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Sample records for accompanying equilibrium state

  1. A search for equilibrium states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    An efficient search algorithm is described for the location of equilibrium states in a search set of states which differ from one another only by the choice of pure phases. The algorithm has three important characteristics: (1) it ignores states which have little prospect for being an improved approximation to the true equilibrium state; (2) it avoids states which lead to singular iteration equations; (3) it furnishes a search history which can provide clues to alternative search paths.

  2. Equilibrium states for hyperbolic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Vanessa; Viana, Marcelo

    2017-02-01

    We prove the existence of finitely many ergodic equilibrium states for local homeomorphisms and hyperbolic potentials. We also deal with partially hyperbolic skew-products over non-uniformly expanding maps with uniform contraction on the fibre. For these systems we prove the existence and finiteness of the equilibrium states associated with a class of Hölder continuous potentials.

  3. Grinding kinetics and equilibrium states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opoczky, L.; Farnady, F.

    1984-01-01

    The temporary and permanent equilibrium occurring during the initial stage of cement grinding does not indicate the end of comminution, but rather an increased energy consumption during grinding. The constant dynamic equilibrium occurs after a long grinding period indicating the end of comminution for a given particle size. Grinding equilibrium curves can be constructed to show the stages of comminution and agglomeration for certain particle sizes.

  4. Radiative-dynamical equilibrium states for Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, L. M.; Stone, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    In order to obtain accurate estimates of the radiative heating that drives motions in Jupiter's atmosphere, previous radiative equilibrium calculations are improved by including the NH3 opacities and updated results for the pressure-induced opacities. These additions increase the radiative lapse rate near the top of the statically unstable region and lead to a fairly constant radiative lapse rate below the tropopause. The radiative-convective equilibrium temperature structure consistent with these changes is calculated, but it differs only slightly from earlier calculations. The radiative equilibrium calculations are used to calculate whether equilibrium states can occur on Jupiter which are similar to the baroclinic instability regimes on the earth and Mars. The results show that Jupiter's dynamical regime cannot be of this kind, except possibly at very high latitudes, and that its regime must be a basically less stable one than this kind.

  5. Bifurcated helical core equilibrium states in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Chapman, I. T.; Schmitz, O.; Turnbull, A. D.; Tobias, B. J.; Lazarus, E. A.; Turco, F.; Lanctot, M. J.; Evans, T. E.; Graves, J. P.; Brunetti, D.; Pfefferlé, D.; Reimerdes, H.; Sauter, O.; Halpern, F. D.; Tran, T. M.; Coda, S.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Pochelon, A.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.; Lao, L.; Luce, T. C.; Buttery, R.; Ferron, J. R.; Hollmann, E. M.; Petty, C. C.; van Zeeland, M.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Hanson, J. M.; Lütjens, H.

    2013-07-01

    Tokamaks with weak to moderate reversed central shear in which the minimum inverse rotational transform (safety factor) qmin is in the neighbourhood of unity can trigger bifurcated magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium states, one of which is similar to a saturated ideal internal kink mode. Peaked prescribed pressure profiles reproduce the ‘snake’ structures observed in many tokamaks which has led to a novel explanation of the snake as a bifurcated equilibrium state. Snake equilibrium structures are computed in simulations of the tokamak à configuration variable (TCV), DIII-D and mega amp spherical torus (MAST) tokamaks. The internal helical deformations only weakly modulate the plasma-vacuum interface which is more sensitive to ripple and resonant magnetic perturbations. On the other hand, the external perturbations do not alter the helical core deformation in a significant manner. The confinement of fast particles in MAST simulations deteriorate with the amplitude of the helical core distortion. These three-dimensional bifurcated solutions constitute a paradigm shift that motivates the applications of tools developed for stellarator research in tokamak physics investigations.

  6. On the Equilibrium States of Interconnected Bubbles or Balloons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinhaus, F.; Barker, W.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the equilibrium states of a system composed of two interconnected, air-filled spherical membranes of different sizes. The equilibrium configurations are determined by the method of minimization of the availability of the system at constant temperature. (GA)

  7. Spin-polarized surface resonances accompanying topological surface state formation

    PubMed Central

    Jozwiak, Chris; Sobota, Jonathan A.; Gotlieb, Kenneth; Kemper, Alexander F.; Rotundu, Costel R.; Birgeneau, Robert J.; Hussain, Zahid; Lee, Dung-Hai; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Topological insulators host spin-polarized surface states born out of the energetic inversion of bulk bands driven by the spin-orbit interaction. Here we discover previously unidentified consequences of band-inversion on the surface electronic structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3. By performing simultaneous spin, time, and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we map the spin-polarized unoccupied electronic structure and identify a surface resonance which is distinct from the topological surface state, yet shares a similar spin-orbital texture with opposite orientation. Its momentum dependence and spin texture imply an intimate connection with the topological surface state. Calculations show these two distinct states can emerge from trivial Rashba-like states that change topology through the spin-orbit-induced band inversion. This work thus provides a compelling view of the coevolution of surface states through a topological phase transition, enabled by the unique capability of directly measuring the spin-polarized unoccupied band structure. PMID:27739428

  8. Spin-polarized surface resonances accompanying topological surface state formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jozwiak, Chris; Sobota, Jonathan A.; Gotlieb, Kenneth; Kemper, Alexander F.; Rotundu, Costel R.; Birgeneau, Robert J.; Hussain, Zahid; Lee, Dung-Hai; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2016-10-01

    Topological insulators host spin-polarized surface states born out of the energetic inversion of bulk bands driven by the spin-orbit interaction. Here we discover previously unidentified consequences of band-inversion on the surface electronic structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3. By performing simultaneous spin, time, and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we map the spin-polarized unoccupied electronic structure and identify a surface resonance which is distinct from the topological surface state, yet shares a similar spin-orbital texture with opposite orientation. Its momentum dependence and spin texture imply an intimate connection with the topological surface state. Calculations show these two distinct states can emerge from trivial Rashba-like states that change topology through the spin-orbit-induced band inversion. This work thus provides a compelling view of the coevolution of surface states through a topological phase transition, enabled by the unique capability of directly measuring the spin-polarized unoccupied band structure.

  9. Spin-polarized surface resonances accompanying topological surface state formation

    DOE PAGES

    Jozwiak, Chris; Sobota, Jonathan A.; Gotlieb, Kenneth; ...

    2016-10-14

    Topological insulators host spin-polarized surface states born out of the energetic inversion of bulk bands driven by the spin-orbit interaction. Here we discover previously unidentified consequences of band-inversion on the surface electronic structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3. By performing simultaneous spin, time, and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we map the spin-polarized unoccupied electronic structure and identify a surface resonance which is distinct from the topological surface state, yet shares a similar spin-orbital texture with opposite orientation. Its momentum dependence and spin texture imply an intimate connection with the topological surface state. Calculations show these two distinct states can emerge frommore » trivial Rashba-like states that change topology through the spin-orbit-induced band inversion. As a result, this work thus provides a compelling view of the coevolution of surface states through a topological phase transition, enabled by the unique capability of directly measuring the spin-polarized unoccupied band structure.« less

  10. Spin-polarized surface resonances accompanying topological surface state formation

    SciTech Connect

    Jozwiak, Chris; Sobota, Jonathan A.; Gotlieb, Kenneth; Kemper, Alexander F.; Rotundu, Costel R.; Birgeneau, Robert J.; Hussain, Zahid; Lee, Dung -Hai; Shen, Zhi -Xun; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2016-10-14

    Topological insulators host spin-polarized surface states born out of the energetic inversion of bulk bands driven by the spin-orbit interaction. Here we discover previously unidentified consequences of band-inversion on the surface electronic structure of the topological insulator Bi2Se3. By performing simultaneous spin, time, and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we map the spin-polarized unoccupied electronic structure and identify a surface resonance which is distinct from the topological surface state, yet shares a similar spin-orbital texture with opposite orientation. Its momentum dependence and spin texture imply an intimate connection with the topological surface state. Calculations show these two distinct states can emerge from trivial Rashba-like states that change topology through the spin-orbit-induced band inversion. As a result, this work thus provides a compelling view of the coevolution of surface states through a topological phase transition, enabled by the unique capability of directly measuring the spin-polarized unoccupied band structure.

  11. SCREENED COULOMB FORMULATION OF THE IONIZATION EQUILIBRIUM EQUATION OF STATE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The ionization equilibrium equation of state (IEEOS) is formulated relative to the numerical solutions of the Schrodinger equation with the complete...for hydrogen and iron, where pressures at high densities and temperature are compared with pressures from the equation of state based upon the Thomas...IEEOS represents a significant improvement over the TFD equation of state . (Author)

  12. Nonexistence of equilibrium states at absolute negative temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Rochín, Víctor

    2013-08-01

    We show that states of macroscopic systems with purported absolute negative temperatures are not stable under small, yet arbitrary, perturbations. We prove the previous statement using the fact that, in equilibrium, the entropy takes its maximum value. We discuss that, while Ramsey theoretical reformulation of the second law for systems with negative temperatures is logically correct, it must be a priori assumed that those states are in thermodynamic equilibrium. Since we argue that those states cannot occur, reversible processes are impossible, and, thus, Ramsey identification of absolute negative temperatures is untenable.

  13. Equilibrium charge states of uranium at relativistic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, H.; Gould, H.; Greiner, D.; Lindstrom, P.; Symons, J.

    1983-06-01

    We have measured the charge fractions of uranium ions at energies of 962 MeV/amu and 430 MeV/amu passing through various thickness targets of mylar (Z approx. = 6.6), Cu (Z = 29) and Ta (Z = 73). From these we determine the equilibrium charge state distributions.

  14. Equilibrium Binding and Steady-State Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunford, H. Brian

    1984-01-01

    Points out that equilibrium binding and steady-state enzyme kinetics have a great deal in common and that related equations and error analysis can be cast in identical forms. Emphasizes that if one type of problem solution is taught, the other is also taught. Various methods of data analysis are evaluated. (JM)

  15. 48 CFR 225.7402 - Contractor personnel authorized to accompany U.S. Armed Forces deployed outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... authorized to accompany U.S. Armed Forces deployed outside the United States. 225.7402 Section 225.7402... personnel authorized to accompany U.S. Armed Forces deployed outside the United States. For additional information on contractor personnel authorized to accompany the U.S. Armed Forces, see PGI 225.7402....

  16. 48 CFR 225.7402 - Contractor personnel authorized to accompany U.S. Armed Forces deployed outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... authorized to accompany U.S. Armed Forces deployed outside the United States. 225.7402 Section 225.7402... personnel authorized to accompany U.S. Armed Forces deployed outside the United States. For additional information on contractor personnel authorized to accompany the U.S. Armed Forces, see PGI 225.7402....

  17. 48 CFR 225.7402 - Contractor personnel authorized to accompany U.S. Armed Forces deployed outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... authorized to accompany U.S. Armed Forces deployed outside the United States. 225.7402 Section 225.7402... personnel authorized to accompany U.S. Armed Forces deployed outside the United States. For additional information on contractor personnel authorized to accompany the U.S. Armed Forces, see PGI 225.7402....

  18. 48 CFR 225.7402 - Contractor personnel authorized to accompany U.S. Armed Forces deployed outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... authorized to accompany U.S. Armed Forces deployed outside the United States. 225.7402 Section 225.7402... personnel authorized to accompany U.S. Armed Forces deployed outside the United States. For additional information on contractor personnel authorized to accompany the U.S. Armed Forces, see PGI 225.7402....

  19. Entropy Production and Non-Equilibrium Steady States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masuo

    2013-01-01

    The long-term issue of entropy production in transport phenomena is solved by separating the symmetry of the non-equilibrium density matrix ρ(t) in the von Neumann equation, as ρ(t) = ρs(t) + ρa(t) with the symmetric part ρs(t) and antisymmetric part ρa(t). The irreversible entropy production (dS/dt)irr is given in M. Suzuki, Physica A 390(2011)1904 by (dS/dt)irr = Tr( {H}(dρ s{(t)/dt))}/T for the Hamiltonian {H} of the relevant system. The general formulation of the extended von Neumann equation with energy supply and heat extraction is reviewed from the author's paper (M. S.,Physica A391(2012)1074). irreversibility; entropy production; transport phenomena; electric conduction; thermal conduction; linear response; Kubo formula; steady state; non-equilibrium density matrix; energy supply; symmetry-separated von Neumann equation; unboundedness.

  20. Scalar Fluctuations from Extended Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettleton, R. E.

    1985-10-01

    In the framework of extended non-equilibrium thermodynamics, the local non-equilibrium state of a liquid is described by the density, temperature, and a structural variable, ζ, and its rate-of-change. ζ is the ensemble average of a function A (Q) of the configuration co-ordinates, and it is assumed to relax to local equilibrium in a time short compared to the time for diffusion of an appreciable number of particles into the system. By a projection operator technique of Grabert, an equation is derived from the Liouville equation for the distribution of fluctuations in TV, the particle number, and in A and Ȧ. An approximate solution is proposed which exhibits nonequilibrium corrections to the Einstein function in the form of a sum of thermodynamic forces. For a particular structural model, the corresponding non-Einstein contributions to correlation functions are estimated to be very small. For variables of the type considered here, the thermodynamic pressure is found to equal the pressure trace.

  1. Equilibrium state of a trapped two-dimensional Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, Steffen P.; Yefsah, Tarik; Guenter, Kenneth J.; Cheneau, Marc; Desbuquois, Remi; Dalibard, Jean; Holzmann, Markus; Krauth, Werner

    2010-07-15

    We study experimentally and numerically the equilibrium density profiles of a trapped two-dimensional {sup 87}Rb Bose gas and investigate the equation of state of the homogeneous system using the local density approximation. We find a clear discrepancy between in situ measurements and quantum Monte Carlo simulations, which we attribute to a nonlinear variation of the optical density of the atomic cloud with its spatial density. However, good agreement between experiment and theory is recovered for the density profiles measured after time of flight, taking advantage of their self-similarity in a two-dimensional expansion.

  2. Tokamak magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium states with axisymmetric boundary and a 3D helical core.

    PubMed

    Cooper, W A; Graves, J P; Pochelon, A; Sauter, O; Villard, L

    2010-07-16

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium states with imposed axisymmetric boundary are computed in which a spontaneous bifurcation develops to produce an internal three-dimensional (3D) configuration with a helical structure in addition to the standard axisymmetric system. Equilibrium states with similar MHD energy levels are shown to develop very different geometric structures. The helical equilibrium states resemble saturated internal kink mode structures.

  3. Tokamak Magnetohydrodynamic Equilibrium States with Axisymmetric Boundary and a 3D Helical Core

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Pochelon, A.; Sauter, O.; Villard, L.

    2010-07-16

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium states with imposed axisymmetric boundary are computed in which a spontaneous bifurcation develops to produce an internal three-dimensional (3D) configuration with a helical structure in addition to the standard axisymmetric system. Equilibrium states with similar MHD energy levels are shown to develop very different geometric structures. The helical equilibrium states resemble saturated internal kink mode structures.

  4. State densities and ionization equilibrium of atoms in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamura, Isao; Fujimoto, Takashi

    1990-08-01

    The semiclassical Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition is used to derive an approximate analytical expression for the state density of the hydrogen atom in a dense plasma. An ion-sphere model with an infinitely high potential wall is assumed. The expression leads to a universal curve that spans all values of the electron density. The curve is continuous and smooth over the entire energy range, starting from the hydrogenic state density for low-lying bound states and approaching the plane-wave state density in the high-energy limit of the continuum. The number of bound states is approximately proportional to the inverse of the square root of the electron density. Integration of the state density over the Boltzmann distribution of the electronic energy results in an ionization equilibrium relation, leading to modified Saha's equation. The correction factor for this modified equation is a function of both the electron temperature and the electron density, and is expressed as a universal function of the ion coupling parameter.

  5. Macroscopic Fluctuation Theory for Stationary Non-Equilibrium States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertini, L.; de Sole, A.; Gabrielli, D.; Jona-Lasinio, G.; Landim, C.

    2002-05-01

    We formulate a dynamical fluctuation theory for stationary non-equilibrium states (SNS) which is tested explicitly in stochastic models of interacting particles. In our theory a crucial role is played by the time reversed dynamics. Within this theory we derive the following results: the modification of the Onsager-Machlup theory in the SNS; a general Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the macroscopic entropy; a non-equilibrium, nonlinear fluctuation dissipation relation valid for a wide class of systems; an H theorem for the entropy. We discuss in detail two models of stochastic boundary driven lattice gases: the zero range and the simple exclusion processes. In the first model the invariant measure is explicitly known and we verify the predictions of the general theory. For the one dimensional simple exclusion process, as recently shown by Derrida, Lebowitz, and Speer, it is possible to express the macroscopic entropy in terms of the solution of a nonlinear ordinary differential equation; by using the Hamilton-Jacobi equation, we obtain a logically independent derivation of this result.

  6. Relativistic hydrodynamics and non-equilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillane, Michael; Herzog, Christopher P.

    2016-10-01

    We review recent interest in the relativistic Riemann problem as a method for generating a non-equilibrium steady state. In the version of the problem under consideration, the initial conditions consist of a planar interface between two halves of a system held at different temperatures in a hydrodynamic regime. The new double shock solutions are in contrast with older solutions that involve one shock and one rarefaction wave. We use numerical simulations to show that the older solutions are preferred. Briefly we discuss the effects of a conserved charge. Finally, we discuss deforming the relativistic equations with a nonlinear term and how that deformation affects the temperature and velocity in the region connecting the asymptotic fluids.

  7. Equilibrium wave spectrum and sea state bias in satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.; Srokosz, Meric A.

    1991-01-01

    For a well-developed sea at equilibrium with a constant wind, the energy-containing range of the wavenumber spectrum for wind-generated gravity waves is approximated by a generalized power law involving the angular spread function and mu, interpreted as a fractal codimension of a small surface patch. Dependence of mu on the wave age is estimated, and the 'Phillips constant', beta, along with the low-wavenumber boundary, k0, of the inertial subrange are analyzed on the basis of the wave action and energy conservation principles. The resulting expressions are employed to evaluate various non-Gaussian statistics of a weakly nonlinear sea surface, which determine the sea state bias in satellite altimetry. The locally accelerated decay of the spectral density function in a high-wavenumber dissipation subrange is pointed out as an important factor of wave dynamics and the geometrical optics treatment of the sea state bias. The analysis is carried out in the approximation of a unidirectional wave field and confined to the case of a well-developed sea.

  8. Caloric and entropic temperatures in non-equilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, D.; Restuccia, L.

    2016-10-01

    We examine the non-equilibrium consequences of two different definitions of temperature in systems out of equilibrium: one is based on the internal energy (caloric temperature), and the other one on the entropy (entropic temperature). We discuss the relation between the values obtained from these two definitions in ideal gases and in two-level systems.

  9. Dynamic relaxation of a levitated nanoparticle from a non-equilibrium steady state.

    PubMed

    Gieseler, Jan; Quidant, Romain; Dellago, Christoph; Novotny, Lukas

    2014-05-01

    Fluctuation theorems are a generalization of thermodynamics on small scales and provide the tools to characterize the fluctuations of thermodynamic quantities in non-equilibrium nanoscale systems. They are particularly important for understanding irreversibility and the second law in fundamental chemical and biological processes that are actively driven, thus operating far from thermal equilibrium. Here, we apply the framework of fluctuation theorems to investigate the important case of a system relaxing from a non-equilibrium state towards equilibrium. Using a vacuum-trapped nanoparticle, we demonstrate experimentally the validity of a fluctuation theorem for the relative entropy change occurring during relaxation from a non-equilibrium steady state. The platform established here allows non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to be studied experimentally for arbitrary steady states and can be extended to investigate quantum fluctuation theorems as well as systems that do not obey detailed balance.

  10. Directed percolation identified as equilibrium pre-transition towards non-equilibrium arrested gel states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurati, Marco; Capellmann, Ronja; Kohl, Matthias; Egelhaaf, Stefan; Schmiedeberg, Michael

    The macroscopic properties of gels arise from their slow dynamics and load bearing network structure, which are exploited by nature and in numerous industrial products. However, a link between these structural and dynamical properties has remained elusive. Here we present confocal microscopy exper- iments and simulations of gel-forming colloid-polymer mixtures with competing interactions. They reveal that gel formation is preceded by continuous and directed percolation. Both transitions lead to system spanning networks, but only directed percolation results in extremely slow dynamics, ageing and a shrinking of the gel that resembles syneresis. Therefore, dynamical arrest in gels is found to be linked to a structural transition, namely directed percolation, which is quantitatively associated with the mean number of bonded neighbours. Directed percolation is a universality class of transitions out of equilibrium, our study hence connects gel formation to a well-developed theoretical framework which now can be exploited to achieve a detailed understanding of arrested gels.

  11. Non-equilibrium steady states: fluctuations and large deviations of the density and of the current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, Bernard

    2007-07-01

    These lecture notes give a short review of methods such as the matrix ansatz, the additivity principle or the macroscopic fluctuation theory, developed recently in the theory of non-equilibrium phenomena. They show how these methods allow us to calculate the fluctuations and large deviations of the density and the current in non-equilibrium steady states of systems like exclusion processes. The properties of these fluctuations and large deviation functions in non-equilibrium steady states (for example, non-Gaussian fluctuations of density or non-convexity of the large deviation function which generalizes the notion of free energy) are compared with those of systems at equilibrium.

  12. Classifying magnetic and superfluid equilibrium states in magnets with the spin s = 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevskii, M. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    Based on the method of quasiaverages, we classify magnetic and superfluid equilibrium states in magnets with the spin s = 1. Under certain simplifications, assumptions about the residual symmetry of degenerate states and the transformation properties of order parameter operators under transformations generated by additive integrals of motions lead to linear algebraic equations for a classification of the equilibrium means of the order parameters. We consider different cases of the magnetic SO(3) or SU(3) symmetry breaking and obtain solutions for the vector and tensor order parameters for particular forms of the parameters of the residual symmetry generators. We study the equilibriums of magnets with simultaneously broken phase and magnetic symmetries. We find solutions of the classification equations for superfluid equilibrium states and establish relations between the parameters of the residual symmetry generator that allow the thermodynamic coexistence of nonzero equilibrium means of the order parameters.

  13. [The accuracy of rapid equilibrium assumption in steady-state enzyme kinetics is the function of equilibrium segment structure and properties].

    PubMed

    Vrzheshch, P V

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of the accuracy of the rapid equilibrium assumption in the steady-state enzyme kinetics was obtained for an arbitrary mechanism of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. This evaluation depends only on the structure and properties of the equilibrium segment, but doesn't depend on the structure and properties of the rest (stationary part) of the kinetic scheme. The smaller the values of the edges leaving equilibrium segment in relation to values of the edges within the equilibrium segment, the higher the accuracy of determination of intermediate concentrations and reaction velocity in a case of the rapid equilibrium assumption.

  14. Observations of Nighttime HONO in an Urban Area: Steady States, Dynamic Equilibrium States and Reversible Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaren, Robert; Wojtal, Patryk

    2013-04-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important radical precursor in the troposphere. Recent consensus suggests that HONO is formed in the dark through the heterogeneous hydrolysis of NO2 on surfaces (2 NO2 + H2O -> HONO + HNO3), largely dominated by hydrolysis on ground surfaces and a smaller contribution from aerosol surfaces. Frequently a steady state of HONO is observed (dHONO/dt ~ 0) at night, which has been ascribed to a balance between heterogeneous formation and dry deposition. The fate of the surface deposited HONO remains an open question with the possibilities including the permanent loss of N(III), accumulation of surface reservoirs of N(III) at night, and/or a full dynamic equilibrium that partitions HONO between the atmosphere and water on the surface. Surface reservoirs of N(III) accumulated at night could act as a source of HONO the next day. Here we report measurements of HONO by DOAS in Toronto for a 1-year period. Of interest is the frequently observed phenomena of a fast approach to a steady state at sunset with rates of increase of d[HONO]/dt = 1.4 ppb/hr (with snow cover) and long periods in which the mixing ratio of HONO is constant with a median level of ~ 1.1 ppb. We discuss these observations in the context of the steady state being attributable to a dynamic equilibrium state.

  15. Imaging the equilibrium state and magnetization dynamics of partially built hard disk write heads

    SciTech Connect

    Valkass, R. A. J. Yu, W.; Shelford, L. R.; Keatley, P. S.; Loughran, T. H. J.; Hicken, R. J.; Cavill, S. A.; Laan, G. van der; Dhesi, S. S.; Bashir, M. A.; Gubbins, M. A.; Czoschke, P. J.; Lopusnik, R.

    2015-06-08

    Four different designs of partially built hard disk write heads with a yoke comprising four repeats of NiFe (1 nm)/CoFe (50 nm) were studied by both x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM) and time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy (TRSKM). These techniques were used to investigate the static equilibrium domain configuration and the magnetodynamic response across the entire structure, respectively. Simulations and previous TRSKM studies have made proposals for the equilibrium domain configuration of similar structures, but no direct observation of the equilibrium state of the writers has yet been made. In this study, static XPEEM images of the equilibrium state of writer structures were acquired using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism as the contrast mechanism. These images suggest that the crystalline anisotropy dominates the equilibrium state domain configuration, but competition with shape anisotropy ultimately determines the stability of the equilibrium state. Dynamic TRSKM images were acquired from nominally identical devices. These images suggest that a longer confluence region may hinder flux conduction from the yoke into the pole tip: the shorter confluence region exhibits clear flux beaming along the symmetry axis, whereas the longer confluence region causes flux to conduct along one edge of the writer. The observed variations in dynamic response agree well with the differences in the equilibrium magnetization configuration visible in the XPEEM images, confirming that minor variations in the geometric design of the writer structure can have significant effects on the process of flux beaming.

  16. Equilibrium states and ground state of two-dimensional fluid foams

    SciTech Connect

    Graner, F.; Jiang, Y.; Janiaud, E.; Flament, C.

    2001-01-01

    We study the equilibrium energies of two-dimensional (2D) noncoarsening fluid foams, which consist of bubbles with fixed areas. The equilibrium states correspond to local minima of the total perimeter. We present a theoretical derivation of energy minima; experiments with ferrofluid foams, which can be either highly distorted, locally relaxed, or globally annealed; and Monte Carlo simulations using the extended large-Q Potts model. For a dry foam with small size variance we develop physical insight and an electrostatic analogy, which enables us to (i) find an approximate value of the global minimum perimeter, accounting for (small) area disorder, the topological distribution, and physical boundary conditions; (ii) conjecture the corresponding pattern and topology: small bubbles sort inward and large bubbles sort outward, topological charges of the same signs ''repel'' while charges of the opposite signs ''attract;'' (iii) define local and global markers to determine directly from an image how far a foam is from its ground state; (iv) conjecture that, in a local perimeter minimum at prescribed topology, the pressure distribution and thus the edge curvature are unique. Some results also apply to 3D foams.

  17. Turbulence Modeling Effects on the Prediction of Equilibrium States of Buoyant Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, C. Y.; So, R. M. C.; Gatski, T. B.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of turbulence modeling on the prediction of equilibrium states of turbulent buoyant shear flows were investigated. The velocity field models used include a two-equation closure, a Reynolds-stress closure assuming two different pressure-strain models and three different dissipation rate tensor models. As for the thermal field closure models, two different pressure-scrambling models and nine different temperature variance dissipation rate, Epsilon(0) equations were considered. The emphasis of this paper is focused on the effects of the Epsilon(0)-equation, of the dissipation rate models, of the pressure-strain models and of the pressure-scrambling models on the prediction of the approach to equilibrium turbulence. Equilibrium turbulence is defined by the time rate (if change of the scaled Reynolds stress anisotropic tensor and heat flux vector becoming zero. These conditions lead to the equilibrium state parameters. Calculations show that the Epsilon(0)-equation has a significant effect on the prediction of the approach to equilibrium turbulence. For a particular Epsilon(0)-equation, all velocity closure models considered give an equilibrium state if anisotropic dissipation is accounted for in one form or another in the dissipation rate tensor or in the Epsilon(0)-equation. It is further found that the models considered for the pressure-strain tensor and the pressure-scrambling vector have little or no effect on the prediction of the approach to equilibrium turbulence.

  18. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions of 2 MeV/u sulfur ions passing through carbon foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, M.; Sataka, M.; Kawatsura, K.; Takahiro, K.; Komaki, K.; Shibata, H.; Sugai, H.; Nishio, K.

    2009-08-01

    Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions for 2.0 MeV/u sulfur ions after passing through carbon foils were studied experimentally. For the equilibrium charge-state distribution, incident ions of S 7+, S 12+, S 14+ and S 16+ were injected into carbon foils 54, 98, 150 and 200 μg/cm 2 in thickness, whereas for the non-equilibrium distributions, new measurements for S 15+ and S 16+ incidences were made through carbon foils of 0.9-10 μg/cm 2 to supplement our previous experiments regarding S 6+-S 14+ incidences [M. Imai, M. Sataka, K. Kawatsura, K. Takahiro, K. Komaki, H. Shibata, H. Sugai, K. Nishio, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 230 (2005) 63; M. Imai, M. Sataka, K. Kawatsura, K. Takahiro, K. Komaki, H. Shibata, H. Sugai, K. Nishio, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 256 (2007) 11]. Mean charge states for S 6+-S 14+ incidences as functions of the penetration thickness merged at 6.9 μg/cm 2 and changed together until reaching equilibrium at around 100 μg/cm 2, while those for S 15+ and S 16+ incidences took different paths to equilibrium, which was also the case for distribution widths for S 6+-S 14+, S 15+ and S 16+ incidences. An equilibrium mean charge state of 12.68 and distribution width of 1.11 were attained with equilibrium charge distributions between 6+ and 16+.

  19. Crystalline-state reaction of cobaloxime complexes accompanying conformational change1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasada, Yoshio; Ohashi, Yuji

    1985-01-01

    In the crystals of some cobaloxime complexes, racemization of chiral group bonded to Co proceeds by X-ray irradiation without degradation of crystallinity. Racemization of methoxycarbonylethyl (mce) group has been examined for five cobaloxime complexes with different base as the second axial ligand, three of which did not give any indication of the reaction. Their crystal structures well explain the inactivity. Every stage of the change in the reactive crystals (base 4-chloropyridine, I; pyridine, II) has been revealed by X-ray analysis. In I, the mce groups suffer configurational and conformational changes at high temperature cooperatively. In II, rapid desolvation at room temperature is accompanied by conformational change of mce, and at 343 K random inversion occurs.

  20. Resource theory of quantum states out of thermal equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fernando G S L; Horodecki, Michał; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Renes, Joseph M; Spekkens, Robert W

    2013-12-20

    The ideas of thermodynamics have proved fruitful in the setting of quantum information theory, in particular the notion that when the allowed transformations of a system are restricted, certain states of the system become useful resources with which one can prepare previously inaccessible states. The theory of entanglement is perhaps the best-known and most well-understood resource theory in this sense. Here, we return to the basic questions of thermodynamics using the formalism of resource theories developed in quantum information theory and show that the free energy of thermodynamics emerges naturally from the resource theory of energy-preserving transformations. Specifically, the free energy quantifies the amount of useful work which can be extracted from asymptotically many copies of a quantum system when using only reversible energy-preserving transformations and a thermal bath at fixed temperature. The free energy also quantifies the rate at which resource states can be reversibly interconverted asymptotically, provided that a sublinear amount of coherent superposition over energy levels is available, a situation analogous to the sublinear amount of classical communication required for entanglement dilution.

  1. The equation of state and ionization equilibrium of dense aluminum plasma with conductivity verification

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kun; Shi, Zongqian; Shi, Yuanjie; Bai, Jun; Wu, Jian; Jia, Shenli

    2015-06-15

    The equation of state, ionization equilibrium, and conductivity are the most important parameters for investigation of dense plasma. The equation of state is calculated with the non-ideal effects taken into consideration. The electron chemical potential and pressure, which are commonly used thermodynamic quantities, are calculated by the non-ideal free energy and compared with results of a semi-empirical equation of state based on Thomas-Fermi-Kirzhnits model. The lowering of ionization potential, which is a crucial factor in the calculation of non-ideal Saha equation, is settled according to the non-ideal free energy. The full coupled non-ideal Saha equation is applied to describe the ionization equilibrium of dense plasma. The conductivity calculated by the Lee-More-Desjarlais model combined with non-ideal Saha equation is compared with experimental data. It provides a possible approach to verify the accuracy of the equation of state and ionization equilibrium.

  2. State-to-state modeling of non equilibrium low-temperature atomic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultel, Arnaud; Morel, Vincent; Annaloro, Julien; Druguet, Marie-Claude

    2017-03-01

    The most relevant approach leading to a thorough understanding of the behavior of non equilibrium atomic plasmas is to elaborate state-to-state models in which the mass conservation equation is applied directly to atoms or ions on their excited states. The present communication reports the elaboration of such models and the results obtained. Two situations close to each other are considered. First, the plasmas produced behind shock fronts obtained in ground test facilities (shock tubes) or during planetary atmospheric entries of spacecrafts are discussed. We focused our attention on the nitrogen case for which a complete implementation of the CoRaM-N2 collisional-radiative model has been performed in a steady one-dimensional computation code based on the Rankine-Hugoniot assumptions. Second, the plasmas produced by the interaction between an ultra short laser pulse and a tungsten sample are discussed in the framework of the elaboration of the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. In the present case, tungsten has been chosen in the purpose of validating an in situ experimental method able to provide the elemental composition of the divertor wall of a tokamak like WEST or ITER undergoing high energetic deuterium and tritium nuclei fluxes.

  3. Equilibrium state of a cylindrical particle with flat ends in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, S Masoomeh; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    A continuum theory is employed to numerically study the equilibrium orientation and defect structures of a circular cylindrical particle with flat ends under a homeotropic anchoring condition in a uniform nematic medium. Different aspect ratios of this colloidal geometry from thin discotic to long rodlike shapes and several colloidal length scales ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale are investigated. We show that the equilibrium state of this colloidal geometry is sensitive to the two geometrical parameters: aspect ratio and length scale of the particle. For a large enough mesoscopic particle, there is a specific asymptotic equilibrium angle associated to each aspect ratio. Upon reducing the particle size to nanoscale, the equilibrium angle follows a descending or ascending trend in such a way that the equilibrium angle of a particle with the aspect ratio bigger than 1:1 (a discotic particle) goes to a parallel alignment with respect to the far-field nematic, whereas the equilibrium angle for a particle with the aspect ratio 1:1 and smaller (a rodlike particle) tends toward a perpendicular alignment to the uniform nematic direction. The discrepancy between the equilibrium angles of the mesoscopic and nanoscopic particles originates from the significant differences between their defect structures. The possible defect structures related to mesoscopic and nanoscopic colloidal particles of this geometry are also introduced.

  4. A non-equilibrium state diagram for liquid/fluid/particle mixtures.

    PubMed

    Velankar, Sachin S

    2015-11-21

    The equilibrium structures of ternary oil/water/surfactant systems are often represented within a triangular composition diagram with various regions of the triangle corresponding to different equilibrium states. We transplant this idea to ternary liquid/fluid/particle systems that are far from equilibrium. Liquid/liquid/particle mixtures or liquid/gas/particle mixtures yield a wide diversity of morphologies including Pickering emulsions, bijels, pendular aggregates, spherical agglomerates, capillary suspensions, liquid marbles, powdered liquids, and particle-stabilized foams. This paper argues that such ternary liquid/fluid/particle mixtures can be unified into a non-equilibrium state diagram. What is common among all these systems is that the morphology results from an interplay between the preferential wettability of the particles, capillarity, and viscous forces encountered during mixing. Therefore all such systems share certain universal features, regardless of the details of the particles or fluids used. These features guide the construction of a non-equilibrium state diagram which takes the form of a triangular prism, where each triangular cross-section of the prism corresponds to a different relative affinity of the particles towards the two fluids. We classify the prism into regions in which the various morphologies appear and also emphasize the major difference between systems in which the particles are fully-wetted by one of the fluids vs. partially-wetted by both fluids. We also discuss how the state diagram may change with mixing intensity or with interparticle attractions.

  5. Equilibrium excited state and emission spectra of molecular aggregates from the hierarchical equations of motion approach.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yuanyuan; Chen, Liping; Bai, Shuming; Shi, Qiang

    2013-01-28

    The hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) method was applied to calculate the emission spectra of molecular aggregates using the Frenkel exciton model. HEOM equations for the one-exciton excited state were first propagated until equilibration. The reduced density operator and auxiliary density operators (ADOs) were used to characterize the coupled system-bath equilibrium. The dipole-dipole correlation functions were then calculated to obtain the emission spectra of model dimers, and the B850 band of light-harvesting complex II (LH2) in purple bacteria. The effect of static disorder on equilibrium excited state and the emission spectra of LH2 was also explicitly considered. Several approximation schemes, including the high temperature approximation (HTA) of the HEOM, a modified version of the HTA, the stochastic Liouville equation approach, the perturbative time-local and time-nonlocal generalized quantum master equations, were assessed in the calculation of the equilibrium excited state and emission spectra.

  6. Tryptophan fluorescence monitors structural changes accompanying signalling state formation in the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein.

    PubMed

    Gensch, Thomas; Hendriks, Johnny; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2004-06-01

    Photoactive yellow protein, a small, water-soluble blue-light absorbing photoreceptor protein from Ectothiorhodospira(Halorhodospira)[space]halophila has a structure with two hydrophobic cores, of which the main one houses its light-sensitive chromophore (p-coumaric acid), separated by a central [small beta]-sheet. This photoreceptor protein contains a single tryptophan residue (W119) that is situated at the interface between the central beta-sheet and its N-terminal cap. The fluorescence properties of W119 in the dark state pG (lambda(max)= 328 nm; Phi(fl)= 0.01; nearly pH-independent) are typical for a buried tryptophan in a hydrophobic environment with significant quenching by nearby amino acid residues. Signalling state formation leads to pH-dependent fluorescence changes: At pH values <6.5 the fluorescence emission increases, with a minor blue shift of the emission maximum. Above this pH, the emission maximum of the tryptophan shifts considerably to the red, whereas its total intensity decreases. These results further support the contention that signalling state formation in PYP leads to significant changes in the structure of this protein, even at sites that are at a considerable distance from the chromophore. The nature of these changes in pB, however, depend upon the pH imposed upon the protein: At slightly alkaline pH, which presumably is closest to the pH to which this protein is exposed in vivo, these changes lead to an exposure of the part of the central beta-sheet harbouring W119. At slightly acidic pH the polarity of the environment of W119 is hardly affected by the formation of the signalling state but the quenching of its fluorescence emission, possibly by nearby amino acids, is reduced. On the other hand, its accessibility for quenching by small molecules in the solution is enhanced at acidic and alkaline pH in the signalling state (pB) compared to the dark state (pG). This latter observation points towards a more flexible structure of the N

  7. Qualitative changes in the proteome of extracellular vesicles accompanying cancer cell transition to mesenchymal state.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Delphine; Magnus, Nathalie; Meehan, Brian; Kislinger, Thomas; Rak, Janusz

    2013-10-15

    Transitions of the cancer cell phenotype between epithelial and mesenchymal states (EMT) are likely to alter the patterns of intercellular communication. In this regard we have previously documented that EMT-like changes trigger quantitative rearrangements in exosomal vesicle emission in A431 cancer cells driven by oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Here we report that extracellular vesicles (EVs) produced by these cancer cells in their epithelial and mesenchymal states exhibit profound qualitative differences in their proteome. Thus, induction of the EMT-like state through blockade of E-cadherin and EGFR stimulation provoked a mesenchymal shift in cellular morphology and enrichment in the CD44-high/CD24-low immunophenotype, often linked to cellular stemness. This change also resulted in reprogramming of the EV-related proteome (distinct from that of corresponding cells), which contained 30 unique protein signals, and revealed enrichment in pathways related to cellular growth, cell-to-cell signaling, and cell movement. Some of the most prominent EV-related proteins were validated, including integrin α2 and tetraspanin CD9. We propose that changes in cellular differentiation status translate into unique qualitative rearrangements in the cargo of EVs, a process that may have implications for intercellular communication and could serve as source of new biomarkers to detect EMT-like processes in cancer.

  8. Time behavior of a Gaussian wave packet accompanying the generalized coherent state for the inverted oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maamache, Mustapha; Bouguerra, Yacine; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2016-06-01

    A Gaussian wave packet of the inverted oscillator is investigated using the invariant operator method together with the unitary transformation method. A simple wave packet directly derived from the eigenstates of the invariant operator of the system corresponds to a plane wave that is fully delocalized. However, we can construct a weighted wave packet in terms of such plane waves, which corresponds to a Gaussian wave. This wave packet is associated with the generalized coherent state, which can be crucially utilized for investigating the classical limit of quantum wave mechanics. Various quantum properties of the system, such as fluctuations of the canonical variables, the uncertainty product, and the motion of the wave packet or quantum particle, are analyzed by means of this wave packet. We have confirmed that the time behavior of such a wave packet is very similar to the counterpart classical state. The wave packet runs away from the origin in the positive or negative direction in the 1D coordinate depending on the condition of the initial state. We have confirmed that this wave packet not only moves acceleratively but also spreads out during its propagation.

  9. Dynamical Detailed Balance and Local Kms Condition for Non-Equilibrium States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, Luigi; Imafuku, Kentaro

    The principle of detailed balance is at the basis of equilibrium physics and is equivalent to the Kubo-Martin-Schwinger (KMS) condition (under quite general assumptions). In the present paper we prove that a large class of non-equilibrium quantum systems satisfies a dynamical generalization of the detailed balance condition (dynamical detailed balance) expressing the fact that all the micro-currents, associated to the Bohr frequencies are constant. The usual (equilibrium) detailed balance condition is characterized by the property that this constant is identically zero. From this we deduce a simple and experimentally measurable relation expressing the microcurrent associated to a transition between two levels ɛm→ɛn as a linear combination of the occupation probabilities of the two levels, with coefficients given by the generalized susceptivities (transport coefficients). We then give a second characterization of the dynamical detailed balance condition using a master equation rather than the microcurrents. Finally we show that these two conditions are equivalent to a "local" generalization of the usual KMS condition. Summing up: rather than postulating some ansatz on the basis of phenomenological models or of numerical simulations, we deduce, directly in the quantum domain and from fundamental principles, some natural and simple non equilibrium generalizations of the three main characterizations of equilibrium states. Then we prove that these three, apparently very far, conditions are equivalent. These facts support our convinction that these three equivalent conditions capture a universal aspect of non equilibrium phenomena.

  10. Elastic modulus and equilibrium swelling of networks crosslinked by end-linking oligodimethylsiloxane at solution state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urayama, Kenji; Kawamura, Takanobu; Kohjiya, Shinzo

    1996-09-01

    We have investigated the degree of equilibrium swelling and the elastic modulus of networks prepared by end-linking oligo(dimethylsiloxane)s (ODMS) in solution as a function of polymer concentration at crosslinking. The molecular weight of ODMS is so low that entanglement couplings are not formed in uncrosslinked state. It has been found from the preparation concentration dependence of elastic modulus in preparation state that trapped entanglements are formed by the introduction of crosslinks, and those considerably contribute to elastic modulus, even if the prepolymers are not entangled in uncrosslinked state. The experimental results for preparation concentration dependence of the degree of equilibrium swelling and the elastic modulus of equilibrium swollen networks are compared with the theoretical predictions by the two theories, i.e., the affine model and the c* theorem. It has been clearly shown that the affine model describes well the experimental results, while the discrepancies between the experimental results and the predictions by the c* theorem are considerable. These results strongly suggest that preparation concentration should be regarded as a reference state, and the displacement of crosslinks moves affinely on swelling, while the complete disinterpenetration of network chains in equilibrium swollen state, which is a postulate of the c* theorem, does not occur.

  11. Application of the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation relation to thermostated steady states near equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Evans, Denis J; Searles, Debra J; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2005-05-01

    The fluctuation relation of the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem (GCFT) concerns fluctuations in the phase-space compression rate of dissipative, reversible dynamical systems. It has been proven for Anosov systems, but it is expected to apply more generally. This raises the question of which non-Anosov systems satisfy the fluctuation relation. We analyze time-dependent fluctuations in the phase space compression rate of a class of N-particle systems that are at equilibrium or in near equilibrium steady states. This class does not include Anosov systems or isoenergetic systems; however, it includes most steady-state systems considered in molecular-dynamics simulations of realistic systems. We argue that the fluctuations of the phase-space compression rate of these systems at or near equilibrium do not satisfy the fluctuation relation of the GCFT, although the discrepancies become somewhat smaller as the systems move further from equilibrium. In contrast, similar fluctuation relations for an appropriately defined dissipation function appear to hold both near and far from equilibrium.

  12. Application of the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation relation to thermostated steady states near equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Denis J.; Searles, Debra J.; Rondoni, Lamberto

    2005-05-01

    The fluctuation relation of the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem (GCFT) concerns fluctuations in the phase-space compression rate of dissipative, reversible dynamical systems. It has been proven for Anosov systems, but it is expected to apply more generally. This raises the question of which non-Anosov systems satisfy the fluctuation relation. We analyze time-dependent fluctuations in the phase space compression rate of a class of N -particle systems that are at equilibrium or in near equilibrium steady states. This class does not include Anosov systems or isoenergetic systems; however, it includes most steady-state systems considered in molecular-dynamics simulations of realistic systems. We argue that the fluctuations of the phase-space compression rate of these systems at or near equilibrium do not satisfy the fluctuation relation of the GCFT, although the discrepancies become somewhat smaller as the systems move further from equilibrium. In contrast, similar fluctuation relations for an appropriately defined dissipation function appear to hold both near and far from equilibrium.

  13. [New relations for steady-state enzyme kinetics and their application to rapid equilibrium assumption].

    PubMed

    Vrzheshch, P V

    2013-01-01

    With the use of a graph theory new relations for steady-state enzyme kinetics are derived and strictly proved for the arbitrary mechanism of an enzyme-catalysed reaction containing a reversible segment. Using these relations, a general principle for rapid equilibrium assumption is formulated and proved: the reversible bound segment can be considered as an equilibrium segment only when the values of the base trees that are not proper to this segment can be neglected (within a prescribed accuracy) in relation to the values of the base trees that belong to this segment. In contrast with the foreign base trees the base trees that are proper to the segment have the following properties: the tree that is directed to the base within this segment does not contain the edges leaving this segment; and the tree that is directed to the base outside the segment contains only one edge leaving this segment. Equilibrium variations are assessed for steady-state intermediates concentrations of the equilibrium segment, numerical expressions are obtained for the accuracy of determination of the intermediates concentrations as well as for the accuracy of determination of the rate of enzyme-catalysed reaction in case of using rapid equilibrium assumption.

  14. The Depths of Hydraulic Fracturing and Accompanying Water Use Across the United States.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Robert B; Lowry, Ella R; Pickle, Amy; Kang, Mary; DiGiulio, Dominic; Zhao, Kaiguang

    2015-08-04

    Reports highlight the safety of hydraulic fracturing for drinking water if it occurs "many hundreds of meters to kilometers underground". To our knowledge, however, no comprehensive analysis of hydraulic fracturing depths exists. Based on fracturing depths and water use for ∼44,000 wells reported between 2010 and 2013, the average fracturing depth across the United States was 8300 ft (∼2500 m). Many wells (6900; 16%) were fractured less than a mile from the surface, and 2600 wells (6%) were fractured above 3000 ft (900 m), particularly in Texas (850 wells), California (720), Arkansas (310), and Wyoming (300). Average water use per well nationally was 2,400,000 gallons (9,200,000 L), led by Arkansas (5,200,000 gallons), Louisiana (5,100,000 gallons), West Virginia (5,000,000 gallons), and Pennsylvania (4,500,000 gallons). Two thousand wells (∼5%) shallower than one mile and 350 wells (∼1%) shallower than 3000 ft were hydraulically fractured with >1 million gallons of water, particularly in Arkansas, New Mexico, Texas, Pennsylvania, and California. Because hydraulic fractures can propagate 2000 ft upward, shallow wells may warrant special safeguards, including a mandatory registry of locations, full chemical disclosure, and, where horizontal drilling is used, predrilling water testing to a radius 1000 ft beyond the greatest lateral extent.

  15. Zero Temperature Limits of Gibbs-Equilibrium States for Countable Alphabet Subshifts of Finite Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkinson, O.; Mauldin, R. D.; Urbański, M.

    2005-05-01

    Let Σ A be a finitely primitive subshift of finite type on a countable alphabet. For appropriate functions f:Σ A → IR, the family of Gibbs-equilibrium states (μ tf ) t⩾1 for the functions tf is shown to be tight. Any weak*-accumulation point as t→∞ is shown to be a maximizing measure for f.

  16. Non-equilibrium oxidation states of zirconium during early stages of metal oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Wen; Yildiz, Bilge; Herbert, F. William; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.

    2015-03-09

    The chemical state of Zr during the initial, self-limiting stage of oxidation on single crystal zirconium (0001), with oxide thickness on the order of 1 nm, was probed by synchrotron x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of the Zr 3d spectrum by the spectrum reconstruction method demonstrated the formation of Zr{sup 1+}, Zr{sup 2+}, and Zr{sup 3+} as non-equilibrium oxidation states, in addition to Zr{sup 4+} in the stoichiometric ZrO{sub 2}. This finding resolves the long-debated question of whether it is possible to form any valence states between Zr{sup 0} and Zr{sup 4+} at the metal-oxide interface. The presence of local strong electric fields and the minimization of interfacial energy are assessed and demonstrated as mechanisms that can drive the formation of these non-equilibrium valence states of Zr.

  17. Non-equilibrium oxidation states of zirconium during early stages of metal oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Wen; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Herbert, F. William; ...

    2015-03-11

    The chemical state of Zr during the initial, self-limiting stage of oxidation on single crystal zirconium (0001), with oxide thickness on the order of 1 nm, was probed by synchrotron x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of the Zr 3d spectrum by the spectrum reconstruction method demonstrated the formation of Zr1+, Zr2+, and Zr3+ as non-equilibrium oxidation states, in addition to Zr4+ in the stoichiometric ZrO2. This finding resolves the long-debated question of whether it is possible to form any valence states between Zr0 and Zr4+ at the metal-oxide interface. As a result, the presence of local strong electric fields andmore » the minimization of interfacial energy are assessed and demonstrated as mechanisms that can drive the formation of these non-equilibrium valence states of Zr.« less

  18. A computer simulation using spreadsheets for learning concept of steady-state equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharda, Vandana; Sastri, O. S. K. S.; Bhardwaj, Jyoti; Jha, Arbind K.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a simple spreadsheet based simulation activity that can be performed by students at the undergraduate level. This simulation is implemented in free open source software (FOSS) LibreOffice Calc, which is available for both Windows and Linux platform. This activity aims at building the probability distribution for the possible macro-states of a system. This has been achieved by randomly sampling the configuration space consisting of all the possible microstates and determining the corresponding macrostate for each of the samples, which is akin to Monte-Carlo simulation. This simulation could act as a very useful tool in engaging students for learning the concepts of microstates, macrostates and steady state equilibrium, once the ideas have been introduced in the classroom. Further, the effect of the number of particles on the quality of steady state equilibrium achieved demonstrates the idea of thermodynamic limit.

  19. Markov state models from short non-equilibrium simulations—Analysis and correction of estimation bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nüske, Feliks; Wu, Hao; Prinz, Jan-Hendrik; Wehmeyer, Christoph; Clementi, Cecilia; Noé, Frank

    2017-03-01

    Many state-of-the-art methods for the thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of large and complex biomolecular systems by simulation rely on ensemble approaches, where data from large numbers of relatively short trajectories are integrated. In this context, Markov state models (MSMs) are extremely popular because they can be used to compute stationary quantities and long-time kinetics from ensembles of short simulations, provided that these short simulations are in "local equilibrium" within the MSM states. However, over the last 15 years since the inception of MSMs, it has been controversially discussed and not yet been answered how deviations from local equilibrium can be detected, whether these deviations induce a practical bias in MSM estimation, and how to correct for them. In this paper, we address these issues: We systematically analyze the estimation of MSMs from short non-equilibrium simulations, and we provide an expression for the error between unbiased transition probabilities and the expected estimate from many short simulations. We show that the unbiased MSM estimate can be obtained even from relatively short non-equilibrium simulations in the limit of long lag times and good discretization. Further, we exploit observable operator model (OOM) theory to derive an unbiased estimator for the MSM transition matrix that corrects for the effect of starting out of equilibrium, even when short lag times are used. Finally, we show how the OOM framework can be used to estimate the exact eigenvalues or relaxation time scales of the system without estimating an MSM transition matrix, which allows us to practically assess the discretization quality of the MSM. Applications to model systems and molecular dynamics simulation data of alanine dipeptide are included for illustration. The improved MSM estimator is implemented in PyEMMA of version 2.3.

  20. Equilibrium unfolding of Escherichia coli ribonuclease H: characterization of a partially folded state.

    PubMed Central

    Dabora, J. M.; Marqusee, S.

    1994-01-01

    We have examined the equilibrium unfolding of Escherichia coli ribonuclease HI (RNase H), a member of a family of enzymes that cleaves RNA from RNA:DNA hybrids. A completely synthetic gene was constructed that expresses a variant of the wild-type sequence with all 3 cysteines replaced with alanine. The resulting recombinant protein is active and folds reversibly. Denaturation studies monitored by circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence yield coincident curves that suggest the equilibrium unfolding reaction is a 2-state process. Acid denaturation, however, reveals a cooperative transition at approximately pH 1.8 to a partially folded state. This acid state can be further denatured in a reversible manner by the addition of heat or urea as monitored by either CD or tryptophan fluorescence. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies indicate that the acid state of RNase H is both compact and monomeric. Although compact, the acid state does not resemble the native protein: the acid state displays a near-UV CD spectrum similar to the unfolded state and binds to and enhances the fluorescence of the dye 1-anilinonaphthalene, 8-sulfonate much more than either the native or unfolded states. Therefore, the acid state of E. coli RNase H has the characteristics of a molten globule: it retains a high degree of secondary structure, remains compact, yet does not appear to contain a tightly packed core. PMID:7833802

  1. Emergence of equilibrium thermodynamic properties in quantum pure states. I. Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Fresch, Barbara; Moro, Giorgio J.

    2010-07-21

    Investigation on foundational aspects of quantum statistical mechanics recently entered a renaissance period due to novel intuitions from quantum information theory and to increasing attention on the dynamical aspects of single quantum systems. In the present contribution a simple but effective theoretical framework is introduced to clarify the connections between a purely mechanical description and the thermodynamic characterization of the equilibrium state of an isolated quantum system. A salient feature of our approach is the very transparent distinction between the statistical aspects and the dynamical aspects in the description of isolated quantum systems. Like in the classical statistical mechanics, the equilibrium distribution of any property is identified on the basis of the time evolution of the considered system. As a consequence equilibrium properties of quantum system appear to depend on the details of the initial state due to the abundance of constants of the motion in the Schroedinger dynamics. On the other hand the study of the probability distributions of some functions, such as the entropy or the equilibrium state of a subsystem, in statistical ensembles of pure states reveals the crucial role of typicality as the bridge between macroscopic thermodynamics and microscopic quantum dynamics. We shall consider two particular ensembles: the random pure state ensemble and the fixed expectation energy ensemble. The relation between the introduced ensembles, the properties of a given isolated system, and the standard quantum statistical description are discussed throughout the presentation. Finally we point out the conditions which should be satisfied by an ensemble in order to get meaningful thermodynamical characterization of an isolated quantum system.

  2. Numerical simulation of coupled state-to-state kinetics and heat transfer in viscous non-equilibrium flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunova, O.; Kustova, E.; Mekhonoshina, M.; Shoev, G.

