. The APA dosimeters were prepared with four different total monomer concentrations (2, 4, 6 and 8% by weight). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin and spin-lattice proton relaxation measurements at 20 MHz, and gravimetric analyses performed on all four dosimeters, show a continuous degree of polymerization over the dose range of 0-25 Gy. The developed NMR model explains the relationship observed between the relaxation data and the amount of crosslinked polymer formed at each dose. This model can be extended with gelatin relaxation data to provide a fundamental understanding of radiation-induced polymerization in the conventional PAG dosimeters.

  7. Ground-based evaluation of dosimeters for NASA high-altitude balloon flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straume, T.; Mertens, C. J.; Lusby, T. C.; Gersey, B.; Tobiska, W. K.; Norman, R. B.; Gronoff, G. P.; Hands, A.

    2016-11-01

    Results are presented from evaluations of radiation dosimeters prior to a NASA high-altitude balloon flight, the RaD-X mission. Four radiation dosimeters were on board RaD-X: a Far West Hawk (version 3), a Teledyne dosimeter (UDOS001), a Liulin dosimeter (MDU 6SA1), and a RaySure dosimeter (version 3b). The Hawk is a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and the others are solid-state Si sensors. The Hawk served as the "flight standard" and was calibrated for this mission. The Si-based dosimeters were tested to make sure they functioned properly prior to flight but were not calibrated for the radiation environment in the stratosphere. The dosimeters were exposed to 60Co gamma rays and 252Cf fission radiation (which includes both neutrons and gamma rays) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The measurement results were compared with results from standard "benchmark" measurements of the same sources and source-to-detector distances performed contemporaneously by LLNL calibration facility personnel. For 60Co gamma rays, the dosimeter-to-benchmark ratios were 0.84 ± 0.06, 1.07 ± 0.32, 1.31 ± 0.07, and 0.82 ± 0.24 for the TEPC, Teledyne, Liulin, and RaySure, respectively. For 252Cf radiation, the dosimeter-to-benchmark ratios were 0.94 ± 0.15, 0.55 ± 0.18, 0.58 ± 0.08, and 0.33 ± 0.12 for the TEPC, Teledyne, Liulin, and RaySure. Some examples of how the results were used to help interpret the flight data are also presented.

  8. Intercomparison of Global Precipitation Products: The Third Precipitation Intercomparison Project (PIP-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert F.; Kidd, Christopher; Petty, Grant; Morrissey, Mark; Goodman, H. Michael; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A set of global, monthly rainfall products has been intercompared to understand the quality and utility of the estimates. The products include 25 observational (satellite-based), four model and two climatological products. The results of the intercomparison indicate a very large range (factor of two or three) of values when all products are considered. The range of values is reduced considerably when the set of observational products is limited to those considered quasi-standard. The model products do significantly poorer in the tropics, but are competitive with satellite-based fields in mid-latitudes over land. Over ocean, products are compared to frequency of precipitation from ship observations. The evaluation of the observational products point to merged data products (including rain gauge information) as providing the overall best results.

  9. Urine Radiobioassay Intercomparison Results From The Intercomparison Studies Program At Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bores, Norman; Schultz, Michael K

    2008-01-01

    The Intercomparison Studies Program (ISP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN USA) provides natural-matrix human urine quality-assurance/quality-control (QA/QC) samples to radiobioassay analysis laboratories. Samples are provided to these laboratories as 'single-blind' or 'double-blind' unknowns, spiked with radioactive-solution standards at 'low' levels (e.g., 0-250 mBq {center_dot} kg{sup -1} for alpha-emitters). Participants use the results as a tool for self-evaluation and a measure of performance. In this paper, sample preparation and the results of testing during the years 2000-2004 for the radionuclides natural uranium (U-nat), {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 241}Am are presented and discussed.

  10. Review of four novel dosimeters developed for use in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, P.; Quinn, A.; Loo, K.; Lerch, M.; Petasecca, M.; Wong, J.; Hardcastle, N.; Carolan, M.; McNamara, J.; Cutajar, D.; Fuduli, I.; Espinoza, A.; Porumb, C.; Rosenfeld, A.

    2013-06-01

    Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP) is a research strength at the University of Wollongong, the main research theme of this centre is to develop prototype novel radiation dosimeters. Multiple detector systems have been developed by Prof Rosenfelds' group for various radiation detector applications. This paper focuses on four current detector systems being developed and studied at CMRP. Two silicon array detectors include the magic plate and dose magnifying glass (DMG), the primary focus of these two detectors is high spatial and temporal resolution dosimetry in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams. The third detector discussed is the MOSkinTM which is a high spatial resolution detector based on MOSFET technology, its primary role is in vivo dosimetry. The fourth detector system discussed is BrachyView, this is a high resolution dose viewing system based on Medipix detector technology.

  11. Evaluation of commercial programmable floating gate devices as radiation dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgecock, R.; Matheson, J.; Weber, M.; Giulio Villani, E.; Bose, R.; Khan, A.; Smith, D. R.; Adil-Smith, I.; Gabrielli, A.

    2009-02-01

    Programmable floating gate MOSFET transistors were tested with gamma radiation with doses up to approximately 100Gy (air equivalent), to evaluate their suitability as dosimeters in radiotherapy. After characterization and programming at different threshold voltages, the devices were irradiated and their Vgs shift with dose monitored in real time. Post-irradiation analysis was carried out to evaluate sensitivity, linearity, reproducibility and voltage threshold annealing. A subsequent re-programming phase followed by characterization was performed to asses their post-irradiation charge restoring capabilities. It was found that up to 73% of the initial maximum threshold voltage could be recovered. A sensitivity of up to 9 mV/Gy with an uncertainty of less than 1%, an excellent linearity up to the maximum programmable threshold voltage and low noise suggest the use of this technology for in vivo dosimetry applications.

  12. Solid state dosimeters used in medical physics 'A review'

    SciTech Connect

    Azorin-Nieto, Juan

    2012-10-23

    Many solid-state detectors have been successfully used to perform the quality control and in vivo dosimetry in medical physics, both in diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy, as they have high sensitivity in a small volume; most of them do not require electrical connection and have dosimetric characteristics of interest such as: good accuracy and reproducibility, as well as a response independent of the energy of radiation, some of them. For this reason, the selection of an appropriate detector for use in medical physics must take into account the energy mass absorption coefficient relative to water for photon sources and the mass stopping power relative to water for beta emitters and electron beams in the energy range of interest in medical physics, as well as the effective atomic number of materials that constitute them. This paper presents a review of the dosimetric characteristics of the solid state dosimeters most suitable for use in medical physics.

  13. A Radiation Dosimeter Concept for the Lunar Surface Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H.; Christl, Mark J.; Watts, John; Kuznetsov, Eugeny N.; Parnell, Thomas A.; Pendleton, Geoff N.

    2007-01-01

    A novel silicon detector configuration for radiation dose measurements in an environment where solar energetic particles are of most concern is described. The dosimeter would also measure the dose from galactic cosmic rays. In the lunar environment a large range in particle flux and ionization density must be measured and converted to dose equivalent. This could be accomplished with a thick (e.g. 2mm) silicon detector segmented into cubic volume elements "voxels" followed by a second, thin monolithic silicon detector. The electronics needed to implement this detector concept include analog signal processors (ASIC) and a field programmable gate array (FPGA) for data accumulation and conversion to linear energy transfer (LET) spectra and to dose-equivalent (Sievert). Currently available commercial ASIC's and FPGA's are suitable for implementing the analog and digital systems.

  14. [AOR characterization and zoning: a dosimeter for blue light].

    PubMed

    Dario, R; Uva, J; Di Lecce, V; Quarto, A

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the results obtained thanks to an innovative experimental device for the assessment of artificial optical radiation (AOR) exposure in workplace. This . device was developed by 'Politecnico di Bari-DIASS'. The wearable personal dosimeter has three sensors: one is used for measuring head position/movement, therefore there is a color light sensor to determine the AOR and finally there is a video camera to localize sources. Our system is connected to a netbook via USB cable that allows one to obtain the real and extimated value of worker's exposure, also with "augmented reality". The aim of this paper is realizing work place safety zoning for the classifacation of not only specific dangerous areas through the analysis of overlapping information from the device.

  15. Design, Fabrication, Calibration, Testing and Satellite Integration of a Space-Radiation Dosimeter.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    IU2I 0 AFGL-TR-81-0354 DESIGN, FABRICATION, CALIBRATION, TESTING AND SATELLITE INTEGRATION OF A SPACE-RADIATION DOSIMETER ~ Bach Sellers Ralph...1978 - Dec. 1981 Radiation Dosimeter 6. PERFoRMu *PG. RgPORT NUges, AUT"OR(a) 4. CONTRACT an calT uMei[ews) Bach Sellers Frederick A. Hanser Ralph...SIOPPLEMENTARy NOTES 9. KEY WORDS (Confnlow ..n tevrs* lie If ft.ea4.# w IioaflFp by bleek ainb,) Dosimeter Particle Fluxes Electron Dose Nuclear Stars

  16. Measurement of a 200 MeV proton beam using a polyurethane dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Malcolm; Adamovics, John; Ibbott, Geoffrey

    2006-12-01

    PRESAGETM (Heuris Pharma LLC, Skillman, NJ) is a three-dimensional polyurethane dosimeter containing a leuco dye that generates a color change when irradiated. The dosimeter is solid and does not require a container to maintain its shape. The dosimeter is transparent before irradiation and the maximum absorbance of the leuco dye occurs at 633 nm which is compatible with the OCT-OPUSTM laser CT scanner (MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT). The purpose of this study was to investigate the response of PRESAGETM to proton beam radiotherapy.

  17. New technique to improve the accuracy of albedo neutron dosimeter evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankins, D. E.

    The calibration factor for albedo neutron dosimeters varies greatly depending upon the energy of the neutrons in the exposure. Calibration results obtained over an eight-year period at each Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory facility where neutron exposure may occur were reviewed. A stronger relationship than expected was found between the ratio of the readings of the 9-in. to 3-in. spheres and the percent thermal. Readings from personnel and albedo badges were reviewed. The readings were consistent with the use of a calibration factor for the albedo dosimeter which varies with changes in the ratio of the personnel and albedo dosimeter TLD readings.

  18. 49 CFR 835.11 - Obtaining Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and supporting information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Obtaining Board accident reports, factual accident... Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and supporting information. It is the responsibility... obtain Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and accompanying accident docket files....

  19. 49 CFR 835.11 - Obtaining Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and supporting information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Obtaining Board accident reports, factual accident... Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and supporting information. It is the responsibility... obtain Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and accompanying accident docket files....

  20. 49 CFR 835.11 - Obtaining Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and supporting information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Obtaining Board accident reports, factual accident... Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and supporting information. It is the responsibility... obtain Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and accompanying accident docket files....

  1. 49 CFR 835.11 - Obtaining Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and supporting information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Obtaining Board accident reports, factual accident... Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and supporting information. It is the responsibility... obtain Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and accompanying accident docket files....

  2. 49 CFR 835.11 - Obtaining Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and supporting information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Obtaining Board accident reports, factual accident... Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and supporting information. It is the responsibility... obtain Board accident reports, factual accident reports, and accompanying accident docket files....

  3. Hang-gliding accidents.

    PubMed Central

    Margreiter, R; Lugger, L J

    1978-01-01

    Seventy-five known hang-gliding accidents causing injury to the pilot occurred in the Tyrol during 1973-6. Most occurred in May, June, or September and between 11 am and 3 pm, when unfavourable thermic conditions are most likely. Thirty-four accidents happened during launching, 13 during flight, and 28 during landing, and most were caused by human errors--especially deficient launching technique; incorrect estimation of wind conditions, altitude, and speed; and choice of unfavourable launching and landing sites. Eight pilots were moderately injured, 60 severely (multiply in 24 cases), and seven fatally; fractures of the spine and arms predominated. Six of the 21 skull injuries were fatal. The risk of hang-gliding seems unjustifiably high, and safety precautions and regulations should be adopted to ensure certain standards of training and equipment and to limit flying to favourable sites and times. Images p401-a PMID:624028

  4. Daily variation of radiation dose rate after the Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Masatoshi

    2015-04-01

    After the radioactive contamination of the lands from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident, the radiation dose rates observed by the dosimeters often shows daily variations, at different local times at different places or time. These variations are caused by different reasons: the temperature-dependent characteristics of the dosimeter (instrumental effect), the daily convective wind that lifts up the radioactive small particle on the ground (local effect), and the daily sea-land wind that transports the radioactive small particle from highly contaminated area (regional effect). The last type is most important in understanding the internal dose by air taking. However, while very regular patterns can easily be judged as instrumental effect, variations that strongly depend on the weather conditions are not easily judged. Combining the atmospheric electric field measurement near the ground (potential gradient, PG) with the wind and weather data, some of these unclear cases can be classified into above three reasoning, which will be shown in the presentation. Thus, the PG measurement is important right after any nuclear accidents in the future.

  5. Los Alamos personnel and area criticality dosimeter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilik, D.G.; Martin, R.W.

    1981-06-01

    Fissionable materials are handled and processed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Although the probability of a nuclear criticality accident is very remote, it must be considered. Los Alamos maintains a broad spectrum of dose assessment capabilities. This report describes the methods employed for personnel neutron, area neutron, and photon dose evaluations with passive dosimetry systems.

  6. THE NORTH AMERICAN MERCURY MODEL INTER-COMPARISON STUDY (NAMMIS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the North American Mercury Model Inter-comparison Study (NAMMIS). The NAMMIS is an effort to apply atmospheric Hg models in a tightly constrained testing environment with a focus on North America. With each model using the same input data sets for initial co...

  7. PM 2.5 ORGANIC SPECIATION INTERCOMPARISON RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a poster on results to a laboratory intercomparison of organic aerosol speciation analysis to be presented at the 2006 International Aerosol Conference sponsored by the American Association for Aerosol Research in St. Paul, Minnesota on September 10-15. T...

  8. The GABLS4 Inter-comparison: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazile, E.; Couvreux, F.; Le Moigne, P.

    2015-12-01

    The GABLS4 intercomparison, launched in summer 2014, aims to study the interaction between the boundary layer and the surface in strong stability and during the diurnal transition focussing on the decrease of the turbulence. For this, the observation site of Dome C on the Antarctic Plateau was chosen mainly for two reasons: the availability of the in-situ measurements from a 45-m tower and a homogeneous surface with a low conductivity such as snow on a flat topography. The intercomparison will consist of 3 inter-comparisons : Single Column Model (SCM), Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and land-snow model (LSM). It is organized in two steps. The first one is dedicated to the LSM and the SCM with an interactive surface (snow) scheme. Then, in the second one, the observed surface temperature will be prescribed in the SCM and in the LES models. The first GABLS4 workshop was organized in May 2015 in Toulouse (France). 12 groups with LSM/SCM and 7 for LES/DNS sent already the simulations. After a brief description of the setup, the main results for the SCM intercomparison with observations and some preliminary results from the LES will be presented. The setup and more details are available on the GABLS4 Web page (http://www.cnrm.meteo.fr/aladin/meshtml/GABLS4/GABLS4.html).

  9. Evaluation of the annual Canadian biodosimetry network intercomparisons

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Ruth C.; Beaton-Green, Lindsay A.; Lachapelle, Sylvie; Kutzner, Barbara C.; Ferrarotto, Catherine; Chauhan, Vinita; Marro, Leonora; Livingston, Gordon K.; Boulay Greene, Hillary; Flegal, Farrah N.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the importance of annual intercomparisons for maintaining the capacity and capabilities of a well-established biodosimetry network in conjunction with assessing efficient and effective analysis methods for emergency response. Materials and methods: Annual intercomparisons were conducted between laboratories in the Canadian National Biological Dosimetry Response Plan. Intercomparisons were performed over a six-year period and comprised of the shipment of 10–12 irradiated, blinded blood samples for analysis by each of the participating laboratories. Dose estimates were determined by each laboratory using the dicentric chromosome assay (conventional and QuickScan scoring) and where possible the cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) assay. Dose estimates were returned to the lead laboratory for evaluation and comparison. Results: Individual laboratories performed comparably from year to year with only slight fluctuations in performance. Dose estimates using the dicentric chromosome assay were accurate about 80% of the time and the QuickScan method for scoring the dicentric chromosome assay was proven to reduce the time of analysis without having a significant effect on the dose estimates. Although analysis with the CBMN assay was comparable to QuickScan scoring with respect to speed, the accuracy of the dose estimates was greatly reduced. Conclusions: Annual intercomparisons are necessary to maintain a network of laboratories for emergency response biodosimetry as they evoke confidence in their capabilities. PMID:25670072

  10. New polymer gel dosimeters consisting of less toxic monomers with radiation-crosslinked gel matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroki, A.; Yamashita, S.; Sato, Y.; Nagasawa, N.; Taguchi, M.

    2013-06-01

    New polymer gel dosimeters consisting of less toxic methacrylate-type monomers such as 2-hydroxymethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and polyethylene glycol 400 dimethacrylate (9G) with hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) gel were prepared. The HPC gels were obtained by using a radiation-induced crosslinking technique to be applied in a matrix instead of a gelatin, which is conventionally used in earlier dosimeters, for the polymer gel dosimeters. The prepared polymer gel dosimeters showed cloudiness by exposing to 60Co γ-ray, in which the cloudiness increased with the dose up to 10 Gy. At the same dose, the increase in the cloudiness appeared with increasing concentration of 9G. As a result of the absorbance measurement, it was found that the dose response depended on the composition ratio between HEMA and 9G.

  11. Development and evaluation of a microprocessor-based ergonomic dosimeter for evaluating carpentry tasks.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, A; Warren, J; Teuschler, J; Dimov, M; Medvedovic, M; Lemasters, G

    1999-12-01

    This portable and self-contained lightweight microprocessor based Ergonomic Dosimeter is designed to collect continuously postural angles of the torso and the upper arm in the sagittal plane and the number of kneeling activities. Up to 4 h of task performance data can be stored in a non-volatile memory of the dosimeter, which can then be downloaded to a lap-top computer. The portable dosimeter was tested for test-retest reliability, compared with posture data obtained with a computer-based video analysis system and evaluated at a carpenter's apprentices school and at a construction site. The dosimeter was shown to be suitable for collecting posture and kneeling data for a prolonged period at construction sites.

  12. Novel composition of polymer gel dosimeters based on N-(Hydroxymethyl)acrylamide for radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basfar, Ahmed A.; Moftah, Belal; Rabaeh, Khalid A.; Almousa, Akram A.

    2015-07-01

    A new composition of polymer gel dosimeters is developed based on radiation induced polymerization of N-(Hydroxymethyl)acrylamide (NHMA) for radiotherapy treatment planning. The dosimeters were irradiated by 10 MV photon beam of a medical linear accelerator at a constant dose rate of 600 cGy/min with doses up to 20 Gy. The polymerization occurs and increases with increasing absorbed dose. The dose response of polymer gel dosimeters was studied using nuclear magnetic imaging (NMR) for relaxation rate (R2) of water proton. Dose rate, energy of radiation and the stability of the polymerization after irradiation were investigated. No appreciable effects of these parameters on the performance of the novel gel dosimeters were observed.

  13. NASA Crew Personal Active Dosimeters (CPADs): Leveraging Novel Terrestrial Personal Radiation Monitoring Capabilities for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitgab, Martin; Semones, Edward; Lee, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG) is developing novel Crew Personal Active Dosimeters (CAPDs) for upcoming crewed space exploration missions and beyond. To reduce the resource footprint of the project a COTS dosimeter base is used for the development of CPADs. This base was identified from evaluations of existing COTS personal dosimeters against the concept of operations of future crewed missions and tests against detection requirements for radiation characteristic of the space environment. CPADs exploit operations efficiencies from novel features for space flight personal dosimeters such as real-time dose feedback, and autonomous measuring and data transmission capabilities. Preliminary CPAD design, results of radiation testing and aspects of operational integration will be presented.

  14. Neutron Activation Foil and Thermoluminescent Dosimeter Responses to a Polyethylene Reflected Pulse of the CEA Valduc SILENE Critical Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Celik, Cihangir; McMahan, Kimberly L.; Lee, Yi-kang; Gagnier, Emmanuel; Authier, Nicolas; Piot, Jerome; Jacquet, Xavier; Rousseau, Guillaume; Reynolds, Kevin H.

    2016-09-01

    This benchmark experiment was conducted as a joint venture between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the French Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA). Staff at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the US and the Centre de Valduc in France planned this experiment. The experiment was conducted on October 19, 2010 in the SILENE critical assembly facility at Valduc. Several other organizations contributed to this experiment and the subsequent evaluation, including CEA Saclay, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Y-12 National Security Complex (NSC), Babcock International Group in the United Kingdom, and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this experiment was to measure neutron activation and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) doses from a source similar to a fissile solution critical excursion. The resulting benchmark can be used for validation of computer codes and nuclear data libraries as required when performing analysis of criticality accident alarm systems (CAASs). A secondary goal of this experiment was to qualitatively test performance of two CAAS detectors similar to those currently and formerly in use in some US DOE facilities. The detectors tested were the CIDAS MkX and the Rocky Flats NCD-91. The CIDAS detects gammas with a Geiger-Muller tube and the Rocky Flats detects neutrons via charged particles produced in a thin 6LiF disc depositing energy in a Si solid state detector. These detectors were being evaluated to determine whether they would alarm, so they were not expected to generate benchmark quality data.

  15. Neutron Activation Foil and Thermoluminescent Dosimeter Responses to a Lead Reflected Pulse of the CEA Valduc SILENE Critical Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Celik, Cihangir; Isbell, Kimberly McMahan; Lee, Yi-kang; Gagnier, Emmanuel; Authier, Nicolas; Piot, Jerome; Jacquet, Xavier; Rousseau, Guillaume; Reynolds, Kevin H.

    2016-09-01

    This benchmark experiment was conducted as a joint venture between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the French Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA). Staff at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the US and the Centre de Valduc in France planned this experiment. The experiment was conducted on October 13, 2010 in the SILENE critical assembly facility at Valduc. Several other organizations contributed to this experiment and the subsequent evaluation, including CEA Saclay, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Y-12 National Security Complex (NSC), Babcock International Group in the United Kingdom, and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this experiment was to measure neutron activation and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) doses from a source similar to a fissile solution critical excursion. The resulting benchmark can be used for validation of computer codes and nuclear data libraries as required when performing analysis of criticality accident alarm systems (CAASs). A secondary goal of this experiment was to qualitatively test performance of two CAAS detectors similar to those currently and formerly in use in some US DOE facilities. The detectors tested were the CIDAS MkX and the Rocky Flats NCD-91. The CIDAS detects gammas with a Geiger-Muller tube, and the Rocky Flats detects neutrons via charged particles produced in a thin 6LiF disc, depositing energy in a Si solid-state detector. These detectors were being evaluated to determine whether they would alarm, so they were not expected to generate benchmark quality data.

  16. [Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident and Tokaimura criticality accident].

    PubMed

    Takada, Jun

    2012-03-01

    It is clear from inspection of historical incidents that the scale of disasters in a nuclear power plant accident is quite low level overwhelmingly compared with a nuclear explosion in nuclear war. Two cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were destroyed by nuclear blast with about 20 kt TNT equivalent and then approximately 100,000 people have died respectively. On the other hand, the number of acute death is 30 in the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. In this chapter, we review health hazards and doses in two historical nuclear incidents of Chernobyl and Tokaimura criticality accident and then understand the feature of the radiation accident in peaceful utilization of nuclear power.

  17. Low-cost solar array project: Four absolute cavity radiometer (pyrheliometer) intercomparisons at New River, Arizona: Radiometer standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estey, R. S.; Seaman, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    Four detailed intercomparisons were made for a number of models of cavity-type self-calibrating radiometers (pyrheliometers). Each intercomparison consisted of simultaneous readings of pyrheliometers at 30-second intervals in runs of 10 minutes, with at least 15 runs per intercomparison. Twenty-seven instruments were in at least one intercomparison, and five were in all four. Summarized results and all raw data are provided from the intercomparisons.

  18. Performance of KCl:Eu2+ storage phosphor dosimeters for low-dose measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. Harold; Xiao, Zhiyan; Hansel, Rachael; Knutson, Nels; Yang, Deshan

    2013-06-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that europium doped potassium chloride (KCl:Eu2+) storage phosphor material has the potential to become the physical foundation of a novel and reusable dosimetry system using either film-like devices or devices similar to thermoluminescent dosimeter chips. The purposes of this work are to quantify the performance of KCl:Eu2+ prototype dosimeters for low-dose measurements and to demonstrate how it can be incorporated into clinical application for in vivo peripheral dose measurements. Pellet-style KCl:Eu2+ dosimeters, 6 mm in diameter, and 1 mm thick, were fabricated in-house for this study. The dosimeters were read using a laboratory photostimulated luminescence detection system. KCl:Eu2+ prototype storage phosphor dosimeter was capable of measuring a dose-to-water as low as 0.01 cGy from a 6 MV photon beam with a signal-to-noise ratio greater than 6. A pre-readout thermal annealing procedure enabled the dosimeter to be read within an hour post-irradiation. After receiving large accumulated doses (˜10 kGy), the dosimeters retained linear response in the low-dose region with only a 20% loss of sensitivity comparing to a fresh sample (zero Gy history). The energy dependence encountered during low-dose peripheral measurements could be accounted for via a single point outside-field calibration per each beam quality. With further development the KCl:Eu2+--based dosimeter could become a versatile and durable dosimetry tool with large dynamic range (sub-cGy to 100 Gy).

