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Sample records for accidents worker compensation laws

  1. Occupationally acquired HIV: the vulnerability of health care workers under workers' compensation laws.

    PubMed

    Tereskerz, P M; Jagger, J

    1997-09-01

    Approximately 800,000 needlesticks and other sharp injuries from contaminated medical devices occur in health care settings each year, of which an estimated 16,000 are contaminated by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Health care workers who are occupationally infected by HIV are at risk of being left without workers' compensation coverage. In some states, the definition of an occupational disease is so restrictive that infected health care workers are unlikely to qualify for benefits. For those who are able to meet the definition, compensation is often inadequate. Recourse is also limited by statutory provisions that preclude health care workers from bringing civil suits against their employers. We recommend the amendment of legislation to provide more equitable remedies, including: (1) broadening the definition of occupational disease; (2) eliminating provisions that require a claimant to prove that (a) a specific occupational incident resulted in infection and (b) HIV is not an ordinary disease of life; (3) expanding the time for filing a claim; (4) assuring that lifetime benefits will be provided to the disabled health care worker; and (5) assuring that claims will remain confidential.

  2. Reducing workers' compensation costs.

    PubMed

    Killian, M J

    1994-01-01

    Employers can reduce their workers' compensation costs by encouraging internal communication and education before and after injuries occur. Comprehensive workers' compensation programs can be developed by integrating the management of employee benefits and workers' compensation claims. PMID:10133659

  3. Coal workers' pneumoconiosis and compensation in Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Westerfield, B.T.

    1993-04-01

    Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis has been a compensable disease since the 1960s. In 1987 the Kentucky Workers' Compensation Law was changed to provide reduced benefits for coal miners with radiographic evidence of Black Lung Disease, but little or no respiratory impairment. This paper reports a typical case of Black Lung today and discusses the status of workers' compensation for this disease in Kentucky.

  4. Administering the cost of death: organisational perspectives on workers' compensation and common law claims following traumatic death at work in Australia.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Scott J; Matthews, Lynda R; Ngo, Mark; Bohle, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Quite apart from its devastating human and psychological effects, the death of a worker can have significant, life-changing effects on their families. For many affected families, workers' compensation entitlements represent the primary financial safeguard. Where the worker was self-employed, the family will generally be excluded from this remedy and have to take the more problematic option of claiming damages at common law. Despite the centrality of workers' compensation, little attention has been given to how effectively workers' compensation agencies address the needs of bereaved families or the views of other organisations involved, such as safety inspectors, unions, employers and victim advocates. Based on interviews with forty eight organisational representatives in five Australian states, this study examines how workers' compensation regimes deal with work-related death from the perspective of those organisations involved directly or indirectly in the process. The study highlighted a number of problems, including the exclusion of self-employed workers and dealing with 'mixed families'.

  5. 48 CFR 852.236-86 - Workers' compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Workers' compensation. 852... Workers' compensation. As prescribed in 836.577, insert the following clause: Workers' Compensation (JAN... workers compensation laws to all lands and premises owned or held by the United States. (End of clause)...

  6. Epidemiologic characteristics of compensated occupational lung cancers among Korean workers.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Jeong, Kyoung Sook

    2014-11-01

    An understanding of the characteristics of occupational lung cancer is important to establish policies that prevent carcinogen exposure and to compensate workers exposed to lung carcinogens. This study analyzed the characteristics of occupational lung cancers in workers who were compensated under the Industrial Accident Compensation Insurance Law between 1994 and 2011. A total of 179 occupational lung cancers were compensated. The main carcinogenic exposure was asbestos, followed by crystalline silica and hexavalent chromium. The mean exposure duration and latency were 19.8 and 23.2 yr. The most common industry was manufacturing, followed by construction and transportation. The most common occupation was maintenance and repair, followed by foundry work, welding, painting, and spinning or weaving. Although asbestos was predominant carcinogen, the proportion of these cases was relatively low compared to other developed countries. Proper surveillance system is needed to monitor occupational lung cancer and improve prevention measures. PMID:25408577

  7. Workers' Compensation Insurance and Occupational Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jun-Byoung; Yi, Hyung Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Although compensation for occupational injuries and diseases is guaranteed in almost all nations, countries vary greatly with respect to how they organize workers' compensation systems. In this paper, we focus on three aspects of workers' compensation insurance in Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries - types of systems, employers' funding mechanisms, and coverage for injured workers - and their impacts on the actual frequencies of occupational injuries and diseases. Methods We estimated a panel data fixed effect model with cross-country OECD and International Labor Organization data. We controlled for country fixed effects, relevant aggregate variables, and dummy variables representing the occupational accidents data source. Results First, the use of a private insurance system is found to lower the occupational accidents. Second, the use of risk-based pricing for the payment of employer raises the occupational injuries and diseases. Finally, the wider the coverage of injured workers is, the less frequent the workplace accidents are. Conclusion Private insurance system, fixed flat rate employers' funding mechanism, and higher coverage of compensation scheme are significantly and positively correlated with lower level of occupational accidents compared with the public insurance system, risk-based funding system, and lower coverage of compensation scheme. PMID:22953197

  8. 28 CFR 301.318 - Civilian compensation laws distinguished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Civilian compensation laws distinguished... Civilian compensation laws distinguished. The Inmate Accident Compensation system is not obligated to... under civilian workmen's compensation laws in that hospitalization is usually completed prior to...

  9. Administering the cost of death: organisational perspectives on workers' compensation and common law claims following traumatic death at work in Australia.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Scott J; Matthews, Lynda R; Ngo, Mark; Bohle, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Quite apart from its devastating human and psychological effects, the death of a worker can have significant, life-changing effects on their families. For many affected families, workers' compensation entitlements represent the primary financial safeguard. Where the worker was self-employed, the family will generally be excluded from this remedy and have to take the more problematic option of claiming damages at common law. Despite the centrality of workers' compensation, little attention has been given to how effectively workers' compensation agencies address the needs of bereaved families or the views of other organisations involved, such as safety inspectors, unions, employers and victim advocates. Based on interviews with forty eight organisational representatives in five Australian states, this study examines how workers' compensation regimes deal with work-related death from the perspective of those organisations involved directly or indirectly in the process. The study highlighted a number of problems, including the exclusion of self-employed workers and dealing with 'mixed families'. PMID:25686790

  10. Labor Laws Affecting Private Household Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Wages and working conditions for private household workers have not kept pace with other occupations, partly because of lack of coverage by labor laws. This pamphlet describes the protection available to domestics under both federal and state laws. Not only wages and hours, but also coverage by Unemployment Compensation, Workmen's Compensation,…

  11. Medicare program; right of appeal for Medicare secondary payer determinations relating to liability insurance (including self-insurance), no-fault insurance, and workers' compensation laws and plans. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-02-27

    This final rule implements provisions of the Strengthening Medicare and Repaying Taxpayers Act of 2012 (SMART Act) which require us to provide a right of appeal and an appeal process for liability insurance (including self-insurance), no-fault insurance, and workers' compensation laws or plans when Medicare pursues a Medicare Secondary Payer (MSP) recovery claim directly from the liability insurance (including self-insurance), no-fault insurance, or workers' compensation law or plan.

  12. Contingent workers: Workers' compensation data analysis strategies and limitations.

    PubMed

    Foley, Michael; Ruser, John; Shor, Glenn; Shuford, Harry; Sygnatur, Eric

    2014-07-01

    The growth of the contingent workforce presents many challenges in the occupational safety and health arena. State and federal laws impose obligations and rights on employees and employers, but contingent work raises issues regarding responsibilities to maintain a safe workplace and difficulties in collecting and reporting data on injuries and illnesses. Contingent work may involve uncertainty about the length of employment, control over the labor process, degree of regulatory, or statutory protections, and access to benefits under workers' compensation. The paper highlights differences in regulatory protections and benefits among various types of contingent workers and how these different arrangements affect safety incentives. It discusses challenges caused by contingent work for accurate data reporting in existing injury and illness surveillance and benefit programs, differences between categories of contingent work in their coverage in various data sources, and opportunities for overcoming obstacles to effectively using workers' compensation data.

  13. 48 CFR 836.577 - Workers' compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 836.577 Workers' compensation. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 852.236-86, Workers' compensation, in... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Workers' compensation....

  14. 48 CFR 836.577 - Workers' compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 836.577 Workers' compensation. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 852.236-86, Workers' compensation, in... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Workers' compensation....

  15. 48 CFR 836.577 - Workers' compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 836.577 Workers' compensation. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 852.236-86, Workers' compensation, in... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Workers' compensation....

  16. 48 CFR 836.577 - Workers' compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 836.577 Workers' compensation. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 852.236-86, Workers' compensation, in... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Workers' compensation....

  17. 48 CFR 836.577 - Workers' compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Workers' compensation. 836.577 Section 836.577 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SPECIAL...' compensation. The contracting officer shall insert the clause at 852.236-86, Workers' compensation,...

  18. Legal considerations on the liability of damage compensation in medical accidents in China.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiuqin; Chen, Xiaoyang

    2008-12-01

    In the past years, there has been an increasing number of medical accidents in various places around the country. Some of them often led to medical litigations. The responsibility of medical accident compensation is the key factor, which involves either the harmony between physician-patient relationship, or the realization of patients' rights. Though relevant legal provisions on the responsibility of medical accidents have been made in national law, regulation and some judicial interpretation, there exist so many problems in reality, such as the uniformity of law application, compensational rate and the deficiency of compensational scope and method. Therefore, in this article, the author tries to analysis the attribute of medical accident compensation, relevant laws and regulations and the problems in practical life, and to put forward advice on how to perfect medical accident legislation.

  19. Accident Prevention: A Workers' Education Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Labour Office, Geneva (Switzerland).

    Devoted to providing industrial workers with a greater knowledge of precautionary measures undertaken and enforced by industries for the protection of workers, this safety education manual contains 14 lessons ranging from "The Problems of Accidents during Work" to "Trade Unions and Workers and Industrial Safety." Fire protection, safety equipment…

  20. Current Situation and Issue of Industrial Accident Compensation Insurance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Inah; Rhie, Jeongbae; Yoon, Jo-Duk; Kim, Jinsoo

    2012-01-01

    Industrial Accident Compensation Insurance (IACI) has a history of about 50 yr, and is the oldest social insurance system in Korea. After more than 20 times of revision improvements in benefits, its contents and claim systems have been upgraded. It became the protector of injured workers and their families, and at the same time became the system which could cope with both financial burden of employers and their responsibilities. However, there are some issues to be reformed to upgrade the IACI: 1) the problems in the approval system of occupational diseases, 2) quality improvement of workers' compensation medical care, 3) vocational rehabilitation and return to work, 4) workers' compensation premiums and out-of-pocket money of injured workers, 5) issues in application of IACI. Growth of IACI cannot be achieved by an effort of an individual. Efforts by workers, owners, and government, in addition to physicians and welfare professionals toward the same goal are required for the next level improvement of IACI. PMID:22661871

  1. Suggested guidelines for rating cardiac disability in workers' compensation. Medical and Chiropractic Advisory Committee to the Administrative Director of the California Division of Industrial Accidents.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, W L; Alpern, H L; Breall, W S; Hyman, R M; Markovitz, A; O'Brien, J B; Starke, R D

    1993-01-01

    Cardiac disability ratings in workers' compensation cases currently lack any consistent scientific basis, with varying medical evidence used by different examiners in the same case. Opinions about the extent of disability may differ with the same patient, delaying resolution and the delivery of benefits. We describe guidelines for determining cardiac impairment and suggest a schedule for rating disability based on evidence. Our experience is in California, but arriving at equitable ratings for disability purposes is a nationwide challenge. Exercise stress testing provides the best reproducible data to test the heart's ability to do work. When exercise stress testing is not possible or adequate, alternative or supplemental testing is necessary. Certain conditions, such as hypertension, arrhythmias, coronary artery spasm, and a history of coronary artery operations or myocardial infarction, may affect "cardiac disability" but may not necessarily be reflected in exercise testing. PMID:8460507

  2. Workers compensation: coverage, benefits, and costs, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.N.

    1984-12-01

    Workers compensation provides medical care and income maintenance protection to workers disabled from work-related injury or illness. This program is of considerable interest to the Social Security Administration (SSA) from several perspectives. For example, since 1965 Social Security Disability Insurance (DI) benefits and workers compensation payments have been integrated. Information on the experience under workers compensation provides a framework for examining questions concerning gaps and overlaps in the Nation's social insurance system. In addition, since December 1969 SSA has administered claims filed through 1973 under part B of the Black Lung program--the program providing income maintenance protection to coal miners disabled by pneumoconiosis. The workers compensation experience reported here consists of information on benefits for work-related injury and disease, including data on the combined benefits paid under the entire Federal Black Lung program administered by the Labor Department and SSA.

  3. Benefit adequacy in state workers' compensation programs.

    PubMed

    Hunt, H Allan

    This article summarizes several different methods used to measure the adequacy of wage replacement in state workers' compensation systems in the United States. Empirical research casts serious doubt on benefit adequacy, especially in the case of more serious disabilities.

  4. Attitudes of California Dermatologists Toward Worker's Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    A survey-questionnaire on Worker's Compensation sent to 492 California dermatologists produced 268 replies, a recovery rate of 54 percent, representing approximately 10 percent of the practicing dermatologists in the United States. A total of 75 percent replied they treat Worker's Compensation patients; most of the 25 percent who replied they do not gave strong reasons for refusing to assume the care of these patients. The answers to the questionnaire given by the 201 California dermatologists who treat Worker's Compensation patients are tabulated and discussed. Although there exists considerable misunderstanding among physicians, insurance companies and employers on many aspects of Worker's Compensation, the situation is not without hope for improvement. Better knowledge of work procedures, more availability of precise information on the ingredients of work contactants and cooperation among the interested parties should improve the quality of care for these patients in the future. PMID:135417

  5. Managing workers' compensation exposures in healthcare.

    PubMed

    McDonald, L

    1998-01-01

    Employees in healthcare are exposed to numerous and varied risks that pose the threat of injury. Management of those exposures by the organization will ultimately help create a safe environment for staff, patients and the public. Incorporating workers' compensation into the risk management program is the first step toward managing and reducing these exposures. This article presents a suggested outline for a written risk management plan for workers' compensation exposures. PMID:10182134

  6. Risk compensation behaviours in construction workers' activities.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yingbin; Wu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether the construction workers have the tendency of engaging in risk compensation behaviours, and identify the demographic variables, which may influence the extent to which the construction workers may show risk compensation behaviours. Both quantitative (survey) and qualitative (interviews) approaches were used in this study. A questionnaire survey was conducted with all the construction workers on three building construction sites of a leading construction company in Australia. Semi-structured interviews were then conducted to validate the findings of the quantitative research. The findings indicate that workers tend to show risk compensation behaviours in the construction environment. The workers with more working experience, higher education, or having never been injured at work before have a higher tendency to show risk compensation in their activities than the others. The implication is that contractors need to assess the potential influence of workers' risk compensation behaviours when evaluating the effect of risk control measures. It is recommended that supervisors pay more attention to the behavioural changes of those workers who have more experience, higher education, and have never been injured before after the implementation of new safety control measures on construction site. PMID:24134314

  7. Risk compensation behaviours in construction workers' activities.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yingbin; Wu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether the construction workers have the tendency of engaging in risk compensation behaviours, and identify the demographic variables, which may influence the extent to which the construction workers may show risk compensation behaviours. Both quantitative (survey) and qualitative (interviews) approaches were used in this study. A questionnaire survey was conducted with all the construction workers on three building construction sites of a leading construction company in Australia. Semi-structured interviews were then conducted to validate the findings of the quantitative research. The findings indicate that workers tend to show risk compensation behaviours in the construction environment. The workers with more working experience, higher education, or having never been injured at work before have a higher tendency to show risk compensation in their activities than the others. The implication is that contractors need to assess the potential influence of workers' risk compensation behaviours when evaluating the effect of risk control measures. It is recommended that supervisors pay more attention to the behavioural changes of those workers who have more experience, higher education, and have never been injured before after the implementation of new safety control measures on construction site.

  8. Ten years' experience using an integrated workers' compensation management system to control workers' compensation costs.

    PubMed

    Bernacki, Edward J; Tsai, Shan P

    2003-05-01

    This work presents 10 years of experience using an Integrated Workers' Compensation Claims Management System that allows safety professionals, adjusters, and selected medical and nursing providers to collaborate in a process of preventing accidents and expeditiously assessing, treating, and returning individuals to productive work. The hallmarks of the program involve patient advocacy and customer service, steerage of injured employees to a small network of physicians, close follow-up, and the continuous dialogue between parties regarding claims management. The integrated claims management system was instituted in fiscal year 1992 servicing a population of approximately 21,000 individuals. The system was periodically refined and by the 2002 fiscal year, 39,000 individuals were managed under this paradigm. The frequency of lost-time and medical claims rate decreased 73% (from 22 per 1000 employees to 6) and 61% (from 155 per 1000 employees to 61), respectively, between fiscal year 1992 and fiscal year 2002. The number of temporary/total days paid per 100 insureds decreased from 163 in fiscal year 1992 to 37 in fiscal year 2002, or 77%. Total workers' compensation expenses including all medical, indemnity and administrative, decreased from $0.81 per $100 of payroll in fiscal year 1992 to $0.37 per $100 of payroll in fiscal year 2002, a 54% decrease. More specifically, medical costs per $100 of payroll decreased 44% (from $0.27 to $0.15), temporary/total, 61% (from $0.18 to $0.07), permanent/partial, 63% (from $0.19 to $0.07) and administrative costs, 48% ($0.16 to $0.09). These data suggests that workers' compensation costs can be reduced over a multi-year period by using a small network of clinically skilled health care providers who address an individual workers' psychological, as well as physical needs and where communication between all parties (e.g., medical care providers, supervisors, and injured employees) is constantly maintained. Furthermore, these results

  9. Sick leave and workers' compensation for police officers in Australia.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Robert

    2010-05-01

    In Australia it has been necessary to enact specific provisions into industrial and employment laws to ensure workplace protection and coverage of police officers because at common law police officers have not been regarded as employees. Police unions in Australia have emerged as strong industrial players and have secured a range of terms and conditions of employment which do not apply to the broader workforce. However, the battle in relation to workers' compensation coverage and extended sick leave seems to be ongoing, particularly in Western Australia. The area of interaction between workers' compensation laws and sick leave entitlements is often neglected against the background of other industrial matters concerning police. This article investigates the entitlements of Australian police officers to these benefits against the historical background of industrial laws. It concludes that there is no uniformity in coverage for workers' compensation and sick leave and that the publicly available data in relation to absence from work of police officers due to sickness are generally incomplete and present challenges for cross-jurisdictional comparisons. The article points to future areas of research into police sick leave. PMID:20552944

  10. Silicosis and workers' compensation in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Stanbury, M; Joyce, P; Kipen, H

    1995-12-01

    The employer is expected to maintain responsibility for health care expenses and lost income that result from occupational injury and illness through the workers' compensation insurance system. However, financial support for individuals with occupational illnesses, especially those with long latency, is often from sources other than workers' compensation. Silicosis, a well defined, chronic, occupational lung disease, can be viewed as a sentinel for the inadequacy of the public policy to compensate workers for chronic occupational lung disease. Three hundred twenty-nine patients with confirmed silicosis were identified by the silicosis surveillance program in the New Jersey Department of Health using source data from 1979 through 1992. One hundred seventy-seven of these individuals provided information on the status of any compensation claims against their employer. Only 31% of these patients stated that a claim had been filed; 84% of those whose claims were settled were awarded payments. Severity of radiologic findings was not associated with the likelihood of filing a claim or with being awarded a payment; whereas, smoking was associated with these outcomes. The implications of these findings for the health care system are discussed. PMID:8749739

  11. 39 CFR 3050.27 - Workers' Compensation Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Workers' Compensation Report. 3050.27 Section 3050.27 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PERIODIC REPORTING § 3050.27 Workers' Compensation Report. The Workers' Compensation Report, including summary workpapers, shall be provided by...

  12. Factors influencing mode of claims settlement in workers' compensation cases.

    PubMed

    Morrison, D L; Wood, G A; MacDonald, S

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines the variables that influence the means by which 10,192 injured workers settled their compensation claims during 1990. The data on which this study is based come from a state in Australia where there are three means by which workers' compensation claims can be settled by lump sum payment: settlement following a specific injury payment, early settlement payment and settlement following a common law payment. This paper is specifically concerned with identifying the variables that determine whether the claim will be settled by a lump sum payment and whether different modes of claims settlement by lump sum are unique and predictable from a range of variables that include injury characteristics and demographics. The results of logistic regression modelling revealed that those who received a lump sum settlement could be reliably distinguished from those who did not receive such a payment. Each mode of settlement varied in the extent to which it could be predicted. Contrary to expectations, the most difficult form of settlement mode to predict was that of specific injury payments (4% accurate) with the most predictive being early settlement payments (81% accurate). Common law payments were also highly predictable (48% accurate). The form of lump sum payment received by injured workers was found to depend on a range of injury characteristics, indices of severity and for common law payments, gender and potential income loss. It is argued that although injury characteristics play a part in the process of claims settlement, personal circumstances and insurance company policies are influential in dictating the form by which workers compensation cases are finalized. PMID:7797315

  13. The European influence on workers' compensation reform in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Workers' compensation law in the United States is derived from European models of social insurance introduced in Germany and in England. These two concepts of workers' compensation are found today in the federal and state workers' compensation programs in the United States. All reform proposals in the United States are influenced by the European experience with workers' compensation. In 2006, a reform proposal termed the Public Health Model was made that would abolish the workers' compensation system, and in its place adopt a national disability insurance system for all injuries and illnesses. In the public health model, health and safety professionals would work primarily in public health agencies. The public health model eliminates the physician from any role other than that of privately consulting with the patient and offering advice solely to the patient. The Public Health Model is strongly influenced by the European success with physician consultation with industry and labor. PMID:22151643

  14. The amount of consolation compensation in road traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Jou, Rong-Chang

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the amount of consolation compensation that road accident perpetrators were willing to pay victims. It used 2010 statistics for general road accidents from Taiwan's National Police Agency (NPA) for further sampling and to mail questionnaires. In investigating consolation compensation, the framework of the contingent valuation method was used, and the data were collected through the design of different scenarios. In this study, five injury levels were designed to further analyse the consolation compensation price the perpetrators were willing to pay: minor injury, moderate injury, serious injury, disability, and death. The results revealed the price that many perpetrators were willing to pay was zero; however, we overcame this issue by using the Spike model. The estimated results showed that road accident perpetrators were willing to pay more consolation compensation with increased injury severity.

  15. The amount of consolation compensation in road traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Jou, Rong-Chang

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the amount of consolation compensation that road accident perpetrators were willing to pay victims. It used 2010 statistics for general road accidents from Taiwan's National Police Agency (NPA) for further sampling and to mail questionnaires. In investigating consolation compensation, the framework of the contingent valuation method was used, and the data were collected through the design of different scenarios. In this study, five injury levels were designed to further analyse the consolation compensation price the perpetrators were willing to pay: minor injury, moderate injury, serious injury, disability, and death. The results revealed the price that many perpetrators were willing to pay was zero; however, we overcame this issue by using the Spike model. The estimated results showed that road accident perpetrators were willing to pay more consolation compensation with increased injury severity. PMID:24598034

  16. 78 FR 35982 - Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Collection...' Compensation Programs is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection: Survivor's Form for Benefits... beneficiary. Type of Review: Extension. Agency: Office of Workers' Compensation Programs. Title:...

  17. A study of influences of the workers' compensation and injury management regulations on aviation safety at a workplace.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Devinder K; Nikraz, Hamid; Chen, Yongqing

    2016-01-01

    As the aviation industries developed, so too did the recognition that there must be an effective regulatory framework to address issues related to the workers' compensation and rehabilitation. All employees would like to work and return home safely from their workplace. Therefore, the efficient management of workplace injury and disease reduces the cost of aviation operations and improves flight safety. Workers' compensation and injury management laws regulate a majority of rehabilitation and compensation issues, but achieving an injury-free workplace remains a major challenge for the regulators. This paper examines the clauses of the workers' compensation and injury management laws of Western Australia related to workplace safety, compensation, and rehabilitations of the injured workers. It also discusses various provisions of common law under the relevant workers' health injury management legislations.

  18. Why most workers with occupational repetitive trauma do not file for workers' compensation.

    PubMed

    Rosenman, K D; Gardiner, J C; Wang, J; Biddle, J; Hogan, A; Reilly, M J; Roberts, K; Welch, E

    2000-01-01

    Despite the availability of no fault insurance for wage replacement and medical care costs, the majority of workers diagnosed with an occupational disease do not apply for workers' compensation. The objective of the study was to determine the reasons why workers diagnosed with work-related musculoskeletal disease did not apply for workers' compensation benefits. A cross-sectional study of 1598 individuals diagnosed with neck, upper extremity, and low back work-related musculoskeletal disease from April to June 1996 was performed. All individuals were interviewed over the telephone using a standardized questionnaire. The questionnaire included questions about the precipitating event; demographics; health limitations; mood; pain level; and attitudes toward their health care provider, fellow workers, management, work environment, and filing for workers' compensation. Whenever possible, standardized questions from previous surveys were used. The interviewed individuals with work-related musculoskeletal disease were reported by health care practitioners as required by the state of Michigan's occupational disease reporting law. Workers reported during 12 weeks in the spring of 1996 by a Michigan health care professional as having a neck, back, or upper extremity musculoskeletal disorder were eligible to participate. Among the 2703 reports received, 490 individuals could not be reached, 22 did not speak English, 12 had died or were too incapacitated by other medical conditions, and 581 refused. We interviewed 59% of all eligible workers and 73% of all workers who were reachable and capable of responding in English. Only 25% of workers diagnosed with musculoskeletal disease filed a workers' compensation claim. The factors significantly associated with filing a claim were (1) increased length of employment (> 21 years: odds ratio [OR], 3.01, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.31 to 6.90); 11 to 20 years: OR, 2.34, 95% CI, 1.01 to 5.47; 6 to 10 years: OR, 1.76, 95% CI, 0.73 to

  19. Preserving workers' compensation benefits in a managed health care environment.

    PubMed

    Dembe, A E

    1998-01-01

    Managed care techniques are increasingly being applied in the workers' compensation setting. Many workers, labor representatives and public health advocates fear that the introduction of managed care into workers' compensation may reflect a broader employer-driven campaign to erode benefits, tighten eligibility criteria, and weaken employees' control over health care and compensation issues. The potential threats to workers can be mitigated by involving them in the design of the workers' compensation health plan and selection of provider organization, assuring access to appropriate specialists and diagnostic testing, minimizing delays, increasing accountability through contract provisions and government oversight, and enhancing communications through the use of ombudsmen and alternative dispute resolution approaches. Additional outcomes studies assessing the long-term impact of managed care in workers' compensation are needed. PMID:9670702

  20. coal workers' pneumoconiosis and the compensation dilemma

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, P.J.

    1981-06-01

    Coal workers' pneumoconiosis is a preventable occupational disorder of the respiratory system resulting from exposure to and retention of respirable coal dust. It exists in two distinguishable forms: simple, which is seldom if ever disabling, and complicated, also known as progressive massive fibrosis (PMF), which is sometimes totally disabling and is associated with a high mortality rate. The disease affects a small proportion of active US miners, and only a very small number develop PMF. Scientific criteria for diagnosis are well established but are not followed in the US because of Federal law and regulation.

  1. Social Work and the Uniform Accident and Sickness Policy Provision Law: A Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Gerald; Davis, King

    2012-01-01

    The Uniform Accident and Sickness Policy Provision Law (UPPL) is a statute existing in 26 states that permits health insurance companies to deny payment for claims made by individuals who have sustained injuries as a result of drug or alcohol use. This law presents a series of complicated clinical and ethical dilemmas for social workers and other…

  2. Outcomes after hip arthroscopy in patients with workers' compensation claims.

    PubMed

    Salvo, John P; Hammoud, Sommer; Flato, Russell; Sgromolo, Nicole; Mendelsohn, Elliot S

    2015-02-01

    Patients with a workers' compensation claim have been shown to have inferior outcomes after various orthopedic procedures. In hip arthroscopy, good to excellent results have been shown in the athletic and prearthritic population in short-term and long-term follow-up. In the current study, the authors' hypothesis was that patients with a workers' compensation claim would have inferior outcomes after hip arthroscopy compared with patients without a workers' compensation claim. All patients with a workers' compensation claim who underwent hip arthroscopy over a 2-year period were studied. Postoperative functional outcomes were assessed with the Hip Outcome Score and modified Harris Hip Score. A cohort of 30 patients who did not have a workers' compensation claim was selected for comparison. Twenty-six patients were identified who had a workers' compensation claim and underwent hip arthroscopy performed by a single surgeon at the authors' institution with at least 6 months of follow-up. These patients were compared with 30 patients who did not have a workers' compensation claim. The workers' compensation group had a Hip Outcome Score of 66.5±28.8 and the non-workers' compensation group had a Hip Outcome Score of 89.4±12.0. This difference was statistically significant with Wilcoxon test (P=.003). The workers' compensation group had an average modified Harris Hip Score of 72.5±20.7 (mean±SD), and the non-workers' compensation group had a modified Harris Hip Score of 75.6±15.3. This difference was not significantly significant with Wilcoxon test (P=.9). At latest follow-up, 15 patients in the workers' compensation group (58%) were working. Patients returned to work an average of 6.8 months after surgery. The current study showed that postoperative functional outcomes in the workers' compensation group, as measured by Hip Outcome Score, were significantly inferior to those in the non-workers' compensation group. No statistical difference in postoperative modified

  3. 28 CFR 345.62 - Inmate accident compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... assignments) as specified by the Inmate Accident Compensation Program (28 CFR part 301). ... Section 345.62 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.62 Inmate...

  4. 28 CFR 345.62 - Inmate accident compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... assignments) as specified by the Inmate Accident Compensation Program (28 CFR part 301). ... Section 345.62 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.62 Inmate...

  5. 28 CFR 345.62 - Inmate accident compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... assignments) as specified by the Inmate Accident Compensation Program (28 CFR part 301). ... Section 345.62 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.62 Inmate...

  6. 28 CFR 345.62 - Inmate accident compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... assignments) as specified by the Inmate Accident Compensation Program (28 CFR part 301). ... Section 345.62 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.62 Inmate...

  7. 28 CFR 345.62 - Inmate accident compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... assignments) as specified by the Inmate Accident Compensation Program (28 CFR part 301). ... Section 345.62 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits § 345.62 Inmate...

  8. World Trade Organization, ILO conventions, and workers' compensation.

    PubMed

    LaDou, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The World Trade Organization, the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund can assist in the implementation of ILO Conventions relating to occupational safety and health in developing countries. Most countries that seek to trade globally receive permission to do so from the WTO. If the WTO required member countries to accept the core ILO Conventions relating to occupational safety and health and workers' compensation, it could accomplish something that has eluded international organizations for decades. International workers' compensation standards are seldom discussed, but may at this time be feasible. Acceptance of a minimum workers' compensation insurance system could be a requirement imposed on applicant nations by WTO member states.

  9. Informal Workers in Thailand: Occupational Health and Social Security Disparities.

    PubMed

    Kongtip, Pornpimol; Nankongnab, Noppanun; Chaikittiporn, Chalermchai; Laohaudomchok, Wisanti; Woskie, Susan; Slatin, Craig

    2015-08-01

    Informal workers in Thailand lack employee status as defined under the Labor Protection Act (LPA). Typically, they do not work at an employer's premise; they work at home and may be self-employed or temporary workers. They account for 62.6 percent of the Thai workforce and have a workplace accident rate ten times higher than formal workers. Most Thai Labor laws apply only to formal workers, but some protect informal workers in the domestic, home work, and agricultural sectors. Laws that protect informal workers lack practical enforcement mechanisms and are generally ineffective because informal workers lack employment contracts and awareness of their legal rights. Thai social security laws fail to provide informal workers with treatment of work-related accidents, diseases, and injuries; unemployment and retirement insurance; and workers' compensation. The article summarizes the differences in protections available for formal and informal sector workers and measures needed to decrease these disparities in coverage. PMID:25995374

  10. Informal Workers in Thailand: Occupational Health and Social Security Disparities.

    PubMed

    Kongtip, Pornpimol; Nankongnab, Noppanun; Chaikittiporn, Chalermchai; Laohaudomchok, Wisanti; Woskie, Susan; Slatin, Craig

    2015-08-01

    Informal workers in Thailand lack employee status as defined under the Labor Protection Act (LPA). Typically, they do not work at an employer's premise; they work at home and may be self-employed or temporary workers. They account for 62.6 percent of the Thai workforce and have a workplace accident rate ten times higher than formal workers. Most Thai Labor laws apply only to formal workers, but some protect informal workers in the domestic, home work, and agricultural sectors. Laws that protect informal workers lack practical enforcement mechanisms and are generally ineffective because informal workers lack employment contracts and awareness of their legal rights. Thai social security laws fail to provide informal workers with treatment of work-related accidents, diseases, and injuries; unemployment and retirement insurance; and workers' compensation. The article summarizes the differences in protections available for formal and informal sector workers and measures needed to decrease these disparities in coverage.

  11. Construction safety: Can management prevent all accidents or are workers responsible for their own actions?

    SciTech Connect

    Cotten, G.B.; Jenkins, S.L.

    1997-10-01

    The construction industry has struggled for many years with the answer to the question posed in the title: Can Management Prevent All Accidents or Are Workers Responsible for Their Own Actions? In the litigious society that we live, it has become more important to find someone {open_quotes}at fault{close_quotes} for an accident than it is to find out how we can prevent it from ever happening again. Most successful companies subscribe to the theme that {open_quotes}all accidents can be prevented.{close_quotes} They institute training and qualification programs, safe performance incentives, and culture-change-driven directorates such as the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP); yet we still see construction accidents that result in lost time, and occasionally death, which is extremely costly in the shortsighted measure of money and, in real terms, impact to the worker`s family. Workers need to be properly trained in safety and health protection before they are assigned to a job that may expose them to safety and health hazards. A management committed to improving worker safety and health will bring about significant results in terms of financial savings, improved employee morale, enhanced communities, and increased production. But how can this happen, you say? Reduction in injury and lost workdays are the rewards. A decline in reduction of injuries and lost workdays results in lower workers` compensation premiums and insurance rates. In 1991, United States workplace injuries and illnesses cost public and private sector employers an estimated $62 billion in workers` compensation expenditures.

  12. Workers' compensation and outcomes of upper extremity surgery.

    PubMed

    Gruson, Konrad I; Huang, Kevin; Wanich, Tony; Depalma, Anthony A

    2013-02-01

    Clinical outcomes following upper extremity surgery among workers' compensation patients have traditionally been found to be worse than those of non-workers' compensation patients. In addition, workers' compensation patients take significantly longer to return to their jobs, and they return to their preinjury levels of employment at a lower overall rate. These unfavorable prognoses may stem from the strenuous physical demands placed on the upper extremity in this group of patients. Further, there is a potential financial benefit within this patient population to report severe functional disability following surgery. Orthopaedic upper extremity surgeons who treat workers' compensation patients should be aware of the potentially prolonged period before return to work after surgical intervention and should counsel this group of patients accordingly. Vocational training should be considered if a patient's clinical progress begins to plateau.

  13. Physician-patient relationship and medical accident victim compensation: some insights into the French regulatory system.

    PubMed

    Ancelot, Lydie; Oros, Cornel

    2015-06-01

    Given the growing amount of medical litigation heard by courts, the 2002 Kouchner law in France has created the Office National d'Indemnisation des Accidents Médicaux (ONIAM), whose main aim is to encourage out-of-court settlements when a conflict between a physician and the victim of a medical accident occurs. More than 10 years after the implementation of this law, the statistics analysing its effectiveness are contradictory, which raises the question of the potential negative effects of the ONIAM on the compensation system. In order to address this question, the article analyses the impact of the ONIAM on the nature of settlement negotiations between the physician and the victim. Using a dynamic game within incomplete information, we develop a comparative analysis of two types of compensation systems in case of medical accidents: socialised financing granted by the ONIAM and private financing provided by the physician. We show that the ONIAM could encourage out-of-court settlements provided that the hypothesis of judicial error is relevant. On the contrary, in the case of a low probability of judicial errors, the ONIAM could be effective only for severe medical accidents.

  14. Coal workers' pneumoconiosis and the compensation dilemma

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, P.J.

    1981-06-01

    Coal workers' pneumoconiosis is a preventable occupational disorder of the respiratory system resulting from exposure to and retention of respirable coal dust. It exists in two distinguishable forms: simple, which is seldom if ever disabling, and complicated, also known as progressive massive fibrosis (PMF), which is sometimes totally disabling and is associated with a high mortality rate. The disease affects a small proportion of active U.S. miners, and only a very small number develop PMF. In its more advanced stages, the disorder is characterized by shortness of breath. Scientific criteria for diagnosis are well established but are not followed in the U.S. because of Federal law and regulation. However, an acceptable scheme for classification of chest radiographs exists. Black lung benefits payable to miners, their survivors and dependents are approaching /2 billion annually, and regulations concerning eligibility for such benefits are intentionally slanted to make it possible for claimants to receive benefits in a manner not consistent with regulations governing similar payments to other occupationally employed persons or in accordance with established medical criteria.

  15. Worker Alienation and Compensation at the Savannah River Site.

    PubMed

    Ashwood, Loka; Wing, Steve

    2016-05-01

    Corporations operating U.S. nuclear weapons plants for the federal government began tracking occupational exposures to ionizing radiation in 1943. However, workers, scholars, and policy makers have questioned the accuracy and completeness of radiation monitoring and its capacity to provide a basis for workers' compensation. We use interviews to explore the limitations of broad-scale, corporate epidemiological surveillance through worker accounts from the Savannah River Site nuclear weapons plant. Interviewees report inadequate monitoring, overbearing surveillance, limited venues to access medical support and exposure records, and administrative failure to report radiation and other exposures at the plant. The alienation of workers from their records and toil is relevant to worker compensation programs and the accuracy of radiation dose measurements used in epidemiologic studies of occupational radiation exposures at the Savannah River Site and other weapons plants. PMID:26956018

  16. Worker Alienation and Compensation at the Savannah River Site.

    PubMed

    Ashwood, Loka; Wing, Steve

    2016-05-01

    Corporations operating U.S. nuclear weapons plants for the federal government began tracking occupational exposures to ionizing radiation in 1943. However, workers, scholars, and policy makers have questioned the accuracy and completeness of radiation monitoring and its capacity to provide a basis for workers' compensation. We use interviews to explore the limitations of broad-scale, corporate epidemiological surveillance through worker accounts from the Savannah River Site nuclear weapons plant. Interviewees report inadequate monitoring, overbearing surveillance, limited venues to access medical support and exposure records, and administrative failure to report radiation and other exposures at the plant. The alienation of workers from their records and toil is relevant to worker compensation programs and the accuracy of radiation dose measurements used in epidemiologic studies of occupational radiation exposures at the Savannah River Site and other weapons plants.

  17. The dismissal of injured workers and workers' compensation arrangements in Australia.

    PubMed

    Purse, K

    2000-01-01

    In Australia, as in Canada and to a lesser extent the United States, the vocational rehabilitation of injured workers is an integral part of workers' compensation arrangements. An essential feature of the return-to-work process is the provision of suitable employment by employers for workers able to resume work following a work-related injury. This article highlights the importance of employment security measures within workers' compensation legislation for injured workers and of scheme management. The author examines the major approaches adopted by the various Australian jurisdictions, critically reviews the issue of compliance with employment security legislation, and suggests a number of proposals for reform. Given the number of similarities between Australian and North American workers' compensation schemes, policy lessons drawn from the Australian experiences may be relevant to the labor movement and legislators in Canada and the United States.

  18. Accident patterns for construction-related workers: a cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chia-Wen; Tyan, Yaw-Yauan

    2012-01-01

    The construction industry has been identified as one of the most hazardous industries. The risk of constructionrelated workers is far greater than that in a manufacturing based industry. However, some steps can be taken to reduce worker risk through effective injury prevention strategies. In this article, k-means clustering methodology is employed in specifying the factors related to different worker types and in identifying the patterns of industrial occupational accidents. Accident reports during the period 1998 to 2008 are extracted from case reports of the Northern Region Inspection Office of the Council of Labor Affairs of Taiwan. The results show that the cluster analysis can indicate some patterns of occupational injuries in the construction industry. Inspection plans should be proposed according to the type of construction-related workers. The findings provide a direction for more effective inspection strategies and injury prevention programs.

  19. Accident patterns for construction-related workers: a cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chia-Wen; Tyan, Yaw-Yauan

    2011-12-01

    The construction industry has been identified as one of the most hazardous industries. The risk of constructionrelated workers is far greater than that in a manufacturing based industry. However, some steps can be taken to reduce worker risk through effective injury prevention strategies. In this article, k-means clustering methodology is employed in specifying the factors related to different worker types and in identifying the patterns of industrial occupational accidents. Accident reports during the period 1998 to 2008 are extracted from case reports of the Northern Region Inspection Office of the Council of Labor Affairs of Taiwan. The results show that the cluster analysis can indicate some patterns of occupational injuries in the construction industry. Inspection plans should be proposed according to the type of construction-related workers. The findings provide a direction for more effective inspection strategies and injury prevention programs.

  20. Unwanted pregnancy: The outer boundary of "treatment injury" in the New Zealand accident compensation scheme.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Rosemary

    2015-09-01

    The New Zealand accident compensation scheme has undergone many changes over the years and these changes are reflected in the way unwanted pregnancy claims have been dealt with under the regime. The New Zealand Supreme Court has now confirmed that pregnancy as a result of medical misadventure can be classified as a personal injury under the scheme with the result that the woman patient is entitled to the benefits of the scheme and may not pursue a common law claim against the medical practitioner. This article analyses two recent decisions in the context of consideration of the changing fortunes of the unwanted pregnancy claims. PMID:26554207

  1. Unwanted pregnancy: The outer boundary of "treatment injury" in the New Zealand accident compensation scheme.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Rosemary

    2015-09-01

    The New Zealand accident compensation scheme has undergone many changes over the years and these changes are reflected in the way unwanted pregnancy claims have been dealt with under the regime. The New Zealand Supreme Court has now confirmed that pregnancy as a result of medical misadventure can be classified as a personal injury under the scheme with the result that the woman patient is entitled to the benefits of the scheme and may not pursue a common law claim against the medical practitioner. This article analyses two recent decisions in the context of consideration of the changing fortunes of the unwanted pregnancy claims.

  2. 76 FR 13669 - Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of Existing Collection; Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of.... 941 and 20 CFR 725.533(e) authorizes the Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation (DCMWC) to pay compensation to coal miner beneficiaries. Once a miner or survivor is found eligible for benefits, the...

  3. [Medicolegal and compensation scientific approach to automobile accident].