    2016-11-01

    The influence of vibrational-dissociation kinetics on mass and heat transfer in non-equilibrium flows of N2/N and O2/O mixtures behind shock waves is investigated on the basis of the state-to-state approach. A method of the numerical solution of coupled equations of gas dynamics and state-to-state kinetics in the commercial flow solver ANSYS Fluent is proposed. Based on the proposed numerical tool, the flows near a cone and behind a planar shock wave are studied. The calculation results are compared with available experimental data.

  3. A new climate-vegetation equilibrium state for Tropical South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Marcos Daisuke; Nobre, Carlos Afonso

    2003-12-01

    The existence of multiple climate-vegetation equilibria in Tropical South America is investigated under present-day climate conditions with the use of an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a potential vegetation model. Two stable equilibria were found. One corresponds to the current biome distribution. The second is a new equilibrium state: savannas replace eastern Amazonian forests and a semi-desert area appears in the driest portion of Northeast Brazil. If sustainable development and conservation policies were not able to halt the increasing environmental degradation in those areas, then land use changes could, per se, tip the climate-vegetation system towards this new alternative drier stable equilibrium state, with savannization of parts of Amazonia and desertification of the driest area of Northeast Brazil, and with potential adverse impacts on the rich species diversity in the former region and water resources in the latter.

  4. The equilibrium state of hydrogen in gallium nitride: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; WRIGHT,ALAN F.; PETERSEN,GARY A.; SEAGER,CARLETON H.; WAMPLER,WILLIAM R.; CRAWFORD,MARY H.; HAN,JUNG

    2000-04-17

    Formation energies and vibrational frequencies for H in wurtzite GaN were calculated from density functional theory and used to predict equilibrium state occupancies and solid solubilities for p-type, intrinsic, and n-type material. The solubility of deuterium (D) was measured at 600--800 C as a function of D{sub 2} pressure and doping and compared with theory. Agreement was obtained by reducing the H formation energies 0.2 eV from ab-initio theoretical values. The predicted stretch-mode frequency for H bound to the Mg acceptor lies 5% above an observed infrared absorption attributed to this complex. It is concluded that currently recognized H states and physical processes account for the equilibrium behavior of H examined in this work.

  5. On Nash Equilibrium and Evolutionarily Stable States That Are Not Characterised by the Folk Theorem.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiawei; Kendall, Graham

    2015-01-01

    In evolutionary game theory, evolutionarily stable states are characterised by the folk theorem because exact solutions to the replicator equation are difficult to obtain. It is generally assumed that the folk theorem, which is the fundamental theory for non-cooperative games, defines all Nash equilibria in infinitely repeated games. Here, we prove that Nash equilibria that are not characterised by the folk theorem do exist. By adopting specific reactive strategies, a group of players can be better off by coordinating their actions in repeated games. We call it a type-k equilibrium when a group of k players coordinate their actions and they have no incentive to deviate from their strategies simultaneously. The existence and stability of the type-k equilibrium in general games is discussed. This study shows that the sets of Nash equilibria and evolutionarily stable states have greater cardinality than classic game theory has predicted in many repeated games.

  6. Incorporation of a Chemical Equilibrium Equation of State into LOCI-Chem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Carey F.

    2005-01-01

    Renewed interest in development of advanced high-speed transport, reentry vehicles and propulsion systems has led to a resurgence of research into high speed aerodynamics. As this flow regime is typically dominated by hot reacting gaseous flow, efficient models for the characteristic chemical activity are necessary for accurate and cost effective analysis and design of aerodynamic vehicles that transit this regime. The LOCI-Chem code recently developed by Ed Luke at Mississippi State University for NASA/MSFC and used by NASA/MSFC and SSC represents an important step in providing an accurate, efficient computational tool for the simulation of reacting flows through the use of finite-rate kinetics [3]. Finite rate chemistry however, requires the solution of an additional N-1 species mass conservation equations with source terms involving reaction kinetics that are not fully understood. In the equilibrium limit, where the reaction rates approach infinity, these equations become very stiff. Through the use of the assumption of local chemical equilibrium the set of governing equations is reduced back to the usual gas dynamic equations, and thus requires less computation, while still allowing for the inclusion of reacting flow phenomenology. The incorporation of a chemical equilibrium equation of state module into the LOCI-Chem code was the primary objective of the current research. The major goals of the project were: (1) the development of a chemical equilibrium composition solver, and (2) the incorporation of chemical equilibrium solver into LOCI-Chem. Due to time and resource constraints, code optimization was not considered unless it was important to the proper functioning of the code.

  7. Thermal Equilibrium of a Macroscopic Quantum System in a Pure State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Sheldon; Huse, David A.; Lebowitz, Joel L.; Tumulka, Roderich

    2015-09-01

    We consider the notion of thermal equilibrium for an individual closed macroscopic quantum system in a pure state, i.e., described by a wave function. The macroscopic properties in thermal equilibrium of such a system, determined by its wave function, must be the same as those obtained from thermodynamics, e.g., spatial uniformity of temperature and chemical potential. When this is true we say that the system is in macroscopic thermal equilibrium (MATE). Such a system may, however, not be in microscopic thermal equilibrium (MITE). The latter requires that the reduced density matrices of small subsystems be close to those obtained from the microcanonical, equivalently the canonical, ensemble for the whole system. The distinction between MITE and MATE is particularly relevant for systems with many-body localization for which the energy eigenfuctions fail to be in MITE while necessarily most of them, but not all, are in MATE. We note, however, that for generic macroscopic systems, including those with MBL, most wave functions in an energy shell are in both MATE and MITE. For a classical macroscopic system, MATE holds for most phase points on the energy surface, but MITE fails to hold for any phase point.

  8. Thermal Equilibrium of a Macroscopic Quantum System in a Pure State.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Sheldon; Huse, David A; Lebowitz, Joel L; Tumulka, Roderich

    2015-09-04

    We consider the notion of thermal equilibrium for an individual closed macroscopic quantum system in a pure state, i.e., described by a wave function. The macroscopic properties in thermal equilibrium of such a system, determined by its wave function, must be the same as those obtained from thermodynamics, e.g., spatial uniformity of temperature and chemical potential. When this is true we say that the system is in macroscopic thermal equilibrium (MATE). Such a system may, however, not be in microscopic thermal equilibrium (MITE). The latter requires that the reduced density matrices of small subsystems be close to those obtained from the microcanonical, equivalently the canonical, ensemble for the whole system. The distinction between MITE and MATE is particularly relevant for systems with many-body localization for which the energy eigenfuctions fail to be in MITE while necessarily most of them, but not all, are in MATE. We note, however, that for generic macroscopic systems, including those with MBL, most wave functions in an energy shell are in both MATE and MITE. For a classical macroscopic system, MATE holds for most phase points on the energy surface, but MITE fails to hold for any phase point.

  9. Equilibrium points of the tilted perfect fluid Bianchi VIh state space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolopoulos, Pantelis S.

    2005-05-01

    We present the full set of evolution equations for the spatially homogeneous cosmologies of type VIh filled with a tilted perfect fluid and we provide the corresponding equilibrium points of the resulting dynamical state space. It is found that only when the group parameter satisfies h > -1 a self-similar solution exists. In particular we show that for h > -{1/9} there exists a self-similar equilibrium point provided that γ ∈ ({2(3+sqrt{-h})/5+3sqrt{-h}},{3/2}) whereas for h < -{frac 19} the state parameter belongs to the interval γ ∈(1,{2(3+sqrt{-h})/5+3sqrt{-h}}). This family of new exact self-similar solutions belongs to the subclass nαα = 0 having non-zero vorticity. In both cases the equilibrium points have a six-dimensional stable manifold and may act as future attractors at least for the models satisfying nαα = 0. Also we give the exact form of the self-similar metrics in terms of the state and group parameter. As an illustrative example we provide the explicit form of the corresponding self-similar radiation model (γ = {frac 43}), parametrised by the group parameter h. Finally we show that there are no tilted self-similar models of type III and irrotational models of type VIh.

  10. Single-molecule measurement of the effective temperature in non-equilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterich, E.; Camunas-Soler, J.; Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Seifert, U.; Ritort, F.

    2015-11-01

    Temperature is a well-defined quantity for systems in equilibrium. For glassy systems, it has been extended to the non-equilibrium regime, showing up as an effective quantity in a modified version of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. However, experimental evidence supporting this definition remains scarce. Here, we present the first direct experimental demonstration of the effective temperature by measuring correlations and responses in single molecules in non-equilibrium steady states generated under external random forces. We combine experiment, analytical theory and simulations for systems with different levels of complexity, ranging from a single bead in an optical trap to two-state and multiple-state DNA hairpins. From these data, we extract a unifying picture for the existence of an effective temperature based on the relative order of various timescales characterizing intrinsic relaxation and external driving. Our study thus introduces driven small systems as a fertile ground to address fundamental concepts in statistical physics, condensed-matter physics and biophysics.

  11. Adaptive behaviour and multiple equilibrium states in a predator-prey model.

    PubMed

    Pimenov, Alexander; Kelly, Thomas C; Korobeinikov, Andrei; O'Callaghan, Michael J A; Rachinskii, Dmitrii

    2015-05-01

    There is evidence that multiple stable equilibrium states are possible in real-life ecological systems. Phenomenological mathematical models which exhibit such properties can be constructed rather straightforwardly. For instance, for a predator-prey system this result can be achieved through the use of non-monotonic functional response for the predator. However, while formal formulation of such a model is not a problem, the biological justification for such functional responses and models is usually inconclusive. In this note, we explore a conjecture that a multitude of equilibrium states can be caused by an adaptation of animal behaviour to changes of environmental conditions. In order to verify this hypothesis, we consider a simple predator-prey model, which is a straightforward extension of the classic Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model. In this model, we made an intuitively transparent assumption that the prey can change a mode of behaviour in response to the pressure of predation, choosing either "safe" of "risky" (or "business as usual") behaviour. In order to avoid a situation where one of the modes gives an absolute advantage, we introduce the concept of the "cost of a policy" into the model. A simple conceptual two-dimensional predator-prey model, which is minimal with this property, and is not relying on odd functional responses, higher dimensionality or behaviour change for the predator, exhibits two stable co-existing equilibrium states with basins of attraction separated by a separatrix of a saddle point.

  12. The Donnan equilibrium: I. On the thermodynamic foundation of the Donnan equation of state.

    PubMed

    Philipse, A; Vrij, A

    2011-05-18

    The thermodynamic equilibrium between charged colloids and an electrolyte reservoir is named after Frederic Donnan who first published on it one century ago (Donnan 1911 Z. Electrochem. 17 572). One of the intriguing features of the Donnan equilibrium is the ensuing osmotic equation of state which is a nonlinear one, even when both colloids and ions obey Van 't Hoff's ideal osmotic pressure law. The Donnan equation of state, nevertheless, is internally consistent; we demonstrate it to be a rigorous consequence of the phenomenological thermodynamics of a neutral bulk suspension equilibrating with an infinite salt reservoir. Our proof is based on an exact thermodynamic relation between osmotic pressure and salt adsorption which, when applied to ideal ions, does indeed entail the Donnan equation of state. Our derivation also shows that, contrary to what is often assumed, the Donnan equilibrium does not require ideality of the colloids: the Donnan model merely evaluates the osmotic pressure of homogeneously distributed ions, in excess of the pressure exerted by an arbitrary reference fluid of uncharged colloids. We also conclude that results from the phenomenological Donnan model coincide with predictions from statistical thermodynamics in the limit of weakly charged, point-like colloids.

  13. Conservative-variable average states for equilibrium gas multi-dimensional fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannelli, G. S.

    1992-01-01

    Modern split component evaluations of the flux vector Jacobians are thoroughly analyzed for equilibrium-gas average-state determinations. It is shown that all such derivations satisfy a fundamental eigenvalue consistency theorem. A conservative-variable average state is then developed for arbitrary equilibrium-gas equations of state and curvilinear-coordinate fluxes. Original expressions for eigenvalues, sound speed, Mach number, and eigenvectors are then determined for a general average Jacobian, and it is shown that the average eigenvalues, Mach number, and eigenvectors may not coincide with their classical pointwise counterparts. A general equilibrium-gas equation of state is then discussed for conservative-variable computational fluid dynamics (CFD) Euler formulations. The associated derivations lead to unique compatibility relations that constrain the pressure Jacobian derivatives. Thereafter, alternative forms for the pressure variation and average sound speed are developed in terms of two average pressure Jacobian derivatives. Significantly, no additional degree of freedom exists in the determination of these two average partial derivatives of pressure. Therefore, they are simultaneously computed exactly without any auxiliary relation, hence without any geometric solution projection or arbitrary scale factors. Several alternative formulations are then compared and key differences highlighted with emphasis on the determination of the pressure variation and average sound speed. The relevant underlying assumptions are identified, including some subtle approximations that are inherently employed in published average-state procedures. Finally, a representative test case is discussed for which an intrinsically exact average state is determined. This exact state is then compared with the predictions of recent methods, and their inherent approximations are appropriately quantified.

  14. Effects of Ice Microphysics on Tropical Radiative-Convective-Oceanic Quasi-Equilibrium States.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoqing

    2002-06-01

    The effects of ice microphysics on the mean state of tropical atmosphere and ocean are quantified using a coupled cloud-ocean model. The cloud-resolving model (CRM) treats explicitly the cloud-scale dynamics instead of using parameterization as is necessary in a general circulation model (GCM). The ocean model is a one-dimensional (1D) mixed layer model with a nonlocal K-profile parameterization to represent the vertical mixing in the oceanic surface boundary layer. Two sets of 40-day simulations attain radiative-convective-oceanic quasi-equilibrium states, one is a coupled simulation, the other has a fixed sea surface temperature (SST). Each set consists of two simulations, with a larger and smaller ice fall speed, respectively.The two coupled simulations (T0C and M2C) yield dramatically different radiative-convective-oceanic quasi-equilibrium states demonstrating the profound impact of ice microphysics on the water vapor, cloud, and radiation fields. The mean SST and mixed layer depth in M2C is 0.67 K colder and 33 m deeper than those in T0C, and the net surface solar radiation in M2C is 88 W m2 smaller than that in T0C. The simulation associated with the larger ice fall speed achieves a quasi-equilibrium state characterized by a colder and drier atmosphere, less cloudiness, stronger convection and precipitation, and warmer SST. On the other hand, a quasi-equilibrium state associated with the smaller ice fall speed has a warmer and moister atmosphere, more cloudiness, weaker convection and precipitation, and colder SST. The key mechanism is cloud-radiation interaction: the more (less) cloudiness the ice microphysics produces, the weaker (stronger) the radiative cooling.The upper-ocean mixing and entrainment of the oceanic deep water play an important role in establishing the quasi-equilibrium SST. The comparison between two coupled and two fixed-SST simulations illustrates that the water vapor variation induced by the change of ice microphysics is reduced by the

  15. Thermal Effect in Lipkin Model. I --- Thermal Equilibrium State and Phase Transition ---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriyama, A.; Provid234ncia, J. D.; Tsue, Y.; Yamamura, M.

    1995-12-01

    We study the thermal effect with the use of Lipkin model. We define the density and entropy operator associated with the mixed state representation of Lipkin model, which has been developed with the aid of auxiliary fermion field. We investigate the thermal equilibrium state and its phase transition. In super phase, the thermal effect breaks the particle-hole pairs with coupled angular momentum 0 and does not lift up nucleons from the lower level to upper one, contrary to the case of normal phase.

  16. Equilibrium States and Their Entropy Densities in Gauge-Invariant C*-SYSTEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiho, Nobuyuki; Hiai, Fumio; Petz, Dénes

    A gauge-invariant C*-system is obtained as the fixed point subalgebra of the infinite tensor product of full matrix algebras under the tensor product unitary action of a compact group. In this paper, thermodynamics is studied in such systems and the chemical potential theory developed by Araki, Haag, Kastler and Takesaki is used. As a generalization of quantum spin system, the equivalence of the KMS condition, the Gibbs condition and the variational principle is shown for translation-invariant states. The entropy density of extremal equilibrium states is also investigated in relation to macroscopic uniformity.

  17. Steady State Transportation Cooling in Porous Media Under Local, Non-Thermal Equilibrium Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Alvaro Che

    2002-01-01

    An analytical solution to the steady-state fluid temperature for 1-D (one dimensional) transpiration cooling has been derived. Transpiration cooling has potential use in the aerospace industry for protection against high heating environments for re-entry vehicles. Literature for analytical treatments of transpiration cooling has been largely confined to the assumption of thermal equilibrium between the porous matrix and fluid. In the present analysis, the fundamental fluid and matrix equations are coupled through a volumetric heat transfer coefficient and investigated in non-thermal equilibrium. The effects of varying the thermal conductivity of the solid matrix and the heat transfer coefficient are investigated. The results are also compared to existing experimental data.

  18. Turbulent relaxation and meta-stable equilibrium states of an electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, Douglas J.

    A Malmberg-Penning electron trap allows for the experimental study of nearly ideal, two-dimensional (2D) inviscid (Euler) hydrodynamics. This is perhaps the simplest case of self organizing nonlinear turbulence, and is therefore a paradigm for dynamo theory, Taylor relaxation, selective decay and other nonlinear fluid processes. The dynamical relaxation of a pure electron plasma in the guiding-center-drift approximation is studied, comparing experiments, numerical simulations and statistical theories of weakly-dissipative 2D turbulence. The nonuniform metastable equilibrium states resulting from turbulent evolution are examined, and are well-described by a maximum entropy principle for constrained circulation, energy, and angular momentum. The turbulent decay of the system is also examined, and a similarity decay law is proposed which incorporates the substantial enstrophy trapped in the metastable equilibrium. This law approaches Batchelor's t-2 self-similar decay in the limit of strong turbulence, and is verified in turbulent evolution in the electron plasma experiment.

  19. Infinite-mode squeezed coherent states and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics (phase-space-picture approach)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Leehwa

    1993-01-01

    The phase-space-picture approach to quantum non-equilibrium statistical mechanics via the characteristic function of infinite-mode squeezed coherent states is introduced. We use quantum Brownian motion as an example to show how this approach provides an interesting geometrical interpretation of quantum non-equilibrium phenomena.

  20. Non-equilibrium oxidation states of zirconium during early stages of metal oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Wen; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Herbert, F. William; Yildiz, Bilge

    2015-03-11

    The chemical state of Zr during the initial, self-limiting stage of oxidation on single crystal zirconium (0001), with oxide thickness on the order of 1 nm, was probed by synchrotron x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of the Zr 3d spectrum by the spectrum reconstruction method demonstrated the formation of Zr1+, Zr2+, and Zr3+ as non-equilibrium oxidation states, in addition to Zr4+ in the stoichiometric ZrO2. This finding resolves the long-debated question of whether it is possible to form any valence states between Zr0 and Zr4+ at the metal-oxide interface. As a result, the presence of local strong electric fields and the minimization of interfacial energy are assessed and demonstrated as mechanisms that can drive the formation of these non-equilibrium valence states of Zr.

  1. Search for the Non-Equilibrium Ionization State in Merging Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shota; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Ueda, Shutaro; Nagino, Ryo; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Katsuji

    2015-08-01

    Galaxy clusters are considered that they have evolved by their merging. Many observations of the merging cluster with their shock wave are reported recently (e.g. Akamatsu et al. 2012, PASJ, 64, 67, Bourdin et al. 2013, ApJ, 764, 82). If the shock heats the plasma, the non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) state occurs. Even so, an intracluster medium (ICM) is assumed that it is in collisional ionization equilibrium state, because the timescale of the evolution of galaxy clusters is longer than the timescale that the NEI plasma reaches the equilibrium state. Actually, no observation of the NEI plasma in the ICM is reported. However, for the merging cluster, if its merging timescale is 108 yr, the condition of the NEI state of the ionization parameter (net <1013 s/cm3) is filled in the ICM with the electron density of ~10-3 /cm3. In fact, numerical simulation of the merging cluster shows that the NEI state in the ICM occurs due to the shock heating (e.g. Akahori & Yoshikawa 2010, PASJ, 62, 335). Our purpose is to detect the NEI plasma in the merging cluster, to estimate its timescale from the shock heating quantitatively by ionization parameter to reveal the cluster evolution.From this point, we have analyzed the ionization state of the merging cluster, Abell 754. We used the Suzaku observation data and measured the ratio of the intensities of He-like Fe and H-like Fe lines. As a result, we find that the temperature in the cluster increases from southeast to northwest along the direction of merging. Furthermore, at the specific region with highest temperature (kT = 13.3+1.41-1.14 keV), we find the plasma with ionization parameter, net = 6.98+14.57-3.92 x1011 s/cm3. Its timescale estimated by the ionization parameter is 7.7~54.4 Myr in 90% confidence level. We conclude that the plasma in this region is NEI state due to the recent shock heating. The Ionization state in the ICM can provide a physically meaningful way to estimate the phase and/or timescale of the merging

  2. Liquid-vapor equilibrium-states and critical properties of aluminum from dense plasma equation-of-state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, Mofreh

    2016-10-01

    We present successful estimates of the critical properties and liquid-vapor equilibrium states of pure aluminum fluid as predicted from a chemical model for the equation-of-state of hot dense partially ionized plasma. The essential features of strongly-coupled plasma of metal vapors, such as, multiple ionization, Coulomb interactions among charged particles, partial degeneracy, and intensive short range hard core repulsion are taken into consideration. Internal partition functions of neutral, excited, and ionized species are thoughtfully evaluated in a statistical-mechanically consistent way implementing recent developments in the literature. Results predicted from the present model are discussed and carefully examined against available data and predictions in the literature.

  3. Condensation coefficient of methanol vapor near vapor-liquid equilibrium states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, S.; Yano, T.; Ichijo, M.; Iwanami, K.

    This paper is concerned with the nonequilibrium condensation from a vapor to a liquid phase on the plate endwall of a shock tube behind a reflected shock wave. The growth of a liquid film on the endwall is measured by an optical interferometer using a laser beam. The experiment is carefully conducted on the precisely designed apparatus, and thereby the condensation coefficient of methanol vapor is determined in a wide range of vapor-liquid conditions from near to far from equilibrium states. The result shows that the condensation coefficient increases with the increase of the ratio of number densities of vapor and saturated vapor at the interface.

  4. Equilibrium conditions and the region of metastable states of Freon-12 gas hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavodovsky, A. G.; Madygulov, M. Sh.; Reshetnikov, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The results from DTA experiments to determine the thermodynamic parameters of equilibrium of Freon-12 gas hydrate with water (super cooled water), gas, and ice are analyzed. Empirical relations are obtained for determining the positions of the boundaries in the region of metastable states of Freon-12 gas hydrate in the P-T phase diagram. The enthalpies of dissociation of gas hydrate to water and ice are calculated. The size of pores in Freon-12 hydrate formed from granules of ground ice is estimated from the magnitude of the shift in the quadrupole point at temperatures below 273 K.

  5. Pseudospectral Solution of the Fokker-Planck Equation with Equilibrium Bistable States: the Eigenvalue Spectrum and the Approach to Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2016-09-01

    The Fokker-Planck equation with a constant diffusion coefficient and a particular polynomial drift coefficient can exhibit a bistable equilibrium distribution. Such model systems have been used to study chemical reactions, nucleation, climate, optical bistability and other phenomena. In this paper, we consider a particular choice for the drift coefficient of the form A(x) = x^5 - x^3 to exemplify the statistical behaviour of such systems. The transformation of the Fokker-Planck equation to a Schrödinger equation leads to a potential that belongs to the class of potentials in supersymmetric (SUSY) quantum mechanics. A pseudospectral method based on nonclassical polynomials is used to determine the spectrum of the Fokker-Planck operator and of the Schrödinger equation. The converged numerical eigenvalues are compared with WKB and SWKB approximations of the eigenvalues.

  6. Out-of-equilibrium stationary states, percolation, and subcritical instabilities in a fully nonconservative system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génois, Mathieu; Hersen, Pascal; Bertin, Eric; Courrech du Pont, Sylvain; Grégoire, Guillaume

    2016-10-01

    The exploration of the phase diagram of a minimal model for barchan fields leads to the description of three distinct phases for the system: stationary, percolable, and unstable. In the stationary phase the system always reaches an out-of-equilibrium, fluctuating, stationary state, independent of its initial conditions. This state has a large and continuous range of dynamics, from dilute—where dunes do not interact—to dense, where the system exhibits both spatial structuring and collective behavior leading to the selection of a particular size for the dunes. In the percolable phase, the system presents a percolation threshold when the initial density increases. This percolation is unusual, as it happens on a continuous space for moving, interacting, finite lifetime dunes. For extreme parameters, the system exhibits a subcritical instability, where some of the dunes in the field grow without bound. We discuss the nature of the asymptotic states and their relations to well-known models of statistical physics.

  7. Out-of-equilibrium stationary states, percolation, and subcritical instabilities in a fully nonconservative system.

    PubMed

    Génois, Mathieu; Hersen, Pascal; Bertin, Eric; Courrech du Pont, Sylvain; Grégoire, Guillaume

    2016-10-01

    The exploration of the phase diagram of a minimal model for barchan fields leads to the description of three distinct phases for the system: stationary, percolable, and unstable. In the stationary phase the system always reaches an out-of-equilibrium, fluctuating, stationary state, independent of its initial conditions. This state has a large and continuous range of dynamics, from dilute-where dunes do not interact-to dense, where the system exhibits both spatial structuring and collective behavior leading to the selection of a particular size for the dunes. In the percolable phase, the system presents a percolation threshold when the initial density increases. This percolation is unusual, as it happens on a continuous space for moving, interacting, finite lifetime dunes. For extreme parameters, the system exhibits a subcritical instability, where some of the dunes in the field grow without bound. We discuss the nature of the asymptotic states and their relations to well-known models of statistical physics.

  8. A Review of Equation of State Models, Chemical Equilibrium Calculations and CERV Code Requirements for SHS Detonation Modelling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Beattie - Bridgeman Virial expansion The above equations are suitable for moderate pressures and are usually based on either empirical constants...CR 2010-013 October 2009 A Review of Equation of State Models, Chemical Equilibrium Calculations and CERV Code Requirements for SHS Detonation...Defence R&D Canada. A Review of Equation of State Models, Chemical Equilibrium Calculations and CERV Code Requirements for SHS Detonation

  9. On the state dependency of the equilibrium climate sensitivity during the last 5 million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, P.; de Boer, B.; von der Heydt, A. S.; Stap, L. B.; van de Wal, R. S. W.

    2015-12-01

    It is still an open question how equilibrium warming in response to increasing radiative forcing - the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S - depends on background climate. We here present palaeodata-based evidence on the state dependency of S, by using CO2 proxy data together with a 3-D ice-sheet-model-based reconstruction of land ice albedo over the last 5 million years (Myr). We find that the land ice albedo forcing depends non-linearly on the background climate, while any non-linearity of CO2 radiative forcing depends on the CO2 data set used. This non-linearity has not, so far, been accounted for in similar approaches due to previously more simplistic approximations, in which land ice albedo radiative forcing was a linear function of sea level change. The latitudinal dependency of ice-sheet area changes is important for the non-linearity between land ice albedo and sea level. In our set-up, in which the radiative forcing of CO2 and of the land ice albedo (LI) is combined, we find a state dependence in the calculated specific equilibrium climate sensitivity, S[CO2,LI], for most of the Pleistocene (last 2.1 Myr). During Pleistocene intermediate glaciated climates and interglacial periods, S[CO2,LI] is on average ~ 45 % larger than during Pleistocene full glacial conditions. In the Pliocene part of our analysis (2.6-5 Myr BP) the CO2 data uncertainties prevent a well-supported calculation for S[CO2,LI], but our analysis suggests that during times without a large land ice area in the Northern Hemisphere (e.g. before 2.82 Myr BP), the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity, S[CO2,LI], was smaller than during interglacials of the Pleistocene. We thus find support for a previously proposed state change in the climate system with the widespread appearance of northern hemispheric ice sheets. This study points for the first time to a so far overlooked non-linearity in the land ice albedo radiative forcing, which is important for similar palaeodata

  10. On the state-dependency of the equilibrium climate sensitivity during the last 5 million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, P.; de Boer, B.; von der Heydt, A. S.; Stap, L. B.; van de Wal, R. S. W.

    2015-07-01

    A still open question is how equilibrium warming in response to increasing radiative forcing - the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S - is depending on background climate. We here present paleo-data based evidence on the state-dependency of S, by using CO2 proxy data together with 3-D ice-sheet model-based reconstruction of land ice albedo over the last 5 million years (Myr). We find that the land-ice albedo forcing depends non-linearly on the background climate, while any non-linearity of CO2 radiative forcing depends on the CO2 data set used. This non-linearity was in similar approaches not accounted for due to previously more simplistic approximations of land-ice albedo radiative forcing being a linear function of sea level change. Important for the non-linearity between land-ice albedo and sea level is a latitudinal dependency in ice sheet area changes.In our setup, in which the radiative forcing of CO2 and of the land-ice albedo (LI) is combined, we find a state-dependency in the calculated specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S[CO2,LI] for most of the Pleistocene (last 2.1 Myr). During Pleistocene intermediate glaciated climates and interglacial periods S[CO2,LI] is on average ∼ 45 % larger than during Pleistocene full glacial conditions. In the Pliocene part of our analysis (2.6-5 Myr BP) the CO2 data uncertainties prevents a well-supported calculation for S[CO2,LI], but our analysis suggests that during times without a large land-ice area in the Northern Hemisphere (e.g. before 2.82 Myr BP) the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S[CO2,LI] was smaller than during interglacials of the Pleistocene. We thus find support for a previously proposed state-change in the climate system with the wide appearance of northern hemispheric ice sheets. This study points for the first time to a so far overlooked non-linearity in the land-ice albedo radiative forcing, which is important for similar paleo data-based approaches to calculate climate

  11. A Computational Investigation of the Equilibrium Constants for the Fluorescent and Chemiluminescent States of Coelenteramide.

    PubMed

    Min, Chun-Gang; Pinto da Silva, Luís; Esteves da Silva, Joaquim C G; Yang, Xi-Kun; Huang, Shao-Jun; Ren, Ai-Min; Zhu, Yan-Qin

    2017-01-04

    In spite of recent advances in understanding the mechanism of coelenterate bioluminescence, there is no consensus about which coelenteramide specie and/or state are the light emitter. In this study, a systematic investigation of the geometries and spectra of all possible light emitters has been performed at the TD ωB97XD/6-31+G(d) level of theory, including various fluorescent and chemiluminescent states in vacuum, in a hydrophobic environment and in aqueous solution. To deduce the most probable form of the fluorescent and chemiluminescent coelenteramide emitter, the equilibrium constants for the fluorescent and chemiluminescent states connecting the various species have been calculated. ωB97XD gives a qualitatively good description of fluorescent and chemiluminescent structures. Coelenteramide is formed in a "dark" chemiluminescent state and must evolve to a bright fluorescent state. Moreover, the photoacidity of the phenol group is significantly higher in the fluorescent state than in the chemiluminescent state, which allows the formation of phenolate coelenteramide and clarifies its role as the bioluminescent emitter.

  12. Equilibrium states and chaos in an oscillating double-well potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, H.; Susanto, H.; Benson, T. M.; Cliffe, K. A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate numerically parametrically driven coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations modeling the dynamics of coupled wave fields in a periodically oscillating double-well potential. The equations describe, among other things, two coupled periodically curved optical waveguides with Kerr nonlinearity or Bose-Einstein condensates in a double-well potential that is shaken horizontally and periodically in time. In particular, we study the persistence of equilibrium states of the undriven system due to the presence of the parametric drive. Using numerical continuations of periodic orbits and calculating the corresponding Floquet multipliers, we find that the drive can (de)stabilize a continuation of an equilibrium state indicated by the change in the (in)stability of the orbit, showing that parametric drives can provide a powerful control to nonlinear (optical- or matter-wave-) field tunneling. We also discuss the appearance of chaotic regions reported in previous studies that is due to destabilization of a periodic orbit. Analytical approximations based on an averaging method are presented. Using perturbation theory, the influence of the drive on the symmetry-breaking bifurcation point is analyzed.

  13. Non-equilibrium Steady-State Behavior in a Scale-Free Quantum Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianshi; Price, Craig; Liu, Qi; Gemelke, Nathan

    We describe the nonequilibrium dynamics of a cold atomic gas held in a spatially random optical potential and gravity, subject to a controlled amount of dissipation in the form of an extremely slow dark-state laser cooling process. Reaching local kinetic temperatures below the 100nK scale, such systems provide a novel context for observing the non-equilibrium steady-state (NESS) behavior of a disordered quantum system. For sufficiently deep potentials and strong dissipation, this system can be modeled by a self-organized version of directed percolation, and exhibits power-law decay of phase-space density with time due to the presence of absorbing clusters with a wide distribution of entropy and coupling rates. In the absence of dissipation, such a model cannot apply, and we observe the crossover to exponential loss of phase-space density. We provide measurements of the power-law decay constant by observing the non-equilibrium motion of atoms over a ten-minute period, consistent with γ = 0 . 31 +/- 0 . 04 , and extract scaling of the absorbed number with dissipation rate, showing another power-law behavior, with exponent 0 . 5 +/- 0 . 2 over two decades of optical excitation probability.

  14. Simplification of reversible Markov chains by removal of states with low equilibrium occupancy.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ghanim; Bruno, William J; Pearson, John E

    2012-10-21

    We present a practical method for simplifying Markov chains on a potentially large state space when detailed balance holds. A simple and transparent technique is introduced to remove states with low equilibrium occupancy. The resulting system has fewer parameters. The resulting effective rates between the remaining nodes give dynamics identical to the original system's except on very fast timescales. This procedure amounts to using separation of timescales to neglect small capacitance nodes in a network of resistors and capacitors. We illustrate the technique by simplifying various reaction networks, including transforming an acyclic four-node network to a three-node cyclic network. For a reaction step in which a ligand binds, the law of mass action implies a forward rate proportional to ligand concentration. The effective rates in the simplified network are found to be rational functions of ligand concentration.

  15. Mass conserved elementary kinetics is sufficient for the existence of a non-equilibrium steady state concentration.

    PubMed

    Fleming, R M T; Thiele, I

    2012-12-07

    Living systems are forced away from thermodynamic equilibrium by exchange of mass and energy with their environment. In order to model a biochemical reaction network in a non-equilibrium state one requires a mathematical formulation to mimic this forcing. We provide a general formulation to force an arbitrary large kinetic model in a manner that is still consistent with the existence of a non-equilibrium steady state. We can guarantee the existence of a non-equilibrium steady state assuming only two conditions; that every reaction is mass balanced and that continuous kinetic reaction rate laws never lead to a negative molecule concentration. These conditions can be verified in polynomial time and are flexible enough to permit one to force a system away from equilibrium. With expository biochemical examples we show how reversible, mass balanced perpetual reaction(s), with thermodynamically infeasible kinetic parameters, can be used to perpetually force various kinetic models in a manner consistent with the existence of a steady state. Easily testable existence conditions are foundational for efforts to reliably compute non-equilibrium steady states in genome-scale biochemical kinetic models.

  16. Observations of Nighttime HONO over Snow in a Polluted Urban Area: Evidence of an Equilibrium State?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtal, P. R.; McLaren, R.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important radical precursor in the troposphere. Recent literature consensus suggests that the dark formation of HONO is through the heterogeneous hydrolysis of NO2 on surfaces largely dominated by hydrolysis on ground surfaces and a smaller contribution from aerosol surfaces. Frequently at night, a steady state of HONO is observed (dHONO/dt ~ 0), which has been ascribed to a balance between heterogeneous formation and dry deposition, both at the surface. The fate of the surface deposited HONO remains an open question; with the possibilities including the accumulation of surface reservoirs of nitrite at night and/or a full dynamic equilibrium that partitions HONO between the atmosphere and the surface. Surface reservoirs of nitrite accumulated at night could potentially act as a source of daytime HONO the next day with several release mechanisms possible. In an effort to shed light on these processes, we made daily measurements of HONO by differential optical absorption spectroscopy at York University, Toronto for a 1-year period, including periods of snow accumulation at the surface. Our hypothesis is that during periods of snow coverage, the urban area behaves as a truly aqueous environment, similar to a body of water. Of interest is the frequently observed phenomena of a fast approach to a steady state at sunset with rates of increase of d[HONO]/dt = 2.0 ppb/hr, and long periods in which the mixing ratio of HONO is constant at a median level of ~ 1.1 ppb. We discuss these observations in the context of the steady state being better described as a dynamic equilibrium state.

  17. The possibility of steady state nonionization equilibrium conditions in soft X-ray flare plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of the existence in soft X-ray flare plasmas of conditions that result in a steady state departure of ion abundances from ionization equilibrium values is considered. The observed flare plasma is assumed to be a result of many small 'elementary bursts' that occur on time scales comparable to the ionization and recombination times of highly ionized atoms of iron and calcium. Specific models are adopted, the time-dependent equations for ion abundances are solved numerically, and X-ray line intensities and line ratios are computed and averaged over the effective time of a single burst. The computed results are compared to observed variations for a number of different line ratios. Although the behavior of certain line ratios can be explained in the context of the burst models considered in this paper, the behavior of the set of all the available line ratios cannot be explained in this manner. The observed departures of line ratios from equilibrium values that can be explained in terms of a burst scenario can also be accounted for by uncertainties in the atomic physics.

  18. Numerical study of the steady state fluctuation relations far from equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Stephen R.; Searles, Debra J.; Evans, Denis J.

    2006-05-01

    A thermostatted dynamical model with five degrees of freedom is used to test the fluctuation relation of Evans and Searles (Ω-FR) and that of Gallavotti and Cohen (Λ-FR). In the absence of an external driving field, the model generates a time-independent ergodic equilibrium state with two conjugate pairs of Lyapunov exponents. Each conjugate pair sums to zero. The fluctuation relations are tested numerically both near and far from equilibrium. As expected from previous work, near equilibrium the Ω-FR is verified by the simulation data while the Λ-FR is not confirmed by the data. Far from equilibrium where a positive exponent in one of these conjugate pairs becomes negative, we test a conjecture regarding the Λ-FR [Bonetto et al., Physica D 105, 226 (1997); Giuliani et al., J. Stat. Phys. 119, 909 (2005)]. It was conjectured that when the number of nontrivial Lyapunov exponents that are positive becomes less than the number of such negative exponents, then the form of the Λ-FR needs to be corrected. We show that there is no evidence for this conjecture in the empirical data. In fact, when the correction factor differs from unity, the corrected form of Λ-FR is less accurate than the uncorrected Λ-FR. Also as the field increases the uncorrected Λ-FR appears to be satisfied with increasing accuracy. The reason for this observation is likely to be that as the field increases, the argument of the Λ-FR more and more accurately approximates the argument of the Ω-FR. Since the Ω-FR works for arbitrary field strengths, the uncorrected Λ-FR appears to become ever more accurate as the field increases. The final piece of evidence against the conjecture is that when the smallest positive exponent changes sign, the conjecture predicts a discontinuous change in the "correction factor" for Λ-FR. We see no evidence for a discontinuity at this field strength.

  19. Numerical study of the steady state fluctuation relations far from equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stephen R; Searles, Debra J; Evans, Denis J

    2006-05-21

    A thermostatted dynamical model with five degrees of freedom is used to test the fluctuation relation of Evans and Searles (Omega-FR) and that of Gallavotti and Cohen (Lambda-FR). In the absence of an external driving field, the model generates a time-independent ergodic equilibrium state with two conjugate pairs of Lyapunov exponents. Each conjugate pair sums to zero. The fluctuation relations are tested numerically both near and far from equilibrium. As expected from previous work, near equilibrium the Omega-FR is verified by the simulation data while the Lambda-FR is not confirmed by the data. Far from equilibrium where a positive exponent in one of these conjugate pairs becomes negative, we test a conjecture regarding the Lambda-FR [Bonetto et al., Physica D 105, 226 (1997); Giuliani et al., J. Stat. Phys. 119, 909 (2005)]. It was conjectured that when the number of nontrivial Lyapunov exponents that are positive becomes less than the number of such negative exponents, then the form of the Lambda-FR needs to be corrected. We show that there is no evidence for this conjecture in the empirical data. In fact, when the correction factor differs from unity, the corrected form of Lambda-FR is less accurate than the uncorrected Lambda-FR. Also as the field increases the uncorrected Lambda-FR appears to be satisfied with increasing accuracy. The reason for this observation is likely to be that as the field increases, the argument of the Lambda-FR more and more accurately approximates the argument of the Omega-FR. Since the Omega-FR works for arbitrary field strengths, the uncorrected Lambda-FR appears to become ever more accurate as the field increases. The final piece of evidence against the conjecture is that when the smallest positive exponent changes sign, the conjecture predicts a discontinuous change in the "correction factor" for Lambda-FR. We see no evidence for a discontinuity at this field strength.

  20. Equilibrium and stationary nonequilibrium states in a chain of colliding harmonic oscillators

    PubMed

    Sano

    2000-02-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium properties of a chain of colliding harmonic oscillators (ding-dong model) are investigated. Our chain is modeled as harmonically bounded particles that can only interact with neighboring particles by hard-core interaction. Between the collisions, particles are just independent harmonic oscillators. We are especially interested in the stationary nonequilibrium state of the ding-dong model coupled with two stochastic heat reservoirs (not thermostated) at the ends, whose temperature is different. We check the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem [G. Gallavoti and E. G. D. Cohen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 2694 (1995)] and also the Evans-Searles identity [D. Evans and D. Searles, Phys. Rev. E. 50, 1994 (1994)] numerically. It is verified that the former theorem is satisfied for this system, although the system is not a thermostated system.

  1. Indicial response approach derived from Navier-Stokes equations. Part 1: Time-invariant equilibrium state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, K. V.; Tobak, M.

    1990-01-01

    The indicial response approach is recast in a form appropriate to the study of vortex induced oscillations phenomena. An appropriate form is demonstrated for the indicial response of the velocity field which may be derived directly from the Navier-Stokes equations. On the basis of the Navier-Stokes equations, it is demonstrated how a form of the velocity response to an arbitrary motion may be determined. To establish its connection with the previous work, the new approach is applied first to the simple situation wherein the indicial response has a time invariant equilibrium state. Results for the aerodynamic response to an arbitrary motion are shown to confirm to the form obtained previously.

  2. Relaxation from Steady States Far from Equilibrium and the Persistence of Anomalous Shock Behavior in Weakly Ionized Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Auslender, Aaron H.

    1999-01-01

    The decay of anomalous effects on shock waves in weakly ionized gases following plasma generator extinction has been measured in the anticipation that the decay time must correlate well with the relaxation time of the mechanism responsible for the anomalous effects. When the relaxation times cannot be measured directly, they are inferred theoretically, usually assuming that the initial state is nearly in thermal equilibrium. In this paper, it is demonstrated that relaxation from any steady state far from equilibrium, including the state of a weakly ionized gas, can proceed much more slowly than arguments based on relaxation from near equilibrium states might suggest. This result justifies a more careful analysis of the relaxation times in weakly ionized gases and suggests that although the experimental measurements of relaxation times did not lead to an unambiguous conclusion, this approach to understanding the anomalous effects may warrant further investigation.

  3. Equilibrium equation of state of a hard sphere binary mixture at very large densities using replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Odriozola, Gerardo; Berthier, Ludovic

    2011-02-07

    We use replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations to measure the equilibrium equation of state of the disordered fluid state for a binary hard sphere mixture up to very large densities where standard Monte Carlo simulations do not easily reach thermal equilibrium. For the moderate system sizes we use (up to N = 100), we find no sign of a pressure discontinuity near the location of dynamic glass singularities extrapolated using either algebraic or simple exponential divergences, suggesting they do not correspond to genuine thermodynamic glass transitions. Several scenarios are proposed for the fate of the fluid state in the thermodynamic limit.

  4. A steady-state non-equilibrium molecular dynamics approach for the study of evaporation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Müller-Plathe, Florian; Yahia-Ouahmed, Méziane; Leroy, Frédéric

    2013-10-01

    Two non-equilibrium methods (called bubble method and splitting method, respectively) have been developed and tested to study the steady state evaporation of a droplet surrounded by its vapor, where the evaporation continuously occurs at the vapor-liquid interface while the droplet size remains constant. In the bubble method, gas molecules are continuously reinserted into a free volume (represented by a bubble) located at the centre of mass of the droplet to keep the droplet size constant. In the splitting method, a molecule close to the centre of mass of the droplet is split into two: In this way, the droplet size is also maintained during the evaporation. By additional local thermostats confined to the area of insertion, the effect of frequent insertions on properties such as density and temperature can be limited to the immediate insertion area. Perturbations are not observed in other parts of the droplet. In the end, both the bubble method and the splitting method achieve steady-state droplet evaporation. Although these methods have been developed using an isolated droplet, we anticipate that they will find a wide range of applications in the study of the evaporation of isolated films and droplets or thin films on heated substrates or under confinement. They can in principle also be used to study the steady-state of other physical processes, such as the diffusion or permeation of gas molecules or ions in a pressure gradient or a concentration gradient.

  5. INFLUENCE OF ELECTRON-IMPACT MULTIPLE IONIZATION ON EQUILIBRIUM AND DYNAMIC CHARGE STATE DISTRIBUTIONS: A CASE STUDY USING IRON

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2015-02-10

    We describe the influence of electron-impact multiple ionization (EIMI) on the ionization balance of collisionally ionized plasmas. Previous ionization balance calculations have largely neglected EIMI. Here, EIMI cross-section data are incorporated into calculations of both equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions (CSDs). For equilibrium CSDs, we find that EIMI has only a small effect and can usually be ignored. However, for non-equilibrium plasmas the influence of EIMI can be important. In particular, we find that for plasmas in which the temperature oscillates there are significant differences in the CSD when including versus neglecting EIMI. These results have implications for modeling and spectroscopy of impulsively heated plasmas, such as nanoflare heating of the solar corona.

  6. Scaling of the equilibrium magnetization in the mixed state of type-II superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, I. L.; Ott, H. R.

    2005-04-01

    We discuss the analysis of mixed-state magnetization data of type-II superconductors using a recently developed scaling procedure. It is based on the fact that, if the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ does not depend on temperature, the magnetic susceptibility χ(H,T) is a universal function of H/Hc2(T), leading to a simple relation between magnetizations at different temperatures. Although this scaling procedure does not provide absolute values of the upper critical field Hc2(T), its temperature variation can be established rather accurately. This provides an opportunity to validate theoretical models that are usually employed for the evaluation of Hc2(T) from equilibrium magnetization data. In the second part of the paper we apply this scaling procedure for a discussion of the notorious first order phase transition in the mixed state of high-Tc superconductors. Our analysis, based on experimental magnetization data available in the literature, shows that the shift of the magnetization accross the transition may adopt either sign, depending on the particular chosen sample. We argue that this observation is inconsistent with the interpretation that this transition always represents the melting transition of the vortex lattice.

  7. The crossover between organized and disorganized states in some non-equilibrium systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Diego Luis; Téllez, Gabriel

    2009-05-01

    We study numerically the crossover between organized and disorganized states of three non-equilibrium systems: the Poisson/coalesce random walk (PCRW), a one-dimensional spin system and a quasi one-dimensional lattice gas. In all cases, we describe this crossover in terms of the average spacing between particles/domain borders langS(t)rang and the spacing distribution functions p(n)(s). The nature of the crossover is not the same for all systems; however, we found that for all systems the nearest neighbor distribution p(0)(s) is well fitted by the Berry-Robnik model. The destruction of the level repulsion in the crossover between organized and disorganized states is present in all systems. Additionally, we found that the correlations between domains in the gas and spin systems are not strong and can be neglected in a first approximation, but for the PCRW the correlations between particles must be taken into account. To find p(n)(s) with n > 1, we propose two different analytical models based on the Berry-Robnik model. Our models give us a good approximation for the statistical behavior of these systems at their crossover and allow us to quantify the degree of order/disorder of the system.

  8. Evidence for out-of-equilibrium states in warm dense matter probed by x-ray Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Clérouin, Jean; Robert, Grégory; Arnault, Philippe; Ticknor, Christopher; Kress, Joel D; Collins, Lee A

    2015-01-01

    A recent and unexpected discrepancy between ab initio simulations and the interpretation of a laser shock experiment on aluminum, probed by x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS), is addressed. The ion-ion structure factor deduced from the XRTS elastic peak (ion feature) is only compatible with a strongly coupled out-of-equilibrium state. Orbital free molecular dynamics simulations with ions colder than the electrons are employed to interpret the experiment. The relevance of decoupled temperatures for ions and electrons is discussed. The possibility that it mimics a transient, or metastable, out-of-equilibrium state after melting is also suggested.

  9. A second perspective on the Amann-Schmiedl-Seifert criterion for non-equilibrium in a three-state system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chen; Chen, Yong

    2015-05-01

    In the work of Amann, Schmiedl and Seifert (2010 J. Chem. Phys. 132 041102), the authors derived a sufficient criterion to identify a non-equilibrium steady state (NESS) in a three-state Markov system based on the coarse-grained information of two-state trajectories. In this paper, we present a mathematical derivation and provide a probabilistic interpretation of the Amann-Schmiedl-Seifert (ASS) criterion. Moreover, the ASS criterion is compared with some other criterions for a NESS.

  10. Development and Assessment of a Computer-Based Equation of State for Equilibrium Air

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Pressure .............. 25 10. High-Density Contribution to the Enthalpy Divided by the Equilibrium Enthalpy ............... 26 11. High-Density...Contribution to the Entropy Divided by the Equilibrium Entropy .................. 27 12. Relative Difference in Calculated Enthalpy for Six Temperatures for...13. Relative Difference in Calculated Enthalpy for Six Temperatures for Lowest Densities ... 33 14. Relative Difference in Calculated Enthalpy for

  11. Spin-up, adjustment and equilibrium state of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, D. P.; Allison, L. C.; Johnson, H. L.; Munday, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    Results will be presented for the spin-up, adjustment and equilibrium state of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), forced by wind stress, buoyancy forcing and diapycnal mixing. First, an analytical model will be presented for the spin-up of an ACC in a reduced-gravity ocean, starting from a shallow pycnocline (consistent with Sandstrom's theorem). The initial spin up is controlled by diapycnal mixing, but the eventual equilibration/adjustment time-scale is controlled by the Gent and McWilliams eddy transfer coefficient. This result has important implications for climate model studies: eddy closures greatly underestimate the sensitivity of the eddy fluxes to subtle changes in the mean strength of the ACC, and the adjustment time- scale is therefore likely to be overestimated. We also find that diapycnal mixing plays an important in setting the mean strength of the ACC, in particular in the limit of strong diapycnal mixing (10-4 m2 s- 1), for precisely the same reasons that diapycnal mixing may play a role in setting the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). These theoretical predictions are compared with the results of numerical calculations using the MITgcm, in a global configuration with parameterized eddies, and in an idealized basin/reentrant channel configuration with partially resolved eddies. The relation of the adjustment of the ACC to the global pycnocline and the AMOC, and the possibility of exciting seiching modes between the different basins, will also be discussed.

  12. Spin-up, adjustment and equilibrium state of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, H. L.; Allison, L. C.; Marshall, D. P.; Munday, D. R.

    2009-04-01

    An analytical model will be presented for the spin-up, adjustment and equilibrium state of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) in a reduced-gravity ocean, forced by wind stress, buoyancy forcing and diapycnal mixing. The initial spin-up from a shallow pycnocline (consistent with Sandstrom's theorem) is controlled by diapycnal mixing, but the eventual equilibration/adjustment time-scale is controlled by the Gent and McWilliams eddy transfer coefficient. This has important implications for climate model studies, which greatly underestimate the sensitivity of eddy fluxes to changes in the mean strength of the ACC. We also find that diapycnal mixing plays an important role in setting the mean strength of the ACC, in particular in the limit of strong diapycnal mixing (10-4 m2 s-1). This is for precisely the same reasons that diapycnal mixing may be important in setting the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The theoretical predictions are compared with the results of numerical calculations carried out with the MITgcm, in a global configuration with parameterized eddies, and in an idealized basin/re-entrant channel configuration with partially resolved eddies. The relationship between ACC adjustment, the global pycnocline and the AMOC, as well as the possibility of exciting seiching modes between the different basins, will also be discussed.

  13. Equilibrium phase behavior and maximally random jammed state of truncated tetrahedra.

    PubMed

    Chen, Duyu; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2014-07-17

    Numerous recent investigations have been devoted to the determination of the equilibrium phase behavior and packing characteristics of hard nonspherical particles, including ellipsoids, superballs, and polyhedra, to name but just a few shapes. Systems of hard nonspherical particles exhibit a variety of stable phases with different degrees of translational and orientational order, including isotropic liquid, solid crystal, rotator and a variety of liquid crystal phases. In this paper, we employ a Monte Carlo implementation of the adaptive-shrinking-cell (ASC) numerical scheme and free-energy calculations to ascertain with high precision the equilibrium phase behavior of systems of congruent Archimedean truncated tetrahedra over the entire range of possible densities up to the maximal nearly space-filling density. In particular, we find that the system undergoes two first-order phase transitions as the density increases: first a liquid-solid transition and then a solid-solid transition. The isotropic liquid phase coexists with the Conway-Torquato (CT) crystal phase at intermediate densities, verifying the result of a previous qualitative study [ J. Chem. Phys. 2011 , 135 , 151101 ]. The freezing- and melting-point packing fractions for this transition are respectively ϕF = 0.496 ± 0.006 and ϕM = 0.591 ± 0.005. At higher densities, we find that the CT phase undergoes another first-order phase transition to one associated with the densest-known crystal, with coexistence densities in the range ϕ ∈ [0.780 ± 0.002, 0.802 ± 0.003]. We find no evidence for stable rotator (or plastic) or nematic phases. We also generate the maximally random jammed (MRJ) packings of truncated tetrahedra, which may be regarded to be the glassy end state of a rapid compression of the liquid. Specifically, we systematically study the structural characteristics of the MRJ packings, including the centroidal pair correlation function, structure factor and orientational pair correlation

  14. Comparison between natural Rain drop size distributions and corresponding models near equilibrium state during warm rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthes, Laurent; Mallet, Cécile

    2010-05-01

    Keywords: Rain Drop Size Distribution, Breakup, coalescence, disdrometer The study of the vertical evolution of raindrop size distributions (DSDs) during rainfall, from the freezing level isotherm to ground level, is a key to improving our understanding of the microphysics of rain. In numerous domains such as remote sensing, telecommunications, soil erosion, and the study of the rain's efficiency in 'washing' the atmosphere, the DSD plays an important role. Among the different processes affecting the evolution of DSD, breakup and coalescence are two of the most significant. Models of coalescence and breakup lead to equilibrium of the raindrop size distribution (DSD) after a fall through sufficient vertical height. At equilibrium, the DSD no longer evolves, and its shape is unique whatever the rain rate or LWC. This implies that the DSD is known, to within a multiplication constant. These models based on experimental measurements have been developed over the past 40 years. The Low and List (1982a,b) parameterization (hereinafter LL82) and the Greg M. McFarquhar (2004) model are both based on the same laboratory experiments, which lead to an equilibrium drop size distribution (EDSD) with two or three peaks, and an exponential tail with a slope of approximately Λ=65 cm-1. Numerous measurements using disdrometer collected in different climatic areas: Paris, France (Mars to October 2000), Iowa-City (April to October 2002), and Djougou (Benin June to September 2006) corresponding to 537 hours of rain period have shown that for high rain rates, close to a state of equilibrium, this slope lies between Λ=20 - 22 cm-1. This latter value is corroborated by others measurements found in the literature (Hu & Srivastava, 1995). Hu & Srivastava suggested that the Low and List parameterization may overestimate the effects of the breakup process. This hypothesis is in adequation with recent laboratory experiments (A.P. Barros 2008) in which the authors conclude that the number of

  15. A corresponding-states analysis of the liquid-vapor equilibrium properties of common water models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugel, Malte; Weiss, Volker C.