  19. Preliminary dose response study of a gel dosimeter using 2-Hydroxyethyl Methacrylate (HEMA).

    PubMed

    Trapp, J V; Leach, M O; Webb, S

    2005-09-01

    In this work we present a gel dosimeter based on 2-Hydroxyethyl Methacrylate (HEMA). The gel dosimeter is manufactured in normal atmospheric oxygen (normoxic) and undergoes a measurable change after irradiation. The gel is shown to provide a signal to noise ratio of up to at least 35 and have a linear change in transverse relaxation rate up to 70 Gy when measured with magnetic resonance imaging.

  20. Neutron Fading Characteristics of Copper Doped Lithium Fluoride (LiF: MCP) Thermoluminescent Dosimeters (TLDs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-21

    Fading Characteristics of Copper-Doped Lithium Fluoride (LiF: MCP) Thermoluminescent Dosimeters (TLDs)" Name of Candidate: L T Jeffrey A. Delzer Master...Lithium Fluoride Thermoluminescent Dosimeters beyond brief excerpts is with the permission of the copyright owner, and will save and hold harmless...Thesis: Author: Thesis directed by: ABSTRACT "Neutron Fading Characteristics of Copper-Doped Lithium Fluoride (LiF: MCP) Thermoluminescent

  1. Results of the NY-Alesund ozone measurements intercomparison NAOMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbrecht, W.; Gross, M.; McGee, T.; Neuber, R.; Gathen, P. V. D.; Wahl, P.; Klein, U.; Langer, J.

    1998-01-01

    Worldwide, about ten Differential Absorption Lidars are used for long-term monitoring of stratospheric ozone. These systems are an important component of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change. Although DIALs are self-calibrating in principle, regular intercomparisons with other ozone-lidars, microwave radiometers or ozone-sondes are highly desirable to ensure high data quality at a well known level. The Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC) validation policy suggests that such intercomparisons be "blind", meaning all participants submit their data to an impartial referee, without seeing results from the other participants. Here we report on the "blind" intercomparison taking place from January 20th to February 10th 1998 at Ny-Alesund, Spitsbergen (78.92 deg N, 11.95 deg E). Participating groups were from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Potsdam, operating the NDSC DIAL system at Ny-Alesund, from the University of Bremen operating the NDSC microwave radiometer for ozone profiling at Ny-Alesund, and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center group with the "NDSC travelling standard" STROZ-LITE. The first author acted as the impartial referee. Also used for the intercomparison were data from ECC-6A/Vaisala RS80 ozone sondes routinely launched at Ny-Alesund by the AWI group. A 1% KI solution (3 ml) and the 1986 ECC pump correction (1.092 at 5 hPa) are used. The ECC-data were available to all participants during the campaign and thus were not "blind". Table 1 summarizes the expected performance of the instruments participating in the ozone intercomparison reported in this paper.

  2. Dose evaluation in criticality accident conditions using transient critical facilities fueled with a fissile solution.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Tonoike, K; Miyoshi, Y

    2004-01-01

    Neutron dose measurement and evaluation techniques in criticality accident conditions using a thermo luminescence dosemeter (TLD) was studied at the Transient Experiment Critical Facility (TRACY) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). In the present approach, the absorbed dose is derived from the ambient dose equivalent measured with a TLD, using the appropriate conversion factor given by computation. Using this technique, the neutron dose around the SILENE reactor of the Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) of France was measured in the Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Exercise (June 10-21, 2002) organized by OECD/NEA and IRSN. In this exercise, the gamma dose was also measured with a TLD. In this report, measurements and evaluation results at TRACY and SILENE are presented.

  3. Characterization of a water-equivalent fiber-optic coupled dosimeter for use in diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Hyer, Daniel E; Fisher, Ryan F; Hintenlang, David E

    2009-05-01

    This work reports on the characterization of a new fiber-optic coupled (FOC) dosimeter for use in the diagnostic radiology energy range. The FOC dosimeter was constructed by coupling a small cylindrical plastic scintillator, 500 microm in diameter and 2 mm in length, to a 2 m long optical fiber, which acts as a light guide to transmit scintillation photons from the sensitive element to a photo-multiplier tube (PMT). A serial port interface on the PMT permits real-time monitoring of light output from the dosimeter via a custom computer program. The FOC dosimeter offered excellent sensitivity and reproducibility, allowing doses as low as 0.16 mGy to be measured with a coefficient of variation of only 3.64%. Dose linearity was also excellent with a correlation coefficient of 1.000 over exposures ranging from 0.16 to 57.29 mGy. The FOC dosimeter exhibited little angular dependence from axial irradiation, varying by less than 5% over an entire revolution. A positive energy dependence was observed and measurements performed within a scatter medium yielded a 10% variation in sensitivity as beam quality changed due to hardening and scatter across a 16 cm depth range. The current dosimetry system features an array of five PMTs to allow multiple FOC dosimeters to be monitored simultaneously. Overall, the system allows for rapid and accurate dose measurements relevant to a range of diagnostic imaging applications.

  4. Characterization of a Tissue-Equivalent Dosimeter based on CMOS Solid-State Photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Erik; Benton, Eric; Stapels, Christopher; Chrsitian, James; Jie Chen, Xiao

    Available digital dosimeters are bulky and unable to provide real-time monitoring of dose from space radiation. The complexity of space-flight design requires reliable, fault-tolerant equip-ment capable of providing real-time dosimetry during a mission, which is not feasible with the existing thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) technology, especially during extravehicular activity (EVA). Real-time monitoring is important for low-Earth orbiting spacecraft and inter-planetary space flight to alert the crew when Solar Particle Events (SPE) increase the particle flux of the spacecraft environment. A dosimeter-on-a-chip for personal dosimetry is comprised of a tissue-equivalent scintillator coupled to a solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM) built using CMOS technology. The radiation sensitive component of the dosimeter is coupled to analog signal processing components and a microprocessor, which can maintain processing fidelity up to 5x105 events per second. The dynamic range of the dosimeter has been verified from 1-GeV protons (0.22 keV/µm in H20) to 420 MeV/n Fe (201.1 keV/µm in H20). The dosimeter confirmed doses to within 3

  5. Small-Field Measurements of 3D Polymer Gel Dosimeters through Optical Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Cheng-Ting; Lee, Yao-Ting; Wu, Shin-Hua; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    With advances in therapeutic instruments and techniques, three-dimensional dose delivery has been widely used in radiotherapy. The verification of dose distribution in a small field becomes critical because of the obvious dose gradient within the field. The study investigates the dose distributions of various field sizes by using NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter. The dosimeter consists of 5% gelatin, 5% monomers, 3% cross linkers, and 5 mM THPC. After irradiation, a 24 to 96 hour delay was applied, and the gel dosimeters were read by a cone beam optical computed tomography (optical CT) scanner. The dose distributions measured by the NIPAM gel dosimeter were compared to the outputs of the treatment planning system using gamma evaluation. For the criteria of 3%/3 mm, the pass rates for 5 × 5, 3 × 3, 2 × 2, 1 × 1, and 0.5 × 0.5 cm2 were as high as 91.7%, 90.7%, 88.2%, 74.8%, and 37.3%, respectively. For the criteria of 5%/5 mm, the gamma pass rates of the 5 × 5, 3 × 3, and 2 × 2 cm2 fields were over 99%. The NIPAM gel dosimeter provides high chemical stability. With cone-beam optical CT readouts, the NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter has potential for clinical dose verification of small-field irradiation. PMID:26974434

  6. An investigation into the sensitivity of various albedo neutron dosimeters aimed at correcting the readings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, A. G.; Mokrov, Yu. V.; Morozova, S. V.

    2012-03-01

    The results of an experimental determination of the sensitivity of three types of individual neutron albedo dosimeters in neutron reference fields on the basis of radionuclide sources and at the top concrete shielding of the U-70 accelerator are presented. The results show that the ratios between the responses of the albedo dosimeters designed earlier at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (the albedo dosimeter (AD) and the multicomponent dosimeter (MD)) and the currently used DVGN-01 dosimeter are constant within 25% in a wide range of neutron energy. This fact makes it possible to use the results of measuring the AD and MD responses obtained earlier in neutron fields of nuclear-physical installations at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) for the correction of DVGN-01 dosimeter measurement results to apply it to personal radiation monitoring (PRM) at these installations. The correction factors for DVGN-01 measurement results are found and recommended to be used in PRM for most JINR installations.

  7. Characterization of a water-equivalent fiber-optic coupled dosimeter for use in diagnostic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, Daniel E.; Fisher, Ryan F.; Hintenlang, David E.

    2009-05-15

    This work reports on the characterization of a new fiber-optic coupled (FOC) dosimeter for use in the diagnostic radiology energy range. The FOC dosimeter was constructed by coupling a small cylindrical plastic scintillator, 500 {mu}m in diameter and 2 mm in length, to a 2 m long optical fiber, which acts as a light guide to transmit scintillation photons from the sensitive element to a photomultiplier tube (PMT). A serial port interface on the PMT permits real-time monitoring of light output from the dosimeter via a custom computer program. The FOC dosimeter offered excellent sensitivity and reproducibility, allowing doses as low as 0.16 mGy to be measured with a coefficient of variation of only 3.64%. Dose linearity was also excellent with a correlation coefficient of 1.000 over exposures ranging from 0.16 to 57.29 mGy. The FOC dosimeter exhibited little angular dependence from axial irradiation, varying by less than 5% over an entire revolution. A positive energy dependence was observed and measurements performed within a scatter medium yielded a 10% variation in sensitivity as beam quality changed due to hardening and scatter across a 16 cm depth range. The current dosimetry system features an array of five PMTs to allow multiple FOC dosimeters to be monitored simultaneously. Overall, the system allows for rapid and accurate dose measurements relevant to a range of diagnostic imaging applications.

  8. Preparation of polymer gel dosimeters based on less toxic monomers and gellan gum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroki, A.; Sato, Y.; Nagasawa, N.; Ohta, A.; Seito, H.; Yamabayashi, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Taguchi, M.; Tamada, M.; Kojima, T.

    2013-10-01

    New polymer gel dosimeters consisting of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), triethylene glycol monoethyl ether monomethacrylate (TGMEMA), polyethylene glycol 400 dimethacrylate (9G), tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride as an antioxidant, and gellan gum as a gel matrix were prepared. They were optically analyzed by measuring absorbance to evaluate a dose response. The absorbance of the polymer gel dosimeters that were exposed to 60Co γ-rays increased with increasing dose. The dosimeters comprising HEMA and 9G showed a linear increase in absorbance in the dose range from 0 to 10 Gy. The dose response depended on the 9G concentration. For others comprising HEMA, 9G and TGMEMA, the absorbance of the polymer gel dosimeters drastically increased above a certain dose, and then leveled off up to 10 Gy. The optical variations in these polymer gel dosimeters were also induced by x-irradiation from Cyberknife radiotherapy equipment. Furthermore, the exposed region of the latter polymer gel dosimeter exhibited a thermo-responsive behavior.

  9. Accidents associated with equipment.

    PubMed

    Heath, M L

    1984-01-01

    Serious accidents in which the possibility of equipment-related hazards are raised have been reported to the Scientific and Technical Branch of the Department of Health and Social Security. The author has examined anonymous summaries of 23 such reports of events which occurred over a 5-year period. The principle cause of catastrophe in seventeen of the incidents was user error involving disconnexion or misconnexion. Faulty systems of equipment management combined in some cases with inadequate pre-anaesthetic checking of apparatus were responsible for the other instances. Appropriate systems of equipment management and checking together with meticulous basic clinical monitoring are recommended as the best safeguards in anaesthetic practice.

  10. Characterization of a new radiochromic three-dimensional dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, P.Y.; Adamovics, J.A.; Oldham, M.

    2006-05-15

    The development of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has created a clear need for a dosimeter that can accurately and conveniently measure dose distributions in three dimensions to assure treatment quality. PRESAGE{sup TM} is a new three dimensional (3D) dosimetry material consisting of an optically clear polyurethane matrix, containing a leuco dye that exhibits a radiochromic response when exposed to ionizing radiation. A number of potential advantages accrue over other gel dosimeters, including insensitivity to oxygen, radiation induced light absorption contrast rather than scattering contrast, and a solid texture amenable to machining to a variety of shapes and sizes without the requirement of an external container. In this paper, we introduce an efficient method to investigate the basic properties of a 3D dosimetry material that exhibits an optical dose response. The method is applied here to study the key aspects of the optical dose response of PRESAGE{sup TM}: linearity, dose rate dependency, reproducibility, stability, spectral changes in absorption, and temperature effects. PRESAGE{sup TM} was prepared in 1x1x4.5 cm{sup 3} optical cuvettes for convenience and was irradiated by both photon and electron beams to different doses, dose rates, and energies. Longer PRESAGE{sup TM} columns (2 x2x13 cm{sup 3}) were formed without an external container, for measurements of photon and high energy electron depth-dose curves. A linear optical scanning technique was used to detect the depth distribution of radiation induced optical density (OD) change along the PRESAGE{sup TM} columns and cuvettes. Measured depth-OD curves were compared with percent depth dose (PDD). Results indicate that PRESAGE{sup TM} has a linear optical response to radiation dose (with a root mean square error of {approx}1%), little dependency on dose rate ({approx}2%), high intrabatch reproducibility (<2%), and can be stable ({approx}2%) during 2 hours to 2 days post irradiation. Accurate

  11. Characterization of a new radiochromic three-dimensional dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Guo, P Y; Adamovics, J A; Oldham, M

    2006-05-01

    The development of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has created a clear need for a dosimeter that can accurately and conveniently measure dose distributions in three dimensions to assure treatment quality. PRESAGE is a new three dimensional (3D) dosimetry material consisting of an optically clear polyurethane matrix, containing a leuco dye that exhibits a radiochromic response when exposed to ionizing radiation. A number of potential advantages accrue over other gel dosimeters, including insensitivity to oxygen, radiation induced light absorption contrast rather than scattering contrast, and a solid texture amenable to machining to a variety of shapes and sizes without the requirement of an external container. In this paper, we introduce an efficient method to investigate the basic properties of a 3D dosimetry material that exhibits an optical dose response. The method is applied here to study the key aspects of the optical dose response of PRESAGE: linearity, dose rate dependency, reproducibility, stability, spectral changes in absorption, and temperature effects. PRESAGE was prepared in 1 x 1 x 4.5 cm3 optical cuvettes for convenience and was irradiated by both photon and electron beams to different doses, dose rates, and energies. Longer PRESAGE columns (2 x 2 x 13 cm3) were formed without an external container, for measurements of photon and high energy electron depth-dose curves. A linear optical scanning technique was used to detect the depth distribution of radiation induced optical density (OD) change along the PRESAGE columns and cuvettes. Measured depth-OD curves were compared with percent depth dose (PDD). Results indicate that PRESAGE has a linear optical response to radiation dose (with a root mean square error of -1%), little dependency on dose rate (-2%), high intrabatch reproducibility (< 2%), and can be stable (-2%) during 2 hours to 2 days post irradiation. Accurate PRESAGE dosimetry requires temperature control within 1 degrees C

  12. An investigation of a PRESAGE® in vivo dosimeter for brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidovic, A. K.; Juang, T.; Meltsner, S.; Adamovics, J.; Chino, J.; Steffey, B.; Craciunescu, O.; Oldham, M.

    2014-07-01

    Determining accurate in vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy treatment with high dose gradients is challenging. Here we introduce, investigate, and characterize a novel in vivo dosimeter and readout technique with the potential to address this problem. A cylindrical (4 mm × 20 mm) tissue equivalent radiochromic dosimeter PRESAGE® in vivo (PRESAGE®-IV) is investigated. Two readout methods of the radiation induced change in optical density (OD) were investigated: (i) volume-averaged readout by spectrophotometer, and (ii) a line profile readout by 2D projection imaging utilizing a high-resolution (50 micron) telecentric optical system. Method (i) is considered the gold standard when applied to PRESAGE® in optical cuvettes. The feasibility of both methods was evaluated by comparison to standard measurements on PRESAGE® in optical cuvettes via spectrophotometer. An end-to-end feasibility study was performed by a side-by-side comparison with TLDs in an 192Ir HDR delivery. 7 and 8 Gy was delivered to PRESAGE®-IV and TLDs attached to the surface of a vaginal cylinder. Known geometry enabled direct comparison of measured dose with a commissioned treatment planning system. A high-resolution readout study under a steep dose gradient region showed 98.9% (5%/1 mm) agreement between PRESAGE®-IV and Gafchromic® EBT2 Film. Spectrometer measurements exhibited a linear dose response between 0-15 Gy with sensitivity of 0.0133 ± 0.0007 ΔOD/(Gy ṡ cm) at the 95% confidence interval. Method (ii) yielded a linear response with sensitivity of 0.0132 ± 0.0006 (ΔOD/Gy), within 2% of method (i). Method (i) has poor spatial resolution due to volume averaging. Method (ii) has higher resolution (˜1 mm) without loss of sensitivity or increased noise. Both readout methods are shown to be feasible. The end-to-end comparison revealed a 2.5% agreement between PRESAGE®-IV and treatment plan in regions of uniform high dose. PRESAGE®-IV shows promise for in vivo dose verification

  13. Validation of an "Intelligent Mouthguard" Single Event Head Impact Dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Adam; Samorezov, Sergey; Benzel, Edward; Miele, Vincent; Brett, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    Dating to Colonel John Paul Stapp MD in 1975, scientists have desired to measure live human head impacts with accuracy and precision. But no instrument exists to accurately and precisely quantify single head impact events. Our goal is to develop a practical single event head impact dosimeter known as "Intelligent Mouthguard" and quantify its performance on the benchtop, in vitro and in vivo. In the Intelligent Mouthguard hardware, limited gyroscope bandwidth requires an algorithm-based correction as a function of impact duration. After we apply gyroscope correction algorithm, Intelligent Mouthguard results at time of CG linear acceleration peak correlate to the Reference Hybrid III within our tested range of pulse durations and impact acceleration profiles in American football and Boxing in vitro tests: American football, IMG=1.00REF-1.1g, R2=0.99; maximum time of peak XYZ component imprecision 3.6g and 370 rad/s2; maximum time of peak azimuth and elevation imprecision 4.8° and 2.9°; maximum average XYZ component temporal imprecision 3.3g and 390 rad/s2. Boxing, IMG=1.00REF-0.9 g, R2=0.99, R2=0.98; maximum time of peak XYZ component imprecision 3.9 g and 390 rad/s2, maximum time of peak azimuth and elevation imprecision 2.9° and 2.1°; average XYZ component temporal imprecision 4.0 g and 440 rad/s2. In vivo Intelligent Mouthguard true positive head impacts from American football players and amateur boxers have temporal characteristics (first harmonic frequency from 35 Hz to 79 Hz) within our tested benchtop (first harmonic frequency<180 Hz) and in vitro (first harmonic frequency<100 Hz) ranges. Our conclusions apply only to situations where the rigid body assumption is valid, sensor-skull coupling is maintained and the ranges of tested parameters and harmonics fall within the boundaries of harmonics validated in vitro. For these situations, Intelligent Mouthguard qualifies as a single event dosimeter in American football and Boxing.

  14. Development of a wavelength-separated type scintillator with optical fiber (SOF) dosimeter to compensate for the Cerenkov radiation effect

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Nagase, Naomi; Matsuura, Taeko; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Miyamoto, Naoki; Sutherland, Kenneth Lee; Fujita, Katsuhisa; Shirato, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    The scintillator with optical fiber (SOF) dosimeter consists of a miniature scintillator mounted on the tip of an optical fiber. The scintillator of the current SOF dosimeter is a 1-mm diameter hemisphere. For a scintillation dosimeter coupled with an optical fiber, measurement accuracy is influenced by signals due to Cerenkov radiation in the optical fiber. We have implemented a spectral filtering technique for compensating for the Cerenkov radiation effect specifically for our plastic scintillator-based dosimeter, using a wavelength-separated counting method. A dichroic mirror was used for separating input light signals. Individual signal counting was performed for high- and low-wavelength light signals. To confirm the accuracy, measurements with various amounts of Cerenkov radiation were performed by changing the incident direction while keeping the Ir-192 source-to-dosimeter distance constant, resulting in a fluctuation of <5%. Optical fiber bending was also addressed; no bending effect was observed for our wavelength-separated SOF dosimeter. PMID:25618136

  15. Development of a wavelength-separated type scintillator with optical fiber (SOF) dosimeter to compensate for the Cerenkov radiation effect.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Nagase, Naomi; Matsuura, Taeko; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Miyamoto, Naoki; Sutherland, Kenneth Lee; Fujita, Katsuhisa; Shirato, Hiroki

    2015-03-01

    The scintillator with optical fiber (SOF) dosimeter consists of a miniature scintillator mounted on the tip of an optical fiber. The scintillator of the current SOF dosimeter is a 1-mm diameter hemisphere. For a scintillation dosimeter coupled with an optical fiber, measurement accuracy is influenced by signals due to Cerenkov radiation in the optical fiber. We have implemented a spectral filtering technique for compensating for the Cerenkov radiation effect specifically for our plastic scintillator-based dosimeter, using a wavelength-separated counting method. A dichroic mirror was used for separating input light signals. Individual signal counting was performed for high- and low-wavelength light signals. To confirm the accuracy, measurements with various amounts of Cerenkov radiation were performed by changing the incident direction while keeping the Ir-192 source-to-dosimeter distance constant, resulting in a fluctuation of <5%. Optical fiber bending was also addressed; no bending effect was observed for our wavelength-separated SOF dosimeter.

  16. Radiation accident grips Goiania

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, L.

    1987-11-20

    On 13 September two young scavengers in Goiania, Brazil, removed a stainless steel cylinder from a cancer therapy machine in an abandoned clinic, touching off a radiation accident second only to Chernobyl in its severity. On 18 September they sold the cylinder, the size of a 1-gallon paint can, to a scrap dealer for $25. At the junk yard an employee dismantled the cylinder and pried open the platinum capsule inside to reveal a glowing blue salt-like substance - 1400 curies of cesium-137. Fascinated by the luminescent powder, several people took it home with them. Some children reportedly rubbed in on their bodies like carnival glitter - an eerie image of how wrong things can go when vigilance over radioactive materials lapses. In all, 244 people in Goiania, a city of 1 million in central Brazil, were contaminated. The eventual toll, in terms of cancer or genetic defects, cannot yet be estimated. Parts of the city are cordoned off as radiation teams continue washing down buildings and scooping up radioactive soil. The government is also grappling with the political fallout from the accident.

  17. Feasibility Study of Glass Dosimeter for In Vivo Measurement: Dosimetric Characterization and Clinical Application in Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rah, Jeong-Eun; Oh, Do Hoon; Kim, Jong Won; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Suh, Tae-Suk; Ji, Young Hoon; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Kim, Dae Yong; Park, Sung Yong

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the suitability of the GD-301 glass dosimeter for in vivo dose verification in proton therapy. Methods and Materials: The glass dosimeter was analyzed for its dosimetrics characteristic in proton beam. Dosimeters were calibrated in a water phantom using a stairlike holder specially designed for this study. To determine the accuracy of the glass dosimeter in proton dose measurements, we compared the glass dosimeter and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) dose measurements using a cylindrical phantom. We investigated the feasibility of the glass dosimeter for the measurement of dose distributions near the superficial region for proton therapy plans with a varying separation between the target volume and the surface of 6 patients. Results and Discussion: Uniformity was within 1.5%. The dose-response has good linearity. Dose-rate, fading, and energy dependence were found to be within 3%. The beam profile measured using the glass dosimeter was in good agreement with the profile obtained from the ionization chamber. Depth-dose distributions in nonmodulated and modulated proton beams obtained with the glass dosimeter were estimated to be within 3%, which was lower than those with the ionization chamber. In the phantom study, the difference of isocenter dose between the delivery dose calculated by the treatment planning system and that measured by the glass dosimeter was within 5%. With in vivo dosimetry, the calculated surface doses overestimated measurements by 4%-16% using glass dosimeter and TLD. Conclusion: It is recommended that bolus be added for these clinical cases. We also believe that the glass dosimeter has considerable potential for use with in vivo patient proton dosimetry.

  18. A CCD-based γ-ray dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, E. J.; Royle, G. J.; Mooney, M. J.; Speller, R. D.

    2001-02-01

    This paper investigates the use of charged coupled devices (CCDs) for personal γ-ray dosimetry. Personal dosimeters require high sensitivity to the photon energies likely to be encountered and a sensitivity response across a wide dose rate range, particularly at low dose rates. The principal advantages of CCDs for this application are two-fold: sensitivity at low dose rates due to low-noise operation and a wide dynamic range. Preliminary experimental measurements have been performed on a standard buried channel CCD using a range of isotope sources. One half of the sensor was coated with a 100 μm thick layer of caesium iodide. It is proposed that the differing properties of the two halves of the sensor increases its range for personal dosimetry. Deposition of scintillator coatings of various thicknesses across the surface of the sensor should provide sensitivity to a wide energy range. The results demonstrated that the device has potential for this application. A linear dose rate response was observed over the dose rate range 0.08-35 μSv h -1. It was found that the uncoated side of the sensor demonstrated better response at low dose rates and a better energy response. Whereas the scintillator coated side would improve the detection efficiency at energies beyond 60 keV.

  19. Study of Fricke gel dosimeter response for different gel quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavinato, C. C.; Campos, L. L.

    2010-11-01

    The Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) dosimeter has been studied for application in radiotherapy because it is capable of to measure the spatial distribution of radiation doses. The dosimetry is based on the oxidation of ferrous (Fe2+) to ferric (Fe3+) ions radiation induced, related to the radiation dose. The gel material usually employed is the 300 Bloom gelatin, which is imported and very expensive in Brazil. Aiming to analyze the viability of to use a locally produced and low cost gel material, in this work the spectrophotometric responses of FXG solutions prepared using 270 Bloom gelatin commercially available and 300 Bloom gelatin imported were compared. The absorption spectra of solutions prepared with 5% by weight 270 and 300 Bloom gelatins non-irradiated and irradiated with 60Co gamma radiation in the dose range between 0.5 and 100 Gy were analysed, the dose-response curves were evaluated and the useful dose range was established. The obtained results indicate that the FXG solution prepared with 270 Bloom gelatin presents good performance, similar to that presented by the FXG solution prepared with 300 Bloom gelatin and its use can be recommended owing to the low cost and the availability in local market.

