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Sample records for accompanying equilibrium state

  1. A search for equilibrium states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeleznik, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    An efficient search algorithm is described for the location of equilibrium states in a search set of states which differ from one another only by the choice of pure phases. The algorithm has three important characteristics: (1) it ignores states which have little prospect for being an improved approximation to the true equilibrium state; (2) it avoids states which lead to singular iteration equations; (3) it furnishes a search history which can provide clues to alternative search paths.

  2. Grinding kinetics and equilibrium states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opoczky, L.; Farnady, F.

    1984-01-01

    The temporary and permanent equilibrium occurring during the initial stage of cement grinding does not indicate the end of comminution, but rather an increased energy consumption during grinding. The constant dynamic equilibrium occurs after a long grinding period indicating the end of comminution for a given particle size. Grinding equilibrium curves can be constructed to show the stages of comminution and agglomeration for certain particle sizes.

  3. Dynamically defined measures and equilibrium states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Ivan

    2011-12-01

    A technique of dynamically defined measures is developed and its relation to the theory of equilibrium states is shown. The technique uses Carathéodory's method and the outer measure introduced in a previous work by I. Werner [Math. Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. 140(2), 333-347 (2006), 10.1017/S0305004105009072]. As an application, equilibrium states for contractive Markov systems [I. Werner, J. London Math. Soc. 71(1), 236-258 (2005), 10.1112/S0024610704006088] are obtained.

  4. Bifurcated helical core equilibrium states in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Chapman, I. T.; Schmitz, O.; Turnbull, A. D.; Tobias, B. J.; Lazarus, E. A.; Turco, F.; Lanctot, M. J.; Evans, T. E.; Graves, J. P.; Brunetti, D.; Pfefferlé, D.; Reimerdes, H.; Sauter, O.; Halpern, F. D.; Tran, T. M.; Coda, S.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Pochelon, A.; Turnyanskiy, M. R.; Lao, L.; Luce, T. C.; Buttery, R.; Ferron, J. R.; Hollmann, E. M.; Petty, C. C.; van Zeeland, M.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Hanson, J. M.; Lütjens, H.

    2013-07-01

    Tokamaks with weak to moderate reversed central shear in which the minimum inverse rotational transform (safety factor) qmin is in the neighbourhood of unity can trigger bifurcated magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium states, one of which is similar to a saturated ideal internal kink mode. Peaked prescribed pressure profiles reproduce the ‘snake’ structures observed in many tokamaks which has led to a novel explanation of the snake as a bifurcated equilibrium state. Snake equilibrium structures are computed in simulations of the tokamak à configuration variable (TCV), DIII-D and mega amp spherical torus (MAST) tokamaks. The internal helical deformations only weakly modulate the plasma-vacuum interface which is more sensitive to ripple and resonant magnetic perturbations. On the other hand, the external perturbations do not alter the helical core deformation in a significant manner. The confinement of fast particles in MAST simulations deteriorate with the amplitude of the helical core distortion. These three-dimensional bifurcated solutions constitute a paradigm shift that motivates the applications of tools developed for stellarator research in tokamak physics investigations.

  5. Modeling of bi-equilibrium states in dielectric elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Longgui

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric elastomer is a soft active material, producing fast deformation under voltage-activation. Under a specific boundary condition, trussed dielectric elastomer elongates mimicking the behavior of biological muscle. During this process, dielectric elastomer experiences a snap from one deformation mode to another, though both at the electromechanical equilibrium states. Based on thermodynamics, models are established to investigate electromechanical coupling at the two equilibrium states. Particular emphasis is devoted to establishing the governing equations of the two deformation modes with physical interpretations. The transition of equilibrium state is discussed, to predict the attainable stable state for application.

  6. Stochastic linearization of turbulent dynamics of dispersive waves in equilibrium and non-equilibrium state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shixiao W.; Lu, Haihao; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2016-08-01

    Characterizing dispersive wave turbulence in the long time dynamics is central to understanding of many natural phenomena, e.g., in atmosphere ocean dynamics, nonlinear optics, and plasma physics. Using the β-Fermi–Pasta–Ulam nonlinear system as a prototypical example, we show that in thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium steady state the turbulent state even in the strongly nonlinear regime possesses an effective linear stochastic structure in renormalized normal variables. In this framework, we can well characterize the spatiotemporal dynamics, which are dominated by long-wavelength renormalized waves. We further demonstrate that the energy flux is nearly saturated by the long-wavelength renormalized waves in non-equilibrium steady state. The scenario of such effective linear stochastic dynamics can be extended to study turbulent states in other nonlinear wave systems.

  7. The entropy concept for non-equilibrium states.

    PubMed

    Lieb, Elliott H; Yngvason, Jakob

    2013-10-01

    In earlier work, we presented a foundation for the second law of classical thermodynamics in terms of the entropy principle. More precisely, we provided an empirically accessible axiomatic derivation of an entropy function defined on all equilibrium states of all systems that has the appropriate additivity and scaling properties, and whose increase is a necessary and sufficient condition for an adiabatic process between two states to be possible. Here, after a brief review of this approach, we address the question of defining entropy for non-equilibrium states. Our conclusion is that it is generally not possible to find a unique entropy that has all relevant physical properties. We do show, however, that one can define two entropy functions, called S - and S +, which, taken together, delimit the range of adiabatic processes that can occur between non-equilibrium states. The concept of comparability of states with respect to adiabatic changes plays an important role in our reasoning. PMID:24101892

  8. Persistent Probability Currents in Non-equilibrium Steady States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, Royce; Mellor, Andrew; Mobilia, Mauro; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Weiss, Jeffrey

    For many interesting phenomena in nature, from all life forms to the global climate, the fundamental hypothesis of equilibrium statistical mechanics does not apply. Instead, they are perhaps better characterized by non-equilibrium steady states, evolving with dynamical rules which violate detailed balance. In particular, such dynamics leads to the existence of non-trivial, persistent probability currents - a principal characteristic of non-equilibrium steady states. In turn, they give rise to the notion of 'probability angular momentum'. Observable manifestations of such abstract concepts will be illustrated in two distinct contexts: a heterogeneous nonlinear voter model and our ocean heat content. Supported in part by grants from the Bloom Agency (Leeds, UK) and the US National Science Foundation: OCE-1245944. AM acknowledges the support of EPSRC Industrial CASE Studentship, Grant No. EP/L50550X/1.

  9. Equilibrium Binding and Steady-State Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunford, H. Brian

    1984-01-01

    Points out that equilibrium binding and steady-state enzyme kinetics have a great deal in common and that related equations and error analysis can be cast in identical forms. Emphasizes that if one type of problem solution is taught, the other is also taught. Various methods of data analysis are evaluated. (JM)

  10. Nakedly singular non-vacuum gravitating equilibrium states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woszczyna, Andrzej; Kutschera, Marek; Kubis, Sebastian; Czaja, Wojciech; Plaszczyk, Piotr; Golda, Zdzisław A.

    2016-01-01

    Non-vacuum static spherically symmetric spacetimes with central point-like repulsive gravity sources are investigated. Both the symmetries of spacetime and the degree of irregularity of curvature invariants, are the same as for the Schwarzschild case. The equilibrium configurations are modelled using the neutron star polytrope equation of state.

  11. Non-equilibrium steady state in the hydro regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourhasan, Razieh

    2016-02-01

    We study the existence and properties of the non-equilibrium steady state which arises by putting two copies of systems at different temperatures into a thermal contact. We solve the problem for the relativistic systems that are described by the energy-momentum of a perfect hydro with general equation of state (EOS). In particular, we examine several simple examples: a hydro with a linear EOS, a holographic CFT perturbed by a relevant operator and a barotropic fluid, i.e., P=P({E}) . Our studies suggest that the formation of steady state is a universal result of the hydro regime regardless of the kind of fluid.

  12. Non-equilibrium transport in the quantum dot: quench dynamics and non-equilibrium steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culver, Adrian; Andrei, Natan

    We calculate the non-equilibrium current driven by a voltage drop across a quantum dot. The system is described by the two lead Anderson model at zero temperature with on-site Coulomb repulsion and non-interacting, linearized leads. We prepare the system in an initial state consisting of a free Fermi sea in each lead with the voltage drop given as the difference between the two Fermi levels. We quench the system by coupling the dot to the leads at t =0 and following the time evolution of the wavefunction. In the long time limit a new type of Bethe Ansatz wavefunction emerges, which satisfies the Lippmann-Schwinger equation with the two Fermi seas serving as the boundary conditions. The solution describes the non-equilibrium steady state of the system. We use this solution to compute the infinite time limit of the expectation value of the current operator at a given voltage, yielding the I-V characteristic. The calculation is non-perturbative and exact. Research supported by NSF Grant DMR 1410583.

  13. The thermal vacuum for non-equilibrium steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Ryosuke; Kuwahara, Yukiro; Nakamura, Yusuke; Yamanaka, Yoshiya

    Our purpose is to construct a theoretical description of non-equilibrium steady state (NESS), employing thermo field dynamics (TFD). TFD is the operator-based formalism of thermal quautum field theory, where every degree of freedom is doubled and thermal averages are given by expectation values of the thermal vacuum. To specify the thermal vacuum for NESS is a non-trivial issue, and we attempt it on the analogy between the superoperator formalism and TFD. Using the thermal vacuum thus obtained, we analyze the NESS which is realized in the two-reservoir model. It will be shown that the NESS vacuum of the model coincides with the fixed point solutions of the quantum transport equation derived by the self-consistent renormalization of the self-energy in non-equilibrium TFD.

  14. Entropy Production and Non-Equilibrium Steady States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masuo

    2013-01-01

    The long-term issue of entropy production in transport phenomena is solved by separating the symmetry of the non-equilibrium density matrix ρ(t) in the von Neumann equation, as ρ(t) = ρs(t) + ρa(t) with the symmetric part ρs(t) and antisymmetric part ρa(t). The irreversible entropy production (dS/dt)irr is given in M. Suzuki, Physica A 390(2011)1904 by (dS/dt)irr = Tr( {H}(dρ s{(t)/dt))}/T for the Hamiltonian {H} of the relevant system. The general formulation of the extended von Neumann equation with energy supply and heat extraction is reviewed from the author's paper (M. S.,Physica A391(2012)1074). irreversibility; entropy production; transport phenomena; electric conduction; thermal conduction; linear response; Kubo formula; steady state; non-equilibrium density matrix; energy supply; symmetry-separated von Neumann equation; unboundedness.

  15. Statistically optimal analysis of samples from multiple equilibrium states

    PubMed Central

    Shirts, Michael R.; Chodera, John D.

    2008-01-01

    We present a new estimator for computing free energy differences and thermodynamic expectations as well as their uncertainties from samples obtained from multiple equilibrium states via either simulation or experiment. The estimator, which we call the multistate Bennett acceptance ratio estimator (MBAR) because it reduces to the Bennett acceptance ratio estimator (BAR) when only two states are considered, has significant advantages over multiple histogram reweighting methods for combining data from multiple states. It does not require the sampled energy range to be discretized to produce histograms, eliminating bias due to energy binning and significantly reducing the time complexity of computing a solution to the estimating equations in many cases. Additionally, an estimate of the statistical uncertainty is provided for all estimated quantities. In the large sample limit, MBAR is unbiased and has the lowest variance of any known estimator for making use of equilibrium data collected from multiple states. We illustrate this method by producing a highly precise estimate of the potential of mean force for a DNA hairpin system, combining data from multiple optical tweezer measurements under constant force bias. PMID:19045004

  16. Equilibrium state of a trapped two-dimensional Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, Steffen P.; Yefsah, Tarik; Guenter, Kenneth J.; Cheneau, Marc; Desbuquois, Remi; Dalibard, Jean; Holzmann, Markus; Krauth, Werner

    2010-07-15

    We study experimentally and numerically the equilibrium density profiles of a trapped two-dimensional {sup 87}Rb Bose gas and investigate the equation of state of the homogeneous system using the local density approximation. We find a clear discrepancy between in situ measurements and quantum Monte Carlo simulations, which we attribute to a nonlinear variation of the optical density of the atomic cloud with its spatial density. However, good agreement between experiment and theory is recovered for the density profiles measured after time of flight, taking advantage of their self-similarity in a two-dimensional expansion.

  17. Climate and the equilibrium state of land surface hydrology parameterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Entekhabi, Dara; Eagleson, Peter S.

    1991-01-01

    For given climatic rates of precipitation and potential evaporation, the land surface hydrology parameterizations of atmospheric general circulation models will maintain soil-water storage conditions that balance the moisture input and output. The surface relative soil saturation for such climatic conditions serves as a measure of the land surface parameterization state under a given forcing. The equilibrium value of this variable for alternate parameterizations of land surface hydrology are determined as a function of climate and the sensitivity of the surface to shifts and changes in climatic forcing are estimated.

  18. Non-Equilibrium Steady States for Chains of Four Rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuneo, N.; Eckmann, J.-P.

    2016-07-01

    We study a chain of four interacting rotors (rotators) connected at both ends to stochastic heat baths at different temperatures. We show that for non-degenerate interaction potentials the system relaxes, at a stretched exponential rate, to a non-equilibrium steady state (NESS). Rotors with high energy tend to decouple from their neighbors due to fast oscillation of the forces. Because of this, the energy of the central two rotors, which interact with the heat baths only through the external rotors, can take a very long time to dissipate. By appropriately averaging the oscillatory forces, we estimate the dissipation rate and construct a Lyapunov function. Compared to the chain of length three (considered previously by C. Poquet and the current authors), the new difficulty with four rotors is the appearance of resonances when both central rotors are fast. We deal with these resonances using the rapid thermalization of the two external rotors.

  19. Equilibrium wave spectrum and sea state bias in satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.; Srokosz, Meric A.

    1991-01-01

    For a well-developed sea at equilibrium with a constant wind, the energy-containing range of the wavenumber spectrum for wind-generated gravity waves is approximated by a generalized power law involving the angular spread function and mu, interpreted as a fractal codimension of a small surface patch. Dependence of mu on the wave age is estimated, and the 'Phillips constant', beta, along with the low-wavenumber boundary, k0, of the inertial subrange are analyzed on the basis of the wave action and energy conservation principles. The resulting expressions are employed to evaluate various non-Gaussian statistics of a weakly nonlinear sea surface, which determine the sea state bias in satellite altimetry. The locally accelerated decay of the spectral density function in a high-wavenumber dissipation subrange is pointed out as an important factor of wave dynamics and the geometrical optics treatment of the sea state bias. The analysis is carried out in the approximation of a unidirectional wave field and confined to the case of a well-developed sea.

  20. Discrete molecular states in the brain accompany changing responses to a vocal signal

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shu; Replogle, Kirstin L.; Hasadsri, Linda; Imai, Brian S.; Yau, Peter M.; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra; Southey, Bruce R.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Clayton, David F.

    2009-01-01

    New experiences can trigger changes in gene expression in the brain. To understand this phenomenon better, we studied zebra finches hearing playbacks of birdsong. Earlier research had shown that initial playbacks of a novel song transiently increase the ZENK (ZIF-268, EGR1, NGFIA, KROX-24) mRNA in the auditory forebrain, but the response selectively habituates after repetition of the stimulus. Here, using DNA microarray analysis, we show that novel song exposure induces rapid changes in thousands of RNAs, with even more RNAs decreasing than increasing. Habituation training leads to the emergence of a different gene expression profile a day later, accompanied by loss of essentially all of the rapid “novel” molecular responses. The novel molecular profile is characterized by increases in genes involved in transcription and RNA processing and decreases in ion channels and putative noncoding RNAs. The “habituated” profile is dominated by changes in genes for mitochondrial proteins. A parallel proteomic analysis [2-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and sequencing by mass spectrometry] also detected changes in mitochondrial proteins, and direct enzyme assay demonstrated changes in both complexes I and IV in the habituated state. Thus a natural experience, in this case hearing the sound of birdsong, can lead to major shifts in energetics and macromolecular metabolism in higher centers in the brain. PMID:19541599

  1. Non-equilibrium plasma experiments at The Pennsylvania State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knecht, Sean; Bilen, Sven; Micci, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The authors have recently established the capability at The Pennsylvania State University to generate non-equilibrium plasma in atmospheric-pressure air and liquids such as water and saline. The plasma is generated using a high-voltage pulser (Pacific-Electronics PT-55), which is capable of voltage pulses of 75-ns width, peak voltage >50 kV, with rise-times on the order of nanoseconds. The electrodes are tungsten wires of various diameters (50 μm, 175 μm, 254 μm) insulated with nylon tubing. The spacing of the electrodes is controlled with translating mounts with resolution of tens of microns. Spectroscopy (Ocean Optics Model HR2000) is presently used for line identification only. Current and voltage vs. time will be measured with a 500-MHz bandwidth oscilloscope, a high-voltage probe and a shunt resistor connected to the ground side of the circuit. Research directions presently being pursued include the effects of solution electrical conductivity on plasma production and propellant ignition studies. Data from several types of experiments will be presented.

  2. Non-equilibrium Steady States in Kac's Model Coupled to a Thermostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Josephine

    2016-09-01

    This paper studies the existence, uniqueness and convergence to non-equilibrium steady states in Kac's model with an external coupling. We work in both Fourier distances and Wasserstein distances. Our methods work in the case where the external coupling is not a Maxwellian equilibrium. This provides an example of a non-equilibrium steady state. We also study the behaviour as the number of particles goes to infinity and show quantitative estimates on the convergence rate of the first marginal.

  3. A probable probability distribution of a series nonequilibrium states in a simple system out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Haixia; Li, Ting; Xiao, Changming

    2016-05-01

    When a simple system is in its nonequilibrium state, it will shift to its equilibrium state. Obviously, in this process, there are a series of nonequilibrium states. With the assistance of Bayesian statistics and hyperensemble, a probable probability distribution of these nonequilibrium states can be determined by maximizing the hyperensemble entropy. It is known that the largest probability is the equilibrium state, and the far a nonequilibrium state is away from the equilibrium one, the smaller the probability will be, and the same conclusion can also be obtained in the multi-state space. Furthermore, if the probability stands for the relative time the corresponding nonequilibrium state can stay, then the velocity of a nonequilibrium state returning back to its equilibrium can also be determined through the reciprocal of the derivative of this probability. It tells us that the far away the state from the equilibrium is, the faster the returning velocity will be; if the system is near to its equilibrium state, the velocity will tend to be smaller and smaller, and finally tends to 0 when it gets the equilibrium state.

  4. Directed percolation identified as equilibrium pre-transition towards non-equilibrium arrested gel states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurati, Marco; Capellmann, Ronja; Kohl, Matthias; Egelhaaf, Stefan; Schmiedeberg, Michael

    The macroscopic properties of gels arise from their slow dynamics and load bearing network structure, which are exploited by nature and in numerous industrial products. However, a link between these structural and dynamical properties has remained elusive. Here we present confocal microscopy exper- iments and simulations of gel-forming colloid-polymer mixtures with competing interactions. They reveal that gel formation is preceded by continuous and directed percolation. Both transitions lead to system spanning networks, but only directed percolation results in extremely slow dynamics, ageing and a shrinking of the gel that resembles syneresis. Therefore, dynamical arrest in gels is found to be linked to a structural transition, namely directed percolation, which is quantitatively associated with the mean number of bonded neighbours. Directed percolation is a universality class of transitions out of equilibrium, our study hence connects gel formation to a well-developed theoretical framework which now can be exploited to achieve a detailed understanding of arrested gels.

  5. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions of 2.0 MeV/u carbon ions passing through carbon foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, M.; Sataka, M.; Matsuda, M.; Okayasu, S.; Kawatsura, K.; Takahiro, K.; Komaki, K.; Shibata, H.; Nishio, K.

    2015-07-01

    Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions were studied experimentally for 2.0 MeV/u carbon ions after passing through carbon foils. Measured charge-state distribution established the equilibrium at a target thickness of 10 μg/cm2 and this remained unchanged until a maximum target thickness of 98 μg/cm2. The equilibrium charge-state distribution, the equilibrium mean charge-state, and the width and skewness of the equilibrium distribution were compared with predictions using existing semi-empirical formulae as well as simulation results, including the ETACHA code. It was found that charge-state distributions, mean charge states, and distribution widths for C2+, C3+, and C4+ incident ions merged into quasi-equilibrium values at a target thickness of 5.7 μg/cm2 in the pre-equilibrium region and evolved simultaneously to the 'real equilibrium' values for all of the initial charge states, including C5+ and C6+ ions, as previously demonstrated for sulfur projectile ions at the same velocity (Imai et al., 2009). Two kinds of simulation, ETACHA and solution of rate equations taking only single electron transfers into account, were used, and both of them reproduced the measured charge evolution qualitatively. The quasi-equilibrium behavior could be reproduced with the ETACHA code, but not with solution of elementary rate equations.

  6. Classifying magnetic and superfluid equilibrium states in magnets with the spin s = 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevskii, M. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    Based on the method of quasiaverages, we classify magnetic and superfluid equilibrium states in magnets with the spin s = 1. Under certain simplifications, assumptions about the residual symmetry of degenerate states and the transformation properties of order parameter operators under transformations generated by additive integrals of motions lead to linear algebraic equations for a classification of the equilibrium means of the order parameters. We consider different cases of the magnetic SO(3) or SU(3) symmetry breaking and obtain solutions for the vector and tensor order parameters for particular forms of the parameters of the residual symmetry generators. We study the equilibriums of magnets with simultaneously broken phase and magnetic symmetries. We find solutions of the classification equations for superfluid equilibrium states and establish relations between the parameters of the residual symmetry generator that allow the thermodynamic coexistence of nonzero equilibrium means of the order parameters.

  7. Non-equilibrium States of Active Filament Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Robert A.; Betterton, Meredith D.; Sweezy, Oliver M.; Glaser, Matthew A.

    2014-03-01

    Active networks of filamentous proteins and crosslinking motor proteins play a critical role in many cellular processes. Among the most important active networks is the mitotic spindle, an assembly of microtubules and crosslinking motor proteins that forms during cell division and that ultimately separates chromosomes into two daughter cells. To evolve a better understanding of spindle formation, structure, and dynamics, we have developed course-grained models of active networks composed of filaments, modeled as hard spherocylinders, in diffusive equilibrium with a reservoir of crosslinking motors, modeled as Hookean springs that can adsorb to microtubules and translocate at finite velocity along the microtubule axis. We explore the phase diagram and other characteristics of this model in two and three dimensions as a function of filament packing fraction, and of crosslink concentration, velocity, and adsorption and desorption rates. We observe a variety of interesting emergent behaviors including sorting of filaments into polar domains, generation of extensile stress, and superdiffusive transport. DMR-0820579

  8. Imaging the equilibrium state and magnetization dynamics of partially built hard disk write heads

    SciTech Connect

    Valkass, R. A. J. Yu, W.; Shelford, L. R.; Keatley, P. S.; Loughran, T. H. J.; Hicken, R. J.; Cavill, S. A.; Laan, G. van der; Dhesi, S. S.; Bashir, M. A.; Gubbins, M. A.; Czoschke, P. J.; Lopusnik, R.

    2015-06-08

    Four different designs of partially built hard disk write heads with a yoke comprising four repeats of NiFe (1 nm)/CoFe (50 nm) were studied by both x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM) and time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy (TRSKM). These techniques were used to investigate the static equilibrium domain configuration and the magnetodynamic response across the entire structure, respectively. Simulations and previous TRSKM studies have made proposals for the equilibrium domain configuration of similar structures, but no direct observation of the equilibrium state of the writers has yet been made. In this study, static XPEEM images of the equilibrium state of writer structures were acquired using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism as the contrast mechanism. These images suggest that the crystalline anisotropy dominates the equilibrium state domain configuration, but competition with shape anisotropy ultimately determines the stability of the equilibrium state. Dynamic TRSKM images were acquired from nominally identical devices. These images suggest that a longer confluence region may hinder flux conduction from the yoke into the pole tip: the shorter confluence region exhibits clear flux beaming along the symmetry axis, whereas the longer confluence region causes flux to conduct along one edge of the writer. The observed variations in dynamic response agree well with the differences in the equilibrium magnetization configuration visible in the XPEEM images, confirming that minor variations in the geometric design of the writer structure can have significant effects on the process of flux beaming.

  9. Turbulence Modeling Effects on the Prediction of Equilibrium States of Buoyant Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, C. Y.; So, R. M. C.; Gatski, T. B.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of turbulence modeling on the prediction of equilibrium states of turbulent buoyant shear flows were investigated. The velocity field models used include a two-equation closure, a Reynolds-stress closure assuming two different pressure-strain models and three different dissipation rate tensor models. As for the thermal field closure models, two different pressure-scrambling models and nine different temperature variance dissipation rate, Epsilon(0) equations were considered. The emphasis of this paper is focused on the effects of the Epsilon(0)-equation, of the dissipation rate models, of the pressure-strain models and of the pressure-scrambling models on the prediction of the approach to equilibrium turbulence. Equilibrium turbulence is defined by the time rate (if change of the scaled Reynolds stress anisotropic tensor and heat flux vector becoming zero. These conditions lead to the equilibrium state parameters. Calculations show that the Epsilon(0)-equation has a significant effect on the prediction of the approach to equilibrium turbulence. For a particular Epsilon(0)-equation, all velocity closure models considered give an equilibrium state if anisotropic dissipation is accounted for in one form or another in the dissipation rate tensor or in the Epsilon(0)-equation. It is further found that the models considered for the pressure-strain tensor and the pressure-scrambling vector have little or no effect on the prediction of the approach to equilibrium turbulence.

  10. Time behavior of a Gaussian wave packet accompanying the generalized coherent state for the inverted oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maamache, Mustapha; Bouguerra, Yacine; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2016-06-01

    A Gaussian wave packet of the inverted oscillator is investigated using the invariant operator method together with the unitary transformation method. A simple wave packet directly derived from the eigenstates of the invariant operator of the system corresponds to a plane wave that is fully delocalized. However, we can construct a weighted wave packet in terms of such plane waves, which corresponds to a Gaussian wave. This wave packet is associated with the generalized coherent state, which can be crucially utilized for investigating the classical limit of quantum wave mechanics. Various quantum properties of the system, such as fluctuations of the canonical variables, the uncertainty product, and the motion of the wave packet or quantum particle, are analyzed by means of this wave packet. We have confirmed that the time behavior of such a wave packet is very similar to the counterpart classical state. The wave packet runs away from the origin in the positive or negative direction in the 1D coordinate depending on the condition of the initial state. We have confirmed that this wave packet not only moves acceleratively but also spreads out during its propagation.

  11. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions of 2 MeV/u sulfur ions passing through carbon foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, M.; Sataka, M.; Kawatsura, K.; Takahiro, K.; Komaki, K.; Shibata, H.; Sugai, H.; Nishio, K.

    2009-08-01

    Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions for 2.0 MeV/u sulfur ions after passing through carbon foils were studied experimentally. For the equilibrium charge-state distribution, incident ions of S 7+, S 12+, S 14+ and S 16+ were injected into carbon foils 54, 98, 150 and 200 μg/cm 2 in thickness, whereas for the non-equilibrium distributions, new measurements for S 15+ and S 16+ incidences were made through carbon foils of 0.9-10 μg/cm 2 to supplement our previous experiments regarding S 6+-S 14+ incidences [M. Imai, M. Sataka, K. Kawatsura, K. Takahiro, K. Komaki, H. Shibata, H. Sugai, K. Nishio, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 230 (2005) 63; M. Imai, M. Sataka, K. Kawatsura, K. Takahiro, K. Komaki, H. Shibata, H. Sugai, K. Nishio, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 256 (2007) 11]. Mean charge states for S 6+-S 14+ incidences as functions of the penetration thickness merged at 6.9 μg/cm 2 and changed together until reaching equilibrium at around 100 μg/cm 2, while those for S 15+ and S 16+ incidences took different paths to equilibrium, which was also the case for distribution widths for S 6+-S 14+, S 15+ and S 16+ incidences. An equilibrium mean charge state of 12.68 and distribution width of 1.11 were attained with equilibrium charge distributions between 6+ and 16+.

  12. Out of equilibrium: understanding cosmological evolution to lower-entropy states

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, Anthony; Carroll, Sean M.; Johnson, Matthew C. E-mail: seancarroll@gmail.com

    2012-02-01

    Despite the importance of the Second Law of Thermodynamics, it is not absolute. Statistical mechanics implies that, given sufficient time, systems near equilibrium will spontaneously fluctuate into lower-entropy states, locally reversing the thermodynamic arrow of time. We study the time development of such fluctuations, especially the very large fluctuations relevant to cosmology. Under fairly general assumptions, the most likely history of a fluctuation out of equilibrium is simply the CPT conjugate of the most likely way a system relaxes back to equilibrium. We use this idea to elucidate the spacetime structure of various fluctuations in (stable and metastable) de Sitter space and thermal anti-de Sitter space.

  13. The Depths of Hydraulic Fracturing and Accompanying Water Use Across the United States.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Robert B; Lowry, Ella R; Pickle, Amy; Kang, Mary; DiGiulio, Dominic; Zhao, Kaiguang

    2015-08-01

    Reports highlight the safety of hydraulic fracturing for drinking water if it occurs "many hundreds of meters to kilometers underground". To our knowledge, however, no comprehensive analysis of hydraulic fracturing depths exists. Based on fracturing depths and water use for ∼44,000 wells reported between 2010 and 2013, the average fracturing depth across the United States was 8300 ft (∼2500 m). Many wells (6900; 16%) were fractured less than a mile from the surface, and 2600 wells (6%) were fractured above 3000 ft (900 m), particularly in Texas (850 wells), California (720), Arkansas (310), and Wyoming (300). Average water use per well nationally was 2,400,000 gallons (9,200,000 L), led by Arkansas (5,200,000 gallons), Louisiana (5,100,000 gallons), West Virginia (5,000,000 gallons), and Pennsylvania (4,500,000 gallons). Two thousand wells (∼5%) shallower than one mile and 350 wells (∼1%) shallower than 3000 ft were hydraulically fractured with >1 million gallons of water, particularly in Arkansas, New Mexico, Texas, Pennsylvania, and California. Because hydraulic fractures can propagate 2000 ft upward, shallow wells may warrant special safeguards, including a mandatory registry of locations, full chemical disclosure, and, where horizontal drilling is used, predrilling water testing to a radius 1000 ft beyond the greatest lateral extent. PMID:26196164

  14. The equation of state and ionization equilibrium of dense aluminum plasma with conductivity verification

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kun; Shi, Zongqian; Shi, Yuanjie; Bai, Jun; Wu, Jian; Jia, Shenli

    2015-06-15

    The equation of state, ionization equilibrium, and conductivity are the most important parameters for investigation of dense plasma. The equation of state is calculated with the non-ideal effects taken into consideration. The electron chemical potential and pressure, which are commonly used thermodynamic quantities, are calculated by the non-ideal free energy and compared with results of a semi-empirical equation of state based on Thomas-Fermi-Kirzhnits model. The lowering of ionization potential, which is a crucial factor in the calculation of non-ideal Saha equation, is settled according to the non-ideal free energy. The full coupled non-ideal Saha equation is applied to describe the ionization equilibrium of dense plasma. The conductivity calculated by the Lee-More-Desjarlais model combined with non-ideal Saha equation is compared with experimental data. It provides a possible approach to verify the accuracy of the equation of state and ionization equilibrium.

  15. Equilibrium state of a cylindrical particle with flat ends in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, S. Masoomeh; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    A continuum theory is employed to numerically study the equilibrium orientation and defect structures of a circular cylindrical particle with flat ends under a homeotropic anchoring condition in a uniform nematic medium. Different aspect ratios of this colloidal geometry from thin discotic to long rodlike shapes and several colloidal length scales ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale are investigated. We show that the equilibrium state of this colloidal geometry is sensitive to the two geometrical parameters: aspect ratio and length scale of the particle. For a large enough mesoscopic particle, there is a specific asymptotic equilibrium angle associated to each aspect ratio. Upon reducing the particle size to nanoscale, the equilibrium angle follows a descending or ascending trend in such a way that the equilibrium angle of a particle with the aspect ratio bigger than 1:1 (a discotic particle) goes to a parallel alignment with respect to the far-field nematic, whereas the equilibrium angle for a particle with the aspect ratio 1:1 and smaller (a rodlike particle) tends toward a perpendicular alignment to the uniform nematic direction. The discrepancy between the equilibrium angles of the mesoscopic and nanoscopic particles originates from the significant differences between their defect structures. The possible defect structures related to mesoscopic and nanoscopic colloidal particles of this geometry are also introduced.

  16. Equilibrium state of a cylindrical particle with flat ends in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, S Masoomeh; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    A continuum theory is employed to numerically study the equilibrium orientation and defect structures of a circular cylindrical particle with flat ends under a homeotropic anchoring condition in a uniform nematic medium. Different aspect ratios of this colloidal geometry from thin discotic to long rodlike shapes and several colloidal length scales ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale are investigated. We show that the equilibrium state of this colloidal geometry is sensitive to the two geometrical parameters: aspect ratio and length scale of the particle. For a large enough mesoscopic particle, there is a specific asymptotic equilibrium angle associated to each aspect ratio. Upon reducing the particle size to nanoscale, the equilibrium angle follows a descending or ascending trend in such a way that the equilibrium angle of a particle with the aspect ratio bigger than 1:1 (a discotic particle) goes to a parallel alignment with respect to the far-field nematic, whereas the equilibrium angle for a particle with the aspect ratio 1:1 and smaller (a rodlike particle) tends toward a perpendicular alignment to the uniform nematic direction. The discrepancy between the equilibrium angles of the mesoscopic and nanoscopic particles originates from the significant differences between their defect structures. The possible defect structures related to mesoscopic and nanoscopic colloidal particles of this geometry are also introduced. PMID:25679634

  17. Taylor dispersion in equilibrium gradient focusing at steady state.

    PubMed

    Ivory, Cornelius F

    2015-03-01

    An analytic expression is presented for the effective dispersion coefficient in the case where a solute is focused in a parabolic flow against a linear gradient in a restoring force. This expression was derived by employing a minor variation on the method of moments used by Aris in his development of the dispersion coefficients for a time-dependent, isocratic system. In the present case, dispersion is controlled by two dimensionless groups, a Peclet number which is proportional to the parabolic component of the flow, and a gradient number which is proportional to the slope of the restoring force. These results confirm that the Aris-Taylor expression for the dispersion coefficient should not be applied in cases where a solute is focused to a stationary steady state. PMID:25521436

  18. Characterizing the non-equilibrium ionization state of the intergalactic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvia, Devin W.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Smith, Britton D.; Shull, J. Michael; Turk, Matthew; Reynolds, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common ions used to track metals in the intergalactic medium (IGM) is OVI. Ion species in the IGM are typically assumed to be in ionization equilibrium, but owing to the low density of the plasma they may be significantly out of equilibrium. Divergences from equilibrium would make estimates of the amount and evolution of metals in the IGM incorrect. Using a new software package for building and solving complex chemical networks coupled to cosmological hydrodynamic + N-body simulations, we investigate the non-equilibrium properties of the IGM. In particular, we explore how significantly the ionization structure of the IGM diverges from the equilibrium state as a function of time and physical environment. Motivated by the abundant observational data that probes the intergalactic medium via OVI absorption lines in quasar spectra, we track all ionization states of atomic oxygen alongside those of hydrogen and helium. We use the results of these non-equilibrium simulations to characterize the mass content and ionization properties of the IGM and help interpret current observations made by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph.

  19. Equilibrium excited state and emission spectra of molecular aggregates from the hierarchical equations of motion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Yuanyuan; Chen, Liping; Bai, Shuming; Shi, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    The hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) method was applied to calculate the emission spectra of molecular aggregates using the Frenkel exciton model. HEOM equations for the one-exciton excited state were first propagated until equilibration. The reduced density operator and auxiliary density operators (ADOs) were used to characterize the coupled system-bath equilibrium. The dipole-dipole correlation functions were then calculated to obtain the emission spectra of model dimers, and the B850 band of light-harvesting complex II (LH2) in purple bacteria. The effect of static disorder on equilibrium excited state and the emission spectra of LH2 was also explicitly considered. Several approximation schemes, including the high temperature approximation (HTA) of the HEOM, a modified version of the HTA, the stochastic Liouville equation approach, the perturbative time-local and time-nonlocal generalized quantum master equations, were assessed in the calculation of the equilibrium excited state and emission spectra.

  20. Equilibrium State and Magnetic Permeability Tensor of the Epitaxial Ferrite Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobkov, V. B.; Zavislyak, I. V.

    1997-12-01

    The analysis of the equilibrium state of an arbitrarily oriented epitaxial ferrite film with basic cubic symmetry has been carried out. The equilibrium orientation of the magnetization has been shown to coincide with the direction of the applied magnetic field for (n, n, m), (m, n, 0) and (112) films that are magnetized parallel to the surface along the axes 110, 100 and 111, respectively. Conditions of the stability of the equilibrium state have been found. For (100), (110) and (111) films a simple technique for determining the magnetic parameters of the films by the use of the spectra of magnetostatic waves has been proposed. For those films the magnetic permeability tensor has been obtained. Different algorithms have been proposed for processing the MSW spectra.

  1. Cost of Living, Equilibrium Wages, and Cost of Public Services. City and State Indexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halstead, D. Kent

    This study presents indexes estimating the cost of living, value of amenities, and equilibrium wages in 579 cities and averages for the 50 states and the District of Columbia. An additional index of the cost of providing government public services is derived from these data. The indexes are intended to be useful tools for employees, unions,…

  2. Non-equilibrium oxidation states of zirconium during early stages of metal oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Wen; Yildiz, Bilge; Herbert, F. William; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.

    2015-03-09

    The chemical state of Zr during the initial, self-limiting stage of oxidation on single crystal zirconium (0001), with oxide thickness on the order of 1 nm, was probed by synchrotron x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of the Zr 3d spectrum by the spectrum reconstruction method demonstrated the formation of Zr{sup 1+}, Zr{sup 2+}, and Zr{sup 3+} as non-equilibrium oxidation states, in addition to Zr{sup 4+} in the stoichiometric ZrO{sub 2}. This finding resolves the long-debated question of whether it is possible to form any valence states between Zr{sup 0} and Zr{sup 4+} at the metal-oxide interface. The presence of local strong electric fields and the minimization of interfacial energy are assessed and demonstrated as mechanisms that can drive the formation of these non-equilibrium valence states of Zr.

  3. Non-equilibrium oxidation states of zirconium during early stages of metal oxidation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ma, Wen; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Herbert, F. William; Yildiz, Bilge

    2015-03-11

    The chemical state of Zr during the initial, self-limiting stage of oxidation on single crystal zirconium (0001), with oxide thickness on the order of 1 nm, was probed by synchrotron x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of the Zr 3d spectrum by the spectrum reconstruction method demonstrated the formation of Zr1+, Zr2+, and Zr3+ as non-equilibrium oxidation states, in addition to Zr4+ in the stoichiometric ZrO2. This finding resolves the long-debated question of whether it is possible to form any valence states between Zr0 and Zr4+ at the metal-oxide interface. As a result, the presence of local strong electric fields andmore » the minimization of interfacial energy are assessed and demonstrated as mechanisms that can drive the formation of these non-equilibrium valence states of Zr.« less

  4. Nonequilibrium Pump–Probe Photoexcitation as a Tool for Analyzing Unoccupied Equilibrium States of Correlated Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaji, Youhei; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-09-01

    Relaxation of electrons in a Hubbard ring coupled to a dissipative bosonic bath is studied to simulate the pump-probe photoemission measurement. From this insight, we propose an experimental method of eliciting the unoccupied part of single-particle spectra at the equilibrium of doped Mott insulators. We reveal first that the effective temperatures of distribution functions and electronic spectra are different during the relaxation, which makes the frequently employed thermalization picture inappropriate. Contrary to the conventional analysis, we show that the unoccupied spectra at equilibrium can be detected as the states that relax faster.

  5. Nonequilibrium Pump–Probe Photoexcitation as a Tool for Analyzing Unoccupied Equilibrium States of Correlated Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaji, Youhei; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-09-01

    Relaxation of electrons in a Hubbard model coupled to a dissipative bosonic bath is studied to simulate the pump-probe photoemission measurement. From this insight, we propose an experimental method of eliciting unoccupied part of the single-particle spectra at the equilibrium of doped-Mott insulators. We reveal first that effective temperatures of distribution functions and electronic spectra are different during the relaxation, which makes the frequently employed thermalization picture inappropriate. Contrary to the conventional analysis, we show that the unoccupied spectra at equilibrium can be detected as the states that relax faster.

  6. Saturated ideal kink/peeling formations described as three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic tokamak equilibrium states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Brunetti, D.; Duval, B. P.; Faustin, J. M.; Graves, J. P.; Kleiner, A.; Patten, H.; Pfefferlé, D.; Porte, L.; Raghunathan, M.; Reimerdes, H.; Sauter, O.; Tran, T. M.

    2016-04-01

    Free boundary magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium states with spontaneous three dimensional deformations of the plasma-vacuum interface are computed for the first time. The structures obtained have the appearance of saturated ideal external kink/peeling modes. High edge pressure gradients yield toroidal mode number n = 1 corrugations for a high edge bootstrap current and larger n distortions when this current is small. Deformations in the plasma boundary region induce a nonaxisymmetric Pfirsch-Schlüter current driving a field-aligned current ribbon consistent with reported experimental observations. A variation in the 3D equilibrium confirms that the n = 1 mode is a kink/peeling structure. We surmise that our calculated equilibrium structures constitute a viable model for the edge harmonic oscillations and outer modes associated with a quiescent H-mode operation in shaped tokamak plasmas.

  7. Equilibrium Topology of the Intermediate State in Type-I Superconductors of Different Shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Ruslan Prozorov

    2007-06-22

    A high-resolution magneto-optical technique was used to analyze flux patterns in the intermediate state of bulk Pb samples of various shapes--cones, hemispheres, and discs. Combined with the measurements of macroscopic magnetization, these results allowed studying the effect of bulk pinning and geometric barrier on the equilibrium structure of the intermediate state. Zero-bulk pinning discs and slabs show hysteretic behavior due to topological hysteresis--flux tubes on penetration and lamellae on flux exit. (Hemi)spheres and cones do not have a geometric barrier and show no hysteresis with flux tubes dominating the intermediate field region in both regimes. It is concluded that flux tubes represent the equilibrium topology of the intermediate state.

  8. A computer simulation using spreadsheets for learning concept of steady-state equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharda, Vandana; Sastri, O. S. K. S.; Bhardwaj, Jyoti; Jha, Arbind K.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a simple spreadsheet based simulation activity that can be performed by students at the undergraduate level. This simulation is implemented in free open source software (FOSS) LibreOffice Calc, which is available for both Windows and Linux platform. This activity aims at building the probability distribution for the possible macro-states of a system. This has been achieved by randomly sampling the configuration space consisting of all the possible microstates and determining the corresponding macrostate for each of the samples, which is akin to Monte-Carlo simulation. This simulation could act as a very useful tool in engaging students for learning the concepts of microstates, macrostates and steady state equilibrium, once the ideas have been introduced in the classroom. Further, the effect of the number of particles on the quality of steady state equilibrium achieved demonstrates the idea of thermodynamic limit.

  9. On Nash Equilibrium and Evolutionarily Stable States That Are Not Characterised by the Folk Theorem

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiawei; Kendall, Graham

    2015-01-01

    In evolutionary game theory, evolutionarily stable states are characterised by the folk theorem because exact solutions to the replicator equation are difficult to obtain. It is generally assumed that the folk theorem, which is the fundamental theory for non-cooperative games, defines all Nash equilibria in infinitely repeated games. Here, we prove that Nash equilibria that are not characterised by the folk theorem do exist. By adopting specific reactive strategies, a group of players can be better off by coordinating their actions in repeated games. We call it a type-k equilibrium when a group of k players coordinate their actions and they have no incentive to deviate from their strategies simultaneously. The existence and stability of the type-k equilibrium in general games is discussed. This study shows that the sets of Nash equilibria and evolutionarily stable states have greater cardinality than classic game theory has predicted in many repeated games. PMID:26288088

  10. The equilibrium state of hydrogen in gallium nitride: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS JR.,SAMUEL M.; WRIGHT,ALAN F.; PETERSEN,GARY A.; SEAGER,CARLETON H.; WAMPLER,WILLIAM R.; CRAWFORD,MARY H.; HAN,JUNG

    2000-04-17

    Formation energies and vibrational frequencies for H in wurtzite GaN were calculated from density functional theory and used to predict equilibrium state occupancies and solid solubilities for p-type, intrinsic, and n-type material. The solubility of deuterium (D) was measured at 600--800 C as a function of D{sub 2} pressure and doping and compared with theory. Agreement was obtained by reducing the H formation energies 0.2 eV from ab-initio theoretical values. The predicted stretch-mode frequency for H bound to the Mg acceptor lies 5% above an observed infrared absorption attributed to this complex. It is concluded that currently recognized H states and physical processes account for the equilibrium behavior of H examined in this work.

  11. Incorporation of a Chemical Equilibrium Equation of State into LOCI-Chem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Carey F.

    2005-01-01

    Renewed interest in development of advanced high-speed transport, reentry vehicles and propulsion systems has led to a resurgence of research into high speed aerodynamics. As this flow regime is typically dominated by hot reacting gaseous flow, efficient models for the characteristic chemical activity are necessary for accurate and cost effective analysis and design of aerodynamic vehicles that transit this regime. The LOCI-Chem code recently developed by Ed Luke at Mississippi State University for NASA/MSFC and used by NASA/MSFC and SSC represents an important step in providing an accurate, efficient computational tool for the simulation of reacting flows through the use of finite-rate kinetics [3]. Finite rate chemistry however, requires the solution of an additional N-1 species mass conservation equations with source terms involving reaction kinetics that are not fully understood. In the equilibrium limit, where the reaction rates approach infinity, these equations become very stiff. Through the use of the assumption of local chemical equilibrium the set of governing equations is reduced back to the usual gas dynamic equations, and thus requires less computation, while still allowing for the inclusion of reacting flow phenomenology. The incorporation of a chemical equilibrium equation of state module into the LOCI-Chem code was the primary objective of the current research. The major goals of the project were: (1) the development of a chemical equilibrium composition solver, and (2) the incorporation of chemical equilibrium solver into LOCI-Chem. Due to time and resource constraints, code optimization was not considered unless it was important to the proper functioning of the code.

  12. Thermal Equilibrium of a Macroscopic Quantum System in a Pure State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Sheldon; Huse, David A.; Lebowitz, Joel L.; Tumulka, Roderich

    2015-09-01

    We consider the notion of thermal equilibrium for an individual closed macroscopic quantum system in a pure state, i.e., described by a wave function. The macroscopic properties in thermal equilibrium of such a system, determined by its wave function, must be the same as those obtained from thermodynamics, e.g., spatial uniformity of temperature and chemical potential. When this is true we say that the system is in macroscopic thermal equilibrium (MATE). Such a system may, however, not be in microscopic thermal equilibrium (MITE). The latter requires that the reduced density matrices of small subsystems be close to those obtained from the microcanonical, equivalently the canonical, ensemble for the whole system. The distinction between MITE and MATE is particularly relevant for systems with many-body localization for which the energy eigenfuctions fail to be in MITE while necessarily most of them, but not all, are in MATE. We note, however, that for generic macroscopic systems, including those with MBL, most wave functions in an energy shell are in both MATE and MITE. For a classical macroscopic system, MATE holds for most phase points on the energy surface, but MITE fails to hold for any phase point.

  13. Adaptive behaviour and multiple equilibrium states in a predator-prey model.

    PubMed

    Pimenov, Alexander; Kelly, Thomas C; Korobeinikov, Andrei; O'Callaghan, Michael J A; Rachinskii, Dmitrii

    2015-05-01

    There is evidence that multiple stable equilibrium states are possible in real-life ecological systems. Phenomenological mathematical models which exhibit such properties can be constructed rather straightforwardly. For instance, for a predator-prey system this result can be achieved through the use of non-monotonic functional response for the predator. However, while formal formulation of such a model is not a problem, the biological justification for such functional responses and models is usually inconclusive. In this note, we explore a conjecture that a multitude of equilibrium states can be caused by an adaptation of animal behaviour to changes of environmental conditions. In order to verify this hypothesis, we consider a simple predator-prey model, which is a straightforward extension of the classic Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model. In this model, we made an intuitively transparent assumption that the prey can change a mode of behaviour in response to the pressure of predation, choosing either "safe" of "risky" (or "business as usual") behaviour. In order to avoid a situation where one of the modes gives an absolute advantage, we introduce the concept of the "cost of a policy" into the model. A simple conceptual two-dimensional predator-prey model, which is minimal with this property, and is not relying on odd functional responses, higher dimensionality or behaviour change for the predator, exhibits two stable co-existing equilibrium states with basins of attraction separated by a separatrix of a saddle point. PMID:25732186

  14. Equilibrium points of the tilted perfect fluid Bianchi VIh state space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolopoulos, Pantelis S.

    2005-05-01

    We present the full set of evolution equations for the spatially homogeneous cosmologies of type VIh filled with a tilted perfect fluid and we provide the corresponding equilibrium points of the resulting dynamical state space. It is found that only when the group parameter satisfies h > -1 a self-similar solution exists. In particular we show that for h > -{1/9} there exists a self-similar equilibrium point provided that γ ∈ ({2(3+sqrt{-h})/5+3sqrt{-h}},{3/2}) whereas for h < -{frac 19} the state parameter belongs to the interval γ ∈(1,{2(3+sqrt{-h})/5+3sqrt{-h}}). This family of new exact self-similar solutions belongs to the subclass nαα = 0 having non-zero vorticity. In both cases the equilibrium points have a six-dimensional stable manifold and may act as future attractors at least for the models satisfying nαα = 0. Also we give the exact form of the self-similar metrics in terms of the state and group parameter. As an illustrative example we provide the explicit form of the corresponding self-similar radiation model (γ = {frac 43}), parametrised by the group parameter h. Finally we show that there are no tilted self-similar models of type III and irrotational models of type VIh.

  15. Single-molecule measurement of the effective temperature in non-equilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterich, E.; Camunas-Soler, J.; Ribezzi-Crivellari, M.; Seifert, U.; Ritort, F.

    2015-11-01

    Temperature is a well-defined quantity for systems in equilibrium. For glassy systems, it has been extended to the non-equilibrium regime, showing up as an effective quantity in a modified version of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. However, experimental evidence supporting this definition remains scarce. Here, we present the first direct experimental demonstration of the effective temperature by measuring correlations and responses in single molecules in non-equilibrium steady states generated under external random forces. We combine experiment, analytical theory and simulations for systems with different levels of complexity, ranging from a single bead in an optical trap to two-state and multiple-state DNA hairpins. From these data, we extract a unifying picture for the existence of an effective temperature based on the relative order of various timescales characterizing intrinsic relaxation and external driving. Our study thus introduces driven small systems as a fertile ground to address fundamental concepts in statistical physics, condensed-matter physics and biophysics.

  16. Conservative-variable average states for equilibrium gas multi-dimensional fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannelli, G. S.

    1992-01-01

    Modern split component evaluations of the flux vector Jacobians are thoroughly analyzed for equilibrium-gas average-state determinations. It is shown that all such derivations satisfy a fundamental eigenvalue consistency theorem. A conservative-variable average state is then developed for arbitrary equilibrium-gas equations of state and curvilinear-coordinate fluxes. Original expressions for eigenvalues, sound speed, Mach number, and eigenvectors are then determined for a general average Jacobian, and it is shown that the average eigenvalues, Mach number, and eigenvectors may not coincide with their classical pointwise counterparts. A general equilibrium-gas equation of state is then discussed for conservative-variable computational fluid dynamics (CFD) Euler formulations. The associated derivations lead to unique compatibility relations that constrain the pressure Jacobian derivatives. Thereafter, alternative forms for the pressure variation and average sound speed are developed in terms of two average pressure Jacobian derivatives. Significantly, no additional degree of freedom exists in the determination of these two average partial derivatives of pressure. Therefore, they are simultaneously computed exactly without any auxiliary relation, hence without any geometric solution projection or arbitrary scale factors. Several alternative formulations are then compared and key differences highlighted with emphasis on the determination of the pressure variation and average sound speed. The relevant underlying assumptions are identified, including some subtle approximations that are inherently employed in published average-state procedures. Finally, a representative test case is discussed for which an intrinsically exact average state is determined. This exact state is then compared with the predictions of recent methods, and their inherent approximations are appropriately quantified.

  17. MHD-instability of the equilibrium state of the surface of a conductive liquid thin layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnichenko, I.; Khripchenko, S.