    2017-02-01

    Many atomistic potential models have been proposed to reproduce the properties of real water and to capture as many of its anomalies as possible. The large number of different models indicates that this task is by no means an easy one. Some models are reasonably successful for various properties, while others are designed to account for only a very few specific features of water accurately. Among the most popular models are SPC/E, TIP4P, TIP4P/2005, TIP4P/Ice, and TIP5P-E. Here, we report the equilibrium properties of the liquid-vapor coexistence, such as the densities of the liquid phase and the vapor phase, the interfacial tension between them, and the vapor pressure at saturation. From these data, the critical parameters are determined and subsequently used to cast the liquid-vapor coexistence properties into a corresponding-states form following Guggenheim's suggestions. Doing so reveals that the three TIP4P-based models display the same corresponding-states behavior and that the SPC/E model behaves quite similarly. Only the TIP5P-E model shows clear deviations from the corresponding-states properties of the other models. A comparison with data for real water shows that the reduced surface tension is well described, while the reduced coexistence curve is too wide. The models underestimate the critical compressibility factor and overestimate Guggenheim's ratio as well as the reduced boiling temperature (Guldberg's ratio). As demonstrated by the collapse of the data for the TIP4P-based models, these deviations are inherent to the specific model and cannot be corrected by a simple reparametrization. For comparison, the results for two recent polarizable models, HBP and BK3, are shown, and both models are seen to perform well in terms of absolute numbers and in a corresponding-states framework. The kind of analysis applied here can therefore be used as a guideline in the design of more accurate and yet simple multi-purpose models of water.

  16. Transition state theory demonstrated at the micron scale with out-of-equilibrium transport in a confined environment

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Christian L.; Mikkelsen, Morten Bo; Reisner, Walter; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Transition state theory (TST) provides a simple interpretation of many thermally activated processes. It applies successfully on timescales and length scales that differ several orders of magnitude: to chemical reactions, breaking of chemical bonds, unfolding of proteins and RNA structures and polymers crossing entropic barriers. Here we apply TST to out-of-equilibrium transport through confined environments: the thermally activated translocation of single DNA molecules over an entropic barrier helped by an external force field. Reaction pathways are effectively one dimensional and so long that they are observable in a microscope. Reaction rates are so slow that transitions are recorded on video. We find sharp transition states that are independent of the applied force, similar to chemical bond rupture, as well as transition states that change location on the reaction pathway with the strength of the applied force. The states of equilibrium and transition are separated by micrometres as compared with angstroms/nanometres for chemical bonds. PMID:26732388

  17. General and Partial Equilibrium Modeling of Sectoral Policies to Address Climate Change in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Pizer, William; Burtraw, Dallas; Harrington, Winston; Newell, Richard; Sanchirico, James; Toman, Michael

    2003-03-31

    This document provides technical documentation for work using detailed sectoral models to calibrate a general equilibrium analysis of market and non-market sectoral policies to address climate change. Results of this work can be found in the companion paper, "Modeling Costs of Economy-wide versus Sectoral Climate Policies Using Combined Aggregate-Sectoral Model".

  18. Dark Matter and Baryon Asymmetry production from out-of-equilibrium decays of Supersymmetric states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcadi, Giorgio

    2016-02-01

    We will review the main aspects of a mechanism for the contemporary generation of the baryon and Dark Matter abundances from the out-of-equilibrium decay of a WIMP-like mother particle and briefly discuss a concrete realization in a Supersymmetric scenario.

  19. Minimization of a free-energy-like potential for non-equilibrium flow systems at steady state

    PubMed Central

    Niven, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines a new formulation of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, which gives a conditional derivation of the ‘maximum entropy production’ (MEP) principle for flow and/or chemical reaction systems at steady state. The analysis uses a dimensionless potential function ϕst for non-equilibrium systems, analogous to the free energy concept of equilibrium thermodynamics. Spontaneous reductions in ϕst arise from increases in the ‘flux entropy’ of the system—a measure of the variability of the fluxes—or in the local entropy production; conditionally, depending on the behaviour of the flux entropy, the formulation reduces to the MEP principle. The inferred steady state is also shown to exhibit high variability in its instantaneous fluxes and rates, consistent with the observed behaviour of turbulent fluid flow, heat convection and biological systems; one consequence is the coexistence of energy producers and consumers in ecological systems. The different paths for attaining steady state are also classified. PMID:20368250

  20. Colossal magnetoresistance accompanying a structural transition in a highly two-dimensional metallic state of Ca3 Ru2 O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmichi, E.; Yoshida, Y.; Ikeda, S. I.; Shirakawa, N.; Osada, T.

    2004-09-01

    We report the high-field magnetoresistivity, magnetization, and magnetostriction data of a bilayered ruthenate Ca3Ru2O7 grown by a floating-zone method. The samples used in this study show metallic inplane conduction, but nonmetallic interplane conduction, below 30K ; these results are suggestive of a highly two-dimensional metallic ground state. We demonstrate here the existence of two types of field-induced metamagnetic transitions at 6 and 15T , accompanied by the colossal magnetoresistance effect in the interplane conduction [ρc(20T)/ρc(0T)<10-3] . Interestingly, the higher-field transition is accompanied by large inplane lattice shrinkage that is sufficient to cause orbital polarization in nearly threefold t2g orbitals. The lattice change due to the magnetic field coincides with the discontinuity at 48K observed in the thermal contraction data, suggesting that the high-temperature crystal structure is restored by the application of a magnetic field. In this paper, we will discuss this anomalous coupling between spin, charge, and lattice in Ca3Ru2O7 in terms of structural distortions.

  1. Signature of a continuous quantum phase transition in non-equilibrium energy absorption: Footprints of criticality on higher excited states

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sirshendu; Dasgupta, Subinay; Das, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    Understanding phase transitions in quantum matters constitutes a significant part of present day condensed matter physics. Quantum phase transitions concern ground state properties of many-body systems, and hence their signatures are expected to be pronounced in low-energy states. Here we report signature of a quantum critical point manifested in strongly out-of-equilibrium states with finite energy density with respect to the ground state and extensive (subsystem) entanglement entropy, generated by an external pulse. These non-equilibrium states are evidently completely disordered (e.g., paramagnetic in case of a magnetic ordering transition). The pulse is applied by switching a coupling of the Hamiltonian from an initial value (λI) to a final value (λF) for sufficiently long time and back again. The signature appears as non-analyticities (kinks) in the energy absorbed by the system from the pulse as a function of λF at critical-points (i.e., at values of λF corresponding to static critical-points of the system). As one excites higher and higher eigenstates of the final Hamiltonian H(λF) by increasing the pulse height , the non-analyticity grows stronger monotonically with it. This implies adding contributions from higher eigenstates help magnifying the non-analyticity, indicating strong imprint of the critical-point on them. Our findings are grounded on exact analytical results derived for Ising and XY chains in transverse field. PMID:26568306

  2. Signature of a continuous quantum phase transition in non-equilibrium energy absorption: Footprints of criticality on higher excited states.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sirshendu; Dasgupta, Subinay; Das, Arnab

    2015-11-16

    Understanding phase transitions in quantum matters constitutes a significant part of present day condensed matter physics. Quantum phase transitions concern ground state properties of many-body systems, and hence their signatures are expected to be pronounced in low-energy states. Here we report signature of a quantum critical point manifested in strongly out-of-equilibrium states with finite energy density with respect to the ground state and extensive (subsystem) entanglement entropy, generated by an external pulse. These non-equilibrium states are evidently completely disordered (e.g., paramagnetic in case of a magnetic ordering transition). The pulse is applied by switching a coupling of the Hamiltonian from an initial value (λI) to a final value (λF) for sufficiently long time and back again. The signature appears as non-analyticities (kinks) in the energy absorbed by the system from the pulse as a function of λF at critical-points (i.e., at values of λF corresponding to static critical-points of the system). As one excites higher and higher eigenstates of the final Hamiltonian H(λF) by increasing the pulse height (|λF - λI|), the non-analyticity grows stronger monotonically with it. This implies adding contributions from higher eigenstates help magnifying the non-analyticity, indicating strong imprint of the critical-point on them. Our findings are grounded on exact analytical results derived for Ising and XY chains in transverse field.

  3. A TDDFT study on the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT): excited-state equilibrium induced by electron density swing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingzhen; Yang, Dapeng; Ren, Baiping; Wang, Dandan

    2013-07-01

    One important issue of current interest is the excited-state equilibrium for some ESITP dyes. However, so far, the information about the driving forces for excited-state equilibrium is very limited. In this work, the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) method was employed to investigate the nature of the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The geometric structures, vibrational frequencies, frontier molecular orbitals (MOs) and the potential-energy curves for 1-hydroxy-11H-benzo[b]fluoren-11-one (HHBF) in the ground and the first singlet excited state were calculated. Analysis of the results shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond of HHBF is strengthened from E to E*. Moreover, it is found that electron density swing between the proton acceptor and donor provides the driving forces for the forward and backward ESIPT, enabling the excited-state equilibrium to be established. Furthermore, we proposed that the photoexcitation and the interchange of position for electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups are the main reasons for the electron density swing. The potential-energy curves suggest that the forward ESIPT and backward ESIPT may happen on the similar timescale, which is faster than the fluorescence decay of both E* and K* forms.

  4. Internal variables in the local-equilibrium approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kestin, J.

    1992-05-01

    We explore the basis and consequences of the formalism known in the literature as the method of local equilibrium. Contemporary controversies regarding the foundations of thermodynamics are rooted not only in different sets of concepts and principles, but also in semantics. An attempt is made here to use a consistent group of terms, each of whose dictionary meaning corresponds to its physical nature as closely as possible. Since the intention is to study irreversible processes in systems in which even locally there prevails a state of nonequilibrium, the term local equilibrium is abandoned in favor of the phrase principle of local state. In defining the thermodynamic state of system, a distinction is made between the intensive parameters which appear in the physical space and those which describe states of constrained equilibrium in the Gibbsian phase space. The principle of local state is applied by association with every nonequilibrium state n and accompanying equilibrium state e of equal values of U, a, {alpha}, and by asserting that the entropy {bar S} assignable in physical space and temperature {bar T} measured in it can be approximated by the values S and T calculated in the Gibbsian phase space by standard, classical methods. A continuous sequence of accompanying equilibrium states is called an accompanying reversible process, it is conceived as an adiabatic projection of the continuous sequence of nonequilibrium states. The essential part of the method consists in the formulation of the Gibbs equation for the accompanying reversible process in the phase space. It is noted that the local-state approximation, made explicit in this paper, has been used and tested in fluid mechanics though its validity is contested in contemporary continuum mechanics and mechanics of solids.

  5. Internal variables in the local-equilibrium approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kestin, J.

    1992-05-01

    We explore the basis and consequences of the formalism known in the literature as the method of local equilibrium. Contemporary controversies regarding the foundations of thermodynamics are rooted not only in different sets of concepts and principles, but also in semantics. An attempt is made here to use a consistent group of terms, each of whose dictionary meaning corresponds to its physical nature as closely as possible. Since the intention is to study irreversible processes in systems in which even locally there prevails a state of nonequilibrium, the term local equilibrium is abandoned in favor of the phrase principle of local state. In defining the thermodynamic state of system, a distinction is made between the intensive parameters which appear in the physical space and those which describe states of constrained equilibrium in the Gibbsian phase space. The principle of local state is applied by association with every nonequilibrium state n and accompanying equilibrium state e of equal values of U, a, alpha, and by asserting that the entropy (bar-S) assignable in physical space and temperature (bar-T) measured in it can be approximated by the values S and T calculated in the Gibbsian phase space by standard, classical methods. A continuous sequence of accompanying equilibrium states is called an accompanying reversible process, it is conceived as an adiabatic projection of the continuous sequence of nonequilibrium states. The essential part of the method consists in the formulation of the Gibbs equation for the accompanying reversible process in the phase space. It is noted that the local-state approximation, made explicit in this paper, has been used and tested in fluid mechanics though its validity is contested in contemporary continuum mechanics and mechanics of solids.

  6. A Note on the Relationship between Temperature and Water Vapor in Quasi-Equilibrium and Climate States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shie, C.-L.; Shie, C.-L.; Tao, W.-K.; Simpson, J.; Sui, C.-H.

    2005-01-01

    An ideal and simple formulation is successfully derived that well represents a quasi-linear relationship found between the domain-averaged water vapor, q (mm), and temperature, T (K), fields obtained from a series of quasi-equilibrium (long-term) simulations for the Tropics using the two-dimensional Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Earlier model work showed that the forced maintenance of two different wind profiles in the Tropics leads to two different equilibrium states. Investigating this finding required investigation of the slope of the moisture-temperature relations, which turns out to be linear in the Tropics. The extra-tropical climate equilibriums become more complex, but insight on modeling sensitivity can be obtained by linear stepwise regression of the integrated temperature and humidity. A globally curvilinear moisture-temperature distribution, similar to the famous Clausius-Clapeyron curve (i.e., saturated water vapor pressure versus temperature), is then found in this study. Such a genuine finding clarifies that the dynamics are crucial to the climate (shown in the earlier work) but the thermodynamics adjust. The range of validity of this result is further examined herein. The GCE-modeled tropical domain-averaged q and T fields form a linearly-regressed "q-T" slope that genuinely resides within an ideal range of slopes obtained from the aforementioned formulation. A quantity (denoted as dC2/dC1) representing the derivative between the static energy densities due to temperature (C2) and water vapor (C1) for various quasi-equilibrium states can also be obtained. A dC2/dC1 value near unity obtained for the GCE-modeled tropical simulations implies that the static energy densities due to moisture and temperature only differ by a pure constant for various equilibrium states. An overall q-T relation also including extra-tropical regions is, however, found to have a curvilinear relationship. Accordingly, warm/moist regions favor change in water vapor

  7. Are two plasma equilibrium states possible when the emission coefficient exceeds unity?

    DOE PAGES

    Campanell, Michael D.; Umansky, M. V.

    2017-02-28

    Two floating sheath solutions with strong electron emission in planar geometry have been proposed, a “space-charge limited” (SCL) sheath and an “inverse” sheath. SCL and inverse models contain different assumptions about conditions outside the sheath (e.g., the velocity of ions entering the sheath). So it is not yet clear whether both sheaths are possible in practice, or only one. Here we treat the global presheath-sheath problem for a plasma produced volumetrically between two planar walls. We show that all equilibrium requirements (a) floating condition, (b) plasma shielding, and (c) presheath force balance, can indeed be satisfied in two different waysmore » when the emission coefficient γ > 1. There is one solution with SCL sheaths and one with inverse sheaths, each with sharply different presheath distributions. As we show for the first time in 1D-1V simulations, a SCL and inverse equilibrium are both possible in plasmas with the same upstream properties (e.g., same N and Te). However, maintaining a true SCL equilibrium requires no ionization or charge exchange collisions in the sheath, or else cold ion accumulation in the SCL's “dip” forces a transition to the inverse. This suggests that only a monotonic inverse type sheath potential should exist at any plasma-facing surface with strong emission, whether be a divertor plate, emissive probe, dust grain, Hall thruster channel wall, sunlit object in space, etc. Nevertheless, SCL sheaths might still be possible if the ions in the dip can escape. Finally, our simulations demonstrate ways in which SCL and inverse regimes might be distinguished experimentally based on large-scale presheath effects, without having to probe inside the sheath.« less

  8. Cumulants and large deviations of the current through non-equilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodineau, Thierry; Derrida, Bernard

    2007-06-01

    Using a generalisation of detailed balance for systems maintained out of equilibrium by contact with 2 reservoirs at unequal temperatures or at unequal densities, one can recover the fluctuation theorem for the large deviation function of the current. For large diffusive systems, we show how the large deviation function of the current can be computed using a simple additivity principle. The validity of this additivity principle and the occurrence of phase transitions are discussed in the framework of the macroscopic fluctuation theory. To cite this article: T. Bodineau, B. Derrida, C. R. Physique 8 (2007).

  9. Calculation of NARM's equilibrium with Peng-Robinson equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tingxun; Guo, Kaihua; Wang, Ruzhu; Fan, Shuanshi

    2001-04-01

    The liquid molar volumes of nonazeotropic refrigerant mixtures (NARM), calculated with Peng Robinson (PR) equation, were compared with vapor -liquid equilibrium experimental data in this paper. Provided with co-reaction coefficient k ij , the discrepancies of liquid molar volume data for R22+R114 and R22+R142b using PR equation are 7.7% and 8.1%, respectively. When HBT (Hankinson-Brobst-Thomson) equation was joined with PR equation, the deviations are reduced to less than 1.5% for both R22+R114 and R22+R142b.

  10. Predicting equilibrium states with Reynolds stress closures in channel flow and homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abid, R.; Speziale, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    Turbulent channel flow and homogeneous shear flow have served as basic building block flows for the testing and calibration of Reynolds stress models. A direct theoretical connection is made between homogeneous shear flow in equilibrium and the log-layer of fully-developed turbulent channel flow. It is shown that if a second-order closure model is calibrated to yield good equilibrium values for homogeneous shear flow it will also yield good results for the log-layer of channel flow provided that the Rotta coefficient is not too far removed from one. Most of the commonly used second-order closure models introduce an ad hoc wall reflection term in order to mask deficient predictions for the log-layer of channel flow that arise either from an inaccurate calibration of homogeneous shear flow or from the use of a Rotta coefficient that is too large. Illustrative model calculations are presented to demonstrate this point which has important implications for turbulence modeling.

  11. Two-phase equilibrium states in individual Cu-Ni nanoparticles: size, depletion and hysteresis effects.

    PubMed

    Shirinyan, Aram S

    2015-01-01

    In isolated bimetallic nanoscale systems the limit amount of matter and surface-induced size effects can change the thermodynamics of first-order phase transformation. In this paper we present theoretical modification of Gibbs free energy concept describing first-order phase transformation of binary alloyed nanoparticles taking into account size effects as well as depletion and hysteresis effects. In such a way the hysteresis in a form of nonsymmetry for forth and back transforming paths takes place; compositional splitting and the loops-like splitted path on the size dependent temperature-composition phase diagram occur. Our calculations for individual Cu-Ni nanoparticle show that one must differentiate the solubility curves and the equilibrium loops (discussed here in term of solidification and melting loops). For the first time we have calculated and present here on the temperature-composition phase diagram the nanomelting loop at the size of 80 nm and the nanosolidification loop at the size of 25 nm for an individual Cu-Ni nanoparticle. So we observe the difference between the size-dependent phase diagram and solubility diagram, between two-phase equilibrium curves and solubility curves; also intersection of nanoliquidus and nanosolidus is available. These findings lead to the necessity to reconsider such basic concepts in materials science as phase diagram and solubility diagram.

  12. Application of equilibrium chemistry and the Williamsburg equation of state to HMX-based explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braithwaite, M.; Swift, D. C.

    1999-06-01

    Thermodynamic equations of state have been demonstrated to give reasonable predictions of the species and states in the reaction products of energetic materials. The Williamsburg is a physically-based algebraic form for an equation of state. The Williamsburg is being used to interpolate and extrapolate a wide-ranging equation of state from a smaller set of chemical calculations of HMX-based explosives. These equations of state will be compared with experiments on explosive performance. Extensions to the Williamsburg form, necessary to treat processes such as carbon condensation in TATB-based explosives, will be discussed.

  13. Non-Equilibrium DNA Dynamics Probed by Delayed Capture and Recapture by a Solid-State Nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihovilovic, Mirna; Teich, Erin; Hagerty, Nicholas; Stein, Derek

    2012-02-01

    We studied the relaxation of λ-DNA following its translocation through a voltage-biased solid-state nanopore. The translocation process drives DNA into a non-equilibrium state because the ˜2 ms translocation time is roughly fifty times shorter that the polymer's characteristic (Zimm) relaxation time. By reversing the applied voltage at controlled delay times after a translocation event, the nanopore probed the configurations of recaptured molecules at various stages of relaxation. We monitored the disruptions of the ionic current through the nanopore and computed the integrated charge deficits (ECDs) resulting from DNA translocations. As the delay time between voltage reversals was decreased from 50 ms to 5 ms, the distribution of ECDs shifted to lower values. Furthermore, an increasing fraction of recapture events occurred in a shorter interval from the voltage reversal than the delay time. These observations are explained by the expansion of the DNA coil as it approaches equilibrium. Finally, we show that recapturing a molecule multiple times and averaging the ECDs reduces the measurement error, which is useful for molecular diagnostic applications. The variance decreases approximately as the inverse number of passes through the pore.

  14. Allosteric equilibrium model explains steady-state coupling of beta-adrenergic receptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Ugur, O; Onaran, H O

    1997-05-01

    We used a simple experimental approach to clarify some contradictory predictions of the collision coupling and equilibrium models (e.g. ternary complex, two-state ternary complex or quinternary complex), which describe G-protein-mediated beta-adrenergic receptor signalling in essentially different manners. Analysis of the steady-state coupling of beta-adrenoceptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes showed that: (1) in the absence of an agonist, Gpp(NH)p (a hydrolysis-resistant analogue of GTP) can activate adenylate cyclase very slowly; (2) this activity reaches a steady state in approx. 5 h, the extent of activity depending on the concentration of the nucleotide; (3) isoprenaline-activated steady-state adenylate cyclase can be inactivated by propranolol (a competitive antagonist that relaxes the receptor activation), in the presence of Gpp(NH)p (which provides a virtual absence of GTPase) and millimolar concentrations of Mg2+ (the rate of this inactivation is relatively fast); (4) increasing the concentration of Gpp(NH)p can saturate the steady-state activity of adenylate cyclase. The saturated enzyme activity was lower than that induced by isoprenaline under the same conditions. This additional agonist-induced activation was reversible. In the light of these results, we conclude that agonist can also activate the guanine nucleotide-saturated system in the absence of GTPase by a mechanism other than guanine nucleotide exchange. We explain these phenomena in the framework of a quinternary complex model as an agonist-induced and receptor-mediated dissociation of guanine nucleotide-saturated residual heterotrimer, the equilibrium concentration of which is not necessarily zero. These results, which suggest a continuous interaction between receptor and G-protein, can hardly be accommodated by the collision coupling model that was originally suggested for the present experimental system and then applied to many other G-protein systems. Therefore we

  15. Molecular effect on equilibrium charge-state distributions. [of nitrogen ions injected through carbon foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickholm, D.; Bickel, W. S.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes an experiment consisting of the acceleration of N(+) and N2(+) ions to energies between 0.25 and 1.75 MeV and their injection through a thin carbon foil, whereupon they were charge-state analyzed with an electrostatic analyzer. A foil-covered electrically suppressed Faraday cup, connected to a stepping motor, moved in the plane of the dispersed beams. The Faraday cup current, which was proportional to the number of incident ions, was sent to a current digitizer and computer programmed as a multiscaler. The energy-dependent charge-state fractions, the mean charge and the distribution width were calculated. It was shown that for incident atoms, the charge state distribution appeared to be spread over more charge states, while for the incident molecules, there was a greater fraction of charge states near the mean charge.

  16. Thermal equilibrium/disequilibrium features in the excited-state temperature of atomic helium in MAP-II divertor simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, S.

    2015-08-01

    Doppler-Stark spectrometry and laser Thomson scattering diagnostics for helium plasmas were applied to the MAP-II (material and plasma) steady-state linear divertor simulator at the University of Tokyo. In recombining plasmas, as the volumetric recombination proceeded, atomic, ionic and electron temperatures converged to the same values, which indicated the achievement of thermal equilibrium. On the other hand, in ionizing plasmas, in addition to the collisional heating of bulk atoms, excess heating of atoms in the high principal quantum number states (above Griem's boundary) was observed. This disequilibrium feature can be attributed to the presence of two prevailing conditions: that the characteristic time of the charge-exchange process of the atoms with ions in the system became shorter than the lifetime of the excited atoms spent above Griem's boundary, and that the population influx from above Griem's boundary is considerably larger than that from below the boundary.

  17. Combining the GW formalism with the polarizable continuum model: A state-specific non-equilibrium approach.

    PubMed

    Duchemin, Ivan; Jacquemin, Denis; Blase, Xavier

    2016-04-28

    We have implemented the polarizable continuum model within the framework of the many-body Green's function GW formalism for the calculation of electron addition and removal energies in solution. The present formalism includes both ground-state and non-equilibrium polarization effects. In addition, the polarization energies are state-specific, allowing to obtain the bath-induced renormalisation energy of all occupied and virtual energy levels. Our implementation is validated by comparisons with ΔSCF calculations performed at both the density functional theory and coupled-cluster single and double levels for solvated nucleobases. The present study opens the way to GW and Bethe-Salpeter calculations in disordered condensed phases of interest in organic optoelectronics, wet chemistry, and biology.

  18. On the equilibrium state of a small system with random matrix coupling to its environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebowitz, J. L.; Pastur, L.

    2015-07-01

    We consider a random matrix model of interaction between a small n-level system, S, and its environment, a N-level heat reservoir, R. The interaction between S and R is modeled by a tensor product of a fixed n× n matrix and a N× N Hermitian random matrix. We show that under certain ‘macroscopicity’ conditions on R, the reduced density matrix of the system {{ρ }S}=T{{r}R}ρ S\\cup R(eq), is given by ρ S(c)˜ exp \\{-β {{H}S}\\}, where HS is the Hamiltonian of the isolated system. This holds for all strengths of the interaction and thus gives some justification for using ρ S(c) to describe some nano-systems, like biopolymers, in equilibrium with their environment (Seifert 2012 Rep. Prog. Phys. 75 126001). Our results extend those obtained previously in (Lebowitz and Pastur 2004 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 37 1517-34) (Lebowitz et al 2007 Contemporary Mathematics (Providence RI: American Mathematical Society) pp 199-218) for a special two-level system.

  19. Probing autoinducer-2 based quorum sensing: the biological consequences of molecules unable to traverse equilibrium states.

    PubMed

    Tsuchikama, Kyoji; Lowery, Colin A; Janda, Kim D

    2011-09-02

    Bacteria have developed a cell-to-cell communication system, termed quorum sensing (QS), which allows for the population-dependent coordination of their behavior via the exchange of chemical signals. Autoinducer-2 (AI-2), a class of QS signals derived from 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentandione (DPD), has been revealed as a universal signaling molecule in a variety of bacterial species. In spite of considerable interest, the study of putative AI-2 based QS systems remains a challenging topic in part due to the rapid interconversion between the linear and cyclic forms of DPD. Herein, we report the design and development of efficient syntheses of carbocyclic analogues of DPD, which are locked in the cyclic form. The synthetic analogues were evaluated for the modulation of AI-2-based QS in Vibrio harveyi and Salmonella typhimurium. No agonists were uncovered in either V. harveyi or S. typhimurium assay, whereas weak to moderate antagonists were found against V. harveyi. On the basis of NMR analyses and DFT calculations, the heterocyclic oxygen atom within DPD appears necessary to promote hydration at the C3 position of cyclic DPD to afford the active tetrahydroxy species. These results also shed light on the interaction between the heterocyclic oxygen atom and receptor proteins as well as the importance of the linear form and dynamic equilibrium of DPD as crucial requirements for activation of AI-2 based QS circuits.

  20. A quantitative description of equilibrium and homeostatic thickness regulation in the in vivo cornea. II. Variations from the normal state.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M H

    1972-06-01

    The description of corneal mechanics and transport developed in part I and used there to describe normal corneal behavior is here applied to corneas whose properties or boundary conditions are abnormal. The predicted effects of changing intraocular pressure, aqueous concentration, and tear tonicity are examined, and these compare favorably with available experimental data. The periodic variation in tear tonicity which accompanies the sleep-wake cycle prevents the cornea from achieving a true steady state, but a time-average steady state, about which corneal behavior oscillates, can be defined. The in vivo effects of endothelial dystrophy and epithelial removal are explained, and it is suggested that the epithelial sodium pump may act homeostatically to maintain corneal thickness in the face of ambient temperature variations. Part II concludes with a discussion, from the standpoint of the present theory, of the role of metabolically coupled water transport in the maintenance of the normal corneal thickness.

  1. On the theory of steady-state crystallization with a non-equilibrium mushy layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, D. V.; Alexandrova, I. V.; Ivanov, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Complete analytical solutions of nonlinear equations describing the steady-state directional crystallization of binary melts with a nonequilibrium mushy layer, where the processes of nucleation and growth of crystals occur, are constructed.

  2. Bose-Hubbard model: Relation between driven-dissipative steady states and equilibrium quantum phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Boité, Alexandre; Orso, Giuliano; Ciuti, Cristiano

    2014-12-01

    We present analytical solutions for the mean-field master equation of the driven-dissipative Bose-Hubbard model for cavity photons, in the limit of both weak pumping and weak dissipation. Instead of pure Mott-insulator states, we find statistical mixtures with the same second-order coherence g(2 )(0 ) as a Fock state with n photons, but a mean photon number of n /2 . These mixed states occur when n pump photons have the same energy as n interacting photons inside the nonlinear cavity and survive up to a critical tunneling coupling strength, above which a crossover to a classical coherent state takes place. We also explain the origin of both antibunching and superbunching predicted by P-representation mean-field theory at higher pumping and dissipation. In particular, we show that the strongly correlated region of the associated phase diagram cannot be described within the semiclassical Gross-Pitaevskii approach.

  3. Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccotti, Giovanni; Kapral, Raymond; Sergi, Alessandro

    Statistical mechanics provides a well-established link between microscopic equilibrium states and thermodynamics. If one considers systems out of equilibrium, the link between microscopic dynamical properties and non-equilibrium macroscopic states is more difficult to establish [1,2]. For systems lying near equilibrium, linear response theory provides a route to derive linear macroscopic laws and the microscopic expressions for the transport properties that enter the constitutive relations. If the system is displaced far from equilibrium, no fully general theory exists to treat such systems. By restricting consideration to a class of non-equilibrium states which arise from perturbations (linear or non-linear) of an equilibrium state, methods can be developed to treat non-equilibrium states. Furthermore, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulation methods can be devised to provide estimates for the transport properties of these systems.

  4. Insights into the allosteric regulation of Syk association with receptor ITAM, a multi-state equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chao; Post, Carol Beth

    2016-02-17

    The phosphorylation of interdomain A (IA), a linker region between tandem SH2 domains of Syk tyrosine kinase, regulates the binding affinity for association of Syk with doubly-phosphorylated ITAM regions of the B cell receptor. The mechanism of this allosteric regulation has been suggested to be a switch from the high-affinity bifunctional binding, mediated through both SH2 domains binding two phosphotyrosine residues of ITAM, to a substantially lower-affinity binding of only one SH2 domain. IA phosphorylation triggers the switch by inducing disorder in IA and weakening the SH2-SH2 interaction. The postulated switch to a single-SH2-domain binding mode is examined using NMR to monitor site-specific binding to each SH2 domain of Syk variants engineered to have IA regions that differ in conformational flexibility. The combined analysis of titration curves and NMR line-shapes provides sufficient information to determine the energetics of inter-molecular binding at each SH2 site along with an intra-molecular binding or isomerization step. A less favorable isomerization equilibrium associated with the changes in the SH2-SH2 conformational ensemble and IA flexibility accounts for the inhibition of Syk association with membrane ITAM regions when IA is phosphorylated, and refutes the proposed switch to single-SH2-domain binding. Syk localizes in the cell through its SH2 interactions, and this basis for allosteric regulation of ITAM association proposes for the first time a phosphorylation-dependent model to regulate Syk binding to alternate receptors and other signaling proteins that differ either in the number of residues separating ITAM phosphotyrosines or by having only one phosphotyrosine, a half ITAM.

  5. Heterogeneity of equilibrium molten globule state of cytochrome c induced by weak salt denaturants under physiological condition.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Hamidur; Alam Khan, Md Khurshid; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Ahmad, Faizan

    2015-01-01

    While many proteins are recognized to undergo folding via intermediate(s), the heterogeneity of equilibrium folding intermediate(s) along the folding pathway is less understood. In our present study, FTIR spectroscopy, far- and near-UV circular dichroism (CD), ANS and tryptophan fluorescence, near IR absorbance spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were used to study the structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the native (N), denatured (D) and intermediate state (X) of goat cytochorme c (cyt-c) induced by weak salt denaturants (LiBr, LiCl and LiClO4) at pH 6.0 and 25°C. The LiBr-induced denaturation of cyt-c measured by Soret absorption (Δε400) and CD ([θ]409), is a three-step process, N ↔ X ↔ D. It is observed that the X state obtained along the denaturation pathway of cyt-c possesses common structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the molten globule (MG) state. The MG state of cyt-c induced by LiBr is compared for its structural and thermodynamic parameters with those found in other solvent conditions such as LiCl, LiClO4 and acidic pH. Our observations suggest: (1) that the LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c retains the native Met80-Fe(III) axial bond and Trp59-propionate interactions; (2) that LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c is more compact retaining the hydrophobic interactions in comparison to the MG states induced by LiCl, LiClO4 and 0.5 M NaCl at pH 2.0; and (3) that there exists heterogeneity of equilibrium intermediates along the unfolding pathway of cyt-c as highly ordered (X1), classical (X2) and disordered (X3), i.e., D ↔ X3 ↔ X2 ↔ X1 ↔ N.

  6. Out-of-equilibrium dynamics of photoexcited spin-state concentration waves

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, Andrea; Buron-Le Cointe, M.; Lorenc, M.; Toupet, L.; Henning, Robert W.; DiChiara, A. D.; Moffat, Keith; Brefuel, N.; Collet, E.

    2015-01-28

    The spin crossover compound [FeIIH2L2-Me][PF6]2 presents a two-step phase transition. In the intermediate phase, a spin state concentration wave (SSCW) appears resulting from a symmetry breaking (cell doubling) associated with a long-range order of alternating high and low spin molecular states. Lastly, by combining time-resolved optical and X-ray diffraction measurements on a single crystal, we study how such a system responds to femtosecond laser excitation and we follow in real time the erasing and rewriting of the SSCW

  7. Out-of-equilibrium dynamics of photoexcited spin-state concentration waves

    DOE PAGES

    Marino, Andrea; Buron-Le Cointe, M.; Lorenc, M.; ...

    2015-01-28

    The spin crossover compound [FeIIH2L2-Me][PF6]2 presents a two-step phase transition. In the intermediate phase, a spin state concentration wave (SSCW) appears resulting from a symmetry breaking (cell doubling) associated with a long-range order of alternating high and low spin molecular states. Lastly, by combining time-resolved optical and X-ray diffraction measurements on a single crystal, we study how such a system responds to femtosecond laser excitation and we follow in real time the erasing and rewriting of the SSCW

  8. The Role of Active Video-Accompanied Exercises in Improvement of the Obese State in Children: A Prospective Study from Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Duman, Fatma; Kokaçya, Mehmet Hanifi; Doğru, Esra; Katayıfcı, Nihan; Canbay, Özden; Aman, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of active video games and music-accompanied aerobic and callisthenic exercises on body mass index (BMI), body fat ratio, physical performance tests, psychosocial status, and self-respect in overweight and obese adolescents. Methods: Fifty (21 males and 29 females) slightly overweight and obese participants with no chronic disorder and of an average age of 12.16±0.99 years were included in the study. The percentile values for BMI, triceps skinfold thickness, waist circumference measurements, and physical performance tests were evaluated. The effects of obesity on psychological wellness were evaluated using the depression scale for children (DSC) and the Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale for self-esteem. Following these evaluations, the participants were subjected to an exercise program in five groups of 10 people, 3 days a week for a duration of 8 weeks. Each exercise session lasted 45 minutes. Participants were re-evaluated at the end of the exercise program. The data collected both before and after the exercise program were analyzed using the SPSS 18.0 program. Results: According to BMI reference values, 28% of the 50 participants (n=14; 6 males and 8 females) were assessed to be overweight and 72% to be obese (n=36; 15 males and 21 females). Following the exercise program, 14% of the participants (n=7; 3 males and 4 females) were assessed as normal, 46% (n=23; 14 males and 9 female) as slightly overweight, and 40% (n=20; 4 male and 16 female) as obese. It was determined that the decrease in BMI values (p<0.05) was higher in male participants than in female participants and that the frequency of obesity was higher in the females. A statistically significant decrease in BMI values was found after the exercise program (p<0.01). Following the exercise program, statistically significant differences have also been observed in the self-esteem (p<0.01), psychological wellness (p=0.025), triceps

  9. High-Efficiency Solid State Cooling Technologies: Non-Equilibrium Asymmetic Thermoelectrics (NEAT) Devices

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: Sheetak is developing a thermoelectric-based solid state cooling system to replace typical air conditioners that use vapor compression to cool air. With noisy mechanical components, vapor compression systems use a liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the external environment. With no noisy moving parts or polluting refrigerants, thermoelectric systems rely on an electrical current being passed through the junction of the two different conducting materials to change temperature. Using advanced semiconductor technology, Sheetak is improving solid state cooling systems by using proprietary thermoelectric materials along with other innovations to achieve significant energy efficiency. Sheetak’s new design displaces compressor-based technology; improves reliability; and decreases energy usage. Sheetak’s use of semiconductor manufacturing methods leads to less material use—facilitating cheaper production.

  10. Entropy for Zero-Temperature Limits of Gibbs-Equilibrium States for Countable-Alphabet Subshifts of Finite Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, I. D.

    2007-01-01

    Let Σ A be a finitely primitive subshift of finite type over a countable alphabet. For suitable potentials f : Σ A → ℝ we can associate an invariant Gibbs equilibrium state μ tf to the potential tf for each t ≥ 1. In this note, we show that the entropy h(μ tf ) converges in the limit t→ ∞ to the maximum entropy of those invariant measures which maximize ∫ f dμ. We further show that every weak-* accumulation point of the family of measures μ tf has entropy equal to this value. This answers a pair of questions posed by O. Jenkinson, R. D. Mauldin and M. Urbański.

  11. Yeast TATA Binding Protein Interaction with DNA: Fluorescence Determination of Oligomeric State, Equilibrium Binding, On-Rate, and Dissociation Kinetics†

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Howard, Gina M.; Weil, P. Anthony

    2010-01-01

    A combination of steady-state, stopped-flow, and time-resolved fluorescence of intrinsic tryptophan and extrinsically labeled fluorescent DNA is utilized to examine the interaction of yeast TATA binding protein (TBP) with DNA. TBP is composed of two structural domains, the carboxy domain (residues 61–240), which is responsible for DNA binding and initiation of basal level transcription, and an amino terminal domain (residues 1–60), whose function is currently unknown. The steady-state fluorescence emission spectrum of the single tryptophan in the amino terminal domain of TBP undergoes a huge (30–40 nm) red-shift upon interaction with stoichiometric amounts of TATA box containing DNA. From time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence anisotropy studies, we demonstrate that, in the absence of DNA, the protein exists as a multimer in solution and it contains (at least) two primary conformations, one with the amino terminus associated tightly with the protein(s) in a hydrophobic environment and one with the amino terminus decoupled away from the rest of the protein and solvent-exposed. Upon binding DNA, the protein dissociates into a monomeric complex, upon which only the solvent-exposed amino terminus conformation remains. Kinetic and equilibrium binding studies were performed on TATA box containing DNA which was extrinsically labeled with a fluorescent probe Rhodamine-X at the 5′-end. This “fluorescent” DNA allowed for the collection of quantitative spectroscopic binding, kinetic on-rate, and kinetic off-rate data at physiological concentrations. Global analysis of equilibrium binding studies performed from 500 pM to 50 nM DNA reveals a single dissociation constant (Kd) of approximately 5 nM. Global analysis of stopped-flow anisotropy on-rate experiments, with millisecond timing resolution and TBP concentrations ranging from 20 to 600 nM (20 nM DNA), can be perfectly described by a single second-order rate constant of 1.66 × 105 M−1 s−1. These measurements

  12. Economic Impacts of Potential Foot and Mouth Disease Agro-terrorism in the United States: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A; Rose, Adam; Bumsoo, Lee

    2013-01-01

    The foot and mouth disease (FMD) virus has high agro-terrorism potential because it is contagious, can be easily transmitted via inanimate objects and can be spread by wind. An outbreak of FMD in developed countries results in massive slaughtering of animals (for disease control) and disruptions in meat supply chains and trade, with potentially large economic losses. Although the United States has been FMD-free since 1929, the potential of FMD as a deliberate terrorist weapon calls for estimates of the physical and economic damage that could result from an outbreak. This paper estimates the economic impacts of three alternative scenarios of potential FMD attacks using a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of the US economy. The three scenarios range from a small outbreak successfully contained within a state to a large multi-state attack resulting in slaughtering of 30 percent of the national livestock. Overall, the value of total output losses in our simulations range between $37 billion (0.15% of 2006 baseline economic output) and $228 billion (0.92%). Major impacts stem from the supply constraint on livestock due to massive animal slaughtering. As expected, the economic losses are heavily concentrated in agriculture and food manufacturing sectors, with losses ranging from $23 billion to $61 billion in the two industries.

  13. Non-equilibrium relaxation between two quasi-stationary states in a stochastic lattice Lotka-Volterra model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng; Täuber, Uwe C.

    2015-03-01

    Spatially extended stochastic models for predator-prey competition and coexistence display complex, correlated spatio-temporal structures and are governed by remarkably large fluctuations. Both populations are characterized by damped erratic oscillations whose properties are governed by the reaction rates. Here, we specifically study a stochastic lattice Lotka-Volterra model by means of Monte Carlo simulations that impose spatial restrictions on the number of occupants per site. The system tends to relax into a quasi-stationary state, independent of the imposed initial conditions. We investigate the non-equilibrium relaxation between two such quasi-stationary states, following an instantaneous change of the predation rate. The ensuing relaxation times are measured via the peak width of the population density Fourier transforms. As expected, we find that the initial state only influences the oscillations for the duration of this relaxation time, implying that the system quickly loses any memory of the initial configuration. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award DE-FG02-09ER46613.

  14. Prediction of the Chapman-Jouguet chemical equilibrium state in a detonation wave from first principles based reactive molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dezhou; Zybin, Sergey V; An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-01-21

    The combustion or detonation of reacting materials at high temperature and pressure can be characterized by the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state that describes the chemical equilibrium of the products at the end of the reaction zone of the detonation wave for sustained detonation. This provides the critical properties and product kinetics for input to macroscale continuum simulations of energetic materials. We propose the ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics to CJ point protocol (Rx2CJ) for predicting the CJ state parameters, providing the means to predict the performance of new materials prior to synthesis and characterization, allowing the simulation based design to be done in silico. Our Rx2CJ method is based on atomistic reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) using the QM-derived ReaxFF force field. We validate this method here by predicting the CJ point and detonation products for three typical energetic materials. We find good agreement between the predicted and experimental detonation velocities, indicating that this method can reliably predict the CJ state using modest levels of computation.

  15. Rich structure in the correlation matrix spectra in non-equilibrium steady states.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Soham; Leyvraz, Francois; Monroy Castillero, Paulino; Seligman, Thomas H

    2017-01-17

    It has been shown that, if a model displays long-range (power-law) spatial correlations, its equal-time correlation matrix will also have a power law tail in the distribution of its high-lying eigenvalues. The purpose of this paper is to show that the converse is generally incorrect: a power-law tail in the high-lying eigenvalues of the correlation matrix may exist even in the absence of equal-time power law correlations in the initial model. We may therefore view the study of the eigenvalue distribution of the correlation matrix as a more powerful tool than the study of spatial Correlations, one which may in fact uncover structure, that would otherwise not be apparent. Specifically, we show that in the Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process, whereas there are no clearly visible correlations in the steady state, the eigenvalues of its correlation matrix exhibit a rich structure which we describe in detail.

  16. Rich structure in the correlation matrix spectra in non-equilibrium steady states

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Soham; Leyvraz, Francois; Monroy Castillero, Paulino; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that, if a model displays long-range (power-law) spatial correlations, its equal-time correlation matrix will also have a power law tail in the distribution of its high-lying eigenvalues. The purpose of this paper is to show that the converse is generally incorrect: a power-law tail in the high-lying eigenvalues of the correlation matrix may exist even in the absence of equal-time power law correlations in the initial model. We may therefore view the study of the eigenvalue distribution of the correlation matrix as a more powerful tool than the study of spatial Correlations, one which may in fact uncover structure, that would otherwise not be apparent. Specifically, we show that in the Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process, whereas there are no clearly visible correlations in the steady state, the eigenvalues of its correlation matrix exhibit a rich structure which we describe in detail. PMID:28094322

  17. Rich structure in the correlation matrix spectra in non-equilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Soham; Leyvraz, Francois; Monroy Castillero, Paulino; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that, if a model displays long-range (power-law) spatial correlations, its equal-time correlation matrix will also have a power law tail in the distribution of its high-lying eigenvalues. The purpose of this paper is to show that the converse is generally incorrect: a power-law tail in the high-lying eigenvalues of the correlation matrix may exist even in the absence of equal-time power law correlations in the initial model. We may therefore view the study of the eigenvalue distribution of the correlation matrix as a more powerful tool than the study of spatial Correlations, one which may in fact uncover structure, that would otherwise not be apparent. Specifically, we show that in the Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process, whereas there are no clearly visible correlations in the steady state, the eigenvalues of its correlation matrix exhibit a rich structure which we describe in detail.

  18. Mass budgets, pathways, and equilibrium states of two hexachlorocyclohexanes in the Baltic Sea environment.

    PubMed

    Breivik, Knut; Wania, Frank

    2002-03-01

    The POPCYCLING-Baltic model, a non-steady-state multicompartmental mass balance model of long-term chemical fate in the Baltic Sea environment, is used to derive a quantitative understanding of the behavior of alpha- and gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) from 1970 to 2000. The atmosphere is found to effectively distribute the HCHs within the Baltic Sea environment and beyond, resulting in relatively uniform concentrations in environmental compartments that do not directly receive emissions. This uniformity is the result of a large-scale redistribution of a relatively small fraction of the emitted HCHs from the agricultural systems in source areas to all other environmental compartments throughout the Baltic Sea region. The major fraction of the HCHs is degraded in the soils receiving the pesticide application. In areas where HCH-containing pesticides are used, HCHs evaporate from soils and water bodies and are advected away in the atmosphere. They are deposited to forests and water bodies when they reach remote regions. This redistribution is driven by the inclination of the HCHs to equalize their chemical potential within the environment, which is illustrated through the use of fugacity fractions. The model is believed to provide useful insight into the complex set of interactions that determine the overall fate of an environmental contaminant but which are inaccessible to measurements.

  19. Equilibrium fluctuations of liquid state static properties in a subvolume by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, D. M.; Dini, D.; Smith, E. R.

    2016-09-01

    System property fluctuations increasingly dominate a physical process as the sampling volume decreases. The purpose of this work is to explore how the fluctuation statistics of various thermodynamic properties depend on the sampling volume, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. First an examination of various expressions for calculating the bulk pressure of a bulk liquid is made, which includes a decomposition of the virial expression into two terms, one of which is the Method of Planes (MOP) applied to the faces of the cubic simulation cell. Then an analysis is made of the fluctuations of local density, temperature, pressure, and shear stress as a function of sampling volume (SV). Cubic and spherical shaped SVs were used within a spatially homogeneous LJ liquid at a state point along the melting curve. It is shown that the MD-generated probability distribution functions (PDFs) of all of these properties are to a good approximation Gaussian even for SV containing only a few molecules (˜10), with the variances being inversely proportional to the SV volume, Ω. For small subvolumes the shear stress PDF fits better to a Gaussian than the pressure PDF. A new stochastic sampling technique to implement the volume averaging definition of the pressure tensor is presented, which is employed for cubic, spherical, thin cubic, and spherical shell SV. This method is more efficient for less symmetric SV shapes.

  20. Ground state properties and non-equilibrium dynamics of hard-core bosons confined on optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigol, Marcos; Muramatsu, Alejandro

    2004-03-01

    We study by means of an exact approach, a gas of hard core bosons (HCB) confined on optical lattices. The ground state properties of such systems are analyzed. Local incompressible phases appear in the system, like in the case of interacting soft-core bosons [1] and fermions [2,3]. The changes in momentum distribution function and in the natural orbitals (effective single particle states) introduced by the formation of such phases are analyzed. We also study non-equilibrium properties for those systems, which within our numerical approach can be obtained exactly for systems with 200 particles on lattices with 3000 sites. In particular we analyze the free expansion of the gas when it is released from the trap turning off the confining potential. We show that the expansion is non-trivial (as opposed to the fermionic case) and new features to be observed in the experiments are analyzed. [1] G. G. Batrouni, V. Rousseau, R. T. Scalettar, M. Rigol, A. Muramatsu, P. J. H. Denteneer, and M. Troyer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 117203 (2002). [2] M. Rigol, A. Muramatsu, G. G. Batrouni, and R. T. Scalettar, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 130403 (2003). [3] M. Rigol and A. Muramatsu, cond-mat/0309670 (2003).

  1. Radon Testing for Safe Schools Act. Report (To Accompany S. 1697) from the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works.

    This report was written to accompany the Radon Testing for Safe Schools Act (S.1697), a bill that provides for radon testing of schools located in high risk radon areas and provides limited financial assistance to schools for mitigation of high levels of radon. A description of radon, its harmful effects, and the radon levels detected in schools…

  2. Partition Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Michal; Tennenholtz, Moshe

    We introduce partition equilibrium and study its existence in resource selection games (RSG). In partition equilibrium the agents are partitioned into coalitions, and only deviations by the prescribed coalitions are considered. This is in difference to the classical concept of strong equilibrium according to which any subset of the agents may deviate. In resource selection games, each agent selects a resource from a set of resources, and its payoff is an increasing (or non-decreasing) function of the number of agents selecting its resource. While it has been shown that strong equilibrium exists in resource selection games, these games do not possess super-strong equilibrium, in which a fruitful deviation benefits at least one deviator without hurting any other deviator, even in the case of two identical resources with increasing cost functions. Similarly, strong equilibrium does not exist for that restricted two identical resources setting when the game is played repeatedly. We prove that for any given partition there exists a super-strong equilibrium for resource selection games of identical resources with increasing cost functions; we also show similar existence results for a variety of other classes of resource selection games. For the case of repeated games we identify partitions that guarantee the existence of strong equilibrium. Together, our work introduces a natural concept, which turns out to lead to positive and applicable results in one of the basic domains studied in the literature.

  3. Quasi-Equilibrium States in the Tropics Simulated by a Cloud-Resolving Model. Part 1; Specific Features and Budget Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shie, C.-L.; Tao, W.-K.; Simpson, J.; Sui, C.-H.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A series of long-term integrations using the two-dimensional Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model were performed by altering imposed environmental components to produce various quasi-equilibrium thermodynamic states. Model results show that the genesis of a warm/wet quasi-equilibrium state is mainly due to either strong vertical wind shear (from nudging) or large surface fluxes (from strong surface winds), while a cold/dry quasi-equilibrium state is attributed to a remarkably weakened mixed-wind shear (from vertical mixing due to deep convection) along with weak surface winds. In general, latent heat flux and net large-scale temperature forcing, the two dominant physical processes, dominate in the beginning stage of the simulated convective systems, then considerably weaken in the final stage, which leads to quasi-equilibrium states. A higher thermodynamic regime is found to produce a larger rainfall amount, as convective clouds are the leading source of rainfall over stratiform clouds even though the former occupy much less area. Moreover, convective clouds are more likely to occur in the presence of strong surface winds (latent heat flux), while stratiform clouds (especially the well-organized type) are favored in conditions with strong wind shear (large-scale forcing). The convective systems, which consist of distinct cloud types due to the variation in horizontal winds, are also found to propagate differently. Accordingly, convective systems with mixed-wind shear generally propagate in the direction of shear, while the system with strong (multidirectional) wind shear propagates in a more complex way. Based on the results from the temperature (Q1) and moisture (Q2) budgets, cloud-scale eddies are found to act as a hydrodynamic 'vehicle' that cascades the heat and moisture vertically. Several other specific features such as atmospheric stability, CAPE, and mass fluxes are also investigated and found to be significantly different between diverse quasi-equilibrium

  4. Compressibility changes accompanying conformational transitions of apomyoglobin.

    PubMed

    Taulier, Nicolas; Beletskaya, Irina V; Chalikian, Tigran V

    2005-11-01

    We used high-precision density and ultrasonic velocity measurements to characterize the native (N), molten globule (MG), and unfolded (U) conformations of apomyoglobin. The molten globule states that were studied in this work include the MG(pH4)(NaCl) state observed at pH 4 and 20 mM NaCl, the MG(pH4)(NaTCA) state observed at pH 4 and 20 mM sodium trichloracetate (NaTCA), the MG(pH2)(NaCl) state observed at pH 2 and 200 mM NaCl, and the MG(pH2)(NaTCA) state observed at pH 2 and 20 mM NaTCA. We used our densimetric and acoustic data to evaluate changes in adiabatic compressibility associated with the acid- or salt-induced N-to-MG, MG-to-U, MG-to-MG, and U-to-MG transitions of the protein. The N-to-MG(pH4)(NaCl) and N-to-MG(pH4)(NaTCA) transitions are accompanied by decreases in compressibility of -(3.0 +/- 0.6) x 10(-6) and -(2.0 +/- 0.6) x 10(-6) cm3 g(-1)bar(-1), respectively. The N-to-MG(pH2)(NaCl) and N-to-MG(pH2)(NaTCA) transitions are associated with compressibility changes of -(4.9 +/- 1.1) x 10(-6) and (0.7 +/- 0.9) x 10(-6) cm3 g(-1) bar(-1), respectively. We interpret these data in terms of the degree of unfolding of the various molten globule forms of apomyoglobin. In general, our compressibility data reveal significant disparities between the various equilibrium molten globule states of apomyoglobin while also quantitatively characterizing each of these states. Volumetric insights provided by our data facilitate gaining a better understanding of the folding pathways, intermediates, and kinetics of apomyoglobin folding.

  5. The Effects of Resistance to Shift of the Equilibrium State of a Liquid Droplet in Contact with a Solid.

    PubMed

    Iliev

    1999-05-01

    The effect of blocking the shift of the contact surface between a liquid drop and a solid body is discussed. The model proposed in (S. D. Iliev, 1997, J. Colloid Interface Sci., 194, 287) is discussed. This equilibrium model considers the resistance to shift by adding an energy to the classical capillary equilibrium model. It is shown that the set of equilibrium shapes of static droplets is effectively modeled. Studying the set of equilibrium axisymmetric drops, located on a horizontal surface, the analysis proves that the contact angle hysteresis is described without introducing a dependence between the resistance-to-shift coefficients and the drop volume and Bond's number. A possibility of realizing a stick-slip motion and division of the equilibrium drops is studied, too. It is shown that the equilibrium model describes also the set of equilibrium nonaxisymmetric static drops. The everyday experience to obtain the various nonaxisymmetric drop shapes by the deforming of contact line with a thin rod is numerically modeled. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  6. Detecting equilibrium cytochrome c folding intermediates by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry: Two partially folded forms populate the molten-globule state

    PubMed Central

    Grandori, Rita

    2002-01-01

    Nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-ESI-MS) is applied to the characterization of ferric cytochromec (cytc) conformational states under different solvent conditions. The methanol-induced molten-globule state in the pH range 2.6–3.0 is found to be populated by two distinct, partially folded conformers IA and IB. The more compact intermediate IB resembles that induced by glycerol in acid-unfolded cytc. The less compact one, IA, also can be induced by destabilization of the native structure by trifluoroethanol. IA and IB can be detected, in the absence of additives, around the midpoint of the acid-induced unfolding transition, providing direct evidence for involvement of equilibrium folding intermediates in cytc conformational transitions at low pH. This study shows that mass spectrometry can contribute to the characterization of molten-globule states of proteins by detection of distinct, although poorly populated, conformations involved in a dynamic equilibrium. PMID:11847268

  7. Distinguishing between keto-enol and acid-base forms of firefly oxyluciferin through calculation of excited-state equilibrium constants.