  20. Production of element correction factors for thermoluminescent dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Plato, P.; Miklos, J.

    1985-11-01

    Approximately 80 processors of personal dosimetry in the United States use thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). Recent demands that dosimetry processors be able to measure radiation doses to within +/- 50% of the correct value have focused attention on the reproducibility of the TL elements within each TLD. The phosphors for these TLDs are manufactured by three companies. A dosimetry processor faces three options concerning the quality of the TL elements purchased; trust the supplier's quality control program, screen new TL elements and discard those that are extremely bad, or use element correction factors (ECFs). The first option results in dosimetry processors failing the +/- 50% accuracy requirement due to excessive variability among the TL elements. The second option still permits large precision errors that come close to the +/- 50% accuracy requirement. This paper advocates the third option and presents a 10-step procedure to produce ECFs. The procedure ensures that the ECFs represent only variations among the TL elements and not variations caused by stability problems with the TLD reader. Following is an example of ECF production for 3000 TLDs.

  1. Spectral discrimination of Cerenkov radiation in scintillating dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Frelin, A M; Fontbonne, J M; Ban, G; Colin, J; Labalme, M; Batalla, A; Isambert, A; Vela, A; Leroux, T

    2005-09-01

    Radiation therapy accelerators require highly accurate dose deposition and the output must be monitored frequently and regularly. Ionization chambers are the primary tool for this control, but their size, their high voltage needed, and the correction needed for electrons make them unsuitable for use during patient treatment. We have developed a small (1-mm-diam and 1-mm-long active part), flexible, and water-equivalent dosimeter. It is suitable for photon and electron beams without corrections, and performs on line dose measurements. This detector is based on only one scintillating fiber and a CCD camera. A new signal processing is used to remove the effect of Cerenkov radiation background, which only requires a preliminary calibration. Central-axis depth-dose distribution comparisons have been achieved with standard ionization chambers, over a range from 8 to 25 MV photons and from 6 to 21 MeV electrons in order to validate this calibration. Results show a very good agreement, with less than 1% difference between the two detectors.

  2. Dose measurements in intraoral radiography using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorín, C.; Azorín, J.; Aguirre, F.; Rivera, T.

    2015-01-01

    The use of X-ray in medicine demands to expose the patient and the professional to the lowest radiation doses available in agreement with ALARA philosophy. The reference level for intraoral dental radiography is 7 mGy and, in Mexico, a number of examinations of this type are performed annually. It is considered that approximately 25% of all the X-rays examinations carried out in our country correspond to intraoral radiographies. In other hand, most of the intraoral X-ray equipment correspond to conventional radiological systems using film, which are developed as much manual as automatically. In this work the results of determining the doses received by the patients in intraoral radiological examinations made with different radiological systems using LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE thermoluminescent dosimeters are presented. In some conventional radiological systems using film, when films are developed manual or automatically, incident kerma up to 10.61 ± 0.74 mGv were determined. These values exceed that reference level suggested by the IAEA and in the Mexican standards for intraoral examinations.

  3. Intercomparison measurements with energy deposition spectrometer Liulin and TEPC Hawk at HIMAC, and related calculations with PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploc, Ondrej; Uchihori, Yukio; Kitamura, H.; Kodaira, S.; Dachev, Tsvetan; Spurny, Frantisek; Jadrnickova, Iva; Mrazova, Zlata; Kubancak, Jan

    Liulin type detectors are recently used in a wide range of cosmic radiation measurements, e.g. at alpine observatories, onboard aircrafts and spacecrafts. They provide energy deposition spectra up to 21 MeV, higher energy deposition events are stored in the last (overflow) channel. Their main advantages are portability (about the same size as a pack of cigarettes) and ability to record spectra as a function of time, so they can be used as personal dosimeters. Their well-known limitations are: (i) the fact that they are not tissue equivalent, (ii) they can be used as LET spectrometer only under specific conditions (e.g. broad parallel beam), and (iii) that the energy deposition event from particles of LETH20¿35 keV/µm is stored in the overflow bin only so the spectral information is missing. Tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) Hawk has no of these limitations but on the other hand, it cannot be used as personal dosimeter because of its big size (cylinder of 16 cm diameter and 34 cm long). An important fraction of dose equivalent onboard spacecrafts is caused by heavy ions. This contribution presents results from intercomparison measurements with Liulin and Hawk at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) and cyclotron beams, and related calculations with PHITS (Particle and Heavy-ion Transport code System). Following particles/ions and energies were used: protons 70 MeV, He 150 MeV, Ne 400 MeV, C 135 MeV, C 290 MeV, and Fe 500 MeV. Calculations of LET spectra by PHITS were performed for both, Liulin and Hawk. In case of Liulin, the dose equivalent was calculated using simulations in which several tissue equivalent materials were used as active volume instead of the silicon diode. Dose equivalents calculated in such way was compared with that measured with Hawk. LET spectra measured with Liulin and Hawk were compared for each ion at several points behind binary filters along the Brag curve. Good agreement was observed for some configurations; for

  4. Entrance surface dose measurements using a small OSL dosimeter with a computed tomography scanner having 320 rows of detectors.

    PubMed

    Takegami, Kazuki; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Yamada, Kenji; Mihara, Yoshiki; Kimoto, Natsumi; Kanazawa, Yuki; Higashino, Kousaku; Yamashita, Kazuta; Hayashi, Fumio; Okazaki, Tohru; Hashizume, Takuya; Kobayashi, Ikuo

    2017-03-01

    Entrance surface dose (ESD) measurements are important in X-ray computed tomography (CT) for examination, but in clinical settings it is difficult to measure ESDs because of a lack of suitable dosimeters. We focus on the capability of a small optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter. The aim of this study is to propose a practical method for using an OSL dosimeter to measure the ESD when performing a CT examination. The small OSL dosimeter has an outer width of 10 mm; it is assumed that a partial dose may be measured because the slice thickness and helical pitch can be set to various values. To verify our method, we used a CT scanner having 320 rows of detectors and checked the consistencies of the ESDs measured using OSL dosimeters by comparing them with those measured using Gafchromic™ films. The films were calibrated using an ionization chamber on the basis of half-value layer estimation. On the other hand, the OSL dosimeter was appropriately calibrated using a practical calibration curve previously proposed by our group. The ESDs measured using the OSL dosimeters were in good agreement with the reference ESDs from the Gafchromic™ films. Using these data, we also estimated the uncertainty of ESDs measured with small OSL dosimeters. We concluded that a small OSL dosimeter can be considered suitable for measuring the ESD with an uncertainty of 30 % during CT examinations in which pitch factors below 1.000 are applied.

  5. German aircraft accident statistics, 1930

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitzmann, Ludwig

    1932-01-01

    The investigation of all serious accidents, involving technical defects in the airplane or engine, is undertaken by the D.V.L. in conjunction with the imperial traffic minister and other interested parties. All accidents not clearly explained in the reports are subsequently cleared up.

  6. Weather types and traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Klaić, Z B

    2001-06-01

    Traffic accident data for the Zagreb area for the 1981-1982 period were analyzed to investigate possible relationships between the daily number of accidents and the weather conditions that occurred for the 5 consecutive days, starting two days before the particular day. In the statistical analysis of low accident days weather type classification developed by Poje was used. For the high accident days a detailed analyses of surface and radiosonde data were performed in order to identify possible front passages. A test for independence by contingency table confirmed that conditional probability of the day with small number of accidents is the highest, provided that one day after it "N" or "NW" weather types occur, while it is the smallest for "N1" and "Bc" types. For the remaining 4 days of the examined periods dependence was not statistically confirmed. However, northern ("N", "NE" and "NW") and anticyclonic ("Vc", "V4", "V3", "V2" and "mv") weather types predominated during 5-days intervals related to the days with small number of accidents. On the contrary, the weather types with cyclonic characteristics ("N1", "N2", "N3", "Bc", "Dol1" and "Dol"), that are generally accompanied by fronts, were the rarest. For 85% days with large number of accidents, which had not been caused by objective circumstances (such as poor visibility, damaged or slippery road etc.), at least one front passage was recorded during the 3-days period, starting one day before the day with large number of accidents.

  7. First Responders and Criticality Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Valerie L. Putman; Douglas M. Minnema

    2005-11-01

    Nuclear criticality accident descriptions typically include, but do not focus on, information useful to first responders. We studied these accidents, noting characteristics to help (1) first responders prepare for such an event and (2) emergency drill planners develop appropriate simulations for training. We also provide recommendations to help people prepare for such events in the future.

  8. SU-E-T-368: Effect of a Strong Magnetic Field On Select Radiation Dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, M; Wen, Z; Tailor, R; Sawakuchi, G; Flint, D; Beddar, S; Ibbott, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of a strong magnetic field on TLD-100, OSLD (Al{sub 2}O{sub 2}:C), and PRESAGE dosimetry devices. This study will help to determine which types of dosimeters can be used for quality assurance and in-vivo dosimetry measurements in a magnetic resonance imaginglinear accelerator (MRI-linac) system. Methods: The dosimeters were separated into two categories which were either exposed or not exposed to a strong magnetic field. In each category a set of dosimeters was irradiated with 0, 2, or 6 Gy. To expose the dosimeters to a magnetic field the samples in that category were place in a Bruker small animal magnetic resonance scanner at a field strength slightly greater than 2.5 T for at least 1 hour preirradiation and at least 1 hour post-irradiation. Irradiations were performed with a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian TrueBeam linac with 10×10 cm{sup 2} field at a 600 MU/min dose rate. The samples that received no radiation dose were used as control detectors. Results: The readouts of the dosimeters which were not exposed to a strong magnetic field were compared with the measurements of the dosimetry devices which were exposed to a magnetic field. No significant differences (less than 2% difference) in the performance of TLD, OSLD, or PRESAGE dosimeters due to exposure to a strong magnetic field were observed. Conclusion: Exposure to a strong magnetic field before and after irradiation does not appear to change the dosimetric properties of TLD, OSLD, or PRESAGE which indicates that these dosimeters have potential for use in quality assurance and in-vivo dosimetry in a MRI-linac. We plan to further test the effect of magnetic fields on these devices by irradiating them in the presence of a magnetic fields similar to those produced by a MRI-linac system. Elekta-MD Anderson Cancer Center Research Agreement.

  9. Study of a non-diffusing radiochromic gel dosimeter for 3D radiation dose imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Craig Michael

    2000-12-01

    This thesis investigates the potential of a new radiation gel dosimeter, based on nitro-blue tetrazolium (NBTZ) suspended in a gelatin mold. Unlike all Fricke based gel dosimeters this dosimeter does not suffer from diffusive loss of image stability. Images are obtained by an optical tomography method. Nitro blue tetrazolium is a common biological indicator that when irradiated in an aqueous medium undergoes reduction to a highly colored formazan, which has an absorbance maximum at 525nm. Tetrazolium is water soluble while the formazan product is insoluble. The formazan product sticks to the gelatin matrix and the dose image is maintained for three months. Methods to maximize the sensitivity of the system were evaluated. It was found that a chemical detergent, Triton X-100, in combination with sodium formate, increased the dosimeter sensitivity significantly. An initial G-value of formazan production for a dosimeter composed of 1mM NBTZ, gelatin, and water was on the order of 0.2. The addition of Triton and formate produced a G-value in excess of 5.0. The effects of NBTZ, triton, formate, and gel concentration were all investigated. All the gels provided linear dose vs. absorbance plots for doses from 0 to >100 Gy. It was determined that gel concentration had minimal if any effect on sensitivity. Sensitivity increased slightly with increasing NBTZ concentration. Triton and formate individually and together provided moderate to large increases in dosimeter sensitivity. The dosimeter described in this work can provide stable 3D radiation dose images for all modalities of radiation therapy equipment. Methods to increase sensitivity are developed and discussed.

  10. Industrial accidents triggered by lightning.

    PubMed

    Renni, Elisabetta; Krausmann, Elisabeth; Cozzani, Valerio

    2010-12-15

    Natural disasters can cause major accidents in chemical facilities where they can lead to the release of hazardous materials which in turn can result in fires, explosions or toxic dispersion. Lightning strikes are the most frequent cause of major accidents triggered by natural events. In order to contribute towards the development of a quantitative approach for assessing lightning risk at industrial facilities, lightning-triggered accident case histories were retrieved from the major industrial accident databases and analysed to extract information on types of vulnerable equipment, failure dynamics and damage states, as well as on the final consequences of the event. The most vulnerable category of equipment is storage tanks. Lightning damage is incurred by immediate ignition, electrical and electronic systems failure or structural damage with subsequent release. Toxic releases and tank fires tend to be the most common scenarios associated with lightning strikes. Oil, diesel and gasoline are the substances most frequently released during lightning-triggered Natech accidents.

  11. Spectroradiometer Intercomparison and Impact on Characterizing Photovoltaic Device Performance: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, E.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

    2014-11-01

    Indoor and outdoor testing of photovoltaic (PV) device performance requires the use of solar simulators and natural solar radiation, respectively. This performance characterization requires accurate knowledge of spectral irradiance distribution that is incident on the devices. Spectroradiometers are used to measure the spectral distribution of solar simulators and solar radiation. On September 17, 2013, a global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers was organized by the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This paper presents highlights of the results of this first intercomparison, which will help to decrease systematic inter-laboratory differences in the measurements of the outputs or efficiencies of PV devices and harmonize laboratory experimental procedures.

  12. Intercomparison of TCCON and MUSICA Water Vapour Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, D.; Strong, K.; Deutscher, N. M.; Schneider, M.; Blumenstock, T.; Robinson, J.; Notholt, J.; Sherlock, V.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Barthlott, S.; García, O. E.; Smale, D.; Palm, M.; Jones, N. B.; Hase, F.; Kivi, R.; Ramos, Y. G.; Yoshimura, K.; Sepúlveda, E.; Gómez-Peláez, Á. J.; Gisi, M.; Kohlhepp, R.; Warneke, T.; Dohe, S.; Wiegele, A.; Christner, E.; Lejeune, B.; Demoulin, P.

    2014-12-01

    We present an intercomparison between the water vapour products from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and the MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water (MUSICA), two datasets from ground-based Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometers with good global representation. Where possible, comparisons to radiosondes are also included. The near-infrared TCCON measurements are optimized to provide precise monitoring of greenhouse gases for carbon cycle studies; however, TCCON's retrievals also produce water vapour products. The mid-infrared MUSICA products result from retrievals optimized to give precise and accurate information about H2O, HDO, and δD. The MUSICA water vapour products have been validated by extensive intercomparisons with H2O and δD in-situ measurements made from ground, radiosonde, and aircraft (Schneider et al. 2012, 2014), as well as by intercomparisons with satellite-based H2O and δD remote sensing measurements (Wiegele et al., 2014). This dataset provides a valuable reference point for other measurements of water vapour. This study is motivated by the limited intercomparisons performed for TCCON water vapour products and limited characterisation of their uncertainties. We compare MUSICA and TCCON products to assess the potential for TCCON measurements to contribute to studies of the water cycle, water vapour's role in climate and use as a tracer for atmospheric dynamics, and to evaluate the performance of climate models. The TCCON and MUSICA products result from measurements taken using the same FTIR instruments, enabling a comparison with constant instrumentation. The retrieval techniques differ, however, in their method and a priori information. We assess the impact of these differences and characterize the comparability of the TCCON and MUSICA datasets.

  13. An Intercomparison of Airborne VOC and PAN Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Flocke, F.; Weinheimer, A.; Fall, R.; Goldan, P.; Hübler, G.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2002-12-01

    As part of the Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS 2000) an informal airborne intercomparison has been conducted to evaluate the state-of-the-art of fast-response, in-situ methods for analyzing Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN). Instrumentation included a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS), the Tropospheric Airborne Chromatograph for Oxy-hydrocarbons and Hydrocarbons (TACOH) and a gas chromatograph for PAN detection using electron capture (GC/ECD). The measurements were made in the Greater Houston area and East Texas in August/September 2000 during 13 flights with the NSF/NCAR ELECTRA aircraft. The intercomparison was conducted mainly in the boundary layer but included some encounters with air masses from the free troposphere. Final results from the intercomparison show that measurements of acetaldehyde, isoprene, the sum\\textsuperscript{*} of acetone and propanal, the sum\\textsuperscript{*} methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein (\\textsuperscript{*} PTR-MS does not distinguish between isobaric species) and toluene agree very well. Poor agreement was achieved in the case of methanol and the underlying sensitivity problem in the PTR-MS or TACOH system is under investigation. The results of the PAN intercomparison indicate that the PTR-MS technique suffered from an interference most likely associated with the presence of peracetic acid in photochemically aged air. If this interfering signal was traced by periodically inserting a selective PAN scrubber (thermal decomposition) into the sample air stream and subtracted from the original signal, the corrected PTR-MS PAN data are in very good agreement with the GC/ECD results.

  14. Transport aircraft accident dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cominsky, A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was carried out of 112 impact survivable jet transport aircraft accidents (world wide) of 27,700 kg (60,000 lb.) aircraft and up extending over the last 20 years. This study centered on the effect of impact and the follow-on events on aircraft structures and was confined to the approach, landing and takeoff segments of the flight. The significant characteristics, frequency of occurrence and the effect on the occupants of the above data base were studied and categorized with a view to establishing typical impact scenarios for use as a basis of verifying the effectiveness of potential safety concepts. Studies were also carried out of related subjects such as: (1) assessment of advanced materials; (2) human tolerance to impact; (3) merit functions for safety concepts; and (4) impact analysis and test methods.

  15. SECOND LATIN AMERICAN INTERCOMPARISON ON INTERNAL DOSE ASSESSMENT.

    PubMed

    Rojo, A; Puerta, N; Gossio, S; Gómez Parada, I; Cruz Suarez, R; López, E; Medina, C; Lastra Boylan, J; Pinheiro Ramos, M; Mora Ramírez, E; Alves Dos Reis, A; Yánez, H; Rubio, J; Vironneau Janicek, L; Somarriba Vanegas, F; Puerta Ortiz, J; Salas Ramírez, M; López Bejerano, G; da Silva, T; Miri Oliveira, C; Terán, M; Alfaro, M; García, T; Angeles, A; Duré Romero, E; Farias de Lima, F

    2016-09-01

    Internal dosimetry intercomparisons are essential for the verification of applied models and the consistency of results'. To that aim, the First Regional Intercomparison was organised in 2005, and that results led to the Second Regional Intercomparison Exercise in 2013, which was organised in the frame of the RLA 9/066 and coordinated by Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear of Argentina. Four simulated cases covering intakes of (131)I, (137)Cs and Tritium were proposed. Ninteen centres from thirteen different countries participated in this exercise. This paper analyses the participants' results in this second exercise in order to test their skills and acquired knowledge, particularly in the application of the IDEAS Guidelines. It is important to highlight the increased number of countries that participated in this exercise compared with the first one and, furthermore, the improvement in the overall performance. The impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Projects since 2003 has led to a significant enhancement of internal dosimetry capabilities that strengthen the radiation protection of workers.

  16. EARLINET instrument intercomparison campaigns: overview on strategy and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandinger, Ulla; Freudenthaler, Volker; Baars, Holger; Amodeo, Aldo; Engelmann, Ronny; Mattis, Ina; Groß, Silke; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Giunta, Aldo; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Osipenko, Fiodor; Slesar, Alexander; Nicolae, Doina; Belegante, Livio; Talianu, Camelia; Serikov, Ilya; Linné, Holger; Jansen, Friedhelm; Apituley, Arnoud; Wilson, Keith M.; de Graaf, Martin; Trickl, Thomas; Giehl, Helmut; Adam, Mariana; Comerón, Adolfo; Muñoz-Porcar, Constantino; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Sicard, Michaël; Tomás, Sergio; Lange, Diego; Kumar, Dhiraj; Pujadas, Manuel; Molero, Francisco; Fernández, Alfonso J.; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Bravo-Aranda, Juan Antonio; Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; José Granados-Muñoz, María; Preißler, Jana; Wagner, Frank; Gausa, Michael; Grigorov, Ivan; Stoyanov, Dimitar; Iarlori, Marco; Rizi, Vincenco; Spinelli, Nicola; Boselli, Antonella; Wang, Xuan; Lo Feudo, Teresa; Perrone, Maria Rita; De Tomasi, Ferdinando; Burlizzi, Pasquale

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces the recent European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) quality-assurance efforts at instrument level. Within two dedicated campaigns and five single-site intercomparison activities, 21 EARLINET systems from 18 EARLINET stations were intercompared between 2009 and 2013. A comprehensive strategy for campaign setup and data evaluation has been established. Eleven systems from nine EARLINET stations participated in the EARLINET Lidar Intercomparison 2009 (EARLI09). In this campaign, three reference systems were qualified which served as traveling standards thereafter. EARLINET systems from nine other stations have been compared against these reference systems since 2009. We present and discuss comparisons at signal and at product level from all campaigns for more than 100 individual measurement channels at the wavelengths of 355, 387, 532, and 607 nm. It is shown that in most cases, a very good agreement of the compared systems with the respective reference is obtained. Mean signal deviations in predefined height ranges are typically below ±2 %. Particle backscatter and extinction coefficients agree within ±2 × 10-4 km-1 sr-1 and ± 0.01 km-1, respectively, in most cases. For systems or channels that showed larger discrepancies, an in-depth analysis of deficiencies was performed and technical solutions and upgrades were proposed and realized. The intercomparisons have reinforced confidence in the EARLINET data quality and allowed us to draw conclusions on necessary system improvements for some instruments and to identify major challenges that need to be tackled in the future.

  17. EARLINET instrument intercomparison campaigns: overview on strategy and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandinger, U.; Freudenthaler, V.; Baars, H.; Amodeo, A.; Engelmann, R.; Mattis, I.; Groß, S.; Pappalardo, G.; Giunta, A.; D'Amico, G.; Chaikovsky, A.; Osipenko, F.; Slesar, A.; Nicolae, D.; Belegante, L.; Talianu, C.; Serikov, I.; Linné, H.; Jansen, F.; Apituley, A.; Wilson, K. M.; de Graaf, M.; Trickl, T.; Giehl, H.; Adam, M.; Comerón, A.; Muñoz, C.; Rocadenbosch, F.; Sicard, M.; Tomás, S.; Lange, D.; Kumar, D.; Pujadas, M.; Molero, F.; Fernández, A. J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Navas-Guzmán, F.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Preißler, J.; Wagner, F.; Gausa, M.; Grigorov, I.; Stoyanov, D.; Iarlori, M.; Rizi, V.; Spinelli, N.; Boselli, A.; Wang, X.; Lo Feudo, T.; Perrone, M. R.; De Tomasi, F.; Burlizzi, P.

    2015-10-01

    This paper introduces the recent EARLINET quality-assurance efforts at instrument level. Within two dedicated campaigns and five single-site intercomparison activities 21 EARLINET systems from 18 EARLINET stations were intercompared between 2009 and 2013. A comprehensive strategy for campaign setup and data evaluation has been established. Eleven systems from nine EARLINET stations participated in the EARLINET Lidar Intercomparison 2009 (EARLI09). In this campaign, three reference systems were qualified which served as traveling standards thereafter. EARLINET systems from nine other stations have been compared against these reference systems since 2009. We present and discuss comparisons at signal and at product level from all campaigns for more than 100 individual measurement channels at the wavelengths of 355, 387, 532 and 607 nm. It is shown that in most cases a very good agreement of the compared systems with the respective reference is obtained. Mean signal deviations in pre-defined height ranges are typically below ±2 %. Particle backscatter and extinction coefficients agree within ±2 × 10-4 km-1 sr-1 and ± 0.01 km-1, respectively, in most cases. For systems or channels that showed larger discrepancies, an in-depth analysis of deficiences was performed and technical solutions and upgrades were proposed and realized. The intercomparisons have reinforced the confidence in the EARLINET data quality and allowed us to draw conclusions on necessary system improvements for some instruments and to identify major challenges that need to be tackled in the future.

  18. Inter-comparison between AIRS and IASI through Retrieved Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Smith, William L.; Taylor, Jonathan P.; Schluessel, Peter; Strow, L. Larrabee; Mango, Steve

    2008-01-01

    A State-of-the-art retrieval algorithm dealing with all-weather conditions has been applied to satellite/aircraft instruments retrieving cloud/surface and atmospheric conditions. High quality retrievals have been achieved from IASI data. Surface, cloud, and atmospheric structure and variation are well captured by IASI measurements and/or retrievals. The same retrieval algorithm is also applied to AIRS for retrieval inter-comparison. Both AIRS and IASI have a similar FOV size but AIRS has a higher horizontal resolution. AIRS data can be interpolated to IASI horizontal resolution for inter-comparison at the same geophysical locations, however a temporal variation between AIRS and IASI observations need to be considered. JAIVEx has employed aircraft to obtain the atmospheric variation filling the temporal gap between two satellites. First results show that both AIRS and IASI have a very similar vertical resolving power, atmospheric conditions are well captured by both instruments, and radiances are well calibrated. AIRS data shown in retrievals (e.g., surface emissivity and moisture) have a relatively higher noise level. Since the this type of retrieval is very sensitive to its radiance quality, retrieval products inter-comparison is an effective way to identify/compare their radiance quality, in terms of a combination of spectral resolution and noise level, and to assess instrument performance. Additional validation analyses are needed to provide more-definitive conclusions.