    PubMed

    Yamanouchi, Haruo

    2002-09-01

    medico legal and scientific compensation approach to automobile accident is now necessary. PMID:12415831

  4. [Medicolegal and compensation scientific approach to automobile accident].

    PubMed

    Yamanouchi, Haruo

    2002-09-01

    medico legal and scientific compensation approach to automobile accident is now necessary.

  5. Health effects of air pollution and the Japanese compensation law

    SciTech Connect

    Namekata, T.; Duv Florey, C.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Part 1. Individual Presentations: I. Gas Cooking and Respiratory Disease in Children, II. Health Effects of Fossil Fuel Combustion Compared With Effects of Energy Shortages, III. Daily Symptoms of Lung Function in Relation to Air Pollution: A Study in West Berlin 1982/83, IV. Studies of the Acute Effects of London Smog, and Their Relevance to Present-Day Conditions, V. Epidemiological Issues on Air Pollution in the Japanese Pollution-Related Health Damage Compensation Law. Part 2. Panel Discussion: Epidemiological Issues on Air Pollution in the Japanese Pollution-Related Health Damage Compensation Law; Problems in Air Pollution Epidemiology; Exposure Criteria for Compensation; Problems in the Use of Respiratory Symptoms Questionnaires; Legal and Policy Issues in the Japanes Compensation Law. Part 3. Background Information: I. Legal and Policy Issues in the Japanese Compensation Law. II. Reappraisal of Air Pollution/Health Effects Studies in Japan.

  6. 48 CFR 852.236-86 - Workers' compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Workers' compensation. 852.236-86 Section 852.236-86 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses...

  7. "Carve-Outs" from the Workers' Compensation System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, David I.; Neuhauser, Frank; Petersen, Jeffrey S.

    2002-01-01

    Decentralized regulation has become increasingly important in many areas; examples range from school vouchers to workplace safety committees to alternative dispute resolution procedures replacing courts. Consistent with this trend, in 1993 California permitted construction unions and employers to "carve out" their own workers' compensation system.…

  8. Workers' Compensation Claims and Physical Fitness Capacity of Police Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyce, Robert W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study compared police officers' physical fitness levels with workers' compensation (WC) claims. Officers who collected WC were predominantly female, younger, and lower ranking, with better physical fitness than officers not collecting WC. Officers in the second highest fitness level and older officers with greater cardiovascular fitness had…

  9. Will Australian workers' compensation insurance management get better soon?

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Carol

    2000-01-01

    A study of Australian experience in the state of New South Wales (NSW) suggests that private sector underwriting of workers' compensation insurance risk plus insurer competition on premium price may put downward pressure on benefits for injured workers, inhibit rehabilitation, and cause related cost increases for taxpayers and employers. Insurer underwriting also increases workers' compensation administrative costs and means an unnecessary loss of investment income for government and industry. An emerging and better alternative for the Australian community is for government and industry to underwrite a national workers' compensation scheme and to fix premium and benefit requirements which are competitively administered by insurers. In such a regulatory environment insurer inability to compete on premium price should promote competition to provide effective services to help employers prevent injury, assist rehabilitation and contain cost. National standards are necessary to enable widespread dissemination of comparable, reliable information on the outcome of health, rehabilitation, dispute resolution and return to work services. This is required to assess the competitive performance of service providers in order to ensure effective operation of the market to achieve scheme objectives. Holistic, multi-skilled and objective rehabilitation professionals are needed who can clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of their actions in assisting injury prevention, worker rehabilitation, and safe return to work across a range of industry contexts. PMID:12441487

  10. The willingness to pay of parties to traffic accidents for loss of productivity and consolation compensation.

    PubMed

    Jou, Rong-Chang; Chen, Tzu-Ying

    2015-12-01

    In this study, willingness to pay (WTP) for loss of productivity and consolation compensation by parties to traffic accidents is investigated using the Tobit model. In addition, WTP is compared to compensation determined by Taiwanese courts. The modelling results showed that variables such as education, average individual monthly income, traffic accident history, past experience of severe traffic accident injuries, the number of working days lost due to a traffic accident, past experience of accepting compensation for traffic accident-caused productivity loss and past experience of accepting consolation compensation caused by traffic accidents have a positive impact on WTP. In addition, average WTP for these two accident costs were obtained. We found that parties to traffic accidents were willing to pay more than 90% of the compensation determined by the court in the scenario of minor and moderate injuries. Parties were willing to pay approximately 80% of the compensation determined by the court for severe injuries, disability and fatality. Therefore, related agencies can use our study findings as the basis for determining the compensation that parties should pay for productivity losses caused by traffic accidents of different types.

  11. Repeat workers' compensation claims: risk factors, costs and work disability

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of our study was to describe factors associated with repeat workers' compensation claims and to compare the work disability arising in workers with single and multiple compensation claims. Methods All initial injury claims lodged by persons of working age during a five year period (1996 to 2000) and any repeat claims were extracted from workers' compensation administrative data in the state of Victoria, Australia. Groups of workers with single and multiple claims were identified. Descriptive analysis of claims by affliction, bodily location, industry segment, occupation, employer and workplace was undertaken. Survival analysis determined the impact of these variables on the time between the claims. The economic impact and duration of work incapacity associated with initial and repeat claims was compared between groups. Results 37% of persons with an initial claim lodged a second claim. This group contained a significantly greater proportion of males, were younger and more likely to be employed in manual occupations and high-risk industries than those with single claims. 78% of repeat claims were for a second injury. Duration between the claims was shortest when the working conditions had not changed. The initial claims of repeat claimants resulted in significantly (p < 0.001) lower costs and work disability than the repeat claims. Conclusions A substantial proportion of injured workers experience a second occupational injury or disease. These workers pose a greater economic burden than those with single claims, and also experience a substantially greater cumulative period of work disability. There is potential to reduce the social, health and economic burden of workplace injury by enacting prevention programs targeted at these workers. PMID:21696637

  12. Quality of physiotherapy services for injured workers compensated by workers' compensation in Quebec: a focus group study of physiotherapy professionals.

    PubMed

    Hudon, Anne; Laliberté, Maude; Hunt, Matthew; Feldman, Debbie Ehrmann

    2015-02-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are among the leading causes of work-related physical disability in the province of Quebec in Canada. The authors conducted a focus group study with physiotherapists and physical rehabilitation therapists working with patients whose treatments are compensated by the Quebec Workers' Compensation Board with the goal of exploring quality of care and ethical issues. Three main themes were identified: (1) systemic factors, (2) complexity in treatment decisions and (3) inequality of care. Although physiotherapy professionals strive to give these patients the best possible care, patients might not always be provided with optimal or equal treatment. When compared with other patients, there appear to be differences with respect to access to care and types of services offered to injured workers, raising equity concerns. Factors that shape and constrain quality of physiotherapy services for injured workers need to be addressed to improve care for these patients.

  13. Quality of Physiotherapy Services for Injured Workers Compensated by Workers' Compensation in Quebec: A Focus Group Study of Physiotherapy Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Laliberté, Maude; Hunt, Matthew; Feldman, Debbie Ehrmann

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are among the leading causes of work-related physical disability in the province of Quebec in Canada. The authors conducted a focus group study with physiotherapists and physical rehabilitation therapists working with patients whose treatments are compensated by the Quebec Workers' Compensation Board with the goal of exploring quality of care and ethical issues. Three main themes were identified: (1) systemic factors, (2) complexity in treatment decisions and (3) inequality of care. Although physiotherapy professionals strive to give these patients the best possible care, patients might not always be provided with optimal or equal treatment. When compared with other patients, there appear to be differences with respect to access to care and types of services offered to injured workers, raising equity concerns. Factors that shape and constrain quality of physiotherapy services for injured workers need to be addressed to improve care for these patients. PMID:25947032

  14. Health problems due to long working hours in Japan: working hours, workers' compensation (Karoshi), and preventive measures.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kenji; Takahashi, Masaya; Nakata, Akinori

    2006-10-01

    Late in the 1970s, serious social concern over health problems due to long working hours has arisen in Japan. This report briefly summarizes the Japanese circumstances about long working hours and what the Government has achieved so far. The national statistics show that more than 6 million people worked for 60 h or more per week during years 2000 and 2004. Approximately three hundred cases of brain and heart diseases were recognized as labour accidents resulting from overwork (Karoshi) by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) between 2002 and 2005. Consequently, the MHLW has been working to establish a more appropriate compensation system for Karoshi, as well as preventive measures for overwork related health problems. In 2001, the MHLW set the standards for clearly recognizing Karoshi in association with the amount of overtime working hours. These standards were based on the results of a literature review and medical examinations indicating a relationship between overwork and brain and heart diseases. In 2002, the MHLW launched the program for the prevention of health impairment due to overwork, and in 2005 the health guidance through an interview by a doctor for overworked workers has been enacted as law. Long working hours are controversial issues because of conflicts between health, safety, work-life balance, and productivity. It is obvious that we need to continue research regarding the impact on worker health and the management of long working hours.

  15. The original intent of workers' compensation: a team approach.

    PubMed

    Hallden, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    A state's legislation dictates the expectations in the handling of work-related injuries. However, the reality is that positive outcomes depend more on a company's value system, such as whether an organization views its employees as assets rather than liabilities, than on legal protections. This article reviews the workers' compensation system in the United States and the false assumptions that create barriers to effective and timely resolution of claims. The United States workers' compensation system is a very reactive process. Professionals in the workers' compensation field who work with employers, medical providers, and insurance companies regularly encounter deeply ingrained assumptions that create unnecessary barriers to injured workers' opportunities to participate in transitional work and modified duty while recovering from a work-related injury. Regardless of the size or type of the employer, the jurisdiction where the injury occurred, or the type of claim management organization, these perceptions continue to permeate the industry. This article addresses these assumptions and offers suggestions for a more proactive approach to achieve quicker and more successful outcomes.

  16. 48 CFR 652.228-71 - Worker's Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act)-Services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Worker's Compensation... Clauses 652.228-71 Worker's Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act)—Services. As prescribed in 628.309-70(b), insert the following clause: Workers' Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act)—Services...

  17. 76 FR 10070 - Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of Existing Collection; Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of... Quality Rereading (CM-933b), Medical History and Examination for Coal Mine Workers' Pneumoconiosis (CM-988... interpretation of x-rays. When a miner applies for benefits, the Division of Coal Mine Workers'...

  18. Return to Work After Diskogenic Fusion in Workers' Compensation Subjects.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joshua T; Haas, Arnold R; Percy, Rick; Woods, Stephen T; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2015-12-01

    Lumbar fusion for degenerative disk disease (DDD) is associated with variable clinical outcomes. Patients with workers' compensation claims often have worse fusion outcomes than the general population. Few studies have evaluated the risk factors for poor outcomes within this clinically distinct population. The goal of this study was to identify preoperative predictors of return to work status after fusion for DDD in a workers' compensation setting. The authors used International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9), diagnosis and Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) procedural codes to identify 1037 subjects from the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation database who underwent fusion for DDD between 1993 and 2013. Of these subjects, 23.2% (n=241) made a sustained return to work within 2 years after fusion. To identify preoperative predictors of postoperative return to work status, the authors used multivariate logistic regression analysis, adjusting for many important covariates. These included prolonged time out of work (P<.001; odds ratio [OR], 0.24), psychiatric history (P<.001; OR, 0.14), prolonged use of opioid analgesics (P<.001; OR, 0.46), male sex (P=.014; OR, 0.65), and legal representation (P=.042; OR, 0.67). The return to work rates associated with these risk factors were 10.4%, 2.0%, 11.9%, 21.1%, and 20.7%, respectively. Of the study subjects, 76.8% (n=796) did not return to work and had considerably worse postoperative outcomes, highlighted by chronic opioid dependence and high rates of failed back syndrome, additional surgery, and new psychiatric comorbidity. The low return to work rates and other generally poor outcomes reported in this study may indicate a more limited role for lumbar fusion among patients with DDD who have workers' compensation claims. More studies are needed to determine whether fusion for DDD can improve function and quality of life in these patients. PMID:26652326

  19. Social work and the Uniform Accident and Sickness Policy Provision Law: a pilot project.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Gerald; Davis, King

    2012-01-01

    The Uniform Accident and Sickness Policy Provision Law (UPPL) is a statute existing in 26 states that permits health insurance companies to deny payment for claims made by individuals who have sustained injuries as a result of drug or alcohol use. This law presents a series of complicated clinical and ethical dilemmas for social workers and other medical personnel. The majority of contributions to the national discussion regarding the UPPL have been produced by the medical, nursing, and policy/legal disciplines. Social work has, however, remained silent. It is paramount that social workers add their perspective and insight to this debate. This article discusses the first survey, to the authors' knowledge, of social workers practicing in health care settings regarding their knowledge and beliefs about the UPPL.

  20. The Occupationally Injured Worker: Investigating the Decision to Settle a Workers' Compensation Claim

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nay, Andrew Paul

    2010-01-01

    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (2007), a total of 4.2 million work-place injuries were reported within the United States in 2005, nearly half of which resulted in days away from work, job transfer, or restriction. In the majority of workers' compensation claims, wage-replacement benefits are paid voluntarily by the employer or…

  1. Costs of workers' compensation claims for hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Alleyne, B C; Dufresne, R M; Kanji, N; Reesal, M R

    1989-02-01

    Much has been written about the merits, needs, adequacy, and effectiveness of hearing conservation programs but very little about the cost of noise-induced hearing loss. Using claims for hearing loss submitted to a Canadian compensation board for a 5-years period (1979 to 1983), we estimated the current cost per claim to be $14,106. We observed an annual increase of 20.4% for noise-induced hearing loss claims and project that if 80% of the 450 claims submitted in 1987 are accepted, it will commit the Workers' Compensation Board in Alberta to a cost of $5,373,360--a considerable commitment for a disease that makes up only 0.3% of all claims. As a measure of morbidity we determined the years of potential hearing loss. The 207 workers between the ages of 18 and 70 years who were pensioned had a potential hearing loss value of 2529 years. Some authors have expressed the view that hearing loss is currently inadequately compensated and our review of the literature suggests that a fertile climate is emerging for increasing litigation. This tendency is likely to lead to further escalation of costs if prevention is not taken more seriously.

  2. The big bang? An eventful year in workers' compensation.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, Tee L

    2006-01-01

    Workers' compensation in the past two years has been dominated by events in California, which have been so fundamental as to merit the term big bang. Passage of Senate Bill 899 has led to a comprehensive program of reform in access to medical care, access to rehabilitation services, temporary and permanent disability, evidence-based management, dispute resolution, and system innovation. Two noteworthy developments thus arose: a new requirement for apportionment by cause in causation analysis, and the adoption of evidence-based criteria for impairment assessment, treatment guidelines, and, soon, utilization review. Elsewhere in the United States, changes were modest, but extensive legislative activity in Texas suggests that Texas will be next to make major changes. In Canada, the Workers' Compensation Board of British Columbia has adopted an ambitious strategic initiative, and there is a Canadawide movement to establish presumption for certain diseases in firefighters. Suggestions for future directions include an increased emphasis on prevention, integration of programs, worker participation, enhancing the expertise of health care professionals, evidence-based management, process evaluation, and opportunities for innovation.

  3. A Total Systems Approach: Reducing Workers' Compensation Costs at UC Davis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukulinsky, Janet C.

    1993-01-01

    The University of California (Davis) has revamped its workers' compensation program by improving accountability and safety, implementing safety training, informing workers of the costs of the workers' compensation program, designating a physician and physical therapist, giving light duty to injured employees, using sports medicine techniques, and…

  4. The dentist's responsibilities with respect to a nofault motor accident compensation scheme.

    PubMed

    Craig, Pamela J G; Clement, John G

    2012-11-30

    The State of Victoria, Australia operates a no-fault accident compensation scheme for the treatment and rehabilitation of those injured on the roads. The administration of the scheme by the Transport Accident Commission includes an in-house clinical panel of clinicians in many disciplines including dentistry who liaise with treating practitioners with the aim of optimizing the outcome for the injured claimants.

  5. 20 CFR 601.2 - Approval of State unemployment compensation laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Approval of State unemployment compensation... unemployment compensation laws. States may at their option submit their unemployment compensation laws for... Employment and Training Administration (ETA), one copy of the State unemployment compensation law...

  6. 20 CFR 601.2 - Approval of State unemployment compensation laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Approval of State unemployment compensation... unemployment compensation laws. States may at their option submit their unemployment compensation laws for... Employment and Training Administration (ETA), one copy of the State unemployment compensation law...

  7. 20 CFR 601.2 - Approval of State unemployment compensation laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Approval of State unemployment compensation... unemployment compensation laws. States may at their option submit their unemployment compensation laws for... Employment and Training Administration (ETA), one copy of the State unemployment compensation law...

  8. 20 CFR 601.2 - Approval of State unemployment compensation laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Approval of State unemployment compensation... unemployment compensation laws. States may at their option submit their unemployment compensation laws for... Employment and Training Administration (ETA), one copy of the State unemployment compensation law...

  9. 20 CFR 601.2 - Approval of State unemployment compensation laws.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Approval of State unemployment compensation... unemployment compensation laws. States may at their option submit their unemployment compensation laws for... Employment and Training Administration (ETA), one copy of the State unemployment compensation law...

  10. Workers describe the effect of the workers' compensation process on their health: a Québec study.

    PubMed

    Lippel, Katherine

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on a Canadian qualitative study designed to examine the workers' experience of the workers' compensation process and to look at the effects of the process on the physical and mental health of claimants. Eighty five in depth individual interviews of injured workers in Québec and six group interviews with workers and worker advocates from Québec, Ontario and British Columbia were analysed to determine the positive and negative impact on claimant health of various steps of the workers' compensation process and of behaviours of significant actors in that process. While superior access to health care and access to economic support both contributed to claimant well-being, various facets of the process undermined the mental health of workers, and in some cases, also had a negative impact on physical health. Primary characteristics of the process that influenced outcomes included stigmatization of injured workers and the significant power imbalance between the claimants and the other actors in the system; the effect of both these mechanisms was tempered by social support. The article describes how caseworkers, physicians, appeal tribunals, employers and compensation boards contribute to the positive or negative impacts on worker health and concludes with recommendations designed to promote the therapeutic aspects of workers' compensation and to curtail those facets that are harmful to worker health. It also has implications for researchers who wish to consider the role of lawyers or compensation in the development or prevention of disability.

  11. Occupational lead poisoning in Ohio: surveillance using workers' compensation data.

    PubMed

    Seligman, P J; Halperin, W E; Mullan, R J; Frazier, T M

    1986-11-01

    To determine the utility of workers' compensation (WC) data in a system for the surveillance of occupational lead poisoning, we reviewed workers' compensation claims for lead poisoning in Ohio. For the period 1979 through 1983, 92 (81 per cent) of the 114 claims attributed to lead met our case definition of lead poisoning. The likelihood that a company had a case of lead poisoning was strongly correlated with the number of claims against the company. Thirty companies accounted for the 92 cases; two companies accounted for 49 per cent of these. Inspection by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) occurred at 14 of these companies, all of which were cited for violations of the OSHA lead standard. Comparison of the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes for the 14 companies inspected by OSHA with the 15 companies not inspected by OSHA revealed that OSHA inspected battery manufacturers, non-ferrous foundries, secondary smelters, and primary lead smelters, but not bridge painters, manufacturers of electronic components, mechanical power transmission equipment, pumps, and paints, nor a sheriff's office where firing range slugs were remelted to make new bullets. Neither the number of cases of lead poisoning at a company nor the size of a company was related to the likelihood of being inspected by OSHA. Claims for WC appear to be a useful adjunct to an occupational lead poisoning surveillance system; their usefulness should be compared to that of other systems such as laboratory reports of elevated blood lead levels in adults.

  12. Occupational lead poisoning in Ohio: surveillance using worker's compensation data

    SciTech Connect

    Seligman, P.J.; Halperin, W.E.; Mullan, R.J.; Frazier, T.M.

    1986-11-01

    To determine the utility of workers' compensation (WC) data in a system for the surveillance of occupational lead poisoning, we reviewed workers' compensation claims for lead poisoning in Ohio. For the period 1979 through 1983, 92(81 per cent) of the 114 claims attributed to lead met our case definition of lead poisoning. The likelihood that a company had a case of lead poisoning was strongly correlated with the number of claims against the company. Thirty companies accounted for the 92 cases; two companies accounted for 49 per cent of these. Inspection by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) occurred at 14 of these companies, all of which were cited for violations of the OSHA lead standard. Comparison of the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes for the 14 companies inspected by OSHA with the 15 companies not inspected by OSHA revealed that OSHA inspected battery manufacturers, non-ferrous foundries, secondary smelters, and primary lead smelters, but not bridge painters, manufacturers of electronic components, mechanical power transmission equipment, pumps, and paints, nor a sheriff's office where firing range slugs were remelted to make new bullets. Neither the number of cases of lead poisoning at a company nor the size of a company was related to the likelihood of being inspected by OSHA. Claims for WC appear to be useful adjunct to an occupational lead poisoning surveillance system; their usefulness should be compared to that of other systems such as laboratory reports of elevated blood lead levels in adults.

  13. 75 FR 51487 - Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor, as part of...

  14. 48 CFR 52.228-3 - Workers' Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Insurance (Defense Base Act). 52.228-3 Section 52.228-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.228-3 Workers' Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act). As prescribed in 28.309(a), insert the following clause: Workers' Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act) (APR 1984) The...

  15. 48 CFR 52.228-3 - Workers' Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Insurance (Defense Base Act). 52.228-3 Section 52.228-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.228-3 Workers' Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act). As prescribed in 28.309(a), insert the following clause: Workers' Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act) (APR 1984) The...

  16. 48 CFR 52.228-3 - Workers' Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Insurance (Defense Base Act). 52.228-3 Section 52.228-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.228-3 Workers' Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act). As prescribed in 28.309(a), insert the following clause: Workers' Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act) (APR 1984) The...

  17. 48 CFR 52.228-3 - Workers' Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Insurance (Defense Base Act). 52.228-3 Section 52.228-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.228-3 Workers' Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act). As prescribed in 28.309(a), insert the following clause: Workers' Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act) (APR 1984) The...

  18. 48 CFR 52.228-4 - Workers' Compensation and War-Hazard Insurance Overseas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... War-Hazard Insurance Overseas. 52.228-4 Section 52.228-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.228-4 Workers' Compensation and War-Hazard Insurance Overseas. As prescribed in 28.309(b), insert the following clause: Workers' Compensation and War-Hazard Insurance...

  19. 48 CFR 1328.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 1328.305 Section 1328.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. The designee authorized to recommend a waiver to...

  20. 48 CFR 228.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 228.305 Section 228.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... Insurance 228.305 Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. (d) When submitting requests...

  1. 48 CFR 652.228-71 - Worker's Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act)-Services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Insurance (Defense Base Act)-Services. 652.228-71 Section 652.228-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Clauses 652.228-71 Worker's Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act)—Services. As prescribed in 628.309-70(b), insert the following clause: Workers' Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act)—Services...

  2. 20 CFR 726.6 - The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs. 726.6 Section 726.6 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED BLACK LUNG BENEFITS; REQUIREMENTS FOR...

  3. 20 CFR 726.6 - The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs. 726.6 Section 726.6 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED BLACK LUNG BENEFITS; REQUIREMENTS FOR...

  4. 20 CFR 726.6 - The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false The Office of Workers' Compensation Programs. 726.6 Section 726.6 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED BLACK LUNG BENEFITS; REQUIREMENTS FOR...

  5. 20 CFR 1.1 - Under what authority does the Office of Workers' Compensation Programs operate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Under what authority does the Office of Workers' Compensation Programs operate? 1.1 Section 1.1 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES PERFORMANCE OF FUNCTIONS § 1.1...

  6. 20 CFR 1.1 - Under what authority does the Office of Workers' Compensation Programs operate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Under what authority does the Office of Workers' Compensation Programs operate? 1.1 Section 1.1 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES PERFORMANCE OF FUNCTIONS § 1.1...

  7. 20 CFR 1.1 - Under what authority does the Office of Workers' Compensation Programs operate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Under what authority does the Office of Workers' Compensation Programs operate? 1.1 Section 1.1 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES PERFORMANCE OF FUNCTIONS § 1.1...

  8. 75 FR 63864 - Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of Existing Collection; Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of... to Coal Mine Employment (CM-913). A copy of the proposed information collection request can be... of benefits to coal miners who are totally disabled by black lung disease arising out of coal...

  9. 75 FR 21351 - Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Collection; Comment Request ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor, as part of its continuing effort...

  10. 77 FR 1513 - Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Renewal of Existing Collection; Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Renewal of Existing Collection; Comment Request ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor, as part of...

  11. 75 FR 11912 - Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Office of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Collection; Comment Request ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor, as part of its continuing effort...

  12. 78 FR 72717 - Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Collection... to Coal Mine Employment (CM-913). A copy of the proposed information collection request can be... of benefits to coal miners who are totally disabled by black lung disease arising out of coal...

  13. 75 FR 51488 - Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of... comments (mail, fax, or E-mail). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background: The Division of Coal Mine... benefits to coal miners totally disabled due to pneumoconiosis, and their surviving dependents. When...

  14. 48 CFR 228.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 228.305 Section 228.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... Insurance 228.305 Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. (d) When submitting requests...

  15. 48 CFR 228.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 228.305 Section 228.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... Insurance 228.305 Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. (d) When submitting requests...

  16. 48 CFR 1328.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 1328.305 Section 1328.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. The designee authorized to recommend a waiver to...

  17. 48 CFR 1328.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 1328.305 Section 1328.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. The designee authorized to recommend a waiver to...

  18. 48 CFR 52.228-4 - Workers' Compensation and War-Hazard Insurance Overseas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... War-Hazard Insurance Overseas. 52.228-4 Section 52.228-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.228-4 Workers' Compensation and War-Hazard Insurance Overseas. As prescribed in 28.309(b), insert the following clause: Workers' Compensation and War-Hazard Insurance...

  19. 48 CFR 1328.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 1328.305 Section 1328.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. The designee authorized to recommend a waiver to...

  20. 48 CFR 52.228-4 - Workers' Compensation and War-Hazard Insurance Overseas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... War-Hazard Insurance Overseas. 52.228-4 Section 52.228-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.228-4 Workers' Compensation and War-Hazard Insurance Overseas. As prescribed in 28.309(b), insert the following clause: Workers' Compensation and War-Hazard Insurance...

  1. 48 CFR 228.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 228.305 Section 228.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... Insurance 228.305 Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. (d) When submitting requests...

  2. 48 CFR 228.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 228.305 Section 228.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... Insurance 228.305 Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. (d) When submitting requests...

  3. 48 CFR 52.228-4 - Workers' Compensation and War-Hazard Insurance Overseas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... War-Hazard Insurance Overseas. 52.228-4 Section 52.228-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.228-4 Workers' Compensation and War-Hazard Insurance Overseas. As prescribed in 28.309(b), insert the following clause: Workers' Compensation and War-Hazard Insurance...

  4. 48 CFR 1328.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 1328.305 Section 1328.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance. The designee authorized to recommend a waiver to...

  5. 48 CFR 52.228-4 - Workers' Compensation and War-Hazard Insurance Overseas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... War-Hazard Insurance Overseas. 52.228-4 Section 52.228-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.228-4 Workers' Compensation and War-Hazard Insurance Overseas. As prescribed in 28.309(b), insert the following clause: Workers' Compensation and War-Hazard Insurance...

  6. 20 CFR 1.1 - Under what authority was the Office of Workers' Compensation Programs established?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Under what authority was the Office of Workers' Compensation Programs established? 1.1 Section 1.1 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES PERFORMANCE OF FUNCTIONS § 1.1...

  7. 20 CFR 1.1 - Under what authority was the Office of Workers' Compensation Programs established?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Under what authority was the Office of Workers' Compensation Programs established? 1.1 Section 1.1 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES PERFORMANCE OF FUNCTIONS § 1.1...

  8. A way through the dark and thorny thickets? The adjudication of "serious injury" under the narrative tests in the Transport Accident Act 1986 (Vic) and the Workplace Injury Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 2013 (Vic).

    PubMed

    Taliadoros, Jason

    2015-09-01

    The so-called "narrative" test provides the means by which injured persons who satisfy the statutory and common law definition of "serious injury" may bring proceedings for common law damages under s 93 of the Transport Accident Act 1986 (Vic) and s 134AB of the Accident Compensation Act 1985 (Vic) (or, for injuries after 1 July 2014, under ss 324-347 of the Workplace Injury Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 2013 (Vic)). These are among the most litigated provisions in Australia. This article outlines the legislative and political background to these provisions, the provisions themselves, and an account of the statutory and common law requirements needed to satisfy the provisions.

  9. Immigrant workers: health, law, and public policy.

    PubMed

    Guttmacher, S

    1984-01-01

    Immigrant workers are a large segment of the lower echelon of the U.S. labor force, and as many as 3.6 to 6 million of these workers and their families are living in the U.S. illegally. This paper examines who the recent immigrants are: explains why their current situation in the U.S. is an important public health matter; discusses the ethical and policy issues stemming from their health needs and from illegal status; and concludes with a brief look at some implications of the Simpson-Mazzoli Immigration and Reform Act, currently before Congress. The paper suggests that the illegal status of undocumented workers intensifies their health risks; that the immigrants' responsibility for budget short-falls in public services is not as clearcut as frequently assumed; and that legislation aimed at regulating the status of immigrant workers in the U.S. is unlikely to solve many of the central problems.

  10. Do Blue Laws Save Lives? The Effect of Sunday Alcohol Sales Bans on Fatal Vehicle Accidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovenheim, Michael F.; Steefel, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of state-level Sunday alcohol sales restrictions ("blue laws") on fatal vehicle accidents, which is an important parameter in assessing the desirability of these laws. Using a panel data set of all fatal vehicle accidents in the U.S. between 1990 and 2009 combined with 15 state repeals of blue laws, we show that…

  11. Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Korea Provoked by Workers' Collective Compensation Claims against Work Intensification.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongmug; Kim, Youngki; Lee, Young-Il; Koh, Sangbaek; Kim, Inah; Lee, Hoonkoo

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the process of workers' problems with work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs), the introduction of risk assessments (RA) for their prevention, and the consequences of this process in Korea. In 1997, economic crisis caused a rapid increase of massive layoffs, worker dispatch system introduction, job insecurity, and use of irregular workers resulting in work intensification. Work intensification increased WMSDs, which created massive workers' compensation collective claims. Workers argued for the reduction of work intensity. The RAs introduced as a consequence of the workers' struggle is unique in the world. Whereas these RAs were expected to play a pivotal role in WMSDs prevention, they dis not due to workers' lack of engagement after the compensation struggle. In fact, changes in the compensation judgment system and criteria have resulted in lower compensation approval rates leading to lower workers' compensation claims. The Korean experience provides insight into WMSDs causes in a globalized world. In such a the globalized world, work intensification as the result of work flexibility could be an international trend.

  12. 78 FR 35327 - Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation; Proposed Collection of Existing Collection; Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... payments of state or federal benefits for workers' compensation due to pneumoconiosis. To ensure compliance... paid out for this award, such as attorney fees and related expenses associated with...

  13. Working on reform. How workers' compensation medical care is affected by health care reform.

    PubMed Central

    Himmelstein, J; Rest, K

    1996-01-01

    The medical component of workers' compensation programs-now costing over $24 billion annually-and the rest of the nation's medical care system are linked. They share the same patients and providers. They provide similar benefits and services. And they struggle over who should pay for what. Clearly, health care reform and restructuring will have a major impact on the operation and expenditures of the workers' compensation system. For a brief period, during the 1994 national health care reform debate, these two systems were part of the same federal policy development and legislative process. With comprehensive health care reform no longer on the horizon, states now are tackling both workers' compensation and medical system reforms on their own. This paper reviews the major issues federal and state policy makers face as they consider reforms affecting the relationship between workers' compensation and traditional health insurance. What is the relationship of the workers' compensation cost crisis to that in general health care? What strategies are being considered by states involved in reforming the medical component of workers compensation? What are the major policy implications of these strategies? Images p13-a p14-a p15-a p16-a p18-a p19-a p20-a p22-a p24-a PMID:8610187

  14. 48 CFR 2928.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Overseas workers' compensation and war hazard insurance. 2928.305 Section 2928.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...' compensation and war hazard insurance. The authority of the Agency Head to recommend to the Secretary of...

  15. 48 CFR 2928.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Overseas workers' compensation and war hazard insurance. 2928.305 Section 2928.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...' compensation and war hazard insurance. The authority of the Agency Head to recommend to the Secretary of...

  16. 48 CFR 2928.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Overseas workers' compensation and war hazard insurance. 2928.305 Section 2928.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...' compensation and war hazard insurance. The authority of the Agency Head to recommend to the Secretary of...

  17. 48 CFR 2928.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Overseas workers' compensation and war hazard insurance. 2928.305 Section 2928.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...' compensation and war hazard insurance. The authority of the Agency Head to recommend to the Secretary of...

  18. 48 CFR 2928.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Overseas workers' compensation and war hazard insurance. 2928.305 Section 2928.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...' compensation and war hazard insurance. The authority of the Agency Head to recommend to the Secretary of...

  19. 75 FR 18887 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... under the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act and its Extension (LS-276, LS-275-IC and LS-275... benefits by the responsible carrier or self-insurer to injured workers and their survivors. Forms LS-276, Application for Security Deposit Determination; LS-275-IC, Agreement and Undertaking (Insurance Carrier);...

  20. A Health Education Program Designed To Increase Job-Seeking Skills for Workers' Compensation Claimants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Florette L.

    A research project addressed the high unemployment rate of Workers' Compensation claimants by the formation of a job-seeking club. Unemployment statistics for this population were compiled. Five percent of the workers were skilled, 14 percent semiskilled, and 60 percent unskilled; 84 percent were male, 91 percent were white, and almost half lacked…

  1. Posttraumatic stress disorder in co-workers following exposure to a fatal construction accident in China.

    PubMed

    Hu, B S; Liang, Y X; Hu, X Y; Long, Y F; Ge, L N

    2000-01-01

    To assess the mental disturbances induced by accidents at work, 41 male workers who had witnessed a fatal work accident were evaluated utilizing the criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from the ICD-10 Classification of Mental and Behavioral Disorders. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) was also administered to the exposed workers, as well as to 47 non-exposed construction-worker controls. The two groups were well matched with respect to age, years of employment, and years of education. They were all of Han sect; and lifestyles, incomes, and living conditions were similar. The exposed workers had a high rate of PTSD: 11 of 41 (26.8%) at one month and five of 39 (12.9%) four months after the fatal accident. The exposed groups' scores for depressive symptoms were significantly higher than those of the controls, including: 1) depressed mood, 2) guilt, 3) initial insomnia, 4) middle insomnia, 5) delayed insomnia, 6) decreased interest in work and other activities, 7) anxiety, 8) somatization, and 9) gastrointestinal symptoms (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, p < 0.001). Fatal work accidents, a major hazard in the construction industry, affect not only the victims but also the mental health of other workers. PTSD and associated emotional disorders related to exposure to serious work accidents deserve more attention for clinical and research purposes.

  2. Association of State Laws and Healthcare Workers' Influenza Vaccination Rates.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Raymund, Mahlon; Sweeney, Patricia M; Zimmerman, Richard K

    2016-02-01

    State laws are being used to increase healthcare worker (HCW) influenza vaccine uptake. Approximately 40% of states have enacted such laws but their effectiveness has been infrequently studied. Data sources for this study were the 2000-2011 U.S. National Health Interview Survey Adult Sample File and a summary of U.S. state HCW influenza vaccination laws. Hierarchical linear modeling was used for two time periods: 1) 2000-2005 (before enactment of many state laws) and 2) 2006-2011 (a time of increased enactment of state HCW influenza vaccination legislation). During 2000-2005, two states had HCW influenza vaccination laws and HCW influenza vaccination rates averaged 22.5%. In 2006-2011, 19 states had such laws and vaccination rates averaged 50.9% (p < 0.001). The likelihood of HCW vaccination increased with the scope and breadth, measured by a law score. Although laws varied widely in scope and applicability, states with HCW influenza vaccination laws reported higher HCW vaccination rates. PMID:26928494

  3. Association of State Laws and Healthcare Workers' Influenza Vaccination Rates.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Raymund, Mahlon; Sweeney, Patricia M; Zimmerman, Richard K

    2016-02-01

    State laws are being used to increase healthcare worker (HCW) influenza vaccine uptake. Approximately 40% of states have enacted such laws but their effectiveness has been infrequently studied. Data sources for this study were the 2000-2011 U.S. National Health Interview Survey Adult Sample File and a summary of U.S. state HCW influenza vaccination laws. Hierarchical linear modeling was used for two time periods: 1) 2000-2005 (before enactment of many state laws) and 2) 2006-2011 (a time of increased enactment of state HCW influenza vaccination legislation). During 2000-2005, two states had HCW influenza vaccination laws and HCW influenza vaccination rates averaged 22.5%. In 2006-2011, 19 states had such laws and vaccination rates averaged 50.9% (p < 0.001). The likelihood of HCW vaccination increased with the scope and breadth, measured by a law score. Although laws varied widely in scope and applicability, states with HCW influenza vaccination laws reported higher HCW vaccination rates.

  4. 20 CFR 601.6 - Grants for administration of unemployment compensation laws and employment service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Grants for administration of unemployment... administration of unemployment compensation laws and employment service. Grants of funds for administration of State unemployment compensation laws and public employment service programs are made to States...

  5. 20 CFR 601.6 - Grants for administration of unemployment compensation laws and employment service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Grants for administration of unemployment... administration of unemployment compensation laws and employment service. Grants of funds for administration of State unemployment compensation laws and public employment service programs are made to States...

  6. 20 CFR 601.6 - Grants for administration of unemployment compensation laws and employment service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Grants for administration of unemployment... administration of unemployment compensation laws and employment service. Grants of funds for administration of State unemployment compensation laws and public employment service programs are made to States...

  7. 20 CFR 601.6 - Grants for administration of unemployment compensation laws and employment service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Grants for administration of unemployment... administration of unemployment compensation laws and employment service. Grants of funds for administration of State unemployment compensation laws and public employment service programs are made to States...

  8. 20 CFR 601.6 - Grants for administration of unemployment compensation laws and employment service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Grants for administration of unemployment... administration of unemployment compensation laws and employment service. Grants of funds for administration of State unemployment compensation laws and public employment service programs are made to States...

  9. Review of Cytogenetic analysis of restoration workers for Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station accident.

    PubMed

    Suto, Yumiko

    2016-09-01

    Japan faced with the nuclear accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) caused by the combined disaster of the Great East Japan Earthquake and the subsequent tsunamis on 11 March 2011. National Institute of Radiological Sciences received all nuclear workers who were engaged in emergency response tasks at the NPS and suspected of being overexposed to acute radiation. Biological dosimetry by dicentric chromosome assay was helpful for medical triage and management of the workers. PMID:27473701

  10. Review of Cytogenetic analysis of restoration workers for Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station accident.

    PubMed

    Suto, Yumiko

    2016-09-01

    Japan faced with the nuclear accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) caused by the combined disaster of the Great East Japan Earthquake and the subsequent tsunamis on 11 March 2011. National Institute of Radiological Sciences received all nuclear workers who were engaged in emergency response tasks at the NPS and suspected of being overexposed to acute radiation. Biological dosimetry by dicentric chromosome assay was helpful for medical triage and management of the workers.

  11. Risk Perception and Occupational Accidents: A Study of Gas Station Workers in Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Rocha, Laurelize Pereira; Bonow, Clarice Alves; da Silva, Mara Regina Santos; Vaz, Joana Cezar; Cardoso, Letícia Silveira

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the perceptions of gas station workers about physical, chemical, biological and physiological risk factors to which they are exposed in their work environment; identify types of occupational accidents involving gas station workers and; report the development of a socioenvironmental intervention as a tool for risk communication to gas station workers. A quantitative study was performed with 221 gas station workers in southern Brazil between October and December 2010. Data collection was performed between October to December 2010 via structured interviews. The data were analyzed using SPSS 19.0. The participants identified the following risk types: chemical (93.7%), physical (88.2%), physiological (64.3%) and biological (62.4%). In this sample, 94.1% of gas station workers reported occupational accidents, and 74.2% reported fuel contact with the eyes (p < 0.05). It is concluded that workers perceive risks, and that they tend to relate risks with the occurrence of occupational accidents as an indicator of the dangerous nature of their work environment. PMID:22851948

  12. Accident data study of concrete construction companies' similarities and differences between qualified and non-qualified workers in Spain.

    PubMed

    López-Arquillos, Antonio; Rubio-Romero, Juan Carlos; Gibb, Alistair

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss findings from an analysis of accidents in concrete construction companies in Spain and to compare the accident rates of qualified and non-qualified workers. A total of 125,021 accidents between 2003 and 2008 involving both blue-collar and white-collar workers were analysed, comparing the variables of occupation, age, company staff, length of service, location of the accident, together with the severity of the accidents. Results showed that lack of experience in the first month is more significant in non-qualified workers and experienced supervisors and that head injuries are more likely to lead to fatalities. The most remarkable similarity was that fatal accidents to and from the worksite are a problem common to both groups of workers.

  13. Estimating Worker Risk Levels Using Accident/Incident Data

    SciTech Connect

    Kenoyer, Judson L.; Stenner, Robert D.; Andrews, William B.; Scherpelz, Robert I.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.

    2000-09-26

    The purpose of the work described in this report was to identify methods that are currently being used in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex to identify and control hazards/risks in the workplace, evaluate them in terms of their effectiveness in reducing risk to the workers, and to develop a preliminary method that could be used to predict the relative risks to workers performing proposed tasks using some of the current methodology. This report describes some of the performance indicators (i.e., safety metrics) that are currently being used to track relative levels of workplace safety in the DOE complex, how these fit into an Integrated Safety Management (ISM) system, some strengths and weaknesses of using a statistically based set of indicators, and methods to evaluate them. Also discussed are methods used to reduce risk to the workers and some of the techniques that appear to be working in the process of establishing a condition of continuous improvement. The results of these methods will be used in future work involved with the determination of modifying factors for a more complex model. The preliminary method to predict the relative risk level to workers during an extended future time period is based on a currently used performance indicator that uses several factors tracked in the CAIRS. The relative risks for workers in a sample (but real) facility on the Hanford site are estimated for a time period of twenty years and are based on workforce predictions. This is the first step in developing a more complex model that will incorporate other modifying factors related to the workers, work environment and status of the ISM system to adjust the preliminary prediction.

  14. 28 CFR 301.106 - Repetitious accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Repetitious accidents. 301.106 Section 301.106 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ACCIDENT COMPENSATION General § 301.106 Repetitious accidents. If an inmate worker is involved in successive...

  15. 28 CFR 301.106 - Repetitious accidents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Repetitious accidents. 301.106 Section 301.106 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ACCIDENT COMPENSATION General § 301.106 Repetitious accidents. If an inmate worker is involved in successive...

  16. Typical accidents encountered by assembly workers: six scenarios for safety planning identified using multivariate methods.