    PubMed

    Falklöf, Olle; Durbeej, Bo

    2014-11-15

    Although recent years have seen much progress in the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the bioluminescence of fireflies, there is to date no consensus on the precise contributions to the light emission from the different possible forms of the chemiexcited oxyluciferin (OxyLH2) cofactor. Here, this problem is investigated by the calculation of excited-state equilibrium constants in aqueous solution for keto-enol and acid-base reactions connecting six neutral, monoanionic and dianionic forms of OxyLH2. Particularly, rather than relying on the standard Förster equation and the associated assumption that entropic effects are negligible, these equilibrium constants are for the first time calculated in terms of excited-state free energies of a Born-Haber cycle. Performing quantum chemical calculations with density functional theory methods and using a hybrid cluster-continuum approach to describe solvent effects, a suitable protocol for the modeling is first defined from benchmark calculations on phenol. Applying this protocol to the various OxyLH2 species and verifying that available experimental data (absorption shifts and ground-state equilibrium constants) are accurately reproduced, it is then found that the phenolate-keto-OxyLH(-) monoanion is intrinsically the preferred form of OxyLH2 in the excited state, which suggests a potential key role for this species in the bioluminescence of fireflies.

  8. Response reactions: equilibrium coupling.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Eufrozina A; Nagypal, Istvan

    2006-06-01

    It is pointed out and illustrated in the present paper that if a homogeneous multiple equilibrium system containing k components and q species is composed of the reactants actually taken and their reactions contain only k + 1 species, then we have a unique representation with (q - k) stoichiometrically independent reactions (SIRs). We define these as coupling reactions. All the other possible combinations with k + 1 species are the coupled reactions that are in equilibrium when the (q - k) SIRs are in equilibrium. The response of the equilibrium state for perturbation is determined by the coupling and coupled equilibria. Depending on the circumstances and the actual thermodynamic data, the effect of coupled equilibria may overtake the effect of the coupling ones, leading to phenomena that are in apparent contradiction with Le Chatelier's principle.

  9. [Wernicke encephalopathy accompanying linitis plastica].

    PubMed

    Soós, Zsuzsanna; Salamon, Mónika; Oláh, Roland; Czégeni, Anna; Salamon, Ferenc; Folyovich, András; Winkler, Gábor

    2014-01-05

    Wernicke encephalopathy (or Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy) is a rarely diagnosed neurological disorder, which is caused by vitamin B1 deficiency. In the classical form it is characterized by a typical triad (confusion, oculomotor disturbance and ataxia), however, in the majority of the cases only confusion is present. It can be frequently observed in subjects with chronic alcohol consumption, but it may accompany different pathological states of which end stage malignant diseases are the most importants, where confusion may have different backgrounds. The authors present the case of an old male patient with advanced gastric cancer recognised and treated vitamin B1 deficiency, and they draw attention to difficulties of the diagnosis of Wernicke's disease.

  10. Electrooptical Absorption Measurements (EOAM) Testify Existence of two Conformers of Prodan and Laurdan with Different Dipole Moments in Equilibrium Ground and Franck-Condon Excited State.

    PubMed

    Nemkovich, N A; Detert, H; Roeder, N

    2016-09-01

    The results from the electrooptical absorption measurements (EOAM) on the equilibrium ground and excited Franck-Condon state dipole moments of Prodan and Laurdan in 1,4-dioxane are presented. As follows from experiments Prodan and Laurdan in the equilibrium ground and excited Franck-Condon state have two conformers with considerably different dipole moments. The electrical dipole moments and the transition dipole moment, obtained from the short-wavelength region of the absorption spectrum are parallel. The electrical dipole moments measured at the long-wavelength spectral region are parallel to each other but not parallel to the transition dipole moment m a. The angle θ between the transition dipole moment m a and the dipole moment in the equilibrium ground state μ g of the long-wavelength conformer is about 30(0) for both probes. Obtained results evidence that donor-acceptor pairs of the short-wavelength and long-wavelength conformers are not located on the same axis. Two low-energy conformers of Prodan have been found by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, differing in the orientation of the carbonyl group towards the naphthalene system.

  11. Local-equilibrium formalism applied to mechanics of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kestin, J.

    1992-01-01

    The lecture starts with an expression of good wishes to George Herrmann on the occasion of his seventieth birthday and continues with a lament that the majority of research workers in the field of solid mechanics have failed to appreciate the power and relevance of conventional'' thermodynamics which is based on the acceptance of the hypothesis of local equilibrium (principle of local state). The lecture then proceeds to motivate the essential concepts of conventional thermodynamics and emphasizes the differences between the description of nonequilibrium states in physical space and equilibrium states in the Gibbsian phase space. It is asserted that the subject acquires its simplest form by the recognition of the relevance of Bridgman's internal variables. With their aid it is possible to define the accompanying equilibrium state and the accompanying reversible process. An elimination of internal energy between the field equation of energy (First Law) and the Gibbs equation in rate form results in an explicit expression for the local rate of entropy production, {theta}. It is asserted that the preceding elements supplemented with appropriate rate equations result in a closed system of partial differential equations whose solution, subject to appropriate initial and boundary conditions, constitutes the process ( history'') under consideration. 11 refs.

  12. Local-equilibrium formalism applied to mechanics of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kestin, J.

    1992-08-01

    The lecture starts with an expression of good wishes to George Herrmann on the occasion of his seventieth birthday and continues with a lament that the majority of research workers in the field of solid mechanics have failed to appreciate the power and relevance of ``conventional`` thermodynamics which is based on the acceptance of the hypothesis of local equilibrium (principle of local state). The lecture then proceeds to motivate the essential concepts of conventional thermodynamics and emphasizes the differences between the description of nonequilibrium states in physical space and equilibrium states in the Gibbsian phase space. It is asserted that the subject acquires its simplest form by the recognition of the relevance of Bridgman`s internal variables. With their aid it is possible to define the accompanying equilibrium state and the accompanying reversible process. An elimination of internal energy between the field equation of energy (First Law) and the Gibbs equation in rate form results in an explicit expression for the local rate of entropy production, {theta}. It is asserted that the preceding elements supplemented with appropriate rate equations result in a closed system of partial differential equations whose solution, subject to appropriate initial and boundary conditions, constitutes the process (``history``) under consideration. 11 refs.

  13. Folding equilibrium constants of telomere G-quadruplexes in free state or associated with proteins determined by isothermal differential hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan; Ma, Li; Hao, Yu-Hua; Tan, Zheng

    2010-11-15

    Guanine rich (G-rich) nucleic acids form G-quadruplex structures that are implicated in many biological processes, pharmaceutical applications, and molecular machinery. The folding equilibrium constant (K(F)) of the G-quadruplex not only determines its stability and competition against duplex formation in genomic DNA but also defines its recognition by proteins and drugs and technical specifications. The K(F) is most conveniently derived from thermal melting analysis that has so far yielded extremely diversified results for the human telomere G-quadruplex. Melting analysis cannot be used for nucleic acids associated with proteins, thus has difficulty to study how protein association affects the folding equilibrium of G-quadruplex structure. In this work, we established an isothermal differential hybridization (IDH) method that is able to determine the K(F) of G-quadruplex, either alone or associated with proteins. Using this method, we studied the folding equilibrium of the core sequence G(3)(T(2)AG(3))(3) from vertebrate telomere in K(+) and Na(+) solutions and how it is affected by proteins associated at its adjacent regions. Our results show that the K(F) obtained for the free G-quadruplex is within 1 order of magnitude of most of those obtained by melting analysis and protein binding beside a G-quadruplex can dramatically destabilize the G-quadruplex.

  14. Seven years of geomorphic change in the head of Monterey Canyon, CA: Steady state equilibrium or monotonic change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. P.; Kvitek, R. G.; Ross, E.; Iampietro, P.; Paull, C. K.; Sandersfeld, M.

    2010-12-01

    The head of Monterey submarine canyon has been surveyed with high-precision multibeam sonar at least once each year since September 2002. This poster provides a summary of changes between September 2002 and September 2008. Data were collected with a variety of Reson mulitbeam sonar heads, and logged with an ISIS data acquisition system. Vessel attitude was corrected using an Applanix POS MV equipped with an auxillary C-Nav 2050 GPS receiver. Data were processed and filtered and cleaned in Caris HIPS. Depth changes for various time spans were determined through raster subtraction of pairs of 3-m resolution bathymetric grids in ArcMap. The depth change analyses focused on the canyon floor, except where a landslide occurred on a wall, and where obvious gullying near the headwall had occurred during the time of our study. Canyon walls were generally excluded from analysis. The analysis area was 1,414,240 sq meters. The gross changes between 2002 and 2008 include net erosion of 2,300,000 m^3 +/- 800,000 m^3 of material from the canyon. The annualized rate of net sediment loss from this time frame agrees within an order of magnitude with our previously published estimates from earlier (shorter) time frames, so the erosion events seem to be moderate magnitude and frequent, rather than infrequent and catastrophic. The greatest sediment loss appears to be from lateral erosion of channel-bounding terraces rather than deepening or scouring of the existing channel axis. A single landslide event that occurred in summer 2003 had an initial slide scar (void) volume of 71,000 m^3. The scar was observed to increase annually, and had grown to approximately 96,000 m^3 by 2008. The initial slide was too small to be tsunamigenic. In contrast to the monotonic canyon axis widening, the shoreward terminus of the canyon (canyon lip) appears to be in steady state equilibrium with sediment supply entering the canyon from the littoral zone. The lip position, indicated by the clearly defined

  15. Informational Equilibrium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    that for variouis standard types of equilibria* they hold. In particular, if one uses the teaporary equilibrium framework one can use the standard ...T, the integral converges toward f’ia(da) f fU(b~dc)6(a,b,c)T( asdm ) A B C which is fR (da) f d(lib,c) U0 T (cab) A BxC Me converse Is obvious

  16. 31 CFR 538.511 - Accompanied baggage authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the United States directly or indirectly from Sudan are authorized to import into the United States... Sudan are authorized to export from the United States accompanied baggage normally incident to...

  17. 31 CFR 538.511 - Accompanied baggage authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the United States directly or indirectly from Sudan are authorized to import into the United States... Sudan are authorized to export from the United States accompanied baggage normally incident to...

  18. 31 CFR 538.511 - Accompanied baggage authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the United States directly or indirectly from Sudan are authorized to import into the United States... Sudan are authorized to export from the United States accompanied baggage normally incident to...

  19. 31 CFR 538.511 - Accompanied baggage authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the United States directly or indirectly from Sudan are authorized to import into the United States... Sudan are authorized to export from the United States accompanied baggage normally incident to...

  20. 31 CFR 538.511 - Accompanied baggage authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the United States directly or indirectly from Sudan are authorized to import into the United States... Sudan are authorized to export from the United States accompanied baggage normally incident to...

  1. 31 CFR 560.507 - Accompanied baggage authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the United States directly or indirectly from Iran are authorized to import into the United States... Iran are authorized to export from the United States accompanied baggage normally incident to...

  2. 31 CFR 560.507 - Accompanied baggage authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the United States directly or indirectly from Iran are authorized to import into the United States... Iran are authorized to export from the United States accompanied baggage normally incident to...

  3. 31 CFR 560.507 - Accompanied baggage authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the United States directly or indirectly from Iran are authorized to import into the United States... Iran are authorized to export from the United States accompanied baggage normally incident to...

  4. Text and References To Accompany "Map Showing the Thickness and Character of Quaternary Sediments in the Glaciated United States East of the Rocky Mountains"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soller, David R.

    1992-01-01

    A 1:1,000,000-scale map of Quaternary deposits has been compiled for the glaciated area of the United States east of the Rocky Mountains (that is, the area covered by the Laurentide ice sheets). Parts of southern Ontario, areas beneath the Great Lakes, and parts of the submerged eastern seaboard are also included on the map. The map has three components that, together, provide the first regional three-dimensional view of these deposits. These map components are the surface distribution of Quaternary sediments, the total thickness of Quaternary sediments, and the distribution of significant buried Quaternary units. For many areas, this is the first map of Quaternary sediment thickness published at any scale. This report provides supporting information for the map, preliminary interpretations of sediment distribution, and the list of geologic sources used to generate the map. Within the mapped area, there is a particular need for three-dimensional geologic mapping to support decisions on water resources and land use. Approximately 40 percent of the U.S. population resides within the mapped area, which is less than one-quarter the size of the conterminous United States. This map is intended to supplement the more detailed mapping on which it is based and is designed to be a regional planning tool. Through the Pleistocene, large deposits of thick glacial sediment accumulated between certain late Wisconsinan glacial lobes, on bedrock topographic highs, whereas relatively thin deposits generally accumulated in the adjacent bedrock lowlands occupied by drainage and ice lobes. The lithology of the bedrock and its resistance to erosion in part controlled the patterns of ice lobation and the distribution of thick sediment. On a local scale, the spatial relation of these sediment masses to ice lobation has been suggested in places, and a regional correlation may have been assumed. This map provides the first comprehensive, regional view of glacial sediment thickness to permit

  5. Non-equilibrium supramolecular polymerization.

    PubMed

    Sorrenti, Alessandro; Leira-Iglesias, Jorge; Markvoort, Albert J; de Greef, Tom F A; Hermans, Thomas M

    2017-03-28

    Supramolecular polymerization has been traditionally focused on the thermodynamic equilibrium state, where one-dimensional assemblies reside at the global minimum of the Gibbs free energy. The pathway and rate to reach the equilibrium state are irrelevant, and the resulting assemblies remain unchanged over time. In the past decade, the focus has shifted to kinetically trapped (non-dissipative non-equilibrium) structures that heavily depend on the method of preparation (i.e., pathway complexity), and where the assembly rates are of key importance. Kinetic models have greatly improved our understanding of competing pathways, and shown how to steer supramolecular polymerization in the desired direction (i.e., pathway selection). The most recent innovation in the field relies on energy or mass input that is dissipated to keep the system away from the thermodynamic equilibrium (or from other non-dissipative states). This tutorial review aims to provide the reader with a set of tools to identify different types of self-assembled states that have been explored so far. In particular, we aim to clarify the often unclear use of the term "non-equilibrium self-assembly" by subdividing systems into dissipative, and non-dissipative non-equilibrium states. Examples are given for each of the states, with a focus on non-dissipative non-equilibrium states found in one-dimensional supramolecular polymerization.

  6. Dynamical properties of α-amylase in the folded and unfolded state: the role of thermal equilibrium fluctuations for conformational entropy and protein stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitter, J.; Herrmann, R.; Hauß, T.; Lechner, R. E.; Dencher, N. A.

    2001-07-01

    A comparative analysis of thermal equilibrium fluctuations occurring in a mesophilic and in a thermophilic α-amylase was performed to study the effect of structural fluctuations on thermostability. The thermal fluctuations determining the conformational entropy of both enzymes have been characterised for the folded (at 30°C and 60°C) and for the unfolded state by applying neutron spectroscopy (at 30°C). The folded state shows a higher structural flexibility for the thermophilic protein as compared to the mesophilic homologue. In contrast, the unfolded state of both enzymes is rather similar with respect to the structural fluctuations. On the basis of this result, a mechanism characterised by entropic stabilisation (i.e., smaller Δ S for the unfolding transition of thermophilic α-amylase) can be assumed to be responsible for the higher thermostability of the thermophilic enzyme.

  7. Rapid-Equilibrium Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberty, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid-equilibrium rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are especially useful because if experimental data can be fit by these simpler rate equations, the Michaelis constants can be interpreted as equilibrium constants. However, for some reactions it is necessary to use the more complicated steady-state rate equations. Thermodynamics is…

  8. Equilibrium intermediate-state patterns in a type-I superconducting slab in an arbitrarily oriented applied magnetic field

    DOE PAGES

    Clem, John; Prozorov, Ruslan; Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    2013-09-04

    The equilibrium topology of superconducting and normal domains in flat type-I superconductors is investigated. Important improvements with respect to previous work are that (1) the energy of the external magnetic field, as deformed by the presence of superconducting domains, is calculated in the same way for three different topologies and (2) calculations are made for arbitrary orientation of the applied field. A phase diagram is presented for the minimum-energy topology as a function of applied field magnitude and angle. For small (large) applied fields, normal (superconducting) tubes are found, while for intermediate fields, parallel domains have a lower energy. Themore » range of field magnitudes for which the superconducting-tubes structure is favored shrinks when the field is more in-plane oriented.« less

  9. Equilibrium intermediate-state patterns in a type-I superconducting slab in an arbitrarily oriented applied magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Clem, John; Prozorov, Ruslan; Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    2013-09-04

    The equilibrium topology of superconducting and normal domains in flat type-I superconductors is investigated. Important improvements with respect to previous work are that (1) the energy of the external magnetic field, as deformed by the presence of superconducting domains, is calculated in the same way for three different topologies and (2) calculations are made for arbitrary orientation of the applied field. A phase diagram is presented for the minimum-energy topology as a function of applied field magnitude and angle. For small (large) applied fields, normal (superconducting) tubes are found, while for intermediate fields, parallel domains have a lower energy. The range of field magnitudes for which the superconducting-tubes structure is favored shrinks when the field is more in-plane oriented.

  10. The Moving Lines on Electron Spectra as Charge Reflexes on Non-equilibrium States of Nanostructured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchuk, Oleg A.

    2016-04-01

    The experimental results present the phenomenon of moving lines on electron spectra which are linked spatially and in time with the localization and durability of the processes of new surface producing in folds and grain boundaries. This effect was also realized for a thin-layer composite "organic on metal films on dielectric substrate" in modeling non-equilibrium conditions which are created by the intensive electron beam pulse impact. It was found that the nature of the inceptive adsorption layer, in addition to the metal film, determines the initial positions of moving lines on the spectra. The main accents in these investigations were in observations of appearance of the moving lines, dynamics of their displacements on the spectra, final stages when these lines vanished, and finding the general regularities between the spontaneous and induced events.

  11. The Moving Lines on Electron Spectra as Charge Reflexes on Non-equilibrium States of Nanostructured Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mishchuk, Oleg A

    2016-12-01

    The experimental results present the phenomenon of moving lines on electron spectra which are linked spatially and in time with the localization and durability of the processes of new surface producing in folds and grain boundaries. This effect was also realized for a thin-layer composite "organic on metal films on dielectric substrate" in modeling non-equilibrium conditions which are created by the intensive electron beam pulse impact. It was found that the nature of the inceptive adsorption layer, in addition to the metal film, determines the initial positions of moving lines on the spectra. The main accents in these investigations were in observations of appearance of the moving lines, dynamics of their displacements on the spectra, final stages when these lines vanished, and finding the general regularities between the spontaneous and induced events.

  12. Direct observation of the solvent effects on the low-lying nπ* and ππ* excited triplet states of acetophenone derivatives in thermal equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Narra, Sudhakar; Shigeto, Shinsuke

    2015-03-05

    Low-lying excited triplet states of aromatic carbonyl compounds exhibit diverse photophysical and photochemical properties of fundamental importance. Despite tremendous effort in studying those triplet states, the effects of substituents and solvents on the energetics of the triplet manifold and on photoreactivity remain to be fully understood. We have recently studied the ordering of the low-lying nπ* and ππ* excited triplet states and its substituent dependence in acetophenone derivatives using nanosecond time-resolved near-IR (NIR) spectroscopy. Here we address the other important issue, the solvent effects, by directly observing the electronic bands in the NIR that originate from the lowest nπ* and ππ* states of acetophenone derivatives in four solvents of different polarity (n-heptane, benzene, acetonitrile, and methanol). The two transient NIR bands decay synchronously in all the solvents, indicating that the lowest nπ* and ππ* states are in thermal equilibrium irrespective of the solvent polarity studied here. We found that the ππ* band increases in intensity relative to the nπ* band as solvent polarity increases. These results are compared with the photoreduction rate constant for the acetophenone derivatives in the solvents to which 2-propanol was added as a hydrogen-atom donor. Based on the present findings, we present a comprehensive, solvent- and substituent-dependent energy level diagram of the low-lying nπ* and ππ* excited triplet states.

  13. Non-equilibrium reaction and relaxation dynamics in a strongly interacting explicit solvent: F + CD3CN treated with a parallel multi-state EVB model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glowacki, David R.; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Harvey, Jeremy N.

    2015-07-01

    We describe a parallelized linear-scaling computational framework developed to implement arbitrarily large multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) calculations within CHARMM and TINKER. Forces are obtained using the Hellmann-Feynman relationship, giving continuous gradients, and good energy conservation. Utilizing multi-dimensional Gaussian coupling elements fit to explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory, we built a 64-state MS-EVB model designed to study the F + CD3CN → DF + CD2CN reaction in CD3CN solvent (recently reported in Dunning et al. [Science 347(6221), 530 (2015)]). This approach allows us to build a reactive potential energy surface whose balanced accuracy and efficiency considerably surpass what we could achieve otherwise. We ran molecular dynamics simulations to examine a range of observables which follow in the wake of the reactive event: energy deposition in the nascent reaction products, vibrational relaxation rates of excited DF in CD3CN solvent, equilibrium power spectra of DF in CD3CN, and time dependent spectral shifts associated with relaxation of the nascent DF. Many of our results are in good agreement with time-resolved experimental observations, providing evidence for the accuracy of our MS-EVB framework in treating both the solute and solute/solvent interactions. The simulations provide additional insight into the dynamics at sub-picosecond time scales that are difficult to resolve experimentally. In particular, the simulations show that (immediately following deuterium abstraction) the nascent DF finds itself in a non-equilibrium regime in two different respects: (1) it is highly vibrationally excited, with ˜23 kcal mol-1 localized in the stretch and (2) its post-reaction solvation environment, in which it is not yet hydrogen-bonded to CD3CN solvent molecules, is intermediate between the non-interacting gas-phase limit and the solution-phase equilibrium limit. Vibrational relaxation of the nascent DF results in a spectral

  14. Non-equilibrium reaction and relaxation dynamics in a strongly interacting explicit solvent: F + CD{sub 3}CN treated with a parallel multi-state EVB model

    SciTech Connect

    Glowacki, David R.; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Harvey, Jeremy N.

    2015-07-28

    We describe a parallelized linear-scaling computational framework developed to implement arbitrarily large multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) calculations within CHARMM and TINKER. Forces are obtained using the Hellmann-Feynman relationship, giving continuous gradients, and good energy conservation. Utilizing multi-dimensional Gaussian coupling elements fit to explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory, we built a 64-state MS-EVB model designed to study the F + CD{sub 3}CN → DF + CD{sub 2}CN reaction in CD{sub 3}CN solvent (recently reported in Dunning et al. [Science 347(6221), 530 (2015)]). This approach allows us to build a reactive potential energy surface whose balanced accuracy and efficiency considerably surpass what we could achieve otherwise. We ran molecular dynamics simulations to examine a range of observables which follow in the wake of the reactive event: energy deposition in the nascent reaction products, vibrational relaxation rates of excited DF in CD{sub 3}CN solvent, equilibrium power spectra of DF in CD{sub 3}CN, and time dependent spectral shifts associated with relaxation of the nascent DF. Many of our results are in good agreement with time-resolved experimental observations, providing evidence for the accuracy of our MS-EVB framework in treating both the solute and solute/solvent interactions. The simulations provide additional insight into the dynamics at sub-picosecond time scales that are difficult to resolve experimentally. In particular, the simulations show that (immediately following deuterium abstraction) the nascent DF finds itself in a non-equilibrium regime in two different respects: (1) it is highly vibrationally excited, with ∼23 kcal mol{sup −1} localized in the stretch and (2) its post-reaction solvation environment, in which it is not yet hydrogen-bonded to CD{sub 3}CN solvent molecules, is intermediate between the non-interacting gas-phase limit and the solution-phase equilibrium limit. Vibrational

  15. Direct Observation of Thermal Equilibrium of Excited Triplet States of 9,10-Phenanthrenequinone. A Time-Resolved Resonance Raman Study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Venkatraman Ravi; Rajkumar, Nagappan; Ariese, Freek; Umapathy, Siva

    2015-10-08

    The photochemistry of aromatic ketones plays a key role in various physicochemical and biological processes, and solvent polarity can be used to tune their triplet state properties. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of the conformational structure and the solvent polarity induced energy level reordering of the two lowest triplet states of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) was carried out using nanosecond-time-resolved absorption (ns-TRA), time-resolved resonance Raman (TR(3)) spectroscopy, and time dependent-density functional theory (TD-DFT) studies. The ns-TRA of PQ in acetonitrile displays two bands in the visible range, and these two bands decay with similar lifetime at least at longer time scales (μs). Interestingly, TR(3) spectra of these two bands indicate that the kinetics are different at shorter time scales (ns), while at longer time scales they followed the kinetics of ns-TRA spectra. Therefore, we report a real-time observation of the thermal equilibrium between the two lowest triplet excited states of PQ, assigned to nπ* and ππ* of which the ππ* triplet state is formed first through intersystem crossing. Despite the fact that these two states are energetically close and have a similar conformational structure supported by TD-DFT studies, the slow internal conversion (∼2 ns) between the T(2)(1(3)nπ*) and T(1)(1(3)ππ*) triplet states indicates a barrier. Insights from the singlet excited states of PQ in protic solvents [ J. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 142 , 24305 ] suggest that the lowest nπ* and ππ* triplet states should undergo hydrogen bond weakening and strengthening, respectively, relative to the ground state, and these mechanisms are substantiated by TD-DFT calculations. We also hypothesize that the different hydrogen bonding mechanisms exhibited by the two lowest singlet and triplet excited states of PQ could influence its ISC mechanism.

  16. Shift in the Equilibrium between On and Off States of the Allosteric Switch in Ras-GppNHp Affected by Small Molecules and Bulk Solvent Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Holzapfel, Genevieve; Buhrman, Greg; Mattos, Carla

    2012-08-31

    Ras GTPase cycles between its active GTP-bound form promoted by GEFs and its inactive GDP-bound form promoted by GAPs to affect the control of various cellular functions. It is becoming increasingly apparent that subtle regulation of the GTP-bound active state may occur through promotion of substates mediated by an allosteric switch mechanism that induces a disorder to order transition in switch II upon ligand binding at an allosteric site. We show with high-resolution structures that calcium acetate and either dithioerythritol (DTE) or dithiothreitol (DTT) soaked into H-Ras-GppNHp crystals in the presence of a moderate amount of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) can selectively shift the equilibrium to the 'on' state, where the active site appears to be poised for catalysis (calcium acetate), or to what we call the 'ordered off' state, which is associated with an anticatalytic conformation (DTE or DTT). We also show that the equilibrium is reversible in our crystals and dependent on the nature of the small molecule present. Calcium acetate binding in the allosteric site stabilizes the conformation observed in the H-Ras-GppNHp/NOR1A complex, and PEG, DTE, and DTT stabilize the anticatalytic conformation observed in the complex between the Ras homologue Ran and Importin-{beta}. The small molecules are therefore selecting biologically relevant conformations in the crystal that are sampled by the disordered switch II in the uncomplexed GTP-bound form of H-Ras. In the presence of a large amount of PEG, the ordered off conformation predominates, whereas in solution, in the absence of PEG, switch regions appear to remain disordered in what we call the off state, unable to bind DTE.

  17. Molecular equilibrium with condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, C. M.; Huebner, W. F.

    1990-02-01

    Minimization of the Gibbs energy of formation for species of chemical elements and compounds in their gas and condensed phases determines their relative abundances in a mixture in chemical equilibrium. The procedure is more general and more powerful than previous abundance determinations in multiphase astrophysical mixtures. Some results for astrophysical equations of state are presented, and the effects of condensation on opacity are briefly indicated.

  18. Modeling of phase equilibrium and vapor adsorption on carbon black based on a combination of a lattice theory and equation of state.

    PubMed

    Ustinov, E A; Do, D D

    2002-09-15

    A thermodynamic approach is developed in this paper to describe the behavior of a subcritical fluid in the neighborhood of vapor-liquid interface and close to a graphite surface. The fluid is modeled as a system of parallel molecular layers. The Helmholtz free energy of the fluid is expressed as the sum of the intrinsic Helmholtz free energies of separate layers and the potential energy of their mutual interactions calculated by the 10-4 potential. This Helmholtz free energy is described by an equation of state (such as the Bender or Peng-Robinson equation), which allows us a convenient means to obtain the intrinsic Helmholtz free energy of each molecular layer as a function of its two-dimensional density. All molecular layers of the bulk fluid are in mechanical equilibrium corresponding to the minimum of the total potential energy. In the case of adsorption the external potential exerted by the graphite layers is added to the free energy. The state of the interface zone between the liquid and the vapor phases or the state of the adsorbed phase is determined by the minimum of the grand potential. In the case of phase equilibrium the approach leads to the distribution of density and pressure over the transition zone. The interrelation between the collision diameter and the potential well depth was determined by the surface tension. It was shown that the distance between neighboring molecular layers substantially changes in the vapor-liquid transition zone and in the adsorbed phase with loading. The approach is considered in this paper for the case of adsorption of argon and nitrogen on carbon black. In both cases an excellent agreement with the experimental data was achieved without additional assumptions and fitting parameters, except for the fluid-solid potential well depth. The approach has far-reaching consequences and can be readily extended to the model of adsorption in slit pores of carbonaceous materials and to the analysis of multicomponent adsorption

  19. Dielectric relaxation and the conformer equilibrium in the liquid and glassy states of β- D-fructose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombari, E.; Cardelli, C.; Salvetti, G.; Johari, G. P.

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the ionic and molecular dynamics in the liquid and glassy states of β- D-fructose, its dielectric relaxation spectra (12 Hz-500 kHz) and dynamic heat capacity (3.33 mHz) have been measured from 5 K above its melting point through the vitrification range, by allowing sufficient time for attainment of the conformer (or chemical) equilibria. Effects of the change in the conformer population on thermal cycling has been further studied. The dielectric behavior of liquid β- D-fructose is characteristically different from that of other molecular liquids in three ways: (i) the contribution to orientation polarization associated with the fast relaxation process, which persists in the glassy state, is relatively high in the liquid state of β- D-fructose; (ii) this contribution decreases with temperature exceptionally rapidly on cooling; and (iii) the difference in the rates of the two process is exceptionally large. The dynamic heat capacity change through the vitrification region is ˜160 J/(mol K), and is spread over ˜20 K range, and the enthalpy relaxation time is ˜50 s at 383 K. Transformation of β-pyranose to other conformers and other conformer transformation equilibria change on thermal cycling with the result that the overall relaxation rate increases at T>315 K and decreases at T<315 K. The relaxation spectrum becomes broader, the dc conductivity increases and the rate of the Johari-Goldstein relaxation whose Arrhenius energy is 42.1 kJ/mol increases.

  20. Noise-induced modulation of the relaxation kinetics around a non-equilibrium steady state of non-linear chemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; González-Segredo, Nélido

    2011-01-28

    Stochastic effects from correlated noise non-trivially modulate the kinetics of non-linear chemical reaction networks. This is especially important in systems where reactions are confined to small volumes and reactants are delivered in bursts. We characterise how the two noise sources confinement and burst modulate the relaxation kinetics of a non-linear reaction network around a non-equilibrium steady state. We find that the lifetimes of species change with burst input and confinement. Confinement increases the lifetimes of all species that are involved in any non-linear reaction as a reactant. Burst monotonically increases or decreases lifetimes. Competition between burst-induced and confinement-induced modulation may hence lead to a non-monotonic modulation. We quantify lifetime as the integral of the time autocorrelation function (ACF) of concentration fluctuations around a non-equilibrium steady state of the reaction network. Furthermore, we look at the first and second derivatives of the ACF, each of which is affected in opposite ways by burst and confinement. This allows discriminating between these two noise sources. We analytically derive the ACF from the linear Fokker-Planck approximation of the chemical master equation in order to establish a baseline for the burst-induced modulation at low confinement. Effects of higher confinement are then studied using a partial-propensity stochastic simulation algorithm. The results presented here may help understand the mechanisms that deviate stochastic kinetics from its deterministic counterpart. In addition, they may be instrumental when using fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) or fluorescence-correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to measure confinement and burst in systems with known reaction rates, or, alternatively, to correct for the effects of confinement and burst when experimentally measuring reaction rates.

  1. On the equilibrium of a extremely extended and diluted magneto-matter state subject to its weight.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdichevsky, Daniel

    Solutions to the force relationship between the magnetic stresses and the self-gravitational force are discussed for a simple homogeneous distribution of matter coalescent to a magnetic field in a cylindrical geometry. Consideration are given to the needed permeability of the medium to make it capable of supporting many times the mass of the Sun, on an extension of several parsecs to kiloparsec. This state of self organization of matter and magnetic field (magneto-matter state) has proven useful interpretation for the explanation of anomalous thermodynamic of the gas of electrons contained in flux-tubes with a twist, low-beta, often observed at 1 AU in the interplanetary medium, Berdichevsky and Shefers, 2015. This state of matter, which most basic property, the freezing in the magnetic field, see e.g., Chew et al, 1956, has proved to exist in the regions where robotic observations in the near and far space perform detailed observations of magnetic fields, and extreme dilute plasma (commonly about 1000 to 0.1 or less ionized particles per cubic cm). This work is in many ways an extension of Alfven work on magnetized space plasmas, Alven, 1942. Berdichevsky, D.B., and K., Schefers, ApJ, 803, 70, 2015, doi: 10.1088/0004-637X/805/1/70 Chew, G.F., M.L., Goldberger, and F.E. Low, 1956, the Royal Soc. London, section Math & Phys Sc., 236, pp. 112. Alfv'e n, H (1942). ``Existence of electromagnetic-hydrodynamic waves.'' Nature 150, 405 doi:10.1038/150405d0

  2. A theoretical equation of state for detonation products with chemical equilibrium composition of the surface of small carbon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, M. Sam

    2000-04-01

    A theoretical equation of state for detonation products is described and compared with various data. A perturbation theory approach is used for the mixture of molecular fluids that is based on Monte Carlo simulations. The solid carbon is characterized as small clusters rather than as a bulk material. The free energy of the clusters is modeled as primarily additive contributions such as vibrational modes, bond strengths, and effective volumes. Up to 30% of the atoms in a diamond cluster are on the surface with dangling bonds capped by various groups composed of C, H, N, and O from the background fluid. A counting term similar to ideal entropy of mixing is also found for the surface composition. Competition between the U, TS, and PV terms in the Gibbs free energy leads to dramatic shifts in the surface composition in some regions. This in turn leads to shifts in the background fluid mixture composition and anomalous behavior in the total EOS. This behavior in PBX 9502 is in good agreement with recent data on release isentropes from overdriven states (1).

  3. Chemical Equilibrium Models for the S3 State of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Hiroshi; Shoji, Mitsuo; Shen, Jian-Ren; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2016-01-19

    We have performed hybrid density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate how chemical equilibria can be described in the S3 state of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II. For a chosen 340-atom model, 1 stable and 11 metastable intermediates have been identified within the range of 13 kcal mol(-1) that differ in protonation, charge, spin, and conformational states. The results imply that reversible interconversion of these intermediates gives rise to dynamic equilibria that involve processes with relocations of protons and electrons residing in the Mn4CaO5 cluster, as well as bound water ligands, with concomitant large changes in the cluster geometry. Such proton tautomerism and redox isomerism are responsible for reversible activation/deactivation processes of substrate oxygen species, through which Mn-O and O-O bonds are transiently ruptured and formed. These results may allow for a tentative interpretation of kinetic data on substrate water exchange on the order of seconds at room temperature, as measured by time-resolved mass spectrometry. The reliability of the hybrid DFT method for the multielectron redox reaction in such an intricate system is also addressed.

  4. Accelerating Multiagent Reinforcement Learning by Equilibrium Transfer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yujing; Gao, Yang; An, Bo

    2015-07-01

    An important approach in multiagent reinforcement learning (MARL) is equilibrium-based MARL, which adopts equilibrium solution concepts in game theory and requires agents to play equilibrium strategies at each state. However, most existing equilibrium-based MARL algorithms cannot scale due to a large number of computationally expensive equilibrium computations (e.g., computing Nash equilibria is PPAD-hard) during learning. For the first time, this paper finds that during the learning process of equilibrium-based MARL, the one-shot games corresponding to each state's successive visits often have the same or similar equilibria (for some states more than 90% of games corresponding to successive visits have similar equilibria). Inspired by this observation, this paper proposes to use equilibrium transfer to accelerate equilibrium-based MARL. The key idea of equilibrium transfer is to reuse previously computed equilibria when each agent has a small incentive to deviate. By introducing transfer loss and transfer condition, a novel framework called equilibrium transfer-based MARL is proposed. We prove that although equilibrium transfer brings transfer loss, equilibrium-based MARL algorithms can still converge to an equilibrium policy under certain assumptions. Experimental results in widely used benchmarks (e.g., grid world game, soccer game, and wall game) show that the proposed framework: 1) not only significantly accelerates equilibrium-based MARL (up to 96.7% reduction in learning time), but also achieves higher average rewards than algorithms without equilibrium transfer and 2) scales significantly better than algorithms without equilibrium transfer when the state/action space grows and the number of agents increases.

  5. Caging and solvent effects on the tautomeric equilibrium of 3-pyridone/3-hydroxypyridine in the ground state: a study in cyclodextrins and binary solvents.

    PubMed

    Abou-Zied, Osama K; Al-Shihi, Othman I K

    2009-07-14

    The tautomeric equilibrium between 3-pyridone (3Py) and 3-hydroxypyridine (3HP) shows characteristic absorption peaks for the zwitterion form of 3Py in water that may be used as a probe of the hydrophobic nature inside macromolecules such as proteins and other biologically related systems. We studied this equilibrium in the ground state in aqueous cyclodextrins (CDs) and in binary solvent mixtures of 1,4-dioxane and water by absorption spectroscopy, and by ab initio calculations. Upon the addition of alpha-CD or beta-CD to an aqueous solution of the 3Py/3HP system, the absorbance intensity of the zwitterion tautomer decreases with a concomitant increase in the intensity of the enol tautomer of 3HP. The results reflect the nature of the tautomeric equilibrium and point to the hydrophobic environment inside the CD cavities. The effect of inclusion is noticeably less in the case of alpha-CD. This is attributed to the small cavity size of alpha-CD which sustains only partial inclusion. Upon the addition of gamma-CD, the intensity of the zwitterion tautomer slightly increased over that in water which is attributed to the direct interaction between the charged sides of the tautomer with the outer primary or secondary hydroxyls of the glycopyranose units of gamma-CD. This interaction is a result of the large cavity size of gamma-CD which does not support a stable complex. The largest caging effect was observed in 2,6-di-O-methyl-beta-CD (DMbeta-CD) which is an indication of a more hydrophobic environment around the guest. The large hydrophobicity of DMbeta-CD is due to the presence of the two methyl groups in the beta-CD derivative which reduce the amount of water inside the cavity upon encapsulation. In the binary mixtures of 1,4-dioxane and water, the change in the absorbance intensity of the enol and the zwitterion tautomers was analyzed quantitatively and three water molecules were found to solvate the polar centers of each tautomer. Ab initio calculations of the

  6. Non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium populations of the first vibrational excited state of CO in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Lopez-Valverde, M. A.; Edwards, D. P.; Taylor, F. W.

    1993-05-01

    A non-LTE radiative transfer model for the population of the CO(1) vibrational state in the middle atmosphere is presented. Radiative transfer is treated by using the Curtis matrix method. The transmittances needed for the Curtis matrix have been computed by using the GENLN2 line-by-line radiance/transmittance code. A study of the radiative and collisional processes and atmospheric parameters that affect the population of CO(1) populations has been performed. We find that the tropospheric kinetic temperature and CO abundance profiles play an important role through radiative coupling in the population of mesospheric CO(1) at nighttime. During the day, the solar flux and the mesospheric CO abundance are the main factors determining the CO vibrational temperature in the mesosphere. Non-thermal collisions with the atmospheric N2(1) are also shown to be important for the daytime population of CO(1) in that region. The consequences of these results for the retrieval of CO abundances from the remote sensing of radiance at 4.7 microns are discussed.

  7. Melatonin affects the dynamic steady-state equilibrium of estrogen sulfates in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by regulating the balance between estrogen sulfatase and sulfotransferase.

    PubMed

    González, Alicia; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Alonso-González, Carolina; Cos, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Melatonin is known to reduce the growth of endocrine-responsive breast cancers by interacting with estrogen signaling pathways. Estrogens play an important role in breast cancer, but also in various types of tissues, including vascular tissue. Estrogen sulfatase (STS) converts inactive estrogen sulfates into active estrogens, whereas estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) sulfonates estrogens to estrogen sulfates. Therefore, STS and EST are considered to be involved in the regulation of local estrogen levels in hormone‑dependent tumors and in non-pathologic tissues, such as those of the vascular system. Estrogens have a major impact on the vasculature, influencing vascular function, the expression of adhesion proteins, angiogenesis and the inflammatory state. In this study, we investigated the status of STS and EST in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the modulatory effects of melatonin. Both STS and EST were highly expressed in the HUVECs. The enzymatic activity correlated with the expression levels in these cells. Our findings also demonstrated that melatonin, at physiological concentrations, modulated the synthesis and transformation of biologically active estrogens in HUVECs through the inhibition of STS activity and expression, and the stimulation of EST activity and expression. Since melatonin decreased the STS levels and increased the EST levels, it modified the dynamic steady‑state equilibrium of estrogen sulfates by increasing the inactive estrogen levels and decreasing the active estrogen levels. Therefore, melatonin may modulate the known different biological actions of estrogens in endothelial cells, as well as in estrogen-dependent tumors and non-pathologic tissues.

  8. Dynamic equilibrium between closed and partially closed states of the bacterial Enzyme I unveiled by solution NMR and X-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Venditti, Vincenzo; Schwieters, Charles D.; Grishaev, Alexander; Clore, G. Marius

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme I (EI) is the first component in the bacterial phosphotransferase system, a signal transduction pathway in which phosphoryl transfer through a series of bimolecular protein–protein interactions is coupled to sugar transport across the membrane. EI is a multidomain, 128-kDa homodimer that has been shown to exist in two conformational states related to one another by two large (50–90°) rigid body domain reorientations. The open conformation of apo EI allows phosphoryl transfer from His189 located in the N-terminal domain α/β (EINα/β) subdomain to the downstream protein partner bound to the EINα subdomain. The closed conformation, observed in a trapped phosphoryl transfer intermediate, brings the EINα/β subdomain into close proximity to the C-terminal dimerization domain (EIC), thereby permitting in-line phosphoryl transfer from phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) bound to EIC to His189. Here, we investigate the solution conformation of a complex of an active site mutant of EI (H189A) with PEP. Simulated annealing refinement driven simultaneously by solution small angle X-ray scattering and NMR residual dipolar coupling data demonstrates unambiguously that the EI(H189A)–PEP complex exists in a dynamic equilibrium between two approximately equally populated conformational states, one corresponding to the closed structure and the other to a partially closed species. The latter likely represents an intermediate in the open-to-closed transition. PMID:26305976

  9. The Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, remote sensing, and mineral resources maps of the Butte 1 degree x 2 degrees Quadrangle, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, James E.; Trautwein, C.M.; Wallace, C.A.; Lee, G.K.; Rowan, L.C.; Hanna, W.F.

    1993-01-01

    The Butte 1?x2 ? quadrangle in west-central Montana was investigated as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program (CUSMAP). These investigations included geologic mapping, geochemical surveys, gravity and aeromagnetic surveys, examinations of mineral deposits, and specialized geochronologic and remote-sensing studies. The data collected during these studies were compiled, combined with available published and unpublished data, analyzed, and used in a mineral-resource assessment of the quadrangle. The results, including data, interpretations, and mineral-resource assessments for nine types of mineral deposits, are published separately as a folio of maps. These maps are accompanied by figures, tables, and explanatory text. This circular provides background information on the Butte quadrangle, summarizes the studies and published maps, and lists a selected bibliography of references pertinent to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral resources of the quadrangle. The Butte quadrangle, which includes the world-famous Butte mining district, has a long history of mineral production. Many mining districts within the quadrangle have produced large quantities of many commodities; the most important in dollar value of production were copper, gold, silver, lead, zinc, manganese, molybdenum, and phosphate. At present, mines at several locations produce copper, molybdenum, gold, silver, lead, zinc, and phosphate. Exploration, mainly for gold, has indicated the presence of other mineral deposits that may be exploited in the future. The results of the investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey indicate that many areas of the quadrangle are highly favorable for the occurrence of additional undiscovered resources of gold, silver, copper, molybdenum, tungsten, and other metals in several deposit types.

  10. Phase equilibrium for surfactant Ls-54 in liquid CO(2) with water and solubility estimation using the Peng-Robinson equation of state.

    PubMed

    Tarafa, Pedro J; Matthews, Michael A

    2010-11-25

    It is known that the commercial surfactant Dehypon® Ls-54 is soluble in supercritical CO(2) and that it enables formation of water-in-CO(2) microemulsions. In this work we observed phase equilibrium for the Ls-54/CO(2) and Ls-54/water/CO(2) systems in the liquid CO(2) region, from 278.15 - 298.15 K. In addition, the Peng-Robinson equation of state (PREOS) was used to model the phase behavior of Ls-54/CO(2) binary system as well as to estimate water solubilities in CO(2). Ls-54 in CO(2) can have solubilities as high as 0.086 M at 278.15 K and 15.2 MPa. The stability of the microemulsion decreases with increasing concentration of water, and lower temperatures favor increased solubility of water into the one-phase microemulsion. The PREOS model showed satisfactory agreement with the experimental data for both Ls-54/CO(2) and water/CO(2) systems.

  11. Phase equilibrium for surfactant Ls-54 in liquid CO2 with water and solubility estimation using the Peng-Robinson equation of state

    PubMed Central

    Tarafa, Pedro J.; Matthews, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    It is known that the commercial surfactant Dehypon® Ls-54 is soluble in supercritical CO2 and that it enables formation of water-in-CO2 microemulsions. In this work we observed phase equilibrium for the Ls-54/CO2 and Ls-54/water/CO2 systems in the liquid CO2 region, from 278.15 - 298.15 K. In addition, the Peng-Robinson equation of state (PREOS) was used to model the phase behavior of Ls-54/CO2 binary system as well as to estimate water solubilities in CO2. Ls-54 in CO2 can have solubilities as high as 0.086 M at 278.15 K and 15.2 MPa. The stability of the microemulsion decreases with increasing concentration of water, and lower temperatures favor increased solubility of water into the one-phase microemulsion. The PREOS model showed satisfactory agreement with the experimental data for both Ls-54/CO2 and water/CO2 systems. PMID:21037962

  12. Rapid equilibrium kinetic analysis of arsenite methylation catalyzed by recombinant human arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (hAS3MT).

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuping; Li, Xiangli; Song, Xiaoli; Geng, Zhirong; Hu, Xin; Wang, Zhilin

    2012-11-09

    In the human body, arsenic is metabolized by methylation. Understanding this process is important and provides insight into the relationship between arsenic and its related diseases. We used the rapid equilibrium kinetic model to study the reaction sequence of arsenite methylation. The results suggest that the mechanism for arsenite methylation is a completely ordered mechanism that is also of general interest in reaction systems with different reductants, such as tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine, cysteine, and glutathione. In the reaction, cysteine residues of recombinant human arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (hAS3MT) coordinate with arsenicals and involve the methyl transfer step. S-Adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) is the first-order reactant, which modulates the conformation of hAS3MT to a best matched state by hydrophobic interaction. As the second-order reactant, reductant reduces the disulfide bond, most likely between Cys-250 and another cysteine residue of hAS3MT, and exposes the active site cysteine residues for binding trivalent inorganic arsenic (iAs(3+)) to give monomethylarsonic dicysteine (MADC(3+)). In addition, the reaction can be extended to further methylate MADC(3+) to dimethylarsinic cysteine (DAMC(3+)). In the methylation reaction, the β-pleated sheet content of hAS3MT is increased, and the hydrophobicity of the microenvironment around the active sites is decreased. Similarly, we confirm that both the high β-pleated sheet content of hAS3MT and the high dissociation ability of the enzyme-AdoMet-reductant improve the yield of dimethylated arsenicals.

  13. Natural mineral water of the United States: Section in Fourteenth Annual Report of the United States Geological Survey to the Secretary of the Interior, 1892-1893: Part 2 - Accompanying papers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peale, A.C.

    1894-01-01

    Aside from the geological interest attached to the subject of mineral waters the facts that within the limits of the United States there are between 8,000 and 10,000 mineral springs, and that the waters from nearly 300 are annually placed upon the market to the extent of over 21,000,000 gallons, at a valuation of nearly \\$5,000,000, show plainly that the subject is also one of considerable economic importance. That this importance is an increasing one is evident when a comparison of these figures is made with the figures for 1883, the first year they were compiled. The production then was 7,529,423 gallons, with a valuation of \\$1,119,603, and the total number of springs known to be utilized for commercial purposes was only 189.

  14. Relevance of equilibrium in multifragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Furuta, Takuya; Ono, Akira

    2009-01-15

    The relevance of equilibrium in a multifragmentation reaction of very central {sup 40}Ca + {sup 40}Ca collisions at 35 MeV/nucleon is investigated by using simulations of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). Two types of ensembles are compared. One is the reaction ensemble of the states at each reaction time t in collision events simulated by AMD, and the other is the equilibrium ensemble prepared by solving the AMD equation of motion for a many-nucleon system confined in a container for a long time. The comparison of the ensembles is performed for the fragment charge distribution and the excitation energies. Our calculations show that there exists an equilibrium ensemble that well reproduces the reaction ensemble at each reaction time t for the investigated period 80{<=}t{<=}300 fm/c. However, there are some other observables that show discrepancies between the reaction and equilibrium ensembles. These may be interpreted as dynamical effects in the reaction. The usual static equilibrium at each instant is not realized since any equilibrium ensemble with the same volume as that of the reaction system cannot reproduce the fragment observables.

  15. Tuning universality far from equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Markus; Nowak, Boris; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Possible universal dynamics of a many-body system far from thermal equilibrium are explored. A focus is set on meta-stable non-thermal states exhibiting critical properties such as self-similarity and independence of the details of how the respective state has been reached. It is proposed that universal dynamics far from equilibrium can be tuned to exhibit a dynamical transition where these critical properties change qualitatively. This is demonstrated for the case of a superfluid two-component Bose gas exhibiting different types of long-lived but non-thermal critical order. Scaling exponents controlled by the ratio of experimentally tuneable coupling parameters offer themselves as natural smoking guns. The results shed light on the wealth of universal phenomena expected to exist in the far-from-equilibrium realm. PMID:23928853

  16. The transformation dynamics towards equilibrium in non-equilibrium w/w/o double emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Youchuang; Mak, Sze Yi; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2016-10-01

    We use a glass-based microfluidic device to generate non-equilibrium water-in-water-in-oil (w/w/o) double emulsions and study how they transform into equilibrium configurations. The method relies on using three immiscible liquids, with two of them from the phase-separated aqueous two-phase systems. We find that the transformation is accompanied by an expansion rim, while the characteristic transformation speed of the rim mainly depends on the interfacial tension between the innermost and middle phases, as well as the viscosity of the innermost phase when the middle phase is non-viscous. Remarkably, the viscosity of the outermost phase has little effect on the transformation speed. Our results account for the dynamics of non-equilibrium double emulsions towards their equilibrium structure and suggest a possibility to utilize the non-equilibrium drops to synthesize functional particles.

  17. Statistical physics ""Beyond equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    The scientific challenges of the 21st century will increasingly involve competing interactions, geometric frustration, spatial and temporal intrinsic inhomogeneity, nanoscale structures, and interactions spanning many scales. We will focus on a broad class of emerging problems that will require new tools in non-equilibrium statistical physics and that will find application in new material functionality, in predicting complex spatial dynamics, and in understanding novel states of matter. Our work will encompass materials under extreme conditions involving elastic/plastic deformation, competing interactions, intrinsic inhomogeneity, frustration in condensed matter systems, scaling phenomena in disordered materials from glasses to granular matter, quantum chemistry applied to nano-scale materials, soft-matter materials, and spatio-temporal properties of both ordinary and complex fluids.

  18. Picosecond spectroscopic studies of equilibrium structural fluctuations of native and partially unfolded states of Zinc II-substituted and metal-free cytochromes C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Jagnyaseni

    Picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was employed to characterize the equilibrium and non-equilibrium protein structural fluctuations in Zn II-substituted (ZnCytc) and metal-free (fbCytc) cytochromes c using dynamic fluorescence Stokes shift (FSS) and fluorescence anisotropy (FA) measurements. The intrinsic porphyrin chromophore is used as the probe for the structural fluctuations of the surrounding protein and solvent. The FSS experiments examine how the time scales detected from the dynamic solvation of a chromoprotein report changes in the character of motion. ZnCytc and fbCytc serve as limited, single-chromophore models for photosynthetic reaction center and light-harvesting proteins. The dynamic solvation of redox and light-harvesting chromophores in photosynthesis plays an important role in the quantum efficiency of electron transfer and energy transfer performed by these systems, respectively. The FSS response function of fbCytc in water is biexponential over the 100-ps--50-ns regime and the two time constants are 1.4 ns and 9.1 ns. ZnCytc under similar solution conditions shows a biexponential FSS response but with time constants of 0.2 ns and 1.5 ns. The two correlation times from the FSS response function correspond to motions of the hydrophobic core and the solvent-contact layer, respectively. Both FSS correlation times were lengthened and the solvation reorganization energy was reduced from 43 cm-1 to 33 cm-1 in the presence of 50% (v/v) glycerol. A Brownian diffusion model with thermally activated barrier crossings on the protein-folding energy landscape is used to interpret these results. The conclusion is that the mean-squared deviations of the fluctuations exhibited by fbCytc are perhaps a factor of ten larger than those in ZnCytc, which is consistent with the suggestion that fbCytc assumes a dynamic, partially unfolded structure with some of the characteristics of a molten globule. The nature of the motion associated with the

  19. 19 CFR 148.4 - Accompanying articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Accompanying articles. 148.4 Section 148.4 Customs... (CONTINUED) PERSONAL DECLARATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS General Provisions § 148.4 Accompanying articles. (a) Generally. Articles shall be considered as accompanying a passenger or brought in by him if the...

  20. 19 CFR 148.4 - Accompanying articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Accompanying articles. 148.4 Section 148.4 Customs... (CONTINUED) PERSONAL DECLARATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS General Provisions § 148.4 Accompanying articles. (a) Generally. Articles shall be considered as accompanying a passenger or brought in by him if the...

  1. 19 CFR 148.4 - Accompanying articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Accompanying articles. 148.4 Section 148.4 Customs... (CONTINUED) PERSONAL DECLARATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS General Provisions § 148.4 Accompanying articles. (a) Generally. Articles shall be considered as accompanying a passenger or brought in by him if the...

  2. 19 CFR 148.4 - Accompanying articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Accompanying articles. 148.4 Section 148.4 Customs... (CONTINUED) PERSONAL DECLARATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS General Provisions § 148.4 Accompanying articles. (a) Generally. Articles shall be considered as accompanying a passenger or brought in by him if the...