  19. The Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson-Sellers, A.; Yang, Z.-L.; Dickinson, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    The Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) is described and the first stage science plan outlined. PILPS is a project designed to improve the parameterization of the continental surface, especially the hydrological, energy, momentum, and carbon exchanges with the atmosphere. The PILPS Science Plan incorporates enhanced documentation, comparison, and validation of continental surface parameterization schemes by community participation. Potential participants include code developers, code users, and those who can provide datasets for validation and who have expertise of value in this exercise. PILPS is an important activity because existing intercomparisons, although piecemeal, demonstrate that there are significant differences in the formulation of individual processes in the available land surface schemes. These differences are comparable to other recognized differences among current global climate models such as cloud and convection parameterizations. It is also clear that too few sensitivity studies have been undertaken with the result that there is not yet enough information to indicate which simplifications or omissions are important for the near-surface continental climate, hydrology, and biogeochemistry. PILPS emphasizes sensitivity studies with and intercomparisons of existing land surface codes and the development of areally extensive datasets for their testing and validation.

  20. A soil sampling intercomparison exercise for the ALMERA network.

    PubMed

    Belli, Maria; de Zorzi, Paolo; Sansone, Umberto; Shakhashiro, Abduhlghani; Gondin da Fonseca, Adelaide; Trinkl, Alexander; Benesch, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Soil sampling and analysis for radionuclides after an accidental or routine release is a key factor for the dose calculation to members of the public, and for the establishment of possible countermeasures. The IAEA organized for selected laboratories of the ALMERA (Analytical Laboratories for the Measurement of Environmental Radioactivity) network a Soil Sampling Intercomparison Exercise (IAEA/SIE/01) with the objective of comparing soil sampling procedures used by different laboratories. The ALMERA network is a world-wide network of analytical laboratories located in IAEA member states capable of providing reliable and timely analysis of environmental samples in the event of an accidental or intentional release of radioactivity. Ten ALMERA laboratories were selected to participate in the sampling exercise. The soil sampling intercomparison exercise took place in November 2005 in an agricultural area qualified as a "reference site", aimed at assessing the uncertainties associated with soil sampling in agricultural, semi-natural, urban and contaminated environments and suitable for performing sampling intercomparison. In this paper, the laboratories sampling performance were evaluated.

  1. GABLS4: a model intercomparison study in extremely stable conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazile, Eric; Le Moigne, Patrick; Couvreux, Fleur

    2016-04-01

    In polar regions and under stable stratifications, models presents large biases that are dependent upon the parametrizations used for the surface and boundary layers (Holtslag et al., 2013). The GABLS4 inter-comparison, launched in summer 2014, aims to study the diurnal cycles over the Antarctic Plateau, focussing on the boundary layer characteristics and the coupling with the surface in strong stability. For this, the observation site of Dome C on the Antarctic Plateau was chosen mainly for two reasons: the availability of the on-site measurements from a 45-m tower and a homogeneous surface with a low conductivity such as snow on a flat topography. The inter-comparison will consist of 3 inter-comparisons : Single Column Model (SCM), Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and land-snow model (LSM). It is organized in two steps. The first one is dedicated to the LSM and the SCM with an interactive surface (snow) scheme. Then, in the second one, the observed surface temperature will be prescribed in the SCM and in the LES models. A large variability in surface fluxes was highlighted in all types of simulations with variations about 30W/m2 during daytime and night-time which is about 100% of the ensemble mean value. After a rapid overview of the setup, we will focus on the SCM results and how the results are sensitive to the surface characteristics and the vertical resolution.

  2. TH-C-19A-05: Evaluation of a New Reusable 3D Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Juang, T; Adamovics, J; Oldham, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: PRESAGE is a radiochromic plastic which has demonstrated strong potential for high resolution single-use 3D dosimetry. This study evaluates a new PRESAGE formulation (Presage-RU) in which the radiochromic response is reversible (the dosimeter optically clears after irradiation), enabling the potential for reusability. Methods: Presage-RU dose response and optical-clearing rates were evaluated in both small volume dosimeters (1×1×4.5cm) and a larger cylindrical dosimeter (8cm diameter, 4.5cm length). All dosimeters were allowed to fully optically clear in dark, room temperature conditions between irradiations. Dose response was determined by irradiating small volume samples from 0–8.0Gy and measuring change in optical density. The cylindrical dosimeter was irradiated with a simple 4-field box plan (parallel opposed pairs of 4cm×4cm AP-PA beams and 2cm×4cm lateral beams) to 20Gy. High resolution 3D dosimetry was achieved utilizing optical-CT readout. Readings were tracked up to 14 days to characterize optical clearing. Results: Initial irradiation yielded a response of 0.0119△OD/(Gy*cm) while two subsequent reirradiations yielded a lower but consistent response of 0.0087△OD/(Gy*cm). Strong linearity of dose response was observed for all irradiations. In the large cylindrical dosimeter, the integral dose within the high dose region exhibited an exponential decay in signal over time (halflife= 23.9 hours), with the dosimeter effectively cleared (0.04% of the initial signal) after 10 days. Subsequent irradiation resulted in 19.5% lower initial signal but demonstrated that the exponential clearing rate remained consistent. Results of additional subsequent irradiations will also be presented. Conclusion: This work introduces a new re-usable radiochromic dosimeter (Presage-RU) compatible with high resolution (sub-millimeter) 3D dosimetry. Sensitivity of the initial radiation was observed to be slightly higher than subsequent irradiations, but the

  3. FlexyDos3D: a deformable anthropomorphic 3D radiation dosimeter: radiation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Deene, Y.; Skyt, P. S.; Hil, R.; Booth, J. T.

    2015-02-01

    Three dimensional radiation dosimetry has received growing interest with the implementation of highly conformal radiotherapy treatments. The radiotherapy community faces new challenges with the commissioning of image guided and image gated radiotherapy treatments (IGRT) and deformable image registration software. A new three dimensional anthropomorphically shaped flexible dosimeter, further called ‘FlexyDos3D’, has been constructed and a new fast optical scanning method has been implemented that enables scanning of irregular shaped dosimeters. The FlexyDos3D phantom can be actuated and deformed during the actual treatment. FlexyDos3D offers the additional advantage that it is easy to fabricate, is non-toxic and can be molded in an arbitrary shape with high geometrical precision. The dosimeter formulation has been optimized in terms of dose sensitivity. The influence of the casting material and oxygen concentration has also been investigated. The radiophysical properties of this new dosimeter are discussed including stability, spatial integrity, temperature dependence of the dosimeter during radiation, readout and storage, dose rate dependence and tissue equivalence. The first authors Y De Deene and P S Skyt made an equivalent contribution to the experimental work presented in this paper.

  4. Chemically tuned linear energy transfer dependent quenching in a deformable, radiochromic 3D dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høye, Ellen Marie; Skyt, Peter S.; Balling, Peter; Muren, Ludvig P.; Taasti, Vicki T.; Swakoń, Jan; Mierzwińska, Gabriela; Rydygier, Marzena; Bassler, Niels; Petersen, Jørgen B. B.

    2017-02-01

    Most solid-state detectors, including 3D dosimeters, show lower signal in the Bragg peak than expected, a process termed quenching. The purpose of this study was to investigate how variation in chemical composition of a recently developed radiochromic, silicone-based 3D dosimeter influences the observed quenching in proton beams. The dependency of dose response on linear energy transfer, as calculated through Monte Carlo simulations of the dosimeter, was investigated in 60 MeV proton beams. We found that the amount of quenching varied with the chemical composition: peak-to-plateau ratios (1 cm into the plateau) ranged from 2.2 to 3.4, compared to 4.3 using an ionization chamber. The dose response, and thereby the quenching, was predominantly influenced by the curing agent concentration, which determined the dosimeter’s deformation properties. The dose response was found to be linear at all depths. All chemical compositions of the dosimeter showed dose-rate dependency; however this was not dependent on the linear energy transfer. Track-structure theory was used to explain the observed quenching effects. In conclusion, this study shows that the silicone-based dosimeter has potential for use in measuring 3D-dose-distributions from proton beams.

  5. Undoped and doped poly(tetraphenylbenzidine) as sensitive material for an impedimetric nitrogen dioxide gas dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, I.; Moos, R.; Neumann, K.; Thelakkat, M.

    2014-09-29

    This article presents a nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) detecting gas dosimeter based on poly(tetraphenylbenzidine) poly(TPD) as nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) sensitive layer. Gas dosimeters are suitable devices to determine reliably low levels of analytes over a long period of time. During NO{sub x} exposure, the analyte molecules are accumulated irreversibly in the sensing layer of the dosimeter enhancing the conductivity of the hole conducting poly(TPD), which can be measured by impedance spectroscopy. Due to their possibility for low cost production by simple printing techniques and very good physical, photochemical, and electrochemical properties, poly(TPD)s are suitable for application in gas dosimeters operated at room temperature. We studied the effect of doping with a Co(III)-complex in combination with a conducting salt on the dosimeter behavior. Compared to the undoped material, a strong influence of the doping can be observed: the conductivity of the sensing material increases significantly, the noise of the signal decreases and an unwanted recovery of the sensor signal can be prevented, leading to a NO{sub x} detection limit <10 ppm.

  6. Estimation of biologically damaging UV levels in marine surface waters with DNA and viral dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Steven W; Jeffrey, Wade H; Suttle, Curtis A; Mitchell, David L

    2002-09-01

    We have surveyed the biologically harmful radiation penetrating the water column along a transect in the western Gulf of Mexico using dosimeters consisting of intact viruses or naked calf-thymus DNA (ctDNA). The indigenous marine bacteriophage PWH3a-P1, which lytically infects the heterotrophic bacterium Vibrio natriegens (strain PWH3a), displayed decay rates for infectivity approaching 1.0 h(-1) in surface waters when deployed in a seawater-based dosimeter. The accumulation of pyrimidine dimers in ctDNA dosimeters provided a strong correlation to these results, with pyrimidine dimers representing more than 0.3% (up to ca 3800 dimers Mb(-1) DNA) of the total DNA in dosimeters exposed to sea surface levels of solar radiation. The results demonstrate a strong correlation between the dimer formation in the DNA dosimeters, the decay rates of viral infectivity and the penetration of UVB radiation into the water column. The decay of viral infectivity attenuated with depth in a manner similar to the decay of solar radiation and was still significant at 10 m in offshore oligotrophic water and at dimer frequencies less than 0.1% (ca 200-300 dimers Mb(-1) DNA).

  7. Photofission Analysis for Fissile Dosimeters Dedicated to Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourganel, Stéphane; Faucher, Margaux; Thiollay, Nicolas

    2016-02-01

    Fissile dosimeters are commonly used in reactor pressure vessel surveillance programs. In this paper, the photofission contribution is analyzed for in-vessel 237Np and 238U fissile dosimeters in French PWR. The aim is to reassess this contribution using recent tools (the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code) and latest nuclear data (JEFF3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII nuclear libraries). To be as exhaustive as possible, this study is carried out for different configurations of fissile dosimeters, irradiated inside different kinds of PWR: 900 MWe, 1300 MWe, and 1450 MWe. Calculation of photofission rate in dosimeters does not present a major problem using the TRIPOLI-4® Monte Carlo code and the coupled neutron-photon simulation mode. However, preliminary studies were necessary to identify the origin of photons responsible of photofissions in dosimeters in relation to the photofission threshold reaction (around 5 MeV). It appears that the main contribution of high enough energy photons generating photofissions is the neutron inelastic scattering in stainless steel reactor structures. By contrast, 137Cs activity calculation is not an easy task since photofission yield data are known with high uncertainty.

  8. Single and multichannel scintillating fiber dosimeter for radiotherapic beams with SiPM readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berra, A.; Ferri, A.; Novati, C.; Ostinelli, A.; Paternoster, G.; Piemonte, C.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.

    2016-12-01

    The treatment of many neoplastic diseases requires the use of radiotherapy, which consists in the irradiation of the tumor, identified as the target volume, with ionizing radiations generated both by administered radiopharmaceuticals or by linear particle accelerators (LINACs). The radiotherapy beam delivered to the patient must be regularly checked to assure the best tumor control probability: this task is performed with dosimeters, i.e. devices able to provide a measurement of the dose deposited in their sensitive volume. This paper describes the development of two scintillator dosimeter prototypes for radiotherapic applications based on plastic scintillating fibers read out by high dynamic range Silicon PhotoMultipliers. The first dosimeter, consisting of a single-channel prototype with a pair of optical fibers, a scintillating and a white one, read out by two SiPMs, has been fully characterized and led to the development of a second multi-channel dosimeter based on an array of scintillating fibers: this device represents the first step towards the assembly of a "one-shot" device, capable to perform some of the daily quality controls in a few seconds. The dosimeters characterization was performed with a Varian Clinac iX linear accelerator at the Radiotherapy Department of the St. Anna Hospital in Como (IT).

  9. Dose rate dependence for different dosimeters and detectors: TLD, OSL, EBT films, and diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Karsch, L.; Beyreuther, E.; Burris-Mog, T.; Kraft, S.; Richter, C.; Zeil, K.; Pawelke, J.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: The use of laser accelerators in radiation therapy can perhaps increase the low number of proton and ion therapy facilities in some years due to the low investment costs and small size. The laser-based acceleration technology leads to a very high peak dose rate of about 10{sup 11} Gy/s. A first dosimetric task is the evaluation of dose rate dependence of clinical dosimeters and other detectors. Methods: The measurements were done at ELBE, a superconductive linear electron accelerator which generates electron pulses with 5 ps length at 20 MeV. The different dose rates are reached by adjusting the number of electrons in one beam pulse. Three clinical dosimeters (TLD, OSL, and EBT radiochromic films) were irradiated with four different dose rates and nearly the same dose. A faraday cup, an integrating current transformer, and an ionization chamber were used to control the particle flux on the dosimeters. Furthermore two diamond detectors were tested. Results: The dosimeters are dose rate independent up to 410{sup 9} Gy/s within 2% (OSL and TLD) and up to 1510{sup 9} Gy/s within 5% (EBT films). The diamond detectors show strong dose rate dependence. Conclusions: TLD, OSL dosimeters, and EBT films are suitable for pulsed beams with a very high pulse dose rate like laser accelerated particle beams.

  10. SU-D-213-07: Initial Characterization of a Gel Patch Dosimeter for in Vivo Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Matrosic, C; Culberson, W; Rosen, B; Madsen, E; Frank, G; Bednarz, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In vivo dosimetry, despite being the most direct method for monitoring the dose delivered during radiation therapy and being recommended by several national and international organizations (AAPM, ICRU, NACP), is underutilized in the clinic due to issues associated with dose sensitivity, feasibility, and cost. Given the increasing complexity of radiation therapy modern treatments, there is a compelling need for a robust, affordable in vivo dosimetry option. In this work we present the initial characterization of a novel gel patch in vivo dosimeter. Methods: DEFGEL (6%T) was used to make 1-cm thick small cylindrical patch dosimeters. The optical density of each dosimeter was read before and after irradiation by an in-house laser densitometer. The dosimeters were irradiated using a Varian Clinac EX linac. Three separate batches of gel patches were used to create dose response curves and evaluate repeatability. The development time of the dosimeter was also evaluated. Results: The dose response of the dosimeter was found to be linear from a range of approximately 1-Gy to 20-Gy, which is a larger window of linearity compared to other in vivo dosimeters. At doses below 1-Gy, the cumulative uncertainties were on the order of the measured data. When compared, the three batches demonstrated repeatability from 1-Gy to approximately 13-Gy, with some variation at higher doses. For doses of >8-Gy, the dosimeter reached full optical density after 4-hours, whereas low doses developed within an hour. Conclusion: Initial results indicate that the gel patch dosimeter is a reliable and simple way to measure a large range of doses, including high doses such as those delivered during hypofractionated treatments (e.g. SBRT or MR-guided radiotherapy). The simple fabrication method for the dosimeter and the use of a laser densitometer would allow for the dosimeter to used and read in-house, cheaply and easily.

  11. A review of criticality accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, W R; Smith, D R

    1989-03-01

    Criticality accidents and the characteristics of prompt power excursions are discussed. Forty-one accidental power transients are reviewed. In each case where available, enough detail is given to help visualize the physical situation, the cause or causes of the accident, the history and characteristics of the transient, the energy release, and the consequences, if any, to personnel and property. Excursions associated with large power reactors are not included in this study, except that some information on the major accident at the Chernobyl reactor in April 1986 is provided in the Appendix. 67 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. The study of N-isopropylacrylamide gel dosimeter doped iodinated contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y. J.; Hsieh, L. L.; Liu, M. H.; Liu, J. S.; Hsieh, B. T.

    2013-06-01

    Low toxicity of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) dosimeter was doped with clinical iodinated contrast medium agents(Iobitridol (Xenetix® 350) and organically bound iodine (Conray® 60) as radiation sensitizers; The suitable gel dosimeter preparation formula in this research was 5 w/w% gelatin, 5 w/w% N-isopropylacrylamide, 3 w/w% N,N-methylene-bis-acrylamide, and 5 mM Tetrakis phosphonium chloride. The spiral CT was irradiator, and 120 kVp was the operating tube voltage. The maximum radiation dose was 0.6 Gy, and optical CT was the gel measurement device used. The results showed SERs with the addition of radiosensitizers were 10.70 (Xenetix® 350) and 9.67 (Conray® 60), respectively. Thus, the polymerized gel dosimeter could be used in the efficacy evaluation of low-energy and low-radiation dose.

  13. Improving the Success Rate of Delivering Annual Occupational Dosimetry Reports to Persons Issued Temporary External Dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Mallett, Michael Wesley

    2014-09-09

    Workers who are not routinely monitored for occupational radiation exposure at LANL may be issued temporary dosimeters in the field. Per 10CFR835 and DOE O 231.1A, the Laboratory's radiation protection program is responsible for reporting these results to the worker at the end of the year. To do so, the identity of the worker and their mailing address must be recorded by the delegated person at the time the dosimeter is issued. Historically, this data has not been consistently captured. A new online application was developed to record the issue of temporary dosimeters. The process flow of the application was structured such that: 1) the worker must be uniquely identified in the Lab's HR database, and 2) the mailing address of record is verified live time via a commercial web service, for the transaction to be completed. A COPQ savings (Type B1) of $96K/year is demonstrated for the new application.

  14. Industrial accidents triggered by flood events: analysis of past accidents.

    PubMed

    Cozzani, Valerio; Campedel, Michela; Renni, Elisabetta; Krausmann, Elisabeth

    2010-03-15

    Industrial accidents triggered by natural events (NaTech accidents) are a significant category of industrial accidents. Several specific elements that characterize NaTech events still need to be investigated. In particular, the damage mode of equipment and the specific final scenarios that may take place in NaTech accidents are key elements for the assessment of hazard and risk due to these events. In the present study, data on 272 NaTech events triggered by floods were retrieved from some of the major industrial accident databases. Data on final scenarios highlighted the presence of specific events, as those due to substances reacting with water, and the importance of scenarios involving consequences for the environment. This is mainly due to the contamination of floodwater with the hazardous substances released. The analysis of process equipment damage modes allowed the identification of the expected release extents due to different water impact types during floods. The results obtained were used to generate substance-specific event trees for the quantitative assessment of the consequences of accidents triggered by floods.

  15. Underreporting of maritime accidents to vessel accident databases.

    PubMed

    Hassel, Martin; Asbjørnslett, Bjørn Egil; Hole, Lars Petter

    2011-11-01

    Underreporting of maritime accidents is a problem not only for authorities trying to improve maritime safety through legislation, but also to risk management companies and other entities using maritime casualty statistics in risk and accident analysis. This study collected and compared casualty data from 01.01.2005 to 31.12.2009, from IHS Fairplay and the maritime authorities from a set of nations. The data was compared to find common records, and estimation of the true number of occurred accidents was performed using conditional probability given positive dependency between data sources, several variations of the capture-recapture method, calculation of best case scenario assuming perfect reporting, and scaling up a subset of casualty information from a marine insurance statistics database. The estimated upper limit reporting performance for the selected flag states ranged from 14% to 74%, while the corresponding estimated coverage of IHS Fairplay ranges from 4% to 62%. On average the study results document that the number of unreported accidents makes up roughly 50% of all occurred accidents. Even in a best case scenario, only a few flag states come close to perfect reporting (94%). The considerable scope of underreporting uncovered in the study, indicates that users of statistical vessel accident data should assume a certain degree of underreporting, and adjust their analyses accordingly. Whether to use correction factors, a safety margin, or rely on expert judgment, should be decided on a case by case basis.

  16. Optical properties of a long dynamic range chemical UV dosimeter based on solvent cast polyvinyl chloride (PVC).

    PubMed

    Amar, Abdurazaq; Parisi, Alfio V

    2013-11-05

    The dosimetric properties of the recently introduced UV dosimeter based on 16 μm PVC film have been fully characterised. Drying the thin film in air at 50 °C for at least 28 days was found to be necessary to minimise the temperature effects on the dosimeter response. This research has found that the dosimeter response, previously reported to be mainly to UVB, has no significant dependence on either exposure temperature or dose rate. The dosimeter has negligible dark reaction and responds to the UV radiation with high reproducibility. The dosimeter angular response was found to have a similar pattern as the cosine function but deviates considerably at angles larger than 70°. Dose response curves exhibit monotonically increasing shape and the dosimeter can measure more than 900 SED. This is about 3 weeks of continuous exposure during summer at subtropical sites. Exposures measured by the PVC dosimeter for some anatomical sites exposed to solar radiation for twelve consecutive days were comparable with those concurrently measured by a series of PPO dosimeters and were in line with earlier results reported in similar studies.

  17. Method for correcting for isotope burn-in effects in fission neutron dosimeters

    DOEpatents

    Gold, Raymond; McElroy, William N.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for correcting for effect of isotope burn-in in fission neutron dosimeters. Two quantities are measured in order to quantify the "burn-in" contribution, namely P.sub.Z',A', the amount of (Z', A') isotope that is burned-in, and F.sub.Z', A', the fissions per unit volume produced in the (Z', A') isotope. To measure P.sub.Z', A', two solid state track recorder fission deposits are prepared from the very same material that comprises the fission neutron dosimeter, and the mass and mass density are measured. One of these deposits is exposed along with the fission neutron dosimeter, whereas the second deposit is subsequently used for observation of background. P.sub.Z', A' is then determined by conducting a second irradiation, wherein both the irradiated and unirradiated fission deposits are used in solid state track recorder dosimeters for observation of the absolute number of fissions per unit volume. The difference between the latter determines P.sub.Z', A' since the thermal neutron cross section is known. F.sub.Z', A' is obtained by using a fission neutron dosimeter for this specific isotope, which is exposed along with the original threshold fission neutron dosimeter to experience the same neutron flux-time history at the same location. In order to determine the fissions per unit volume produced in the isotope (Z', A') as it ingrows during the irradiation, B.sub.Z', A', from these observations, the neutron field must generally be either time independent or a separable function of time t and neutron energy E.

  18. SU-D-213-06: Dosimetry of Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy Using Fricke Gel Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Gawad, M Abdel; Elgohary, M; Hassaan, M; Emam, M; Desouky, O; Eldib, A; Ma, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) has been proposed as an effective modality for treatment of superficial targets. MERT utilizes multiple beams of different energies which are intensity modulated to deliver optimized dose distribution. Energy independent dosimeters are thus needed for quantitative evaluations of MERT dose distributions and measurements of absolute doses delivered to patients. Thus in the current work we study the feasibility of Fricke gel dosimeters in MERT dosimetry. Methods: Batches of radiation sensitive Fricke gel is fabricated and poured into polymethyl methacrylate cuvettes. The samples were irradiated in solid water phantom and a thick layer of bolus was used as a buildup. A spectrophotometer system was used for measuring the color changes (the absorbance) before and after irradiation and then we calculate net absorbance. We constructed calibration curves to relate the measured absorbance in terms of absorbed dose for all available electron energies. Dosimetric measurements were performed for mixed electron beam delivery and we also performed measurement for segmented field delivery with the dosimeter placed at the junction of two adjacent electron beams of different energies. Dose measured by our gel dosimetry is compared to that calculation from our precise treatment planning system. We also initiated a Monte Carlo study to evaluate the water equivalence of our dosimeters. MCBEAM and MCSIM codes were used for treatment head simulation and phantom dose calculation. PDDs and profiles were calculated for electron beams incident on a phantom designed with 1cm slab of Fricke gel. Results: The calibration curves showed no observed energy dependence with all studied electron beam energies. Good agreement was obtained between dose calculated and that obtained by gel dosimetry. Monte Carlo results illustrated the tissue equivalency of our Gel dosimeters. Conclusion: Fricke Gel dosimeters represent a good option for the dosimetric

  19. SU-E-T-274: Does Atmospheric Oxygen Affect the PRESAGE Dosimeter?

    SciTech Connect

    Alqathami, M; Ibbott, G; Blencowe, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To experimentally determine the influence of atmospheric oxygen on the efficiency of the PRESAGE dosimeter and its reporting system. Methods: Batches of the reporting system – a mixture of chloroform and leuchomalachite green dye – and PRESAGE were prepared in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. For anaerobic batches, samples were deoxygenated by bubbling nitrogen through the dosimeter precursors or reporting system for 10 min. The dosimeters and reporting systems were prepared in spectrophotometric cuvettes and glass vials, respectively, and were irradiated with 6 MV photons to various radiation doses using a clinical linear accelerator. Changes in optical density of the dosimeters and reporting system before and after irradiation were measured using a spectrophotometer. In addition, the concentrations of dissolved oxygen were measured using a dissolved oxygen meter. Results: The experiments revealed that oxygen has little influence on the characteristics of PRESAGE, with the radical initiator oxidizing the leucomalachite green even in the presence of oxygen. However, deoxygenation of the reporting system leads to an increase in sensitivity to radiation dose by ∼ 30% when compared to the non-deoxygenated system. A slight improvement in sensitivity (∼ 5%) was also achieved by deoxygenating the PRESAGE precursor prior to casting. Measurement of the dissolved oxygen revealed low levels (0.4 ppm) in the polyurethane precursor used to fabricate the dosimeters, as compared to water (8.6 ppm). In addition, deoxygenation had no effect on the retention of the post-response absorption value of the PRESAGE dosimeter. Conclusion: The results suggest that the presence of oxygen does not inhibit the radiochromic properties of the PRESAGE system. In addition, there were no observed changes in the dose linearity, absorption spectrum and post-response photofading characteristics of the PRESAGE under the conditions investigated.