    PubMed

    Laflamme, L; Backström, T; Döös, M

    1993-08-01

    This study highlights the most typical accidents encountered by assembly workers employed in a variety of different workshops at a large automobile and truck factory in Sweden. Following site visits and the collection of data from accident registers, statistics on 28 accident characteristics were compiled on the basis of the 145 accidents involving assemblers in 1986 and 1987. For data treatment, two statistical methods complemented one another: the factorial analysis of correspondence (FAC) and the hierarchical ascendant classification (HAC). Six typical accident profiles were extensively portrayed, quantified, and illustrated graphically: overexertion; falls and stumbling; injuries related to the handling of tools; superficial wounds to the (left) hand; cuts/pinches from moving machine parts and the handling of objects; miscellaneous blows from work pieces. The distribution of these types of accidents across the workshops was studied. It is emphasized that the search for typical accident patterns using multivariate statistical methods helps to structure and define the accident problems of a target group and therefore provides benefits for the evaluation of the need for preventive measures. PMID:8357453

  17. Assessment of potential doses to workers during postulated accident conditions at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, M.D.; Farrell, R.F.; Newton, G.J.

    1995-12-01

    The recent 1995 WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR) Update provided detailed analyses of potential radiation doses to members of the public at the site boundary during postulated accident scenarios at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The SAR Update addressed the complete spectrum of potential accidents associated with handling and emplacing transuranic waste at WIPP, including damage to waste drums from fires, punctures, drops, and other disruptions. The report focused on the adequacy of the multiple layers of safety practice ({open_quotes}defense-in-depth{close_quotes}) at WIPP, which are designed to (1) reduce the likelihood of accidents and (2) limit the consequences of those accidents. The safeguards which contribute to defense-in-depth at WIPP include a substantial array of inherent design features, engineered controls, and administrative procedures. The SAR Update confirmed that the defense-in-depth at WIPP is adequate to assure the protection of the public and environment. As a supplement to the 1995 SAR Update, we have conducted additional analyses to confirm that these controls will also provide adequate protection to workers at the WIPP. The approaches and results of the worker dose assessment are summarized here. In conformance with the guidance of DOE Standard 3009-94, we emphasize that use of these evaluation guidelines is not intended to imply that these numbers constitute acceptable limits for worker exposures under accident conditions. However, in conjunction with the extensive safety assessment in the 1995 SAR Update, these results indicate that the Carlsbad Area Office strategy for the assessment of hazards and accidents assures the protection of workers, members of the public, and the environment.

  18. 48 CFR 728.305-70 - Overseas worker's compensation and war-hazard insurance-waivers and USAID insurance coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Overseas worker's compensation and war-hazard insurance-waivers and USAID insurance coverage. 728.305-70 Section 728.305-70... REQUIREMENTS BONDS AND INSURANCE Insurance 728.305-70 Overseas worker's compensation and war-hazard...

  19. 48 CFR 728.305-70 - Overseas worker's compensation and war-hazard insurance-waivers and USAID insurance coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Overseas worker's compensation and war-hazard insurance-waivers and USAID insurance coverage. 728.305-70 Section 728.305-70... REQUIREMENTS BONDS AND INSURANCE Insurance 728.305-70 Overseas worker's compensation and war-hazard...

  20. 48 CFR 728.305-70 - Overseas worker's compensation and war-hazard insurance-waivers and USAID insurance coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Overseas worker's compensation and war-hazard insurance-waivers and USAID insurance coverage. 728.305-70 Section 728.305-70... REQUIREMENTS BONDS AND INSURANCE Insurance 728.305-70 Overseas worker's compensation and war-hazard...

  1. 48 CFR 728.305-70 - Overseas worker's compensation and war-hazard insurance-waivers and USAID insurance coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Overseas worker's compensation and war-hazard insurance-waivers and USAID insurance coverage. 728.305-70 Section 728.305-70... REQUIREMENTS BONDS AND INSURANCE Insurance 728.305-70 Overseas worker's compensation and war-hazard...

  2. 48 CFR 728.305-70 - Overseas worker's compensation and war-hazard insurance-waivers and USAID insurance coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Overseas worker's compensation and war-hazard insurance-waivers and USAID insurance coverage. 728.305-70 Section 728.305-70... REQUIREMENTS BONDS AND INSURANCE Insurance 728.305-70 Overseas worker's compensation and war-hazard...

  3. 78 FR 57416 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Proposed Revision of Existing Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ...: Regulations Governing the Administration of the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act (LS-200, LS-201, LS-203, LS-204, LS-262, LS-267, LS- 271, LS-274, and LS-513). A copy of the proposed information... of the forms in this package, the LS-513 (Report of Payments), is now being modified slightly...

  4. 48 CFR 752.228-3 - Worker's compensation insurance (Defense Base Act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... insurance (Defense Base Act). 752.228-3 Section 752.228-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR... Clauses 752.228-3 Worker's compensation insurance (Defense Base Act). As prescribed in 728.309, the... contracting officer. (a) The Contractor agrees to procure Defense Base Act (DBA) insurance pursuant to...

  5. 48 CFR 752.228-3 - Worker's compensation insurance (Defense Base Act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... insurance (Defense Base Act). 752.228-3 Section 752.228-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR... Clauses 752.228-3 Worker's compensation insurance (Defense Base Act). As prescribed in 728.309, the... contracting officer. (a) The Contractor agrees to procure Defense Base Act (DBA) insurance pursuant to...

  6. 48 CFR 752.228-3 - Worker's compensation insurance (Defense Base Act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... insurance (Defense Base Act). 752.228-3 Section 752.228-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR... Clauses 752.228-3 Worker's compensation insurance (Defense Base Act). As prescribed in 728.309, the... contracting officer. (a) The Contractor agrees to procure Defense Base Act (DBA) insurance pursuant to...

  7. 48 CFR 752.228-3 - Worker's compensation insurance (Defense Base Act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... insurance (Defense Base Act). 752.228-3 Section 752.228-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR... Clauses 752.228-3 Worker's compensation insurance (Defense Base Act). As prescribed in 728.309, the... contracting officer. (a) The Contractor agrees to procure Defense Base Act (DBA) insurance pursuant to...

  8. 48 CFR 752.228-3 - Worker's compensation insurance (Defense Base Act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... insurance (Defense Base Act). 752.228-3 Section 752.228-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR... Clauses 752.228-3 Worker's compensation insurance (Defense Base Act). As prescribed in 728.309, the... contracting officer. (a) The Contractor agrees to procure Defense Base Act (DBA) insurance pursuant to...

  9. 48 CFR 52.228-3 - Workers' Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... by the Defense Base Act, and Department of Labor regulations at 20 CFR Parts 701 to 704. (b) For... Insurance (Defense Base Act). 52.228-3 Section 52.228-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.228-3 Workers' Compensation Insurance (Defense Base Act). As prescribed in...

  10. 42 CFR 411.45 - Basis for conditional Medicare payment in workers' compensation cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) The beneficiary, because of physical or mental incapacity, failed to file a proper claim. (b) Any... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Basis for conditional Medicare payment in workers' compensation cases. 411.45 Section 411.45 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT...

  11. 42 CFR 411.45 - Basis for conditional Medicare payment in workers' compensation cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) The beneficiary, because of physical or mental incapacity, failed to file a proper claim. (b) Any... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Basis for conditional Medicare payment in workers' compensation cases. 411.45 Section 411.45 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT...

  12. 42 CFR 411.45 - Basis for conditional Medicare payment in workers' compensation cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) The beneficiary, because of physical or mental incapacity, failed to file a proper claim. (b) Any... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis for conditional Medicare payment in workers' compensation cases. 411.45 Section 411.45 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT...

  13. 42 CFR 411.45 - Basis for conditional Medicare payment in workers' compensation cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) The beneficiary, because of physical or mental incapacity, failed to file a proper claim. (b) Any... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Basis for conditional Medicare payment in workers' compensation cases. 411.45 Section 411.45 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT...

  14. 42 CFR 411.45 - Basis for conditional Medicare payment in workers' compensation cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) The beneficiary, because of physical or mental incapacity, failed to file a proper claim. (b) Any... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Basis for conditional Medicare payment in workers' compensation cases. 411.45 Section 411.45 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT...

  15. 32 CFR 220.13 - Special rules for workers' compensation programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special rules for workers' compensation programs. 220.13 Section 220.13 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTION FROM THIRD PARTY PAYERS OF REASONABLE CHARGES FOR...

  16. 75 FR 63425 - Regulations Implementing the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act: Recreational Vessels

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act: Recreational Vessels, published on August 17, 2010 (75 FR 50718... comments. 75 FR 50718 (Aug. 17, 2010). As explained in the supplementary information section below, the..., 2009 (see Secretary's Order 10-2009, 74 FR 58834 (Nov. 13, 2009)), that title was no longer...

  17. 76 FR 24918 - Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation Proposed Renewal of Existing Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... under the Black Lung Benefits Act (CM-911) and Employment History (CM- 911A). A copy of the proposed...). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background: The Division of Coal Mine Workers' Compensation administers the Black... to pneumoniosis, and their surviving dependents. A miner who applies for black lung benefits...

  18. Fish harvesters with injuries' accounts of their experiences with the workers' compensation system.

    PubMed

    Murray, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The workers' compensation system was established to provide fair access to compensation for workers who have experienced occupational injury and can no longer work. It was expected that such a system would reduce individual legal claims. Evidence indicates that many injured workers proceed with a variety of appeals indicating dissatisfaction with the current system. The fishing industry is extremely dangerous. The aim of this research was to explore the experience of injured fish harvesters who were making use of a compensation system. Interviews were held with a sample of injured in-shore and deep-sea fish harvesters. In general, they identified themselves strongly as hard-working people who did not deserve their injury. They also reported substantial frustration with the staff of the compensation system who they believed treated them with suspicion and disrespect. The deep-sea fish harvesters were more concerned with the amount of compensation. This dissatisfaction with the system contributed to the fish harvesters' use of the appeals procedure. The fish harvesters' complaints are discussed with reference to the concepts of distributive and procedural justice.

  19. Association between outdoor ozone and compensated acute respiratory diseases among workers in Quebec (Canada)

    PubMed Central

    ADAM-POUPART, Ariane; LABRÈCHE, France; BUSQUE, Marc-Antoine; BRAND, Allan; DUGUAY, Patrice; FOURNIER, Michel; ZAYED, Joseph; SMARGIASSI, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory effects of ozone in the workplace have not been extensively studied. Our aim was to explore the relationship between daily average ozone levels and compensated acute respiratory problems among workers in Quebec between 2003 and 2010 using a time-stratified case-crossover design. Health data came from the Workers’ Compensation Board. Daily concentrations of ozone were estimated using a spatiotemporal model. Conditional logistic regressions, with and without adjustment for temperature, were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs, per 1 ppb increase of ozone), and lag effects were assessed. Relationships with respiratory compensations in all industrial sectors were essentially null. Positive non-statistically significant associations were observed for outdoor sectors, and decreased after controlling for temperature (ORs of 0.98; 1.01 and 1.05 at Lags 0, 1 and 2 respectively). Considering the predicted increase of air pollutant concentrations in the context of climate change, closer investigation should be carried out on outdoor workers. PMID:25736778

  20. Service quality assessment of workers compensation health care delivery programs in New York using SERVQUAL.

    PubMed

    Arunasalam, Mark; Paulson, Albert; Wallace, William

    2003-01-01

    Preferred provider organizations (PPOs) provide healthcare services to an expanding proportion of the U.S. population. This paper presents a programmatic assessment of service quality in the workers' compensation environment using two different models: the PPO program model and the fee-for-service (FFS) payor model. The methodology used here will augment currently available research in workers' compensation, which has been lacking in measuring service quality determinants and assessing programmatic success/failure of managed care type programs. Results indicated that the SERVQUAL tool provided a reliable and valid clinical quality assessment tool that ascertained that PPO marketers should focus on promoting physician outreach (to show empathy) and accessibility (to show reliability) for injured workers. PMID:15271631

  1. Service quality assessment of workers compensation health care delivery programs in New York using SERVQUAL.

    PubMed

    Arunasalam, Mark; Paulson, Albert; Wallace, William

    2003-01-01

    Preferred provider organizations (PPOs) provide healthcare services to an expanding proportion of the U.S. population. This paper presents a programmatic assessment of service quality in the workers' compensation environment using two different models: the PPO program model and the fee-for-service (FFS) payor model. The methodology used here will augment currently available research in workers' compensation, which has been lacking in measuring service quality determinants and assessing programmatic success/failure of managed care type programs. Results indicated that the SERVQUAL tool provided a reliable and valid clinical quality assessment tool that ascertained that PPO marketers should focus on promoting physician outreach (to show empathy) and accessibility (to show reliability) for injured workers.

  2. Impact of the Illinois Seat Belt Use Law on Accidents, Deaths, and Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Steven M.

    1992-01-01

    The impact of the 1985 Illinois seat belt law is explored using Box-Jenkins Auto-Regressive, Integrated Moving Averages (ARIMA) techniques and monthly accident statistical data from the state department of transportation for January-July 1990. A conservative estimate is that the law provides benefits of $15 million per month in Illinois. (SLD)

  3. Characterization of exposures to workers covered under the U.S. Energy Employees Compensation Act.

    PubMed

    Neton, James W

    2014-02-01

    Since the mid-1940s, hundreds of thousands of workers have been engaged in nuclear weapons-related activities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies. In 2000, Congress promulgated the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (EEOICPA), which provides monetary compensation and medical benefits to certain energy employees who have developed cancer. Under Part B of EEOICPA, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is required to estimate radiation doses for those workers who have filed a claim, or whose survivors have filed a claim, under Part B of the Act. To date, over 39,000 dose reconstructions have been completed for workers from more than 200 facilities. These reconstructions have included assessment of both internal and external exposure at all major DOE facilities, as well as at a large number of private companies [known as Atomic Weapons Employer (AWE) facilities in the Act] that engaged in contract work for the DOE and its predecessor agencies. To complete these dose reconstructions, NIOSH has captured and reviewed thousands of historical documents related to site operations and worker/workplace monitoring practices at these facilities. Using the data collected and reviewed pursuant to NIOSH's role under EEOICPA, this presentation will characterize historical internal and external exposures received by workers at DOE and AWE facilities. To the extent possible, use will be made of facility specific coworker models to highlight changes in exposure patterns over time. In addition, the effects that these exposures have on compensation rates for workers are discussed.Introduction of Characterization of Exposures to Workers (Video 1:59, http://links.lww.com/HP/A3).

  4. Impact of the number of painful stimuli on life satisfaction among Korean industrial accident workers completing convalescence: dual mediating effects of self-esteem and sleeping time

    PubMed Central

    CHOI, Wan-Suk; KIM, Bo-Kyung; KIM, Ki-Do; MOON, Ok-Kon; YEUM, Dong-Moon

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the impact of the number of painful stimuli on life satisfaction among workers who experienced an industrial accident and investigated how self-esteem and sleeping time affected life satisfaction. The Korea Workers’ Compensation & Welfare Service conducted the first nationwide panel survey on occupational health and safety insurance in 2013–2014 through a stratified systematic sampling on 2,000 industrial accident workers who completed convalescence. Based on the dataset, our study analyzed 1,832 workers experiencing an industrial accident after excluding 168 disease patients. For the research model analysis, a four-stage hierarchical regression analysis technique was applied using the SPSS regression analysis Macro program of PROCESS Procedure. To test mediated indirect effects of the self-esteem and sleeping time, the bootstrapping technique was applied. Life satisfaction, self-esteem and sleeping time decreased as the number of painful stimuli increased. Life satisfaction decreased as self-esteem and sleeping time decreased. On balance, the partial mediation model confirmed that self-esteem and sleeping time both mediate the impact of the number of painful stimuli on life satisfaction. PMID:27021061

  5. [On psychologic profile of locomotive crew workers in Russian Railways JSC and its role in accidents prevention].

    PubMed

    Mendelevich, V D; Makaricheva, E V; Serikov, V V; Dmitrieva, E V; Zakrevskaia, A A; Ozhogina, O A; Alpaev, D V

    2015-01-01

    The article covers personality characters of locomotive crew workers of Russian Railways JSC, and specifying a block of methods for psychologic support of these workers' occupational activities. According to the results obtained, the authors presented a thorough description of characterologic, motivational personality traits characterizing a select of locomotive crew workers, and analyzed a relationship between the traits and levels of accidents in the workers' occupational activity. PMID:25826879

  6. Workers' compensation boards and nineteenth century French railway firms.

    PubMed

    Béland, François

    2008-01-01

    WCBs are able to provide fast access to high-quality healthcare to workers through their role as parallel payers in a publicly financed healthcare system. On the positive side, added funding from WCBs may help public facilities to fund and keep costly medical expertise. On the negative side, WCBs may drive them to accept much-needed funding below true costs of care and to crowd out public-pay patients. Some studies showed that governments were expecting from policies supporting parallel private payers the benefits hoped for by Hurley et al, while some of their negative effects could not be avoided. The combination of cost shifting from public-pay to private-pay patients, and of crowding out, are the ingredients of a Dupuit's case wherein third-class passengers riding the nineteenth century French railway system were subsidizing first- and second-class passengers. With the pressure for allowing private financing of healthcare throughout Canada, the Canadian healthcare system may be ripe for a ride toward subsidization of private-pay patients by the public purse, with a little help from WCBs.

  7. 42 CFR 411.35 - Limitations on charges to a beneficiary or other party when a workers' compensation plan, a no...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... party when a workers' compensation plan, a no-fault insurer, or an employer group health plan is primary... beneficiary or other party when a workers' compensation plan, a no-fault insurer, or an employer group health... when a workers' compensation plan, a no-fault insurer or an employer group health plan is primary...

  8. 42 CFR 411.35 - Limitations on charges to a beneficiary or other party when a workers' compensation plan, a no...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... party when a workers' compensation plan, a no-fault insurer, or an employer group health plan is primary... beneficiary or other party when a workers' compensation plan, a no-fault insurer, or an employer group health... when a workers' compensation plan, a no-fault insurer or an employer group health plan is primary...

  9. 42 CFR 411.35 - Limitations on charges to a beneficiary or other party when a workers' compensation plan, a no...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... party when a workers' compensation plan, a no-fault insurer, or an employer group health plan is primary... beneficiary or other party when a workers' compensation plan, a no-fault insurer, or an employer group health... when a workers' compensation plan, a no-fault insurer or an employer group health plan is primary...

  10. 42 CFR 411.35 - Limitations on charges to a beneficiary or other party when a workers' compensation plan, a no...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... party when a workers' compensation plan, a no-fault insurer, or an employer group health plan is primary... beneficiary or other party when a workers' compensation plan, a no-fault insurer, or an employer group health... when a workers' compensation plan, a no-fault insurer or an employer group health plan is primary...

  11. 42 CFR 411.35 - Limitations on charges to a beneficiary or other party when a workers' compensation plan, a no...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... party when a workers' compensation plan, a no-fault insurer, or an employer group health plan is primary... beneficiary or other party when a workers' compensation plan, a no-fault insurer, or an employer group health... when a workers' compensation plan, a no-fault insurer or an employer group health plan is primary...

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF EXPOSURES TO WORKERS COVERED UNDER THE U.S. ENERGY EMPLOYEES COMPENSATION ACT

    PubMed Central

    Neton, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Since the mid-1940s, hundreds of thousands of workers have been engaged in nuclear weapons-related activities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies. In 2000, Congress promulgated the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (EEOICPA), which provides monetary compensation and medical benefits to certain energy employees who have developed cancer. Under Part B of EEOICPA, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is required to estimate radiation doses for those workers who have filed a claim, or whose survivors have filed a claim, under Part B of the Act. To date, over 39,000 dose reconstructions have been completed for workers from more than 200 facilities. These reconstructions have included assessment of both internal and external exposure at all major DOE facilities, as well as at a large number of private companies [known as Atomic Weapons Employer (AWE) facilities in the Act] that engaged in contract work for the DOE and its predecessor agencies. To complete these dose reconstructions, NIOSH has captured and reviewed thousands of historical documents related to site operations and worker/workplace monitoring practices at these facilities. Using the data collected and reviewed pursuant to NIOSH’s role under EEOICPA, this presentation will characterize historical internal and external exposures received by workers at DOE and AWE facilities. To the extent possible, use will be made of facility specific coworker models to highlight changes in exposure patterns over time. In addition, the effects that these exposures have on compensation rates for workers are discussed. PMID:24378500

  13. Does time off work after injury vary by jurisdiction? A comparative study of eight Australian workers' compensation systems

    PubMed Central

    Collie, Alex; Lane, Tyler J; Hassani-Mahmooei, Behrooz; Thompson, Jason; McLeod, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether the jurisdiction in which a work-related injury compensation claim is made is an independent predictor of duration of time off work following work injury, and if so, the magnitude of the effect. Setting Eight Australian state and territory workers' compensation systems, providing coverage for more than 90% of the Australian labour force. Administrative claims data from these systems were provided by government regulatory authorities for the study. Participants 95 976 Australian workers with workers' compensation claims accepted in 2010 and with at least 2 weeks of compensated time off work. Primary outcome measure Duration of time lost from work in weeks, censored at 104 weeks. Results After controlling for demographic, worker, injury and employer factors in a Cox regression model, significant differences in duration of time loss between state and territory of claim were observed. Compared with New South Wales, workers in Victoria, South Australia and Comcare had significantly longer durations of time off work and were more likely to be receiving income benefits at 104 weeks postinjury, while workers in Tasmania and Queensland had significantly shorter durations of time off work. Conclusions The jurisdiction in which an injured worker makes a compensation claim has a significant and independent impact on duration of time loss. Further research is necessary to identify specific compensation system policies and practices that promote timely and appropriate return to work and reduce duration of time off work. PMID:27150186

  14. Workers' compensation claims for musculoskeletal disorders among wholesale and retail trade industry workers--Ohio, 2005-2009.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) resulting from ergonomic hazards are common in the United States. Recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) indicate that in 2011, one third of occupational injuries and illnesses resulting in lost time from work were WMSDs. Based on data from the 2010 BLS Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses, a higher rate of WMSDs resulting in lost time from work occurred in the Wholesale and Retail Trade (WRT) industry compared with most other industries. To assess trends and identify WRT subsectors and subgroups associated with high rates of WMSD workers' compensation claims, the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation (OBWC) and CDC analyzed OBWC claims data for single-location WRT employers in Ohio for the period 2005-2009. From 2005 to 2009, the rate of WMSD claims declined from 86.3 to 52.8 per 10,000 employees. The three WRT industry subsectors with the highest rates of WMSD claims were Merchant Wholesalers, Nondurable Goods; Furniture and Home Furnishings Stores; and Merchant Wholesalers, Durable Goods. Within those three WRT subsectors, the highest rates of WMSD claims were noted in five subgroups: furniture stores and wholesalers of alcoholic beverages, groceries and related products, metal and minerals, and motor vehicle parts. Providing recommendations for WMSD prevention is particularly important for these WRT subgroups.

  15. Workers' compensation claims for musculoskeletal disorders among wholesale and retail trade industry workers--Ohio, 2005-2009.

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) resulting from ergonomic hazards are common in the United States. Recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) indicate that in 2011, one third of occupational injuries and illnesses resulting in lost time from work were WMSDs. Based on data from the 2010 BLS Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses, a higher rate of WMSDs resulting in lost time from work occurred in the Wholesale and Retail Trade (WRT) industry compared with most other industries. To assess trends and identify WRT subsectors and subgroups associated with high rates of WMSD workers' compensation claims, the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation (OBWC) and CDC analyzed OBWC claims data for single-location WRT employers in Ohio for the period 2005-2009. From 2005 to 2009, the rate of WMSD claims declined from 86.3 to 52.8 per 10,000 employees. The three WRT industry subsectors with the highest rates of WMSD claims were Merchant Wholesalers, Nondurable Goods; Furniture and Home Furnishings Stores; and Merchant Wholesalers, Durable Goods. Within those three WRT subsectors, the highest rates of WMSD claims were noted in five subgroups: furniture stores and wholesalers of alcoholic beverages, groceries and related products, metal and minerals, and motor vehicle parts. Providing recommendations for WMSD prevention is particularly important for these WRT subgroups. PMID:23739337

  16. Hazard Prevention Regarding Occupational Accidents Involving Blue-Collar Foreign Workers: A Perspective of Taiwanese Manpower Agencies.

    PubMed

    Chang, Huan-Cheng; Wang, Mei-Chin; Liao, Hung-Chang; Cheng, Shu-Fang; Wang, Ya-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Since 1989, blue-collar foreign workers have been permitted to work in Taiwanese industries. Most blue-collar foreign workers apply for jobs in Taiwan through blue-collar foreign workers' agencies. Because blue-collar foreign workers are not familiar with the language and culture in Taiwan, in occupational accident education and hazard prevention, the agencies play an important role in the coordination and translation between employees and blue-collar foreign workers. The purpose of this study is to establish the agencies' role in the occupational accidents education and hazard prevention for blue-collar foreign workers in Taiwan. This study uses a qualitative method-grounded theory-to collect, code, and analyze the data in order to understand the agencies' role in occupational accident education and hazard prevention for blue-collar foreign workers in Taiwan. The results show that the duty of agencies in occupational accident education and hazard prevention includes selecting appropriate blue-collar foreign workers, communicating between employees and blue-collar foreign workers, collecting occupational safety and health information, assisting in the training of occupational safety and health, and helping blue-collar foreign workers adapt to their lives in Taiwan. Finally, this study suggests seven important points and discusses the implementation process necessary to improve governmental policies. The government and employees should pay attention to the education/training of occupational safety and health for blue-collar foreign workers to eliminate unsafe behavior in order to protect the lives of blue-collar foreign workers. PMID:27420085

  17. Hazard Prevention Regarding Occupational Accidents Involving Blue-Collar Foreign Workers: A Perspective of Taiwanese Manpower Agencies.

    PubMed

    Chang, Huan-Cheng; Wang, Mei-Chin; Liao, Hung-Chang; Cheng, Shu-Fang; Wang, Ya-Huei

    2016-07-13

    Since 1989, blue-collar foreign workers have been permitted to work in Taiwanese industries. Most blue-collar foreign workers apply for jobs in Taiwan through blue-collar foreign workers' agencies. Because blue-collar foreign workers are not familiar with the language and culture in Taiwan, in occupational accident education and hazard prevention, the agencies play an important role in the coordination and translation between employees and blue-collar foreign workers. The purpose of this study is to establish the agencies' role in the occupational accidents education and hazard prevention for blue-collar foreign workers in Taiwan. This study uses a qualitative method-grounded theory-to collect, code, and analyze the data in order to understand the agencies' role in occupational accident education and hazard prevention for blue-collar foreign workers in Taiwan. The results show that the duty of agencies in occupational accident education and hazard prevention includes selecting appropriate blue-collar foreign workers, communicating between employees and blue-collar foreign workers, collecting occupational safety and health information, assisting in the training of occupational safety and health, and helping blue-collar foreign workers adapt to their lives in Taiwan. Finally, this study suggests seven important points and discusses the implementation process necessary to improve governmental policies. The government and employees should pay attention to the education/training of occupational safety and health for blue-collar foreign workers to eliminate unsafe behavior in order to protect the lives of blue-collar foreign workers.

  18. Hazard Prevention Regarding Occupational Accidents Involving Blue-Collar Foreign Workers: A Perspective of Taiwanese Manpower Agencies

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Huan-Cheng; Wang, Mei-Chin; Liao, Hung-Chang; Cheng, Shu-Fang; Wang, Ya-huei

    2016-01-01

    Since 1989, blue-collar foreign workers have been permitted to work in Taiwanese industries. Most blue-collar foreign workers apply for jobs in Taiwan through blue-collar foreign workers’ agencies. Because blue-collar foreign workers are not familiar with the language and culture in Taiwan, in occupational accident education and hazard prevention, the agencies play an important role in the coordination and translation between employees and blue-collar foreign workers. The purpose of this study is to establish the agencies’ role in the occupational accidents education and hazard prevention for blue-collar foreign workers in Taiwan. This study uses a qualitative method—grounded theory—to collect, code, and analyze the data in order to understand the agencies’ role in occupational accident education and hazard prevention for blue-collar foreign workers in Taiwan. The results show that the duty of agencies in occupational accident education and hazard prevention includes selecting appropriate blue-collar foreign workers, communicating between employees and blue-collar foreign workers, collecting occupational safety and health information, assisting in the training of occupational safety and health, and helping blue-collar foreign workers adapt to their lives in Taiwan. Finally, this study suggests seven important points and discusses the implementation process necessary to improve governmental policies. The government and employees should pay attention to the education/training of occupational safety and health for blue-collar foreign workers to eliminate unsafe behavior in order to protect the lives of blue-collar foreign workers. PMID:27420085

  19. Experiences and Perspectives of Physical Therapists Managing Patients Covered by Workers' Compensation in Queensland, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Mandy; Corbière, Marc; Franche, Reneé-Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background Physical therapists have an active role in the rehabilitation of injured workers. However, regulations in Queensland, Australia, do not afford them the opportunity to participate in return-to-work (RTW) decisions in a standardized way. No prior research has explored the experiences and perceptions of therapists in determining work capacity. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate physical therapists' experiences with and perspectives on their role in determining readiness for RTW and work capacity for patients receiving workers' compensation in Queensland. Design A qualitative design was used. Participants were physical therapists who manage injured workers. Methods Novice (n=5) and experienced (n=20) therapists managing patients receiving workers' compensation were selected through purposeful sampling to participate in a focus group or semistructured telephone interviews. Data obtained were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were thematically analyzed. Physical therapists' confidence in making RTW decisions was determined with 1 question scored on a 0 to 10 scale. Results Themes identified were: (1) physical therapists believe they are important in RTW, (2) physical therapists use a variety of methods to determine work capacity, and (3) physical therapists experience a lack of role clarity. Therapists made recommendations for RTW using clinical judgment informed by subjective and objective information gathered from the injured worker. Novice therapists were less confident in making RTW decisions. Conclusion Therapists are well situated to gather and interpret the information necessary to make RTW recommendations. Strategies targeting the Australian Physiotherapy Association, physical therapists, and the regulators are needed to standardize assessment of readiness for RTW, improve role clarity, and assist novice practitioners. PMID:22745200

  20. [Medical certificates in occupational accidents, in common law and social affairs].

    PubMed

    El Banna, S; Van de Vyvere, A; Beauthier, J-P

    2013-09-01

    Physicians are asked to complete certificates within their profession. These certificates relate to various aspects of an individual's life, from birth to the end of life. The nature of requests is striking by its diversity. As a first step, the authors recall the outline of a certificate and its structure, as well as traps, hazards and risks to avoid. In a second step they describe three specific situations for the certificate: in the context of work accidents, common law accidents and social matters. All materials can not be treated in this space, so they refer the reader to the main bibliographic sources useful in this matter.

  1. [Base-rate estimates for negative response bias in a workers' compensation claim sample].

    PubMed

    Merten, T; Krahi, G; Krahl, C; Freytag, H W

    2010-09-01

    Against the background of a growing interest in symptom validity assessment in European countries, new data on base rates of negative response bias is presented. A retrospective data analysis of forensic psychological evaluations was performed based on 398 patients with workers' compensation claims. 48 percent of all patients scored below cut-off in at least one symptom validity test (SVT) indicating possible negative response bias. However, different SVTs appear to have differing potential to identify negative response bias. The data point at the necessity to use modern methods to check data validity in civil forensic contexts.

  2. The three essentials for accident prevention.

    PubMed

    Eastman, Crystal

    2014-11-01

    This article was written by Crystal Eastman when she was Secretary of the New York Commission on Employers' Liability and Causes of Industrial Accidents, Unemployment, and Lack of Farm Labor. It was published in July of 1911, in Volume 38, Number 1 of the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, pages 98-107. The issue title was "Risks in Modern Industry." Eastman calls for the prevention of workplace accidents through three essentials: injury surveillance/reporting (with annual public reporting of the data); government enforcement of accident prevention laws, via departments with well-paid and well-trained officials and inspectors, fines that are high enough to be a deterrence to employers, and the power to have police shut down a factory if preventive measures are not installed; and a workers' compensation system-"a system of liability by which an employer can reduce his accident costs, not by hiring a more unscrupulous attorney and a more hard-hearted claim agent, but only by reducing his accidents." PMID:25261022

  3. Improving the quality of workers' compensation health care delivery: the Washington State Occupational Health Services Project.

    PubMed

    Wickizer, T M; Franklin, G; Plaeger-Brockway, R; Mootz, R D

    2001-01-01

    This article has summarized research and policy activities undertaken in Washington State over the past several years to identify the key problems that result in poor quality and excessive disability among injured workers, and the types of system and delivery changes that could best address these problems in order to improve the quality of occupational health care provided through the workers' compensation system. Our investigations have consistently pointed to the lack of coordination and integration of occupational health services as having major adverse effects on quality and health outcomes for workers' compensation. The Managed Care Pilot Project, a delivery system intervention, focused on making changes in how care is organized and delivered to injured workers. That project demonstrated robust improvements in disability reduction; however, worker satisfaction suffered. Our current quality improvement initiative, developed through the Occupational Health Services Project, synthesizes what was learned from the MCP and other pilot studies to make delivery system improvements. This initiative seeks to develop provider incentives and clinical management processes that will improve outcomes and reduce the burden of disability on injured workers. Fundamental to this approach are simultaneously preserving workers' right to choose their own physician and maintaining flexibility in the provision of individualized care based on clinical need and progress. The OHS project then will be a "real world" test to determine if aligning provider incentives and giving physicians the tools they need to optimize occupational health delivery can demonstrate sustainable reduction in disability and improvements in patient and employer satisfaction. Critical to the success of this initiative will be our ability to: (1) enhance the occupational health care management skills and expertise of physicians who treat injured workers by establishing community-based Centers of Occupational

  4. Improving the quality of workers' compensation health care delivery: the Washington State Occupational Health Services Project.

    PubMed

    Wickizer, T M; Franklin, G; Plaeger-Brockway, R; Mootz, R D

    2001-01-01

    This article has summarized research and policy activities undertaken in Washington State over the past several years to identify the key problems that result in poor quality and excessive disability among injured workers, and the types of system and delivery changes that could best address these problems in order to improve the quality of occupational health care provided through the workers' compensation system. Our investigations have consistently pointed to the lack of coordination and integration of occupational health services as having major adverse effects on quality and health outcomes for workers' compensation. The Managed Care Pilot Project, a delivery system intervention, focused on making changes in how care is organized and delivered to injured workers. That project demonstrated robust improvements in disability reduction; however, worker satisfaction suffered. Our current quality improvement initiative, developed through the Occupational Health Services Project, synthesizes what was learned from the MCP and other pilot studies to make delivery system improvements. This initiative seeks to develop provider incentives and clinical management processes that will improve outcomes and reduce the burden of disability on injured workers. Fundamental to this approach are simultaneously preserving workers' right to choose their own physician and maintaining flexibility in the provision of individualized care based on clinical need and progress. The OHS project then will be a "real world" test to determine if aligning provider incentives and giving physicians the tools they need to optimize occupational health delivery can demonstrate sustainable reduction in disability and improvements in patient and employer satisfaction. Critical to the success of this initiative will be our ability to: (1) enhance the occupational health care management skills and expertise of physicians who treat injured workers by establishing community-based Centers of Occupational

  5. Telomere length in Chernobyl accident recovery workers in the late period after the disaster

    PubMed Central

    Reste, Jelena; Zvigule, Gunda; Zvagule, Tija; Kurjane, Natalja; Eglite, Maija; Gabruseva, Natalija; Berzina, Dace; Plonis, Juris; Miklasevics, Edvins

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (CNPP) accident was that a huge number of people were exposed to ionizing radiation. Previous studies of CNPP clean-up workers from Latvia revealed a high occurrence of age-associated degenerative diseases and cancer in young adults, as well as a high mortality as a result of cardiovascular disorders at age 45–54 years. DNA tandem repeats that cap chromosome ends, known as telomeres, are sensitive to oxidative damage and exposure to ionizing radiation. Telomeres are important in aging processes and carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effect of protracted ionizing radiation exposure on telomere length in CNPP clean-up workers. Relative telomere length (RTL) was measured in peripheral blood leukocytes of 595 CNPP clean-up workers and 236 gender- and age-matched controls using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR). Close attention was paid to participation year and tasks performed during the worker's stay in Chernobyl, health status, and RTL differences between subgroups. Telomere shortening was not found in CNPP clean-up workers; on the contrary, their RTL was slightly greater than in controls (P = 0.001). Longer telomeres were found in people who worked during 1986, in those undertaking ‘dirty’ tasks (digging and deactivation), and in people with cancer. Shorter telomeres appeared frequently in those with cataract, osteoporosis, atherosclerosis, or coronary heart disease. We conclude that the longer telomeres revealed in people more heavily exposed to ionizing radiation probably indicate activation of telomerase as a chromosome healing mechanism following damage, and reflect defects in telomerase regulation that could potentiate carcinogenesis. PMID:25015931

  6. Telomere length in Chernobyl accident recovery workers in the late period after the disaster.

    PubMed

    Reste, Jelena; Zvigule, Gunda; Zvagule, Tija; Kurjane, Natalja; Eglite, Maija; Gabruseva, Natalija; Berzina, Dace; Plonis, Juris; Miklasevics, Edvins

    2014-11-01

    The outcome of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (CNPP) accident was that a huge number of people were exposed to ionizing radiation. Previous studies of CNPP clean-up workers from Latvia revealed a high occurrence of age-associated degenerative diseases and cancer in young adults, as well as a high mortality as a result of cardiovascular disorders at age 45-54 years. DNA tandem repeats that cap chromosome ends, known as telomeres, are sensitive to oxidative damage and exposure to ionizing radiation. Telomeres are important in aging processes and carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effect of protracted ionizing radiation exposure on telomere length in CNPP clean-up workers. Relative telomere length (RTL) was measured in peripheral blood leukocytes of 595 CNPP clean-up workers and 236 gender- and age-matched controls using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR). Close attention was paid to participation year and tasks performed during the worker's stay in Chernobyl, health status, and RTL differences between subgroups. Telomere shortening was not found in CNPP clean-up workers; on the contrary, their RTL was slightly greater than in controls (P = 0.001). Longer telomeres were found in people who worked during 1986, in those undertaking 'dirty' tasks (digging and deactivation), and in people with cancer. Shorter telomeres appeared frequently in those with cataract, osteoporosis, atherosclerosis, or coronary heart disease. We conclude that the longer telomeres revealed in people more heavily exposed to ionizing radiation probably indicate activation of telomerase as a chromosome healing mechanism following damage, and reflect defects in telomerase regulation that could potentiate carcinogenesis.

  7. Clinical aspects of the health disturbances in Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident clean-up workers (liquidators) from Latvia.

    PubMed

    Eglite, M E; Zvagule, T J; Rainsford, K D; Reste, J D; Curbakova, E V; Kurjane, N N

    2009-06-01

    The health status of some 6,000 workers from Latvia who went to clean-up the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) site following the explosion on 26 April 1986 has been analyzed. The data on these workers have been recorded in the Latvian State Register of Occupational disease patients and people exposed to ionizing radiation due to Chernobyl NPP accident (Latvian State Register) that was established in 1994. From these data, estimates have been made of external ionizing radiation to which these workers were exposed together with observations on the impact of exposure to heavy metals (especially lead and zinc) and radioactive isotopes released during the reactor 'meltdown'. These factors along with psycho-emotional and social-economic stresses account for a marked excess of mortality and morbidity in the group of CNPP accident clean-up workers compared with that of the non-exposed normal Latvian population adjusted for age and sex. The number of diseases or conditions in the CNPP accident clean-up workers has progressively risen from an average of 1.3 in 1986 to 10.9 in 2007. This exceeds for the Latvian population when adjusted for age and sex. The most serious conditions affect the nervous, digestive, respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine (especially thyroid) and immunological systems. While the morbidity associated with diseases of the respiratory and digestive systems has decreased in recent years that in the other systems is increasing. In recent years, there has been an increased occurrence of cancers affecting the thyroid, prostate and stomach. Clinical and laboratory investigations suggest that surviving CNPP accident clean-up workers exhibit signs of immuno-inflammatory reactions causing premature aging with evidence of autoimmune diseases and immunological deficiencies or abnormalities. It is suggested that the CNPP accident clean-up workers may have a specific syndrome, the 'Chernobyl post-radiation neurosomatic polypathy', due to sustained oxidant

  8. Clastogenic factors in the plasma of Chernobyl accident recovery workers: Anticlastogenic effect of Ginkgo biloba extract

    SciTech Connect

    Emerit, I.; Levy, A.; Cernjavski, L.

    1995-11-01

    Clastogenic factors are found in the plasma of persons irradiated accidentally or therapeutically. They persisted in the plasma of A-bomb survivors over 30 years. Clastogenic factors were found in 33 or 47 Chernobyl accident recovery workers (often referred to as liquidators) in a previous study. In the present study, we show that there is a positive correlation between clastogenic activity and dose and that these biomarkers of oxidative stress can be influenced successfully by appropriate antioxidant treatment. With the authorization of the Armenian Ministry of Health, 30 workers were treated with antioxidants from Ginkgo biloba leaves. The extract EGb 761 containing flavonoids and terpenoids was given at a daily dose of 3 x 40 mg (Tanakan, IPSEN, France) during 2 months. The clastogenic activity of the plasma was reduced to control levels on the first day after the end of the treatment. A 1-year follow-up showed that the benefit of the treatment persisted for at least 7 months. One-third of the workers again had clastogenic factors after 1 year, demonstrating that the process which produced clastogenic factors continued. However, the observation that antioxidants do not have to be given continuously is encouraging for intervention trials on a large-scale basis. These appear justified, since clastogenic factors are thought to be risk factors for the development of late effects of irradiation. 43 refs., 6 tabs.

  9. The relationship between motivation, monetary compensation, and data quality among US- and India-based workers on Mechanical Turk.

    PubMed

    Litman, Leib; Robinson, Jonathan; Rosenzweig, Cheskie

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we examined data quality among Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk) workers based in India, and the effect of monetary compensation on their data quality. Recent studies have shown that work quality is independent of compensation rates, and that compensation primarily affects the quantity but not the quality of work. However, the results of these studies were generally based on compensation rates below the minimum wage, and far below a level that was likely to play a practical role in the lives of workers. In this study, compensation rates were set around the minimum wage in India. To examine data quality, we developed the squared discrepancy procedure, which is a task-based quality assurance approach for survey tasks whose goal is to identify inattentive participants. We showed that data quality is directly affected by compensation rates for India-based participants. We also found that data were of a lesser quality among India-based than among US participants, even when optimal payment strategies were utilized. We additionally showed that the motivation of MTurk users has shifted, and that monetary compensation is now reported to be the primary reason for working on MTurk, among both US- and India-based workers. Overall, MTurk is a constantly evolving marketplace where multiple factors can contribute to data quality. High-quality survey data can be acquired on MTurk among India-based participants when an appropriate pay rate is provided and task-specific quality assurance procedures are utilized.