    2001-12-01

    In this paper, the phenomenon of MHD-instability of the surface equilibrium of a conductive liquid thin layer under small long-wave disturbances is investigated. The layer is under the action of electric and magnetic fields. The equations of motion and oscillation of the layer surface about the equilibrium state are presented. The equation of oscillation is investigated by the methods of the linear stability theory. A numerical analysis of the equations of motion allows to obtain some neutral curves for different values of the magnetic fields. These curves divide the region of process parameters into two domains of stability and instability for small long-wave disturbances. Figs 2, Refs 5.

  18. Far-from-equilibrium distribution from near-steady-state work fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Marsland, Robert; England, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    A long-standing goal of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics has been to extend the conceptual power of the Boltzmann distribution to driven systems. We report some new progress towards this goal. Instead of writing the nonequilibrium steady-state distribution in terms of perturbations around thermal equilibrium, we start from the linearized driven dynamics of observables about their stable fixed point, and expand in the strength of the nonlinearities encountered during typical fluctuations away from the fixed point. The first terms in this expansion retain the simplicity of known expansions about equilibrium, but can correctly describe the statistics of a certain class of systems even under strong driving. We illustrate this approach by comparison with a numerical simulation of a sheared Brownian colloid, where we find that the first two terms in our expansion are sufficient to account for the shear thinning behavior at high shear rates. PMID:26651660

  19. Non-equilibrium steady states in two-temperature Ising models with Kawasaki dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchers, Nick; Pleimling, Michel; Zia, R. K. P.

    2013-03-01

    From complex biological systems to a simple simmering pot, thermodynamic systems held out of equilibrium are exceedingly common in nature. Despite this, a general theory to describe these types of phenomena remains elusive. In this talk, we explore a simple modification of the venerable Ising model in hopes of shedding some light on these issues. In both one and two dimensions, systems attached to two distinct heat reservoirs exhibit many of the hallmarks of phase transition. When such systems settle into a non-equilibrium steady-state they exhibit numerous interesting phenomena, including an unexpected ``freezing by heating.'' There are striking and surprising similarities between the behavior of these systems in one and two dimensions, but also intriguing differences. These phenomena will be explored and possible approaches to understanding the behavior will be suggested. Supported by the US National Science Foundation through Grants DMR-0904999, DMR-1205309, and DMR-1244666

  20. Steady State Transportation Cooling in Porous Media Under Local, Non-Thermal Equilibrium Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Alvaro Che

    2002-01-01

    An analytical solution to the steady-state fluid temperature for 1-D (one dimensional) transpiration cooling has been derived. Transpiration cooling has potential use in the aerospace industry for protection against high heating environments for re-entry vehicles. Literature for analytical treatments of transpiration cooling has been largely confined to the assumption of thermal equilibrium between the porous matrix and fluid. In the present analysis, the fundamental fluid and matrix equations are coupled through a volumetric heat transfer coefficient and investigated in non-thermal equilibrium. The effects of varying the thermal conductivity of the solid matrix and the heat transfer coefficient are investigated. The results are also compared to existing experimental data.

  1. Infinite-mode squeezed coherent states and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics (phase-space-picture approach)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Leehwa

    1993-01-01

    The phase-space-picture approach to quantum non-equilibrium statistical mechanics via the characteristic function of infinite-mode squeezed coherent states is introduced. We use quantum Brownian motion as an example to show how this approach provides an interesting geometrical interpretation of quantum non-equilibrium phenomena.

  2. Non-equilibrium oxidation states of zirconium during early stages of metal oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Wen; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Herbert, F. William; Yildiz, Bilge

    2015-03-11

    The chemical state of Zr during the initial, self-limiting stage of oxidation on single crystal zirconium (0001), with oxide thickness on the order of 1 nm, was probed by synchrotron x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of the Zr 3d spectrum by the spectrum reconstruction method demonstrated the formation of Zr1+, Zr2+, and Zr3+ as non-equilibrium oxidation states, in addition to Zr4+ in the stoichiometric ZrO2. This finding resolves the long-debated question of whether it is possible to form any valence states between Zr0 and Zr4+ at the metal-oxide interface. As a result, the presence of local strong electric fields and the minimization of interfacial energy are assessed and demonstrated as mechanisms that can drive the formation of these non-equilibrium valence states of Zr.

  3. Minimally entangled typical thermal states versus matrix product purifications for the simulation of equilibrium states and time evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Moritz; Barthel, Thomas

    We compare matrix product purifications and minimally entangled typical thermal states (METTS) for the simulation of equilibrium states and finite-temperature response functions of strongly correlated quantum many-body systems. For METTS, we highlight the interplay of statistical and DMRG truncation errors, discuss the use of self-averaging effects, and describe schemes for the computation of response functions. We assess the computation costs and accuracies of the two methods for critical and gapped spin chains and the Bose-Hubbard model. For the same computation cost, purifications yield more accurate results than METTS except for temperatures well below the system's energy gap.

  4. Minimally entangled typical thermal states versus matrix product purifications for the simulation of equilibrium states and time evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Moritz; Barthel, Thomas

    We compare matrix product purifications and minimally entangled typical thermal states (METTS) for the simulation of equilibrium states and finite-temperature response functions of strongly correlated quantum many-body systems. For METTS, we highlight the interplay of statistical and DMRG truncation errors, discuss the use of self-averaging effects, and describe schemes for the computation of response functions. We assess the computation costs and accuracies of the two methods for critical and gapped spin chains and the Bose-Hubbard model. For the same computation cost, purifications yield more accurate results than METTS except for temperatures well below the system's energy gap. (Phys. Rev. B 92, 125119 (2015)

  5. Non-equilibrium steady-state distributions of colloids in a tilted periodic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoguang; Lai, Pik-Yin; Ackerson, Bruce; Tong, Penger

    A two-layer colloidal system is constructed to study the effects of the external force F on the non-equilibrium steady-state (NESS) dynamics of the diffusing particles over a tilted periodic potential, in which detailed balance is broken due to the presence of a steady particle flux. The periodic potential is provided by the bottom layer colloidal spheres forming a fixed crystalline pattern on a glass substrate. The corrugated surface of the bottom colloidal crystal provides a gravitational potential field for the top layer diffusing particles. By tilting the sample with respect to gravity, a tangential component F is applied to the diffusing particles. The measured NESS probability density function Pss (x , y) of the particles is found to deviate from the equilibrium distribution depending on the driving or distance from equilibrium. The experimental results are compared with the exact solution of the 1D Smoluchowski equation and the numerical results of the 2D Smoluchowski equation. Moreover, from the obtained exact 1D solution, we develop an analytical method to accurately extract the 1D potential U0 (x) from the measured Pss (x) . Work supported in part by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong SAR.

  6. xTRAM: Estimating Equilibrium Expectations from Time-Correlated Simulation Data at Multiple Thermodynamic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mey, Antonia S. J. S.; Wu, Hao; Noé, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Computing the equilibrium properties of complex systems, such as free energy differences, is often hampered by rare events in the dynamics. Enhanced sampling methods may be used in order to speed up sampling by, for example, using high temperatures, as in parallel tempering, or simulating with a biasing potential such as in the case of umbrella sampling. The equilibrium properties of the thermodynamic state of interest (e.g., lowest temperature or unbiased potential) can be computed using reweighting estimators such as the weighted histogram analysis method or the multistate Bennett acceptance ratio (MBAR). weighted histogram analysis method and MBAR produce unbiased estimates, the simulation samples from the global equilibria at their respective thermodynamic states—a requirement that can be prohibitively expensive for some simulations such as a large parallel tempering ensemble of an explicitly solvated biomolecule. Here, we introduce the transition-based reweighting analysis method (TRAM)—a class of estimators that exploit ideas from Markov modeling and only require the simulation data to be in local equilibrium within subsets of the configuration space. We formulate the expanded TRAM (xTRAM) estimator that is shown to be asymptotically unbiased and a generalization of MBAR. Using four exemplary systems of varying complexity, we demonstrate the improved convergence (ranging from a twofold improvement to several orders of magnitude) of xTRAM in comparison to a direct counting estimator and MBAR, with respect to the invested simulation effort. Lastly, we introduce a random-swapping simulation protocol that can be used with xTRAM, gaining orders-of-magnitude advantages over simulation protocols that require the constraint of sampling from a global equilibrium.

  7. Condensation coefficient of methanol vapor near vapor-liquid equilibrium states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, S.; Yano, T.; Ichijo, M.; Iwanami, K.

    This paper is concerned with the nonequilibrium condensation from a vapor to a liquid phase on the plate endwall of a shock tube behind a reflected shock wave. The growth of a liquid film on the endwall is measured by an optical interferometer using a laser beam. The experiment is carefully conducted on the precisely designed apparatus, and thereby the condensation coefficient of methanol vapor is determined in a wide range of vapor-liquid conditions from near to far from equilibrium states. The result shows that the condensation coefficient increases with the increase of the ratio of number densities of vapor and saturated vapor at the interface.

  8. Canonical deformations of surfaces of equilibrium states in thermodynamic phase space

    PubMed

    Jurkowski

    2000-08-01

    Deformations of submanifolds of thermodynamic equilibrium states introduced by continuous contact maps on a phase-space manifold are considered in terms of the geometrical formulation of thermodynamics. The notion of a contact Hamiltonian is recalled in order to give some possible physical interpretations of such a function in terms of statistical quantities describing initial and deformed systems. Using contact flows we propose a very efficient method for constructing continuous families of thermodynamic systems. A few examples show the possible advantages of using contact Hamiltonians. PMID:11088641

  9. Equilibrium States for Interval Maps: Potentials with sup φ - inf φ < h top ( f)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruin, Henk; Todd, Mike

    2008-11-01

    We study an inducing scheme approach for smooth interval maps to prove existence and uniqueness of equilibrium states for potentials φ with the `bounded range' condition sup φ - inf φ < h top ( f), first used by Hofbauer and Keller [HK]. We compare our results to Hofbauer and Keller's use of Perron-Frobenius operators. We demonstrate that this `bounded range' condition on the potential is important even if the potential is Hölder continuous. We also prove analyticity of the pressure in this context.

  10. Long-lived non-equilibrium states in a quantum-Hall Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Toshimasa; Washio, Kazuhisa; Nakazawa, Ryo; Hashisaka, Masayuki; Muraki, Koji; Tokura, Yasuhiro

    The existence of long-lived non-equilibrium states without showing thermalization, which has previously been demonstrated in time evolution of ultracold atoms (quantum quench), suggests the possibility of their spatial analogue in transport behavior of interacting electrons in solid-state systems. Here we report long-lived non-equilibrium states in one-dimensional edge channels in the integer quantum Hall regime. For this purpose, non-trivial binary spectrum composed of hot and cold carriers is prepared by an indirect heating scheme using weakly coupled counterpropagating edge channels in an AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. Quantum dot spectroscopy clearly reveals that the carriers with the non-trivial binary spectrum propagate over a long distance (5 - 10 um), much longer than the length required for electronic relaxation (about 0.1 um), without thermalization into a trivial Fermi distribution. This observation is consistent with the integrable model of Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid. The long-lived spectrum implies that the system is well described by non-interacting plasmons, which are attractive for carrying information for a long distance. This work was supported by the JSPS 26247051 and 15H05854, and Nanotechnology Platform Program of MEXT.

  11. Equilibrium and Steady State of Dense Z-Pinches Superposing a Small Amount of Axial Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Mitsuhiro; Miyamoto, Tetsu

    2016-07-01

    The pressure equilibrium and steady state of z-pinches trapping a small amount of axial magnetic flux are studied. The Bennett relation and the Pease-Braginskii-current are modified, taking into account the superposed axial field. The line energy density decreases in the modified Bennett relation, but the decrease is only of the order ɛ2, where ɛ = (the axial field strength at the axis)/(the azimuthal field strength at the plasma periphery) ≪ 1. On the other hand, the current in the steady state can increase without being limited by the Pease-Braginskii-current. Hence, the radiation collapse is prevented. The decrease of line energy density in the modified Bennett relation is almost canceled in the steady state.

  12. On the state-dependency of the equilibrium climate sensitivity during the last 5 million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, P.; de Boer, B.; von der Heydt, A. S.; Stap, L. B.; van de Wal, R. S. W.

    2015-07-01

    A still open question is how equilibrium warming in response to increasing radiative forcing - the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S - is depending on background climate. We here present paleo-data based evidence on the state-dependency of S, by using CO2 proxy data together with 3-D ice-sheet model-based reconstruction of land ice albedo over the last 5 million years (Myr). We find that the land-ice albedo forcing depends non-linearly on the background climate, while any non-linearity of CO2 radiative forcing depends on the CO2 data set used. This non-linearity was in similar approaches not accounted for due to previously more simplistic approximations of land-ice albedo radiative forcing being a linear function of sea level change. Important for the non-linearity between land-ice albedo and sea level is a latitudinal dependency in ice sheet area changes.In our setup, in which the radiative forcing of CO2 and of the land-ice albedo (LI) is combined, we find a state-dependency in the calculated specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S[CO2,LI] for most of the Pleistocene (last 2.1 Myr). During Pleistocene intermediate glaciated climates and interglacial periods S[CO2,LI] is on average ∼ 45 % larger than during Pleistocene full glacial conditions. In the Pliocene part of our analysis (2.6-5 Myr BP) the CO2 data uncertainties prevents a well-supported calculation for S[CO2,LI], but our analysis suggests that during times without a large land-ice area in the Northern Hemisphere (e.g. before 2.82 Myr BP) the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S[CO2,LI] was smaller than during interglacials of the Pleistocene. We thus find support for a previously proposed state-change in the climate system with the wide appearance of northern hemispheric ice sheets. This study points for the first time to a so far overlooked non-linearity in the land-ice albedo radiative forcing, which is important for similar paleo data-based approaches to calculate climate

  13. On the state dependency of the equilibrium climate sensitivity during the last 5 million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, P.; de Boer, B.; von der Heydt, A. S.; Stap, L. B.; van de Wal, R. S. W.

    2015-12-01

    It is still an open question how equilibrium warming in response to increasing radiative forcing - the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity S - depends on background climate. We here present palaeodata-based evidence on the state dependency of S, by using CO2 proxy data together with a 3-D ice-sheet-model-based reconstruction of land ice albedo over the last 5 million years (Myr). We find that the land ice albedo forcing depends non-linearly on the background climate, while any non-linearity of CO2 radiative forcing depends on the CO2 data set used. This non-linearity has not, so far, been accounted for in similar approaches due to previously more simplistic approximations, in which land ice albedo radiative forcing was a linear function of sea level change. The latitudinal dependency of ice-sheet area changes is important for the non-linearity between land ice albedo and sea level. In our set-up, in which the radiative forcing of CO2 and of the land ice albedo (LI) is combined, we find a state dependence in the calculated specific equilibrium climate sensitivity, S[CO2,LI], for most of the Pleistocene (last 2.1 Myr). During Pleistocene intermediate glaciated climates and interglacial periods, S[CO2,LI] is on average ~ 45 % larger than during Pleistocene full glacial conditions. In the Pliocene part of our analysis (2.6-5 Myr BP) the CO2 data uncertainties prevent a well-supported calculation for S[CO2,LI], but our analysis suggests that during times without a large land ice area in the Northern Hemisphere (e.g. before 2.82 Myr BP), the specific equilibrium climate sensitivity, S[CO2,LI], was smaller than during interglacials of the Pleistocene. We thus find support for a previously proposed state change in the climate system with the widespread appearance of northern hemispheric ice sheets. This study points for the first time to a so far overlooked non-linearity in the land ice albedo radiative forcing, which is important for similar palaeodata

  14. Non-equilibrium Steady-State Behavior in a Scale-Free Quantum Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianshi; Price, Craig; Liu, Qi; Gemelke, Nathan

    We describe the nonequilibrium dynamics of a cold atomic gas held in a spatially random optical potential and gravity, subject to a controlled amount of dissipation in the form of an extremely slow dark-state laser cooling process. Reaching local kinetic temperatures below the 100nK scale, such systems provide a novel context for observing the non-equilibrium steady-state (NESS) behavior of a disordered quantum system. For sufficiently deep potentials and strong dissipation, this system can be modeled by a self-organized version of directed percolation, and exhibits power-law decay of phase-space density with time due to the presence of absorbing clusters with a wide distribution of entropy and coupling rates. In the absence of dissipation, such a model cannot apply, and we observe the crossover to exponential loss of phase-space density. We provide measurements of the power-law decay constant by observing the non-equilibrium motion of atoms over a ten-minute period, consistent with γ = 0 . 31 +/- 0 . 04 , and extract scaling of the absorbed number with dissipation rate, showing another power-law behavior, with exponent 0 . 5 +/- 0 . 2 over two decades of optical excitation probability.

  15. The number statistics and optimal history of non-equilibrium steady states of mortal diffusing particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerson, Baruch

    2015-05-01

    Suppose that a point-like steady source at x = 0 injects particles into a half-infinite line. The particles diffuse and die. At long times a non-equilibrium steady state sets in, and we assume that it involves many particles. If the particles are non-interacting, their total number N in the steady state is Poisson-distributed with mean \\bar{N} predicted from a deterministic reaction-diffusion equation. Here we determine the most likely density history of this driven system conditional on observing a given N. We also consider two prototypical examples of interacting diffusing particles: (i) a family of mortal diffusive lattice gases with constant diffusivity (as illustrated by the simple symmetric exclusion process with mortal particles), and (ii) random walkers that can annihilate in pairs. In both examples we calculate the variances of the (non-Poissonian) stationary distributions of N.

  16. Hydrogen-exchange labeling study of the allosteric R-state to T-state equilibrium in methemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnie, R. E.; Englander, J. J.; Englander, S. W.

    1991-12-01

    Hydrogen-exchange labeling methods can be used to identify functionally important changes at positions all through a protein structure, can monitor the effect at these positions of structure changes anywhere in the protein, and can quantify these effects in terms of change in structural-stabilization free energy. These methods were used to study effects at two widely separated positions in human methemoglobin (metHb). The results show that the observed changes in hydrogen-exchange behavior reflect changes in the global R-state to T-state equilibrium, and specifically that stabilizing salt links at the α-chain N-terminus and the β-chain C-terminus are reformed in the R-T transition. The strong allosteric effector, inositol hexaphosphate (IHP), switches R-state methemoglobin to the T-state, but achieves a T/R equilibrium constant of only ≈ 3 (at pH=6.5, 0°C). Addition of the weaker effector, bezafibrate (Bzf), promotes this transition by an additional 0.7 kcal (T/R shifts to ≈ 12). Bzf alone is insufficient to cause the transition, indicating that R/T is 10 or more in stripped metHb under these conditions. However, R/T is small enough, not more than 103, to be reversed by the differential (T versus R) binding energy of IHP. The R-T transition caused by IHP and Bzf acting together can be reversed by some covalent modifications that sever the stabilizing salt links at the chain termini and thus favor transition back to the R-state.

  17. Numerical study of the steady state fluctuation relations far from equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stephen R; Searles, Debra J; Evans, Denis J

    2006-05-21

    A thermostatted dynamical model with five degrees of freedom is used to test the fluctuation relation of Evans and Searles (Omega-FR) and that of Gallavotti and Cohen (Lambda-FR). In the absence of an external driving field, the model generates a time-independent ergodic equilibrium state with two conjugate pairs of Lyapunov exponents. Each conjugate pair sums to zero. The fluctuation relations are tested numerically both near and far from equilibrium. As expected from previous work, near equilibrium the Omega-FR is verified by the simulation data while the Lambda-FR is not confirmed by the data. Far from equilibrium where a positive exponent in one of these conjugate pairs becomes negative, we test a conjecture regarding the Lambda-FR [Bonetto et al., Physica D 105, 226 (1997); Giuliani et al., J. Stat. Phys. 119, 909 (2005)]. It was conjectured that when the number of nontrivial Lyapunov exponents that are positive becomes less than the number of such negative exponents, then the form of the Lambda-FR needs to be corrected. We show that there is no evidence for this conjecture in the empirical data. In fact, when the correction factor differs from unity, the corrected form of Lambda-FR is less accurate than the uncorrected Lambda-FR. Also as the field increases the uncorrected Lambda-FR appears to be satisfied with increasing accuracy. The reason for this observation is likely to be that as the field increases, the argument of the Lambda-FR more and more accurately approximates the argument of the Omega-FR. Since the Omega-FR works for arbitrary field strengths, the uncorrected Lambda-FR appears to become ever more accurate as the field increases. The final piece of evidence against the conjecture is that when the smallest positive exponent changes sign, the conjecture predicts a discontinuous change in the "correction factor" for Lambda-FR. We see no evidence for a discontinuity at this field strength. PMID:16729798

  18. Reprint of: Out-of-equilibrium dynamics in superspin glass state of strongly interacting magnetic nanoparticle assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamae, Sawako

    2014-11-01

    Interacting magnetic nanoparticles display a wide variety of magnetic behaviors ranging from modified superparamagnetism, superspin glass to possibly, superferromagnetism. The superspin glass state is described by its slow and out-of-equilibrium magnetic behaviors akin to those found in atomic spin glasses. In this article, recent experimental findings on superspin correlation length growth and the violation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem obtained in concentrated frozen ferrofluids are presented to illustrate certain out-of-equilibrium dynamics behavior in superspin glasses.

  19. Indicial response approach derived from Navier-Stokes equations. Part 1: Time-invariant equilibrium state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, K. V.; Tobak, M.

    1990-01-01

    The indicial response approach is recast in a form appropriate to the study of vortex induced oscillations phenomena. An appropriate form is demonstrated for the indicial response of the velocity field which may be derived directly from the Navier-Stokes equations. On the basis of the Navier-Stokes equations, it is demonstrated how a form of the velocity response to an arbitrary motion may be determined. To establish its connection with the previous work, the new approach is applied first to the simple situation wherein the indicial response has a time invariant equilibrium state. Results for the aerodynamic response to an arbitrary motion are shown to confirm to the form obtained previously.

  20. Relaxation from Steady States Far from Equilibrium and the Persistence of Anomalous Shock Behavior in Weakly Ionized Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Auslender, Aaron H.

    1999-01-01

    The decay of anomalous effects on shock waves in weakly ionized gases following plasma generator extinction has been measured in the anticipation that the decay time must correlate well with the relaxation time of the mechanism responsible for the anomalous effects. When the relaxation times cannot be measured directly, they are inferred theoretically, usually assuming that the initial state is nearly in thermal equilibrium. In this paper, it is demonstrated that relaxation from any steady state far from equilibrium, including the state of a weakly ionized gas, can proceed much more slowly than arguments based on relaxation from near equilibrium states might suggest. This result justifies a more careful analysis of the relaxation times in weakly ionized gases and suggests that although the experimental measurements of relaxation times did not lead to an unambiguous conclusion, this approach to understanding the anomalous effects may warrant further investigation.

  1. Equilibrium equation of state of a hard sphere binary mixture at very large densities using replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Odriozola, Gerardo; Berthier, Ludovic

    2011-02-01

    We use replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations to measure the equilibrium equation of state of the disordered fluid state for a binary hard sphere mixture up to very large densities where standard Monte Carlo simulations do not easily reach thermal equilibrium. For the moderate system sizes we use (up to N = 100), we find no sign of a pressure discontinuity near the location of dynamic glass singularities extrapolated using either algebraic or simple exponential divergences, suggesting they do not correspond to genuine thermodynamic glass transitions. Several scenarios are proposed for the fate of the fluid state in the thermodynamic limit. PMID:21303135

  2. Influence of Electron-Impact Multiple Ionization on Equilibrium and Dynamic Charge State Distributions: A Case Study Using Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2015-02-01

    We describe the influence of electron-impact multiple ionization (EIMI) on the ionization balance of collisionally ionized plasmas. Previous ionization balance calculations have largely neglected EIMI. Here, EIMI cross-section data are incorporated into calculations of both equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions (CSDs). For equilibrium CSDs, we find that EIMI has only a small effect and can usually be ignored. However, for non-equilibrium plasmas the influence of EIMI can be important. In particular, we find that for plasmas in which the temperature oscillates there are significant differences in the CSD when including versus neglecting EIMI. These results have implications for modeling and spectroscopy of impulsively heated plasmas, such as nanoflare heating of the solar corona.

  3. INFLUENCE OF ELECTRON-IMPACT MULTIPLE IONIZATION ON EQUILIBRIUM AND DYNAMIC CHARGE STATE DISTRIBUTIONS: A CASE STUDY USING IRON

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2015-02-10

    We describe the influence of electron-impact multiple ionization (EIMI) on the ionization balance of collisionally ionized plasmas. Previous ionization balance calculations have largely neglected EIMI. Here, EIMI cross-section data are incorporated into calculations of both equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge-state distributions (CSDs). For equilibrium CSDs, we find that EIMI has only a small effect and can usually be ignored. However, for non-equilibrium plasmas the influence of EIMI can be important. In particular, we find that for plasmas in which the temperature oscillates there are significant differences in the CSD when including versus neglecting EIMI. These results have implications for modeling and spectroscopy of impulsively heated plasmas, such as nanoflare heating of the solar corona.

  4. Exterior integrability: Yang-Baxter form of non-equilibrium steady-state density operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosen, Tomaž; Ilievski, Enej; Popkov, Vladislav

    2013-07-01

    A new type of quantum transfer matrix, arising as a Cholesky factor for the steady-state density matrix of a dissipative Markovian process associated with the boundary-driven Lindblad equation for the isotropic spin-1/2 Heisenberg (XXX) chain, is presented. The transfer matrix forms a commuting family of non-Hermitian operators depending on the spectral parameter, which is essentially the strength of dissipative coupling at the boundaries. The intertwining of the corresponding Lax and monodromy matrices is performed by an infinitely dimensional Yang-Baxter R-matrix, which we construct explicitly and is essentially different from the standard 4 × 4 XXX R-matrix. We also discuss a possibility to construct Bethe ansatz for the spectrum and eigenstates of the non-equilibrium steady-state density operator. Furthermore, we indicate the existence of a deformed R-matrix in the infinite dimensional auxiliary space for the anisotropic XXZ spin-1/2 chain, which in general provides a sequence of new, possibly quasi-local, conserved quantities of the bulk XXZ dynamics.

  5. Enhanced magnetic flux density mapping using coherent steady state equilibrium signal in MREIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Lee, Mun Bae; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2016-03-01

    Measuring the z-component of magnetic flux density B = (Bx, By, Bz) induced by transversally injected current, magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) aims to visualize electrical property (current density and/or conductivity distribution) in a three-dimensional imaging object. For practical implementations of MREIT technique, it is critical to reduce injection of current pulse within safety requirements. With the goal of minimizing the noise level in measured Bz data, we propose a new method to enhance the measure Bz data using steady-state coherent gradient multi-echo (SSC-GME) MR pulse sequence combining with injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) method in MREIT, where the ICNE technique injects current during a readout gradient to maximize the signal intensity of phase signal including Bz. The total phase offset in SSC-GME includes additional magnetic flux density due to the injected current, which is different from the phase signal for the conventional spoiled MR pulse sequence. We decompose the magnetization precession phase from the total phase offset including Bz and optimize Bz data using the steady-state equilibrium signal. Results from a real phantom experiment including different kinds of anomalies demonstrated that the proposed method enhanced Bz comparing to a conventional spoiled pulse sequence.

  6. The crossover between organized and disorganized states in some non-equilibrium systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Diego Luis; Téllez, Gabriel

    2009-05-01

    We study numerically the crossover between organized and disorganized states of three non-equilibrium systems: the Poisson/coalesce random walk (PCRW), a one-dimensional spin system and a quasi one-dimensional lattice gas. In all cases, we describe this crossover in terms of the average spacing between particles/domain borders langS(t)rang and the spacing distribution functions p(n)(s). The nature of the crossover is not the same for all systems; however, we found that for all systems the nearest neighbor distribution p(0)(s) is well fitted by the Berry-Robnik model. The destruction of the level repulsion in the crossover between organized and disorganized states is present in all systems. Additionally, we found that the correlations between domains in the gas and spin systems are not strong and can be neglected in a first approximation, but for the PCRW the correlations between particles must be taken into account. To find p(n)(s) with n > 1, we propose two different analytical models based on the Berry-Robnik model. Our models give us a good approximation for the statistical behavior of these systems at their crossover and allow us to quantify the degree of order/disorder of the system.

  7. Evidence for out-of-equilibrium states in warm dense matter probed by x-ray Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Clérouin, Jean; Robert, Grégory; Arnault, Philippe; Ticknor, Christopher; Kress, Joel D; Collins, Lee A

    2015-01-01

    A recent and unexpected discrepancy between ab initio simulations and the interpretation of a laser shock experiment on aluminum, probed by x-ray Thomson scattering (XRTS), is addressed. The ion-ion structure factor deduced from the XRTS elastic peak (ion feature) is only compatible with a strongly coupled out-of-equilibrium state. Orbital free molecular dynamics simulations with ions colder than the electrons are employed to interpret the experiment. The relevance of decoupled temperatures for ions and electrons is discussed. The possibility that it mimics a transient, or metastable, out-of-equilibrium state after melting is also suggested. PMID:25679563

  8. A second perspective on the Amann-Schmiedl-Seifert criterion for non-equilibrium in a three-state system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chen; Chen, Yong

    2015-05-01

    In the work of Amann, Schmiedl and Seifert (2010 J. Chem. Phys. 132 041102), the authors derived a sufficient criterion to identify a non-equilibrium steady state (NESS) in a three-state Markov system based on the coarse-grained information of two-state trajectories. In this paper, we present a mathematical derivation and provide a probabilistic interpretation of the Amann-Schmiedl-Seifert (ASS) criterion. Moreover, the ASS criterion is compared with some other criterions for a NESS.

  9. Reactive and internal contributions to the thermal conductivity of local thermodynamic equilibrium nitrogen plasma: The effect of electronically excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, D.; Colonna, G.; Laricchiuta, A.; Capitelli, M.

    2012-12-01

    Internal and reactive contributions to the thermal conductivity of a local thermodynamic equilibrium nitrogen plasma have been calculated using the Chapman-Enskog method. Low-lying (LL) electronically excited states (i.e., states with the same principal quantum number of the ground state) and high-lying (HL) ones (i.e., states with principal quantum number n > 2) have been considered. Several models have been developed, the most accurate being a model that treats the LL states as separate species while disregarding the presence of HL states, on account of their enormous transport cross sections.

  10. Reactive and internal contributions to the thermal conductivity of local thermodynamic equilibrium nitrogen plasma: The effect of electronically excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, D.; Colonna, G.; Laricchiuta, A.; Capitelli, M.

    2012-12-15

    Internal and reactive contributions to the thermal conductivity of a local thermodynamic equilibrium nitrogen plasma have been calculated using the Chapman-Enskog method. Low-lying (LL) electronically excited states (i.e., states with the same principal quantum number of the ground state) and high-lying (HL) ones (i.e., states with principal quantum number n> 2) have been considered. Several models have been developed, the most accurate being a model that treats the LL states as separate species while disregarding the presence of HL states, on account of their enormous transport cross sections.

  11. Aversive viscerally referred states and thirst accompanying the sating of hunger motivation by rapid digestion of glucosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Booth, David A; O'Leary, Gemma; Li, Lixiang; Higgs, Suzanne

    2011-03-01

    Associative conditioning of satiety indicates that concentrated maltodextrin (cMD) may induce a mildly aversive visceral signal within 20 min of its ingestion, as well as satiating normally. Individuals' awareness of this adverse state was tested on ratings of statistically distinct descriptions of factors liable to suppress hunger, whether distressing or comfortably satisfying. Wanted amount of a food and the pleasantness of eating it correlated highly for each of five foods, once again refuting the widespread presumption that "pleasant" refers to sensory pleasure; hence, as in previous reports, suppression of hunger was measured as a reduction of the averaged pleasantness of functionally related foods. At 20 min after the start of ingestion of a small meal on a near-empty stomach, cMD reliably reduced hunger. The greatest influence on hunger, besides normal sating, was thirst, but there were also tendencies to nausea and bloat, although all less than after a full sized meal. Visceral processes shortly after a meal can create dissociable conscious states, only one of which is satiety for food. PMID:21118700

  12. Principles of the equilibrium theory of small multicomponent systems in three aggregate states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2015-11-01

    Principles of the molecular statistical theory of small multicomponent drops/microcrystals in a three-dimensional bulk and in two-dimensional adsorption systems are developed. Equations of the theory are derived using the cluster approach. The theory describes discrete distributions of molecules in space (on a size scale comparable to the molecular size) and continuous molecular distributions (at short distances inside cells) upon their translational and vibrational motions. The theory provides a unified description of the equilibrium molecular distributions in three aggregate states and at their interfaces. Pair intermolecular interaction potentials (such as the Mie potential) in several coordination spheres that determine lattice structure compressibility are taken into account. For simplicity, it is considered that the sizes of mixture components are virtually the same. Structural cell distribution functions for the transition region of curved interfaces are derived. Expressions for the pressure tensor components inside small bodies are obtained, allowing us to calculate the thermodynamic characteristics of a vapor-liquid interface, including surface tension. Questions regarding the consistency between the theory of phase transitions in small systems and the traditional theory of associate (cluster) formation and the transition to systems limited in the total volume value are discussed.

  13. Constraining supernova equations of state with equilibrium constants from heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempel, Matthias; Hagel, Kris; Natowitz, Joseph; Röpke, Gerd; Typel, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Cluster formation is a fundamental aspect of the equation of state (EOS) of warm and dense nuclear matter such as can be found in supernovae (SNe). Similar matter can be studied in heavy-ion collisions (HICs). We use the experimental data of Qin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 172701 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.172701] to test calculations of cluster formation and the role of in-medium modifications of cluster properties in SN EOSs. For the comparison between theory and experiment we use chemical equilibrium constants as the main observables. This reduces some of the systematic uncertainties and allows deviations from ideal gas behavior to be identified clearly. In the analysis, we carefully account for the differences between matter in SNe and HICs. We find that, at the lowest densities, the experiment and all theoretical models are consistent with the ideal gas behavior. At higher densities ideal behavior is clearly ruled out and interaction effects have to be considered. The contributions of continuum correlations are of relevance in the virial expansion and remain a difficult problem to solve at higher densities. We conclude that at the densities and temperatures discussed mean-field interactions of nucleons, inclusion of all relevant light clusters, and a suppression mechanism of clusters at high densities have to be incorporated in the SN EOS.

  14. Minimally entangled typical thermal states versus matrix product purifications for the simulation of equilibrium states and time evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Moritz; Barthel, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    For the simulation of equilibrium states and finite-temperature response functions of strongly correlated quantum many-body systems, we compare the efficiencies of two different approaches in the framework of the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG). The first is based on matrix product purifications. The second, more recent one, is based on so-called minimally entangled typical thermal states (METTS). For the latter, we highlight the interplay of statistical and DMRG truncation errors, discuss the use of self-averaging effects, and describe schemes for the computation of response functions. For critical as well as gapped phases of the spin-1 /2 XXZ chain and the one-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model, we assess the computation costs and accuracies of the two methods at different temperatures. For almost all considered cases, we find that, for the same computation cost, purifications yield more accurate results than METTS—often by orders of magnitude. The METTS algorithm becomes more efficient only for temperatures well below the system's energy gap. The exponential growth of the computation cost in the evaluation of response functions limits the attainable time scales in both methods and we find that in this regard, METTS do not outperform purifications.

  15. The rate form of equilibrium equation for problems of steady-state, elastic, viscous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Lung John

    1992-07-01

    The development of a numerical simulation for steady-state, elastic, viscous flows in two dimensions is presented. A mixed finite element method is used to couple the rate-equilibrium and the rate-constitutive equations by using successive substitution to solve for the velocity field and the stress field simultaneously. The method is applied to the flow analysis of co-rotational Maxwell (CRM), upper convective Maxwell (UCM), and four-element UCM fluid models. A flow through contraction problem is analyzed for the CRM, UCM and four-element UCM models. For both the CRM and UCM modles, the purely elastic case is compared to a solution found by using a linear formulation and it is found to compare favorably. For the purely viscous case, comparison is made with results obtained using the mixed formulation for velocity and pressure. Again, the results compare quite favorably. For the four-element UCM model, it is compared with the conventional UCM model. For the purely elastic and the purely viscous cases both models compare very well, and two examples are given for simulating both the Oldroyd-B and the Kelvin-Voigt models. From this illustration, the four-element UCM model is shown to work well for a wide range of constitutive behaviors. A second example presents an analysis of a metal forming rolling problem in the presence of free surfaces. For the purely elastic case, a decent solution of the velocity and stress distributions in the control volume for both CRM and UCM fluids is found. However, when the viscous effect is increased in the material, the free surface exhibits a continual swelling on the downstream side and the accuracy of the stress distribution deteriorates. In spite of the progress made on the free surface problem, the solutions for free surface problem presented in this dissertation are not yet of sufficient accuracy to be directly applicable to practical forming process design or analysis. The final example is an application of the rate-equilibrium

  16. Metastable and equilibrium wetting states in the Bi-Sn system

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, F.G.; O`Toole, E.J.

    1998-09-01

    Sessile drop experiments involving a variety of Bi-Sn alloys on solid Bi substrates were performed. Substrates prepared from small- and large-grained polycrystals and single crystals were used to measure equilibrium and metastable contact angles and estimate the surface tension and equilibrium contact angle of the solid-liquid interface. The substrates were also used to investigate the coupling of the dissolution and wetting processes and to investigate the effect of the substrate grain size on wetting. It was determined that the equilibrium wetting geometry is independent of linear scale and that grain size has little influence on wetting or dissolution in the Bi-Sn system.

  17. Comparison between natural Rain drop size distributions and corresponding models near equilibrium state during warm rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthes, Laurent; Mallet, Cécile

    2010-05-01

    Keywords: Rain Drop Size Distribution, Breakup, coalescence, disdrometer The study of the vertical evolution of raindrop size distributions (DSDs) during rainfall, from the freezing level isotherm to ground level, is a key to improving our understanding of the microphysics of rain. In numerous domains such as remote sensing, telecommunications, soil erosion, and the study of the rain's efficiency in 'washing' the atmosphere, the DSD plays an important role. Among the different processes affecting the evolution of DSD, breakup and coalescence are two of the most significant. Models of coalescence and breakup lead to equilibrium of the raindrop size distribution (DSD) after a fall through sufficient vertical height. At equilibrium, the DSD no longer evolves, and its shape is unique whatever the rain rate or LWC. This implies that the DSD is known, to within a multiplication constant. These models based on experimental measurements have been developed over the past 40 years. The Low and List (1982a,b) parameterization (hereinafter LL82) and the Greg M. McFarquhar (2004) model are both based on the same laboratory experiments, which lead to an equilibrium drop size distribution (EDSD) with two or three peaks, and an exponential tail with a slope of approximately Λ=65 cm-1. Numerous measurements using disdrometer collected in different climatic areas: Paris, France (Mars to October 2000), Iowa-City (April to October 2002), and Djougou (Benin June to September 2006) corresponding to 537 hours of rain period have shown that for high rain rates, close to a state of equilibrium, this slope lies between Λ=20 - 22 cm-1. This latter value is corroborated by others measurements found in the literature (Hu & Srivastava, 1995). Hu & Srivastava suggested that the Low and List parameterization may overestimate the effects of the breakup process. This hypothesis is in adequation with recent laboratory experiments (A.P. Barros 2008) in which the authors conclude that the number of

  18. Transition state theory demonstrated at the micron scale with out-of-equilibrium transport in a confined environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestergaard, Christian L.; Mikkelsen, Morten Bo; Reisner, Walter; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Transition state theory (TST) provides a simple interpretation of many thermally activated processes. It applies successfully on timescales and length scales that differ several orders of magnitude: to chemical reactions, breaking of chemical bonds, unfolding of proteins and RNA structures and polymers crossing entropic barriers. Here we apply TST to out-of-equilibrium transport through confined environments: the thermally activated translocation of single DNA molecules over an entropic barrier helped by an external force field. Reaction pathways are effectively one dimensional and so long that they are observable in a microscope. Reaction rates are so slow that transitions are recorded on video. We find sharp transition states that are independent of the applied force, similar to chemical bond rupture, as well as transition states that change location on the reaction pathway with the strength of the applied force. The states of equilibrium and transition are separated by micrometres as compared with angstroms/nanometres for chemical bonds.

  19. Transition state theory demonstrated at the micron scale with out-of-equilibrium transport in a confined environment.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Christian L; Mikkelsen, Morten Bo; Reisner, Walter; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Transition state theory (TST) provides a simple interpretation of many thermally activated processes. It applies successfully on timescales and length scales that differ several orders of magnitude: to chemical reactions, breaking of chemical bonds, unfolding of proteins and RNA structures and polymers crossing entropic barriers. Here we apply TST to out-of-equilibrium transport through confined environments: the thermally activated translocation of single DNA molecules over an entropic barrier helped by an external force field. Reaction pathways are effectively one dimensional and so long that they are observable in a microscope. Reaction rates are so slow that transitions are recorded on video. We find sharp transition states that are independent of the applied force, similar to chemical bond rupture, as well as transition states that change location on the reaction pathway with the strength of the applied force. The states of equilibrium and transition are separated by micrometres as compared with angstroms/nanometres for chemical bonds. PMID:26732388

  20. MANE: A MULTIPHASE, AQUEOUS, NON-STEADY STATE EQUILIBRIUM MODEL FOR SIMULATING SOIL-WATER INTERACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemical equilibrium models have been developed to help assess environmental chemistry problems, but few were specifically developed as research and teaching tools for use in conjunction with soil chemistry experiments. MANE model was developed to calculate equilibri...

  1. Qualms Regarding the Range of Validity of the Glansdorff-Prigogine Criterion for Stability of Non-Equilibrium States

    PubMed Central

    Keizer, Joel; Fox, Ronald Forrest

    1974-01-01

    Doubt is raised concerning the range of validity of a stability criterion for non-equilibrium states which has been proposed by Glansdorff and Prigogine. In the case of a particular autocatalytic reaction, the stability analysis presented by Glansdorff and Prigogine, and by Eigen and by Katchalsky in their reviews of this problem, does not agree with our analysis, which is based upon exact solution of the relevant rate equations. We also find disagreement between the analysis based upon the Glansdorff-Prigogine criterion and our analysis of a second example which involves non-equilibrium steady states. The situation is quite delicate because seemingly innocent approximations (e.g., the use of specialized conditions in the autocatalytic reaction X + Y ⇄ 2X discussed in the sequel) may lead to the impression that the scope of validity of the criterion is wider than it actually is. By considering the stability of the equilibrium state, we conclude that the second differential of the entropy, which is at the heart of the Glansdorff-Prigogine criterion, is likely to be relevant for stability questions close to equilibrium only. PMID:16592132

  2. Deviations of the energy-momentum tensor from equilibrium in the initial state for hydrodynamics from transport approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliinychenko, D.; Petersen, H.

    2016-03-01

    Many hybrid models of heavy ion collisions construct the initial state for hydrodynamics from transport models. Hydrodynamics requires that the energy-momentum tensor Tμ ν and four-currents jμ do not deviate considerably from the equilibrium ideal-fluid form, but the ones constructed from transport do not necessarily possess this property. In this work we investigate the space-time picture of Tμ ν deviations from equilibrium in Au+Au collisions using a coarse-grained transport approach. The collision energy is varied in the range Elab=5 -160 A GeV . The sensitivity of Tμ ν deviations from equilibrium to collision centrality, and other parameters such as the switching criterion, the amount of statistics used to construct the initial state, and the smearing parameter σ are investigated. For low statistics, deviations of Tμ ν from equilibrium are large and dominated by the effect of finite sampling. For large statistics, the pressure anisotropy plays the most significant role, while the off-diagonal components of Tμ ν are small in a large volume during the whole evolution. For all considered energies and centralities the pressure anisotropy exhibits a similar feature: there is a narrow interval of time when it rapidly drops in a considerable volume. This allows us to introduce an "isotropization time," which is found to decrease with energy and slightly increase with centrality. The isotropization times are larger than times typically used for initializing hydrodynamics.

  3. Dark Matter and Baryon Asymmetry production from out-of-equilibrium decays of Supersymmetric states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcadi, Giorgio

    2016-02-01

    We will review the main aspects of a mechanism for the contemporary generation of the baryon and Dark Matter abundances from the out-of-equilibrium decay of a WIMP-like mother particle and briefly discuss a concrete realization in a Supersymmetric scenario.

  4. Departure of High-temperature Iron Lines from the Equilibrium State in Flaring Solar Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawate, T.; Keenan, F. P.; Jess, D. B.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify if the assumption of ionization equilibrium and a Maxwellian electron energy distribution is valid in flaring solar plasmas. We analyze the 2014 December 20 X1.8 flare, in which the Fe xxi 187 Å, Fe xxii 253 Å, Fe xxiii 263 Å, and Fe xxiv 255 Å emission lines were simultaneously observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board the Hinode satellite. Intensity ratios among these high-temperature Fe lines are compared and departures from isothermal conditions and ionization equilibrium examined. Temperatures derived from intensity ratios involving these four lines show significant discrepancies at the flare footpoints in the impulsive phase, and at the looptop in the gradual phase. Among these, the temperature derived from the Fe xxii/Fe xxiv intensity ratio is the lowest, which cannot be explained if we assume a Maxwellian electron distribution and ionization equilibrium, even in the case of a multithermal structure. This result suggests that the assumption of ionization equilibrium and/or a Maxwellian electron energy distribution can be violated in evaporating solar plasma around 10 MK.

  5. General and Partial Equilibrium Modeling of Sectoral Policies to Address Climate Change in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Pizer, William; Burtraw, Dallas; Harrington, Winston; Newell, Richard; Sanchirico, James; Toman, Michael

    2003-03-31

    This document provides technical documentation for work using detailed sectoral models to calibrate a general equilibrium analysis of market and non-market sectoral policies to address climate change. Results of this work can be found in the companion paper, "Modeling Costs of Economy-wide versus Sectoral Climate Policies Using Combined Aggregate-Sectoral Model".

  6. Thermodynamic Bethe ansatz for non-equilibrium steady states: exact energy current and fluctuations in integrable QFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Alvaredo, Olalla; Chen, Yixiong; Doyon, Benjamin; Hoogeveen, Marianne

    2014-03-01

    We evaluate the exact energy current and scaled cumulant generating function (related to the large-deviation function) in non-equilibrium steady states with energy flow, in any integrable model of relativistic quantum field theory (IQFT) with diagonal scattering. Our derivations are based on various recent results of Bernard and Doyon. The steady states are built by connecting homogeneously two infinite halves of the system thermalized at different temperatures Tl, Tr, and waiting for a long time. We evaluate the current J(Tl, Tr) using the exact QFT density matrix describing these non-equilibrium steady states and using Zamolodchikov’s method of the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz (TBA). The scaled cumulant generating function is obtained from the extended fluctuation relations which hold in integrable models. We verify our formula in particular by showing that the conformal field theory (CFT) result is obtained in the high-temperature limit. We analyze numerically our non-equilibrium steady-state TBA equations for three models: the sinh-Gordon model, the roaming trajectories model, and the sine-Gordon model at a particular reflectionless point. Based on the numerics, we conjecture that an infinite family of non-equilibrium c-functions, associated with the scaled cumulants, can be defined, which we interpret physically. We study the full scaled distribution function and find that it can be described by a set of independent Poisson processes. Finally, we show that the ‘additivity’ property of the current, which is known to hold in CFT and was proposed to hold more generally, does not hold in general IQFT—that is, J(Tl, Tr) is not of the form f(Tl) - f(Tr).

  7. Minimization of a free-energy-like potential for non-equilibrium flow systems at steady state

    PubMed Central

    Niven, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines a new formulation of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, which gives a conditional derivation of the ‘maximum entropy production’ (MEP) principle for flow and/or chemical reaction systems at steady state. The analysis uses a dimensionless potential function ϕst for non-equilibrium systems, analogous to the free energy concept of equilibrium thermodynamics. Spontaneous reductions in ϕst arise from increases in the ‘flux entropy’ of the system—a measure of the variability of the fluxes—or in the local entropy production; conditionally, depending on the behaviour of the flux entropy, the formulation reduces to the MEP principle. The inferred steady state is also shown to exhibit high variability in its instantaneous fluxes and rates, consistent with the observed behaviour of turbulent fluid flow, heat convection and biological systems; one consequence is the coexistence of energy producers and consumers in ecological systems. The different paths for attaining steady state are also classified. PMID:20368250

  8. The statistical mechanics basis of non-equilibrium stationary states in the solar wind and outer heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    In situ observations of solar wind at 1 AU have occasionally detected ion distributions in equilibrium, where the three-dimensional spectral slope or k-index approaches infinity (a Maxwellian distribution) [e.g., Hammond, C. M., et al. (1996), J. Geophys. Res., 100, 7881-7889]. More commonly, however, suprathermal particle distributions in the solar wind routinely show highly non-equilibrium stationary states, with a k~1.5 [Fisk, L. A., and G. Gloeckler (2006), Astrophys. J., 640, L79-L82], while other observations from Voyager 1 detected k~1.63 in the inner heliosheath, beyond the termination shock [Decker, R. B., et al. (2005), Science, 309, 2020-2024]. While this value is close to 1.5, the observations demonstrated a clear statistical difference between these two indices. Finally, recent observations show distributions for which k~2.45 is a special value, separating indices that appear to be near or far from equilibrium [e.g., Dayeh, M. A., et al. (2009), Astrophys. J., 693, 1588-1600; Dialynas, K., et al. (2009), J. Geophys. Res., 114, A01212]. In this study we show how all of these special values of k~1.5, 1.63, 2.45, and infinity can be predicted by a special relationship of the entropy, defined in the framework of non-extensive Statistical Mechanics as applied to space physics [Livadiotis, G., and D. McComas (2009), in Press in JGR-Space Physics], which characterizes plasmas in stationary states out of equilibrium. Amazingly, the four values observed in the solar wind plasma and mentioned above are uniquely identified with the four special points in the derived entropy function. This correlation suggests that the observations are detecting the primacy of these stationary states.

  9. Trp-107 and trp-253 account for the increased steady state fluorescence that accompanies the conformational change in human pancreatic triglyceride lipase induced by tetrahydrolipstatin and bile salt.

    PubMed

    Bourbon-Freie, Angela; Dub, Rachel E; Xiao, Xunjun; Lowe, Mark E

    2009-05-22

    The conformation of a surface loop, the lid, controls activity of pancreatic triglyceride lipase (PTL) by moving from a position that sterically hinders substrate access to the active site into a new conformation that opens and configures the active site. Movement of the lid is accompanied by a large change in steady state tryptophan fluorescence. Although a change in the microenvironment of Trp-253, a lid residue, could account for the increased fluorescence, the mechanism and tryptophan residues have not been identified. To identify the tryptophan residues responsible for the increased fluorescence and to gain insight into the mechanism of lid opening and the structure of PTL in aqueous solution, we examined the effects of mutating individual tryptophan residues to tyrosine, alanine, or phenylalanine on lipase activity and steady state fluorescence. Substitution of tryptophans 86, 107, 253, and 403 reduced activity against tributyrin with the largest effects caused by substituting Trp-86 and Trp-107. Trp-107 and Trp-253 fluorescence accounts for the increased fluorescence emissions of PTL that is stimulated by tetrahydrolipstatin and sodium taurodeoxycholate. The largest contribution is from Trp-107. Contrary to the prediction from the crystal structure of PTL, Trp-107 is likely exposed to solvent. Both tetrahydrolipstatin and sodium taurodeoxycholate are required to produce the increased fluorescence in PTL. Alone, neither is sufficient. Colipase does not significantly influence the conformational changes leading to increased emission fluorescence. Thus, Trp-107 and Trp-253 contribute to the change in steady state fluorescence that is triggered by mixed micelles of inhibitor and bile salt. Furthermore, the results suggest that the conformation of PTL in solution differs significantly from the conformation in crystals. PMID:19346257

  10. Signature of a continuous quantum phase transition in non-equilibrium energy absorption: Footprints of criticality on higher excited states

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sirshendu; Dasgupta, Subinay; Das, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    Understanding phase transitions in quantum matters constitutes a significant part of present day condensed matter physics. Quantum phase transitions concern ground state properties of many-body systems, and hence their signatures are expected to be pronounced in low-energy states. Here we report signature of a quantum critical point manifested in strongly out-of-equilibrium states with finite energy density with respect to the ground state and extensive (subsystem) entanglement entropy, generated by an external pulse. These non-equilibrium states are evidently completely disordered (e.g., paramagnetic in case of a magnetic ordering transition). The pulse is applied by switching a coupling of the Hamiltonian from an initial value (λI) to a final value (λF) for sufficiently long time and back again. The signature appears as non-analyticities (kinks) in the energy absorbed by the system from the pulse as a function of λF at critical-points (i.e., at values of λF corresponding to static critical-points of the system). As one excites higher and higher eigenstates of the final Hamiltonian H(λF) by increasing the pulse height , the non-analyticity grows stronger monotonically with it. This implies adding contributions from higher eigenstates help magnifying the non-analyticity, indicating strong imprint of the critical-point on them. Our findings are grounded on exact analytical results derived for Ising and XY chains in transverse field. PMID:26568306

  11. Internal variables in the local-equilibrium approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kestin, J.

    1992-05-01

    We explore the basis and consequences of the formalism known in the literature as the method of local equilibrium. Contemporary controversies regarding the foundations of thermodynamics are rooted not only in different sets of concepts and principles, but also in semantics. An attempt is made here to use a consistent group of terms, each of whose dictionary meaning corresponds to its physical nature as closely as possible. Since the intention is to study irreversible processes in systems in which even locally there prevails a state of nonequilibrium, the term local equilibrium is abandoned in favor of the phrase principle of local state. In defining the thermodynamic state of system, a distinction is made between the intensive parameters which appear in the physical space and those which describe states of constrained equilibrium in the Gibbsian phase space. The principle of local state is applied by association with every nonequilibrium state n and accompanying equilibrium state e of equal values of U, a, {alpha}, and by asserting that the entropy {bar S} assignable in physical space and temperature {bar T} measured in it can be approximated by the values S and T calculated in the Gibbsian phase space by standard, classical methods. A continuous sequence of accompanying equilibrium states is called an accompanying reversible process, it is conceived as an adiabatic projection of the continuous sequence of nonequilibrium states. The essential part of the method consists in the formulation of the Gibbs equation for the accompanying reversible process in the phase space. It is noted that the local-state approximation, made explicit in this paper, has been used and tested in fluid mechanics though its validity is contested in contemporary continuum mechanics and mechanics of solids.