  20. SU-E-T-643: Pure Alanine Dosimeter for Verification Dosimetry in IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Karmi, Anan M.; Zraiqat, Fadi

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was evaluation of accuracy of pure alanine dosimeters measuring intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose distributions in a thorax phantom. Methods: Alanine dosimeters were prepared in the form of 110 mg pure L-α-alanine powder filled into clear tissue-equivalent polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) plastic tubes with the dimensions 25 mm length, 3 mm inner diameter, and 1 mm wall thickness. A dose-response calibration curve was established for the alanine by placing the dosimeters at 1.5 cm depth in a 30×30×30 cm{sup 3} solid water phantom and then irradiating on a linac with 6 MV photon beam at 10×10 cm{sup 2} field size to doses ranging from 1 to 5 Gy. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to determine the absorbed dose in alanine. An IMRT treatment plan was designed for a commercial heterogeneous CIRS thorax phantom and the dose values were calculated at three different points located in tissue, lung, and bone equivalent materials. A set of dose measurements was carried out to compare measured and calculated dose values by placing the alanine dosimeters at those selected locations inside the thorax phantom and delivering the IMRT to the phantom. Results: The alanine dose measurements and the IMRT plan dose calculations were found to be in agreement within ±2%. Specifically, the deviations were −0.5%, 1.3%, and −1.7% for tissue, lung, and bone; respectively. The slightly large deviations observed for lung and bone may be attributed to tissue inhomogeneity, steep dose gradients in these regions, and uncontrollable changes in spectrometer conditions. Conclusion: The results described herein confirmed that pure alanine dosimeter was suitable for in-phantom dosimetry of IMRT beams because of its high sensitivity and acceptable accuracy. This makes the dosimeter a promising option for quality control of the therapeutic beams, complementing the commonly used ionization chambers, TLDs, and films.

  1. 49 CFR 801.32 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Accident reports. 801.32 Section 801.32... PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION Accident Investigation Records § 801.32 Accident reports. (a) The NTSB....S. civil transportation accidents, in accordance with 49 U.S.C. 1131(e). (b) These reports may...

  2. 32 CFR 644.532 - Reporting accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Reporting accidents. 644.532 Section 644.532... and Improvements § 644.532 Reporting accidents. Immediately upon receipt of information of an accident... that an accident has occurred, the former using command should be requested to send qualified...

  3. 49 CFR 230.22 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Accident reports. 230.22 Section 230.22... Requirements § 230.22 Accident reports. In the case of an accident due to failure, from any cause, of a steam... persons, the railroad on whose line the accident occurred shall immediately make a telephone report of...

  4. 49 CFR 230.22 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accident reports. 230.22 Section 230.22... Requirements § 230.22 Accident reports. In the case of an accident due to failure, from any cause, of a steam... persons, the railroad on whose line the accident occurred shall immediately make a telephone report of...

  5. 49 CFR 195.54 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Accident reports. 195.54 Section 195.54... PIPELINE Annual, Accident, and Safety-Related Condition Reporting § 195.54 Accident reports. (a) Each operator that experiences an accident that is required to be reported under § 195.50 must, as soon...

  6. 32 CFR 644.532 - Reporting accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Reporting accidents. 644.532 Section 644.532... and Improvements § 644.532 Reporting accidents. Immediately upon receipt of information of an accident... that an accident has occurred, the former using command should be requested to send qualified...

  7. 29 CFR 1960.29 - Accident investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accident investigation. 1960.29 Section 1960.29 Labor... MATTERS Inspection and Abatement § 1960.29 Accident investigation. (a) While all accidents should be investigated, including accidents involving property damage only, the extent of such investigation shall...

  8. 49 CFR 801.32 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accident reports. 801.32 Section 801.32... PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION Accident Investigation Records § 801.32 Accident reports. (a) The NTSB....S. civil transportation accidents, in accordance with 49 U.S.C. 1131(e). (b) These reports may...

  9. 49 CFR 845.40 - Accident report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accident report. 845.40 Section 845.40... RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRANSPORTATION; ACCIDENT/INCIDENT HEARINGS AND REPORTS Board Reports § 845.40 Accident report. (a) The Board will issue a detailed narrative accident report in connection with...

  10. 49 CFR 845.40 - Accident report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Accident report. 845.40 Section 845.40... RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRANSPORTATION; ACCIDENT/INCIDENT HEARINGS AND REPORTS Board Reports § 845.40 Accident report. (a) The Board will issue a detailed narrative accident report in connection with...

  11. 49 CFR 801.32 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accident reports. 801.32 Section 801.32... PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION Accident Investigation Records § 801.32 Accident reports. (a) The NTSB....S. civil transportation accidents, in accordance with 49 U.S.C. 1131(e). (b) These reports may...

  12. 49 CFR 195.54 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accident reports. 195.54 Section 195.54... PIPELINE Annual, Accident, and Safety-Related Condition Reporting § 195.54 Accident reports. (a) Each operator that experiences an accident that is required to be reported under § 195.50 must, as soon...

  13. 49 CFR 230.22 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accident reports. 230.22 Section 230.22... Requirements § 230.22 Accident reports. In the case of an accident due to failure, from any cause, of a steam... persons, the railroad on whose line the accident occurred shall immediately make a telephone report of...

  14. 22 CFR 102.8 - Reporting accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reporting accidents. 102.8 Section 102.8... Accidents Abroad § 102.8 Reporting accidents. (a) To airline and Civil Aeronautics Administration... probably be the first to be informed of the accident, in which event he will be expected to report...

  15. 29 CFR 1960.29 - Accident investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accident investigation. 1960.29 Section 1960.29 Labor... MATTERS Inspection and Abatement § 1960.29 Accident investigation. (a) While all accidents should be investigated, including accidents involving property damage only, the extent of such investigation shall...

  16. 49 CFR 230.22 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Accident reports. 230.22 Section 230.22... Requirements § 230.22 Accident reports. In the case of an accident due to failure, from any cause, of a steam... persons, the railroad on whose line the accident occurred shall immediately make a telephone report of...

  17. 29 CFR 1960.29 - Accident investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accident investigation. 1960.29 Section 1960.29 Labor... MATTERS Inspection and Abatement § 1960.29 Accident investigation. (a) While all accidents should be investigated, including accidents involving property damage only, the extent of such investigation shall...

  18. 22 CFR 102.8 - Reporting accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reporting accidents. 102.8 Section 102.8... Accidents Abroad § 102.8 Reporting accidents. (a) To airline and Civil Aeronautics Administration... probably be the first to be informed of the accident, in which event he will be expected to report...

  19. 49 CFR 195.54 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Accident reports. 195.54 Section 195.54... PIPELINE Annual, Accident, and Safety-Related Condition Reporting § 195.54 Accident reports. (a) Each operator that experiences an accident that is required to be reported under § 195.50 must, as soon...

  20. 49 CFR 845.40 - Accident report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Accident report. 845.40 Section 845.40... RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRANSPORTATION; ACCIDENT/INCIDENT HEARINGS AND REPORTS Board Reports § 845.40 Accident report. (a) The Board will issue a detailed narrative accident report in connection with...

  1. 49 CFR 195.54 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accident reports. 195.54 Section 195.54... PIPELINE Annual, Accident, and Safety-Related Condition Reporting § 195.54 Accident reports. (a) Each operator that experiences an accident that is required to be reported under § 195.50 shall as soon...

  2. 22 CFR 102.8 - Reporting accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reporting accidents. 102.8 Section 102.8... Accidents Abroad § 102.8 Reporting accidents. (a) To airline and Civil Aeronautics Administration... probably be the first to be informed of the accident, in which event he will be expected to report...

  3. 49 CFR 801.32 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Accident reports. 801.32 Section 801.32... PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION Accident Investigation Records § 801.32 Accident reports. (a) The NTSB....S. civil transportation accidents, in accordance with 49 U.S.C. 1131(e). (b) These reports may...

  4. 49 CFR 195.54 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Accident reports. 195.54 Section 195.54... PIPELINE Annual, Accident, and Safety-Related Condition Reporting § 195.54 Accident reports. (a) Each operator that experiences an accident that is required to be reported under § 195.50 must, as soon...

  5. 49 CFR 845.40 - Accident report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accident report. 845.40 Section 845.40... RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRANSPORTATION; ACCIDENT/INCIDENT HEARINGS AND REPORTS Board Reports § 845.40 Accident report. (a) The Board will issue a detailed narrative accident report in connection with...

  6. 49 CFR 845.40 - Accident report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Accident report. 845.40 Section 845.40... RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRANSPORTATION; ACCIDENT/INCIDENT HEARINGS AND REPORTS Board Reports § 845.40 Accident report. (a) The Board will issue a detailed narrative accident report in connection with...

  7. 32 CFR 644.532 - Reporting accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting accidents. 644.532 Section 644.532... and Improvements § 644.532 Reporting accidents. Immediately upon receipt of information of an accident... that an accident has occurred, the former using command should be requested to send qualified...

  8. 29 CFR 1960.29 - Accident investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accident investigation. 1960.29 Section 1960.29 Labor... MATTERS Inspection and Abatement § 1960.29 Accident investigation. (a) While all accidents should be investigated, including accidents involving property damage only, the extent of such investigation shall...

  9. 29 CFR 1960.29 - Accident investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accident investigation. 1960.29 Section 1960.29 Labor... MATTERS Inspection and Abatement § 1960.29 Accident investigation. (a) While all accidents should be investigated, including accidents involving property damage only, the extent of such investigation shall...

  10. 49 CFR 230.22 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Accident reports. 230.22 Section 230.22... Requirements § 230.22 Accident reports. In the case of an accident due to failure, from any cause, of a steam... persons, the railroad on whose line the accident occurred shall immediately make a telephone report of...

  11. 22 CFR 102.8 - Reporting accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reporting accidents. 102.8 Section 102.8... Accidents Abroad § 102.8 Reporting accidents. (a) To airline and Civil Aeronautics Administration... probably be the first to be informed of the accident, in which event he will be expected to report...

  12. 22 CFR 102.8 - Reporting accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reporting accidents. 102.8 Section 102.8... Accidents Abroad § 102.8 Reporting accidents. (a) To airline and Civil Aeronautics Administration... probably be the first to be informed of the accident, in which event he will be expected to report...

  13. 49 CFR 801.32 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Accident reports. 801.32 Section 801.32... PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION Accident Investigation Records § 801.32 Accident reports. (a) The NTSB....S. civil transportation accidents, in accordance with 49 U.S.C. 1131(e). (b) These reports may...

  14. Aircraft accidents : method of analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    This report on a method of analysis of aircraft accidents has been prepared by a special committee on the nomenclature, subdivision, and classification of aircraft accidents organized by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in response to a request dated February 18, 1928, from the Air Coordination Committee consisting of the Assistant Secretaries for Aeronautics in the Departments of War, Navy, and Commerce. The work was undertaken in recognition of the difficulty of drawing correct conclusions from efforts to analyze and compare reports of aircraft accidents prepared by different organizations using different classifications and definitions. The air coordination committee's request was made "in order that practices used may henceforth conform to a standard and be universally comparable." the purpose of the special committee therefore was to prepare a basis for the classification and comparison of aircraft accidents, both civil and military. (author)

  15. Columbia Accident Probe Widens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covault, Craig

    2003-01-01

    The Columbia Accident Investigation Board has identified about a dozen shuttle program safety concerns it will address in its final report, in addition to foam shedding from the Lockheed Martin external tank-believed by many board members to be the direct cause for the loss of Columbia and her crew. As new evidence narrows the location of Columbia's left-wing breach to a lower corner of reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) Panel 8 and its adjoining T-seal, the board is broadening its penetration of other shuttle safety issues. As the board works in Houston, United Space Alliance technicians here at Kennedy last week sent the first six of 22 RCC panels from the orbiter Atlantis left wing to Vought Aircraft Industries Inc. in Dallas for extensive testing to assess their integrity. The move is a key step toward both returning the shuttle to flight with Atlantis and obtaining more data on RCC panels subjected to fewer flights, and less exposure to the weather, than the older panels used on Columbia.

  16. Experimental determination of the influence of oxygen on the PRESAGE® dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Alqathami, Mamdooh; Blencowe, Anton; Ibbott, Geoffrey

    2016-01-21

    It is generally accepted that the PRESAGE(®) radiochromic dosimeter is not sensitive to oxygen, however, this claim has not been supported or verified experimentally. Therefore, the aim of this study was to experimentally determine the potential influence of oxygen on dose sensitivity of the PRESAGE(®) dosimeter and its reporting system. Batches of PRESAGE(®) and its radical initiator-leuco dye reporting system were prepared in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The anaerobic batches were deoxygenated by bubbling nitrogen through the dosimeter precursors or reporting system for 10 min. The dosimeters and reporting systems were prepared in spectrophotometric cuvettes and glass vials, respectively, and were irradiated with 6 MV photons to various radiation doses. Changes in optical density of the dosimeters and reporting system before and after irradiation were measured using a spectrophotometer. The overall results show that oxygen has some influence on the dosimetric characteristics of PRESAGE(®), although the radical initiator does appear to oxidize the leucomalachite green even in the presence of oxygen. Deoxygenation of the reporting system leads to an increase in sensitivity to radiation dose by ~30% when compared to the non-deoxygenated system. A minor increase in sensitivity (~5%) was also achieved by deoxygenating the PRESAGE(®) precursor prior to casting. In addition, dissolved oxygen measurements revealed low levels of dissolved oxygen (0.40 ± 0.04 mg l(-1)) in the polyurethane precursor used to fabricate the PRESAGE(®) dosimeters, as compared to water (8.60 ± 0.03 mg l(-1)) and the reporting system alone (1.30 ± 0.10 mg l(-1)). The results suggest that the presence of oxygen does not inhibit the radiochromic properties of the PRESAGE(®) system. However, deoxygenation of the dosimeter precursors prior to casting improves the dosimeters dose sensitivity by ~5%, which might be particularly useful for measuring low radiation doses. Nevertheless, we

  17. Experimental determination of the influence of oxygen on the PRESAGE® dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqathami, Mamdooh; Blencowe, Anton; Ibbott, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the PRESAGE® radiochromic dosimeter is not sensitive to oxygen, however, this claim has not been supported or verified experimentally. Therefore, the aim of this study was to experimentally determine the potential influence of oxygen on dose sensitivity of the PRESAGE® dosimeter and its reporting system. Batches of PRESAGE® and its radical initiator-leuco dye reporting system were prepared in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The anaerobic batches were deoxygenated by bubbling nitrogen through the dosimeter precursors or reporting system for 10 min. The dosimeters and reporting systems were prepared in spectrophotometric cuvettes and glass vials, respectively, and were irradiated with 6 MV photons to various radiation doses. Changes in optical density of the dosimeters and reporting system before and after irradiation were measured using a spectrophotometer. The overall results show that oxygen has some influence on the dosimetric characteristics of PRESAGE®, although the radical initiator does appear to oxidize the leucomalachite green even in the presence of oxygen. Deoxygenation of the reporting system leads to an increase in sensitivity to radiation dose by ~30% when compared to the non-deoxygenated system. A minor increase in sensitivity (~5%) was also achieved by deoxygenating the PRESAGE® precursor prior to casting. In addition, dissolved oxygen measurements revealed low levels of dissolved oxygen (0.40  ±  0.04 mg l-1) in the polyurethane precursor used to fabricate the PRESAGE® dosimeters, as compared to water (8.60  ±  0.03 mg l-1) and the reporting system alone (1.30  ±  0.10 mg l-1). The results suggest that the presence of oxygen does not inhibit the radiochromic properties of the PRESAGE® system. However, deoxygenation of the dosimeter precursors prior to casting improves the dosimeters dose sensitivity by ~5%, which might be particularly useful for measuring low radiation doses

  18. Neutron dosimetry at commercial nuclear plants. Final report of Subtask B: dosimeter response

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, F.M.; Endres, G.W.R.; Brackenbush, L.W.

    1983-03-01

    As part of a larger program to evaluate personnel neutron dosimetry at commercial nuclear power plants, this study was designed to characterize neutron dosimeter responses inside the containment structure of commercial nuclear plants. In order to characterize those responses, dosimeters were irradiated inside containment at 2 pressurized water reactors and at pipe penetrations outside the biological shield at two boiling water reactors. The reactors were operating at full power during the irradiations. Measurements were also performed with electronic instruments, the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), and portable remmeters, SNOOPY, RASCAL and PNR-4.

  19. Novel Multicompartment 3-Dimensional Radiochromic Radiation Dosimeters for Nanoparticle-Enhanced Radiation Therapy Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Alqathami, Mamdooh; Blencowe, Anton; Yeo, Un Jin; Doran, Simon J.; Qiao, Greg; Geso, Moshi

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Gold nanoparticles (AuNps), because of their high atomic number (Z), have been demonstrated to absorb low-energy X-rays preferentially, compared with tissue, and may be used to achieve localized radiation dose enhancement in tumors. The purpose of this study is to introduce the first example of a novel multicompartment radiochromic radiation dosimeter and to demonstrate its applicability for 3-dimensional (3D) dosimetry of nanoparticle-enhanced radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A novel multicompartment phantom radiochromic dosimeter was developed. It was designed and formulated to mimic a tumor loaded with AuNps (50 nm in diameter) at a concentration of 0.5 mM, surrounded by normal tissues. The novel dosimeter is referred to as the Sensitivity Modulated Advanced Radiation Therapy (SMART) dosimeter. The dosimeters were irradiated with 100-kV and 6-MV X-ray energies. Dose enhancement produced from the interaction of X-rays with AuNps was calculated using spectrophotometric and cone-beam optical computed tomography scanning by quantitatively comparing the change in optical density and 3D datasets of the dosimetric measurements between the tissue-equivalent (TE) and TE/AuNps compartments. The interbatch and intrabatch variability and the postresponse stability of the dosimeters with AuNps were also assessed. Results: Radiation dose enhancement factors of 1.77 and 1.11 were obtained using 100-kV and 6-MV X-ray energies, respectively. The results of this study are in good agreement with previous observations; however, for the first time we provide direct experimental confirmation and 3D visualization of the radiosensitization effect of AuNps. The dosimeters with AuNps showed small (<3.5%) interbatch variability and negligible (<0.5%) intrabatch variability. Conclusions: The SMART dosimeter yields experimental insights concerning the spatial distributions and elevated dose in nanoparticle-enhanced radiation therapy, which cannot be performed using any of

  20. On the response of electronic personal dosimeters in constant potential and pulsed x- ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, M. C.; Silva, C. R. E.; Oliveira, P. M. C.; da Silva, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) based on solid state detectors have widely been used but some deficiencies in their response in pulsed radiation beams have been reported. Nowadays, there is not an international standard for pulsed x-ray beams for calibration or type testing of dosimeters. Irradiation conditions for testing the response of EPDs in both the constant potential and pulsed x-ray beams were established in CDTN. Three different types of EPDs were tested in different conditions in similar ISO and IEC x-ray qualities. Results stressed the need of performing additional checks before using EPDs in constant potential or pulsed x-rays.

  1. Simulation and test of a new albedo personal dosimeter for neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfredotti, C.; Zanini, A.; Rollet, S.; Arman, G.

    1989-12-01

    A new personal dosimeter for neutrons, using three TLD 600s and one TLD 700 in a cadmium housing and detecting both incoming and albedo neutrons, has been designed, developed, tested and simulated by the code MORSE. Its response in the energy region between 10 -8 and 10 MeV is more similar to ICRP fluence-dose equivalent calibration factor behaviour with respect to previous albedo dosimeters, and particularly fast neutron tissue dose equivalents are less underestimated. Present data confirm that both accuracy and precision fulfil the International Commissions requests (NCR, NCRP, ANSI). Theory, simulation and experimental results obtained with a laboratory prototype are presented and discussed.

  2. A Bremsstrahlung spectrometer using k-edge and differential filters with image plate dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. D.; Porkolab, M.; King, J. A.; Beg, F. N.; Key, M. H.; Chen, H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Patel, P. K.; Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B.; Freeman, R. R.; Link, A.; Van Woerkom, L. D.

    2008-10-15

    A Bremsstrahlung spectrometer using k-edge and differential filtering has been used with image plate dosimeters to measure the x-ray fluence from short-pulse laser/target interactions. An electron spectrometer in front of the Bremsstrahlung spectrometer deflects electrons from the x-ray line of sight and simultaneously measures the electron spectrum. The response functions were modeled with the Monte Carlo code INTEGRATED TIGER SERIES 3.0 and the dosimeters calibrated with radioactive sources. An electron distribution with a slope temperature of 1.3 MeV is inferred from the Bremsstrahlung spectra.

  3. A Bremsstrahlung Spectrometer using k-edge and Differential Filters with Image plate dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C; Mackinnon, A; Beg, F; Chen, H; Key, M; King, J A; Link, A; MacPhee, A; Patel, P; Porkolab, M; Stephens, R; VanWoerkom, L; Akli, K; Freeman, R

    2008-05-02

    A Bremsstrahlung spectrometer using k-edge and differential filtering has been used with Image Plate dosimeters to measure the x-ray fluence from short-pulse laser/target interactions. An electron spectrometer in front of the Bremsstrahlung spectrometer deflects electrons from the x-ray line of sight and simultaneously measures the electron spectrum. The response functions were modeled with the Monte Carlo code Integrated Tiger Series 3.0 and the dosimeters calibrated with radioactive sources. Electron distributions with slope temperatures in the MeV range are inferred from the Bremsstrahlung spectra.

  4. Study of the absorption spectra of Fricke Xylenol Orange gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Gambarini, Grazia; Artuso, Emanuele; Liosi, Giulia Maria; Giacobbo, Francesca; Mariani, Mari; Brambilla, Luigi; Castiglioni, Chiara; Carrara, Mauro; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2015-07-01

    A systematic study of the absorption spectra of Fricke Xylenol Orange gel dosimeters has been performed, in the wavelength range from 300 nm to 700 nm. The spectrum of Xylenol Orange (without ferrous sulphate solution) has been achieved, in order to subtract its contribution from the absorption spectra of the irradiated Fricke Xylenol Orange gel dosimeters. The absorbance due to ferric ions chelated by Xylenol Orange has been studied for various irradiation doses. Two absorbance peaks are visible, mainly at low doses: the first peak increases with the dose more slowly than the second one. This effect can explain the apparent threshold dose that was frequently evidenced. (authors)

  5. Initial characterization of a gel patch dosimeter for in vivo dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrosic, C.; Culberson, W.; Rosen, B.; Madsen, E.; Frank, G.; Bednarz, B.

    2016-05-01

    In vivo dosimetry is a greatly underutilized tool for patient safety in clinical external beam radiotherapy treatments, despite being recommended by several national and international organizations (AAPM, ICRU, IAEA, NACP). The reasons for this underutilization mostly relate to the feasibility and cost of in vivo dosimetry methods. Due to the increase in the number of beam angles and dose per fraction in modern treatments, there is a compelling need for a novel dosimeter that is robust and affordable while able to operate properly in these complex conditions. This work presents a gel patch dosimeter as a novel method of in vivo dosimetry. DEFGEL, a 6% T normoxic polyacrylamide gel, was injected into 1 cm thick acrylic molds to create 1 cm thick small cylindrical patch dosimeters. To evaluate the change in optical density due to radiation induced polymerization, dosimeters were scanned before and after irradiation using an in-house developed laser densitometer. The dose-responses of three separate batches of gel were evaluated and compared to check for linearity and repeatability. The response development time was evaluated to ensure that the patch dosimeter could be high throughput. Additionally, the potential of this system to be used as an in vivo dosimeter was tested with a clinically relevant end-to-end in vivo phantom test. All irradiations were performed with a Varian Clinac 21EX at the University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center (UWMRRC). The dose-response of all three batches of gel was found to be linear within the range of 2-20 Gy. At doses below 0.5 Gy the statistical uncertainties were prohibitively large to make quantitative assessments of the results. The three batches demonstrated good repeatability in the range of 2 Gy to up to 10 Gy, with only slight variations in response at higher doses. For low doses the dosimeter fully developed within an hour while at higher doses they fully developed within four hours. During the in vivo

  6. Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Ayer, J E; Clark, A T; Loysen, P; Ballinger, M Y; Mishima, J; Owczarski, P C; Gregory, W S; Nichols, B D

    1988-05-01

    The Accident Analysis Handbook (AAH) covers four generic facilities: fuel manufacturing, fuel reprocessing, waste storage/solidification, and spent fuel storage; and six accident types: fire, explosion, tornado, criticality, spill, and equipment failure. These are the accident types considered to make major contributions to the radiological risk from accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facility operations. The AAH will enable the user to calculate source term releases from accident scenarios manually or by computer. A major feature of the AAH is development of accident sample problems to provide input to source term analysis methods and transport computer codes. Sample problems and illustrative examples for different accident types are included in the AAH.

  7. Enhancement in dose sensitivity of polymer gel dosimeters composed of radiation-crosslinked gel matrix and less toxic monomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroki, A.; Yamashita, S.; Taguchi, M.