  10. Barriers to Use of Workers' Compensation for Patient Care at Massachusetts Community Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Azaroff, Lenore S; Davis, Letitia K; Naparstek, Robert; Hashimoto, Dean; Laing, James R; Wegman, David H

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine barriers community health centers (CHCs) face in using workers' compensation insurance (WC). Data Sources/Study Setting Leadership of CHCs in Massachusetts. Study Design We used purposeful snowball sampling of CHC leaders for in-depth exploration of reimbursement policies and practices, experiences with WC, and decisions about using WC. We quantified the prevalence of perceived barriers to using WC through a mail survey of all CHCs in Massachusetts. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Emergent coding was used to elaborate themes and processes related to use of WC. Numbers and percentages of survey responses were calculated. Principal Findings Few CHCs formally discourage use of WC, but underutilization emerged as a major issue: “We see an awful lot of work-related injury, and I would say that most of it doesn't go through workers' comp.” Barriers include lack of familiarity with WC, uncertainty about work-relatedness, and reliance on patients to identify work-relatedness of their conditions. Reimbursement delays and denials lead patients and CHCs to absorb costs of services. Conclusion Follow-up studies should fully characterize barriers to CHC use of WC and experiences in other states to guide system changes in CHCs and WC agencies. Education should target CHC staff and workers about WC. PMID:23445431

  11. Young Workers and the Wage-Hour Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Child labor provisions of Fair Labor Standards Act affect more people than any other aspect of the law. Latest changes in the law are reported regarding: (1) farm employment, (2) nonfarm work, (3) other hazardous jobs, (4) minimum wage, (5) overtime pay, and (6) State laws. (MW)

  12. The biomedicalisation of war and military remains: US nuclear worker compensation in the 'post-Cold War'.

    PubMed

    Krupar, Shiloh

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the recent legislation and administration of United States nuclear worker compensation--the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Programme Act (EEOICPA)--in order to show the domestic impacts of war and the social order that has been established to respond to the Cold War legacy of occupational exposures, illness, and death. Examining the epistemological politics and material effects of compensation, an insufficiently analysed aspect of the Cold War, I argue that the system designed to redress the occupational exposures of nuclear workers accomplishes something else: obscuring the ethical problem of misinformation and missing data from the Cold War era; mobilising an industry of knowledge and market-economic opportunities in the arena of biomedical exposure assessment and dose reconstruction for parts of the former US nuclear complex; and, lastly, dematerialising and depoliticising geographies of the Cold War and its differential impacts through an individualistic epidemiological reprocessing of radiation exposures. The paper shows how the general claims procedure, combined with two methods mandated by EEOICPA--dose reconstruction and the probability of causation--effectively de-link workers from each other, and worksites from homes, pin compensation to a cost-benefit logic, implicate genuine scientific complexity and uncertainty in an ongoing denial of the toxic legacies of war, and ethically undermine the social justice aims of the legislation. The article ends by considering some of the ways that US nuclear workers have responded to living as the remains of both US bomb production and the compensation system.

  13. The biomedicalisation of war and military remains: US nuclear worker compensation in the 'post-Cold War'.

    PubMed

    Krupar, Shiloh

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the recent legislation and administration of United States nuclear worker compensation--the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Programme Act (EEOICPA)--in order to show the domestic impacts of war and the social order that has been established to respond to the Cold War legacy of occupational exposures, illness, and death. Examining the epistemological politics and material effects of compensation, an insufficiently analysed aspect of the Cold War, I argue that the system designed to redress the occupational exposures of nuclear workers accomplishes something else: obscuring the ethical problem of misinformation and missing data from the Cold War era; mobilising an industry of knowledge and market-economic opportunities in the arena of biomedical exposure assessment and dose reconstruction for parts of the former US nuclear complex; and, lastly, dematerialising and depoliticising geographies of the Cold War and its differential impacts through an individualistic epidemiological reprocessing of radiation exposures. The paper shows how the general claims procedure, combined with two methods mandated by EEOICPA--dose reconstruction and the probability of causation--effectively de-link workers from each other, and worksites from homes, pin compensation to a cost-benefit logic, implicate genuine scientific complexity and uncertainty in an ongoing denial of the toxic legacies of war, and ethically undermine the social justice aims of the legislation. The article ends by considering some of the ways that US nuclear workers have responded to living as the remains of both US bomb production and the compensation system. PMID:24236362

  14. Power Law Behavior and Self-Similarity in Modern Industrial Accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, António M.; Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    Advances in technology have produced more and more intricate industrial systems, such as nuclear power plants, chemical centers and petroleum platforms. Such complex plants exhibit multiple interactions among smaller units and human operators, rising potentially disastrous failure, which can propagate across subsystem boundaries. This paper analyzes industrial accident data-series in the perspective of statistical physics and dynamical systems. Global data is collected from the Emergency Events Database (EM-DAT) during the time period from year 1903 up to 2012. The statistical distributions of the number of fatalities caused by industrial accidents reveal Power Law (PL) behavior. We analyze the evolution of the PL parameters over time and observe a remarkable increment in the PL exponent during the last years. PL behavior allows prediction by extrapolation over a wide range of scales. In a complementary line of thought, we compare the data using appropriate indices and use different visualization techniques to correlate and to extract relationships among industrial accident events. This study contributes to better understand the complexity of modern industrial accidents and their ruling principles.

  15. Age in Relation to Worker Compensation Costs in the Construction Industry

    PubMed Central

    Schwatka, Natalie V.; Butler, Lesley M.; Rosecrance, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Background A better understanding of how workers’ compensation (WC) costs are affected by an aging US workforce is needed, especially for physically demanding industries, such as construction. Methods The relationship between age and injury type on claim costs was evaluated using a database of 107,064 Colorado WC claims filed between 1998 and 2008 among construction workers. Results Mean WC costs increased with increasing age for total cost (P < 0.0001), medical costs (P < 0.0001), and indemnity costs (P < 0.0001). For each one-year increase in age, indemnity, and medical costs increased by 3.5% and 1.1%, respectively. For specific injury types, such as strains and contusions, the association between age and indemnity costs was higher among claimants aged ≥65 compared to claimants aged 18–24. Conclusions Our findings suggest that specific injury types may be partially responsible for the higher indemnity costs among older construction workers, compared with their younger coworkers. PMID:22782837

  16. 5 CFR 894.304 - Am I eligible to enroll if I'm retired or receiving workers' compensation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Am I eligible to enroll if I'm retired or receiving workers' compensation? 894.304 Section 894.304 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION...

  17. 5 CFR 894.304 - Am I eligible to enroll if I'm retired or receiving workers' compensation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Am I eligible to enroll if I'm retired or receiving workers' compensation? 894.304 Section 894.304 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION...

  18. 5 CFR 894.304 - Am I eligible to enroll if I'm retired or receiving workers' compensation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Am I eligible to enroll if I'm retired or receiving workers' compensation? 894.304 Section 894.304 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION...

  19. 5 CFR 894.304 - Am I eligible to enroll if I'm retired or receiving workers' compensation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Am I eligible to enroll if I'm retired or receiving workers' compensation? 894.304 Section 894.304 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION...

  20. 5 CFR 894.304 - Am I eligible to enroll if I'm retired or receiving workers' compensation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Am I eligible to enroll if I'm retired or receiving workers' compensation? 894.304 Section 894.304 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION...

  1. Insights into the Experiences of Older Workers and Change: Through the Lens of Selection, Optimization, and Compensation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unson, Christine; Richardson, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The study examined the barriers faced, the goals selected, and the optimization and compensation strategies of older workers in relation to career change. Method: Thirty open-ended interviews, 12 in the United States and 18 in New Zealand, were conducted, recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for themes. Results: Barriers to…

  2. [Motivation of the employer for accident prevention and rehabilitation through risk-justified premiums].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, A L; Merz, R

    1989-01-01

    The Swiss workers' compensation law prescribes experience rating. Successful efforts of an employer to reduce the risk of accidents through adequate preventive measures on one hand, and on the other hand to keep subsequent costs of still occurring accidents low with quick, consistent and generous measures of rehabilitation, will therefore result in a lower insurance rate. The motivating influence and success of this self-responsibility is pointed out with the figures of a trading company who had been detached from a large risk-community due to bad results. The success with accident prevention and the very favourable ratio achievable of costs for medical treatment (as a measure for the severity of the injuries) to daily payments and costs for permanent disabilities is shown with the example of a construction machinery company. What relations and consecutive costs result from (partly conscious) neglect of rehabilitation is demonstrated with the figures of a construction company. PMID:2532438

  3. 42 CFR 411.39 - Automobile and liability insurance (including self-insurance), no-fault insurance, and workers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-insurance), no-fault insurance, and workers' compensation: Final conditional payment amounts via Web portal... (including self-insurance), no-fault insurance, and workers' compensation: Final conditional payment amounts...). (2) No fault insurance. (3) Workers' compensation laws or plans. Medicare Secondary Payer...

  4. 42 CFR 411.39 - Automobile and liability insurance (including self-insurance), no-fault insurance, and workers...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-insurance), no-fault insurance, and workers' compensation: Final conditional payment amounts via Web portal... (including self-insurance), no-fault insurance, and workers' compensation: Final conditional payment amounts...). (2) No fault insurance. (3) Workers' compensation laws or plans. Medicare Secondary Payer...

  5. Semen Quality of Workers Exposed to Ionizing Radiation in Decontamination Work after the Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor Accident.

    PubMed

    Bartoov; Zabludovsky; Eltes; Smirnov; Grischenko; Fischbein

    1997-07-01

    The objective of the study was to assess effects of radiation on sperm quality, including ultramorphology of spermatozoa of men who worked as salvage workers at the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident site or in the adjacent region. Semen characteristics were assessed by light microscopy, biochemical analysis, and quantitative ultramorphologic analysis seven years after the accident. Samples were collected in the Ukraine, examined there by routine semen analysis, fixed, and transferred to Israel for further examinations. The study population consisted of 18 radiation-exposed individuals. Eighteen unexposed Ukrainian men were examined as controls. Sperm motility was found to be reduced in the radiation-exposed workers. Ultramorphologic defects were evident in the sperm nucleus. Fertility potential was adversely affected among the exposed workers. Thus, salvage workers who had worked at the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident site or in the vicinity thereof were found to manifest ultramorphologic abnormalities in the sperm nucleus and to have impaired fertility potential seven years after the radiation exposure. The injury was independent of whether the work site had been located at the reactor site or in the vicinity thereof.

  6. The impact of workplace factors on filing of workers’ compensation claims among nursing home workers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Injuries reported to workers’ compensation (WC) system are often used to estimate incidence of health outcomes and evaluate interventions in musculoskeletal epidemiology studies. However, WC claims represent a relatively small subset of all musculoskeletal disorders among employed individuals, and perhaps not a representative subset. This study determined the influence of workplace and individual factors on filing of workers’ compensation claims by nursing home employees with back pain. Methods Surveys were conducted in 18 skilled nursing facilities in four U.S. states. Self-administered questionnaires obtained information on demographic characteristics, working environment, and health behaviors/status. Employees who reported low back pain at least once in four questionnaire surveys were included. WC claims from the same facilities were obtained from the employer’s workers compensation insurer and matched by employee name. The dichotomous dependent variable was filing of back-related worker’s compensation claim. Association with predictors of interest, including pain severity, physical job demand, job strain, social support, schedule control, and safety climate, was assessed using multivariate regression modeling. Individual characteristics were tested as potential confounders. Results Pain severity level was significantly associated with filing low-back related claims (odds ratio (OR) = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.18 – 1.87). Higher physical demands at work (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.01 – 1.14) also increased the likelihood of claim filing. Higher job strain (OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.73 – 0.94), social support at work (OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.82 – 0.99), and education (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.71 – 0.89) decreased the likelihood of claim filing. Conclusions The results suggest that the WC system captured the most severe occupational injuries. Workplace factors had additional influence on workers’ decision to file

  7. The administrative process for recognition and compensation for occupational diseases in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Chan; Kim, Hyoung-Ryoul; Kwon, Young-Jun

    2014-06-01

    In the Workers' Compensation Insurance (WCI) system in Korea, occupational diseases (ODs) are approved through deliberation meetings of the Committee on Occupational Disease Judgment (CODJ) after disease investigations when workers or medical institutions requested the Korea Workers' Compensation and Welfare Service (COMWEL) for medical care benefits. Insufficient data presented by employers or workers or lack of objective evidence may increase the possibility of disapproval. The expertise of accident investigation staff members should be reinforced and employers' and related institutions' obligations to cooperate and submit data should be specified under the law. The deliberation meetings of the CODJ are held separately for musculoskeletal, cerebro-cardiovascular, and medical diseases, and the judgments of ODs are made by the chairperson of COMWEL and six committee members by majority vote by issue. To reinforce the expertise of the members of the CODJ, periodic education and a system to accredit the committee members after appropriate education should be introduced. To fairly and quickly compensate for diseases that occur in workers, the criteria for the recognition of occupational diseases should be continuously amended and the systems for disease investigations and judgments should be continuously improved. PMID:25006321

  8. Descriptive Study of Occupational Accidents and their Causes among Electricity Distribution Company Workers at an Eight-year Period in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Abdolrasoul; Khadem, Monireh; Madreseh, Elham; Aghaei, Habib-Allah; Raei, Mehdi; Karchani, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Background Occupational accidents are unplanned events that cause damage. The socio-economic impacts and human costs of accidents are tremendous around the world. Many fatalities happen every year in workplaces such as electricity distribution companies. Some electrical injuries are electrocution, electric shock, and burns. This study was conducted in an electricity distribution company (with rotational 12-hour shift work) in Iran during an 8-year period to survey descriptive factors of injuries. Methods Variables collected included accident time, age of injured worker, employment type, work experience, injury cause, educational background, and other information about accidents. Results Results indicated that most of the accidents occurred in summer, and 51.3% were during shift work. Worker negligence (malpractice) was the cause of 75% of deaths. Type of employment had a significant relationship with type of injuries (p < 0.05). Most injuries were electrical burns. Conclusion High rate of accidents in summer may be due to the warm weather or insufficient professional skills in seasonal workers. Shift workers are at risk of sleep complaints leading to a high rate of work injuries. Acquiring knowledge about safety was related to job experiences. Temporary workers have no chance to work all year like permanent workers, therefore impressive experiences may be less in them. Because the lack of protective equipment and negligence are main causes of accidents, periodical inspections in workshops are necessary. PMID:24106647

  9. Youth Employment Laws: A Handbook for Supervisors of Young Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerber, Gaer C.

    Prepared by an attorney, this guide is intended for school personnel involved in the work placement of students. Pertinent youth employment laws are condensed and interpreted, providing a reference guide for both school personnel and employers. Information is provided about the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, the Hittle Juvenile Employment Act,…

  10. Clinical practices in the management of new-onset, uncomplicated, low back workers' compensation disability claims.

    PubMed

    Tacci, J A; Webster, B S; Hashemi, L; Christiani, D C

    1999-05-01

    Recent consensus guidelines delineate what appears to be the most successful and cost-effective management of low back pain (LBP), and some recent studies have suggested that better outcomes occur with the least aggressive forms of medical intervention. The purpose of this study was to describe how practitioners manage new-onset, uncomplicated low back workers' compensation (WC) disability cases. A sample of cases was randomly selected from a large insurance carrier's national data source. An effort was made to select only uncomplicated cases, which would be expected to have relatively minimal need for medical intervention. There was an apparent overuse of diagnostic and treatment modalities. Diagnostic imaging was overutilized, not only in terms of the number of studies done (65% had plain films, 22% had magnetic resonance imaging scans) but also in the time frame in which they were performed (38% had plain films on the first clinic visit). Ninety percent received at least one medication, and 38% received more than one prescription for opioid analgesics. Expensive non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were prescribed more often than acetaminophen (61% versus 6%, respectively). Sixty-two percent received physical therapy that often included modalities with as yet unproven efficacy. Overutilization of either diagnostic or treatment procedures increases the likelihood of iatrogenic complications, is not cost-effective, and may adversely impact clinical and occupational outcomes.

  11. 75 FR 12270 - Division of Federal Employees' Compensation; Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Federal Employees' Compensation; Proposed Collection...' Compensation Programs is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection: Notice of Law Enforcement... Employees' Compensation Act (FECA) provides, under 5 U.S.C. 8191, et.seq. and 20 CFR 10.735, that...

  12. To amend the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act to improve compensation for workers involved in uranium mining, and for other purposes.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Lujan, Ben Ray [D-NM-3

    2010-04-22

    06/15/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security, and International Law. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. 29 CFR 500.122 - Adjustments in insurance requirements when workers' compensation coverage is provided under State...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... policy or liability bond apply: (1) Except as provided in § 500.123, no vehicle liability insurance policy or liability bond shall be required of the employer, if such worker is transported only under circumstances for which there is coverage under such State law. (2) A liability insurance policy or...

  14. 29 CFR 500.122 - Adjustments in insurance requirements when workers' compensation coverage is provided under State...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... policy or liability bond apply: (1) Except as provided in § 500.123, no vehicle liability insurance policy or liability bond shall be required of the employer, if such worker is transported only under circumstances for which there is coverage under such State law. (2) A liability insurance policy or...

  15. 29 CFR 500.122 - Adjustments in insurance requirements when workers' compensation coverage is provided under State...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... policy or liability bond apply: (1) Except as provided in § 500.123, no vehicle liability insurance policy or liability bond shall be required of the employer, if such worker is transported only under circumstances for which there is coverage under such State law. (2) A liability insurance policy or...

  16. Impact of the accident at the Three Mile Island on the behavior and well-being of nuclear workers. Part II. Job tension, psychophysiological symptoms, and indices of distress

    SciTech Connect

    Kasl, S.V.; Chisholm, R.F.; Eskenazi, B.

    1981-05-01

    Three Mile Island (TMI) workers experienced much greater job tension and lower occupational self-esteem (supervisors only) in comparison with workers interviewed at the Peach Bottom Plant. At the time of the accident, TMI workers reported experiencing more periods of anger, extreme worrry and extreme upset, and more psychophysiological symptoms. Six months after the accident, some persistence of these feelings and symptoms was evident. Demoralization was greater primarily among TMI non-supervisory workers. The impact of the accident was not greater among TMI workers living closer to the plant. Presence of a preschool child at home enhanced the impact of the accident, but primarily among TMI supervisors. 39 references, 17 tables.

  17. Air quality, mortality, and economic benefits of a smoke - free workplace law for non-smoking Ontario bar workers.

    PubMed

    Repace, J; Zhang, B; Bondy, S J; Benowitz, N; Ferrence, R

    2013-04-01

    We estimated the impact of a smoke-free workplace bylaw on non-smoking bar workers' health in Ontario, Canada. We measured bar workers' urine cotinine before (n = 99) and after (n = 91) a 2004 smoke-free workplace bylaw. Using pharmacokinetic and epidemiological models, we estimated workers' fine-particle (PM2.5 ) air pollution exposure and mortality risks from workplace secondhand smoke (SHS). workers' pre-law geometric mean cotinine was 10.3 ng/ml; post-law dose declined 70% to 3.10 ng/ml and reported work hours of exposure by 90%. Pre-law, 97% of workers' doses exceeded the 90th percentile for Canadians of working age. Pre-law-estimated 8-h average workplace PM2.5 exposure from SHS was 419 μg/m(3) or 'Very Poor' air quality, while outdoor PM2.5 levels averaged 7 μg/m(3) , 'Very Good' air quality by Canadian Air Quality Standards. We estimated that the bar workers' annual mortality rate from workplace SHS exposure was 102 deaths per 100000 persons. This was 2.4 times the occupational disease fatality rate for all Ontario workers. We estimated that half to two-thirds of the 10620 Ontario bar workers were non-smokers. Accordingly, Ontario's smoke-free law saved an estimated 5-7 non-smoking bar workers' lives annually, valued at CA $50 million to $68 million (US $49 million to $66 million).

  18. Lessons learned: medical and health care management for emergency workers at the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi APP accident.

    PubMed

    Koerner, John; Yasui, Shojiro

    2014-01-01

    During the emergency work at the Fukushima Daiichi Atomic Power Plant (APP), the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) and the Japanese government experienced various problems in medical and health care management issues, including special medical examinations, on-site triage and initial treatment, patient transportation, lodging and food, and long-term health care for emergency workers. To resolve these problems, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW) issued a series of compulsory directives and provided administrative guidance to TEPCO. Based on the experiences and lessons learned, the MHLW recognized that the proper management and implementation of medical and health care management in response to a similar accident would require sufficient measures and systematic preparation, including the following: 1. In case of large-scale nuclear accidents, the government needs to assist in dispatching medical staff to the affected plants. 2. Nuclear facility operators, medical facilities and fire departments should make an agreement to clarify the division of the roles played prior to the accident and should conduct emergency drills periodically with the full attendance of related personnel to identify and resolve the problems. 3. Operators need to develop a support base at a safe distance from the plant and to prepare to develop makeshift lodgings in case of emergency. 4. Operators need to come to an agreement to share food stocks among closely located nuclear plants and prepare cooking equipment that can be used in case of blackout to provide warm foods and drinks to as many workers as possible. 5. It is necessary to conduct long-term follow-up for emergency workers, including health care system, medical examinations and mental health consultations.

  19. Occupational skin diseases in Washington State, 1989 through 1993: using workers' compensation data to identify cutaneous hazards.

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, J D; Cohen, M A; Sama, S R; Shields, J W; Kalat, J

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to characterize occupational dermatoses and cutaneous hazards. METHODS: Workers' compensation claims filed for skin disease in the Washington State Fund were analyzed for 1989 through 1993; incidence rates for industries and employers were calculated, and cutaneous hazards associated with the highest rates were identified. RESULTS: A total of 7445 claims were filed for skin disorders, principally contact dermatitis; 675 (9.1%) involved more than 3 missed work-days. The rate of accepted skin disorder claims was 1.0 per 1000 full-time employee-years. The highest incidence rates (4.6 to 30.7 accepted claims per 1000 full-time employee-years) were in certain manufacturing industries (plastics related, concrete products, aircraft parts, sporting goods, and boat building), wholesale farm product raw materials, automotive glass replacement, and beauty shops. Seven of the 10 employers with the highest incidence rates (19.6 to 85.5 accepted claims per 1000 full-time employee-years) used fiber-reinforced plastics (composites) and exposed workers to epoxy and other resin systems associated with contact dermatitis. CONCLUSIONS: Workers' compensation data identify known and emerging workplace cutaneous hazards and show promise for targeting prevention efforts. PMID:9663152

  20. The impact of the accident at the Three Mile Island on the behavior and well-being of nuclear workers: Part II: job tension, psychophysiological symptoms, and indices of distress.

    PubMed

    Kasl, S V; Chisholm, R F; Eskenazi, B

    1981-05-01

    TMI workers experienced much greater job tension and lower occupational self-esteem (supervisors only). At the time of the accident, TMI workers reported experiencing more periods of anger, extreme worry and extreme upset, and more psychophysiological symptoms. Six months after the accident, some persistence of these feelings and symptoms was evident. Demoralization was greater primarily among TMI non-supervisory workers. The impact of the accident was not greater among TMI workers living closer to the plant. Presence of a preschool child at home enhanced the impact of the accident, but primarily among TMI supervisors. PMID:7212136

  1. 76 FR 64976 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Proposed Renewal of Existing Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ...: Notice of Controversion of Right to Compensation (LS-207). A copy of the proposed information collection... compensation is controverted. Form LS-207 has been designated for this purpose. Form LS-207 is used by...: 1240-0042. Agency Number: LS-207. Affected Public: Business or other for-profit. Total Respondents:...

  2. 48 CFR 628.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 628.305 Section 628.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. (b)(1) Acquisitions for services, including construction but excluding... employees and their beneficiaries for war-hazard injury, death, capture, or detention as prescribed by...

  3. 48 CFR 628.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 628.305 Section 628.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. (b)(1) Acquisitions for services, including construction but excluding... employees and their beneficiaries for war-hazard injury, death, capture, or detention as prescribed by...

  4. 48 CFR 628.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 628.305 Section 628.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. (b)(1) Acquisitions for services, including construction but excluding... employees and their beneficiaries for war-hazard injury, death, capture, or detention as prescribed by...

  5. 48 CFR 628.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 628.305 Section 628.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. (b)(1) Acquisitions for services, including construction but excluding... employees and their beneficiaries for war-hazard injury, death, capture, or detention as prescribed by...

  6. 48 CFR 628.305 - Overseas workers' compensation and war-hazard insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. 628.305 Section 628.305 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...' compensation and war-hazard insurance. (b)(1) Acquisitions for services, including construction but excluding... employees and their beneficiaries for war-hazard injury, death, capture, or detention as prescribed by...

  7. Can road traffic law enforcement permanently reduce the number of accidents?

    PubMed

    Bjørnskau, T; Elvik, R

    1992-10-01

    In this paper it is argued that conventional analyses of road user adaptation to traffic law enforcement, based on parametric rational-choice theory, are flawed. Such analyses only consider road-user actions as a response to enforcement level and penalty size and do not simultaneously consider enforcement as a response to road-user behaviour. If each party is considered a rational agent who adapts to the other's behaviour, the proper way to analyze the outcomes is by the way of game theory. A game-theoretic model is presented and the main implications are: (i) most attempts at enforcing road traffic legislation will not have any lasting effects, either on road-user behaviour or on accidents; (ii) imposing stricter penalties (in the form of higher fines or longer prison sentences) will not affect road-user behaviour; (iii) imposing stricter penalties will reduce the level of enforcement; (iv) implementing automatic traffic surveillance techniques and/or allocating enforcement resources according to a chance mechanism, and not according to police estimates of violation probability, can make enforcement effects last, but both alternatives are difficult to implement. Relevant empirical studies are reviewed, and they seem to support the conclusions arrived at by the game-theoretic model.

  8. Incidence and risk of work-related fracture injuries: experience of a state-managed workers' compensation system.

    PubMed

    Islam, S S; Biswas, R S; Nambiar, A M; Syamlal, G; Velilla, A M; Ducatman, A M; Doyle, E J

    2001-02-01

    Incidence rates of occupational fractures at various anatomic sites and associated risk factors have not been well documented. We identified 3490 work-related fractures from a West Virginia Workers Compensation database that occurred between July 1, 1994, and June 30, 1995. The annual incidence rate was 55 per 10,000 workers, which is substantially higher than the work-related fracture rates reported previously. The incidence rate of fracture was highest in the agricultural sector, followed by the mining, construction, and manufacturing sectors (202.0, 165.2, 116.7, and 88.0 per 10,000 workers, respectively). The age-specific gender distribution comparing fracture and non-fracture injuries showed a bimodal distribution, with greater proportions of female employees at the younger and older age groups. Fracture of the phalanges was the most common, followed by fractures of the foot bone and carpal bone (15.8, 9.5, and 7.9 per 10,000 workers, respectively). In a multiple logistic regression analysis, age, gender, occupation, caught in-between objects, fall, struck by or against object, and vehicle collision were significant independent predictors of fracture (all sites combined). We believe work-related fractures to be a bigger problem than previously reported. The association among gender, age, occupation, and causes of fractures identified in this study will be useful in developing gender- and occupation-specific prevention intervention.

  9. Incidence and risk of work-related fracture injuries: experience of a state-managed workers' compensation system.

    PubMed

    Islam, S S; Biswas, R S; Nambiar, A M; Syamlal, G; Velilla, A M; Ducatman, A M; Doyle, E J

    2001-02-01

    Incidence rates of occupational fractures at various anatomic sites and associated risk factors have not been well documented. We identified 3490 work-related fractures from a West Virginia Workers Compensation database that occurred between July 1, 1994, and June 30, 1995. The annual incidence rate was 55 per 10,000 workers, which is substantially higher than the work-related fracture rates reported previously. The incidence rate of fracture was highest in the agricultural sector, followed by the mining, construction, and manufacturing sectors (202.0, 165.2, 116.7, and 88.0 per 10,000 workers, respectively). The age-specific gender distribution comparing fracture and non-fracture injuries showed a bimodal distribution, with greater proportions of female employees at the younger and older age groups. Fracture of the phalanges was the most common, followed by fractures of the foot bone and carpal bone (15.8, 9.5, and 7.9 per 10,000 workers, respectively). In a multiple logistic regression analysis, age, gender, occupation, caught in-between objects, fall, struck by or against object, and vehicle collision were significant independent predictors of fracture (all sites combined). We believe work-related fractures to be a bigger problem than previously reported. The association among gender, age, occupation, and causes of fractures identified in this study will be useful in developing gender- and occupation-specific prevention intervention. PMID:11227632

  10. Radiation-epidemiological Study of Cerebrovascular Diseases in the Cohort of Russian Recovery Operation Workers of the Chernobyl Accident.

    PubMed

    Kashcheev, V V; Chekin, S Yu; Maksioutov, M A; Tumanov, K A; Menyaylo, A N; Kochergina, E V; Kashcheeva, P V; Gorsky, A I; Shchukina, N V; Karpenko, S V; Ivanov, V K

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the incidence of cerebrovascular diseases (CeVD) in the cohort of Russian workers involved in recovery tasks after the Chernobyl accident. The studied cohort consists of 53,772 recovery operation workers (liquidators) who arrived in the zone of the Chernobyl accident within the first year after this accident (26 April 1986-26 April 1987). The mean external whole body dose in the cohort was 0.161 Gy, while individual doses varied from 0.0001 Gy to 1.42 Gy. During the follow-up period 1986-2012, a total of 23,264 cases of CeVD were diagnosed as a result of annual health examinations. A Poisson regression model was applied for estimation of radiation risks and for an assessment of other risk factors of CeVD. The following factors were considered as risk factors for CeVD: the dose, duration of the liquidators' work in the Chernobyl zone, and the concomitant diseases (hypertension, ischemic heart disease, atherosclerosis, and diabetes). The baseline incidence of CeVD is statistically significantly (p < 0.001) associated with all studied concomitant diseases. The incidence of CeVD has revealed a statistically significant dose response with the lack of a latent period and with the average ERR/Gy = 0.45, 95% CI: (0.28, 0.62), p < 0.001. Radiation risks of CeVD statistically significantly (p = 0.03) varied with the duration of liquidators' stay in the Chernobyl zone; for those who stayed in the Chernobyl zone less than 6 wk, ERR/Gy = 0.64, 95% CI = (0.38; 0.93), p < 0.001. Among studied concomitant diseases, diabetes mellitus statistically significantly (p = 0.002) increases the radiation risk of CeVD: for liquidators with diagnosed diabetes, ERR/Gy = 1.29. PMID:27356064

  11. Radiation-epidemiological Study of Cerebrovascular Diseases in the Cohort of Russian Recovery Operation Workers of the Chernobyl Accident.

    PubMed

    Kashcheev, V V; Chekin, S Yu; Maksioutov, M A; Tumanov, K A; Menyaylo, A N; Kochergina, E V; Kashcheeva, P V; Gorsky, A I; Shchukina, N V; Karpenko, S V; Ivanov, V K

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the incidence of cerebrovascular diseases (CeVD) in the cohort of Russian workers involved in recovery tasks after the Chernobyl accident. The studied cohort consists of 53,772 recovery operation workers (liquidators) who arrived in the zone of the Chernobyl accident within the first year after this accident (26 April 1986-26 April 1987). The mean external whole body dose in the cohort was 0.161 Gy, while individual doses varied from 0.0001 Gy to 1.42 Gy. During the follow-up period 1986-2012, a total of 23,264 cases of CeVD were diagnosed as a result of annual health examinations. A Poisson regression model was applied for estimation of radiation risks and for an assessment of other risk factors of CeVD. The following factors were considered as risk factors for CeVD: the dose, duration of the liquidators' work in the Chernobyl zone, and the concomitant diseases (hypertension, ischemic heart disease, atherosclerosis, and diabetes). The baseline incidence of CeVD is statistically significantly (p < 0.001) associated with all studied concomitant diseases. The incidence of CeVD has revealed a statistically significant dose response with the lack of a latent period and with the average ERR/Gy = 0.45, 95% CI: (0.28, 0.62), p < 0.001. Radiation risks of CeVD statistically significantly (p = 0.03) varied with the duration of liquidators' stay in the Chernobyl zone; for those who stayed in the Chernobyl zone less than 6 wk, ERR/Gy = 0.64, 95% CI = (0.38; 0.93), p < 0.001. Among studied concomitant diseases, diabetes mellitus statistically significantly (p = 0.002) increases the radiation risk of CeVD: for liquidators with diagnosed diabetes, ERR/Gy = 1.29.

  12. Fatal accident circumstances and epidemiology (FACE) report: confined-space incident kills two workers - company employee and rescuing fireman

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-06

    A fatal accident circumstance and epidemiology report on an incident occurring in a confined space and involving two fatalities is presented. Two employees of a petroleum company were determining whether an empty 10,000-gallon toluene tank needed cleaning. Due to limited visibility, one worker decided to enter the tank. As he descended through a 16 inch opening in the top of the tank, he apparently fell into the tank. The other worker called the city fire department. The responding unit decided to use a K 12 saw to cut an opening in the side of the tank. Although water sprays were used to minimize spark generation, an explosion occurred and a fireman was killed by the concussion. Preliminary medical information indicates that the worker inside the tank was dead prior to the explosion. Recommendations include city fire departments establishing a registry of confined spaces and toxic or explosive substances in the area in which they serve and conducting research to determine the best methods to gain entry into enclosed spaces containing inflammable or explosive atmospheres.

  13. Accident insurance, sickness, and science: New Zealand's no-fault system.

    PubMed

    Dew, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    This article explores the process of seeking compensation for occupational illness under a no-fault accident insurance scheme. The author uses two case studies--firefighters who attended a fire at a chemical storage depot and timbermill workers who worked with pentachlorophenol--to illustrate how science can be used to deny compensation to sick and dying workers. The results of the studies suggest that a no-fault accident compensation scheme, considered to be a victory for workers, offers no guarantee of just outcomes for working people. And science can be co-opted and used to support business and state interests against workers; this ideological support is increasingly hidden behind the development of "objective" systems of assessing compensation claims.

  14. Work status after workers' compensation claims for upper limb musculoskeletal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Roquelaure, Y; Cren, S; Rousseau, F; Touranchet, A; Dano, C; Fanello, S; Penneau-Fontbonne, D

    2004-01-01

    Methods: Two-year follow up of the workers who filed a WC claim for MSDs in 1996 in the Pays de la Loire region. Of the 701 eligible workers, 514 workers (70%) participated. Information was requested by means of a mailed questionnaire about the characteristics of the MSDs and job status at the time of the WC claim and two years later. Results: Two years after the WC claim, 65% of the claimants had returned to work in the same company, often without any ergonomic improvement, 12% had retired or had left employment voluntarily, and 18% had been dismissed. The risk of dismissal was associated with three factors: being older than 45 years, having two or more MSDs at claim, and working in the cleaning services sector. PMID:14691278

  15. 76 FR 67481 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed Renewal of Existing Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    .... Filing of the report is mandatory, and failure to do so is subject to a civil penalty. This information... responsibility to meet the statutory requirements to provide compensation or death benefits under the Act to...: On occasion. Total Burden Cost (capital/startup): $0. Total Burden Cost (operating/maintenance):...

  16. 75 FR 63862 - Division of Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation; Proposed Extension of Existing Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ...: Certification of Funeral Expenses (LS-265). A copy of the proposed information collection request can be... shall be paid in all compensable death cases. The LS-265 has been provided for use in submitting the.... Title: Certification of Funeral Expenses. OMB Number: 1240-0040. Agency Number: LS-265. Affected...

  17. 76 FR 18259 - Announcement Regarding Delaware Triggering “on” Tier Four of Emergency Unemployment Compensation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2008 (EUC08) AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, Labor... Unemployment Compensation 2008 (EUC08). Public Law 111-312 extended provisions in Public Law 111-92 which... unemployed workers claiming benefits in high unemployment states. The Department of Labor produces a...

  18. [CHANGES OF GLOBAL AND LOCAL MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTILITY OF CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT CLEAN-UP WORKERS WITH STABLE ANGINA].

    PubMed

    Nastina, O

    2014-01-01

    Changes of global and local myocardial contractility of Chernobyl accident clean-up workers (ChA CW) with stable angina were investigated. There were discovered that regular long-term treatment of ChA CW with stable angina using of antiischemic and metabolic drugs promoted to stabilization of global and local myocardial contractility indexes. Ejection fraction, degree of contraction of front-rear systolic left ventricle size, systolic thickness of interventricular septum sufficiently increased. Step-by-step worsening of global and local myocardial contractility indexes in cases of non-regular treatment was taken place. Sufficient differences between indexes of ejection fraction, left ventricle end-diastolic volume, systolic thickness and excursion of interventricular septum in stable angina patients of general population and ChA CW were discovered. Results of global and local myocardial contractility monitoring in ChA CW with stable angina substantiate the advisability of long-term supporting treatment using evidence-based drugs.

  19. [Comparative analysis of the combined treatment efficacy of the Chernobyl accident clean-up workers with essential hypertension].

    PubMed

    Habulavichene, Zh M

    2012-12-01

    It was shown the results of comparative evaluation of combined treatment in 111 clean-up workers of Chernobyl accident with essential hypertension (EH). This treatment consist of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers in combination with calcium channel blockers and diuretics. The follow-up period lasted 12 months. It was found that combined therapy provides comparable and reliable blood pressure (BP) control during 24-hour, significant reduction of average daily BP, daytime and nighttime BP, an index of time of the BP, BP variability. Despite on achieved target blood pressure level, 4 weeks treatment is not enough for regression of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Significant regress of LVH was found if treatment lasted during a year under the condition that BP remained at the target level. It was revealed the advantage of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers intake combined with a diuretic on regress of left ventricular hypertrophy and dysfunction.

  20. Job stress, mental health, and accidents among offshore workers in the oil and gas extraction industries.

    PubMed

    Cooper, C L; Sutherland, V J

    1987-02-01

    Psychosocial and occupational stressors among 194 male employees on drilling rig and production platform installations in the United Kingdom and Dutch sectors of the North Sea were studied. Mental well-being and job satisfaction were also assessed, with attention to the incidence of accidents offshore. This occupational group were found to be much less satisfied with their jobs than their onshore counterparts. Although overall mental well-being compared favorably with that of the general population, levels of anxiety were significantly higher. Multivariate analysis showed "relationships at work and at home" to be a strong predictor of both job dissatisfaction and mental ill-health. Type A coronary-prone behavior was also found to be a significant predictor of reduced mental well-being and increased accident rates offshore.

  1. The Proportion of Work-Related Emergency Department Visits Not Expected to Be Paid by Workers' Compensation: Implications for Occupational Health Surveillance, Research, Policy, and Health Equity

    PubMed Central

    Groenewold, Matthew R; Baron, Sherry L

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To examine trends in the proportion of work-related emergency department visits not expected to be paid by workers' compensation during 2003–2006, and to identify demographic and clinical correlates of such visits. Data Source. A total of 3,881 work-related emergency department visit records drawn from the 2003–2006 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys. Study Design. Secondary, cross-sectional analyses of work-related emergency department visit data were performed. Odds ratios and 95 percent confidence intervals were modeled using logistic regression. Principal Findings. A substantial and increasing proportion of work-related emergency department visits in the United States were not expected to be paid by workers' compensation. Private insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, and workers themselves were expected to pay for 40 percent of the work-related emergency department visits with this percentage increasing annually. Work-related visits by blacks, in the South, to for-profit hospitals and for work-related illnesses were all more likely not to be paid by workers' compensation. Conclusions. Emergency department-based surveillance and research that determine work-relatedness on the basis of expected payment by workers' compensation systematically underestimate the occurrence of occupational illness and injury. This has important methodological and policy implications. PMID:23662682

  2. Do State Community Health Worker Laws Align with Best Available Evidence?

    PubMed

    Barbero, Colleen; Gilchrist, Siobhan; Chriqui, Jamie F; Martin, Molly A; Wennerstrom, Ashley; VanderVeur, Jennifer; Prewitt, Kim; Brownstein, J Nell

    2016-04-01

    Community health workers (CHWs) are expected to improve patient care and population health while reducing health care costs. Law is a tool states are using to build a supportive infrastructure for the CHW workforce. This study assessed the extent existing state law pertaining to the CHW workforce aligned with best available evidence. We used the previously developed Quality and Impact of Component (QuIC) Evidence Assessment method to identify and prioritize those components that could comprise an evidence-informed CHW policy at the state level. We next assessed the extent codified statutes and regulations in effect as of December 31, 2014 for the 50 states and D.C. included the components identified in the evidence assessment. Fourteen components of an evidence-informed CHW policy were identified; eight had best, three had promising, and three had emerging evidence bases. Codified law in 18 states (35.3 % of 51) pertained to the CHW workforce. Fifteen of these 18 states authorized at least one of the 14 components from the evidence assessment (maximum: nine components, median: 2.5). The most frequently authorized component was a defined scope of practice for CHWs (authorized by eight states) followed by a standard core competency curriculum and inclusion of CHWs in multidisciplinary health care teams (each authorized by six states). States could consider the components presented in this article when developing new or strengthening existing law.

  3. Do State Community Health Worker Laws Align with Best Available Evidence?

    PubMed

    Barbero, Colleen; Gilchrist, Siobhan; Chriqui, Jamie F; Martin, Molly A; Wennerstrom, Ashley; VanderVeur, Jennifer; Prewitt, Kim; Brownstein, J Nell

    2016-04-01

    Community health workers (CHWs) are expected to improve patient care and population health while reducing health care costs. Law is a tool states are using to build a supportive infrastructure for the CHW workforce. This study assessed the extent existing state law pertaining to the CHW workforce aligned with best available evidence. We used the previously developed Quality and Impact of Component (QuIC) Evidence Assessment method to identify and prioritize those components that could comprise an evidence-informed CHW policy at the state level. We next assessed the extent codified statutes and regulations in effect as of December 31, 2014 for the 50 states and D.C. included the components identified in the evidence assessment. Fourteen components of an evidence-informed CHW policy were identified; eight had best, three had promising, and three had emerging evidence bases. Codified law in 18 states (35.3 % of 51) pertained to the CHW workforce. Fifteen of these 18 states authorized at least one of the 14 components from the evidence assessment (maximum: nine components, median: 2.5). The most frequently authorized component was a defined scope of practice for CHWs (authorized by eight states) followed by a standard core competency curriculum and inclusion of CHWs in multidisciplinary health care teams (each authorized by six states). States could consider the components presented in this article when developing new or strengthening existing law. PMID:26455578

  4. The Relative Compensation of Part-Time and Full-Time Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Barry

    A study examined the role of worker-specific skills, occupational skill requirements, and job working conditions on the part-time/full-time wage differential. Analysis of research found that part-time employment was concentrated among jobs requiring a lower skill level and that measurable personal and location characteristics accounted for a large…

  5. Compensation for occupational diseases in the RSA.

    PubMed

    Myers, J E; Garisch, D; Cornell, J E

    1987-03-01

    Compensation legislation for occupational disease in the RSA is at present complex and non-uniform, and the administrative bodies that process compensation claims are understaffed. In this setting occupational disease, particularly in migrant workers who are often ignorant of their rights under the law, frequently goes uncompensated. General practitioners and medical officers need to be aware of the basic provisions in the law, and how to submit claims in the best interests of their patients. Some case studies are included to illustrate problematic areas. The responsibilities of doctors in the diagnosis and compensation of occupational diseases are addressed.