  12. Equilibrium K-, L-, and M-shell ionizations and charge-state distribution of sulfur projectiles passing through solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Banas, D.; Polasik, M.; Slabkowska, K.; Koziol, K.; Jaskola, M.; Korman, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Choinski, J.

    2010-08-15

    In the present work, an alternative approach for the evaluation of the equilibrium K-, L-, and M-shell ionizations and the mean charge state q for projectiles passing through various targets has been proposed. The approach is based on measured K x-ray energy shifts and line intensity ratios and utilizes the theoretical analysis of projectile spectra using multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations. It was applied for the satellite and hypersatellite K lines in the x-ray spectra emitted by sulfur projectiles passing with energies of 9.6-122 MeV through carbon, aluminium, titanium, and iron targets, recorded by a Si(Li) detector. It was found that only in the high projectile energy region there was significant dependence of mean equilibrium K-shell ionization on the target atomic number. The equilibrium L-shell ionization rises with the increase of sulfur energy until 32 MeV, but for higher energies the changes are very weak. The equilibrium M-shell ionization changes very weakly for low projectile energy while for higher energies this ionization is practically constant. For each target, the estimated value of q rises with the increase of the sulfur energy value. The dependence of the sulfur charge state on the target atomic number was discussed by taking into account the cross sections for ionization, decay, and electron capture processes. The data were compared with the experimental data measured by other authors and with the predictions of Shima's and Schiwietz and Grande's semiempirical formulas. The presented good agreement points out that this alternative approach delivers quantitative results.

  13. Equilibrium K-, L-, and M-shell ionizations and charge-state distribution of sulfur projectiles passing through solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braziewicz, J.; Polasik, M.; Słabkowska, K.; Majewska, U.; Banaś, D.; Jaskóła, M.; Korman, A.; Kozioł, K.; Kretschmer, W.; Choinski, J.

    2010-08-01

    In the present work, an alternative approach for the evaluation of the equilibrium K-, L-, and M-shell ionizations and the mean charge state q¯ for projectiles passing through various targets has been proposed. The approach is based on measured K x-ray energy shifts and line intensity ratios and utilizes the theoretical analysis of projectile spectra using multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations. It was applied for the satellite and hypersatellite K lines in the x-ray spectra emitted by sulfur projectiles passing with energies of 9.6-122 MeV through carbon, aluminium, titanium, and iron targets, recorded by a Si(Li) detector. It was found that only in the high projectile energy region there was significant dependence of mean equilibrium K-shell ionization on the target atomic number. The equilibrium L-shell ionization rises with the increase of sulfur energy until 32 MeV, but for higher energies the changes are very weak. The equilibrium M-shell ionization changes very weakly for low projectile energy while for higher energies this ionization is practically constant. For each target, the estimated value of q¯ rises with the increase of the sulfur energy value. The dependence of the sulfur charge state on the target atomic number was discussed by taking into account the cross sections for ionization, decay, and electron capture processes. The data were compared with the experimental data measured by other authors and with the predictions of Shima’s and Schiwietz and Grande’s semiempirical formulas. The presented good agreement points out that this alternative approach delivers quantitative results.

  14. THE EFFECT OF METASTABLE EQUILIBRIUM STATES ON THE PARTITIONING OF NITRATE BETWEEN THE GAS AND AEROSOL PHASES. (R826371C005)

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the aid of three atmospheric aerosol equilibrium models, we quantify the effect of metastable equilibrium states (efflorescence branch) in comparison to stable (deliquescence branch) on the partitioning of total nitrate between the gas and aerosol phases. On average, effl...

  15. A Note on the Relationship between Temperature and Water Vapor in Quasi-Equilibrium and Climate States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shie, C.-L.; Shie, C.-L.; Tao, W.-K.; Simpson, J.; Sui, C.-H.

    2005-01-01

    An ideal and simple formulation is successfully derived that well represents a quasi-linear relationship found between the domain-averaged water vapor, q (mm), and temperature, T (K), fields obtained from a series of quasi-equilibrium (long-term) simulations for the Tropics using the two-dimensional Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Earlier model work showed that the forced maintenance of two different wind profiles in the Tropics leads to two different equilibrium states. Investigating this finding required investigation of the slope of the moisture-temperature relations, which turns out to be linear in the Tropics. The extra-tropical climate equilibriums become more complex, but insight on modeling sensitivity can be obtained by linear stepwise regression of the integrated temperature and humidity. A globally curvilinear moisture-temperature distribution, similar to the famous Clausius-Clapeyron curve (i.e., saturated water vapor pressure versus temperature), is then found in this study. Such a genuine finding clarifies that the dynamics are crucial to the climate (shown in the earlier work) but the thermodynamics adjust. The range of validity of this result is further examined herein. The GCE-modeled tropical domain-averaged q and T fields form a linearly-regressed "q-T" slope that genuinely resides within an ideal range of slopes obtained from the aforementioned formulation. A quantity (denoted as dC2/dC1) representing the derivative between the static energy densities due to temperature (C2) and water vapor (C1) for various quasi-equilibrium states can also be obtained. A dC2/dC1 value near unity obtained for the GCE-modeled tropical simulations implies that the static energy densities due to moisture and temperature only differ by a pure constant for various equilibrium states. An overall q-T relation also including extra-tropical regions is, however, found to have a curvilinear relationship. Accordingly, warm/moist regions favor change in water vapor

  16. Calculation of NARM's equilibrium with Peng-Robinson equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tingxun; Guo, Kaihua; Wang, Ruzhu; Fan, Shuanshi

    2001-04-01

    The liquid molar volumes of nonazeotropic refrigerant mixtures (NARM), calculated with Peng Robinson (PR) equation, were compared with vapor -liquid equilibrium experimental data in this paper. Provided with co-reaction coefficient k ij , the discrepancies of liquid molar volume data for R22+R114 and R22+R142b using PR equation are 7.7% and 8.1%, respectively. When HBT (Hankinson-Brobst-Thomson) equation was joined with PR equation, the deviations are reduced to less than 1.5% for both R22+R114 and R22+R142b.

  17. Predicting equilibrium states with Reynolds stress closures in channel flow and homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abid, R.; Speziale, C. G.

    1993-01-01

    Turbulent channel flow and homogeneous shear flow have served as basic building block flows for the testing and calibration of Reynolds stress models. A direct theoretical connection is made between homogeneous shear flow in equilibrium and the log-layer of fully-developed turbulent channel flow. It is shown that if a second-order closure model is calibrated to yield good equilibrium values for homogeneous shear flow it will also yield good results for the log-layer of channel flow provided that the Rotta coefficient is not too far removed from one. Most of the commonly used second-order closure models introduce an ad hoc wall reflection term in order to mask deficient predictions for the log-layer of channel flow that arise either from an inaccurate calibration of homogeneous shear flow or from the use of a Rotta coefficient that is too large. Illustrative model calculations are presented to demonstrate this point which has important implications for turbulence modeling.

  18. Improving the quality of the experimental reconstructions as the initial equilibrium state for the NIMROD code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jacob; Kruger, Scott; NIMROD Team

    2014-10-01

    High quality equilibria are essential for extended-MHD modeling with the initial-value NIMROD code. Typically the spatial resolution requirements for extended-MHD modeling, which must resolve singular-layer physics and highly anisotropic diffusion, are more stringent than the resolution of equilibrium reconstructions from experimental discharges. With the current workflow, reconstructed fields are mapped onto the NIMROD finite-element grid, and the disparity between the coarse resolution reconstruction and the fine resolution FE grid can create artificial small-scale artifacts. Extended-MHD modeling, which contains many high-order differential operators, can be corrupted by the mapping errors. We describe efforts to re-solve the Grad-Shafranov equation with open-flux regions using the NIMEQ solver to generate a new equilibrium while using the mapped results for both an initial guess and to specify the boundary conditions. Effects on computations with and without the re-solving for force balance will be described. Work funded by US DOE.

  19. Predicting equilibrium states with Reynolds stress closures in channel flow and homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abid, R.; Speziale, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    Turbulent channel flow and homogeneous shear flow have served as basic building block flows for the testing and calibration of Reynolds stress models. A direct theoretical connection is made between homogeneous shear flow in equilibrium and the log-layer of fully-developed turbulent channel flow. It is shown that if a second-order closure model is calibrated to yield good equilibrium values for homogeneous shear flow it will also yield good results for the log-layer of channel flow provided that the Rotta coefficient is not too far removed from one. Most of the commonly used second-order closure models introduce an ad hoc wall reflection term in order to mask deficient predictions for the log-layer of channel flow that arise either from an inaccurate calibration of homogeneous shear flow or from the use of a Rotta coefficient that is too large. Illustrative model calculations are presented to demonstrate this point which has important implications for turbulence modeling.

  20. Rate Constant in Far-from-Equilibrium States of a Replicating System with Mutually Catalyzing Chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Atsushi; Yukawa, Satoshi; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2006-02-01

    As a first step to study reaction dynamics in far-from-equilibrium open systems, we propose a stochastic protocell model in which two mutually catalyzing chemicals are replicating depending on the external flow of energy resources J. This model exhibits an Arrhenius type reaction; furthermore, it produces a non-Arrhenius reaction that exhibits a power-law reaction rate with regard to the activation energy. These dependences are explained using the dynamics of J; the asymmetric random walk of J results in the Arrhenius equation and conservation of J results in a power-law dependence. Further, we find that the discreteness of molecules results in the power change. Effects of cell divisions are also discussed in our model.

  1. Pyrolysis of sulfur tetrafluoride over boron: Excited-state rotational spectra and equilibrium structure of fluorothioborine (FBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzocchi, L.; Esposti, C. Degli

    2001-10-01

    The unstable FBS molecule has been produced in the gas phase by a high-temperature reaction between crystalline boron and sulfur tetrafluoride. Its rotational spectrum has been observed in the millimeter-wave region, from 75 to 460 GHz, for different isotopic species and vibrational states. All the excited states which approximately lie below 1700 cm-1, that are 1000 (F-B stretch), 0110 (FBS bend), 0001 (B=S stretch), 2000, 0200, 0220, 0310, 0330, 0400, 0420, 0440, 1110, 1200, and 1220, have been investigated for the most abundant isotopomer F11B32S. The analysis of the spectra has been performed taking simultaneously into account the Fermi interaction which couples the states ν1,ν2,ν3 with ν1-1, ν2+2,ν3, and l-type resonances between different sublevels of a given vibrational bending state. This procedure allowed us to calculate directly deperturbed parameters and, in addition, yielded reliable estimates of the vibrational energy difference between the interacting levels and of the normal coordinate cubic force constant k122. Rotational spectra in the ground and various excited states have been also recorded and analyzed for the less abundant isotopic species F10B32S, F11B34S, F10B34S, F11B33S, and F10B33S. The very weak spectrum in the 0001 state was successfully observed for the pair of isotopomers F11B32S and F10B32S, whose equilibrium rotational constants could be accurately calculated yielding the first evaluation of the equilibrium structure of fluorothioborine: re(F-B)=1.2762±0.0002 Å and re(B=S)=1.6091±0.0002 Å.

  2. Combining the GW formalism with the polarizable continuum model: A state-specific non-equilibrium approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchemin, Ivan; Jacquemin, Denis; Blase, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    We have implemented the polarizable continuum model within the framework of the many-body Green's function GW formalism for the calculation of electron addition and removal energies in solution. The present formalism includes both ground-state and non-equilibrium polarization effects. In addition, the polarization energies are state-specific, allowing to obtain the bath-induced renormalisation energy of all occupied and virtual energy levels. Our implementation is validated by comparisons with ΔSCF calculations performed at both the density functional theory and coupled-cluster single and double levels for solvated nucleobases. The present study opens the way to GW and Bethe-Salpeter calculations in disordered condensed phases of interest in organic optoelectronics, wet chemistry, and biology.

  3. Combining the GW formalism with the polarizable continuum model: A state-specific non-equilibrium approach.

    PubMed

    Duchemin, Ivan; Jacquemin, Denis; Blase, Xavier

    2016-04-28

    We have implemented the polarizable continuum model within the framework of the many-body Green's function GW formalism for the calculation of electron addition and removal energies in solution. The present formalism includes both ground-state and non-equilibrium polarization effects. In addition, the polarization energies are state-specific, allowing to obtain the bath-induced renormalisation energy of all occupied and virtual energy levels. Our implementation is validated by comparisons with ΔSCF calculations performed at both the density functional theory and coupled-cluster single and double levels for solvated nucleobases. The present study opens the way to GW and Bethe-Salpeter calculations in disordered condensed phases of interest in organic optoelectronics, wet chemistry, and biology. PMID:27131530

  4. Equilibrium state at supersaturated drug concentration achieved by hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate: molecular characterization using (1)H NMR technique.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Keisuke; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2015-04-01

    The maintenance mechanism of the supersaturated state of poorly water-soluble drugs, glibenclamide (GLB) and chlorthalidone (CLT), in hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMC-AS) solution was investigated at a molecular level. HPMC-AS suppressed drug crystallization from supersaturated drug solution and maintained high supersaturated level of drugs with small amount of HPMC-AS for 24 h. However, the dissolution of crystalline GLB into HPMC-AS solution failed to produce supersaturated concentrations, although supersaturated concentrations were achieved by adding amorphous GLB to HPMC-AS solution. HPMC-AS did not improve drug dissolution and/or solubility but efficiently inhibited drug crystallization from supersaturated drug solutions. Such an inhibiting effect led to the long-term maintenance of the amorphous state of GLB in HPMC-AS solution. NMR measurements showed that HPMC-AS suppressed the molecular mobility of CLT depending on their supersaturation level. Highly supersaturated CLT in HPMC-AS solution formed a gel-like structure with HPMC-AS in which the molecular mobility of the CLT was strongly suppressed. The gel-like structure of HPMC-AS could inhibit the reorganization from drug prenuclear aggregates to the crystal nuclei and delay the formation of drug crystals. The prolongation subsequently led to the redissolution of the aggregated drugs in aqueous solution and formed the equilibrium state at the supersaturated drug concentration in HPMC-AS solution. The equilibrium state formation of supersaturated drugs by HPMC-AS should be an essential mechanism underlying the marked drug concentration improvement. PMID:25723893

  5. Excited state population of a 3D transmon in thermal equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, X. Y.; Gustavsson, S.; Kamal, A.; Sears, A. P.; Gudmundsen, T.; Hover, D.; Kerman, A. J.; Yan, F.; Yoder, J.; Orlando, T. P.; Oliver, W. D.

    2014-03-01

    We present a systematic study of the excited state population of a 3D transmon qubit at various temperatures. We experimentally demonstrate that the population of the first excited state follows the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the temperature range of 35-150 mK. For bath temperatures below 35 mK, the excited-state population saturates, with an upper-bound estimate of 0.1%. The saturation suggests a qubit effective temperature of approximately 35 mK. The Lincoln Laboratory portion of this work was sponsored by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering under Air Force Contract number FA8721-05-C-0002. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations are those of the author and are not necessarily endorsed by the United States Government.

  6. Radon Testing for Safe Schools Act. Report (To Accompany S. 1697) from the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works.

    This report was written to accompany the Radon Testing for Safe Schools Act (S.1697), a bill that provides for radon testing of schools located in high risk radon areas and provides limited financial assistance to schools for mitigation of high levels of radon. A description of radon, its harmful effects, and the radon levels detected in schools…

  7. The role of biotic and abiotic processes in determining equilibrium states and transient dynamics in tidal bio-geomorphic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Lio, C.; D'Alpaos, A.; Marani, M.

    2010-12-01

    A point model of the joint evolution of tidal landforms and biota is described and applied to explore the equilibrium states and the transient behaviour of tidal bio-geomorphic systems under varying physical and biological forcings. The model incorporates the dynamics of intertidal vegetation, benthic microbial assemblages, erosional, depositional, and sediment exchange processes, and wind-wave dynamics. Alternative stable states and punctuated equilibria emerge, characterized by possible sudden transitions of the system state, governed by vegetation type, disturbances of the benthic biofilm, sediment availability and marine transgressions or regressions. Multiple stable states are suggested to result from the interplay of erosion, deposition and biostabilization, providing a simple explanation for the ubiquitous presence of the typical landforms observed in tidal environments worldwide. The explicit and dynamically-coupled description of biotic and abiotic processes thus emerges as a key requirement for realistic and predictive models of the evolution of a tidal system as a whole. The analysis of such coupled processes indicates that hysteretic switches between stable states arise because of differences in the threshold values of relative sea level rise inducing transitions from vegetated to unvegetated equilibria and viceversa, with implications for the preservation of tidal environments under a climate change. Finally, we explore the transient behaviour of the system forced by synthetic and observed sea-level rise forcings and identify the effects of the characteristic response time of vegetation to environmental changes on the overall system dynamics.

  8. The fluorescence detected guanidine hydrochloride equilibrium denaturation of wild-type staphylococcal nuclease does not fit a three-state unfolding model

    PubMed Central

    Talla, Deepika; Stites, Wesley E.

    2013-01-01

    A three-state equilibrium unfolding of a protein can be difficult to detect if two of the states fail to differ in some easily measurable way. It has been unclear whether staphylococcal nuclease unfolds in a two-state fashion, with only the native and denatured states significantly populated at equilibrium, or in a three-state manner, with a well-populated intermediate. Since equilibrium unfolding experiments are commonly used to determine protein stability and the course of denaturation are followed by changes in the fluorescence which has difficulty in distinguishing various states, this is a potential problem for many proteins. Over the course of twenty years we have performed more than one hundred guanidine hydrochloride equilibrium denaturations of wild-type staphylococcal nuclease; to our knowledge, a number of denaturations unrivaled in any other protein system. A careful examination of the data from these experiments shows no sign of the behavior predicted by a three-state unfolding model. Specifically, a three-state unfolding should introduce a slight, but characteristic, non-linearity to the plot of stability versus denaturant concentration. The average residuals from this large number of repeated experiments do not show the predicted behavior, casting considerable doubt on the likelihood of a three-state unfolding for the wild-type protein. The methods used for analysis here could be applied to other protein systems to distinguish a two-state from a three-state denaturation. PMID:23523929

  9. Heterogeneity of equilibrium molten globule state of cytochrome c induced by weak salt denaturants under physiological condition.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Hamidur; Alam Khan, Md Khurshid; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Ahmad, Faizan

    2015-01-01

    While many proteins are recognized to undergo folding via intermediate(s), the heterogeneity of equilibrium folding intermediate(s) along the folding pathway is less understood. In our present study, FTIR spectroscopy, far- and near-UV circular dichroism (CD), ANS and tryptophan fluorescence, near IR absorbance spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were used to study the structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the native (N), denatured (D) and intermediate state (X) of goat cytochorme c (cyt-c) induced by weak salt denaturants (LiBr, LiCl and LiClO4) at pH 6.0 and 25°C. The LiBr-induced denaturation of cyt-c measured by Soret absorption (Δε400) and CD ([θ]409), is a three-step process, N ↔ X ↔ D. It is observed that the X state obtained along the denaturation pathway of cyt-c possesses common structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the molten globule (MG) state. The MG state of cyt-c induced by LiBr is compared for its structural and thermodynamic parameters with those found in other solvent conditions such as LiCl, LiClO4 and acidic pH. Our observations suggest: (1) that the LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c retains the native Met80-Fe(III) axial bond and Trp59-propionate interactions; (2) that LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c is more compact retaining the hydrophobic interactions in comparison to the MG states induced by LiCl, LiClO4 and 0.5 M NaCl at pH 2.0; and (3) that there exists heterogeneity of equilibrium intermediates along the unfolding pathway of cyt-c as highly ordered (X1), classical (X2) and disordered (X3), i.e., D ↔ X3 ↔ X2 ↔ X1 ↔ N. PMID:25849212

  10. Fluctuation, dissipation, and a non-equilibrium ``equation of state'' via nonlinear microrheology of hydrodynamically interacting colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Henry; Zia, Roseanna

    2014-11-01

    In our recently developed non-equilibrium Stokes-Einstein relation for microrheology, we showed that, in the absence of hydrodynamic interactions, the stress in a suspension is given by a balance between fluctuation and dissipation. Here we generalize our theory to develop a simple analytical relation connecting diffusive fluctuation, viscous dissipation and suspension stress in systems of hydrodynamically interacting colloids. In active microrheology, a Brownian probe is driven through a complex medium. The strength of probe forcing compared to the entropic restoring force defines a Peclet number, Pe. In the absence of hydrodynamics, normal stress differences scale as Pe4 and Pe for weak and strong probe forcing, respectively. But as hydrodynamics become important, interparticle forces give way to lubrication interactions and the normal stresses scale as Pe2 and Peδln(Pe), where 0.773 <= δ <= 1 as hydrodynamics vary from strong to weak. The new phenomenological theory is shown to agree with standard micromechanical definitions of the stress. A connection is made between the stress and an effective temperature of the medium, prompting the interpretation of the particle stress as the energy density, and the expression for osmotic pressure as a ``non-equilibrium equation of state.''

  11. Statistical Mechanics of the Human Placenta: A Stationary State of a Near-Equilibrium System in a Linear Regime.

    PubMed

    Lecarpentier, Yves; Claes, Victor; Hébert, Jean-Louis; Krokidis, Xénophon; Blanc, François-Xavier; Michel, Francine; Timbely, Oumar

    2015-01-01

    All near-equilibrium systems under linear regime evolve to stationary states in which there is constant entropy production rate. In an open chemical system that exchanges matter and energy with the exterior, we can identify both the energy and entropy flows associated with the exchange of matter and energy. This can be achieved by applying statistical mechanics (SM), which links the microscopic properties of a system to its bulk properties. In the case of contractile tissues such as human placenta, Huxley's equations offer a phenomenological formalism for applying SM. SM was investigated in human placental stem villi (PSV) (n = 40). PSV were stimulated by means of KCl exposure (n = 20) and tetanic electrical stimulation (n = 20). This made it possible to determine statistical entropy (S), internal energy (E), affinity (A), thermodynamic force (A / T) (T: temperature), thermodynamic flow (v) and entropy production rate (A / T x v). We found that PSV operated near equilibrium, i.e., A ≺≺ 2500 J/mol and in a stationary linear regime, i.e., (A / T) varied linearly with v. As v was dramatically low, entropy production rate which quantified irreversibility of chemical processes appeared to be the lowest ever observed in any contractile system. PMID:26569482

  12. Statistical Mechanics of the Human Placenta: A Stationary State of a Near-Equilibrium System in a Linear Regime

    PubMed Central

    Lecarpentier, Yves; Claes, Victor; Hébert, Jean-Louis; Krokidis, Xénophon; Blanc, François-Xavier; Michel, Francine; Timbely, Oumar

    2015-01-01

    All near-equilibrium systems under linear regime evolve to stationary states in which there is constant entropy production rate. In an open chemical system that exchanges matter and energy with the exterior, we can identify both the energy and entropy flows associated with the exchange of matter and energy. This can be achieved by applying statistical mechanics (SM), which links the microscopic properties of a system to its bulk properties. In the case of contractile tissues such as human placenta, Huxley’s equations offer a phenomenological formalism for applying SM. SM was investigated in human placental stem villi (PSV) (n = 40). PSV were stimulated by means of KCl exposure (n = 20) and tetanic electrical stimulation (n = 20). This made it possible to determine statistical entropy (S), internal energy (E), affinity (A), thermodynamic force (A / T) (T: temperature), thermodynamic flow (v) and entropy production rate (A / T x v). We found that PSV operated near equilibrium, i.e., A ≺≺ 2500 J/mol and in a stationary linear regime, i.e., (A / T) varied linearly with v. As v was dramatically low, entropy production rate which quantified irreversibility of chemical processes appeared to be the lowest ever observed in any contractile system. PMID:26569482

  13. Out-of-equilibrium dynamics of photoexcited spin-state concentration waves

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, Andrea; Buron-Le Cointe, M.; Lorenc, M.; Toupet, L.; Henning, Robert W.; DiChiara, A. D.; Moffat, Keith

    2015-01-01

    The spin crossover compound [FeIIH2L2-Me][PF6]2 presents a two-step phase transition. In the intermediate phase, a spin state concentration wave (SSCW) appears resulting from a symmetry breaking (cell doubling) associated with a long-range order of alternating high and low spin molecular states. By combining time-resolved optical and X-ray diffraction measurements on a single crystal, we study how such a system responds to femtosecond laser excitation and we follow in real time the erasing and rewriting of the SSCW

  14. Out-of-equilibrium dynamics of photoexcited spin-state concentration waves

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marino, Andrea; Buron-Le Cointe, M.; Lorenc, M.; Toupet, L.; Henning, Robert W.; DiChiara, A. D.; Moffat, Keith; Brefuel, N.; Collet, E.

    2015-01-28

    The spin crossover compound [FeIIH2L2-Me][PF6]2 presents a two-step phase transition. In the intermediate phase, a spin state concentration wave (SSCW) appears resulting from a symmetry breaking (cell doubling) associated with a long-range order of alternating high and low spin molecular states. Lastly, by combining time-resolved optical and X-ray diffraction measurements on a single crystal, we study how such a system responds to femtosecond laser excitation and we follow in real time the erasing and rewriting of the SSCW

  15. Out-of-equilibrium dynamics of photoexcited spin-state concentration waves

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, Andrea; Buron-Le Cointe, M.; Lorenc, M.; Toupet, L.; Henning, Robert W.; DiChiara, A. D.; Moffat, Keith; Brefuel, N.; Collet, E.

    2015-01-28

    The spin crossover compound [FeIIH2L2-Me][PF6]2 presents a two-step phase transition. In the intermediate phase, a spin state concentration wave (SSCW) appears resulting from a symmetry breaking (cell doubling) associated with a long-range order of alternating high and low spin molecular states. Lastly, by combining time-resolved optical and X-ray diffraction measurements on a single crystal, we study how such a system responds to femtosecond laser excitation and we follow in real time the erasing and rewriting of the SSCW

  16. Out-of-equilibrium dynamics of photoexcited spin-state concentration waves

    PubMed Central

    Marino, A.; Lorenc, M.; Toupet, L.; Henning, R.; DiChiara, A. D.; Moffat, K.; Bréfuel, N.

    2015-01-01

    The spin crossover compound [FeIIH2L2-Me][PF6]2 presents a two-step phase transition. In the intermediate phase, a spin state concentration wave (SSCW) appears resulting from a symmetry breaking (cell doubling) associated with a long-range order of alternating high and low spin molecular states. By combining time-resolved optical and X-ray diffraction measurements on a single crystal, we study how such a system responds to femtosecond laser excitation and we follow in real time the erasing and rewriting of the SSCW. PMID:25627455

  17. Observation of a Persistent Non-Equilibrium State in an Extremely Isotropic Harmonic Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobser, D. S.

    Ludwig Boltzmann made tremendously important contributions to the problem of con- necting macroscopic, empirical phenomena with microscopic, atomistic dynamics. At the end of the nineteenth century, Boltzmann was confronted with various strong objections to his work. For example, Boltzmann's atomistic explanations presuppose the reality of atoms, a notion that was vigorously rejected in some circles [14, 38]. Then too, there was the critique by Loschmidt that Boltzmann's H-theorem, put forth as a microscopic explanation for the Second Law of Thermodynamics, could hardly account for irreversible physics when the individual two-atom collisions were each reversible [18, 42]. Still intriguing today is the existence of special cases of the Boltzmann equation in which time-varying distributions of atoms re- sist the imperative of equilibration, even in the presence of collisions. Boltzmann discussed such situations in a paper dedicated to responding to Loschmidt's critique [7, 4]. Perhaps Boltzmann's motivation was to enumerate special cases where his famous H value does not relax as it should, and by enumerating them, point out their nonnaturalness, their artificiality. Damping, or relaxation to equilibrium, of a time-invariant phase-space distribution, is an all-but universal result predicted by the Boltzmann equation. Such improbable systems of atoms have only very recently been realized experimentally. Kinoshita et al. [36] experimentally confirmed that atoms constrained to move in a quasi one-dimensional potential, an atomistic Newtons cradle, exhibit vastly suppressed relaxation. Chevy et al. [15] observed long-lived breathe-mode oscillations in highly elongated but still 3D geometries. Perhaps one of the more interesting cases is the vanishing damping of the monopole breathe-mode oscillation in a spherically symmetric harmonic oscillator [29], where a cloud of atoms experiences undamped temperature oscillations, causing the cloud to expand and contract as if it

  18. High-Efficiency Solid State Cooling Technologies: Non-Equilibrium Asymmetic Thermoelectrics (NEAT) Devices

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: Sheetak is developing a thermoelectric-based solid state cooling system to replace typical air conditioners that use vapor compression to cool air. With noisy mechanical components, vapor compression systems use a liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the external environment. With no noisy moving parts or polluting refrigerants, thermoelectric systems rely on an electrical current being passed through the junction of the two different conducting materials to change temperature. Using advanced semiconductor technology, Sheetak is improving solid state cooling systems by using proprietary thermoelectric materials along with other innovations to achieve significant energy efficiency. Sheetak’s new design displaces compressor-based technology; improves reliability; and decreases energy usage. Sheetak’s use of semiconductor manufacturing methods leads to less material use—facilitating cheaper production.

  19. Of the nature of a hot, ``strongly-'' magnetized plasma state -in thermal equilibrium- in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdichevsky, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The main outcome of this study of constitutive properties of the medium is the estimation of its magnetic permeability, two orders of magnitude smaller than that of the vacuum, i.e., a highly diamagnetic material. (This diamagnetic property is consistent with the superconductivity assumption in magnetohydrodynamics theory, baseline of any macroscopic-scale description of the interplanetary medium.) We propose that a 3-D amorphous Langmuir lattice state is a good representation of the properties of this class of self-organized magnetized matter in solar transients, coronal mass ejections, containing extremely dilute matter strongly dominated by a magnetic field. We further conjecture that the presented state of magnetized matter could be an adequate representation of the `local insterstellar medium region,' in which the solar-system as a whole moves, based on current observations by the spacecraft Voyager 1. The presented interpretation benefits from the observation of many strongly magnetized structures ejected by the Sun, in their march through the interplanetary space evolving consistently with a simple 3-D magnetohydrodynamic model representation. Understanding of the magnetized matter state is gained by means of a case study from 3s in-situ magnetic field and plasma observations in space, which will be outlined in the presentation. (These are SWE and MFI instruments data in spacecraft Wind.)

  20. Structure of the flux lines lattice in NbSe2 : Equilibrium state and influence of the magnetic history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pautrat, A.; Aburas, M.; Simon, Ch.; Mathieu, P.; Brûlet, A.; Dewhurst, C. D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Higgins, M. J.

    2009-05-01

    We have performed small-angle neutron scattering of the flux line lattice (FLL) in a Fe-doped NbSe2 sample which presents a large peak effect in the critical current. The scattered intensity and the width of the Bragg peaks of the equilibrium FLL indicate an ordered structure in the peak effect zone. The history dependence in the FLL structure has been studied using field-cooled and zero-field-cooled procedures, and each state shows the same intensity of Bragg scattering and good orientational order. These results strongly suggest that the peak effect is unrelated to a bulk-disordering transition and confirm the role of a heterogeneous distribution of screening current.

  1. Molecular electronic states near metal surfaces at equilibrium using potential of mean force and numerical renormalization group methods: Hysteresis revisited.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wenjie; Nitzan, Abraham; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2016-02-21

    We investigate equilibrium observables for molecules near metals by employing a potential of mean force (PMF) that takes level broadening into account. Through comparison with exact data, we demonstrate that this PMF approach performs quite well, even for cases where molecule-electrode couplings depend on nuclear position. As an application, we reexamine the possibility of hysteresis effects within the Anderson-Holstein model (i.e., an impurity coupled both to a metal surface and a nuclear oscillator). As compared against the standard mean field approach by Galperin et al. [Nano Lett. 5, 125 (2005)], our PMF approach agrees much better with exact results for average electronic populations both at zero and finite temperature; we find, however, that mean field theory can be very useful for predicting the onset of dynamical instabilities, metastable states, and hysteresis. PMID:26896978

  2. Economic Impacts of Potential Foot and Mouth Disease Agro-terrorism in the United States: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A; Rose, Adam; Bumsoo, Lee

    2013-01-01

    The foot and mouth disease (FMD) virus has high agro-terrorism potential because it is contagious, can be easily transmitted via inanimate objects and can be spread by wind. An outbreak of FMD in developed countries results in massive slaughtering of animals (for disease control) and disruptions in meat supply chains and trade, with potentially large economic losses. Although the United States has been FMD-free since 1929, the potential of FMD as a deliberate terrorist weapon calls for estimates of the physical and economic damage that could result from an outbreak. This paper estimates the economic impacts of three alternative scenarios of potential FMD attacks using a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of the US economy. The three scenarios range from a small outbreak successfully contained within a state to a large multi-state attack resulting in slaughtering of 30 percent of the national livestock. Overall, the value of total output losses in our simulations range between $37 billion (0.15% of 2006 baseline economic output) and $228 billion (0.92%). Major impacts stem from the supply constraint on livestock due to massive animal slaughtering. As expected, the economic losses are heavily concentrated in agriculture and food manufacturing sectors, with losses ranging from $23 billion to $61 billion in the two industries.

  3. Prediction of the Chapman-Jouguet chemical equilibrium state in a detonation wave from first principles based reactive molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dezhou; Zybin, Sergey V; An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-01-21

    The combustion or detonation of reacting materials at high temperature and pressure can be characterized by the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state that describes the chemical equilibrium of the products at the end of the reaction zone of the detonation wave for sustained detonation. This provides the critical properties and product kinetics for input to macroscale continuum simulations of energetic materials. We propose the ReaxFF Reactive Dynamics to CJ point protocol (Rx2CJ) for predicting the CJ state parameters, providing the means to predict the performance of new materials prior to synthesis and characterization, allowing the simulation based design to be done in silico. Our Rx2CJ method is based on atomistic reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) using the QM-derived ReaxFF force field. We validate this method here by predicting the CJ point and detonation products for three typical energetic materials. We find good agreement between the predicted and experimental detonation velocities, indicating that this method can reliably predict the CJ state using modest levels of computation. PMID:26688211

  4. Non-equilibrium relaxation between two quasi-stationary states in a stochastic lattice Lotka-Volterra model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng; Täuber, Uwe C.

    2015-03-01

    Spatially extended stochastic models for predator-prey competition and coexistence display complex, correlated spatio-temporal structures and are governed by remarkably large fluctuations. Both populations are characterized by damped erratic oscillations whose properties are governed by the reaction rates. Here, we specifically study a stochastic lattice Lotka-Volterra model by means of Monte Carlo simulations that impose spatial restrictions on the number of occupants per site. The system tends to relax into a quasi-stationary state, independent of the imposed initial conditions. We investigate the non-equilibrium relaxation between two such quasi-stationary states, following an instantaneous change of the predation rate. The ensuing relaxation times are measured via the peak width of the population density Fourier transforms. As expected, we find that the initial state only influences the oscillations for the duration of this relaxation time, implying that the system quickly loses any memory of the initial configuration. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award DE-FG02-09ER46613.

  5. Multiplicity of equilibrium states in laterally heated thermosolutal systems with equal diffusivity coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitverblit, N.

    1999-09-01

    This work uncovers the instabilities arising in laterally heated stably stratified systems when the diffusivities of the two involved components are equal. These instabilities are demonstrated to be the result of the differential diffusion caused by the unequal lateral diffusion gradients of the components. Such gradients form in the perturbed state due to the different side-wall boundary conditions. Examination of the bifurcation phenomena in the finite enclosures with equal diffusivities exhibited most qualitative features established by Tsitverblit and Kit [Phys. Fluids A 5, 1062 (1993)] and Tsitverblit [Phys. Fluids 7, 718 (1995)] for such phenomena in the heat-salt problem. In the behavior of singularities and steady flows, a number of the regularities that are not distinct in the heat-salt case were distinguished. Additional results obtained with the solute sidewall boundary conditions being of the same (fixed-value) type as the temperature conditions were also discussed.

  6. Equilibrium and Dynamic Vortex States near Absolute Zero in a Weak Pinning Amorphous Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochi, Aguri; Sohara, Naoya; Kaneko, Shin-ichi; Kokubo, Nobuhito; Okuma, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    By developing and employing a mode-locking measurement with pulsed currents, we successfully determine the dynamic melting field B{c,dyn}∞ (T) for a driven vortex lattice of an amorphous MoxGe1-x film in the limit of zero temperature (T → 0) and complete a dynamic as well as a static vortex phase diagram. At T = 0, the mixed state in the absence of pinning comprises vortex-lattice and quantum-vortex-liquid (QVL) phases, and the melting field separating the two phases is identified as B{c,dyn}∞ (0). Comparison of the dynamic and static phase diagrams reveals that, when the weak pinning is introduced into the pin-free system, a disordered phase emerges just above the vortex-lattice phase and a threshold field separating the two phases is slightly suppressed from B{c,dyn}∞ (0), indicative of defect-induced disordering of the lattice. By contrast, a melting field into QVL is much enhanced from B{c,dyn}∞ (0) up to a point near the upper critical field, resulting in a significant suppression of the QVL phase. This is attributed to the stronger effective pinning at lower T, which survives quantum fluctuations.

  7. Deep arid system hydrodynamics: 1. Equilibrium states and response times in thick desert vadose zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walvoord, M.A.; Plummer, M.A.; Phillips, F.M.; Wolfsberg, A.V.

    2002-01-01

    Quantifying moisture fluxes through deep desert soils remains difficult because of the small magnitude of the fluxes and the lack of a comprehensive model to describe flow and transport through such dry material. A particular challenge for such a model is reproducing both observed matric potential and chloride profiles. We propose a conceptual model for flow in desert vadose zones that includes isothermal and nonisothermal vapor transport and the role of desert vegetation in supporting a net upward moisture flux below the root zone. Numerical simulations incorporating this conceptual model match typical matric potential and chloride profiles. The modeling approach thereby reconciles the paradox between the recognized importance of plants, upward driving forces, and vapor flow processes in desert vadose zones and the inadequacy of the downward-only liquid flow assumption of the conventional chloride mass balance approach. Our work shows that water transport in thick desert vadose zones at steady state is usually dominated by upward vapor flow and that long response times, of the order of 104-105 years, are required to equilibrate to existing arid surface conditions. Simulation results indicate that most thick desert vadose zones have been locked in slow drying transients that began in response to a climate shift and establishment of desert vegetation many thousands of years ago.

  8. Ground state properties and non-equilibrium dynamics of hard-core bosons confined on optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigol, Marcos; Muramatsu, Alejandro

    2004-03-01

    We study by means of an exact approach, a gas of hard core bosons (HCB) confined on optical lattices. The ground state properties of such systems are analyzed. Local incompressible phases appear in the system, like in the case of interacting soft-core bosons [1] and fermions [2,3]. The changes in momentum distribution function and in the natural orbitals (effective single particle states) introduced by the formation of such phases are analyzed. We also study non-equilibrium properties for those systems, which within our numerical approach can be obtained exactly for systems with 200 particles on lattices with 3000 sites. In particular we analyze the free expansion of the gas when it is released from the trap turning off the confining potential. We show that the expansion is non-trivial (as opposed to the fermionic case) and new features to be observed in the experiments are analyzed. [1] G. G. Batrouni, V. Rousseau, R. T. Scalettar, M. Rigol, A. Muramatsu, P. J. H. Denteneer, and M. Troyer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 117203 (2002). [2] M. Rigol, A. Muramatsu, G. G. Batrouni, and R. T. Scalettar, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 130403 (2003). [3] M. Rigol and A. Muramatsu, cond-mat/0309670 (2003).

  9. The equilibrium state in the Si-O-C ternary system during SiC growth by chemical substitution of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, S. A.; Osipov, A. V.

    2015-03-01

    The equilibrium state in the silicon-carbon-oxygen (Si-O-C) ternary system has been calculated in the framework of the thermodynamics of chemical reactions. It is established that, in the practically important temperature interval of 1000°C < T < 1400°C, the system initially consisting of crystalline Si and gaseous CO tends toward an equilibrium state comprising a mixture of four solid phases (Si, C, SiC, and SiO2) and vapor mixture (predominantly of SiO, CO, Si, and CO2). Equilibrium partial pressures of all gases in the mixture have been calculated. An optimum regime of SiC film growth from Si by the method of atomic substitution is proposed, whereby only SiC phase is growing while SiO2 and C phases are not formed.

  10. Partition Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Michal; Tennenholtz, Moshe

    We introduce partition equilibrium and study its existence in resource selection games (RSG). In partition equilibrium the agents are partitioned into coalitions, and only deviations by the prescribed coalitions are considered. This is in difference to the classical concept of strong equilibrium according to which any subset of the agents may deviate. In resource selection games, each agent selects a resource from a set of resources, and its payoff is an increasing (or non-decreasing) function of the number of agents selecting its resource. While it has been shown that strong equilibrium exists in resource selection games, these games do not possess super-strong equilibrium, in which a fruitful deviation benefits at least one deviator without hurting any other deviator, even in the case of two identical resources with increasing cost functions. Similarly, strong equilibrium does not exist for that restricted two identical resources setting when the game is played repeatedly. We prove that for any given partition there exists a super-strong equilibrium for resource selection games of identical resources with increasing cost functions; we also show similar existence results for a variety of other classes of resource selection games. For the case of repeated games we identify partitions that guarantee the existence of strong equilibrium. Together, our work introduces a natural concept, which turns out to lead to positive and applicable results in one of the basic domains studied in the literature.

  11. Quasi-Equilibrium States in the Tropics Simulated by a Cloud-Resolving Model. Part 1; Specific Features and Budget Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shie, C.-L.; Tao, W.-K.; Simpson, J.; Sui, C.-H.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A series of long-term integrations using the two-dimensional Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model were performed by altering imposed environmental components to produce various quasi-equilibrium thermodynamic states. Model results show that the genesis of a warm/wet quasi-equilibrium state is mainly due to either strong vertical wind shear (from nudging) or large surface fluxes (from strong surface winds), while a cold/dry quasi-equilibrium state is attributed to a remarkably weakened mixed-wind shear (from vertical mixing due to deep convection) along with weak surface winds. In general, latent heat flux and net large-scale temperature forcing, the two dominant physical processes, dominate in the beginning stage of the simulated convective systems, then considerably weaken in the final stage, which leads to quasi-equilibrium states. A higher thermodynamic regime is found to produce a larger rainfall amount, as convective clouds are the leading source of rainfall over stratiform clouds even though the former occupy much less area. Moreover, convective clouds are more likely to occur in the presence of strong surface winds (latent heat flux), while stratiform clouds (especially the well-organized type) are favored in conditions with strong wind shear (large-scale forcing). The convective systems, which consist of distinct cloud types due to the variation in horizontal winds, are also found to propagate differently. Accordingly, convective systems with mixed-wind shear generally propagate in the direction of shear, while the system with strong (multidirectional) wind shear propagates in a more complex way. Based on the results from the temperature (Q1) and moisture (Q2) budgets, cloud-scale eddies are found to act as a hydrodynamic 'vehicle' that cascades the heat and moisture vertically. Several other specific features such as atmospheric stability, CAPE, and mass fluxes are also investigated and found to be significantly different between diverse quasi-equilibrium

  12. [Wernicke encephalopathy accompanying linitis plastica].

    PubMed

    Soós, Zsuzsanna; Salamon, Mónika; Oláh, Roland; Czégeni, Anna; Salamon, Ferenc; Folyovich, András; Winkler, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (or Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy) is a rarely diagnosed neurological disorder, which is caused by vitamin B1 deficiency. In the classical form it is characterized by a typical triad (confusion, oculomotor disturbance and ataxia), however, in the majority of the cases only confusion is present. It can be frequently observed in subjects with chronic alcohol consumption, but it may accompany different pathological states of which end stage malignant diseases are the most importants, where confusion may have different backgrounds. The authors present the case of an old male patient with advanced gastric cancer recognised and treated vitamin B1 deficiency, and they draw attention to difficulties of the diagnosis of Wernicke's disease. PMID:24379094

  13. Helical equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, S.

    1981-08-01

    A straight, helical plasma equilibrium equation is solved numerically for a plasma with a helical magnetic axis. As is expected, by a suitable choice of the plasma boundary, the vacuum configuration is made line ..integral.. dl/B stable. As the plasma pressure increases, the line ..integral.. dl/B criterion will improve (again as expected). There is apparently no limit on the plasma ..beta.. from the equilibrium consideration. Thus helical-axis stellarator ..beta.. will presumably be limited by MHD stability ..beta.., and not by equilibrium ..beta...

  14. Model analysis of ground-state dissociation energies and equilibrium separations in alkali-metal diatomic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, Erminio; Jansen, Laurens

    1986-05-01

    Ground-state dissociation energies De and equilibrium distances Re for the series of homonuclear alkali-metal diatomic molecules Li2,Na2,..., as well as those for six heteronuclear alkali-metal diatomic compounds, are evaluated on the basis of a simple valence-bond model. Each alkali-metal atom in a diatomic molecule is characterized by two quantities: a Gaussian parameter βe of the valence-electron function and a valence-to-core ``relative-size'' parameter γ≡(βc/βe)2, with βc the Gaussian parameter for the core-electron charge distribution. For the homonuclear diatomic molecules, accurate results are obtained with a 2s Gaussian valence function (r2-a2)G orthogonalized to the core. For each homonuclear diatomic molecule there exists an optimal (βe,γ) set yielding values of De and Re in practically quantitative agreement with experiment. The quantities βe and γ exhibit the expected physical behavior over the series in that βe decreases from Li2 to Cs2, and γ is highest for the lightest diatomic molecule Li2. The compounds K2, Rb2, and Cs2 are found to be ``Heitler-London'' molecules to within 5% of their binding energies. An approximate, similar, analysis of six heteronuclear diatomic compounds yields close agreement with experiment for LiNa and RbCs, whereas with the other four compounds (LiK, NaK, NaRb, and NaCs) the agreement with experimental De and Re is to within at most 5%. Also RbCs is a ``Heitler-London'' molecule to a very good approximation.

  15. [Uranium, thorium and potassium contents and radioactive equilibrium states of the uranium and thorium series nuclides in phosphate rocks and phosphate fertilizers].

    PubMed

    Komura, K; Yanagisawa, M; Sakurai, J; Sakanoue, M

    1985-10-01

    Uranium, thorium and potassium contents and radioactive equilibrium states of the uranium and thorium series nuclides have been studied for 2 phosphate rocks and 7 phosphate fertilizers. Uranium contents were found to be rather high (39-117 ppm) except for phosphate rock from Kola. The uranium series nuclides were found to be in various equilibration states, which can be grouped into following three categories. Almost in the equilibrium state, 238U approximately 230Th greater than 210Pb greater than 226Ra and 238U greater than 230Th greater than 210Pb greater than 226Ra. Thorium contents were found to be, in general, low and appreciable disequilibrium of the thorium series nuclides was not observed except one sample. Potassium contents were also very low (less than 0.3% K2O) except for complex fertilizers. Based on the present data, discussions were made for the radiation exposure due to phosphate fertilizers. PMID:3006158

  16. 48 CFR 252.225-7040 - Contractor Personnel Authorized to Accompany U.S. Armed Forces Deployed Outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... territorial jurisdiction of the United States, may potentially be subject to the criminal jurisdiction of the..., et seq.); (ii) Pursuant to the War Crimes Act (18 U.S.C. 2441), Federal criminal jurisdiction also... Uniform Code of Military Justice under 10 U.S.C. 802(a)(10). (f) Processing and departure points....

  17. 48 CFR 252.225-7040 - Contractor Personnel Authorized to Accompany U.S. Armed Forces Deployed Outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... many of the offenses addressed by the definition are covered under the Uniform Code of Military Justice... of Military Justice may nevertheless have consequences to the contractor employees (see paragraph (h... jurisdiction of the United States, may potentially be subject to the criminal jurisdiction of the United...

  18. 48 CFR 252.225-7040 - Contractor Personnel Authorized to Accompany U.S. Armed Forces Deployed Outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... many of the offenses addressed by the definition are covered under the Uniform Code of Military Justice... of Military Justice may nevertheless have consequences to the contractor employees (see paragraph (h... jurisdiction of the United States, may potentially be subject to the criminal jurisdiction of the United...

  19. "An Easy Switch": A Descriptive Case Study Exploring the Shift toward Informational Text Accompanying the Implementation of Common Core State Standards in Five Primary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kindall, Heather

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive case study was to discover how the newly implemented Common Core State Standards (CCSS) may have changed teachers' practices and philosophies regarding literacy instruction and to determine which teaching strategies were being presented in regard to informational text in the studied Kindergarten through second grade…

  20. 31 CFR 538.511 - Accompanied baggage authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the United States directly or indirectly from Sudan are authorized to import into the United States... Sudan are authorized to export from the United States accompanied baggage normally incident to...

  1. 31 CFR 538.511 - Accompanied baggage authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the United States directly or indirectly from Sudan are authorized to import into the United States... Sudan are authorized to export from the United States accompanied baggage normally incident to...

  2. 31 CFR 538.511 - Accompanied baggage authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the United States directly or indirectly from Sudan are authorized to import into the United States... Sudan are authorized to export from the United States accompanied baggage normally incident to...

  3. 31 CFR 538.511 - Accompanied baggage authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the United States directly or indirectly from Sudan are authorized to import into the United States... Sudan are authorized to export from the United States accompanied baggage normally incident to...

  4. 31 CFR 538.511 - Accompanied baggage authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the United States directly or indirectly from Sudan are authorized to import into the United States... Sudan are authorized to export from the United States accompanied baggage normally incident to...

  5. 31 CFR 560.507 - Accompanied baggage authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the United States directly or indirectly from Iran are authorized to import into the United States... Iran are authorized to export from the United States accompanied baggage normally incident to...

  6. 31 CFR 560.507 - Accompanied baggage authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the United States directly or indirectly from Iran are authorized to import into the United States... Iran are authorized to export from the United States accompanied baggage normally incident to...

  7. 31 CFR 560.507 - Accompanied baggage authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the United States directly or indirectly from Iran are authorized to import into the United States... Iran are authorized to export from the United States accompanied baggage normally incident to...

  8. Electrooptical Absorption Measurements (EOAM) Testify Existence of two Conformers of Prodan and Laurdan with Different Dipole Moments in Equilibrium Ground and Franck-Condon Excited State.