  3. 19 CFR 148.4 - Accompanying articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Accompanying articles. 148.4 Section 148.4 Customs... (CONTINUED) PERSONAL DECLARATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS General Provisions § 148.4 Accompanying articles. (a) Generally. Articles shall be considered as accompanying a passenger or brought in by him if the...

  4. Modulation and Salt-Induced Reverse Modulation of the Excited-State Proton-Transfer Process of Lysozymized Pyranine: The Contrasting Scenario of the Ground-State Acid-Base Equilibrium of the Photoacid.

    PubMed

    Das, Ishita; Panja, Sudipta; Halder, Mintu

    2016-07-28

    Here we report on the excited-state behavior in terms of the excited-state proton-transfer (ESPT) reaction as well as the ground-state acid-base property of pyranine [8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (HPTS)] in the presence of an enzymatic protein, human lysozyme (LYZ). HPTS forms a 1:1 ground-state complex with LYZ having the binding constant KBH = (1.4 ± 0.05) × 10(4) M(-1), and its acid-base equilibrium gets shifted toward the deprotonated conjugate base (RO(-)), resulting in a downward shift in pKa. This suggests that the conjugate base (RO(-)) is thermodynamically more favored over the protonated (ROH) species inside the lysozyme matrix, resulting in an increased population of the deprotonated form. However, for the release of the proton from the excited photoacid, interestingly, the rate of proton transfer gets slowed down due to the "slow" acceptor biological water molecules present in the immediate vicinity of the fluorophore binding region inside the protein. The observed ESPT time constants, ∼140 and ∼750 ps, of protein-bound pyranine are slower than in bulk aqueous media (∼100 ps, single exponential). The molecular docking study predicts that the most probable binding location of the fluorophore is in a region near to the active site of the protein. Here we also report on the effect of external electrolyte (NaCl) on the reverse modulation of ground-state prototropy as well as the ESPT process of the protein-bound pyranine. It is found that there is a dominant role of electrostatic forces in the HPTS-LYZ interaction process, because an increase in ionic strength by the addition of NaCl dislodges the fluorophore from the protein pocket to the bulk again. The study shows a considerably different perspective of the perturbation offered by the model macromolecular host used, unlike the available literature reports on the concerned photoacid.

  5. Thermodynamic theory of equilibrium fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Mishin, Y.

    2015-12-15

    The postulational basis of classical thermodynamics has been expanded to incorporate equilibrium fluctuations. The main additional elements of the proposed thermodynamic theory are the concept of quasi-equilibrium states, a definition of non-equilibrium entropy, a fundamental equation of state in the entropy representation, and a fluctuation postulate describing the probability distribution of macroscopic parameters of an isolated system. Although these elements introduce a statistical component that does not exist in classical thermodynamics, the logical structure of the theory is different from that of statistical mechanics and represents an expanded version of thermodynamics. Based on this theory, we present a regular procedure for calculations of equilibrium fluctuations of extensive parameters, intensive parameters and densities in systems with any number of fluctuating parameters. The proposed fluctuation formalism is demonstrated by four applications: (1) derivation of the complete set of fluctuation relations for a simple fluid in three different ensembles; (2) fluctuations in finite-reservoir systems interpolating between the canonical and micro-canonical ensembles; (3) derivation of fluctuation relations for excess properties of grain boundaries in binary solid solutions, and (4) derivation of the grain boundary width distribution for pre-melted grain boundaries in alloys. The last two applications offer an efficient fluctuation-based approach to calculations of interface excess properties and extraction of the disjoining potential in pre-melted grain boundaries. Possible future extensions of the theory are outlined.

  6. The Conterminous United States Mineral Appraisal Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resources maps of the Walker Lake 1 degree x 2 degrees Quadrangle, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, John Harris; Chaffee, M.A.; Dohrenwend, J.C.; John, D.A.; Kistler, R.W.; Kleinhampl, F.J.; Menzie, W.D.; Plouff, Donald; Rowan, L.C.; Silberling, Norman J.

    1984-01-01

    The Walker Lake 1? by 2? quadrangle in eastern California and western Nevada was studied by an interdisciplinary research team to appraise its mineral resources. The appraisal is based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical field and laboratory investigations, the results of which are published as a folio of maps, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The selected bibliography lists selected references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the Walker Lake 1? by 2? quadrangle.

  7. The Conterminous United States Mineral Appraisal Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resources maps of the Tonopah 1 by 2 degree Quadrangle, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, David A.; Nash, J.T.; Plouff, Donald; Whitebread, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    The Tonopah 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle in south-central Nevada was studied by an interdisciplinary research team to appraise its mineral resources. The appraisal is based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical field and laboratory investigations, the results of which are published as a folio of maps, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The selected bibliography lists references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the Tonopah 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle.

  8. The Conterminous United States Mineral Appraisal Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resource maps of the Choteau 1 degree x 2 degrees Quadrangle, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Earhart, Robert L.; Grimes, David J.; Leinz, Reinhard W.; Kleinkopf, M. Dean

    1981-01-01

    The Choteau l? x 2? quadrangle in northwest Montana was studied by an interdisciplinary research team in order to appraise its mineral resource and hydrocarbon potential The appraisal is based on field and laboratory investigations of the geology, geochemistry, and geophysics. The results of the investigations are published as a folio of maps, figures, tables, and accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the investigations and integrates the published components of the resource appraisal. A comprehensive bibliography cites both specific and general references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the Choteau l? x 2? quadrangle.

  9. The Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Project; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resources maps of the Reno 1 by 2 degree Quadrangle, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, David A.; Stewart, John H.; Hendricks, J.D.; Rowan, L.C.; Plouff, Donald

    1992-01-01

    The Reno 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle in west-central Nevada was studied by an interdisciplinary research team to appraise its mineral resources. The assessment is based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical field and laboratory investigations, the results of which are published as a folio of maps, reports, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The selected bibliography lists references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the Reno 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle.

  10. The Conterminous United States Mineral Appraisal Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resources maps of the Medford 1 degree x 2 degrees Quadrangle, Oregon and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, James G.; Blakely, R.J.; Johnson, M.G.; Page, N.J.; Peterson, J.A.; Singer, D.A.; Whittington, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Medford 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle in southern Oregon and northern California was studied by an interdisciplinary research team to appraise its mineral resources. The appraisal is based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical field and laboratory investigations, the results of which are published as a folio of maps, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The bibliography lists selected references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the Medford 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle.

  11. The Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, remote sensing, and mineral resource maps of the Wallace 1 degree x 2 degrees Quadrangle, Montana and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Jack Edward; Leach, David L.; Kleinkopf, M. Dean; Long, Carl L.; Rowan, Larry C.; Marvin, Richard F.

    1986-01-01

    The Wallace 1? x 2 quadrangle in Montana and Idaho was studied by an interdisciplinary research team that included geologists, geochemists, and geophysicists, as well as specialists in isotopic dating and remote sensing. The basic data resulting from these studies, as well as the final metallic mineral resource assessments, are published as a folio of maps, figures, tables, and accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the studies and lists the published components of the resource appraisal. An extensive bibliography lists both specific and general references that apply to this geoscience study of the quadrangle.

  12. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization

    PubMed Central

    Anzà, F.; Vedral, V.

    2017-01-01

    A crucial point in statistical mechanics is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which can be given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy, under the validity of some constraints. Arguing that such a notion can never be experimentally probed, in this paper we propose a new notion of thermal equilibrium, focused on observables rather than on the full state of the quantum system. We characterise such notion of thermal equilibrium for an arbitrary observable via the maximisation of its Shannon entropy and we bring to light the thermal properties that it heralds. The relation with Gibbs ensembles is studied and understood. We apply such a notion of equilibrium to a closed quantum system and show that there is always a class of observables which exhibits thermal equilibrium properties and we give a recipe to explicitly construct them. Eventually, an intimate connection with the Eigenstate Thermalisation Hypothesis is brought to light. PMID:28266646

  13. Disturbances in equilibrium function after major earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Motoyasu; Endo, Nobutaka; Osada, Yoshihisa; Kim, Yoshiharu; Kuriyama, Kenichi

    2012-10-01

    Major earthquakes were followed by a large number of aftershocks and significant outbreaks of dizziness occurred over a large area. However it is unclear why major earthquake causes dizziness. We conducted an intergroup trial on equilibrium dysfunction and psychological states associated with equilibrium dysfunction in individuals exposed to repetitive aftershocks versus those who were rarely exposed. Greater equilibrium dysfunction was observed in the aftershock-exposed group under conditions without visual compensation. Equilibrium dysfunction in the aftershock-exposed group appears to have arisen from disturbance of the inner ear, as well as individual vulnerability to state anxiety enhanced by repetitive exposure to aftershocks. We indicate potential effects of autonomic stress on equilibrium function after major earthquake. Our findings may contribute to risk management of psychological and physical health after major earthquakes with aftershocks, and allow development of a new empirical approach to disaster care after such events.

  14. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzà, F.; Vedral, V.

    2017-03-01

    A crucial point in statistical mechanics is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which can be given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy, under the validity of some constraints. Arguing that such a notion can never be experimentally probed, in this paper we propose a new notion of thermal equilibrium, focused on observables rather than on the full state of the quantum system. We characterise such notion of thermal equilibrium for an arbitrary observable via the maximisation of its Shannon entropy and we bring to light the thermal properties that it heralds. The relation with Gibbs ensembles is studied and understood. We apply such a notion of equilibrium to a closed quantum system and show that there is always a class of observables which exhibits thermal equilibrium properties and we give a recipe to explicitly construct them. Eventually, an intimate connection with the Eigenstate Thermalisation Hypothesis is brought to light.

  15. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization.

    PubMed

    Anzà, F; Vedral, V

    2017-03-07

    A crucial point in statistical mechanics is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which can be given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy, under the validity of some constraints. Arguing that such a notion can never be experimentally probed, in this paper we propose a new notion of thermal equilibrium, focused on observables rather than on the full state of the quantum system. We characterise such notion of thermal equilibrium for an arbitrary observable via the maximisation of its Shannon entropy and we bring to light the thermal properties that it heralds. The relation with Gibbs ensembles is studied and understood. We apply such a notion of equilibrium to a closed quantum system and show that there is always a class of observables which exhibits thermal equilibrium properties and we give a recipe to explicitly construct them. Eventually, an intimate connection with the Eigenstate Thermalisation Hypothesis is brought to light.

  16. Atomic resolution for non-equilibrium structures in the steady state and for structural transformations at the interface between NaCl(c) and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Masanori

    1996-07-01

    Observations of both nanoscale and microscale images were carried out on a NaCl(001) surface in water using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The observed higher density of steps and the observed convex and concave steps in water result from the forward motion of monatomic steps and crystal growth of the so-called step-flow mode. The non-equilibrium structure having a unit cell of 0953-8984/8/27/003/img1 structure has been observed for the first time on terraces. Since every 0953-8984/8/27/003/img2 on terraces is located at the same height as 0953-8984/8/27/003/img3, each 0953-8984/8/27/003/img2 as well as each 0953-8984/8/27/003/img3 have been observed as protrusions by AFM. The metastable configuration at the interface between the NaCl(001) surface and water was transformed, at steps, into the equilibrium structure of NaCl(c), about 3 h after the NaCl(001) surface had been covered with its own saturated water. After about 30 min, however, 0953-8984/8/27/003/img2 still remains at the same height as 0953-8984/8/27/003/img3 at steps, or sodium ions leave the surface at steps. The reason why the forward motion of monatomic steps takes place at the interface between the NaCl(001) surface and water is the decrease of about 0.05 nm in the distance of like nearest neighbours in the non-equilibrium structure having a unit cell of 0953-8984/8/27/003/img1 structure on terraces after its structural transformation to the equilibrium structure of NaCl(c) with the aid of water molecules.

  17. Local Nash equilibrium in social networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichao; Aziz-Alaoui, M A; Bertelle, Cyrille; Guan, Jihong

    2014-08-29

    Nash equilibrium is widely present in various social disputes. As of now, in structured static populations, such as social networks, regular, and random graphs, the discussions on Nash equilibrium are quite limited. In a relatively stable static gaming network, a rational individual has to comprehensively consider all his/her opponents' strategies before they adopt a unified strategy. In this scenario, a new strategy equilibrium emerges in the system. We define this equilibrium as a local Nash equilibrium. In this paper, we present an explicit definition of the local Nash equilibrium for the two-strategy games in structured populations. Based on the definition, we investigate the condition that a system reaches the evolutionary stable state when the individuals play the Prisoner's dilemma and snow-drift game. The local Nash equilibrium provides a way to judge whether a gaming structured population reaches the evolutionary stable state on one hand. On the other hand, it can be used to predict whether cooperators can survive in a system long before the system reaches its evolutionary stable state for the Prisoner's dilemma game. Our work therefore provides a theoretical framework for understanding the evolutionary stable state in the gaming populations with static structures.

  18. Getting Freshman in Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Various aspects of chemical equilibrium were discussed in six papers presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (Stillwater, Oklahoma 1982). These include student problems in understanding hydrolysis, helping students discover/uncover topics, equilibrium demonstrations, instructional strategies, and flaws to kinetic…

  19. The Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resource maps of the Ajo and Lukeville 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangles, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, Floyd; Tosdal, R.M.; Peterson, J.A.; Cox, D.P.; Miller, R.J.; Klein, D.P.; Theobald, P.K.; Haxel, G.B.; Grubensky, M.J.; Raines, G.L.; Barton, H.N.; Singer, D.A.; Eppinger, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    Encompassing about 21,000 km 2 in southwestern Arizona, the Ajo and Lukeville 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangles have been the subject of mineral resource investigations utilizing field and laboratory studies in the disciplines of geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and Landsat imagery. The results of these studies are published as a folio of maps, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. Past mineral production has been limited to copper from the Ajo Mining District. In addition to copper, the quadrangles contain potentially significant resources of gold and silver; a few other commodities, including molybdenum and evaporites, may also exist in the area as appreciable resources. This circular provides background information on the mineral deposits and on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The bibliography cites references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the two quadrangles.

  20. Equilibrium of KSTAR Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K.-I.; Lee, D.-K.; Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.; Hahn, S. H.; Lao, L.; Kstar Team

    2011-10-01

    We have installed the EFIT code on our computing system and made some modification to reconstruct the plasma equilibrium of KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research). KSTAR PF and TF coil systems use a CICC (Cable-In-Conduit Conductor) type superconductor. The CICC jacket material for most PF and all TF coils is Incoloy 908, which is a magnetic material with relative magnetic permeability greater than 10 in low external field. We newly introduced Diamagnetic Loop and variational Motion Stark Effect signals to equilibrium reconstruction. In this paper, we present some results of equilibrium reconstruction with the EFIT code, assess the effects of newly introduced diagnsotics signal on the equilibrium reconstruction and compare the EFIT results with the various diagnostics data in various plasma conditions including H- and L- modes. In addition, we will show the Incoloy908 effects on the plasma equilibrium.

  1. 19 CFR 12.6 - Affidavits required to accompany entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Importation of Certain Cheeses § 12.6 Affidavits required to accompany entry. (a) Cheeses produced in the member states of the European Communities shall... (excluding Puerto Rico), of the producer or exporter that the cheese has not received and will not...

  2. 36 CFR 14.25 - Documents which must accompany application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Maps. Each application, other than an appropriation for Federal-aid highway purposes under Title 23, United States Code, section 317, must be accompanied by a map prepared on tracing linen, or on tracing... engineer or land surveyor. The map should comply with the following requirements: (1) The scale should be...

  3. 36 CFR 14.25 - Documents which must accompany application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Maps. Each application, other than an appropriation for Federal-aid highway purposes under Title 23, United States Code, section 317, must be accompanied by a map prepared on tracing linen, or on tracing... engineer or land surveyor. The map should comply with the following requirements: (1) The scale should be...

  4. 36 CFR 14.25 - Documents which must accompany application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Maps. Each application, other than an appropriation for Federal-aid highway purposes under Title 23, United States Code, section 317, must be accompanied by a map prepared on tracing linen, or on tracing... engineer or land surveyor. The map should comply with the following requirements: (1) The scale should be...

  5. 36 CFR 14.25 - Documents which must accompany application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Maps. Each application, other than an appropriation for Federal-aid highway purposes under Title 23, United States Code, section 317, must be accompanied by a map prepared on tracing linen, or on tracing... engineer or land surveyor. The map should comply with the following requirements: (1) The scale should be...

  6. Beyond transition state theory: accurate description of nuclear quantum effects on the rate and equilibrium constants of chemical reactions using Feynman path integrals.

    PubMed

    Vanícek, Jirí

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear tunneling and other nuclear quantum effects have been shown to play a significant role in molecules as large as enzymes even at physiological temperatures. I discuss how these quantum phenomena can be accounted for rigorously using Feynman path integrals in calculations of the equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects as well as of the temperature dependence of the rate constant. Because these calculations are extremely computationally demanding, special attention is devoted to increasing the computational efficiency by orders of magnitude by employing efficient path integral estimators.

  7. Probing local equilibrium in nonequilibrium fluids.

    PubMed

    del Pozo, J J; Garrido, P L; Hurtado, P I

    2015-08-01

    We use extensive computer simulations to probe local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in a quintessential model fluid, the two-dimensional hard-disks system. We show that macroscopic LTE is a property much stronger than previously anticipated, even in the presence of important finite-size effects, revealing a remarkable bulk-boundary decoupling phenomenon in fluids out of equilibrium. This allows us to measure the fluid's equation of state in simulations far from equilibrium, with an excellent accuracy comparable to the best equilibrium simulations. Subtle corrections to LTE are found in the fluctuations of the total energy which strongly point to the nonlocality of the nonequilibrium potential governing the fluid's macroscopic behavior out of equilibrium.

  8. How Far from Equilibrium Is Active Matter?

    PubMed

    Fodor, Étienne; Nardini, Cesare; Cates, Michael E; Tailleur, Julien; Visco, Paolo; van Wijland, Frédéric

    2016-07-15

    Active matter systems are driven out of thermal equilibrium by a lack of generalized Stokes-Einstein relation between injection and dissipation of energy at the microscopic scale. We consider such a system of interacting particles, propelled by persistent noises, and show that, at small but finite persistence time, their dynamics still satisfy a time-reversal symmetry. To do so, we compute perturbatively their steady-state measure and show that, for short persistent times, the entropy production rate vanishes. This endows such systems with an effective fluctuation-dissipation theorem akin to that of thermal equilibrium systems. Last, we show how interacting particle systems with viscous drags and correlated noises can be seen as in equilibrium with a viscoelastic bath but driven out of equilibrium by nonconservative forces, hence providing energetic insight into the departure of active systems from equilibrium.

  9. How Far from Equilibrium Is Active Matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Étienne; Nardini, Cesare; Cates, Michael E.; Tailleur, Julien; Visco, Paolo; van Wijland, Frédéric

    2016-07-01

    Active matter systems are driven out of thermal equilibrium by a lack of generalized Stokes-Einstein relation between injection and dissipation of energy at the microscopic scale. We consider such a system of interacting particles, propelled by persistent noises, and show that, at small but finite persistence time, their dynamics still satisfy a time-reversal symmetry. To do so, we compute perturbatively their steady-state measure and show that, for short persistent times, the entropy production rate vanishes. This endows such systems with an effective fluctuation-dissipation theorem akin to that of thermal equilibrium systems. Last, we show how interacting particle systems with viscous drags and correlated noises can be seen as in equilibrium with a viscoelastic bath but driven out of equilibrium by nonconservative forces, hence providing energetic insight into the departure of active systems from equilibrium.

  10. Time-Resolved Photoemission of Correlated Electrons Driven Out of Equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T.P.; Freericks, J.K.; /Georgetown U.

    2010-02-15

    We describe the temporal evolution of the time-resolved photoemission response of the spinless Falicov-Kimball model driven out of equilibrium by strong, applied fields. The model is one of the few possessing a metal-insulator transition and admitting an exact solution in the time domain. The nonequilibrium dynamics, evaluated using an extension of dynamical mean-field theory, show how the driven system differs from two common viewpoints - a quasi-equilibrium system at an elevated, effective temperature (the 'hot' electron model) or a rapid interaction quench ('melting' of the Mott gap) - due to the rearrangement of electronic states and redistribution of spectral weight. The results demonstrate the inherent trade-off between energy and time resolution accompanying the finite width probe-pulses, characteristic of those employed in pump-probe, time-domain experiments, which can be used to focus attention on different aspects of the dynamics near the transition.

  11. (SO2)-S-34-O-16: High-resolution analysis of the (030),(101), (111), (002) and (201) vibrational states; determination of equilibrium rotational constants for sulfur dioxide and anharmonic vibrational constants

    SciTech Connect

    Lafferty, Walter; Flaud, Jean-marie; Ngom, El Hadji A.; Sams, Robert L.

    2009-01-02

    High resolution Fourier transform spectra of a sample of sulfur dioxide, enriched in 34S (95.3%). were completely analyzed leading to a large set of assigned lines. The experimental levels derived from this set of transitions were fit to within their experimental uncertainties using Watson-type Hamiltonians. Precise band centers, rotational and centrifugal distortion constants were determined. The following band centers in cm-1 were obtained: ν0(3ν2)=1538.720198(11), ν0(ν1+ν3)=2475.828004(29), ν0(ν1+ν2+ν3)=2982.118600(20), ν0(2ν3)=2679.800919(35), and ν0(2ν1+ν3)=3598.773915(38). The rotational constants obtained in this work have been fit together with the rotational constants of lower lying vibrational states [ W.J. Lafferty, J.-M. Flaud, R.L. Sams and EL Hadjiabib, in press] to obtain equilibrium constants as well as vibration-rotation constants. These equilibrium constants have been fit together with those of 32S16O2 [J.-M. Flaud and W.J. Lafferty, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 16 (1993) 396-402] leading to an improved equilibrium structure. Finally the observed band centers have been fit to obtain anharmonic rotational constants.

  12. Chemical Principles Revisited: Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes: (1) Law of Mass Action; (2) equilibrium constant and ideal behavior; (3) general form of the equilibrium constant; (4) forward and reverse reactions; (5) factors influencing equilibrium; (6) Le Chatelier's principle; (7) effects of temperature, changing concentration, and pressure on equilibrium; and (8) catalysts and equilibrium. (JN)

  13. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  14. Altered spin state equilibrium in the T309V mutant of cytochrome P450 2D6: a spectroscopic and computational study

    PubMed Central

    Bonifacio, Alois; Groenhof, André R.; Keizers, Peter H. J.; de Graaf, Chris; Commandeur, Jan N. M.; Vermeulen, Nico P. E.; Ehlers, Andreas W.; Lammertsma, Koop; Gooijer, Cees

    2007-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is one of the most important cytochromes P450 in humans. Resonance Raman data from the T309V mutant of CYP2D6 show that the substitution of the conserved I-helix threonine situated in the enzyme’s active site perturbs the heme spin equilibrium in favor of the six-coordinated low-spin species. A mechanistic hypothesis is introduced to explain the experimental observations, and its compatibility with the available structural and spectroscopic data is tested using quantum-mechanical density functional theory calculations on active-site models for both the CYP2D6 wild type and the T309V mutant. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00775-007-0210-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:17318599

  15. Non-Equilibrium Properties from Equilibrium Free Energy Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Calculating free energy in computer simulations is of central importance in statistical mechanics of condensed media and its applications to chemistry and biology not only because it is the most comprehensive and informative quantity that characterizes the eqUilibrium state, but also because it often provides an efficient route to access dynamic and kinetic properties of a system. Most of applications of equilibrium free energy calculations to non-equilibrium processes rely on a description in which a molecule or an ion diffuses in the potential of mean force. In general case this description is a simplification, but it might be satisfactorily accurate in many instances of practical interest. This hypothesis has been tested in the example of the electrodiffusion equation . Conductance of model ion channels has been calculated directly through counting the number of ion crossing events observed during long molecular dynamics simulations and has been compared with the conductance obtained from solving the generalized Nernst-Plank equation. It has been shown that under relatively modest conditions the agreement between these two approaches is excellent, thus demonstrating the assumptions underlying the diffusion equation are fulfilled. Under these conditions the electrodiffusion equation provides an efficient approach to calculating the full voltage-current dependence routinely measured in electrophysiological experiments.

  16. Oligomer formation of the bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP: reaction rates and equilibrium constants indicate a monomeric state at physiological concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Martin; Allan, Martin G; Zaehringer, Franziska; Schirmer, Tilman; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2012-01-18

    Cyclic diguanosine-monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial signaling molecule that triggers a switch from motile to sessile bacterial lifestyles. This mechanism is of considerable pharmaceutical interest, since it is related to bacterial virulence, biofilm formation, and persistence of infection. Previously, c-di-GMP has been reported to display a rich polymorphism of various oligomeric forms at millimolar concentrations, which differ in base stacking and G-quartet interactions. Here, we have analyzed the equilibrium and exchange kinetics between these various forms by NMR spectroscopy. We find that the association of the monomer into a dimeric form is in fast exchange (equilibrium constant of about 1 mM. At concentrations above 100 μM, higher oligomers are formed in the presence of cations. These are presumably tetramers and octamers, with octamers dominating above about 0.5 mM. Thus, at the low micromolar concentrations of the cellular environment and in the absence of additional compounds that stabilize oligomers, c-di-GMP should be predominantly monomeric. This finding has important implications for the understanding of c-di-GMP recognition by protein receptors. In contrast to the monomer/dimer exchange, formation and dissociation of higher oligomers occurs on a time scale of several hours to days. The time course can be described quantitatively by a simple kinetic model where tetramers are intermediates of octamer formation. The extremely slow oligomer dissociation may generate severe artifacts in biological experiments when c-di-GMP is diluted from concentrated stock solution. We present a simple method to quantify c-di-GMP monomers and oligomers from UV spectra and a procedure to dissolve the unwanted oligomers by an annealing step.

  17. Local equilibrium in bird flocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Del Castello, Lorenzo; Ginelli, Francesco; Melillo, Stefania; Parisi, Leonardo; Viale, Massimiliano; Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene

    2016-12-01

    The correlated motion of flocks is an example of global order emerging from local interactions. An essential difference with respect to analogous ferromagnetic systems is that flocks are active: animals move relative to each other, dynamically rearranging their interaction network. This non-equilibrium characteristic has been studied theoretically, but its impact on actual animal groups remains to be fully explored experimentally. Here, we introduce a novel dynamical inference technique, based on the principle of maximum entropy, which accommodates network rearrangements and overcomes the problem of slow experimental sampling rates. We use this method to infer the strength and range of alignment forces from data of starling flocks. We find that local bird alignment occurs on a much faster timescale than neighbour rearrangement. Accordingly, equilibrium inference, which assumes a fixed interaction network, gives results consistent with dynamical inference. We conclude that bird orientations are in a state of local quasi-equilibrium over the interaction length scale, providing firm ground for the applicability of statistical physics in certain active systems.

  18. Conformations of Proteins in Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheletti, Cristian; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Maritan, Amos

    2001-08-01

    We introduce a simple theoretical approach for an equilibrium study of proteins with known native-state structures. We test our approach with results on well-studied globular proteins, chymotrypsin inhibitor (2ci2), barnase, and the alpha spectrin SH3 domain, and present evidence for a hierarchical onset of order on lowering the temperature with significant organization at the local level even at high temperatures. A further application to the folding process of HIV-1 protease shows that the model can be reliably used to identify key folding sites that are responsible for the development of drug resistance.

  19. Determination of nonaxisymmetric equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Elkin, D.

    1980-01-01

    The Princeton Equilibrium Code is modified to determine the equilibrium surfaces for a large aspect ratio toroidal system with helical magnetic fields. The code may easily be made to include any variety of modes. Verification of the code is made by comparison with an analytic solution for l = 3. Previously observed shifting of the magnetic axis with increasing pressure or with a changed externally applied vertical field is obtained. The case l = 0, a bumpy torus, gives convergence only for the lenient convergence tolerance of epsilon/sub b/ = 1.0 x 10-/sup 2/.

  20. Beyond Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2005-01-01

    Beyond Equilibrium Thermodynamics fills a niche in the market by providing a comprehensive introduction to a new, emerging topic in the field. The importance of non-equilibrium thermodynamics is addressed in order to fully understand how a system works, whether it is in a biological system like the brain or a system that develops plastic. In order to fully grasp the subject, the book clearly explains the physical concepts and mathematics involved, as well as presenting problems and solutions; over 200 exercises and answers are included. Engineers, scientists, and applied mathematicians can all use the book to address their problems in modelling, calculating, and understanding dynamic responses of materials.

  1. PHYSICAL EFFECTS OCCURRING DURING GENERATION AND AMPLIFICATION OF LASER RADIATION: Self-induced resonance under conditions of radiative equilibrium of quasienergy states in a three-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisyan, M. A.

    1989-02-01

    An analysis is made of the interaction of a three-level "cascade" atomic system with a resonant laser field. An investigation is made of the dynamics of the populations of the quasienergy states and of the atomic levels over times greater than the spontaneous transition times. In the steady-state regime the distribution of atoms over various quasienergy states is obtained under two-photon resonance conditions and for the case when all the resonances are strong. It is found that a suitable selection of the interaction parameters can establish an inversion between the quasienergy states and also due to atomic transitions. The total probability of spontaneous scattering is calculated. It is shown that, under two-photon resonance conditions, the scattering intensity increases sharply due to a self-induced resonance.

  2. Transient state kinetics of enzyme IICBGlc, a glucose transporter of the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system of Escherichia coli: equilibrium and second order rate constants for the glucose binding and phosphotransfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Meadow, Norman D; Savtchenko, Regina S; Nezami, Azin; Roseman, Saul

    2005-12-23

    During translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli, glucose is phosphorylated by phospho-IIA(Glc) and Enzyme IICB(Glc), the last two proteins in the phosphotransfer sequence of the phosphoenolpyruvate:glucose phosphotransferase system. Transient state (rapid quench) methods were used to determine the second order rate constants that describe the phosphotransfer reactions (phospho-IIA(Glc) to IICB(Glc) to Glc) and also the second order rate constants for the transfer from phospho-IIA(Glc) to molecularly cloned IIB(Glc), the soluble, cytoplasmic domain of IICB(Glc). The rate constants for the forward and reverse phosphotransfer reactions between IIA(Glc) and IICB(Glc) were 3.9 x 10(6) and 0.31 x 10(6) m(-1) s(-1), respectively, and the rate constant for the physiologically irreversible reaction between [P]IICB(Glc) and Glc was 3.2 x 10(6) m(-1) s(-1). From the rate constants, the equilibrium constants for the transfer of the phospho-group from His90 of [P]IIA(Glc) to the phosphorylation site Cys of IIB(Glc) or IICB(Glc) were found to be 3.5 and 12, respectively. These equilibrium constants signify that the thiophospho-group in these proteins has a high phosphotransfer potential, similar to that of the phosphohistidinyl phosphotransferase system proteins. In these studies, preparations of IICB(Glc) were invariably found to contain endogenous, firmly bound Glc (estimated K'(D) approximately 10(-7) m). The bound Glc was kinetically competent and was rapidly phosphorylated, indicating that IICB(Glc) has a random order, Bi Bi, substituted enzyme mechanism. The equilibrium constant for the binding of Glc was deduced from differences in the statistical goodness of fit of the phosphotransfer data to the kinetic model.

  3. Stochastic approach to equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tomé, Tânia; de Oliveira, Mário J

    2015-04-01

    We develop the stochastic approach to thermodynamics based on stochastic dynamics, which can be discrete (master equation) and continuous (Fokker-Planck equation), and on two assumptions concerning entropy. The first is the definition of entropy itself and the second the definition of entropy production rate, which is non-negative and vanishes in thermodynamic equilibrium. Based on these assumptions, we study interacting systems with many degrees of freedom in equilibrium or out of thermodynamic equilibrium and how the macroscopic laws are derived from the stochastic dynamics. These studies include the quasiequilibrium processes; the convexity of the equilibrium surface; the monotonic time behavior of thermodynamic potentials, including entropy; the bilinear form of the entropy production rate; the Onsager coefficients and reciprocal relations; and the nonequilibrium steady states of chemical reactions.

  4. MP4 Study of the Anharmonic Coupling of the Shared Proton Stretching Vibration of the Protonated Water Dimer in Equilibrium and Transition States.

    PubMed

    Pitsevich, G; Malevich, A; Kozlovskaya, E; Mahnach, E; Doroshenko, I; Pogorelov, V; Pettersson, Lars G M; Sablinskas, V; Balevicius, V

    2017-03-16

    The structure and harmonic and anharmonic IR spectra of the protonated water dimer (PWD) were calculated in C1, C2, and Cs symmetry at the MP4/acc-pVTZ level of theory. We found that structure and IR spectra are practically identical in C2 and C1 symmetry, demonstrating that an equilibrium C1 configuration of the PWD is not realized. Anharmonic coupling of the shared proton stretching vibration with all other modes in the PWD in C2 and Cs symmetry was the focus of this investigation. For this purpose, 28 two-dimensional potential energy surfaces (2D PES) were built at the MP4/acc-pVTZ level of theory and the corresponding vibrational Schrödinger equations were solved using the DVR method. Differences in the coupling of the investigated mode with other modes in the C2 and Cs configurations, along with some factors that determine the red- or blue-shift of the stretching vibration frequency, were analyzed. We obtained a rather reasonable value of the stretching frequency of the bridging proton (1058.4 cm(-1)) unperturbed by Fermi resonance. The Fermi resonance between the fundamental vibration ν7 and the combined vibration ν2 + ν6 of the same symmetry was analyzed through anharmonic second-order perturbation theory calculations, as well as by 3D PES constructed using Q2, Q6, and Q7 as normal coordinates. A significant (up to 50%) transfer of intensity from the fundamental vibration to the combined one was found. We have estimated the frequency of the bridging proton stretching vibration in the Cs configuration of the PWD based on calculations of the intrinsic anharmonicity and anharmonic double modes interactions at the MP4/acc-pVTZ level of theory (1261 cm(-1)).

  5. Teaching Chemical Equilibrium with the Jigsaw Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doymus, Kemal

    2008-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of cooperative learning (jigsaw) versus individual learning methods on students’ understanding of chemical equilibrium in a first-year general chemistry course. This study was carried out in two different classes in the department of primary science education during the 2005-2006 academic year. One of the classes was randomly assigned as the non-jigsaw group (control) and other as the jigsaw group (cooperative). Students participating in the jigsaw group were divided into four “home groups” since the topic chemical equilibrium is divided into four subtopics (Modules A, B, C and D). Each of these home groups contained four students. The groups were as follows: (1) Home Group A (HGA), representin g the equilibrium state and quantitative aspects of equilibrium (Module A), (2) Home Group B (HGB), representing the equilibrium constant and relationships involving equilibrium constants (Module B), (3) Home Group C (HGC), representing Altering Equilibrium Conditions: Le Chatelier’s principle (Module C), and (4) Home Group D (HGD), representing calculations with equilibrium constants (Module D). The home groups then broke apart, like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, and the students moved into jigsaw groups consisting of members from the other home groups who were assigned the same portion of the material. The jigsaw groups were then in charge of teaching their specific subtopic to the rest of the students in their learning group. The main data collection tool was a Chemical Equilibrium Achievement Test (CEAT), which was applied to both the jigsaw and non-jigsaw groups The results indicated that the jigsaw group was more successful than the non-jigsaw group (individual learning method).

  6. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are…

  7. Dynamics of Charged Particles in an Adiabatic Thermal Beam Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chiping; Wei, Haofei

    2010-11-01

    Charged-particle motion is studied in the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of a well-matched, intense charged-particle beam and an applied periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field. The beam is assumed to be in a state of adiabatic thermal equilibrium. The phase space is analyzed and compared with that of the well-known Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV)-type beam equilibrium. It is found that the widths of nonlinear resonances in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium are narrower than those in the KV-type beam equilibrium. Numerical evidence is presented, indicating almost complete elimination of chaotic particle motion in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium.

  8. Valence-bond non-equilibrium solvation model for a twisting monomethine cyanine.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Sean; McKenzie, Ross H; Olsen, Seth

    2015-02-28

    We propose and analyze a two-state valence-bond model of non-equilibrium solvation effects on the excited-state twisting reaction of monomethine cyanines. Suppression of this reaction is thought responsible for environment-dependent fluorescence yield enhancement in these dyes. Fluorescence is quenched because twisting is accompanied via the formation of dark twisted intramolecular charge-transfer (TICT) states. For monomethine cyanines, where the ground state is a superposition of structures with different bond and charge localizations, there are two possible twisting pathways with different charge localizations in the excited state. For parameters corresponding to symmetric monomethines, the model predicts two low-energy twisting channels on the excited-state surface, which leads to a manifold of TICT states. For typical monomethines, twisting on the excited state surface will occur with a small barrier or no barrier. Changes in the solvation configuration can differentially stabilize TICT states in channels corresponding to different bonds, and that the position of a conical intersection between adiabatic states moves in response to solvation to stabilize either one channel or the other. There is a conical intersection seam that grows along the bottom of the excited-state potential with increasing solvent polarity. For monomethine cyanines with modest-sized terminal groups in moderately polar solution, the bottom of the excited-state potential surface is completely spanned by a conical intersection seam.

  9. Valence-bond non-equilibrium solvation model for a twisting monomethine cyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Sean; McKenzie, Ross H.; Olsen, Seth

    2015-02-01

    We propose and analyze a two-state valence-bond model of non-equilibrium solvation effects on the excited-state twisting reaction of monomethine cyanines. Suppression of this reaction is thought responsible for environment-dependent fluorescence yield enhancement in these dyes. Fluorescence is quenched because twisting is accompanied via the formation of dark twisted intramolecular charge-transfer (TICT) states. For monomethine cyanines, where the ground state is a superposition of structures with different bond and charge localizations, there are two possible twisting pathways with different charge localizations in the excited state. For parameters corresponding to symmetric monomethines, the model predicts two low-energy twisting channels on the excited-state surface, which leads to a manifold of TICT states. For typical monomethines, twisting on the excited state surface will occur with a small barrier or no barrier. Changes in the solvation configuration can differentially stabilize TICT states in channels corresponding to different bonds, and that the position of a conical intersection between adiabatic states moves in response to solvation to stabilize either one channel or the other. There is a conical intersection seam that grows along the bottom of the excited-state potential with increasing solvent polarity. For monomethine cyanines with modest-sized terminal groups in moderately polar solution, the bottom of the excited-state potential surface is completely spanned by a conical intersection seam.

  10. Pions in and out of equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.

    1991-12-01

    Can final state scattering wrestle the secondaries in nucleus-nucleus collisions into a fluid state near local thermal equilibrium What do the pion p{sub T} spectra measured in pp, pA and SPS light ion experiments already tell us about the approach to equilibrium To begin to address these questions, we must face the nonequilibrium nature of hadronic evolution in the late stages of these collisions. I will outline efforts to apply transport theory to the nonequilibrium pion fluid at midrapidity focusing on two phenomena: partial thermalization and pion conservation.

  11. Pions in and out of equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.

    1991-12-01

    Can final state scattering wrestle the secondaries in nucleus-nucleus collisions into a fluid state near local thermal equilibrium? What do the pion p{sub T} spectra measured in pp, pA and SPS light ion experiments already tell us about the approach to equilibrium? To begin to address these questions, we must face the nonequilibrium nature of hadronic evolution in the late stages of these collisions. I will outline efforts to apply transport theory to the nonequilibrium pion fluid at midrapidity focusing on two phenomena: partial thermalization and pion conservation.

  12. An empirical assessment of non-equilibrium theory and state-and-transition models with a long-term (1953-2009) vegetation record from the Sonoran Desert

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resilience-based ecological frameworks, including state-and-transition models (STM), are being increasingly called upon to guide ecosystem management and inform natural resource policy. Yet multiple challenges continue to impede their application, including limited empirical assessments of non-equil...

  13. 50 CFR 26.24 - Exception for entry when accompanied by refuge personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exception for entry when accompanied by refuge personnel. 26.24 Section 26.24 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE... § 26.24 Exception for entry when accompanied by refuge personnel. A permit is not required for...

  14. 7 CFR 319.37-12 - Prohibited articles accompanying restricted articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Prohibited articles accompanying restricted articles... Stock, Plants, Roots, Bulbs, Seeds, and Other Plant Products 1,2 § 319.37-12 Prohibited articles accompanying restricted articles. A restricted article for importation into the United States shall not...

  15. 7 CFR 319.37-12 - Prohibited articles accompanying restricted articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prohibited articles accompanying restricted articles... Stock, Plants, Roots, Bulbs, Seeds, and Other Plant Products 1,2 § 319.37-12 Prohibited articles accompanying restricted articles. A restricted article for importation into the United States shall not...

  16. 22 CFR 40.102 - Guardian required to accompany excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. 40.102 Section 40.102 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. INA 212(a)(9)(B) is not applicable at the time of...

  17. 22 CFR 40.102 - Guardian required to accompany excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. 40.102 Section 40.102 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. INA 212(a)(9)(B) is not applicable at the time of...

  18. 22 CFR 40.102 - Guardian required to accompany excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. 40.102 Section 40.102 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. INA 212(a)(9)(B) is not applicable at the time of...

  19. 22 CFR 40.102 - Guardian required to accompany excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. 40.102 Section 40.102 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. INA 212(a)(9)(B) is not applicable at the time of...

  20. 22 CFR 40.102 - Guardian required to accompany excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. 40.102 Section 40.102 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. INA 212(a)(9)(B) is not applicable at the time of...

  1. Entanglement in ground and excited states of gapped free-fermion systems and their relationship with Fermi surface and thermodynamic equilibrium properties.

    PubMed

    Storms, Michelle; Singh, Rajiv R P

    2014-01-01

    We study bipartite entanglement entropies in the ground and excited states of free-fermion models, where a staggered potential, μs, induces a gap in the spectrum. Ground-state entanglement entropies satisfy the "area law", and the "area-law" coefficient is found to diverge as a logarithm of the staggered potential, when the system has an extended Fermi surface at μs=0. On the square lattice, we show that the coefficient of the logarithmic divergence depends on the Fermi surface geometry and its orientation with respect to the real-space interface between subsystems and is related to the Widom conjecture as enunciated by Gioev and Klich [ Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 100503 (2006)]. For point Fermi surfaces in two-dimension, the "area-law" coefficient stays finite as μs→0. The von Neumann entanglement entropy associated with the excited states follows a "volume law" and allows us to calculate an entropy density function sV(e), which is substantially different from the thermodynamic entropy density function sT(e), when the lattice is bipartitioned into two equal subsystems but approaches the thermodynamic entropy density as the fraction of sites in the larger subsystem, that is integrated out, approaches unity.

  2. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-08-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are applied. Equilibrium can be approached from different distributions of balls in the container under different conditions. The Le Châtelier principle can be demonstrated. Kinetic concepts can be demonstrated by changing the nature of the barrier, either changing the height or by having various sized holes in the barrier. Thermodynamic concepts can be demonstrated by taping over some or all of the openings and restricting air flow into container on either side of the barrier.

  3. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  4. Approaches to the Treatment of Equilibrium Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2003-10-01

    Perturbations from equilibrium are treated in the textbooks by a combination of Le Châtelier's principle, the comparison of the equilibrium constant K with the reaction quotient Q,and the kinetic approach. Each of these methods is briefly reviewed. This is followed by derivations of the variation of the equilibrium value of the extent of reaction, ξeq, with various parameters on which it depends. Near equilibrium this relationship can be represented by a straight line. The equilibrium system can be regarded as moving on this line as the parameter is varied. The slope of the line depends on quantities like enthalpy of reaction, volume of reaction and so forth. The derivation shows that these quantities pertain to the equilibrium system, not the standard state. Also, the derivation makes clear what kind of assumptions underlie our conclusions. The derivation of these relations involves knowledge of thermodynamics that is well within the grasp of junior level physical chemistry students. The conclusions that follow from the derived relations are given as subsidiary rules in the form of the slope of ξeq, with T, p, et cetera. The rules are used to develop a visual way of predicting the direction of shift of a perturbed system. This method can be used to supplement one of the other methods even at the introductory level.

  5. Solids Far from Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godrèche, C.

    2011-03-01

    Preface; 1. Shape and growth of crystals P. Nozières; 2. Instabilities of planar solidification fronts B. Caroli, C. Caroli and B. Roulet; 3. An introduction to the kinetics of first-order phase transition J. S. Langer; 4. Dendritic growth and related topics Y. Pomeau and M. Ben Amar; 5. Growth and aggregation far from equilibrium L. M. Sander; 6. Kinetic roughening of growing surfaces J. Krug and H. Spohn; Acknowledgements; References; Index.

  6. Equilibrium Electroconvective Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, I.; Zaltzman, B.

    2015-03-01

    Since its prediction 15 years ago, hydrodynamic instability in concentration polarization at a charge-selective interface has been attributed to nonequilibrium electro-osmosis related to the extended space charge which develops at the limiting current. This attribution had a double basis. On the one hand, it has been recognized that neither equilibrium electro-osmosis nor bulk electroconvection can yield instability for a perfectly charge-selective solid. On the other hand, it has been shown that nonequilibrium electro-osmosis can. The first theoretical studies in which electro-osmotic instability was predicted and analyzed employed the assumption of perfect charge selectivity for the sake of simplicity and so did the subsequent studies of various time-dependent and nonlinear features of electro-osmotic instability. In this Letter, we show that relaxing the assumption of perfect charge selectivity (tantamount to fixing the electrochemical potential of counterions in the solid) allows for the equilibrium electroconvective instability. In addition, we suggest a simple experimental test for determining the true, either equilibrium or nonequilibrium, origin of instability in concentration polarization.

  7. On equilibrium structures of the water molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Császár, Attila G.; Czakó, Gábor; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Tennyson, Jonathan; Szalay, Viktor; Shirin, Sergei V.; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Polyansky, Oleg L.

    2005-06-01

    Equilibrium structures are fundamental entities in molecular sciences. They can be inferred from experimental data by complicated inverse procedures which often rely on several assumptions, including the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Theory provides a direct route to equilibrium geometries. A recent high-quality ab initio semiglobal adiabatic potential-energy surface (PES) of the electronic ground state of water, reported by Polyansky et al. [Polyansky et al.Science 299, 539 (2003)] and called CVRQD here, is analyzed in this respect. The equilibrium geometries resulting from this direct route are deemed to be of higher accuracy than those that can be determined by analyzing experimental data. Detailed investigation of the effect of the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation suggests that the concept of an isotope-independent equilibrium structure holds to about 3×10-5Å and 0.02° for water. The mass-independent [Born-Oppenheimer (BO)] equilibrium bond length and bond angle on the ground electronic state PES of water is reBO=0.95782Å and θeBO=104.485°, respectively. The related mass-dependent (adiabatic) equilibrium bond length and bond angle of H2O16 is read=0.95785Å and θead=104.500°, respectively, while those of D2O16 are read=0.95783Å and θead=104.490°. Pure ab initio prediction of J =1 and 2 rotational levels on the vibrational ground state by the CVRQD PESs is accurate to better than 0.002cm-1 for all isotopologs of water considered. Elaborate adjustment of the CVRQD PESs to reproduce all observed rovibrational transitions to better than 0.05cm-1 (or the lower ones to better than 0.0035cm-1) does not result in noticeable changes in the adiabatic equilibrium structure parameters. The expectation values of the ground vibrational state rotational constants of the water isotopologs, computed in the Eckart frame using the CVRQD PESs and atomic masses, deviate from the experimentally measured ones only marginally, especially for A0 and B0. The

  8. Disorganization of Equilibrium Directional Interactions in the Brain Motor Network of Parkinson's disease: New Insight of Resting State Analysis Using Granger Causality and Graphical Approach.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Mahdieh; Mahloojifar, Ali

    2013-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological disorder characterized by tremor, rigidity, and slowness of movements. Particular changes related to various pathological attacks in PD could result in causal interactions of the brain network from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data. In this paper, we aimed to disclose the network structure of the directed influences over the brain using multivariate Granger causality analysis and graph theory in patients with PD as compared with control group. rs-fMRI at rest from 10 PD patients and 10 controls were analyzed. Topological properties of the networks showed that information flow in PD is smaller than that in healthy individuals. We found that there is a balanced local network in healthy control group, including positive pair-wise cross connections between caudate and cerebellum and reciprocal connections between motor cortex and caudate in the left and right hemispheres. The results showed that this local network is disrupted in PD due to disturbance of the interactions in the motor networks. These findings suggested alteration of the functional organization of the brain in the resting state that affects the information transmission from and to other brain regions related to both primary dysfunctions and higher-level cognition impairments in PD. Furthermore, we showed that regions with high degree values could be detected as betweenness centrality nodes. Our results demonstrate that properties of small-world connectivity could also recognize and quantify the characteristics of directed influence brain networks in PD.

  9. Disorganization of Equilibrium Directional Interactions in the Brain Motor Network of Parkinson's disease: New Insight of Resting State Analysis Using Granger Causality and Graphical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Mahdieh; Mahloojifar, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological disorder characterized by tremor, rigidity, and slowness of movements. Particular changes related to various pathological attacks in PD could result in causal interactions of the brain network from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data. In this paper, we aimed to disclose the network structure of the directed influences over the brain using multivariate Granger causality analysis and graph theory in patients with PD as compared with control group. rs-fMRI at rest from 10 PD patients and 10 controls were analyzed. Topological properties of the networks showed that information flow in PD is smaller than that in healthy individuals. We found that there is a balanced local network in healthy control group, including positive pair-wise cross connections between caudate and cerebellum and reciprocal connections between motor cortex and caudate in the left and right hemispheres. The results showed that this local network is disrupted in PD due to disturbance of the interactions in the motor networks. These findings suggested alteration of the functional organization of the brain in the resting state that affects the information transmission from and to other brain regions related to both primary dysfunctions and higher-level cognition impairments in PD. Furthermore, we showed that regions with high degree values could be detected as betweenness centrality nodes. Our results demonstrate that properties of small-world connectivity could also recognize and quantify the characteristics of directed influence brain networks in PD. PMID:24098860

  10. Metastatic Basal cell carcinoma accompanying gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bilir, Yeliz; Gokce, Erkan; Ozturk, Banu; Deresoy, Faik Alev; Yuksekkaya, Ruken; Yaman, Emel

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity and mortality. A 66-year-old male patient with a history of recurrent basal cell carcinoma was presented with exophthalmus in the left eye and the lesions localized in the left lateral orbita and left zygomatic area. His physical examination revealed hearing loss, gapped teeth, highly arched palate, and frontal prominence. Left orbital mass, cystic masses at frontal and ethmoidal sinuses, and multiple pulmonary nodules were detected at CT scans. Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed from biopsy of ethmoid sinus. Based on the clinical and typical radiological characteristics (falx cerebri calcification, bifid costa, and odontogenic cysts), the patient was diagnosed with metastatic skin basal cell carcinoma accompanied by Gorlin syndrome. Our case is a basal cell carcinoma with aggressive course accompanying a rarely seen syndrome.

  11. Structural design using equilibrium programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    Multiple nonlinear programming methods are combined in the method of equilibrium programming. Equilibrium programming theory has been appied to problems in operations research, and in the present study it is investigated as a framework to solve structural design problems. Several existing formal methods for structural optimization are shown to actually be equilibrium programming methods. Additionally, the equilibrium programming framework is utilized to develop a new structural design method. Selected computational results are presented to demonstrate the methods.

  12. The Lewis Chemical Equilibrium Program with parametric study capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevigny, R.

    1981-01-01

    The program was developed to determine chemical equilibrium in complex systems. Using a free energy minimization technique, the program permits calculations such as: chemical equilibrium for assigned thermodynamic states; theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen compositions during expansion; incident and reflected shock properties; and Chapman-Jouget detonation properties. It is shown that the same program can handle solid coal in an entrained flow coal gasification problem.

  13. Local non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jinwoo, Lee; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Local Shannon entropy lies at the heart of modern thermodynamics, with much discussion of trajectory-dependent entropy production. When taken at both boundaries of a process in phase space, it reproduces the second law of thermodynamics over a finite time interval for small scale systems. However, given that entropy is an ensemble property, it has never been clear how one can assign such a quantity locally. Given such a fundamental omission in our knowledge, we construct a new ensemble composed of trajectories reaching an individual microstate, and show that locally defined entropy, information, and free energy are properties of the ensemble, or trajectory-independent true thermodynamic potentials. We find that the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution and Landauer's principle can be generalized naturally as properties of the ensemble, and that trajectory-free state functions of the ensemble govern the exact mechanism of non-equilibrium relaxation. PMID:25592077

  14. Algorithm For Hypersonic Flow In Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant

    1989-01-01

    Implicit, finite-difference, shock-capturing algorithm calculates inviscid, hypersonic flows in chemical equilibrium. Implicit formulation chosen because overcomes limitation on mathematical stability encountered in explicit formulations. For dynamical portion of problem, Euler equations written in conservation-law form in Cartesian coordinate system for two-dimensional or axisymmetric flow. For chemical portion of problem, equilibrium state of gas at each point in computational grid determined by minimizing local Gibbs free energy, subject to local conservation of molecules, atoms, ions, and total enthalpy. Major advantage: resulting algorithm naturally stable and captures strong shocks without help of artificial-dissipation terms to damp out spurious numerical oscillations.

  15. Thermal equilibrium of goats.

    PubMed

    Maia, Alex S C; Nascimento, Sheila T; Nascimento, Carolina C N; Gebremedhin, Kifle G

    2016-05-01

    The effects of air temperature and relative humidity on thermal equilibrium of goats in a tropical region was evaluated. Nine non-pregnant Anglo Nubian nanny goats were used in the study. An indirect calorimeter was designed and developed to measure oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, methane production and water vapour pressure of the air exhaled from goats. Physiological parameters: rectal temperature, skin temperature, hair-coat temperature, expired air temperature and respiratory rate and volume as well as environmental parameters: air temperature, relative humidity and mean radiant temperature were measured. The results show that respiratory and volume rates and latent heat loss did not change significantly for air temperature between 22 and 26°C. In this temperature range, metabolic heat was lost mainly by convection and long-wave radiation. For temperature greater than 30°C, the goats maintained thermal equilibrium mainly by evaporative heat loss. At the higher air temperature, the respiratory and ventilation rates as well as body temperatures were significantly elevated. It can be concluded that for Anglo Nubian goats, the upper limit of air temperature for comfort is around 26°C when the goats are protected from direct solar radiation.

  16. Universality in equilibrium and away from it: A personal perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, Miguel A.