  6. Factors Associated with Fatal Occupational Accidents among Mexican Workers: A National Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Delgado, Mery; Gómez-Dantés, Héctor; Fernández-Niño, Julián Alfredo; Robles, Eduardo; Borja, Víctor H.; Aguilar, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify the factors associated with fatal occupational injuries in Mexico in 2012 among workers affiliated with the Mexican Social Security Institute. Methods Analysis of secondary data using information from the National Occupational Risk Information System, with the consequence of the occupational injury (fatal versus non-fatal) as the response variable. The analysis included 406,222 non-fatal and 1,140 fatal injuries from 2012. The factors associated with the lethality of the injury were identified using a logistic regression model with the Firth approach. Results Being male (OR=5.86; CI95%: 4.22-8.14), age (OR=1.04; CI95%: 1.03-1.06), employed in the position for 1 to 10 years (versus less than 1 year) (OR=1.37; CI95%: 1.15-1.63), working as a facilities or machine operator or assembler (OR: 3.28; CI95%: 2.12- 5.07) and being a worker without qualifications (OR=1.96; CI95%: 1.18-3.24) (versus an office worker) were associated with fatality in the event of an injury. Additionally, companies classified as maximum risk (OR=1.90; CI 95%: 1.38-2.62), workplace conditions (OR=7.15; CI95%: 3.63-14.10) and factors related to the work environment (OR=9.18; CI95%:4.36-19.33) were identified as risk factors for fatality in the event of an occupational injury. Conclusions Fatality in the event of an occupational injury is associated with factors related to sociodemographics (age, sex and occupation), the work environment and workplace conditions. Worker protection policies should be created for groups with a higher risk of fatal occupational injuries in Mexico. PMID:25790063

  7. 20 CFR 10.824 - How can a party request review by the Director of the administrative law judge's recommended...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT, AS AMENDED Information for Medical...; (4) A substantial question of law, policy, or discretion is involved; or (5) A prejudicial error...

  8. Factors influencing the duration of work-related disability: a population-based study of Washington State workers' compensation.

    PubMed Central

    Cheadle, A; Franklin, G; Wolfhagen, C; Savarino, J; Liu, P Y; Salley, C; Weaver, M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to examine factors predictive of duration of work-related disability. METHODS. Multivariate survival analysis techniques were used to conduct a population-based, retrospective cohort study on a random sample of 28,473 workers' compensation claims from Washington State filed for injuries occurring in 1987 to 1989. The principal outcome measure was length of time for which compensation for lost wages was paid, used as a surrogate for duration of temporary total disability. RESULTS. The findings suggest that, even after adjusting for severity of injury, older age, female gender, and a diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome or back/neck sprain significantly predict longer duration of disability. Other predictors that were stable and significant, but involved lower magnitudes of effect included divorced marital status, firm size of fewer than 50 employees, higher country unemployment rates, and construction and agricultural work. CONCLUSIONS. Greater disability prevention efforts targeting these higher risk subgroups could have significant economic and public health effects. The greatest impact may be on claimants who remain disabled at 6 months after an injury that did not require hospitalization. PMID:8296938

  9. Occupational management in the workplace and impact on Workers' Compensation Board claims, duration, and cost: a prospective longitudinal cohort.

    PubMed

    Lemstra, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Few workplaces have prospectively reviewed workplace and worker issues simultaneously and assessed their impact on Workers' Compensation Board (WCB) claims. In January of 2014, each worker in a large workplace in Saskatchewan, Canada, was prospectively followed for 1 year to determine factors that impact injury claim incidence, recovery, and costs. In total, 207 out of 245 workers agreed to complete the baseline survey (84.5%). In 2014, 82.5% of workers had self-reported pain, but only 35.5% submitted a WCB claim. Binary logistic regression was used to compare those with pain who did not submit a WCB injury claim to those with pain who did initiate a WCB claim. Independent risk factors associated with WCB claim incidence included depressed mood (odds ratio [OR] =2.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-9.78) and lower job satisfaction (OR =1.70, 95% CI 1.08-10.68). Higher disability duration was independently associated with higher depressed mood (OR =1.60, 95% CI 1.05-4.11) and poor recovery expectation (OR =1.31, 95% CI 1.01-5.78). Higher cost disability claims were independently associated with higher depressed mood (OR =1.51, 95% CI 1.07-6.87) and pain catastrophizing (OR =1.11, 95% CI 1.02-8.11). Self-reported pain, physically assessed injury severity, and measured ergonomic risk of workstation did not significantly predict injury claim incidence, duration, or costs. In January 2015, the workplace implemented a new occupational prevention and management program. The injury incidence rate ratio reduced by 58% from 2014 to 2015 (IRR =1.58, 95% CI =1.28-1.94). The ratio for disability duration reduced by 139% from 2014 to 2015 (RR =2.39, 95% CI =2.16-2.63). Costs reduced from $114,149.07 to $56,528.14 per year. In summary, WCB claims are complex. Recognizing that nonphysical factors, such as depressed mood, influence injury claim incidence, recovery, and costs, can be helpful to claims management. PMID:27528804

  10. 5 CFR 894.701 - May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false May I keep my dental and/or vision... DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Annuitants and Compensationers § 894.701 May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation? (a) Your FEDVIP...

  11. 5 CFR 894.701 - May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false May I keep my dental and/or vision... DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Annuitants and Compensationers § 894.701 May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation? (a) Your FEDVIP...

  12. 5 CFR 894.701 - May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false May I keep my dental and/or vision... DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Annuitants and Compensationers § 894.701 May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation? (a) Your FEDVIP...

  13. 5 CFR 894.701 - May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false May I keep my dental and/or vision... DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Annuitants and Compensationers § 894.701 May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation? (a) Your FEDVIP...

  14. 5 CFR 894.701 - May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false May I keep my dental and/or vision... DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Annuitants and Compensationers § 894.701 May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation? (a) Your FEDVIP...

  15. Development of site profiles for dose reconstruction used in worker compensation claims.

    PubMed

    Kenoyer, Judson L; Scalsky, Edward D; Taulbee, Timothy D

    2008-07-01

    For the purpose of dose reconstruction, personal dosimeter data and measured intakes through bioassay analysis (i.e., in-vivo and in-vitro measurements) should be used whenever possible and given precedence over area monitoring data, survey data, or source term data. However, this is not always possible. A worker's exposure record may be incomplete or missing, or, based on directives and guidelines at the time, a worker may not have been monitored during his or her time of employment. In an effort to recognize, analyze, and incorporate all possible considerations of potential exposures, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Radiation Dose Reconstruction Program developed "site profiles" for all of the major U.S. Department of Energy sites and Atomic Weapons Employer sites. Site profiles are technical documents that (1) provide a brief, general overview of the site; (2) identify the facilities on site with a brief description of the processes and radionuclides used in these processes; (3) contain detailed information on the historical detection limits for film, thermoluminescent dosimeter, and bioassay measurements that are used by the dose reconstructor to interpret a worker's available monitoring records; and (4) provide important supporting information for the dose reconstructor to use if the monitoring data are inadequate or unavailable. When a complete set of monitoring data for an individual is unavailable, it is the parameters in the site profile that are of the most use to the dose reconstructor. These parameters include facility monitoring data (by radionuclide, mechanism of intake, year of exposure, location within a facility); occupational medical x rays and techniques used; environmental measurements (by area on site, radiation type, energy range); minimum detectable activities of the types and kinds of instruments used to detect the different radionuclides; specific source terms (quantities of material and their molecular form

  16. Health conditions among workers who participated in the cleanup of the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Kamarli, Z; Abdulina, A

    1996-01-01

    People who took part in the Chernobyl accident cleanup have been registered upon their return to Kyrgyzstan since 1991, and their children since 1992. Later, citizens affected by the Semipalatinsk and Chelyabinsk contamination incidents were included for registration and health care purposes. The effects of the nuclear waste depositories in the Mailuu-Suu region were examined with the assistance of the Kansas University Medical Center (United States of America). All these investigations of affected people indicate apparent increases in a number of symptoms and illnesses when compared to the rest of the population. Sample sizes ranged from several hundred to several thousand. Above-normal radiation levels and/or the stress and fear of living in contaminated area can lead to significant increases in nervous disorders, cardiovascular diseases and other problems. The most significant increase was in the suicide rate.

  17. A study of the effects of exposure on cleanup workers at the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident using multiple end points.

    PubMed

    Moore, D H; Tucker, J D; Jones, I M; Langlois, R G; Pleshanov, P; Vorobtsova, I; Jensen, R

    1997-11-01

    Blood samples were collected from 192 exposed workers who participated in the cleanup after the April 26, 1986, nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl, Ukraine. These samples, together with samples from 73 individuals living in Russia but not involved in Chernobyl cleanup activities, were collected during September 1991 to May 1996 and shipped to the U.S. for evaluation by three bioassays: cytogenetic analysis based on chromosome painting, HPRT mutation analysis and glycophorin A (GPA) variant analysis. Univariate statistical analyses of the results of each bioassay (including adjustments for age, smoking status and estimated precision of the bioassay) found greater frequencies of chromosome translocations and HPRT mutant T lymphocytes among the exposed individuals compared to the controls (P < or = 0.01). GPA analyses showed no significant difference for exposed compared to controls for either hemizygous, N/O, or homozygous, N/N, variant cell frequency. Multivariate analysis of variance of the subset of 44 exposed and 14 unexposed individuals with measurements from all three bioassays found elevated frequencies of chromosomal translocations and HPRT mutants, and reduced frequencies for both GPA end points among the exposed persons compared to the controls. However, none of these differences, considered singly or in combination, was statistically significant (although statistical power is low due to small sample sizes). Mean estimated dose, based on cytogenetic response, for those exposed was 9 cGy (range 0 to 51 cGy) and was less than that estimated by physical dosimetry (25 cGy). Correlation between the end points of the bioassays and estimated physical dosimetry was low (r < 0.2); the only significant correlation found was for physical dose estimate and dates worked at Chernobyl (r = 0.4, P < 0.01), with those working soon after the accident receiving greater estimated doses.

  18. Report calls for changes to the law to improve safety, security and well-being of sex workers.

    PubMed

    Betteridge, Glenn

    2005-12-01

    In June of 2005, the STAR (Sex Trade Advocacy and Research) project submitted a report to the House of Commons subcommittee regarding the prostitution-related sections of the Criminal Code. The report calls for the repeal of these Criminal Code sections, the recognition of prostitution as work under provincial laws, changes to municipal by-laws and increased funding for sex worker organizations to engage in education, support and advocacy.

  19. 77 FR 7604 - Notice of a Change in Status of the Payable Periods in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... Unemployment Compensation 2008 (EUC08) Program for Alaska AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, Labor... Unemployment Compensation 2008 (EUC08) program for Alaska. Public law 112-78 extended provisions in Public Law... for qualified unemployed workers claiming benefits in high unemployment states. The Department...

  20. The impact of the accident at the Three Mile Island on the behavior and well-being of nuclear workers; Part I: perceptions and evaluations, behavioral responses, and work-related attitudes and feelings.

    PubMed

    Kasl, S V; Chisholm, R F; Eskenazi, B

    1981-05-01

    In order to assess the impact of the accident at the Three Mile Island (TMI), telephone interviews were conducted six months later with 324 nuclear workers assigned to TMI and 298 workers assigned to a comparison plant at Peach Bottom (PB). Examination of PB-TMI differences, stratified by supervisory status, revealed the following: Part I: TMI workers reported greater exposure to radiation at the time of the accident and felt that their health had been thereby endangered. TMI workers experienced more uncertainty and conflict at the time of the accident. Coping responses such as seeing a doctor, taking drugs, and increasing alcohol consumption were quite infrequent. Leaving the area was more common; however, over 40 per cent of TMI workers wished to leave but did not do so because of work obligations. TMI workers reported much lower job satisfaction and much greater uncertainty about their job future. PMID:7212135

  1. [Blood exposure accidents: knowledge and practices of hospital health workers in Mali].

    PubMed

    Koné, M C; Mallé, K K

    2015-12-01

    This is a prospective study conducted in December 2012 among 128 at the Nianankoro Fomba Hospital in Segou in order to assess their knowledge and practices on Blood Exposure Accidents (BEA). The average age of caregivers was 35.4 ± 9 years (range: 22-59 years). The nurses were predominant with 37.5%. The definition of BEA was mastered by 43.8%. The main transmissible infectious agents (HIV, HBV and HCV) were ignored by 76.6%. Questioning revealed that during the treatment, 78.9% wore gloves and 36.0% recapped needles after use. The concept of washing and disinfection after BEA was known by 68.8%. The disinfectant applied was correct for 21.9% of the cases, the time of application for 69.5%. Consulting a referring physician after BEA was mandatory for 32% of them. The time limit of 48 hours delay for the declaration of BEA was experienced by 51.3%. Among staff interviewed 82 caregivers (64.1%) experienced at least one BEA. Students and nursing students were most at risk. Needle pricks were the most frequent (73.2%). BEA is a major problem in the Segou Nianankoro Fomba Hospital. Compliance with standard precautions is not of common practice. Post-exposure care is not widely known. The experienced cases show poor management of BEA in the structure. PMID:26419484

  2. [The assessment of remote cytogenetic effects in clean up workers of Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Golub, E V

    2009-01-01

    Cytogenetic study cohort of the liquidators of the consequences of Chernobyl accident over 4-6 years after clean-up working in the alienation zone was carried out by conventional method. For The results of study liquidators cohort of 1986-1987 years have shown decreasing the frequency of cells with unstable chromosome aberrations for 25-30% per each year of examination. The frequency of chromosomal and chromatid-type aberrations have been also decreasing. The increasing of frequency radiation markers (dicentrics and rings) was observed for liquidators who worked in Chernobyl in 1988 year. Significant distinctions on other cytogenetics parameters as well as for liquidators who worked in Chernobyl in 1989 year were not observed perhaps of small number of examined cohorts. Nevertheless level of chromosome aberrations observed in remote post radiation period was significantly higher then controls that may be caused by radiation-induced genome instability. Obtained data show the importance of cytogenetic examination of that cohort for estimation and the prognosis the risk of delayed negative consequences of exposure.

  3. New Test of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law at the Submillimeter Range with Dual Modulation and Compensation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen-Hai; Yang, Shan-Qing; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Li, Jia; Du, An-Bin; Zhan, Bi-Fu; Wang, Qing-Lan; Luo, Peng-Shun; Tu, Liang-Cheng; Luo, Jun

    2016-04-01

    By using a torsion pendulum and a rotating eightfold symmetric attractor with dual modulation of both the interested signal and the gravitational calibration signal, a new test of the gravitational inverse-square law at separations down to 295  μm is presented. A dual-compensation design by adding masses on both the pendulum and the attractor was adopted to realize a null experiment. The experimental result shows that, at a 95% confidence level, the gravitational inverse-square law holds (|α|≤1) down to a length scale λ=59  μm. This work establishes the strongest bound on the magnitude α of Yukawa-type deviations from Newtonian gravity in the range of 70-300  μm, and improves the previous bounds by up to a factor of 2 at the length scale λ≈160  μm. PMID:27081964

  4. New Test of the Gravitational Inverse-Square Law at the Submillimeter Range with Dual Modulation and Compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Wen-Hai; Yang, Shan-Qing; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Li, Jia; Du, An-Bin; Zhan, Bi-Fu; Wang, Qing-Lan; Luo, Peng-Shun; Tu, Liang-Cheng; Luo, Jun

    2016-04-01

    By using a torsion pendulum and a rotating eightfold symmetric attractor with dual modulation of both the interested signal and the gravitational calibration signal, a new test of the gravitational inverse-square law at separations down to 295 μ m is presented. A dual-compensation design by adding masses on both the pendulum and the attractor was adopted to realize a null experiment. The experimental result shows that, at a 95% confidence level, the gravitational inverse-square law holds (|α |≤1 ) down to a length scale λ =59 μ m . This work establishes the strongest bound on the magnitude α of Yukawa-type deviations from Newtonian gravity in the range of 70 - 300 μ m , and improves the previous bounds by up to a factor of 2 at the length scale λ ≈160 μ m .

  5. Occupational hazards among the abattoir workers associated with noncompliance to the meat processing and waste disposal laws in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Abdullahi, Auwalu; Hassan, Azmi; Kadarman, Norizhar; Junaidu, Yakubu Muhammad; Adeyemo, Olanike Kudrat; Lua, Pei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to investigate the occupational hazards among the abattoir workers associated with noncompliance to the meat processing and waste disposal laws in Terengganu State, Malaysia. Occupational hazards are the major source of morbidity and mortality among the animal workers due to exposure to many hazardous situations in their daily practices. Occupational infections mostly contracted by abattoir workers could be caused by iatrogenic or transmissible agents, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites and the toxins produced by these organisms. Materials and methods The methodology was based on a cross-sectional survey using cluster sampling technique in the four districts of Terengganu State, Malaysia. One hundred and twenty-one abattoir workers from five abattoirs were assessed using a validated structured questionnaire and an observation checklist. Results The mean and standard deviation of occupational hazards scores of the workers were 2.32 (2.721). Physical, chemical, biological, psychosocial, musculoskeletal, and ergonomics hazards were the major findings of this study. However, the highest prevalence of occupational hazards identified among the workers was injury by sharp equipment such as a knife (20.0%), noise exposure (17.0%), and due to offensive odor within the abattoir premises (12.0%). Conclusion The major occupational hazards encountered by the workers in the study area were physical, chemical, biological, psychosocial, musculoskeletal, and ergonomics hazards. To ensure proper control of occupational health hazards among the abattoir workers, standard design and good environmental hygiene must be taken into consideration all the time. Exposure control plan, which includes risk identification, risk characterization, assessment of workers at risk, risk control, workers’ education/training, and implementation of safe work procedures, should be implemented by the government and all the existing laws governing the abattoir

  6. THREE-YEAR RETENTION OF RADIOACTIVE CAESIUM IN THE BODY OF TEPCO WORKERS INVOLVED IN THE FUKUSHIMA DAIICHI NUCLEAR POWER STATION ACCIDENT.

    PubMed

    Nakano, T; Tani, K; Kim, E; Kurihara, O; Sakai, K; Akashi, M

    2016-09-01

    Direct measurements of seven highly exposed workers at the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident have been performed continuously since June 2011. Caesium clearance in the monitored workers is in agreement with the biokinetic models proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. After 500 d from the initial measurement, however, the caesium clearance slowed. It was thought to be unlikely that additional Cs intake had occurred after the initial intake, as activity in foods was kept low. And, the contribution from the detector over the chest was enhanced with time. This indicates that insoluble Cs particles were inhaled and a long metabolic rate showed.

  7. THREE-YEAR RETENTION OF RADIOACTIVE CAESIUM IN THE BODY OF TEPCO WORKERS INVOLVED IN THE FUKUSHIMA DAIICHI NUCLEAR POWER STATION ACCIDENT.

    PubMed

    Nakano, T; Tani, K; Kim, E; Kurihara, O; Sakai, K; Akashi, M

    2016-09-01

    Direct measurements of seven highly exposed workers at the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident have been performed continuously since June 2011. Caesium clearance in the monitored workers is in agreement with the biokinetic models proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. After 500 d from the initial measurement, however, the caesium clearance slowed. It was thought to be unlikely that additional Cs intake had occurred after the initial intake, as activity in foods was kept low. And, the contribution from the detector over the chest was enhanced with time. This indicates that insoluble Cs particles were inhaled and a long metabolic rate showed. PMID:26979805

  8. Effects of the accident at Three Mile Island on the mental health and behavior responses of the general population and the nuclear workers

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-02-01

    A main conclusion drawn from the investigation by the President's Commission was that the most serious health effect of the Three Mile Island nuclear accident was severe mental stress, which was short-lived. The highest levels of psychological distress were found among those living within 5 miles of Three Mile Island, in families with preschool children, and among the Three Mile Island nuclear workers. This report provides some understanding of how these conclusions were drawn, the methods used to obtain information of the experiences of mental stress and the behavioral effects and responses of the general population and the nuclear workers to the accident at Three Mile Island. In order to limit the scope of the discussion, information is taken from the Behavioral Effects Task Group Report (TMI79c) to the President's Commission, and thus from the labors of the many behavioral scientists.

  9. Compensation and Recovery From Injury

    PubMed Central

    Beals, Rodney K.

    1984-01-01

    Workers' compensation laws influence recovery from injury. They affect the “cause” of disease, access to care, diagnostic evaluation, treatment, response to treatment and residual disability. Paradoxically, financial compensation may discourage return to work, the appeal process may increase disability, an open claim may inhibit return to work and recovering patients may be unable to return to work. Physicians may help improve the prospects of returning patients to work by providing care that is medical, caring and independent. It is essential that the treatment of back pain be based on the known natural history and on the understanding that the management of acute pain differs from that of chronic pain. Increased awareness of the factors controlling return to work should motivate legislative bodies, labor and industry to alter those features of the compensation system that interfere with the return to work of injured workers. PMID:6233794

  10. A recommended epidemiological study design for examining the adverse health effects among emergency workers who experienced the TEPCO fukushima daiichi NPP accident in 2011.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Shojiro

    2016-01-01

    Results from medical examinations conducted in 2012 of workers who were engaged in radiation work in 2012 as a result of the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident showed that the prevalence of abnormal findings was 4.21%, 3.23 points higher than the 0.98% that was found prior to the accident in the jurisdiction area of the labor inspection office which holds jurisdiction over the NPP. The Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) concluded that the 2010 and 2012 data cannot be easily compared because 70% of the enterprises within the jurisdiction of the office that reported the 2012 results were different from those that did so in 2010. In addition, although the radiation workers' estimated average dose weighted by number of workers was 3.66 times higher than decontamination workers' dose, the prevalence among radiation workers was only 1.14 times higher than that among decontamination workers. Based on the results of the medical examinations, however, the MHLW decided to implement an epidemiological study on the health effects of radiation exposure on all emergency workers. This article explains key issues of the basic design of the study recommended by the expert meeting established in the MHLW and also identifies challenges that could not be resolved and thus required further consideration by the study researchers. The major issues included: (a) study methods and target group; (b) evaluation of cumulative doses; (c) health effects (end points); (d) control of confounding factors; and (e) study implementation framework. Identified key challenges that required further deliberation were: (a) preventing arbitrary partisan analysis; (b) ensuring a high participation rate; (c) inquiry about the medical radiation doses; and (d) the preparedness of new analytical technology. The study team formulated and implemented the pilot study in 2014 and started the full-scale study in April 2015 with funding from a research grant from the MHLW. PMID

  11. Continuous composite finite-time convergent guidance laws with autopilot dynamics compensation.

    PubMed

    He, Shaoming; Lin, Defu

    2015-09-01

    This paper has proposed two continuous composite finite-time convergent guidance laws to intercept maneuvering targets in the presence of autopilot lag: one is for hit-to-kill and the other is for zeroing the line-of-sight (LOS) angular rate. More specifically, the nonlinear disturbance observer (NDOB) is used to estimate the lumped uncertainty online while the finite-time control technique is used to fulfill the design goal in finite time. The key feature in derivation of the proposed guidance law is that two integral-type Lyapunov functions are used to avoid analytic differentiation of virtual control law encountered with traditional backstepping. The finite-time stability of the closed-loop nonlinear observer-controller system is established using finite-time bounded (FTB) function and Lyapunov function methods. Numerical simulations with some comparisons are carried out to demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method.

  12. Food safety knowledge, attitude, and practice toward compliance with abattoir laws among the abattoir workers in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Abdullahi, Auwalu; Hassan, Azmi; Kadarman, Norizhar; Saleh, Ahmadu; Baraya, Yusha’u Shu’aibu; Lua, Pei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Foodborne diseases are common in the developing countries due to the predominant poor food handling and sanitation practices, particularly as a result of inadequate food safety laws, weak regulatory structures, and inadequate funding as well as a lack of appropriate education for food-handlers. The most frequently involved foods in disease outbreaks are of animal origin. However, in spite of the adequate legislation and laws governing the abattoir operation in Malaysia, compliance with food safety requirements during meat processing and waste disposal is inadequate. Therefore, the present study was designed to assess the food safety knowledge, attitude, and practice toward compliance with abattoir laws among the workers in Terengganu, Malaysia. Materials and methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted using simple random sampling technique in the six districts of Terengganu: two districts were used for the pilot study and the remaining four were used for the main study. One hundred sixty-five abattoir workers from the selected districts were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Results The mean and standard deviation of knowledge, attitude, and practice scores of the workers were 6.02 and 1.954, 45.16 and 4.496, and 18.03 and 3.186, respectively. The majority of the workers (38.8%) had a low level of knowledge and 91.7% had a positive attitude, while 77.7% had a good practice of compliance. Sex had a significant association with the level of knowledge (P<0.001) and practice (P=0.044) among the workers. The females had a higher level of knowledge than the males, while the males had a better practice of compliance than females. Similarly, knowledge also had a significant (P=0.009) association with the level of practice toward compliance with abattoir laws among the workers. Conclusion The abattoir workers had a positive attitude and good practice, but a low level of knowledge toward compliance with the abattoir laws. Therefore, public awareness

  13. Prevalence of Needlestick Injuries Among Healthcare Workers in the Accident and Emergency Department of a Teaching Hospital in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Isara, AR; Oguzie, KE; Okpogoro, OE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Healthcare workers (HCWs) are continually exposed to hazards from contact with blood and body fluids of patients in the healthcare setting. Aim: To determine the prevalence of needlestick injuries (NSIs) and associated factors among HCWs in the Accident and Emergency Department of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH), Benin City, Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Data were collected using a structured, self-administered questionnaire and analyzed using IBM SPSS version 20. Univariate, bivariate, and binary logistic regression analyses were done. The level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: The prevalence of NSIs 12 months preceding the study was 51.0% (50/98). Doctors 8/10 (80.0%) and nurses 28/40 (70.0%) had the highest occurrence. Recapping of needles 19/50 (38.0%) and patient aggression 13/50 (26.0%) were responsible for most injuries. The majority 31/50 (62.0%) of the injuries were not reported. The uptake of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) was low 11/50 (22.0%). The factors that were significantly associated with NSI include age 30 years and above (odds ratio [OR] =0.28, confidence interval [CI] = 0.11–0.70), work duration of three years and above (OR = 0.29, CI = 0.11–0.75), and being a nurse (OR = 3.38, CI = 1.49–9.93) or a paramedic (OR = 0.18, CI = 0.06–0.52). Conclusion: The high prevalence of NSIs among the HCWs, especially in doctors and nurses is an indication that HCWs in UBTH are at great risk of contracting blood-borne infections. Efforts should be made to ensure that injuries are reported and appropriate PEP undertaken following NSIs. PMID:27057376

  14. Emerging legal concerns with chronic diseases in the Australian workplace: pre-employment medicals, functional capacity evaluations, workers' compensation and disability discrimination.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Robert; Westaway, Jennifer

    2009-05-01

    Although considerable attention is paid to injury and disease sustained or contracted through work causes, by far the most prolific cause of diminished health in the Australian workplace is chronic illness, which is not caused by work but which may have significant effects upon the work environment. Employers' concerns in relation to loss of productivity through poor health are reflected in a number of practices such as pre-employment screening, on-the-job drug testing and other health and safety requirements. In turn, workers' concerns regarding discrimination, workers' compensation and privacy are frequently raised in relation to discussions on workplace fitness for work. This article reflects on the issues of chronic illness and the legal issues which arise through the interaction of employers' obligations for safety and efficiency and workers' concerns with fairness and privacy. PMID:19554861

  15. Global estimates of fatal occupational accidents.

    PubMed

    Takala, J

    1999-09-01

    Data on occupational accidents are not available from all countries in the world. Furthermore, underreporting, limited coverage by reporting and compensation schemes, and non-harmonized accident recording and notification systems undermine efforts to obtain worldwide information on occupational accidents. This paper presents a method and new estimated global figures of fatal accidents at work by region. The fatal occupational accident rates reported to the International Labour Office are extended to the total employed workforce in countries and regions. For areas not covered by the reported information, rates from other countries that have similar or comparable conditions are applied. In 1994, an average estimated fatal occupational accident rate in the whole world was 14.0 per 100,000 workers, and the total estimated number of fatal occupational accidents was 335,000. The rates are different for individual countries and regions and for separate branches of economic activity. In conclusion, fatal occupational accident figures are higher than previously estimated. The new estimates can be gradually improved by obtaining and adding data from countries where information is not yet available. Sectoral estimates for at least key economic branches in individual countries would further increase the accuracy.

  16. Early prognostic factors for duration on temporary total benefits in the first year among workers with compensated occupational soft tissue injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hogg-Johnson, S; Cole, D

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To develop a model of prognosis for time receiving workers' compensation wage replacement benefits in the first year. Methods: A prospective cohort of 907 injured workers off work because of soft tissue injuries was followed for one year through structured telephone interviews and administrative data sources. Workers were recruited at workers' compensation claim registration. Only those still off work at four weeks post-registration were included in the analysis. Data from several domains (demographics, clinical factors, workplace factors, recovery expectations) were collected at approximately two weeks and a subset again at four weeks. Outcome was duration on total temporary wage replacement benefits. Variable selection was carried out in two steps using content experts and backward elimination with the Cox model. Results: Body region specific functional status, change in pain, workplace offers of arrangements for return to work, and recovery expectations were independently predictive of time on benefits. Change in pain and workplace offers interacted, so the largest mutual association occurred for those whose pain was getting worse—that is, reduction in median duration from 112.5 to 32.5 days. Across observed values, widely different recovery profiles of groups of workers resulted; for example, at four months, only one third of the highest risk group had gone off benefits while over 95% of the lowest risk group had done so. Conclusions: Focus on a relatively small set of prognostic factors should enable occupational health practitioners to triage injured workers within the first month and concentrate on those requiring additional assistance to return to work. PMID:12660372

  17. 29 CFR 500.122 - Adjustments in insurance requirements when workers' compensation coverage is provided under State...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS MIGRANT AND SEASONAL AGRICULTURAL WORKER PROTECTION Motor Vehicle Safety and Insurance for Transportation of Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Workers, Housing Safety and Health for Migrant Workers Insurance § 500.122 Adjustments in insurance...

  18. 75 FR 34768 - Division of Federal Employees' Compensation; Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-18

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Federal Employees' Compensation; Proposed Collection.... II. Current Actions This is a new collection. The Federal Employees' Compensation Act provides workers' compensation coverage to three million federal and postal workers around the world for...

  19. Effects of the accident at Three Mile Island on the mental health and behavioral responses of the general population and nuclear workers

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1983-02-01

    On March 28, 1979, an accident occurred at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant Unit No. 2 near Middletown, PA. A Presidential Commission was established to investigate the incident and was given the responsibility to evaluate the actual and potential impact of the events on the health and safety of the workers and the public. A main conclusion of the investigation was that the most serious health effect was severe, short-lived mental stress. This paper describes the study and the findings for four different study groups: (1) the general population of heads of households located within 20 miles of the plant; (2) mothers of preschool children from the same area; (3) teenagers in the 7th, 9th, and 11th grades from the area; and (4) nuclear workers employed at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant. (ACR)

  20. Governmental re-evaluation of the committed effective dose received by emergency workers at the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Shojiro

    2015-01-01

    In April 2013, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) noticed that significant discrepancies were present between the committed effective dose (CED) data for emergency workers at the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant provided by TEPCO and that reported by five primary contractors. The MHLW, based on re-evaluation of the data, provided administrative guidance which required TEPCO and the five primary contractors to readjust the CED data for 479 workers (2.5% of 19,346 emergency workers). Of these, data for 450 workers from the primary contractors were readjusted based on the change in assessment methods. Doses were readjusted to higher values for 431 workers and doses were readjusted to lower values for 19 workers, CED data were corrected due to calculation errors for 29 workers from seven contractors, 12 additional workers were found to have received more than 50 mSv but no more than 100 mSv, an increase of 1.7% over the previously established count of 723 workers who had received that dose. Six additional workers were found to have received more than 100 mSv, an increase of 3.6% compared with the previous count of 167 workers. Major issues addressed during re-evaluation included: a) selection of intake scenario for the calculation of the residual activity ratio; b) assumptions about the intake date; c) assessments of exposure to radiation from (132)I and (132)Te; and d) assumptions about (131)I exposure in cases where (131)I was undetectable. Regarding the divergent CED data of 138 workers, the MHLW also confirmed that the CEDs assessed by the primary contractors were valid. To prevent the recurrence of similar incidents, the MHLW issued administrative guidance documents to TEPCO and primary contractors to employ standardized CED assessment methods on July 5. 2013. PMID:25585203

  1. Changes in hospitality workers' exposure to secondhand smoke following the implementation of New York's smoke-free law

    PubMed Central

    Farrelly, M; Nonnemaker, J; Chou, R; Hyland, A; Peterson, K; Bauer, U

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact on hospitality workers' exposure to secondhand smoke of New York's smoke-free law that prohibits smoking in all places of employment, including restaurants, bars, and bowling facilities. Design: Pre-post longitudinal follow up design. Settings: Restaurants, bars, and bowling facilities in New York State. Subjects: At baseline, 104 non-smoking workers in restaurants, bars, and bowling facilities were recruited with newspaper ads, flyers, and radio announcements. Of these, 68 completed a telephone survey and provided at least one saliva cotinine specimen at baseline. At three, six, and 12 month follow up studies, 47, 38, and 32 workers from the baseline sample of 68 completed a telephone survey and provided at least one saliva cotinine specimen. Intervention: The smoke-free law went into effect 24 July 2003. Main outcome measures: Self reported sensory and respiratory symptoms and exposure to secondhand smoke; self administered saliva cotinine specimens. Analyses were limited to subjects in all four study periods who completed a telephone survey and provided at least one saliva cotinine specimen. Results: All analyses were limited to participants who completed both an interview and a saliva specimen for all waves of data collection (n = 30) and who had cotinine concentrations ⩽ 15 ng/ml (n = 24). Hours of exposure to secondhand smoke in hospitality jobs decreased from 12.1 hours (95% confidence interval (CI) 8.0 to 16.3 hours) to 0.2 hours (95% CI –0.1 to 0.5 hours) (p < 0.01) and saliva cotinine concentration decreased from 3.6 ng/ml (95% CI 2.6 to 4.7 ng/ml) to 0.8 ng/ml (95% CI 0.4 to 1.2 ng/ml) (p < 0.01) from baseline to the 12 month follow up. The prevalence of workers reporting sensory symptoms declined from 88% (95% CI 66% to 96%) to 38% (95% CI 20% to 59%) (p < 0.01); there was no change in the overall prevalence of upper respiratory symptoms (p < 0.16). Conclusion: New York's smoke-free law had its intended effect of

  2. Kevlar® as a Potential Accident Radiation Dosimeter for First Responders, Law Enforcement and Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Romanyukha, Alexander; Trompier, François; Benevides, Luis A

    2016-08-01

    Today the armed forces and law enforcement personnel wear body armor, helmets, and flak jackets composed substantially of Kevlar® fiber to prevent bodily injury or death resulting from physical, ballistic, stab, and slash attacks. Therefore, there is a high probability that during a radiation accident or its aftermath, the Kevlar®-composed body armor will be irradiated. Preliminary study with samples of Kevlar® foundation fabric obtained from body armor used by the U.S. Marine Corps has shown that all samples evaluated demonstrated an EPR signal, and this signal increased with radiation dose. Based on these results, the authors predict that, with individual calibration, exposure at dose above 1 Gy can be reliably detected in Kevlar® samples obtained from body armor. As a result of these measurements, a post-event reconstruction of exposure dose can be obtained by taking various samples throughout the armor body and helmet worn by the same irradiated individual. The doses can be used to create a whole-body dose map that would be of vital importance in a case of a partial body or heterogeneous exposure.

  3. The effect of health insurance on workers' compensation filing: Evidence from the affordable care act's age-based threshold for dependent coverage.

    PubMed

    Dillender, Marcus

    2015-09-01

    This paper identifies the effect of health insurance on workers' compensation (WC) filing for young adults by implementing a regression discontinuity design using WC medical claims data from Texas. The results suggest health insurance factors into the decision to have WC pay for discretionary care. The implied instrumental variables estimates suggest a ten-percentage-point decrease in health insurance coverage increases WC bills by 15.3 percent. Despite the large impact of health insurance on the number of WC bills, the additional cost to WC at age 26 appears to be small as most of the increase comes from small bills.

  4. Fatal accident circumstances and epidemiology (FACE) report: construction worker dies as a result of spraying coating material in confined space in California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    A fatal accident circumstances and epidemiology (FACE) report describing a confined space accident in California was presented. The report was part of the NIOSH FACE project to collect data on electricity or confined space/related accidents involving fatalities. The victim and a coworker were exposed to 2-nitropropane and coal-tar-pitch vapors while painting the valves and steel flanges in a 72-inch underground water line with an epoxy coating on July 1, 1985. They were admitted to a hospital after complaining of nausea, headache, and vomiting. They were discharged on July 2. The victim was readmitted on July 6. He lapsed into a coma and died on July 12 of acute liver failure. The coworker was advised by the attending physician not to return to work because of fluctuations in his liver enzyme counts. Despite warnings on the cans not to use the resin in confined, unventilated spaces, a blower provided for ventilation was not used. Since both workers did not speak English well, it is possible they did not understand the warning labels. Recommendations include ensuring that employees are aware of the hazards associated with the materials they are using and enforcing existing safety policies.

  5. Fair law, unfair practices? Benefiting from protective legislation for pregnant workers in Italy and France.

    PubMed

    Romito, P; Saurel-Cubizolles, M J

    1992-12-01

    Protective Maternity Legislation (PML) for pregnant workers is well established in Italy and France, but little is known about the way it fulfils some of its aims, such as the protection of mothers' and babies' health and of the rights of women workers. In this paper, we present the results of two surveys, one carried out in Italy and the other in France, concerned with the implementation of these regulations. Results show that women who were regularly employed generally could benefit from PML, while non-eligible workers, most of them holding manual jobs, were not protected at all. Among eligible workers, inequalities existed: women with less qualified jobs and those employed in the private sector were less likely to benefit from the protective measures considered. A number of specific measures, such as the possibility of taking an early maternity leave for work reasons and of being moved to another job within the same firm were underused in both countries. Some limitations of PML are discussed, namely the fact it covers some but not all pregnant workers, that it ignores domestic work and the tendency to remove the pregnant worker rather than to modify her working conditions.

  6. Sport-related dental injury claims to the New Zealand Accident Rehabilitation & Compensation Insurance Corporation, 1993-1996: analysis of the 10 most common sports, excluding rugby union.

    PubMed

    Love, R M; Carman, N; Carmichael, S; MacFadyen, E

    1998-12-01

    A large number of New Zealanders participate in sport, either formally or informally; sporting injuries are common. In New Zealand, the Accident Rehabilitation & Compensation Insurance Corporation (ACC) is the main organisation that covers sports-related dental claims. Rugby union claims are the most common. The ACC's national data from 1993 to 1996 relating to dental claims for sports injuries (excluding rugby union) were analysed. This study identified 45 other sports in which participants are also at risk for dental injuries. Total claims per sport for each year were determined, and the "top 10" sports for claims per year were identified and compared for any change over the years studied. The top 10 sports for 1993 and 1994 were, in descending order: swimming, rugby league, basketball, cricket, hockey, soccer, netball, squash, softball-baseball, and tennis. Data for 1995 and 1996 revealed a similar trend, except that touch rugby displaced tennis as the tenth-ranked sport. The most common age group for claims was the age group 10-19 years, with a male:female ratio of approximately 2:1. Many sports, in addition to rugby union, place their participants at risk of dental injury. Awareness of prevention of dental injuries should be more widely promoted for all sports.

  7. 76 FR 75562 - Notice of a Change in Status of the Payable Periods in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ... Unemployment Compensation 2008 (EUC08) Program for Colorado AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration... periods in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2008 (EUC08) program for Colorado. Public Law 111-312... benefits within the EUC08 program for qualified unemployed workers claiming benefits in high...

  8. Future Law Enforcement Officers and Social Workers: Perceptions of Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMullan, Elizabeth C.; Carlan, Philip E.; Nored, Lisa S.

    2010-01-01

    This study compares perceptions of domestic violence for college students planning to work in law enforcement with students aspiring to careers in social work and non-law-enforcement criminal justice (N = 491). The study involves students attending four public universities across one Southern state who completed a survey (spring of 2006) measuring…

  9. [Minor and major work accidents in a Puglia business in the food sector: a 10-year study].

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, L; Zocchetti, C; Platania, A; De Francesco, G; De Metrio, R; Pirris, A; Gigante, M R

    1998-01-01

    At present no official data are available for those occupational accidents which, according to current law, are not subject to notification to the Italian National Institute for Insurance of Occupational Accidents (INAIL) and which are conventionally called "minor" accidents. They can be divided into accidents with prognosis from 1 to 3 days (franchises) and accidents which do not cause absence from work (medications). The already mentioned lack of data, which is not confined to Italy, is reflected in the small number of articles published in Italian and international journals. Also information regarding the possible relationships between "minor" accidents and the life habits of injured workers, are rare. The aim of this study was to provide detailed data on the characteristics of the different kinds of occupational accidents occurring in a food factory in Apulia, southern Italy, from 1985 to 1994, as well as to verify whether any relationship existed between the different types of occupational accidents and the consumption of cigarettes and alcohol by injured workers. The company's accident register yielded data on injuries which caused absence from work; the nursing service register provided information about accidents which did not determine absence from work; personal health documents gave details of worker life habits; and the company pay roll showed the amount of "worked hours". "Minor" accidents represented 70% of all accidents occurring during the ten year period studied. "Blue collars" had more frequent and serious occupational injuries, in comparison with "technical employees". "Minor" accidents, and especially "medications", occurred more frequently during one-shift work than during three-shift work. As work seniority increased, the number of "major" accidents decreased and number of accidents without absence from work rose. Contusions were the most frequent lesions and were responsible for the majority of the 3 kinds of accidents. "Medications" together

  10. [Minor and major work accidents in a Puglia business in the food sector: a 10-year study].