    PubMed

    Nemkovich, N A; Detert, H; Roeder, N

    2016-09-01

    The results from the electrooptical absorption measurements (EOAM) on the equilibrium ground and excited Franck-Condon state dipole moments of Prodan and Laurdan in 1,4-dioxane are presented. As follows from experiments Prodan and Laurdan in the equilibrium ground and excited Franck-Condon state have two conformers with considerably different dipole moments. The electrical dipole moments and the transition dipole moment, obtained from the short-wavelength region of the absorption spectrum are parallel. The electrical dipole moments measured at the long-wavelength spectral region are parallel to each other but not parallel to the transition dipole moment m a. The angle θ between the transition dipole moment m a and the dipole moment in the equilibrium ground state μ g of the long-wavelength conformer is about 30(0) for both probes. Obtained results evidence that donor-acceptor pairs of the short-wavelength and long-wavelength conformers are not located on the same axis. Two low-energy conformers of Prodan have been found by density functional theory (DFT) calculations, differing in the orientation of the carbonyl group towards the naphthalene system. PMID:27396483

  9. Local-equilibrium formalism applied to mechanics of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kestin, J.

    1992-08-01

    The lecture starts with an expression of good wishes to George Herrmann on the occasion of his seventieth birthday and continues with a lament that the majority of research workers in the field of solid mechanics have failed to appreciate the power and relevance of ``conventional`` thermodynamics which is based on the acceptance of the hypothesis of local equilibrium (principle of local state). The lecture then proceeds to motivate the essential concepts of conventional thermodynamics and emphasizes the differences between the description of nonequilibrium states in physical space and equilibrium states in the Gibbsian phase space. It is asserted that the subject acquires its simplest form by the recognition of the relevance of Bridgman`s internal variables. With their aid it is possible to define the accompanying equilibrium state and the accompanying reversible process. An elimination of internal energy between the field equation of energy (First Law) and the Gibbs equation in rate form results in an explicit expression for the local rate of entropy production, {theta}. It is asserted that the preceding elements supplemented with appropriate rate equations result in a closed system of partial differential equations whose solution, subject to appropriate initial and boundary conditions, constitutes the process (``history``) under consideration. 11 refs.

  10. Local-equilibrium formalism applied to mechanics of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kestin, J.

    1992-01-01

    The lecture starts with an expression of good wishes to George Herrmann on the occasion of his seventieth birthday and continues with a lament that the majority of research workers in the field of solid mechanics have failed to appreciate the power and relevance of conventional'' thermodynamics which is based on the acceptance of the hypothesis of local equilibrium (principle of local state). The lecture then proceeds to motivate the essential concepts of conventional thermodynamics and emphasizes the differences between the description of nonequilibrium states in physical space and equilibrium states in the Gibbsian phase space. It is asserted that the subject acquires its simplest form by the recognition of the relevance of Bridgman's internal variables. With their aid it is possible to define the accompanying equilibrium state and the accompanying reversible process. An elimination of internal energy between the field equation of energy (First Law) and the Gibbs equation in rate form results in an explicit expression for the local rate of entropy production, {theta}. It is asserted that the preceding elements supplemented with appropriate rate equations result in a closed system of partial differential equations whose solution, subject to appropriate initial and boundary conditions, constitutes the process ( history'') under consideration. 11 refs.

  11. Seven years of geomorphic change in the head of Monterey Canyon, CA: Steady state equilibrium or monotonic change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. P.; Kvitek, R. G.; Ross, E.; Iampietro, P.; Paull, C. K.; Sandersfeld, M.

    2010-12-01

    The head of Monterey submarine canyon has been surveyed with high-precision multibeam sonar at least once each year since September 2002. This poster provides a summary of changes between September 2002 and September 2008. Data were collected with a variety of Reson mulitbeam sonar heads, and logged with an ISIS data acquisition system. Vessel attitude was corrected using an Applanix POS MV equipped with an auxillary C-Nav 2050 GPS receiver. Data were processed and filtered and cleaned in Caris HIPS. Depth changes for various time spans were determined through raster subtraction of pairs of 3-m resolution bathymetric grids in ArcMap. The depth change analyses focused on the canyon floor, except where a landslide occurred on a wall, and where obvious gullying near the headwall had occurred during the time of our study. Canyon walls were generally excluded from analysis. The analysis area was 1,414,240 sq meters. The gross changes between 2002 and 2008 include net erosion of 2,300,000 m^3 +/- 800,000 m^3 of material from the canyon. The annualized rate of net sediment loss from this time frame agrees within an order of magnitude with our previously published estimates from earlier (shorter) time frames, so the erosion events seem to be moderate magnitude and frequent, rather than infrequent and catastrophic. The greatest sediment loss appears to be from lateral erosion of channel-bounding terraces rather than deepening or scouring of the existing channel axis. A single landslide event that occurred in summer 2003 had an initial slide scar (void) volume of 71,000 m^3. The scar was observed to increase annually, and had grown to approximately 96,000 m^3 by 2008. The initial slide was too small to be tsunamigenic. In contrast to the monotonic canyon axis widening, the shoreward terminus of the canyon (canyon lip) appears to be in steady state equilibrium with sediment supply entering the canyon from the littoral zone. The lip position, indicated by the clearly defined

  12. 19 CFR 12.6 - Affidavits required to accompany entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 12.6 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... required to accompany entry. (a) Cheeses produced in the member states of the European Communities shall... not be required to accompany importations of cheese produced in the member states of the...

  13. The oxidation state of primary MOR-Basalts before degassing of C-H-S-O species indicates an oxidized source regions buffered by sulphur-sulphate equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Iacono-Marziano, Giada; Morizet, Yann; Marrocchi, Yves

    2014-05-01

    The Earth's mantle redox state regulates the igneous inputs of volcanic gases in the atmosphere and probably controls the depth of mantle weakening by redox melting. Capturing the processes that control basalt oxidation state and how the latter is connected to their mantle sources is a central topic in planetary sciences. Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts, constituting 80% of the extrusive rocks, are widely used for this purpose. But MOR-basalts are considerably degassed. In particular, they have lost most of their primary CO2 by open system degassing and it is unclear if this can importantly affect their redox state. In order to reconstruct their primary volatile contents and their primary oxidation states, we simulate here their degassing considering primary undegassed MORB being variably enriched in H2O and CO2. Our results indicate that clear relationships between MORB oxidation state and their volatile enrichments are triggered by degassing: Volatile-rich melts degas more CO2, H2O and SO2, which triggers a more pronounced decrease in Fe3+/Fetot. The reduction associated to degassing is relatively small, but it explains well recently reported geochemical observations relating geochemical enrichments and MORBs oxidation state. The oxidation state of MORBs as retrieved from their post-eruption Fe3+/Fetot therefore underestimates the oxidation state of their source regions by about 0.3-0.8 log-units; the degree of underestimation correlating with the amount of initial CO2 and H2O. The source regions of MORBs must buffer fO2s that are centred on FMQ+1 just after melt extraction from the mantle. This fO2 range corresponds to the region where the sulphide-sulphate equilibrium in basalts is the dominant redox buffer, and we therefore propose that the fact most basalts erupting on Earth since the Archean have a constant fO2 of FMQ reflects the redox buffering by sulphur during partial melting. Prior to melting, the deep subsolidus mantle must be equilibrated with higher fO2 as

  14. The Moving Lines on Electron Spectra as Charge Reflexes on Non-equilibrium States of Nanostructured Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mishchuk, Oleg A

    2016-12-01

    The experimental results present the phenomenon of moving lines on electron spectra which are linked spatially and in time with the localization and durability of the processes of new surface producing in folds and grain boundaries. This effect was also realized for a thin-layer composite "organic on metal films on dielectric substrate" in modeling non-equilibrium conditions which are created by the intensive electron beam pulse impact. It was found that the nature of the inceptive adsorption layer, in addition to the metal film, determines the initial positions of moving lines on the spectra. The main accents in these investigations were in observations of appearance of the moving lines, dynamics of their displacements on the spectra, final stages when these lines vanished, and finding the general regularities between the spontaneous and induced events. PMID:27083583

  15. Equilibrium intermediate-state patterns in a type-I superconducting slab in an arbitrarily oriented applied magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Clem, John; Prozorov, Ruslan; Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    2013-09-04

    The equilibrium topology of superconducting and normal domains in flat type-I superconductors is investigated. Important improvements with respect to previous work are that (1) the energy of the external magnetic field, as deformed by the presence of superconducting domains, is calculated in the same way for three different topologies and (2) calculations are made for arbitrary orientation of the applied field. A phase diagram is presented for the minimum-energy topology as a function of applied field magnitude and angle. For small (large) applied fields, normal (superconducting) tubes are found, while for intermediate fields, parallel domains have a lower energy. The range of field magnitudes for which the superconducting-tubes structure is favored shrinks when the field is more in-plane oriented.

  16. Equilibrium intermediate-state patterns in a type-I superconducting slab in an arbitrarily oriented applied magnetic field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Clem, John; Prozorov, Ruslan; Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    2013-09-04

    The equilibrium topology of superconducting and normal domains in flat type-I superconductors is investigated. Important improvements with respect to previous work are that (1) the energy of the external magnetic field, as deformed by the presence of superconducting domains, is calculated in the same way for three different topologies and (2) calculations are made for arbitrary orientation of the applied field. A phase diagram is presented for the minimum-energy topology as a function of applied field magnitude and angle. For small (large) applied fields, normal (superconducting) tubes are found, while for intermediate fields, parallel domains have a lower energy. Themore » range of field magnitudes for which the superconducting-tubes structure is favored shrinks when the field is more in-plane oriented.« less

  17. The Moving Lines on Electron Spectra as Charge Reflexes on Non-equilibrium States of Nanostructured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchuk, Oleg A.

    2016-04-01

    The experimental results present the phenomenon of moving lines on electron spectra which are linked spatially and in time with the localization and durability of the processes of new surface producing in folds and grain boundaries. This effect was also realized for a thin-layer composite "organic on metal films on dielectric substrate" in modeling non-equilibrium conditions which are created by the intensive electron beam pulse impact. It was found that the nature of the inceptive adsorption layer, in addition to the metal film, determines the initial positions of moving lines on the spectra. The main accents in these investigations were in observations of appearance of the moving lines, dynamics of their displacements on the spectra, final stages when these lines vanished, and finding the general regularities between the spontaneous and induced events.

  18. Rapid-Equilibrium Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberty, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid-equilibrium rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are especially useful because if experimental data can be fit by these simpler rate equations, the Michaelis constants can be interpreted as equilibrium constants. However, for some reactions it is necessary to use the more complicated steady-state rate equations. Thermodynamics is…

  19. Equilibrium Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzo, Dario; Petazzi, Lorenzo

    2006-08-01

    We present a satellite path planning technique able to make identical spacecraft aquire a given configuration. The technique exploits a behaviour-based approach to achieve an autonomous and distributed control over the relative geometry making use of limited sensorial information. A desired velocity is defined for each satellite as a sum of different contributions coming from generic high level behaviours: forcing the final desired configuration the behaviours are further defined by an inverse dynamic calculation dubbed Equilibrium Shaping. We show how considering only three different kind of behaviours it is possible to acquire a number of interesting formations and we set down the theoretical framework to find the entire set. We find that allowing a limited amount of communication the technique may be used also to form complex lattice structures. Several control feedbacks able to track the desired velocities are introduced and discussed. Our results suggest that sliding mode control is particularly appropriate in connection with the developed technique.

  20. 19 CFR 210.56 - Notice accompanying service copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Notice accompanying service copies. 210.56 Section 210.56 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION INVESTIGATIONS OF UNFAIR PRACTICES IN IMPORT TRADE ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Temporary Relief § 210.56 Notice accompanying service copies. (a) Each service copy of the...

  1. Non-equilibrium reaction and relaxation dynamics in a strongly interacting explicit solvent: F + CD3CN treated with a parallel multi-state EVB model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glowacki, David R.; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Harvey, Jeremy N.

    2015-07-01

    We describe a parallelized linear-scaling computational framework developed to implement arbitrarily large multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) calculations within CHARMM and TINKER. Forces are obtained using the Hellmann-Feynman relationship, giving continuous gradients, and good energy conservation. Utilizing multi-dimensional Gaussian coupling elements fit to explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory, we built a 64-state MS-EVB model designed to study the F + CD3CN → DF + CD2CN reaction in CD3CN solvent (recently reported in Dunning et al. [Science 347(6221), 530 (2015)]). This approach allows us to build a reactive potential energy surface whose balanced accuracy and efficiency considerably surpass what we could achieve otherwise. We ran molecular dynamics simulations to examine a range of observables which follow in the wake of the reactive event: energy deposition in the nascent reaction products, vibrational relaxation rates of excited DF in CD3CN solvent, equilibrium power spectra of DF in CD3CN, and time dependent spectral shifts associated with relaxation of the nascent DF. Many of our results are in good agreement with time-resolved experimental observations, providing evidence for the accuracy of our MS-EVB framework in treating both the solute and solute/solvent interactions. The simulations provide additional insight into the dynamics at sub-picosecond time scales that are difficult to resolve experimentally. In particular, the simulations show that (immediately following deuterium abstraction) the nascent DF finds itself in a non-equilibrium regime in two different respects: (1) it is highly vibrationally excited, with ˜23 kcal mol-1 localized in the stretch and (2) its post-reaction solvation environment, in which it is not yet hydrogen-bonded to CD3CN solvent molecules, is intermediate between the non-interacting gas-phase limit and the solution-phase equilibrium limit. Vibrational relaxation of the nascent DF results in a spectral

  2. Non-equilibrium reaction and relaxation dynamics in a strongly interacting explicit solvent: F + CD{sub 3}CN treated with a parallel multi-state EVB model

    SciTech Connect

    Glowacki, David R.; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Harvey, Jeremy N.

    2015-07-28

    We describe a parallelized linear-scaling computational framework developed to implement arbitrarily large multi-state empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) calculations within CHARMM and TINKER. Forces are obtained using the Hellmann-Feynman relationship, giving continuous gradients, and good energy conservation. Utilizing multi-dimensional Gaussian coupling elements fit to explicitly correlated coupled cluster theory, we built a 64-state MS-EVB model designed to study the F + CD{sub 3}CN → DF + CD{sub 2}CN reaction in CD{sub 3}CN solvent (recently reported in Dunning et al. [Science 347(6221), 530 (2015)]). This approach allows us to build a reactive potential energy surface whose balanced accuracy and efficiency considerably surpass what we could achieve otherwise. We ran molecular dynamics simulations to examine a range of observables which follow in the wake of the reactive event: energy deposition in the nascent reaction products, vibrational relaxation rates of excited DF in CD{sub 3}CN solvent, equilibrium power spectra of DF in CD{sub 3}CN, and time dependent spectral shifts associated with relaxation of the nascent DF. Many of our results are in good agreement with time-resolved experimental observations, providing evidence for the accuracy of our MS-EVB framework in treating both the solute and solute/solvent interactions. The simulations provide additional insight into the dynamics at sub-picosecond time scales that are difficult to resolve experimentally. In particular, the simulations show that (immediately following deuterium abstraction) the nascent DF finds itself in a non-equilibrium regime in two different respects: (1) it is highly vibrationally excited, with ∼23 kcal mol{sup −1} localized in the stretch and (2) its post-reaction solvation environment, in which it is not yet hydrogen-bonded to CD{sub 3}CN solvent molecules, is intermediate between the non-interacting gas-phase limit and the solution-phase equilibrium limit. Vibrational

  3. Direct observation of the solvent effects on the low-lying nπ* and ππ* excited triplet states of acetophenone derivatives in thermal equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Narra, Sudhakar; Shigeto, Shinsuke

    2015-03-01

    Low-lying excited triplet states of aromatic carbonyl compounds exhibit diverse photophysical and photochemical properties of fundamental importance. Despite tremendous effort in studying those triplet states, the effects of substituents and solvents on the energetics of the triplet manifold and on photoreactivity remain to be fully understood. We have recently studied the ordering of the low-lying nπ* and ππ* excited triplet states and its substituent dependence in acetophenone derivatives using nanosecond time-resolved near-IR (NIR) spectroscopy. Here we address the other important issue, the solvent effects, by directly observing the electronic bands in the NIR that originate from the lowest nπ* and ππ* states of acetophenone derivatives in four solvents of different polarity (n-heptane, benzene, acetonitrile, and methanol). The two transient NIR bands decay synchronously in all the solvents, indicating that the lowest nπ* and ππ* states are in thermal equilibrium irrespective of the solvent polarity studied here. We found that the ππ* band increases in intensity relative to the nπ* band as solvent polarity increases. These results are compared with the photoreduction rate constant for the acetophenone derivatives in the solvents to which 2-propanol was added as a hydrogen-atom donor. Based on the present findings, we present a comprehensive, solvent- and substituent-dependent energy level diagram of the low-lying nπ* and ππ* excited triplet states. PMID:25686256

  4. Direct Observation of Thermal Equilibrium of Excited Triplet States of 9,10-Phenanthrenequinone. A Time-Resolved Resonance Raman Study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Venkatraman Ravi; Rajkumar, Nagappan; Ariese, Freek; Umapathy, Siva

    2015-10-01

    The photochemistry of aromatic ketones plays a key role in various physicochemical and biological processes, and solvent polarity can be used to tune their triplet state properties. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of the conformational structure and the solvent polarity induced energy level reordering of the two lowest triplet states of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (PQ) was carried out using nanosecond-time-resolved absorption (ns-TRA), time-resolved resonance Raman (TR(3)) spectroscopy, and time dependent-density functional theory (TD-DFT) studies. The ns-TRA of PQ in acetonitrile displays two bands in the visible range, and these two bands decay with similar lifetime at least at longer time scales (μs). Interestingly, TR(3) spectra of these two bands indicate that the kinetics are different at shorter time scales (ns), while at longer time scales they followed the kinetics of ns-TRA spectra. Therefore, we report a real-time observation of the thermal equilibrium between the two lowest triplet excited states of PQ, assigned to nπ* and ππ* of which the ππ* triplet state is formed first through intersystem crossing. Despite the fact that these two states are energetically close and have a similar conformational structure supported by TD-DFT studies, the slow internal conversion (∼2 ns) between the T(2)(1(3)nπ*) and T(1)(1(3)ππ*) triplet states indicates a barrier. Insights from the singlet excited states of PQ in protic solvents [ J. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 142 , 24305 ] suggest that the lowest nπ* and ππ* triplet states should undergo hydrogen bond weakening and strengthening, respectively, relative to the ground state, and these mechanisms are substantiated by TD-DFT calculations. We also hypothesize that the different hydrogen bonding mechanisms exhibited by the two lowest singlet and triplet excited states of PQ could influence its ISC mechanism. PMID:26381591

  5. Equilibrium charge state distributions of Ni, Co, and Cu beams in molybdenum foil at 2 MeV/u

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastis, Panagiotis; Perdikakis, George; Robertson, Daniel; Bauder, Will; Skulski, Michael; Collon, Phillipe; Anderson, Tyler; Ostdiek, Karen; Aprahamian, Ani; Lu, Wenting; Almus, Robert

    2015-10-01

    The charge states of heavy-ions are important for the study of nuclear reactions in inverse kinematics when electromagnetic recoil mass spectrometers are used. The passage of recoil products through a material, like the windows of gas cells or charge state boosters, results a charge state distribution (CSD) in the exit. This distribution must be known for the extraction of any cross section since only few charge-state can be transmitted through a magnetic separator separator for a given setting. The calculation of CSDs for heavy ions is challenging. Currently we rely on semi-empirical models with unknown accuracy for ion/target combinations in the Z > 20 region. In the present study were measured the CSDs of the stable 60Ni, 59Co, and 63Cu beams while passing through a 1 μm molybdenum foil. The beam energies were 1.84 MeV/u, 2.09 MeV/u, and 2.11 MeV/u for the 60Ni, 59Co, and 63Cu respectively. The results of this study mainly check the accuracy of the semi-empirical models used by the program LISE++, on calculating CSDs for ion/target combinations of Z > 20. In addition, other empirical models on calculating mean charge states were compared and checked.

  6. Influence of disorder on ageing and memory effects in non-equilibrium critical dynamics of 3D Ising model relaxing from an ordered state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, Vladimir V.; Prudnikov, Pavel V.; Pospelov, Evgeny A.

    2016-04-01

    We have performed a numerical investigation of the influence of disorder on the dynamical non-equilibrium evolution of a 3D site-diluted Ising model from a low-temperature initial state with magnetization m 0  =  1. It is shown that two-time dependences of the autocorrelation and integrated response functions for systems with spin concentrations p  =  1.0, 0.95, 0.8, 0.6 and 0.5 demonstrate ageing properties with anomalous slowing-down relaxation and violation of the fluctuation-dissipation ratio. It was revealed that during non-equilibrium critical dynamics in the long-time regime t-{{t}\\text{w}}\\gg {{t}\\text{w}}\\gg 1 the autocorrelation functions for diluted systems are extremely slow due to the pinning of domain walls on impurity sites. We have found that the fluctuation-dissipation ratio {{X}∞}=0 for diluted systems with spin concentration p  <  1 while the pure system is characterized by {{X}∞}=0.784(7) . The autocorrelation function power-law delay becomes the same as for the time dependence of the magnetization in the critical point and is characterized by exponent -β /zν . Also, for diluted systems we reveal memory effects for critical evolution in the ageing regime with realization of cyclic temperature change and quenching at T<{{T}\\text{c}} .

  7. Instrumentalists' Assessment of Solo Performances with Compact Disc, Piano, or No Accompaniment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brittin, Ruth V.

    2002-01-01

    Assigned middle school and high school instrumentalists to listen and rate twelve performances: four without accompaniment, four with CD accompaniment, and four with piano accompaniment. Reports that CD accompaniment rated highest and piano the lowest. States that students consistently assigned the best feature and the aspect needing most practice…

  8. Fluorescence changes accompanying short-term light adaptations in photosystem I and photosystem II of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and phycobiliprotein-impaired mutants: State 1/State 2 transitions and carotenoid-induced quenching of phycobilisomes.

    PubMed

    Stadnichuk, Igor N; Lukashev, Evgeny P; Elanskaya, Irina V

    2009-03-01

    The features of the two types of short-term light-adaptations of photosynthetic apparatus, State 1/State 2 transitions, and non-photochemical fluorescence quenching of phycobilisomes (PBS) by orange carotene-protein (OCP) were compared in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 wild type, CK pigment mutant lacking phycocyanin, and PAL mutant totally devoid of phycobiliproteins. The permanent presence of PBS-specific peaks in the in situ action spectra of photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII), as well as in the 77 K fluorescence excitation spectra for chlorophyll emission at 690 nm (PSII) and 725 nm (PSI) showed that PBS are constitutive antenna complexes of both photosystems. The mutant strains compensated the lack of phycobiliproteins by higher PSII content and by intensification of photosynthetic linear electron transfer. The detectable changes of energy migration from PBS to the PSI and PSII in the Synechocystis wild type and the CK mutant in State 1 and State 2 according to the fluorescence excitation spectra measurements were not registered. The constant level of fluorescence emission of PSI during State 1/State 2 transitions and simultaneous increase of chlorophyll fluorescence emission of PSII in State 1 in Synechocystis PAL mutant allowed to propose that spillover is an unlikely mechanism of state transitions. Blue-green light absorbed by OCP diminished the rout of energy from PBS to PSI while energy migration from PBS to PSII was less influenced. Therefore, the main role of OCP-induced quenching of PBS is the limitation of PSI activity and cyclic electron transport under relatively high light conditions. PMID:19169839

  9. Far-from-Equilibrium Field Theory of Many-Body Quantum Spin Systems: Prethermalization and Relaxation of Spin Spiral States in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadi, Mehrtash; Demler, Eugene; Knap, Michael

    2015-10-01

    We study theoretically the far-from-equilibrium relaxation dynamics of spin spiral states in the three-dimensional isotropic Heisenberg model. The investigated problem serves as an archetype for understanding quantum dynamics of isolated many-body systems in the vicinity of a spontaneously broken continuous symmetry. We present a field-theoretical formalism that systematically improves on the mean field for describing the real-time quantum dynamics of generic spin-1 /2 systems. This is achieved by mapping spins to Majorana fermions followed by a 1 /N expansion of the resulting two-particle-irreducible effective action. Our analysis reveals rich fluctuation-induced relaxation dynamics in the unitary evolution of spin spiral states. In particular, we find the sudden appearance of long-lived prethermalized plateaus with diverging lifetimes as the spiral winding is tuned toward the thermodynamically stable ferro- or antiferromagnetic phases. The emerging prethermalized states are characterized by different bosonic modes being thermally populated at different effective temperatures and by a hierarchical relaxation process reminiscent of glassy systems. Spin-spin correlators found by solving the nonequilibrium Bethe-Salpeter equation provide further insight into the dynamic formation of correlations, the fate of unstable collective modes, and the emergence of fluctuation-dissipation relations. Our predictions can be verified experimentally using recent realizations of spin spiral states with ultracold atoms in a quantum gas microscope [S. Hild et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 147205 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.147205].

  10. Entanglement in ground and excited states of gapped fermion systems and their relationship with fermi surface and thermodynamic equilibrium properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, Michelle; Singh, Rajiv

    2014-03-01

    We study bipartite entanglement entropies in the ground and excited states of model fermion systems, where a staggered potential, μs, induces a gap in the spectrum. Ground state entanglement entropies satisfy the ``area law,'' and the ``area-law'' coefficient is found to diverge as a logarithm of the staggered potential, when the system has an extended Fermi surface at μs = 0 . On the square-lattice, we show that the coefficient of the logarithmic divergence depends on the fermi surface geometry and its orientation with respect to the real-space interface between subsystems and is related to the Widom conjecture as enunciated by Gioev and Klich (Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 100503 (2006)). For point Fermi surfaces in two-dimension, the ``area-law'' coefficient stays finite as μs --> 0 . The von Neumann entanglement entropy associated with the excited states follows a ``volume law'' and allows us to calculate an entropy density function sV(e) , which is substantially different from the thermodynamic entropy density function sT(e) when the lattice is bipartitioned into two equal subsystems, but approaches the thermodynamic entropy density as the fraction of sites in the larger subsystem, that is integrated out, approaches unity.

  11. On the equilibrium of a extremely extended and diluted magneto-matter state subject to its weight.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdichevsky, Daniel

    Solutions to the force relationship between the magnetic stresses and the self-gravitational force are discussed for a simple homogeneous distribution of matter coalescent to a magnetic field in a cylindrical geometry. Consideration are given to the needed permeability of the medium to make it capable of supporting many times the mass of the Sun, on an extension of several parsecs to kiloparsec. This state of self organization of matter and magnetic field (magneto-matter state) has proven useful interpretation for the explanation of anomalous thermodynamic of the gas of electrons contained in flux-tubes with a twist, low-beta, often observed at 1 AU in the interplanetary medium, Berdichevsky and Shefers, 2015. This state of matter, which most basic property, the freezing in the magnetic field, see e.g., Chew et al, 1956, has proved to exist in the regions where robotic observations in the near and far space perform detailed observations of magnetic fields, and extreme dilute plasma (commonly about 1000 to 0.1 or less ionized particles per cubic cm). This work is in many ways an extension of Alfven work on magnetized space plasmas, Alven, 1942. Berdichevsky, D.B., and K., Schefers, ApJ, 803, 70, 2015, doi: 10.1088/0004-637X/805/1/70 Chew, G.F., M.L., Goldberger, and F.E. Low, 1956, the Royal Soc. London, section Math & Phys Sc., 236, pp. 112. Alfv'e n, H (1942). ``Existence of electromagnetic-hydrodynamic waves.'' Nature 150, 405 doi:10.1038/150405d0

  12. Non-linear dynamics of the photodissociation of nitrous oxide: equilibrium points, periodic orbits, and transition states.

    PubMed

    Mauguiere, Frederic; Farantos, Stavros C; Suarez, Jaime; Schinke, Reinhard

    2011-06-28

    The diffuse vibrational bands, observed in the ultraviolet photodissociation spectrum of nitrous oxide by exciting the molecule in the first (1)A' state, have recently been attributed to resonances localized mainly in the NN stretch and bend degrees of freedom. To further investigate the origin of this localization, fundamental families of periodic orbits emanating from several stationary points of the (1)A' potential energy surface and bifurcations of them are computed. We demonstrate that center-saddle bifurcations of periodic orbits are the main mechanism for creating stable regions in phase space that can support the partial trapping of the wave packet, and thus they explain the observed spectra. A non-linear mechanical methodology, which involves the calculation of equilibria, periodic orbits, and transition states in normal form coordinates, is applied for an in detail exploration of phase space. The fingerprints of the phase space structures in the quantum world are identified by solving the time dependent Schrödinger equation and calculating autocorrelation functions. This demonstrates that different reaction channels could be controlled if exact knowledge of the phase space structure is available to guide the initial excitation of the molecule. PMID:21721625

  13. Chemical Equilibrium Models for the S3 State of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex of Photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Hiroshi; Shoji, Mitsuo; Shen, Jian-Ren; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2016-01-19

    We have performed hybrid density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate how chemical equilibria can be described in the S3 state of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II. For a chosen 340-atom model, 1 stable and 11 metastable intermediates have been identified within the range of 13 kcal mol(-1) that differ in protonation, charge, spin, and conformational states. The results imply that reversible interconversion of these intermediates gives rise to dynamic equilibria that involve processes with relocations of protons and electrons residing in the Mn4CaO5 cluster, as well as bound water ligands, with concomitant large changes in the cluster geometry. Such proton tautomerism and redox isomerism are responsible for reversible activation/deactivation processes of substrate oxygen species, through which Mn-O and O-O bonds are transiently ruptured and formed. These results may allow for a tentative interpretation of kinetic data on substrate water exchange on the order of seconds at room temperature, as measured by time-resolved mass spectrometry. The reliability of the hybrid DFT method for the multielectron redox reaction in such an intricate system is also addressed. PMID:26717045

  14. The Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, remote sensing, and mineral resources maps of the Butte 1 degree x 2 degrees Quadrangle, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, James E.; Trautwein, C.M.; Wallace, C.A.; Lee, G.K.; Rowan, L.C.; Hanna, W.F.

    1993-01-01

    The Butte 1?x2 ? quadrangle in west-central Montana was investigated as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program (CUSMAP). These investigations included geologic mapping, geochemical surveys, gravity and aeromagnetic surveys, examinations of mineral deposits, and specialized geochronologic and remote-sensing studies. The data collected during these studies were compiled, combined with available published and unpublished data, analyzed, and used in a mineral-resource assessment of the quadrangle. The results, including data, interpretations, and mineral-resource assessments for nine types of mineral deposits, are published separately as a folio of maps. These maps are accompanied by figures, tables, and explanatory text. This circular provides background information on the Butte quadrangle, summarizes the studies and published maps, and lists a selected bibliography of references pertinent to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral resources of the quadrangle. The Butte quadrangle, which includes the world-famous Butte mining district, has a long history of mineral production. Many mining districts within the quadrangle have produced large quantities of many commodities; the most important in dollar value of production were copper, gold, silver, lead, zinc, manganese, molybdenum, and phosphate. At present, mines at several locations produce copper, molybdenum, gold, silver, lead, zinc, and phosphate. Exploration, mainly for gold, has indicated the presence of other mineral deposits that may be exploited in the future. The results of the investigations by the U.S. Geological Survey indicate that many areas of the quadrangle are highly favorable for the occurrence of additional undiscovered resources of gold, silver, copper, molybdenum, tungsten, and other metals in several deposit types.

  15. Caging and solvent effects on the tautomeric equilibrium of 3-pyridone/3-hydroxypyridine in the ground state: a study in cyclodextrins and binary solvents.

    PubMed

    Abou-Zied, Osama K; Al-Shihi, Othman I K

    2009-07-14

    The tautomeric equilibrium between 3-pyridone (3Py) and 3-hydroxypyridine (3HP) shows characteristic absorption peaks for the zwitterion form of 3Py in water that may be used as a probe of the hydrophobic nature inside macromolecules such as proteins and other biologically related systems. We studied this equilibrium in the ground state in aqueous cyclodextrins (CDs) and in binary solvent mixtures of 1,4-dioxane and water by absorption spectroscopy, and by ab initio calculations. Upon the addition of alpha-CD or beta-CD to an aqueous solution of the 3Py/3HP system, the absorbance intensity of the zwitterion tautomer decreases with a concomitant increase in the intensity of the enol tautomer of 3HP. The results reflect the nature of the tautomeric equilibrium and point to the hydrophobic environment inside the CD cavities. The effect of inclusion is noticeably less in the case of alpha-CD. This is attributed to the small cavity size of alpha-CD which sustains only partial inclusion. Upon the addition of gamma-CD, the intensity of the zwitterion tautomer slightly increased over that in water which is attributed to the direct interaction between the charged sides of the tautomer with the outer primary or secondary hydroxyls of the glycopyranose units of gamma-CD. This interaction is a result of the large cavity size of gamma-CD which does not support a stable complex. The largest caging effect was observed in 2,6-di-O-methyl-beta-CD (DMbeta-CD) which is an indication of a more hydrophobic environment around the guest. The large hydrophobicity of DMbeta-CD is due to the presence of the two methyl groups in the beta-CD derivative which reduce the amount of water inside the cavity upon encapsulation. In the binary mixtures of 1,4-dioxane and water, the change in the absorbance intensity of the enol and the zwitterion tautomers was analyzed quantitatively and three water molecules were found to solvate the polar centers of each tautomer. Ab initio calculations of the

  16. Excitatory/inhibitory equilibrium of the central amygdala nucleus gates anti-depressive and anxiolytic states in the hamster.

    PubMed

    Alò, Raffaella; Avolio, Ennio; Mele, Maria; Storino, Francesca; Canonaco, Alessia; Carelli, Antonio; Canonaco, Marcello

    2014-03-01

    Several studies have pointed to the amygdala as a main limbic station capable of regulating different stressful states such as anxiety and depression. In this work it was our intention to determine the role of the central amygdala nucleus (CeA) on the execution of either anxiolytic and/or anti-depressant behaviors in the hibernating hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) via infusion of CeA with the antagonist, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) specific for α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor (AMPAR) plus the specific agonist for α4 GABAAR i.e. 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol (THIP). Treatment with CNQX appeared to mainly prompt anti-depressant effects as shown by the achievements of swimming feats during forced swim test while THIP prevalently accounted for evident bouts of climbing when exposed to the same test. Moreover, even in the presence of the concomitant administration of both of these compounds, hamsters continued to spend more time in swimming despite this significant behavioral effect resulted to be numerically reduced for hamsters treated with only the α4 GABAAR agonist. Conversely, when these animals were tested in elevated plus maze (EPM), THIP tended to mostly favor anxiolytic activities as exhibited by stressed animals spending more time entering and remaining in EPM open arms. It was interesting to note that behavioral changes induced by both drugs appeared to be also responsible for glutamate receptor (GluR) expression differences as indicated by CNQX favoring an evident up-regulation of GluR2-containing neurons whereas THIP induced an up-regulation, this time of GluR1-containing neurons. Overall, the anti-depressant role of CNQX seems to be mostly attributed to elevated GluR2 levels while an anxiolytic-like effect of THIP was correlated to high GluR1values thereby proposing distinct GluRs as useful therapeutic sites against degenerative diseases such as depression-like behaviors. PMID:24468014

  17. Efficiency and limits of Stability Charts in the analysis of limit equilibrium state of slopes of geological interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausilia Paparo, Maria; Tinti, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    The stability charts are one of the most common tools used in engineering and applied geology to derive the value of the Safety Factor, say F, of slopes of engineering and geological interest. Its importance is due to the easiness of finding the solution for F without falling into complex numerical calculations. These charts propose a graphical method to derive F=F(Ns), where Ns is the Stability Number, obtained by a combination of geotechnical (cohesion, friction angle, weight) and geometrical parameters (angle of incline and slope height): for each value of Ns it is possible to find one single value of F. Taylor (1948) was the first to introduce the stability charts method and later until recently many others proposed different improved versions of them (Michalowski, 1997; 2002; Baker, 1999; 2003; Baker et al. 2006; Easa and Vatankhah, 2011). The aim of this work is to show that there is no univocal relationship between F and Ns like it is erroneously assumed by the stability charts method. Indeed, the comparison of the stability charts with new charts obtained with the Minimum Lithostatic Deviation (MLD) method (Tinti and Manucci, 2006; 2008) reveals that F depends separately on all the parameters that concur to form the stability number, though the dependence on some of them, especially the soil weight, is more relevant. The work has been conducted not only on soil parameter configurations typical of embankments and dykes, but also on configurations typical of homogeneous slopes of geophysical interest. It is found that the values of F usually fall below the ones predicted by the stability charts though the general trend of the stability curves is confirmed. This discrepancy is particularly crucial when the value of F is close to the critical value of 1, since in this case classical methods could indicate that a slope is stable, even though it is not. One can therefore state that the classical stability single-valued curves F(Ns) can provide an acceptable first

  18. Dynamic equilibrium between closed and partially closed states of the bacterial Enzyme I unveiled by solution NMR and X-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Venditti, Vincenzo; Schwieters, Charles D.; Grishaev, Alexander; Clore, G. Marius

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme I (EI) is the first component in the bacterial phosphotransferase system, a signal transduction pathway in which phosphoryl transfer through a series of bimolecular protein–protein interactions is coupled to sugar transport across the membrane. EI is a multidomain, 128-kDa homodimer that has been shown to exist in two conformational states related to one another by two large (50–90°) rigid body domain reorientations. The open conformation of apo EI allows phosphoryl transfer from His189 located in the N-terminal domain α/β (EINα/β) subdomain to the downstream protein partner bound to the EINα subdomain. The closed conformation, observed in a trapped phosphoryl transfer intermediate, brings the EINα/β subdomain into close proximity to the C-terminal dimerization domain (EIC), thereby permitting in-line phosphoryl transfer from phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) bound to EIC to His189. Here, we investigate the solution conformation of a complex of an active site mutant of EI (H189A) with PEP. Simulated annealing refinement driven simultaneously by solution small angle X-ray scattering and NMR residual dipolar coupling data demonstrates unambiguously that the EI(H189A)–PEP complex exists in a dynamic equilibrium between two approximately equally populated conformational states, one corresponding to the closed structure and the other to a partially closed species. The latter likely represents an intermediate in the open-to-closed transition. PMID:26305976

  19. Competitive Equilibrium and Classroom Pit Markets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffle, Bradley J.

    2003-01-01

    Describes a pit-market experiment using the work of Charles A. Holt to illustrate to students the real world relevance of the competitive equilibrium concept. Explains how to set up and conduct a pit-market experiment, discusses features of the data, and provides accompanying materials. (JEH)

  20. 10 CFR 9.56 - Accompanying persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for Information, Access Or Amendment of Records Maintained About Them § 9.56 Accompanying persons. An individual requesting access to records about himself may be accompanied by another individual of his own choosing. Both the individual requesting access and the individual accompanying him shall sign the...

  1. 19 CFR 148.4 - Accompanying articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Accompanying articles. 148.4 Section 148.4 Customs... (CONTINUED) PERSONAL DECLARATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS General Provisions § 148.4 Accompanying articles. (a) Generally. Articles shall be considered as accompanying a passenger or brought in by him if the...

  2. 19 CFR 148.4 - Accompanying articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Accompanying articles. 148.4 Section 148.4 Customs... (CONTINUED) PERSONAL DECLARATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS General Provisions § 148.4 Accompanying articles. (a) Generally. Articles shall be considered as accompanying a passenger or brought in by him if the...

  3. 19 CFR 148.4 - Accompanying articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Accompanying articles. 148.4 Section 148.4 Customs... (CONTINUED) PERSONAL DECLARATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS General Provisions § 148.4 Accompanying articles. (a) Generally. Articles shall be considered as accompanying a passenger or brought in by him if the...

  4. 19 CFR 148.4 - Accompanying articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Accompanying articles. 148.4 Section 148.4 Customs... (CONTINUED) PERSONAL DECLARATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS General Provisions § 148.4 Accompanying articles. (a) Generally. Articles shall be considered as accompanying a passenger or brought in by him if the...

  5. 19 CFR 148.4 - Accompanying articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Accompanying articles. 148.4 Section 148.4 Customs... (CONTINUED) PERSONAL DECLARATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS General Provisions § 148.4 Accompanying articles. (a) Generally. Articles shall be considered as accompanying a passenger or brought in by him if the...

  6. Phase equilibrium for surfactant Ls-54 in liquid CO2 with water and solubility estimation using the Peng-Robinson equation of state

    PubMed Central

    Tarafa, Pedro J.; Matthews, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    It is known that the commercial surfactant Dehypon® Ls-54 is soluble in supercritical CO2 and that it enables formation of water-in-CO2 microemulsions. In this work we observed phase equilibrium for the Ls-54/CO2 and Ls-54/water/CO2 systems in the liquid CO2 region, from 278.15 - 298.15 K. In addition, the Peng-Robinson equation of state (PREOS) was used to model the phase behavior of Ls-54/CO2 binary system as well as to estimate water solubilities in CO2. Ls-54 in CO2 can have solubilities as high as 0.086 M at 278.15 K and 15.2 MPa. The stability of the microemulsion decreases with increasing concentration of water, and lower temperatures favor increased solubility of water into the one-phase microemulsion. The PREOS model showed satisfactory agreement with the experimental data for both Ls-54/CO2 and water/CO2 systems. PMID:21037962

  7. Biotechnology Patent Protection Act of 1991. Report 102-260 to accompany S. 654 introduced in the United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, March 11, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The report accompanying S. 654 describes the proposed amendment, including its purpose and the legislative background, reviews the hearings and committee findings, and summarizes changes in the existing law and a cost estimate. The purpose of this legislation is to amend the Patent Code to afford needed additional protection for process inventions. It will eliminate barriers to process patenting thereby increasing innovation and stimulate the development of new products and processes.

  8. On the Role of Modified Post Weld Heat Treatment in Eliminating Incipient Melting of Non-equilibrium Product Resulting During Solid-State Welding of Astroloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluwasegun, K. M.; Olawale, J. O.; Adio, S. A.; Isadare, D. A.; Daniyan, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The formation of non-equilibrium phases as a result of segregation during solidification of castings or in the welds of nickel-based superalloys has been a major concern limiting the enhancement of the optimal heat treatment procedure that could have improved the performance of the superalloys to their full potential strength in service. Much consideration has not been given to the dissolution of the non-equilibrium products resulting from welding of nickel-based superalloys. The present work on astroloy shows how non-equilibrium welding products could be completely eliminated by a modified post weld heat treatment procedure.

  9. On the Role of Modified Post Weld Heat Treatment in Eliminating Incipient Melting of Non-equilibrium Product Resulting During Solid-State Welding of Astroloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluwasegun, K. M.; Olawale, J. O.; Adio, S. A.; Isadare, D. A.; Daniyan, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    The formation of non-equilibrium phases as a result of segregation during solidification of castings or in the welds of nickel-based superalloys has been a major concern limiting the enhancement of the optimal heat treatment procedure that could have improved the performance of the superalloys to their full potential strength in service. Much consideration has not been given to the dissolution of the non-equilibrium products resulting from welding of nickel-based superalloys. The present work on astroloy shows how non-equilibrium welding products could be completely eliminated by a modified post weld heat treatment procedure.

  10. Measurement of the equilibrium charge state distributions of Ni, Co, and Cu beams in Mo at 2 MeV/u: Review and evaluation of the relevant semi-empirical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastis, P.; Perdikakis, G.; Robertson, D.; Almus, R.; Anderson, T.; Bauder, W.; Collon, P.; Lu, W.; Ostdiek, K.; Skulski, M.

    2016-04-01

    Equilibrium charge state distributions of stable 60Ni, 59Co, and 63Cu beams passing through a 1 μm thick Mo foil were measured at beam energies of 1.84 MeV/u, 2.09 MeV/u, and 2.11 MeV/u respectively. A 1-D position sensitive Parallel Grid Avalanche Counter detector (PGAC) was used at the exit of a spectrograph magnet, enabling us to measure the intensity of several charge states simultaneously. The number of charge states measured for each beam constituted more than 99% of the total equilibrium charge state distribution for that element. Currently, little experimental data exists for equilibrium charge state distributions for heavy ions with 19 ≲Zp,Zt ≲ 54 (Zp and Zt, are the projectile's and target's atomic numbers respectively). Hence the success of the semi-empirical models in predicting typical characteristics of equilibrium CSDs (mean charge states and distribution widths), has not been thoroughly tested at the energy region of interest. A number of semi-empirical models from the literature were evaluated in this study, regarding their ability to reproduce the characteristics of the measured charge state distributions. The evaluated models were selected from the literature based on whether they are suitable for the given range of atomic numbers and on their frequent use by the nuclear physics community. Finally, an attempt was made to combine model predictions for the mean charge state, the distribution width and the distribution shape, to come up with a more reliable model. We discuss this new "combinatorial" prescription and compare its results with our experimental data and with calculations using the other semi-empirical models studied in this work.

  11. Tuning universality far from equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Karl, Markus; Nowak, Boris; Gasenzer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Possible universal dynamics of a many-body system far from thermal equilibrium are explored. A focus is set on meta-stable non-thermal states exhibiting critical properties such as self-similarity and independence of the details of how the respective state has been reached. It is proposed that universal dynamics far from equilibrium can be tuned to exhibit a dynamical transition where these critical properties change qualitatively. This is demonstrated for the case of a superfluid two-component Bose gas exhibiting different types of long-lived but non-thermal critical order. Scaling exponents controlled by the ratio of experimentally tuneable coupling parameters offer themselves as natural smoking guns. The results shed light on the wealth of universal phenomena expected to exist in the far-from-equilibrium realm. PMID:23928853

  12. Cystic lesions accompanying extra-axial tumours.

    PubMed

    Lohle, P N; Wurzer, H A; Seelen, P J; Kingma, L M; Go, K G

    1999-01-01

    We examined the mechanism of cyst formation in extra-axial tumours in the central nervous system (CNS). Cyst fluid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood plasma were analysed in eight patients with nine peritumoral cysts: four with meningiomas, two with intracranial and two spinal intradural schwannomas. Measuring concentrations of various proteins [albumin, immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgA, alpha 2-macroglobulin and IgM] in cyst fluid, CSF and blood plasma provides insight into the state of the semipermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. Peritumoral cysts accompanying intra-axial brain tumours are the end result of disruption of the BBB and oedema formation. Unlike intra-axial tumours which lie embedded within nervous tissue, extra-axial tumours tend to be separated from nervous tissue by arachnoid and pia mater. High concentrations of proteins were measured in the cyst fluid, approaching blood plasma levels, suggesting a local barrier disruption, and passage across the arachnoid, pia mater and cortical/medullary layer into the CNS parenchyma, leaving the protein concentrations of CSF practically unchanged. We confirmed that very high concentrations of protein are to be found in tumour cysts, plasma proteins forming almost 90% of the total protein in the cyst. We review current hypotheses on the pathogenesis of cysts accompanying neoplasms, particularly meningiomas and schwannomas, and conclude that the majority of proteins in cyst fluid in extra-axial, intradural meningiomas and schwannomas are plasma proteins. This provides a strong argument for pathogenesis of extra-axial intradural tumour cysts in favour of leakage of plasma proteins out of the tumour vessels into the nervous tissue. PMID:9987761

  13. The Conterminous United States Mineral Appraisal Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resources maps of the Tonopah 1 by 2 degree Quadrangle, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, David A.; Nash, J.T.; Plouff, Donald; Whitebread, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    The Tonopah 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle in south-central Nevada was studied by an interdisciplinary research team to appraise its mineral resources. The appraisal is based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical field and laboratory investigations, the results of which are published as a folio of maps, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The selected bibliography lists references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the Tonopah 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle.

  14. The Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Project; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resources maps of the Reno 1 by 2 degree Quadrangle, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, David A.; Stewart, John H.; Hendricks, J.D.; Rowan, L.C.; Plouff, Donald

    1992-01-01

    The Reno 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle in west-central Nevada was studied by an interdisciplinary research team to appraise its mineral resources. The assessment is based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical field and laboratory investigations, the results of which are published as a folio of maps, reports, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The selected bibliography lists references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the Reno 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle.

  15. The Conterminous United States Mineral Appraisal Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resource maps of the Choteau 1 degree x 2 degrees Quadrangle, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Earhart, Robert L.; Grimes, David J.; Leinz, Reinhard W.; Kleinkopf, M. Dean

    1981-01-01

    The Choteau l? x 2? quadrangle in northwest Montana was studied by an interdisciplinary research team in order to appraise its mineral resource and hydrocarbon potential The appraisal is based on field and laboratory investigations of the geology, geochemistry, and geophysics. The results of the investigations are published as a folio of maps, figures, tables, and accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the investigations and integrates the published components of the resource appraisal. A comprehensive bibliography cites both specific and general references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the Choteau l? x 2? quadrangle.

  16. The Conterminous United States Mineral Appraisal Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resources maps of the Walker Lake 1 degree x 2 degrees Quadrangle, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, John Harris; Chaffee, M.A.; Dohrenwend, J.C.; John, D.A.; Kistler, R.W.; Kleinhampl, F.J.; Menzie, W.D.; Plouff, Donald; Rowan, L.C.; Silberling, Norman J.

    1984-01-01

    The Walker Lake 1? by 2? quadrangle in eastern California and western Nevada was studied by an interdisciplinary research team to appraise its mineral resources. The appraisal is based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical field and laboratory investigations, the results of which are published as a folio of maps, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The selected bibliography lists selected references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the Walker Lake 1? by 2? quadrangle.

  17. The Conterminous United States Mineral Appraisal Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resources maps of the Medford 1 degree x 2 degrees Quadrangle, Oregon and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, James G.; Blakely, R.J.; Johnson, M.G.; Page, N.J.; Peterson, J.A.; Singer, D.A.; Whittington, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Medford 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle in southern Oregon and northern California was studied by an interdisciplinary research team to appraise its mineral resources. The appraisal is based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical field and laboratory investigations, the results of which are published as a folio of maps, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. This circular provides background information on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The bibliography lists selected references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the Medford 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangle.

  18. Picosecond spectroscopic studies of equilibrium structural fluctuations of native and partially unfolded states of Zinc II-substituted and metal-free cytochromes C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Jagnyaseni

    Picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was employed to characterize the equilibrium and non-equilibrium protein structural fluctuations in Zn II-substituted (ZnCytc) and metal-free (fbCytc) cytochromes c using dynamic fluorescence Stokes shift (FSS) and fluorescence anisotropy (FA) measurements. The intrinsic porphyrin chromophore is used as the probe for the structural fluctuations of the surrounding protein and solvent. The FSS experiments examine how the time scales detected from the dynamic solvation of a chromoprotein report changes in the character of motion. ZnCytc and fbCytc serve as limited, single-chromophore models for photosynthetic reaction center and light-harvesting proteins. The dynamic solvation of redox and light-harvesting chromophores in photosynthesis plays an important role in the quantum efficiency of electron transfer and energy transfer performed by these systems, respectively. The FSS response function of fbCytc in water is biexponential over the 100-ps--50-ns regime and the two time constants are 1.4 ns and 9.1 ns. ZnCytc under similar solution conditions shows a biexponential FSS response but with time constants of 0.2 ns and 1.5 ns. The two correlation times from the FSS response function correspond to motions of the hydrophobic core and the solvent-contact layer, respectively. Both FSS correlation times were lengthened and the solvation reorganization energy was reduced from 43 cm-1 to 33 cm-1 in the presence of 50% (v/v) glycerol. A Brownian diffusion model with thermally activated barrier crossings on the protein-folding energy landscape is used to interpret these results. The conclusion is that the mean-squared deviations of the fluctuations exhibited by fbCytc are perhaps a factor of ten larger than those in ZnCytc, which is consistent with the suggestion that fbCytc assumes a dynamic, partially unfolded structure with some of the characteristics of a molten globule. The nature of the motion associated with the

  19. Statistical physics ""Beyond equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E

    2009-01-01

    The scientific challenges of the 21st century will increasingly involve competing interactions, geometric frustration, spatial and temporal intrinsic inhomogeneity, nanoscale structures, and interactions spanning many scales. We will focus on a broad class of emerging problems that will require new tools in non-equilibrium statistical physics and that will find application in new material functionality, in predicting complex spatial dynamics, and in understanding novel states of matter. Our work will encompass materials under extreme conditions involving elastic/plastic deformation, competing interactions, intrinsic inhomogeneity, frustration in condensed matter systems, scaling phenomena in disordered materials from glasses to granular matter, quantum chemistry applied to nano-scale materials, soft-matter materials, and spatio-temporal properties of both ordinary and complex fluids.

  20. Modulation and Salt-Induced Reverse Modulation of the Excited-State Proton-Transfer Process of Lysozymized Pyranine: The Contrasting Scenario of the Ground-State Acid-Base Equilibrium of the Photoacid.