    2011-03-24

    In this talk/paper I discuss the concept of universality in phase transitions and the question of whether universality classes are more robust in equilibrium than away from it. In both of these situations, the main ingredients determining universality are symmetries, conservation laws, the dimension of the space and of the order-parameter and the presence of long-range interactions or quenched disorder. The existence of detailed-balance and fluctuation-dissipation theorems imposes severe constraints on equilibrium systems, allowing to define universality classes in a very robust way; instead, non-equilibrium allows for more variability. Still, quite robust non-equilibrium universality classes have been identified in the last decades. Here, I discuss some examples in which (i) non-equilibrium phase transitions are simply controlled by equilibrium critical points, i.e. non-equilibrium ingredients turn out to be irrelevant in the renormalization group sense and (ii) non-equilibrium situations in which equilibrium seems to come out of the blue, generating an adequate effective description of intrinsically non-equilibrium problems. Afterwards, I shall describe different genuinely non-equilibrium phase transitions in which introducing small, apparently innocuous changes (namely: presence or absence of an underlying lattice, parity conservation in the overall number of particles, existence of an un-accessible vacuum state, deterministic versus stochastic microscopic rules, presence or absence of a Fermionic constraint), the critical behavior is altered, making the case for lack of robustness. However, it will be argued that in all these examples, there is an underlying good reason (in terms of general principles) for universality to be altered. The final conclusions are that: (i) robust universality classes exist both in equilibrium and non-equilibrium; (ii) symmetry and conservation principles are crucial in both, (iii) non-equilibrium allows for more variability (i

  17. EXPLORING TRANSITIONS OF SPACE PLASMAS OUT OF EQUILIBRIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2010-05-01

    Space plasmas from the solar wind to planetary magnetospheres and the outer heliosphere are systems in stationary states out of equilibrium. Empirical kappa distributions, which naturally emerge from Tsallis Statistics, successfully describe these space plasmas. The Tsallis formalism offers a solid statistical foundation and provides a set of proven tools for understanding these distributions, including a consistent definition of temperature-the physical temperature, which characterizes the non-equilibrium stationary states. Here, we develop a measure of the 'thermodynamic distance' of stationary states away from equilibrium. The stationary states are labeled by the value of the entropic q-index, lying in a spectrum from q = 1 (equilibrium) to the maximum value of q, which specifies the furthest possible stationary state from equilibrium. We call this the 'q-frozen state', because as a system approaches this state, it behaves analogously to when its temperature approaches absolute zero. We also introduce a novel isothermal procedure that describes a system's transition into different stationary states by varying the q-index, and show how the variation of temperature can be realized using an 'iso-metastability' procedure, in which the system remains in a fixed stationary state. These innovations allow a generalization of the zeroth law of thermodynamics to cover stationary states out of equilibrium. By expressing the entropy in terms of the q-index, we show the detailed paths by which the transition of stationary states evolves toward equilibrium following the dynamics of a characteristic difference equation along the q-indices. This naturally exhibits certain stationary states out of equilibrium that are frequently observed in space plasmas.

  18. Exploring Transitions of Space Plasmas Out of Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2010-05-01

    Space plasmas from the solar wind to planetary magnetospheres and the outer heliosphere are systems in stationary states out of equilibrium. Empirical kappa distributions, which naturally emerge from Tsallis Statistics, successfully describe these space plasmas. The Tsallis formalism offers a solid statistical foundation and provides a set of proven tools for understanding these distributions, including a consistent definition of temperature—the physical temperature, which characterizes the non-equilibrium stationary states. Here, we develop a measure of the "thermodynamic distance" of stationary states away from equilibrium. The stationary states are labeled by the value of the entropic q-index, lying in a spectrum from q = 1 (equilibrium) to the maximum value of q, which specifies the furthest possible stationary state from equilibrium. We call this the "q-frozen state," because as a system approaches this state, it behaves analogously to when its temperature approaches absolute zero. We also introduce a novel isothermal procedure that describes a system's transition into different stationary states by varying the q-index, and show how the variation of temperature can be realized using an "iso-metastability" procedure, in which the system remains in a fixed stationary state. These innovations allow a generalization of the zeroth law of thermodynamics to cover stationary states out of equilibrium. By expressing the entropy in terms of the q-index, we show the detailed paths by which the transition of stationary states evolves toward equilibrium following the dynamics of a characteristic difference equation along the q-indices. This naturally exhibits certain stationary states out of equilibrium that are frequently observed in space plasmas.

  19. Philicities, Fugalities, and Equilibrium Constants.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Herbert; Ofial, Armin R

    2016-05-17

    The mechanistic model of Organic Chemistry is based on relationships between rate and equilibrium constants. Thus, strong bases are generally considered to be good nucleophiles and poor nucleofuges. Exceptions to this rule have long been known, and the ability of iodide ions to catalyze nucleophilic substitutions, because they are good nucleophiles as well as good nucleofuges, is just a prominent example for exceptions from the general rule. In a reaction series, the Leffler-Hammond parameter α = δΔG(⧧)/δΔG° describes the fraction of the change in the Gibbs energy of reaction, which is reflected in the change of the Gibbs energy of activation. It has long been considered as a measure for the position of the transition state; thus, an α value close to 0 was associated with an early transition state, while an α value close to 1 was considered to be indicative of a late transition state. Bordwell's observation in 1969 that substituent variation in phenylnitromethanes has a larger effect on the rates of deprotonation than on the corresponding equilibrium constants (nitroalkane anomaly) triggered the breakdown of this interpretation. In the past, most systematic investigations of the relationships between rates and equilibria of organic reactions have dealt with proton transfer reactions, because only for few other reaction series complementary kinetic and thermodynamic data have been available. In this Account we report on a more general investigation of the relationships between Lewis basicities, nucleophilicities, and nucleofugalities as well as between Lewis acidities, electrophilicities, and electrofugalities. Definitions of these terms are summarized, and it is suggested to replace the hybrid terms "kinetic basicity" and "kinetic acidity" by "protophilicity" and "protofugality", respectively; in this way, the terms "acidity" and "basicity" are exclusively assigned to thermodynamic properties, while "philicity" and "fugality" refer to kinetics

  20. Equilibrium of nematic vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napoli, Gaetano; Vergori, Luigi

    2010-11-01

    A variational scheme is proposed which allows the derivation of a concise and elegant formulation of the equilibrium equations for closed fluid membranes, endowed with a nematic microstructure. The nematic order is described by an in-plane nematic director and a degree of orientation, as customary in the theory of uniaxial nematics. The only constitutive ingredient in this scheme is a free-energy density which depends on the vesicle geometry and order parameters. The stress and the couple stress tensors related to this free-energy density are provided. As an application of the proposed scheme, a certain number of special theories are deduced: soap bubbles, lipid vesicles, chiral and achiral nematic membranes, and nematics on curved substrates.

  1. Calculating and Visualizing Thermodynamic Equilibrium: A Tutorial on the Isolated System with an Internal Adiabatic Piston

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, Joao Paulo M.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of the equilibrium state of an isolated composite system with a movable internal adiabatic wall is a recurrent one in the literature. Classical equilibrium thermodynamics is unable to predict the equilibrium state, unless supplemented with information about the process taking place. This conclusion is clearly demonstrated in this…

  2. Fluctuation theorem for constrained equilibrium systems.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Thomas; Dorfman, J Robert

    2006-02-01

    We discuss the fluctuation properties of equilibrium chaotic systems with constraints such as isokinetic and Nosé-Hoover thermostats. Although the dynamics of these systems does not typically preserve phase-space volumes, the average phase-space contraction rate vanishes, so that the stationary states are smooth. Nevertheless, finite-time averages of the phase-space contraction rate have nontrivial fluctuations which we show satisfy a simple version of the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem, complementary to the usual fluctuation theorem for nonequilibrium stationary states and appropriate to constrained equilibrium states. Moreover, we show that these fluctuations are distributed according to a Gaussian curve for long enough times. Three different systems are considered here: namely, (i) a fluid composed of particles interacting with Lennard-Jones potentials, (ii) a harmonic oscillator with Nosé-Hoover thermostatting, and (iii) a simple hyperbolic two-dimensional map.

  3. Fluctuation theorem for constrained equilibrium systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Thomas; Dorfman, J. Robert

    2006-02-01

    We discuss the fluctuation properties of equilibrium chaotic systems with constraints such as isokinetic and Nosé-Hoover thermostats. Although the dynamics of these systems does not typically preserve phase-space volumes, the average phase-space contraction rate vanishes, so that the stationary states are smooth. Nevertheless, finite-time averages of the phase-space contraction rate have nontrivial fluctuations which we show satisfy a simple version of the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem, complementary to the usual fluctuation theorem for nonequilibrium stationary states and appropriate to constrained equilibrium states. Moreover, we show that these fluctuations are distributed according to a Gaussian curve for long enough times. Three different systems are considered here: namely, (i) a fluid composed of particles interacting with Lennard-Jones potentials, (ii) a harmonic oscillator with Nosé-Hoover thermostatting, and (iii) a simple hyperbolic two-dimensional map.

  4. The ACOSTA accompanying measure A2106.

    PubMed

    Thayer, C; De Moor, G; Van Goor, J

    1994-10-01

    At a time when the informatics and telecommunications industries are looking for new markets to exploit in relation, for example, to the emerging ISDN and broadband communications networks, there is a need to create a broad consensus in Europe by bringing together systematically the relevant industries including telecom service providers, health care providers, insurance organisations, standardisation experts and policy makers. The aim of the ACOSTA (Consensus Formation and Standardisation Promotion) Accompanying Measure is the creation of more general awareness of the relevant environment among all the parties, better specification of common requirements and options taking better account of the real needs of the users, and enlargement of the common market in health care telematics.

  5. The Mechanism of Atomization Accompanying Solid Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, R A , Jr

    1933-01-01

    A brief historical and descriptive account of solid injection is followed by a detailed review of the available theoretical and experimental data that seem to throw light on the mechanism of this form of atomization. It is concluded that this evidence indicates that (1) the atomization accompanying solid injection occurs at the surface of the liquid after it issues as a solid stream from the orifice; and (2) that such atomization has a mechanism physically identical with the atomization which takes place in an air stream, both being due merely to the formation, at the gas-liquid interface, of fine ligaments under the influence of the relative motion of gas and liquid, and to their collapse, under the influence of surface tension, to form the drops in the spray.

  6. Sacral Perineural Cyst Accompanying Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Chang Il; Shin, Ho; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2009-01-01

    Although most of sacral perineural cysts are asymptomatic, some may produce symptoms. Specific radicular pain may be due to distortion, compression, or stretching of nerve root by a space occupying cyst. We report a rare case of S1 radiculopathy caused by sacral perineural cyst accompanying disc herniation. The patient underwent a microscopic discectomy at L5-S1 level. However, the patient's symptoms did not improved. The hypesthesia persisted, as did the right leg pain. Cyst-subarachnoid shunt was set to decompress nerve root and to equalize the cerebrospinal fluid pressure between the cephalad thecal sac and cyst. Immediately after surgery, the patient had no leg pain. After 6 months, the patient still remained free of leg pain. PMID:19352483

  7. Equilibrium avalanches in spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Doussal, Pierre; Müller, Markus; Wiese, Kay Jörg

    2012-06-01

    We study the distribution of equilibrium avalanches (shocks) in Ising spin glasses which occur at zero temperature upon small changes in the magnetic field. For the infinite-range Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model, we present a detailed derivation of the density ρ(ΔM) of the magnetization jumps ΔM. It is obtained by introducing a multicomponent generalization of the Parisi-Duplantier equation, which allows us to compute all cumulants of the magnetization. We find that ρ(ΔM)˜ΔM-τ with an avalanche exponent τ=1 for the SK model, originating from the marginal stability (criticality) of the model. It holds for jumps of size 1≪ΔMstates in an avalanche is ρ(q)˜1/(1-q). These results show interesting similarities with numerical simulations for the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of the SK model. For finite-range models, using droplet arguments, we obtain the prediction τ=(df+θ)/dm where df,dm, and θ are the fractal dimension, magnetization exponent, and energy exponent of a droplet, respectively. This formula is expected to apply to other glassy disordered systems, such as the random-field model and pinned interfaces. We make suggestions for further numerical investigations, as well as experimental studies of the Barkhausen noise in spin glasses.

  8. Hydraulic non-equilibrium during infiltration induced by structural connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, Steffen; Vanderborght, Jan; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2012-08-01

    Water infiltration into heterogeneous, structured soil leads to hydraulic non-equilibrium across the infiltration front. That is, the water content and pressure head are not in equilibrium according to some static water retention curve. The water content increases more rapidly in more conductive regions followed by a slow relaxation towards an equilibrium state behind the front. An extreme case is preferential infiltration into macropores. Since flow paths adapt to the structural heterogeneity of the porous medium, there is a direct link between structure and non-equilibrium. The aim of our study is to develop an upscaled description of water dynamics which conserves the macroscopic effects of non-equilibrium and which can be directly linked to structural properties of the material. A critical question is how to define averaged state variables at the larger scale. We propose a novel approach based on flux-weighted averaging of pressure head, and compare its performance to alternative methods for averaging. Further, we suggest some meaningful indicators of hydraulic non-equilibrium that can be related to morphological characteristics of infiltration fronts in quantitative terms. These methods provide a sound basis to assess the impact of structural connectivity on hydraulic non-equilibrium. We demonstrate our approach using numerical case studies for infiltration into two-dimensional heterogeneous media using three different structure models with distinct differences in connectivity. Our results indicate that an increased isotropic, short-range connectivity reduces non-equilibrium, whereas anisotropic structures that are elongated in the direction of flow enforce it. We observe a good agreement between front morphology and effective hydraulic non-equilibrium. A detailed comparison of averaged state variables with results from an upscaled model that includes hydraulic non-equilibrium outlines potential improvements in the description of non-equilibrium dynamics

  9. Hydraulic non-equilibrium during infiltration induced by structural connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, S.; Vanderborght, J.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2012-04-01

    Water infiltration into heterogeneous, structured soil leads to hydraulic non-equilibrium across the infiltration front. That is the water content and water potential is not in equilibrium according to some static water retention curve. The water content increases more rapidly in more conductive regions followed by a slow relaxation towards an equilibrium state. An extreme case is preferential infiltration into macro-pores. As flow paths adapt to the structural heterogeneity of the subsurface, there is a direct link between structure and non-equilibrium. The aim of our study is to develop an upscaled description of water dynamics which conserves the macroscopic effects of non-equilibrium and which can be linked to structural properties of the material. However, this relationship cannot be rigorously examined without an upscaling approach that conserves non-equilibrium during averaging of state variables. We achieve this with a novel approach, that is based on flux-weighted averaging of hydraulic potential, and compare its performance to existing averaging approaches by means of infiltration simulations. Further, we set up some meaningful indicators of hydraulic non-equilibrium that can be easily compared to morphological characteristics of the infiltration front. These methods provide a sound basis to assess the impact of structural connectivity on hydraulic non-equilibrium. We generate several realizations of two-dimensional random fields originating from three heterogeneity models with distinct differences in connectivity of high-K areas and conduct infiltration simulations with them. Our results indicate, that an increased isotropic, short-range connectivity reduces non-equilibrium, whereas anisotropic, macropore-like structures enforce it. We observed a good agreement between front morphology and upscaled non-equilibrium. Our findings encourage to use flux-weighted potentials for upscaling of state variables during transient conditions. We demonstrate, that

  10. Hydraulic non-equilibrium during infiltration induced by structural connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüter, S.; Vogel, H.

    2011-12-01

    Water infiltration into heterogeneous, structured soil leads to hydraulic non-equilibrium across the infiltration front. That is the water content and water potential is not in equilibrium according to some static water retention curve. The water content increases more rapidly in more conductive regions followed by a slow relaxation towards an equilibrium state. An extreme case is preferential infiltration into macro-pores. As flowpaths adapt to the structural heterogeneity of the subsurface, there is a direct link between structure and non-equilibrium. The aim of our study is to develop an upscaled description of water dynamics which conserves the macroscopic effects of non-equilibrium and which can be linked to structural properties of the material. However, this relationship cannot be rigorously examined without an upscaling approach that conserves non-equilibrium during averaging of state variables. We achieve this with a novel approach, that is based on flux-weighted averaging of hydraulic potential, and compare its performance to existing averaging approaches by means of infiltration simulations. Further, we set up some meaningful indicators of hydraulic non-equilibrium that can be easily compared to morphological characteristics of the infiltration front. These methods provide a sound basis to assess the impact of structural connectivity on hydraulic non-equilibrium. We generate several realizations of two-dimensional random fields originating from three heterogeneity models with distinct differences in connectivity of high-K areas and conduct infiltration simulations with them. Our results indicate, that an increased isotropic, short-range connectivity reduces non-equilibrium, whereas anisotropic, macropore-like structures enforce it. We observed a good agreement between front morphology and upscaled non-equilibrium. Our findings encourage to use flux-weighted potentials for upscaling of state variables during transient conditions. We demonstrate, that this

  11. Equilibrium Policy Proposals with Abstentions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    AB I I I EQUILIBRIUM POLICY PROPOSALS WITH ABSTENTIONS* by Peter Coughlin** 1. Introduction Spatial analyses of economic policy formation in elections...alternative in S at which there is a local equilibrium when the incumbent must defend the status quo. 5. Applications to Related Spatial Voting Models...York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston. Hestenes, M. [19751, Optimization Theoy, New York: Wiley. Hinich, M. [1977], " Equilibrium in Spatial Voting: The Median

  12. Topologically protected modes in non-equilibrium stochastic systems

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Arvind; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan

    2017-01-01

    Non-equilibrium driving of biophysical processes is believed to enable their robust functioning despite the presence of thermal fluctuations and other sources of disorder. Such robust functions include sensory adaptation, enhanced enzymatic specificity and maintenance of coherent oscillations. Elucidating the relation between energy consumption and organization remains an important and open question in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Here we report that steady states of systems with non-equilibrium fluxes can support topologically protected boundary modes that resemble similar modes in electronic and mechanical systems. Akin to their electronic and mechanical counterparts, topological-protected boundary steady states in non-equilibrium systems are robust and are largely insensitive to local perturbations. We argue that our work provides a framework for how biophysical systems can use non-equilibrium driving to achieve robust function. PMID:28071644

  13. Non-equilibrium in low-temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taccogna, Francesco; Dilecce, Giorgio

    2016-11-01

    The wide range of applications of cold plasmas originates from their special characteristic of being a physical system out of thermodynamic equilibrium. This property enhances its reactivity at low gas temperature and allows to obtain macroscopic effects with a moderate energy consumption. In this review, the basic concepts of non-equilibrium in ionized gases are treated by showing why and how non-equilibrium functions of the degrees of freedom are formed in a variety of natural and man-made plasmas with particular emphasis on the progress made in the last decade. The modern point of view of a molecular basis of non-equilibrium and of a state-to-state kinetic approach is adopted. Computational and diagnostic techniques used to investigate the non-equilibrium conditions are also surveyed.

  14. Topologically protected modes in non-equilibrium stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Arvind; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan

    2017-01-01

    Non-equilibrium driving of biophysical processes is believed to enable their robust functioning despite the presence of thermal fluctuations and other sources of disorder. Such robust functions include sensory adaptation, enhanced enzymatic specificity and maintenance of coherent oscillations. Elucidating the relation between energy consumption and organization remains an important and open question in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Here we report that steady states of systems with non-equilibrium fluxes can support topologically protected boundary modes that resemble similar modes in electronic and mechanical systems. Akin to their electronic and mechanical counterparts, topological-protected boundary steady states in non-equilibrium systems are robust and are largely insensitive to local perturbations. We argue that our work provides a framework for how biophysical systems can use non-equilibrium driving to achieve robust function.

  15. Topologically protected modes in non-equilibrium stochastic systems.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Arvind; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan

    2017-01-10

    Non-equilibrium driving of biophysical processes is believed to enable their robust functioning despite the presence of thermal fluctuations and other sources of disorder. Such robust functions include sensory adaptation, enhanced enzymatic specificity and maintenance of coherent oscillations. Elucidating the relation between energy consumption and organization remains an important and open question in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Here we report that steady states of systems with non-equilibrium fluxes can support topologically protected boundary modes that resemble similar modes in electronic and mechanical systems. Akin to their electronic and mechanical counterparts, topological-protected boundary steady states in non-equilibrium systems are robust and are largely insensitive to local perturbations. We argue that our work provides a framework for how biophysical systems can use non-equilibrium driving to achieve robust function.

  16. Napoleon Is in Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Rob

    2015-03-01

    It has been said that the cell is the test tube of the twenty-first century. If so, the theoretical tools needed to quantitatively and predictively describe what goes on in such test tubes lag sorely behind the stunning experimental advances in biology seen in the decades since the molecular biology revolution began. Perhaps surprisingly, one of the theoretical tools that has been used with great success on problems ranging from how cells communicate with their environment and each other to the nature of the organization of proteins and lipids within the cell membrane is statistical mechanics. A knee-jerk reaction to the use of statistical mechanics in the description of cellular processes is that living organisms are so far from equilibrium that one has no business even thinking about it. But such reactions are probably too hasty given that there are many regimes in which, because of a separation of timescales, for example, such an approach can be a useful first step. In this article, we explore the power of statistical mechanical thinking in the biological setting, with special emphasis on cell signaling and regulation. We show how such models are used to make predictions and describe some recent experiments designed to test them. We also consider the limits of such models based on the relative timescales of the processes of interest.

  17. Napoleon Is in Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Rob

    2015-03-01

    It has been said that the cell is the test tube of the twenty-first century. If so, the theoretical tools needed to quantitatively and predictively describe what goes on in such test tubes lag sorely behind the stunning experimental advances in biology seen in the decades since the molecular biology revolution began. Perhaps surprisingly, one of the theoretical tools that has been used with great success on problems ranging from how cells communicate with their environment and each other to the nature of the organization of proteins and lipids within the cell membrane is statistical mechanics. A knee-jerk reaction to the use of statistical mechanics in the description of cellular processes is that living organisms are so far from equilibrium that one has no business even thinking about it. But such reactions are probably too hasty given that there are many regimes in which, because of a separation of timescales, for example, such an approach can be a useful first step. In this article, we explore the power of statistical mechanical thinking in the biological setting, with special emphasis on cell signaling and regulation. We show how such models are used to make predictions and describe some recent experiments designed to test them. We also consider the limits of such models based on the relative timescales of the processes of interest.

  18. Increased spatial variance accompanies reorganization of two continental shelf ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Litzow, Michael A; Urban, J Daniel; Laurel, Benjamin J

    2008-09-01

    Phase transitions between alternate stable states in marine ecosystems lead to disruptive changes in ecosystem services, especially fisheries productivity. We used trawl survey data spanning phase transitions in the North Pacific (Gulf of Alaska) and the North Atlantic (Scotian Shelf) to test for increases in ecosystem variability that might provide early warning of such transitions. In both time series, elevated spatial variability in a measure of community composition (ratio of cod [Gadus sp.] abundance to prey abundance) accompanied transitions between ecosystem states, and variability was negatively correlated with distance from the ecosystem transition point. In the Gulf of Alaska, where the phase transition was apparently the result of a sudden perturbation (climate regime shift), variance increased one year before the transition in mean state occurred. On the Scotian Shelf, where ecosystem reorganization was the result of persistent overfishing, a significant increase in variance occurred three years before the transition in mean state was detected. However, we could not reject the alternate explanation that increased variance may also have simply been inherent to the final stable state in that ecosystem. Increased variance has been previously observed around transition points in models, but rarely in real ecosystems, and our results demonstrate the possible management value in tracking the variance of key parameters in exploited ecosystems.

  19. Spatial distribution of thermal energy in equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2015-06-01

    The equipartition theorem states that in equilibrium, thermal energy is equally distributed among uncoupled degrees of freedom that appear quadratically in the system's Hamiltonian. However, for spatially coupled degrees of freedom, such as interacting particles, one may speculate that the spatial distribution of thermal energy may differ from the value predicted by equipartition, possibly quite substantially in strongly inhomogeneous or disordered systems. Here we show that for systems undergoing simple Gaussian fluctuations around an equilibrium state, the spatial distribution is universally bounded from above by 1/2k(B)T. We further show that in one-dimensional systems with short-range interactions, the thermal energy is equally partitioned even for coupled degrees of freedom in the thermodynamic limit and that in higher dimensions nontrivial spatial distributions emerge. Some implications are discussed.

  20. Review: Regional land subsidence accompanying groundwater extraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, Devin L.; Burbey, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The extraction of groundwater can generate land subsidence by causing the compaction of susceptible aquifer systems, typically unconsolidated alluvial or basin-fill aquifer systems comprising aquifers and aquitards. Various ground-based and remotely sensed methods are used to measure and map subsidence. Many areas of subsidence caused by groundwater pumping have been identified and monitored, and corrective measures to slow or halt subsidence have been devised. Two principal means are used to mitigate subsidence caused by groundwater withdrawal—reduction of groundwater withdrawal, and artificial recharge. Analysis and simulation of aquifer-system compaction follow from the basic relations between head, stress, compressibility, and groundwater flow and are addressed primarily using two approaches—one based on conventional groundwater flow theory and one based on linear poroelasticity theory. Research and development to improve the assessment and analysis of aquifer-system compaction, the accompanying subsidence and potential ground ruptures are needed in the topic areas of the hydromechanical behavior of aquitards, the role of horizontal deformation, the application of differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry, and the regional-scale simulation of coupled groundwater flow and aquifer-system deformation to support resource management and hazard mitigation measures.

  1. Mechanical Surface Waves Accompany Action Potential Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Benjamin; El Hady, Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    The action potential (AP) is the basic mechanism by which information is transmitted along neuronal axons. Although the excitable nature of axons is understood to be primarily electrical, many experimental studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane co-propagates with the electrical signal. While the experimental evidence for co-propagating mechanical waves is diverse and compelling, there is no consensus for their physical underpinnings. We present a model in which these mechanical displacements arise from the driving of mechanical surface waves, in which potential energy is stored in elastic deformations of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is stored in the movement of the axoplasmic fluid. In our model these surface waves are driven by the traveling wave of electrical depolarization that characterizes the AP, altering the electrostatic forces across the membrane as it passes. Our model allows us to predict the shape of the displacement that should accompany any traveling wave of voltage, including the well-characterized AP. We expect our model to serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs in neurobiology. See Arxiv/1407.7600

  2. Photolysis Accompanying Peptide Absorption in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W. David; Foster, Joseph F.

    1972-01-01

    Exposure of proteins and polypeptides to ultraviolet radiation below 240 nm produces peptide cleavage which may or may not be accompanied by observable changes in conformation and optical rotary dispersion (ORD) properties, depending on the stability of the secondary and tertiary structure of the macromolecule under the experimental conditions. Helical and coiled forms of poly-L-glutamic acid undergo degradation at similar rates but only the helical form shows a significant change in rotatory properties. The helical form of poly-L-lysine, but neither the coiled nor β forms, shows a change in [α]233 on irradiation at 233 nm. β-Lactoglobulin shows essentially no change in [α]233 on irradiation in either dilute salt solution or 4 M urea at room temperature; however, in 4 M urea at 56°C a large change occurs. A model is developed which shows that studies of the effect of radiation on ORD properties may be useful in providing information on possible intermediate steps in protein denaturation. The method is illustrated with results on bovine plasma albumin. A quantum yield, 4.3 × 10-3 moles/einstein, was obtained for peptide cleavage in this protein at 225 nm. These studies, based on gel electrophoresis, also showed that the fragments produced are essentially random, suggesting that transfer of energy from aromatic residues is not an important contributor to the peptide photolysis. Possible errors which could arise in ORD and other studies involving intense ultraviolet radiation are considered. PMID:5063838

  3. Radial equilibrium of relativistic particle bunches in plasma wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotov, K. V.

    2017-02-01

    Drive particle beams in linear or weakly nonlinear regimes of the plasma wakefield accelerator quickly reach a radial equilibrium with the wakefield, which is described in detail for the first time. The equilibrium beam state and self-consistent wakefields are obtained by combining analytical relationships, numerical integration, and first-principles simulations. In the equilibrium state, the beam density is strongly peaked near the axis, the beam radius is constant along most of the beam, and longitudinal variation of the focusing strength is balanced by varying beam emittance. The transverse momentum distribution of beam particles depends on the observation radius and is neither separable nor Gaussian.

  4. Molecular equilibrium with condensation. [in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, C. M.; Huebner, W. F.

    1990-01-01

    Minimization of the Gibbs energy of formation for species of chemical elements and compounds in their gas and condensed phases determines their relative abundances in a mixture in chemical equilibrium. The procedure is more general and more powerful than previous abundance determinations in multiphase astrophysical mixtures. Some results for astrophysical equations of state are presented, and the effects of condensation on opacity are briefly indicated.

  5. Flux Jacobian Matrices For Equilibrium Real Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, Marcel

    1990-01-01

    Improved formulation includes generalized Roe average and extension to three dimensions. Flux Jacobian matrices derived for use in numerical solutions of conservation-law differential equations of inviscid flows of ideal gases extended to real gases. Real-gas formulation of these matrices retains simplifying assumptions of thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium, but adds effects of vibrational excitation, dissociation, and ionization of gas molecules via general equation of state.

  6. Thermodynamic efficiency out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivak, David; Crooks, Gavin

    2011-03-01

    Molecular-scale machines typically operate far from thermodynamic equilibrium, limiting the applicability of equilibrium statistical mechanics to understand their efficiency. Thermodynamic length analysis relates a non-equilibrium property (dissipation) to equilibrium properties (equilibrium fluctuations and their relaxation time). Herein we demonstrate that the thermodynamic length framework follows directly from the assumptions of linear response theory. Uniting these two frameworks provides thermodynamic length analysis a firmer statistical mechanical grounding, and equips linear response theory with a metric structure to facilitate the prediction and discovery of optimal (minimum dissipation) paths in complicated free energy landscapes. To explore the applicability of this theoretical framework, we examine its accuracy for simple bistable systems, parametrized to model single-molecule force-extension experiments. Through analytic derivation of the equilibrium fluctuations and numerical calculation of the dissipation and relaxation time, we verify that thermodynamic length analysis (though derived in a near-equilibrium limit) provides a strikingly good approximation even far from equilibrium, and thus provides a useful framework for understanding molecular motor efficiency.

  7. Equilibrium Shape of Colloidal Crystals.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Ray M; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2015-10-27

    Assembling colloidal particles into highly ordered configurations, such as photonic crystals, has significant potential for enabling a broad range of new technologies. Facilitating the nucleation of colloidal crystals and developing successful crystal growth strategies require a fundamental understanding of the equilibrium structure and morphology of small colloidal assemblies. Here, we report the results of a novel computational approach to determine the equilibrium shape of assemblies of colloidal particles that interact via an experimentally validated pair potential. While the well-known Wulff construction can accurately capture the equilibrium shape of large colloidal assemblies, containing O(10(4)) or more particles, determining the equilibrium shape of small colloidal assemblies of O(10) particles requires a generalized Wulff construction technique which we have developed for a proper description of equilibrium structure and morphology of small crystals. We identify and characterize fully several "magic" clusters which are significantly more stable than other similarly sized clusters.

  8. Group Contribution Methods for Phase Equilibrium Calculations.

    PubMed

    Gmehling, Jürgen; Constantinescu, Dana; Schmid, Bastian

    2015-01-01

    The development and design of chemical processes are carried out by solving the balance equations of a mathematical model for sections of or the whole chemical plant with the help of process simulators. For process simulation, besides kinetic data for the chemical reaction, various pure component and mixture properties are required. Because of the great importance of separation processes for a chemical plant in particular, a reliable knowledge of the phase equilibrium behavior is required. The phase equilibrium behavior can be calculated with the help of modern equations of state or g(E)-models using only binary parameters. But unfortunately, only a very small part of the experimental data for fitting the required binary model parameters is available, so very often these models cannot be applied directly. To solve this problem, powerful predictive thermodynamic models have been developed. Group contribution methods allow the prediction of the required phase equilibrium data using only a limited number of group interaction parameters. A prerequisite for fitting the required group interaction parameters is a comprehensive database. That is why for the development of powerful group contribution methods almost all published pure component properties, phase equilibrium data, excess properties, etc., were stored in computerized form in the Dortmund Data Bank. In this review, the present status, weaknesses, advantages and disadvantages, possible applications, and typical results of the different group contribution methods for the calculation of phase equilibria are presented.

  9. Phase equilibrium measurements on twelve binary mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, N.F.; Wilson, H.L.; Wilding, W.V.

    1996-11-01

    Phase equilibrium measurements have been performed on twelve binary mixtures. The PTx method was used to obtain vapor-liquid equilibrium data for the following binary systems at two temperatures each: ethanethiol + propylene; nitrobenzene + methanol; pyridine + ethyl acetate; octane + tert-amyl methyl ether; diisopropyl ether + butane; 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol + epichlorohydrin; 2,3-dichloro-1-propanol + epichlorohydrin; 2,3-epoxy-1-propanol + epichlorohydrin; 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol + epichlorohydrin; methanol + hydrogen cyanide. For these systems, equilibrium vapor and liquid phase compositions were derived from the PTx data using the Soave equation of state to represent the vapor phase and the Wilson, NRTL, or Redlich-Kister activity coefficient model to represent the liquid phase. The infinite dilution activity coefficient of methylamine in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone was determined at three temperatures by performing PTx measurements on the N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone was determined at three temperatures by performing PTx measurements on the N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone-rich half of the binary. Liquid-liquid equilibrium studies were made on the triethylene glycol + 1-pentene system at two temperatures by directly analyzing samples taken from each liquid phase.

  10. Equilibrium Molecular Thermodynamics from Kirkwood Sampling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present two methods for barrierless equilibrium sampling of molecular systems based on the recently proposed Kirkwood method (J. Chem. Phys.2009, 130, 134102). Kirkwood sampling employs low-order correlations among internal coordinates of a molecule for random (or non-Markovian) sampling of the high dimensional conformational space. This is a geometrical sampling method independent of the potential energy surface. The first method is a variant of biased Monte Carlo, where Kirkwood sampling is used for generating trial Monte Carlo moves. Using this method, equilibrium distributions corresponding to different temperatures and potential energy functions can be generated from a given set of low-order correlations. Since Kirkwood samples are generated independently, this method is ideally suited for massively parallel distributed computing. The second approach is a variant of reservoir replica exchange, where Kirkwood sampling is used to construct a reservoir of conformations, which exchanges conformations with the replicas performing equilibrium sampling corresponding to different thermodynamic states. Coupling with the Kirkwood reservoir enhances sampling by facilitating global jumps in the conformational space. The efficiency of both methods depends on the overlap of the Kirkwood distribution with the target equilibrium distribution. We present proof-of-concept results for a model nine-atom linear molecule and alanine dipeptide. PMID:25915525

  11. Equilibrium molecular thermodynamics from Kirkwood sampling.

    PubMed

    Somani, Sandeep; Okamoto, Yuko; Ballard, Andrew J; Wales, David J

    2015-05-21

    We present two methods for barrierless equilibrium sampling of molecular systems based on the recently proposed Kirkwood method (J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 130, 134102). Kirkwood sampling employs low-order correlations among internal coordinates of a molecule for random (or non-Markovian) sampling of the high dimensional conformational space. This is a geometrical sampling method independent of the potential energy surface. The first method is a variant of biased Monte Carlo, where Kirkwood sampling is used for generating trial Monte Carlo moves. Using this method, equilibrium distributions corresponding to different temperatures and potential energy functions can be generated from a given set of low-order correlations. Since Kirkwood samples are generated independently, this method is ideally suited for massively parallel distributed computing. The second approach is a variant of reservoir replica exchange, where Kirkwood sampling is used to construct a reservoir of conformations, which exchanges conformations with the replicas performing equilibrium sampling corresponding to different thermodynamic states. Coupling with the Kirkwood reservoir enhances sampling by facilitating global jumps in the conformational space. The efficiency of both methods depends on the overlap of the Kirkwood distribution with the target equilibrium distribution. We present proof-of-concept results for a model nine-atom linear molecule and alanine dipeptide.

  12. 16 CFR 1500.125 - Labeling requirements for accompanying literature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling requirements for accompanying literature. 1500.125 Section 1500.125 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL... REGULATIONS § 1500.125 Labeling requirements for accompanying literature. When any accompanying...

  13. Non-Equilibrium Conductivity at Quantum Critical Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berridge, Andrew; Bhaseen, M. J.; Green, A. G.

    2013-03-01

    The behaviour of quantum systems driven out of equilibrium is a field in which we are still searching for general principles and universal results. Quantum critical systems are useful in this search as their out of equilibrium steady states may inherit universal features from equilibrium. While this has been shown in some cases, the calculational techniques used often involve simplified models or calculational tricks, which can obscure some of the underlying physical processes. Here we use a Boltzmann transport approach to study the steady-state non-equilibrium properties - conductivity and current noise, of the Bose-Hubbard model head-on. We must explicitly consider heat-flow and rate limiting processes in the establishment of the steady-state to show that it can indeed be universal. Our analysis reveals the importance of the hydrodynamic limit and the limitations of current approaches.

  14. Influence of 2'-deoxy sugar moiety on excited-state protonation equilibrium of adenine and adenosine with acridine inside SDS micelles: a time-resolved study with quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Sarangi, Manas Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Basu, Samita

    2012-02-01

    The protonation dynamics of the DNA base adenine (Ade) and its nucleoside 2'-deoxyadenosine (d-Ade) are investigated by monitoring the deprotonation kinetics of an N-heterocyclic DNA intercalator, acridine (Acr), in the confined environment of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles. Protonation of acridine (AcrH(+)) occurs at the hydrophilic interface and this species remains in dynamic equilibrium with its deprotonated counterpart (Acr) inside the hydrophobic core of SDS micelles. Quenching of the fluorescence of AcrH(+)* at 478 nm is observed after addition of Ade and d-Ade with Stern-Volmer constant (K(SV)) 298 and 75 M(-1), respectively, with a concomitant increment in Acr* at 425 nm. Time-resolved fluorescence studies reveal quenching in the lifetime of AcrH(+)*. The relative amplitude of AcrH(+)* decreases from 0.97 to 0.51 and 0.97 to 0.89 with equimolar addition of Ade and d-Ade, respectively. These observations are explained by excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) from AcrH(+)* to the bases. The reduced K(SV) value and negligible change in the relative amplitudes of AcrH(+)* with d-Ade infer that ESPT is hindered substantially by the presence of a 2'-deoxy sugar unit. Transient time-resolved absorption spectra of Acr reflect that Ade reduces the absorbance of (3)AcrH(+)*; however, d-Ade keeps it unaltered for more than a time delay of 2 μs. The optimized geometries calculated by quantum chemical methods reflect deprotonation of AcrH(+)* with protonation at the N1 position of Ade, while it remains protonated with d-Ade. The hindered ESPT between AcrH(+)* and d-Ade singles out the significance of the 2'-deoxy sugar moiety in controlling the deprotonation kinetics.

  15. Decomposition of solids accompanied by melting--Bawn kinetics.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael E; Glass, Beverley D

    2003-03-26

    The book "Chemistry of the Solid State", edited by W.E. Garner more than 50 years ago, contained a chapter (Chapter 10) by C.E.H. Bawn which dealt with the kinetics of the thermal decompositions of solids that are accompanied by some melting. Rate equations were derived and this model has become known as the Bawn model or as "Bawn kinetics". This kinetic model has proved particularly useful in pharmaceutical stability studies. The isothermal curves of extent of decomposition, alpha, against time for this model are sigmoidal and the problems of distinguishing this model from other sigmoidal models (Prout-Tompkins, Avrami-Erofeev) have been examined. Under programmed temperature conditions, distinguishability becomes even more difficult.

  16. EASI - EQUILIBRIUM AIR SHOCK INTERFERENCE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    New research on hypersonic vehicles, such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP), has raised concerns about the effects of shock-wave interference on various structural components of the craft. State-of-the-art aerothermal analysis software is inadequate to predict local flow and heat flux in areas of extremely high heat transfer, such as the surface impingement of an Edney-type supersonic jet. EASI revives and updates older computational methods for calculating inviscid flow field and maximum heating from shock wave interference. The program expands these methods to solve problems involving the six shock-wave interference patterns on a two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge with an equilibrium chemically reacting gas mixture (representing, for example, the scramjet cowl of the NASP). The inclusion of gas chemistry allows for a more accurate prediction of the maximum pressure and heating loads by accounting for the effects of high temperature on the air mixture. Caloric imperfections and specie dissociation of high-temperature air cause shock-wave angles, flow deflection angles, and thermodynamic properties to differ from those calculated by a calorically perfect gas model. EASI contains pressure- and temperature-dependent thermodynamic and transport properties to determine heating rates, and uses either a calorically perfect air model or an 11-specie, 7-reaction reacting air model at equilibrium with temperatures up to 15,000 K for the inviscid flowfield calculations. EASI solves the flow field and the associated maximum surface pressure and heat flux for the six common types of shock wave interference. Depending on the type of interference, the program solves for shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction, expansion-fan/boundary-layer interaction, attaching shear layer or supersonic jet impingement. Heat flux predictions require a knowledge (from experimental data or relevant calculations) of a pertinent length scale of the interaction. Output files contain flow

  17. Modeling Equilibrium of microRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lawrence W. C.

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of non-coding RNAs and the dysregulated expression of these short RNA molecules was frequently observed in cancer cells. The steady state level of microRNA concentration may differentiate the biological function of the cells between normal and impaired. To understand the steady state or equilibrium of microRNAs, their interactions with transcription factors and target genes need to be explored and visualized through prediction and network analysis algorithms. This article discusses the application of mathematical model for simulating the dynamics of network feedback loop so as to decipher the mechanism of microRNA regulation. PMID:22303331

  18. Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift.

  19. Interregional equilibrium with heterogeneous labor.

    PubMed

    Michel, P; Perrot, A; Thisse J-f

    1996-02-01

    "The impact of labor migration on interregional equilibrium is studied when workers are heterogeneous in productivity and regional mobility. The skilled respond to market disequilibrium by moving into the most attractive region. The unskilled are immobile in the short-run and move with the skilled in the long-run. Both regions have a neoclassical production function affected by an externality depending on the number of skilled. Workers move according to the utility differential when regional amenities vary with population or according to the wage differential. The equilibrium pattern depends on the unskilled's mobility and on migration incentives. Typically, regional imbalance characterizes the equilibrium which is often suboptimal."

  20. A mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of the hydroxyl stretch in methanol/carbon tetrachloride mixtures: equilibrium hydrogen-bond structure and dynamics at the ground state and the infrared absorption spectrum.

    PubMed

    Kwac, Kijeong; Geva, Eitan

    2011-07-28

    We present a mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of the structure and dynamics of the hydroxyl stretch in methanol/carbon tetrachloride mixtures. One of the methanol molecules is tagged, and its hydroxyl stretch is treated quantum-mechanically, while the remaining degrees of freedom are treated classically. The adiabatic Hamiltonian of the quantum-mechanical hydroxyl is diagonalized on-the-fly to obtain the corresponding adiabatic energy levels and wave functions which depend parametrically on the instantaneous configuration of the classical degrees of freedom. The dynamics of the classical degrees of freedom are in turn affected by the quantum-mechanical state of the tagged hydroxyl stretch via the corresponding Hellmann-Feynman forces. The ability of five different force-field combinations to reproduce the experimental absorption infrared spectrum of the hydroxyl stretch is examined for different isotopomers and on a wide range of compositions. It is found that, in addition to accounting for the anharmonic nature of the hydroxyl stretch, one also has to employ polarizable force fields and account for the damping of the polarizability at short distances. The equilibrium ground-state hydrogen-bonding structure and dynamics is analyzed, and its signature on the absorption infrared spectrum of the hydroxyl stretch is investigated in detail. Five different hydroxyl stretch subpopulations are identified and spectrally assigned: monomers (α), hydrogen-bond acceptors (β), hydrogen-bond donors (γ), simultaneous hydrogen-bond donors and acceptors (δ), and simultaneous hydrogen-bond donors and double-acceptors (ε). The fundamental transition frequencies of the α and β subpopulations are found to be narrowly distributed and to overlap, thereby giving rise to a single narrow band whose intensity is significantly diminished by rotational relaxation. The fundamental transition frequency distributions of the γ, δ, and ε subpopulations are found to be

  1. Non-equilibrium dynamics from RPMD and CMD.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Ralph; Song, Kai; Shi, Qiang; Althorpe, Stuart C; Miller, Thomas F

    2016-11-28

    We investigate the calculation of approximate non-equilibrium quantum time correlation functions (TCFs) using two popular path-integral-based molecular dynamics methods, ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) and centroid molecular dynamics (CMD). It is shown that for the cases of a sudden vertical excitation and an initial momentum impulse, both RPMD and CMD yield non-equilibrium TCFs for linear operators that are exact for high temperatures, in the t = 0 limit, and for harmonic potentials; the subset of these conditions that are preserved for non-equilibrium TCFs of non-linear operators is also discussed. Furthermore, it is shown that for these non-equilibrium initial conditions, both methods retain the connection to Matsubara dynamics that has previously been established for equilibrium initial conditions. Comparison of non-equilibrium TCFs from RPMD and CMD to Matsubara dynamics at short times reveals the orders in time to which the methods agree. Specifically, for the position-autocorrelation function associated with sudden vertical excitation, RPMD and CMD agree with Matsubara dynamics up to O(t(4)) and O(t(1)), respectively; for the position-autocorrelation function associated with an initial momentum impulse, RPMD and CMD agree with Matsubara dynamics up to O(t(5)) and O(t(2)), respectively. Numerical tests using model potentials for a wide range of non-equilibrium initial conditions show that RPMD and CMD yield non-equilibrium TCFs with an accuracy that is comparable to that for equilibrium TCFs. RPMD is also used to investigate excited-state proton transfer in a system-bath model, and it is compared to numerically exact calculations performed using a recently developed version of the Liouville space hierarchical equation of motion approach; again, similar accuracy is observed for non-equilibrium and equilibrium initial conditions.

  2. Non-equilibrium dynamics from RPMD and CMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, Ralph; Song, Kai; Shi, Qiang; Althorpe, Stuart C.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the calculation of approximate non-equilibrium quantum time correlation functions (TCFs) using two popular path-integral-based molecular dynamics methods, ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) and centroid molecular dynamics (CMD). It is shown that for the cases of a sudden vertical excitation and an initial momentum impulse, both RPMD and CMD yield non-equilibrium TCFs for linear operators that are exact for high temperatures, in the t = 0 limit, and for harmonic potentials; the subset of these conditions that are preserved for non-equilibrium TCFs of non-linear operators is also discussed. Furthermore, it is shown that for these non-equilibrium initial conditions, both methods retain the connection to Matsubara dynamics that has previously been established for equilibrium initial conditions. Comparison of non-equilibrium TCFs from RPMD and CMD to Matsubara dynamics at short times reveals the orders in time to which the methods agree. Specifically, for the position-autocorrelation function associated with sudden vertical excitation, RPMD and CMD agree with Matsubara dynamics up to O (t4) and O (t1) , respectively; for the position-autocorrelation function associated with an initial momentum impulse, RPMD and CMD agree with Matsubara dynamics up to O (t5) and O (t2) , respectively. Numerical tests using model potentials for a wide range of non-equilibrium initial conditions show that RPMD and CMD yield non-equilibrium TCFs with an accuracy that is comparable to that for equilibrium TCFs. RPMD is also used to investigate excited-state proton transfer in a system-bath model, and it is compared to numerically exact calculations performed using a recently developed version of the Liouville space hierarchical equation of motion approach; again, similar accuracy is observed for non-equilibrium and equilibrium initial conditions.

  3. In command of non-equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Roduner, Emil; Radhakrishnan, Shankara Gayathri

    2016-05-21

    The second law of thermodynamics is well known for determining the direction of spontaneous processes in the laboratory, life and the universe. It is therefore often called the arrow of time. Less often discussed but just as important is the effect of kinetic barriers which intercept equilibration and preserve highly ordered, high energy non-equilibrium states. Examples of such states are many modern materials produced intentionally for technological applications. Furthermore, all living organisms fuelled directly by photosynthesis and those fuelled indirectly by living on high energy nutrition represent preserved non-equilibrium states. The formation of these states represents the local reversal of the arrow of time which only seemingly violates the second law. It has been known since the seminal work of Prigogine that the stabilisation of these states inevitably requires the dissipation of energy in the form of waste heat. It is this feature of waste heat dissipation following the input of energy that drives all processes occurring at a non-zero rate. Photosynthesis, replication of living organisms, self-assembly, crystal shape engineering and distillation have this principle in common with the well-known Carnot cycle in the heat engine. Drawing on this analogy, we subsume these essential and often sophisticated driven processes under the term machinery of life.

  4. Equilibrium Constants You Can Smell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Michael; Buckley, Amy

    1996-01-01

    Presents a simple experiment involving the sense of smell that students can accomplish during a lecture. Illustrates the important concepts of equilibrium along with the acid/base properties of various ions. (JRH)

  5. Equilibrium and Orientation in Cephalopods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budelmann, Bernd-Ulrich

    1980-01-01

    Describes the structure of the equilibrium receptor system in cephalopods, comparing it to the vertebrate counterpart--the vestibular system. Relates the evolution of this complex system to the competition of cephalopods with fishes. (CS)

  6. Simulations for Teaching Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huddle, Penelope A.; White, Margaret Dawn; Rogers, Fiona

    2000-07-01

    This paper outlines a systematic approach to teaching chemical equilibrium using simulation experiments that address most known alternate conceptions in the topic. Graphs drawn using the data from the simulations are identical to those obtained using real experimental data for reactions that go to equilibrium. This allows easy mapping of the analogy to the target. The requirements for the simulations are simple and inexpensive, making them accessible to even the poorest schools. The simulations can be adapted for all levels, from pupils who are first encountering equilibrium through students in tertiary education to qualified teachers who have experienced difficulty in teaching the topic. The simulations were piloted on four very different audiences. Minor modifications were then made before the Equilibrium Games as reported in this paper were tested on three groups of subjects: a Grade 12 class, college students, and university Chemistry I students. Marked improvements in understanding of the concept were shown in two of the three sets of subjects.

  7. Edge equilibrium code for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xujing; Drozdov, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-15

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids.

  8. Circuit theory of the equilibrium electrical noise bispectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafov, Boris M.

    2003-05-01

    This work brings into use the well known circuit theory concept that states that the short-circuit noise current is related to the open-circuit noise voltage through a small-signal admittance (or small-signal impedance). This concept is perfectly illustrated by the famous Nyquist theorem for nonlinear equilibrium systems. The original results that are described in this report are as follows: (1) the equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation theorem of the 3rd order that is consistent with the cumulant spectrum invariance concept holds only for the bispectrum with equal frequencies, i.e. for the one-frequency bispectrum. (2) the one-frequency bispectrum of the equilibrium electrical fluctuations is proportional to magnitude of the small-signal quadratic rectification at the equilibrium state.

  9. Electron Systems Out of Equilibrium: Nonequilibrium Green's Function Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špička, Václav Velický, Bedřich Kalvová, Anděla

    2015-10-01

    This review deals with the state of the art and perspectives of description of non-equilibrium many body systems using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NGF) method. The basic aim is to describe time evolution of the many-body system from its initial state over its transient dynamics to its long time asymptotic evolution. First, we discuss basic aims of transport theories to motivate the introduction of the NGF techniques. Second, this article summarizes the present view on construction of the electron transport equations formulated within the NGF approach to non-equilibrium. We discuss incorporation of complex initial conditions to the NGF formalism, and the NGF reconstruction theorem, which serves as a tool to derive simplified kinetic equations. Three stages of evolution of the non-equilibrium, the first described by the full NGF description, the second by a Non-Markovian Generalized Master Equation and the third by a Markovian Master Equation will be related to each other.

  10. Shape characteristics of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fractal clusters.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Marc L; Douglas, Jack F

    2013-07-28

    It is often difficult in practice to discriminate between equilibrium and non-equilibrium nanoparticle or colloidal-particle clusters that form through aggregation in gas or solution phases. Scattering studies often permit the determination of an apparent fractal dimension, but both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters in three dimensions frequently have fractal dimensions near 2, so that it is often not possible to discriminate on the basis of this geometrical property. A survey of the anisotropy of a wide variety of polymeric structures (linear and ring random and self-avoiding random walks, percolation clusters, lattice animals, diffusion-limited aggregates, and Eden clusters) based on the principal components of both the radius of gyration and electric polarizability tensor indicates, perhaps counter-intuitively, that self-similar equilibrium clusters tend to be intrinsically anisotropic at all sizes, while non-equilibrium processes such as diffusion-limited aggregation or Eden growth tend to be isotropic in the large-mass limit, providing a potential means of discriminating these clusters experimentally if anisotropy could be determined along with the fractal dimension. Equilibrium polymer structures, such as flexible polymer chains, are normally self-similar due to the existence of only a single relevant length scale, and are thus anisotropic at all length scales, while non-equilibrium polymer structures that grow irreversibly in time eventually become isotropic if there is no difference in the average growth rates in different directions. There is apparently no proof of these general trends and little theoretical insight into what controls the universal anisotropy in equilibrium polymer structures of various kinds. This is an obvious topic of theoretical investigation, as well as a matter of practical interest. To address this general problem, we consider two experimentally accessible ratios, one between the hydrodynamic and gyration radii, the other

  11. Entropic phase transitions and accompanying anomalous thermodynamics of matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iosilevskiy, I. L.

    2015-11-01

    Thermodynamic consequences of subdivision for all first-order phase transitions (PT) into enthalpy- and entropy-driven ones (H-PT and S-PT), proposed previously [arXiv:1403.8053], are under discussions. Key-value for proposed discrimination is main benefit (decreasing) in enthalpy or (nega)entropy in spontaneous phase decomposition, i.e. the sign of latent heat of PT and consequent slope of its P(T)-dependence. The main driving mechanism for many isostructural S-PT is the decay (delocalization) of some kind of bound complexes, e.g. atoms, molecules etc. Thermodynamic features of H-PT and S-PT differ significantly. Entropic PT are always the part of more general thermodynamic anomaly—domain where great number of usually positive second cross derivatives (e.g. Grüneisen parameter, thermal pressure coefficient etc.) became negative simultaneously. This domain is restricted (in the case of isostructural S-PT) by remarkable bound, where all mentioned second derivatives are equal to zero. Isostructural S-PT has more complicated topology of stable, metastable and unstable states and their boundaries—binodals and spinodals in comparison with ordinary enthalpic PTs. Two new thermodynamic objects accompany isostructural S-PT: (i) appearance of third (additional) region of metastable states with positive compressibility, isolated from the regions of stable states; (ii) appearance of new additional spinodal, topped with a new singular point, separating metastable and unstable states. These additional spinodal and singular point obey to relation (∂P/∂V)T = ∞. All thermodynamic anomalies of entropic PTs correspond to conclusive and transparent geometrical feature of such PTs: multilayered structure of thermodynamic surfaces for temperature, entropy and internal energy as pressure- density functions U(P, V), S(P, V) and T(P, V).

  12. Electron-positron pair equilibrium in strongly magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, A.K.

    1984-11-01

    Steady states of thermal electron-positron pair plasmas at mildly relativistic temperatures and in strong magnetic fields are investigated. The pair density in steady-state equilibrium, where pair production balances annihilation, is found as a function of temperature, magnetic field strength and source size, by a numerical calculation which includes pair production attenuation and Compton scattering of the photons. It is found that there is a maximum pair density for each value of temperature and field strength, and also a source size above which optically thin equilibrium states do not exist. (ESA)

  13. "Non-equilibrium" block copolymer micelles with glassy cores: a predictive approach based on theory of equilibrium micelles.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Ramanathan

    2015-07-01

    Micelles generated in water from most amphiphilic block copolymers are widely recognized to be non-equilibrium structures. Typically, the micelles are prepared by a kinetic process, first allowing molecular scale dissolution of the block copolymer in a common solvent that likes both the blocks and then gradually replacing the common solvent by water to promote the hydrophobic blocks to aggregate and create the micelles. The non-equilibrium nature of the micelle originates from the fact that dynamic exchange between the block copolymer molecules in the micelle and the singly dispersed block copolymer molecules in water is suppressed, because of the glassy nature of the core forming polymer block and/or its very large hydrophobicity. Although most amphiphilic block copolymers generate such non-equilibrium micelles, no theoretical approach to a priori predict the micelle characteristics currently exists. In this work, we propose a predictive approach for non-equilibrium micelles with glassy cores by applying the equilibrium theory of micelles in two steps. In the first, we calculate the properties of micelles formed in the mixed solvent while true equilibrium prevails, until the micelle core becomes glassy. In the second step, we freeze the micelle aggregation number at this glassy state and calculate the corona dimension from the equilibrium theory of micelles. The condition when the micelle core becomes glassy is independently determined from a statistical thermodynamic treatment of diluent effect on polymer glass transition temperature. The predictions based on this "non-equilibrium" model compare reasonably well with experimental data for polystyrene-polyethylene oxide diblock copolymer, which is the most extensively studied system in the literature. In contrast, the application of the equilibrium model to describe such a system significantly overpredicts the micelle core and corona dimensions and the aggregation number. The non-equilibrium model suggests ways to

  14. The Approach to Equilibrium: Detailed Balance and the Master Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Millard H.; Hall, Gregory E.; Dagdigian, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    The approach to the equilibrium (Boltzmann) distribution of populations of internal states of a molecule is governed by inelastic collisions in the gas phase and with surfaces. The set of differential equations governing the time evolution of the internal state populations is commonly called the master equation. An analytic solution to the master…

  15. Microscopic theory of equilibrium polariton condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Fei; Wu, Fengcheng; Xie, Ming; Su, Jung-Jung; MacDonald, A. H.