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, L; Zocchetti, C; Platania, A; De Francesco, G; De Metrio, R; Pirris, A; Gigante, M R

    1998-01-01

    At present no official data are available for those occupational accidents which, according to current law, are not subject to notification to the Italian National Institute for Insurance of Occupational Accidents (INAIL) and which are conventionally called "minor" accidents. They can be divided into accidents with prognosis from 1 to 3 days (franchises) and accidents which do not cause absence from work (medications). The already mentioned lack of data, which is not confined to Italy, is reflected in the small number of articles published in Italian and international journals. Also information regarding the possible relationships between "minor" accidents and the life habits of injured workers, are rare. The aim of this study was to provide detailed data on the characteristics of the different kinds of occupational accidents occurring in a food factory in Apulia, southern Italy, from 1985 to 1994, as well as to verify whether any relationship existed between the different types of occupational accidents and the consumption of cigarettes and alcohol by injured workers. The company's accident register yielded data on injuries which caused absence from work; the nursing service register provided information about accidents which did not determine absence from work; personal health documents gave details of worker life habits; and the company pay roll showed the amount of "worked hours". "Minor" accidents represented 70% of all accidents occurring during the ten year period studied. "Blue collars" had more frequent and serious occupational injuries, in comparison with "technical employees". "Minor" accidents, and especially "medications", occurred more frequently during one-shift work than during three-shift work. As work seniority increased, the number of "major" accidents decreased and number of accidents without absence from work rose. Contusions were the most frequent lesions and were responsible for the majority of the 3 kinds of accidents. "Medications" together

  11. Future law enforcement officers and social workers: perceptions of domestic violence.

    PubMed

    McMullan, Elizabeth C; Carlan, Philip E; Nored, Lisa S

    2010-08-01

    This study compares perceptions of domestic violence for college students planning to work in law enforcement with students aspiring to careers in social work and non-law-enforcement criminal justice (N = 491). The study involves students attending four public universities across one Southern state who completed a survey (spring of 2006) measuring whether various scenarios were (1) related to domestic violence, and (2) worthy of being reported to law enforcement. Findings indicate that all student groups (law enforcement, non-law-enforcement criminal justice, and social work) tended to identify the various scenarios as domestic violence (and worthy of being reported) regardless of the person's sexual orientation, violence severity, and offender's or victim's gender. However, law enforcement students are less sensitive to domestic violence when compared with social work and non-law enforcement criminal justice students. Findings reveal that (1) graduate students, (2) female students, and (3) White students (compared with African American students in general) attending majority White universities were more likely to identify domestic violence and its worthiness of being reported.The data in this study indicate that criminal justice programs produce graduates who are reasonably sensitive toward the importance of appropriate domestic violence response but could still improve using the techniques employed within social work programs.

  12. Evaluation of a smoke-free law on indoor air quality and on workers' health in Portuguese restaurants.

    PubMed

    Madureira, Joana; Mendes, Ana; Teixeira, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Workplace bans on smoking are interventions to reduce exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) to try to prevent harmful health effects. The Portuguese Government on January 1, 2008, introduced the first national law banning smoking in public workplaces, including restaurants. The main aim of this study was to examine the impact of this law on indoor air quality (IAQ) in restaurants and on the respiratory and sensory health of restaurant workers. Concentrations of respirable suspended particulate matter (RSP), total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon dioxide (CO2) in 10 restaurants were measured and compared before and after the ban. Benzene (C6H6) concentrations were also measured in all restaurants. Fifty-two and twenty-eight restaurant workers, respectively, answered questionnaires on exposure to SHS, and respiratory and sensory symptoms in the pre- and post-ban phases. There was a statistically significant decrease in RSP, CO, TVOC, and C6H6 concentrations after the ban. Additionally, in both phases the monitored CO2 concentrations greatly exceeded 1800 mg x m(-3), suggesting inefficient ventilation of the indoor spaces. Between pre- and post-ban phases a significant reduction in self-reported workplace SHS exposure was also observed after the enforcement of the law, as well as a significant marked reduction in dry, itching, irritated, or watery eyes, nasal problems, sore or dry throat, cough, wheeze, and headache. This study provides, in a single investigation, comparison of IAQ and respiratory health in Portugal before and after the introduction of the smoke-free law, the first data reported in the literature to our knowledge. Our findings suggest that a total workplace smoking ban results in a significant reduction in indoor air pollution and an improvement in the respiratory health of restaurant workers. These observations may have implications for policymakers and legislators currently considering the nature and extent of their

  13. Evaluation of a smoke-free law on indoor air quality and on workers' health in Portuguese restaurants.

    PubMed

    Madureira, Joana; Mendes, Ana; Teixeira, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Workplace bans on smoking are interventions to reduce exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) to try to prevent harmful health effects. The Portuguese Government on January 1, 2008, introduced the first national law banning smoking in public workplaces, including restaurants. The main aim of this study was to examine the impact of this law on indoor air quality (IAQ) in restaurants and on the respiratory and sensory health of restaurant workers. Concentrations of respirable suspended particulate matter (RSP), total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon dioxide (CO2) in 10 restaurants were measured and compared before and after the ban. Benzene (C6H6) concentrations were also measured in all restaurants. Fifty-two and twenty-eight restaurant workers, respectively, answered questionnaires on exposure to SHS, and respiratory and sensory symptoms in the pre- and post-ban phases. There was a statistically significant decrease in RSP, CO, TVOC, and C6H6 concentrations after the ban. Additionally, in both phases the monitored CO2 concentrations greatly exceeded 1800 mg x m(-3), suggesting inefficient ventilation of the indoor spaces. Between pre- and post-ban phases a significant reduction in self-reported workplace SHS exposure was also observed after the enforcement of the law, as well as a significant marked reduction in dry, itching, irritated, or watery eyes, nasal problems, sore or dry throat, cough, wheeze, and headache. This study provides, in a single investigation, comparison of IAQ and respiratory health in Portugal before and after the introduction of the smoke-free law, the first data reported in the literature to our knowledge. Our findings suggest that a total workplace smoking ban results in a significant reduction in indoor air pollution and an improvement in the respiratory health of restaurant workers. These observations may have implications for policymakers and legislators currently considering the nature and extent of their

  14. Late effects of ionizing radiation on functional status of bronchopulmonary system in COPD patients among the clean-up workers of the Chornobyl NPP accident.

    PubMed

    Sushko, V O; Shvaiko, L I; Bazyka, K D

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of ionizing radiation on the functional condition of the bronchopulmonary system in clean-up workers of Chornobyl NPP patients with COPD in a remote post-emergency period. Materials and methods. The study of functional characteristics was carried out in 272 patients - 197 clean-up workers of Chornobyl NPP accident (ChNPPA) with radiation exposure from 25 to 988 mSv; 75 - group of nosological control and 20 healthy persons. Results and conclusions. For the clean-up workers of Chornobyl NPP with exposure doses over 500 mSv demonstrated correlation between respiratory function parameters and dose which is confirmed for these patients, compared with irradiated in doses less than 500 mSv and nosology control, a significant decreasing of VC (76,3 ± 8,5%, 82,4 ± 8,5% and 82,7 ± 8,1% accordingly, p <0,05), FVC (78,2 ± 8,3%, 84,3 ± 7,9% і 86,1 ± 9,7%, p <0,05), FEF 50 (26,1 ± 11,5%, 32,6 ± 10,6% і 32,1 ± 12,7%, p <0, 05) і FEF 75 (23,8 ± 8,1%, 27,8 ± 9,3% і 27,6 ± 9,2%, p <0,05). These changers combined with decrease in lung diffusion capacity in cases more than 500 mSv, and indicate severe respiratory disorders in patients with COPD among clean-up workers of ChNPPA.

  15. 20 CFR 10.735 - When is a non-Federal law enforcement officer (LEO) covered under the FECA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When is a non-Federal law enforcement officer (LEO) covered under the FECA? 10.735 Section 10.735 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... When is a non-Federal law enforcement officer (LEO) covered under the FECA? (a) A law...

  16. Associations between Disaster Exposures, Peritraumatic Distress, and Posttraumatic Stress Responses in Fukushima Nuclear Plant Workers following the 2011 Nuclear Accident: The Fukushima NEWS Project Study

    PubMed Central

    Shigemura, Jun; Tanigawa, Takeshi; Nishi, Daisuke; Matsuoka, Yutaka; Nomura, Soichiro; Yoshino, Aihide

    2014-01-01

    Background The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident was the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl. The nearby Daini plant also experienced substantial damage but remained intact. Workers for the both plants experienced multiple stressors as disaster victims and workers, as well as the criticism from the public due to their company's post-disaster management. Little is known about the psychological pathway mechanism from nuclear disaster exposures, distress during and immediately after the event (peritraumatic distress; PD), to posttraumatic stress responses (PTSR). Methods A self-report questionnaire was administered to 1,411 plant employees (Daiichi, n = 831; Daini, n = 580) 2–3 months post-disaster (total response rate: 80.2%). The socio-demographic characteristics and disaster-related experiences were assessed as independent variables. PD and PTSR were measured by the Japanese versions of Peritraumatic Distress Inventory and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, respectively. The analysis was conducted separately for the two groups. Bivariate regression analyses were performed to assess the relationships between independent variables, PD, and PTSR. Significant variables were subsequently entered in the multiple regression analyses to explore the pathway mechanism for development of PTSR. Results For both groups, PTSR highly associated with PD (Daiichi: adjusted β, 0.66; p<0.001; vs. Daini: adjusted β, 0.67; p<0.001). PTSR also associated with discrimination/slurs experience (Daiichi: 0.11; p<0.001; vs. Daini, 0.09; p = 0.005) and presence of preexisting illness(es) (Daiichi: 0.07; p = 0.005; vs. Daini: 0.15; p<.0001). Other disaster-related variables were likely to be associated with PD than PTSR. Conclusion Among the Fukushima nuclear plant workers, disaster exposures associated with PD. PTSR was highly affected by PD along with discrimination/slurs experience. PMID:24586278

  17. Incidence and mortality of solid cancer among emergency workers of the Chernobyl accident: assessment of radiation risks for the follow-up period of 1992-2009.

    PubMed

    Kashcheev, V V; Chekin, S Yu; Maksioutov, M A; Tumanov, K A; Kochergina, E V; Kashcheeva, P V; Shchukina, N V; Ivanov, V K

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a retrospective cohort study of cancer incidence and mortality among emergency workers of the Chernobyl accident, for the follow-up period 1992-2009. The cohort selected for analysis consists of 67,568 emergency workers who worked in the Chernobyl exclusion zone in 1986-1987. External radiation whole-body absorbed dose varied from 0.0001 gray (Gy) to 1.24 Gy, with a median of 0.102 Gy. Over the follow-up period 1992-2009, a total of 4,002 solid cancers of different sites were identified as the result of annual compulsory health examination, and a total of 2,442 deaths from all solid cancers in the study cohort were reported. Poisson regression was applied for the analysis of cancer incidence and mortality. The analysis of the standardized incidence ratio (SIR) has shown a statistically significant increase in cancer incidence in the cohort as compared with baseline cancer incidence among males of Russia. The average excess over the entire follow-up period is 18 % [SIR = 1.18, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.15; 1.22]. In contrast, however, no increase in the mortality from all cancers among the emergency workers as compared to the baseline mortality in Russian men was found. Values of excess relative risk of cancer incidence and mortality per 1 Gy (ERR Gy(-1)) are 0.47 (95 % CI 0.03; 0.96, p value = 0.034) and 0.58 (95 % CI 0.002; 1.25, p value = 0.049), respectively. These values are statistically significant.

  18. Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, W. R.; Cox, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of the legal issues relative to water quality covering publications of 1977. Consideration is given to federal laws, Supreme Court cases, and the impact of federal environmental laws on local government. A list of 47 references is also presented. (HM)

  19. Evaluation of New Zealand's bicycle helmet law.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Colin F

    2012-02-10

    The New Zealand helmet law (all ages) came into effect on 1 January 1994. It followed Australian helmet laws, introduced in 1990-1992. Pre-law (in 1990) cyclist deaths were nearly a quarter of pedestrians in number, but in 2006-09, the equivalent figure was near to 50% when adjusted for changes to hours cycled and walked. From 1988-91 to 2003-07, cyclists' overall injury rate per hour increased by 20%. Dr Hillman, from the UK's Policy Studies Institute, calculated that life years gained by cycling outweighed life years lost in accidents by 20 times. For the period 1989-1990 to 2006-2009, New Zealand survey data showed that average hours cycled per person reduced by 51%. This evaluation finds the helmet law has failed in aspects of promoting cycling, safety, health, accident compensation, environmental issues and civil liberties.

  20. Evaluation of New Zealand's bicycle helmet law.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Colin F

    2012-02-10

    The New Zealand helmet law (all ages) came into effect on 1 January 1994. It followed Australian helmet laws, introduced in 1990-1992. Pre-law (in 1990) cyclist deaths were nearly a quarter of pedestrians in number, but in 2006-09, the equivalent figure was near to 50% when adjusted for changes to hours cycled and walked. From 1988-91 to 2003-07, cyclists' overall injury rate per hour increased by 20%. Dr Hillman, from the UK's Policy Studies Institute, calculated that life years gained by cycling outweighed life years lost in accidents by 20 times. For the period 1989-1990 to 2006-2009, New Zealand survey data showed that average hours cycled per person reduced by 51%. This evaluation finds the helmet law has failed in aspects of promoting cycling, safety, health, accident compensation, environmental issues and civil liberties. PMID:22327159

  1. The inverse primary care law in sub-Saharan Africa: a qualitative study of the views of migrant health workers

    PubMed Central

    Moosa, Shabir; Wojczewski, Silvia; Hoffmann, Kathryn; Poppe, Annelien; Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Peersman, Wim; Willcox, Merlin; Derese, Anselme; Mant, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Many low-income and middle-income countries globally are now pursuing ambitious plans for universal primary care, but are failing to deliver adequate care quality because of intractable human resource problems. Aim To understand why migrant nurses and doctors from sub-Saharan Africa did not wish to take up available posts in primary and first-contact care in their home countries. Design and setting Qualitative study of migrant health workers to Europe (UK, Belgium, and Austria) or southern Africa (Botswana and South Africa) from sub-Saharan Africa. Method Semi-structured interviews with 66 health workers (24 nurses and 42 doctors) from 18 countries between July 2011 and April 2012. Transcripts were analysed thematically using a framework approach. Results The reasons given for choosing not to work in primary care were grouped into three main analytic streams: poor working environment, difficult living experiences, and poor career path. Responders described a lack of basic medicines and equipment, an unmanageable workload, and lack of professional support. Many had concerns about personal security, living conditions (such as education for children), and poor income. Primary care was seen as lower status than hospital medicine, with lack of specialist training opportunities and more exposure to corruption. Conclusions Clinicians are reluctant to work in the conditions they currently experience in primary care in sub-Saharan Africa and these conditions tend to get worse as poverty and need for primary care increases. This inverse primary care law undermines achievement of universal health coverage. Policy experience from countries outside Africa shows that it is not immutable. PMID:24868069

  2. Impact of the Spanish Smoking Law on Exposure to Second-Hand Smoke and Respiratory Health in Hospitality Workers: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Esteve; Fu, Marcela; Pascual, José A.; López, María J.; Pérez-Ríos, Mónica; Schiaffino, Anna; Martínez-Sánchez, Jose M.; Ariza, Carles; Saltó, Esteve; Nebot, Manel

    2009-01-01

    Background A smoke-free law came into effect in Spain on 1st January 2006, affecting all enclosed workplaces except hospitality venues, whose proprietors can choose among totally a smoke-free policy, a partial restriction with designated smoking areas, or no restriction on smoking on the premises. We aimed to evaluate the impact of the law among hospitality workers by assessing second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure and the frequency of respiratory symptoms before and one year after the ban. Methods and Finding We formed a baseline cohort of 431 hospitality workers in Spain and 45 workers in Portugal and Andorra. Of them, 318 (66.8%) were successfully followed up 12 months after the ban, and 137 nonsmokers were included in this analysis. We obtained self-reported exposure to SHS and the presence of respiratory symptoms, and collected saliva samples for cotinine measurement. Salivary cotinine decreased by 55.6% after the ban among nonsmoker workers in venues where smoking was totally prohibited (from median of 1.6 ng/ml before to 0.5 ng/ml, p<0.01). Cotinine concentration decreased by 27.6% (p = 0.068) among workers in venues with designated smoking areas, and by 10.7% (p = 0.475) among workers in venues where smoking was allowed. In Portugal and Andorra, no differences between cotinine concentration were found before (1.2 ng/ml) and after the ban (1.2 ng/ml). In Spain, reported respiratory symptom declined significantly (by 71.9%; p<0.05) among workers in venues that became smoke-free. After adjustment for potential confounders, salivary cotinine and respiratory symptoms decreased significantly among workers in Spanish hospitality venues where smoking was totally banned. Conclusions Among nonsmoker hospitality workers in bars and restaurants where smoking was allowed, exposure to SHS after the ban remained similar to pre-law levels. The partial restrictions on smoking in Spanish hospitality venues do not sufficiently protect hospitality workers against SHS or its

  3. Radiation and non-radiation factors and their impact on the natural history of coronary heart disease in Chornobyl accident clean-up workers.

    PubMed

    Bilyi, D O; Nastina, O M; Gabulavichene, Zh M; Sydorenko, G V; Bazyka, O D; Bilaya, V V; Kovalyov, O S

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of a range of risk factors and ionizing radiation on the severity of clinical presentation of coronary heart disease (CHD) in Chornobyl accident clean-up workers (ACW). Materials and methods. A total of 376 ACW and 123 Kiev city residents with no exposure to radiation participated in the study. Study scope included the case history recording, clinical check-up, electrocardiography (ECG), daily ECG-monitoring, daily arterial blood pressure monitoring, exercise ECG, Doppler ultrasound (Doppler echocardiography), and serum lipid profile assay. The severity of CHD was scored as a sum of functional class (FC) of angina pectoris and stage of heart failure (HF) to estimate the combined impact of several risk factors. Participation in the clean-up work, age, gender, body mass excess, hypercholesterolemia, CHD, diabetes mellitus (DM), survived myocardial infarction (MI) and acute cerebral stroke, heart rhythm abnormalities, and a complete bundle branch block were accounted as risk factors. Both separate and combined impact of those factors was assayed. The combined effect was scored as a sum where value zero corresponded to no sign and value one corresponded to its presence, whereas values from 1 to 4 explained the expression of a sign according to severity or stage of a disease according to contemporary classifications. Results and conclusions. Despite the fact that clinical characterization, functional state of cardiovascular system, and comorbidities in ACW were almost similar to that in control group the onset of CHD in ACW was significantly earlier (55.9 vs. 59.8 years old). According to Spearman's rank-order correlation data there was a reliable link of FC grades and HF severity values sum to the sum of indices scoring the age group of patients, their gender, presence of arterial hypertension, MI in a history, DM type 2, heart rhythm abnormalities, and a complete bundle branch block. Cluster of risk factors

  4. Radiation and non-radiation factors and their impact on the natural history of coronary heart disease in Chornobyl accident clean-up workers.

    PubMed

    Bilyi, D O; Nastina, O M; Gabulavichene, Zh M; Sydorenko, G V; Bazyka, O D; Bilaya, V V; Kovalyov, O S

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of a range of risk factors and ionizing radiation on the severity of clinical presentation of coronary heart disease (CHD) in Chornobyl accident clean-up workers (ACW). Materials and methods. A total of 376 ACW and 123 Kiev city residents with no exposure to radiation participated in the study. Study scope included the case history recording, clinical check-up, electrocardiography (ECG), daily ECG-monitoring, daily arterial blood pressure monitoring, exercise ECG, Doppler ultrasound (Doppler echocardiography), and serum lipid profile assay. The severity of CHD was scored as a sum of functional class (FC) of angina pectoris and stage of heart failure (HF) to estimate the combined impact of several risk factors. Participation in the clean-up work, age, gender, body mass excess, hypercholesterolemia, CHD, diabetes mellitus (DM), survived myocardial infarction (MI) and acute cerebral stroke, heart rhythm abnormalities, and a complete bundle branch block were accounted as risk factors. Both separate and combined impact of those factors was assayed. The combined effect was scored as a sum where value zero corresponded to no sign and value one corresponded to its presence, whereas values from 1 to 4 explained the expression of a sign according to severity or stage of a disease according to contemporary classifications. Results and conclusions. Despite the fact that clinical characterization, functional state of cardiovascular system, and comorbidities in ACW were almost similar to that in control group the onset of CHD in ACW was significantly earlier (55.9 vs. 59.8 years old). According to Spearman's rank-order correlation data there was a reliable link of FC grades and HF severity values sum to the sum of indices scoring the age group of patients, their gender, presence of arterial hypertension, MI in a history, DM type 2, heart rhythm abnormalities, and a complete bundle branch block. Cluster of risk factors

  5. Compensation and Allitt.

    PubMed

    Dimond, B

    1996-07-01

    In British law fault and liability must be proved to obtain compensation. This may involve a lengthy, expensive and upsetting court case. To obtain compensation for PTSD it is necessary to have been close to the incident. Financially, it may be better to accept an out of court settlement. Mediation is often a better way to resolve disputes.

  6. Occupational accidents and forensic medicine in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ince, Haluk; Ince, Nurhan; Ozyildirim, Bedia Ayhan

    2006-01-01

    In Turkey, evaluation of the ratio of loss of working capacity is made according to various laws and regulations. These laws and regulations use different standards in computing the above-mentioned ratio depending on the professional status of the worker, whether he or she is a member of SSK (Social Security Institution) or ES (The Retirement Pension Institution) system. The aim of this study is to point out at the differences and deficiencies in computing the degree of disability and at the need to bring common standards to these computations. This prospective descriptive research is based on the cases of occupational accidents and occupational diseases brought to the 3rd specialized branch of the Institution of Forensic Medicine (which is the highest ruling instance concerning the decision on this field). Of the 164 accident cases included in this research, 95.1% are males, and 4.9% females. According to distribution by age of the cases, the modal group is respectively (30-39) years for men and (12-19) years for women. 43.8% of the injuries were localized at the hand or wrist. No meaningful statistical relationship could be found between the level of qualification of the workers (skilled-unskilled) and the proportion of those suffering from total disability. For the cases included in the categories 3, 4 and 5 is the ES system; the ratio of disability was similar to those computed according to the SSK system. In conclusion, we would like to insist on the need for our country to amend our laws and regulations according to changing and prevailing conditions and sex differentials and to bring homogeneous standards for all workers.

  7. [Croatian and international regulations on the protection and rights of workers exposed to asbestos at work].

    PubMed

    Zavalić, Marija; Macan, Jelena

    2009-11-01

    exposed to asbestos, and criteria for the confirmation of occupational asbestos-related diseases which are harmonised with the Helsinki criteria acknowledged by ILO and EU, particularly concerning the level and length of exposure. Croatian law on compensation of workers occupationally exposed to asbestos from 2007 regulates compensation claims for workers with occupational asbestos-related disease, authorities competent to process these claims, and funds and coefficients for compensation payments. Accordingly, Croatia is responsible for compensation claims payment for workers with occupational asbestos-related disease. The 2007 law on conditions for entitlement to full pension for workers exposed to asbestos at work defines the conditions for fulfilling criteria for retirement pension for workers exposed to asbestos at work. PMID:20853780

  8. 75 FR 12271 - Division of Federal Employees' Compensation Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Federal Employees' Compensation Proposed Collection...' Compensation Programs is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection: Claim for Reimbursement of Benefit Payments and Claims Expense Under the War Hazards Compensation Act (CA-278). A copy of...

  9. 75 FR 10504 - Division of Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation...' Compensation Programs is soliciting comments concerning the proposed collection: Energy Employees Occupational... administration of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000, as amended...

  10. Toxic compensation bills.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R C

    1985-01-01

    Congress has demonstrated interest in toxic compensation legislation, but not enough agreement to make significant progress. Advocates of reform claim that the legal system is heavily weighed against victims who seek compensation through the courts. Proposed reforms include a compensation fund and a cause of action in federal court. Critics have questioned whether these changes in the law would represent an improvement. Existing income replacement, medical cost reimbursement, and survivor insurance programs largely cover the losses of individuals with chronic disease. Thus, the need for an additional compensation is not clear. Furthermore, experience with compensation funds such as the Black Lung Fund suggests that political rather than scientific criteria may be used to determine eligibility. Finally, under the proposed financing mechanisms the compensation funds that are being debated would not increase incentives for care in the handling of hazardous wastes or toxic substances. PMID:4085440

  11. Unrestrained outsourcing in Brazil: more precarization and health risks for workers.

    PubMed

    Druck, Graça

    2016-06-20

    This article discusses the current status of outsourcing in Brazil, with new regulation underway featuring a bill of law under review by the National Congress, aimed at allowing outsourcing for all activities. The authors argue that outsourcing and precarization of work are inseparable phenomena, based on the results of 20 years of research in Brazil that reveals the more precarious working conditions of outsourced workers in different occupational categories. They focus particularly on workers' health: outsourcing of risks has led to more fatal work accidents, invariably at higher rates in outsourced workers. Finally, the article contends that to remove restraints on outsourcing in Brazil amounts to legalizing and legitimizing predatory workforce exploitation, disregarding workers' physical limits, exposing them to risk of fatal accidents, and reverting to forms of work that violate the human condition.

  12. 20 CFR 726.313 - Decision and order of Administrative Law Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Decision and order of Administrative Law Judge. 726.313 Section 726.313 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED BLACK LUNG...

  13. 20 CFR 726.310 - Appointment of Administrative Law Judge and notification of hearing date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Appointment of Administrative Law Judge and notification of hearing date. 726.310 Section 726.310 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED BLACK...

  14. 20 CFR 726.310 - Appointment of Administrative Law Judge and notification of hearing date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Appointment of Administrative Law Judge and notification of hearing date. 726.310 Section 726.310 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED BLACK...

  15. 20 CFR 726.313 - Decision and order of Administrative Law Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Decision and order of Administrative Law Judge. 726.313 Section 726.313 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED BLACK LUNG...

  16. 20 CFR 726.313 - Decision and order of Administrative Law Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Decision and order of Administrative Law Judge. 726.313 Section 726.313 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED BLACK LUNG...

  17. 20 CFR 726.310 - Appointment of Administrative Law Judge and notification of hearing date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Appointment of Administrative Law Judge and notification of hearing date. 726.310 Section 726.310 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, AS AMENDED BLACK...

  18. [Free radical lipid peroxidation in clean-up workers from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident depending on working conditions in the area of radioactive contamination].

    PubMed

    D'iakova, A M; Liasko, L I; Sushkevich, G N; Poluéktova, M V; Chirkova, T V

    1994-01-01

    Plasma lipids and antioxidant defense factors were examined 5-6 years after the exposure in 49 subjects who had taken part in decontamination of the territories after the Chernobyl accident against those in non-exposed donors. Elevated levels of heptane-soluble lipoperoxides and of dienketones were registered, though malonic dialdehyde changed little. The above parameters deviated from the control level more in subjects exposed to higher ecological risk. In this group of examinees the antioxidant activity failed to neutralize lipoperoxide excess under low activity of plasma catalase. Antioxidant drugs are recommended to manage disorders of lipoperoxide homeostasis in subjects exposed to radiation as a result of Chernobyl accident.

  19. Your workers may be contingent but your liability for them is certain: Part III: other employment issues.

    PubMed

    Koen, Clifford M; Mitchell, Michael S; Crow, Stephen M

    2010-01-01

    Hiring contingent workers can significantly help health care employers reduce labor costs while maintaining the staff required for quality patient care. However, a number of federal laws create legal land mines that await the unsuspecting employer. This article, the concluding part of a 3-part examination of contingent employment, addresses additional issues including benefits, tax implications, workers' compensation, contract considerations, and the screening of potential staffing partners. PMID:20686392

  20. 12 CFR 9.15 - Fiduciary compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fiduciary compensation. 9.15 Section 9.15 Banks... BANKS Regulations § 9.15 Fiduciary compensation. (a) Compensation of bank. If the amount of a national bank's compensation for acting in a fiduciary capacity is not set or governed by applicable law,...

  1. Rationalizing vaccine injury compensation.

    PubMed

    Mello, Michelle M

    2008-01-01

    Legislation recently adopted by the United States Congress provides producers of pandemic vaccines with near-total immunity from civil lawsuits without making individuals injured by those vaccines eligible for compensation through the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. The unusual decision not to provide an alternative mechanism for compensation is indicative of a broader problem of inconsistency in the American approach to vaccine-injury compensation policy. Compensation policies have tended to reflect political pressures and economic considerations more than any cognizable set of principles. This article identifies a set of ethical principles bearing on the circumstances in which vaccine injuries should be compensated, both inside and outside public health emergencies. A series of possible bases for compensation rules, some grounded in utilitarianism and some nonconsequentialist, are discussed and evaluated. Principles of fairness and reasonableness are found to constitute the strongest bases. An ethically defensible compensation policy grounded in these principles would make a compensation fund available to all individuals with severe injuries and to individuals with less-severe injuries whenever the vaccination was required by law or professional duty.

  2. Lockout/tagout accident investigation.

    PubMed

    White, James R

    2014-08-01

    When I was in boot camp, our drill instructor told us that assume makes an ass out of u and me. It was true then, and it is true today. In this instance, assumptions came into play several times, both by the worker and by the companies involved. The good news is that it did not result in a fatality, but that does not relieve the pain and suffering that the employee had to endure. This same type of scenario is likely repeated at many job sites throughout the United States. Multiple contractors, dozens--maybe hundreds--of workers, power system equipment and devices; all of these have to be taken into consideration when performing maintenance activities. It can become a blur. People are people, and people make mistakes. That is why we have OSHA regulations, NFPA 70E, company procedures, policies, etc. Most if not all of us have either been involved in accidents or know people who have been. It's not like it's a secret that people make mistakes, but talk to some and they seem to think only others have that failing. Safety is not about just any one procedure or rule. It's about slowing down, making a plan, and executing that plan. There are plenty of tools available to help us: policies, procedures, codes, standards, federal regulations, and state and local laws. I am not about to say that the worker involved in this incident was not taking safety seriously, but he failed to follow some fundamental safety rules like test-before-touch. If he had taken just that one step, there would be nothing to write about. PMID:25188988

  3. Action research for the health and safety of domestic workers in montreal: using numbers to tell stories and effect change.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Jill; Premji, Stephanie; Messing, Karen; Lippel, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, a Filipina organization in Quebec (PINAY) sought the help of university researchers to document the workplace health and safety experiences of domestic workers. Together, they surveyed 150 domestic workers and produced a report that generated interest from community groups, policy-makers, and the media. In this article, we-the university researchers-offer a case study of community-university action research. We share the story of how one project contributed to academic knowledge of domestic workers' health and safety experiences and also to a related policy campaign. We describe how Quebec workers' compensation legislation excludes domestic workers, and we analyze the occupational health literature related to domestic work. Striking data related to workplace accidents and illnesses emerged from the survey, and interesting lessons were learned about how occupational health questions should be posed. We conclude with a description of the successful policy advocacy that was possible as an outcome of this project. PMID:21342868

  4. Action research for the health and safety of domestic workers in montreal: using numbers to tell stories and effect change.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Jill; Premji, Stephanie; Messing, Karen; Lippel, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, a Filipina organization in Quebec (PINAY) sought the help of university researchers to document the workplace health and safety experiences of domestic workers. Together, they surveyed 150 domestic workers and produced a report that generated interest from community groups, policy-makers, and the media. In this article, we-the university researchers-offer a case study of community-university action research. We share the story of how one project contributed to academic knowledge of domestic workers' health and safety experiences and also to a related policy campaign. We describe how Quebec workers' compensation legislation excludes domestic workers, and we analyze the occupational health literature related to domestic work. Striking data related to workplace accidents and illnesses emerged from the survey, and interesting lessons were learned about how occupational health questions should be posed. We conclude with a description of the successful policy advocacy that was possible as an outcome of this project.

  5. Medical Surveillance for Former Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Takaro Jordan Firestone

    2009-05-29

    The Former Hanford Worker Medical Monitoring Program, directed by the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program at the University of Washington, served former production and other non-construction workers who were potentially exposed to workplace hazards while working for the USDOE or its contractors at Hanford. The USDOE Former Workers Program arose from Congressional action in the Defense Authorization of 1993 (Public Law 102). Section 3162 stated that, “The Secretary shall establish and carry out a program for the identification and ongoing medical evaluation of current and former Department of Energy employees who are subject to significant health risks as a result of exposure of such employees to hazardous or radioactive substances during such employment.” (This also covers former employees of USDOE contractors and subcontractors.) The key objective has been to provide these former workers with medical evaluations in order to determine whether workers have experienced significant risk due to workplace exposure to hazards. Exposures to asbestos, beryllium, and noise can produce specific medical conditions: asbestosis, berylliosis, and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Each of these conditions can be identified by specific, non-invasive screening tests, which are widely available. Treatments are also available for individuals affected by these conditions. This project involved two phases. Phase I involved a needs and risk assessment, characterizing the nature and extent of workplace health hazards which may have increased the risk for long-term health effects. We categorized jobs and tasks by likelihood of exposures to specific workplace health hazards; and located and established contact with former Hanford workers. Phase II involved implementation of medical monitoring programs for former workers whose individual work history indicated significant risk for adverse health effects. We identified 118,000 former workers, employed from 1943 to 1997

  6. The American compensation phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Bale, A

    1990-01-01

    In this article, the author defines the occupational safety and health domain, characterizes the distinct compensation phenomenon in the United States, and briefly reviews important developments in the last decade involving Karen Silkwood, intentional torts, and asbestos litigation. He examines the class conflict over the value and meaning of work-related injuries and illnesses involved in the practical activity of making claims and turning them into money through compensation inquiries. Juries, attributions of fault, and medicolegal discourse play key roles in the compensation phenomenon. This article demonstrates the extensive, probing inquiry through workers' bodies constituted by the American compensation phenomenon into the moral basis of elements of the system of production. PMID:2139638

  7. [Simultaneous flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle and subpopulations of immunocompetent cells in workers participating in the clean up of the Chernobyl Atomic Energy Station accident].

    PubMed

    Romanenko, A E; Chumak, A A; Bazyka, D A; Beliaeva, N V

    1991-10-01

    Surface phenotype and cellular cycle of nonstimulated peripheric blood mononuclear cells of 35 cleaner-worker with dose commitment 0.05-0.25 Gy and 12 control persons were studied by means of flow cytometry. Differences in cellular cycle were found, they needed further investigations. The details of the method promoting its reproducibility are described.

  8. Accident prevention manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-05-01

    Among the many common needs and goals are the safety and well-being of families, ourselves, fellow employees, and the continuing success of this organization. To these ends--minimizing human suffering and economic waste--the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Accident Prevention Program and this Accident Prevention Manual (APM) are dedicated. The BPA Accident Prevention Program is revised as necessary to ensure compliance with relevant Federal safety and health standards. The mandatory rules herein express minimum requirements for dealing with the principal hazards inherent in daily work activities. These and other written requirements, which neither can nor should provide complete coverage of all work situations, must be continually reinforced through the sound and mature safety judgments of all workers on each assigned task. In the event of conflicting judgments, the more conservative interpretation shall prevail pending review and resolution by management.

  9. Workers' safety in the construction industry in the southern West Bank of Palestine.

    PubMed

    Al-Sari, M I; Al-Khatib, I A

    2012-10-01

    There are few data about safety in the construction industry in Palestine. The main aim of the study was to assess worker's experiences and perceptions of safety at construction sites in Hebron and Bethlehem governorates of the West Bank. A structured questionnaire was completed through direct interviews with 349 construction workers. Of the respondents, 34.6% had experienced work-related accidents, 13.0% and 65.6% indicated that their workplace did not have a first-aid kit or trained first-aid specialist respectively, 35.8% reported that their work sites did not have safety tools and 83.7% had not received safety training. Workers perceived that awareness and training were the most frequent factor affecting workers' safety, with the foreman position having the greatest impact on the workers' safety. Greater enforcement of the current Palestinian safety laws is needed.

  10. Guidelines for accident prevention and emergency preparedness

    SciTech Connect

    Fthenakis, V.M.; Morris, S.C.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1993-05-01

    This report reviews recent developments in the guidelines on chemical accident prevention, risk assessment, and management of chemical emergencies, principally in the United States and Europe, and discusses aspects of their application to developing countries. Such guidelines are either in the form of laws or regulations promulgated by governments, or of recommendations from international, professional, or non governmental organizations. In many cases, these guidelines specify lists of materials of concern and methods for evaluating safe usage of these materials and recommend areas of responsibility for different organizations; procedures to be included in planning, evaluation, and response; and appropriate levels of training for different classes of workers. Guidelines frequently address the right of communities to be informed of potential hazards and address ways for them to participate in planning and decision making.

  11. Human research subjects as human research workers.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Holly Fernandez

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical research involving human subjects has traditionally been treated as a unique endeavor, presenting special risks and demanding special protections. But in several ways, the regulatory scheme governing human subjects research is counter-intuitively less protective than the labor and employment laws applicable to many workers. This Article relies on analogical and legal reasoning to demonstrate that this should not be the case; in a number of ways, human research subjects ought to be fundamentally recast as human research workers. Like other workers protected under worklaw, biomedical research subjects often have interests that diverge from those in positions of control but little bargaining power for change. Bearing these important similarities in mind, the question becomes whether there is any good reason to treat subjects and protected workers differently as a matter of law. With regard to unrestricted payment, eligibility for a minimum wage, compensation for injury, and rights to engage in concerted activity, the answer is no and human subjects regulations ought to be revised accordingly. PMID:25051653

  12. S. 2799: a bill to consolidate and improve Federal laws providing compensation and establishing liability for oil spills. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, September 9, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The Oil Pollution Liability and Compensation Act of 1986 consolidates and improves existing federal law. The Act clarifies definitions and conditions for liability either on the high seas, at offshore facilities, or in port or onshore facilities. It also sets liability limits for vessel or facility owners, with such limits subject to periodic adjustment, and defines the uses of the fund established to pay claims. Sections of the bill describe procedures for litigation, jurisdiction and venue and interaction with state and local laws. Title II contains conforming amendments affecting the Trans-Alaska Pipeline Fund, the High Seas Act, Clean Water Act, and the Deepwater Port Act. Title III covers international conventions and the International Fund.

  13. Evaluation of three somatic genetic biomarkers as indicators of low dose radiation effects in clean-up workers of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident.

    PubMed

    Jones, I M; Tucker, J D; Langlois, R G; Mendelsohn, M L; Pleshanov, P; Nelson, D O

    2001-01-01

    The goals of this study were to assess three biomarkers of genetic effect for their individual and collective ability to detect and estimate radiation exposure in Russian Chernobyl clean-up workers. Work assignments were planned to limit dose to 0.25 Gy. The three biomarkers employed were chromosome translocations detectcd in lynmphocytes by florescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), and mutation at two genes, glycophorin A (GPA) in red blood cells detected by flow cytometry and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) in lymphocytes detected by selective cell culture. Samples were Obtained from 1992 to 2000. The time between exposure at Chernobyl and sample acquisition was > or =5 years. The lymphocyte assays detected an elevation over controls in average outcomes it clean-up workers: translocation rates were 46% higher when adjusted for age and smoking and HPRT mutant frequencies were were 16% higher when adjusted for age. The G PA assay did not detect an exposure effect. The results indicate that measuring frequency of translocations by FISH is preferred for low dose radiation, retrospective biochemistry.

  14. Knowledge about childhood autism and opinion among healthcare workers on availability of facilities and law caring for the needs and rights of children with childhood autism and other developmental disorders in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Bakare, Muideen O; Ebigbo, Peter O; Agomoh, Ahamefule O; Eaton, Julian; Onyeama, Gabriel M; Okonkwo, Kevin O; Onwukwe, Jojo U; Igwe, Monday N; Orovwigho, Andrew O; Aguocha, Chinyere M

    2009-01-01

    Background In designing programs to raise the community level of awareness about childhood autism in sub-Saharan Africa, it is logical to use the primary healthcare workers as contact point for education of the general public. Tertiary healthcare workers could play the role of trainers on childhood autism at primary healthcare level. Assessing their baseline knowledge about childhood autism to detect areas of knowledge gap is an essential ingredient in starting off such programs that would be aimed at early diagnosis and interventions. Knowledge of the healthcare workers on availability of facilities and law that would promote the required interventions is also important. This study assessed the baseline knowledge about childhood autism and opinion among Nigerian healthcare workers on availability of facilities and law caring for the needs and rights of children with childhood autism and other developmental disorders. Method A total of one hundred and thirty four (134) consented healthcare workers working in tertiary healthcare facilities located in south east and south-south regions of Nigeria were interviewed with Socio-demographic, Knowledge about Childhood Autism among Health Workers (KCAHW) and Opinion on availability of Facilities and Law caring for the needs and rights of children with Childhood Autism and other developmental disorders (OFLCA) questionnaires. Results The total mean score of participated healthcare workers on KCAHW questionnaire was 12.35 ± 4.40 out of a total score of 19 possible. Knowledge gap was found to be higher in domain 3 (symptoms of obsessive and repetitive pattern of behavior), followed by domains 1 (symptoms of impairments in social interaction), 4 (type of disorder autism is and associated co-morbidity) and 2 (symptoms of communication impairments) of KCAHW respectively among the healthcare workers. Knowledge about childhood autism (KCA) as measured by scores on KCAHW questionnaire was significantly associated with age group

  15. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the Commission shall not compensate advisory...

  16. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial... MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the Commission... cost to the Commission. The compensation to be paid to such consultant may not exceed the maximum...

  17. S. 686: A bill to consolidate and improve Federal laws providing compensation and establishing liability for oil spills. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred First Congress, First Session, April 4, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This bill is for the purpose of consolidating and improving Federal laws which provide compensation and establish liability for oil spills. The owner or operator of a vessel or onshore/offshore facility from which there is an oil spill shall be liable for all costs incurred for spill removal and all damages for economic loss or loss of natural resources resulting from the discharge. There is no liability for the person otherwise liable if it can be established that the discharge or threat of discharge resulted from an act of God, an act of war, or an act of omission of a third party other than an employee or agent of the owner/operator. The law sets maximum limits to this liability, for example, 100 million dollars is the maximum liability for any deep water port facility. An oil spill compensation fund and regional oil spill response teams are established by this act and are described. Required amendments to the Trans-Alaska Pipeline Fund, the Intervention on the High Seas Act, Clean Water Act, Deepwater Port Act, and Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act are included.

  18. Exploratory analysis of Spanish energetic mining accidents.

    PubMed

    Sanmiquel, Lluís; Freijo, Modesto; Rossell, Josep M

    2012-01-01

    Using data on work accidents and annual mining statistics, the paper studies work-related accidents in the Spanish energetic mining sector in 1999-2008. The following 3 parameters are considered: age, experience and size of the mine (in number of workers) where the accident took place. The main objective of this paper is to show the relationship between different accident indicators: risk index (as an expression of the incidence), average duration index for the age and size of the mine variables (as a measure of the seriousness of an accident), and the gravity index for the various sizes of mines (which measures the seriousness of an accident, too). The conclusions of this study could be useful to develop suitable prevention policies that would contribute towards a decrease in work-related accidents in the Spanish energetic mining industry. PMID:22721539

  19. The Concept of Accident Proneness: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Froggatt, Peter; Smiley, James A.