    PubMed

    Das, Ishita; Panja, Sudipta; Halder, Mintu

    2016-07-28

    Here we report on the excited-state behavior in terms of the excited-state proton-transfer (ESPT) reaction as well as the ground-state acid-base property of pyranine [8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (HPTS)] in the presence of an enzymatic protein, human lysozyme (LYZ). HPTS forms a 1:1 ground-state complex with LYZ having the binding constant KBH = (1.4 ± 0.05) × 10(4) M(-1), and its acid-base equilibrium gets shifted toward the deprotonated conjugate base (RO(-)), resulting in a downward shift in pKa. This suggests that the conjugate base (RO(-)) is thermodynamically more favored over the protonated (ROH) species inside the lysozyme matrix, resulting in an increased population of the deprotonated form. However, for the release of the proton from the excited photoacid, interestingly, the rate of proton transfer gets slowed down due to the "slow" acceptor biological water molecules present in the immediate vicinity of the fluorophore binding region inside the protein. The observed ESPT time constants, ∼140 and ∼750 ps, of protein-bound pyranine are slower than in bulk aqueous media (∼100 ps, single exponential). The molecular docking study predicts that the most probable binding location of the fluorophore is in a region near to the active site of the protein. Here we also report on the effect of external electrolyte (NaCl) on the reverse modulation of ground-state prototropy as well as the ESPT process of the protein-bound pyranine. It is found that there is a dominant role of electrostatic forces in the HPTS-LYZ interaction process, because an increase in ionic strength by the addition of NaCl dislodges the fluorophore from the protein pocket to the bulk again. The study shows a considerably different perspective of the perturbation offered by the model macromolecular host used, unlike the available literature reports on the concerned photoacid. PMID:27355857

  1. The Conterminous United States Mineral Assessment Program; background information to accompany folio of geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral resource maps of the Ajo and Lukeville 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangles, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, Floyd; Tosdal, R.M.; Peterson, J.A.; Cox, D.P.; Miller, R.J.; Klein, D.P.; Theobald, P.K.; Haxel, G.B.; Grubensky, M.J.; Raines, G.L.; Barton, H.N.; Singer, D.A.; Eppinger, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    Encompassing about 21,000 km 2 in southwestern Arizona, the Ajo and Lukeville 1 ? by 2 ? quadrangles have been the subject of mineral resource investigations utilizing field and laboratory studies in the disciplines of geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and Landsat imagery. The results of these studies are published as a folio of maps, figures, and tables, with accompanying discussions. Past mineral production has been limited to copper from the Ajo Mining District. In addition to copper, the quadrangles contain potentially significant resources of gold and silver; a few other commodities, including molybdenum and evaporites, may also exist in the area as appreciable resources. This circular provides background information on the mineral deposits and on the investigations and integrates the information presented in the folio. The bibliography cites references to the geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and mineral deposits of the two quadrangles.

  2. Equation of State for thermodynamic equilibrium of gas mixtures and brines to allow simulation of the effects of impurities in CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziabakhshganji, Z.; Kooi, H.

    2012-04-01

    Comprehensive understanding and prediction of chemical, reactive processes during and following injection of CO2 in depleted gas reservoirs and saline aquifers is important for the assessment of the performance and impacts of planned and existing Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) projects. Over the last decade significant improvements have been made in numerical modelling of the complex, coupled processes involved. Among the many remaining issues where progress is still called for, is the consistent simulation of impacts of gas mixtures. In particular the presence of 'impurities' or 'co-contaminants' in the injected CO2 stream that are retained from the original flue-gases, such as H2S, SO2, have the potential, upon dissolution in the pore water, to alter aqueous and water-mineral reactions. Moreover, presence of these and other injected or in-situ (CH4) gases affect CO2 solubility and thermodynamic properties of the fluid and gas phases, which, in turn, impact transport processes. To be able to evaluate the impact of gas mixtures on these processes, a new non-iterative Equation of State (EOS) has been developed which allows accurate and efficient modelling of thermodynamic equilibrium of gas mixtures and brines over a large range of pressure, temperature and salinity conditions. Presently the model includes CO2, SO2, H2S, CH4 and N2. This model is based on equating the chemical potentials in the system, using the modified Redlich-Kwong EOS to calculate the fugacity of the gas phase. Preliminary analysis shows, for instance, that CO2 solubility is most sensitive to CH4 admixture and least sensitive to the presence of SO2 in the injected gas mixture. The model design/approach will be outlined. Furthermore, the model performance will be illustrated with respect to experimental data from literature and other EOS's. In further work we aim to use this EOS in coupled flow and chemical reactive-transport simulations to investigate the impact of gas mixtures for CO2 storage.

  3. A Holistic Equilibrium Theory of Organization Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Baiyin; Zheng, Wei

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a holistic equilibrium theory of organizational development (OD). The theory states that there are three driving forces in organizational change and development--rationality, reality, and liberty. OD can be viewed as a planned process of change in an organization so as to establish equilibrium among these three interacting…

  4. Disturbances in equilibrium function after major earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Motoyasu; Endo, Nobutaka; Osada, Yoshihisa; Kim, Yoshiharu; Kuriyama, Kenichi

    2012-10-01

    Major earthquakes were followed by a large number of aftershocks and significant outbreaks of dizziness occurred over a large area. However it is unclear why major earthquake causes dizziness. We conducted an intergroup trial on equilibrium dysfunction and psychological states associated with equilibrium dysfunction in individuals exposed to repetitive aftershocks versus those who were rarely exposed. Greater equilibrium dysfunction was observed in the aftershock-exposed group under conditions without visual compensation. Equilibrium dysfunction in the aftershock-exposed group appears to have arisen from disturbance of the inner ear, as well as individual vulnerability to state anxiety enhanced by repetitive exposure to aftershocks. We indicate potential effects of autonomic stress on equilibrium function after major earthquake. Our findings may contribute to risk management of psychological and physical health after major earthquakes with aftershocks, and allow development of a new empirical approach to disaster care after such events.

  5. Torsional tunneling splittings in the v4 = 1 excited torsional state of Si2H6: analysis of hot bands accompanying fundamental transitions in the high resolution infrared spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzi, F.; di Lauro, C.; Horneman, V.-M.

    The (ν4 + ν6) - ν4, (ν4 + ν8) - ν4 and (ν4 + ν9) - ν4 hot infrared systems of disilane (Si2H6) have been analysed at high resolution, and the values of the relative vibration-rotation-torsion parameters have been determined. The torsional splitting is about 0.500 cm-1 in the ν4 and ν4 + ν6 states, and decreases strongly in the vibrationally degenerate upper states ν4 + ν8 (about 0.0272 cm-1 on average) and ν4 + ν9 (about 0.3019 cm-1), consistent with theoretical predictions. Comparison between the vibrational wavenumbers of cold transitions and hot transitions originating in the excited torsional state v4 = 1 allows one to determine the change of the fundamental torsional frequency ν4 caused by the excitation of small amplitude vibrations. A remarkable increase in ν4 of about 8.599 cm-1 is found in the v9 = 1 state (E1d SiH3-rocking mode, asymmetric to inversion in the staggered geometry), and this corresponds to an increase in the torsional barrier height in this excited fundamental vibrational state by about 48.77 cm-1. The mechanism responsible for the decrease of the torsional splittings in the degenerate vibrational states is briefly outlined by means of second-order perturbation theory, using torsion-hindered vibrational basis functions of E1d and E2d symmetries for the degenerate modes.

  6. Local Nash Equilibrium in Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yichao; Aziz-Alaoui, M. A.; Bertelle, Cyrille; Guan, Jihong

    2014-01-01

    Nash equilibrium is widely present in various social disputes. As of now, in structured static populations, such as social networks, regular, and random graphs, the discussions on Nash equilibrium are quite limited. In a relatively stable static gaming network, a rational individual has to comprehensively consider all his/her opponents' strategies before they adopt a unified strategy. In this scenario, a new strategy equilibrium emerges in the system. We define this equilibrium as a local Nash equilibrium. In this paper, we present an explicit definition of the local Nash equilibrium for the two-strategy games in structured populations. Based on the definition, we investigate the condition that a system reaches the evolutionary stable state when the individuals play the Prisoner's dilemma and snow-drift game. The local Nash equilibrium provides a way to judge whether a gaming structured population reaches the evolutionary stable state on one hand. On the other hand, it can be used to predict whether cooperators can survive in a system long before the system reaches its evolutionary stable state for the Prisoner's dilemma game. Our work therefore provides a theoretical framework for understanding the evolutionary stable state in the gaming populations with static structures. PMID:25169150

  7. Partial molar volume, surface area, and hydration changes for equilibrium unfolding and formation of aggregation transition state: High-pressure and cosolute studies on recombinant human IFN-γ

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Jonathan N.; Webb, Serena D.; Cleland, Jeffrey L.; Carpenter, John F.; Randolph, Theodore W.

    2001-01-01

    The equilibrium dissociation of recombinant human IFN-γ was monitored as a function of pressure and sucrose concentration. The partial molar volume change for dissociation was −209 ± 13 ml/mol of dimer. The specific molar surface area change for dissociation was 12.7 ± 1.6 nm2/molecule of dimer. The first-order aggregation rate of recombinant human IFN-γ in 0.45 M guanidine hydrochloride was studied as a function of sucrose concentration and pressure. Aggregation proceeded through a transition-state species, N*. Sucrose reduced aggregation rate by shifting the equilibrium between native state (N) and N* toward the more compact N. Pressure increased aggregation rate through increased solvation of the protein, which exposes more surface area, thus shifting the equilibrium away from N toward N*. The changes in partial molar volume and specific molar surface area between the N* and N were −41 ± 9 ml/mol of dimer and 3.5 ± 0.2 nm2/molecule, respectively. Thus, the structural change required for the formation of the transition state for aggregation is small relative to the difference between N and the dissociated state. Changes in waters of hydration were estimated from both specific molar surface area and partial molar volume data. From partial molar volume data, estimates were 25 and 128 mol H2O/mol dimer for formation of the aggregation transition state and for dissociation, respectively. From surface area data, estimates were 27 and 98 mol H2O/mol dimer. Osmotic stress theory yielded values ≈4-fold larger for both transitions. PMID:11381145

  8. Getting Freshman in Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Various aspects of chemical equilibrium were discussed in six papers presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (Stillwater, Oklahoma 1982). These include student problems in understanding hydrolysis, helping students discover/uncover topics, equilibrium demonstrations, instructional strategies, and flaws to kinetic…

  9. Probing local equilibrium in nonequilibrium fluids.

    PubMed

    del Pozo, J J; Garrido, P L; Hurtado, P I

    2015-08-01

    We use extensive computer simulations to probe local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in a quintessential model fluid, the two-dimensional hard-disks system. We show that macroscopic LTE is a property much stronger than previously anticipated, even in the presence of important finite-size effects, revealing a remarkable bulk-boundary decoupling phenomenon in fluids out of equilibrium. This allows us to measure the fluid's equation of state in simulations far from equilibrium, with an excellent accuracy comparable to the best equilibrium simulations. Subtle corrections to LTE are found in the fluctuations of the total energy which strongly point to the nonlocality of the nonequilibrium potential governing the fluid's macroscopic behavior out of equilibrium. PMID:26382354

  10. How Far from Equilibrium Is Active Matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Étienne; Nardini, Cesare; Cates, Michael E.; Tailleur, Julien; Visco, Paolo; van Wijland, Frédéric

    2016-07-01

    Active matter systems are driven out of thermal equilibrium by a lack of generalized Stokes-Einstein relation between injection and dissipation of energy at the microscopic scale. We consider such a system of interacting particles, propelled by persistent noises, and show that, at small but finite persistence time, their dynamics still satisfy a time-reversal symmetry. To do so, we compute perturbatively their steady-state measure and show that, for short persistent times, the entropy production rate vanishes. This endows such systems with an effective fluctuation-dissipation theorem akin to that of thermal equilibrium systems. Last, we show how interacting particle systems with viscous drags and correlated noises can be seen as in equilibrium with a viscoelastic bath but driven out of equilibrium by nonconservative forces, hence providing energetic insight into the departure of active systems from equilibrium.

  11. (SO2)-S-34-O-16: High-resolution analysis of the (030),(101), (111), (002) and (201) vibrational states; determination of equilibrium rotational constants for sulfur dioxide and anharmonic vibrational constants

    SciTech Connect

    Lafferty, Walter; Flaud, Jean-marie; Ngom, El Hadji A.; Sams, Robert L.

    2009-01-02

    High resolution Fourier transform spectra of a sample of sulfur dioxide, enriched in 34S (95.3%). were completely analyzed leading to a large set of assigned lines. The experimental levels derived from this set of transitions were fit to within their experimental uncertainties using Watson-type Hamiltonians. Precise band centers, rotational and centrifugal distortion constants were determined. The following band centers in cm-1 were obtained: ν0(3ν2)=1538.720198(11), ν0(ν1+ν3)=2475.828004(29), ν0(ν1+ν2+ν3)=2982.118600(20), ν0(2ν3)=2679.800919(35), and ν0(2ν1+ν3)=3598.773915(38). The rotational constants obtained in this work have been fit together with the rotational constants of lower lying vibrational states [ W.J. Lafferty, J.-M. Flaud, R.L. Sams and EL Hadjiabib, in press] to obtain equilibrium constants as well as vibration-rotation constants. These equilibrium constants have been fit together with those of 32S16O2 [J.-M. Flaud and W.J. Lafferty, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 16 (1993) 396-402] leading to an improved equilibrium structure. Finally the observed band centers have been fit to obtain anharmonic rotational constants.

  12. Chemical Principles Revisited: Chemical Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes: (1) Law of Mass Action; (2) equilibrium constant and ideal behavior; (3) general form of the equilibrium constant; (4) forward and reverse reactions; (5) factors influencing equilibrium; (6) Le Chatelier's principle; (7) effects of temperature, changing concentration, and pressure on equilibrium; and (8) catalysts and equilibrium. (JN)

  13. Computing Equilibrium Chemical Compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1995-01-01

    Chemical Equilibrium With Transport Properties, 1993 (CET93) computer program provides data on chemical-equilibrium compositions. Aids calculation of thermodynamic properties of chemical systems. Information essential in design and analysis of such equipment as compressors, turbines, nozzles, engines, shock tubes, heat exchangers, and chemical-processing equipment. CET93/PC is version of CET93 specifically designed to run within 640K memory limit of MS-DOS operating system. CET93/PC written in FORTRAN.

  14. Rotation spectrum and high resolution infrared spectra of the fundamental bands of 121SbD 3. Determination of the ground state and equilibrium structures. Ab initio calculations of the spectroscopic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canè, E.; Di Lonardo, G.; Fusina, L.; Jerzembeck, W.; Bürger, H.; Breidung, J.; Thiel, W.

    2006-01-01

    The high resolution infrared spectrum of 121SbD 3, recorded between 20 and 350 cm -1 and in the regions of bending and stretching fundamental bands, centred at 600 and 1350 cm -1, has been analysed. Splittings of the K″=3, 6 lines have been observed both in the rotation and ro-vibration spectra. A large number of 'perturbation allowed' transitions with selection rules Δ(k-ℓ)=±3, ±6 and ±9 have been identified in all fundamental bands. Accurate ground state molecular parameters have been determined fitting simultaneously the rotational transitions and about 9000 ground state combination differences obtained from lines assigned in the ro-vibrational spectra. The A and B reductions of the rotational Hamiltonian have been applied in the analysis of the ground state. They provided almost equivalent results. The molecular parameters of the 1 1, 2 1, 3 1 and 4 1 states have been obtained from the simultaneous analysis of the ν1 ( A1)/ ν3 ( E) stretching and of the ν2 ( A1)/ ν4 ( E) bending dyads. In fact, the corresponding excited states are affected by strong perturbations due to Coriolis and k-type rovibrational interactions that have been treated explicitly in the model adopted for the analysis. Improved effective ground state and equilibrium geometries have been determined and compared to those of 121SbH 3 and of 123SbD 3. Ab initio calculations at the coupled cluster CCSD(T) level with an energy-consistent large-core pseudopotential and large basis sets have been carried out to determine the equilibrium structure, the anharmonic force field, and the associated spectroscopic constants of 121-stibine. The theoretical constants and structural parameters are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Non-equilibrium Transport of Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chiao-Hsuan; Taylor, Jacob

    Non-equilibrium Transport of Light The thermalization of light under conditions of parametric coupling to a bath provides a robust chemical potential for light. We study non-equilibrium transport of light using non-equilibrium Green's function approach under the parametric coupling scheme, and explore a potential photonic analogue to the Landauer transport equation. Our results provide understandings of many-body states of photonic matter with chemical potential imbalances. The transport theory of light paves the way for quantum simulation and even practical applications of diode-like circuits using quantum photonic sources in the microwave and optical domain.

  16. Non-Equilibrium Properties from Equilibrium Free Energy Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Calculating free energy in computer simulations is of central importance in statistical mechanics of condensed media and its applications to chemistry and biology not only because it is the most comprehensive and informative quantity that characterizes the eqUilibrium state, but also because it often provides an efficient route to access dynamic and kinetic properties of a system. Most of applications of equilibrium free energy calculations to non-equilibrium processes rely on a description in which a molecule or an ion diffuses in the potential of mean force. In general case this description is a simplification, but it might be satisfactorily accurate in many instances of practical interest. This hypothesis has been tested in the example of the electrodiffusion equation . Conductance of model ion channels has been calculated directly through counting the number of ion crossing events observed during long molecular dynamics simulations and has been compared with the conductance obtained from solving the generalized Nernst-Plank equation. It has been shown that under relatively modest conditions the agreement between these two approaches is excellent, thus demonstrating the assumptions underlying the diffusion equation are fulfilled. Under these conditions the electrodiffusion equation provides an efficient approach to calculating the full voltage-current dependence routinely measured in electrophysiological experiments.

  17. 39 CFR 320.7 - Suspension for advertisements accompanying parcels or periodicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspension for advertisements accompanying parcels or periodicals. 320.7 Section 320.7 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE RESTRICTIONS ON PRIVATE CARRIAGE OF LETTERS SUSPENSION OF THE PRIVATE EXPRESS STATUTES § 320.7 Suspension for advertisements accompanying parcels or periodicals. (a)...

  18. 22 CFR 40.102 - Guardian required to accompany excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. 40.102 Section 40.102 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. INA 212(a)(9)(B) is not applicable at the time of...

  19. 22 CFR 40.102 - Guardian required to accompany excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. 40.102 Section 40.102 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. INA 212(a)(9)(B) is not applicable at the time of...

  20. 22 CFR 40.102 - Guardian required to accompany excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. 40.102 Section 40.102 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. INA 212(a)(9)(B) is not applicable at the time of...

  1. 22 CFR 40.102 - Guardian required to accompany excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. 40.102 Section 40.102 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. INA 212(a)(9)(B) is not applicable at the time of...

  2. 22 CFR 40.102 - Guardian required to accompany excluded alien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. 40.102 Section 40.102 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. INA 212(a)(9)(B) is not applicable at the time of...

  3. 39 CFR 320.7 - Suspension for advertisements accompanying parcels or periodicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... or periodicals. 320.7 Section 320.7 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE RESTRICTIONS ON... advertisements accompanying parcels or periodicals. (a) The operation of 39 U.S.C. 601(a) (1) through (6) and... with merchandise in parcels or accompanying periodicals under the following circumstances: (1)...

  4. 39 CFR 320.7 - Suspension for advertisements accompanying parcels or periodicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or periodicals. 320.7 Section 320.7 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE RESTRICTIONS ON... advertisements accompanying parcels or periodicals. (a) The operation of 39 U.S.C. 601(a) (1) through (6) and... with merchandise in parcels or accompanying periodicals under the following circumstances: (1)...

  5. 39 CFR 320.7 - Suspension for advertisements accompanying parcels or periodicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... or periodicals. 320.7 Section 320.7 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE RESTRICTIONS ON... advertisements accompanying parcels or periodicals. (a) The operation of 39 U.S.C. 601(a) (1) through (6) and... with merchandise in parcels or accompanying periodicals under the following circumstances: (1)...

  6. 39 CFR 320.7 - Suspension for advertisements accompanying parcels or periodicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or periodicals. 320.7 Section 320.7 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE RESTRICTIONS ON... advertisements accompanying parcels or periodicals. (a) The operation of 39 U.S.C. 601(a) (1) through (6) and... with merchandise in parcels or accompanying periodicals under the following circumstances: (1)...

  7. 7 CFR 319.37-12 - Prohibited articles accompanying restricted articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Prohibited articles accompanying restricted articles... Stock, Plants, Roots, Bulbs, Seeds, and Other Plant Products 1,2 § 319.37-12 Prohibited articles accompanying restricted articles. A restricted article for importation into the United States shall not...

  8. 7 CFR 319.37-12 - Prohibited articles accompanying restricted articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prohibited articles accompanying restricted articles... Stock, Plants, Roots, Bulbs, Seeds, and Other Plant Products 1,2 § 319.37-12 Prohibited articles accompanying restricted articles. A restricted article for importation into the United States shall not...

  9. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation.

    PubMed

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B

    2015-01-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs. PMID:25819404

  10. Ocular myasthenia gravis accompanied by anosmia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Li; Zhou, Li; Gao, Ying

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of ocular myasthenia gravis (MG) accompanied by anosmia. A 76-year-old man had idiopathic anosmia of 2-year duration. Four months before consultation, he began to have drooping in the right upper eyelid along with muscle soreness, distension, and pain in the nape. His tongue was dark-red with a thin and white coating; his pulse was wiry and slippery. According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, eyelid drooping and anosmia are the main signs of liver constraint and spleen deficiency. In Western Medicine, the diagnosis was ocular MG and idiopathic anosmia. Our patient, along with the literature, suggests that anosmia may be an early symptom before MG. MG accompanied by anosmia could be a special subtype of MG according to antibody production and symptoms. PMID:26946629

  11. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B.

    2015-03-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs.

  12. Theory for non-equilibrium statistical mechanics.

    PubMed

    Attard, Phil

    2006-08-21

    This paper reviews a new theory for non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. This gives the non-equilibrium analogue of the Boltzmann probability distribution, and the generalization of entropy to dynamic states. It is shown that this so-called second entropy is maximized in the steady state, in contrast to the rate of production of the conventional entropy, which is not an extremum. The relationships of the new theory to Onsager's regression hypothesis, Prigogine's minimal entropy production theorem, the Langevin equation, the formula of Green and Kubo, the Kawasaki distribution, and the non-equilibrium fluctuation and work theorems, are discussed. The theory is worked through in full detail for the case of steady heat flow down an imposed temperature gradient. A Monte Carlo algorithm based upon the steady state probability density is summarized, and results for the thermal conductivity of a Lennard-Jones fluid are shown to be in agreement with known values. Also discussed is the generalization to non-equilibrium mechanical work, and to non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. As examples of the new theory two general applications are briefly explored: a non-equilibrium version of the second law of thermodynamics, and the origin and evolution of life. PMID:16883388

  13. Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma Accompanying Gorlin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bilir, Yeliz; Gokce, Erkan; Ozturk, Banu; Deresoy, Faik Alev; Yuksekkaya, Ruken; Yaman, Emel

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity and mortality. A 66-year-old male patient with a history of recurrent basal cell carcinoma was presented with exophthalmus in the left eye and the lesions localized in the left lateral orbita and left zygomatic area. His physical examination revealed hearing loss, gapped teeth, highly arched palate, and frontal prominence. Left orbital mass, cystic masses at frontal and ethmoidal sinuses, and multiple pulmonary nodules were detected at CT scans. Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed from biopsy of ethmoid sinus. Based on the clinical and typical radiological characteristics (falx cerebri calcification, bifid costa, and odontogenic cysts), the patient was diagnosed with metastatic skin basal cell carcinoma accompanied by Gorlin syndrome. Our case is a basal cell carcinoma with aggressive course accompanying a rarely seen syndrome. PMID:25506011

  14. Equilibrium games in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Angsheng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Pan, Yicheng; Peng, Pan

    2014-12-01

    It seems a universal phenomenon of networks that the attacks on a small number of nodes by an adversary player Alice may generate a global cascading failure of the networks. It has been shown (Li et al., 2013) that classic scale-free networks (Barabási and Albert, 1999, Barabási, 2009) are insecure against attacks of as small as O(logn) many nodes. This poses a natural and fundamental question: Can we introduce a second player Bob to prevent Alice from global cascading failure of the networks? We proposed a game in networks. We say that a network has an equilibrium game if the second player Bob has a strategy to balance the cascading influence of attacks by the adversary player Alice. It was shown that networks of the preferential attachment model (Barabási and Albert, 1999) fail to have equilibrium games, that random graphs of the Erdös-Rényi model (Erdös and Rényi, 1959, Erdös and Rényi, 1960) have, for which randomness is the mechanism, and that homophyly networks (Li et al., 2013) have equilibrium games, for which homophyly and preferential attachment are the underlying mechanisms. We found that some real networks have equilibrium games, but most real networks fail to have. We anticipate that our results lead to an interesting new direction of network theory, that is, equilibrium games in networks.

  15. Conformations of Proteins in Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheletti, Cristian; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Maritan, Amos

    2001-08-01

    We introduce a simple theoretical approach for an equilibrium study of proteins with known native-state structures. We test our approach with results on well-studied globular proteins, chymotrypsin inhibitor (2ci2), barnase, and the alpha spectrin SH3 domain, and present evidence for a hierarchical onset of order on lowering the temperature with significant organization at the local level even at high temperatures. A further application to the folding process of HIV-1 protease shows that the model can be reliably used to identify key folding sites that are responsible for the development of drug resistance.

  16. PHYSICAL EFFECTS OCCURRING DURING GENERATION AND AMPLIFICATION OF LASER RADIATION: Self-induced resonance under conditions of radiative equilibrium of quasienergy states in a three-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisyan, M. A.

    1989-02-01

    An analysis is made of the interaction of a three-level "cascade" atomic system with a resonant laser field. An investigation is made of the dynamics of the populations of the quasienergy states and of the atomic levels over times greater than the spontaneous transition times. In the steady-state regime the distribution of atoms over various quasienergy states is obtained under two-photon resonance conditions and for the case when all the resonances are strong. It is found that a suitable selection of the interaction parameters can establish an inversion between the quasienergy states and also due to atomic transitions. The total probability of spontaneous scattering is calculated. It is shown that, under two-photon resonance conditions, the scattering intensity increases sharply due to a self-induced resonance.

  17. Stochastic approach to equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomé, Tânia; de Oliveira, Mário J.

    2015-04-01

    We develop the stochastic approach to thermodynamics based on stochastic dynamics, which can be discrete (master equation) and continuous (Fokker-Planck equation), and on two assumptions concerning entropy. The first is the definition of entropy itself and the second the definition of entropy production rate, which is non-negative and vanishes in thermodynamic equilibrium. Based on these assumptions, we study interacting systems with many degrees of freedom in equilibrium or out of thermodynamic equilibrium and how the macroscopic laws are derived from the stochastic dynamics. These studies include the quasiequilibrium processes; the convexity of the equilibrium surface; the monotonic time behavior of thermodynamic potentials, including entropy; the bilinear form of the entropy production rate; the Onsager coefficients and reciprocal relations; and the nonequilibrium steady states of chemical reactions.

  18. Stochastic approach to equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Tomé, Tânia; de Oliveira, Mário J

    2015-04-01

    We develop the stochastic approach to thermodynamics based on stochastic dynamics, which can be discrete (master equation) and continuous (Fokker-Planck equation), and on two assumptions concerning entropy. The first is the definition of entropy itself and the second the definition of entropy production rate, which is non-negative and vanishes in thermodynamic equilibrium. Based on these assumptions, we study interacting systems with many degrees of freedom in equilibrium or out of thermodynamic equilibrium and how the macroscopic laws are derived from the stochastic dynamics. These studies include the quasiequilibrium processes; the convexity of the equilibrium surface; the monotonic time behavior of thermodynamic potentials, including entropy; the bilinear form of the entropy production rate; the Onsager coefficients and reciprocal relations; and the nonequilibrium steady states of chemical reactions. PMID:25974471

  19. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-01-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are…

  20. Dynamics of Charged Particles in an Adiabatic Thermal Beam Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chiping; Wei, Haofei

    2010-11-01

    Charged-particle motion is studied in the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of a well-matched, intense charged-particle beam and an applied periodic solenoidal magnetic focusing field. The beam is assumed to be in a state of adiabatic thermal equilibrium. The phase space is analyzed and compared with that of the well-known Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV)-type beam equilibrium. It is found that the widths of nonlinear resonances in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium are narrower than those in the KV-type beam equilibrium. Numerical evidence is presented, indicating almost complete elimination of chaotic particle motion in the adiabatic thermal beam equilibrium.

  1. An empirical assessment of non-equilibrium theory and state-and-transition models with a long-term (1953-2009) vegetation record from the Sonoran Desert

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resilience-based ecological frameworks, including state-and-transition models (STM), are being increasingly called upon to guide ecosystem management and inform natural resource policy. Yet multiple challenges continue to impede their application, including limited empirical assessments of non-equil...

  2. Mechanical force effect on the two-state equilibrium of the hyaluronan-binding domain of CD44 in cell rolling.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takashi; Suzuki, Miho; Ogino, Shinji; Umemoto, Ryo; Nishida, Noritaka; Shimada, Ichio

    2015-06-01

    CD44 is the receptor for hyaluronan (HA) and mediates cell rolling under fluid shear stress. The HA-binding domain (HABD) of CD44 interconverts between a low-affinity, ordered (O) state and a high-affinity, partially disordered (PD) state, by the conformational change of the C-terminal region, which is connected to the plasma membrane. To examine the role of tensile force on CD44-mediated rolling, we used a cell-free rolling system, in which recombinant HABDs were attached to beads through a C-terminal or N-terminal tag. We found that the rolling behavior was stabilized only at high shear stress, when the HABD was attached through the C-terminal tag. In contrast, no difference was observed for the beads coated with HABD mutants that constitutively adopt either the O state or the PD state. Steered molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the force from the C terminus disrupts the interaction between the C-terminal region and the core of the domain, thus providing structural insights into how the mechanical force triggers the allosteric O-to-PD transition. Based on these results, we propose that the force applied from the C terminus enhances the HABD-HA interactions by inducing the conformational change to the high-affinity PD transition more rapidly, thereby enabling CD44 to mediate lymphocyte trafficking and hematopoietic progenitor cell homing under high-shear conditions. PMID:26038553

  3. Pions in and out of equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.

    1991-12-01

    Can final state scattering wrestle the secondaries in nucleus-nucleus collisions into a fluid state near local thermal equilibrium What do the pion p{sub T} spectra measured in pp, pA and SPS light ion experiments already tell us about the approach to equilibrium To begin to address these questions, we must face the nonequilibrium nature of hadronic evolution in the late stages of these collisions. I will outline efforts to apply transport theory to the nonequilibrium pion fluid at midrapidity focusing on two phenomena: partial thermalization and pion conservation.

  4. Pions in and out of equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S.

    1991-12-01

    Can final state scattering wrestle the secondaries in nucleus-nucleus collisions into a fluid state near local thermal equilibrium? What do the pion p{sub T} spectra measured in pp, pA and SPS light ion experiments already tell us about the approach to equilibrium? To begin to address these questions, we must face the nonequilibrium nature of hadronic evolution in the late stages of these collisions. I will outline efforts to apply transport theory to the nonequilibrium pion fluid at midrapidity focusing on two phenomena: partial thermalization and pion conservation.

  5. Global equilibrium and local thermodynamics in stationary spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panerai, Rodolfo

    2016-05-01

    In stationary spacetimes global equilibrium states can be defined, applying the maximum entropy principle, by the introduction of local thermodynamic fields determined solely by geometry. As an example, we study a class of equilibrium states for a scalar field in Einstein's static universe, characterized by inhomogeneous thermodynamic properties and nonvanishing angular momentum.

  6. Statistical physics of shear flow: a non-equilibrium problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R. M. L.

    2010-09-01

    Complex fluids are easily and reproducibly driven into non-equilibrium steady states by the action of shear flow. The statistics of the microstructure of non-equilibrium fluids is important to the material properties of every complex fluid that flows, e.g. axle grease on a rotating bearing; blood circulating in capillaries; molten plastic flowing into a mould; the non-equilibrium onion phase of amphiphiles used for drug delivery; the list is endless. Such states are as diverse and interesting as equilibrium states, but are not governed by the same statistics as equilibrium materials. I review some recently discovered principles governing the probabilities of various types of molecular re-arrangements taking place within a sheared fluid. As well as providing new foundations for the study of non-equilibrium matter, the principles are applied to some simple models of particles interacting under flow, showing that the theory exhibits physically convincing behaviour.

  7. Entanglement in ground and excited states of gapped free-fermion systems and their relationship with Fermi surface and thermodynamic equilibrium properties.

    PubMed

    Storms, Michelle; Singh, Rajiv R P

    2014-01-01

    We study bipartite entanglement entropies in the ground and excited states of free-fermion models, where a staggered potential, μs, induces a gap in the spectrum. Ground-state entanglement entropies satisfy the "area law", and the "area-law" coefficient is found to diverge as a logarithm of the staggered potential, when the system has an extended Fermi surface at μs=0. On the square lattice, we show that the coefficient of the logarithmic divergence depends on the Fermi surface geometry and its orientation with respect to the real-space interface between subsystems and is related to the Widom conjecture as enunciated by Gioev and Klich [ Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 100503 (2006)]. For point Fermi surfaces in two-dimension, the "area-law" coefficient stays finite as μs→0. The von Neumann entanglement entropy associated with the excited states follows a "volume law" and allows us to calculate an entropy density function sV(e), which is substantially different from the thermodynamic entropy density function sT(e), when the lattice is bipartitioned into two equal subsystems but approaches the thermodynamic entropy density as the fraction of sites in the larger subsystem, that is integrated out, approaches unity. PMID:24580190

  8. Entanglement in ground and excited states of gapped free-fermion systems and their relationship with Fermi surface and thermodynamic equilibrium properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storms, Michelle; Singh, Rajiv R. P.

    2014-01-01

    We study bipartite entanglement entropies in the ground and excited states of free-fermion models, where a staggered potential, μs, induces a gap in the spectrum. Ground-state entanglement entropies satisfy the "area law", and the "area-law" coefficient is found to diverge as a logarithm of the staggered potential, when the system has an extended Fermi surface at μs=0. On the square lattice, we show that the coefficient of the logarithmic divergence depends on the Fermi surface geometry and its orientation with respect to the real-space interface between subsystems and is related to the Widom conjecture as enunciated by Gioev and Klich [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 100503 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.100503]. For point Fermi surfaces in two-dimension, the "area-law" coefficient stays finite as μs→0. The von Neumann entanglement entropy associated with the excited states follows a "volume law" and allows us to calculate an entropy density function sV(e), which is substantially different from the thermodynamic entropy density function sT(e), when the lattice is bipartitioned into two equal subsystems but approaches the thermodynamic entropy density as the fraction of sites in the larger subsystem, that is integrated out, approaches unity.

  9. Morphodynamic equilibrium of alluvial estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambroni, Nicoletta; Bolla Pittaluga, Michele; Canestrelli, Alberto; Lanzoni, Stefano; Seminara, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    equilibrium state is reached through an erosional wave, which leads to bed degradation of the upstream 'fluvial reach'. For a given river discharge, the length of the tidal reach increases quite rapidly with tidal amplitude, up to some threshold value of the tidal amplitude above which the length of the estuary becomes comparable with the length of the tidal wave. When the channel plan-form is convergent, deposition of sediments of fluvial origin in the funnel-shaped region drastically changes the equilibrium configuration. The effect of an increasing channel convergence is thus to induce bed aggradation close to the inlet. Nevertheless, tidal forcing only slightly changes the non-tidal profile. The effect of increasing tidal oscillations again leads to an increase of the bed slope at the inlet and to a general bed degradation upstream. The effects of varying sediment supply, flow discharge and river width in the upstream reach have also been investigated and play an important role. Further geomorphological implications of these results will be discussed at the meeting. References Dalrymple, R. W., and K. Choi (2007), Morphologic and facies trends through the fluvialmarine transition in tide-dominated depositional systems: A schematic framework for environmental and sequence-stratigraphic interpretation, Earth-Science Reviews, 81(3-4), 135-174, doi:10.1016/j.earscirev.2006.10.002. Seminara, G., M. Bolla Pittaluga, and N. Tambroni (2012), Morphodynamic equilibrium of tidal channels, Environmental Fluid Mechanics: Memorial Volume in Honour of Prof. Gerhard H. Jirka, 153-174

  10. An Updated Equilibrium Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Emeric

    2008-08-01

    A device that can demonstrate equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic concepts is described. The device consists of a leaf blower attached to a plastic container divided into two chambers by a barrier of variable size and form. Styrofoam balls can be exchanged across the barrier when the leaf blower is turned on and various air pressures are applied. Equilibrium can be approached from different distributions of balls in the container under different conditions. The Le Châtelier principle can be demonstrated. Kinetic concepts can be demonstrated by changing the nature of the barrier, either changing the height or by having various sized holes in the barrier. Thermodynamic concepts can be demonstrated by taping over some or all of the openings and restricting air flow into container on either side of the barrier.

  11. Absolute Equilibrium Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1997-01-01

    The entropy associated with absolute equilibrium ensemble theories of ideal, homogeneous, fluid and magneto-fluid turbulence is discussed and the three-dimensional fluid case is examined in detail. A sigma-function is defined, whose minimum value with respect to global parameters is the entropy. A comparison is made between the use of global functions sigma and phase functions H (associated with the development of various H-theorems of ideal turbulence). It is shown that the two approaches are complimentary though conceptually different: H-theorems show that an isolated system tends to equilibrium while sigma-functions allow the demonstration that entropy never decreases when two previously isolated systems are combined. This provides a more complete picture of entropy in the statistical mechanics of ideal fluids.

  12. The equilibrium dayside magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavriyev, Anton; Hasegawa, Akira

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented of computing the dayside global earth magnetic field which is in equilibrium with the plasma pressure, based on satellite observations at a local region of the magnetosphere. The method, which utilizes a perturbation around a dipole magnetic field, involves computation of the global plasma pressure profile based on the equatorial (anisotropic) pressure data, derivation of the current profile which satisfies the equilibrium condition, and computation of the magnetic field using the current profile and the boundary current produced by the solar wind. The method is applied for the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers data, and the result of the computation is found to compare reasonably well with the observed magnetic field profile near the geomagnetic equator.

  13. The ACOSTA accompanying measure A2106.

    PubMed

    Thayer, C; De Moor, G; Van Goor, J

    1994-10-01

    At a time when the informatics and telecommunications industries are looking for new markets to exploit in relation, for example, to the emerging ISDN and broadband communications networks, there is a need to create a broad consensus in Europe by bringing together systematically the relevant industries including telecom service providers, health care providers, insurance organisations, standardisation experts and policy makers. The aim of the ACOSTA (Consensus Formation and Standardisation Promotion) Accompanying Measure is the creation of more general awareness of the relevant environment among all the parties, better specification of common requirements and options taking better account of the real needs of the users, and enlargement of the common market in health care telematics. PMID:7889758

  14. Sacral Perineural Cyst Accompanying Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Chang Il; Shin, Ho; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2009-01-01

    Although most of sacral perineural cysts are asymptomatic, some may produce symptoms. Specific radicular pain may be due to distortion, compression, or stretching of nerve root by a space occupying cyst. We report a rare case of S1 radiculopathy caused by sacral perineural cyst accompanying disc herniation. The patient underwent a microscopic discectomy at L5-S1 level. However, the patient's symptoms did not improved. The hypesthesia persisted, as did the right leg pain. Cyst-subarachnoid shunt was set to decompress nerve root and to equalize the cerebrospinal fluid pressure between the cephalad thecal sac and cyst. Immediately after surgery, the patient had no leg pain. After 6 months, the patient still remained free of leg pain. PMID:19352483

  15. Sacral perineural cyst accompanying disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Ju, Chang Il; Shin, Ho; Kim, Seok Won; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2009-03-01

    Although most of sacral perineural cysts are asymptomatic, some may produce symptoms. Specific radicular pain may be due to distortion, compression, or stretching of nerve root by a space occupying cyst. We report a rare case of S1 radiculopathy caused by sacral perineural cyst accompanying disc herniation. The patient underwent a microscopic discectomy at L5-S1 level. However, the patient's symptoms did not improved. The hypesthesia persisted, as did the right leg pain. Cyst-subarachnoid shunt was set to decompress nerve root and to equalize the cerebrospinal fluid pressure between the cephalad thecal sac and cyst. Immediately after surgery, the patient had no leg pain. After 6 months, the patient still remained free of leg pain. PMID:19352483

  16. The Mechanism of Atomization Accompanying Solid Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, R A , Jr

    1933-01-01

    A brief historical and descriptive account of solid injection is followed by a detailed review of the available theoretical and experimental data that seem to throw light on the mechanism of this form of atomization. It is concluded that this evidence indicates that (1) the atomization accompanying solid injection occurs at the surface of the liquid after it issues as a solid stream from the orifice; and (2) that such atomization has a mechanism physically identical with the atomization which takes place in an air stream, both being due merely to the formation, at the gas-liquid interface, of fine ligaments under the influence of the relative motion of gas and liquid, and to their collapse, under the influence of surface tension, to form the drops in the spray.

  17. Solids Far from Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godrèche, C.

    2011-03-01

    Preface; 1. Shape and growth of crystals P. Nozières; 2. Instabilities of planar solidification fronts B. Caroli, C. Caroli and B. Roulet; 3. An introduction to the kinetics of first-order phase transition J. S. Langer; 4. Dendritic growth and related topics Y. Pomeau and M. Ben Amar; 5. Growth and aggregation far from equilibrium L. M. Sander; 6. Kinetic roughening of growing surfaces J. Krug and H. Spohn; Acknowledgements; References; Index.

  18. [How to accompany a suicidal patient].

    PubMed

    Dorfman Lerner, B

    1986-06-01

    In this paper the author offers the prospective T.C. an orientation for the treatment of patients who have intended suicide. After examining general questions such as who and when people commit suicide, she presents an "Assessment of self-destructive potentiality" by Tabachnik & Farberow as a guide to the best prevention of the suicidal act. The metapsychological view of Freud as regards the repressed homicidal motivation in suicide is complemented by the views of Garma and Abadi. In respect to the process of accompaniment in these cases, the author suggests the appearance of four phases (simultaneous or in succession) that are: 1. the presence and the regard in which what is important for the patient is that the T.C. is there and affectionately regards him; 2. the listening, in which the T.C. provides facilities for the patient to speak; 3. the key word, in which "I comprehend" is the privileged T.C. expression; and 4. the dialogue. Within phase 3. discrimination can be made between different psycholinguistic aspects of the key expression, such as: a) its constituting aspects; b) its catarctic or economic aspect; c) its meaning a recognition of the patient's identity; and d) the emergence of hope. Also, as suicide is the end point of different psychopathologies, a brief indication of possible T.C. responses is given. In all these, the principal aim is to help the patient to elaborate a new life project. A clinical successful example shows how three T.C. were included in the treatment of a suicidal patient to accompany her in the recognition and tolerance of her own and others' aggressive feelings. Some philosophical considerations are added. PMID:3788628

  19. Exoplanet Equilibrium Chemistry Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, Sarah; Harrington, J.; Bowman, M.; Blecic, J.

    2013-10-01

    Recently, Agundez et al. (2012, A&A 548, A73) used a chemical kinetics code to study a model HD 209458b (equilibrium temperature of 1450 K, assuming full redistribution and 0 albedo). They found that thermochemistry dominates most of the dayside, but that significant compositional gradients may exist across the dayside. We calculate equilibrium-chemistry molecular abundances for several model exoplanets, using NASA's open-source Chemical Equilibrium Abundances code (McBride and Gordon 1996). We vary the degree of radiation redistribution to the dark side, ranging from total redistribution to instantaneous reradiation. Atomically, both the solar abundance multiple and the carbon fraction vary. Planet substellar temperatures range from just above 1200 K, where photochemistry should no longer be important, to those of hot planets (3000 K). We present synthetic abundance images for the key spectroscopic molecules CO, CH4, and H2O for several hot-Jupiter model planets. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G.

  20. Equilibrium Electroconvective Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, I.; Zaltzman, B.

    2015-03-01

    Since its prediction 15 years ago, hydrodynamic instability in concentration polarization at a charge-selective interface has been attributed to nonequilibrium electro-osmosis related to the extended space charge which develops at the limiting current. This attribution had a double basis. On the one hand, it has been recognized that neither equilibrium electro-osmosis nor bulk electroconvection can yield instability for a perfectly charge-selective solid. On the other hand, it has been shown that nonequilibrium electro-osmosis can. The first theoretical studies in which electro-osmotic instability was predicted and analyzed employed the assumption of perfect charge selectivity for the sake of simplicity and so did the subsequent studies of various time-dependent and nonlinear features of electro-osmotic instability. In this Letter, we show that relaxing the assumption of perfect charge selectivity (tantamount to fixing the electrochemical potential of counterions in the solid) allows for the equilibrium electroconvective instability. In addition, we suggest a simple experimental test for determining the true, either equilibrium or nonequilibrium, origin of instability in concentration polarization.

  1. Equilibrium versus disequilibrium of barchan dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El belrhiti, Hicham; Douady, Stéphane

    2011-02-01

    Barchans are crescentic dunes which occur in mainly mono-directional winds. Shape, aspect ratios and velocities of these dunes have been studied as if they were in equilibrium. However, following a study of the shape and migration of 11 barchans of different sizes for 18 months in the field on Moroccan Atlantic Sahara, we show that they only appear to be in a stationary state if studied over a long timeframe (at the scale of the year or several years), but are never in equilibrium at the scale of weeks or months. Rather, they are always 'trying' to reach a possible equilibrium state but never have enough time to accomplish this. This may be the main reason for the large variation observed in previous measurements, and justifies some caution in what can be deduced from them.

  2. Detection of "punctuated equilibrium" by bayesian estimation of speciation and extinction rates, ancestral character states, and rates of anagenetic and cladogenetic evolution on a molecular phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Bokma, Folmer

    2008-11-01

    Algorithms are presented to simultaneously estimate probabilities of speciation and extinction, rates of anagenetic and cladogenetic phenotypic evolution, as well as ancestral character states, from a complete ultrametric species-level phylogeny with dates assigned to all bifurcations and one or more phenotypes in three or more extant species, using Metropolis-Hastings Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling. The algorithms also estimate missing phenotypes of extant species and numbers of speciation events that occurred on all branches of the phylogeny. The algorithms are discussed and their performance is evaluated using simulated data. That evaluation shows that precise estimation of rates of evolution of one or a few phenotypes requires large phylogenies. Estimation accuracy improves with the number of species on the phylogeny. PMID:18752617

  3. Equilibrium free energies from nonequilibrium processes

    SciTech Connect

    Jarzynski, C.

    1997-10-29

    A recent result, relating the (irreversible) work performed on a system during a non quasistatic process, to the Helmholtz free energy difference between two equilibrium states of the system, is discussed. A proof of this result is given for the special case when the evolution of the system in question is modeled by a Langevin equation in configuration space.

  4. Structural design using equilibrium programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    Multiple nonlinear programming methods are combined in the method of equilibrium programming. Equilibrium programming theory has been appied to problems in operations research, and in the present study it is investigated as a framework to solve structural design problems. Several existing formal methods for structural optimization are shown to actually be equilibrium programming methods. Additionally, the equilibrium programming framework is utilized to develop a new structural design method. Selected computational results are presented to demonstrate the methods.

  5. Non-Equilibrium Transitions of Heliospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Recent advances in Space Physics theory have established the connection between non-extensive Statistical Mechanics and space plasmas by providing a theoretical basis for the empirically derived kappa distributions commonly used to describe the phase space distribution functions of these systems [1]. The non-equilibrium temperature and the kappa index that govern these distributions are the two independent controlling parameters of non-equilibrium systems [1-3]. The significance of the kappa index is primarily given by its role in identifying the non-equilibrium stationary states, and measuring their "thermodynamic distance" from thermal equilibrium [4], while its physical meaning is connected to the correlation between the system's particles [5]. For example, analysis of the IBEX high Energetic Neutral Atom spectra [6] showed that the vast majority of measured kappa indices are between ~1.5 and ~2.5, consistent with the far-equilibrium "cavity" of minimum entropy discovered by Livadiotis & McComas [2]. Spontaneous procedures that can increase the entropy, move the system gradually toward equilibrium, that is the state with the maximum (infinite) kappa index. Other external factors that may decrease the entropy, move the system back to states further from equilibrium where the kappa indices are smaller. Newly formed pick-up ions can play this critical role in the solar wind and other space plasmas. We have analytically shown that their highly ordered motion can reduce the average entropy in the plasma beyond the termination shock, inside the inner heliosheath [7]. Non-equilibrium transitions have a key role in understanding the governing thermodynamical processes of space plasmas. References 1. Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D. J. 2009, JGR, 114, 11105. 2. Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D. J. 2010a, ApJ, 714, 971. 3. Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D. J. 2010c, in AIP Conf. Proc. 9, Pickup Ions Throughout the Heliosphere and Beyond, ed. J. LeRoux, V. Florinski, G. P. Zank, & A

  6. The Lewis Chemical Equilibrium Program with parametric study capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevigny, R.

    1981-01-01

    The program was developed to determine chemical equilibrium in complex systems. Using a free energy minimization technique, the program permits calculations such as: chemical equilibrium for assigned thermodynamic states; theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen compositions during expansion; incident and reflected shock properties; and Chapman-Jouget detonation properties. It is shown that the same program can handle solid coal in an entrained flow coal gasification problem.

  7. Equilibrium time correlation functions and the dynamics of fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Luban, Marshall; Luscombe, James H.

    1999-12-01

    Equilibrium time correlation functions are of great importance because they probe the equilibrium dynamical response to external perturbations. We discuss the properties of time correlation functions for several systems that are simple enough to illustrate the calculational steps involved. The discussion underscores the need for avoiding language which misleadingly suggests that thermal equilibrium is associated with a quiescent or moribund state of the system. (c) 1999 American Association of Physics Teachers.

  8. Adsorption of toxic metal ion Cr(VI) from aqueous state by TiO2-MCM-41: equilibrium and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Parida, Kulamani; Mishra, Krushna Gopal; Dash, Suresh Kumar

    2012-11-30

    This paper deals with the immobilization of various weight percentage of TiO(2) on mesoporous MCM-41, characterization of the materials by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and evaluation of the adsorption capacity toward Cr(VI) removal. It is found that the MCM-41 structure retained after loading of TiO(2) but the surface area and pore diameter decreased due to pore blockage. Adsorption of Cr(VI) from aqueous state was investigated on TiO(2)-MCM-41 by changing various parameters such as pH, metal ion concentration, and the temperature. When TiO(2) loading was more than 20 wt.%, the adsorption activity (25)TiO(2)-MCM-41 reduced significantly due to considerable decrease in the surface area. It is also observed that TiO(2) and neat MCM-41 exhibits very less Cr(VI) adsorption compared to TiO(2)-MCM-41. The adsorption of Cr(VI) onto (20)TiO(2)-MCM-41 at pH~5.5 and temperature 323 K was 91% at 100mg/L Cr(VI) metal ion concentration in 80 min. The experimental data fitted well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The adsorption of Cr(VI) on TiO(2)-MCM-41 followed a second order kinetics with higher values of intra-particle diffusion rate. Thermodynamic parameters suggested that the adsorption process is endothermic in nature and desorption studies indicated a chemisorption mode. PMID:23092612

  9. Mechanical Surface Waves Accompany Action Potential Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Benjamin; El Hady, Ahmed

    2015-03-01

    The action potential (AP) is the basic mechanism by which information is transmitted along neuronal axons. Although the excitable nature of axons is understood to be primarily electrical, many experimental studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane co-propagates with the electrical signal. While the experimental evidence for co-propagating mechanical waves is diverse and compelling, there is no consensus for their physical underpinnings. We present a model in which these mechanical displacements arise from the driving of mechanical surface waves, in which potential energy is stored in elastic deformations of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is stored in the movement of the axoplasmic fluid. In our model these surface waves are driven by the traveling wave of electrical depolarization that characterizes the AP, altering the electrostatic forces across the membrane as it passes. Our model allows us to predict the shape of the displacement that should accompany any traveling wave of voltage, including the well-characterized AP. We expect our model to serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs in neurobiology. See Arxiv/1407.7600

  10. Equilibrium and off-equilibrium trap-size scaling in one-dimensional ultracold bosonic gases

    SciTech Connect

    Campostrini, Massimo; Vicari, Ettore

    2010-12-15

    We study some aspects of equilibrium and off-equilibrium quantum dynamics of dilute bosonic gases in the presence of a trapping potential. We consider systems with a fixed number of particles and study their scaling behavior with increasing the trap size. We focus on one-dimensional bosonic systems, such as gases described by the Lieb-Liniger model and its Tonks-Girardeau limit of impenetrable bosons, and gases constrained in optical lattices as described by the Bose-Hubbard model. We study their quantum (zero-temperature) behavior at equilibrium and off equilibrium during the unitary time evolution arising from changes of the trapping potential, which may be instantaneous or described by a power-law time dependence, starting from the equilibrium ground state for an initial trap size. Renormalization-group scaling arguments and analytical and numerical calculations show that the trap-size dependence of the equilibrium and off-equilibrium dynamics can be cast in the form of a trap-size scaling in the low-density regime, characterized by universal power laws of the trap size, in dilute gases with repulsive contact interactions and lattice systems described by the Bose-Hubbard model. The scaling functions corresponding to several physically interesting observables are computed. Our results are of experimental relevance for systems of cold atomic gases trapped by tunable confining potentials.