    2015-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters based on radiation-crosslinked hydroxypropyl cellulose gel were prepared, which comprised 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and polyethylene glycol #400 dimethacrylate (9G) as less toxic monomers and tetrakis (hydroxymethyl) phosphonium chloride (THPC) as an antioxidant. The dosimeters exposed to 60Co γ-rays became cloudy at only 1 Gy. The irradiated dosimeters were optically analyzed by using a UV- vis spectrophotometer to evaluate dose response. Absorbance of the dosimeters linearly increased in the dose range from 0 to 10 Gy, in which dose sensitivity increased with increasing 9G concentration. The dose sensitivity of the dosimeters with 2 wt% HEMA and 3 wt% 9G was also enhanced by increment in THPC.

  8. A gelatin-free model system for the study of the basic radiation-induced polymerization in PAG dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babic, S.; Park, Y. S.; Schreiner, L. J.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation we show results of investigations on gelatin-free dosimeters containing equal amounts of acrylamide and N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide (named Aqueous Polyacrylamide, APA, dosimeters). The dosimeters were prepared with three different total monomer concentrations (2, 6, and 8% by weight). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin and spin-lattice proton relaxation measurements at 20 MHz, and gravimetric analyses performed on all three dosimeters, show a continuous degree of polymerization over the range of dose 0.5 - 25 Gy. The developed NMR model explains the relationship observed between the relaxation data and the amount of cross-linked polymer formed at each dose. This model may be extended with gelatin relaxation data to provide a fundamental understanding of radiation-induced polymerization in the conventional PAG dosimeters.

  9. Chernobyl Accident Fatalities and Causes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    TI FLE CY N Defense Nuclear Agency Alexandria, VA 22310-3398 SWES% Ot DNA-TR-89-45 Chernobyl Accident Fatalities and Causes A. Laupa G. H. Anno...0104 Chernobyl Accident Fatalities and Causes PE - 62715H PR - RM 6 AUTHOR(S) TA -RH A. Laupa: G. H. Anno WU - DH026130 7 PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...vi 1 INTRODUCTION .......................................... 1I DATA SOURCES ON CHERNOBYL VICTIMS ............... 3 CHERNOBYL

  10. Paragliding accidents in remote areas.

    PubMed

    Fasching, G; Schippinger, G; Pretscher, R

    1997-08-01

    Paragliding is an increasingly popular hobby, as people try to find new and more adventurous activities. However, there is an increased and inherent danger with this sport. For this reason, as well as the inexperience of many operators, injuries occur frequently. This retrospective study centers on the helicopter rescue of 70 individuals in paragliding accidents. All histories were examined, and 43 patients answered a questionnaire. Nineteen (42%) pilots were injured when taking off, 20 (44%) during the flight, and six (13%) when landing. Routine and experience did not affect the prevalence of accident. Analysis of the causes of accident revealed pilot errors in all but three cases. In 34 rescue operations a landing of the helicopter near the site of the accident was possible. Half of the patients had to be rescued by a cable winch or a long rope fixed to the helicopter. Seven (10%) of the pilots suffered multiple trauma, 38 (54%) had injuries of the lower extremities, and 32 (84%) of them sustained fractures. Injuries to the spine were diagnosed in 34 cases with a fracture rate of 85%. One patient had an incomplete paraplegia. Injuries to the head occurred in 17 patients. No paraglider pilot died. The average hospitalization was 22 days, and average time of working inability was 14 weeks. Fourteen (34%) patients suffered from a permanent damage to their nerves or joints. Forty-three percent of the paragliders continued their sport despite the accident; two of them had another accident. An improved training program is necessary to lower the incidence of paragliding accidents. Optimal equipment to reduce injuries in case of accidents is mandatory. The helicopter emergency physician must perform a careful examination, provide stabilization of airways and circulation, give analgesics, splint fractured extremities, and transport the victim on a vacuum mattress to the appropriate hospital.

  11. [Accidents of toddlers and youngsters].

    PubMed

    von Nicolai, D

    2002-02-01

    The Public Health Department in Biberach an der Riss developed a questionnaire to investigate the incidence of accidents in children under school-starting age (6 years). This questionnaire was presented to the parents of more than 2,300 prospective first-graders from the town and rural district on the occasion of the pre-school medical examination 2000. As this examination is mandatory for all children starting school, and as the questions were answered by all the parents with very few exceptions (language reasons), a complete survey can be assumed. The investigation confirmed the results of last year: The incidence of children who suffered an accident requiring medical attention before reaching school age is approximately 33 %; boys are predominantly involved. The scene of accidents also changes with increasing age from living quarters to outside areas. The most frequent type of accidents are, of course, falls, resulting especially in injuries to the head and face. Scalds and burns, in particular at the age of 2, occur more frequently in the Biberach district than described in other up-to-date investigations in Germany. For this reason efforts have to be made to reduce this number over the next years. About 11 % of accidents occur in the streets or involve traffic, a result which is also higher in comparison to other investigations. According to the statement of parents, more than two-thirds of accidents are caused by the children themselves, including babies and toddlers. At the time of the accident 40 % of the children were without parental control, and 20 % completely alone.A great number of the accidents could certainly have been prevented. That is why the results of the study should be made available to all those responsible for the care and wellbeing of this age group. The last section of the paper deals with the most urgent needs of action to be implemented in the long run for the sake of the health of our children.

  12. Severe accident analysis using dynamic accident progression event trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakobyan, Aram P.

    In present, the development and analysis of Accident Progression Event Trees (APETs) are performed in a manner that is computationally time consuming, difficult to reproduce and also can be phenomenologically inconsistent. One of the principal deficiencies lies in the static nature of conventional APETs. In the conventional event tree techniques, the sequence of events is pre-determined in a fixed order based on the expert judgments. The main objective of this PhD dissertation was to develop a software tool (ADAPT) for automated APET generation using the concept of dynamic event trees. As implied by the name, in dynamic event trees the order and timing of events are determined by the progression of the accident. The tool determines the branching times from a severe accident analysis code based on user specified criteria for branching. It assigns user specified probabilities to every branch, tracks the total branch probability, and truncates branches based on the given pruning/truncation rules to avoid an unmanageable number of scenarios. The function of a dynamic APET developed includes prediction of the conditions, timing, and location of containment failure or bypass leading to the release of radioactive material, and calculation of probabilities of those failures. Thus, scenarios that can potentially lead to early containment failure or bypass, such as through accident induced failure of steam generator tubes, are of particular interest. Also, the work is focused on treatment of uncertainties in severe accident phenomena such as creep rupture of major RCS components, hydrogen burn, containment failure, timing of power recovery, etc. Although the ADAPT methodology (Analysis of Dynamic Accident Progression Trees) could be applied to any severe accident analysis code, in this dissertation the approach is demonstrated by applying it to the MELCOR code [1]. A case study is presented involving station blackout with the loss of auxiliary feedwater system for a

  13. The agricultural model intercomparison and improvement project (AgMIP): Protocols and pilot studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) is a distributed climate-scenario simulation research activity for historical period model intercomparison and future climate change conditions with participation of multiple crop and agricultural economic model groups around the...

  14. Global Intercomparison of 12 Land Surface Heat Flux Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, C.; Prigent, C.; Mueller, B.; Seneviratne, S. I.; McCabe, M. F.; Wood, E. F.; Rossow, W. B.; Balsamo, G.; Betts, A. K.; Dirmeyer, P. A.; Fisher, J. B.; Jung, M.; Kanamitsu, M.; Reichle, R. H.; Reichstein, M.; Rodell, M.; Sheffield, J.; Tu, K.; Wang, K.

    2011-01-01

    A global intercomparison of 12 monthly mean land surface heat flux products for the period 1993-1995 is presented. The intercomparison includes some of the first emerging global satellite-based products (developed at Paris Observatory, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, University of California Berkeley, University of Maryland, and Princeton University) and examples of fluxes produced by reanalyses (ERA-Interim, MERRA, NCEP-DOE) and off-line land surface models (GSWP-2, GLDAS CLM/ Mosaic/Noah). An intercomparison of the global latent heat flux (Q(sub le)) annual means shows a spread of approx 20 W/sq m (all-product global average of approx 45 W/sq m). A similar spread is observed for the sensible (Q(sub h)) and net radiative (R(sub n)) fluxes. In general, the products correlate well with each other, helped by the large seasonal variability and common forcing data for some of the products. Expected spatial distributions related to the major climatic regimes and geographical features are reproduced by all products. Nevertheless, large Q(sub le)and Q(sub h) absolute differences are also observed. The fluxes were spatially averaged for 10 vegetation classes. The larger Q(sub le) differences were observed for the rain forest but, when normalized by mean fluxes, the differences were comparable to other classes. In general, the correlations between Q(sub le) and R(sub n) were higher for the satellite-based products compared with the reanalyses and off-line models. The fluxes were also averaged for 10 selected basins. The seasonality was generally well captured by all products, but large differences in the flux partitioning were observed for some products and basins.

  15. [Accidents of fulguration].

    PubMed

    Virenque, C; Laguerre, J

    1976-01-01

    Fulguration, first electric accident in which the man was a victim, is to day better known. A clap of thunder is decomposed in two elements: lightning, and thunder. Lightning is caused by an electrical discharge, either within a cloud, or between two clouds, or, above all, between a cloud and the surface of the ground. Experimental equipments owned by the French Electricity Company and by the Atomic Energy Commission, have allowed to photograph lightnings and to measure certain physical characteristics (Intensity variable between 25 to 100 kA, voltage variable between 20 to 1 000 kV). The frequency of storms was learned: the isokeraunic level, in France, is about 20, meaning that thunder is heard twenty days during one year. Man may be stricken by thunder by direct hit, by sudden bursting, by earth current, or through various conductors. The electric charge which reached him may go to the earth directly by contact with the ground or may dissipate in the air through a bony promontory (elbow). The total number of victims, "wounded" or deceased, is not now known by statistics. Death comes by insulation breakdown of one of several anatomic cephalic formations: skull, meninx, brain. Many various lesions may happen in survivors: loss of consciousness, more or less long, sensorial or motion deficiencies. All these signs are momentary and generally reversible. Besides one may observe much more intense lesions on the skin: burns and, over all, characteristic aborescence (skin effect by high frequency current). The heart is protected, contrarily to what happens with industrial electrocution. The curative treatment is merely symptomatic : reanimation, surgery for burns or associated traumatic lesions. A prevention is researched to help the lonely man, in the country or in the mountains in the houses (lightning conductor, Faraday cage), in vehicles (aircraft, cars, ships). The mysterious and unforseeable character of lightning still stays, leaving a door opened for numerous

  16. Accident Tolerant Fuel Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Curtis; Chichester, Heather; Johns, Jesse; Teague, Melissa; Tonks, Michael; Youngblood, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional “accident-tolerant” (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and

  17. Intercomparison of ionisation chamber measurements from (125)I seeds.

    PubMed

    Davies, J B; Enari, K F; Baldock, C

    2007-05-01

    The reference air kerma rates of a set of individual (125)I seeds were calculated from current measurements of a calibrated re-entrant ionisation chamber. Single seeds were distributed to seven Australian brachytherapy centres for the same measurement with the user's instrumentation. Results are expressed as the ratio of the reference air kerma rate measured by the Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organisation (ANSTO) to the reference air kerma rate measured at the centre. The intercomparison ratios of all participants were within +/-5% of unity.

  18. Preliminary results of an intercomparison of total ozone spectrophotometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, C. L.; Gerlach, J. C.; Williams, M. E.; Kerr, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary results from an intercomparison of five total ozone spectrophotometers are presented. These are the Dobson spectrophotometer, the USSR M-83 ozonometer, the Canterbury filter photometer, the SenTran Company filter photometer, and the Brewer grating spectrophotometer. The pertinent characteristics of each are described, and conclusions are drawn about the agreement of each instrument's measurements with the Dobson's values over a time period of nearly one year. A discussion of the importance of calibration and long-term stability and reliability is included.

  19. Characteristics of polyacrylamide gel with THPC and Turnbull Blue gel dosimeters evaluated using optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilařová (Vávrů), Kateřina; Kozubíková, Petra; Šolc, Jaroslav; Spěváček, Václav

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare characteristics of radiochromic gel - Turnbull Blue gel (TB gel) with polymer gel - polyacrylamide gel and tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride (PAGAT) using optical tomography. Both types of gels were examined in terms of dose sensitivity, dose response linearity and background value of spectrophotometric absorbance. The calibration curve was obtained for 60Co irradiation performed on Gammacell 220 at predefined gamma dose levels between 0 and 140 Gy for TBG and 0-15 Gy for PAGAT. To measure relative dose distributions from stereotactic irradiation, dosimeters were irradiated on Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion. The cylindrical glass housings filled with gel were attached to the stereotactic frame. They were exposed with single shot and 16 mm collimator by 65 Gy to a 50% prescription isodose for TB gel and 4 Gy to a 50% prescription isodose for PAGAT. Evaluations of dosimeters were performed on an UV-vis Spectrophotometer Helios β and an optical cone beam homemade tomography scanner with a 16-bit astronomy CCD camera with a set of color filters. The advantages and potential disadvantages for both types of gel dosimeters were summarized. Dose distribution in central slice and measured profiles of 16 mm shot shows excellent correspondence with treatment planning system Leksell GammaPlan® for both PAGAT and Turnbull Blue gels. Gel dosimeters are suitable for steep dose gradient verification. An optical tomography evaluation method is successful. Dose response characteristics of TB gel and PAGAT gel are presented.

  20. Area Monitoring Dosimeter Program for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Results for CY 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Bivins, Steven R.; Stoetzel, Gregory A.

    2000-09-19

    In January 1993, PNNL established an area monitoring dosimeter program in accordance with Article 514 of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. This program was to minimize the number of areas requiring issuance of personnel dosimeters and to demonstrate that doses outside Radiological Buffer Areas are negligible. In accordance with 10 CFR Part 835.402 (a)(1)-(4) and Article 511.1 of the DOE Standard Radiological Control, personnel dosimetry shall be provided to 1) radiological workers who are likely to receive at least 100 mrem annually and 2) declared pregnant workers, minors, and members of the public who are likely to receive at least 50 mrem annually. Program results for calendar years 1993-1998 confirmed that personnel dosimetry was not needed for individuals located in areas monitored by the program. A total of 123 area thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed in PNNL facilities during calendar year 1999. The TLDs were exchanged and analyzed quarterly. All routine area monitoring TLD results were less than 50 mrem annually after correcting for worker occupancy. The results support the conclusion that personnel dosimeters are not necessary for staff, declared pregnant workers, minors, or members of the public in these monitored areas.

  1. Considerations in the application of the electronic dosimeter to dose of record

    SciTech Connect

    Swinth, K.L.

    1997-12-01

    This report describes considerations for application of the electronic dosimeter (ED) as a measurement device for the dose of record (primary dosimetry). EDs are widely used for secondary dosimetry and advances in their reliability and capabilities have resulted in interest in their use to meet the needs of both primary and secondary dosimetry. However, the ED is an active device and more complex than the thermoluminescent and film dosimeters now in use for primary dosimetry. The user must evaluate the ED in terms of reliability, serviceability and radiations detected its intended application(s). If an ED is selected for primary dosimetry, the user must establish methods both for controlling the performance of the ED to ensure long term reliability of the measurements and for their proper use as a primary dosimeter. Regulatory groups may also want to develop methods to ensure adequate performance of the ED for dose of record. The purpose of the report is to provide an overview of considerations in the use of the ED for primary dosimetry. Considerations include recognizing current limitations, type testing of EDs, testing by the user, approval performance testing, calibration, and procedures to integrate the dosimeter into the users program.

  2. The dose response of normoxic polymer gel dosimeters measured using X-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Hill, B; Venning, A; Baldock, C

    2005-07-01

    X-ray CT was used to determine the dose response of normoxic polymer gel dosimeters. Normoxic polymer gel dosimeters were manufactured and irradiated up to 150 Gy. Up to 50 CT images were acquired on a Toshiba Aquilion Multislice CT scanner using protocols for 80 kV and 135 kV to determine dose response. HU-dose sensitivity, the linear regression of data for the HU versus dose for the linear part of the curve up to 60 Gy was 0.38+/-0.07 HU Gy(-1) for 135 kV and 0.37+/-0.01 HU Gy(-1) for 80 kV. Dose resolution was found to be < 1.3 Gy for an absorbed dose range up to 70 Gy for 135 kV, similar to that measured previously for polyacrylamide gel (PAG). Although the HU-dose sensitivity was lower than that previously measured for PAG gel dosimeters it had a greater range of absorbed dose indicating that normoxic polymer gel dosimeters have potential in CT gel dosimetry.

  3. Angular response characterization of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., personnel dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, A.B.; McMahan, K.L.; Colwell, D.S.

    1993-08-01

    An evaluation of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., personnel dosimeter to radiation incident from non-perpendicular angles was carried out to meet the Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) requirements. Dosimeters were exposed to six different radiation sources. For each source, dosimeters were rotated about their horizontal and vertical axes at seven different angles each. Raw readings were processed through the dose calculation algorithm used for routine personnel dosimetry to determine dose equivalent values. Dose equivalent responses relative to zero degree incident angle were found to be within {plus_minus} 20% for M150, K-59 and {sup 137}Cs photons when the incident angle was 60{degree} or less. For low-energy photon irradiations (M30 and K-16), responses for angles other than perpendicular incidence are generally unpredictable. Reasons include: (1) failure of dose calculation algorithm to identify the radiation field correctly due to unusual element ratios; and (2) at extreme angles ({plus_minus} 85{degree}), the dosimeter design (in relation to the irradiation geometry) becomes the limiting factor in producing reproducible results. Response to {sup 204}Tl beta particles decreases rapidly with increasing angle of incidence.

  4. Method and apparatus for passive optical dosimeter comprising caged dye molecules

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, David R.

    2001-07-03

    A new class of ultraviolet dosimeters is made possible by exposing caged dye molecules, which generate a dye molecule on exposure to ultraviolet radiation, to an exterior environment. Applications include sunburn monitors, characterizing the UV exposure history of UV-sensitive materials, especially including structural plastics, and use in disposable `one-use` optical equipment, especially medical devices.

  5. Verification of 3D Dose Distributions of a Beta-Emitting Radionuclide Using PRESAGE^ Dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowder, Mandi; Grant, Ryan; Ibbott, Geoff; Wendt, Richard

    2010-11-01

    Liquid Brachytherapy involves the direct administration of a beta-emitting radioactive solution into the selected tissue. The solution does not migrate from the injection point and uses the limited range of beta particles to produce a three-dimensional dose distribution. We simulated distributions by beta-dose kernels and validated those estimates by irradiating PRESAGE^ polyurethane dosimeters that measure the three-dimensional dose distributions by a change in optical density that is proportional to dose. The dosimeters were injected with internal beta-emitting radionuclide yttrium-90, exposed for 5.75 days, imaged with optical tomography, and analyzed with radiotherapy software. Dosimeters irradiated with an electron beam to 2 or 3 Gy were used for calibration. The shapes and dose distributions in the PRESAGE^ dosimeters were consistent with the predicted dose kernels. Our experiments have laid the groundwork for future application to individualized patient therapy by ultimately designing a treatment plan that conforms to the shape of any appropriate tumor.

  6. SU-E-T-753: Three-Dimensional Dose Distributions of Incident Proton Particle in the Polymer Gel Dosimeter and the Radiochromic Gel Dosimeter: A Simulation Study with MCNP Code

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M; Kim, G; Ji, Y; Kim, K; Park, S; Jung, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to estimate the three-dimensional dose distributions in the polymer and the radiochromic gel dosimeter, and to identify the detectability of both gel dosimeters by comparing with the water phantom in case of irradiating the proton particles. Methods: The normoxic polymer gel and the LCV micelle radiochromic gel were used in this study. The densities of polymer and the radiochromic gel dosimeter were 1.024 and 1.005 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively. The dose distributions of protons in the polymer and radiochromic gel were simulated using Monte Carlo radiation transport code (MCNPX, Los Alamos National Laboratory). The shape of phantom irradiated by proton particles was a hexahedron with the dimension of 12.4 × 12.4 × 15.0 cm{sup 3}. The energies of proton beam were 50, 80, and 140 MeV energies were directed to top of the surface of phantom. The cross-sectional view of proton dose distribution in both gel dosimeters was estimated with the water phantom and evaluated by the gamma evaluation method. In addition, the absorbed dose(Gy) was also calculated for evaluating the proton detectability. Results: The evaluation results show that dose distributions in both gel dosimeters at intermediated section and Bragg-peak region are similar with that of the water phantom. At entrance section, however, inconsistencies of dose distribution are represented, compared with water. The relative absorbed doses in radiochromic and polymer gel dosimeter were represented to be 0.47 % and 2.26 % difference, respectively. These results show that the radiochromic gel dosimeter was better matched than the water phantom in the absorbed dose evaluation. Conclusion: The polymer and the radiochromic gel dosimeter show similar characteristics in dose distributions for the proton beams at intermediate section and Bragg-peak region. Moreover the calculated absorbed dose in both gel dosimeters represents similar tendency by comparing with that in water phantom.

  7. The TMI-2 accident evaluation program

    SciTech Connect

    Osetek, D.J.; Broughton, J.M.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    The accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor, now 10 years old, remains as the United States' worst commercial nuclear reactor accident. Although the consequences of the accident were restricted primarily to the plant itself, the potential consequences of the accident, should it have progressed further, are large enough to warrant close scrutiny of all aspects of the event. TMI-2 accident research is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to provide the basis for more accurate calculations of source terms for postulated severe accidents. Research objectives supporting this goal include developing a comprehensive and consistent understanding of the mechanisms that controlled the progression of core damage and subsequent fission product behavior during the TMI-2 accident, and applying that understanding to the resolution of important severe accident safety issues. Developing a best-estimate scenario of the core melt progression during the accident is the focal point of the research and involves analytical work to interpret and integrate: (1) data recorded during the accident from plant instrumentation, (2) the post-accident state of the core, (3) results of the examination of material from the damaged core, and (4) related severe-accident research results. This paper summarizes the TMI-2 Accident Evaluation Program that is being conducted for the USDOE and briefly describes the important results that have been achieved. The Program is divided into four parts: Sample Acquisition and Plant Examination, Accident Scenario, Standard Problem Exercise, and Information and Industry Coordination.

  8. Effects of refractive index mismatch in optical CT imaging of polymer gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Makki S, Sharath; Kanhirodan, Rajan; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Proposing an image reconstruction technique, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc). The proposed method takes care of refractive index mismatches present in gel dosimeter scanner at the boundary, and also corrects for the interior ray refraction. Polymer gel dosimeters with high dose regions have higher refractive index and optical density compared to the background medium, these changes in refractive index at high dose results in interior ray bending. Methods: The inclusion of the effects of refraction is an important step in reconstruction of optical density in gel dosimeters. The proposed ray tracing algorithm models the interior multiple refraction at the inhomogeneities. Jacob’s ray tracing algorithm has been modified to calculate the pathlengths of the ray that traverses through the higher dose regions. The algorithm computes the length of the ray in each pixel along its path and is used as the weight matrix. Algebraic reconstruction technique and pixel based reconstruction algorithms are used for solving the reconstruction problem. The proposed method is tested with numerical phantoms for various noise levels. The experimental dosimetric results are also presented. Results: The results show that the proposed scheme ART-rc is able to reconstruct optical density inside the dosimeter better than the results obtained using filtered backprojection and conventional algebraic reconstruction approaches. The quantitative improvement using ART-rc is evaluated using gamma-index. The refraction errors due to regions of different refractive indices are discussed. The effects of modeling of interior refraction in the dose region are presented. Conclusions: The errors propagated due to multiple refraction effects have been modeled and the improvements in reconstruction using proposed model is presented. The refractive index of the dosimeter has a mismatch with the surrounding medium (for dry air or water scanning). The algorithm

  9. Remote auditing of radiotherapy facilities using optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Lye, Jessica Dunn, Leon; Kenny, John; Alves, Andrew; Lehmann, Joerg; Williams, Ivan; Kron, Tomas; Oliver, Chris; Butler, Duncan; Johnston, Peter; Franich, Rick

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: On 1 July 2012, the Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) released its Optically Stimulated Luminescent Dosimeter (OSLD) Level I audit, replacing the previous TLD based audit. The aim of this work is to present the results from this new service and the complete uncertainty analysis on which the audit tolerances are based. Methods: The audit release was preceded by a rigorous evaluation of the InLight® nanoDot OSLD system from Landauer (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL). Energy dependence, signal fading from multiple irradiations, batch variation, reader variation, and dose response factors were identified and quantified for each individual OSLD. The detectors are mailed to the facility in small PMMA blocks, based on the design of the existing Radiological Physics Centre audit. Modeling and measurement were used to determine a factor that could convert the dose measured in the PMMA block, to dose in water for the facility's reference conditions. This factor is dependent on the beam spectrum. The TPR{sub 20,10} was used as the beam quality index to determine the specific block factor for a beam being audited. The audit tolerance was defined using a rigorous uncertainty calculation. The audit outcome is then determined using a scientifically based two tiered action level approach. Audit outcomes within two standard deviations were defined as Pass (Optimal Level), within three standard deviations as Pass (Action Level), and outside of three standard deviations the outcome is Fail (Out of Tolerance). Results: To-date the ACDS has audited 108 photon beams with TLD and 162 photon beams with OSLD. The TLD audit results had an average deviation from ACDS of 0.0% and a standard deviation of 1.8%. The OSLD audit results had an average deviation of −0.2% and a standard deviation of 1.4%. The relative combined standard uncertainty was calculated to be 1.3% (1σ). Pass (Optimal Level) was reduced to ≤2.6% (2σ), and Fail (Out of Tolerance) was reduced to >3

  10. Characteristics of a novel polymer gel dosimeter formula for MRI scanning: Dosimetry, toxicity and temporal stability of response.