    2016-12-01

    We present a microscopic theory of the equilibrium polariton condensate state of a semiconductor quantum well in a planar optical cavity. The theory accounts for the adjustment of matter excitations to the presence of a coherent photon field, predicts effective polariton-polariton interaction strengths that are weaker and condensate exciton fractions that are smaller than in the commonly employed exciton-photon model, and yields effective Rabi coupling strengths that depend on the detuning of the cavity-photon energy relative to the bare exciton energy. The dressed quasiparticle bands that appear naturally in the theory provide a mechanism for electrical manipulation of polariton condensates.

  16. Local thermodynamic equilibrium for globally disequilibrium open systems under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikov, Yury

    2016-04-01

    Predictive modeling of far and near equilibrium processes is essential for understanding of patterns formation and for quantifying of natural processes that are never in global equilibrium. Methods of both equilibrium and non-equilibrium thermodynamics are needed and have to be combined. For example, predicting temperature evolution due to heat conduction requires simultaneous use of equilibrium relationship between internal energy and temperature via heat capacity (the caloric equation of state) and disequilibrium relationship between heat flux and temperature gradient. Similarly, modeling of rocks deforming under stress, reactions in system open for the porous fluid flow, or kinetic overstepping of the equilibrium reaction boundary necessarily needs both equilibrium and disequilibrium material properties measured under fundamentally different laboratory conditions. Classical irreversible thermodynamics (CIT) is the well-developed discipline providing the working recipes for the combined application of mutually exclusive experimental data such as density and chemical potential at rest under constant pressure and temperature and viscosity of the flow under stress. Several examples will be presented.

  17. Engaging Elementary Students with Mathematical Processes during Assessment: What Opportunities Exist in Tests Accompanying Published Curricula?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunsader, Patricia D.; Thompson, Denisse R.; Zorin, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a framework used to analyze the extent to which assessments (i.e., chapter tests) accompanying three published elementary grades 3-5 curricula in the United States provide students with opportunities to engage with key mathematical processes. The framework uses indicators for five criteria to assess the processes of…

  18. Adiabatic evolution of plasma equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Grad, H.; Hu, P. N.; Stevens, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    A new theory of plasma equilibrium is introduced in which adiabatic constraints are specified. This leads to a mathematically nonstandard structure, as compared to the usual equilibrium theory, in which prescription of pressure and current profiles leads to an elliptic partial differential equation. Topologically complex configurations require further generalization of the concept of adiabaticity to allow irreversible mixing of plasma and magnetic flux among islands. Matching conditions across a boundary layer at the separatrix are obtained from appropriate conservation laws. Applications are made to configurations with planned islands (as in Doublet) and accidental islands (as in Tokamaks). Two-dimensional, axially symmetric, helically symmetric, and closed line equilibria are included. PMID:16578729

  19. Equilibrium in a Production Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Chiarolla, Maria B.; Haussmann, Ulrich G.

    2011-06-15

    Consider a closed production-consumption economy with multiple agents and multiple resources. The resources are used to produce the consumption good. The agents derive utility from holding resources as well as consuming the good produced. They aim to maximize their utility while the manager of the production facility aims to maximize profits. With the aid of a representative agent (who has a multivariable utility function) it is shown that an Arrow-Debreu equilibrium exists. In so doing we establish technical results that will be used to solve the stochastic dynamic problem (a case with infinite dimensional commodity space so the General Equilibrium Theory does not apply) elsewhere.

  20. 9 CFR 93.508 - Articles accompanying swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Articles accompanying swine. 93.508 Section 93.508 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.508 Articles accompanying swine. No...

  1. 9 CFR 93.508 - Articles accompanying swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Articles accompanying swine. 93.508 Section 93.508 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.508 Articles accompanying swine. No...

  2. 9 CFR 93.508 - Articles accompanying swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Articles accompanying swine. 93.508 Section 93.508 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.508 Articles accompanying swine. No...

  3. 9 CFR 93.508 - Articles accompanying swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Articles accompanying swine. 93.508 Section 93.508 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.508 Articles accompanying swine. No...

  4. 9 CFR 93.508 - Articles accompanying swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Articles accompanying swine. 93.508 Section 93.508 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.508 Articles accompanying swine. No...

  5. 9 CFR 93.307 - Articles accompanying horses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Articles accompanying horses. 93.307... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.307 Articles accompanying horses. No..., blankets, or other things used for or about horses governed by the regulations this part, shall be...

  6. 9 CFR 93.307 - Articles accompanying horses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Articles accompanying horses. 93.307... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.307 Articles accompanying horses. No..., blankets, or other things used for or about horses governed by the regulations this part, shall be...

  7. 9 CFR 93.307 - Articles accompanying horses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Articles accompanying horses. 93.307... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.307 Articles accompanying horses. No..., blankets, or other things used for or about horses governed by the regulations this part, shall be...

  8. 9 CFR 93.307 - Articles accompanying horses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Articles accompanying horses. 93.307... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.307 Articles accompanying horses. No..., blankets, or other things used for or about horses governed by the regulations this part, shall be...

  9. 9 CFR 93.307 - Articles accompanying horses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Articles accompanying horses. 93.307... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.307 Articles accompanying horses. No..., blankets, or other things used for or about horses governed by the regulations this part, shall be...

  10. 9 CFR 93.409 - Articles accompanying ruminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Articles accompanying ruminants. 93...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants § 93.409 Articles accompanying ruminants..., blankets, or other things used for or about ruminants governed by the regulations in this part, shall...

  11. 9 CFR 93.409 - Articles accompanying ruminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Articles accompanying ruminants. 93...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants § 93.409 Articles accompanying ruminants..., blankets, or other things used for or about ruminants governed by the regulations in this part, shall...

  12. 9 CFR 93.409 - Articles accompanying ruminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Articles accompanying ruminants. 93...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants § 93.409 Articles accompanying ruminants..., blankets, or other things used for or about ruminants governed by the regulations in this part, shall...

  13. 9 CFR 93.409 - Articles accompanying ruminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Articles accompanying ruminants. 93...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants § 93.409 Articles accompanying ruminants..., blankets, or other things used for or about ruminants governed by the regulations in this part, shall...

  14. 9 CFR 93.409 - Articles accompanying ruminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Articles accompanying ruminants. 93...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants § 93.409 Articles accompanying ruminants..., blankets, or other things used for or about ruminants governed by the regulations in this part, shall...

  15. 49 CFR 591.6 - Documents accompanying declarations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... pursuant to § 591.5(j) shall be accompanied by the following documentation: (1) A declaration made pursuant to § 591.5(j)(1)(i), (ii), (iv), or (v) and (j)(2)(i) shall be accompanied by a letter from the Administrator authorizing importation pursuant to § 591.5(j)(1)(i), (ii), (iv), or (v) and (j)(2)(i). Any...

  16. 49 CFR 591.6 - Documents accompanying declarations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... pursuant to § 591.5(j) shall be accompanied by the following documentation: (1) A declaration made pursuant to § 591.5(j)(1)(i), (ii), (iv), or (v) and (j)(2)(i) shall be accompanied by a letter from the Administrator authorizing importation pursuant to § 591.5(j)(1)(i), (ii), (iv), or (v) and (j)(2)(i). Any...

  17. Chemical Principles Revisited: Using the Equilibrium Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the concept of equilibrium in chemical systems, particularly in relation to predicting the position of equilibrium, predicting spontaneity of a reaction, quantitative applications of the equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, determination of the solubility product constant, common-ion effect, and dissolution of precipitates.…

  18. Equilibrium Principles: A Game for Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonson, Lionel J., Jr.; Lewis, Don L.

    1999-04-01

    The laboratory exercise is a game using marked sugar cubes as dice. The game emphasizes the dynamic character of equilibrium. Forward and reverse rate-constant values are used to calculate an equilibrium constant and to predict equilibrium populations. Predicted equilibrium populations are compared with experimental results.

  19. Strongly Non-equilibrium Dynamics of Nanochannel Confined DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, Walter

    Nanoconfined DNA exhibits a wide-range of fascinating transient and steady-state non-equilibrium phenomena. Yet, while experiment, simulation and scaling analytics are converging on a comprehensive picture regarding the equilibrium behavior of nanochannel confined DNA, non-equilibrium behavior remains largely unexplored. In particular, while the DNA extension along the nanochannel is the key observable in equilibrium experiments, in the non-equilibrium case it is necessary to measure and model not just the extension but the molecule's full time-dependent one-dimensional concentration profile. Here, we apply controlled compressive forces to a nanochannel confined molecule via a nanodozer assay, whereby an optically trapped bead is slid down the channel at a constant speed. Upon contact with the molecule, a propagating concentration ``shockwave'' develops near the bead and the molecule is dynamically compressed. This experiment, a single-molecule implementation of a macroscopic cylinder-piston apparatus, can be used to observe the molecule response over a range of forcings and benchmark theoretical description of non-equilibrium behavior. We show that the dynamic concentration profiles, including both transient and steady-state response, can be modelled via a partial differential evolution equation combining nonlinear diffusion and convection. Lastly, we present preliminary results for dynamic compression of multiple confined molecules to explore regimes of segregation and mixing for multiple chains in confinement.

  20. Far-from-equilibrium measurements of thermodynamic length

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Edward H.; Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-11-05

    Thermodynamic length is a path function that generalizes the notion of length to the surface of thermodynamic states. Here, we show how to measure thermodynamic length in far-from-equilibrium experiments using the work fluctuation relations. For these microscopic systems, it proves necessary to define the thermodynamic length in terms of the Fisher information. Consequently, the thermodynamic length can be directly related to the magnitude of fluctuations about equilibrium. The work fluctuation relations link the work and the free energy change during an external perturbation on a system. We use this result to determine equilibrium averages at intermediate points of the protocol in which the system is out-of-equilibrium. This allows us to extend Bennett's method to determine the potential of mean force, as well as the thermodynamic length, in single molecule experiments.

  1. Biochemical thermodynamics and rapid-equilibrium enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Alberty, Robert A

    2010-12-30

    Biochemical thermodynamics is based on the chemical thermodynamics of aqueous solutions, but it is quite different because pH is used as an independent variable. A transformed Gibbs energy G' is used, and that leads to transformed enthalpies H' and transformed entropies S'. Equilibrium constants for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are referred to as apparent equilibrium constants K' to indicate that they are functions of pH in addition to temperature and ionic strength. Despite this, the most useful way to store basic thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions is to give standard Gibbs energies of formation, standard enthalpies of formation, electric charges, and numbers of hydrogen atoms in species of biochemical reactants like ATP. This makes it possible to calculate standard transformed Gibbs energies of formation, standard transformed enthalpies of formation of reactants (sums of species), and apparent equilibrium constants at desired temperatures, pHs, and ionic strengths. These calculations are complicated, and therefore, a mathematical application in a computer is needed. Rapid-equilibrium enzyme kinetics is based on biochemical thermodynamics because all reactions in the mechanism prior to the rate-determining reaction are at equilibrium. The expression for the equilibrium concentration of the enzyme-substrate complex that yields products can be derived by applying Solve in a computer to the expressions for the equilibrium constants in the mechanism and the conservation equation for enzymatic sites. In 1979, Duggleby pointed out that the minimum number of velocities of enzyme-catalyzed reactions required to estimate the values of the kinetic parameters is equal to the number of kinetic parameters. Solve can be used to do this with steady-state rate equations as well as rapid-equilibrium rate equations, provided that the rate equation is a polynomial. Rapid-equilibrium rate equations can be derived for complicated mechanisms that involve several reactants

  2. Structural changes accompanying phosphorylation of tarantula muscle myosin filaments

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Electron microscopy has been used to study the structural changes that occur in the myosin filaments of tarantula striated muscle when they are phosphorylated. Myosin filaments in muscle homogenates maintained in relaxing conditions (ATP, EGTA) are found to have nonphosphorylated regulatory light chains as shown by urea/glycerol gel electrophoresis and [32P]phosphate autoradiography. Negative staining reveals an ordered, helical arrangement of crossbridges in these filaments, in which the heads from axially neighboring myosin molecules appear to interact with each other. When the free Ca2+ concentration in a homogenate is raised to 10(-4) M, or when a Ca2+-insensitive myosin light chain kinase is added at low Ca2+ (10(-8) M), the regulatory light chains of myosin become rapidly phosphorylated. Phosphorylation is accompanied by potentiation of the actin activation of the myosin Mg- ATPase activity and by loss of order of the helical crossbridge arrangement characteristic of the relaxed filament. We suggest that in the relaxed state, when the regulatory light chains are not phosphorylated, the myosin heads are held down on the filament backbone by head-head interactions or by interactions of the heads with the filament backbone. Phosphorylation of the light chains may alter these interactions so that the crossbridges become more loosely associated with the filament backbone giving rise to the observed changes and facilitating crossbridge interaction with actin. PMID:2958483

  3. Magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    Self-consistent magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure is obtained by employing an iterative metric method for solving the inverse equilibrium equation in an optimal flux coordinate system. A method of determining plasma parallel and perpendicular pressures from either analytic particle distribution or particle distribution measured along the satellite's path is presented. The numerical results of axisymmetric magnetospheric equilibrium including the effects of finite beta, pressure anisotropy, and boundary conditions are presented for a bi-Maxwellian particle distribution. For the isotropic pressure cases, the finite beta effect produces an outward expansion of the constant magnetic flux surfaces in relation to the dipole field lines, and along the magnetic field the toroidal ring current is maximum at the magnetic equator. The effect of pressure anisotropy is found to further expand the flux surfaces outward. Along the magnetic field lines the westward ring current can be peak away from the equator due to an eastward current contribution resulting from pressure anisotropy. As pressure anisotropy increases, the peak westward current can become more singular. The outer boundary flux surface has significant effect on the magnetospheric equilibrium. For the outer flux boundary resembling dayside compressed flux surface due to solar wind pressure, the deformation of the magnetic field can be quite different from that for the outer flux boundary resembling the tail-like surface. 23 refs., 17 figs.

  4. Understanding Thermal Equilibrium through Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathare, Shirish; Huli, Saurabhee; Nachane, Madhura; Ladage, Savita; Pradhan, Hemachandra

    2015-01-01

    Thermal equilibrium is a basic concept in thermodynamics. In India, this concept is generally introduced at the first year of undergraduate education in physics and chemistry. In our earlier studies (Pathare and Pradhan 2011 "Proc. episteme-4 Int. Conf. to Review Research on Science Technology and Mathematics Education" pp 169-72) we…

  5. Accurate equilibrium structures for piperidine and cyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Demaison, Jean; Craig, Norman C; Groner, Peter; Écija, Patricia; Cocinero, Emilio J; Lesarri, Alberto; Rudolph, Heinz Dieter

    2015-03-05

    Extended and improved microwave (MW) measurements are reported for the isotopologues of piperidine. New ground state (GS) rotational constants are fitted to MW transitions with quartic centrifugal distortion constants taken from ab initio calculations. Predicate values for the geometric parameters of piperidine and cyclohexane are found from a high level of ab initio theory including adjustments for basis set dependence and for correlation of the core electrons. Equilibrium rotational constants are obtained from GS rotational constants corrected for vibration-rotation interactions and electronic contributions. Equilibrium structures for piperidine and cyclohexane are fitted by the mixed estimation method. In this method, structural parameters are fitted concurrently to predicate parameters (with appropriate uncertainties) and moments of inertia (with uncertainties). The new structures are regarded as being accurate to 0.001 Å and 0.2°. Comparisons are made between bond parameters in equatorial piperidine and cyclohexane. Another interesting result of this study is that a structure determination is an effective way to check the accuracy of the ground state experimental rotational constants.

  6. Map accompanies a series of letters regarding modifications to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Map accompanies a series of letters regarding modifications to the Aurora shops written during the later portion of 1878. Aurora shop scale 50 - 1' - Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, Roundhouse & Shops, Broadway & Spring Streets, Aurora, Kane County, IL

  7. Separation of Singing Voice from Music Accompaniment for Monaural Recordings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Directory: pub/tech-report/2005 File in pdf format: TR61.pdf Separation of Singing Voice from Music Accompaniment for Monaural Recordings Yipeng Li...Abstract Separating singing voice from music accompaniment is very useful in many applications, such as lyrics recognition and alignment, singer...identification, and music information retrieval. Although speech separation has been extensively studied for decades, singing voice separation has been little

  8. Korshunov instantons out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, M.; Gutman, D. B.

    2016-04-01

    Zero-dimensional dissipative action possesses nontrivial minima known as Korshunov instantons. They have been known so far only for imaginary time representation that is limited to equilibrium systems. In this work we reconstruct and generalise Korshunov instantons using real-time Keldysh approach. This allows us to formulate the dissipative action theory for generic nonequilibrium conditions. Possible applications of the theory to transport in strongly biased quantum dots are discussed.

  9. Conformational stability and self-association equilibrium in biologics.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Benjamin R; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto

    2016-02-01

    Biologics exist in equilibrium between native, partially denatured, and denatured conformational states. The population of any of these states is dictated by their Gibbs energy and can be altered by changes in physical and solution conditions. Some conformations have a tendency to self-associate and aggregate, an undesirable phenomenon in protein therapeutics. Conformational equilibrium and self-association are linked thermodynamic functions. Given that any associative reaction is concentration dependent, conformational stability studies performed at different protein concentrations can provide early clues to future aggregation problems. This analysis can be applied to the selection of protein variants or the identification of better formulation solutions. In this review, we discuss three different aggregation situations and their manifestation in the observed conformational equilibrium of a protein.

  10. Equilibrium of nucleotides in the dogfish brain.

    PubMed

    Andjus, Radoslav K; Dzakula, Zeljko; Marjanović, Marina

    2005-06-01

    In the past, the results of experiments on the time course of concentration changes of adenylates, phosphocreatine, and free creatine in muscle appeared compatible with an equilibrium hypothesis involving only the Lohmann and the myokinase reactions. Other reports, however, denied the applicability of the equilibrium hypothesis to the same tissue. The controversy may have been due to the high probability of experimental errors since time sampling was performed at second intervals. We presently test the hypothesis in the living brain of the small-spotted dogfish shark (Scyliorhinus canicula), an animal-model allowing for timing of sampling at hourly intervals. According to our earlier work, the dogfish shark can easily be resuscitated 8.2 h on average after being brought into the state of "suspended animation" at 0 degree C body temperature and exposed, out of water, to an atmosphere of nitrogen gas. To obtain a complete mathematical description of the time course of concentration changes of brain adenylates and phosphocreatine, we devised a kinetic model based on principles of classical multicompartmental analysis and biochemical kinetics. Model testing of the equilibrium hypothesis resulted in very good agreement between the hypothesis and our experimental data. Time-course modeling, achieved by simultaneously fitting the time series of our data by the set of four equations constituting our model resulted in an excellent agreement between data points and the computed curves. Finally, modeling of the depletion profiles of brain energy status concerning three of its descriptors (energy charge, total adenylate, and primary energy stores expressed in high-energy phosphate equivalents) allowed for a correlation to be established between energy status and the "revival time," a valuable physiological descriptor of tolerance.

  11. Diffusion and thermodynamic equilibrium under pressure variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulas, Evangelos; Tajčmanová, Lucie; Vrijmoed, Johannes; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2015-04-01

    Pressure is one of the most fundamental variables in mineral thermodynamics. In that respect, pressure-sensitive mineral reactions provide an important constraint on pressure under which the rock was developed. One implicit assumption when interpreting such pressure estimates is that the state-of-stress is close to hydrostatic, homogeneous and that the differential stress is negligible. Recent spectroscopic data from the mineral scale documenting pressure variations do not support this assumption. In addition to observations, mechanical models (numerical and analytical) suggest that rocks can develop and maintain heterogeneous pressure distributions at geological time scales. The recently developed unconventional barometry explains chemical zoning in minerals as a result of a pressure variation. We focus to apply the unconventional barometry in cases where chemical zoning in minerals cannot be explained by sluggish kinetics. In that respect, the unconventional barometry offers an alternative view of the chemical zoning which is consistent with thermodynamic equilibrium. However, to distinguish between a pressure-controlled chemical zoning and a zoning reflecting an incomplete chemical reaction is still challenging, especially for multicomponent systems. In this contribution, different types of chemical zoning are discussed. We investigate plagioclase rims around kyanite from an amphibolitized eclogite from Rhodope Metamorphic Complex (Greece-Bulgaria) as a case study and compare them with similar published textures from the Bohemian Massif. Mineral microstructures and phase equilibrium suggest that both rocks experienced near-isothermal decompression at high (>700C) temperatures. However, several distinct microstructural features suggest the development and/or the decay of mechanically maintained heterogeneous pressure distributions. We discuss our results and interpretations based on phase-equilibrium modeling, unconventional barometry and diffusion modeling under

  12. A wetting experiment as a tool to study the physicochemical processes accompanying the contact of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic materials with aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Boinovich, Ludmila; Emelyanenko, Alexandre

    2012-11-01

    In most fields of technological application of superhydrophobic materials, such as protection against corrosion, icing, and capillary condensation, or micro fluidics applications, a superhydrophobic surface has to operate in contact with aggressive aqueous media. Therefore, the peculiarities of behaviour of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces on prolonged contact with water and the mechanisms of possible degradation of superhydrophobicity need to be discussed. In this study, a consideration of the physicochemical processes accompanying the contact of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic materials with water, acid, alkaline and saline aqueous solutions is presented on the basis of experimental data on three-phase equilibrium obtained by the sessile drop method. It is shown that simultaneous analysis of the contact angle and contact diameter of the sessile drop and liquid/vapour surface tension allows one to attribute degradation of the superhydrophobic and hydrophobic state to reversible and irreversible processes such as hydrolysis of hydrophobic molecules, growth of an oxide layer and so on. A method for estimating both the portion of wetted area and the intrinsic wettability state (hydrophobic versus hydrophilic) of texture elements for a heterogeneous wetting regime is proposed and discussed.

  13. Explicit Integration of Extremely Stiff Reaction Networks: Partial Equilibrium Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, Mike W; Billings, J. J.; Hix, William Raphael

    2013-01-01

    In two preceding papers [1,2] we have shown that, when reaction networks are well removed from equilibrium, explicit asymptotic and quasi-steady-state approximations can give algebraically stabilized integration schemes that rival standard implicit methods in accuracy and speed for extremely stiff systems. However, we also showed that these explicit methods remain accurate but are no longer competitive in speed as the network approaches equilibrium. In this paper we analyze this failure and show that it is associated with the presence of fast equilibration timescales that neither asymptotic nor quasi-steady-state approximations are able to remove efficiently from the numerical integration. Based on this understanding, we develop a partial equilibrium method to deal effectively with the new partial equilibrium methods, give an integration scheme that plausibly can deal with the stiffest networks, even in the approach to equilibrium, with accuracy and speed competitive with that of implicit methods. Thus we demonstrate that algebraically stabilized explicit methods may offer alternatives to implicit integration of even extremely stiff systems, and that these methods may permit integration of much larger networks than have been feasible previously in a variety of fields.

  14. Equilibrium stellar systems with spindle singularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Stuart L.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    1992-01-01

    Equilibrium sequences of axisymmetric Newtonian clusters that tend toward singular states are constructed. The distribution functions are chosen to be of the form f = f(E, Jz). The numerical method then determines the density and gravitational potential self-consistently to satisfy Poisson's equation. For the prolate models, spindle singularities arise from the depletion of angular momentum near the symmetry axis. While the resulting density enhancement is confined to the region near the axis, the influence of the spindle extends much further out through its tidal gravitational field. Centrally condensed prolate clusters may contain strong-field regions even though the spindle mass is small and the mean cluster eccentricity is not extreme. While the calculations performed here are entirely Newtonian, the issue of singularities is an important topic in general relativity. Equilibrium solutions for relativistic star clusters can provide a testing ground for exploring this issue. The methods used in this paper for building nonspherical clusters can be extended to relativistic systems.

  15. Non-equilibrium modelling of transferred arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidar, J.

    1999-02-01

    A two-temperature, variable-density, arc model has been developed for description of high-current free-burning arcs, including departures from thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium in the plasma. The treatment includes the arc, the anode and the cathode and considers the separate energy balance of the electrons and the heavy particles, together with the continuity equations for these species throughout the plasma. The output includes a two-dimensional distribution for the temperatures and densities both of the electrons and of the heavy particles, plasma velocity, current density and electrical potential throughout the arc. For a 200 A arc in pure argon at 1 atm, we calculate large differences between the temperatures of the electrons and the heavy particles in the plasma region near the cathode tip, together with large departures from local chemical plasma equilibrium. In the main body of the arc at high plasma temperatures, we predict minor differences between the temperatures of the electrons and the heavy particles, which are inconsistent with recent measurements using laser-scattering techniques showing differences of up to several thousand degrees. However, we find that, for the region in front of the cathode tip, the ground-state level of the neutral atoms is overpopulated relative to the corresponding populations under conditions of LTE, in agreement with experimental observations. These departures from LTE are caused by the injection of a large mass flow of cold gas into the arc core due to arc constriction at the tip of the cathode.

  16. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  17. Transition from thermal to turbulent equilibrium with a resulting electromagnetic spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Gaelzer, R.; Pavan, J.

    2014-01-15

    A recent paper [Ziebell et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 010701 (2014)] discusses a new type of radiation emission process for plasmas in a state of quasi-equilibrium between the particles and enhanced Langmuir turbulence. Such a system may be an example of the so-called “turbulent quasi-equilibrium.” In the present paper, it is shown on the basis of electromagnetic weak turbulence theory that an initial thermal equilibrium state (i.e., only electrostatic fluctuations and Maxwellian particle distributions) transitions toward the turbulent quasi-equilibrium state with enhanced electromagnetic radiation spectrum, thus demonstrating that the turbulent quasi-equilibrium discussed in the above paper correctly describes the weakly turbulent plasma dynamically interacting with electromagnetic fluctuations, while maintaining a dynamical steady-state in the average sense.

  18. Torque equilibrium attitude control for Skylab reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, J. R.; Kennel, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    All the available torque equilibrium attitudes (most were useless from the standpoint of lack of electrical power) and the equilibrium seeking method are presented, as well as the actual successful application during the 3 weeks prior to Skylab reentry.

  19. Response Theory for Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics: Causality and Generalized Kramers-Kronig Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarini, Valerio

    2008-05-01

    We consider the general response theory recently proposed by Ruelle for describing the impact of small perturbations to the non-equilibrium steady states resulting from Axiom A dynamical systems. We show that the causality of the response functions entails the possibility of writing a set of Kramers-Kronig (K-K) relations for the corresponding susceptibilities at all orders of nonlinearity. Nonetheless, only a special class of directly observable susceptibilities obey K-K relations. Specific results are provided for the case of arbitrary order harmonic response, which allows for a very comprehensive K-K analysis and the establishment of sum rules connecting the asymptotic behavior of the harmonic generation susceptibility to the short-time response of the perturbed system. These results set in a more general theoretical framework previous findings obtained for optical systems and simple mechanical models, and shed light on the very general impact of considering the principle of causality for testing self-consistency: the described dispersion relations constitute unavoidable benchmarks that any experimental and model generated dataset must obey. The theory exposed in the present paper is dual to the time-dependent theory of perturbations to equilibrium states and to non-equilibrium steady states, and has in principle similar range of applicability and limitations. In order to connect the equilibrium and the non equilibrium steady state case, we show how to rewrite the classical response theory by Kubo so that response functions formally identical to those proposed by Ruelle, apart from the measure involved in the phase space integration, are obtained. These results, taking into account the chaotic hypothesis by Gallavotti and Cohen, might be relevant in several fields, including climate research. In particular, whereas the fluctuation-dissipation theorem does not work for non-equilibrium systems, because of the non-equivalence between internal and external

  20. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium metal-ceramic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Y.; Merkle, K.L.

    1991-12-31

    Metal-ceramic interfaces in thermodynamic equilibrium (Au/ZrO{sub 2}) and non-equilibrium (Au/MgO) have been studied by TEM and HREM. In the Au/ZrO{sub 2} system, ZrO{sub 2} precipitates formed by internal oxidation of a 7%Zr-Au alloy show a cubic ZrO{sub 2} phase. It appears that formation of the cubic ZrO{sub 2} is facilitated by alignment with the Au matrix. Most of the ZrO{sub 2} precipitates have a perfect cube-on-cube orientation relationship with the Au matrix. The large number of interfacial steps observed in a short-time annealing experiment indicate that the precipitates are formed by the ledge growth mechanism. The lowest interfacial energy is indicated by the dominance of closed-packed [111] Au/ZrO{sub 2} interfaces. In the Au/MgO system, composite films with small MgO smoke particles embedded in a Au matrix were prepared by a thin film technique. HREM observations show that most of the Au/MgO interfaces have a strong tendency to maintain a dense lattice structure across the interfaces irrespective of whether the interfaces are incoherent of semi-coherent. This indicates that there may be relatively strong bond between MgO and Au.

  1. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium metal-ceramic interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Y.; Merkle, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    Metal-ceramic interfaces in thermodynamic equilibrium (Au/ZrO{sub 2}) and non-equilibrium (Au/MgO) have been studied by TEM and HREM. In the Au/ZrO{sub 2} system, ZrO{sub 2} precipitates formed by internal oxidation of a 7%Zr-Au alloy show a cubic ZrO{sub 2} phase. It appears that formation of the cubic ZrO{sub 2} is facilitated by alignment with the Au matrix. Most of the ZrO{sub 2} precipitates have a perfect cube-on-cube orientation relationship with the Au matrix. The large number of interfacial steps observed in a short-time annealing experiment indicate that the precipitates are formed by the ledge growth mechanism. The lowest interfacial energy is indicated by the dominance of closed-packed (111) Au/ZrO{sub 2} interfaces. In the Au/MgO system, composite films with small MgO smoke particles embedded in a Au matrix were prepared by a thin film technique. HREM observations show that most of the Au/MgO interfaces have a strong tendency to maintain a dense lattice structure across the interfaces irrespective of whether the interfaces are incoherent of semi-coherent. This indicates that there may be relatively strong bond between MgO and Au.

  2. Open problems in non-equilibrium physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kusnezov, D.

    1997-09-22

    The report contains viewgraphs on the following: approaches to non-equilibrium statistical mechanics; classical and quantum processes in chaotic environments; classical fields in non-equilibrium situations: real time dynamics at finite temperature; and phase transitions in non-equilibrium conditions.

  3. An oligomeric equilibrium intermediate as the precursory nucleus of globular and fibrillar supramacromolecular assemblies in a PDZ domain.

    PubMed

    Murciano-Calles, Javier; Cobos, Eva S; Mateo, Pedro L; Camara-Artigas, Ana; Martinez, Jose C

    2010-07-07

    The equilibrium unfolding at neutral pH of the third PDZ domain of PSD95, as followed by DSC, is characterized by the presence of an equilibrium intermediate with clear signs of oligomerization. DLS and SEC measurements indicate that at 60-70 degrees C small oligomers populate, showing a typical beta-sheet far-UV CD spectrum. These intermediate species lead to the formation of rodlike particulates of approximately 12 nm, which remain in solution after 2 weeks incubation and grow until they adopt annular/spherical shapes of approximately 50 nm and protofibrils, which are subsequently fully transformed into fibrils. The fibrils can also disaggregate after the addition of 1:1 buffer dilution followed by cooling to room temperature, thus returning to the initial monomeric state. Growth kinetics, as shown by ThT and ANS fluorescence, show that the organization of the different supramacromolecular structures comes from a common nucleation unit, the small oligomers, which organize themselves before reaching the incubation temperature of 60 degrees C. Our experiments point toward the existence of a well-defined reversible, stepwise, and downhill organization of the processes involved in the association-dissociation of the intermediate. We estimate the enthalpy change accompanying the association-dissociation equilibria to be 130 kJ x mol(-1). Furthermore, the coalescence under essentially reversible conditions of different kinds of supramacromolecular assemblies renders this protein system highly interesting for biophysical studies aimed at our further understanding of amyloid pathological conditions.

  4. Princeton spectral equilibrium code: PSEC

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, K.M.; Jardin, S.C.

    1984-03-01

    A fast computer code has been developed to calculate free-boundary solutions to the plasma equilibrium equation that are consistent with the currents in external coils and conductors. The free-boundary formulation is based on the minimization of a mean-square error epsilon while the fixed-boundary solution is based on a variational principle and spectral representation of the coordinates x(psi,theta) and z(psi,theta). Specific calculations using the Columbia University Torus II, the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) geometries are performed.

  5. LAPS discretization and solution of plasma equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missanelli, Maria; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Guo, Zehua; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xianzhu

    2011-10-01

    LAPS provides spectral element discretization for solving steady state plasma profiles. Our initial focus is on its implementation for two dimensional open magnetic field equilibria in linear and toroidal geometries. The linear geometry is an axisymmetric magnetic mirror with anisotropic pressure. The toroidal case is a tokamak scrape-off layer plasma. Structured grids are produced by the grid generation package in LAPS. The spectral element discretization uses modal bases over quadrilateral elements. A Newton-Krylov solver implemented with the Portable, Extensible Toolkits for Scientific Computing PETSc is applied to iteratively converge the solution. Care has been taken in the code design to separate the grid generation, spectral element discretization, and (non)linear solver from the user-specified equilibrium equations, so the LAPS infrastructure can be easily used for different applications. Work supported by DOE OFES.

  6. Equilibrium properties of chemically reacting gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The equilibrium energy, enthalpy, entropy, specific heat at constant volume and constant pressure, and the equation of state of the gas are all derived for chemically reacting gas mixtures in terms of the compressibility, the mol fractions, the thermodynamic properties of the pure gas components, and the change in zero point energy due to reaction. Results are illustrated for a simple diatomic dissociation reaction and nitrogen is used as an example. Next, a gas mixture resulting from combined diatomic dissociation and atomic ionization reactions is treated and, again, nitrogen is used as an example. A short discussion is given of the additional complexities involved when precise solutions for high-temperature air are desired, including effects caused by NO produced in shuffle reactions and by other trace species formed from CO2, H2O and Ar found in normal air.

  7. Dynamic Protonation Equilibrium of Solvated Acetic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Wei; Frigato, Tomaso; Straatsma, TP; Helms, Volkhard H.

    2007-04-13

    For the first time, the dynamic protonation equilibrium between an amino acid side chain analogue and bulk water as well as the diffusion properties of the excess proton were successfully reproduced through unbiased computer simulations. During a 50 ns Q-HOP MD simulation, two different regimes of proton transfer were observed. Extended phases of frequent proton swapping between acetic acid and nearby water were separated by phases where the proton freely diffuses in the simulation box until it is captured again by acetic acid. The pKa of acetic acid was calculated around 3.0 based on the relative population of protonated and deprotonated states and the diffusion coefficient of excess proton was computed from the average mean squared displacement in the simulation. Both calculated values agree well with the experimental measurements.

  8. Kinetic theory of plasma equilibrium in an electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbunov, L. M.; Gradov, O. M.; Ziunder, D.; Ramazashvili, R. R.

    1981-04-01

    The present study examines the equilibrium of a direct-current-carrying plasma in an electromagnetic field under the assumption that the particles escaping from the plasma have a Maxwellian distribution. It is shown that an equilibrium state is possible only in the case of a definite relationship between the amplitude of the incident wave and the concentration of escaping particles. Attention is given to spatial variations of the electromagnetic field, and of the plasma density and flow velocity. The application of these effects in microwave devices is discussed.

  9. [Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in genetic epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Hu, Yonghua

    2010-01-01

    Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test is the base of genetic epidemiology. The new methods for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test involve: X chromosome-linked single nucleotide polymorphism Hardy-Weinberg test, inbreeding coefficient (F) test, an incomplete enumeration algorithm for an exact test of Hardy-Weinberg proportions with multiple alleles, and graphical tests for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium based on the ternary plot. It is necessary to conduct Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test in genetic epidemiology studies and adjust the associations as deviation of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium occurs.

  10. The geometry of structural equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Building on a long tradition from Maxwell, Rankine, Klein and others, this paper puts forward a geometrical description of structural equilibrium which contains a procedure for the graphic analysis of stress resultants within general three-dimensional frames. The method is a natural generalization of Rankine’s reciprocal diagrams for three-dimensional trusses. The vertices and edges of dual abstract 4-polytopes are embedded within dual four-dimensional vector spaces, wherein the oriented area of generalized polygons give all six components (axial and shear forces with torsion and bending moments) of the stress resultants. The relevant quantities may be readily calculated using four-dimensional Clifford algebra. As well as giving access to frame analysis and design, the description resolves a number of long-standing problems with the incompleteness of Rankine’s description of three-dimensional trusses. Examples are given of how the procedure may be applied to structures of engineering interest, including an outline of a two-stage procedure for addressing the equilibrium of loaded gridshell rooves.

  11. Are the Concepts of Dynamic Equilibrium and the Thermodynamic Criteria for Spontaneity, Nonspontaneity, and Equilibrium Compatible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverberg, Lee J.; Raff, Lionel M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic spontaneity-equilibrium criteria require that in a single-reaction system, reactions in either the forward or reverse direction at equilibrium be nonspontaneous. Conversely, the concept of dynamic equilibrium holds that forward and reverse reactions both occur at equal rates at equilibrium to the extent allowed by kinetic…

  12. Spondylolisthesis Accompanying Bilateral Pedicle Stress Fracture at Two Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeun Sung; Lee, Won Tae

    2012-01-01

    There has been no report of bilateral pedicle stress fractures involving two vertebrae. The authors describe a unique case of spondylolisthesis accompanying a bilateral pedicle stress fracture involving two vertebrae. De novo development of spondylolisthesis at the L5-S1 vertebrae accompanying a bilateral pedicle stress fracture at L4 and L5 was observed in a 70-year-old woman. The patient's medical history was unremarkable and she did not have any predisposing factors except severe osteoporosis. Interbody fusion with bone cement augmented screw fixation was performed. Surgical treatment resulted in good pain management and improved functional recovery. PMID:22949973

  13. The use of Bayesian inversion to resolve plasma equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Hole, M. J.; Nessi, G. von; Pretty, D.; Howard, J.; Blackwell, B.; Svensson, J.; Appel, L. C.

    2010-10-15

    Recently, Bayesian probability theory has been used at a number of experiments to fold uncertainties and interdependencies in the diagnostic data and forward models, together with prior knowledge of the state of the plasma, to increase accuracy of inferred physics variables. A new probabilistic framework, MINERVA, based on Bayesian graphical models, has been used at JET and W7-AS to yield predictions of internal magnetic structure. A feature of the framework is the Bayesian inversion for poloidal magnetic flux without the need for an explicit equilibrium assumption. Building on this, we discuss results from a new project to develop Bayesian inversion tools that aim to (1) distinguish between competing equilibrium theories, which capture different physics, using the MAST spherical tokamak, and (2) test the predictions of MHD theory, particularly mode structure, using the H-1 Heliac. Specifically, we report on correction of the motional Stark effect, pickup coils, flux-loop constrained Bayesian inferred equilibrium for varying toroidal flux.

  14. The use of bayesian inversion to resolve plasma equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Hole, M J; von Nessi, G; Pretty, D; Howard, J; Blackwell, B; Svensson, J; Appel, L C

    2010-10-01

    Recently, bayesian probability theory has been used at a number of experiments to fold uncertainties and interdependencies in the diagnostic data and forward models, together with prior knowledge of the state of the plasma, to increase accuracy of inferred physics variables. A new probabilistic framework, MINERVA, based on bayesian graphical models, has been used at JET and W7-AS to yield predictions of internal magnetic structure. A feature of the framework is the bayesian inversion for poloidal magnetic flux without the need for an explicit equilibrium assumption. Building on this, we discuss results from a new project to develop bayesian inversion tools that aim to (1) distinguish between competing equilibrium theories, which capture different physics, using the MAST spherical tokamak, and (2) test the predictions of MHD theory, particularly mode structure, using the H-1 Heliac. Specifically, we report on correction of the motional Stark effect, pickup coils, flux-loop constrained bayesian inferred equilibrium for varying toroidal flux.

  15. Detection of Non-Equilibrium Fluctuations in Active Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacanu, Alexandru; Broedersz, Chase; Gladrow, Jannes; Mackintosh, Fred; Schmidt, Christoph; Fakhri, Nikta

    Active force generation at the molecular scale in cells can result in stochastic non-equilibrium dynamics on mesoscpopic scales. Molecular motors such as myosin can drive steady-state stress fluctuations in cytoskeletal networks. Here, we present a non-invasive technique to probe non-equilibrium fluctuations in an active gel using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNTs are semiflexible polymers with intrinsic fluorescence in the near infrared. Both thermal and active motor-induced forces in the network induce transverse fluctuations of SWNTs. We demonstrate that active driven shape fluctuations of the SWNTs exhibit dynamics that reflect the non-equilibrium activity, in particular the emergence of correlations between the bending modes. We discuss the observation of breaking of detailed balance in this configurational space of the SWNT probes. Supported by National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Student Fellowship (NDSEG).

  16. Spectral Quasi-Equilibrium Manifold for Chemical Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kooshkbaghi, Mahdi; Frouzakis, Christos E; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Karlin, Iliya V

    2016-05-26

    The Spectral Quasi-Equilibrium Manifold (SQEM) method is a model reduction technique for chemical kinetics based on entropy maximization under constraints built by the slowest eigenvectors at equilibrium. The method is revisited here and discussed and validated through the Michaelis-Menten kinetic scheme, and the quality of the reduction is related to the temporal evolution and the gap between eigenvalues. SQEM is then applied to detailed reaction mechanisms for the homogeneous combustion of hydrogen, syngas, and methane mixtures with air in adiabatic constant pressure reactors. The system states computed using SQEM are compared with those obtained by direct integration of the detailed mechanism, and good agreement between the reduced and the detailed descriptions is demonstrated. The SQEM reduced model of hydrogen/air combustion is also compared with another similar technique, the Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium (RCCE). For the same number of representative variables, SQEM is found to provide a more accurate description.

  17. Temperature lapse rates at restricted thermodynamic equilibrium. Part II: Saturated air and further discussions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björnbom, Pehr

    2016-03-01

    In the first part of this work equilibrium temperature profiles in fluid columns with ideal gas or ideal liquid were obtained by numerically minimizing the column energy at constant entropy, equivalent to maximizing column entropy at constant energy. A minimum in internal plus potential energy for an isothermal temperature profile was obtained in line with Gibbs' classical equilibrium criterion. However, a minimum in internal energy alone for adiabatic temperature profiles was also obtained. This led to a hypothesis that the adiabatic lapse rate corresponds to a restricted equilibrium state, a type of state in fact discussed already by Gibbs. In this paper similar numerical results for a fluid column with saturated air suggest that also the saturated adiabatic lapse rate corresponds to a restricted equilibrium state. The proposed hypothesis is further discussed and amended based on the previous and the present numerical results and a theoretical analysis based on Gibbs' equilibrium theory.

  18. Relaxation to equilibrium of the expectation values in macroscopic quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Monnai, Takaaki

    2011-07-01

    A quantum mechanical explanation of the relaxation to equilibrium is shown for macroscopic systems for nonintegrable cases and numerically verified. The macroscopic system is initially in an equilibrium state, subsequently externally perturbed during a finite time, and then isolated for a sufficiently long time. We show a quantitative explanation that the initial microcanonical state typically reaches a state whose expectation values are well approximated by the average over another microcanonical ensemble.

  19. Thermodynamic Equilibrium in the Origin of Organic Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayhoff, M. O.; Eck, R. V.; Lippincott, E. R.; Pratt, Y. T.

    1966-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental support is presented for the hypothesis that organic compounds occurring in carbonaceous chondrites may have formed under equilibrium or near equilibrium conditions. The equilibrium distributions of organic compounds at temperature between 300 and 1000 K and pressures of 10(exp 16) to 50 atmospheres for the C-H-O system have been computed. At high temperatures and low pressures aromatic compounds may form even in the presence of excess hydrogen. Equilibrium concentrations of numerous compounds possible at 1000 K when N, S, and C1 are added to the system have also been determined. A limited equilibrium method is employed in which those few compounds which form with most difficulty are excluded from the computations. This approach is shown to be useful in the interpretation of certain experimental data. In preliminary experiments it has been found that gases, converted to the plasma state by high energy radio frequency discharge, yield product mixtures which are in qualitative agreement with those predicted.

  20. Adaptive Equilibrium Regulation: A Balancing Act in Two Timescales.

    PubMed

    Boker, Steven M

    2015-03-01

    An equilibrium involves a balancing of forces. Just as one maintains upright posture in standing or walking, many self-regulatory and interpersonal behaviors can be framed as a balancing act between an ever changing environment and within-person processes. The emerging balance between person and environment, the equilibria, are dynamic and adaptive in response to development and learning. A distinction is made between equilibrium achieved solely due to a short timescale balancing of forces and a longer timescale preferred equilibrium which we define as a state towards which the system slowly adapts. Together, these are developed into a framework that this article calls Adaptive Equilibrium Regulation (ÆR), which separates a regulatory process into two timescales: a faster regulation that automatically balances forces and a slower timescale adaptation process that reconfigures the fast regulation so as to move the system towards its preferred equilibrium when an environmental force persists over the longer timescale. This way of thinking leads to novel models for the interplay between multiple timescales of behavior, learning, and development.

  1. Equilibrium I: Principles. Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). Unit P2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inner London Education Authority (England).

    This unit on the principles of equilibrium is one of 10 first year units produced by the Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). The unit consists of two levels. After a treatment of non-mathematical aspects in level one (the idea of a reversible reaction, characteristics of an equilibrium state, the Le Chatelier's principle),…

  2. Note: Local thermal conductivities from boundary driven non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bresme, F.; Armstrong, J.

    2014-01-07

    We report non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of heat transport in models of molecular fluids. We show that the “local” thermal conductivities obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations agree within numerical accuracy with equilibrium Green-Kubo computations. Our results support the local equilibrium hypothesis for transport properties. We show how to use the local dependence of the thermal gradients to quantify the thermal conductivity of molecular fluids for a wide range of thermodynamic states using a single simulation.

  3. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis accompanying neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kon, Tomoya; Nishijima, Haruo; Haga, Rie; Funamizu, Yukihisa; Ueno, Tatsuya; Arai, Akira; Suzuki, Chieko; Nunomura, Jin-ichi; Baba, Masayuki; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2015-10-15

    We report a case of idiopathic cerebral hypertrophic pachymeningitis accompanying neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. No other identifiable cause of pachymeningitis was detected. Corticosteroid therapy was effective for both diseases. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis is closely related to autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. This case supports the hypothesis that hypertrophic pachymeningitis can be a rare comorbidity of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

  4. Looking for Meaning. Instructional Manual to Accompany "Pixie".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipman, Matthew; Sharp, Ann Margaret

    Designed to accompany "Pixie," a philosophy reader for students in grades three and four, this instructional manual presents discussion plans, games, philosophical activities, and reasoning exercises so that the concepts in the reader can be readily operationalized in the classroom. The "Pixie" program focuses on abstract reasoning, ambiguity, and…

  5. Teacher's Manual to Accompany "How to Get a Job."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, John D.

    Prepared for teachers of mentally handicapped students, this teacher's guide accompanies the student booklet, "How to Get A Job," and contains suggestions for learning activities and vocabulary development for each subdivision of all four major units in the student booklet: choosing the right kind of work, looking for the job, going on an…

  6. The Global Education Practicum: Perspectives from Accompanying Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Catherine; Cacciattolo, Marcelle; Kidman, Gillian

    2017-01-01

    The benefits of international education experiences for students are well documented. The effect on the individual of international experiences has been researched and theorised by authors for at least the last 20 years. In this paper the experiences of three academics who accompanied pre-service teachers on a 3 week international practicum are…

  7. 9 CFR 93.208 - Articles accompanying poultry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Articles accompanying poultry. 93.208... AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS;...

  8. 9 CFR 93.208 - Articles accompanying poultry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Articles accompanying poultry. 93.208... AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS;...

  9. 9 CFR 93.208 - Articles accompanying poultry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Articles accompanying poultry. 93.208... AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS;...

  10. 9 CFR 93.208 - Articles accompanying poultry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Articles accompanying poultry. 93.208... AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS;...

  11. 9 CFR 93.208 - Articles accompanying poultry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Articles accompanying poultry. 93.208... AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS;...

  12. 9 CFR 93.314 - Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment. 93.314 Section 93.314 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND...

  13. 9 CFR 93.314 - Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment. 93.314 Section 93.314 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND...

  14. 9 CFR 93.314 - Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Horses, certification, and... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.314 Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment. (a) Horses offered for importation from any part of the world...

  15. 9 CFR 93.314 - Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Horses, certification, and... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.314 Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment. (a) Horses offered for importation from any part of the world...

  16. Hereditary nodular heterotopia accompanied by mega cisterna magna.

    PubMed

    Oda, T; Nagai, Y; Fujimoto, S; Sobajima, H; Kobayashi, M; Togari, H; Wada, Y

    1993-08-15

    This is the first report of hereditary nodular heterotopia accompanied by mega cisterna magna. Magnetic resonance imaging documented multiple bilateral subependymal nodules, which were isointense to gray matter. This disease entity is considered a dominant trait, since the mother and two daughters, half-sisters, were affected.

  17. 16 CFR 1500.125 - Labeling requirements for accompanying literature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Labeling requirements for accompanying literature. 1500.125 Section 1500.125 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL... includes or bears any directions for use (by printed word, picture, design, or combination thereof),...

  18. Notes to Accompany the BBC Television Series: Tele-France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Terry; Kuhn, Michel

    These notes are designed to accompany a series of 10 British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) television programs intended to give persons already familiar with French, an insight into aspects of contemporary Francophone societies. The programs revolve around various themes: (1) numbers and letters; (2) words and meanings; (3) eating patterns; (4)…

  19. 9 CFR 93.314 - Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... inspected on the premises of origin and found free of evidence of communicable disease and, insofar as can... region of origin, or if exported from Mexico, shall be accompanied either by such a certificate or by a..., vesicular stomatitis, or equine infectious anemia has occurred on the premises of origin or on...

  20. 31 CFR 545.507 - Accompanied baggage authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accompanied baggage authorized. 545.507 Section 545.507 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued... that are necessary for personal use incident to travel, that are not intended for any other person...

  1. Non-equilibrium origin of high electrical conductivity in gallium zinc oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Zakutayev, Andriy Ginley, David S.; Lany, Stephan; Perry, Nicola H.; Mason, Thomas O.

    2013-12-02

    Non-equilibrium state defines physical properties of materials in many technologies, including architectural, metallic, and semiconducting amorphous glasses. In contrast, crystalline electronic and energy materials, such as transparent conductive oxides (TCO), are conventionally thought to be in equilibrium. Here, we demonstrate that high electrical conductivity of crystalline Ga-doped ZnO TCO thin films occurs by virtue of metastable state of their defects. These results imply that such defect metastability may be important in other functional oxides. This finding emphasizes the need to understand and control non-equilibrium states of materials, in particular, their metastable defects, for the design of novel functional materials.

  2. Nanomechanics Model for Static Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunghoon

    2002-09-01

    This study presented a computational technique to model and simulate atomistic behavior of materials under static loads, Interatomic potential energy was used to maintain equilibrium among atoms under static loads and constraints, In addition, the atomistic model was coupled with the finite element analysis model so that more flexible loads and constraints could be applied to the atomistic model A multi-scale technique was also presented for some single wall nanotubes of both zigzag and armchair and then their effective stiffness were estimated Those designed nanotubes are woven into fabric composites, which can be used in various military applications including body armored, vehicles, and infantry transportation vehicles because advanced nano- composites could be much lighter and stronger than current ones, Some example problems were presented to illustrate the developed technique for the nano-composites and SWNTs, The proposed technique for nanomechanics can be used for design and analysis of materials at the atomic or molecular level,

  3. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mina; Tománek, David

    2010-11-17

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  4. Equilibrium structure of ferrofluid aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Mina; Tomanek, David

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium structure of large but finite aggregates of magnetic dipoles, representing a colloidal suspension of magnetite particles in a ferrofluid. With increasing system size, the structural motif evolves from chains and rings to multi-chain and multi-ring assemblies. Very large systems form single- and multi-wall coils, tubes and scrolls. These structural changes result from a competition between various energy terms, which can be approximated analytically within a continuum model. We also study the effect of external parameters such as magnetic field on the relative stability of these structures. Our results may give insight into experimental data obtained during solidification of ferrofluid aggregates at temperatures where thermal fluctuations become negligible in comparison to inter-particle interactions. These data may also help to experimentally control the aggregation of magnetic particles.

  5. Effects of ROS and RNS in non-equilibrium plasma enhanced oxidizing and nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datsyuk, Vitaly; Izmailov, Igor; Naumov, Vadym; Khomich, Vladimir; Tsiolko, Vyacheslav

    2016-09-01

    Plasma enhanced oxidizing and nitriding processes are of great interest for physics and applications. However, despite all advances in plasma technology, mechanisms of non-equilibrium plasma chemistry are not quite clear, particularly concerning reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in metastable states. We tried to study this matter more detail. Experiments were done in a low temperature magnetron with a non-self-sustained glow discharge in oxygen/nitrogen/argon mixtures, employing electrical and optical diagnostics. Measurements showed that plasma processing is accompanied by the formation of electronically excited particles ROS/RNS. Computer modeling by using 0D-kinetic and 1D-fluid models including ionization, excitation, dissociation-recombination, vibrational relaxation, collisional quenching and radiation revealed the most probable mechanisms of plasma-chemical transformations. Effects of metastables of singlet oxygen O2*(a,b)and nitrogen N2*(A)as well as small but important radicals O*(1 D), N*(2 D) were also examined. Our study confirms the role of ROS/RNS in plasma kinetics and indicates the way toward more efficient oxygen and nitrogen plasma processing.