  11. Increased spatial variance accompanies reorganization of two continental shelf ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Litzow, Michael A; Urban, J Daniel; Laurel, Benjamin J

    2008-09-01

    Phase transitions between alternate stable states in marine ecosystems lead to disruptive changes in ecosystem services, especially fisheries productivity. We used trawl survey data spanning phase transitions in the North Pacific (Gulf of Alaska) and the North Atlantic (Scotian Shelf) to test for increases in ecosystem variability that might provide early warning of such transitions. In both time series, elevated spatial variability in a measure of community composition (ratio of cod [Gadus sp.] abundance to prey abundance) accompanied transitions between ecosystem states, and variability was negatively correlated with distance from the ecosystem transition point. In the Gulf of Alaska, where the phase transition was apparently the result of a sudden perturbation (climate regime shift), variance increased one year before the transition in mean state occurred. On the Scotian Shelf, where ecosystem reorganization was the result of persistent overfishing, a significant increase in variance occurred three years before the transition in mean state was detected. However, we could not reject the alternate explanation that increased variance may also have simply been inherent to the final stable state in that ecosystem. Increased variance has been previously observed around transition points in models, but rarely in real ecosystems, and our results demonstrate the possible management value in tracking the variance of key parameters in exploited ecosystems. PMID:18767612

  12. Local non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jinwoo, Lee; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Local Shannon entropy lies at the heart of modern thermodynamics, with much discussion of trajectory-dependent entropy production. When taken at both boundaries of a process in phase space, it reproduces the second law of thermodynamics over a finite time interval for small scale systems. However, given that entropy is an ensemble property, it has never been clear how one can assign such a quantity locally. Given such a fundamental omission in our knowledge, we construct a new ensemble composed of trajectories reaching an individual microstate, and show that locally defined entropy, information, and free energy are properties of the ensemble, or trajectory-independent true thermodynamic potentials. We find that the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution and Landauer's principle can be generalized naturally as properties of the ensemble, and that trajectory-free state functions of the ensemble govern the exact mechanism of non-equilibrium relaxation. PMID:25592077

  13. Local non-equilibrium thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Jinwoo, Lee; Tanaka, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Local Shannon entropy lies at the heart of modern thermodynamics, with much discussion of trajectory-dependent entropy production. When taken at both boundaries of a process in phase space, it reproduces the second law of thermodynamics over a finite time interval for small scale systems. However, given that entropy is an ensemble property, it has never been clear how one can assign such a quantity locally. Given such a fundamental omission in our knowledge, we construct a new ensemble composed of trajectories reaching an individual microstate, and show that locally defined entropy, information, and free energy are properties of the ensemble, or trajectory-independent true thermodynamic potentials. We find that the Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution and Landauer's principle can be generalized naturally as properties of the ensemble, and that trajectory-free state functions of the ensemble govern the exact mechanism of non-equilibrium relaxation. PMID:25592077

  14. Algorithm For Hypersonic Flow In Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant

    1989-01-01

    Implicit, finite-difference, shock-capturing algorithm calculates inviscid, hypersonic flows in chemical equilibrium. Implicit formulation chosen because overcomes limitation on mathematical stability encountered in explicit formulations. For dynamical portion of problem, Euler equations written in conservation-law form in Cartesian coordinate system for two-dimensional or axisymmetric flow. For chemical portion of problem, equilibrium state of gas at each point in computational grid determined by minimizing local Gibbs free energy, subject to local conservation of molecules, atoms, ions, and total enthalpy. Major advantage: resulting algorithm naturally stable and captures strong shocks without help of artificial-dissipation terms to damp out spurious numerical oscillations.

  15. Non-equilibrium DMFT - Polaritonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubatsch, Andreas; Frank, Regine

    Non-equilibrium physics recently really becomes important with the progress of ultrafast laser sciences. However in our understanding there is still a gap between equilibrium physics and the non-equilibrium, even though numerical methods have been advanced in recent years. We compare in this talk novel results at hand with equilibrium physics. The comparison will show that especially theoretical efforts are needed to explain many - so far - unresolved problems and to predict novel research on the basis of ab initio computing. We specifically discuss several non-equilibrium extensions of DMFT, numerical methods as well as semi-analytical solvers.

  16. Thermal equilibrium of goats.

    PubMed

    Maia, Alex S C; Nascimento, Sheila T; Nascimento, Carolina C N; Gebremedhin, Kifle G

    2016-05-01

    The effects of air temperature and relative humidity on thermal equilibrium of goats in a tropical region was evaluated. Nine non-pregnant Anglo Nubian nanny goats were used in the study. An indirect calorimeter was designed and developed to measure oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, methane production and water vapour pressure of the air exhaled from goats. Physiological parameters: rectal temperature, skin temperature, hair-coat temperature, expired air temperature and respiratory rate and volume as well as environmental parameters: air temperature, relative humidity and mean radiant temperature were measured. The results show that respiratory and volume rates and latent heat loss did not change significantly for air temperature between 22 and 26°C. In this temperature range, metabolic heat was lost mainly by convection and long-wave radiation. For temperature greater than 30°C, the goats maintained thermal equilibrium mainly by evaporative heat loss. At the higher air temperature, the respiratory and ventilation rates as well as body temperatures were significantly elevated. It can be concluded that for Anglo Nubian goats, the upper limit of air temperature for comfort is around 26°C when the goats are protected from direct solar radiation. PMID:27157333

  17. Universality in equilibrium and away from it: A personal perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, Miguel A.

    2011-03-24

    In this talk/paper I discuss the concept of universality in phase transitions and the question of whether universality classes are more robust in equilibrium than away from it. In both of these situations, the main ingredients determining universality are symmetries, conservation laws, the dimension of the space and of the order-parameter and the presence of long-range interactions or quenched disorder. The existence of detailed-balance and fluctuation-dissipation theorems imposes severe constraints on equilibrium systems, allowing to define universality classes in a very robust way; instead, non-equilibrium allows for more variability. Still, quite robust non-equilibrium universality classes have been identified in the last decades. Here, I discuss some examples in which (i) non-equilibrium phase transitions are simply controlled by equilibrium critical points, i.e. non-equilibrium ingredients turn out to be irrelevant in the renormalization group sense and (ii) non-equilibrium situations in which equilibrium seems to come out of the blue, generating an adequate effective description of intrinsically non-equilibrium problems. Afterwards, I shall describe different genuinely non-equilibrium phase transitions in which introducing small, apparently innocuous changes (namely: presence or absence of an underlying lattice, parity conservation in the overall number of particles, existence of an un-accessible vacuum state, deterministic versus stochastic microscopic rules, presence or absence of a Fermionic constraint), the critical behavior is altered, making the case for lack of robustness. However, it will be argued that in all these examples, there is an underlying good reason (in terms of general principles) for universality to be altered. The final conclusions are that: (i) robust universality classes exist both in equilibrium and non-equilibrium; (ii) symmetry and conservation principles are crucial in both, (iii) non-equilibrium allows for more variability (i

  18. Philicities, Fugalities, and Equilibrium Constants.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Herbert; Ofial, Armin R

    2016-05-17

    The mechanistic model of Organic Chemistry is based on relationships between rate and equilibrium constants. Thus, strong bases are generally considered to be good nucleophiles and poor nucleofuges. Exceptions to this rule have long been known, and the ability of iodide ions to catalyze nucleophilic substitutions, because they are good nucleophiles as well as good nucleofuges, is just a prominent example for exceptions from the general rule. In a reaction series, the Leffler-Hammond parameter α = δΔG(⧧)/δΔG° describes the fraction of the change in the Gibbs energy of reaction, which is reflected in the change of the Gibbs energy of activation. It has long been considered as a measure for the position of the transition state; thus, an α value close to 0 was associated with an early transition state, while an α value close to 1 was considered to be indicative of a late transition state. Bordwell's observation in 1969 that substituent variation in phenylnitromethanes has a larger effect on the rates of deprotonation than on the corresponding equilibrium constants (nitroalkane anomaly) triggered the breakdown of this interpretation. In the past, most systematic investigations of the relationships between rates and equilibria of organic reactions have dealt with proton transfer reactions, because only for few other reaction series complementary kinetic and thermodynamic data have been available. In this Account we report on a more general investigation of the relationships between Lewis basicities, nucleophilicities, and nucleofugalities as well as between Lewis acidities, electrophilicities, and electrofugalities. Definitions of these terms are summarized, and it is suggested to replace the hybrid terms "kinetic basicity" and "kinetic acidity" by "protophilicity" and "protofugality", respectively; in this way, the terms "acidity" and "basicity" are exclusively assigned to thermodynamic properties, while "philicity" and "fugality" refer to kinetics

  19. Planetary cratering 2: Studies of saturation equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, William K.; Gaskell, Robert W.

    1997-01-01

    A realistic computer model has been developed to display images of imaginary cratered surfaces, taking into account empirically measured input size distributions of primary and secondary craters, ejecta blanket morphology including feathering with distance, obliteration due to ejecta from outside the imaged area, lighting effects, etc. The model allows us to track surface evolution of morphology as new craters are added. Using the model as well as lunar photos, we have studied the approach to saturation equilibrium (defined as a condition when no further proportionate increase in crater density occurs as input cratering increases). We find that an identifiable saturation equilibrium occurs close to a level previously identified for this state (Hartmann 1984), typically fluctuating around a crater density from about 0.4 to 2 times that level. This result is fairly robust vis-a-vis the range of model parameters we have chosen. Flooding, basin ejecta blankets, and other obliterative effects can introduce structure and oscillations within this range, even after saturation equilibrium is achieved. These findings may constrain or revise certain earlier interpretations of satellite and planet surface evolution and impactor populations which were predicated on the assumed absence of saturation equilibrium. In our fourth experimental run, we found that suppression of "sandblasting" by sub-resolution impacts allows the smallest secondaries to rise above the saturation equilibrium line, a result that might be relevant to a similar situation on Gaspra and perhaps some other asteroids.

  20. Languages and Societies: The "Punctuated Equilibrium" Model of Language Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuteva, Tania

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this article is twofold: (1) on the basis of non-conjectural, concrete cases, to establish the linguistic situations that are characteristic of the socio-historical states of equilibrium and punctuation; and (2) to show that neither the equilibrium nor punctuation can be uniquely defined by a particular linguistic situation specific to…

  1. Thermal expansion accompanying the glass-liquid transition and crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, M. Q.; Naderi, M.; Wang, Y. J.; Peterlechner, M.; Liu, X. F.; Zeng, F.; Jiang, F.; Dai, L. H.; Wilde, G.

    2015-12-01

    We report the linear thermal expansion behaviors of a Zr-based (Vitreloy 1) bulk metallic glass in its as-cast, annealed and crystallized states. Accompanying the glass-liquid transition, the as-cast Vitreloy 1 shows a continuous decrease in the thermal expansivity, whereas the annealed glass shows a sudden increase. The crystallized Vitreloy 1 exhibits an almost unchanged thermal expansivity prior to its melting. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the nucleation of crystalline phases can induce a significant thermal shrinkage of the supercooled liquid, but with the growth of these nuclei, the thermal expansion again dominates. These results are explained in the framework of the potential energy landscape, advocating that the configurational and vibrational contributions to the thermal expansion of the glass depend on both, structure and temperature.

  2. Case of alcoholic ketoacidosis accompanied with severe hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Tadanobu; Shiraishi, Wataru; Iwanaga, Yasutaka; Yamamoto, Akifumi

    2015-03-01

    We report a 55 year old Japanese man with a history of alcohol abuse, who was in a near fasting state for the previous few days.He was admitted to our hospital with abrupt disturbance of consciousness. He presented disturbance of consciousness with extreme hypoglycemia and ketoacidosis with high β-hydroxybutyric acid concentration. Taking into account his living history, we diagnosed with alcoholic ketoacidosis (AKA). Symptoms ameliorated with glucose injection and fluid loading. AKA patients show abdominal pain, nausea or vomiting, but they are usually alert and lucid despite the severe acidosis. This case, however, presented comatose status caused by hypoglycemia. Poor oral intake of this patient was assumed to be the cause of hypoglycemia. Alcoholism may cause hypoglycemia accompanying with AKA, due to a low carbohydrate intake, the inhibition of gluconeogenesis, and reduced hepaticglycogen storage as seen in this case. Here, we report a case of AKA that demonstrated hypoglycemia with the literature review. PMID:25787101

  3. Fertility reduction programmes should accompany land reforms.

    PubMed

    Atiku, J

    1994-01-01

    health and welfare. Fertility reduction programs should be accompanied by economic policies, such as land reform. Uganda's proposed policy promotes intervention programs in health, nutrition, education, and the environment. To succeed, local support must be mobilized, and population problems should be addressed in a way that integrates gender equity, empowerment of women, sustained economic growth, eradication of poverty, and international cooperation. PMID:12318956

  4. Calculating and Visualizing Thermodynamic Equilibrium: A Tutorial on the Isolated System with an Internal Adiabatic Piston

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, Joao Paulo M.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of the equilibrium state of an isolated composite system with a movable internal adiabatic wall is a recurrent one in the literature. Classical equilibrium thermodynamics is unable to predict the equilibrium state, unless supplemented with information about the process taking place. This conclusion is clearly demonstrated in this…

  5. ``From Fundamental Motives to Rational Expectation Equilibrium[REE, henceworth] of Indeterminacy''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksoed, Ssi, Wh-

    For ``Principle of Indeterminacy''from Heisenberg states: ``one of the fundamental cornerstone of quantum mechanics is the Heisenberg uncertainty principle''.whereas canonically conjugate quantities can be determined simultaneously only with a characteristic indeterminacy[M. Arevalo Aguilar, et.al]. Accompanying Alfred North Whitehead conclusion in ``The Aims of Education''that mathematical symbols are artificial before new meanings given, two kinds of fundamental motives: (i) expectation-expectation, (ii) expectation-certainty inherently occurs with determinacy properties of rational expectation equilibrium(REE, henceworth)- Guido Ascari & Tizano Ropele:''Trend inflation, Taylor principle & Indeterminacy'', Kiel Institute, June 2007. Furthers, relative price expression can be compare of their α and (1 - α) configurations in the expression of possible activity. Acknowledgment to Prof[asc]. Dr. Bobby Eka Gunara for ``made a rank through physics'' denotes...

  6. The Nash equilibrium: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Holt, Charles A; Roth, Alvin E

    2004-03-23

    In 1950, John Nash contributed a remarkable one-page PNAS article that defined and characterized a notion of equilibrium for n- person games. This notion, now called the "Nash equilibrium," has been widely applied and adapted in economics and other behavioral sciences. Indeed, game theory, with the Nash equilibrium as its centerpiece, is becoming the most prominent unifying theory of social science. In this perspective, we summarize the historical context and subsequent impact of Nash's contribution. PMID:15024100

  7. Napoleon Is in Equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Rob

    2016-01-01

    It has been said that the cell is the test tube of the twenty-first century. If so, the theoretical tools needed to quantitatively and predictively describe what goes on in such test tubes lag sorely behind the stunning experimental advances in biology seen in the decades since the molecular biology revolution began. Perhaps surprisingly, one of the theoretical tools that has been used with great success on problems ranging from how cells communicate with their environment and each other to the nature of the organization of proteins and lipids within the cell membrane is statistical mechanics. A knee-jerk reaction to the use of statistical mechanics in the description of cellular processes is that living organisms are so far from equilibrium that one has no business even thinking about it. But such reactions are probably too hasty given that there are many regimes in which, because of a separation of timescales, for example, such an approach can be a useful first step. In this article, we explore the power of statistical mechanical thinking in the biological setting, with special emphasis on cell signaling and regulation. We show how such models are used to make predictions and describe some recent experiments designed to test them. We also consider the limits of such models based on the relative timescales of the processes of interest. PMID:27429713

  8. Napoleon Is in Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Rob

    2015-03-01

    It has been said that the cell is the test tube of the twenty-first century. If so, the theoretical tools needed to quantitatively and predictively describe what goes on in such test tubes lag sorely behind the stunning experimental advances in biology seen in the decades since the molecular biology revolution began. Perhaps surprisingly, one of the theoretical tools that has been used with great success on problems ranging from how cells communicate with their environment and each other to the nature of the organization of proteins and lipids within the cell membrane is statistical mechanics. A knee-jerk reaction to the use of statistical mechanics in the description of cellular processes is that living organisms are so far from equilibrium that one has no business even thinking about it. But such reactions are probably too hasty given that there are many regimes in which, because of a separation of timescales, for example, such an approach can be a useful first step. In this article, we explore the power of statistical mechanical thinking in the biological setting, with special emphasis on cell signaling and regulation. We show how such models are used to make predictions and describe some recent experiments designed to test them. We also consider the limits of such models based on the relative timescales of the processes of interest.

  9. Equilibrium and highly nonequilibrium states of condensed matter (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 21 April 2008): Radiation-dynamic effects. Potential for producing condensed media with unique properties and structural states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, V. V.; Murtazaev, A. K.; Khazanov, E. A.; Sergeev, A. M.

    2008-09-01

    On 21 April 2008, a scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences was held at the conference room of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The following talks were presented: (1) Ovchinnikov V V (Institute of Electrophysics, RAS (UB), Ekaterinburg) "Radiation-dynamic effects. Potential for producing condensed media with unique properties and structural states"; (2) Garnov S V (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Femtosecond laser plasma of multiply ionized gases"; (3) Murtazaev A K (Institute of Physics, Dagestan Scientific Center, RAS, Dagestan State University, Makhachkala) "Critical properties of frustrated spin systems on a stacked triangular lattice"; (4) Khazanov E A and Sergeev A M (Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, Nizhnii Novgorod) "Petawatt lasers based on optical parametric amplifiers: their state and prospects". Summaries of talks 1, 3, and 4 are given below. • Radiation-dynamic effects. Potential for producing condensed media with unique properties and structural states, V V Ovchinnikov Physics-Uspekhi, 2008, Volume 51, Number 9, Pages 955-964 • Critical properties of frustrated spin systems on a stacked triangular lattice, A K Murtazaev Physics-Uspekhi, 2008, Volume 51, Number 9, Pages 965-969 • Petawatt lasers based on optical parametric amplifiers: their state and prospects, E A Khazanov and A M Sergeev Physics-Uspekhi, 2008, Volume 51, Number 9, Pages 969-974

  10. Equilibrium Macroscopic Structure Revisited from Spatial Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuge, Koretaka

    2016-02-01

    In classical systems, we reexamine how macroscopic structures in equilibrium state connect with spatial constraint on the systems. For example, volume and density as the constraint for liquids in rigid box, and crystal lattice as the constraint for crystalline solids. We find that in disordered states, equilibrium macroscopic structure, depending on temperature and on multibody interactions in the system, can be well characterized by a single special microscopic structure independent of temperature and of interactions. The special microscopic structure depends only on the spatial constraint. We demonstrate the present findings providing (i) significantly efficient and systematic prediction of macroscopic structures for possible combination of constituents in multicomponent systems using first-principles calculations, and (ii) unique and accurate prediction of multibody interactions in given system from measured macroscopic structure, without performing trial-and-error simulation.

  11. Equilibrium configurations of degenerate fluid spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, P.G.

    1985-04-01

    Equilibrium configurations of degenerate fluid spheres which assume a polytropic form in the ultrahigh-density regime are considered. We show that analytic solutions more general than those of Misner and Zapolsky exist which possess the asymptotic equation of state. Simple expressions are derived which indicate this nature of the fluids in the extreme relativistic limit, and the stability of these interiors is considered in the asymptotic region.

  12. Emergence and pseudo-equilibrium in geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Jonathan D.

    2011-09-01

    Many geomorphic system states and behaviors often interpreted as tendencies toward establishment and maintenance of steady-state equilibrium are actually emergent outcomes of two simple principles: gradient selection and threshold-mediated modulation. The principle of gradient selection is simply that geomorphic features associated with gradient-driven flows persist and grow relative to other features and pathways. The principle of threshold-mediated modulation reflects the inherent limits on system development along any particular pathway. Thresholds not only define a restricted state space for any given geomorphic system, but may also result in oscillatory behavior around an intermediate condition that resembles fluctuations around a steady-state equilibrium. Together, these principles often produce outcomes that mimic steady-state equilibria. Examples are given involving several aspects of fluvial systems (channel profiles, alluvial channel changes, and drainage density), hillslope gradients, and barchan dunes. Steady-states indeed occur in Earth surface systems, and are a useful simplification in some models. However, the assumption that such states are somehow normative, or the only natural condition, is incorrect, and can lead to problems in geomorphic interpretations, environmental restoration and management, and conceptions of how Earth systems work.

  13. Equilibrium Molecular Thermodynamics from Kirkwood Sampling

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present two methods for barrierless equilibrium sampling of molecular systems based on the recently proposed Kirkwood method (J. Chem. Phys.2009, 130, 134102). Kirkwood sampling employs low-order correlations among internal coordinates of a molecule for random (or non-Markovian) sampling of the high dimensional conformational space. This is a geometrical sampling method independent of the potential energy surface. The first method is a variant of biased Monte Carlo, where Kirkwood sampling is used for generating trial Monte Carlo moves. Using this method, equilibrium distributions corresponding to different temperatures and potential energy functions can be generated from a given set of low-order correlations. Since Kirkwood samples are generated independently, this method is ideally suited for massively parallel distributed computing. The second approach is a variant of reservoir replica exchange, where Kirkwood sampling is used to construct a reservoir of conformations, which exchanges conformations with the replicas performing equilibrium sampling corresponding to different thermodynamic states. Coupling with the Kirkwood reservoir enhances sampling by facilitating global jumps in the conformational space. The efficiency of both methods depends on the overlap of the Kirkwood distribution with the target equilibrium distribution. We present proof-of-concept results for a model nine-atom linear molecule and alanine dipeptide. PMID:25915525

  14. Is Soret equilibrium a non-equilibrium effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Würger, Alois

    2013-04-01

    Recent thermophoretic experiments on colloidal suspensions revived an old debate, namely whether the Soret effect is properly described by thermostatics, or necessarily requires non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Based on colloidal transport theory and the entropy production of the related viscous flow, our analysis leads to the conclusion that the equilibrium approach may work for small ions, yet fails for colloidal particles and polymers. Regarding binary molecular mixtures, our results shed some doubt on the validity of thermostatic approaches that derive the Soret coefficient from equilibrium potentials.

  15. EASI - EQUILIBRIUM AIR SHOCK INTERFERENCE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    New research on hypersonic vehicles, such as the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP), has raised concerns about the effects of shock-wave interference on various structural components of the craft. State-of-the-art aerothermal analysis software is inadequate to predict local flow and heat flux in areas of extremely high heat transfer, such as the surface impingement of an Edney-type supersonic jet. EASI revives and updates older computational methods for calculating inviscid flow field and maximum heating from shock wave interference. The program expands these methods to solve problems involving the six shock-wave interference patterns on a two-dimensional cylindrical leading edge with an equilibrium chemically reacting gas mixture (representing, for example, the scramjet cowl of the NASP). The inclusion of gas chemistry allows for a more accurate prediction of the maximum pressure and heating loads by accounting for the effects of high temperature on the air mixture. Caloric imperfections and specie dissociation of high-temperature air cause shock-wave angles, flow deflection angles, and thermodynamic properties to differ from those calculated by a calorically perfect gas model. EASI contains pressure- and temperature-dependent thermodynamic and transport properties to determine heating rates, and uses either a calorically perfect air model or an 11-specie, 7-reaction reacting air model at equilibrium with temperatures up to 15,000 K for the inviscid flowfield calculations. EASI solves the flow field and the associated maximum surface pressure and heat flux for the six common types of shock wave interference. Depending on the type of interference, the program solves for shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction, expansion-fan/boundary-layer interaction, attaching shear layer or supersonic jet impingement. Heat flux predictions require a knowledge (from experimental data or relevant calculations) of a pertinent length scale of the interaction. Output files contain flow

  16. 9 CFR 93.409 - Articles accompanying ruminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Articles accompanying ruminants. 93...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants § 93.409 Articles accompanying ruminants..., blankets, or other things used for or about ruminants governed by the regulations in this part, shall...

  17. 9 CFR 93.409 - Articles accompanying ruminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Articles accompanying ruminants. 93...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants § 93.409 Articles accompanying ruminants..., blankets, or other things used for or about ruminants governed by the regulations in this part, shall...

  18. 9 CFR 93.409 - Articles accompanying ruminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Articles accompanying ruminants. 93...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants § 93.409 Articles accompanying ruminants..., blankets, or other things used for or about ruminants governed by the regulations in this part, shall...

  19. 9 CFR 93.409 - Articles accompanying ruminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Articles accompanying ruminants. 93...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants § 93.409 Articles accompanying ruminants..., blankets, or other things used for or about ruminants governed by the regulations in this part, shall...

  20. 9 CFR 93.409 - Articles accompanying ruminants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Articles accompanying ruminants. 93...; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Ruminants § 93.409 Articles accompanying ruminants..., blankets, or other things used for or about ruminants governed by the regulations in this part, shall...

  1. 9 CFR 93.508 - Articles accompanying swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Articles accompanying swine. 93.508... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.508 Articles accompanying swine. No litter..., or other things used for or about swine governed by the regulations in this part, shall be...

  2. 9 CFR 93.508 - Articles accompanying swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Articles accompanying swine. 93.508... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.508 Articles accompanying swine. No litter..., or other things used for or about swine governed by the regulations in this part, shall be...

  3. 9 CFR 93.508 - Articles accompanying swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Articles accompanying swine. 93.508... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.508 Articles accompanying swine. No litter..., or other things used for or about swine governed by the regulations in this part, shall be...

  4. 9 CFR 93.508 - Articles accompanying swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Articles accompanying swine. 93.508... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.508 Articles accompanying swine. No litter..., or other things used for or about swine governed by the regulations in this part, shall be...

  5. 9 CFR 93.508 - Articles accompanying swine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Articles accompanying swine. 93.508... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Swine § 93.508 Articles accompanying swine. No litter..., or other things used for or about swine governed by the regulations in this part, shall be...

  6. 9 CFR 93.307 - Articles accompanying horses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Articles accompanying horses. 93.307... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.307 Articles accompanying horses. No..., blankets, or other things used for or about horses governed by the regulations this part, shall be...

  7. 9 CFR 93.307 - Articles accompanying horses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Articles accompanying horses. 93.307... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.307 Articles accompanying horses. No..., blankets, or other things used for or about horses governed by the regulations this part, shall be...

  8. 9 CFR 93.307 - Articles accompanying horses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Articles accompanying horses. 93.307... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.307 Articles accompanying horses. No..., blankets, or other things used for or about horses governed by the regulations this part, shall be...

  9. 9 CFR 93.307 - Articles accompanying horses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Articles accompanying horses. 93.307... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.307 Articles accompanying horses. No..., blankets, or other things used for or about horses governed by the regulations this part, shall be...

  10. 9 CFR 93.307 - Articles accompanying horses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Articles accompanying horses. 93.307... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.307 Articles accompanying horses. No..., blankets, or other things used for or about horses governed by the regulations this part, shall be...

  11. 9 CFR 93.208 - Articles accompanying poultry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Articles accompanying poultry. 93.208 Section 93.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Poultry § 93.208 Articles accompanying poultry....

  12. 9 CFR 93.208 - Articles accompanying poultry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Articles accompanying poultry. 93.208 Section 93.208 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Poultry § 93.208 Articles accompanying poultry....

  13. 37 CFR 1.935 - Initial Office action usually accompanies order for inter partes reexamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Initial Office action usually accompanies order for inter partes reexamination. 1.935 Section 1.935 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES Inter Partes Reexamination...

  14. 50 CFR 26.24 - Exception for entry when accompanied by refuge personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exception for entry when accompanied by refuge personnel. 26.24 Section 26.24 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PUBLIC ENTRY AND USE Public Entry § 26.24 Exception for entry...

  15. 50 CFR 26.24 - Exception for entry when accompanied by refuge personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... refuge personnel. 26.24 Section 26.24 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PUBLIC ENTRY AND USE Public Entry... to any part of a national wildlife refuge by a person when accompanied by refuge personnel....

  16. 50 CFR 26.24 - Exception for entry when accompanied by refuge personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... refuge personnel. 26.24 Section 26.24 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PUBLIC ENTRY AND USE Public Entry... to any part of a national wildlife refuge by a person when accompanied by refuge personnel....

  17. 50 CFR 26.24 - Exception for entry when accompanied by refuge personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exception for entry when accompanied by refuge personnel. 26.24 Section 26.24 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PUBLIC ENTRY AND USE Public Entry § 26.24 Exception for entry...

  18. 50 CFR 26.24 - Exception for entry when accompanied by refuge personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... refuge personnel. 26.24 Section 26.24 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PUBLIC ENTRY AND USE Public Entry... to any part of a national wildlife refuge by a person when accompanied by refuge personnel....

  19. Establishing as the Policy of the United States the Preservation, Protection, and Promotion of the Rights of Indigenous Americans To Use, Practice and Develop Native American Languages, and for Other Purposes. Report To Accompany S.J. Res. 379 from the Select Committee on Indian Affairs. United States Senate, 100th Congress, 2d Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs.

    This report was submitted in support of a joint resolution (S.J. Res. 379) to establish as the policy of the United States the preservation, protection, and promotion of the right of indigenous Americans to practice and develop their indigenous languages. Traditional languages are an integral part of Native American culture, heritage, and…

  20. Helical axis stellarator equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A.E.; Johnson, J.L.

    1985-02-01

    An asymptotic model is developed to study MHD equilibria in toroidal systems with a helical magnetic axis. Using a characteristic coordinate system based on the vacuum field lines, the equilibrium problem is reduced to a two-dimensional generalized partial differential equation of the Grad-Shafranov type. A stellarator-expansion free-boundary equilibrium code is modified to solve the helical-axis equations. The expansion model is used to predict the equilibrium properties of Asperators NP-3 and NP-4. Numerically determined flux surfaces, magnetic well, transform, and shear are presented. The equilibria show a toroidal Shafranov shift.

  1. Understanding thermal equilibrium through activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathare, Shirish; Huli, Saurabhee; Nachane, Madhura; Ladage, Savita; Pradhan, Hemachandra

    2015-03-01

    Thermal equilibrium is a basic concept in thermodynamics. In India, this concept is generally introduced at the first year of undergraduate education in physics and chemistry. In our earlier studies (Pathare and Pradhan 2011 Proc. episteme-4 Int. Conf. to Review Research on Science Technology and Mathematics Education pp 169-72) we found that students in India have a rather unsatisfactory understanding of thermal equilibrium. We have designed and developed a module of five activities, which are presented in succession to the students. These activities address the students’ alternative conceptions that underlie their lack of understanding of thermal equilibrium and aim at enhancing their understanding of the concept.

  2. Secular equilibrium of radium in Western coal

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, V.R.; Fleissner, J.G.; Styron, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    Concentrations of radium-226, radium-228, and thorium-228 in coal from six Western states have been measured by gamma spectroscopy. The existence of secular equilibrium was verified for radium-226 and previously measured uranium-238 and also for radium-228 and thorium-228. The measured radionuclide concentrations for Western coal averaged about 0.3 pCi/g for radium-226 and 0.2 pCi/g for radium-228 and thorium-228. These average values are not greatly different from those in coal from other provinces of the United States.

  3. BINARY NEUTRON STARS IN QUASI-EQUILIBRIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Keisuke; Shibata, Masaru

    2010-05-15

    Quasi-equilibrium sequences of binary neutron stars are constructed for a variety of equations of state in general relativity. Einstein's constraint equations in the Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews approximation are solved together with the relativistic equations of hydrostationary equilibrium under the assumption of irrotational flow. We focus on unequal-mass sequences as well as equal-mass sequences, and compare those results. We investigate the behavior of the binding energy and total angular momentum along a quasi-equilibrium sequence, the endpoint of sequences, and the orbital angular velocity as a function of time, changing the mass ratio, the total mass of the binary system, and the equation of state of a neutron star. It is found that the orbital angular velocity at the mass-shedding limit can be determined by an empirical formula derived from an analytic estimation. We also provide tables for 160 sequences, which will be useful as a guideline of numerical simulations for the inspiral and merger performed in the near future.

  4. Exploring Chemical and Thermal Non-equilibrium in Nitrogen Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorui, S.; Das, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    Plasma torches operating with nitrogen are of special importance as they can operate with usual tungsten based refractory electrodes and offer radical rich non-oxidizing high temperature environment for plasma chemistry. Strong gradients in temperature as well as species densities and huge convective fluxes lead to varying degrees of chemical non-equilibrium in associated regions. An axi-symmetric two-temperature chemical non-equilibrium model of a nitrogen plasma torch has been developed to understand the effects of thermal and chemical non-equilibrium in arcs. A 2-D finite volume CFD code in association with a non-equilibrium property routine enabled extraction of steady state self-consistent distributions of various plasma quantities inside the torch under various thermal and chemical non-equilibrium conditions. Chemical non-equilibrium has been incorporated through computation of diffusive and convective fluxes in each finite volume cell in every iteration and associating corresponding thermodynamic and transport properties through the scheme of 'chemical non-equilibrium parameter' introduced by Ghorui et. al. Recombination coefficient data from Nahar et. al. and radiation data from Krey and Morris have been used in the simulation. Results are presented for distributions of temperature, pressure, velocity, current density, electric potential, species densities and chemical non-equilibrium effects. Obtained results are compared with similar results under LTE.

  5. In command of non-equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Roduner, Emil; Radhakrishnan, Shankara Gayathri

    2016-05-21

    The second law of thermodynamics is well known for determining the direction of spontaneous processes in the laboratory, life and the universe. It is therefore often called the arrow of time. Less often discussed but just as important is the effect of kinetic barriers which intercept equilibration and preserve highly ordered, high energy non-equilibrium states. Examples of such states are many modern materials produced intentionally for technological applications. Furthermore, all living organisms fuelled directly by photosynthesis and those fuelled indirectly by living on high energy nutrition represent preserved non-equilibrium states. The formation of these states represents the local reversal of the arrow of time which only seemingly violates the second law. It has been known since the seminal work of Prigogine that the stabilisation of these states inevitably requires the dissipation of energy in the form of waste heat. It is this feature of waste heat dissipation following the input of energy that drives all processes occurring at a non-zero rate. Photosynthesis, replication of living organisms, self-assembly, crystal shape engineering and distillation have this principle in common with the well-known Carnot cycle in the heat engine. Drawing on this analogy, we subsume these essential and often sophisticated driven processes under the term machinery of life. PMID:27146424

  6. Equilibrium and Orientation in Cephalopods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budelmann, Bernd-Ulrich

    1980-01-01

    Describes the structure of the equilibrium receptor system in cephalopods, comparing it to the vertebrate counterpart--the vestibular system. Relates the evolution of this complex system to the competition of cephalopods with fishes. (CS)

  7. Equilibrium Constants You Can Smell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Michael; Buckley, Amy

    1996-01-01

    Presents a simple experiment involving the sense of smell that students can accomplish during a lecture. Illustrates the important concepts of equilibrium along with the acid/base properties of various ions. (JRH)

  8. Equilibrium ignition for ICF capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Lackner, K.S.; Colgate, S.A.; Johnson, N.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Menikoff, R.; Petschek, A.G.

    1993-12-31

    There are two fundamentally different approaches to igniting DT fuel in an ICF capsule which can be described as equilibrium and hot spot ignition. In both cases, a capsule which can be thought of as a pusher containing the DT fuel is imploded until the fuel reaches ignition conditions. In comparing high-gain ICF targets using cryogenic DT for a pusher with equilibrium ignition targets using high-Z pushers which contain the radiation. The authors point to the intrinsic advantages of the latter. Equilibrium or volume ignition sacrifices high gain for lower losses, lower ignition temperature, lower implosion velocity and lower sensitivity of the more robust capsule to small fluctuations and asymmetries in the drive system. The reduction in gain is about a factor of 2.5, which is small enough to make the more robust equilibrium ignition an attractive alternative.

  9. Absence of equilibrium chiral magnetic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubkov, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the (3 +1 )D equilibrium chiral magnetic effect (CME). We apply derivative expansion to the Wigner transform of the two-point Green function. This technique allows us to express the response of electric current to the external electromagnetic field strength through the momentum space topological invariant. We consider the wide class of the lattice regularizations of quantum field theory (that includes, in particular, the regularization with Wilson fermions) and also certain lattice models of solid state physics (including those of Dirac semimetals). It appears that in these models the mentioned topological invariant vanishes identically at nonzero chiral chemical potential. That means that the bulk equilibrium CME is absent in those systems.

  10. Equilibrium fluctuation theorems compatible with anomalous response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, L.; Curilef, S.

    2010-12-01

    Previously, we have derived a generalization of the canonical fluctuation relation between heat capacity and energy fluctuations C = β2langδU2rang, which is able to describe the existence of macrostates with negative heat capacities C < 0. In this work, we extend our previous results for an equilibrium situation with several control parameters to account for the existence of states with anomalous values in other response functions. Our analysis leads to the derivation of three different equilibrium fluctuation theorems: the fundamental and the complementary fluctuation theorems, which represent the generalization of two fluctuation identities already obtained in previous works, and the associated fluctuation theorem, a result that has no counterpart in the framework of Boltzmann-Gibbs distributions. These results are applied to study the anomalous susceptibility of a ferromagnetic system, in particular, the case of the 2D Ising model.

  11. Edge equilibrium code for tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xujing; Drozdov, Vladimir V.

    2014-01-15

    The edge equilibrium code (EEC) described in this paper is developed for simulations of the near edge plasma using the finite element method. It solves the Grad-Shafranov equation in toroidal coordinate and uses adaptive grids aligned with magnetic field lines. Hermite finite elements are chosen for the numerical scheme. A fast Newton scheme which is the same as implemented in the equilibrium and stability code (ESC) is applied here to adjust the grids.

  12. Solution of mathematical programming formulations of subgame perfect equilibrium problems

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C.M.; Hurter, A.P.

    1992-02-12

    Mathematical programming models have been developed to represent imperfectly competitive (oligopolistic) market structures and the interdependencies of decision-making units in establishing prices and production levels. The solution of these models represents an economic equilibrium. A subgame perfect equilibrium formulation explicitly considers that each agent`s strategies depend on the current state of the system; the state depends solely on previous decisions made by the economic agents. The structure of an industry-wide model that is formulated as a subgame perfect equilibrium problem is a matrix of simultaneous mathematical programming problems, where the rows represent time periods and the columns represent agents. This paper formally defines the subgame perfect equilibrium problem that includes mathematical programs for agent decision problems, and it characterizes the feasible space in a way that is conducive to the solution of the problem. The existence of equilibrium solutions on convex subspaces of the feasible region is proved, and this set is shown to contain the subgame perfect equilibrium solutions. A procedure for computing equilibrium solutions and systematically searching the subspaces is illustrated by a numerical example.

  13. Good's Syndrome Accompanied by Agranulocytosis Following a Rapid Clinical Course.

    PubMed

    Okusu, Takahiro; Sato, Taiki; Ogata, Yoshitaka; Nagata, Shinpei; Kozumi, Kazuhiro; Kim, Sung-Ho; Yamamoto, Suguru; Yamayoshi, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Good's syndrome is an immunodeficiency disease involving thymoma accompanied by hypogammaglobulinemia. We encountered a case of Good's syndrome accompanied by agranulocytosis that followed a rapid clinical course. A 72-year-old man visited our hospital with a two-week history of a sore throat. Candida albicans was detected in the pharynx, and hypogammaglobulinemia was detected in addition to granulocytopenia. The patient subsequently developed septic shock and followed a rapid clinical course which ended in death. Good's syndrome with agranulocytosis was diagnosed at autopsy. Good's syndrome accompanied by agranulocytosis can follow a rapid clinical course and some cases remain asymptomatic until old age. Its prompt treatment is crucial. PMID:26935379

  14. Electron Systems Out of Equilibrium: Nonequilibrium Green's Function Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špička, Václav Velický, Bedřich Kalvová, Anděla

    2015-10-01

    This review deals with the state of the art and perspectives of description of non-equilibrium many body systems using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NGF) method. The basic aim is to describe time evolution of the many-body system from its initial state over its transient dynamics to its long time asymptotic evolution. First, we discuss basic aims of transport theories to motivate the introduction of the NGF techniques. Second, this article summarizes the present view on construction of the electron transport equations formulated within the NGF approach to non-equilibrium. We discuss incorporation of complex initial conditions to the NGF formalism, and the NGF reconstruction theorem, which serves as a tool to derive simplified kinetic equations. Three stages of evolution of the non-equilibrium, the first described by the full NGF description, the second by a Non-Markovian Generalized Master Equation and the third by a Markovian Master Equation will be related to each other.

  15. Shape characteristics of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fractal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Marc L.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2013-07-01

    It is often difficult in practice to discriminate between equilibrium and non-equilibrium nanoparticle or colloidal-particle clusters that form through aggregation in gas or solution phases. Scattering studies often permit the determination of an apparent fractal dimension, but both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters in three dimensions frequently have fractal dimensions near 2, so that it is often not possible to discriminate on the basis of this geometrical property. A survey of the anisotropy of a wide variety of polymeric structures (linear and ring random and self-avoiding random walks, percolation clusters, lattice animals, diffusion-limited aggregates, and Eden clusters) based on the principal components of both the radius of gyration and electric polarizability tensor indicates, perhaps counter-intuitively, that self-similar equilibrium clusters tend to be intrinsically anisotropic at all sizes, while non-equilibrium processes such as diffusion-limited aggregation or Eden growth tend to be isotropic in the large-mass limit, providing a potential means of discriminating these clusters experimentally if anisotropy could be determined along with the fractal dimension. Equilibrium polymer structures, such as flexible polymer chains, are normally self-similar due to the existence of only a single relevant length scale, and are thus anisotropic at all length scales, while non-equilibrium polymer structures that grow irreversibly in time eventually become isotropic if there is no difference in the average growth rates in different directions. There is apparently no proof of these general trends and little theoretical insight into what controls the universal anisotropy in equilibrium polymer structures of various kinds. This is an obvious topic of theoretical investigation, as well as a matter of practical interest. To address this general problem, we consider two experimentally accessible ratios, one between the hydrodynamic and gyration radii, the other

  16. Shape characteristics of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fractal clusters.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Marc L; Douglas, Jack F

    2013-07-28

    It is often difficult in practice to discriminate between equilibrium and non-equilibrium nanoparticle or colloidal-particle clusters that form through aggregation in gas or solution phases. Scattering studies often permit the determination of an apparent fractal dimension, but both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters in three dimensions frequently have fractal dimensions near 2, so that it is often not possible to discriminate on the basis of this geometrical property. A survey of the anisotropy of a wide variety of polymeric structures (linear and ring random and self-avoiding random walks, percolation clusters, lattice animals, diffusion-limited aggregates, and Eden clusters) based on the principal components of both the radius of gyration and electric polarizability tensor indicates, perhaps counter-intuitively, that self-similar equilibrium clusters tend to be intrinsically anisotropic at all sizes, while non-equilibrium processes such as diffusion-limited aggregation or Eden growth tend to be isotropic in the large-mass limit, providing a potential means of discriminating these clusters experimentally if anisotropy could be determined along with the fractal dimension. Equilibrium polymer structures, such as flexible polymer chains, are normally self-similar due to the existence of only a single relevant length scale, and are thus anisotropic at all length scales, while non-equilibrium polymer structures that grow irreversibly in time eventually become isotropic if there is no difference in the average growth rates in different directions. There is apparently no proof of these general trends and little theoretical insight into what controls the universal anisotropy in equilibrium polymer structures of various kinds. This is an obvious topic of theoretical investigation, as well as a matter of practical interest. To address this general problem, we consider two experimentally accessible ratios, one between the hydrodynamic and gyration radii, the other

  17. Typicality of Thermal Equilibrium and Thermalization in Isolated Macroscopic Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaki, Hal

    2016-06-01

    Based on the view that thermal equilibrium should be characterized through macroscopic observations, we develop a general theory about typicality of thermal equilibrium and the approach to thermal equilibrium in macroscopic quantum systems. We first formulate the notion that a pure state in an isolated quantum system represents thermal equilibrium. Then by assuming, or proving in certain classes of nontrivial models (including that of two bodies in thermal contact), large-deviation type bounds (which we call thermodynamic bounds) for the microcanonical ensemble, we prove that to represent thermal equilibrium is a typical property for pure states in the microcanonical energy shell. We believe that the typicality, along with the empirical success of statistical mechanics, provides a sound justification of equilibrium statistical mechanics. We also establish the approach to thermal equilibrium under two different assumptions; one is that the initial state has a moderate energy distribution, and the other is the energy eigenstate thermalization hypothesis.

  18. 29 CFR 575.5 - Supporting data to accompany application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... HARVESTING OF SHORT SEASON CROPS § 575.5 Supporting data to accompany application. Objective data, as... harvesting season.” The variety of each crop to be harvested must ordinarily be harvested within 4 weeks...

  19. 29 CFR 575.5 - Supporting data to accompany application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... HARVESTING OF SHORT SEASON CROPS § 575.5 Supporting data to accompany application. Objective data, as... harvesting season.” The variety of each crop to be harvested must ordinarily be harvested within 4 weeks...

  20. 29 CFR 575.5 - Supporting data to accompany application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... HARVESTING OF SHORT SEASON CROPS § 575.5 Supporting data to accompany application. Objective data, as... harvesting season.” The variety of each crop to be harvested must ordinarily be harvested within 4 weeks...

  1. Map accompanies a series of letters regarding modifications to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Map accompanies a series of letters regarding modifications to the Aurora shops written during the later portion of 1878. Aurora shop scale 50 - 1' - Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, Roundhouse & Shops, Broadway & Spring Streets, Aurora, Kane County, IL

  2. 7. DETAIL OF TYPICAL PURGE PANEL THAT ACCOMPANIES ASSEMBLED FAIRING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL OF TYPICAL PURGE PANEL THAT ACCOMPANIES ASSEMBLED FAIRING TO LAUNCH PAD - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Vehicle Support Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  3. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of finite-volume crystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degawa, Masashi

    Finite volume effects on equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of nano-crystallites are studied theoretically and compared to both experiment and simulation. When a system is isolated or its size is small compared to the correlation length, all equilibrium and close-to-equilibrium properties will depend on the system boundary condition. Specifically for solid nano-crystallites, their finite size introduces global curvature to the system, which alters its equilibrium properties compared to the thermodynamic limit. Also such global curvature leads to capillary-induced morphology changes of the surface. Interesting dynamics can arise when the crystallite is supported on a substrate, with crossovers of the dominant driving force from the capillary force and crystallite-substrate interactions. To address these questions, we introduce thermodynamic functions for the boundary conditions, which can be derived from microscopic models. For nano-crystallites, the boundary is the surface (including interfaces), the thermodynamic description is based on the steps that define the shape of the surface, and the underlying microscopic model includes kinks. The global curvature of the surface introduces metastable states with different shapes governed by a constant of integration of the extra boundary condition, which we call the shape parameter c. The discrete height of the steps introduces transition states in between the metastable states, and the lowest energy accessible structure (energy barrier less 10k BT) as a function of the volume has been determined. The dynamics of nano-crystallites as they relax from a non-equilibrium structure is described quantitatively in terms of the motion of steps in both capillary-induced and interface-boundary-induced regimes. The step-edge fluctuations of the top facet are also influenced by global curvature and volume conservation and the effect yields different dynamic scaling exponents from a pure 1D system. Theoretical results are

  4. Statistical approach to partial equilibrium analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yougui; Stanley, H. E.

    2009-04-01

    A statistical approach to market equilibrium and efficiency analysis is proposed in this paper. One factor that governs the exchange decisions of traders in a market, named willingness price, is highlighted and constitutes the whole theory. The supply and demand functions are formulated as the distributions of corresponding willing exchange over the willingness price. The laws of supply and demand can be derived directly from these distributions. The characteristics of excess demand function are analyzed and the necessary conditions for the existence and uniqueness of equilibrium point of the market are specified. The rationing rates of buyers and sellers are introduced to describe the ratio of realized exchange to willing exchange, and their dependence on the market price is studied in the cases of shortage and surplus. The realized market surplus, which is the criterion of market efficiency, can be written as a function of the distributions of willing exchange and the rationing rates. With this approach we can strictly prove that a market is efficient in the state of equilibrium.

  5. Electron-positron pair equilibrium in strongly magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, A.K.

    1984-11-01

    Steady states of thermal electron-positron pair plasmas at mildly relativistic temperatures and in strong magnetic fields are investigated. The pair density in steady-state equilibrium, where pair production balances annihilation, is found as a function of temperature, magnetic field strength and source size, by a numerical calculation which includes pair production attenuation and Compton scattering of the photons. It is found that there is a maximum pair density for each value of temperature and field strength, and also a source size above which optically thin equilibrium states do not exist. (ESA)

  6. The Approach to Equilibrium: Detailed Balance and the Master Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Millard H.; Hall, Gregory E.; Dagdigian, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    The approach to the equilibrium (Boltzmann) distribution of populations of internal states of a molecule is governed by inelastic collisions in the gas phase and with surfaces. The set of differential equations governing the time evolution of the internal state populations is commonly called the master equation. An analytic solution to the master…

  7. General equilibrium of an ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Tschirhart, J

    2000-03-01

    Ecosystems and economies are inextricably linked: ecosystem models and economic models are not linked. Consequently, using either type of model to design policies for preserving ecosystems or improving economic performance omits important information. Improved policies would follow from a model that links the systems and accounts for the mutual feedbacks by recognizing how key ecosystem variables influence key economic variables, and vice versa. Because general equilibrium economic models already are widely used for policy making, the approach used here is to develop a general equilibrium ecosystem model which captures salient biological functions and which can be integrated with extant economic models. In the ecosystem model, each organism is assumed to be a net energy maximizer that must exert energy to capture biomass from other organisms. The exerted energies are the "prices" that are paid to biomass, and each organism takes the prices as signals over which it has no control. The maximization problem yields the organism's demand for and supply of biomass to other organisms as functions of the prices. The demands and supplies for each biomass are aggregated over all organisms in each species which establishes biomass markets wherein biomass prices are determined. A short-run equilibrium is established when all organisms are maximizing and demand equals supply in every biomass market. If a species exhibits positive (negative) net energy in equilibrium, its population increases (decreases) and a new equilibrium follows. The demand and supply forces in the biomass markets drive each species toward zero stored energy and a long-run equilibrium. Population adjustments are not based on typical Lotka-Volterra differential equations in which one entire population adjusts to another entire population thereby masking organism behavior; instead, individual organism behavior is central to population adjustments. Numerical simulations use a marine food web in Alaska to

  8. Local thermodynamic equilibrium for globally disequilibrium open systems under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikov, Yury

    2016-04-01

    Predictive modeling of far and near equilibrium processes is essential for understanding of patterns formation and for quantifying of natural processes that are never in global equilibrium. Methods of both equilibrium and non-equilibrium thermodynamics are needed and have to be combined. For example, predicting temperature evolution due to heat conduction requires simultaneous use of equilibrium relationship between internal energy and temperature via heat capacity (the caloric equation of state) and disequilibrium relationship between heat flux and temperature gradient. Similarly, modeling of rocks deforming under stress, reactions in system open for the porous fluid flow, or kinetic overstepping of the equilibrium reaction boundary necessarily needs both equilibrium and disequilibrium material properties measured under fundamentally different laboratory conditions. Classical irreversible thermodynamics (CIT) is the well-developed discipline providing the working recipes for the combined application of mutually exclusive experimental data such as density and chemical potential at rest under constant pressure and temperature and viscosity of the flow under stress. Several examples will be presented.