    PubMed

    Abtahi, S M

    2016-09-01

    The present study intended to investigate the composition of a new polymer gel dosimeter. The new composition would be more suitable for a wide range of applications in comparison to polyacrylamide gel dosimeter since its extremely toxic acrylamide has been replaced with less harmful monomer i.e. 2-Acrylamido-2-MethylPropane Sulfonic acid (AMPS). To this end, the PAGAT gel dosimeter formula was used as a basis to test the new formulation of polymer gel dosimeter with a different monomer (AMPS) instead of acrylamide by using the %6T and %50C to the formula. The new formulation was named PAMPSGAT (Poly AMPS, Gelatin and THPC) polymer gel dosimeter. Moreover, the MRI response (R2) of dosimeters was analyzed in terms of different dose range as well as post-irradiation time. The results indicated that the dose-response (R2) of AMPS/Bis had a linear trend over a wide dose range. Furthermore, the results showed an acceptable temporal stability for the new polymer gel dosimeter.

  11. Determining the applicability of the Landauer nanoDot as a general public dosimeter in a research imaging facility.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Michael A; Thoreson, Kelly F; Cerecero, Jennifer A

    2012-11-01

    The Research Imaging Institute (RII) building at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) houses two cyclotron particle accelerators, positron emission tomography (PET) machines, and a fluoroscopic unit. As part of the radiation protection program (RPP) and meeting the standard for achieving ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable), it is essential to minimize the ionizing radiation exposure to the general public through the use of controlled areas and area dose monitoring. Currently, thirty-four whole body Luxel+ dosimeters, manufactured by Landauer, are being used in various locations within the RII to monitor dose to the general public. The intent of this research was to determine if the nanoDot, a single point dosimeter, can be used as a general public dosimeter in a diagnostic facility. This was tested by first verifying characteristics of the nanoDot dosimeter including dose linearity, dose rate dependence, angular dependence, and energy dependence. Then, the response of the nanoDot dosimeter to the Luxel+ dosimeter when placed in a continuous, low dose environment was investigated. Finally, the nanoDot was checked for appropriate response in an acute, high dose environment. Based on the results, the current recommendation is that the nanoDot should not replace the Luxel+ dosimeter without further work to determine the energy spectra in the RII building and without considering the limitation of the microStar reader, portable on-site OSL reader, at doses below 0.1 mGy (10 mrad).

  12. DOE radiological calibrations intercomparison program: Results of fiscal year 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, F.M.; Roberson, P.L.; McDonald, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    The Department of Energy Radiological Calibration Intercomparison Program was initiated in January 1986, under the research portion of the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program. The program operates via the exchange of transfer standards, consisting of instrument sets and standard secondary beta sources. There are two instrument sets and the scheduled use has been staggered such that one set is available for use during each month. One set of secondary standard beta sources is available for use bimonthly. During the 1986 fiscal year, five laboratories used the instrument sets and three laboratories used the beta source set. Results were reported for all the measurements. The average and one standard deviation of the ratios of participant results to Pacific Northwest Laboratory calibration values were 1.12 +- 0.17 for gamma measurements. Those ratios for the gamma measurements varied from 0.98 to 3.06. The larger differences of results from measurements performed at two facilities were directly attributable to unfamiliarity with the intercomparison instruments. The average and one standard deviation of the ratios of participant results to PNL calibration values obtained using the secondary /sup 90/Sr beta source was 1.02 +- 0.05, which is well within measurement uncertainties. The one participant who performed measurements using /sup 147/Pm and /sup 204/Tl sources obtained ratios of 0.68 and 1.11, respectively. No measurements were performed using neutron or x-ray sources.

  13. WOCE 1991 chlorofluorocarbon standard intercomparison report. Data report

    SciTech Connect

    Bullister, J.L.; Menzia, F.; Wisegarver, D.P.

    1993-07-01

    A chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) standard intercomparison study was done among ten laboratories involved in measurements of dissolved and atmospheric CFCs as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) and other programs. The goal of the study was to compare CFC calibration scales and to allow CFC data sets collected by the participating groups to be merged together more easily. One cyclinder was distributed to each participating laboratory for analysis and return to PMEL. Within the precision of the analytical techniques used at PMEL, the CFC-11 and CFC-12 concentrations in the cylinders remained uniform throughout the intercomparison exercise. The CFC-113 and carbon tetrachloride content of the cylinders remained relatively uniform in all but one of the cylinders analyzed. The CFC-11 concentrations reported by participating laboratories ranged from 258.8 to 275.6 parts-per-trillion (PPT). The reported CFC-12 concentrations ranged from 487.4 to 503.5 PPT. Two laboratories reported values for CFC-113, and only one laboratory reported a value for carbon tetrachloride. Details of the calibration techniques used by the ten participating laboratories are given in the Appendices of the report.

  14. An overview of sensor calibration inter-comparison and applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Cao, Changyong; Chander, Gyanesh

    2010-01-01

    Long-term climate data records (CDR) are often constructed using observations made by multiple Earth observing sensors over a broad range of spectra and a large scale in both time and space. These sensors can be of the same or different types operated on the same or different platforms. They can be developed and built with different technologies and are likely operated over different time spans. It has been known that the uncertainty of climate models and data records depends not only on the calibration quality (accuracy and stability) of individual sensors, but also on their calibration consistency across instruments and platforms. Therefore, sensor calibration inter-comparison and validation have become increasingly demanding and will continue to play an important role for a better understanding of the science product quality. This paper provides an overview of different methodologies, which have been successfully applied for sensor calibration inter-comparison. Specific examples using different sensors, including MODIS, AVHRR, and ETM+, are presented to illustrate the implementation of these methodologies.

  15. The 1994 North American Interagency Intercomparison of Ultraviolet Monitoring Spectroradiometers

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Ambler; Early, Edward A.; DeLuisi, John; Disterhoft, Patrick; Wardle, David; Kerr, James; Rives, John; Sun, Yongchen; Lucas, Timothy; Mestechkina, Tanya; Neale, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Concern over stratospheric ozone depletion has prompted several government agencies in North America to establish networks of spectroradiometers for monitoring solar ultraviolet irradiance at the surface of the Earth. To assess the ability of spectroradiometers to accurately measure solar ultraviolet irradiance, and to compare the results between instruments of different monitoring networks, the first North American Intercomparison of Ultraviolet Monitoring Spectroradiometers was held September 19–29, 1994 at Table Mountain outside Boulder, Colorado, USA. This Intercomparison was coordinated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Participating agencies were the Environmental Protection Agency, National Science Foundation, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, and Atmospheric Environment Service, Canada. Instruments were characterized for wavelength accuracy, bandwidth, stray-light rejection, and spectral irradiance responsivity, the latter with a NIST standard lamp calibrated to operate in the horizontal position. The spectral irradiance responsivity was determined once indoors and twice outdoors, and demonstrated that, while the responsivities changed upon moving the instruments, they were relatively stable when the instruments remained outdoors. Synchronized spectral scans of the solar irradiance were performed over several days. Using the spectral irradiance responsivities determined with the NIST standard lamp, and a simple convolution technique to account for the different bandwidths of the instruments, the measured solar irradiances agreed within 5 %. PMID:27805148

  16. The 1995 North American Interagency Intercomparison of Ultraviolet Monitoring Spectroradiometers

    PubMed Central

    Early, Edward; Thompson, Ambler; Johnson, Carol; DeLuisi, John; Disterhoft, Patrick; Wardle, David; Wu, Edmund; Mou, Wanfeng; Sun, Yongchen; Lucas, Timothy; Mestechkina, Tanya; Harrison, Lee; Berndt, Jerry; Hayes, Douglas S.

    1998-01-01

    Concern over stratospheric ozone depletion has prompted several government agencies in North America to establish networks of spectroradiometers for monitoring solar ultraviolet irradiance at the surface of the Earth. To assess the ability of spectroradiometers to accurately measure solar ultraviolet irradiance, and to compare the results between instruments of different monitoring networks, the second North American Intercomparison of Ultraviolet Monitoring Spectroradiometers was held June 12 to 23, 1995 at Table Mountain outside Boulder, Colorado, USA. This Intercomparison was coordinated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Participating agencies were the Environmental Protection Agency; the National Science Foundation; the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center; the Department of Agriculture; and the Atmospheric Environment Service, Canada. Instruments were characterized for wavelength uncertainty, bandwidth, stray-light rejection, and spectral irradiance responsivity, the latter with a NIST standard lamp operating in a specially designed field calibration unit. The spectral irradiance responsivity, determined once indoors and twice outdoors, demonstrated that while the responsivities changed upon moving the instruments, they were relatively stable when the instruments remained outdoors. Synchronized spectral scans of the solar irradiance were performed over several days. Using the spectral irradiance responsivities determined with the NIST standard lamp and three different convolution functions to account for the different bandwidths of the instruments, the measured solar irradiances generally agreed to within 3 %. PMID:28009371

  17. An optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter for measuring patient exposure from imaging guidance procedures.

    PubMed

    Ding, George X; Malcolm, Arnold W

    2013-09-07

    There is a growing interest in patient exposure resulting from an x-ray imaging procedure used in image-guided radiation therapy. This study explores a feasibility to use a commercially available optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter, nanoDot, for estimating imaging radiation exposure to patients. The kilovoltage x-ray sources used for kV-cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging acquisition procedures were from a Varian on-board imager (OBI) image system. An ionization chamber was used to determine the energy response of nanoDot dosimeters. The chamber calibration factors for x-ray beam quality specified by half-value layer were obtained from an Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory. The Monte Carlo calculated dose distributions were used to validate the dose distributions measured by using the nanoDot dosimeters in phantom and in vivo. The range of the energy correction factors for the nanoDot as a function of photon energy and bow-tie filters was found to be 0.88-1.13 for different kVp and bow-tie filters. Measurement uncertainties of nanoDot were approximately 2-4% after applying the energy correction factors. The tests of nanoDot placed on a RANDO phantom and on patient's skin showed consistent results. The nanoDot is suitable dosimeter for in vivo dosimetry due to its small size and manageable energy dependence. The dosimeter placed on a patient's skin has potential to serve as an experimental method to monitor and to estimate patient exposure resulting from a kilovoltage x-ray imaging procedure. Due to its large variation in energy response, nanoDot is not suitable to measure radiation doses resulting from mixed beams of megavoltage therapeutic and kilovoltage imaging radiations.

  18. Development of a high efficiency personal/environmental radon dosimeter using polycarbonate detectors.

    PubMed

    Taheri, M; Jafarizadeh, M; Baradaran, S; Zainali, Gh

    2006-12-01

    Passive radon dosimeters, based on alpha particle etched track detectors, are widely used for the assessment of radon exposure. These methods are often applied in radon dosimetry for long periods of time. In this research work, we have developed a highly efficient method of personal/environmental radon dosimetry that is based upon the detection of alpha particles from radon daughters, (218)Po and (214)Po, using a polycarbonate detector (PC). The radon daughters are collected on the filter surface by passing a fixed flow of air through it and the PC detector, placed at a specified distance from the filter, is simultaneously exposed to alpha particles. After exposure, the latent tracks on the detector are made to appear by means of an electrochemical etching process; these are proportional to the radon dose. The air flow rate and the detector-filter distance are the major factors that can affect the performance of the dosimeter. The results obtained in our experimental investigations have shown that a distance of 1.5 cm between the detector and the filter, an absorber layer of Al with a thickness of 12 microm and an air flow rate of 4 l min(-1) offer the best design parameters for a high efficiency radon dosimeter. Then, the designed dosimeter was calibrated against different values of radon exposures and the obtained sensitivity was found to be 2.1 (tracks cm(-2)) (kBq h m(-3))(-1). The most important advantages of this method are that it is reliable, fast and convenient when used for radon dose assessment. In this paper, the optimized parameters of the dosimeter structure and its calibration procedure are presented and discussed.

  19. Water-equivalent dosimeter array for small-field external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, Louis; Beddar, A. Sam; Gingras, Luc; Lacroix, Frederic; Roy, Rene; Beaulieu, Luc

    2007-05-15

    With the increasing complexity of dose patterns external beam radiotherapy, there is a great need for new types of dosimeters. We studied the first prototype of a new dosimeter array consisting of water-equivalent plastic scintillating fibers for dose measurement in external beam radiotherapy. We found that this array allows precise, rapid dose evaluation of small photon fields. Starting with a dosimeter system constructed with a single scintillating fiber coupled to a clear optical fiber and read using a charge coupled device camera, we looked at the dosimeter's spatial resolution under small radiation fields and angular dependence. Afterward, we analyzed the camera's light collection to determine the maximum array size that could be built. Finally, we developed a prototype made of ten scintillating fiber detectors to study the behavior and precision of this system in simple dosimetric situations. The scintillation detector showed no measurable angular dependence. Comparison of the scintillation detector and a small-volume ion chamber showed agreement except for 1x1 and 0.5x5.0 cm{sup 2} fields where the output factor measured by the scintillator was higher. The actual field of view of the camera could accept more than 4000 scintillating fiber detectors simultaneously. Evaluation of the dose profile and depth dose curve using a prototype with ten scintillating fiber detectors showed precise, rapid dose evaluation even with placement of more than 75 optical fibers in the field to simulate what would happen in a larger array. We concluded that this scintillating fiber dosimeter array is a valuable tool for dose measurement in external beam radiotherapy. It possesses the qualities necessary to evaluate small and irregular fields with various incident angles such as those encountered in intensity-modulated radiotherapy, radiosurgery, and tomotherapy.

  20. Application of a radiophotoluminescent glass plate dosimeter for small field dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Aaki, Fujio; Ishidoya, Tatsuya; Ikegami, Tohru; Moribe, Nobuyuki; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2005-06-01

    We have recently developed a prototypical radiophotoluminescent glass plate dosimeter (GPD) system as a device for small field dosimetry. The purpose of this study is to examine the usefulness of the GPD system for small field dosimetry. The profiles measured with the GPD were evaluated by comparing them to those from Kodak X-Omat V and GAFCROMIC XR type R film dosimeters for 2, 5, 9, and 15 mm circular collimators created by a linear accelerator-based radiosurgery system. The GPD output factors were compared with those of various detectors including an ion chamber, a p-type silicon diode detector, a glass rod dosimeter (GRD), and a diamond detector. The results measured with the GPD were also confirmed by comparing them to those from Monte Carlo simulations. The accuracy of a simulated beam is validated by the excellent agreement between Monte Carlo calculated and measured central axis depth-dose curves for 9- and 15 mm circular collimators using 4- and 10 MV photon beams. The GPD profiles show almost the same full width at half maximum as those of film dosimeters and Monte Carlo simulations at 4- and 10 MV photon beams, but a little narrower penumbrae than the film dosimeters and Monte Carlo simulations. The output factors measured with the GPD are in good agreement with those from a diode detector, a diamond detector, and the GRD with a small active volume and Monte Carlo simulations, except for a very small 2 mm circular collimator. It was found that the GPD is a very useful detector for small field dosimetry.

  1. Dose evaluation of an NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter using gamma index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yuan-Jen; Lin, Jing-Quan; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Chen, Chin-Hsing

    2014-11-01

    An N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel dosimeter has great potential in clinical applications. However, its three-dimensional dose distribution must be assessed. In this work, a quantitative evaluation of dose distributions was performed to evaluate the NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter using gamma analysis. A cylindrical acrylic phantom filled with NIPAM gel measuring 10 cm (diameter) by 10 cm (height) by 3 mm (thickness) was irradiated by a 4×4 cm2 square light field. The irradiated gel phantom was scanned using an optical computed tomography (optical CT) scanner (OCTOPUS™, MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT, USA) at 1 mm resolution. The projection data were transferred to an image reconstruction program, which was written using MATLAB (The MathWorks, Natick, MA, USA). The program reconstructed the image of the optical density distribution using the algorithm of a filter back-projection. Three batches of replicated gel phantoms were independently measured. The average uncertainty of the measurements was less than 1%. The gel was found to have a high degree of spatial uniformity throughout the dosimeter and good temporal stability. A comparison of the line profiles of the treatment planning system and of the data measured by optical CT showed that the dose was overestimated in the penumbra region because of two factors. The first is light scattering due to changes in the refractive index at the edge of the irradiated field. The second is the edge enhancement caused by free radical diffusion. However, the effect of edge enhancement on the NIPAM gel dosimeter is not as significant as that on the BANG gel dosimeter. Moreover, the dose uncertainty is affected by the inaccuracy of the gel container positioning process. To reduce the uncertainty of 3D dose distribution, improvements in the gel container holder must be developed.

  2. Severe accident simulation at Olkiuoto

    SciTech Connect

    Tirkkonen, H.; Saarenpaeae, T.; Cliff Po, L.C.

    1995-09-01

    A personal computer-based simulator was developed for the Olkiluoto nuclear plant in Finland for training in severe accident management. The generic software PCTRAN was expanded to model the plant-specific features of the ABB Atom designed BWR including its containment over-pressure protection and filtered vent systems. Scenarios including core heat-up, hydrogen generation, core melt and vessel penetration were developed in this work. Radiation leakage paths and dose rate distribution are presented graphically for operator use in diagnosis and mitigation of accidents. Operating on an graphically for operator use in diagnosis and mitigation of accidents. Operating on an 486 DX2-66, PCTRAN-TVO achieves a speed about 15 times faster than real-time. A convenient and user-friendly graphic interface allows full interactive control. In this paper a review of the component models and verification runs are presented.

  3. Road Traffic Accidents in Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    AUBAKIROVA, Alma; KOSSUMOV, Alibek; IGISSINOV, Nurbek

    2013-01-01

    Background: The article provides the analysis of death rates in road traffic accidents in Kazakhstan from 2004 to 2010 and explores the use of sanitary aviation. Methods: Data of fatalities caused by road traffic accidents were collected and analysed. Descriptive and analytical methods of epidemiology and biomedical statistics were applied. Results: Totaly 27,003 people died as a result of road traffic accidents in this period. The death rate for the total population due to road traffic accidents was 25.0±2.10/0000. The death rate for men was (38.3±3.20/0000), which was higher (P<0.05) than that for women (12.6±1.10/0000). High death rates in the entire male population were identified among men of 30–39 years old, whereas the highest rates for women were attributed to the groups of 50–59 years old and 70–79 years old. In time dynamics, death rates tended to decrease: the total population (Tdec=−2.4%), men (Tdec=−2.3%) and women (Tdec=−1.4%). When researching territorial relevance, the rates were established as low (to 18.30/0000), average (between 18.3 and 24.00/0000) and high (from 24.00/0000 and above). Thus, the regions with high rates included Akmola region (24.30/0000), Mangistau region (25.90/0000), Zhambyl region (27.30/0000), Almaty region (29.30/0000) and South Kazakhstan region (32.40/0000). Conclusion: The identified epidemiological characteristics of the population deaths rates from road traffic accidents should be used in integrated and targeted interventions to enhance prevention of injuries in accidents. PMID:23641400

  4. Auto Accidents: Reducing Frequency, Increasing Recovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comeaux, Linda Atkins

    1988-01-01

    Careful hiring, monitoring, training, discipline, and safety policies will reduce school automobile and bus accidents. Guidelines are offered for accident reporting, claim handling, and dealing with insurance adjusters. (MLF)

  5. 76 FR 55079 - Recreational Vessel Accident Reporting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Recreational Vessel Accident Reporting AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... received recommendations from the National Boating Safety Advisory Council (NBSAC) regarding potential ways to improve the recreational boating accident reporting process. NBSAC recommended that the...

  6. Intercomparison of MAX-DOAS NO2 retrieval algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Enno; Pinardi, Gaia; Bösch, Tim; Wittrock, Folkard; Richter, Andreas; Burrows, John P.; Van Roozendael, Michel; Piters, Ankie; Wagner, Thomas; Drosoglou, Theano; Bais, Alkis; Wang, Shanshan; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso

    2016-04-01

    Ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements are a powerful method for monitoring of atmospheric composition in an automated way. The number of instruments and sites operated has been rapidly increasing over the last years. However, integrating the measurements from all these instruments into a consistent data set necessitates careful homogenization of measurements and data retrieval procedures. For this reason, several MAX-DOAS intercomparison campaigns have been carried out in the last years. Mostly, slant columns measured by different instruments and retrieved by different software were intercompared, i.e. observed differences were potentially caused by both, the instrument and/or the retrieval. In contrast, the approach presented here is a pure intercomparison of MAX-DOAS retrievals. In total, 16 international groups and institutes working in the field of MAX-DOAS participated. The work was performed as part of the EU-funded QA4ECV project. The intercomparison exercise is based on data recorded by the IUP-Bremen MAX-DOAS instrument during the MAD-CAT campaign (Multi-Axis DOAS comparison campaign for Aerosols and Trace gases), which was carried out at the Max-Planck-Institute of Chemistry in Mainz, Germany, in summer 2013. Each group participating in the exercise presented here performed MAX-DOAS fits using their own retrieval software but common input (IUP-Bremen spectra, same cross-sections, and same fit settings). The resulting slant columns show in general an excellent agreement (correlation coefficient > 99.9%). Surprisingly, the correlation is substantially smaller when using sequential Fraunhofer reference spectra instead of a noon reference indicating that groups calculate the sequential reference differently. Further differences were found to arise from treatment of the slit function and subsequent convolution of cross-sections as well as from wavelength calibration. The results indicate overall a high

  7. Determinants of injuries in passenger vessel accidents.

    PubMed

    Yip, Tsz Leung; Jin, Di; Talley, Wayne K

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates determinants of crew and passenger injuries in passenger vessel accidents. Crew and passenger injury equations are estimated for ferry, ocean cruise, and river cruise vessel accidents, utilizing detailed data of individual vessel accidents that were investigated by the U.S. Coast Guard during the time period 2001-2008. The estimation results provide empirical evidence (for the first time in the literature) that crew injuries are determinants of passenger injuries in passenger vessel accidents.

  8. Learning from Accident Analysis: The Dynamics Leading Up to a Rafting Accident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovelynck, Johan

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of a case study of a whitewater rafting accident reveals that such accidents tend to result from multiple actions. Many events leading up to such accidents include procedural and process factors, suggesting that hard-skills technical training is an insufficient approach to accident prevention. Contains 26 references. (SAS)

  9. Development of an Automated Reader for Analysis and Storage of Personnel Dosimeter Badge Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghelli, B. J.; Hodge, T. R.; Robinson, L. J.; Lueck, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    The collection and archiving of data from personnel dosimeters has become increasingly important in light of the lowered threshold limit values (TLV) for hydrazine (HZ), monomethylhydrazine (MMH), and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH). The American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) lowered the TLV from 100 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 ppb and has caused increased concern over long term exposures of personnel to trace levels of these hypergols and other potentially harmful chemicals. An automated system of reading the exposure levels of personnel dosimeters and storing exposure data for subsequent evaluation has been developed. The reading of personnel dosimeter badges for exposure lo potentially harmful vapor concentrations of hydrazines or other chemicals is performed visually by comparing the color developed by the badge with a calibrated color comparator. The result obtained using visual comparisons of the developed badge color with the comparator may vary widely from user to user. The automated badge reader takes the variability out of the dosimeter reading by accurately comparing the reflectance obtained from a colored spot on the badge with a reading on the same spot prior to any exposure to chemical vapors. The observed difference between the reflectance values is used as part of a calculation of the dose value for the badge based on a stored calibration curve. The badge reader also stores bar-code data unique to each badge, as well as bar-code information on the user, as part of the permanent badge record. The start and stop exposure times for each badge are recorded and can be used as part of the calculated concentration, in ppm, for each badge logged during a recording period. The badge reader is equipped with a number of badge holders, each of which is unique to a specific type of personnel dosimeter badge. This gives the reader maximum flexibility to allow for the reading of several different types of badges. Test results of

  10. Development of an Automated Reader for Analysis and Storage of Personnel Dosimeter Badge Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghelli, B. J.; Hodge, T. R.; Robinson, L. J.; Lueck, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    The collection and archiving of data from personnel dosimeters has become increasingly important in light of the lowered Threshold Limit Values (TLV) for HydraZine (HZ), MonoMethylHydrazine (MMH), and Unsymmetrical DiMethylHydrazine (UDMH). The American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) lowered the TLV from 100 parts per billion (ppb) to IO ppb and has caused increased concern over long term exposures of personnel to trace levels of these hypergols and other potentially harmful chemicals. An automated system of reading the exposure levels of personnel dosimeters and storing exposure data for subsequent evaluation has been developed. The reading of personnel dosimeter badges for exposure to potentially harmful vapor concentrations of hydrazines or other chemicals is performed visually by comparing the color developed by the badge with a calibrated color comparator. The result obtained using visual comparisons of the developed badge color with the comparator may vary widely from user to user. The automated badge reader takes the variability out of the dosimeter reading by accurately comparing the reflectance obtained from a colored spot on the badge with a reading on the same spot prior to any exposure to chemical vapors. The observed difference between the reflectance values is used as part of a calculation of the dose value for the badge based on a stored calibration curve. The badge reader also stores bar-code data unique to each badge, as well as bar-code information on the user, as part of the permanent badge record. The start and stop exposure times for each badge are recorded and can be used as part of the calculated concentration, in ppm, for each badge logged during a recording period. The badge reader is equipped with a number of badge holders, each of which is unique to a specific type of personnel dosimeter badge. This gives the reader maximum flexibility to allow for the reading of several different types of badges. Test results of

  11. Estimating dose to implantable cardioverter-defibrillator outside the treatment fields using a skin QED diode, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters, and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Chan, Maria F; Song, Yulin; Dauer, Lawrence T; Li, Jingdong; Huang, David; Burman, Chandra

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the relative sensitivity of skin QED diodes, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) (microStar™ DOT, Landauer), and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a function of distance from a photon beam field edge when applied to measure dose at out-of-field points. These detectors have been used to estimate radiation dose to patients' implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) located outside the treatment field. The ICDs have a thin outer case made of 0.4- to 0.6-mm-thick titanium (∼2.4-mm tissue equivalent). A 5-mm bolus, being the equivalent depth of the devices under the patient's skin, was placed over the ICDs. Response per unit absorbed dose-to-water was measured for each of the dosimeters with and without bolus on the beam central axis (CAX) and at a distance up to 20 cm from the CAX. Doses were measured with an ionization chamber at various depths for 6- and 15-MV x-rays on a Varian Clinac-iX linear accelerator. Relative sensitivity of the detectors was determined as the ratio of the sensitivity at each off-axis distance to that at the CAX. The detector sensitivity as a function of the distance from the field edge changed by ± 3% (1-11%) for LiF TLD-700, decreased by 10% (5-21%) for OSLD, and increased by 16% (11-19%) for the skin QED diode (Sun Nuclear Corp.) at the equivalent depth of 5 mm for 6- or 15-MV photon energies. Our results showed that the use of bolus with proper thickness (i.e., ∼d(max) of the photon energy) on the top of the ICD would reduce the scattered dose to a lower level. Dosimeters should be calibrated out-of-field and preferably with bolus equal in thickness to the depth of interest. This can be readily performed in clinic.