    1964-01-01

    The term accident proneness was coined by psychological research workers in 1926. Since then its concept—that certain individuals are always more likely than others to sustain accidents, even though exposed to equal risk—has been questioned but seldom seriously challenged. This article describes much of the work and theory on which this concept is based, details the difficulties encountered in obtaining valid information and the interpretative errors that can arise from the examination of imperfect data, and explains why accident proneness became so readily accepted as an explanation of the facts. A recent hypothesis of accident causation, namely that a person's accident liability may vary from time to time, is outlined, and the respective abilities of this and of accident proneness to accord with data from the more reliable literature are examined. The authors conclude that the hypothesis of individual variation in liability is more realistic and in better agreement with the data than is accident proneness. PMID:14106130

  20. Radiotherapy Accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mckenzie, Alan

    A major benefit of a Quality Assurance system in a radiotherapy centre is that it reduces the likelihood of an accident. For over 20 years I have been the interface in the UK between the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine and the media — newspapers, radio and TV — and so I have learned about radiotherapy accidents from personal experience. In some cases, these accidents did not become public and so the hospital cannot be identified. Nevertheless, lessons are still being learned.

  1. Compensation Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roady, Celia

    2008-01-01

    Congress, the news media, and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) continue to cast a wary eye on the compensation of nonprofit leaders. Hence, any college or university board that falls short of IRS expectations in its procedures for setting the president's compensation is putting the president, other senior officials, and board members at…

  2. [An analysis of industrial accidents in the working field with a particular emphasis on repeated accidents].

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, I; Yanagihashi, T; Tomari, T; Sato, M

    1990-03-01

    The present study is based on an analysis of routinely submitted reports of occupational accidents experienced by the workers of industrial enterprises under the jurisdiction of Kagoshima Labor Standard Office during a 5-year period 1983 to 1987. Officially notified injuries serious enough to keep employees away from their job for work at least 4 days were utilized in this study. Data was classified so as to give an observed frequency distribution for workers having any specified number of accidents. Also, the accident rate which is an indicator of the risk of accident was compared among different occupations, between age groups and between the sexes. Results obtained are as follows; 1) For the combined total of 6,324 accident cases for 8 types of occupation (Construction, Transportation, Mining & Quarrying, Forestry, Food manufacture, Lumber & Woodcraft, Manufacturing industry and Other business), the number of those who had at least one accident was 6,098, of which 5,837 were injured only once, 208 twice, 21 three times and 2 four times. When occupation type was fixed, however, the number of workers having one, two, three and four times of accidents were 5,895, 182, 19 and 2, respectively. This suggests that some workers are likely to have experienced repeated accidents in more than one type of occupation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2131982

  3. [An analysis of industrial accidents in the working field with a particular emphasis on repeated accidents].

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, I; Yanagihashi, T; Tomari, T; Sato, M

    1990-03-01

    The present study is based on an analysis of routinely submitted reports of occupational accidents experienced by the workers of industrial enterprises under the jurisdiction of Kagoshima Labor Standard Office during a 5-year period 1983 to 1987. Officially notified injuries serious enough to keep employees away from their job for work at least 4 days were utilized in this study. Data was classified so as to give an observed frequency distribution for workers having any specified number of accidents. Also, the accident rate which is an indicator of the risk of accident was compared among different occupations, between age groups and between the sexes. Results obtained are as follows; 1) For the combined total of 6,324 accident cases for 8 types of occupation (Construction, Transportation, Mining & Quarrying, Forestry, Food manufacture, Lumber & Woodcraft, Manufacturing industry and Other business), the number of those who had at least one accident was 6,098, of which 5,837 were injured only once, 208 twice, 21 three times and 2 four times. When occupation type was fixed, however, the number of workers having one, two, three and four times of accidents were 5,895, 182, 19 and 2, respectively. This suggests that some workers are likely to have experienced repeated accidents in more than one type of occupation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. 20 CFR 703.119 - Report by employer operating temporarily in another compensation district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... another compensation district. 703.119 Section 703.119 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... in another compensation district. Where an employer having operations in one compensation district contemplates engaging in work subject to the Act in another compensation district, his carrier may submit...

  5. 20 CFR 703.119 - Report by employer operating temporarily in another compensation district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... another compensation district. 703.119 Section 703.119 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... in another compensation district. Where an employer having operations in one compensation district contemplates engaging in work subject to the Act in another compensation district, his carrier may submit...

  6. 20 CFR 703.119 - Report by employer operating temporarily in another compensation district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... another compensation district. 703.119 Section 703.119 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... in another compensation district. Where an employer having operations in one compensation district contemplates engaging in work subject to the Act in another compensation district, his carrier may submit...

  7. 20 CFR 703.119 - Report by employer operating temporarily in another compensation district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... another compensation district. 703.119 Section 703.119 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... in another compensation district. Where an employer having operations in one compensation district contemplates engaging in work subject to the Act in another compensation district, his carrier may submit...

  8. 20 CFR 10.503 - Under what circumstances may OWCP reduce or terminate compensation benefits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... terminate compensation benefits? 10.503 Section 10.503 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT, AS AMENDED Continuing Benefits Rules and Evidence § 10.503 Under...

  9. 20 CFR 10.503 - Under what circumstances may OWCP reduce or terminate compensation benefits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... terminate compensation benefits? 10.503 Section 10.503 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT, AS AMENDED Continuing Benefits Rules and Evidence § 10.503 Under...

  10. Curbing Workers' Comp Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeb, William S.

    1998-01-01

    An actuarial study revealed that Pasadena Schools had an unfunded worker's compensation liability of over $10 million and 400 open claims. Advised to implement strong cost-containment measures (an early return-to-work program) and equally strong accountability measures (strict performance guides and safe work practices), the district achieved…

  11. Twenty questions surrounding unpaid medical leave: Navigating the Bermuda Triangle of employment law.

    PubMed

    McMahon, B T; Domer, T M

    1997-01-01

    No federal or state lawmaker could have foreseen the nuances involved in the mutual implementations of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Family and Medical Leave Act, and state workers compensation statutes. These laws are compared and contrasted on a number of key issues. Readers are provided with a decision matrix to guide them and those they represent in the judicious invocation of the most beneficial statute for each issue. PMID:24441973

  12. Twenty questions surrounding unpaid medical leave: Navigating the Bermuda Triangle of employment law.

    PubMed

    McMahon, B T; Domer, T M

    1997-01-01

    No federal or state lawmaker could have foreseen the nuances involved in the mutual implementations of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Family and Medical Leave Act, and state workers compensation statutes. These laws are compared and contrasted on a number of key issues. Readers are provided with a decision matrix to guide them and those they represent in the judicious invocation of the most beneficial statute for each issue.

  13. 20 CFR 30.626 - How will OWCP coordinate compensation payable under Part E of EEOICPA with benefits from state...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How will OWCP coordinate compensation payable under Part E of EEOICPA with benefits from state workers' compensation programs? 30.626 Section 30.626... Benefits with State Workers' Compensation Benefits § 30.626 How will OWCP coordinate compensation...

  14. Critical Issues in Assessing Teacher Compensation. Backgrounder. No. 2638

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richwine, Jason; Biggs, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    A November 2011 Heritage Foundation report--"Assessing the Compensation of Public-School Teachers"--presented data on teacher salaries and benefits in order to inform debates about teacher compensation reform. The report concluded that public-school teacher compensation is far ahead of what comparable private-sector workers enjoy, and that…

  15. Compensation conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Shoibal

    2012-01-01

    Pressured by questions tabled in parliament that point to a lack of adequate enforcement of regulations, the DCG(I) has abruptly initiated action to ensure payment of compensation for trial-related injuries. While it is astounding that non-compliance to the existing regulations could have gone unnoticed by quality assurance staff as well as by the ethics committees and the regulator, for over six years, sudden enforcement of the regulation has thrown up issues and challenges that are difficult to resolve in the absence of an adequately debated and thought-through guidance. In implementing regulations for suo moto compensation, India is seeking to establish a practice not previously tested elsewhere in the world. There is no doubt that industry must support the idea of putting patients first, but procedural considerations in fixing causality and determining the quantum of compensation promise to raise questions of morality, ethics, and jurisprudence that will not be easy to answer. PMID:22347695

  16. Compensating for cold war cancers.

    PubMed

    Parascandola, Mark J

    2002-07-01

    Although the Cold War has ended, thousands of workers involved in nuclear weapons production are still living with the adverse health effects of working with radioactive materials, beryllium, and silica. After a series of court battles, the U.S. government passed the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Act in October 2000 to financially assist workers whose health has been compromised by these occupational exposures. Now work is underway to set out guidelines for determining which workers will be compensated. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has been assigned the task of developing a model that can scientifically make these determinations, a heavy task considering the controversies that lie in estimating low-level radiation risks and the inadequate worker exposure records kept at many of the plants.

  17. Recording, notification, compilation, and classification of statistics of occupational accidents and diseases: the Thai experience.

    PubMed

    Choi, B C

    1996-11-01

    An International Labour Organization (ILO) project was conducted in July and August 1995 in Thailand to assist with the development of an information system on occupational accidents and diseases for the Workmen's Compensation Fund (WCF). The WCF provides cash benefits and medical care to insured workers who suffer employment injuries. The project included literature research based on the facilities of the ILO in Bangkok, and those of the Thai government, and a thorough review of the ILO Code of Practice (the Code) on recording and notification of occupational accidents and diseases, and of other international recommendations on statistics of occupational accidents and diseases. A comparative study of various notification systems of occupational accidents and diseases in Australia, Canada, the Philippines, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States was conducted. The project also included fact-finding sessions among various information suppliers and users in Thailand. The Thai notification form for collecting data for the database was redesigned and pretested. Results of the project indicated that the Code is appropriate for the recording and notification of occupational accidents and diseases in Thailand. In addition, a number of information requirements, which were included in the notification systems in the countries studied but not listed in the Code, were found to be useful for the database. A list of the baseline variables to be included in the proposed database was developed, the notification form was redesigned, and coding schemes for the information collected on the redesigned form were constructed on the basis of international standard classification systems for economic activity, employment status, occupation, nature of injury, occupational disease, body part, type of accident, and agency. A number of mechanisms were suggested for cross-checking the accuracy of data in the database. Based on the review of the Code and other international recommendations on

  18. Increased leukemia risk in Chernobyl cleanup workers

    Cancer.gov

    A new study found a significantly elevated risk for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among workers who were engaged in recovery and clean-up activities following the Chernobyl power plant accident in 1986.

  19. Compensated for Life: Sex Work and Disease Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arunachalam, Raj; Shah, Manisha

    2013-01-01

    Sex workers draw a premium for engaging in unprotected sex. We theoretically motivate a test of whether this premium represents a compensating differential for disease, thereby mitigating sex workers' propensity to use condoms. Using transaction-level data and biological STI markers from sex workers in Ecuador, we exploit within-worker…

  20. Charlie Wolf Nuclear Workers Compensation Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Udall, Mark [D-CO

    2009-03-31

    03/31/2009 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (text of measure as introduced: CR S4082-4085) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. Federal Workers' Compensation Modernization and Improvement Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Kline, John [R-MN-2

    2011-07-08

    11/30/2011 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  2. Concealing compensation from the IRS.

    PubMed

    Burda, D; Greene, J

    1991-01-28

    Tougher reporting requirements from the Internal Revenue Service are prompting some not-for-profit hospitals to seek ways to hide compensation arrangements from the public and the media. Critics believe those tactics could get hospitals in hot water with the law, especially now that the IRS has launched a new, aggressive auditing offensive.

  3. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the...

  4. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the...

  5. 16 CFR 16.16 - Compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Compensation. 16.16 Section 16.16 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ADVISORY COMMITTEE MANAGEMENT § 16.16 Compensation. (a) Committee members. Unless otherwise provided by law, the...

  6. Working Toward a Holistic Compensation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Brian

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how the Archdiocese of Louisville has begun taking initiatives to become a more equitable employer. Addresses seven components of compensation including income continuation, deferred income, pay for time not worked, health and accident insurance, loss of job income continuation, and spouse and family income continuation. (MZ)

  7. Wage and Hour Farm Labor Laws.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertel, Catherine

    This paper, by a teacher of migrants, summarizes various farm labor laws and child labor laws pertaining to migrant and seasonal workers. The Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act of 1983 provides workers with assurances about pay, hours, and working conditions, including safety and health. This legislation permits anyone…

  8. 20 CFR 10.727 - What is the pay rate of jurors for compensation purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is the pay rate of jurors for compensation purposes? 10.727 Section 10.727 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS.... Peace Corps Volunteers...

  9. 20 CFR 10.727 - What is the pay rate of jurors for compensation purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the pay rate of jurors for compensation purposes? 10.727 Section 10.727 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS.... Peace Corps Volunteers...

  10. 20 CFR 10.727 - What is the pay rate of jurors for compensation purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true What is the pay rate of jurors for compensation purposes? 10.727 Section 10.727 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS.... Peace Corps Volunteers...

  11. 20 CFR 10.727 - What is the pay rate of jurors for compensation purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true What is the pay rate of jurors for compensation purposes? 10.727 Section 10.727 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS.... Peace Corps Volunteers...

  12. 20 CFR 10.727 - What is the pay rate of jurors for compensation purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What is the pay rate of jurors for compensation purposes? 10.727 Section 10.727 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS.... Peace Corps Volunteers...

  13. 20 CFR 725.535 - Reductions; receipt of State or Federal benefit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... disability or death due to pneumoconiosis only under State or Federal laws relating to workers' compensation... pneumoconiosis under State laws relating to workers' compensation (including compensation for...

  14. Radiation accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Saenger, E.L.

    1986-09-01

    It is essential that emergency physicians understand ways to manage patients contaminated by radioactive materials and/or exposed to external radiation sources. Contamination accidents require careful surveys to identify the metabolic pathway of the radionuclides to guide prognosis and treatment. The level of treatment required will depend on careful surveys and meticulous decontamination. There is no specific therapy for the acute radiation syndrome. Prophylactic antibodies are desirable. For severely exposed patients treatment is similar to the supportive care given to patients undergoing organ transplantation. For high-dose extremity injury, no methods have been developed to reverse the fibrosing endarteritis that eventually leads to tissue death so frequently found with this type of injury. Although the Three Mile Island episode of March 1979 created tremendous public concern, there were no radiation injuries. The contamination outside the reactor building and the release of radioiodine were negligible. The accidental fuel element meltdown at Chernobyl, USSR, resulted in many cases of acute radiation syndrome. More than 100,000 people were exposed to high levels of radioactive fallout. The general principles outlined here are applicable to accidents of that degree of severity.

  15. Radiation accidents.

    PubMed

    Saenger, E L

    1986-09-01

    It is essential that emergency physicians understand ways to manage patients contaminated by radioactive materials and/or exposed to external radiation sources. Contamination accidents require careful surveys to identify the metabolic pathway of the radionuclides to guide prognosis and treatment. The level of treatment required will depend on careful surveys and meticulous decontamination. There is no specific therapy for the acute radiation syndrome. Prophylactic antibodies are desirable. For severely exposed patients treatment is similar to the supportive care given to patients undergoing organ transplantation. For high-dose extremity injury, no methods have been developed to reverse the fibrosing endarteritis that eventually leads to tissue death so frequently found with this type of injury. Although the Three Mile Island episode of March 1979 created tremendous public concern, there were no radiation injuries. The contamination outside the reactor building and the release of radioiodine were negligible. The accidental fuel element meltdown at Chernobyl, USSR, resulted in many cases of acute radiation syndrome. More than 100,000 people were exposed to high levels of radioactive fallout. The general principles outlined here are applicable to accidents of that degree of severity. PMID:3526994

  16. 43 CFR 3822.2 - Compensation to surface rights holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compensation to surface rights holder... LAWS Lands Patented Under the Alaska Public Sale Act § 3822.2 Compensation to surface rights holder... be required to compensate the holder of the surface rights for any damages that may be caused to...

  17. 43 CFR 3822.2 - Compensation to surface rights holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compensation to surface rights holder... LAWS Lands Patented Under the Alaska Public Sale Act § 3822.2 Compensation to surface rights holder... be required to compensate the holder of the surface rights for any damages that may be caused to...

  18. 43 CFR 3822.2 - Compensation to surface rights holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compensation to surface rights holder... LAWS Lands Patented Under the Alaska Public Sale Act § 3822.2 Compensation to surface rights holder... be required to compensate the holder of the surface rights for any damages that may be caused to...

  19. 43 CFR 3822.2 - Compensation to surface rights holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compensation to surface rights holder... LAWS Lands Patented Under the Alaska Public Sale Act § 3822.2 Compensation to surface rights holder... be required to compensate the holder of the surface rights for any damages that may be caused to...

  20. 45 CFR 302.65 - Withholding of unemployment compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Withholding of unemployment compensation. 302.65... HUMAN SERVICES STATE PLAN REQUIREMENTS § 302.65 Withholding of unemployment compensation. The State plan... State agency charged with the administration of the State unemployment compensation laws in...

  1. 45 CFR 302.65 - Withholding of unemployment compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Withholding of unemployment compensation. 302.65... HUMAN SERVICES STATE PLAN REQUIREMENTS § 302.65 Withholding of unemployment compensation. The State plan... State agency charged with the administration of the State unemployment compensation laws in...

  2. 45 CFR 302.65 - Withholding of unemployment compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Withholding of unemployment compensation. 302.65... HUMAN SERVICES STATE PLAN REQUIREMENTS § 302.65 Withholding of unemployment compensation. The State plan... State agency charged with the administration of the State unemployment compensation laws in...

  3. 45 CFR 302.65 - Withholding of unemployment compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true Withholding of unemployment compensation. 302.65... HUMAN SERVICES STATE PLAN REQUIREMENTS § 302.65 Withholding of unemployment compensation. The State plan... State agency charged with the administration of the State unemployment compensation laws in...

  4. 45 CFR 302.65 - Withholding of unemployment compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Withholding of unemployment compensation. 302.65... HUMAN SERVICES STATE PLAN REQUIREMENTS § 302.65 Withholding of unemployment compensation. The State plan... State agency charged with the administration of the State unemployment compensation laws in...

  5. The impact of a 100% smoke-free law on the health of hospitality workers from the city of Neuquén, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Alderete, Mariela; Ruiz, Ernesto; Hasdeu, Santiago; Linetzky, Bruno; Ferrante, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of 100% smoke-free environment legislation on respiratory and sensory irritation symptoms and respiratory function among bar and restaurant workers from the city of Neuquén, Argentina. Methods Pre-ban and post-ban studies without a comparison group in an Argentinean city were conducted. A baseline survey and spirometric measurements were performed with a total of 80 bar and restaurant workers 1 month before (October 2007) and 3 months after (March 2008) the implementation of the new 100% smoke-free legislation. Results A significant reduction in secondhand smoke exposure was observed after the enactment and enforcement of the new legislation, and an important reduction in respiratory symptoms (from a pre-ban level of 57.5% to a post-ban level of only 28.8%). The reduction of sensory irritation symptoms was even higher. From 86.3% of workers who reported at least one sensory irritation symptom in October 2007, only 37.5% reported the same symptoms in March 2008. Also, data obtained by spirometry showed a significant forced vital capacity increase. Conclusions Consistent with other studies, 100% smoke-free legislation improved short-term health outcomes in the sample and should be implemented nationwide. Furthermore, undertaking this study has been highly important in promoting 100% smoke-free environment legislation at the workplace as a legitimate right of hospitality workers, and in reducing social acceptance of designated smoking areas in bars and restaurants. PMID:20378587

  6. [Diving accidents. Emergency treatment of serious diving accidents].

    PubMed

    Schröder, S; Lier, H; Wiese, S

    2004-11-01

    Decompression injuries are potentially life-threatening incidents mainly due to a rapid decline in ambient pressure. Decompression illness (DCI) results from the presence of gas bubbles in the blood and tissue. DCI may be classified as decompression sickness (DCS) generated from the liberation of gas bubbles following an oversaturation of tissues with inert gas and arterial gas embolism (AGE) mainly due to pulmonary barotrauma. People working under hyperbaric pressure, e.g. in a caisson for general construction under water, and scuba divers are exposed to certain risks. Diving accidents can be fatal and are often characterized by organ dysfunction, especially neurological deficits. They have become comparatively rare among professional divers and workers. However, since recreational scuba diving is gaining more and more popularity there is an increasing likelihood of severe diving accidents. Thus, emergency staff working close to areas with a high scuba diving activity, e.g. lakes or rivers, may be called more frequently to a scuba diving accident. The correct and professional emergency treatment on site, especially the immediate and continuous administration of normobaric oxygen, is decisive for the outcome of the accident victim. The definitive treatment includes rapid recompression with hyperbaric oxygen. The value of adjunctive medication, however, remains controversial.

  7. Economic Estimation of the Losses Caused by Surface Water Pollution Accidents in China From the Perspective of Water Bodies' Functions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong; You, Zhen; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-22

    The number of surface water pollution accidents (abbreviated as SWPAs) has increased substantially in China in recent years. Estimation of economic losses due to SWPAs has been one of the focuses in China and is mentioned many times in the Environmental Protection Law of China promulgated in 2014. From the perspective of water bodies' functions, pollution accident damages can be divided into eight types: damage to human health, water supply suspension, fishery, recreational functions, biological diversity, environmental property loss, the accident's origin and other indirect losses. In the valuation of damage to people's life, the procedure for compensation of traffic accidents in China was used. The functional replacement cost method was used in economic estimation of the losses due to water supply suspension and loss of water's recreational functions. Damage to biological diversity was estimated by recovery cost analysis and damage to environmental property losses were calculated using pollutant removal costs. As a case study, using the proposed calculation procedure the economic losses caused by the major Songhuajiang River pollution accident that happened in China in 2005 have been estimated at 2263 billion CNY. The estimated economic losses for real accidents can sometimes be influenced by social and political factors, such as data authenticity and accuracy. Besides, one or more aspects in the method might be overestimated, underrated or even ignored. The proposed procedure may be used by decision makers for the economic estimation of losses in SWPAs. Estimates of the economic losses of pollution accidents could help quantify potential costs associated with increased risk sources along lakes/rivers but more importantly, highlight the value of clean water to society as a whole.

  8. Seat Belt Use Among Adult Workers - 21 States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Boal, Winifred L; Li, Jia; Rodriguez-Acosta, Rosa L

    2016-06-17

    Roadway incidents involving motorized vehicles accounted for 24% of fatal occupational injuries in the United States during 2013 and were the leading cause of fatal injuries among workers.* In 2013, workers' compensation costs for serious, nonfatal injuries among work-related roadway incidents involving motorized land vehicles were estimated at $2.96 billion.(†) Seat belt use is a proven method to reduce injuries to motor vehicle occupants (1). Use of lap/shoulder seat belts reduces the risk for fatal injuries to front seat occupants of cars by 45% and the risk to light truck occupants by 60%.(§) To characterize seat belt use among adult workers by occupational group, CDC analyzed data from the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and found that not always using a seat belt was significantly associated with occupational group after controlling for factors known to influence seat belt use. Occupational groups with the highest prevalences of not always using a seat belt included construction and extraction; farming, fishing, and forestry; and installation, maintenance, and repair. To increase seat belt use among persons currently employed, states can enact and enforce primary seat belt laws, employers can set and enforce safety policies requiring seat belt use by all vehicle occupants, and seat belt safety advocates can target interventions to workers in occupational groups with lower reported seat belt use.

  9. Seat Belt Use Among Adult Workers - 21 States, 2013.

    PubMed

    Boal, Winifred L; Li, Jia; Rodriguez-Acosta, Rosa L

    2016-01-01

    Roadway incidents involving motorized vehicles accounted for 24% of fatal occupational injuries in the United States during 2013 and were the leading cause of fatal injuries among workers.* In 2013, workers' compensation costs for serious, nonfatal injuries among work-related roadway incidents involving motorized land vehicles were estimated at $2.96 billion.(†) Seat belt use is a proven method to reduce injuries to motor vehicle occupants (1). Use of lap/shoulder seat belts reduces the risk for fatal injuries to front seat occupants of cars by 45% and the risk to light truck occupants by 60%.(§) To characterize seat belt use among adult workers by occupational group, CDC analyzed data from the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and found that not always using a seat belt was significantly associated with occupational group after controlling for factors known to influence seat belt use. Occupational groups with the highest prevalences of not always using a seat belt included construction and extraction; farming, fishing, and forestry; and installation, maintenance, and repair. To increase seat belt use among persons currently employed, states can enact and enforce primary seat belt laws, employers can set and enforce safety policies requiring seat belt use by all vehicle occupants, and seat belt safety advocates can target interventions to workers in occupational groups with lower reported seat belt use. PMID:27309488

  10. Psychological Distress and Post-Traumatic Symptoms Following Occupational Accidents

    PubMed Central

    Ghisi, Marta; Novara, Caterina; Buodo, Giulia; Kimble, Matthew O.; Scozzari, Simona; Di Natale, Arianna; Sanavio, Ezio; Palomba, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder frequently occur as a consequence of occupational accidents. To date, research has been primarily focused on high-risk workers, such as police officers or firefighters, and has rarely considered individuals whose occupational environment involves the risk of severe, but not necessarily life-threatening, injury. Therefore, the present study was aimed at assessing the psychological consequences of accidents occurring in several occupational settings (e.g., construction and industry). Thirty-eight victims of occupational accidents (injured workers) and 38 gender-, age-, and years of education-matched workers who never experienced a work accident (control group) were recruited. All participants underwent a semi-structured interview administered by a trained psychologist, and then were requested to fill in the questionnaires. Injured workers reported more severe anxious, post-traumatic and depressive symptoms, and poorer coping skills, as compared to controls. In the injured group low levels of resilience predicted post-traumatic symptomatology, whereas the degree of physical injury and the length of time since the accident did not play a predictive role. The results suggest that occupational accidents may result in a disabling psychopathological condition, and that a brief psychological evaluation should be included in the assessment of seriously injured workers. PMID:25379258

  11. Psychological distress and post-traumatic symptoms following occupational accidents.

    PubMed

    Ghisi, Marta; Novara, Caterina; Buodo, Giulia; Kimble, Matthew O; Scozzari, Simona; Di Natale, Arianna; Sanavio, Ezio; Palomba, Daniela

    2013-12-01

    Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder frequently occur as a consequence of occupational accidents. To date, research has been primarily focused on high-risk workers, such as police officers or firefighters, and has rarely considered individuals whose occupational environment involves the risk of severe, but not necessarily life-threatening, injury. Therefore, the present study was aimed at assessing the psychological consequences of accidents occurring in several occupational settings (e.g., construction and industry). Thirty-eight victims of occupational accidents (injured workers) and 38 gender-, age-, and years of education-matched workers who never experienced a work accident (control group) were recruited. All participants underwent a semi-structured interview administered by a trained psychologist, and then were requested to fill in the questionnaires. Injured workers reported more severe anxious, post-traumatic and depressive symptoms, and poorer coping skills, as compared to controls. In the injured group low levels of resilience predicted post-traumatic symptomatology, whereas the degree of physical injury and the length of time since the accident did not play a predictive role. The results suggest that occupational accidents may result in a disabling psychopathological condition, and that a brief psychological evaluation should be included in the assessment of seriously injured workers.

  12. Psychological distress and post-traumatic symptoms following occupational accidents.

    PubMed

    Ghisi, Marta; Novara, Caterina; Buodo, Giulia; Kimble, Matthew O; Scozzari, Simona; Di Natale, Arianna; Sanavio, Ezio; Palomba, Daniela

    2013-12-01

    Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder frequently occur as a consequence of occupational accidents. To date, research has been primarily focused on high-risk workers, such as police officers or firefighters, and has rarely considered individuals whose occupational environment involves the risk of severe, but not necessarily life-threatening, injury. Therefore, the present study was aimed at assessing the psychological consequences of accidents occurring in several occupational settings (e.g., construction and industry). Thirty-eight victims of occupational accidents (injured workers) and 38 gender-, age-, and years of education-matched workers who never experienced a work accident (control group) were recruited. All participants underwent a semi-structured interview administered by a trained psychologist, and then were requested to fill in the questionnaires. Injured workers reported more severe anxious, post-traumatic and depressive symptoms, and poorer coping skills, as compared to controls. In the injured group low levels of resilience predicted post-traumatic symptomatology, whereas the degree of physical injury and the length of time since the accident did not play a predictive role. The results suggest that occupational accidents may result in a disabling psychopathological condition, and that a brief psychological evaluation should be included in the assessment of seriously injured workers. PMID:25379258

  13. Prior History of Back Pain in Patients with Compensable and Non-Compensable Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellecchia, Geraldine L.

    1993-01-01

    Data were collected retrospectively from insurance information forms and histories of 111 patients (ages 14-84) referred to physical therapy for evaluation of back and/or neck pain. Analysis indicated that patients with compensable (work-related or motor vehicle accident) injuries infrequently acknowledged prior episodes of back or neck pain. (JDD)

  14. On-site worker-risk calculations using MACCS

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, V.L.

    1993-05-01

    We have revised the latest version of MACCS for use with the calculation of doses and health risks to on-site workers for postulated accidents at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Colorado. The modifications fall into two areas: (1) an improved estimate of shielding offered by buildings to workers that remain indoors; and, (2) an improved treatment of building-wake effects, which affects both indoor and outdoor workers. Because the postulated accident can be anywhere on plant site, user-friendly software has been developed to create those portions of the (revised) MACCS input data files that are specific to the accident site.

  15. 20 CFR 701.401 - Coverage under state compensation programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Coverage under state compensation programs. 701.401 Section 701.401 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF... decision denying coverage on jurisdictional grounds must be made before coverage or benefits under the...

  16. 20 CFR 701.401 - Coverage under state compensation programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coverage under state compensation programs. 701.401 Section 701.401 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF... decision denying coverage on jurisdictional grounds must be made before coverage or benefits under the...

  17. The Determinants of Hiring Older Workers: Evidence from Hong Kong.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heywood, John S.; Ho, Lok-Sang; Wei, Xiangdong

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 770 Hong Kong firms showed that, in a developed economy with little government intervention, many companies employed older workers but were not hiring new ones. Firms were more likely to invest in training when workers were young. Delayed compensation was more acceptable to younger workers. (SK)

  18. 38 CFR 8.4 - Deduction of insurance premiums from compensation, retirement pay, or pension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... compensation, death compensation, dependency and indemnity compensation, retirement pay, disability pension, or death pension that may be due and payable to him under any laws administered by the Department of... similar awards may have been approved. (b) The monthly disability compensation, death...

  19. 20 CFR 10.731 - What is the pay rate of Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders for compensation purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true What is the pay rate of Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders for compensation purposes? 10.731 Section 10.731 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE FEDERAL...

  20. 20 CFR 10.731 - What is the pay rate of Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders for compensation purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What is the pay rate of Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders for compensation purposes? 10.731 Section 10.731 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE FEDERAL...

  1. 20 CFR 10.731 - What is the pay rate of Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders for compensation purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is the pay rate of Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders for compensation purposes? 10.731 Section 10.731 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE FEDERAL...

  2. 20 CFR 10.731 - What is the pay rate of Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders for compensation purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true What is the pay rate of Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders for compensation purposes? 10.731 Section 10.731 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE FEDERAL...

  3. 20 CFR 10.731 - What is the pay rate of Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders for compensation purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the pay rate of Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders for compensation purposes? 10.731 Section 10.731 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE FEDERAL...

  4. INDUSTRIAL INJURIES OF FARM WORKERS

    PubMed Central

    LaTourette, Donald P.

    1957-01-01

    Most industrial employees receive physical examinations to evaluate their physical fitness in relation to their work. The farm worker is neglected in this matter, in that he is hired for almost any type of work without physical evaluation. As a result, his accident rate is high. His efficiency at his work is low. His time loss from work because of sickness and accident is high, and the employer pays a very high rate of insurance for the patient's care and his own legal protection. Physical fitness cards should be carried by all farm laborers so that they would be put in properly graded jobs. PMID:13460719

  5. 36 CFR 9.46 - Accidents and fires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MINERALS MANAGEMENT Non-Federal Oil and Gas Rights § 9.46 Accidents and fires. The operator shall take... outlined in 36 CFR 2.17, but does not relieve persons from the responsibility of making any other accident reports which may be required under State or local laws....

  6. 32 CFR 634.29 - Traffic accident investigation reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Traffic accident investigation reports. 634.29... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Traffic Supervision § 634.29 Traffic... records. Installation law enforcement officials will record traffic accident investigations on...

  7. [Factors associated with work-related accidents in the informal commercial sector].

    PubMed

    Rios, Marcela Andrade; Nery, Adriana Alves; Rios, Polianna Alves Andrade; Casotti, Cezar Augusto; Cardoso, Jefferson Paixão

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to estimate the incidence of non-fatal work-related accidents in the informal commercial sector and analyze associated socio-demographic, occupational, workplace, and health factors, in a cross-sectional survey of 434 workers in the business district of Jequié, Bahia State, Brazil, in 2013. Logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with accidents. Incidence of accidents in the previous 12 months was estimated at 32.3%, and multivariate analysis showed higher odds of accidents in male sex workers (OR = 1.61), young individuals (OR = 4.62), meat or poultry workers (OR = 9.55), and workers performing heavy physical work (OR = 1.71). The results show the need for public policies to prevent accidents in the informal commercial sector.

  8. [Factors associated with work-related accidents in the informal commercial sector].

    PubMed

    Rios, Marcela Andrade; Nery, Adriana Alves; Rios, Polianna Alves Andrade; Casotti, Cezar Augusto; Cardoso, Jefferson Paixão

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to estimate the incidence of non-fatal work-related accidents in the informal commercial sector and analyze associated socio-demographic, occupational, workplace, and health factors, in a cross-sectional survey of 434 workers in the business district of Jequié, Bahia State, Brazil, in 2013. Logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with accidents. Incidence of accidents in the previous 12 months was estimated at 32.3%, and multivariate analysis showed higher odds of accidents in male sex workers (OR = 1.61), young individuals (OR = 4.62), meat or poultry workers (OR = 9.55), and workers performing heavy physical work (OR = 1.71). The results show the need for public policies to prevent accidents in the informal commercial sector. PMID:26200368

  9. Economic Estimation of the Losses Caused by Surface Water Pollution Accidents in China From the Perspective of Water Bodies’ Functions

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hong; You, Zhen; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    The number of surface water pollution accidents (abbreviated as SWPAs) has increased substantially in China in recent years. Estimation of economic losses due to SWPAs has been one of the focuses in China and is mentioned many times in the Environmental Protection Law of China promulgated in 2014. From the perspective of water bodies’ functions, pollution accident damages can be divided into eight types: damage to human health, water supply suspension, fishery, recreational functions, biological diversity, environmental property loss, the accident’s origin and other indirect losses. In the valuation of damage to people’s life, the procedure for compensation of traffic accidents in China was used. The functional replacement cost method was used in economic estimation of the losses due to water supply suspension and loss of water’s recreational functions. Damage to biological diversity was estimated by recovery cost analysis and damage to environmental property losses were calculated using pollutant removal costs. As a case study, using the proposed calculation procedure the economic losses caused by the major Songhuajiang River pollution accident that happened in China in 2005 have been estimated at 2263 billion CNY. The estimated economic losses for real accidents can sometimes be influenced by social and political factors, such as data authenticity and accuracy. Besides, one or more aspects in the method might be overestimated, underrated or even ignored. The proposed procedure may be used by decision makers for the economic estimation of losses in SWPAs. Estimates of the economic losses of pollution accidents could help quantify potential costs associated with increased risk sources along lakes/rivers but more importantly, highlight the value of clean water to society as a whole. PMID:26805869

  10. Reactive power compensating system

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1987-01-01

    The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

  11. World commercial aircraft accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, C.Y.

    1993-01-01

    This report is a compilation of all accidents world-wide involving aircraft in commercial service which resulted in the loss of the airframe or one or more fatality, or both. This information has been gathered in order to present a complete inventory of commercial aircraft accidents. Events involving military action, sabotage, terrorist bombings, hijackings, suicides, and industrial ground accidents are included within this list. Included are: accidents involving world commercial jet aircraft, world commercial turboprop aircraft, world commercial pistonprop aircraft with four or more engines and world commercial pistonprop aircraft with two or three engines from 1946 to 1992. Each accident is presented with information in the following categories: date of the accident, airline and its flight numbers, type of flight, type of aircraft, aircraft registration number, construction number/manufacturers serial number, aircraft damage, accident flight phase, accident location, number of fatalities, number of occupants, cause, remarks, or description (brief) of the accident, and finally references used. The sixth chapter presents a summary of the world commercial aircraft accidents by major aircraft class (e.g. jet, turboprop, and pistonprop) and by flight phase. The seventh chapter presents several special studies including a list of world commercial aircraft accidents for all aircraft types with 100 or more fatalities in order of decreasing number of fatalities, a list of collision accidents involving commercial aircrafts, and a list of world commercial aircraft accidents for all aircraft types involving military action, sabotage, terrorist bombings, and hijackings.

  12. 20 CFR 703.502 - Same; employer operating temporarily in another compensation district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Same; employer operating temporarily in another compensation district. 703.502 Section 703.502 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... in another compensation district. A district director receiving a report of the issuance of a...

  13. 20 CFR 703.502 - Same; employer operating temporarily in another compensation district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Same; employer operating temporarily in another compensation district. 703.502 Section 703.502 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... in another compensation district. A district director receiving a report of the issuance of a...

  14. 20 CFR 703.502 - Same; employer operating temporarily in another compensation district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Same; employer operating temporarily in another compensation district. 703.502 Section 703.502 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... in another compensation district. A district director receiving a report of the issuance of a...

  15. 20 CFR 703.502 - Same; employer operating temporarily in another compensation district.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Same; employer operating temporarily in another compensation district. 703.502 Section 703.502 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... in another compensation district. A district director receiving a report of the issuance of a...

  16. 78 FR 40513 - Division of Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation; Proposed Extension of Existing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... of Workers' Compensation Programs Division of Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation...: Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Forms (Forms EE-1, EE-2, EE-3, EE-4, EE-7... agency ] responsible for the administration of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness...

  17. Designing an Experimental "Accident"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picker, Lester

    1974-01-01

    Describes an experimental "accident" that resulted in much student learning, seeks help in the identification of nematodes, and suggests biology teachers introduce similar accidents into their teaching to stimulate student interest. (PEB)

  18. Clandestine migrant workers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, T

    1992-01-01

    The author assesses the problem of illegal labor migration to Japan. "Labor policies, regulations, types of immigration violations, and the role of the recruitment industry are described. Most of the estimated 200,000 illegal workers are employed in small and medium sized enterprises, especially construction and manufacturing, which pay them wages well below the normal rate. A key issue is the infringement of human rights of these illegal workers, who lack the protection of labor laws and the social security system."

  19. [Assumption of medical risks and the problem of medical liability in ancient Roman law].

    PubMed

    Váradi, Agnes

    2008-11-01

    The claim of an individual to assure his health and life, to assume and compensate the damage from diseases and accidents, had already appeared in the system of the ancient Roman law in the form of many singular legal institutions. In lack of a unified archetype of regulation, we have to analyse the damages caused in the health or corporal integrity of different personal groups: we have to mention the legal interpretation of the diseases or injuries suffered by serves, people under manus or patria potestas and free Roman citizens. The fragments from the Digest od Justinian do not only demonstrate concrete legal problems, but they can serve as a starting point for further theoretical analyses. For example: if death is the consequence of a medical failure, does the doctor have any kind of liability? Was after-care part of the healing process according to the Roman law? Examining these questions, we should not forget to talk about the complex liability system of the Roman law, the compensation of the damages caused in a contractual or delictual context and about the lex Aquilia. Although these conclusions have no direct relation with the present legal regulation of risk assumption, we have to see that analysing the examples of the Roman law can be useful for developing our view of a certain theoretical problem, like that of the modern liability concept in medicine as well.

  20. The Norwegian system of compensation to patients.

    PubMed

    Jørstad, Rolf Gunnar

    2002-01-01

    In Norway we have come to the conclusion that a traditional compensation law based on negligence is not the right "tool" for handling difficult questions as to whether or not a patient shall get compensation if required after medical treatment or other forms of contact with the medical profession. The compensation scheme established in 1988 involving the public sector of the Norwegian health care system has received almost 18000 claims since Jan 1 1988, and has paid out more than 1.2 billion NOK (137 million US$) in compensation during these years. At the same time, the number of compensation claims brought before the courts has decreased. After 13 years of a provisional scheme dealing with patient injury compensation based on no-fault rules, we find that compensation claims indeed can be handled without focus on blame and negligence, and that this ensures both that the patients get equitable compensation and that unnecessary legal procedures are avoided. The system also has had a favourable impact on interaction within the health care sector and upon relationships between health care personnel and patients.

  1. Compensating differentials, labor market segmentation, and wage inequality.

    PubMed

    Daw, Jonathan; Hardie, Jessica Halliday

    2012-09-01

    Two literatures on work and the labor market draw attention to the importance of non-pecuniary job amenities. Social psychological perspectives on work suggest that workers have preferences for a range of job amenities (e.g. Halaby, 2003). The compensating differentials hypothesis predicts that workers navigate tradeoffs among different job amenities such that wage inequality overstates inequality in utility (Smith, 1979). This paper joins these perspectives by constructing a new measure of labor market success that evaluates the degree to which workers' job amenity preferences and outcomes match. This measure of subjective success is used to predict workers' job satisfaction and to test the hypothesis that some degree of labor force inequality in wages is due to preference-based tradeoffs among all job amenities. Findings demonstrate that the new measure predicts workers' job satisfaction and provides evidence for the presence of compensating differentials in the primary and intermediate, but not secondary, labor markets.

  2. 1976 Hanford americium-exposure incident: accident description

    SciTech Connect

    McMurray, B J

    1982-01-01

    An accident is described, involving the explosion of an ion-exchange column containing about 100 g of /sup 241/Am. A chemical operator was injured in this accident, receiving acid burns and superficial cuts on the upper part of his body. From 1 to 5 curies of /sup 241/Am is estimated to have been deposited on the injured worker and on his clothing.

  3. ANS severe accident program overview & planning document

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1995-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) severe accident document was developed to provide a concise and coherent mechanism for presenting the ANS SAP goals, a strategy satisfying these goals, a succinct summary of the work done to date, and what needs to be done in the future to ensure timely licensability. Guidance was received from various bodies [viz., panel members of the ANS severe accident workshop and safety review committee, Department of Energy (DOE) orders, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements for ALWRs and advanced reactors, ACRS comments, world-wide trends] were utilized to set up the ANS-relevant SAS goals and strategy. An in-containment worker protection goal was also set up to account for the routine experimenters and other workers within containment. The strategy for achieving the goals is centered upon closing the severe accident issues that have the potential for becoming certification issues when assessed against realistic bounding events. Realistic bounding events are defined as events with an occurrency frequency greater than 10{sup {minus}6}/y. Currently, based upon the level-1 probabilistic risk assessment studies, the realistic bounding events for application for issue closure are flow blockage of fuel element coolant channels, and rapid depressurization-related accidents.