  9. Adiabatic evolution of plasma equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Grad, H.; Hu, P. N.; Stevens, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    A new theory of plasma equilibrium is introduced in which adiabatic constraints are specified. This leads to a mathematically nonstandard structure, as compared to the usual equilibrium theory, in which prescription of pressure and current profiles leads to an elliptic partial differential equation. Topologically complex configurations require further generalization of the concept of adiabaticity to allow irreversible mixing of plasma and magnetic flux among islands. Matching conditions across a boundary layer at the separatrix are obtained from appropriate conservation laws. Applications are made to configurations with planned islands (as in Doublet) and accidental islands (as in Tokamaks). Two-dimensional, axially symmetric, helically symmetric, and closed line equilibria are included. PMID:16578729

  10. Phase coexistence far from equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, Ronald

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of simple far-from-equilibrium systems exhibiting phase separation leads to the conclusion that phase coexistence is not well defined in this context. This is because the properties of the coexisting nonequilibrium systems depend on how they are placed in contact, as verified in the driven lattice gas with attractive interactions, and in the two-temperature lattice gas, under (a) weak global exchange between uniform systems, and (b) phase-separated (nonuniform) systems. Thus, far from equilibrium, the notions of universality of phase coexistence (i.e., independence of how systems exchange particles and/or energy), and of phases with intrinsic properties (independent of their environment) are lost.

  11. Chemical Principles Revisited: Using the Equilibrium Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the concept of equilibrium in chemical systems, particularly in relation to predicting the position of equilibrium, predicting spontaneity of a reaction, quantitative applications of the equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, determination of the solubility product constant, common-ion effect, and dissolution of precipitates.…

  12. Steady State Properties of Lock-On Current Filaments in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambour, K.; Kang, Samsoo; Myles, Charles W.; Hjalmarson, Harold P.

    1999-10-01

    Collective impact ionization has been used by Hjalmarson et al.(H. Hjalmarson, F. Zutavern, G. Loubriel, A. Baca, and D. Wake, Sandia Report SAND93-3972(1996).) to explain the lock-on effect, observed in optically activated, semi-insulating GaAs switches. We have used this theory to study some of the steady state properties of the lock-on current filaments which accompany this effect. In steady state, the energy gained from the electric field is exactly compensated for by the the energy lost due to the phonon cooling of the hot carriers. In the simplest approximation, the carrier distribution approaches a quasi-equilibrium Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. In this presentation we report preliminary results on the validity of this quasi-equilibrium approximation. We find that this approximation leads to a filament carrier density which is much lower than the high density needed to achieve a quasi-equilibrium distribution. Further work is in progress.

  13. Strongly Non-equilibrium Dynamics of Nanochannel Confined DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, Walter

    Nanoconfined DNA exhibits a wide-range of fascinating transient and steady-state non-equilibrium phenomena. Yet, while experiment, simulation and scaling analytics are converging on a comprehensive picture regarding the equilibrium behavior of nanochannel confined DNA, non-equilibrium behavior remains largely unexplored. In particular, while the DNA extension along the nanochannel is the key observable in equilibrium experiments, in the non-equilibrium case it is necessary to measure and model not just the extension but the molecule's full time-dependent one-dimensional concentration profile. Here, we apply controlled compressive forces to a nanochannel confined molecule via a nanodozer assay, whereby an optically trapped bead is slid down the channel at a constant speed. Upon contact with the molecule, a propagating concentration ``shockwave'' develops near the bead and the molecule is dynamically compressed. This experiment, a single-molecule implementation of a macroscopic cylinder-piston apparatus, can be used to observe the molecule response over a range of forcings and benchmark theoretical description of non-equilibrium behavior. We show that the dynamic concentration profiles, including both transient and steady-state response, can be modelled via a partial differential evolution equation combining nonlinear diffusion and convection. Lastly, we present preliminary results for dynamic compression of multiple confined molecules to explore regimes of segregation and mixing for multiple chains in confinement.

  14. A Computationally Efficient Algorithm for Aerosol Phase Equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Peters, Len K.; Wexler, Anthony S.

    2004-10-04

    Three-dimensional models of atmospheric inorganic aerosols need an accurate yet computationally efficient thermodynamic module that is repeatedly used to compute internal aerosol phase state equilibrium. In this paper, we describe the development and evaluation of a computationally efficient numerical solver called MESA (Multicomponent Equilibrium Solver for Aerosols). The unique formulation of MESA allows iteration of all the equilibrium equations simultaneously while maintaining overall mass conservation and electroneutrality in both the solid and liquid phases. MESA is unconditionally stable, shows robust convergence, and typically requires only 10 to 20 single-level iterations (where all activity coefficients and aerosol water content are updated) per internal aerosol phase equilibrium calculation. Accuracy of MESA is comparable to that of the highly accurate Aerosol Inorganics Model (AIM), which uses a rigorous Gibbs free energy minimization approach. Performance evaluation will be presented for a number of complex multicomponent mixtures commonly found in urban and marine tropospheric aerosols.

  15. Far-from-equilibrium measurements of thermodynamic length

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Edward H.; Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-11-05

    Thermodynamic length is a path function that generalizes the notion of length to the surface of thermodynamic states. Here, we show how to measure thermodynamic length in far-from-equilibrium experiments using the work fluctuation relations. For these microscopic systems, it proves necessary to define the thermodynamic length in terms of the Fisher information. Consequently, the thermodynamic length can be directly related to the magnitude of fluctuations about equilibrium. The work fluctuation relations link the work and the free energy change during an external perturbation on a system. We use this result to determine equilibrium averages at intermediate points of the protocol in which the system is out-of-equilibrium. This allows us to extend Bennett's method to determine the potential of mean force, as well as the thermodynamic length, in single molecule experiments.

  16. On the approach to thermal equilibrium of macroscopic quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Sheldon; Tumulka, Roderich

    2011-03-24

    In joint work with J. L. Lebowitz, C. Mastrodonato, and N. Zanghi[2, 3, 4], we considered an isolated, macroscopic quantum system. Let H be a micro-canonical 'energy shell', i.e., a subspace of the system's Hilbert space spanned by the (finitely) many energy eigenstates with energies between E and E+{delta}E. The thermal equilibrium macro-state at energy E corresponds to a subspace H{sub eq} of H such that dimHeq/dimH is close to 1. We say that a system with state vector {psi}{epsilon}H is in thermal equilibrium if {psi} is 'close' to H{sub eq}. We argue that for 'typical' Hamiltonians, all initial state vectors {psi}{sub 0} evolve in such a way that {psi}{sub t} is in thermal equilibrium for most times t. This is closely related to von Neumann's quantum ergodic theorem of 1929.

  17. DYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM IN THERAPEUTIC SITUATIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CARROLL, EDWARD J.

    THE CONCEPT OF DYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM IS USED TO EXAMINE THE OCCURRENCE OF CHANGE IN A THERAPEUTIC INTERVIEW AND TO PROPOSE A THEORY OF THERAPY. BY ANALYZING THE WORKINGS OF THE PSYCHOSOCIAL SYSTEM THROUGH THE GENERAL SYSTEMS THEORY, IT IS POSSIBLE TO SEE HOW CHANGE OCCURS IN AN INDIVIDUAL FAMILY OR COMMUNITY. APPLIED TO A FAMILY INTERVIEW, THE MODEL…

  18. Magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1991-07-01

    Self-consistent magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure is obtained by employing an iterative metric method for solving the inverse equilibrium equation in an optimal flux coordinate system. A method of determining plasma parallel and perpendicular pressures from either analytic particle distribution or particle distribution measured along the satellite's path is presented. The numerical results of axisymmetric magnetospheric equilibrium including the effects of finite beta, pressure anisotropy, and boundary conditions are presented for a bi-Maxwellian particle distribution. For the isotropic pressure cases, the finite beta effect produces an outward expansion of the constant magnetic flux surfaces in relation to the dipole field lines, and along the magnetic field the toroidal ring current is maximum at the magnetic equator. The effect of pressure anisotropy is found to further expand the flux surfaces outward. Along the magnetic field lines the westward ring current can be peak away from the equator due to an eastward current contribution resulting from pressure anisotropy. As pressure anisotropy increases, the peak westward current can become more singular. The outer boundary flux surface has significant effect on the magnetospheric equilibrium. For the outer flux boundary resembling dayside compressed flux surface due to solar wind pressure, the deformation of the magnetic field can be quite different from that for the outer flux boundary resembling the tail-like surface. 23 refs., 17 figs.

  19. Understanding Thermal Equilibrium through Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathare, Shirish; Huli, Saurabhee; Nachane, Madhura; Ladage, Savita; Pradhan, Hemachandra

    2015-01-01

    Thermal equilibrium is a basic concept in thermodynamics. In India, this concept is generally introduced at the first year of undergraduate education in physics and chemistry. In our earlier studies (Pathare and Pradhan 2011 "Proc. episteme-4 Int. Conf. to Review Research on Science Technology and Mathematics Education" pp 169-72) we…

  20. An investigation of equilibrium concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prozan, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A different approach to modeling of the thermochemistry of rocket engine combustion phenomena is presented. The methodology described is based on the hypothesis of a new variational principle applicable to compressible fluid mechanics. This hypothesis is extended to treat the thermochemical behavior of a reacting (equilibrium) gas in an open system.

  1. Equilibrium and shot noise in mesoscopic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.

    1994-10-01

    Within the last decade, there has been a resurgence of interest in the study of noise in Mesoscopic devices, both experimentally and theoretically. Noise in solid state devices can have different origins: there is 1/f noise, which is believed to arise from fluctuations in the resistance of the sample due to the motion of impurities. On top of this contribution is a frequency independent component associated with the stochastic nature of electron transport, which will be the focus of this paper. If the sample considered is small enough that dephasing and inelastic effects can be neglected, equilibrium (thermal) and excess noise can be completely described in terms of the elastic scattering properties of the sample. As mentioned above, noise arises as a consequence of random processes governing the transport of electrons. Here, there are two sources of randomness: first, electrons incident on the sample occupy a given energy state with a probability given by the Fermi-Dirac distribution function. Secondly, electrons can be transmitted across the sample or reflected in the same reservoir where they came from with a probability given by the quantum mechanical transmission/reflection coefficients. Equilibrium noise refers to the case where no bias voltage is applied between the leads connected to the sample, where thermal agitation alone allows the electrons close to the Fermi level to tunnel through the sample. In general, equilibrium noise is related to the conductance of the sample via the Johnson-Nyquist formula. In the presence of a bias, in the classical regime, one expects to recover the full shot noise < {Delta}{sup 2}I >= 2I{Delta}{mu} as was observed a long time ago in vacuum diodes. In the Mesoscopic regime, however, excess noise is reduced below the shot noise level. The author introduces a more intuitive picture, where the current passing through the device is a superposition of pulses, or electron wave packets, which can be transmitted or reflected.

  2. Surgical management of complete penile duplication accompanied by multiple anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Irfan; Turk, Erdal; Ucan, A. Basak; Yayla, Derya; Itirli, Gulcin; Ercal, Derya

    2014-01-01

    Diphallus (penile duplication) is very rare and seen once every 5.5 million births. It can be isolated, but is usually accompanied by other congenital anomalies. Previous studies have reported many concurrent anomalies, such as bladder extrophy, cloacal extrophy, duplicated bladder, scrotal abnormalities, hypospadias, separated symphysis pubis, intestinal anomalies and imperforate anus; no penile duplication case accompanied by omphalocele has been reported. We present the surgical management of a patient with multiple anomalies, including complete penile duplication, hypo-gastric omphalocele and extrophic rectal duplication. PMID:25408817

  3. Selective Plasma Exchange for Critically Ill Patients Accompanied With Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Hajime; Fukuda, Hirokazu; Okuyama, Manabu; Igarashi, Toshiko

    2016-08-01

    Selective plasma exchange is a blood purification therapy in which simple plasma exchange is performed using a selective membrane plasma separator (pore size of 0.03 µm). Seven critically ill patients accompanied with thrombocytopenia were treated with selective plasma exchange using fresh frozen plasma. The total bilirubin levels and prothrombin time international normalized ratios decreased significantly after treatment. The total protein, albumin, and fibrinogen levels increased significantly after treatment. Selective plasma exchange may be a useful blood purification therapy for removing causal substances and retaining coagulation factors in patients accompanied with thrombocytopenia. PMID:27523072

  4. Nursing Assistant: Handbook to Accompany VESL Vocabulary Cards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shay, Gail; Lenhart, Debra

    This manual is one of four self-contained components of a larger handbook designed to assist secondary and postsecondary instructors and support staff in meeting the needs of limited-English-proficiency (LEP) students in vocational training programs. Together with an accompanying set of vocational English as a second language (VESL) vocabulary…

  5. Finance of California Community Colleges. Workbook to Accompany the Videotape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of California Community Coll. Administrators.

    Designed to accompany the videotape, "Finance of California Community Colleges," this workbook contains information, worksheets, and forms designed to help viewers assimilate the videotape's presentations on the history and future of California community college finance, and on income and expenditures in community college budgets. First, a summary…

  6. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis accompanying neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kon, Tomoya; Nishijima, Haruo; Haga, Rie; Funamizu, Yukihisa; Ueno, Tatsuya; Arai, Akira; Suzuki, Chieko; Nunomura, Jin-ichi; Baba, Masayuki; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2015-10-15

    We report a case of idiopathic cerebral hypertrophic pachymeningitis accompanying neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. No other identifiable cause of pachymeningitis was detected. Corticosteroid therapy was effective for both diseases. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis is closely related to autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. This case supports the hypothesis that hypertrophic pachymeningitis can be a rare comorbidity of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder. PMID:26439957

  7. Computer Literacy: Handbook to Accompany VESL Vocabulary Cards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siefer, Nancy; Lenhart, Debra

    This manual is one of four self-contained components of a larger handbook designed to assist secondary and postsecondary instructors and support staff in meeting the needs of limited-English-proficiency (LEP) students in vocational training programs. Together with an accompanying set of vocational English as a second language (VESL) vocabulary…

  8. Automotive Mechanics: Handbook to Accompany VESL Vocabulary Cards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shay, Gail; Lenhart, Debra

    This manual is one of four self-contained components of a larger handbook designed to assist secondary and postsecondary instructors and support staff in meeting the needs of limited-English-proficiency (LEP) students in vocational training programs. Together with an accompanying set of vocational English as a second language (VESL) vocabulary…

  9. Food Service: Handbook to Accompany VESL Vocabulary Cards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Nancy; Lenhart, Debra

    This manual is one of four self-contained components of a larger handbook designed to assist secondary and postsecondary instructors and support staff in meeting the needs of limited-English-proficiency (LEP) students in vocational training programs. Together with an accompanying set of vocational English as a second language (VESL) vocabulary…

  10. 16 CFR 1500.125 - Labeling requirements for accompanying literature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling requirements for accompanying literature. 1500.125 Section 1500.125 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.125 Labeling requirements...

  11. 9 CFR 93.208 - Articles accompanying poultry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Articles accompanying poultry. 93.208... AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS;...

  12. 9 CFR 93.208 - Articles accompanying poultry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Articles accompanying poultry. 93.208... AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS;...

  13. 9 CFR 93.208 - Articles accompanying poultry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Articles accompanying poultry. 93.208... AGRICULTURE EXPORTATION AND IMPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS;...

  14. 19 CFR 12.6 - Affidavits required to accompany entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Affidavits required to accompany entry. 12.6 Section 12.6 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... restitution payments of the type referred to in Executive Order No. 11851, dated April 10, 1975 (40 FR...

  15. 19 CFR 12.6 - Affidavits required to accompany entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Affidavits required to accompany entry. 12.6 Section 12.6 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... restitution payments of the type referred to in Executive Order No. 11851, dated April 10, 1975 (40 FR...

  16. 19 CFR 12.6 - Affidavits required to accompany entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Affidavits required to accompany entry. 12.6 Section 12.6 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... restitution payments of the type referred to in Executive Order No. 11851, dated April 10, 1975 (40 FR...

  17. 19 CFR 12.6 - Affidavits required to accompany entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Affidavits required to accompany entry. 12.6 Section 12.6 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... restitution payments of the type referred to in Executive Order No. 11851, dated April 10, 1975 (40 FR...

  18. [Rhinoscleroma disease accompanied with laryngotracheal stenosis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Wang, Zhongqiao; Zheng, Yan

    2015-11-01

    Rhinoscleroma disease accompanied with laryngotracheal stenosis as a main clinical manifestation is seldom. Here one case is reported. At the beginning, the patient had pharyngalgia and his swallowing was not smooth. After that, he had difficulty in breathing. Surgical therapy, antibiotics treatment and nutritional support were performed. The patient was cured. PMID:26930922

  19. Bias in Examination Test Banks that Accompany Cost Accounting Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clute, Ronald C.; McGrail, George R.

    1989-01-01

    Eight text banks that accompany cost accounting textbooks were evaluated for the presence of bias in the distribution of correct responses. All but one were found to have considerable bias, and three of eight were found to have significant choice bias. (SK)

  20. 9 CFR 93.314 - Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Horses, certification, and... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.314 Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment. (a) Horses offered for importation from any part of the world...

  1. 9 CFR 93.314 - Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Horses, certification, and... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.314 Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment. (a) Horses offered for importation from any part of the world...

  2. 9 CFR 93.314 - Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Horses, certification, and... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.314 Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment. (a) Horses offered for importation from any part of the world...

  3. 9 CFR 93.314 - Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Horses, certification, and... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.314 Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment. (a) Horses offered for importation from any part of the world...

  4. 9 CFR 93.314 - Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Horses, certification, and... PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Horses § 93.314 Horses, certification, and accompanying equipment. (a) Horses offered for importation from any part of the world...

  5. Alaska Native Land Claims. Teacher's Guide to Accompany Textbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Lydia L.

    Designed to be used in conjunction with a student workbook accompanying the secondary textbook, "Alaska Native Land Claims", this teacher's guide focuses upon specified learner outcomes and presents a variety of approaches to achieve them. Like the student workbook, this guide presents 39 individual lessons which parallel the subtitles of the 9…

  6. Robust Gaussian entanglement with a macroscopic oscillator at thermal equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Radim; Kupčík, Vojtěch

    2013-06-01

    We propose a feasible Gaussian version of the Schrödinger-cat state. We consider it as a robust Gaussian state of an oscillator prepared in a low-energy Gaussian quantum state entangled with another oscillator which was initially in a quantum state at thermal equilibrium with an arbitrary large energy (macroscopic oscillator). To generate it, we suggest two-mode squeezing as the best candidate. We test that the Gaussian version of the Schrödinger-cat state can be also used to remotely prepare a squeezed state of the macroscopic oscillator.

  7. Phonon Mapping in Flowing Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruff, J. P. C.

    2015-03-01

    When a material conducts heat, a modification of the phonon population occurs. The equilibrium Bose-Einstein distribution is perturbed towards flowing-equilibrium, for which the distribution function is not analytically known. Here I argue that the altered phonon population can be efficiently mapped over broad regions of reciprocal space, via diffuse x-ray scattering or time-of-flight neutron scattering, while a thermal gradient is applied across a single crystal sample. When compared to traditional transport measurements, this technique offers a superior, information-rich new perspective on lattice thermal conductivity, wherein the band and momentum dependences of the phonon thermal current are directly resolved. The proposed method is benchmarked using x-ray thermal diffuse scattering measurements of single crystal diamond under transport conditions. CHESS is supported by the NSF & NIH/NIGMS via NSF Award DMR-1332208.

  8. Connective stability of competitive equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to derive necessary and sufficient conditions for the connective stability of nonlinear matrix systems described by the equation x-dot = A(t, x) x, where the matrix A(t, x) has time-varying nonlinear elements. The results obtained can be used to study the stability of competitive equilibrium in fields as diverse as economics and engineering, model ecosystems, and the arms race.-

  9. Punctuated equilibrium comes of age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Stephan Jay; Eldredge, Niles

    1993-11-01

    The intense controversies that surrounded the youth of punctuated equilibrium have helped it mature to a useful extension of evolutionary theory. As a complement to phyletic gradualism, its most important implications remain the recognition of stasis as a meaningful and predominant pattern within the history of species, and in the recasting of macroevolution as the differential success of certain species (and their descendants) within clades.

  10. No smile like another: adult age differences in identifying emotions that accompany smiles

    PubMed Central

    Riediger, Michaela; Studtmann, Markus; Westphal, Andrea; Rauers, Antje; Weber, Hannelore

    2014-01-01

    People smile in various emotional contexts, for example, when they are amused or angry or simply being polite. We investigated whether younger and older adults differ in how well they are able to identify the emotional experiences accompanying smile expressions, and whether the age of the smiling person plays a role in this respect. With this aim, we produced 80 video episodes of three types of smile expressions: positive-affect smiles had been spontaneously displayed by target persons as they were watching amusing film clips and cartoons. Negative-affect smiles had been displayed spontaneously by target persons during an interaction in which they were being unfairly accused. Affectively neutral smiles were posed upon request. Differences in the accompanying emotional experiences were validated by target persons' self-reports. These smile videos served as experimental stimuli in two studies with younger and older adult participants. In Study 1, older participants were less likely to attribute positive emotions to smiles, and more likely to assume that a smile was posed. Furthermore, younger participants were more accurate than older adults at identifying emotional experiences accompanying smiles. In Study 2, both younger and older participants attributed positive emotions more frequently to smiles shown by older as compared to younger target persons, but older participants did so less frequently than younger participants. Again, younger participants were more accurate than older participants in identifying emotional experiences accompanying smiles, but this effect was attenuated for older target persons. Older participants could better identify the emotional state accompanying smiles shown by older than by younger target persons. Taken together, these findings indicate that there is an age-related decline in the ability to decipher the emotional meaning of smiles presented without context, which, however, is attenuated when the smiling person is also an older adult

  11. Explicit Integration of Extremely Stiff Reaction Networks: Partial Equilibrium Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, Mike W; Billings, J. J.; Hix, William Raphael

    2013-01-01

    In two preceding papers [1,2] we have shown that, when reaction networks are well removed from equilibrium, explicit asymptotic and quasi-steady-state approximations can give algebraically stabilized integration schemes that rival standard implicit methods in accuracy and speed for extremely stiff systems. However, we also showed that these explicit methods remain accurate but are no longer competitive in speed as the network approaches equilibrium. In this paper we analyze this failure and show that it is associated with the presence of fast equilibration timescales that neither asymptotic nor quasi-steady-state approximations are able to remove efficiently from the numerical integration. Based on this understanding, we develop a partial equilibrium method to deal effectively with the new partial equilibrium methods, give an integration scheme that plausibly can deal with the stiffest networks, even in the approach to equilibrium, with accuracy and speed competitive with that of implicit methods. Thus we demonstrate that algebraically stabilized explicit methods may offer alternatives to implicit integration of even extremely stiff systems, and that these methods may permit integration of much larger networks than have been feasible previously in a variety of fields.

  12. Novel mapping in non-equilibrium stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heseltine, James; Kim, Eun-jin

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the time-evolution of a non-equilibrium system in view of the change in information and provide a novel mapping relation which quantifies the change in information far from equilibrium and the proximity of a non-equilibrium state to the attractor. Specifically, we utilize a nonlinear stochastic model where the stochastic noise plays the role of incoherent regulation of the dynamical variable x and analytically compute the rate of change in information (information velocity) from the time-dependent probability distribution function. From this, we quantify the total change in information in terms of information length { L } and the associated action { J }, where { L } represents the distance that the system travels in the fluctuation-based, statistical metric space parameterized by time. As the initial probability density function’s mean position (μ) is decreased from the final equilibrium value {μ }* (the carrying capacity), { L } and { J } increase monotonically with interesting power-law mapping relations. In comparison, as μ is increased from {μ }*,{ L } and { J } increase slowly until they level off to a constant value. This manifests the proximity of the state to the attractor caused by a strong correlation for large μ through large fluctuations. Our proposed mapping relation provides a new way of understanding the progression of the complexity in non-equilibrium system in view of information change and the structure of underlying attractor.

  13. Temperature of systems out of thermodynamic equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garden, J.-L.; Richard, J.; Guillou, H.

    2008-07-01

    Two phenomenological approaches are currently used in the study of the vitreous state. One is based on the concept of fictive temperature introduced by Tool [J. Res. Natl. Bur. Stand. 34, 199 (1945)] and recently revisited by Nieuwenhuizen [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 5580 (1998)]. The other is based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes initiated by De Donder at the beginning of the last century [L'Affinité (Gauthier-Villars, Paris, 1927)] and recently used by Möller et al. for a thorough study of the glass transition [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 094505 (2006)]. This latter approach leads to the possibility of describing the glass transition by means of the freezing-in of one or more order parameters connected to the internal structural degrees of freedom involved in the vitrification process. In this paper, the equivalence of the two preceding approaches is demonstrated, not only for glasses but in a very general way for any system undergoing an irreversible transformation. This equivalence allows the definition of an effective temperature for all systems departed from equilibrium generating a positive amount of entropy. In fact, the initial fictive temperature concept of Tool leads to the generalization of the notion of temperature for systems out of thermodynamic equilibrium, for which glasses are just particular cases.

  14. Gyrokinetic Statistical Absolute Equilibrium and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Zhou Zhu and Gregory W. Hammett

    2011-01-10

    A paradigm based on the absolute equilibrium of Galerkin-truncated inviscid systems to aid in understanding turbulence [T.-D. Lee, "On some statistical properties of hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical fields," Q. Appl. Math. 10, 69 (1952)] is taken to study gyrokinetic plasma turbulence: A finite set of Fourier modes of the collisionless gyrokinetic equations are kept and the statistical equilibria are calculated; possible implications for plasma turbulence in various situations are discussed. For the case of two spatial and one velocity dimension, in the calculation with discretization also of velocity v with N grid points (where N + 1 quantities are conserved, corresponding to an energy invariant and N entropy-related invariants), the negative temperature states, corresponding to the condensation of the generalized energy into the lowest modes, are found. This indicates a generic feature of inverse energy cascade. Comparisons are made with some classical results, such as those of Charney-Hasegawa-Mima in the cold-ion limit. There is a universal shape for statistical equilibrium of gyrokinetics in three spatial and two velocity dimensions with just one conserved quantity. Possible physical relevance to turbulence, such as ITG zonal flows, and to a critical balance hypothesis are also discussed.

  15. Equilibrium stellar systems with spindle singularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Stuart L.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    1992-01-01

    Equilibrium sequences of axisymmetric Newtonian clusters that tend toward singular states are constructed. The distribution functions are chosen to be of the form f = f(E, Jz). The numerical method then determines the density and gravitational potential self-consistently to satisfy Poisson's equation. For the prolate models, spindle singularities arise from the depletion of angular momentum near the symmetry axis. While the resulting density enhancement is confined to the region near the axis, the influence of the spindle extends much further out through its tidal gravitational field. Centrally condensed prolate clusters may contain strong-field regions even though the spindle mass is small and the mean cluster eccentricity is not extreme. While the calculations performed here are entirely Newtonian, the issue of singularities is an important topic in general relativity. Equilibrium solutions for relativistic star clusters can provide a testing ground for exploring this issue. The methods used in this paper for building nonspherical clusters can be extended to relativistic systems.

  16. Torque equilibrium attitude control for Skylab reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, J. R.; Kennel, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    All the available torque equilibrium attitudes (most were useless from the standpoint of lack of electrical power) and the equilibrium seeking method are presented, as well as the actual successful application during the 3 weeks prior to Skylab reentry.

  17. Equilibrium partitioning of Ficoll in composite hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Kosto, Kimberly B; Panuganti, Swapna; Deen, William M

    2004-09-15

    Equilibrium partition coefficients (phi, the concentration in the gel divided by that in free solution) of fluorescein-labeled Ficolls in pure agarose and agarose-dextran composite gels were measured as a function of gel composition and Ficoll size. The four narrow fractions of Ficoll, a spherical polysaccharide, had Stokes-Einstein radii ranging from 2.7 to 5.9 nm. Gels with agarose volume fractions of 0.040 and 0.080 were studied, with dextran volume fractions (calculated as if the chain were a long fiber) up to 0.011. As expected, phi generally decreased as the Ficoll size increased (for a given gel composition) or as the amount of dextran incorporated into the gel increased (for a given agarose concentration and Ficoll size). The decrease in phi that accompanied dextran addition was predicted well by an excluded volume theory in which agarose and dextran were both treated as rigid, straight, randomly positioned and oriented fibers. Modeling dextran as a spherical coil within a fibrous agarose gel produced much less accurate predictions. The diffusional permeabilities of these gels were assessed by combining the current partitioning data with relative diffusivities (Kd, the diffusivity in the gel divided by that in free solution) reported previously. The values of phi Kd for a synthetic gel with 8.0% agarose and 1.1% dextran (by volume) were found to be very similar to those for the glomerular basement membrane, a physiologically important material which also has a total solids content of approximately 10%. PMID:15341852

  18. Transition from thermal to turbulent equilibrium with a resulting electromagnetic spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Gaelzer, R.; Pavan, J.

    2014-01-15

    A recent paper [Ziebell et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 010701 (2014)] discusses a new type of radiation emission process for plasmas in a state of quasi-equilibrium between the particles and enhanced Langmuir turbulence. Such a system may be an example of the so-called “turbulent quasi-equilibrium.” In the present paper, it is shown on the basis of electromagnetic weak turbulence theory that an initial thermal equilibrium state (i.e., only electrostatic fluctuations and Maxwellian particle distributions) transitions toward the turbulent quasi-equilibrium state with enhanced electromagnetic radiation spectrum, thus demonstrating that the turbulent quasi-equilibrium discussed in the above paper correctly describes the weakly turbulent plasma dynamically interacting with electromagnetic fluctuations, while maintaining a dynamical steady-state in the average sense.

  19. Modelling spectral properties of non-equilibrium atomic hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ammando, G.; Pietanza, L. D.; Colonna, G.; Longo, S.; Capitelli, M.

    2010-02-01

    A model to predict the emissivity and absorption coefficient of atomic hydrogen plasma is presented in detail. Non-equilibrium plasma is studied through coupling of the model with a collisional-radiative code for the excited states population as well as with the Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function.

  20. Entropy production determination of the ambipolar solution nearest equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Catto, P.J.; Myra, J.R.

    1984-10-01

    A general derivation of the steady state entropy production equation is presented for a confined plasma which loses particles and energy via radial transport and, perhaps, end loss. The resulting equation is employed to determine which root or solution is closest to thermodynamic equilibrium when more than one self-consistent or ambipolar solution is possible.

  1. Quantum systems in a stationary environment out of thermal equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellomo, Bruno; Messina, Riccardo; Felbacq, Didier; Antezza, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    We discuss how the thermalization of an elementary quantum system is modified when the system is placed in an environment out of thermal equilibrium. To this aim we provide a detailed investigation of the dynamics of an atomic system placed close to a body of arbitrary geometry and dielectric permittivity, whose temperature TM is different from that of the surrounding walls TW. A suitable master equation for the general case of an N-level atom is first derived and then specialized to the cases of a two- and three-level atom. Transition rates and steady states are explicitly expressed as a function of the scattering matrices of the body and become both qualitatively and quantitatively different from the case of radiation at thermal equilibrium. Out of equilibrium, the system steady state depends on the system-body distance, on the geometry of the body, and on the interplay of all such parameters with the body optical resonances. While a two-level atom tends toward a thermal state, this is not the case already in the presence of three atomic levels. This peculiar behavior can be exploited, for example, to invert the populations ordering and to provide an efficient cooling mechanism for the internal state of the quantum system. We finally provide numerical studies and asymptotic expressions when the body is a slab of finite thickness. Our predictions can be relevant for a wide class of experimental configurations out of thermal equilibrium involving different physical realizations of two- or three-level systems.

  2. Unusual Appearance of an Osteochondral Lesion Accompanying Medial Meniscus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mine, Takatomo; Ihara, Koichiro; Kawamura, Hiroyuki; Date, Ryo; Chagawa, Kazuki

    2014-01-01

    An osteochondral lesion in the knee joint is caused by a focal traumatic osteochondral defect, osteochondritis dissecans, an isolated degenerative lesion, or diffuse degenerative disease. An osteochondral lesion with a cleft-like appearance accompanying medial meniscus injury is rare without trauma. We report the case of a 13-year-old boy who complained of right knee pain and swelling, with radiographic findings of an osteochondral defect. Arthroscopic inspection showed an osteochondral lesion in the medial condyle of the femur and tibial plateau accompanying a partial medial meniscus discoid tear. Partial meniscectomy was performed, and a microfracture procedure was carried out on the osteochondral defect. The patient was asymptomatic at 2 years' follow-up. This technique is a relatively easy, completely arthroscopic procedure that spares the bone and cartilage and has yielded a good clinical outcome in a skeletally immature patient who had an osteochondral lesion with a cleft-like appearance. PMID:24749028

  3. Rectal duplications accompanying rectovestibular fistula: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Pampal, Arzu; Ozbayoglu, Asli; Kaya, Cem; Pehlivan, Yildiz; Poyraz, Aylar; Ozen, I Onur; Percin, Ferda E; Demirogullari, Billur

    2013-08-01

    Rectal duplication (RD) cysts are rare congenital anomalies that can be diagnosed with the presence of another opening in the perineum. They seldom accompany anorectal malformations (ARM). Two cases of RD accompanying ARM at opposite ends of the phenotypic spectrum, are described. A 3-month-old baby and a 2-year-old girl with ARM were scheduled for posterior sagittal anorectoplasty. The infant had an orifice at the anal dimple and the other had an orifice at the vestibulum posterior to the rectovestibular fistula. The infant presented with no other anomalies whereas the older one presented with an unusual coexistence of caudal duplication and caudal regression syndromes. Perioperatively both orifices were found to be related to retrorectal cysts, and were excised. Clinicians should always be alert when dealing with complex malformations. Because these malformations have variable anatomical and clinical presentations, they can represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. PMID:23910814

  4. Relation between mechanical dynamic processes and the accompanying electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bivin, Yu. K.

    2015-06-01

    The dependence of the electric field in the plane of motion of a nylon string on the string velocity is experimentally studied. The shape and number of the charges that accompany the motion of solid bodies, which have various geometric parameters, in air up to transonic velocities are determined. The formation and shape of electric charges of different signs in an initially neutral dielectric rod are investigated during the motion of a deformation pulse of the same sign along the rod.

  5. Open problems in non-equilibrium physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kusnezov, D.

    1997-09-22

    The report contains viewgraphs on the following: approaches to non-equilibrium statistical mechanics; classical and quantum processes in chaotic environments; classical fields in non-equilibrium situations: real time dynamics at finite temperature; and phase transitions in non-equilibrium conditions.

  6. Accompaniment needs of nursing students related to the dying patient.

    PubMed

    Van Rooyen, D; Laing, R; Kotzé, W J

    2005-11-01

    Nurse educators are responsible for accompanying students towards becoming capable, competent professional nurses who are a credit to themselves, their patients, colleagues and profession. Student nurses need, therefore, to be taught to render comprehensive nursing care to patients in all stages of their lives, including when they are dying. Being confronted with human suffering and death is challenging and traumatic. Those exposed to such events on a daily basis need to have a solid foundation of self preservation to see past the pain of suffering and to bring light and hope to those in need. A young student nurse will only experience positive growth and development in these circumstances if she is also cared for and guided with understanding. The researcher utilized a qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual design based on the phenomenological approach to enquiry. The following question was asked at the beginning of each unstructured phenomenological interview: "How was if for you to care for a dying or deceased patient?" The central theme identified that student nurses experience turmoil in their different relationships in their accompaniment of the dying patient. Guidelines based on the central theme and sub-themes that emerged from raw data, as well as literature, are offered as strategies to promote/enhance optimal accompaniment of student nurses caring for the dying patient. PMID:16450557

  7. A case of Madelung's disease accompanied by Klinefelter's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ozderya, Aysenur; Aydin Tezcan, Kadriye; Ozturk, Feyza Yener; Altuntas, Yuksel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Madelung's disease is a rare fat metabolism disorder characterised by benign multiple symmetric, encapsulated lipomatosis. The exact cause of the disease is unknown; it may be associated with chronic alcoholism and mutations in mitochondrial DNA (A8344G), but there have been cases without these factors reported in the literature. A 29-year-old man with a 6-year history of diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital for poorly regulated diabetes and decreased libido. He was not an alcohol consumer. His family history was unremarkable. Physical examination revealed that he had a eunuchoid body shape. There was a symmetric excess fat accumulation in his submandibular, deltoid, nuchal, suprapubic and inguinal areas. He was diagnosed with Madelung's disease, and imaging studies supported the diagnosis. Hormonal evaluation revealed a hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Karyotype analysis revealed a 47,XXY mutation. Genetic research showed no mitochondrial DNA mutation. Metabolic disorders, such as diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidaemia, hyperuricaemia and liver disease, endocrine gland diseases, such as hypothyroidism, and neurological diseases, such as polyneuropathy and cognitive disorders, may accompany Madelung's disease. The present study represents the first reported case of Madelung's disease accompanied by Klinefelter's syndrome. Learning points Madelung's disease is a rare fat metabolism disorder characterised by benign multiple symmetric and encapsulated lipid accumulation.The exact cause of the disease is unknown.Metabolic disorders, such as diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidaemia, hyperuricaemia and liver disease, endocrine gland diseases, such as hypothyroidism, and neurological diseases, such as polyneuropathy and cognitive disorders, may accompany Madelung's disease. PMID:25945255

  8. Real-time implementation of an interactive jazz accompaniment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Nikhil

    Modern computational algorithms and digital signal processing (DSP) are able to combine with human performers without forced or predetermined structure in order to create dynamic and real-time accompaniment systems. With modern computing power and intelligent algorithm layout and design, it is possible to achieve more detailed auditory analysis of live music. Using this information, computer code can follow and predict how a human's musical performance evolves, and use this to react in a musical manner. This project builds a real-time accompaniment system to perform together with live musicians, with a focus on live jazz performance and improvisation. The system utilizes a new polyphonic pitch detector and embeds it in an Ableton Live system - combined with Max for Live - to perform elements of audio analysis, generation, and triggering. The system also relies on tension curves and information rate calculations from the Creative Artificially Intuitive and Reasoning Agent (CAIRA) system to help understand and predict human improvisation. These metrics are vital to the core system and allow for extrapolated audio analysis. The system is able to react dynamically to a human performer, and can successfully accompany the human as an entire rhythm section.

  9. Thermal equilibrium in Einstein's elevator.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rey, Bernardo; Chacón-Acosta, Guillermo; Dagdug, Leonardo; Cubero, David

    2013-05-01

    We report fully relativistic molecular-dynamics simulations that verify the appearance of thermal equilibrium of a classical gas inside a uniformly accelerated container. The numerical experiments confirm that the local momentum distribution in this system is very well approximated by the Jüttner function-originally derived for a flat spacetime-via the Tolman-Ehrenfest effect. Moreover, it is shown that when the acceleration or the container size is large enough, the global momentum distribution can be described by the so-called modified Jüttner function, which was initially proposed as an alternative to the Jüttner function. PMID:23767501

  10. Princeton spectral equilibrium code: PSEC

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, K.M.; Jardin, S.C.

    1984-03-01

    A fast computer code has been developed to calculate free-boundary solutions to the plasma equilibrium equation that are consistent with the currents in external coils and conductors. The free-boundary formulation is based on the minimization of a mean-square error epsilon while the fixed-boundary solution is based on a variational principle and spectral representation of the coordinates x(psi,theta) and z(psi,theta). Specific calculations using the Columbia University Torus II, the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) geometries are performed.

  11. On return to thermal equilibrium for the excess charge distribution in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, V. V.

    1985-04-01

    The relaxation time for the return to thermal equilibrium for the excess charge distribution in metals and in semiconductors is shown to be longer than the relaxation time derived in many textbooks. In semiconductors the relaxation of charge is accompanied by an increase in temperature of the charged carriers. The time of decay τT for the temperature is considerably longer than the time of decay for the excess charge. Hence the overall relaxation time for attaining thermal equilibrium is determined by τT.

  12. Equilibrium properties of chemically reacting gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The equilibrium energy, enthalpy, entropy, specific heat at constant volume and constant pressure, and the equation of state of the gas are all derived for chemically reacting gas mixtures in terms of the compressibility, the mol fractions, the thermodynamic properties of the pure gas components, and the change in zero point energy due to reaction. Results are illustrated for a simple diatomic dissociation reaction and nitrogen is used as an example. Next, a gas mixture resulting from combined diatomic dissociation and atomic ionization reactions is treated and, again, nitrogen is used as an example. A short discussion is given of the additional complexities involved when precise solutions for high-temperature air are desired, including effects caused by NO produced in shuffle reactions and by other trace species formed from CO2, H2O and Ar found in normal air.

  13. A hydrodynamic approach to non-equilibrium conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Denis; Doyon, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    We develop a hydrodynamic approach to non-equilibrium conformal field theory. We study non-equilibrium steady states in the context of one-dimensional conformal field theory perturbed by the T\\bar{T} irrelevant operator. By direct quantum computation, we show, to first order in the coupling, that a relativistic hydrodynamic emerges, which is a simple modification of one-dimensional conformal fluids. We show that it describes the steady state and its approach, and we provide the main characteristics of the steady state, which lies between two shock waves. The velocities of these shocks are modified by the perturbation and equal the sound velocities of the asymptotic baths. Pushing this approach further, we are led to conjecture that the approach to the steady state is generically controlled by the power law t -1/2, and that the widths of the shocks increase with time according to t 1/3.

  14. Entropy production determination of the ambipolar solution nearest equilibrium. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Catto, P.J.; Myra, J.R.

    1985-05-01

    A general derivation of the steady state entropy production equation is presented for a confined plasma which loses particles and energy via radial transport and, perhaps, end loss. The resulting equation is employed to determine which root or solution at each pressure surface is closest to local thermodynamic equilibrium when more than one self-consistent or ambipolar solution is possible. The solution closest to local thermodynamic equilibrium is presumed to be the one with the smallest total collisional entropy production rate. This solution makes the distribution functions as close to local Maxwellians as possible.

  15. Non-equilibrium phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Mottola, E.; Cooper, F.M.; Bishop, A.R.; Habib, S.; Kluger, Y.; Jensen, N.G.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Non-equilibrium phase transitions play a central role in a very broad range of scientific areas, ranging from nuclear, particle, and astrophysics to condensed matter physics and the material and biological sciences. The aim of this project was to explore the path to a deeper and more fundamental understanding of the common physical principles underlying the complex real time dynamics of phase transitions. The main emphasis was on the development of general theoretical tools to deal with non-equilibrium processes, and of numerical methods robust enough to capture the time-evolving structures that occur in actual experimental situations. Specific applications to Laboratory multidivisional efforts in relativistic heavy-ion physics (transition to a new phase of nuclear matter consisting of a quark-gluon plasma) and layered high-temperature superconductors (critical currents and flux flow at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory) were undertaken.

  16. Magnetospheric equilibrium with anisotropic pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z. )

    1992-02-01

    Self-consistent magnetospheric equilibria with anisotropic pressure are obtained by employing an iterative metric method for solving the inverse equilibrium equation in an optimal flux coordinate system. A method of determining plasma parallel and perpendicular pressures from either analytic particle distributions or particle distributions measured along a satellite's path is presented. The numerical results of axisymmetric magnetospheric equilibria including the effects of finite beta, pressure anisotropy, and boundary conditions are presented for a bi-Maxwellian particle distribution. For the isotropic pressure cases the finite beta effect produces an outward expansion of the constant magnetic flux surfaces in relation to the dipole field lines, and along the magnetic field the toroidal ring current is maximum at the magnetic equator. The effect of pressure anisotropy is found to further expand the flux surfaces outward. Along the magnetic field lines the westward ring current can be peak away from the equator owing to an eastward current contribution resulting from pressure anisotropy. As pressure anisotropy increases, the peak westward current can become more singular. The outer boundary flux surface has a significant effect on the magnetospheric equilibrium. For the outer flux boundary resembling the dayside compressed flux surface due to solar wind pressure, the deformation of the magnetic field can be quite different from that for the outer flux boundary resembling the taillike flux surface.

  17. Equilibrium Studies of Designed Metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Gibney, B R

    2016-01-01

    Complete thermodynamic descriptions of the interactions of cofactors with proteins via equilibrium studies are challenging, but are essential to the evaluation of designed metalloproteins. While decades of studies on protein-protein interaction thermodynamics provide a strong underpinning to the successful computational design of novel protein folds and de novo proteins with enzymatic activity, the corresponding paucity of data on metal-protein interaction thermodynamics limits the success of computational metalloprotein design efforts. By evaluating the thermodynamics of metal-protein interactions via equilibrium binding studies, protein unfolding free energy determinations, proton competition equilibria, and electrochemistry, a more robust basis for the computational design of metalloproteins may be provided. Our laboratory has shown that such studies provide detailed insight into the assembly and stability of designed metalloproteins, allow for parsing apart the free energy contributions of metal-ligand interactions from those of porphyrin-protein interactions in hemeproteins, and even reveal their mechanisms of proton-coupled electron transfer. Here, we highlight studies that reveal the complex interplay between the various equilibria that underlie metalloprotein assembly and stability and the utility of making these detailed measurements. PMID:27586343

  18. Are the Concepts of Dynamic Equilibrium and the Thermodynamic Criteria for Spontaneity, Nonspontaneity, and Equilibrium Compatible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverberg, Lee J.; Raff, Lionel M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic spontaneity-equilibrium criteria require that in a single-reaction system, reactions in either the forward or reverse direction at equilibrium be nonspontaneous. Conversely, the concept of dynamic equilibrium holds that forward and reverse reactions both occur at equal rates at equilibrium to the extent allowed by kinetic…

  19. Size-frequency distribution of crater populations in equilibrium on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhiyong; Werner, Stephanie C.

    2015-12-01

    Overprinting of craters by subsequent impacts and topographic degradation complicates crater statistics, especially for old surfaces and small-diameter crater populations. A crater population is regarded as in equilibrium at a particular crater size when smaller craters are being produced at the same rate at which they are being destroyed. Evaluating the equilibrium state of crater populations is challenging, and empirical equilibrium densities are frequently inferred. By performing careful crater counts and cross comparisons on several lunar surfaces, we study the size-frequency distributions (SFD) for the crater populations, which have portions in equilibrium. The results are one of the few observational constraints on the SFD of crater populations in equilibrium, showing that referring to empirical equilibrium densities is not safe for evaluating the equilibrium states of crater populations. Equilibrium densities are not positively correlated with the ages of crater populations, and some populations in equilibrium have crater densities less than those previously believed to represent equilibrium conditions. Besides the SFD of the production population, different crater removal rates at different diameters also affect the SFD of crater populations in equilibrium. The equilibrium onset diameter (Deq) of a crater population can be translated to model ages because older populations have larger Deq, and those for same-aged surfaces are comparable. We show that the crater populations studied here are in equilibrium at much smaller diameters than those predicted for same-aged surfaces by crater degradation models, thus indicating lower crater degradation rates on the Moon, and/or younger ages of the counting areas.

  20. Mean gas opacity for circumstellar environments and equilibrium temperature degeneracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malygin, M. G.; Kuiper, R.; Klahr, H.; Dullemond, C. P.; Henning, Th.

    2014-08-01

    Context. In a molecular cloud dust opacity typically dominates over gas opacity, yet in the vicinities of forming stars dust is depleted, and gas is the sole provider of opacity. In the optically thin circumstellar environments the radiation temperature cannot be assumed to be equal to the gas temperature, hence the two-temperature Planck means are necessary to calculate the radiative equilibrium. Aims: By using the two-temperature mean opacity one does obtain the proper equilibrium gas temperature in a circumstellar environment, which is in a chemical equilibrium. A careful consideration of a radiative transfer problem reveals that the equilibrium temperature solution can be degenerate in an optically thin gaseous environment. Methods: We compute mean gas opacities based on the publicly available code DFSYNTHE by Kurucz and Castelli. We performed the calculations assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium and an ideal gas equation of state. The values were derived by direct integration of the high-resolution opacity spectrum. Results: We produced two sets of gas opacity tables: Rosseland means and two-temperature Planck means. For three metallicities [Me/H] = 0.0, ± 0.3 we covered the parameter range 3.48 ≤ log Trad [K] ≤ 4.48 in radiation temperature, 2.8 ≤ log Tgas [K] ≤ 6.0 in gas temperature, and -10 ≤ log P [dyn cm-2] ≤ 6 in gas pressure. We show that in the optically thin circumstellar environment for a given stellar radiation field and local gas density there are several equilibrium gas temperatures possible. Conclusions: We conclude that, in general, equilibrium gas temperature cannot be determined without treating the temperature evolution. The opacity tables are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/568/A91 as well as via http://www.mpia.de/~malygin

  1. Equilibrium iron isotope fractionation at core-mantle boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Veniamin B

    2009-02-13

    The equilibrium iron isotope fractionation between lower mantle minerals and metallic iron at core-mantle boundary conditions can be evaluated from the high-pressure 57Fe partial vibrational density of states determined by synchrotron inelastic nuclear resonant x-ray scattering spectroscopy using a diamond anvil. Ferropericlase [(Mg,Fe)O] and (Fe,Mg)SiO3- post-perovskite are enriched in heavy iron isotopes relative to metallic iron at ultrahigh pressures, as opposed to the equilibrium iron isotope fractionation between these compounds at low pressure. The enrichment of Earth and Moon basalts in heavy iron isotopes relative to those from Mars and asteroid Vesta can be explained by the equilibrium iron isotope fractionation during the segregation of Earth's core and the assumption that Earth was already differentiated before the Moon-forming "giant impact." PMID:19213913

  2. Spectral Quasi-Equilibrium Manifold for Chemical Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kooshkbaghi, Mahdi; Frouzakis, Christos E; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Karlin, Iliya V

    2016-05-26

    The Spectral Quasi-Equilibrium Manifold (SQEM) method is a model reduction technique for chemical kinetics based on entropy maximization under constraints built by the slowest eigenvectors at equilibrium. The method is revisited here and discussed and validated through the Michaelis-Menten kinetic scheme, and the quality of the reduction is related to the temporal evolution and the gap between eigenvalues. SQEM is then applied to detailed reaction mechanisms for the homogeneous combustion of hydrogen, syngas, and methane mixtures with air in adiabatic constant pressure reactors. The system states computed using SQEM are compared with those obtained by direct integration of the detailed mechanism, and good agreement between the reduced and the detailed descriptions is demonstrated. The SQEM reduced model of hydrogen/air combustion is also compared with another similar technique, the Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium (RCCE). For the same number of representative variables, SQEM is found to provide a more accurate description. PMID:27116566

  3. Detection of Non-Equilibrium Fluctuations in Active Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacanu, Alexandru; Broedersz, Chase; Gladrow, Jannes; Mackintosh, Fred; Schmidt, Christoph; Fakhri, Nikta

    Active force generation at the molecular scale in cells can result in stochastic non-equilibrium dynamics on mesoscpopic scales. Molecular motors such as myosin can drive steady-state stress fluctuations in cytoskeletal networks. Here, we present a non-invasive technique to probe non-equilibrium fluctuations in an active gel using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNTs are semiflexible polymers with intrinsic fluorescence in the near infrared. Both thermal and active motor-induced forces in the network induce transverse fluctuations of SWNTs. We demonstrate that active driven shape fluctuations of the SWNTs exhibit dynamics that reflect the non-equilibrium activity, in particular the emergence of correlations between the bending modes. We discuss the observation of breaking of detailed balance in this configurational space of the SWNT probes. Supported by National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Student Fellowship (NDSEG).

  4. EOS of a material mixture in pressure equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Charles W. Cranfill

    2000-01-01

    A procedure is presented for calculating the equation of state (EOS) of a material mixture whose constituents are in pressure equilibrium but not necessarily in temperature equilibrium. A Newton-Raphson iteration is performed to determine the constituent partial volumes and energies that give equal partial pressures subject to the constraints that the total volume and energy of the mixture are specified. During each iteration, the changes in EOS quantities are chosen to be fixed (but arbitrary) linear combinations of their temperature-equilibrium and isentropic values, so those two extremes can be reproduced as special cases. The changes in the constituent partial volumes and energies are limited to prevent the Newton-Raphson iteration from diverging.

  5. Neutral and charged matter in equilibrium with black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2011-10-01

    We study the conditions of a possible static equilibrium between spherically symmetric, electrically charged or neutral black holes and ambient matter. The following kinds of matter are considered: (1) neutral and charged matter with a linear equation of state pr=wρ (for neutral matter the results of our previous work are reproduced), (2) neutral and charged matter with pr˜ρm, m>1, and (3) the possible presence of a “vacuum fluid” (the cosmological constant or, more generally, anything that satisfies the equality T00=T11 at least at the horizon). We find a number of new cases of such an equilibrium, including those generalizing the well-known Majumdar-Papapetrou conditions for charged dust. It turns out, in particular, that ultraextremal black holes cannot be in equilibrium with any matter in the absence of a vacuum fluid; meanwhile, matter with w>0, if it is properly charged, can surround an extremal charged black hole.