  6. No smile like another: adult age differences in identifying emotions that accompany smiles

    PubMed Central

    Riediger, Michaela; Studtmann, Markus; Westphal, Andrea; Rauers, Antje; Weber, Hannelore

    2014-01-01

    People smile in various emotional contexts, for example, when they are amused or angry or simply being polite. We investigated whether younger and older adults differ in how well they are able to identify the emotional experiences accompanying smile expressions, and whether the age of the smiling person plays a role in this respect. With this aim, we produced 80 video episodes of three types of smile expressions: positive-affect smiles had been spontaneously displayed by target persons as they were watching amusing film clips and cartoons. Negative-affect smiles had been displayed spontaneously by target persons during an interaction in which they were being unfairly accused. Affectively neutral smiles were posed upon request. Differences in the accompanying emotional experiences were validated by target persons' self-reports. These smile videos served as experimental stimuli in two studies with younger and older adult participants. In Study 1, older participants were less likely to attribute positive emotions to smiles, and more likely to assume that a smile was posed. Furthermore, younger participants were more accurate than older adults at identifying emotional experiences accompanying smiles. In Study 2, both younger and older participants attributed positive emotions more frequently to smiles shown by older as compared to younger target persons, but older participants did so less frequently than younger participants. Again, younger participants were more accurate than older participants in identifying emotional experiences accompanying smiles, but this effect was attenuated for older target persons. Older participants could better identify the emotional state accompanying smiles shown by older than by younger target persons. Taken together, these findings indicate that there is an age-related decline in the ability to decipher the emotional meaning of smiles presented without context, which, however, is attenuated when the smiling person is also an older adult

  7. No smile like another: adult age differences in identifying emotions that accompany smiles.

    PubMed

    Riediger, Michaela; Studtmann, Markus; Westphal, Andrea; Rauers, Antje; Weber, Hannelore

    2014-01-01

    People smile in various emotional contexts, for example, when they are amused or angry or simply being polite. We investigated whether younger and older adults differ in how well they are able to identify the emotional experiences accompanying smile expressions, and whether the age of the smiling person plays a role in this respect. With this aim, we produced 80 video episodes of three types of smile expressions: positive-affect smiles had been spontaneously displayed by target persons as they were watching amusing film clips and cartoons. Negative-affect smiles had been displayed spontaneously by target persons during an interaction in which they were being unfairly accused. Affectively neutral smiles were posed upon request. Differences in the accompanying emotional experiences were validated by target persons' self-reports. These smile videos served as experimental stimuli in two studies with younger and older adult participants. In Study 1, older participants were less likely to attribute positive emotions to smiles, and more likely to assume that a smile was posed. Furthermore, younger participants were more accurate than older adults at identifying emotional experiences accompanying smiles. In Study 2, both younger and older participants attributed positive emotions more frequently to smiles shown by older as compared to younger target persons, but older participants did so less frequently than younger participants. Again, younger participants were more accurate than older participants in identifying emotional experiences accompanying smiles, but this effect was attenuated for older target persons. Older participants could better identify the emotional state accompanying smiles shown by older than by younger target persons. Taken together, these findings indicate that there is an age-related decline in the ability to decipher the emotional meaning of smiles presented without context, which, however, is attenuated when the smiling person is also an older adult.

  8. Nonequilibrium steady-state circulation and heat dissipation functional.

    PubMed

    Qian, H

    2001-08-01

    A nonequilibrium steady-state (NESS), different from an equilibrium, is sustained by circular balance rather than detailed balance. The circular fluxes are driven by energy input and heat dissipation, accompanied by a positive entropy production. Based on a Master equation formalism for NESS, we show the circulation is intimately related to the recently studied Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry of heat dissipation functional, which in turn suggests a Boltzmann's formulalike relation between rate constants and energy in NESS. Expanding this unifying view on NESS to diffusion is discussed.

  9. A Progression of Static Equilibrium Laboratory Exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzner, Mickey; Kutzner, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    Although simple architectural structures like bridges, catwalks, cantilevers, and Stonehenge have been integral in human societies for millennia, as have levers and other simple tools, modern students of introductory physics continue to grapple with Newton's conditions for static equilibrium. As formulated in typical introductory physics textbooks, these two conditions appear as ΣF=0(1) and Στ=0,(2) where each torque τ is defined as the cross product between the lever arm vector r and the corresponding applied force F, τ =r×F,(3) having magnitude, τ =Frsinθ.(4) The angle θ here is between the two vectors F and r. In Eq. (1), upward (downward) forces are considered positive (negative). In Eq. (2), counterclockwise (clockwise) torques are considered positive (negative). Equation (1) holds that the vector sum of the external forces acting on an object must be zero to prevent linear accelerations; Eq. (2) states that the vector sum of torques due to external forces about any axis must be zero to prevent angular accelerations. In our view these conditions can be problematic for students because a) the equations contain the unfamiliar summation notation Σ, b) students are uncertain of the role of torques in causing rotations, and c) it is not clear why the sum of torques is zero regardless of the choice of axis. Gianino5 describes an experiment using MBL and a force sensor to convey the meaning of torque as applied to a rigid-body lever system without exploring quantitative aspects of the conditions for static equilibrium.

  10. Collisional Ionization Equilibrium for Optically Thin Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryans, P.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Savin, D. W.; Badnell, N. R.; Gorczyca, T. W.; Laming, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    Reliably interpreting spectra from electron-ionized cosmic plasmas requires accurate ionization balance calculations for the plasma in question. However, much of the atomic data needed for these calculations have not been generated using modern theoretical methods and their reliability are often highly suspect. We have utilized state-of-the-art calculations of dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for the hydrogenic through Na-like ions of all elements from He to Zn. We have also utilized state-of-the-art radiative recombination (RR) rate coefficient calculations for the bare through Na-like ions of all elements from H to Zn. Using our data and the recommended electron impact ionization data of Mazzotta et al. (1998), we have calculated improved collisional ionization equilibrium calculations. We compare our calculated fractional ionic abundances using these data with those presented by Mazzotta et al. (1998) for all elements from H to Ni, and with the fractional abundances derived from the modern DR and RR calculations of Gu (2003a,b, 2004) for Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe, and Ni.

  11. Equilibrium sampling by reweighting nonequilibrium simulation trajectories.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Based on equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space of complex systems, which are separated into some metastable regions by high free energy barriers. Nonequilibrium simulations could enhance transitions among these metastable regions and then be applied to sample equilibrium distributions in complex systems, since the associated nonequilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE). Here we present such a systematical method, named reweighted nonequilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to efficiently sample equilibrium conformations. The RNED is a combination of the JE and our previous reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method. The original JE reproduces equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium trajectories but requires that the initial distribution of these trajectories is equilibrium. The RED reweights many equilibrium trajectories from an arbitrary initial distribution to get the equilibrium distribution, whereas the RNED has both advantages of the two methods, reproducing equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium simulation trajectories with an arbitrary initial conformational distribution. We illustrated the application of the RNED in a toy model and in a Lennard-Jones fluid to detect its liquid-solid phase coexistence. The results indicate that the RNED sufficiently extends the application of both the original JE and the RED in equilibrium sampling of complex systems.

  12. Equilibrium sampling by reweighting nonequilibrium simulation trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Based on equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space of complex systems, which are separated into some metastable regions by high free energy barriers. Nonequilibrium simulations could enhance transitions among these metastable regions and then be applied to sample equilibrium distributions in complex systems, since the associated nonequilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE). Here we present such a systematical method, named reweighted nonequilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to efficiently sample equilibrium conformations. The RNED is a combination of the JE and our previous reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method. The original JE reproduces equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium trajectories but requires that the initial distribution of these trajectories is equilibrium. The RED reweights many equilibrium trajectories from an arbitrary initial distribution to get the equilibrium distribution, whereas the RNED has both advantages of the two methods, reproducing equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium simulation trajectories with an arbitrary initial conformational distribution. We illustrated the application of the RNED in a toy model and in a Lennard-Jones fluid to detect its liquid-solid phase coexistence. The results indicate that the RNED sufficiently extends the application of both the original JE and the RED in equilibrium sampling of complex systems.

  13. Equilibrium coexistence of three amphiboles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, P.; Jaffe, H.W.; Klein, C.; Ross, M.

    1969-01-01

    Electron probe and wet chemical analyses of amphibole pairs from the sillimanite zone of central Massachusetts and adjacent New Hampshire indicated that for a particular metamorphic grade there should be a restricted composition range in which three amphiboles can coexist stably. An unequivocal example of such an equilibrium three amphibole rock has been found in the sillimanite-orthoclase zone. It contains a colorless primitive clinoamphibole, space group P21/m, optically and chemically like cummingtonite with blue-green hornblende exsolution lamellae on (100) and (-101) of the host; blue-green hornblende, space group C2/m, with primitive cummingtonite exsolution lamellae on (100) and (-101) of the host; and pale pinkish tan anthophyllite, space group Pnma, that is free of visible exsolution lamellae but is a submicroscopic intergrowth of two orthorhombic amphiboles. Mutual contacts and coarse, oriented intergrowths of two and three host amphiboles indicate the three grew as an equilibrium assemblage prior to exsolution. Electron probe analyses at mutual three-amphibole contacts showed little variation in the composition of each amphibole. Analyses believed to represent most closely the primary amphibole compositions gave atomic proportions on the basis of 23 oxygens per formula unit as follows: for primitive cummingtonite (Na0.02Ca0.21- Mn0.06Fe2+2.28Mg4.12Al0.28) (Al0.17Si7.83), for hornblende (Na0.35Ca1.56Mn0.02Fe1.71Mg2.85Al0.92) (Al1.37Si6.63), and for anthophyllite (Na0.10Ca0.06Mn0.06Fe2.25Mg4.11Al0.47) (Al0.47Si7.53). The reflections violating C-symmetry, on X-ray single crystal photographs of the primitive cummingtonite, are weak and diffuse, and suggest a partial inversion from a C-centered to a primitive clinoamphibole. Single crystal photographs of the anthophyllite show split reflections indicating it is an intergrowth of about 80% anthophyllite and about 20% gedrite which differ in their b crystallographic dimensions. Split reflections are

  14. Equilibrium transition from centralization to competitive market: Stochastic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Arkin, V.; Slastnikov, A.

    1994-12-31

    The paper deals with modelling changes of economic mechanism. Unlike most of the dynamic equilibrium models, both producers and consumers in our model act under budget restrictions. We associate different principles of budgets forming with different economic mechanisms and state a problem of transition from one economic mechanism to another. We focus on the following two mechanisms. The first one assumes the presence of Central Planning Board ({open_quotes}the State{close_quotes}) and may identify with centralized (state controlled) economy. Under the second mechanism, the role of the State is eliminated and its distributive functions are moved to the Market. In the framework of dynamic equilibrium theory we pro pose a model of gradual transition from economy with centralized budgets regulation to market economy. It is assumed that information about possible change of economic mechanism affects essentially on behavior of agents. Duration of transition period is regarded as a random variable. We study conditions when such transition allows firms to adapt their plans to future markets and guarantees the existence of equilibrium paths. The case of Shock (instantaneous transition), which may bring bankruptcy, jump of prices and deficit, is also discussed.

  15. Orfeo, the Pleiades Accompaniment Program and its Users Thematic Commissioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinel, C.; Grizonnet, M.; Fontannaz, D.; de Boissezon, H.; Giros, A.

    2012-08-01

    ORFEO, the PLEIADES Accompaniment Program, was set up by CNES, the French Space Agency, to prepare, accompany and promote the use and the exploitation of the images acquired by this Very High Resolution optical sensor. It was initiated in 2004 and will last until the end of the first year of the satellite life (launched in December 2011) . The Thematic part of the ORFEO accompaniment program covers a large range of applications, and aims at specifying and validating products and services required by users. An in-depth work of user needs assessments in eight thematic domains (sea and coastline, risks and humanitarian aid, cartography and urban planning, geophysical hazards, hydrology, forestry, agriculture and defence) has given rise to a large number of feasibility studies from 2006 to 2011. The Methodological Part of the ORFEO accompaniment program aims at preparing the use and exploitation of these submetric images. CNES decided to develop Orfeo Toolbox (OTB), an open source library capitalising the methodological know-how as a set of image processing and algorithmic components. Among other, OTB provides a number of heavily documented image processing functionalities such as filtering, feature extraction, segmentation, classification, change detection, 3D extraction, GIS links,.... As a conclusion to the ORFEO program, the PLEIADES Users Thematic Commissioning (UTC) started three months after the satellite launch and will last until mid 2013. It covers a large number of specific interest ORFEO sites, on which PLEIADES images are being intensively acquired and processed. These ORFEO sites have been chosen according to the expectations expressed by the users in terms of their interest for dedicated thematic, their geographic location and their multi-thematic content. This paper presents the ORFEO program achievements (thematic and methodology) and the organisation of the Users Thematic Commissioning (sites, studies). The paper is illustrated with some examples of

  16. ENCEPHALOMYELITIS ACCOMPANIED BY MYELIN DESTRUCTION EXPERIMENTALLY PRODUCED IN MONKEYS

    PubMed Central

    Rivers, Thomas M.; Schwentker, Francis F.

    1935-01-01

    The repeated intramuscular injections of aqueous emulsions and alcohol-ether extracts of sterile normal rabbit brains in some manner produced pathological changes accompanied by myelin destruction in the brains of 7 of 8 monkeys (Macacus rhesus). Eight, control monkeys remained well. Cultures from the involved brains remained sterile, and no transmissible agent was demonstrated by means of intracerebral inoculations of emulsions of bits of the brains into monkeys, rabbits, guinea pigs, and white mice. PMID:19870385

  17. Young drivers' attitudes toward accompanied driving: a new multidimensional measure.

    PubMed

    Taubman-Ben-Ari, Orit

    2010-07-01

    Four studies were conducted in order to develop and validate a multidimensional instrument to assess attitudes toward accompanied driving among young drivers. Study 1 (n=841) focused on developing the Attitudes Toward Accompanied Driving Scale (ATADS), a self-report scale based on five previously conceptualized domains of attitudes. Factor analysis revealed the five hypothesized factors: Tension, Relatedness, Disapproval, Avoidance, and Anxiety. In addition, significant associations were found between these factors and gender, age, and the assessment of reckless driving as risky. Study 2 (n=651) adopted a developmental approach, comparing the attitudes of participants in various stages of licensure. Disapproval and Tension were found to be higher, and Relatedness lower, among participants who had not yet begun driving instruction than among those who were taking driving lessons or had already obtained a license. Study 3 (n=160) revealed associations between the five ATADS factors and perceived driving costs and benefits. In Study 4 (n=193), associations were found between these factors and driver's self-image, with a combination of ATADS factors, self-image, and gender contributing to the explained variance of two outcome variables: driving self-efficacy, and reported frequency of reckless driving. The discussion focuses on the validity and utility of the new measure of young drivers' attitudes toward accompanied driving, stressing its practical implications for road safety.

  18. Real-time implementation of an interactive jazz accompaniment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Nikhil

    Modern computational algorithms and digital signal processing (DSP) are able to combine with human performers without forced or predetermined structure in order to create dynamic and real-time accompaniment systems. With modern computing power and intelligent algorithm layout and design, it is possible to achieve more detailed auditory analysis of live music. Using this information, computer code can follow and predict how a human's musical performance evolves, and use this to react in a musical manner. This project builds a real-time accompaniment system to perform together with live musicians, with a focus on live jazz performance and improvisation. The system utilizes a new polyphonic pitch detector and embeds it in an Ableton Live system - combined with Max for Live - to perform elements of audio analysis, generation, and triggering. The system also relies on tension curves and information rate calculations from the Creative Artificially Intuitive and Reasoning Agent (CAIRA) system to help understand and predict human improvisation. These metrics are vital to the core system and allow for extrapolated audio analysis. The system is able to react dynamically to a human performer, and can successfully accompany the human as an entire rhythm section.

  19. Predicted torque equilibrium attitude utilization for Space Station attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Renjith R.; Heck, Michael L.; Robertson, Brent P.

    1990-01-01

    An approximate knowledge of the torque equilibrium attitude (TEA) is shown to improve the performance of a control moment gyroscope (CMG) momentum management/attitude control law for Space Station Freedom. The linearized equations of motion are used in conjunction with a state transformation to obtain a control law which uses full state feedback and the predicted TEA to minimize both attitude excursions and CMG peak and secular momentum. The TEA can be computationally determined either by observing the steady state attitude of a 'controlled' spacecraft using arbitrary initial attitude, or by simulating a fixed attitude spacecraft flying in desired orbit subject to realistic environmental disturbance models.

  20. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  1. Solute transport with multiple equilibrium-controlled or kinetically controlled chemical reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedly, John C.; Rubin, Jacob

    1992-01-01

    A new approach is applied to the problem of modeling solute transport accompanied by many chemical reactions. The approach, based on concepts of the concentration space and its stoichiometric subspaces, uses elements of the subspaces as primary dependent variables. It is shown that the resulting model equations are compact in form, isolate the chemical reaction expressions from flow expressions, and can be used for either equilibrium or kinetically controlled reactions. The implications of the results on numerical algorithms for solving the equations are discussed. The application of the theory is illustrated throughout with examples involving a simple but broadly representative set of reactions previously considered in the literature. Numerical results are presented for four interconnected reactions: a homogeneous complexation reaction, two sorption reactions, and a dissolution/precipitation reaction. Three cases are considered: (1) four kinetically controlled reactions, (2) four equilibrium-controlled reactions, and (3) a system with two kinetically controlled reactions and two equilibrium-controlled reactions.

  2. Colloquium: Homochirality: Symmetry breaking in systems driven far from equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yukio; Hyuga, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    Subsequent to the discovery of chirality of organic molecules by Pasteur, living organisms have been found to utilize biomolecules of only one handedness. The origin of this homochirality in life still remains unknown. It is believed that homochirality is attained in two stages: the initial creation of a chirality bias and its subsequent amplification to pure chirality. In the last two decades, two novel experiments have established the second stage in different fields: Soai and co-workers achieved the amplification of enantiomeric excess in the production of chiral organic molecules, and Viedma obtained homochirality in the solution growth of sodium chlorate crystals. These experiments are explained by a theory with a nonlinear evolution equation for the chiral order parameter; nonlinear processes in reactions or in crystal growth induce enantiomeric excess amplification, and the recycling of achiral elements ensures homochirality. Recycling drives the system to a state far from equilibrium with a free energy higher than that of the equilibrium state.

  3. Equilibrium thickness of large liquid lenses spreading over another liquid surface.

    PubMed

    Sebilleau, Julien

    2013-10-01

    This article discusses the equilibrium states and more particularly the equilibrium thickness of large lenses of a liquid spread over the surface of a denser liquid. Both liquids are supposed to be nonvolatile and immiscible. Taking into account the effect of intermolecular forces in addition to the sign of the spreading parameters leads to four possible states. The three first are similar to the states of equilibrium of a liquid spread on a solid surface: total wetting where the floating liquid spreads until it reaches an equilibrium thickness on the order of the molecular size, partial wetting where the floating liquid forms a lens of macroscopic thickness in equilibrium with a "dry" bath, and pseudopartial wetting where the floating liquid spreads as a lens of macroscopic thickness in equilibrium with a thin film covering the bath. The last regime, called pseudototal wetting, consists of a macroscopic lens of the floating liquid covered with a thin film of the bath. These four regimes are described through a free-energy minimization, and their equilibrium thicknesses are predicted. A comparison of this model with experimental results available in the literature and dedicated experiments for the pseudototal wetting state are reported.

  4. Non-equilibrium phenomena in disordered colloidal solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Peter

    Colloidal particles are a convenient tool for studying a variety of non-equilibrium phenomena. I will discuss experiments that investigate the aging and non-equilibrium growth of disordered solids. In the first set of experiments, colloidal glasses are rapidly formed to study aging in jammed packings. A colloidal fluid, composed of micron-sized temperature-sensitive pNIPAM particles, is rapidly quenched into a colloidal glass. After the glass is formed, collective rearrangements occur as the glass ages. Particles that undergo irreversible rearrangements, which break nearest-neighbor pairings and allow the glass to relax, are identified. These irreversible rearrangements are accompanied by large clusters of fast moving particles; the number of particles involved in these clusters increases as the glass ages, leading to the slowing of dynamics that is characteristic of aging. In the second set of experiments, we study the role particle shape, and thus, interparticle interaction, plays in the formation of disordered solids with different structural and mechanical properties. Aqueous suspensions of colloidal particles with different shapes evaporate on glass slides. Convective flows during evaporation carry particles from drop center to drop edge, where they accumulate. The resulting particle deposits grow heterogeneously from the edge on the air-water interface. Three distinct growth processes were discovered in the evaporating colloidal suspensions by tuning particle shape-dependent capillary interactions and thus varying the microscopic rules of deposition. Mechanical testing of these particulate deposits reveals that the deposit bending rigidity increases as particles become more anisotropic in shape.

  5. Far-from-equilibrium superconductor in fluctuational regime.

    SciTech Connect

    Petkovic, A.; Chtchelkatchev, N. M.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2011-08-19

    We derive Ginzburg-Landau-type action for a two-dimensional disordered superconductor under far-from-equilibrium conditions in a fluctuational regime. Then, utilizing it, we calculate fluctuation-induced density of states and Maki-Thomson- and Aslamazov-Larkin-type contributions to the in-plane electrical conductivity. We apply our approach to a thin superconducting film sandwiched between a gate and a substrate, which have different temperatures and different electrochemical potentials.

  6. Coupled radiative convective equilibrium simulations with explicit and parameterized convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenegger, Cathy; Stevens, Bjorn

    2016-09-01

    Radiative convective equilibrium has been applied in past studies to various models given its simplicity and analogy to the tropical climate. At convection-permitting resolution, the focus has been on the organization of convection that appears when using fixed sea surface temperature (SST). Here the SST is allowed to freely respond to the surface energy. The goals are to examine and understand the resulting transient behavior, equilibrium state, and perturbations thereof, as well as to compare these results to a simulation integrated with parameterized cloud and convection. Analysis shows that the coupling between the SST and the net surface energy acts to delay the onset of self-aggregation and may prevent it, in our case, for a slab ocean of less than 1 m. This is so because SST gradients tend to oppose the shallow low-level circulation that is associated with the self-aggregation of convection. Furthermore, the occurrence of self-aggregation is found to be necessary for reaching an equilibrium state and avoiding a greenhouse-like climate. In analogy to the present climate, the self-aggregation generates the dry and clear subtropics that allow the system to efficiently cool. In contrast, strong shortwave cloud radiative effects, much stronger than at convection-permitting resolution, prevent the simulation with parameterized cloud and convection to fall into a greenhouse state. The convection-permitting simulations also suggest that cloud feedbacks, as arising when perturbing the equilibrium state, may be very different, and in our case less negative, than what emerges from general circulation models.

  7. Zeroth Law, Entropy, Equilibrium, and All That

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2008-01-01

    The place of the zeroth law in the teaching of thermodynamics is examined in the context of the recent discussion by Gislason and Craig of some problems involving the establishment of thermal equilibrium. The concept of thermal equilibrium is introduced through the zeroth law. The relation between the zeroth law and the second law in the…

  8. Far from Equilibrium: The Gas Pendulum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltzberg, Leonard J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the importance of studying the far-from-equilibrium phenomena in college chemistry. Presents a system using the gas pendulum which displays all of the essential characteristics of dissipative systems. Promotes the use of the gas pendulum as a teaching example of a nonlinear far-from-equilibrium process. (TW)

  9. Equilibrium Tail Distribution Due to Touschek Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Nash,B.; Krinsky, S.

    2009-05-04

    Single large angle Coulomb scattering is referred to as Touschek scattering. In addition to causing particle loss when the scattered particles are outside the momentum aperture, the process also results in a non-Gaussian tail, which is an equilibrium between the Touschek scattering and radiation damping. Here we present an analytical calculation for this equilibrium distribution.

  10. Implementing an Equilibrium Law Teaching Sequence for Secondary School Students to Learn Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghirardi, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Regis, Alberto; Roletto, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    A didactic sequence is proposed for the teaching of chemical equilibrium law. In this approach, we have avoided the kinetic derivation and the thermodynamic justification of the equilibrium constant. The equilibrium constant expression is established empirically by a trial-and-error approach. Additionally, students learn to use the criterion of…

  11. Conformational stability of dimeric proteins: quantitative studies by equilibrium denaturation.

    PubMed Central

    Neet, K. E.; Timm, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    The conformational stability of dimeric globular proteins can be measured by equilibrium denaturation studies in solvents such as guanidine hydrochloride or urea. Many dimeric proteins denature with a 2-state equilibrium transition, whereas others have stable intermediates in the process. For those proteins showing a single transition of native dimer to denatured monomer, the conformational stabilities, delta Gu (H2O), range from 10 to 27 kcal/mol, which is significantly greater than the conformational stability found for monomeric proteins. The relative contribution of quaternary interactions to the overall stability of the dimer can be estimated by comparing delta Gu (H2O) from equilibrium denaturation studies to the free energy associated with simple dissociation in the absence of denaturant. In many cases the large stabilization energy of dimers is primarily due to the intersubunit interactions and thus gives a rationale for the formation of oligomers. The magnitude of the conformational stability is related to the size of the polypeptide in the subunit and depends upon the type of structure in the subunit interface. The practical use, interpretation, and utility of estimation of conformational stability of dimers by equilibrium denaturation methods are discussed. PMID:7756976

  12. Non-Equilibrium Turbulence and Two-Equation Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Two-equation turbulence models are analyzed from the perspective of spectral closure theories. Kolmogorov theory provides useful information for models, but it is limited to equilibrium conditions in which the energy spectrum has relaxed to a steady state consistent with the forcing at large scales; it does not describe transient evolution between such states. Transient evolution is necessarily through nonequilibrium states, which can only be found from a theory of turbulence evolution, such as one provided by a spectral closure. When the departure from equilibrium is small, perturbation theory can be used to approximate the evolution by a two-equation model. The perturbation theory also gives explicit conditions under which this model can be valid, and when it will fail. Implications of the non-equilibrium corrections for the classic Tennekes-Lumley balance in the dissipation rate equation are drawn: it is possible to establish both the cancellation of the leading order Re1/2 divergent contributions to vortex stretching and enstrophy destruction, and the existence of a nonzero difference which is finite in the limit of infinite Reynolds number.

  13. Formation of large micellar aggregates before equilibrium in diluted solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Moraes, J. N. B.; Figueiredo, W.

    2013-06-01

    We study the formation of premicelles for different values of the concentration of amphiphile molecules in water. Our model consists of a square lattice with water molecules occupying one cell of the lattice while the amphiphilic molecules, represented by chains of five interconnected sites, occupy five cells of the lattice. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in the NVT ensemble, for a fixed temperature and different concentration of amphiphiles, ranging from below to above the critical micelle concentration. We start our simulations from a monomeric state and follow in time all the aggregates sizes until the equilibrium state is reached. We pay particular attention to two aggregate sizes, one related to the minimum and the other to the maximum of the aggregate-size distribution curve obtained at equilibrium. We show that these aggregates evolve in time exhibiting a maximum concentration well before the equilibrium state, revealing the formation of premicelles. The times to reach these maximum concentrations decrease exponentially with the total concentration of the system.

  14. A critical appraisal of Markov state models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütte, Ch.; Sarich, M.

    2015-09-01

    Markov State Modelling as a concept for a coarse grained description of the essential kinetics of a molecular system in equilibrium has gained a lot of attention recently. The last 10 years have seen an ever increasing publication activity on how to construct Markov State Models (MSMs) for very different molecular systems ranging from peptides to proteins, from RNA to DNA, and via molecular sensors to molecular aggregation. Simultaneously the accompanying theory behind MSM building and approximation quality has been developed well beyond the concepts and ideas used in practical applications. This article reviews the main theoretical results, provides links to crucial new developments, outlines the full power of MSM building today, and discusses the essential limitations still to overcome.

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Relativistic Figures of Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mars, M.

    2009-08-01

    qualitatively different behaviours. The presentation of the main ideas behind this method is very clear and accessible even to the non-expert. The book then is devoted to presenting both qualitative and quantitative results for a number of models with different equations of state. The case treated more in depth is the constant density case, but results for polytropic equations of state as well as a degenerate ideal gas of neutrons and strange quark matter are also presented. The emphasis is put on the exploration of the parameter space for a fixed equation of state. This is done by studying the various limiting cases involved, namely the non-rotating limit, the Newtonian limit, the mass-shedding limit, the infinite central pressure limit, the transition from one rotating body to several bodies, the black hole limit and the disc limit. The emerging picture in the constant density case is a division of the parameter space into an infinite number of classes, all connected through the Maclaurin spheroids and approaching the limiting case of a Maclaurin disc of dust, which in turn is the Newtonian limit of the relativistic disc of dust. Although the phase space of solutions differs for other equations of state, the main feature of having classes of solutions remains. Despite the inherent complexity and variety of possible behaviours, the authors manage to describe the results in a very lucid manner, and the resulting picture emerges very clearly. The presentation also includes many well-chosen figures, which clarify greatly the understanding of the results and makes this chapter very informative indeed. Furthermore, the book has a related webpage (http://www.tpi.uni-jena.de/gravity/relastro/rfe/) where the source codes for calculating various figures of equilibrium are publicly available. Besides considering single fluids, configurations where a central and very compact object is surrounded by a ring of fluid are also treated to some extent. The central object may be a Newtonian

  16. Equilibrium fluctuation relations for voltage coupling in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ilsoo; Warshel, Arieh

    2015-11-01

    A general theoretical framework is developed to account for the effects of an external potential on the energetics of membrane proteins. The framework is based on the free energy relation between two (forward/backward) probability densities, which was recently generalized to non-equilibrium processes, culminating in the work-fluctuation theorem. Starting from the probability densities of the conformational states along the "voltage coupling" reaction coordinate, we investigate several interconnected free energy relations between these two conformational states, considering voltage activation of ion channels. The free energy difference between the two conformational states at zero (depolarization) membrane potential (i.e., known as the chemical component of free energy change in ion channels) is shown to be equivalent to the free energy difference between the two "equilibrium" (resting and activated) conformational states along the one-dimensional voltage couplin reaction coordinate. Furthermore, the requirement that the application of linear response approximation to the free energy functionals of voltage coupling should satisfy the general free energy relations, yields a novel closed-form expression for the gating charge in terms of other basic properties of ion channels. This connection is familiar in statistical mechanics, known as the equilibrium fluctuation-response relation. The theory is illustrated by considering the coupling of a unit charge to the external voltage in the two sites near the surface of membrane, representing the activated and resting states. This is done using a coarse-graining (CG) model of membrane proteins, which includes the membrane, the electrolytes and the electrodes. The CG model yields Marcus-type voltage dependent free energy parabolas for the response of the electrostatic environment (electrolytes etc.) to the transition from the initial to the final configuratinal states, leading to equilibrium free energy difference and free

  17. Immunomodulatory activity accompanying chicken egg yolk immunoglobulin Y.

    PubMed

    Polanowski, A; Zabłocka, A; Sosnowska, A; Janusz, M; Trziszka, T

    2012-12-01

    Immunity transfer from a mother to the newborn does not depend exclusively on immunoglobulins. Peptides, which are characterized by immunoregulatory properties that accompany IgG(2), known as proline-rich polypeptide complex (PRP), have been discovered for the first time in ovine colostrum. In this report we present new data showing that some immunoregulatory peptides associated with the main immunoglobulin class, IgY, are also present in the avian immune system. Cytokine-inducing activity of particular fractions obtained from ovine colostrum, IgG+ (IgG(2) containing PRP), IgG- (IgG(2) free of PRP), and purified PRP, was compared with that of crude egg yolk IgY (IgY+), additionally purified egg yolk IgY (IgY-), and polypeptides accompanying IgY named Yolkin (Y), using an ex vivo model of whole human blood cells. It was shown that both IgG+ fraction and PRP, but not IgG-, stimulated the whole blood cells to release tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β cytokines. Similar experiments performed with hen's egg IgY preparations showed that IgY+ and Y samples showed higher cytokine-inducing activity than samples additionally purified with the use of size exclusion chromatography (IgY-). The IgY+ at a dose of 100 μg was even more active than the positive lipopolysaccharide control. It was also found that Y is able to stimulate macrophage cell line J774.2 to release nitric oxide. The results obtained suggest that IgY, the main chicken immunoglobulin fraction, is accompanied by additional polypeptides and plays a role of a transporter of biologically active substances, which was observed in the case of colostral IgG.

  18. Equilibrium Control Policies for Markov Chains

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The average cost criterion has held great intuitive appeal and has attracted considerable attention. It is widely employed when controlling dynamic systems that evolve stochastically over time by means of formulating an optimization problem to achieve long-term goals efficiently. The average cost criterion is especially appealing when the decision-making process is long compared to other timescales involved, and there is no compelling motivation to select short-term optimization. This paper addresses the problem of controlling a Markov chain so as to minimize the average cost per unit time. Our approach treats the problem as a dual constrained optimization problem. We derive conditions guaranteeing that a saddle point exists for the new dual problem and we show that this saddle point is an equilibrium control policy for each state of the Markov chain. For practical situations with constraints consistent to those we study here, our results imply that recognition of such saddle points may be of value in deriving in real time an optimal control policy.

  19. Non equilibrium studies on FEL facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmand, Marion

    2013-06-01

    The recent development of Free Electron Lasers (FEL), giving ultrafast, high intensity pulses in the X-ray and XUV energy range is opening new opportunities for WDM studies. Development of X-ray diagnostics such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray scattering, has received much attention for the in situ measurement of the structure and physical properties of matter at extreme conditions. Coupled to ultrafast pump - probe schemas, such diagnostics are giving new insights into out-of-equilibrium processes and thus validate current models. We report recent developments to perform few fs time resolved pump - probe experiments, giving access to ultrafast transient WDM states. We also present collective Thomson Scattering with soft x-ray Free Electron Laser radiation (at FLASH) as a method to track the evolution of highly transient warm dense hydrogen with around 100 fs time resolution. In addition, recent experiments at LCLS are suggesting the possibility to perform X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) on FEL facilities to provide simultaneously information on the valence electrons and on the atomic local arrangement within sub-ps time scales.

  20. Persistent Postconcussive Symptoms Are Accompanied by Decreased Functional Brain Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Ingo; Saluja, Rajeet S; Lausberg, Hedda; Kempe, Mathias; Furley, Philip; Berger, Alisa; Chen, Jen-Kai; Ptito, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic methods are considered a major concern in the determination of mild traumatic brain injury. The authors examined brain oxygenation patterns in subjects with severe and minor persistent postconcussive difficulties and a healthy control group during working memory tasks in prefrontal brain regions using functional near-infrared spectroscopy. The results demonstrated decreased working memory performances among concussed subjects with severe postconcussive symptoms that were accompanied by decreased brain oxygenation patterns. An association appears to exist between decreased brain oxygenation, poor performance of working memory tasks, and increased symptom severity scores in subjects suffering from persistent postconcussive symptoms.

  1. Systemic lupus erythematosus accompanying with renal tuberculosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Gao, Liang; Chen, Peng; Bu, Si-Yuan; Cao, De-Hong; Yang, Lu; Wei, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    A 26-year-old woman, with a six-year history of well-controlled systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), complained of urinary frequency and urgency. After failure of commonly-used antibiotic therapy, mycobacterium tuberculosis was cultured from her urine and renal tuberculosis (TB) was diagnosed. However, she underwent right nephrectomy after the combination therapies of prednisone for SLE and anti-tuberculosis treatment for renal TB failed. To our knowledge, SLE accompanying renal TB is rare, and such a rapid deterioration in renal function has never been reported. PMID:26221395

  2. Seckel syndrome accompanied by semilobar holoprosencephaly and arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Sarici, Dilek; Akin, Mustafa Ali; Kara, Ahu; Doganay, Selim; Kurtoglu, Selim

    2012-03-01

    Seckel syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, and its characteristic features include prenatal and postnatal growth retardation, microcephaly, and "bird-like" face with prominent, beak-like nose and micrognathia. Additional abnormalities were described in the cardiovascular, hematopoietic, endocrine, and central nervous systems. We present the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a neonate with Seckel syndrome accompanied by semilobar holoprosencephaly and arthrogryposis. Major brain malformations may be associated with Seckel syndrome. Imaging studies should be performed to determine any central nervous system abnormalities. Considering the basic defect of neuroblast proliferation in Seckel syndrome, neuronal migration disorders should be sought in these patients.

  3. Vortex emission accompanies the advection of optical localized structures.

    PubMed

    Haudin, F; Rojas, R G; Bortolozzo, U; Clerc, M G; Residori, S

    2011-02-11

    We show that the advection of optical localized structures is accompanied by the emission of vortices, with phase singularities appearing in the wake of the drifting structure. Localized structures are obtained in a light-valve experiment and made to drift by a mirror tilt in the feedback loop. Pairs of oppositely charged vortices are detected for small drifts, whereas for large drifts a vortex array develops. Observations are supported by numerical simulations and linear stability analysis of the system equations and are expected to be generic for a large class of translated optical patterns.

  4. Semi-empirical correlation for binary interaction parameters of the Peng–Robinson equation of state with the van der Waals mixing rules for the prediction of high-pressure vapor–liquid equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Fateen, Seif-Eddeen K.; Khalil, Menna M.; Elnabawy, Ahmed O.

    2012-01-01

    Peng–Robinson equation of state is widely used with the classical van der Waals mixing rules to predict vapor liquid equilibria for systems containing hydrocarbons and related compounds. This model requires good values of the binary interaction parameter kij. In this work, we developed a semi-empirical correlation for kij partly based on the Huron–Vidal mixing rules. We obtained values for the adjustable parameters of the developed formula for over 60 binary systems and over 10 categories of components. The predictions of the new equation system were slightly better than the constant-kij model in most cases, except for 10 systems whose predictions were considerably improved with the new correlation. PMID:25685411

  5. Semi-empirical correlation for binary interaction parameters of the Peng-Robinson equation of state with the van der Waals mixing rules for the prediction of high-pressure vapor-liquid equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Fateen, Seif-Eddeen K; Khalil, Menna M; Elnabawy, Ahmed O

    2013-03-01

    Peng-Robinson equation of state is widely used with the classical van der Waals mixing rules to predict vapor liquid equilibria for systems containing hydrocarbons and related compounds. This model requires good values of the binary interaction parameter kij . In this work, we developed a semi-empirical correlation for kij partly based on the Huron-Vidal mixing rules. We obtained values for the adjustable parameters of the developed formula for over 60 binary systems and over 10 categories of components. The predictions of the new equation system were slightly better than the constant-kij model in most cases, except for 10 systems whose predictions were considerably improved with the new correlation.

  6. Calculation of State Specific Rate Coefficients for Non-Equilibrium Hypersonics Applications: from H(Psi) = E(Psi) to k(T) = A *exp(-E(sub a)/RT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Schwenke, David; Chaban, Galina; Panesi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Development of High-Fidelity Physics-Based Models to describe hypersonic flight through the atmospheres of Earth and Mars is underway at NASA Ames Research Center. The goal is to construct chemistry models of the collisional and radiative processes that occur in the bow shock and boundary layers of spacecraft during atmospheric entry that are free of empiricism. In this talk I will discuss our philosophy and describe some of our progress. Topics to be covered include thermochemistry, internal energy relaxation, collisional dissociation and radiative emission and absorption. For this work we start by solving the Schrodinger equation to obtain accurate interaction potentials and radiative properties. Then we invoke classical mechanics to compute state-specific heavy particle collision cross sections and reaction rate coefficients. Finally, phenomenological rate coefficients and relaxation times are determined from master equation solutions.

  7. Directed percolation identified as equilibrium pre-transition towards non-equilibrium arrested gel states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, M.; Capellmann, R. F.; Laurati, M.; Egelhaaf, S. U.; Schmiedeberg, M.

    2016-06-01

    The macroscopic properties of gels arise from their slow dynamics and load-bearing network structure, which are exploited by nature and in numerous industrial products. However, a link between these structural and dynamical properties has remained elusive. Here we present confocal microscopy experiments and simulations of gel-forming colloid-polymer mixtures. They reveal that gel formation is preceded by continuous and directed percolation. Both transitions lead to system-spanning networks, but only directed percolation results in extremely slow dynamics, ageing and a shrinking of the gel that resembles synaeresis. Therefore, dynamical arrest in gels is found to be linked to a structural transition, namely directed percolation, which is quantitatively associated with the mean number of bonded neighbours. Directed percolation denotes a universality class of transitions. Our study hence connects gel formation to a well-developed theoretical framework, which now can be exploited to achieve a detailed understanding of arrested gels.

  8. Directed percolation identified as equilibrium pre-transition towards non-equilibrium arrested gel states

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, M.; Capellmann, R. F.; Laurati, M.; Egelhaaf, S. U.; Schmiedeberg, M.

    2016-01-01

    The macroscopic properties of gels arise from their slow dynamics and load-bearing network structure, which are exploited by nature and in numerous industrial products. However, a link between these structural and dynamical properties has remained elusive. Here we present confocal microscopy experiments and simulations of gel-forming colloid–polymer mixtures. They reveal that gel formation is preceded by continuous and directed percolation. Both transitions lead to system-spanning networks, but only directed percolation results in extremely slow dynamics, ageing and a shrinking of the gel that resembles synaeresis. Therefore, dynamical arrest in gels is found to be linked to a structural transition, namely directed percolation, which is quantitatively associated with the mean number of bonded neighbours. Directed percolation denotes a universality class of transitions. Our study hence connects gel formation to a well-developed theoretical framework, which now can be exploited to achieve a detailed understanding of arrested gels. PMID:27279005

  9. Field evidence of beach profile evolution toward equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludka, B. C.; Guza, R. T.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Yates, M. L.

    2015-11-01

    An equilibrium framework is used to describe the evolution of the cross-shore profile of five beaches (medium grain size sand) in southern California. Elevations were observed quarterly on cross-shore transects extending from the back beach to 8 m depth, for 3-10 years. Transects spaced 100 m in the alongshore direction are alongshore averaged into nineteen 700-900 m long sections. Consistent with previous observations, changes about the time average profile in many sections are captured by the first mode empirical orthogonal function (EOF). The first EOF poorly describes sections with hard substrate (less than roughly 80% sandy bottom) and also fails near the head of a submarine canyon and adjacent to an inlet. At the 12 well-described sections, the time-varying amplitude of the first EOF, the beach state A, describes the well-known seasonal sand exchange between the shoreline and offshore (roughly between 4 and 7 m depth). We show that the beach state change rate dA/dt depends on the disequilibrium between the present state A and wave conditions, consistent with the equilibrium concepts of Wright and Short (1984) and Wright et al. (1985). Empirically determined, optimal model coefficients using the framework of Yates et al. (2009a, 2011) vary between sections, but a single set of globally optimized values performs almost as well. The model implements equilibrium concepts using ad hoc assumptions and empirical parameter values. The similarity with observed profile change at five southern California beaches supports the underlying model equilibrium hypotheses, but for unknown reasons the model fails at Duck, NC.

  10. The Conterminous United States Mineral-Resource Assessment Program; background information to accompany folios of geologic and mineral-resource maps of the Harrison 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangle, Missouri and Arkansas, and the Joplin 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangle Kansas and Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, Walden P.

    1997-01-01

    The Harrison 1 deg X 2 deg quadrangle in southwestern Missouri and northwestern Arkansas and the Joplin 1 deg X 2 deg quadrangle in southeastern Kansas and southwestern Missouri were studied under the Conterminous United States Mineral-Resource Assessment Program (CUSMAP). Map publications in the CUSMAP folios included bedrock geology, subsurface geochemistry, geophysics, subsurface stratigraphy and lithofacies, and potential resources of metallic and industrial minerals and coal. This report summarizes the contents of those publications and related studies.

  11. On the time needed to reach an equilibrium structure of the radiation belts

    DOE PAGES

    Ripoll, J. -F.; Loran, V.; Cunningham, Gregory Scott; ...

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we complement the notion of equilibrium states of the radiation belts with a discussion on the dynamics and time needed to reach equilibrium. We solve for the equilibrium states obtained using 1D radial diffusion with recently developed hiss and chorus lifetimes at constant values of Kp = 1, 3 and 6. We find that the equilibrium states at moderately low Kp, when plotted vs L-shell (L) and energy (E), display the same interesting S-shape for the inner edge of the outer belt as recently observed by the Van Allen Probes. The S-shape is also produced as themore » radiation belts dynamically evolve toward the equilibrium state when initialized to simulate the buildup after a massive dropout or to simulate loss due to outward diffusion from a saturated state. Physically, this shape, intimately linked with the slot structure, is due to the dependence of electron loss rate (originating from wave-particle interactions) on both energy and L-shell. Equilibrium electron flux profiles are governed by the Biot number (τDiffusion/τloss), with large Biot number corresponding to low fluxes and low Biot number to large fluxes. The time it takes for the flux at a specific (L, E) to reach the value associated with the equilibrium state, starting from these different initial states, is governed by the initial state of the belts, the property of the dynamics (diffusion coefficients), and the size of the domain of computation. Its structure shows a rather complex scissor form in the (L, E) plane. The equilibrium value (phase space density or flux) is practically reachable only for selected regions in (L, E) and geomagnetic activity. Convergence to equilibrium requires hundreds of days in the inner belt for E > 300 keV and moderate Kp (≤3). It takes less time to reach equilibrium during disturbed geomagnetic conditions (Kp ≥ 3), when the system evolves faster. Restricting our interest to the slot region, below L = 4, we find that only small regions in (L, E) space

  12. On the time needed to reach an equilibrium structure of the radiation belts

    SciTech Connect

    Ripoll, J. -F.; Loran, V.; Cunningham, Gregory Scott; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Shprits, Y. Y.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we complement the notion of equilibrium states of the radiation belts with a discussion on the dynamics and time needed to reach equilibrium. We solve for the equilibrium states obtained using 1D radial diffusion with recently developed hiss and chorus lifetimes at constant values of Kp = 1, 3 and 6. We find that the equilibrium states at moderately low Kp, when plotted vs L-shell (L) and energy (E), display the same interesting S-shape for the inner edge of the outer belt as recently observed by the Van Allen Probes. The S-shape is also produced as the radiation belts dynamically evolve toward the equilibrium state when initialized to simulate the buildup after a massive dropout or to simulate loss due to outward diffusion from a saturated state. Physically, this shape, intimately linked with the slot structure, is due to the dependence of electron loss rate (originating from wave-particle interactions) on both energy and L-shell. Equilibrium electron flux profiles are governed by the Biot number (τDiffusionloss), with large Biot number corresponding to low fluxes and low Biot number to large fluxes. The time it takes for the flux at a specific (L, E) to reach the value associated with the equilibrium state, starting from these different initial states, is governed by the initial state of the belts, the property of the dynamics (diffusion coefficients), and the size of the domain of computation. Its structure shows a rather complex scissor form in the (L, E) plane. The equilibrium value (phase space density or flux) is practically reachable only for selected regions in (L, E) and geomagnetic activity. Convergence to equilibrium requires hundreds of days in the inner belt for E > 300 keV and moderate Kp (≤3). It takes less time to reach equilibrium during disturbed geomagnetic conditions (Kp ≥ 3), when the system evolves faster. Restricting our interest to the slot region, below L = 4, we find that only small regions in

  13. Middleware Design for Swarm-Driving Robots Accompanying Humans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Su; Kim, Sang Hyuck; Kang, Soon Ju

    2017-02-17

    Research on robots that accompany humans is being continuously studied. The Pet-Bot provides walking-assistance and object-carrying services without any specific controls through interaction between the robot and the human in real time. However, with Pet-Bot, there is a limit to the number of robots a user can use. If this limit is overcome, the Pet-Bot can provide services in more areas. Therefore, in this study, we propose a swarm-driving middleware design adopting the concept of a swarm, which provides effective parallel movement to allow multiple human-accompanying robots to accomplish a common purpose. The functions of middleware divide into three parts: a sequence manager for swarm process, a messaging manager, and a relative-location identification manager. This middleware processes the sequence of swarm-process of robots in the swarm through message exchanging using radio frequency (RF) communication of an IEEE 802.15.4 MAC protocol and manages an infrared (IR) communication module identifying relative location with IR signal strength. The swarm in this study is composed of the master interacting with the user and the slaves having no interaction with the user. This composition is intended to control the overall swarm in synchronization with the user activity, which is difficult to predict. We evaluate the accuracy of the relative-location estimation using IR communication, the response time of the slaves to a change in user activity, and the time to organize a network according to the number of slaves.

  14. Bell's palsy: symptoms preceding and accompanying the facial paresis.

    PubMed

    De Seta, Daniele; Mancini, Patrizia; Minni, Antonio; Prosperini, Luca; De Seta, Elio; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Covelli, Edoardo; De Carlo, Andrea; Filipo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    This individual prospective cohort study aims to report and analyze the symptoms preceding and accompanying the facial paresis in Bell's palsy (BP). Two hundred sixty-nine patients affected by BP with a maximum delay of 48 hours from the onset were enrolled in the study. The evolution of the facial paresis expressed as House-Brackmann grade in the first 10 days and its correlation with symptoms were analyzed. At the onset, 136 patients presented postauricular pain, 114 were affected by dry eye, and 94 reported dysgeusia. Dry mouth was present in 54 patients (19.7%), facial pain, hyperlacrimation, aural fullness, and hyperacusis represented a smaller percentage of the reported symptoms. After 10 days, 39.9% of the group had a severe paresis while 10.2% reached a complete recovery. Dry mouth at the onset was correlated with severe grade of palsy and was prognostic for poor recovery in the early period. These outcomes lead to the deduction that the nervus intermedius plays an important role in the presentation of the BP and it might be responsible for most of the accompanying symptomatology of the paresis. Our findings could be of important interest to early address a BP patient to further examinations and subsequent therapy.

  15. Bell's Palsy: Symptoms Preceding and Accompanying the Facial Paresis

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Patrizia; Minni, Antonio; Prosperini, Luca; De Seta, Elio; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Covelli, Edoardo; De Carlo, Andrea; Filipo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    This individual prospective cohort study aims to report and analyze the symptoms preceding and accompanying the facial paresis in Bell's palsy (BP). Two hundred sixty-nine patients affected by BP with a maximum delay of 48 hours from the onset were enrolled in the study. The evolution of the facial paresis expressed as House-Brackmann grade in the first 10 days and its correlation with symptoms were analyzed. At the onset, 136 patients presented postauricular pain, 114 were affected by dry eye, and 94 reported dysgeusia. Dry mouth was present in 54 patients (19.7%), facial pain, hyperlacrimation, aural fullness, and hyperacusis represented a smaller percentage of the reported symptoms. After 10 days, 39.9% of the group had a severe paresis while 10.2% reached a complete recovery. Dry mouth at the onset was correlated with severe grade of palsy and was prognostic for poor recovery in the early period. These outcomes lead to the deduction that the nervus intermedius plays an important role in the presentation of the BP and it might be responsible for most of the accompanying symptomatology of the paresis. Our findings could be of important interest to early address a BP patient to further examinations and subsequent therapy. PMID:25544960

  16. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics, maximum entropy production and Earth-system evolution.

    PubMed

    Kleidon, Axel

    2010-01-13

    The present-day atmosphere is in a unique state far from thermodynamic equilibrium. This uniqueness is for instance reflected in the high concentration of molecular oxygen and the low relative humidity in the atmosphere. Given that the concentration of atmospheric oxygen has likely increased throughout Earth-system history, we can ask whether this trend can be generalized to a trend of Earth-system evolution that is directed away from thermodynamic equilibrium, why we would expect such a trend to take place and what it would imply for Earth-system evolution as a whole. The justification for such a trend could be found in the proposed general principle of maximum entropy production (MEP), which states that non-equilibrium thermodynamic systems maintain steady states at which entropy production is maximized. Here, I justify and demonstrate this application of MEP to the Earth at the planetary scale. I first describe the non-equilibrium thermodynamic nature of Earth-system processes and distinguish processes that drive the system's state away from equilibrium from those that are directed towards equilibrium. I formulate the interactions among these processes from a thermodynamic perspective and then connect them to a holistic view of the planetary thermodynamic state of the Earth system. In conclusion, non-equilibrium thermodynamics and MEP have the potential to provide a simple and holistic theory of Earth-system functioning. This theory can be used to derive overall evolutionary trends of the Earth's past, identify the role that life plays in driving thermodynamic states far from equilibrium, identify habitability in other planetary environments and evaluate human impacts on Earth-system functioning.

  17. CET89 - CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM WITH TRANSPORT PROPERTIES, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, B.

    1994-01-01

    Scientists and engineers need chemical equilibrium composition data to calculate the theoretical thermodynamic properties of a chemical system. This information is essential in the design and analysis of equipment such as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical processing equipment. The substantial amount of numerical computation required to obtain equilibrium compositions and transport properties for complex chemical systems led scientists at NASA's Lewis Research Center to develop CET89, a program designed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of these systems. CET89 is a general program which will calculate chemical equilibrium compositions and mixture properties for any chemical system with available thermodynamic data. Generally, mixtures may include condensed and gaseous products. CET89 performs the following operations: it 1) obtains chemical equilibrium compositions for assigned thermodynamic states, 2) calculates dilute-gas transport properties of complex chemical mixtures, 3) obtains Chapman-Jouguet detonation properties for gaseous species, 4) calculates incident and reflected shock properties in terms of assigned velocities, and 5) calculates theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen compositions during expansion. The rocket performance function allows the option of assuming either a finite area or an infinite area combustor. CET89 accommodates problems involving up to 24 reactants, 20 elements, and 600 products (400 of which may be condensed). The program includes a library of thermodynamic and transport properties in the form of least squares coefficients for possible reaction products. It includes thermodynamic data for over 1300 gaseous and condensed species and transport data for 151 gases. The subroutines UTHERM and UTRAN convert thermodynamic and transport data to unformatted form for faster processing. The program conforms to the FORTRAN 77 standard, except for

  18. Stability of equilibrium of a compressible hyperelastic hollow sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipova, E. B.

    2015-07-01

    An analytical algorithm for studying the stability of the equilibrium of compressible hyperelastic sphere with Lagrange variables is proposed. The problem is solved in a spherical coordinate system in a general three-dimensional formulation using linearized stability theory and the method of separation of variables with respect to the radial displacement, the displacement due to the rotation, and the resulting strain in the principal directions. Results of numerical and graphical analysis of the stress-strain state for a three-layer-sphere are used to analyze the gravity stress-strain state of the lithosphere of the Kuril island arc system.

  19. Complex potential surface for the {sup 2}B{sub 1} metastable state of the water anion

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, Daniel J.; Zhang, Zhiyong; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2004-04-23

    The potential energy surface corresponding the complex resonance energy of the 2B1 Feshbach resonance state of the water anion is constructed in its full dimensionality. Complex Kohn variational scattering calculations are used to compute the resonance width, while large-scale Configuration Interaction calculations are used to compute the resonance energy. Near the equilibrium geometry, an accompanying ground state potential surface is constructed from Configuration Interaction calculations that treat correlation at a level similar to that used in the calculations on the anion.

  20. Morphodynamics: Rivers beyond steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, M.; Ferguson, R. I.

    2015-04-01

    The morphology of an alluvial river channel affects the movement of water and sediment along it, but in the longer run is shaped by those processes. This interplay has mostly been investigated empirically within the paradigm of Newtonian mechanics. In rivers, this has created an emphasis on equilibrium configurations with simple morphology and uniform steady flow. But transient adjustment, whether between equilibrium states or indefinitely, is to be expected in a world in which hydrology, sediment supply, and base level are not fixed. More fundamentally, water flows and all the phenomena that accompany them are inherently unsteady, and flows in natural channels are characteristically nonuniform. The morphodynamics of alluvial river channels is the striking consequence. In this paper, we develop the essential connection between the episodic nature of bed material transport and the production of river morphology, emphasizing the fundamental problems of sediment transport, the role of bar evolution in determining channel form, the role of riparian vegetation, and the wide range of time scales for change. As the key integrative exercise, we emphasize the importance of physics-based modeling of morphodynamics. We note consequences that can be of benefit to society if properly understood. These include the possibility to better be able to model how varying flows drive morphodynamic change, to understand the influence of the sediments themselves on morphodynamics, and to recognize the inherent necessity for rivers that transport bed material to deform laterally. We acknowledge pioneering contributions in WRR and elsewhere that have introduced some of these themes.