  12. Estimating dose to implantable cardioverter-defibrillator outside the treatment fields using a skin QED diode, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters, and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Maria F.; Song, Yulin; Dauer, Lawrence T.; Li Jingdong; Huang, David; Burman, Chandra

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the relative sensitivity of skin QED diodes, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) (microStar Trade-Mark-Sign DOT, Landauer), and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a function of distance from a photon beam field edge when applied to measure dose at out-of-field points. These detectors have been used to estimate radiation dose to patients' implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) located outside the treatment field. The ICDs have a thin outer case made of 0.4- to 0.6-mm-thick titanium ({approx}2.4-mm tissue equivalent). A 5-mm bolus, being the equivalent depth of the devices under the patient's skin, was placed over the ICDs. Response per unit absorbed dose-to-water was measured for each of the dosimeters with and without bolus on the beam central axis (CAX) and at a distance up to 20 cm from the CAX. Doses were measured with an ionization chamber at various depths for 6- and 15-MV x-rays on a Varian Clinac-iX linear accelerator. Relative sensitivity of the detectors was determined as the ratio of the sensitivity at each off-axis distance to that at the CAX. The detector sensitivity as a function of the distance from the field edge changed by {+-} 3% (1-11%) for LiF TLD-700, decreased by 10% (5-21%) for OSLD, and increased by 16% (11-19%) for the skin QED diode (Sun Nuclear Corp.) at the equivalent depth of 5 mm for 6- or 15-MV photon energies. Our results showed that the use of bolus with proper thickness (i.e., {approx}d{sub max} of the photon energy) on the top of the ICD would reduce the scattered dose to a lower level. Dosimeters should be calibrated out-of-field and preferably with bolus equal in thickness to the depth of interest. This can be readily performed in clinic.

  13. 48 CFR 36.513 - Accident prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Accident prevention. 36... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 36.513 Accident prevention. (a) The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 52.236-13, Accident Prevention,...

  14. 28 CFR 301.106 - Repetitious accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Repetitious accidents. 301.106 Section 301.106 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ACCIDENT COMPENSATION General § 301.106 Repetitious accidents. If an inmate worker is involved in successive...

  15. 48 CFR 636.513 - Accident prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Accident prevention. 636... CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 636.513 Accident prevention. (a) In... contracting activities shall insert DOSAR 652.236-70, Accident Prevention, in lieu of FAR clause...

  16. 49 CFR 229.17 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Accident reports. 229.17 Section 229.17..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS General § 229.17 Accident reports. (a) In the case of an accident due to a failure from any cause of a locomotive or any part or appurtenance...

  17. 28 CFR 301.106 - Repetitious accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Repetitious accidents. 301.106 Section 301.106 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ACCIDENT COMPENSATION General § 301.106 Repetitious accidents. If an inmate worker is involved in successive...

  18. 48 CFR 1836.513 - Accident prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Accident prevention. 1836... 1836.513 Accident prevention. The contracting officer must insert the clause at 1852.223-70, Safety and Health, in lieu of FAR clause 52.236-13, Accident Prevention, and its Alternate I....

  19. 48 CFR 636.513 - Accident prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Accident prevention. 636... CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 636.513 Accident prevention. (a) In... contracting activities shall insert DOSAR 652.236-70, Accident Prevention, in lieu of FAR clause...

  20. 49 CFR 195.50 - Reporting accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reporting accidents. 195.50 Section 195.50 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Annual, Accident, and Safety-Related Condition Reporting § 195.50 Reporting accidents. An...

  1. 48 CFR 836.513 - Accident prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accident prevention. 836... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 836.513 Accident prevention. The contracting officer must insert the clause at 852.236-87, Accident Prevention,...

  2. 49 CFR 229.17 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accident reports. 229.17 Section 229.17..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS General § 229.17 Accident reports. (a) In the case of an accident due to a failure from any cause of a locomotive or any part or appurtenance...

  3. 48 CFR 636.513 - Accident prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accident prevention. 636... CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 636.513 Accident prevention. (a) In... contracting activities shall insert DOSAR 652.236-70, Accident Prevention, in lieu of FAR clause...

  4. 28 CFR 301.106 - Repetitious accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Repetitious accidents. 301.106 Section 301.106 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ACCIDENT COMPENSATION General § 301.106 Repetitious accidents. If an inmate worker is involved in successive...

  5. NASA Medical Response to Human Spacecraft Accidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patlach, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Manned space flight is risky business. Accidents have occurred and may occur in the future. NASA's manned space flight programs, with all their successes, have had three fatal accidents, one at the launch pad and two in flight. The Apollo fire and the Challenger and Columbia accidents resulted in a loss of seventeen crewmembers. Russia's manned space flight programs have had three fatal accidents, one ground-based and two in flight. These accidents resulted in the loss of five crewmembers. Additionally, manned spacecraft have encountered numerous close calls with potential for disaster. The NASA Johnson Space Center Flight Safety Office has documented more than 70 spacecraft incidents, many of which could have become serious accidents. At the Johnson Space Center (JSC), medical contingency personnel are assigned to a Mishap Investigation Team. The team deploys to the accident site to gather and preserve evidence for the Accident Investigation Board. The JSC Medical Operations Branch has developed a flight surgeon accident response training class to capture the lessons learned from the Columbia accident. This presentation will address the NASA Mishap Investigation Team's medical objectives, planned response, and potential issues that could arise subsequent to a manned spacecraft accident. Educational Objectives are to understand the medical objectives and issues confronting the Mishap Investigation Team medical personnel subsequent to a human space flight accident.

  6. 28 CFR 301.106 - Repetitious accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Repetitious accidents. 301.106 Section 301.106 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ACCIDENT COMPENSATION General § 301.106 Repetitious accidents. If an inmate worker is involved in successive...

  7. 49 CFR 195.50 - Reporting accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reporting accidents. 195.50 Section 195.50 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Annual, Accident, and Safety-Related Condition Reporting § 195.50 Reporting accidents. An...

  8. 49 CFR 195.50 - Reporting accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reporting accidents. 195.50 Section 195.50 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Annual, Accident, and Safety-Related Condition Reporting § 195.50 Reporting accidents. An...

  9. 49 CFR 195.50 - Reporting accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reporting accidents. 195.50 Section 195.50 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Annual, Accident, and Safety-Related Condition Reporting § 195.50 Reporting accidents. An...

  10. 48 CFR 36.513 - Accident prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Accident prevention. 36... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 36.513 Accident prevention. (a) The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 52.236-13, Accident Prevention,...

  11. 48 CFR 636.513 - Accident prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Accident prevention. 636... CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 636.513 Accident prevention. (a) In... contracting activities shall insert DOSAR 652.236-70, Accident Prevention, in lieu of FAR clause...

  12. 48 CFR 36.513 - Accident prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accident prevention. 36... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 36.513 Accident prevention. (a) The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 52.236-13, Accident Prevention,...

  13. 28 CFR 301.106 - Repetitious accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Repetitious accidents. 301.106 Section 301.106 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ACCIDENT COMPENSATION General § 301.106 Repetitious accidents. If an inmate worker is involved in successive...

  14. 49 CFR 229.17 - Accident reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accident reports. 229.17 Section 229.17..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS General § 229.17 Accident reports. (a) In the case of an accident due to a failure from any cause of a locomotive or any part or appurtenance...

  15. 48 CFR 1836.513 - Accident prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accident prevention. 1836... 1836.513 Accident prevention. The contracting officer must insert the clause at 1852.223-70, Safety and Health, in lieu of FAR clause 52.236-13, Accident Prevention, and its Alternate I....

  16. 48 CFR 836.513 - Accident prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Accident prevention. 836... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 836.513 Accident prevention. The contracting officer must insert the clause at 852.236-87, Accident Prevention,...

  17. 48 CFR 836.513 - Accident prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Accident prevention. 836... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 836.513 Accident prevention. The contracting officer must insert the clause at 852.236-87, Accident Prevention,...

  18. An analysis of fishing vessel accidents.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Pillay, A; Kwon, Y S; Wall, A D; Loughran, C G

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, accident data collected from the Marine Accident Investigation Branch are presented and an analysis is carried out to determine the most common causes of accidents on fishing vessels. Discussions on fishing vessel-safety assessment and data problems are given.

  19. Nuclear Weapon Accident Response Procedures (NARP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-22

    Fast, reliable, and accurate communications are essential for nuclear weapon accident response operations. Moreover, securing adequate internal ...activities near the scene of a nuclear weapon accident to speed the flow of information to the public and the internal audience. Although it is 183...Departments and Agencies in a nuclear weapon accident. Inherent in this event are the relationships between international , national, State, and

  20. 48 CFR 836.513 - Accident prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accident prevention. 836... prevention. The contracting officer must insert the clause at 852.236-87, Accident Prevention, in solicitations and contracts for construction that contain the clause at FAR 52.236-13, Accident Prevention....

  1. 48 CFR 1836.513 - Accident prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Accident prevention. 1836... 1836.513 Accident prevention. The contracting officer must insert the clause at 1852.223-70, Safety and Health, in lieu of FAR clause 52.236-13, Accident Prevention, and its Alternate I....

  2. 48 CFR 1836.513 - Accident prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Accident prevention. 1836... 1836.513 Accident prevention. The contracting officer must insert the clause at 1852.223-70, Safety and Health, in lieu of FAR clause 52.236-13, Accident Prevention, and its Alternate I....

  3. 48 CFR 1836.513 - Accident prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Accident prevention. 1836... 1836.513 Accident prevention. The contracting officer must insert the clause at 1852.223-70, Safety and Health, in lieu of FAR clause 52.236-13, Accident Prevention, and its Alternate I....

  4. 48 CFR 636.513 - Accident prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accident prevention. 636... CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 636.513 Accident prevention. (a) In... contracting activities shall insert DOSAR 652.236-70, Accident Prevention, in lieu of FAR clause...

  5. 48 CFR 836.513 - Accident prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Accident prevention. 836... prevention. The contracting officer must insert the clause at 852.236-87, Accident Prevention, in solicitations and contracts for construction that contain the clause at FAR 52.236-13, Accident Prevention....

  6. Investigation of unstabilized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) for use as a long-term UV dosimeter: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, Abdurazaq; Parisi, Alfio V.

    2012-08-01

    A new chemical UV dosimeter with a larger dose capacity than existing chemical dosimeters has been investigated for long-term UV measurements. Unstabilized polyvinyl chloride (PVC), cast in 40 µm thick film, has been found to respond to at least 745 SED (Standard Erythema Dose = 100 J m-2) of solar UV radiation, which is equivalent to about two to three summer weeks of exposure in subtropical sites. The UV-induced changes in the PVC dosimeter were quantified using a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer and the decrease in the absorption intensity of the 1064 cm-1 peak was employed to quantify these changes. Dose response curves have been established by relating the decrease in the PVC dosimeter's absorption intensity at 1064 cm-1 to the corresponding absolute and erythemal UV exposure dose.

  7. Comparative sensitivity study and reading correction of various albedo dosimeters in neutron fields on the U-400M accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokrov, Yu. V.; Morozov, S. V.; Shchegolev, V. Yu.

    2013-03-01

    The sensitivities of three types of albedo dosimeters are experimentally studied in U-400M accelerator radiation fields in the experimental hall (one point) and behind its shielding (three points). It is shown that the ratios of the sensitivity of the albedo dosimeter (AD) and the combined personal dosimeter (CPD) used earlier at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) to the sensitivity of the DVGN-01 dosimeter are constant within 25%. This allows the AD and CPD sensitivities obtained earlier at the JINR facilities to be used for correcting readings of the DVGN-01 now used at JINR for personal radiation monitoring. Correction coefficients are found for DVGN-01 readings behind the U-400M shielding. This has allowed a more reliable correction coefficient to be established for the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR).

  8. Intercomparison of Land Surface Remote Sensing Products From Various Sensors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobron, N.; Pinty, B.; Mélin, F.; Taberner, M.; Verstraete, M.; Widlowski, J.

    2003-12-01

    The biophysical activities on land surfaces are documented from spectral measurements made in space. Advances in the understanding of radiation transfer and availability of higher performance instruments have lead to the development of a new generation of geophysical products able to provide reliable, accurate information on the state and evolution of terrestrial environments. Specifically, a series of optimized algorithms have been developed to estimate the Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FAPAR) for various instruments. Such an approach allows the synergistic use of FAPAR products derived from different sensors and the construction of global FAPAR time series independent from the life time of these specific sensors. The outline of the methodology will be summarized and the preliminary results of an inter-comparison exercise conducted with SeaWiFS, MERIS(ENVISAT), MISR(Terra) and MODIS(Terra) products will be presented.

  9. Intercomparison of remote measurements of stratospheric NO and NO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roscoe, H. K.; Kerridge, B. J.; Pollitt, S.; Louisnard, N.; Flaud, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    During the 1982 and 1983 Balloon Intercomparison Campaigns, the vertical profile of stratospheric NO2 was measured remotely by nine instruments and that of NO by two. Total overhead columns were measured by two more instruments. Between 30 and 35 km, where measurements overlapped, agreement between NO profiles was within + or - 30 percent, which is better than the accuracies claimed by the experimenters. Between 35 and 40 km, there was similarly good agreement between NO2 profiles, but below 30 km, differences of greater than a factor of 3 were found. In the second campaign, NO2 values from most instruments agreed within their quoted errors, except that the Oxford radiometer gave much lower values; the first campaign and the column measurements show a more uniform spread of results.

  10. Global reference frame: Intercomparison of results (SLR, VLBI and GPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Chopo; Watkins, Michael M.; Heflin, M.

    1994-01-01

    The terrestrial reference frame (TRF) is realized by a set of positions and velocities derived from a combination of the three space geodetic techniques, SLR, VLBI and GPS. The standard International TRF is constructed by the International Earth Rotation Service in such a way that it is stable with time and the addition of new data. An adopted model for overall plate motion, NUVEL-1 NNR, defines the conceptual reference frame in which all the plates are moving. In addition to the measurements made between reference points within the space geodetic instruments, it is essential to have accurate, documented eccentricity measurements from the instrument reference points to ground monuments. Proper local surveys between the set of ground monuments at a site are also critical for the use of the space geodetic results. Eccentricities and local surveys are, in fact, the most common and vexing sources of error in the use of the TRF for such activities as collocation and intercomparison.

  11. An intercomparison exercise on technetium-99 in seaweed

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, T.H. )

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an intercomparison exercise carried out on the determination of {sup 99}Tc in Fucus vesiculosus taken from the coastline adjacent to Sellafield. This species of seaweed has a very high affinity for the radionuclide (e.g., two orders of magnitude higher than has the edible prophyra species); it presents, therefore, a potential source for a biological reference material with the highest possible specific activity. Details of the preparation and homogeneity testing before distribution of samples for analysis are described and summaries of analytical procedures used by each participant are provided. The exercise was arranged by the UK Analysts' Informal Working Group and participants comprised laboratories considered to be expert in the analysis and others who were using the opportunity to demonstrate their capability to perform this type of determination. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  12. Intercomparison of analytical methods for arsenic speciation in human urine.

    PubMed Central

    Crecelius, E; Yager, J

    1997-01-01

    An intercomparison exercise was conducted for the quantification of arsenic species in spiked human urine. The primary objective of the exercise was to determine the variance among laboratories in the analysis of arsenic species such as inorganic As (As+3 and As+5), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). Laboratories that participated had previous experience with arsenic speciation analysis. The results of this interlaboratory comparison are encouraging. There is relatively good agreement on the concentrations of these arsenic species in urine at concentrations that are relevant to research on the metabolism of arsenic in humans and other mammals. Both the accuracy and precision are relatively poor for arsenic concentrations of less than about 5 micrograms/l. PMID:9288500

  13. International intercomparison for criticality dosimetry: the case of biological dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Roy, L; Buard, V; Delbos, M; Durand, V; Paillole, N; Grégoire, E; Voisin, P

    2004-01-01

    The Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) organized a biological dosimetry international intercomparison with the purpose of comparing (i) dicentrics yield produced in human lymphocytes; (ii) the gamma and neutron dose estimate according to the corresponding laboratory calibration curve. The experimental reactor SILENE was used with different configurations: bare source 4 Gy, lead shield 1 and 2 Gy and a 60Co source 2 Gy. An increasing variation of dicentric yield per cell was observed between participants when there were more damages in the samples. Doses were derived from the observed dicentric rates according to the dose-effect relationship provided by each laboratory. Differences in dicentric rate values are more important than those in the corresponding dose values. The doses obtained by the participants were found to be in agreement with the given physical dose within 20%. The evaluation of the respective gamma and neutron dose was achieved only by four laboratories, with some small variations among them.

  14. Perception of road accident causes.

    PubMed

    Vanlaar, Ward; Yannis, George

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical two-dimensional model on prevalence and risk was developed. The objective of this study was to validate this model empirically to answer three questions: How do European drivers perceive the importance of several causes of road accidents? Are there important differences in perceptions between member states? Do these perceptions reflect the real significance of road accident causes? Data were collected from 23 countries, based on representative national samples of at least 1000 respondents each (n=24,372). Face-to-face interviews with fully licensed, active car drivers were conducted using a questionnaire containing closed answer questions. Respondents were asked to rate 15 causes of road accidents, each using a six-point ordinal scale. The answers were analyzed by calculating Kendall's tau for each pair of items to form lower triangle similarity matrices per country and for Europe as a whole. These matrices were then used as the input files for an individual difference scaling to draw a perceptual map of the 15 items involved. The hypothesized model on risk and prevalence fits the data well and enabled us to answer the three questions of concern. The subject space of the model showed that there are no relevant differences between the 23 countries. The group space of the model comprises four quadrants, each containing several items (high perceived risk/low perceived prevalence items; high perceived risk/high perceived prevalence items; low perceived risk/high perceived prevalence items and low perceived risk/low perceived prevalence items). Finally, perceptions of the items driving under the influence of alcohol, drugs and medicines and driving using a handheld or hands-free mobile phone are discussed with regard to their real significance in causing road accidents. To conclude, individual difference scaling offers some promising possibilities to study drivers' perception of road accident causes.

  15. Inter-Comparison of Terra and Aqua MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, X.; Salomonson, V. V.; Sun, J.; Wu, A.; Barnes, W.; Guenther, B.

    2004-01-01

    Nearly identical copies of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) have been operating on-board the NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites since their launches in December 1999 and May 2002, respectively. Each MODIS has 20 reflective solar bands (RSB) with center wavelengths ranging from 0.41 to 2.1 micrometers and 16 thermal emissive bands (TEB) from 3.7 to 14.4 micrometers. The absolute radiometric accuracy requirements (1 sigma) at the typical spectral radiance levels are plus or minus 2% for the RSB for the RSB reflectance factors and plus or minus 5% for the RSB radiance products. With few exceptions, the TEB requirements are plus or minus 1%. The sensor's on-orbit radiometric calibration is performed by the on-board calibrators, including a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) system for the RSB and a V-groove flat panel blackbody (BB) for the TEB. In addition, the Moon has been extensively used by both Terra and Aqua MODIS to support their on-orbit calibration and characterization. This paper presents MODIS lunar calibration methodology and inter-comparison of Terra and Aqua MODIS in the VIS/NIR spectral regions. Current results from lunar observations show that the calibration difference between the two sensors is less than plus or minus 1%. Also discussed in this paper are the approaches and results of inter-comparison of Terra and Aqua MODIS in the TEB using closely matched thermal infrared (TIR) channels on the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) at 11 and 12 micrometers.

  16. PAGAT gel dosimeters for dose distribution measurements in the vicinity of high-density implants: A preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asena, A.; Kairn, T.; Crowe, S. B.; Smith, S. T.; Trapp, J. V.

    2015-01-01

    This work examined the suitability of the PAGAT gel dosimeter for use in dose distribution measurements around high-density implants. An assessment of the gels reactivity with various metals was performed and no corrosive effects were observed. An artefact reduction technique was also investigated in order to minimise scattering of the laser light in the optical CT scans. The potential for attenuation and backscatter measurements using this gel dosimeter were examined for a temporary tissue expander's internal magnetic port.

  17. Factors Affecting the Application of a Simple Ratio Technique for Spectral Correction of a Neutron Personnel Albedo Dosimeter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Robert Clifton

    To accurately assess the dose equivalent indicated by the albedo response of a neutron personnel dosimeter, additional knowledge is generally required in order to apply the needed spectral specific correction factors. This work was designed to evaluate the capability of the USAF Personnel Neutron Dosimeter to "self-calibrate" for moderated fission neutron spectra. The boron/bare ratio technique is compared with a simple theoretical model of the dosimeter and with the 23 cm (9 in) to 7.6 cm (3 in) Hankins' remmeter calibration technique. The overall goal was to provide dose-equivalent estimates comparable to those provided by the remmeter technique without the necessity of special on-site measurements. Although the boron/bare technique with the present dosimeter design fails to provide calibration factors needed for moderated fission neutron spectra, theoretical predictions based upon the model and the measured dosimeter responses are used to propose a dosimeter design which might fulfill the desired goal. Ancillary data gathered during the study are also presented.

  18. In situ ion-beam-induced luminescence analysis for evaluating a micrometer-scale radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Shunsuke; Kada, Wataru; Parajuli, Raj Kumar; Matsubara, Yoshinori; Sakai, Makoto; Miura, Kenta; Satoh, Takahiro; Koka, Masashi; Yamada, Naoto; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Hanaizumi, Osamu

    2016-06-01

    Micrometer-scale responses of radio-photoluminescence (RPL) glass dosimeters to focused ionized particle radiation were evaluated by combining ion-beam-induced luminescence (IBIL) and proton beam writing (PBW) using a 3 MeV focused proton microbeam. RPL phosphate glass dosimeters doped with ionic Ag or Cu activators at concentrations of 0.2 and 0.1% were fabricated, and their scintillation intensities were evaluated by IBIL spectroscopy under a PBW micropatterning condition. Compared with the Ag-doped dosimeter, the Cu-doped dosimeter was more tolerant of the radiation, while the peak intensity of its luminescence was lower, under the precise dose control of the proton microprobe. Proton-irradiated areas were successfully recorded using these dosimeters and their RPL centers were visualized under 375 nm ultraviolet light. The reproduction of the irradiated region by post-RPL imaging suggests that precise estimation of irradiation dose using microdosimeters can be accomplished by optimizing RPL glass dosimeters for various proton microprobe applications in organic material analysis and in micrometer-scale material modifications.

  19. Three-dimensional radiation dosimetry for gamma knife using a gel dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Kazi Muazzam

    The use of three-dimensional radiation dosimetry has been limited. With the use of water phantoms and ionization chambers, it has been possible to determine three dimensional dose distributions on a gross scale for cobalt 60 and linear accelerator sources. This method has been somewhat useful for traditional radiotherapy. There is, however, a need for more precise dosimetry, particularly with stereotactic radiosurgery. Most gamma knife facilities use either thermoluminescant dosimetry or film, neither of which provides three dimensional dose distributions. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a gel dosimetry system that relies on the production of a ferric ion-xylenol orange colored complex. This work demonstrates the use of laser light and a detector to quantify radiation-induced colorimetric changes in absorbance for the gel dosimeter. The absorbance has been reconstructed by the back projection technique to demonstrate the applicability of the gel dosimeter to gamma knife 3D-dose distributions.

  20. Response of the alanine/ESR dosimeter to radiation from an Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Anton, M; Hackel, T; Zink, K; von Voigts-Rhetz, P; Selbach, H-J

    2015-01-07

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to radiation from an Ir-192 source with respect to the absorbed dose to water, relative to Co-60 radiation, was determined experimentally as well as by Monte Carlo simulations. The experimental and Monte Carlo results for the response agree well within the limits of uncertainty. The relative response decreases with an increasing distance between the measurement volume and the source from approximately 98% at a 1 cm distance to 96% at 5 cm. The present data are more accurate, but agree well with data published by Schaeken et al (2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 6625-34). The decrease of the relative response with an increasing distance that had already been observed by these authors is confirmed. In the appendix, the properties of the alanine dosimeter with respect to volume and sensitivity corrections are investigated. The inhomogeneous distribution of the detection probability that was taken into account for the analysis was determined experimentally.