  6. Temperature lapse rates at restricted thermodynamic equilibrium. Part II: Saturated air and further discussions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björnbom, Pehr

    2016-03-01

    In the first part of this work equilibrium temperature profiles in fluid columns with ideal gas or ideal liquid were obtained by numerically minimizing the column energy at constant entropy, equivalent to maximizing column entropy at constant energy. A minimum in internal plus potential energy for an isothermal temperature profile was obtained in line with Gibbs' classical equilibrium criterion. However, a minimum in internal energy alone for adiabatic temperature profiles was also obtained. This led to a hypothesis that the adiabatic lapse rate corresponds to a restricted equilibrium state, a type of state in fact discussed already by Gibbs. In this paper similar numerical results for a fluid column with saturated air suggest that also the saturated adiabatic lapse rate corresponds to a restricted equilibrium state. The proposed hypothesis is further discussed and amended based on the previous and the present numerical results and a theoretical analysis based on Gibbs' equilibrium theory.

  7. Adaptive Equilibrium Regulation: A Balancing Act in Two Timescales

    PubMed Central

    Boker, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    An equilibrium involves a balancing of forces. Just as one maintains upright posture in standing or walking, many self-regulatory and interpersonal behaviors can be framed as a balancing act between an ever changing environment and within-person processes. The emerging balance between person and environment, the equilibria, are dynamic and adaptive in response to development and learning. A distinction is made between equilibrium achieved solely due to a short timescale balancing of forces and a longer timescale preferred equilibrium which we define as a state towards which the system slowly adapts. Together, these are developed into a framework that this article calls Adaptive Equilibrium Regulation (ÆR), which separates a regulatory process into two timescales: a faster regulation that automatically balances forces and a slower timescale adaptation process that reconfigures the fast regulation so as to move the system towards its preferred equilibrium when an environmental force persists over the longer timescale. This way of thinking leads to novel models for the interplay between multiple timescales of behavior, learning, and development. PMID:27066197

  8. Phenomenon of life: between equilibrium and non-linearity.

    PubMed

    Galimov, E M

    2004-12-01

    A model of ordering applicable to biological evolution is presented. It is shown that a steady state (more precisely approaching to a steady state) system of irreversible processes, under conditions of disproportionation of entropy, produces a lower-entropy product, that is, ordering. The ordering is defined as restricting of degrees of freedom: freedom of motion, interactions etc. The model differs from previous ones in that it relates the ordering to processes running not far from equilibrium, described in the linear field of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. It is shown that a system, which includes adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) conversion meets the demands of the physical model: it provides energy maintaining steady state conditions, and hydrolysis of ATP proceeding with consumption of water can be tightly conjugated with the most important reactions of synthesis of organic polymers (peptides, nucleotide chains etc.), which proceed with release of water. For these and other reasons ATP seems to be a key molecule of prebiotic evolution. It is argued that the elementary chemical reaction proceeding under control of an enzyme is not necessarily far from equilibrium. The experimental evidence supporting this idea, is presented. It is based on isotope data. Carbon isotope distribution in biochemical systems reveals regularity, which is inherent to steady state systems of chemical reactions, proceeding not far from equilibrium. In living organisms this feature appears at the statistical level, as many completely irreversible and non-linear processes occur in organisms. However not-far-from-equilibrium reactions are inherent to biochemical systems as a matter of principle. They are reconcilable with biochemical behavior. Extant organisms are highly evolved entities which, however, show in their basis the same features, as the simplest chemical systems must have had been involved in the origin of life. Some consequences following from the

  9. Thermodynamic equilibrium at heterogeneous pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.; Podladchikov, Yuri Y.

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in metamorphic petrology point out the importance of grain-scale pressure variations in high-temperature metamorphic rocks. Pressures derived from chemical zonation using unconventional geobarometry based on equal chemical potentials fit mechanically feasible pressure variations. Here a thermodynamic equilibrium method is presented that predicts chemical zoning as a result of pressure variations by Gibbs energy minimization. Equilibrium thermodynamic prediction of the chemical zoning in the case of pressure heterogeneity is done by constraint Gibbs minimization using linear programming techniques. Compositions of phases considered in the calculation are discretized into 'pseudo-compounds' spanning the entire compositional space. Gibbs energies of these discrete compounds are generated for a given range and resolution of pressures for example derived by barometry or from mechanical model predictions. Gibbs energy minimization is subsequently performed considering all compounds of different composition and pressure. In addition to constraining the system composition a certain proportion of the system is constraint at a specified pressure. Input pressure variations need to be discretized and each discrete pressure defines an additional constraint for the minimization. The proportion of the system at each different pressure is equally distributed over the number of input pressures. For example if two input pressures P1 and P2 are specified, two constraints are added: 50 percent of the system is constraint at P1 while the remaining 50 percent is constraint at P2. The method has been tested for a set of 10 input pressures obtained by Tajčmanová et al. (2014) using their unconventional geobarometry method in a plagioclase rim around kyanite. Each input pressure is added as constraint to the minimization (1/10 percent of the system for each discrete pressure). Constraining the system composition to the average composition of the plagioclase rim

  10. Modeling equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbar, A.; Jarzecki, A.; Spiro, T.

    2003-04-01

    Research into the stable isotope biogeochemistry of Fe and other transition metals has been driven primarily by analytical innovations which have revealed significant isotope effects in nature and the laboratory. Further development of these new isotope systems requires complementary theoretical research to guide analytical efforts. The results of the first such studies show some discrepancies with experiments. For example, Johnson et al. (2002) report an experimentally-determined 56Fe/54Fe equilibrium fractionation factor between Fe(II) and Fe(III) aquo complexes of ˜1.0025. This effect is ˜50% smaller than predicted theoretically by Schauble et al. (2001). It is important to resolve such discrepancies. Equilibrium isotope fractionation factors can be predicted from vibrational spectroscopic data of isotopically-substituted complexes, or from theoretical predictions of some or all of these frequencies obtained using force field models. The pioneering work of Schauble et al. (2001) utilized a modified Urey-Bradley force field (MUBFF) model. This approach is limiting in at least three ways: First, it is not ab initio, requiring as input some measured vibrational frequencies. Such data are not always available, or may have significant uncertainties. Second, the MUBFF does not include potentially important effects of solvent interaction. Third, because it makes certain assumptions about molecular symmetry, the MUBFF-based approach is not able to model the spectra of mixed-ligand complexes. To address these limitations, we are evaluating the use of density functional theory (DFT) as an ab initio method to predict vibrational frequencies of isotopically-substituted complexes and, hence, equilibrium fractionation factors. In a preliminary examination of the frequency shift upon isotope substitution of the bending and asymmetric stretching modes of the tetrahedral FeCl_42- complex, we find substantial differences between MUBFF and DFT predictions. Results for other Fe

  11. Equilibrium I: Principles. Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). Unit P2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inner London Education Authority (England).

    This unit on the principles of equilibrium is one of 10 first year units produced by the Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). The unit consists of two levels. After a treatment of non-mathematical aspects in level one (the idea of a reversible reaction, characteristics of an equilibrium state, the Le Chatelier's principle),…

  12. Exoemission accompanying the decomposition of methanol on zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylova, I. V.

    2008-09-01

    The electronic phenomena accompanying the adsorption and dehydrogenation of methanol on zinc oxide were studied using the method of exoemission of negative charges. Postemission excited from ZnO by an electron beam was found to be suppressed by the adsorption of methanol vapor, which exhibited electron acceptor properties. Subsequent heating to temperatures close to the temperature of the beginning of methanol decomposition increased the intensity of exoemission, which was evidence of the participation of emission centers (Oδ-) in dehydrogenation. A possible mechanism of methanol decomposition with the participation of surface V s hole centers (Oδ-) of zinc oxide was suggested.

  13. Double-Layered Lateral Meniscus Accompanied by Meniscocapsular Separation

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Aki; Nishimura, Akinobu; Nakazora, Shigeto; Kato, Ko

    2015-01-01

    We report an extremely rare case of double-layered lateral meniscus accompanied by meniscocapsular separation. The upper accessory meniscus was connected with the posterior horn and middle segment of the lower normal meniscus and was more mobile than the lower normal meniscus. A meniscocapsular separation was evident at the overlapping middle segment. Clinical symptoms were significantly improved by the resection of the upper accessory meniscus and the repair of the meniscocapsular separation. Careful arthroscopic analysis of other associated pathologies together with this rare abnormality was needed to achieve clinical improvement. PMID:26090252

  14. En coup de sabre accompanied by pachydermoperiostosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, M; Yildirim, S; Mevlitoğlu, I

    2007-01-01

    Scleroderma en coup de sabre, a variant of localized scleroderma is a disorder characterized by fibrosis of connective tissue. We report a 21-year-old female with scleroderma en coup de sabre accompanied by pachydermoperiostosis. She was born to consanguineous parents and her older sister also had pachydermoperiostosis characterized by clubbing of the digits, enlargement of distal parts of the extremities. The two disorders were diagnosed by clinical examination, histological and x-ray findings. In contrast to scleroderma, pachydermoperiostosis is a hypertrophic process characterized by periosteal proliferation of the tubuler bones and hypertrophic skin changes. We discuss this interesting coexistence and review the literature. PMID:17543162

  15. Mucocele accompanied by a traumatic neuroma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jaafari Ashkavandi, Z; Dehghani Nazhvani, A; Hamzavi, M

    2013-03-01

    Mucocele and traumatic neuroma are two lesions related to the traumatic events; however there is only one reported case in which these two entities were perceived simultaneously. The current study reported a 21-year-old man who complained of painless recurrent swelling, accompanied by paresthesia on his left lower labial mucosa. He had a previous history of similar lesion and had been treated with surgery and cauterization last year. The primary clinical impression was a recurrent mucocele. Microscopic surveys displayed a traumatic neuroma in the vicinity of a mucocele which seems to be arising from the previous surgical treatment. PMID:24724117

  16. Note: Local thermal conductivities from boundary driven non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Bresme, F.; Armstrong, J.

    2014-01-07

    We report non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of heat transport in models of molecular fluids. We show that the “local” thermal conductivities obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations agree within numerical accuracy with equilibrium Green-Kubo computations. Our results support the local equilibrium hypothesis for transport properties. We show how to use the local dependence of the thermal gradients to quantify the thermal conductivity of molecular fluids for a wide range of thermodynamic states using a single simulation.

  17. Non-equilibrium origin of high electrical conductivity in gallium zinc oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Zakutayev, Andriy Ginley, David S.; Lany, Stephan; Perry, Nicola H.; Mason, Thomas O.

    2013-12-02

    Non-equilibrium state defines physical properties of materials in many technologies, including architectural, metallic, and semiconducting amorphous glasses. In contrast, crystalline electronic and energy materials, such as transparent conductive oxides (TCO), are conventionally thought to be in equilibrium. Here, we demonstrate that high electrical conductivity of crystalline Ga-doped ZnO TCO thin films occurs by virtue of metastable state of their defects. These results imply that such defect metastability may be important in other functional oxides. This finding emphasizes the need to understand and control non-equilibrium states of materials, in particular, their metastable defects, for the design of novel functional materials.

  18. Equilibrium Potentials of Membrane Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jui H.; Copeland, Eva

    1973-01-01

    A simple thermodynamic theory of the equilibrium potentials of membrane electrodes is formulated and applied to the glass electrode for measurement of pH. The new formulation assumes the selective adsorption or binding of specific ions on the surface of the membrane which may or may not be permeable to the ion, and includes the conventional derivation based on reversible ion transport across membranes as a special case. To test the theory, a platinum wire was coated with a mixture of stearic acid and methyl-tri-n-octyl-ammonium stearate. When this coated electrode was immersed in aqueous phosphate solution, its potential was found to be a linear function of pH from pH 2 to 12 with a slope equal to the theoretical value of 59.0 mV per pH unit at 24°. PMID:4516194

  19. Neoclassical equilibrium in gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Nguyen, C.; Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Ghendrih, Ph.

    2009-06-15

    This paper presents a set of model collision operators, which reproduce the neoclassical equilibrium and comply with the constraints of a full-f global gyrokinetic code. The assessment of these operators is based on an entropy variational principle, which allows one to perform a fast calculation of the neoclassical diffusivity and poloidal velocity. It is shown that the force balance equation is recovered at lowest order in the expansion parameter, the normalized gyroradius, hence allowing one to calculate correctly the radial electric field. Also, the conventional neoclassical transport and the poloidal velocity are reproduced in the plateau and banana regimes. The advantages and drawbacks of the various model operators are discussed in view of the requirements for neoclassical and turbulent transport.

  20. String fluid in local equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubring, Daniel; Vanchurin, Vitaly

    2014-10-01

    We study the solutions of string fluid equations under the assumption of a local equilibrium which was previously obtained in the context of the kinetic theory. We show that the fluid can be foliated into noninteracting submanifolds whose equations of motion are exactly that of the wiggly strings considered previously by Vilenkin and Carter. In a special case of negligible statistical variance in either the left- or the right-moving directions of microscopic strings, the submanifolds are described by the action of a null-current-carrying chiral string. When both variances vanish the submanifolds are described by the Nambu-Goto action and the string fluid reduces to the string dust introduced by Stachel.

  1. Equilibrium calculations of firework mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.L.; Tanaka, Katsumi; Iida, Mitsuaki; Matsunaga, Takehiro

    1994-12-31

    Thermochemical equilibrium calculations have been used to calculate detonation conditions for typical firework components including three report charges, two display charges, and black powder which is used as a fuse or launch charge. Calculations were performed with a modified version of the TIGER code which allows calculations with 900 gaseous and 600 condensed product species at high pressure. The detonation calculations presented in this paper are thought to be the first report on the theoretical study of firework detonation. Measured velocities for two report charges are available and compare favorably to predicted detonation velocities. However, the measured velocities may not be true detonation velocities. Fast deflagration rather than an ideal detonation occurs when reactants contain significant amounts of slow reacting constituents such as aluminum or titanium. Despite such uncertainties in reacting pyrotechnics, the detonation calculations do show the complex nature of condensed phase formation at elevated pressures and give an upper bound for measured velocities.

  2. Hierarchical condensation near phase equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olemskoi, A. I.; Yushchenko, O. V.; Borisyuk, V. N.; Zhilenko, T. I.; Kosminska, Yu. O.; Perekrestov, V. I.

    2012-06-01

    A novel mechanism of new phase formation is studied both experimentally and theoretically in the example of quasi-equilibrium stationary condensation in an ion-plasma sputterer. Copper condensates are obtained to demonstrate that a specific network structure is formed as a result of self-assembly in the course of deposition. The fractal pattern related is inherent in the phenomena of diffusion limited aggregation. Condensate nuclei are shown to form statistical ensemble of hierarchically subordinated objects distributed in ultrametric space. The Langevin equation and the Fokker-Planck equation related are found to describe stationary distribution of thermodynamic potential variations at condensation. Time dependence of the formation probability of branching structures is found to clarify the experimental situation.

  3. Lattice distortion accompanied by magnetization reversal in A-type antiferromagnetic manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jong-Suck; Iyama, Ayato; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Wakabayashi, Yusuke; Kimura, Tsuyoshi

    2012-05-01

    Magnetostriction was investigated for layered A-type antiferromagnetic SmMnO3 showing large magnetocapacitive effects around a temperature (TTP) where ferrimagnetically coupled Mn 3d and Sm 4f moments were reversed simultaneously. Upon sweeping temperature or a magnetic field, a significant lattice distortion was observed at TTP or the coercive field, respectively. This indicates that the lattice is strongly coupled with the magnetic configuration. We discuss the lattice distortion accompanied by the magnetization reversal in terms of a partial change in the orbital state of Mn eg electrons.

  4. Behavior of Water Jet Accompanied with Air Suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Hironobu; Ishido, Tsutomu; Ihara, Akio

    In order to atomize a liquid, the authors have investigated the behavior of air-water jets. In a series of experiments, we have discovered a strange phenomenon that the water jet accompanied with air suction from the free surface has made a periodic radial splash of water drop. The purpose of the present paper is to clear out the origin of this phenomenon and the behavior of water jet accompanied with air suction. The behavior of water jet has been photographed by a digital camera aided with a flashlight and high-speed video camera. Those experiments enable us to find the origin of a periodic radial splash due to a formation of single air bubble at the flow separation region inside the nozzle and due to explosive expansion of the bubble after injected in the free space. In order to analyze the radial splash of water, we have conducted the equation of spherical liquid membrane. The numerical results obtained have been compared with the experimental results and good agreement has been obtained in radial expansion velocity.

  5. Spinal hydatidosis accompanied by a secondary infection. Case report.

    PubMed

    Kotil, Kadir; Tatar, Zeynep; Bilge, Turgay

    2007-06-01

    Spinal hydatid disease is rarely encountered in nonendemic regions. It is a progressive disease that is associated with risks of serious morbidity. The authors report a case of an isolated primary hydatid cyst of the spine in a 34-year-old woman who presented with back pain, which had lasted for 3 months, as well as lower-extremity pain and fatigue, which had persisted for 2 months. A neurological examination yielded findings indicative of upper motor neuron involvement with complete sensory loss below the level of T-11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine showed multiple extradural cystic lesions with an abscess formation at T-11 and involvement of the paraspinal muscles. The patient underwent spinal decompression in which stabilization and total excision of the multiple epidural and psoas abscesses and paraspinal multiloculated cysts were performed. The diagnosis of hydatid disease associated with another infection was confirmed by histopathological evaluation. Albendazole was administered during the postoperative period. Previous reports of secondary infections accompanying this disease in extraspinal locations have been published. However, to the best of the authors' knowledge, there have been no publications about a secondary infection associated with hydatidosis in the spinal cord. One should bear in mind that spinal hydatidosis may be accompanied by other infections in endemic regions. Antihelminthic treatment should be administered for a long period following early decompressive surgery and adequate stabilization. PMID:17561751

  6. Oppositely charged colloids out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vissers, T.

    2010-11-01

    Colloids are particles with a size in the range of a few nanometers up to several micrometers. Similar to atomic and molecular systems, they can form gases, liquids, solids, gels and glasses. Colloids can be used as model systems because, unlike molecules, they are sufficiently large to be studied directly with light microscopy and move sufficiently slow to study their dynamics. In this thesis, we study binary systems of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) colloidal particles suspended in low-polar solvent mixtures. Since the ions can still partially dissociate, a surface charge builds up which causes electrostatic interactions between the colloids. By carefully tuning the conditions inside the suspension, we make two kinds of particles oppositely charged. To study our samples, we use Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). The positively and negatively charged particles can be distinguished by a different fluorescent dye. Colloids constantly experience a random motion resulting from random kicks of surrounding solvent molecules. When the attractions between the oppositely charged particles are weak, the particles can attach and detach many times and explore a lot of possible configurations and the system can reach thermodynamic equilibrium. For example, colloidal ‘ionic’ crystals consisting of thousands to millions of particles can form under the right conditions. When the attractions are strong, the system can become kinetically trapped inside a gel-like state. We observe that when the interactions change again, crystals can even emerge again from this gel-like phase. By using local order parameters, we quantitatively study the crystallization of colloidal particles and identify growth defects inside the crystals. We also study the effect of gravity on the growth of ionic crystals by using a rotating stage. We find that sedimentation can completely inhibit crystal growth and plays an important role in crystallization from the gel-like state. The surface

  7. Equilibrium and Stability of Coronal Helmet Streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhov, Vyacheslav Sergeevich

    1997-05-01

    Equilibrium states and stability of partially open magentic field structures in the solar corona are studied. Soft X-ray observations of the birth and evolution of a giant coronal helmet streamer suggest that the energy source responsible for the X-ray manifestation of the structure is most probably located in the lower corona. The downward heat flux is the indication that a significant part of the source's energy is transported to the top of the structure and converted there to a disposable form. It is shown that by applying the thermodynamic equilibrium model of the corona to the two-dimensional X-ray data it is possible to reconstruct the three-dimensional form of the coronal helmet. The general significance of the projective geometry effects for the observation of the solar corona is discussed. The hypothesis of thermal pressure increase as the cause of the observed helmet expansion is verified numerically. It is shown that in the solar corona a relatively small variations of the pressure distribution in the closed field region can cause huge variations in the geometry of a coronal helmet streamer. Numerical simulations of the morphology and energy accumulation in helmet-like structures subject to photospheric shear motion show that the magnetic field surrounding a partially open structure can inhibit catastrophic expansion of the structure as its energy grows. Stability of a coronal streamer in the framework of the neutral current sheet model is studied theoretically. It is shown that effects of viscosity and the finite Larmor radius dominate effects of inertial fluid motion in the tearing mode instability of a neutral current sheet. Two new regimes of the instability are discovered. It is proven that in the solar corona the rates of growth of the neutral current sheet instability are much smaller than previously believed. Implications of the obtained results are discussed.

  8. A Progression of Static Equilibrium Laboratory Exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzner, Mickey; Kutzner, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    Although simple architectural structures like bridges, catwalks, cantilevers, and Stonehenge have been integral in human societies for millennia, as have levers and other simple tools, modern students of introductory physics continue to grapple with Newton's conditions for static equilibrium. As formulated in typical introductory physics textbooks, these two conditions appear as ΣF=0(1) and Στ=0,(2) where each torque τ is defined as the cross product between the lever arm vector r and the corresponding applied force F, τ =r×F,(3) having magnitude, τ =Frsinθ.(4) The angle θ here is between the two vectors F and r. In Eq. (1), upward (downward) forces are considered positive (negative). In Eq. (2), counterclockwise (clockwise) torques are considered positive (negative). Equation (1) holds that the vector sum of the external forces acting on an object must be zero to prevent linear accelerations; Eq. (2) states that the vector sum of torques due to external forces about any axis must be zero to prevent angular accelerations. In our view these conditions can be problematic for students because a) the equations contain the unfamiliar summation notation Σ, b) students are uncertain of the role of torques in causing rotations, and c) it is not clear why the sum of torques is zero regardless of the choice of axis. Gianino5 describes an experiment using MBL and a force sensor to convey the meaning of torque as applied to a rigid-body lever system without exploring quantitative aspects of the conditions for static equilibrium.

  9. Conformal field theory out of equilibrium: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Denis; Doyon, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    We provide a pedagogical review of the main ideas and results in non-equilibrium conformal field theory and connected subjects. These concern the understanding of quantum transport and its statistics at and near critical points. Starting with phenomenological considerations, we explain the general framework, illustrated by the example of the Heisenberg quantum chain. We then introduce the main concepts underlying conformal field theory (CFT), the emergence of critical ballistic transport, and the CFT scattering construction of non-equilibrium steady states. Using this we review the theory for energy transport in homogeneous one-dimensional critical systems, including the complete description of its large deviations and the resulting (extended) fluctuation relations. We generalize some of these ideas to one-dimensional critical charge transport and to the presence of defects, as well as beyond one-dimensional criticality. We describe non-equilibrium transport in free-particle models, where connections are made with generalized Gibbs ensembles, and in higher-dimensional and non-integrable quantum field theories, where the use of the powerful hydrodynamic ideas for non-equilibrium steady states is explained. We finish with a list of open questions. The review does not assume any advanced prior knowledge of conformal field theory, large-deviation theory or hydrodynamics.

  10. Is it possible to deduce the ground state OH density from relative optical emission intensities of the OH(A 2Σ+-X 2Πi) transition in atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasmas?—An analysis of self-absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yanjun; Peng, Zhimin; Ding, Yanjun; Sadeghi, Nader; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2016-08-01

    The measurement of absolute densities of reactive species and radicals such as OH is of growing interest for many plasma applications. In this paper, we extend the use of a self-absorption model for atomic emission spectroscopy to molecular emission spectroscopy. The proposed analysis of self-absorbed molecular emission spectra is a simple and inexpensive method to determine OH(X) densities and rotational temperatures compared to laser induced fluorescence. We compare the recorded absolute OH density in a non-equilibrium diffuse atmospheric-pressure RF glow discharge by this method with broadband UV absorption considering a number of rotational lines with J‧  ⩽  6.5, the detection limit of the line integrated OH(X) density with this method is of the order of 2  ×  1019 m‑2. The accuracy of the density is sensitive to the rotational temperature of the OH(A) state and the non-equilibrium rotational population distribution.

  11. Mathematical modeling of non-equilibrium sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliev, Ibragim A.; Mukhambetzhanov, Saltanbek T.; Sabitova, Gulnara S.; Sakhit, Anghyz E.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the system of equations modeling the process of non-equilibrium sorption. Difference approximation of differential problem by the implicit scheme is formulated. The solution of the difference problem is constructed using the sweep method. Based on the numerical results we can conclude the following: when the relaxation time decreases to 0, then the solution of non-equilibrium problem tends with increasing time to solution of the equilibrium problem.

  12. Collisional Ionization Equilibrium for Optically Thin Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryans, P.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Savin, D. W.; Badnell, N. R.; Gorczyca, T. W.; Laming, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    Reliably interpreting spectra from electron-ionized cosmic plasmas requires accurate ionization balance calculations for the plasma in question. However, much of the atomic data needed for these calculations have not been generated using modern theoretical methods and their reliability are often highly suspect. We have utilized state-of-the-art calculations of dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients for the hydrogenic through Na-like ions of all elements from He to Zn. We have also utilized state-of-the-art radiative recombination (RR) rate coefficient calculations for the bare through Na-like ions of all elements from H to Zn. Using our data and the recommended electron impact ionization data of Mazzotta et al. (1998), we have calculated improved collisional ionization equilibrium calculations. We compare our calculated fractional ionic abundances using these data with those presented by Mazzotta et al. (1998) for all elements from H to Ni, and with the fractional abundances derived from the modern DR and RR calculations of Gu (2003a,b, 2004) for Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe, and Ni.

  13. Equilibrium sampling by reweighting nonequilibrium simulation trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Based on equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space of complex systems, which are separated into some metastable regions by high free energy barriers. Nonequilibrium simulations could enhance transitions among these metastable regions and then be applied to sample equilibrium distributions in complex systems, since the associated nonequilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE). Here we present such a systematical method, named reweighted nonequilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to efficiently sample equilibrium conformations. The RNED is a combination of the JE and our previous reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method. The original JE reproduces equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium trajectories but requires that the initial distribution of these trajectories is equilibrium. The RED reweights many equilibrium trajectories from an arbitrary initial distribution to get the equilibrium distribution, whereas the RNED has both advantages of the two methods, reproducing equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium simulation trajectories with an arbitrary initial conformational distribution. We illustrated the application of the RNED in a toy model and in a Lennard-Jones fluid to detect its liquid-solid phase coexistence. The results indicate that the RNED sufficiently extends the application of both the original JE and the RED in equilibrium sampling of complex systems.

  14. Equilibrium sampling by reweighting nonequilibrium simulation trajectories.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Based on equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space of complex systems, which are separated into some metastable regions by high free energy barriers. Nonequilibrium simulations could enhance transitions among these metastable regions and then be applied to sample equilibrium distributions in complex systems, since the associated nonequilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE). Here we present such a systematical method, named reweighted nonequilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to efficiently sample equilibrium conformations. The RNED is a combination of the JE and our previous reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method. The original JE reproduces equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium trajectories but requires that the initial distribution of these trajectories is equilibrium. The RED reweights many equilibrium trajectories from an arbitrary initial distribution to get the equilibrium distribution, whereas the RNED has both advantages of the two methods, reproducing equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium simulation trajectories with an arbitrary initial conformational distribution. We illustrated the application of the RNED in a toy model and in a Lennard-Jones fluid to detect its liquid-solid phase coexistence. The results indicate that the RNED sufficiently extends the application of both the original JE and the RED in equilibrium sampling of complex systems. PMID:27078486

  15. Determining Equilibrium Position For Acoustical Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Aveni, G.; Putterman, S.; Rudnick, J.

    1989-01-01

    Equilibrium position and orientation of acoustically-levitated weightless object determined by calibration technique on Earth. From calibration data, possible to calculate equilibrium position and orientation in presence of Earth gravitation. Sample not levitated acoustically during calibration. Technique relies on Boltzmann-Ehrenfest adiabatic-invariance principle. One converts resonant-frequency-shift data into data on normalized acoustical potential energy. Minimum of energy occurs at equilibrium point. From gradients of acoustical potential energy, one calculates acoustical restoring force or torque on objects as function of deviation from equilibrium position or orientation.

  16. 1-D EQUILIBRIUM DISCRETE DIFFUSION MONTE CARLO

    SciTech Connect

    T. EVANS; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    We present a new hybrid Monte Carlo method for 1-D equilibrium diffusion problems in which the radiation field coexists with matter in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This method, the Equilibrium Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (EqDDMC) method, combines Monte Carlo particles with spatially discrete diffusion solutions. We verify the EqDDMC method with computational results from three slab problems. The EqDDMC method represents an incremental step toward applying this hybrid methodology to non-equilibrium diffusion, where it could be simultaneously coupled to Monte Carlo transport.

  17. Passive equilibrium studies on ZT-P

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M.M.; Reass, W.A.

    1987-12-01

    The poloidal field system of ZT-P was modified by the addition of a transformer, which coupled the magnetizing and equilibrium circuits. ZT-P is a small, air core, Reversed Field Pinch, operated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is used as test bed for the much larger ZT-H, RFP experiment, now under construction at LANL. Planned experiments include size scaling measurements and determining the effect of low time constant measurements and determining the effect of low time constant shell operation. ZT-P has had an entirely passive equilibrium system, which did not provide a well centered equilibrium, although a tolerable equilibrium was realized by removing half of the equilibrium coil set. The transformer was added to the poloidal field system to adjust the equilibrium current for a centered plasma, while using the entire coil set. It also had the effect of reducing the dependence of the equilibrium on the plasma resistance. Stable, well centered discharges were achieved over a broad range of plasma currents. The improved equilibrium also lowered the loop voltage and extended the discharge lifetime. These experiments also investigated the unique problems of equilibrium systems on air core RFP devices. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Equilibrium coexistence of three amphiboles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, P.; Jaffe, H.W.; Klein, C., Jr.; Ross, M.

    1969-01-01

    Electron probe and wet chemical analyses of amphibole pairs from the sillimanite zone of central Massachusetts and adjacent New Hampshire indicated that for a particular metamorphic grade there should be a restricted composition range in which three amphiboles can coexist stably. An unequivocal example of such an equilibrium three amphibole rock has been found in the sillimanite-orthoclase zone. It contains a colorless primitive clinoamphibole, space group P21/m, optically and chemically like cummingtonite with blue-green hornblende exsolution lamellae on (100) and (-101) of the host; blue-green hornblende, space group C2/m, with primitive cummingtonite exsolution lamellae on (100) and (-101) of the host; and pale pinkish tan anthophyllite, space group Pnma, that is free of visible exsolution lamellae but is a submicroscopic intergrowth of two orthorhombic amphiboles. Mutual contacts and coarse, oriented intergrowths of two and three host amphiboles indicate the three grew as an equilibrium assemblage prior to exsolution. Electron probe analyses at mutual three-amphibole contacts showed little variation in the composition of each amphibole. Analyses believed to represent most closely the primary amphibole compositions gave atomic proportions on the basis of 23 oxygens per formula unit as follows: for primitive cummingtonite (Na0.02Ca0.21- Mn0.06Fe2+2.28Mg4.12Al0.28) (Al0.17Si7.83), for hornblende (Na0.35Ca1.56Mn0.02Fe1.71Mg2.85Al0.92) (Al1.37Si6.63), and for anthophyllite (Na0.10Ca0.06Mn0.06Fe2.25Mg4.11Al0.47) (Al0.47Si7.53). The reflections violating C-symmetry, on X-ray single crystal photographs of the primitive cummingtonite, are weak and diffuse, and suggest a partial inversion from a C-centered to a primitive clinoamphibole. Single crystal photographs of the anthophyllite show split reflections indicating it is an intergrowth of about 80% anthophyllite and about 20% gedrite which differ in their b crystallographic dimensions. Split reflections are

  19. [Physiognomy-accompanying auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia: psychopathological investigation of 10 patients].

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported two schizophrenic patients with characteristic hallucinations consisting of auditory hallucinations accompanied by visual hallucinations of the speaker's face. The patient sees the face of the hallucinatory speaker in his/her mind and hears the voice talking inwardly. We termed these experiences physiognomy-accompanying auditory hallucinations. In this report, we present 10 patients with schizophrenia showing physiognomy-accompanying auditory hallucinations and evaluate the characteristics of these clinical symptoms. Moreover we consider what the symptoms mean for patients and the metabasis from structural aspects. Lastly, we consider how we can treat these patients living autistic lives with the symptoms. During physiognomy-accompanying auditory hallucinations, the realistic face moves its mouth and talks to the patient expressively. In early onset cases, the faces of various real people appear talking about ordinary things while in late onset cases, the faces can be imaginary but are mainly real people talking about ordinary or delusional things. We suppose that these characteristics of the symptoms unify the schizophrenic world overwhelmed by "a force of non-sense" to "the sense field". "The force of non-sense" is a substantial power but cannot be reduced to the real meaning. And we suppose that not visual reality but the intensity of auditory hallucinations of the face brings about the overwhelming intensity of symptoms and the substantiality of this intensity depends on the states of excessive fullness of "the force of non-sense". With these symptoms patients see the narration of auditory hallucinations through the facial image and the content of auditory hallucinations is compressed into the movement of visual hallucinations of the speaker's face. The form of symptoms is realistic but the speaker's face and voice are beyond ordinary time and space. The symptoms are essentially different from ordinary perception. The visual

  20. Approach to equilibrium in accelerated global oceanic models

    SciTech Connect

    Danabasoglu, G.; McWilliams, J.C.; Large, W.G.

    1996-05-01

    The approach to equilibrium of a coarse-resolution, seasonally forced, global oceanic general circulation model is investigated, considering the effects of a widely used acceleration technique that distorts the dynamics by using unequal time steps in the governing equations. A measure of the equilibration time for any solution property is defined as the time it takes to go 90% of the way from its present value to its equilibrium value. This measure becomes approximately time invariant only after sufficiently long integration. It indicates that the total kinetic energy and most mass transport rates attain equilibrium within about 90 and 40 calendar years, respectively. The upper-ocean potential temperature and salinity equilibrium times are about 480 and 380 calender years, following 150- and 20-year initial adjustments, respectively. In the abyssal ocean, potential temperature and salinity equilibration take about 4500 and 3900 calender years, respectively. These longer equilibration times are due to the slow diffusion of tracers both along and across the isopycnal surfaces in stably stratified regions, and these times vary with the associated diffusivities. An analysis of synchronous (i.e., not accelerated) integrations shows that there is a complex interplay between convective, advective, and diffusive timescales. Because of the distortion by acceleration of the seasonal cycle, the solutions display some significant adjustments upon switching to synchronous integration. However, the proper seasonal cycle is recovered within five years. Provided that a sufficient equilibrium state has been achieved with acceleration, the model must be integrated synchronously for only about 15 years thereafter to closely approach synchronous equilibrium. 16 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Ectopic Ureter Accompanied by Duplicated Ureter: Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Senel, Ufuk; Tanriverdi, Halil Ibrahim; Ozmen, Zafer; Sozubir, Selami

    2015-09-01

    We report cases of ectopic ureter accompanied by three types of ureteral duplication that had been diagnosed previously and treated for enuresis. Data from three female patients ranging in age from 1 to 10 years were evaluated. The ectopic ureter was observed on the left in one case, on the right in another and bilateral in the third case. Complete duplication was found in two cases, while the third had incomplete duplication. Ureteroneocystostomy was performed in one case and subtotal nephrectomy was carried out in the other two cases. Ureteroneocystostomy was performed for the ectopic ureter found in the opposite urinary system in one of the cases. Ectopic duplicated ureter should be considered in treatment-resistant enuresis and urinary tract infections and after a careful physical examination, imaging as well as function tests should be performed. PMID:26500949

  2. Population differences in olfaction accompany host shift in Drosophila mojavensis.

    PubMed

    Crowley-Gall, Amber; Date, Priya; Han, Clair; Rhodes, Nicole; Andolfatto, Peter; Layne, John E; Rollmann, Stephanie M

    2016-08-31

    Evolutionary shifts in plant-herbivore interactions provide a model for understanding the link among the evolution of behaviour, ecological specialization and incipient speciation. Drosophila mojavensis uses different host cacti across its range, and volatile chemicals emitted by the host are the primary cue for host plant identification. In this study, we show that changes in host plant use between distinct D. mojavensis populations are accompanied by changes in the olfactory system. Specifically, we observe differences in olfactory receptor neuron specificity and sensitivity, as well as changes in sensillar subtype abundance, between populations. Additionally, RNA-seq analyses reveal differential gene expression between populations for members of the odorant receptor gene family. Hence, alterations in host preference are associated with changes in development, regulation and function at the olfactory periphery. PMID:27581882

  3. Sudden synchrony leaps accompanied by frequency multiplications in neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Vardi, Roni; Goldental, Amir; Guberman, Shoshana; Kalmanovich, Alexander; Marmari, Hagar; Kanter, Ido

    2013-01-01

    A classical view of neural coding relies on temporal firing synchrony among functional groups of neurons, however, the underlying mechanism remains an enigma. Here we experimentally demonstrate a mechanism where time-lags among neuronal spiking leap from several tens of milliseconds to nearly zero-lag synchrony. It also allows sudden leaps out of synchrony, hence forming short epochs of synchrony. Our results are based on an experimental procedure where conditioned stimulations were enforced on circuits of neurons embedded within a large-scale network of cortical cells in vitro and are corroborated by simulations of neuronal populations. The underlying biological mechanisms are the unavoidable increase of the neuronal response latency to ongoing stimulations and temporal or spatial summation required to generate evoked spikes. These sudden leaps in and out of synchrony may be accompanied by multiplications of the neuronal firing frequency, hence offering reliable information-bearing indicators which may bridge between the two principal neuronal coding paradigms. PMID:24198764

  4. Bacteriology of branched renal calculi and accompanying urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J E

    1984-02-01

    We determined the bacteriology of apparently infected renal calculi and accompanying urinary tract infections, and assessed the potential clinical value of the culture results. Twenty-two branched renal calculi from 16 patients were cultured. Fifteen calculi were infected with 1 or more urease-producing gram-negative enteric bacterium, 2 were infected with a urease-producing bacterium and a nonurease-producing organism, and 5 were sterile. Immersion of infected stones in antimicrobial solutions before culture reduced or eliminated surface bacteria but usually did not eradicate bacteria within the stone. The bacteriology of a stone or stones could be predicted on the basis of available urine culture results in only 2 of the 16 cases. These data suggest that branched renal calculi associated with bacteriuria usually are infected but that documentation of infection and identification of the infecting organism require culture of the stone. PMID:6422054

  5. Quasiclassical description of bremsstrahlung accompanying {alpha} decay including quadrupole radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jentschura, U. D.; Milstein, A. I.; Terekhov, I. S.; Boie, H.; Scheit, H.; Schwalm, D.

    2008-01-15

    We present a quasiclassical theory of {alpha} decay accompanied by bremsstrahlung with a special emphasis on the case of {sup 210}Po, with the aim of finding a unified description that incorporates both the radiation during the tunneling through the Coulomb wall and the finite energy E{sub {gamma}} of the radiated photon up to E{sub {gamma}}{approx}Q{sub {alpha}}/{radical}({eta}), where Q{sub {alpha}} is the {alpha}-decay Q-value and {eta} is the Sommerfeld parameter. The corrections with respect to previous quasiclassical investigations are found to be substantial, and excellent agreement with a full quantum mechanical treatment is achieved. Furthermore, we find that a dipole-quadrupole interference significantly changes the {alpha}-{gamma} angular correlation. We obtain good agreement between our theoretical predictions and experimental results.

  6. Brain–Immune Interaction Accompanying Odor-Evoked Autobiographic Memory

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Bai, Yu; Yamakawa, Kaori; Toyama, Asako; Kashiwagi, Mitsuyoshi; Fukuda, Kazuyuki; Oshida, Akiko; Sanada, Kazue; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Sadato, Norihiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon in which a certain smell evokes a specific memory is known as the Proust phenomenon. Odor-evoked autobiographic memories are more emotional than those elicited by other sensory stimuli. The results of our previous study indicated that odor-evoked autobiographic memory accompanied by positive emotions has remarkable effects on various psychological and physiological activities, including the secretion of cytokines, which are immune-signaling molecules that modulate systemic inflammation. In this study, we aimed to clarify the neural substrates associated with the interaction between odor-evoked autobiographic memory and peripheral circulating cytokines. We recruited healthy male and female volunteers and investigated the association between brain responses and the concentration of several cytokines in the plasma by using positron emission tomography (PET) recordings when an autographic memory was evoked in participants by asking them to smell an odor that was nostalgic to them. Participants experienced positive emotions and autobiographic memories when nostalgic odors were presented to them. The levels of peripheral proinflammatory cytokines, such as the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), were significantly reduced after experiencing odor-evoked autobiographic memory. Subtraction analysis of PET images indicated that the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) were significantly activated during experiences of odor-evoked autobiographic memory. Furthermore, a correlation analysis indicated that activities of the mOFC and precuneus/PCC were negatively correlated with IFN-γ concentration. These results indicate that the neural networks including the precuneus/PCC and mOFC might regulate the secretion of peripheral proinflammatory cytokines during the experience of odor-evoked autobiographic memories accompanied with positive emotions. PMID:23977312

  7. Ringed Accretion Disks: Equilibrium Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  8. Equilibrium Kinetic Network of the Villin Headpiece in Implicit Solvent

    PubMed Central

    Du, Weina; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    We applied the single-replica multiple-state transition-interface sampling method to elucidate the equilibrium kinetic network of the 35-residue-fragment (HP-35) villin headpiece in implicit water at room temperature. Starting from the native Protein Data Bank structure, nine (meta)stable states of the system were identified, from which the kinetic network was built by sampling pathways between these states. Application of transition path theory allowed analysis of the (un)folding mechanism. The resulting (un)folding rates agree well with experiments. This work demonstrates that high (un)folding barriers can now be studied. PMID:25606685

  9. Predicted torque equilibrium attitude utilization for Space Station attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Renjith R.; Heck, Michael L.; Robertson, Brent P.

    1990-01-01

    An approximate knowledge of the torque equilibrium attitude (TEA) is shown to improve the performance of a control moment gyroscope (CMG) momentum management/attitude control law for Space Station Freedom. The linearized equations of motion are used in conjunction with a state transformation to obtain a control law which uses full state feedback and the predicted TEA to minimize both attitude excursions and CMG peak and secular momentum. The TEA can be computationally determined either by observing the steady state attitude of a 'controlled' spacecraft using arbitrary initial attitude, or by simulating a fixed attitude spacecraft flying in desired orbit subject to realistic environmental disturbance models.

  10. Cognitive dysfunction in type 2 diabetes patients accompanied with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huanyin; Gong, Qi; Shao, Jinshan; Liu, Xueyuan; Zhao, Yanxin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate cognitive dysfunction of type 2 diabetes patients accompanied with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), and to analyze its relevant characteristics. Methods: Total 115 type 2 diabetes patients were divided into OSAS group (O group, n=83) and non-OSAS group (N group, n=32); Physical examination patients (C1 group, n=64) and OSAS patients without diabetes (C2 group, n=47) served as the control group. Apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), nocturnal lowest saturation of pulse oxygen (LSPO2) and simple mental state examination scale (MMSE) were evaluated. Results: Among diabetes patients, patients with OSAS have lower glycated hemoglobin, platelet count, thrombocytocrit, MMSE score and lowest mean arterial oxygen than non-OSAS patients; cognitive dysfunction state and glycemic control of patients are related to their diabetic duration, and then along with increase of diabetic duration, glycemic control becomes poor, so that cognitive dysfunction becomes more and more obvious. Conclusion: Along with increased diabetic duration in type 2 diabetes accompanied with OSAS, glycemic control becomes poor, so that cognitive dysfunction more easily occurs. Meanwhile, coagulation function of blood system in OSAS patients with diabetes is impacted to some extent. PMID:25674144

  11. Non-equilibrium phenomena in disordered colloidal solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Peter

    Colloidal particles are a convenient tool for studying a variety of non-equilibrium phenomena. I will discuss experiments that investigate the aging and non-equilibrium growth of disordered solids. In the first set of experiments, colloidal glasses are rapidly formed to study aging in jammed packings. A colloidal fluid, composed of micron-sized temperature-sensitive pNIPAM particles, is rapidly quenched into a colloidal glass. After the glass is formed, collective rearrangements occur as the glass ages. Particles that undergo irreversible rearrangements, which break nearest-neighbor pairings and allow the glass to relax, are identified. These irreversible rearrangements are accompanied by large clusters of fast moving particles; the number of particles involved in these clusters increases as the glass ages, leading to the slowing of dynamics that is characteristic of aging. In the second set of experiments, we study the role particle shape, and thus, interparticle interaction, plays in the formation of disordered solids with different structural and mechanical properties. Aqueous suspensions of colloidal particles with different shapes evaporate on glass slides. Convective flows during evaporation carry particles from drop center to drop edge, where they accumulate. The resulting particle deposits grow heterogeneously from the edge on the air-water interface. Three distinct growth processes were discovered in the evaporating colloidal suspensions by tuning particle shape-dependent capillary interactions and thus varying the microscopic rules of deposition. Mechanical testing of these particulate deposits reveals that the deposit bending rigidity increases as particles become more anisotropic in shape.

  12. Colloquium: Homochirality: Symmetry breaking in systems driven far from equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yukio; Hyuga, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    Subsequent to the discovery of chirality of organic molecules by Pasteur, living organisms have been found to utilize biomolecules of only one handedness. The origin of this homochirality in life still remains unknown. It is believed that homochirality is attained in two stages: the initial creation of a chirality bias and its subsequent amplification to pure chirality. In the last two decades, two novel experiments have established the second stage in different fields: Soai and co-workers achieved the amplification of enantiomeric excess in the production of chiral organic molecules, and Viedma obtained homochirality in the solution growth of sodium chlorate crystals. These experiments are explained by a theory with a nonlinear evolution equation for the chiral order parameter; nonlinear processes in reactions or in crystal growth induce enantiomeric excess amplification, and the recycling of achiral elements ensures homochirality. Recycling drives the system to a state far from equilibrium with a free energy higher than that of the equilibrium state.

  13. Non-equilibrium Flows of Reacting Air Components in Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevich, S. S.; Sinitsyn, K. A.; Nagnibeda, E. A.

    2008-12-01

    The paper presents the results of the investigation of non-equilibrium flows of reacting air mixtures in nozzles. State-to-state approach based on the solution of the equations for vibrational level populations of molecules and atomic concentrations coupled to the gas dynamics equations is used. For the 5-component air mixture (N2, O2, NO, N, O) non-equilibrium distributions and gasdynamical parameters are calculated for different conditions in a nozzle throat. The influence of various kinetic processes on distributions and gas dynamics parameters is studied. The paper presents the comparison of the results with ones obtained for binary mixtures of molecules and atoms and various models of elementary processes.

  14. Graphical representation for thermal equilibrium when transition temperatures are present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We propose the use of graphics in order to get a quick insight of the thermal equilibrium of two bodies, when a transition temperature is present in the interval between both initial temperatures. We have found two convenient variables in order to represent the mathematical condition for the partial or complete transition of each component. In mixing hot water and cold ice, the proposed graphical representation exhibits straight lines separating four regions corresponding to different equilibrium states, going from one containing just ice up to the other containing just water, and two states in between with increased ice or increased water. This graphical representation helps to avoid typical student errors in learning elementary physics.

  15. Is Equilibrium Floc Size a Function of Concentration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, D. A.; Strom, K.

    2014-12-01

    Flocculation is the process in which cohesive sediments amalgamate to form larger aggregates or flocs. The two factors that strongly influence the flocculation of mud are the turbulent shear rate and the suspended sediment concentration. Increases in turbulent shear rate are known to decrease the time to equilibrium and limit floc size. Increases in concentration are typically thought to decrease the time to equilibrium and increase the final equilibrium floc size. In this laboratory study, the effect of concentration on the growth rate and equilibrium size of flocs is systematically investigated. A camera system and image processing program were used to observe and analyze the evolution of flocs created by of a mixture of 80% kaolinite and 20% montmorillonite clay at six different concentrations (25, 50, 100, 200, 300 and 400 mg/L). Each mixture was first sonicated for 15 minutes before being introduced to a tank of tap water being mixed at an turbulent shear rate of G = 58 s-1. Flocs were then allowed to grow for two hours. During the following hour, a much higher shear rate of G = 1200 s-1 was applied to break the flocs. The shear rate was then reduced back to and maintained at G = 58 s-1 for another six hours. Running the experiments in this way allowed for the observation of floc growth from two different initial particle states at each concentration, resulting in a total of 12 floc growth experiments. The primary conclusions from this set of experiments are: (1) higher suspended sediment concentration is correlated with a higher rate of floc growth, and (2) at equilibrium, the average floc size stabilizes at ≈ 100 µm independent of the initial particle state or the suspended sediment concentration. Therefor, for the sediment mixture tested, the results imply that the effect of concentration on flocculation was restricted to the floc growth rate. This is contrary to what would be predicted using typical mud settling velocity equations.

  16. Millimeter-Wave and High-Resolution Infrared Spectra of Monoisotopic SC 80Se: Equilibrium, Ground State, and ν 1, mν 2, and nν 3 Rovibrational Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, H.; Demaison, J.; Drean, P.; Litz, M.; Willner, H.

    1995-04-01

    The Fourier transform infrared spectrum of monoisotopic SC80Se has been investigated in the ν2, ν3, 2ν2, 2ν3, and ν1 regions with a resolution between 3 and 4 × 10-3 cm-1. In addition, the millimeter-wave spectrum has been studied in the region 150 to 320 GHz, and ground and ν2 = 1 excited state transitions have been measured. Ground state constants, B0 = 2043.285 4(4) MHz and D0 = 146.53(5) Hz, have been determined from a merge of millimeter-wave data and ground state combination differences spanning J values up to 77 and 143, respectively. The band centers ν2 = 352.341 075(9) cm-1 and ν3 = 505.480 06(5)cm-1 have been determined. The rovibrational parameters of numerous overtone and combination levels (ν1νl22ν3) = 0200, 0220, 0310, 0330, 0400, 0420, 0002, and 0003 have been obtained from polynomial analyses whose standard deviations ranged from 0.7 to 3.5 × 10-4 cm-1. The 1000 level, νeff 1435.840 cm-1, is anharmonically perturbed by the 0400 level, with an avoided crossing at J = 55, and W12222 = 0.963 09(1) cm-1. Transitions to both the upper (E+) and lower (E-) sublevels of the dyad were observed for 1 ≤ J‧ ≤ 117 and 4 ≤ J‧ ≤ 171, respectively, and the deperturbed wavenumbers ν1 = 1435.542 76(2) and 4ν02 = 1432.725 00(3) cm-1 were derived. Furthermore, a local crossing of the E- and 0420 levels involving l-type resonance was observed at J = 91.

  17. Equilibrium Tail Distribution Due to Touschek Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Nash,B.; Krinsky, S.

    2009-05-04

    Single large angle Coulomb scattering is referred to as Touschek scattering. In addition to causing particle loss when the scattered particles are outside the momentum aperture, the process also results in a non-Gaussian tail, which is an equilibrium between the Touschek scattering and radiation damping. Here we present an analytical calculation for this equilibrium distribution.

  18. Zeroth Law, Entropy, Equilibrium, and All That

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2008-01-01

    The place of the zeroth law in the teaching of thermodynamics is examined in the context of the recent discussion by Gislason and Craig of some problems involving the establishment of thermal equilibrium. The concept of thermal equilibrium is introduced through the zeroth law. The relation between the zeroth law and the second law in the…

  19. Equilibrium figures in geodesy and geophysics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz, H.

    There is an enormous literature on geodetic equilibrium figures, but the various works have not always been interrelated, also for linguistic reasons (English, French, German, Italian, Russian). The author attempts to systematize the various approaches and to use the standard second-order theory for a study of the deviation of the actual earth and of the equipotential reference ellipsoid from an equilibrium figure.

  20. Local Equilibrium in Inhomogeneous Stochastic Models of Heat Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nándori, Péter

    2016-07-01

    We extend the duality of Kipnis et al. (J Stat Phys 27:65-74, 1982) to inhomogeneous lattice gas systems where either the components have different degrees of freedom or the rate of interaction depends on the spatial location. Then the dual process is applied to prove local equilibrium in the hydrodynamic limit for some inhomogeneous high dimensional systems and in the nonequilibrium steady state for one dimensional systems with arbitrary inhomogeneity.