  4. Compensation Review Analyst

    SciTech Connect

    2003-06-03

    COMPERA is a decision support system designed to facilitate the compensation review process. With parameters provided by the user(s), the system generates recommendations for base increases and nonbase compensation that strives to align total compensation with performance compensation targets. The user(s) prescribe(s) compensation targets according to performance (or value of contribution) designators. These targets are presented in look-up tables, which are then used by embedded formulas in the worksheet to determine the recommended compensation for each individual.

  5. Compensation Review Analyst

    2003-06-03

    COMPERA is a decision support system designed to facilitate the compensation review process. With parameters provided by the user(s), the system generates recommendations for base increases and nonbase compensation that strives to align total compensation with performance compensation targets. The user(s) prescribe(s) compensation targets according to performance (or value of contribution) designators. These targets are presented in look-up tables, which are then used by embedded formulas in the worksheet to determine the recommended compensation formore » each individual.« less

  6. Worker Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yiziang, Zeng; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes worker education in China as an important part of the national educational plan and an indispensible foundation for the work of developing enterprisers. Basic tasks are the development of the mind, preparation of specialists, improving workers, and modernization of socialist enterprises. (JOW)

  7. Risk-based Analysis of Construction Accidents in Iran During 2007-2011-Meta Analyze Study

    PubMed Central

    AMIRI, Mehran; ARDESHIR, Abdollah; FAZEL ZARANDI, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background The present study aimed to investigate the characteristics of occupational accidents and frequency and severity of work related accidents in the construction industry among Iranian insured workers during the years 20072011. Methods The Iranian Social Security Organization (ISSO) accident database containing 21,864 cases between the years 2007-2011 was applied in this study. In the next step, Total Accident Rate (TRA), Total Severity Index (TSI), and Risk Factor (RF) were defined. The core of this work is devoted to analyzing the data from different perspectives such as age of workers, occupation and construction phase, day of the week, time of the day, seasonal analysis, regional considerations, type of accident, and body parts affected. Results Workers between 15-19 years old (TAR=13.4%) are almost six times more exposed to risk of accident than the average of all ages (TAR=2.51%). Laborers and structural workers (TAR=66.6%) and those working at heights (TAR=47.2%) experience more accidents than other groups of workers. Moreover, older workers over 65 years old (TSI=1.97%> average TSI=1.60%), work supervisors (TSI=12.20% >average TSI=9.09%), and night shift workers (TSI=1.89% >average TSI=1.47%) are more prone to severe accidents. Conclusion It is recommended that laborers, young workers, weekend and night shift workers be supervised more carefully in the workplace. Use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) should be compulsory in working environments, and special attention should be undertaken to people working outdoors and at heights. It is also suggested that policymakers pay more attention to the improvement of safety conditions in deprived and cold western regions. PMID:26005662

  8. Sleep apnea and occupational accidents: Are oral appliances the solution?

    PubMed Central

    Rabelo Guimarães, Maria De Lourdes; Hermont, Ana Paula

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental practitioners have a key role in the quality of life and prevention of occupational accidents of workers with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS). Aim: The aim of this study was to review the impact of OSAS, the Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) therapy, and the evidence regarding the use of oral appliances (OA) on the health and safety of workers. Materials and Methods: Searches were conducted in MEDLINE (PubMed), Lilacs and Sci ELO. Articles published from January 1980 to June 2014 were included. Results: The research retrieved 2188 articles and 99 met the inclusion criteria. An increase in occupational accidents due to reduced vigilance and attention in snorers and patients with OSAS was observed. Such involvements were related to excessive daytime sleepiness and neurocognitive function impairments. The use of OA are less effective when compared with CPAP, but the results related to excessive sleepiness and cognitive performance showed improvements similar to CPAP. Treatments with OA showed greater patient compliance than the CPAP therapy. Conclusion: OSAS is a prevalent disorder among workers, leads to increased risk of occupational accidents, and has a significant impact on the economy. The CPAP therapy reduces the risk of occupational accidents. The OA can improve the work performance; but there is no scientific evidence associating its use with occupational accidents reduction. Future research should focus on determining the cost-effectiveness of OA as well as its influence and efficacy in preventing occupational accidents. PMID:25568596

  9. Visualization of Traffic Accidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jie; Shen, Yuzhong; Khattak, Asad

    2010-01-01

    Traffic accidents have tremendous impact on society. Annually approximately 6.4 million vehicle accidents are reported by police in the US and nearly half of them result in catastrophic injuries. Visualizations of traffic accidents using geographic information systems (GIS) greatly facilitate handling and analysis of traffic accidents in many aspects. Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), Inc. is the world leader in GIS research and development. ArcGIS, a software package developed by ESRI, has the capabilities to display events associated with a road network, such as accident locations, and pavement quality. But when event locations related to a road network are processed, the existing algorithm used by ArcGIS does not utilize all the information related to the routes of the road network and produces erroneous visualization results of event locations. This software bug causes serious problems for applications in which accurate location information is critical for emergency responses, such as traffic accidents. This paper aims to address this problem and proposes an improved method that utilizes all relevant information of traffic accidents, namely, route number, direction, and mile post, and extracts correct event locations for accurate traffic accident visualization and analysis. The proposed method generates a new shape file for traffic accidents and displays them on top of the existing road network in ArcGIS. Visualization of traffic accidents along Hampton Roads Bridge Tunnel is included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Development of Database for Accident Analysis in Indian Mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Debi Prasad; Guru Raghavendra Reddy, K.

    2015-08-01

    Mining is a hazardous industry and high accident rates associated with underground mining is a cause of deep concern. Technological developments notwithstanding, rate of fatal accidents and reportable incidents have not shown corresponding levels of decline. This paper argues that adoption of appropriate safety standards by both mine management and the government may result in appreciable reduction in accident frequency. This can be achieved by using the technology in improving the working conditions, sensitising workers and managers about causes and prevention of accidents. Inputs required for a detailed analysis of an accident include information on location, time, type, cost of accident, victim, nature of injury, personal and environmental factors etc. Such information can be generated from data available in the standard coded accident report form. This paper presents a web based application for accident analysis in Indian mines during 2001-2013. An accident database (SafeStat) prototype based on Intranet of the TCP/IP agreement, as developed by the authors, is also discussed.

  11. The role of insurance in the prevention of work-related accidents in France in the first half of the 20th century.

    PubMed

    Ruffat, M

    1998-01-01

    Insurance has played a role in the develoment of prevention of work-related accidents in several ways in France since the industrical revolution. The first attempts at prevention were taken at the initiative of manufacturers' associations, but it remained a matter of goodwill for manufacturers. The 1898 law gave systematic, if partial, financial responsability for occupational hazards to employers, who turned to insurance companies to carry the risks. As a result a new branch of insurance (assurance-loi) appeared, which accounted for 40% of general accident revenue for companies at the time of World War II. But the new law made no mention of prevention and even had a negative impact, since compensation was taken care of by insurance. However, after World War I, insurance companies created an association for the prevention of work-related accidents and illnesses and started to adjust rates according to the prevention efforts of corporations. When social insurance was generalized in 1946, insurance of occupational hazards went under state control and became compulsory. But the experience accumulated in the field of prevention by insurance companies was put to use in this new context, both on the technical side and the financial side.

  12. Quality of life among Thai workers in textile dyeing factories.

    PubMed

    Kittipichai, Wirin; Arsa, Rattanaporn; Jirapongsuwan, Ann; Singhakant, Chatchawal

    2014-11-30

    The purpose of a cross-sectional study was to investigate factors influencing the quality of life among Thai workers in textile dyeing factories. Samples included 205 Thai workers from five textile dyeing factories located in the suburban area of Bangkok in Thailand. Data were collected with a self-administered questionnaire. Scales of the questionnaire had reliability coefficients ranging from 0.70-0.91. The results revealed that the overall quality of life among workers was most likely between good and moderate levels, and the percentage-mean score was 74.77. The seven factors associated with the overall quality of life were co-worker relationships, safety at work in the dimension of accident prevention, job characteristics, supervisory relationships, welfares, marital status, and physical environment. Furthermore, co-worker relationships, accident prevention, and marital status were three considerable predictors accounted for 23% of the variance in the overall quality of life among workers in textile dyeing factories.

  13. Statutory Compensation for the Wrongly Imprisoned.

    PubMed

    Simms, Tina

    2016-04-01

    This article provides an overview of the unique challenges faced by men and women who have been wrongly convicted, imprisoned, and subsequently exonerated, and discusses the relevance of social work to exoneration. The ways in which exonerees can seek compensation are described, and state compensation statutes are examined, delineating monetary and reentry support provisions. Currently, 30 states and the District of Columbia have compensation statutes. Monetary and reentry support provisions vary greatly by state, with few providing both. The wrongly imprisoned experience the same effects of incarceration as other prisoners; their psychological trauma, however, is exacerbated by the fact that they are innocent. Furthermore, upon release, exonerees have fewer reentry supports available to them compared with prisoners released on parole. This article supports the position that the state has a responsibility to provide adequate compensation, monetarily and servicewise, to the wrongly imprisoned, and that compensation by statutory means should be standard in every state. This article also highlights how social workers are uniquely qualified to provide immediate and long-term social and mental health services to exonerees, as well as to advocate for comprehensive exoneree compensation through state statutes.

  14. [Workplace accomodations for two workers with narcolepsy].

    PubMed

    Vico Garcerán, Belén; Monzó Salas, Monserrat; Cuenca Esteve, Francisco; Luis Domingo, José

    2013-01-01

    We describe the case of two workers evaluated in our occupational health unit. The first worker was a kitchen aide; the second was a primary care physician. Both had been diagnosed with narcolepsy and had obvious disability.We assessed occupational hazards related to their jobs, analysed their tasks, and performed medical examinations. Afterwards, we offered recommendations to the patients, consisting of avoidance of situations involving a risk of work accidents and improving their sleep habits. Narcolepsy is a rare disorder, but it has important social and occupational consequences. A better understanding of the disease and some work accommodations can help improve the quality of life of affected workers. PMID:23700708

  15. 20 CFR 10.509 - If an employee's light-duty job is eliminated due to downsizing, what is the effect on compensation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Federal Government or in any well-known branch of the general labor market. Return to Work—Employee's... OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT...

  16. 20 CFR 10.509 - If an employee's light-duty job is eliminated due to downsizing, what is the effect on compensation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Federal Government or in any well-known branch of the general labor market. Return to Work—Employee's... OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT...

  17. [Analisys of work-related accidents and incidents in an oil refinery in Rio de Janeiro].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Carlos Augusto Vaz; de Freitas, Carlos Machado

    2003-01-01

    Accidents in the chemical industry can have serious consequences for workers, communities, and the environment and are thus highly relevant to public health. This article is the result of an occupational surveillance project involving several public institutions. We analyze 800 work-related accidents that resulted in injuries, environmental damage, or loss of production in 1997 in an oil refinery located in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The methodology was based on managerial and organizational approaches to accident investigation, with the European Union reporting system as the reference. The results highlight various limitations in the process of reporting and investigating accidents, as well as a certain hierarchy of accidents, with more attention given to accidents involving loss of production and less to those resulting in injuries, particularly among outsourced workers. PMID:14666211

  18. Laser accidents: Being Prepared

    SciTech Connect

    Barat, K

    2003-01-24

    The goal of the Laser Safety Officer and any laser safety program is to prevent a laser accident from occurring, in particular an injury to a person's eyes. Most laser safety courses talk about laser accidents, causes, and types of injury. The purpose of this presentation is to present a plan for safety offices and users to follow in case of accident or injury from laser radiation.

  19. [Accidents and their health effects in firemen of rescue and firefighting teams].

    PubMed

    Szubert, Z; Sobala, W

    2000-01-01

    Accidents, traumas and poisoning are the most frequent causes of health impairments among firemen, determined by the nature of their occupation. Their work is directly related with the exposure to various harmful chemical and physical factors, involving at the same time mental stress during rescue and firefighting actions. The aim of the analysis performed was to determine the accident rate, range and causes of accident-related absenteeism among firemen of the rescue and firefighting brigades, as well as to indicate major traumas resulting from accidents at work. The study was carried out in a group of 1503 firemen (7% of the total number of firemen in Poland) employed in the rescue and firefighting brigades, selected at random throughout the country. Workers' personal data, as well as the data on the number of accidents and the number of days of work disability during the years 1994-97 were analysed. Accidents and accident-related absenteeism by age, certified causes and sites (body parts) of traumas were also analysed using the following parameters: the accident rate (the number of accidents per 1000 workers), accident severity rate (the number of work disability days per one accident), and absenteeism rate (the number of accident-related work disability days per 100 employed). In the period under study (1994-97) 352 accidents, involving 301 persons were registered. Thus, the accident rate was 70.3. These accidents were responsible for the period of work disability three times higher (293.5 days/100 workers) than that observed in the male population employed in the national economy, and eight times higher (770.2 days/100 workers) in the 50-59 age group. Dislocations and distortions were the most frequent causes of accident-related absenteeism--48, whereas fractures occupied the second place--25%. Burns were classified among the most severe injuries, resulting in more than 90 days of absenteeism annually, but they made only 7% of absenteeism with frequency rate of

  20. [Psychosocial aspects and accidents in land transport].

    PubMed

    Morales-Soto, Nelson; Alfaro-Basso, Daniel; Gálvez-Rivero, Wilfredo

    2010-06-01

    Road traffic accidents are a public health problem in Peru, having caused 35 596 deaths in Peru between 1998 and 2008. Lima is the most affected region, presenting 61.7% of the accidents, the annual cost reached one thousand million dollars, equivalent to a third part of the investment in health. Available studies give emphasis to the protagonists--the drivers, the pedestrians--or to equipment and roads; the laws have been modified and containment plans for accidents have been implemented, but the incidence remains the same. We raise the possibility of exploring behavioral and social factors that could be relevant in the genesis of the problem, revising those related to current disorder in transport, the behaviors of drivers and pedestrians and the permissiveness of society in general particularly of the authority. We propose research and a multidisciplinary and intersectoral intervention. PMID:21072481

  1. Compensability of, and legal issues related to, coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Haley, Luann

    2007-09-01

    Legal issues that may develop when treating patients with coccidioidomycosis include allegations of medical malpractice, claims for workers' compensation benefits, and civil actions against business owners. In states where the disease is most prevalent, California recognizes cocci diodomycosis as a compensable condition, although Arizona does not. In civil actions, the state courts have not imposed liability on any business or institution for those that claim to have developed cocci diodomycosis on or near the premises of the business.

  2. Compensator configurations for load currents' symmetrization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusinaru, D.; Manescu, L. G.; Dinu, R. C.

    2016-02-01

    This paper approaches aspects regarding the mitigation effects of asymmetries in 3-phase 3-wire networks. The measure consisting in connecting of load current symmetrization devices at the load coupling point is presented. A time-variation of compensators parameters is determined as a function of the time-recorded electrical values. The general sizing principle of the load current symmetrization reactive components is based on a simple equivalent model of the unbalanced 3-phase loads. By using these compensators a certain control of the power components transits is ensured in the network. The control is based on the variations laws of the compensators parameters as functions of the recorded electrical values: [B] = [T]·[M]. The link between compensator parameters and measured values is ensured by a transformation matrix [T] for each operation conditions of the supply network. Additional conditions for improving of energy and efficiency performance of the compensator are considered: i.e. reactive power compensation. The compensator sizing algorithm was implemented into a MATLAB environment software, which generate the time-evolution of the parameters of load current symmetrization device. The input data of application takes into account time-recording of the electrical values. By using the compensator sizing software, some results were achieved for the case of a consumer connected at 20 kV busbar of a distribution substation, during 24 hours measurement session. Even the sizing of the compensators aimed some additional network operation aspects (power factor correction) correlated with the total or major load symmetrizations, the harmonics aspects of the network values were neglected.

  3. Woodworking injuries: a comparative study of work-related and hobby-related accidents.

    PubMed

    Loisel, F; Bonin, S; Jeunet, L; Pauchot, J; Tropet, Y; Obert, L

    2014-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to describe the injury characteristics and demographics of patients injured during woodworking activities, upon their arrival to the emergency department in a regional of France where this industry is prevalent. The secondary objective was to compare patient and injury characteristics for work-related and hobby-related accidents. A cohort of 87 patients who had suffered a woodworking accident over a two-year period was evaluated; 79 were available for follow-up. The context and circumstances of the accident, nature and location of the injuries and patient demographics were recorded. Hobby-related accidents accounted for two-thirds of the accidents (51/79). Most of the injured workers were either loggers (35%) or carpenters (46%). The hand was injured in 53 cases (67%). Work-related accidents resulted in significantly more serious consequences in terms of hospital stay, work stoppage, resumption of work or retraining than hobby-related accidents. For the workplace accidents, 86% occurred on new machines; more than 25% of the machines involved in accidents at home were over 15 years. Sixty-eight per cent of workers were wearing their safety gear, while only 31% of those injured during recreational woodworking wore the appropriate gear. Several elements of prevention should be improved: information about the need to maintain the equipment, protect the worker with suitable clothing, and learn which maneuvers are considered hazardous. Safety gear should be regularly inspected in the workplace.

  4. Epidemiology of Accidents in Tile Factories of Mangalore City in Karnataka

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S Ganesh; Rathnakar, UP; Harsha Kumar, HN

    2010-01-01

    Background: Occupational accidents are a major point of concern in industries. The academic community should take the first step to address the long-neglected concerns of occupational safety. Objective: To assess the prevalence and pattern of occupational accidents. Materials and Methods: A record-based, cross-sectional study was done in three tile factories of Mangalore city, in Karnataka. A total of 416 workers were analyzed for the year 2004, and data regarding age, sex, job duration, type and nature of injury, body parts involved, and time of injury were collected in a prestructured proforma. Statistical Analysis: Proportions, Chi-square test, Univariate and Multivariate analysis. Results: The overall prevalence rate of accidents was found to be 18.5%. It was found that almost around 86% of the accidents had affected the limbs (upper limb 24.7%, lower limb 61%), around half (52%) of the injuries were contributed by superficial injuries, 40% of accidents were due to stepping/striking against objects and while handling. Hand tools and machinery in motion contributed to around 20% of the accidents. Accidents were more common among the younger age group and less-experienced workers. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that the age group of 30-39 years had an independent significant association with accidents (OR = 0.21, P = 0.04). Conclusion: Accidents in tile industries are an important occupational health problem in this area of the country. There is a need for proper safety training of the workers. PMID:20606926

  5. 20 CFR 61.400 - Custody of records relating to claims under the War Hazards Compensation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the War Hazards Compensation Act. 61.400 Section 61.400 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS... EMPLOYEES OF CONTRACTORS WITH THE UNITED STATES CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE WAR HAZARDS COMPENSATION ACT, AS AMENDED Miscellaneous Provisions § 61.400 Custody of records relating to claims under the...

  6. 20 CFR 61.400 - Custody of records relating to claims under the War Hazards Compensation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the War Hazards Compensation Act. 61.400 Section 61.400 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS... EMPLOYEES OF CONTRACTORS WITH THE UNITED STATES CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE WAR HAZARDS COMPENSATION ACT, AS AMENDED Miscellaneous Provisions § 61.400 Custody of records relating to claims under the...

  7. 20 CFR 61.400 - Custody of records relating to claims under the War Hazards Compensation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the War Hazards Compensation Act. 61.400 Section 61.400 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS... EMPLOYEES OF CONTRACTORS WITH THE UNITED STATES CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE WAR HAZARDS COMPENSATION ACT, AS AMENDED Miscellaneous Provisions § 61.400 Custody of records relating to claims under the...

  8. 20 CFR 61.400 - Custody of records relating to claims under the War Hazards Compensation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the War Hazards Compensation Act. 61.400 Section 61.400 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS... EMPLOYEES OF CONTRACTORS WITH THE UNITED STATES CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE WAR HAZARDS COMPENSATION ACT, AS AMENDED Miscellaneous Provisions § 61.400 Custody of records relating to claims under the...

  9. 20 CFR 61.400 - Custody of records relating to claims under the War Hazards Compensation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the War Hazards Compensation Act. 61.400 Section 61.400 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS... EMPLOYEES OF CONTRACTORS WITH THE UNITED STATES CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE WAR HAZARDS COMPENSATION ACT, AS AMENDED Miscellaneous Provisions § 61.400 Custody of records relating to claims under the...

  10. 20 CFR 30.626 - How will OWCP coordinate compensation payable under Part E of EEOICPA with benefits from state...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES... reduced will consist of any unpaid monetary payments payable in the future and medical benefits payable...

  11. 20 CFR 30.626 - How will OWCP coordinate compensation payable under Part E of EEOICPA with benefits from state...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES... reduced will consist of any unpaid monetary payments payable in the future and medical benefits payable...

  12. 20 CFR 30.626 - How will OWCP coordinate compensation payable under Part E of EEOICPA with benefits from state...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES... reduced will consist of any unpaid monetary payments payable in the future and medical benefits payable...

  13. Civil aircraft accident investigation.

    PubMed

    Haines, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    This talk reviews some historic aircraft accidents and some more recent. It reflects on the division of accident causes, considering mechanical failures and aircrew failures, and on aircrew training. Investigation results may lead to improved aircraft design, and to appropriate crew training. PMID:24057309

  14. Anatomy of an Accident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobley, Michael

    1984-01-01

    The findings of industrial safety engineers in the areas of accident causation and prevention are wholly applicable to adventure programs. Adventure education instructors can use safety engineering concepts to assess the risk in a particular activity, understand factors that cause accidents, and intervene to minimize injuries and damages if…

  15. Farm accidents in children.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, D.; Bishop, C.; Sibert, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the problem of accidental injury to children on farms. DESIGN--Prospective county based study of children presenting to accident and emergency departments over 12 months with injuries sustained in a farm setting and nationwide review of fatal childhood farm accidents over the four years April 1986 to March 1990. SETTING--Accident and emergency departments in Aberystwyth, Carmarthen, Haverfordwest, and Llanelli and fatal accidents in England, Scotland, and Wales notified to the Health and Safety Executive register. SUBJECTS--Children aged under 16. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Death or injury after farm related accidents. RESULTS--65 accidents were recorded, including 18 fractures. Nine accidents necessitated admission to hospital for a mean of two (range one to four) days. 13 incidents were related to tractors and other machinery; 24 were due to falls. None of these incidents were reported under the statutory notification scheme. 33 deaths were notified, eight related to tractors and allied machinery and 10 related to falling objects. CONCLUSIONS--Although safety is improving, the farm remains a dangerous environment for children. Enforcement of existing safety legislation with significant penalties and targeting of safety education will help reduce accident rates further. PMID:1638192

  16. [Medical inventions: developments and approaches in employer-employee [correction of worker-employee] relations].

    PubMed

    Teff, Zvi

    2012-11-01

    The past twenty years have witnessed a huge increase in research activity on the government health system in Israel. Consequently, a number of questions of enhanced importance arise: to whom the resultant IP (intellectual property) belongs?--to the researcher or the employer? and what compensation should the researcher receive for his inventive efforts? The government found many cases where the IP was registered in the name of the inventor/researcher, thus denying the government ownership of the IP. In 2009, the government sued Omryx over ownership of such an IP. Following these developments, the government issued new rules for management of IP in the government health system. They came into effect in November 2010. In many respects, the new rules are more stringent than the Israeli Patent Law in respect of the inventor. However, the stipulation of awards to the inventor in the new rules is generous. In order for the new rules to be enforceable, the following guidelines are recommended: The new rules should be more aligned with the Patent Law and with the meaning given to the Law by the judicial system, and There is need for the assent and awareness of health system workers to the conditions set out in the new rules, preferably in the form of new work contracts that clearly and concurrently delineate the worker's duties, particularly those pertaining to IP. PMID:23367732

  17. [Medical inventions: developments and approaches in employer-employee [correction of worker-employee] relations].

    PubMed

    Teff, Zvi

    2012-11-01

    The past twenty years have witnessed a huge increase in research activity on the government health system in Israel. Consequently, a number of questions of enhanced importance arise: to whom the resultant IP (intellectual property) belongs?--to the researcher or the employer? and what compensation should the researcher receive for his inventive efforts? The government found many cases where the IP was registered in the name of the inventor/researcher, thus denying the government ownership of the IP. In 2009, the government sued Omryx over ownership of such an IP. Following these developments, the government issued new rules for management of IP in the government health system. They came into effect in November 2010. In many respects, the new rules are more stringent than the Israeli Patent Law in respect of the inventor. However, the stipulation of awards to the inventor in the new rules is generous. In order for the new rules to be enforceable, the following guidelines are recommended: The new rules should be more aligned with the Patent Law and with the meaning given to the Law by the judicial system, and There is need for the assent and awareness of health system workers to the conditions set out in the new rules, preferably in the form of new work contracts that clearly and concurrently delineate the worker's duties, particularly those pertaining to IP.

  18. Robust springback compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleer, Bart; Grimm, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Springback simulation and springback compensation are more and more applied in productive use of die engineering. In order to successfully compensate a tool accurate springback results are needed as well as an effective compensation approach. In this paper a methodology has been introduce in order to effectively compensate tools. First step is the full process simulation meaning that not only the drawing operation will be simulated but also all secondary operations like trimming and flanging. Second will be the verification whether the process is robust meaning that it obtains repeatable results. In order to effectively compensate a minimum clamping concept will be defined. Once these preconditions are fulfilled the tools can be compensated effectively.

  19. Loss-compensated radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, P.C.

    1984-05-01

    A new radiometer concept is described and evaluated. Automatic dynamic electrical compensation is achieved by a high-gain feedback amplifier and low thermal inertia solar and compensating electrical sensors. With sufficiently high gain, compensation can increase accuracy to limits determined by amplifier drift. Equations governing instrument response are derived and analyzed. Initial measurements on a preliminary prototype confirm the validity of the concept which should yield a very accurate instrument with ''self calibrating'' features.

  20. NASA Medical Response to Human Spacecraft Accidents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patlach, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews NASA's role in the response to spacecraft accidents that involve human fatalities or injuries. Particular attention is given to the work of the Mishap Investigation Team (MIT), the first response to the accidents and the interface to the accident investigation board. The MIT does not investigate the accident, but the objective of the MIT is to gather, guard, preserve and document the evidence. The primary medical objectives of the MIT is to receive, analyze, identify, and transport human remains, provide assistance in the recovery effort, and to provide family Casualty Coordinators with latest recovery information. The MIT while it does not determine the cause of the accident, it acts as the fact gathering arm of the Mishap Investigation Board (MIB), which when it is activated may chose to continue to use the MIT as its field investigation resource. The MIT membership and the specific responsibilities and tasks of the flight surgeon is reviewed. The current law establishing the process is also reviewed.

  1. [From medical complication to compensation for the prejudice].

    PubMed

    Trouiller, P; Lopard, E; Mantz, J; Farman, T

    2012-01-01

    Claims in anesthesia and intensive care remains high, despite the reduction of morbidity and mortality associated with this activity. The absence of a national register makes it difficult to quantify. The Medical Committee of MACSF-Sou Medical Group, professional liability insurer of more than half of French physicians, provided us support. The amount of compensation paid is growing and the scope of compensated damage is expanded by the Dintilhac mission. The Act of March 4, 2002 has fully confirmed the principle of medical liability for misconduct. Generally, compensation for bodily injury is based on the demonstration of a causal link between a wrongful event and injury. The proof of fault lies with the applicant. Information accountable to patients and nosocomial infection are a particular setting. The Act of March 4, 2002 has also defined the concept of therapeutic risk. With the establishment of the Regional Commissions of Conciliation and Compensation (RCCI) and the National Office for Compensation of Medical Accident (Oniam), it is now possible for a patient to be compensated for an injury resulting from an accident Medical non-offending, while acknowledging the lack of accountability of the practitioner. The expertise conducted by an RCCI is adversarial. For the practitioner called to the cause, it is important to prepare for both substance and form, with the assistance of the medical board's insurance company.

  2. The radiation exposure compensation act: what is fair?

    PubMed

    Brugge, Doug; Goble, Rob

    2003-01-01

    In 1990 the U.S. Congress passed a law providing compensation to former uranium miners who became ill while the U.S. Government was the sole purchaser of uranium. Ten years later, in 2000, the law was amended to correct widely perceived problems. We reviewed the content of the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA) laws and regulations, cataloged complaints about the 1990 law, compared the law to the scientific knowledge base in 1990 and in the present, reviewed the 2000 amendments to RECA, and drew lessons about how such compensation programs might be better structured. We concur with popular sentiment that the 1990 law had numerous flaws, the central one being that it failed to compensate many miners who by most other standards would have been deemed deserving. This problem arose through setting exposure criteria very high (at six to 15 times elevated risk), with a disproportionate burden placed on miners who had smoked. The additional burden on smokers was exacerbated by a very stringent definition of smokers (one pack-year in a lifetime). Federal compensation laws should prioritize payment to deserving claimants rather than excluding un-deserving claimants. Thus, a doubling of risk should be an upper limit for setting an eligibility threshold and a lower "significant contributory effect" standard could be considered more appropriate. Uncertainties in exposure and in dose response should be considered and resolved with a bias toward compensation. Beyond setting appropriate criteria, an active effort is needed to inform potentially eligible people and to assist them in qualifying; the eligibility criteria and the requirements for documentation should be appropriate for Native Americans and other cultural groups. Built-in evaluation mechanisms are needed for all compensation programs to assess whether they are meeting their stated objectives. PMID:17208740

  3. "Atypical" Employment and the Failure of Labour Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Increased casual employment and contract labor challenge the protective nature of Australian labor law. Laws and social policies should not cause casual and self-employed workers to be denied benefits nor allow employers to evade standards. (SK)

  4. Reactivity Insertion Accident Analysis with Coupled RETRAN

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yo-Han; Yang, Chang-Keun; Sung, Chang-Kyung; Lee, Chang-Sup

    2004-07-01

    Because of analysis field to be wider and complicated is required, it faces up hardships due to the narrow analysis scopes and limited functions of current vendor code systems. To overcome it KEPRI develop the in-house safety analysis methodology based on the available exquisite codes. For the development, the RETRAN code was modified and coupled to compensate for the lack of capabilities. To estimate the feasibility of the methodology and code system, some reactivity insertion accidents were analyzed and compared with the results mentioned in final safety analysis report of the plant. (authors)

  5. Correction of spherical aberrations of lenses by partially compensated beam parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, R.; Mücke, M.

    1999-05-01

    A self-consistent thermal compensation exhibits a radially dropping degree of space charge compensation. The amount of the central compensation as well as the radial variation is only dependent on the temperature of the compensating particles with respect to the potential variation in the uncompensated beam. This non-uniform compensation provides stronger beam spreading for the outer part of the beam and therefore may compensate the spherical aberration of lenses, when used in proper position of a beam line. We calculated this effect in a one-dimensional radial self-consistent analysis of space charge compensation for different ion temperatures and compared the radial behaviour of the field strength with a cubic power law, which gives best aberration correction. An ion temperature of 13% of the potential energy of the non compensated electron beam fits well for large radii with the cubic power law. We also present a schematic drawing for the construction of such a correction unit.

  6. Persistence of airline accidents.

    PubMed

    Barros, Carlos Pestana; Faria, Joao Ricardo; Gil-Alana, Luis Alberiko

    2010-10-01

    This paper expands on air travel accident research by examining the relationship between air travel accidents and airline traffic or volume in the period from 1927-2006. The theoretical model is based on a representative airline company that aims to maximise its profits, and it utilises a fractional integration approach in order to determine whether there is a persistent pattern over time with respect to air accidents and air traffic. Furthermore, the paper analyses how airline accidents are related to traffic using a fractional cointegration approach. It finds that airline accidents are persistent and that a (non-stationary) fractional cointegration relationship exists between total airline accidents and airline passengers, airline miles and airline revenues, with shocks that affect the long-run equilibrium disappearing in the very long term. Moreover, this relation is negative, which might be due to the fact that air travel is becoming safer and there is greater competition in the airline industry. Policy implications are derived for countering accident events, based on competition and regulation.

  7. Crisis Intervention by Social Workers in Fire Departments: An Innovative Role for Social Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacciatore, Joanne; Carlson, Bonnie; Michaelis, Elizabeth; Klimek, Barbara; Steffan, Sara

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a unique use of social workers as crisis response team (CRT) members in a nontraditional host setting, municipal fire departments in Arizona. The role of modern-day firefighters has changed dramatically and now includes responding to a wide variety of crises and emergencies other than fires, such as motor vehicle accidents,…

  8. [Electrophysiologic criteria for the prevention of electric accidents].

    PubMed

    Kupfer, J

    1990-11-01

    About 0.25 percent of all registered industrial accidents are caused by electric current. One in 20 of these accidents has been fatal. The consequences of electric flow are determined by several factors, above all voltage, time and path of flow, type of current, and resistors within the power circuit. These are attributable to physiological criteria of conduction. Slight electric shock and death by ventricular fibrillation are close to each other by the all-or-nothing law. Conclusions are suggested for practice, and a discussion is proposed with a view to find an adequate definition of the power-related accident. PMID:2085034

  9. [Principles of intervertebral disc assessment in private accident insurance].

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, M; Dittrich, V; Röser, K

    2015-09-01

    Due to the spread of intervertebral disc degeneration, insurance companies and experts are regularly confronted with related assessments of insured persons under their private accident insurance. These claims pose a particular challenge for experts, since, in addition to the clinical assessment of the facts, extensive knowledge of general accident insurance conditions, case law and current study findings is required. Each case can only be properly assessed through simultaneous consideration of both the medical and legal facts. These guidelines serve as the basis for experts and claims.managers with respect to the appropriate individual factual assessment of intervertebral disc degeneration in private accident insurance. PMID:26548005

  10. Correlates of mental health in nuclear and coal-fired power plant workers.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, D K; Bromet, E J

    1983-08-01

    The mental health of 104 nuclear workers at the Three Mile Island plant was compared with that of 122 workers from another nuclear plant and 151 workers from two coal-fired generating plants. The coal-fired plant workers were somewhat more symptomatic than the nuclear plant workers. Assessments of work environments showed that the coal-fired plant workers perceived less stress but more problems with workplace exposures than the nuclear plant workers. Negative perceptions of work and marital stress were both strongly and independently related to mental distress. Overall, the results suggest that the Three Mile Island accident did not engender long-term psychological difficulties in workers evaluated 2.5 years after the accident. PMID:6635612

  11. Gmti Motion Compensation

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2004-07-20

    Movement of a GMTI radar during a coherent processing interval over which a set of radar pulses are processed may cause defocusing of a range-Doppler map in the video signal. This problem may be compensated by varying waveform or sampling parameters of each pulse to compensate for distortions caused by variations in viewing angles from the radar to the target.

  12. Accident rates and types among self-employed private forest owners.

    PubMed

    Lindroos, Ola; Burström, Lage

    2010-11-01

    Half of all Swedish forests are owned by private individuals, and at least 215,000 people work in these privately owned forest holdings. However, only lethal accidents are systematically monitored among self-employed forest workers. Therefore, data from the registries of the Swedish Work Environment Authority, the Labor Insurance Organization and the regional University Hospital in Umeå were gathered to allow us to perform a more in-depth assessment of the rate and types of accidents that occurred among private forest owners. We found large differences between the registries in the type and number of accidents that were reported. We encountered difficulties in defining "self-employed forest worker" and also in determining whether the accidents that did occur happened during work or leisure time. Consequently, the estimates for the accident rate that we obtained varied from 32 to > or = 4300 injured persons per year in Sweden, depending on the registry that was consulted, the definition of the sample population that was used, and the accident severity definition that was employed. Nevertheless, the different registries gave a consistent picture of the types of accidents that occur while individuals are participating in self-employed forestry work. Severe accidents were relatively common, as self-employed forestry work fatalities constituted 7% of the total number of fatalities in the work authority registry. Falling trees were associated with many of these fatal accidents as well as with accidents that resulted in severe non-fatal injuries. Thus, unsafe work methods appeared more related to the occurrence of an accident than the equipment that was being used at the time of the accident (e.g., a chainsaw). Improvement of the workers' skills should therefore be considered to be an important prevention measure that should be undertaken in this field. The challenges in improving the safety in these smallest of companies, which fall somewhere between the purview of

  13. Worker Safety and Security Teams Team Member Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Sievers, Cindy S.

    2012-06-11

    Worker Safety and Security Teams (WSSTs) are an effective way to promote safe workplaces. While WSSTs have a variety of structures and roles, they have one thing in common - employees and management collaborate to find ways to prevent accidents, injuries, and illnesses on the job. The benefits for all concerned are obvious in that employees have a safe place to work, employers save money on lost work time and workers compensation costs, and everyone returns home safe and healthy each day. A successful WSST will have the support and wholehearted participation of management and employees. LANL has a WSST at the institutional level (IWSST) and at all directorates and many divisions. The WSSTs are part of LANL's Voluntary Protection Program (VPP). The WSSTs meet at least monthly and follow an agenda covering topics such as safety shares, behavior based safety (BBS) observations, upcoming events or activities, issues, etc. A WSST can effectively influence safety programs and provide recommendations to managers, who have the resources and authority to implement changes in the workplace. WSSTs are effective because they combine the knowledge, expertise, perspective, enthusiasm, and effort of a variety of employees with diverse backgrounds. Those with experience in a specific job or work area know what the hazards or potential hazards are, and generally have ideas how to go about controlling them. Those who are less familiar with a job or area play a vital role too, by seeing what others may have overlooked or taken for granted. This booklet will cover the structure and operations of WSSTs, what needs to be done in order to be effective and successful, and how you can help, whether you're a WSST member or not.

  14. Association of worker characteristics and early reimbursement for physical therapy, chiropractic and opioid prescriptions with workers’ compensation claim duration, for cases of acute low back pain: an observational cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Jason W; Ebrahim, Shanil; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Wang, Li; Couban, Rachel; Walter, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between early reimbursement for physiotherapy, chiropractic and opioid prescriptions for acute low back pain (LBP) with disability claim duration. Design Observational cohort study. Setting and participants From a random sample of 6665 claims for acute, uncomplicated LBP approved by the Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) in 2005, we analysed 1442 who remained on full benefits at 4 weeks after claim approval. Primary outcome measure Our primary outcome was WSIB claim duration. Results We had complete data for all but 3 variables, which had <15% missing data, and we included missing data as a category for these factors. Our time-to-event analysis was adjusted for demographic, workplace and treatment factors, but not injury severity, although we attempted to include a sample with very similar, less-severe injuries. Regarding significant factors and treatment variables in our adjusted analysis, older age (eg, HR for age ≥55 vs <25=0.52; 99% CI 0.36 to 0.74) and WSIB reimbursement for opioid prescription in the first 4 weeks of a claim (HR=0.68; 99% CI 0.53 to 0.88) were associated with longer claim duration. Higher predisability income was associated with longer claim duration, but only among persistent claims (eg, HR for active claims at 1 year with a predisability income >$920 vs ≤$480/week=0.34; 99% CI 0.17 to 0.68). Missing data for union membership (HR=1.27; 99% CI 1.01 to 1.59), and working for an employer with a return-to-work programme were associated with fewer days on claim (HR=1.78; 99% CI 1.45 to 2.18). Neither reimbursement for physiotherapy (HR=1.01; 99% CI 0.86 to 1.19) nor chiropractic care (HR for active claims at 60 days=1.15; 99% CI 0.94 to 1.41) within the first 4 weeks was associated with claim duration. Our meta-analysis of 3 studies (n=51 069 workers) confirmed a strong association between early opioid use and prolonged claim duration (HR=0.57, 95% CI 0.48 to 0.69; low certainty

  15. Percentage compensation arrangements: suspect, but not illegal.

    PubMed

    Fedor, F P

    2001-01-01

    Percentage compensation arrangements, in which a service is outsourced to a contractor that is paid in accordance with the level of its performance, are widely used in many business sectors. The HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) has shown concern that these arrangements in the healthcare industry may offer incentives for the performance of unnecessary services or cause false claims to be made to Federal healthcare programs in violation of the antikickback statute and the False Claims Act. Percentage compensation arrangements can work and need not run afoul of the law as long as the healthcare organization carefully oversees the arrangement and sets specific safeguards in place. These safeguards include screening contractors, carefully evaluating their compliance programs, and obligating them contractually to perform within the limits of the law.

  16. Negative effects of smoking, workers’ compensation, and litigation on pain/disability scores for spine patients

    PubMed Central

    Prasarn, Mark L.; Horodyski, Mary B.; Behrend, Caleb; Wright, John; Rechtine, Glenn R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: When initiating treatment for patients with spinal disorders, we examined the impact of smoking, workers compensation, and litigation on disability and pain scores. Methods: With Institutional Review Board approval, the medical records of 13,704 consecutive patients with spinal disorders treated at two university spine centers were reviewed. Particular attention was focused on the pretreatment impact of three variables: smoking, workers compensation, and litigation. All patients completed a questionnaire that included a modified Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), a visual analog pain scale (VAS) and a history of smoking, workers compensation, and/or litigation issues. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni (when appropriate) was used to analyze the data. Results: ODI scores significantly correlated with a smoking history: Current Smoker > Previous Smoker > Never Smoked (44.22 > 38.11 > 36.02, respectively). Pain scores and ODI scores had a direct correlation to workers compensation and litigation status. Workers compensation, litigation and smoking combined created even higher scores. There was no significant difference between previous smokers and nonsmokers. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a history of smoking, workers compensation, and/or litigation, considered alone or worse, combined, negatively impacted outcomes for patients seeking treatment at our spine centers. For optimal outcomes in spine patients, cessation of smoking and treatment of attendant psychological and social factors prove critical. PMID:23248756

  17. Accident resistant transport container

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.A.; Cole, K.K.

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  18. Accident resistant transport container

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, John A.; Cole, James K.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  19. Safety Is No Accident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christiansen, Monty L.

    1985-01-01

    Liability suits involving accidents in park and recreation areas are expensive and intangible costs are incalculable. Risk management practices related to park planning, personnel, and administrative practices are discussed. (MT)

  20. [Accident cause masculinity?--Gender-related issues of accident victims between prevention and coping in Kaiserreich and Weimarer Republik].

    PubMed

    Knoll-Jung, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Occupational accidents in industrial workplaces are a specific health problem for man. Therefore it seems adequate to use masculinities as a category of research in this field. For the Kaiserreich and the Weimarer Republik it shows that male workers relating to their danger awareness and behavior, prevention, accident causes and coping strategies are settled in an area of conflict between a hard workplace environment and the family. On the basis of health practices of the accident victims it appears that there are different forms of labor masculinities. They have an important influence on all levels of an occupational accident from the endangerment to the success of the treatment. Through a critical use of the category academic void can be shown and alternative explanatory models can be offered. PMID:26219189